Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series

Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Modified: 2018-01-12
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Juniper Networks, Inc.
1133 Innovation Way
Sunnyvale, California 94089
USA
408-745-2000
www.juniper.net
Juniper Networks, the Juniper Networks logo, Juniper, and Junos are registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. and/or its affiliates in
the United States and other countries. All other trademarks may be property of their respective owners.
Juniper Networks assumes no responsibility for any inaccuracies in this document. Juniper Networks reserves the right to change, modify,
transfer, or otherwise revise this publication without notice.
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Copyright © 2018 Juniper Networks, Inc. All rights reserved.
The information in this document is current as of the date on the title page.
YEAR 2000 NOTICE
Juniper Networks hardware and software products are Year 2000 compliant. Junos OS has no known time-related limitations through the
year 2038. However, the NTP application is known to have some difficulty in the year 2036.
END USER LICENSE AGREEMENT
The Juniper Networks product that is the subject of this technical documentation consists of (or is intended for use with) Juniper Networks
software. Use of such software is subject to the terms and conditions of the End User License Agreement (“EULA”) posted at
http://www.juniper.net/support/eula/. By downloading, installing or using such software, you agree to the terms and conditions of that
EULA.
ii
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Table of Contents
About the Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Documentation and Release Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Supported Platforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Using the Examples in This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Merging a Full Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
Merging a Snippet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
Documentation Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Documentation Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi
Requesting Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi
Self-Help Online Tools and Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi
Opening a Case with JTAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxii
Part 1
Interfaces
Chapter 1
Understanding Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Interfaces Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Network Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Special Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Understanding Interface Naming Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Physical Part of an Interface Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Logical Part of an Interface Name on a Switch Running QFabric Software
Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Logical Part of a Channelized Interface Name on a Switch Running Enhanced
Layer 2 Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Wildcard Characters in Interface Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Understanding Interface Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Understanding Management Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Understanding Port Ranges and System Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Port Ranges for Different Media Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Supported System Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Configuring the Port Type on QFX3600 Standalone Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Configuring the QSFP+ Port Type on QFX3500 Standalone Switches . . . . . . . . . 46
Configuring the QSFP+ Port Type on QFX5100 Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Configuring the Interface Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Configuring Port Mode on QFX5100-48S, QFX5100-48T, QFX5100-24Q,
and EX4600 Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Configuring the Link Settings for Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on
QFX5100-48S, QFX5100-96S, and EX4600 Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on QFX5100-48T Switches . . . . . . . 56
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Configuring the Link Settings for 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on
QFX5100-48S, QFX5100-24Q, QFX5100-96S, and EX4600
Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Configuring the Link Settings for 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on
QFX5100-48T Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Configuring the IP Options on QFX5100-48S, QFX5100-48T, QFX5100-24Q,
and EX4600 Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Configuring Short Reach Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Configuring Ethernet Loopback Capability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Configuring an LPM Table With Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Channelizing Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Channelizing Interfaces on QFX5110-48S Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Channelizing Interfaces on QFX5200 Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Configuring the System Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Monitoring Interface Status and Traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Troubleshooting Network Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
The interface on the port in which an SFP or SFP+ transceiver is installed
in an SFP or SFP+ module is down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Part 2
Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management
Chapter 2
Understanding Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Understanding Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) . . . . . . . . . . 86
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Chapter 3
Flexible Ethernet Services Encapsulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Understanding Flexible Ethernet Services Encapsulation on Switches . . . . . . . . . 93
Service Provider Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Enterprise Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Flexible Ethernet Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Configuring Flexible Ethernet Services Encapsulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Part 3
Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE)
Chapter 4
Understanding GRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Understanding Generic Routing Encapsulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Overview of GRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
GRE Tunneling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Encapsulation and De-Encapsulation on the Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Number of Source and Destination Tunnels Allowed on a Switch . . . . . 102
Class of Service on GRE Tunnels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Applying Firewall Filters to GRE Traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Using a Firewall Filter to De-encapsulate GRE Traffic on a QFX5100,
QFX10000, and OCX Series Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Configuration Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Configuring Generic Routing Encapsulation Tunneling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Configuring a GRE Tunnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Verifying That Generic Routing Encapsulation Tunneling Is Working Correctly . . 106
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Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Table of Contents
Part 4
IP Directed Broadcast
Chapter 5
Understanding IP Directed Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Understanding IP Directed Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
IP Directed Broadcast Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
IP Directed Broadcast Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
When to Enable IP Directed Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
When Not to Enable IP Directed Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Configuring IP Directed Broadcast (CLI Procedure) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Example: Configuring IP Directed Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Part 5
Layer 3 Logical Interfaces
Chapter 6
Understanding Layer 3 Logical Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Understanding Layer 3 Logical Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Configuring a Layer 3 Logical Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Verifying That Layer 3 Logical Interfaces Are Working . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Part 6
Link Aggregation Groups (LAGs) and Link Aggregation Control
Protocol (LACP)
Chapter 7
Understanding LAGs and LACP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Understanding Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces and LACP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Link Aggregation Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Configuring Link Aggregation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Creating an Aggregated Ethernet Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Configuring the VLAN Name and VLAN ID Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation Between a QFX Series Product and an
Aggregation Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation with LACP Between a QFX Series Product
and an Aggregation Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Verifying the Status of a LAG Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Verifying That LACP Is Configured Correctly and Bundle Members Are Exchanging
LACP Protocol Packets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Verifying the LACP Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Verifying That LACP Packets Are Being Exchanged . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Troubleshooting an Aggregated Ethernet Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Part 7
LAG Local Link Options
Chapter 8
Understanding Local Link Bias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Understanding Local Link Bias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Configuring Local Link Bias (CLI Procedure) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Chapter 9
Understanding Local Minimum Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Understanding Local Minimum Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Configuring Local Minimum Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Local Minimum Links Effect on LAG Minimum Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Local Minimum Links and Local Link Bias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Part 8
Redundant Trunk Groups
Chapter 10
Understanding Redundant Trunk Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Understanding Redundant Trunk Links (Legacy RTG Configuration) . . . . . . . . . . 158
Example: Configuring Redundant Trunk Links for Faster Recovery on Devices
with ELS Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Part 9
Resilient Hashing
Chapter 11
Understanding Resilient Hashing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Understanding the Algorithm Used to Hash LAG Bundle and Egress Next-Hop
ECMP Traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Understanding the Hashing Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
IP (IPv4 and IPv6) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
MPLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
MAC-in-MAC Packet Hashing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Layer 2 Header Hashing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Understanding the Use of Resilient Hashing to Minimize Flow Remapping in
Trunk/ECMP Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Why You Might Want to Use Resilient Hashing and How It Works with Static
Hashing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Limitations and Caveats for Resilient Hashing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Resilient Hashing on LAGs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Resilient Hashing on ECMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Configuring the Fields in the Algorithm Used To Hash LAG Bundle and ECMP
Traffic (CLI Procedure) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Configuring the Hashing Algorithm to Use Fields in the Layer 2 Header for
Hashing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Configuring the Hashing Algorithm to Use Fields in the IP Payload for
Hashing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Configuring the Hashing Algorithm to Use Fields in the IPv6 Payload for
Hashing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Configuring Resilient Hashing for Trunk/ECMP Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Configuring Resilient Hashing on LAGs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Configuring Resilient Hashing on ECMP Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
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Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Table of Contents
Part 10
Uplink Failure Detection
Chapter 12
Understanding Uplink Failure Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Overview of Uplink Failure Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Uplink Failure Detection Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Failure Detection Pair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Example: Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Verifying That Uplink Failure Detection Is Working Correctly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Part 11
Configuration Statements and Operational Commands
Chapter 13
Interfaces Configuration Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
alarm (chassis) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
auto-negotiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
autostate-exclude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
ccc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
channel-speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
configured-flow-control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
craft-lockout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
description (Interfaces) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
ethernet (Alarm) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
ethernet-switching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
ether-options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
eui-64 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
fec (gigether) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
fibre-channel (Alarm) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
flow-control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
fpc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
gratuitous-arp-reply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
hold-time (Physical Interface) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
irb (Interfaces) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
inet (interfaces) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
inet6 (interfaces) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
interface-mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
interface-range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
link-down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
link-mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240
link-speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
loopback (Aggregated Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, and 10-Gigabit Ethernet) . . . 242
mac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
management-ethernet (Alarm) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
member-range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
mtu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
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no-gratuitous-arp-request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
pic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
rx-buffers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
short-reach-mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
targeted-broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
traceoptions (Individual Interfaces) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
tx-buffers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
vlan-id . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
vlan-tagging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
Chapter 14
Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Configuration Statements . . . . . . 261
action (OAM LFM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
action-profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263
allow-remote-loopback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
ethernet (OAM LFM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
event-thresholds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
event (OAM LFM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
frame-error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
frame-period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
frame-period-summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
oam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
interface (OAM LFM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
link-adjacency-loss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275
link-discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275
link-down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
link-event-rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
link-fault-management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
negotiation-options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278
no-allow-link-events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278
pdu-interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
pdu-threshold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
remote-loopback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
symbol-period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
syslog (OAM LFM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
traceoptions (OAM LFM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
Chapter 15
GRE Configuration Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285
destination (Tunnels) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286
tunnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
tunnel-port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
Chapter 16
IP Directed Broadcast Configuration Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
targeted-broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
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Table of Contents
Chapter 17
LAGs and LACP Configuration Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
aggregated-devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
aggregated-ether-options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
chassis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
802.3ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
device-count . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
force-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298
lacp (802.3ad) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299
lacp (Aggregated Ethernet) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
minimum-links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301
periodic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
Chapter 18
LAG Local Link Options Configuration Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
local-bias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
local-minimum-links-threshold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
Chapter 19
Redundant Trunk Groups Configuration Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
group (Redundant Trunk Groups) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308
interface (Redundant Trunk Groups) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
preempt-cutover-timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
redundant-trunk-group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311
Chapter 20
Resilient Hashing Configuration Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
ecmp-resilient-hash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
enhanced-hash-key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314
hash-mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
inet (enhanced-hash-key) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
inet6 (enhanced-hash-key) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321
resilient-hash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323
Chapter 21
Uplink Failure Detection Configuration Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325
group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325
link-to-disable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326
link-to-monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326
uplink-failure-detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327
Chapter 22
Interfaces Operational Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
monitor interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
show interfaces diagnostics optics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342
show interfaces ge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356
show interfaces (GRE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371
show interfaces irb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381
show interfaces queue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388
show interfaces xe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 430
Chapter 23
Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Operational Command . . . . . . . . 449
show oam ethernet link-fault-management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450
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Chapter 24
LAGs and LACP Operational Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 455
show lacp interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 456
show lacp statistics interfaces (View) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 461
Chapter 25
Redundant Trunk Group Operational Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463
show redundant-trunk-group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464
Chapter 26
Resilient Hashing Operational Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467
show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468
Chapter 27
Uplink Failure Detection Operational Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 473
show uplink-failure-detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 474
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List of Figures
Part 7
LAG Local Link Options
Chapter 8
Understanding Local Link Bias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Figure 1: Egress Traffic Flow with Local Link Bias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Figure 2: Egress Traffic Flow without Local Link Bias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Part 8
Redundant Trunk Groups
Chapter 10
Understanding Redundant Trunk Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Figure 3: Redundant Trunk Group, Link 1 Active . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Figure 4: Redundant Trunk Group, Link 2 Active . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Figure 5: Topology for Configuring the Redundant Trunk Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Part 10
Uplink Failure Detection
Chapter 12
Understanding Uplink Failure Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Figure 6: Uplink Failure Detection Configuration on Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Figure 7: Uplink Failure Detection Configuration on Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
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List of Tables
About the Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Table 1: Notice Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx
Part 1
Interfaces
Chapter 1
Understanding Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Table 3: Network Interface Types and Purposes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Table 4: Special Interface Types and Purposes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Table 5: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3500 Switches Running QFabric Software
Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Table 6: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3500 Switches Running Enhanced Layer 2
Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Table 7: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3600 Switches Running QFabric Software
Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Table 8: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3600 Switches Running Enhanced Layer 2
Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Table 9: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3600 Node Devices Running QFabric Software
Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Table 10: Valid Port Ranges on QFX5100-48S and QFX5100-48T Switches
Running Enhanced Layer 2 Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Table 11: Valid Port Ranges on QFX5100-48S and QFX5100-48T Switches
Running QFabric Software Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Table 12: System Modes Supported on QFX5100 Switches Running Enhanced
Layer 2 Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Table 13: Example LPM Table Combinations Using l2-profile-one With Junos
OS 13.2X51-D10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Table 14: Example LPM Table Combinations Using lpm-profile With Junos OS
13.2X51-D10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Table 15: QFX10002-36Q Switch and QFX10000-36Q Line Card Port
Mappings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Table 16: QFX10002-72Q Switch Port Mappings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Table 17: System Modes Supported on QFX5100 Switches with QFX-EM-4Q or
QFX-PFA-4Q Expansion Modules Installed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Table 18: System Modes Supported on QFX5100-24Q Switches with the
EX4600-8F Expansion Module Installed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Table 19: System Modes Supported on QFX5100-24Q Switches with EX4600-8F
and QFX-EM-4Q Expansion Modules Installed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
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Part 3
Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE)
Chapter 4
Understanding GRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Table 20: Firewall Filter Application Points for Tunneled Packets . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Table 21: Features Not Supported with GRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Part 4
IP Directed Broadcast
Chapter 5
Understanding IP Directed Broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Table 22: Components of the IP Directed Broadcast Topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Part 6
Link Aggregation Groups (LAGs) and Link Aggregation Control
Protocol (LACP)
Chapter 7
Understanding LAGs and LACP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Table 23: Components of the Topology for Configuring a LAG Between a
QFX3500 Switch and Aggregation Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Part 8
Redundant Trunk Groups
Chapter 10
Understanding Redundant Trunk Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Table 24: Components of the Redundant Trunk Link Topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Part 9
Resilient Hashing
Chapter 11
Understanding Resilient Hashing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Table 25: IPv4 and IPv6 Hashing Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Table 26: MPLS Hashing Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Table 27: MAC-in-MAC Hashing Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Table 28: Layer 2 Header Hashing Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Table 29: Destination Path Results for Static Hashing and for Resilient Hashing
When Members Are Added to or Deleted from Trunk Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Part 10
Uplink Failure Detection
Chapter 12
Understanding Uplink Failure Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Table 30: Settings for Uplink Failure Protection Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Part 11
Configuration Statements and Operational Commands
Chapter 22
Interfaces Operational Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
Table 31: Output Control Keys for the monitor interface interface-name
Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
Table 32: Output Control Keys for the monitor interface traffic Command . . . . . 331
Table 33: monitor interface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332
Table 34: show interfaces diagnostics optics Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343
Table 35: show interfaces ge Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357
Table 36: GRE show interfaces Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372
Table 37: show interfaces irb Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381
Table 38: Layer 2 Overhead and Transmitted Packets or Byte Counts . . . . . . . . 389
Table 39: show interfaces queue Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 392
xiv
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
List of Tables
Table 40: Byte Count by Interface Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 396
Table 41: show interfaces xe Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431
Chapter 23
Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Operational Command . . . . . . . . 449
Table 42: show oam ethernet link-fault-management Output Fields . . . . . . . . 450
Chapter 24
LAGs and LACP Operational Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 455
Table 43: show lacp interfaces Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 457
Table 44: show lacp statistics interfaces Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 461
Chapter 25
Redundant Trunk Group Operational Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463
Table 45: show redundant-trunk-group Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464
Chapter 26
Resilient Hashing Operational Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467
Table 46: show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key Output Fields . . . . . . 468
Chapter 27
Uplink Failure Detection Operational Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 473
Table 47: show uplink-failure-detection Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 474
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
xv
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
xvi
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
•
Documentation and Release Notes on page xvii
•
Supported Platforms on page xvii
•
Using the Examples in This Manual on page xvii
•
Documentation Conventions on page xix
•
Documentation Feedback on page xxi
•
Requesting Technical Support on page xxi
Documentation and Release Notes
®
To obtain the most current version of all Juniper Networks technical documentation,
see the product documentation page on the Juniper Networks website at
http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/.
If the information in the latest release notes differs from the information in the
documentation, follow the product Release Notes.
Juniper Networks Books publishes books by Juniper Networks engineers and subject
matter experts. These books go beyond the technical documentation to explore the
nuances of network architecture, deployment, and administration. The current list can
be viewed at http://www.juniper.net/books.
Supported Platforms
For the features described in this document, the following platforms are supported:
•
QFX Series
Using the Examples in This Manual
If you want to use the examples in this manual, you can use the load merge or the load
merge relative command. These commands cause the software to merge the incoming
configuration into the current candidate configuration. The example does not become
active until you commit the candidate configuration.
If the example configuration contains the top level of the hierarchy (or multiple
hierarchies), the example is a full example. In this case, use the load merge command.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
xvii
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
If the example configuration does not start at the top level of the hierarchy, the example
is a snippet. In this case, use the load merge relative command. These procedures are
described in the following sections.
Merging a Full Example
To merge a full example, follow these steps:
1.
From the HTML or PDF version of the manual, copy a configuration example into a
text file, save the file with a name, and copy the file to a directory on your routing
platform.
For example, copy the following configuration to a file and name the file ex-script.conf.
Copy the ex-script.conf file to the /var/tmp directory on your routing platform.
system {
scripts {
commit {
file ex-script.xsl;
}
}
}
interfaces {
fxp0 {
disable;
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 10.0.0.1/24;
}
}
}
}
2. Merge the contents of the file into your routing platform configuration by issuing the
load merge configuration mode command:
[edit]
user@host# load merge /var/tmp/ex-script.conf
load complete
Merging a Snippet
To merge a snippet, follow these steps:
1.
From the HTML or PDF version of the manual, copy a configuration snippet into a text
file, save the file with a name, and copy the file to a directory on your routing platform.
For example, copy the following snippet to a file and name the file
ex-script-snippet.conf. Copy the ex-script-snippet.conf file to the /var/tmp directory
on your routing platform.
commit {
file ex-script-snippet.xsl; }
xviii
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
2. Move to the hierarchy level that is relevant for this snippet by issuing the following
configuration mode command:
[edit]
user@host# edit system scripts
[edit system scripts]
3. Merge the contents of the file into your routing platform configuration by issuing the
load merge relative configuration mode command:
[edit system scripts]
user@host# load merge relative /var/tmp/ex-script-snippet.conf
load complete
For more information about the load command, see CLI Explorer.
Documentation Conventions
Table 1 on page xix defines notice icons used in this guide.
Table 1: Notice Icons
Icon
Meaning
Description
Informational note
Indicates important features or instructions.
Caution
Indicates a situation that might result in loss of data or hardware damage.
Warning
Alerts you to the risk of personal injury or death.
Laser warning
Alerts you to the risk of personal injury from a laser.
Tip
Indicates helpful information.
Best practice
Alerts you to a recommended use or implementation.
Table 2 on page xx defines the text and syntax conventions used in this guide.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
xix
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions
Convention
Description
Examples
Bold text like this
Represents text that you type.
To enter configuration mode, type the
configure command:
user@host> configure
Fixed-width text like this
Italic text like this
Italic text like this
Represents output that appears on the
terminal screen.
user@host> show chassis alarms
•
Introduces or emphasizes important
new terms.
•
•
Identifies guide names.
A policy term is a named structure
that defines match conditions and
actions.
•
Identifies RFC and Internet draft titles.
•
Junos OS CLI User Guide
•
RFC 1997, BGP Communities Attribute
No alarms currently active
Represents variables (options for which
you substitute a value) in commands or
configuration statements.
Configure the machine’s domain name:
Represents names of configuration
statements, commands, files, and
directories; configuration hierarchy levels;
or labels on routing platform
components.
•
To configure a stub area, include the
stub statement at the [edit protocols
ospf area area-id] hierarchy level.
•
The console port is labeled CONSOLE.
< > (angle brackets)
Encloses optional keywords or variables.
stub <default-metric metric>;
| (pipe symbol)
Indicates a choice between the mutually
exclusive keywords or variables on either
side of the symbol. The set of choices is
often enclosed in parentheses for clarity.
broadcast | multicast
# (pound sign)
Indicates a comment specified on the
same line as the configuration statement
to which it applies.
rsvp { # Required for dynamic MPLS only
[ ] (square brackets)
Encloses a variable for which you can
substitute one or more values.
community name members [
community-ids ]
Indention and braces ( { } )
Identifies a level in the configuration
hierarchy.
; (semicolon)
Identifies a leaf statement at a
configuration hierarchy level.
Text like this
[edit]
root@# set system domain-name
domain-name
(string1 | string2 | string3)
[edit]
routing-options {
static {
route default {
nexthop address;
retain;
}
}
}
GUI Conventions
xx
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions (continued)
Convention
Description
Examples
Bold text like this
Represents graphical user interface (GUI)
items you click or select.
•
In the Logical Interfaces box, select
All Interfaces.
•
To cancel the configuration, click
Cancel.
> (bold right angle bracket)
Separates levels in a hierarchy of menu
selections.
In the configuration editor hierarchy,
select Protocols>Ospf.
Documentation Feedback
We encourage you to provide feedback, comments, and suggestions so that we can
improve the documentation. You can provide feedback by using either of the following
methods:
•
Online feedback rating system—On any page of the Juniper Networks TechLibrary site
at http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/index.html, simply click the stars to rate the content,
and use the pop-up form to provide us with information about your experience.
Alternately, you can use the online feedback form at
http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/feedback/.
•
E-mail—Send your comments to techpubs-comments@juniper.net. Include the document
or topic name, URL or page number, and software version (if applicable).
Requesting Technical Support
Technical product support is available through the Juniper Networks Technical Assistance
Center (JTAC). If you are a customer with an active J-Care or Partner Support Service
support contract, or are covered under warranty, and need post-sales technical support,
you can access our tools and resources online or open a case with JTAC.
•
JTAC policies—For a complete understanding of our JTAC procedures and policies,
review the JTAC User Guide located at
http://www.juniper.net/us/en/local/pdf/resource-guides/7100059-en.pdf.
•
Product warranties—For product warranty information, visit
http://www.juniper.net/support/warranty/.
•
JTAC hours of operation—The JTAC centers have resources available 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, 365 days a year.
Self-Help Online Tools and Resources
For quick and easy problem resolution, Juniper Networks has designed an online
self-service portal called the Customer Support Center (CSC) that provides you with the
following features:
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
xxi
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
•
Find CSC offerings: http://www.juniper.net/customers/support/
•
Search for known bugs: https://prsearch.juniper.net/
•
Find product documentation: http://www.juniper.net/documentation/
•
Find solutions and answer questions using our Knowledge Base: http://kb.juniper.net/
•
Download the latest versions of software and review release notes:
http://www.juniper.net/customers/csc/software/
•
Search technical bulletins for relevant hardware and software notifications:
http://kb.juniper.net/InfoCenter/
•
Join and participate in the Juniper Networks Community Forum:
http://www.juniper.net/company/communities/
•
Open a case online in the CSC Case Management tool: http://www.juniper.net/cm/
To verify service entitlement by product serial number, use our Serial Number Entitlement
(SNE) Tool: https://entitlementsearch.juniper.net/entitlementsearch/
Opening a Case with JTAC
You can open a case with JTAC on the Web or by telephone.
•
Use the Case Management tool in the CSC at http://www.juniper.net/cm/.
•
Call 1-888-314-JTAC (1-888-314-5822 toll-free in the USA, Canada, and Mexico).
For international or direct-dial options in countries without toll-free numbers, see
http://www.juniper.net/support/requesting-support.html.
xxii
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 1
Interfaces
•
Understanding Interfaces on page 3
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
1
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
2
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 1
Understanding Interfaces
•
Interfaces Overview on page 3
•
Understanding Interface Naming Conventions on page 5
•
Understanding Interface Ranges on page 16
•
Understanding Management Interfaces on page 17
•
Understanding Port Ranges and System Modes on page 19
•
Configuring the Port Type on QFX3600 Standalone Switches on page 45
•
Configuring the QSFP+ Port Type on QFX3500 Standalone Switches on page 46
•
Configuring the QSFP+ Port Type on QFX5100 Devices on page 48
•
Configuring the Interface Address on page 51
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Configuring Short Reach Mode on page 59
•
Configuring Ethernet Loopback Capability on page 60
•
Configuring an LPM Table With Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D10 on page 61
•
Channelizing Interfaces on page 64
•
Channelizing Interfaces on QFX5110-48S Switches on page 74
•
Channelizing Interfaces on QFX5200 Switches on page 76
•
Configuring the System Mode on page 78
•
Monitoring Interface Status and Traffic on page 81
•
Troubleshooting Network Interfaces on page 81
Interfaces Overview
Juniper Networks devices have two types of interfaces: network interfaces and special
interfaces. This topic provides brief information about these interfaces. For additional
information, see the Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices.
•
Network Interfaces on page 4
•
Special Interfaces on page 5
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
3
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Network Interfaces
Network interfaces connect to the network and carry network traffic. Table 3 on page 4
lists the types of network interfaces supported.
Table 3: Network Interface Types and Purposes
Type
Purpose
Aggregated Ethernet
interfaces
You can group Ethernet interfaces at the physical layer to form a single link-layer interface, also
known as a link aggregation group (LAG) or bundle. These aggregated Ethernet interfaces help to
balance traffic and increase the uplink bandwidth.
Channelized Interfaces
Depending on the device and software package, 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports can be configured to operate
as the following types of interfaces:
•
10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces (xe)
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces (et and xle)
•
40-Gigabit data plane uplink interfaces (fte)
When an et port is channelized to four xe ports, a colon is used to signify the four separate channels.
For example, on a QFX3500 standalone switch with port 2 on PIC 1 configured as four 10-Gigabit
Ethernet ports, the interface names are xe-0/1/2:0, xe-0/1/2:1, xe-0/1/2:2, and xe-0/1/2:3
NOTE: You cannot configure channelized interfaces to operate as Virtual Chassis ports.
4
Ethernet Interfaces
You can configure Gigabit Ethernet, 10-Gigabit Ethernet, 40-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces to connect
to other servers, storage, and switches. You can configure 40-Gigabit data plane uplink ports to
connect a Node device to an Interconnect devices as well as for Virtual Chassis ports (VCPs).
Fibre Channel interfaces
You can use Fibre Channel interfaces to connect the switch to a Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE)
forwarder or a Fibre Channel switch in a storage area network (SAN). You can configure Fibre
Channel interfaces only on ports 0 through 5 and 42 through 47 on QFX3500 devices. Fibre Channel
interfaces do not forward Ethernet traffic.
LAN access interfaces
You can use these interfaces to connect to other servers, storage, and switches. When you power
on a QFX Series product and use the factory-default configuration, the software automatically
configures interfaces in access mode for each of the network ports.
Multichassis aggregated
Ethernet (MC-AE)
interfaces
You can group a LAG on one standalone switch with a LAG on another standalone switch to create
a MC-AE. The MC-AE provides load balancing and redundancy across the two standalone switches.
Tagged-access mode
interfaces
You can used tagged-access interfaces to connect a switch to an access layer device. Tagged-access
interfaces can accept VLAN-tagged packets from multiple VLANs.
Trunk interfaces
You can use trunk interfaces to connect to other switches or routers. To use a port for this type of
connection, you must explicitly configure the port interface for trunk mode. The interfaces from
the switches or routers must also be configured for trunk mode. In this mode, the interface can be
in multiple VLANs and accept tagged packets from multiple devices. Trunk interfaces typically
connect to other switches and to routers on the LAN.
Virtual Chassis ports
(VCPs)
You can use Virtual Chassis ports to send and receive Virtual Chassis Control Protocol (VCCP)
traffic, and to create, monitor, and maintain the Virtual Chassis. On QFX3500, QFX3600, QFX5100,
and EX4600 standalone switches, you can configure 40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ uplink ports
(non-channelized) or fixed SFP+ 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports as VCPs by issuing the request
virtual-chassis-vc-port-set CLI command.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Special Interfaces
Table 4 on page 5 lists the types of special interfaces supported.
Table 4: Special Interface Types and Purposes
Type
Purpose
Console port
Each device has a serial console port, labeled CON or CONSOLE, for connecting tty-type terminals
to the switch. The console port does not have a physical address or IP address associated with
it. However, it is an interface in the sense that it provides access to the switch.
Loopback interface
A software-only virtual interface that is always up. The loopback interface provides a stable
and consistent interface and IP address on the switch.
Management interface
The management Ethernet interface provides an out-of-band method for connecting to a
standalone switch and QFabric system.
NOTE: On OCX Series switches, the em0 management interface always has the status up in
show command outputs, even if the physical port is empty. The me0 interface is a virtual
interface between Junos and the host operating system, therefore its status is independent
from the status of the physical port.
Routed VLAN interfaces (RVI
and IRB interfaces)
Layer 3 routed VLAN interfaces (called RVI in the original CLI, and called IRB in Enhanced Layer
2 Software) route traffic from one broadcast domain to another and perform other Layer 3
functions such as traffic engineering. These functions are typically performed by a router
interface in a traditional network.
The RVI or IRB functions as a logical router, eliminating the need for having both a switch and
a router. The RVI or IRB must be configured as part of a broadcast domain or virtual private
LAN service (VPLS) routing instance for Layer 3 traffic to be routed out of it.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces and LACP on page 125
•
Understanding Interface Naming Conventions on page 5
•
Understanding Layer 3 Logical Interfaces on page 119
•
Understanding Management Interfaces on page 17
•
Understanding Integrated Routing and Bridging
•
Overview of Fibre Channel
Understanding Interface Naming Conventions
The QFX Series and the EX4600 device uses a naming convention for defining the
interfaces that is similar to that of other platforms running under Juniper Networks Junos
OS. This topic provides brief information about the naming conventions used for interfaces
on the QFX Series and on EX4600 switches.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
5
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
This topic describes:
•
Physical Part of an Interface Name on page 6
•
Logical Part of an Interface Name on a Switch Running QFabric Software
Package on page 15
•
Logical Part of a Channelized Interface Name on a Switch Running Enhanced Layer 2
Software on page 16
•
Wildcard Characters in Interface Names on page 16
Physical Part of an Interface Name
Interfaces in Junos OS are specified as follows:
device-name:type-fpc/pic/port
The convention is as follows (and platform support depends on the Junos OS release in
your installation):
•
device-name—(QFabric systems only) The device-name is either the serial number or
the alias of the QFabric system component, such as a Node device, Interconnect device,
or QFabric infrastructure. The name can contain a maximum of 128 characters and
cannot contain any colons.
•
type—The QFX Series and EX4600 device interfaces use the following media types:
•
fc—Fibre Channel interface
•
ge—Gigabit Ethernet interface
•
xe—10-Gigabit Ethernet interface
•
xle—40-Gigabit Ethernet interface (QFX3500, QFX3600, and QFX5100 switches
running a QFabric software package)
•
et—40-Gigabit Ethernet interface (QFX3500, QFX3600, QFX5100, QFX5200,
QFX10000, and EX4600 switches running Enhanced Layer 2 Software)
•
et—100-Gigabit Ethernet interface (QFX5200 and QFX10000 switches running
Enhanced Layer 2 Software)
•
fte—40-Gigabit data plane uplink interface (QFX3500, QFX3600, and QFX5100
switches running a QFabric software package)
•
•
me—Management interface
•
em—Management interface on QFX5100 and EX4600 switches.
fpc—Flexible PIC Concentrator. QFX Series interfaces use the following convention for
the FPC number in interface names:
•
On QFX3500, QFX3600, QFX5100 devices running a QFabric software package,
and QFX10002 switches, the FPC number is always 0.
The FPC number indicates the slot number of the line card that contains the physical
interface.
6
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
•
On QFX3500, QFX3600, QFX5100, QFX5200, EX4600, QFX10002, QFX10008, and
QFX10016 switches running Enhanced Layer 2 Software, the member ID of a member
in a Virtual Chassis determines the FPC number.
NOTE: Every member in a Virtual Chassis must have a unique member
ID, otherwise the Virtual Chassis will not be created.
•
•
On standalone QFX5100, EX4600, and QFX10002 switches, the FPC number is
always 0.
pic—QFX Series and EX4600 device interfaces use the following convention for the
PIC (Physical Interface Card) number in interface names:
•
On a QFX3500 switch running a QFabric software package, PIC 0 can support 48
ports, PIC 1 can support 16 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports, and PIC 2 can support 4
40-Gigabit Ethernet ports.
•
On a QFX3500 switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 can support 48
ports, and PIC 1 can support 16 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports, and 4 40-Gigabit Ethernet
ports.
•
On a QFX3500 Node device running a QFabric software package, PIC 0 can support
48 ports and PIC 1 can support four 40-Gigabit data plane uplink ports.
•
On a QFX3600 switch running a QFabric software package, PIC 0 can support 64
10-Gigabit Ethernet ports, and PIC 1 can support 16 40-Gigabit Ethernet ports.
•
On a QFX3600 switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 can support 64
10-Gigabit Ethernet ports and can also support 16 40-Gigabit Ethernet ports.
•
On a QFX3600 Node device running a QFabric software package, PIC 0 can support
56 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports, and PIC 1 can support 8 40-Gigabit data plane uplink
ports, and up to 14 40-Gigabit Ethernet ports.
•
On a QFX5100-48S switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 provides six
40-Gbps QSFP+ ports and 48 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.
•
On an EX4600 device running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 provides 4 40-Gbps
QSFP+ ports and 24 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces. There are two expansion bays
(PIC 1 and PIC 2), and you can insert QFX-EM-4Q expansion modules and
EX4600-EM-8F expansion modules. The QFX-EM-4Q expansion module provide 4
40-Gbps QSFP+ ports. The EX4600-EM-8F expansion module provides 8 40-Gbps
QSFP+ ports. You can insert any combination of expansion modules. For example,
you can insert two EX4600-EM-8F expansion modules, two QFX-EM-4Q expansion
modules, or one of each.
•
On a QFX5100-48S switch running a QFabric software package, PIC 1 provides six
40-Gbps QSFP+ ports, and PIC 0 provides 48 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.
•
On a QFX5100-24Q switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 provides 24
40-Gbps QSFP+ ports. PIC 1 and PIC 2 can each contain a QFX-EM-4Q expansion
module, and each expansion module provides 4 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
7
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
•
•
On a QFX5100-96S switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 provides 96
10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces and 8 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports .
•
On a QFX5110-48S switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 can support
48 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports labeled 0 through 47, and 4 QSFP28 ports labeled 48
through 51. Ports 0 through 47 support either 1-Gbps small form-factor pluggable
(SFP) or 10-Gbps small form-factor pluggable plus (SFP+) transceivers. You can
also use SFP+ DAC cables and 10-Gbps active optical cables (AOC) in any access
port. The default 100-Gigabit Ethernet ports can be configured as 40-Gigabit Ethernet,
and in this configuration can either operate as dedicated 40-Gigabit Ethernet ports
or can be channelized to 4 independent 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports using copper or
fiber breakout cables.
•
On a QFX5200-32C switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 provides 32
QSFP28 ports. The 100-Gigabit Ethernet ports can be channelized to two 50-Gigabit
Ethernet or four 25-Gigabit Ethernet ports. The default 100-Gigabit Ethernet ports
can be configured as 40-Gigabit Ethernet and operate as 40-Gigabit Ethernet or be
channelized to four 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports.
•
On a QFX10002-36Q switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 provides 144
10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, and 36 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports, and 12 100-Gigabit
Ethernet interfaces.
•
On a QFX10002-72Q switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 provides 288
10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, and 72 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports, and 24 100-Gigabit
Ethernet interfaces.
•
On a QFX10008 switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 provides
one-thousand, one-hundred fifty two 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, two-hundred
eighty-eight 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports, or two-hundred forty 100-Gigabit Ethernet
interfaces.
•
On a QFX10016 switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 provides
two-thousand, three-hundred and four 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, five-hundred
seventy-six 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports, or four-hundred eighty 100-Gigabit Ethernet
interfaces.
port—Interfaces use the following convention for port numbers:
•
On a QFX3500 switch running a QFabric software package, there are 48 network
access ports (10-Gigabit Ethernet) labeled 0 through 47 on PIC 0 and, 16 network
access ports labeled 0 through 15 on PIC 1, and four 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports labeled
Q0 through Q3 on PIC 2. You can use the QSFP+ ports to connect the Node device
to Interconnect devices.
By default, the 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports are configured to operate as 10-Gigabit Ethernet
ports. You can use QSFP+ to four SFP+ copper breakout cables to connect the
10-Gigabit Ethernet ports to other servers, storage, and switches. Optionally, you
can choose to configure the QSFP+ ports as 40-Gigabit Ethernet ports (see
“Configuring the QSFP+ Port Type on QFX3500 Standalone Switches” on page 46).
•
8
On a QFX3500 switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, there are 48 network
access ports labeled 0 through 47 on PIC 0 and 4 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports labeled Q0
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
through Q3 on PIC 1. See “Channelizing Interfaces” on page 64 for information on
how to configure and channelize the 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports.
•
On a QFX3600 switch running a QFabric software package, there are 64 network
access ports (10-Gigabit Ethernet) labeled Q0 through Q15 on PIC 0, and there are
16 network access ports (40-Gigabit Ethernet) labeled Q0 through Q15 on PIC 1.
By default, all the QSFP+ ports are configured to operate as 40-Gigabit Ethernet
ports. Optionally, you can choose to configure the QSFP+ ports as 10-Gigabit Ethernet
ports (see “Configuring the Port Type on QFX3600 Standalone Switches” on page 45)
and use QSFP+ to four SFP+ copper breakout cables to connect the 10-Gigabit
Ethernet ports to other servers, storage, and switches.
•
On a QFX3600 Node device running a QFabric software package, PIC 0 can support
up to 56 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports labeled Q2 through Q15, and PIC 1 can support
up to 8 40-Gigabit data plane uplink ports labeled Q0 through Q7, and up to 14
40-Gigabit Ethernet ports labeled Q2 through Q15.
On a QFX3600 Node device, by default, four 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports (labeled Q0
through Q3) are configured for uplink connections between your Node device and
your Interconnect devices, and twelve 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports (labeled Q4 through
Q15) use QSFP+ to four SFP+ copper breakout cables to support up to 48 10-Gigabit
Ethernet ports for connections to either endpoint systems (such as servers and
storage devices) or external networks. Optionally, you can choose to configure the
first eight ports (Q0 through Q7) for uplink connections between your Node device
and your Interconnect devices, and ports Q2 through Q15 for 10-Gigabit Ethernet or
40-Gigabit Ethernet connections to either endpoint systems or external networks
(see Configuring the Port Type on QFX3600 Node Devices).
•
On a QFX3600 switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 can support 64
network access ports (10-Gigabit Ethernet ports) labeled Q0 through Q15 and 16
40-Gigabit Ethernet ports labeled Q0 through Q15. See “Channelizing Interfaces”
on page 64 for information on how to configure and channelize the 40-Gbps QSFP+
ports.
•
On a QFX5100-48S switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 can support
48 network access ports (10-Gigabit Ethernet ports) labeled 0 through 47 and 6
40-Gbps QSFP+ ports labeled 48 through 53. See “Channelizing Interfaces” on
page 64 for information on how to configure and channelize the 40-Gbps QSFP+
ports.
•
On an EX4600 switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 can support 24
network access ports (10-Gigabit Ethernet ports) labeled 0 through 23 and 4 40-Gbps
QSFP+ ports labeled 24 through 27. There are two expansion bays (PIC 1 and PIC
2), and you can insert QFX-EM-4Q expansion modules and EX4600-EM-8F expansion
modules. The QFX-EM-4Q expansion module provide 4 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports. The
EX4600-EM-8F expansion module provides 8 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports. You can insert
any combination of expansion modules. For example, you can insert two
EX4600-EM-8F expansion modules, two QFX-EM-4Q expansion modules, or one
of each. See “Channelizing Interfaces” on page 64 for information on how to configure
and channelize the 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
9
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
•
On a QFX5100-48S switch running a QFabric software package, PIC 0 can support
48 network access ports (10-Gigabit Ethernet ports) labeled 0 through 47, and PIC
1 can support 6 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports labeled 0 through 5. See “Configuring the
QSFP+ Port Type on QFX5100 Devices” on page 48 for information on how to
configure the port mode of 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports.
•
On a QFX5100-24Q switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 can support
24 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports labeled 0 through 23. PIC 1 and PIC 2 each support 4
40-Gbps QSFP+ port, for a total of eight 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports. See “Channelizing
Interfaces” on page 64 for information on how to configure and channelize the
40-Gbps QSFP+ ports.
NOTE: You cannot channelize the 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports provided in the
two QFX-EM-4Q expansion modules. Also, even though there is a total
of 128 physical ports, only 104 logical ports can be channelized.
You can configure different system modes to achieve varying levels of port density
on the QFX5100-24Q and QFX5100-96S switches. Depending on the system mode
you configure, there are restrictions on which ports you can channelize. If you
channelize ports that are restricted, the configuration is ignored. See “Configuring
the System Mode” on page 78 for information on how to configure the system mode.
•
On a QFX5100-96S switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 can support
96 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports labeled 0 through 95, and 8 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports
labeled 96 through 103. See “Channelizing Interfaces” on page 64 for information
on how to configure and channelize the 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports.
NOTE: You can only channelize the 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports provided in
ports 96 and 100, because only 104 logical ports can be channelized.
You can configure different system modes to achieve varying levels of port density
on the QFX5100-24Q and QFX5100-96S switches. Depending on the system mode
you configure, there are restrictions on which ports you can channelize. If you
channelize ports that are restricted, the configuration is ignored. See “Configuring
the System Mode” on page 78 for information on how to configure the system mode.
10
•
On a QFX5110-48S switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, PIC 0 can support
48 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports labeled 0 through 47, and 4 QSFP28 ports labeled 48
through 51. These data ports (0 through 47) support either 1-Gbps small form-factor
pluggable (SFP) or 10-Gbps small form-factor pluggable plus (SFP+) transceivers.
You can also use SFP+ DAC cables and 10-Gbps active optical cables (AOC) in any
access port.The default 100-Gigabit Ethernet ports can be configured as 40-Gigabit
Ethernet, and in this configuration can either operate as dedicated 40-Gigabit
Ethernet ports or can be channelized to 4 independent 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports
using copper or fiber breakout cables.
•
On a QFX5200-32C switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, there is support for
both quad small-form-factor pluggable (QSFP+) and 28-Gbps QSFP+ (QSFP28)
transceivers in the 32 QSFP28 sockets. The QSFP28 ports are configured as
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
100-Gigabit Ethernet ports by default, but can also be configured to speeds of 50,
40, 25, or 10 Gigabit Ethernet.
The 100 Gigabit Ethernet ports can be channelized using breakout cables either to
2 independent downstream 50 Gigabit Ethernet or to 4 independent 25 Gigabit
Ethernet ports. The default 100 Gigabit Ethernet ports can also be configured as 40
Gigabit Ethernet and in this configuration can either operate as dedicated 40 Gigabit
Ethernet ports or can be channelized to 4 independent 10 Gigabit Ethernet ports
using breakout cables. See “Channelizing Interfaces on QFX5200 Switches” on
page 76 for information on how to configure and channelize the interfaces.
NOTE: Autochannelization is not supported.
•
On a QFX10002-36Q switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, there are 36 quad
small-form factor pluggable plus (QSFP+) ports that support 40-Gigabit Ethernet
optical transceivers. Out of these 36 ports, 12 ports are QSFP28 capable, which are
dual speed 40- or 100-Gigabit Ethernet optical transceivers.
Each QSFP28 socket can be configured to support:
•
100-Gigabit Ethernet using 28-Gbps QSFP28 optical transceivers. When a QSFP28
transceiver is inserted into the ports marked with a fine black line underneath the
socket and the port is configured for 100-Gigabit Ethernet, the two adjacent ports
are disabled and the QSFP28 is enabled for 100-Gigabit Ethernet.
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet using QSFP+ optical transceivers.
•
10-Gigabit Ethernet using breakout cables. When configured for channelization, a
breakout cable converts the 40-Gigabit Ethernet port into 4 independent 10-Gigabit
Ethernet ports.
Any of the 36 ports 0 through 35 can be configured as either uplink or access ports.
See “Channelizing Interfaces” on page 64 for information on how to configure and
channelize the 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports.
Each of the 12 QSFP28 ports support:
•
100-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP28 transceivers
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ transceivers
Each of the 36 QSFP+ ports support:
•
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ transceivers
•
Access ports
On a QFX10002-72Q switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, there are 72 quad
small-form factor pluggable plus (QSFP+) ports that support 40-Gigabit Ethernet
optical transceivers. Out of these 72 ports, 24 ports are QSFP28 capable, which are
dual speed 40- or 100-Gigabit Ethernet optical transceivers.
Each QSFP28 socket can be configured to support:
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
11
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
•
100-Gigabit Ethernet using 28-Gbps QSFP28 optical transceivers. When a QSFP28
transceiver is inserted into the ports marked with a fine black line underneath the
socket and the port is configured for 100-Gigabit Ethernet, the two adjacent ports
are disabled and the QSFP28 is enabled for 100-Gigabit Ethernet.
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet using QSFP+ optical transceivers.
•
10-Gigabit Ethernet using breakout cables. When configured for channelization, a
breakout cable converts the 40-Gigabit Ethernet port into 4 independent 10-Gigabit
Ethernet ports.
Any of the 72 ports 0 through 71 can be configured as either uplink or access ports.
See “Channelizing Interfaces” on page 64 for information on how to configure and
channelize the 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports.
Each of the 24 QSFP28 ports support:
•
100-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP28 transceivers
Each of the 72 QSFP+ ports support:
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ transceivers
Each of the 36 QSFP+ ports support:
•
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ transceivers
•
Access ports
•
Uplink ports
On a QFX10008 switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, there are two line cards
available:
•
QFX10000-36Q, a 36-port 40-Gigabit Ethernet quad small form-factor pluggable
plus transceiver (QSFP+) or 12-port 100GbE QSFP28 line card
•
QFX10000-30C, a 30-port 100-Gigabit or 40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP28 line card
The QFX10000-36Q line cards supports
12
•
36 quad small form-factor pluggable plus (QSFP+) ports that support 40-Gigabit
Ethernet optical transceivers. Out of these 36 ports, 12 ports are QSFP28 capable.
The QSFP+ ports are dual speed and can support either 40-Gigabit or 100-Gigabit
Ethernet optical transceivers. The line card can support 10-Gigabit Ethernet by
channelizing the 40-Gigabit ports. Channelization is supported on fiber break-out
cable using standard structured cabling techniques.
•
Each QSFP28 socket can be configured to support:
•
100-Gigabit Ethernet using QSFP28 optical transceivers. When a QSFP28
transceiver is inserted into the ports marked with a fine black line underneath
the socket and the port is configured for 100-Gigabit Ethernet, the two adjacent
ports are disabled and the QSFP28 socket is enabled for 100-Gigabit Ethernet.
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet using QSFP+ optical transceivers.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
•
10-Gigabit Ethernet using breakout cabling and attached optical transceivers.
When configured for channelization, the system converts the 40-Gigabit Ethernet
port into 4 independent 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports.
Any of the 36 ports 0 through 35 can be configured as either uplink or access ports.
See “Channelizing Interfaces” on page 64 for information on how to configure and
channelize the 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports.
•
Each of the 12 QSFP28 ports supports:
•
100-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP28 transceivers
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ transceivers
•
Each of the 12 QSFP28 ports supports:
•
100-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP28 transceivers
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ transceivers
Each of the 36 QSFP+ ports support:
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ transceivers
•
Access ports
•
Uplink ports
The QFX10000-30C line cards supports
•
Thirty 28-Gbps QSFP+ Pluggable Solution (QSFP28) cages that support either
40-Gigabit Ethernet or 100-Gigabit Ethernet optical transceivers. The
QFX10000-30C ports auto detect the type of transceiver installed and set the
configuration to the appropriate speed.
•
Each QSFP28 socket can be configured to support:
•
100-Gigabit Ethernet using QSFP28 optical transceivers. When a QSFP28
transceiver is inserted into the ports marked with a fine black line underneath
the socket and the port is configured for 100-Gigabit Ethernet, the two adjacent
ports are disabled and the QSFP28 socket is enabled for 100-Gigabit Ethernet.
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet using QSFP+ optical transceivers.
See “Channelizing Interfaces” on page 64 for information on how to configure
and channelize the 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports.
•
•
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Each of the 30 QSFP28 ports supports:
•
100-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP28 transceivers
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ transceivers
•
Access ports
•
Uplink ports
On a QFX10016 switch running Enhanced Layer 2 software, there are 16 slots,
which you can populate with two types line cards:
13
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
•
QFX10000-36Q, a 36-port 40-Gigabit Ethernet quad small form-factor
pluggable plus transceiver (QSFP+) or 12-port 100GbE QSFP28 line card
The QFX10000-36Q line card consists of 36 quad small form-factor pluggable
plus (QSFP+) ports that support 40-Gigabit Ethernet optical transceivers.
Out of these 36 ports, 12 ports are QSFP28 capable. The QSFP+ ports are
dual speed and can support either 40-Gigabit or 100-Gigabit Ethernet optical
transceivers. The line card can support 10-Gigabit Ethernet by channelizing
the 40-Gigabit ports. Channelization is supported on fiber break-out cable
using standard structured cabling techniques.
With 100-Gigabit Ethernet using QSFP28 optical transceivers, when a QSFP28
transceiver is inserted into the ports marked with a fine black line underneath
the socket and the port is configured for 100-Gigabit Ethernet, the two adjacent
ports are disabled and the QSFP28 socket is enabled for 100-Gigabit Ethernet.
You can use 40-Gigabit Ethernet using QSFP+ optical transceivers.
With 10-Gigabit Ethernet using breakout cabling and attached optical
transceivers, when configured for channelization, the system converts the
40-Gigabit Ethernet port into 4 independent 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports.
Any of the 36 ports 0 through 35 can be configured as either uplink or access
ports.
Each of the 12 QSFP28 ports supports:
•
100-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP28 transceivers
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ transceivers
Each of the 36 QSFP+ ports supports:
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ transceivers
•
Access ports
You can use 40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ transceivers in any downstream
port.
•
Uplink ports
You can configure all the QSFP+ ports as uplinks.
Every second and sixth port in a 6XQSFP cage on a QFX10000-36Q supports
100-Gigabit Ethernet using QSFP28 transceivers. These 100-Gigabit Ethernet
ports work either as 100-Gigabit Ethernet or as 40-Gigabit Ethernet, but are
recognized as 40-Gigabit Ethernet by default. When a 40-Gigabit Ethernet
transceiver is inserted into a 100-Gigabit Ethernet port, the port recognizes
the 40-Gigabit Ethernet port speed. When a 100-Gigabit Ethernet transceiver
is inserted into the port and enabled in the CLI, the port recognizes the
100-Gigabit Ethernet speed and disables two adjacent 40-Gigabit Ethernet
ports. You can also use an 100-Gigabit Ethernet transceiver and run it at
40-Gigabit Ethernet by using the CLI to set the port speed to 40-Gigabit
Ethernet.
14
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
The 40-Gigabit Ethernet ports can operate independently, be channelized
into four 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports, or bundled with the next two consecutive
ports and channelized into twelve 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports as a port range.
Only the first and fourth port in each 6XQSFP cage are available to channelize
a port range. The port range must be configured using the set chassis fpc pic
port channel-speed command. For example, to channelize the first switch
port, use the set chassis fpc 0 pic 0port 1channel-speed 10g command.
•
The QFX10000-30C line card consists of thirty 28-Gbps QSFP+ Pluggable
Solution (QSFP28) cages that support either 40-Gigabit Ethernet or
100-Gigabit Ethernet optical transceivers. The QFX10000-30C ports auto
detect the type of transceiver installed and set the configuration to the
appropriate speed.
Each QSFP28 socket supports:
•
100-Gigabit Ethernet using QSFP28 optical transceivers. When a QSFP28
transceiver is inserted into any of the ports, the QSFP28 socket is enabled
for 100-Gigabit Ethernet.
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet using QSFP+ optical transceivers. When a QSFP+
transceiver is inserted into any of the ports, the QSFP+ socket is enabled
for 40-Gigabit.
Any of the 30 ports 0 through 29 can be configured as either uplink or access
ports, and of the 30 QSFP28 ports supports:
•
100-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP28 transceivers
•
40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ transceivers
Logical Part of an Interface Name on a Switch Running QFabric Software Package
The logical unit part of the interface name corresponds to the logical unit number, which
can be a number from 0 through 16384. In the virtual part of the name, a period (.)
separates the port and logical unit numbers: device-name (QFabric systems only):
type-fpc/pic/port.logical-unit-number. For example, if you issue the show
ethernet-switching interfaces command on a system with a default VLAN, the resulting
display shows the logical interfaces associated with the VLAN:
Interface
node-device1:xe-0/0/1.0
node-device1:xe-0/0/2.0
node-device1:xe-0/0/3.0
State
down
down
down
VLAN members
remote-analyzer
default
default
Blocking
unblocked
unblocked
unblocked
When you configure aggregated Ethernet interfaces, you configure a logical interface,
which is called a bundle or a LAG. Each LAG can include up to eight Ethernet interfaces,
depending on the switch model.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
15
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Logical Part of a Channelized Interface Name on a Switch Running Enhanced Layer 2 Software
Channelizing enables you to configure four 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces from a
40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ interface. By default, a 40-Gigabit Ethernet QSFP+ interface
is named et-fpc/pic/port. The resulting 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces appear in the
following format: xe-fpc/pic/port:channel, where channel can be a value of 0 through 3.
For example, if an et interface named et-0/0/3 is channelized to four 10-Gigabit Ethernet
interfaces, the resulting 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface names will be xe-0/0/3:0,
xe-0/0/3:1, xe-0/0/3:2, and xe-0/0/3:3:
Interface
xe-0/0/3:0
xe-0/0/3:1
xe-0/0/3:2
xe-0/0/3:3
Admin Link Proto
up
down
up
down
up
down
up
down
Local
Remote
Wildcard Characters in Interface Names
In the show interfaces and clear interfaces commands, you can use wildcard characters
in the interface-name option to specify groups of interface names without having to type
each name individually. You must enclose all wildcard characters except the asterisk (*)
in quotation marks (" ").
Related
Documentation
•
Interfaces Overview on page 3
•
Channelizing Interfaces on page 64
•
Configuring the System Mode on page 78
•
Understanding Management Interfaces on page 17
•
Understanding Port Ranges and System Modes on page 19
•
Rear Panel of a QFX3500 Device
•
Front Panel of a QFX3600 Device
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
Understanding Interface Ranges
You can use the interface ranges to group interfaces of the same type that share a
common configuration profile. This helps reduce the time and effort in configuring
interfaces. The configurations common to all the interfaces can be included in the interface
range definition.
The interface range definition contains the name of the interface range defined, the
names of the individual member interfaces that do not fall in a series of interfaces, a
range of interfaces defined in the member range, and the configuration statements
common to all the interfaces. An interface range defined with member ranges and
individual members but without any common configurations is also a valid definition.
16
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
NOTE: The interface range definition is supported only for Gigabit Ethernet,
10-Gigabit Ethernet, and Fibre Channel interfaces. OCX Series switches do
not support Fibre Channel interfaces.
The common configurations defined in the interface range will be overridden by the local
configuration.
The defined interface ranges can be used at places where the interface statement is used
in the following configuration hierarchies:
NOTE: These statements are not supported on OCX Series switches:
Related
Documentation
•
protocols isis interface
•
protocols sflow interfaces
•
Interfaces Overview on page 3
•
Interfaces Overview
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Configuring a Layer 3 Logical Interface on page 120
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
•
interface-range on page 230
Understanding Management Interfaces
You use management interfaces to access devices remotely. Typically, a management
interface is not connected to the in-band network, but is connected to a device in the
internal network. Through a management interface, you can access the device over the
network using utilities such as ssh and telnet and configure it from anywhere, regardless
of its physical location. As a security feature, users cannot log in as root through a
management interface. To access the device as root, you must use the console port. You
can also use root to log in using SSH.
NOTE: Before you can use management interfaces, you must configure the
logical interfaces with valid IP addresses. Juniper Networks does not support
configuring two management interfaces in the same subnet.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
17
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Management interface port ranges vary based on device type (and platform support
depends on the Junos OS release in your installation):
•
QFX3500 devices:
The valid port range for a management interface (me) on a QFX3500 device is between
0 and 6, with a total of seven available ports. On a QFX3500 standalone switch,
however, you can only configure me0 and me1 as management interfaces. The
management interfaces are labeled C0 and C1, and they correspond to me0 and me1.
On a QFX3500 Node device, the RJ-45 management interfaces and SFP management
interfaces correspond to me5 and me6
•
QFX3600 devices:
There are two RJ-45 management interfaces (labeled C0 and C1) and two SFP
management interfaces (labeled C0S and C1S). On a QFX3600 standalone switch,
the RJ-45 management interfaces and SFP management interfaces correspond to
me0 and me1. On a QFX3600 Node device, the RJ-45 management interfaces and SFP
management interfaces correspond to me5 and me6. Each pair of management
interfaces correspond to one Ethernet interface—for example, both RJ-45 management
interfaces (labeled C0 and C0s) can correspond to me0, and both SFP management
interfaces (labeled C1 and C1S) can correspond to me1. By default, both RJ-45
management interfaces are active. If you insert an SFP interface into the SFP
management port (C0S, for example), the SFP interface would become the active
management interface, and the corresponding RJ-45 management interface (C0) is
disabled.
NOTE: On a QFX3600 device, you can use either the RJ-45 or the SFP
management interfaces, but not both at the same time.
•
On QFX5100, QFX5200, and EX4600 switches, there is one RJ-45 management
interface (labeled C0 and one SFP management interface (labeled C1), and they
correspond to em0 and em1. You can use both management interfaces simultaneously.
•
On QFX10002 and QFX10008 switches, there is one RJ-45 management interface
(labeled MGMT and one SFP management interface (labeled MGMT), and they
correspond to em0 and em1. Although the CLI permits you to configure two
management Ethernet interfaces within the same subnet, only one interface is usable
and supported.
•
On OCX Series switches:
There is one RJ-45 management interface (labeled MGMT), which corresponds to
em0. The em0 interface always has the status up in show command outputs, even if
the physical port is empty. The me0 interface is a virtual interface between Junos and
the host operating system, therefore its status is independent from the status of the
physical port.
•
QFabric system:
On a QFabric system, there are management interfaces on the Node devices,
Interconnect devices, and Director devices. However, you cannot access the
18
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
management interfaces on the Node devices or Interconnect devices directly. You can
only manage and configure these devices using the Director device. You can connect
to the management interface over the network using utilities such as SSH.
For information on how to use management interfaces on a QFabric system, see
Performing the QFabric System Initial Setup on a QFX3100 Director Group and Gaining
Access to the QFabric System Through the Default Partition.
Related
Documentation
•
Interfaces Overview on page 3
Understanding Port Ranges and System Modes
QFX Series devices and EX4600 switches can support different port ranges depending
on the device, media type of the interface, the software that is running on the device, and
the system mode.
This topic describes:
•
Port Ranges for Different Media Types on page 19
•
Supported System Modes on page 43
Port Ranges for Different Media Types
The following media types support the following port ranges:
•
On a QFX3500 device:
•
The valid port range for a Fibre Channel (fc) interface is 0 through 5 and 42 through
47 on PIC 0, with a total of 12 available Fibre Channel ports.
NOTE: Fibre Channel ports are not supported on QFX3500, QFX3600,
and QFX5100 switches running Enhanced Layer 2 software.
•
•
The valid port range for a Gigabit Ethernet (ge) interface is 6 through 41 on PIC 0
because the ports between 0 and 5 and 42 and 47 are reserved as Fibre Channel
ports. The total number of available Gigabit Ethernet ports is 36, because 12 of the
remaining 48 ports are reserved for Fibre Channel and 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.
Fibre Channel ports cannot be configured as Gigabit Ethernet ports.
•
The valid port range for a 10-Gigabit Ethernet (xe) interface is 0 through 47 on PIC
0. The valid port range for a 10-Gigabit Ethernet (xe) interface is 0 through 15 on PIC
1. The total number of available 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports is 64.
•
The valid port range for a 40-Gigabit data plane uplink interface is 0 through 3 on
PIC 1
•
The valid port range for a 40-Gigabit Ethernet interface is 0 through 3 on PIC 2. There
are four available ports.
On a QFX3600 Node device:
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
19
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
•
The valid port range for a 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface is 8 through 63 on PIC 0.
There are 56 available ports.
•
The valid port range for a 40-Gigabit Ethernet interface is 2 through 15 on PIC 1. There
are 14 available ports.
•
The valid port range for a 40-Gigabit data plane uplink interface is 0 through 7 on
PIC 1. There are eight available ports.
See Table 7 on page 28 for physical port to logical port mappings.
•
On a QFX3600 switch running Enhanced Layer 2 Software:
•
The valid port range for a 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface is 0 through 63 on PIC 0.
There are 64 available ports.
•
The valid port range for a 40-Gigabit Ethernet interface is 0 through 15 on PIC 0.
There are 16 available ports.
See Table 8 on page 31 for physical port to logical port mappings.
•
On QFX5100-48S and QFX5100-48T switches running Enhanced Layer 2 Software:
•
The valid port range for a 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface is 0 through 47 on PIC 0.
There are 48 available ports. When you channelize the 6 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports on
0 through 5 on PIC 1, there are 72 available ports.
NOTE: On PIC 1, ports 0 and 1 are reserved for fte ports. You cannot
convert these fte ports to xe or xle ports.
•
The valid port range for a 40-Gbps QSFP+ port is 0 through 5 on PIC 1. There are six
available ports.
See Table 10 on page 36 for physical port to logical port mappings.
•
On EX4600 switches running Enhanced Layer 2 Software:
•
The valid port range for a 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface is 0 through 23 on PIC 0.
There are 24 available ports. When you channelize the 4 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports on
24 through 27 on PIC 0. There are 40 available ports.
See Table 10 on page 36 for physical port to logical port mappings.
•
On QFX5100-48S and QFX5100-48T switches running a QFabric software package:
•
The valid port range for a 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface is 0 through 47 on PIC 0.
There are 48 available ports.
•
The valid port range for a 40-Gbps QSFP+ port is 0 through 5 on PIC 1. There are six
available ports.
NOTE: On PIC 1, ports 0 and 1 are reserved for fte ports. You cannot
convert these fte ports to xe or xle ports.
20
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
See Table 11 on page 40 for physical port to logical port mappings.
•
For QFX5100-24Q and QFX5100-96S switches running Enhanced Layer 2 Software,
see Table 12 on page 43 for physical port to logical port mappings for different system
modes.
Table 5: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3500 Switches Running QFabric Software Package
Fibre Channel
Interfaces
Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
10-Gigabit
Ethernet
Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0 and 1)
0
fc-0/0/0
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/0/0
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
1
fc-0/0/1
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/0/1
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
2
fc-0/0/2
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/0/2
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
3
fc-0/0/3
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/0/3
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
4
fc-0/0/4
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/0/4
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
5
fc-0/0/5
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/0/5
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
6
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/6
xe-0/0/6
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
7
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/7
xe-0/0/7
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
8
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/8
xe-0/0/8
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
9
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/9
xe-0/0/9
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
10
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/10
xe-0/0/10
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
11
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/11
xe-0/0/11
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
12
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/12
xe-0/0/12
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
40-Gigabit Data
Plane Uplink
Interfaces (On PIC
1)
40-Gigabit
Ethernet
Interfaces
(On PIC 2)
21
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 5: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3500 Switches Running QFabric Software
Package (continued)
Fibre Channel
Interfaces
Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
10-Gigabit
Ethernet
Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0 and 1)
13
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/13
xe-0/0/13
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
14
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/14
xe-0/0/14
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
15
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/15
xe-0/0/15
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
16
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/16
xe-0/0/16
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
17
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/17
xe-0/0/17
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
18
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/18
xe-0/0/18
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
19
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/19
xe-0/0/19
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
20
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/20
xe-0/0/20
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
21
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/21
xe-0/0/21
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
22
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/22
xe-0/0/22
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
23
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/23
xe-0/0/23
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
24
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/24
xe-0/0/24
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
25
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/25
xe-0/0/25
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
26
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/26
xe-0/0/26
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
27
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/27
xe-0/0/27
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
22
40-Gigabit Data
Plane Uplink
Interfaces (On PIC
1)
40-Gigabit
Ethernet
Interfaces
(On PIC 2)
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Table 5: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3500 Switches Running QFabric Software
Package (continued)
Fibre Channel
Interfaces
Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
10-Gigabit
Ethernet
Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0 and 1)
28
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/28
xe-0/0/28
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
29
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/29
xe-0/0/29
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
30
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/30
xe-0/0/30
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
31
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/31
xe-0/0/31
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
32
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/32
xe-0/0/32
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
33
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/33
xe-0/0/33
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
34
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/34
xe-0/0/34
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
35
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/35
xe-0/0/35
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
36
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/36
xe-0/0/36
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
37
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/37
xe-0/0/37
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
38
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/38
xe-0/0/38
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
39
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/39
xe-0/0/39
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
40
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/40
xe-0/0/40
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
41
Not supported on
this port
ge-0/0/41
xe-0/0/41
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
42
fc-0/0/42
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/0/42
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
40-Gigabit Data
Plane Uplink
Interfaces (On PIC
1)
40-Gigabit
Ethernet
Interfaces
(On PIC 2)
23
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 5: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3500 Switches Running QFabric Software
Package (continued)
Fibre Channel
Interfaces
Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
10-Gigabit
Ethernet
Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0 and 1)
43
fc-0/0/43
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/0/43
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
44
fc-0/0/44
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/0/44
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
45
fc-0/0/45
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/0/45
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
46
fc-0/0/46
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/0/46
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
47
fc-0/0/47
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/0/47
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
Q0
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/1/0
fte-0/1/0
xle-0/2/0
fte-0/1/1
xle-0/2/1
40-Gigabit Data
Plane Uplink
Interfaces (On PIC
1)
40-Gigabit
Ethernet
Interfaces
(On PIC 2)
xe-0/1/1
xe-0/1/2
xe-0/1/3
NOTE: Supported
on QFX3500
standalone switch
only.
Q1
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/1/4
xe-0/1/5
xe-0/1/6
xe-0/1/7
NOTE: Supported
on QFX3500
standalone switch
only.
24
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Table 5: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3500 Switches Running QFabric Software
Package (continued)
Fibre Channel
Interfaces
Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
10-Gigabit
Ethernet
Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0 and 1)
40-Gigabit Data
Plane Uplink
Interfaces (On PIC
1)
40-Gigabit
Ethernet
Interfaces
Q2
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/1/8
fte-0/1/2
xle-0/2/2
fte-0/1/3
xle-0/2/3
(On PIC 2)
xe-0/1/9
xe-0/1/10
xe-0/1/11
NOTE: Supported
on QFX3500
standalone switch
only.
Q3
Not supported on
this port
Not supported on
this port
xe-0/1/12
xe-0/1/13
xe-0/1/14
xe-0/1/15
NOTE: Supported
on QFX3500
standalone switch
only.
Table 6: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3500 Switches Running Enhanced Layer 2 Software
Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
10-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0 and 1)
(On PIC 1)
0
Not supported on this port
xe-0/0/0
Not supported on this port
1
Not supported on this port
xe-0/0/1
Not supported on this port
2
Not supported on this port
xe-0/0/2
Not supported on this port
3
Not supported on this port
xe-0/0/3
Not supported on this port
4
Not supported on this port
xe-0/0/4
Not supported on this port
5
Not supported on this port
xe-0/0/5
Not supported on this port
6
ge-0/0/6
xe-0/0/6
Not supported on this port
7
ge-0/0/7
xe-0/0/7
Not supported on this port
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
25
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 6: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3500 Switches Running Enhanced Layer 2
Software (continued)
Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
10-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0 and 1)
(On PIC 1)
8
ge-0/0/8
xe-0/0/8
Not supported on this port
9
ge-0/0/9
xe-0/0/9
Not supported on this port
10
ge-0/0/10
xe-0/0/10
Not supported on this port
11
ge-0/0/11
xe-0/0/11
Not supported on this port
12
ge-0/0/12
xe-0/0/12
Not supported on this port
13
ge-0/0/13
xe-0/0/13
Not supported on this port
14
ge-0/0/14
xe-0/0/14
Not supported on this port
15
ge-0/0/15
xe-0/0/15
Not supported on this port
16
ge-0/0/16
xe-0/0/16
Not supported on this port
17
ge-0/0/17
xe-0/0/17
Not supported on this port
18
ge-0/0/18
xe-0/0/18
Not supported on this port
19
ge-0/0/19
xe-0/0/19
Not supported on this port
20
ge-0/0/20
xe-0/0/20
Not supported on this port
21
ge-0/0/21
xe-0/0/21
Not supported on this port
22
ge-0/0/22
xe-0/0/22
Not supported on this port
23
ge-0/0/23
xe-0/0/23
Not supported on this port
24
ge-0/0/24
xe-0/0/24
Not supported on this port
25
ge-0/0/25
xe-0/0/25
Not supported on this port
26
ge-0/0/26
xe-0/0/26
Not supported on this port
27
ge-0/0/27
xe-0/0/27
Not supported on this port
28
ge-0/0/28
xe-0/0/28
Not supported on this port
29
ge-0/0/29
xe-0/0/29
Not supported on this port
26
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Table 6: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3500 Switches Running Enhanced Layer 2
Software (continued)
Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
10-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0 and 1)
(On PIC 1)
30
ge-0/0/30
xe-0/0/30
Not supported on this port
31
ge-0/0/31
xe-0/0/31
Not supported on this port
32
ge-0/0/32
xe-0/0/32
Not supported on this port
33
ge-0/0/33
xe-0/0/33
Not supported on this port
34
ge-0/0/34
xe-0/0/34
Not supported on this port
35
ge-0/0/35
xe-0/0/35
Not supported on this port
36
ge-0/0/36
xe-0/0/36
Not supported on this port
37
ge-0/0/37
xe-0/0/37
Not supported on this port
38
ge-0/0/38
xe-0/0/38
Not supported on this port
39
ge-0/0/39
xe-0/0/39
Not supported on this port
40
ge-0/0/40
xe-0/0/40
Not supported on this port
41
ge-0/0/41
xe-0/0/41
Not supported on this port
42
Not supported on this port
xe-0/0/42
Not supported on this port
43
Not supported on this port
xe-0/0/43
Not supported on this port
44
Not supported on this port
xe-0/0/44
Not supported on this port
45
Not supported on this port
xe-0/0/45
Not supported on this port
46
Not supported on this port
xe-0/0/46
Not supported on this port
47
Not supported on this port
xe-0/0/47
Not supported on this port
Q0
Not supported on this port
xe-0/1/0:0
et-0/1/0
xe-0/1/0:1
xe-0/1/0:2
xe-0/1/0:3
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
27
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 6: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3500 Switches Running Enhanced Layer 2
Software (continued)
Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
10-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0 and 1)
(On PIC 1)
Q1
Not supported on this port
xe-0/1/1:0
et-0/1/1
xe-0/1/1:1
xe-0/1/1:2
xe-0/1/1:3
Q2
Not supported on this port
xe-0/1/2:0
et-0/1/2
xe-0/1/2:1
xe-0/1/2:2
xe-0/1/2:3
Q3
Not supported on this port
xe-0/1/3:0
et-0/1/3
xe-0/1/3:1
xe-0/1/3:2
xe-0/1/3:3
Table 7: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3600 Switches Running QFabric Software Package
10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 1)
Q0
xe-0/0/0
xle-0/1/0
xe-0/0/1
xe-0/0/2
xe-0/0/3
Q1
xe-0/0/4
xle-0/1/1
xe-0/0/5
xe-0/0/6
xe-0/0/7
28
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Table 7: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3600 Switches Running QFabric Software
Package (continued)
10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 1)
Q2
xe-0/0/8
xle-0/1/2
xe-0/0/9
xe-0/0/10
xe-0/0/11
Q3
xe-0/0/12
xle-0/1/3
xe-0/0/13
xe-0/0/14
xe-0/0/15
Q4
xe-0/0/16
xle-0/1/4
xe-0/0/17
xe-0/0/18
xe-0/0/19
Q5
xe-0/0/20
xle-0/1/5
xe-0/0/21
xe-0/0/22
xe-0/0/23
Q6
xe-0/0/24
xle-0/1/6
xe-0/0/25
xe-0/0/26
xe-0/0/27
Q7
xe-0/0/28
xle-0/1/7
xe-0/0/29
xe-0/0/30
xe-0/0/31
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
29
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 7: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3600 Switches Running QFabric Software
Package (continued)
10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 1)
Q8
xe-0/0/32
xle-0/1/8
xe-0/0/33
xe-0/0/34
xe-0/0/35
Q9
xe-0/0/36
xle-0/1/9
xe-0/0/37
xe-0/0/38
xe-0/0/39
Q10
xe-0/0/40
xle-0/1/10
xe-0/0/41
xe-0/0/42
xe-0/0/43
Q11
xe-0/0/44
xle-0/1/11
xe-0/0/45
xe-0/0/46
xe-0/0/47
Q12
xe-0/0/48
xle-0/1/12
xe-0/0/49
xe-0/0/50
xe-0/0/51
Q13
xe-0/0/52
xle-0/1/13
xe-0/0/53
xe-0/0/54
xe-0/0/55
30
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Table 7: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3600 Switches Running QFabric Software
Package (continued)
10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 1)
Q14
xe-0/0/56
xle-0/1/14
xe-0/0/57
xe-0/0/58
xe-0/0/59
Q15
xe-0/0/60
xle-0/1/15
xe-0/0/61
xe-0/0/62
xe-0/0/63
Table 8: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3600 Switches Running Enhanced Layer 2 Software
10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0)
Q0
xe-0/0/0:0
et-0/0/0
xe-0/0/0:1
xe-0/0/0:2
xe-0/0/0:3
Q1
xe-0/0/1:0
et-0/0/1
xe-0/0/1:1
xe-0/0/1:2
xe-0/0/1:3
Q2
xe-0/0/2:0
et-0/0/2
xe-0/0/2:1
xe-0/0/2:2
xe-0/0/2:3
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
31
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 8: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3600 Switches Running Enhanced Layer 2
Software (continued)
10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0)
Q3
xe-0/0/3:0
et-0/0/3
xe-0/0/3:1
xe-0/0/3:2
xe-0/0/3:3
Q4
xe-0/0/4:0
et-0/0/4
xe-0/0/4:1
xe-0/0/4:2
xe-0/0/4:3
Q5
xe-0/0/5:0
et-0/0/5
xe-0/0/5:1
xe-0/0/5:2
xe-0/0/5:3
Q6
xe-0/0/6:0
et-0/0/6
xe-0/0/6:1
xe-0/0/6:2
xe-0/0/6:3
Q7
xe-0/0/7:0
et-0/0/7
xe-0/0/7:1
xe-0/0/7:2
xe-0/0/7:3
Q8
xe-0/0/8:0
et-0/0/8
xe-0/0/8:1
xe-0/0/8:2
xe-0/0/8:3
32
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Table 8: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3600 Switches Running Enhanced Layer 2
Software (continued)
10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0)
Q9
xe-0/0/9:0
et-0/0/9
xe-0/0/9:1
xe-0/0/9:2
xe-0/0/9:3
Q10
xe-0/0/10:0
et-0/0/10
xe-0/0/10:1
xe-0/0/10:2
xe-0/0/10:3
Q11
xe-0/0/11:0
et-0/0/11
xe-0/0/11:1
xe-0/0/11:2
xe-0/0/11:3
Q12
xe-0/0/12:0
et-0/0/12
xe-0/0/12:1
xe-0/0/12:2
xe-0/0/12:3
Q13
xe-0/0/13:0
et-0/0/13
xe-0/0/13:1
xe-0/0/13:2
xe-0/0/13:3
Q14
xe-0/0/14:0
et-0/0/14
xe-0/0/14:1
xe-0/0/14:2
xe-0/0/14:3
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
33
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 8: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3600 Switches Running Enhanced Layer 2
Software (continued)
10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0)
Q15
xe-0/0/15:0
et-0/0/15
xe-0/0/15:1
xe-0/0/15:2
xe-0/0/15:3
Table 9: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3600 Node Devices Running QFabric Software Package
10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
40-Gigabit Data Plane
Uplink Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 1)
(On PIC 1)
Q0
Not supported on this port
fte-0/1/0
xle-0/1/0
Q1
Not supported on this port
fte-0/1/1
xle-0/1/1
Q2
xe-0/0/8
fte-0/1/2
xle-0/1/2
fte-0/1/3
xle-0/1/3
fte-0/1/4
xle-0/1/4
fte-0/1/5
xle-0/1/5
xe-0/0/9
xe-0/0/10
xe-0/0/11
Q3
xe-0/0/12
xe-0/0/13
xe-0/0/14
xe-0/0/15
Q4
xe-0/0/16
xe-0/0/17
xe-0/0/18
xe-0/0/19
Q5
xe-0/0/20
xe-0/0/21
xe-0/0/22
xe-0/0/23
34
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Table 9: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3600 Node Devices Running QFabric Software
Package (continued)
10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
40-Gigabit Data Plane
Uplink Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 1)
(On PIC 1)
Q6
xe-0/0/24
fte-0/1/6
xle-0/1/6
fte-0/1/7
xle-0/1/7
Not supported on this port
xle-0/1/8
Not supported on this port
xle-0/1/9
Not supported on this port
xle-0/1/10
Not supported on this port
xle-0/1/11
xe-0/0/25
xe-0/0/26
xe-0/0/27
Q7
xe-0/0/28
xe-0/0/29
xe-0/0/30
xe-0/0/31
Q8
xe-0/0/32
xe-0/0/33
xe-0/0/34
xe-0/0/35
Q9
xe-0/0/36
xe-0/0/37
xe-0/0/38
xe-0/0/39
Q10
xe-0/0/40
xe-0/0/41
xe-0/0/42
xe-0/0/43
Q11
xe-0/0/44
xe-0/0/45
xe-0/0/46
xe-0/0/47
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
35
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 9: Valid Port Ranges on QFX3600 Node Devices Running QFabric Software
Package (continued)
10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
40-Gigabit Data Plane
Uplink Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 1)
(On PIC 1)
Q12
xe-0/0/48
Not supported on this port
xle-0/1/12
Not supported on this port
xle-0/1/13
Not supported on this port
xle-0/1/14
Not supported on this port
xle-0/1/15
xe-0/0/49
xe-0/0/50
xe-0/0/51
Q13
xe-0/0/52
xe-0/0/53
xe-0/0/54
xe-0/0/55
Q14
xe-0/0/56
xe-0/0/57
xe-0/0/58
xe-0/0/59
Q15
xe-0/0/60
xe-0/0/61
xe-0/0/62
xe-0/0/63
Table 10: Valid Port Ranges on QFX5100-48S and QFX5100-48T Switches Running Enhanced
Layer 2 Software
10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0)
0
xe-0/0/0
Not supported on this port
1
xe-0/0/1
Not supported on this port
2
xe-0/0/2
Not supported on this port
3
xe-0/0/3
Not supported on this port
4
xe-0/0/4
Not supported on this port
36
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Table 10: Valid Port Ranges on QFX5100-48S and QFX5100-48T Switches Running Enhanced
Layer 2 Software (continued)
10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0)
5
xe-0/0/5
Not supported on this port
6
xe-0/0/6
Not supported on this port
7
xe-0/0/7
Not supported on this port
8
xe-0/0/8
Not supported on this port
9
xe-0/0/9
Not supported on this port
10
xe-0/0/10
Not supported on this port
11
xe-0/0/11
Not supported on this port
12
xe-0/0/12
Not supported on this port
13
xe-0/0/13
Not supported on this port
14
xe-0/0/14
Not supported on this port
15
xe-0/0/15
Not supported on this port
16
xe-0/0/16
Not supported on this port
17
xe-0/0/17
Not supported on this port
18
xe-0/0/18
Not supported on this port
19
xe-0/0/19
Not supported on this port
20
xe-0/0/20
Not supported on this port
21
xe-0/0/21
Not supported on this port
22
xe-0/0/22
Not supported on this port
23
xe-0/0/23
Not supported on this port
24
xe-0/0/24
Not supported on this port
25
xe-0/0/25
Not supported on this port
26
xe-0/0/26
Not supported on this port
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
37
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 10: Valid Port Ranges on QFX5100-48S and QFX5100-48T Switches Running Enhanced
Layer 2 Software (continued)
10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0)
27
xe-0/0/27
Not supported on this port
28
xe-0/0/28
Not supported on this port
29
xe-0/0/29
Not supported on this port
30
xe-0/0/30
Not supported on this port
31
xe-0/0/31
Not supported on this port
32
xe-0/0/32
Not supported on this port
33
xe-0/0/33
Not supported on this port
34
xe-0/0/34
Not supported on this port
35
xe-0/0/35
Not supported on this port
36
xe-0/0/36
Not supported on this port
37
xe-0/0/37
Not supported on this port
38
xe-0/0/38
Not supported on this port
39
xe-0/0/39
Not supported on this port
40
xe-0/0/40
Not supported on this port
41
xe-0/0/41
Not supported on this port
42
xe-0/0/42
Not supported on this port
43
xe-0/0/43
Not supported on this port
44
xe-0/0/44
Not supported on this port
45
xe-0/0/45
Not supported on this port
46
xe-0/0/46
Not supported on this port
47
xe-0/0/47
Not supported on this port
38
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Table 10: Valid Port Ranges on QFX5100-48S and QFX5100-48T Switches Running Enhanced
Layer 2 Software (continued)
10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
40-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
(On PIC 0)
48
xe-0/0/48:0
et-0/0/48
xe-0/0/48:1
xe-0/0/48:2
xe-0/0/48:3
49
xe-0/0/49:0
et-0/0/49
xe-0/0/49:1
xe-0/0/49:2
xe-0/0/49:3
50
xe-0/0/50:0
et-0/0/50
xe-0/0/50:1
xe-0/0/50:2
xe-0/0/50:3
51
xe-0/0/51:0
et-0/0/51
xe-0/0/51:1
xe-0/0/51:2
xe-0/0/51:3
52
xe-0/0/52:0
et-0/0/52
xe-0/0/52:1
xe-0/0/52:2
xe-0/0/52:3
53
xe-0/0/53:0
et-0/0/53
xe-0/0/53:1
xe-0/0/53:2
xe-0/0/53:3
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
39
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 11: Valid Port Ranges on QFX5100-48S and QFX5100-48T Switches Running QFabric
Software Package
10-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
40-Gigabit Data Plane
Uplink Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
40-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces (On PIC 1)
(On PIC 1)
0
xe-0/0/0
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
1
xe-0/0/1
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
2
xe-0/0/2
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
3
xe-0/0/3
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
4
xe-0/0/4
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
5
xe-0/0/5
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
6
xe-0/0/6
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
7
xe-0/0/7
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
8
xe-0/0/8
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
9
xe-0/0/9
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
10
xe-0/0/10
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
11
xe-0/0/11
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
12
xe-0/0/12
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
13
xe-0/0/13
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
14
xe-0/0/14
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
15
xe-0/0/15
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
16
xe-0/0/16
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
17
xe-0/0/17
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
18
xe-0/0/18
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
19
xe-0/0/19
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
20
xe-0/0/20
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
21
xe-0/0/21
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
40
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Table 11: Valid Port Ranges on QFX5100-48S and QFX5100-48T Switches Running QFabric
Software Package (continued)
10-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
40-Gigabit Data Plane
Uplink Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
40-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces (On PIC 1)
(On PIC 1)
22
xe-0/0/22
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
23
xe-0/0/23
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
24
xe-0/0/24
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
25
xe-0/0/25
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
26
xe-0/0/26
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
27
xe-0/0/27
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
28
xe-0/0/28
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
29
xe-0/0/29
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
30
xe-0/0/30
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
31
xe-0/0/31
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
32
xe-0/0/32
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
33
xe-0/0/33
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
34
xe-0/0/34
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
35
xe-0/0/35
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
36
xe-0/0/36
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
37
xe-0/0/37
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
38
xe-0/0/38
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
39
xe-0/0/39
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
40
xe-0/0/40
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
41
xe-0/0/41
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
42
xe-0/0/42
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
43
xe-0/0/43
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
41
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 11: Valid Port Ranges on QFX5100-48S and QFX5100-48T Switches Running QFabric
Software Package (continued)
10-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces
40-Gigabit Data Plane
Uplink Interfaces
Port Number
(On PIC 0)
40-Gigabit Ethernet
Interfaces (On PIC 1)
(On PIC 1)
44
xe-0/0/44
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
45
xe-0/0/45
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
46
xe-0/0/46
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
47
xe-0/0/47
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this port
48
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this PIC
fte-0/1/0
NOTE: This interface is a fixed
fte interface and cannot be
changed to xle.
49
Not supported on this port
Not supported on this PIC
fte-0/1/1
NOTE: This interface is a fixed
fte interface and cannot be
changed to xle.
50
Not supported on this port
xle-0/1/2
fte-0/1/2
NOTE: By default, this
interface is an fte interface
but can be configured as an
xle interface.
51
Not supported on this port
xle-0/1/3
fte-0/1/3
NOTE: By default, this
interface is an fte interface
but can be configured as an
xle interface.
52
Not supported on this port
xle-0/1/4
fte-0/1/4
NOTE: By default, this interface
is an xle interface but can be
configured as an fte interface.
53
Not supported on this port
xle-0/1/5
fte-0/1/5
NOTE: By default, this interface
is an xle interface but can be
configured as an fte interface.
42
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Supported System Modes
NOTE: There are restrictions on the ports you can channelize on the
QFX5100-24Q and QFX5100-96S switches depending on the system mode
you configure. If you try to channelize ports that are restricted, the
configuration is ignored.
The following system modes are available on the QFX5100-24Q switch:
•
Default mode
•
Mode-104-port
•
Flexi-PIC mode
•
Non-oversubscribed mode
See Table 12 on page 43 for more information regarding the supported system modes
for your switch.
The following system modes are available on the QFX5100-96S switch:
•
Default-mode
•
Non-oversubscribed mode
See Table 12 on page 43 for more information regarding the supported system modes
for your switch.
Table 12: System Modes Supported on QFX5100 Switches Running Enhanced Layer 2 Software
QFX5100-48S and
QFX5100-48T
Default-mode
Mode-104port
Flexi-pic-mode
Non-oversubscribed-mode
Not supported
Not supported
Not supported
Not supported
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
43
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 12: System Modes Supported on QFX5100 Switches Running Enhanced Layer 2
Software (continued)
QFX5100-24Q
QFX5100-96S
Default-mode
Mode-104port
Flexi-pic-mode
Non-oversubscribed-mode
Supported
Supported
Supported
Supported
You do not need to
configure the switch to
be in this mode. On PIC
0, you can channelize all
24 40-Gbps QSFP+
ports. On PIC 1 and PIC 2,
the 40-Gbps QSFP+
ports in the expansion
modules are supported
but cannot be
channelized. In this
mode, you can have one
of two port
combinations: 32
40-Gbps QSFP+ ports,
or 96 10-Gigabit Ethernet
ports plus 8 40-Gbps
QSFP+ ports.
On PIC 0, all 24
40-Gbps QSFP+ ports
are channelized by
default, which provides
96 10-Gigabit Ethernet
ports. 40-Gbps QSFP+
ports contained in an
expansion module on
PIC 1 are supported. On
PIC 1, ports 0 and 2 are
channelized by default,
and ports 1 and 3 are
disabled. If 40-Gbps
QSFP+ ports contained
in an expansion module
are detected on PIC 2,
they are ignored.
On PIC 0, the first four
ports (ports 0 through
3) cannot be
channelized. 40-Gbps
QSFP+ ports contained
in expansion modules
on PIC 1 and PIC 2 are
supported but cannot
be channelized.
All 24 40-Gbps QSFP+
ports on PIC 0 can be
channelized to 96
10-Gigabit Ethernet
ports. 40-Gbps QSFP+
ports contained in the
expansion modules on
PIC 1 and PIC 2 are not
supported and cannot
be channelized. There
is no packet loss for
packets of any size in
this mode.
Supported
Not supported
Not supported
Supported
You do not need to
configure the switch to
be in this mode. On PIC
0, all 96 10-Gigabit
Ethernet ports are
supported. You can only
channelize the
40-GbpsQSFP+
interfaces to 10-Gibabit
Ethernet interfaces on
ports 96 and 100. When
you channelize the
interfaces on ports 96
and 100, ports 97, 98, 99,
101, 102 and 103 are
disabled.
Related
Documentation
44
On PIC 0, all 96
10-Gigabit Ethernet
ports are supported.
However, the eight
40-Gbps QSFP+ ports
are not supported and
cannot be channelized.
There is no packet loss
for packets of any size
in this mode.
•
Interfaces Overview on page 3
•
Channelizing Interfaces on page 64
•
Configuring the System Mode on page 78
•
Understanding Interface Naming Conventions on page 5
•
Rear Panel of a QFX3500 Device
•
Front Panel of a QFX3600 Device
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Configuring the Port Type on QFX3600 Standalone Switches
The QFX3600 standalone switch provides 16 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports. By default, all 16
ports operate as 40-Gigabit Ethernet (xle) ports. Optionally, you can choose to configure
the 40-Gbps ports to operate as four 10-Gigabit Ethernet (xe) ports. You can use QSFP+
to four SFP+ breakout cables or QSFP+ transceivers with fiber breakout cables to connect
the 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports to other servers, storage, and switches. You can configure
up to 64 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports on ports Q0 through Q15.
This topic explains how to configure the port type on QFX3600 standalone switches.
CAUTION: The Packet Forwarding Engine on the QFX3600 standalone switch
is restarted when you commit the port type configuration changes. As a result,
you might experience packet loss on the switch.
The following message may be displayed in the system log file when the
Packet Forwarding Engine is restarted. You can ignore this message.
Pipe write error: Broken pipe
flush operation failed
The following steps describe how to configure either a block of ports or an individual port
to operate as 10-Gigabit Ethernet (xe) ports, as well as how to delete a 10-Gigabit Ethernet
(xe) port configuration.
NOTE: When you delete the xe port type configuration for an individual port
or a block of ports, the ports return to operating as 40-Gigabit Ethernet (xle)
ports.
1.
To configure a block of ports to operate as 10-Gigabit Ethernet (xe) ports, specify a
port range:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# set xe port-range port-range-low port-range-high
For example, to configure ports Q4 through Q7 to operate as 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# set xe port-range 4 7
2. To configure an individual port to operate as a 10-Gigabit Ethernet (xe) port, specify
a port number:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# set xe port port-number
For example, to configure port Q4 to operate as a 10-Gigabit Ethernet port:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
45
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
user@switch# set xe port 4
3. Review your configuration and issue the commit command.
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
4. To delete the 10-Gigabit Ethernet (xe) port configuration for a block of ports (and
return to the default 40-Gigabit Ethernet configuration), specify a port range:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# delete xe port-range port-range-low port-range-high
For example, to delete the 10-Gigabit Ethernet port configuration for ports Q4 through
Q7:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# delete xe port-range 4 7
5. To delete the 10-Gigabit Ethernet (xe) port configuration for an individual port (and
return to the default 40-Gigabit Ethernet configuration), specify a port number:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# delete xe port port-number
For example, to delete the 10-Gigabit Ethernet port configuration for port Q4:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# delete xe port 4
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding Interface Naming Conventions on page 5
•
pic
Configuring the QSFP+ Port Type on QFX3500 Standalone Switches
By default, the four 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports are configured to operate as 10-Gigabit Ethernet
(xe) ports. You can use QSFP+ to four SFP+ breakout cables or QSFP+ transceivers with
fiber breakout cables to connect the 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports to other servers, storage,
and switches. You can, however, configure the four 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports to operate as
40-Gigabit Ethernet (xle) ports.
NOTE: Port Q0 supports only three (not the typical four) 10-Gigabit Ethernet
ports, because one port is reserved.
CAUTION: The Packet Forwarding Engine on the QFX3500 standalone switch
is restarted when you commit port type configuration changes (for example,
46
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
configuring or deleting an xle port). As a result, you might experience packet
loss on the device.
The following steps describe how to configure either a block of ports or an individual port
to operate as 40-Gigabit Ethernet (xle) ports, as well as how to delete a 40-Gigabit
Ethernet (xle) configuration.
NOTE: When you delete an xle block of ports or individual port, the ports
return to operating as 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports.
1.
To configure a block of ports to operate as 40-Gigabit Ethernet (xle) ports, specify a
port range:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 2]
user@switch# set xle port-range port–range-low port-range-high
For example, to configure ports Q0 through Q3 to operate as 40-Gigabit Ethernet
ports:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 2]
user@switch# set xle port-range 0 3
2. To configure an individual port to operate as a 40-Gigabit Ethernet (xle) port, specify
a port number:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 2]
user@switch# set xle port port-number
For example, to configure port Q2 to operate as a 40-Gigabit Ethernet port:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 2]
user@switch# set xle port 2
3. Review your configuration and issue the commit command.
[edit]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
4. To delete a block of ports configured as 40-Gigabit Ethernet (xle) ports (and return
to the default 10-Gigabit Ethernet configuration), specify a port range:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 2]
user@switch# delete xle port-range port-range-low port-range-high
For example, to delete the 40-Gigabit Ethernet (xle) port configuration for ports Q0
through Q3 (and return to the default 10-Gigabit Ethernet configuration):
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 2]
user@switch# delete xle port-range 0 3
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
5. To delete an individual port configured as a 40-Gigabit Ethernet (xle) port (and return
to the default 10-Gigabit Ethernet configuration), specify an individual port:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 2]
user@switch# delete xle port port-number
For example, to delete the 40-Gigabit Ethernet (xle) port configuration for port Q2
(and return to the default 10-Gigabit Ethernet configuration):
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 2]
user@switch# delete xle port 2
6. Review your configuration and issue the commit command.
[edit]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding Interface Naming Conventions on page 5
•
pic
Configuring the QSFP+ Port Type on QFX5100 Devices
You can convert default 40-Gigabit Ethernet data plane uplink interfaces (fte) to
40-Gigabit Ethernet access interfaces (xle) ports, and default 40-Gigabit Ethernet
interfaces (xle) to 40-Gigabit Ethernet data plane uplink interfaces (fte). Ports Q0 and
Q1 are fixed fte ports and cannot be changed. Ports Q2 and Q3 are fte ports by default
but can be changed to xle ports. Ports Q4 and Q5 are xle ports by default but can be
changed to fte ports.
NOTE: On QFX5100-24Q switches, ports Q1 through Q7 are fixed FTE ports
and cannot be changed.
NOTE: You must configure xle ports in pairs, not individually, otherwise
functionality is not guaranteed.
CAUTION: The Packet Forwarding Engine on a QFX5100 switch is restarted
when you commit port type configuration changes (for example, configuring
or deleting an fte or xle port). As a result, you might experience packet loss
on the device.
48
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
The following steps describe how to configure either a block of ports or an individual
port, as well as how to delete these configurations.
1.
To configure a block of ports to operate as 40-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces (xle) ,
specify a port range:
[edit chassis node-group name node-device name pic 1]
user@switch# set xle port-range port–range-low port-range-high
For example, to configure ports Q4 through Q5 to operate as 40-Gigabit Ethernet
interfaces (xle):
[edit chassis node-group name node-device name pic 1]
user@switch# set xle port-range 4 5
2. To configure a block of ports to operate as 40-Gigabit Ethernet data plane uplink
interfaces (fte), specify a port range:
[edit chassis node-group name node-device name pic 1]
user@switch# set fte port-range port–range-low port-range-high
For example, to configure ports Q4 through Q5 to operate as 40-Gigabit Ethernet
data plane uplink interfaces (fte):
[edit chassis node-group name node-device name pic 1]
user@switch# set fte port-range 4 5
3. To configure an individual port to operate as a 40-Gigabit Ethernet data plane uplink
interfaces (fte), specify a port number:
[edit chassis node-group name node-device name pic 1]
user@switch# set fte port port-number
For example, to configure port Q4 to operate as a 40-Gigabit Ethernet data plane
uplink interfaces (fte):
[edit chassis node-group name node-device name pic 1]
user@switch# set fte port 4
4. Review your configuration and issue the commit command.
[edit]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
5. To delete a block of ports configured as 40-Gigabit Ethernet (xle) ports, specify a
port range:
[edit chassis node-group name node-device name pic 1]
user@switch# delete xle port-range port-range-low port-range-high
For example, to delete the 40-Gigabit Ethernet access interface (xle) port configuration
for ports Q2 through Q3:
[edit chassis node-group name node-device name pic 1]
user@switch# delete xle port-range 2 3
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
6. To delete an individual port configured as a 40-Gigabit Ethernet (xle) interface:
[edit chassis node-group name node-device name pic 1]
user@switch# delete xle port port-number
For example, to delete the 40-Gigabit Ethernet interface (xle) for port Q2:
[edit chassis node-group name node-device name pic 1]
user@switch# delete xle port 2
7. To delete a block of ports configured as 40-Gigabit Ethernet data plane uplink
interfaces (fte), specify a port range:
[edit chassis node-group name node-device name pic 1]
user@switch# delete fte port-range port-range-low port-range-high
For example, to delete the block of ports configured as 40-Gigabit Ethernet data
plane uplink interfaces (fte) for ports Q4 through Q5:
[edit chassis node-group name node-device name pic 1]
user@switch# delete fte port-range 4 5
8. To delete an individual port configured as a 40-Gigabit Ethernet data plane uplink
interfaces (fte):
[edit chassis node-group name node-device name pic 1]
user@switch# delete fte port port-number
For example, to delete the 40-Gigabit Ethernet data plane uplink interfaces (fte) for
port Q4:
[edit chassis node-group name node-device name pic 1]
user@switch# delete fte port 4
9. Review your configuration and issue the commit command.
[edit]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
Related
Documentation
50
•
Understanding Interface Naming Conventions on page 5
•
Understanding Port Ranges and System Modes on page 19
•
pic
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Configuring the Interface Address
You assign an address to an interface by specifying the address when configuring the
protocol family. For the inet or inet6 family, configure the interface IP address. For the
iso family, configure one or more addresses for the loopback interface. For the ccc,
ethernet-switching, tcc, mpls, tnp, and vpls families, you never configure an address.
NOTE: The point-to-point (PPP) address is taken from the loopback interface
address that has the primary attribute. When the loopback interface is
configured as an unnumbered interface, it takes the primary address from
the donor interface.
To assign an address to an interface, perform the following steps:
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
51
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
1.
Configure the interface address at the [edit interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number family family] hierarchy level.
•
To configure an IPv4 address on routers and switches running Junos OS, use the
interface interface-name unit number family inet address a.b.c.d/nn statement at the
[edit interfaces] hierarchy level.
[edit interfaces ]
user@host# set interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet address a.b.c.d/nn
NOTE:
• Juniper Networks routers and switches support /31 destination prefixes
when used in point-to-point Ethernet configurations; however, they
are not supported by many other devices, such as hosts, hubs, routers,
or switches. You must determine if the peer system also supports /31
destination prefixes before configuration.
•
•
You can configure the same IPv4 address on multiple physical
interfaces. When you assign the same IPv4 address to multiple
physical interfaces, the operational behavior of those interfaces differs,
depending on whether they are implicitly or explicitly point-to-point
.
•
By default, all interfaces are assumed to be point-to-point (PPP)
interfaces. For all interfaces except aggregated Ethernet, Fast
Ethernet, and Gigabit Ethernet, you can explicitly configure an interface
to be a point-to-point connection.
•
If you configure the same IP address on multiple interfaces in the
same routing instance, Junos OS uses only the first configuration. The
remaining IP address configurations are ignored, leaving some
interfaces without an assigned address. Interfaces without an assigned
address cannot be used as a donor interface for an unnumbered
Ethernet interface.
To configure an IPv6 address on routers and switches running Junos OS, use the
interface interface-name unit number family inet6 address aaaa:bbbb:...:zzzz/nn
statement at the [edit interfaces] hierarchy level.
[edit interfaces ]
user@host# set interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet6 address
aaaa:bbbb:...:zzzz/nn
NOTE:
• You represent IP version 6 (IPv6) addresses in hexadecimal notation
using a colon-separated list of 16-bit values. The double colon (::)
represents all bits set to 0.
•
52
You must manually configure the router or switch advertisement and
advertise the default prefix for autoconfiguration to work on a specific
interface.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
2. [Optional] Set the broadcast address on the network or subnet .
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family family address address],
user@host# set broadcast address
NOTE: The broadcast address must have a host portion of either all ones
or all zeros. You cannot specify the addresses 0.0.0.0 or 255.255.255.255
3. [Optional] specify the remote address of the connection for the encrypted,
PPP-encapsulated, and tunnel interfaces.
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number family family address address]
user@host# set destination address
4. [Optional] For interfaces that carry IP version 6 (IPv6) traffic, configure the host to
assign iteslf a unique 64-Bit IP Version 6 interface identifier (EUI-64).
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number family family address address]
user@host# set eui-64
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Default, Primary, and Preferred Addresses and Interfaces
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
Devices include a factory default configuration that:
•
Enables all 10-Gigabit Ethernet network interfaces on the switch
•
Sets a default port mode (access)
•
Sets default link settings
•
Specifies a logical unit (unit 0) and assigns it to family ethernet-switching
•
Configures Storm Control on all 10-Gigabit Ethernet network interfaces
•
Provides basic Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) and Link Layer Discovery Protocol
(LLDP) configuration
NOTE: RSTP and LLDP are not supported on the OCX Series.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
53
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
The ether-options statement enables you to modify the following options:
•
802.3ad—Specify an aggregated Ethernet bundle for both Gigabit Ethernet and
10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.
•
autonegotiation—Enable or disable autonegotation of flow control, link mode, and
speed for interfaces.
•
link-mode—Specify full-duplex, half-duplex, or automatic for Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.
•
loopback—Enable or disable a loopback interface for both Gigabit Ethernet and
10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.
To set ether-options for both Gigabit Ethernet and 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces:
[edit]
user@switch# set interfaces interface-name ether-options
This topic describes:
•
Configuring Port Mode on QFX5100-48S, QFX5100-48T, QFX5100-24Q, and EX4600
Switches on page 54
•
Configuring the Link Settings for Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on QFX5100-48S,
QFX5100-96S, and EX4600 Switches on page 55
•
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on QFX5100-48T Switches on page 56
•
Configuring the Link Settings for 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on QFX5100-48S,
QFX5100-24Q, QFX5100-96S, and EX4600 Switches on page 57
•
Configuring the Link Settings for 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on QFX5100-48T
Switches on page 57
•
Configuring the IP Options on QFX5100-48S, QFX5100-48T, QFX5100-24Q, and
EX4600 Switches on page 58
Configuring Port Mode on QFX5100-48S, QFX5100-48T, QFX5100-24Q, and EX4600 Switches
If you are connecting a switch to other switches and to routers on the LAN, you need to
assign the interface to a logical port and you need to configure the logical port as a trunk
port.
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Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
To configure a Gigabit Ethernet or 10-Gigabit interface for trunk port mode on the original
CLI:
[edit]
user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family ethernet-switching
port-mode trunk
To configure a Gigabit Ethernet or 10-Gigabit interface for trunk port mode on the
Enhanced Layer 2 software (ELS):
[edit]
user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family ethernet-switching
interface-mode trunk
See Also
•
Monitoring Interface Status and Traffic on page 81
Configuring the Link Settings for Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on QFX5100-48S, QFX5100-96S,
and EX4600 Switches
Devices include a factory default configuration that enables Gigabit Ethernet interfaces
with applicable link settings.
The following default configurations are available on Gigabit Ethernet interfaces:
•
You cannot set the speed on these interfaces.
On QFX5100-48S and QFX5100-96S devices using 1-Gigabit Ethernet SFP interfaces,
the speed is set to 1 Gbps by default and cannot be configured to operate in a different
speed.
•
On QFX5100 devices, the interface naming for Gigabit Ethernet interfaces changes
automatically to xe-0/0/0, ge-0/0/0, or et-0/0/0 when the appropriate SFP is inserted.
•
Gigabit Ethernet interfaces operate in full-duplex mode.
•
Autonegotiation is supported by default. Autonegotiation is enabled by default, and
will autonegotiate the speed with the link partner. We recommend that you keep
autonegotiation enabled for interfaces operating at 100M, 1G, and 10G.
If for some reason you have disabled autonegotiation, you can enable it by issuing the
set interfaces name ether-options auto-negotiate command.
To disable autonegotiation, issue the delete interfaces name ether-options auto-negotiate
command.
NOTE: Do not use the set interfaces name ether-options no-auto-negoatiate
command to remove the autonegotiation configuration.
Issue the show interfaces name extensive command to see if autonegotiation is enabled
or disabled and the negotiated speed of the interface.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on QFX5100-48T Switches
Devices include a factory default configuration that enables Gigabit Ethernet interfaces
with applicable link settings.
The following default configurations are available on Gigabit Ethernet interfaces:
•
Gigabit Ethernet interfaces operate in full-duplex mode.
•
Autonegotiation is enabled by default, and will autonegotiate the speed with the link
partner. We recommend that you keep autonegotiation enabled for interfaces operating
at 100M, 1G, and 10G.
To disable autonegotiation, issue the delete interfaces name ether-options auto-negotiate
command.
NOTE: Do not use the set interfaces name ether-options no-auto-negotiate
command to remove the autonegotiation configuration.
You can reenable autonegotation it by issuing the set interfaces name ether-options
auto-negotiate command.
Issue the show interfaces name extensive command to see if autonegotiation is enabled
or disabled and the negotiated speed of the interface.
56
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Configuring the Link Settings for 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on QFX5100-48S, QFX5100-24Q,
QFX5100-96S, and EX4600 Switches
The following default configurations are available on 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces:
•
All the 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces are set to auto-negotiation.
•
Flow control for 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces is set to enabled by default. You can
disable flow control by specifying the no-flow-control option.
•
The speed cannot be configured.
On QFX5100-48S, QFX5100-96S, and QFX5100-24Q devices using 10-Gigabit Ethernet
SFP interfaces, the speed is set to 10 Gbps by default and cannot be configured to
operate in a different speed.
•
On QFX5100 devices, the interface naming for Gigabit Ethernet interfaces changes
automatically to xe-0/0/0, ge-0/0/0, or et-0/0/0 when the appropriate SFP is inserted.
•
10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces operate in full-duplex mode by default.
•
Autonegotiation is enabled by default, and will autonegotiate the speed with the link
partner. We recommend that you keep autonegotiation enabled for interfaces operating
at 100M, 1G, and 10G.
If for some reason you have disabled autonegotiation, you can enable it by issuing the
set interfaces name ether-options auto-negotiate command.
To disable autonegotiation, issue the delete interfaces name ether-options auto-negotiate
command.
NOTE: Do not use the set interfaces name ether-options no-auto-negoatiate
command to remove the autonegotiation configuration.
Issue the show interfaces name extensive command to see if autonegotiation is enabled
or disabled and the negotiated speed of the interface.
Configuring the Link Settings for 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on QFX5100-48T Switches
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
The following default configurations are available on 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces:
•
All the 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces are set to auto-negotiation.
•
Flow control for 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces is set to enabled by default. You can
disable flow control by specifying the no-flow-control option.
•
The speed cannot be configured.
•
10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces operate in full-duplex mode by default.
•
Autonegotiation is enabled by default, and will autonegotiate the speed with the link
partner. We recommend that you keep autonegotiation enabled for interfaces operating
at 100M, 1G, and 10G.
NOTE: In Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D35 on QFX5100-48T-6Q devices
using 10-Gigabit Ethernet Copper interfaces, autonegotiation is disabled
by default on the copper ports, and the interfaces operate at a speed of
100M. You can, however, enable auto-negotiation by issuing the set interface
name ether-options auto-negotiation command on the interface for which
you want to change the interface speed. With autonegotiation enabled,
the interface auto-detects the speed in which to operate.
If for some reason you have disabled autonegotiation, you can enable it by issuing the
set interfaces name ether-options auto-negotiate command.
Issue the show interfaces name extensive command to see if autonegotiation is enabled
or disabled and the negotiated speed of the interface.
Configuring the IP Options on QFX5100-48S, QFX5100-48T, QFX5100-24Q, and EX4600
Switches
To specify an IP address for the logical unit:
[edit]
user@switch# set interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet address ip-address
Release History Table
Related
Documentation
58
Release
Description
14.1X53-D35
In Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D35 on QFX5100-48T-6Q devices using
10-Gigabit Ethernet Copper interfaces, autonegotiation is disabled by
default on the copper ports, and the interfaces operate at a speed of 100M.
•
Monitoring Interface Status and Traffic on page 81
•
show interfaces xe on page 430
•
show interfaces ge-
•
speed on page 252
•
Understanding Interface Naming Conventions on page 5
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Configuring Short Reach Mode
You can enable short-reach mode for individual as well as a range of copper-based
10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces using short cable lengths (less than 10m) on the
QFX5100-48T switch. Short-reach mode reduces power consumption up to 5W on these
interfaces.
1.
To enable short-reach mode on an individual interface, issue the following command:
[edit chassis]
user@switch# set fpc fpc-slot pic pic-slot port port-number short-reach-mode enable
For example, to enable short-reach mode on port 0 on PIC 0, issue the following
command:
[edit chassis]
user@switch# set fpc 0 pic 0 port 0 short-reach-mode enable
2. To enable short-reach mode on a range of interfaces, issue the following command:
[edit chassis]
user@switch# set fpc fpc-slot pic pic-slot port-range port-range-low port-range-high
short-reach-mode enable
For example, to enable short-reach mode on a range of interfaces between port 0
and port 47 on PIC 0, issue the following command:
[edit chassis]
user@switch# set fpc 0 pic 0 port-range 0 47 short-reach-mode enable
3. To disable short-reach mode on an individual interface, issue the following command:
[edit chassis]
user@switch# set fpc fpc-slot pic pic-slot port port-number short-reach-mode disable
For example, to disable short-reach mode on port 0 on PIC 0, issue the following
command:
[edit chassis]
user@switch# set fpc 0 pic 0 port 0 short-reach-mode disable
4. To disable short-reach mode on a range of interfaces, issue the following command:
[edit chassis]
user@switch# set fpc fpc-slot pic pic-slot port-range port-range-low port-range-high
short-reach-mode disable
For example, to disable short-reach mode on a range of interfaces between port 0
and port 47 on PIC 0, issue the following command:
[edit chassis]
user@switch# set fpc 0 pic 0 port-range 0 47 short-reach-mode disable
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Related
Documentation
•
short-reach-mode on page 250
Configuring Ethernet Loopback Capability
To place an interface in loopback mode, include the loopback statement:
loopback;
To return to the default—that is, to disable loopback mode—delete the loopback
statement from the configuration:
[edit]
user@switch# delete interfaces interface-name ether-options loopback
To explicitly disable loopback mode, include the no-loopback statement:
no-loopback;
You can include the loopback and no-loopback statements at the following hierarchy
levels:
Related
Documentation
60
•
[edit interfaces interface-name aggregated-ether-options]
•
[edit interfaces interface-name ether-options]
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Configuring an LPM Table With Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D10
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
In addition to choosing a profile, you can further optimize memory allocation for LPM
table entries by configuring how many IPv6 addresses with prefixes in the range /65
through /127 you want to store. If you want to use more than 16 IPv6 addresses with
prefixes in this range, you must enter and commit the following statement:
[edit]
user@switch# set chassis forwarding-options profile-name num-65-127-prefix value
in which value can be a value in the range 1 through 128. Each increment adds support
for 16 IPv6 addresses with prefixes between /65 and /127, for a maximum of 2048 such
addresses (16 x 128 = 2048). The system supports 16 of these addresses by default, so
to increase the number of supported addresses, you must enter a value of 2 or greater.
For example, if you enter 2, the system will support 32 IPv6 addresses with prefixes in
the range /65 through /127.
NOTE: When you configure the num-65-127-prefix value, all the data interfaces
on the switch restart. The management interfaces are unaffected.
The LPM table is shared, and each increment that you add for IPv6 addresses with prefixes
in the range /65 through /127 reduces the number of forwarding table entries that are
available for IPv4 addresses and IPv6 addresses with prefixes less than /65.
Table 13 on page 62 provides examples of valid combinations that the LPM table can
store, also using the l2-profile-one profile. Once again, each row in the table represents
a case in which the table is full and cannot accommodate any more entries.
Table 13: Example LPM Table Combinations Using l2-profile-one With Junos OS 13.2X51-D10
IPv4 entries
IPv6 Entries (prefix <= 64)
IPv6 Entries (prefix >= 65)
num-65-127-prefix
16K
0K
16
1 (default)
0K
8K
16
1 (default)
8K
4K
16
1 (default)
4K
4K
1K
64
2K
5K
1K
64
0K
6K
1K
64
4K
2K
2K
128
2K
3K
2K
128
0K
4K
2K
128
Table 14 on page 63 provides examples of valid combinations that the LPM table can
store when you use the lpm-profile profile. As before, each row represents a case in which
the table is full and cannot accommodate any more entries.
62
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Table 14: Example LPM Table Combinations Using lpm-profile With Junos OS 13.2X51-D10
IPv4 entries
IPv6 Entries (prefix <= 64)
IPv6 Entries (prefix >= 65)
num-65-127-prefix
128K
0K
16
1 (default)
0K
8K
16
1 (default)
8K
4K
16
1 (default)
4K
4K
1K
64
2K
5K
1K
64
0K
6K
1K
64
4K
2K
2K
128
2K
3K
2K
128
0K
4K
2K
128
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring the Unified Forwarding Table on Switches
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
63
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Channelizing Interfaces
64
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
NOTE: On QFX10008 and QFX10016 switches, channelization is supported
on fiber break-out cables using standard structured cabling techniques.
Channelization is not supported on the QFX10000-30C line card.
NOTE: On QFX10002 switches running on Junos OS Release 15.1X53-D10 or
Junos OS Release 15.1X53-D15, when you delete and then reapply channelized
interfaces, traffic is disrupted and might not be recovered.
The QFX3500, QFX3600, QFX5100, and EX4600, QFX10002, QFX10008, and QFX10016
switches provide 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports that can be channelized. Channelization allows
you to configure 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports to operate as four 10-Gigabit Ethernet (xe)
interfaces. (Platform support depends on the Junos OS release in your installation.) You
can use QSFP+ to four SFP+ breakout cables or QSFP+ transceivers with fiber breakout
cables to connect the 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports to other servers, storage, and switches.
By default, the four 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports operate as 40-Gigabit Ethernet (et) ports.
When an et port is channelized to four xe ports, a colon is used to signify the four separate
channels. For example, on a switch with port 2 on PIC 1 configured as four 10-Gigabit
Ethernet ports, the interface names are xe-0/1/2:0, xe-0/1/2:1, xe-0/1/2:2, and xe-0/1/2:3.
By default, the 40-Gbps QSFP+ ports on EX4600 and QFX5100 switches are channelized
automatically (auto-channelized) if any of the four channels on a 40-Gbps QSFP+ port
receive data, unless you have configured channelization either at the chassis level or at
the port level. Auto-channelization is not supported on interfaces contained in expansion
modules, or on Virtual Chassis ports.
NOTE: If you are using a EX4600 or QFX5100 switch with a peer QFX10000
switch, you must disable auto-channelization on the EX4600 or QFX5100
switch to ensure that the relevant interfaces are created and the links are up.
You can disable auto-channelization by including the disable-auto-speed-detection
statement at the [edit chassis fpc slot-number pic pic-number (port port-number | port-range
port-range-low port-range-high) channel-speed] hierarchy.
There are restrictions on the ports you can channelize on the QFX5100-24Q and
QFX5100-96S switches, depending on the system mode you enable. If you try to
channelize ports that are restricted, the configuration is ignored. See “Configuring the
System Mode” on page 78 for more information.
On QFX10002, QFX10008, and QFX10016 switches, there are 100-Gigabit Ethernet ports
that work either as 100-Gigabit Ethernet or as 40-Gigabit Ethernet, but are recognized
as 40-Gigabit Ethernet by default. You cannot channelize the 100-Gigabit Ethernet ports
when they are operating as 100-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces. The 40-Gigabit Ethernet
ports can operate independently or be channelized into four 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports
as part of a port range. Ports cannot be channelized individually. Only the first and fourth
port in each 6XQSFP cage is available to channelize as part of a port range. In a port
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
65
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
range, the ports are bundled with the next two consecutive ports. For example, if you
want to channelize ports 0 through 2, you would channelize port 0 only. If you try to
channelize a port that is not supported, you will receive an error message when you
commit the configuration. Auto-channelization is not supported on any ports.
When a 40-Gigabit Ethernet transceiver is inserted into a 100-Gigabit Ethernet port, the
port recognizes the 40-Gigabit Ethernet port speed. When a 100-Gigabit Ethernet
transceiver is inserted into the port and enabled in the CLI, the port recognizes the
100-Gigabit Ethernet speed and disables two adjacent 40-Gigabit Ethernet ports.
Table 15 on page 66 provides detailed information on which ports are 100-Gigabit Ethernet,
which ports can be channelized, and which ports are disabled when a 100-Gigabit Ethernet
is inserted in the QFX10002-36Q switch and the QFX10000-36Q line card on a QFX10008
or QFX10016 switch. Table 16 on page 68 provides detailed information on which ports
are 100-Gigabit Ethernet, which ports can be channelized, and which ports are disabled
when a 100-Gigabit Ethernet is inserted in the QFX10002-72Q switch. On the QFX10008
and QFX10016 switches with the QFX10000-36Q line card installed, only ports 0 through
35 are available. For more information, see QFX10002-72Q Port Panel and QFX10000-36Q
Line Card.
Table 15: QFX10002-36Q Switch and QFX10000-36Q Line Card Port Mappings
Port Number
4X10 Gigabit
Ethernet Port
4X10 Gigabit
Channelized
Port Group
40-Gigabit
Ethernet
(Default)
100-Gigabit
Ethernet
100-Gigabit Ethernet Disables
0
✓
✓
✓
–
–
1
✓
✓
✓
0, 2
2
✓
✓
–
–
3
✓
✓
–
–
4
✓
✓
–
–
5
✓
✓
✓
3, 4
6
✓
✓
–
–
7
✓
✓
✓
6, 8
8
✓
✓
–
–
9
✓
✓
–
–
10
✓
✓
–
–
11
✓
✓
✓
9, 10
66
✓
✓
✓
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Table 15: QFX10002-36Q Switch and QFX10000-36Q Line Card Port Mappings (continued)
Port Number
4X10 Gigabit
Ethernet Port
4X10 Gigabit
Channelized
Port Group
40-Gigabit
Ethernet
(Default)
100-Gigabit
Ethernet
100-Gigabit Ethernet Disables
12
✓
✓
✓
–
–
13
✓
✓
✓
12, 14
14
✓
✓
–
–
15
✓
✓
–
–
16
✓
✓
–
–
17
✓
✓
✓
15, 16
18
✓
✓
–
–
19
✓
✓
✓
18, 20
20
✓
✓
–
–
21
✓
✓
–
–
22
✓
✓
–
–
23
✓
✓
✓
21, 22
24
✓
✓
–
–
25
✓
✓
✓
24, 26
26
✓
✓
–
–
27
✓
✓
–
–
28
✓
✓
–
–
29
✓
✓
✓
27, 28
30
✓
✓
–
–
31
✓
✓
✓
30, 32
32
✓
✓
–
–
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
67
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 15: QFX10002-36Q Switch and QFX10000-36Q Line Card Port Mappings (continued)
Port Number
4X10 Gigabit
Ethernet Port
4X10 Gigabit
Channelized
Port Group
40-Gigabit
Ethernet
(Default)
100-Gigabit
Ethernet
100-Gigabit Ethernet Disables
33
✓
✓
✓
–
–
34
✓
✓
–
–
35
✓
✓
✓
33, 34
Table 16: QFX10002-72Q Switch Port Mappings
Port Number
4X10 Gigabit
Ethernet Port
4X10 Gigabit
Channelized
Port Group
40-Gigabit
Ethernet
(Default)
100-Gigabit
Ethernet
100-Gigabit Ethernet Disables
0
✓
✓
✓
–
–
1
✓
✓
✓
0, 2
2
✓
✓
–
–
3
✓
✓
–
–
4
✓
✓
–
–
5
✓
✓
✓
3, 4
6
✓
✓
–
–
7
✓
✓
✓
6, 8
8
✓
✓
–
–
9
✓
✓
–
–
10
✓
✓
–
–
11
✓
✓
✓
9, 10
12
✓
✓
–
–
13
✓
✓
✓
12, 14
14
✓
✓
–
–
68
✓
✓
✓
✓
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Table 16: QFX10002-72Q Switch Port Mappings (continued)
Port Number
4X10 Gigabit
Ethernet Port
4X10 Gigabit
Channelized
Port Group
40-Gigabit
Ethernet
(Default)
100-Gigabit
Ethernet
100-Gigabit Ethernet Disables
15
✓
✓
✓
–
–
16
✓
✓
–
–
17
✓
✓
✓
15, 16
18
✓
✓
–
–
19
✓
✓
✓
18, 20
20
✓
✓
–
–
21
✓
✓
–
–
22
✓
✓
–
–
23
✓
✓
✓
21, 22
24
✓
✓
–
–
25
✓
✓
✓
24, 26
26
✓
✓
–
–
27
✓
✓
–
–
28
✓
✓
–
–
29
✓
✓
✓
27, 28
30
✓
✓
–
–
31
✓
✓
✓
30, 32
32
✓
✓
–
–
33
✓
✓
–
–
34
✓
✓
–
–
35
✓
✓
✓
33, 34
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
69
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 16: QFX10002-72Q Switch Port Mappings (continued)
Port Number
4X10 Gigabit
Ethernet Port
4X10 Gigabit
Channelized
Port Group
40-Gigabit
Ethernet
(Default)
100-Gigabit
Ethernet
100-Gigabit Ethernet Disables
36
✓
✓
✓
–
–
37
✓
✓
✓
36, 38
38
✓
✓
–
–
39
✓
✓
–
–
40
✓
✓
–
–
41
✓
✓
✓
39, 40
42
✓
✓
–
–
43
✓
✓
✓
42, 44
44
✓
✓
–
–
45
✓
✓
–
–
46
✓
✓
–
–
47
✓
✓
✓
45, 46
48
✓
✓
–
–
49
✓
✓
✓
48, 50
50
✓
✓
–
–
51
✓
✓
–
–
52
✓
✓
–
–
53
✓
✓
✓
51, 52
54
✓
✓
–
–
55
✓
✓
✓
54, 56
56
✓
✓
–
–
70
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Table 16: QFX10002-72Q Switch Port Mappings (continued)
Port Number
4X10 Gigabit
Ethernet Port
4X10 Gigabit
Channelized
Port Group
40-Gigabit
Ethernet
(Default)
100-Gigabit
Ethernet
100-Gigabit Ethernet Disables
57
✓
✓
✓
–
–
58
✓
✓
–
–
59
✓
✓
✓
57, 58
60
✓
✓
–
–
61
✓
✓
✓
60, 62
62
✓
✓
–
–
63
✓
✓
–
–
64
✓
✓
–
–
65
✓
✓
✓
63, 64
66
✓
✓
–
–
67
✓
✓
✓
66, 68
68
✓
✓
–
–
69
✓
✓
–
–
70
✓
✓
–
–
71
✓
✓
✓
69, 70
✓
✓
✓
✓
The following steps describe how to configure a block of ports or an individual port to
operate as 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports.
1.
To configure a block of 40-Gigabit Ethernet (et) ports on QFX3500, QFX3600,
QFX5100, EX4600 switches to operate as 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports, specify a port
range and channel speed:
[edit chassis fpc fpc-slot pic pic-slot]
user@switch# set port-range port–range-low port-range-high channel-speed speed
For example, to configure ports 0 through 3 on PIC 1 to operate as 10-Gigabit Ethernet
ports:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 1]
user@switch# set port-range 0 3 channel-speed 10g
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
2. To configure a range of ports on a QFX10002-72Q, QFX10008, or QFX10016 switch
to operate as 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports:
NOTE: The port-range statement is not available on QFX10002-72Q,
QFX10008, and QFX10016 switches. Instead, configure the port range
using the port statement. Starting from port 0, you channelize every third
port to channelize a group of three ports. For example, channelize port 0
to channelize ports 0 through 2, port 3 to channelize ports3 through 5, and
so on. See Table 15 on page 66 for port mapping information.
[edit chassis fpc fpc-slot pic pic-slot]
user@switch# set port port-number channel-speed speed
For example, to configure ports 0 through 2 on PIC 0 to operate as 10-Gigabit Ethernet
ports:
NOTE: When you channelize port 0, ports 1 and 2 are also channelized.
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 1]
user@switch# set port 0 channel-speed 10g
3. To configure an individual 40-Gigabit Ethernet (et) port on QFX3500, QFX3600,
QFX5100, and EX4600 switches to operate as 10-Gigabit Ethernet (xe) ports, specify
a port number and channel speed:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# set port port-number channel-speed speed
For example, to configure port 3 to operate as 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# set port 3 channel-speed 10g
4. Review your configuration and issue the commit command.
[edit]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
5. To return a range of ports on QFX3500, QFX3600, QFX5100, and EX4600 switches
to the default 40-Gigabit Ethernet configuration, delete the 10g statement:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 1]
user@switch# delete port-range port-range-low port-range-high channel-speed speed
For example, to return ports 0 through 3 to the default 40-Gigabit Ethernet
configuration:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 1]
user@switch# delete port-range 0 3 channel-speed 10g
72
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
6. To return a range of ports on QFX10002-72Q, QFX10008, or QFX10016 switches to
the default 40-Gigabit Ethernet configuration, delete the 10g statement:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 1]
user@switch# delete port port-number channel-speed speed
For example, to return ports 0 through 2 to the default 40-Gigabit Ethernet
configuration:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 1]
user@switch# delete port-0 channel-speed 10g
7. Review your configuration and issue the commit command.
[edit]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
8. To return a port on QFX3500, QFX3600, QFX5100, and EX4600 switches to the
default 40-Gigabit Ethernet configuration, delete the 10g statement:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# delete port port-number channel-speed speed
For example, to return port 2 to the default 40-Gigabit Ethernet configuration:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# delete port 2 channel-speed 10g
9. Review your configuration and issue the commit command.
[edit]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
The following steps describe how to disable auto-channelization at the port level on
QFX3500, QFX3600, QFX5100, and EX4600 switches .
1.
To disable auto-channelization at the port level, include the disable statement:
[edit]
user@switch# set chassis fpc slot-number pic pic-number (port port-number |
port-range port-range-low port-range-high) channel-speed
disable-auto-speed-detection
For example, to disable auto-channelization for one port:
[edit]
user@switch# set chassis fpc 0 pic 0 port 2 channel-speed
disable-auto-speed-detection
For example, to disable auto-channelization for a range of ports:
[edit]
user@switch# set chassis fpc 0 pic 0 port-range 2 4 channel-speed
disable-auto-speed-detection
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
73
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
2. Review your configuration and issue the commit command.
[edit]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring the System Mode on page 78
•
channel-speed on page 202
•
fpc on page 219
•
pic on page 248
Channelizing Interfaces on QFX5110-48S Switches
On the QFX5110-48S switch, there are four ports labeled 48 through 51, which support
QFSP28 ports. The QSFP28 ports support 100-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces and 40-Gigabit
Ethernet interfaces. You can channelize the 40-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces to four
independent 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces using breakout cables.
When you channelize the 40-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces as 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces,
the interface names appear in the xe-fpc/pic/port:channel format, where channel can
be a value of 0 through 3. To channelize the ports, manually configure the port speed
using the set chassis fpc slot-number port port-number channel-speed speed command,
where the speed can be set to 10G. The ports do not support auto-channelization.
NOTE: On QFX5110-48S standalone switches, the FPC value is always 0.
Also, Virtual Chassis is not supported.
The following steps describe how to channelize blocks of ports or individual ports.
1.
To configure a block of 100-Gigabit Ethernet (et) ports to operate as 40-Gigabit
Ethernet ports, specify a port range and channel speed:
[edit chassis fpc fpc-slot pic pic-slot]
user@switch# set port-range port–range-low port-range-high channel-speed speed
For example, to configure ports 48 through 51 on PIC 0 to operate as 40-Gigabit
Ethernet ports:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# set port-range 48-51 channel-speed 40g
2. To configure an individual 40-Gigabit Ethernet (et) port to operate as 10-Gigabit
Ethernet (xe) ports, specify a port number and channel speed:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# set port port-number channel-speed speed
For example, to configure port 48to operate as 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
74
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
user@switch# set port 48 channel-speed 10g
3. Review your configuration and issue the commit command.
[edit]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
4. To return a range of ports from the 40-Gigabit Ethernet configuration to the default
100-Gigabit Ethernet configuration, delete the 40g statement:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# delete port-range port-range-low port-range-high channel-speed speed
For example, to return ports 48through 51from the 40-Gigabit Ethernet configuration
to the default 100-Gigabit Ethernet configuration:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# delete port-range 48-51 channel-speed 40g
5. Review your configuration and issue the commit command.
[edit]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
6. To return an individual 40-Gigabit Ethernet port to the default 100-Gigabit Ethernet
configuration, delete the 40g statement:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# delete port port-number channel-speed speed
For example, to return port 48 from the 40-Gigabit Ethernet configuration to the
default 100-Gigabit Ethernet configuration:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# delete port 48 channel-speed 40g
7. Review your configuration and issue the commit command.
[edit]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
Related
Documentation
•
channel-speed on page 202
•
fpc on page 219
•
pic on page 248
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
75
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Channelizing Interfaces on QFX5200 Switches
You can channelize the 100-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces to two independent 50-Gigabit
Ethernet or to four independent 25-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces. The default 100-Gigabit
Ethernet interfaces can also be configured as 40-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, and in this
configuration can either operate as dedicated 40-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces or can be
channelized to four independent 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces using breakout cables.
There are a total of 32 physical ports on the QFX5200 switch. Any port can be used as
either 100-Gigabit Ethernet or 40-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces. You choose the speed by
plugging in the appropriate transceiver. They can also be channelized to 50G, 25G or 10G.
By default, the 100-Gigabit Ethernet and 40-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces appear in the
et-fpc/pic/port format. When the 100-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces are channelized as
50-Gigabit Ethernet and 25-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, the interface names appear in
the et-fpc/pic/port:channel format. When the 40-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces are
channelized as 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, the interface names appear in the
xe-fpc/pic/port:channel format, where channel can be a value of 0 through 3. To
channelize the ports, manually configure the port speed using the set chassis fpc
slot-number port port-number channel-speed speed command, where the speed can be
set to 10G, 25G, or 50G. If a 100-Gigabit Ethernet transceiver is connected, you can only
set the speed to 25G or 50G. If a 40-Gigabit Ethernet transceiver is connected, you can
only set the speed to 10g. There is no commit check for this, however.
The ports support auto-channelization starting in Junos OS Release 15.1X53-D230.
NOTE: For details about supported transceivers and cable specifications,
see the QFX5200 Switch Hardware Guide.
NOTE: On QFX5200 standalone switches, the FPC value is always 0. Virtual
Chassis is not supported.
The following steps describe how to channelize blocks of ports or individual ports.
1.
To configure a block of 100-Gigabit Ethernet (et) ports to operate as 50-Gigabit
Ethernet ports, specify a port range and channel speed:
[edit chassis fpc fpc-slot pic pic-slot]
user@switch# set port-range port–range-low port-range-high channel-speed speed
For example, to configure ports 0 through 3 on PIC 0 to operate as 50-Gigabit Ethernet
ports:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# set port-range 0 3 channel-speed 50g
2. To configure a block of 100-Gigabit Ethernet (et) ports to operate as 25-Gigabit
Ethernet ports, specify a port range and channel speed:
76
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
[edit chassis fpc fpc-slot pic pic-slot]
user@switch# set port-range port–range-low port-range-high channel-speed speed
For example, to configure ports 0 through 3 on PIC 0 to operate as 25-Gigabit Ethernet
ports:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# set port-range 0 3 channel-speed 25g
3. To configure an individual 40-Gigabit Ethernet (et) port to operate as 10-Gigabit
Ethernet (xe) ports, specify a port number and channel speed:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# set port port-number channel-speed speed
For example, to configure port 3 to operate as 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# set port 3 channel-speed 10g
4. Review your configuration and issue the commit command.
[edit]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
5. To return a range of ports from the 50-Gigabit Ethernet configuration to the default
100-Gigabit Ethernet configuration, delete the 50g statement:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# delete port-range port-range-low port-range-high channel-speed speed
For example, to return ports 0 through 3 from the 50-Gigabit Ethernet configuration
to the default 100-Gigabit Ethernet configuration:
[edit chassis fpc 0 pic 0]
user@switch# delete port-range 0 3 channel-speed 50g
NOTE: To configure the ports to another channel-speed, you must delete
the current port-range statement to return to the default 100-Gigabit
Ethernet configuration.
6. Review your configuration and issue the commit command.
[edit]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
7. Review your configuration and issue the commit command.
[edit]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
77
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Related
Documentation
•
channel-speed on page 202
•
fpc on page 219
•
pic on page 248
Configuring the System Mode
You can configure different system modes to achieve varying levels of port density on
the QFX5100-24Q and QFX5100-96S switches. Depending on the system mode you
configure, there are restrictions on which ports you can channelize. If you channelize ports
that are restricted, the configuration is ignored. By default, all QSFP+ interfaces are
auto-channelized. Auto-channelization is not supported on interfaces contained in
expansion modules or on Virtual Chassis ports. To disable auto-channelization, see
“Channelizing Interfaces” on page 64 for more information.
NOTE: The QFX5200 switches do not support System Mode.
NOTE: When you request the system mode change, we recommend that you
reboot the switch for the system mode to take effect.
CAUTION: The Packet Forwarding Engine on the switch is restarted when
you issue system mode changes. As a result, you might experience packet
loss on the switch.
See Table 17 on page 78, Table 18 on page 79, and Table 19 on page 80 for more
information regarding the supported system modes for your switch.
Table 17: System Modes Supported on QFX5100 Switches with QFX-EM-4Q or QFX-PFA-4Q
Expansion Modules Installed
QFX5100-48S
78
Default-mode
Mode-104port
Flexi-pic-mode
Non-oversubscribed-mode
Not supported
Not supported
Not supported
Not supported
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Table 17: System Modes Supported on QFX5100 Switches with QFX-EM-4Q or QFX-PFA-4Q
Expansion Modules Installed (continued)
QFX5100-24Q
QFX5100-96S
Default-mode
Mode-104port
Flexi-pic-mode
Non-oversubscribed-mode
Supported
Supported
Supported
Supported
You do not need to
configure the switch to
be in this mode. On PIC
0, you can channelize all
24 40-Gbps QSFP+
ports. On PIC 1 and PIC 2,
the 40-Gbps QSFP+
ports in the expansion
modules are supported
but cannot be
channelized. In this
mode, you can have one
of two port
combinations: 32
40-Gbps QSFP+ ports,
or 96 10-Gigabit Ethernet
ports plus 8 40-Gbps
QSFP+ ports.
On PIC 0, all 24
40-Gbps QSFP+ ports
are channelized by
default, which provides
96 10-Gigabit Ethernet
ports. 40-Gbps QSFP+
ports contained in an
expansion module on
PIC 1 are supported. On
PIC 1, ports 0 and 2 are
channelized by default,
and ports 1 and 3 are
disabled. If 40-Gbps
QSFP+ ports contained
in an expansion module
are detected on PIC 2,
they are ignored.
On PIC 0, the first four
ports (ports 0 through
3) cannot be
channelized. 40-Gbps
QSFP+ ports contained
in expansion modules
on PIC 1 and PIC 2 are
supported but cannot
be channelized.
All 24 40-Gbps QSFP+
ports on PIC 0 can be
channelized to 96
10-Gigabit Ethernet
ports. 40-Gbps QSFP+
ports contained in the
expansion modules on
PIC 1 and PIC 2 are not
supported and cannot
be channelized. There
is no packet loss for
packets of any size in
this mode.
Supported
Not supported
Not supported
Supported
You do not need to
configure the switch to
be in this mode. On PIC
0, all 96 10-Gigabit
Ethernet ports are
supported. You can only
channelize the 40-Gbps
QSFP+ interfaces to
10-Gibabit Ethernet
interfaces on ports 96
and 100. When you
channelize the interfaces
on ports 96 and 100,
ports 97, 98, 99, 101, 102
and 103 are disabled.
On PIC 0, all 96
10-Gigabit Ethernet
ports are supported.
However, the eight
40-Gbps QSFP+ ports
are not supported and
cannot be channelized.
There is no packet loss
for packets of any size
in this mode.
Table 18: System Modes Supported on QFX5100-24Q Switches with the EX4600-8F Expansion
Module Installed
QFX5100-24Q
Default-mode
Mode-104port
Flexi-pic-mode
Non-oversubscribed-mode
Not supported
Not supported
Supported
Not supported
On PIC 0, you cannot
channelize ports 0
through 3.
Expansion modules
cannot be installed in
PICs 1 and 2.
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Table 19: System Modes Supported on QFX5100-24Q Switches with EX4600-8F and
QFX-EM-4Q Expansion Modules Installed
QFX5100-24Q
Default-mode
Mode-104port
Flexi-pic-mode
Non-oversubscribed-mode
Only the QFX-EM-4Q
module is supported.
Only the QFX-EM-4Q
module is supported.
Supported
Not supported
On PIC 0, you cannot
channelize ports 0
through 3.
You cannot install the
QFX-EM-4Q or
EX4600-8F modules
on PICs 1 and 2.
If you have installed the
EX4600-8F expansion
module on PIC 1, and
you have installed the
QFX-EM-4Q module on
PIC 2, The 40-Gbps
QSFP+ ports in both
PIC slots are not
supported.
If you have installed the
EX4600-8F expansion
module on PIC 2, and
you have installed the
QFX-EM-4Q module on
PIC 1, only the
QFX-EM-4Q module on
PIC 1 is supported.
The following steps describe how to change the system mode.
1.
To change the system mode, issue the following operational command:
{master:0}
root> request chassis system-mode mode
For example:
{master:0}
root> request chassis system-mode non-oversubscribed-mode
2. To return to the default mode (default-mode), issue the following operational
command:
{master:0}
root> request chassis system-mode default-mode
3. To see which system mode is configured, issue the following operational command:
{master:0}
root> show chassis system-mode
Related
Documentation
80
•
Understanding Interface Naming Conventions on page 5
•
Understanding Port Ranges and System Modes on page 19
•
Channelizing Interfaces on page 64
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Understanding Interfaces
Monitoring Interface Status and Traffic
Purpose
Action
Meaning
View interface status to monitor interface bandwidth utilization and traffic statistics.
•
To view interface status for all the interfaces, enter show interfaces xe.
•
To view status and statistics for a specific interface, enter show interfaces xe
interface-name.
•
To view status and traffic statistics for all interfaces, enter either show interfaces xe
detail or show interfaces xe extensive.
For details about output from the CLI commands, see show interfaces xe.
Troubleshooting Network Interfaces
The interface on the port in which an SFP or SFP+ transceiver is installed in an SFP or SFP+
module is down
Problem
Description: The switch has an SFP or SFP+ module installed. The interface on the port
in which an SFP or SFP+ transceiver is installed is down.
Symptoms: When you check the status with the CLI command show interfaces
interface-name , the disabled port is not listed.
Cause
By default, the SFP or SFP+ module operates in the 10-Gigabit Ethernet mode and
supports only SFP or SFP+ transceivers. The operating mode for the module is incorrectly
set.
Solution
Only SFP or SFP+ transceivers can be installed in SFP or SFP+ modules. You must
configure the operating mode of the SFP or SFP+ module to match the type of transceiver
you want to use. For SFP+ transceivers, configure 10-Gigabit Ethernet operating mode.
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82
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PART 2
Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management
•
Understanding Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 85
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84
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CHAPTER 2
Understanding Ethernet OAM Link Fault
Management
•
Understanding Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 85
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
•
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 89
Understanding Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management
Juniper Networks Junos operating system (Junos OS) for Juniper Networks allows the
Ethernet interfaces on these switches to support the IEEE 802.3ah standard for the
Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) of Ethernet in access networks. The
standard defines OAM link fault management (LFM). You can configure IEEE 802.3ah
OAM LFM on point-to-point Ethernet links that are connected either directly or through
Ethernet repeaters. The IEEE 802.3ah standard meets the requirement for OAM
capabilities even as Ethernet moves from being solely an enterprise technology to a WAN
and access technology, and the standard remains backward-compatible with existing
Ethernet technology.
Ethernet OAM provides the tools that network management software and network
managers can use to determine how a network of Ethernet links is functioning. Ethernet
OAM should:
•
Rely only on the media access control (MAC) address or virtual LAN identifier for
troubleshooting.
•
Work independently of the actual Ethernet transport and function over physical Ethernet
ports or a virtual service such as pseudowire.
•
Isolate faults over a flat (or single operator) network architecture or nested or
hierarchical (or multiprovider) networks.
The following OAM LFM features are supported:
•
Discovery and Link Monitoring
The discovery process is triggered automatically when OAM is enabled on the interface.
The discovery process permits Ethernet interfaces to discover and monitor the peer
on the link if it also supports the IEEE 802.3ah standard. You can specify the discovery
mode used for IEEE 802.3ah OAM support. In active mode, the interface discovers and
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monitors the peer on the link if the peer also supports IEEE 802.3ah OAM functionality.
In passive mode, the peer initiates the discovery process. After the discovery process
has been initiated, both sides participate in discovery. The switch performs link
monitoring by sending periodic OAM protocol data units (PDUs) to advertise OAM
mode, configuration, and capabilities.
You can specify the number of OAM PDUs that an interface can miss before the link
between peers is considered down.
•
Remote Fault Detection
Remote fault detection uses flags and events. Flags are used to convey the following:
Link Fault means a loss of signal, Dying Gasp means an unrecoverable condition such
as a power failure, and Critical Event means an unspecified vendor-specific critical
event. You can specify the periodic OAM PDU sending interval for fault detection. The
switch uses the Event Notification OAM PDU to notify the remote OAM device when
a problem is detected. You can specify the action to be taken by the system when the
configured link-fault event occurs.
•
Remote Loopback Mode
Remote loopback mode ensures link quality between the switch and a remote peer
during installation or troubleshooting. In this mode, when the interface receives a frame
that is not an OAM PDU or a pause frame, it sends it back on the same interface on
which it was received. The link appears to be in the active state. You can use the returned
loopback acknowledgement to test delay, jitter, and throughput.
Junos OS can place a remote DTE into loopback mode (if remote loopback mode is
supported by the remote DTE). When you place a remote DTE into loopback mode,
the interface receives the remote loopback request and puts the interface into remote
loopback mode. When the interface is in remote loopback mode, all frames except
OAM PDUs are looped back without any changes made to the frames. OAM PDUs
continue to be sent and processed.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
•
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 89
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure)
Ethernet OAM link fault management (LFM) can be used for physical link-level fault
detection and management. The IEEE 802.3ah LFM works across point-to-point Ethernet
links either directly or through repeaters.
To configure Ethernet OAM LFM using the CLI:
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Chapter 2: Understanding Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management
1.
Enable IEEE 802.3ah OAM support on an interface:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch# set interface interface-name
NOTE: You can configure Ethernet OAM LFM on aggregated interfaces.
NOTE: The remaining steps are optional. You can choose which of these
features to configure for Ethernet OAM LFM on your switch.
2. Specify whether the interface or the peer initiates the discovery process by configuring
the link discovery mode to active or passive (active = interface initiates; passive = peer
initiates):
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch# set interface interface-name link-discovery active
3. Configure a periodic OAM PDU-sending interval (in milliseconds) for fault detection:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch# set interface pdu-interval interval
4. Specify the number of OAM PDUs that an interface can miss before the link between
peers is considered down:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch# set interface interface-name pdu-threshold threshold-value
5. Configure event threshold values on an interface for the local errors that trigger the
sending of link event TLVs:
•
Set the threshold value (in seconds) for sending frame-error events or taking the
action specified in the action profile:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch# set interface interface-name event-thresholds frame-error count
•
Set the threshold value (in seconds) for sending frame-period events or taking the
action specified in the action profile:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch# set interface interface-name event-thresholds frame-period count
•
Set the threshold value (in seconds) for sending frame-period-summary events or
taking the action specified in the action profile:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch# set interface interface-name event-thresholds frame-period-summary count
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•
Set the threshold value (in seconds) for sending symbol-period events or taking
the action specified in the action profile:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch# set interface interface-name event-thresholds symbol-period count
NOTE: You can disable the sending of link event TLVs.
To disable the sending of link event TLVs:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch# set interface interface-name negotiation-options no-allow-link-events
6. Create an action profile to define event fault flags and thresholds to be taken when
the link fault event occurs. Then apply the action profile to one or more interfaces.
(You can also apply multiple action profiles to a single interface.)
a. Name the action profile:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch# set action-profile profile-name
b. Specify actions to be taken by the system when the link fault event occurs:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch# set action-profile profile-name action syslog
user@switch# set action-profile profile-name action link-down
c. Specify events for the action profile:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch# set action-profile profile-name event link-adjacency-loss
NOTE: For each action profile, you must specify at least one link event
and one action. The actions are taken only when all of the events in the
action profile are true. If more than one action is specified, all actions are
executed. You can set a low threshold for a specific action such as logging
the error and set a high threshold for another action such as system logging.
7. Set a remote interface into loopback mode so that all frames except OAM PDUs are
looped back without any changes made to the frames. Set the remote DTE in loopback
mode (the remote DTE must support remote-loopback mode) and then enable remote
loopback support for the local interface.
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch# set interface interface-name remote-loopback
user@switch# set interface interface-name negotiation-options allow-remote-loopback
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Chapter 2: Understanding Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 89
•
Understanding Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 85
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management
Junos OS allows the Ethernet interfaces on these switches to support the IEEE 802.3ah
standard for the Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) of Ethernet in access
networks. The standard defines OAM link fault management (LFM). You can configure
IEEE 802.3ah OAM LFM on point-to-point Ethernet links that are connected either directly
or through Ethernet repeaters.
This example describes how to enable and configure OAM LFM on a Gigabit Ethernet
interface:
•
Requirements on page 89
•
Overview and Topology on page 89
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on Switch 1 on page 89
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on Switch 2 on page 90
•
Verification on page 91
Requirements
This example uses the following hardware and software components:
•
Junos OS Release 9.4 or later for EX Series switches
•
Two EX3200 or EX4200 switches connected directly
Overview and Topology
Junos OS switches allows the Ethernet interfaces on these switches to support the IEEE
802.3ah standard for the Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) of Ethernet
in access networks. The standard defines OAM link fault management (LFM). You can
configure IEEE 802.3ah OAM LFM on point-to-point Ethernet links that are connected
either directly or through Ethernet repeaters.
This example uses two EX4200 switches connected directly. Before you begin configuring
Ethernet OAM LFM on two switches, connect the two switches directly through a trunk
interface.
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on Switch 1
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure Ethernet OAM LFM, copy the following commands and paste them
into the switch terminal window:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
set interface ge-0/0/0
set interface ge-0/0/0 link-discovery active
set interface ge-0/0/0 pdu-interval 800
set interface ge-0/0/0 remote-loopback
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Step-by-Step
Procedure
To configure Ethernet OAM LFM on switch 1:
1.
Enable IEEE 802.3ah OAM support on an interface:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch1# set interface (OAM LFM) ge-0/0/0
2.
Specify that the interface initiates the discovery process by configuring the link
discovery mode to active:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch1# set interface ge-0/0/0 link-discovery active
3.
Set the periodic OAM PDU-sending interval (in milliseconds) to 800 on switch 1:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch1# set interface pdu-interval 800
4.
Set a remote interface into loopback mode so that all frames except OAM PDUs
are looped back without any changes made to the frames. Ensure that the remote
DTE supports remote loopback mode. To set the remote DTE in loopback mode
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch1# set interface ge-0/0/0.0 remote-loopback
Results
Check the results of the configuration:
[edit]
user@switch1# show
protocols {
oam {
ethernet {
link-fault-management {
interface ge-0/0/0 {
pdu-interval 800;
link-discovery active;
remote-loopback;
}
}
}
}
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on Switch 2
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure Ethernet OAM LFM on switch 2, copy the following commands and
paste them into the switch terminal window:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management ]
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Chapter 2: Understanding Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management
set interface ge-0/0/1
set interface ge-0/0/1 negotiation-options allow-remote-loopback
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To configure Ethernet OAM LFM on switch 2:
1.
Enable OAM on the peer interface on switch 2:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch2# set interface ge-0/0/1
2.
Enable remote loopback support for the local interface:
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
user@switch2# set interface ge-0/0/1 negotiation-options allow-remote-loopback
Results
Check the results of the configuration:
[edit]
user@switch2# show
protocols {
oam {
ethernet {
link-fault-management {
interface ge-0/0/1 {
negotiation-options {
allow-remote-loopback;
}
}
}
}
}
Verification
Verifying That OAM LFM Has Been Configured Properly
Purpose
Action
Verify that OAM LFM has been configured properly.
Use the show oam ethernet link-fault-management command:
user@switch1#show oam ethernet link-fault-management
Sample Output
Interface: ge-0/0/0.0
Status: Running, Discovery state: Send Any
Peer address: 00:19:e2:50:3b:e1
Flags:Remote-Stable Remote-State-Valid Local-Stable 0x50
Remote entity information:
Remote MUX action: forwarding, Remote parser action: forwarding
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Discovery mode: active, Unidirectional mode: unsupported
Remote loopback mode: supported, Link events: supported
Variable requests: unsupported
Meaning
Related
Documentation
92
When the output displays the MAC address and the discover state is Send Any, it means
that OAM LFM has been configured properly.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
•
Understanding Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 85
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 3
Flexible Ethernet Services Encapsulation
•
Understanding Flexible Ethernet Services Encapsulation on Switches on page 93
•
Configuring Flexible Ethernet Services Encapsulation on page 95
Understanding Flexible Ethernet Services Encapsulation on Switches
Junos OS supports two different styles of configuration for switch interfaces: the service
provider style and the enterprise style. The service provider style requires more
configuration but provides greater flexibility. The enterprise style is easier to configure
but offers less functionality. Each configuration style requires a different Ethernet
encapsulation type. You can configure a physical interface to support both styles of
configuration using flexible Ethernet services.
Flexible Ethernet services is a type of encapsulation that enables a physical interface to
support different types of Ethernet encapsulations at the logical interface level. Defining
multiple per-unit Ethernet encapsulations makes it easier to customize Ethernet-based
services to multiple hosts connected to the same physical interface.
•
Service Provider Style on page 93
•
Enterprise Style on page 94
•
Flexible Ethernet Services on page 94
Service Provider Style
The service provider style of configuration allows for customization of Ethernet-based
services at the logical interface level. Service providers typically have multiple customers
connected to the same physical interface. Using the service provider style, you can
configure multiple logical interfaces on the physical interface, and associate each unit
with a different VLAN. This provides the flexibility to configure different services for each
customer, but also requires more configuration, because each feature must be explicitly
configured on the logical interface.
When configuring a physical interface to support only the service provider style, the
physical interface must be encapsulated with the extended-vlan-bridge option to support
bridging features. VLAN tagging must also be configured on the physical interface so
that it can operate in trunk mode and transmit Ethernet frames with VLAN tags for
multiple VLANs. Each logical interface is bound to a unique VLAN ID.
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Enterprise Style
The enterprise style of configuration is designed to provide basic bridging functionality
for consumers of Ethernet-based services. The isolation of services for different customers
on a single port is not required, because each port is typically connected to a host or is
providing a trunk to another switch.
With the enterprise style of configuration, logical interfaces are placed into Layer 2 mode
by specifying ethernet-switching as the interface family. Without using flexible Ethernet
services, ethernet-switching can only be configured on a single logical unit, unit 0. You
cannot bind a VLAN ID to unit 0, because these interfaces operate either in trunk mode,
which supports traffic with various VLAN tags, or in access mode, which supports untagged
traffic.
Flexible Ethernet Services
The flexible Ethernet services encapsulation type enables a physical interface to support
both styles of configuration. To support the service provider style, flexible Ethernet services
allows for encapsulations to be configured at the logical interface level instead of the
physical interface. To support the enterprise style, flexible Ethernet services allows the
ethernet-switching family to be configured on any logical interface unit number instead
of only unit 0.
For example, the configuration below shows three logical interfaces configured on a
physical interface, xe-0/0/51, that is encapsulated for flexible Ethernet services. Unit 100
and unit 200 are configured in the service provider style and unit 300 is configured in the
enterprise style. The encapsulation type of vlan-bridge is used to enable bridging on
unit 100 and unit 200, and family ethernet-switching enables bridging on unit 300.
interfaces {
xe-0/0/51 {
flexible-vlan-tagging;
encapsulation flexible-ethernet-services;
unit 100 {
encapsulation vlan-bridge;
vlan-id 100;
}
unit 200 {
encapsulation vlan-bridge;
vlan-id 200;
}
unit 300 {
family ethernet-switching {
interface-mode trunk;
vlan members 300;
}
}
}
}
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Chapter 3: Flexible Ethernet Services Encapsulation
NOTE: It is not required that the unit number and VLAN ID match, but it is
considered a best practice.
NOTE: On QFX5100 switches, you can combine encapsulations on the same
physical interface for vlan-bridge and family ethernet switching but not for
family inet and family ethernet-switching.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Flexible Ethernet Services Encapsulation on page 95
Configuring Flexible Ethernet Services Encapsulation
Flexible Ethernet services is a type of encapsulation that enables a physical interface to
specify Ethernet encapsulations at the logical interface level. Each logical interface can
have a different Ethernet encapsulation. Defining multiple per-unit Ethernet
encapsulations makes it easier to customize Ethernet-based services to multiple hosts
connected to the same physical interface.
An Ethernet interface that is not encapsulated with flexible Ethernet services and is
operating in Layer 2 mode is limited to a single logical interface unit (0). Bridging is enabled
on the interface by configuring ethernet-switching as the interface family on unit 0. The
ethernet-switching family can be configured only on logical interface unit 0, and no other
logical units can be defined on that interface.
Some switching features, however, cannot be configured on logical interface unit 0.
Features such as Q-in-Q tunneling require the logical interface to transmit VLAN-tagged
frames. To enable a logical interface to receive and forward Ethernet frames tagged with
a matching VLAN ID, you must bind the logical interface to that VLAN. These features
must be configured on a logical interface unit other than 0, because you cannot bind a
VLAN ID to unit 0.
When you encapsulate an interface by using flexible Ethernet services, you can configure
a logical interface unit other than 0 with family ethernet-switching. You can also configure
other logical interfaces on that same interface with different types of Ethernet
encapsulations. This enables logical interfaces that are bound to a VLAN ID to coexist
with logical interfaces configured with family ethernet-switching.
For example, if you configure PVLAN on the same physical interface on which you are
configuring Q-in-Q tunneling, you can use flexible ethernet services to support the
enterprise style of configuration for PVLAN, using family ethernet-switching, along with
vlan-bridge encapsulation for Q-in-Q tunneling.
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To configure flexible Ethernet services encapsulation on an interface:
1.
Enable flexible Ethernet services encapsulation on the interface. The
flexible-ethernet-services statement allows configuration of both service-provider-style
logical interfaces and enterprise-style logical interfaces:
[edit interfaces interface-name]
user@switch# set encapsulation flexible-ethernet-services
2. Enable the interface to transmit packets with 802.1Q VLAN single-tagged and
dual-tagged frames:
[edit interfaces interface-name]
user@switch# set flexible-vlan-tagging
3. Configure a logical interface (unit) on the interface:
[edit interfaces interface-name]
user@switch# set unit unit-number
NOTE: Do not use logical interface unit 0. You must later bind a VLAN tag
ID to the unit you specify in this step, and you cannot bind a VLAN tag ID
to unit 0. It is a best practice to match the unit number to the VLAN ID to
which the interface is bound.
4. Encapsulate the logical interface for bridging—for example, use vlan-bridge
encapsulation on an interface to be used for Q-in-Q tunneling. (If you were configuring
the interface only for Q-in-Q tunneling, you would use encapsulation
extended-vlan-bridge on the physical interface.)
[edit interfaces interface-name]
user@switch# set unit unit-number encapsulation vlan-bridge
5. Bind the logical interface from the preceding step to a VLAN ID:
[edit interfaces interface-name]
user@switch# set unit unit-number vlan-id vlan-id
6. Configure another logical interface. (If you were configuring just PVLAN, we would
recommend that you configure a single logical interface for all PVLAN domains on an
interface.)
[edit interfaces interface-name]
user@switch# set unit unit-number
7. Enable the logical interface in the preceding step for bridging:
[edit interfaces interface-name]
user@switch# set unit unit-number family ethernet-switching
8. Assign VLAN membership to the logical interface:
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Chapter 3: Flexible Ethernet Services Encapsulation
[edit interfaces interface-name]
user@switch# set unit unit-number family ethernet-switching vlan members vlan-id
9. Configure the interface as a trunk interface to transmit frames with 802.1Q VLAN tags:
[edit interfaces interface-name]
user@switch# set unit unit-number family ethernet-switching interface-mode trunk
NOTE: For EX4300 device, the service provider style configuration
(encapsulation extended-vlan-bridge) is recommended only for QinQ
scenarios. For other scenarios, use the enterprise style configuration.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding Flexible Ethernet Services Encapsulation on Switches on page 93
•
Configuring Q-in-Q Tunneling
•
Creating a Private VLAN on a Single Switch with ELS Support (CLI Procedure)
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PART 3
Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE)
•
Understanding GRE on page 101
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Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 4
Understanding GRE
•
Understanding Generic Routing Encapsulation on page 101
•
Configuring Generic Routing Encapsulation Tunneling on page 105
•
Verifying That Generic Routing Encapsulation Tunneling Is Working Correctly on page 106
Understanding Generic Routing Encapsulation
Generic routing encapsulation (GRE) provides a private, secure path for transporting
packets through an otherwise public network by encapsulating (or tunneling) the packets.
This topic describes:
•
Overview of GRE on page 101
•
GRE Tunneling on page 102
•
Using a Firewall Filter to De-encapsulate GRE Traffic on a QFX5100, QFX10000, and
OCX Series Switches on page 104
•
Configuration Limitations on page 104
Overview of GRE
GRE encapsulates data packets and redirects them to a device that de-encapsulates
them and routes them to their final destination. This allows the source and destination
switches to operate as if they have a virtual point-to-point connection with each other
(because the outer header applied by GRE is transparent to the encapsulated payload
packet). For example, GRE tunnels allow routing protocols such as RIP and OSPF to
forward data packets from one switch to another switch across the Internet. In addition,
GRE tunnels can encapsulate multicast data streams for transmission over the Internet.
GRE is described in RFC 2784 (obsoletes earlier RFCs 1701 and 1702). The switches support
RFC 2784, but not completely. (For a list of limitations, see “Configuration Limitations”
on page 104.)
As a tunnel source router, the switch encapsulates a payload packet for transport through
the tunnel to a destination network. The payload packet is first encapsulated in a GRE
packet, and then the GRE packet is encapsulated in a delivery protocol. The switch
performing the role of a tunnel remote router extracts the tunneled packet and forwards
the packet to its destination. Note that you can use one firewall term to terminate many
GRE tunnels on a QFX5100 switch.
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GRE Tunneling
Data is routed by the system to the GRE endpoint over routes established in the route
table. (These routes can be statically configured or dynamically learned by routing
protocols such as RIP or OSPF.) When a data packet is received by the GRE endpoint, it
is de-encapsulated and routed again to its destination address.
GRE tunnels are stateless-–that is, the endpoint of the tunnel contains no information
about the state or availability of the remote tunnel endpoint. Therefore, the switch
operating as a tunnel source router cannot change the state of the GRE tunnel interface
to down if the remote endpoint is unreachable.
For details about GRE tunneling, see:
•
Encapsulation and De-Encapsulation on the Switch on page 102
•
Number of Source and Destination Tunnels Allowed on a Switch on page 102
•
Class of Service on GRE Tunnels on page 103
•
Applying Firewall Filters to GRE Traffic on page 103
Encapsulation and De-Encapsulation on the Switch
Encapsulation—A switch operating as a tunnel source router encapsulates and forwards
GRE packets as follows:
1.
When a switch receives a data packet (payload) to be tunneled, it sends the packet
to the tunnel interface.
2. The tunnel interface encapsulates the data in a GRE packet and adds an outer IP
header.
3. The IP packet is forwarded on the basis of the destination address in the outer IP
header.
De-encapsulation—A switch operating as a tunnel remote router handles GRE packets
as follows:
1.
When the destination switch receives the IP packet from the tunnel interface, the
outer IP header and GRE header are removed.
2. The packet is routed based on the inner IP header.
Number of Source and Destination Tunnels Allowed on a Switch
QFX5100 and OCX Series switches support as many as 512 GRE tunnels, including tunnels
created with a firewall filter. That is, you can create a total of 512 GRE tunnels, regardless
of which method you use.
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Chapter 4: Understanding GRE
EX switches support as many as 500 GRE tunnels between switches transmitting IPv4
or IPv6 payload packets over GRE. If a passenger protocol in addition to IPv4 and IPv6
is used, you can configure up to 333 GRE tunnels between the switches.
An EX switch can have a maximum of 20 tunnel source IP addresses configured, and
each tunnel source IP can be configured with up to 20 destination IP addresses on a
second switch. As a result, the two connected switches can have a maximum of 400 GRE
tunnels. If the first switch is also connected to a third switch, the possible maximum
number of tunnels is 500.
Class of Service on GRE Tunnels
When a network experiences congestion and delay, some packets might be dropped.
Junos OS class of service (CoS) divides traffic into classes to which you can apply different
levels of throughput and packet loss when congestion occurs and thereby set rules for
packet loss. For details about CoS, see Junos OS CoS for EX Series Switches Overview.
The following CoS components are available on a switch operating as a GRE tunnel
source router or GRE tunnel remote router:
•
•
At the GRE tunnel source—On a switch operating as a tunnel source router, you can
apply CoS classifiers on an ingress port or on a GRE port, with the following results on
CoS component support on tunneled packets:
•
Schedulers only—Based on the CoS classification on the ingress port, you can apply
CoS schedulers on a GRE port of the switch to define output queues and control the
transmission of packets through the tunnel after GRE encapsulation. However, you
cannot apply CoS rewrite rules to these packets.
•
Schedulers and rewrite rules—Depending on the CoS classification on the GRE port,
you can apply both schedulers and rewrite rules to the encapsulated packets
transmitted through the tunnel.
At the GRE tunnel endpoint—When the switch is a tunnel remote router, you can apply
CoS classifiers on the GRE port and schedulers and rewrite rules on the egress port to
control the transmission of a de-encapsulated GRE packet out from the egress port.
Applying Firewall Filters to GRE Traffic
Firewall filters provide rules that define whether to permit, deny, or forward packets that
are transiting an interface on a switch. (For details, see Firewall Filters for EX Series Switches
Overview.) Because of the encapsulation and de-encapsulation performed by GRE, you
are constrained as to where you can apply a firewall filter to filter tunneled packets and
which header will be affected. Table 20 on page 103 identifies these constraints.
Table 20: Firewall Filter Application Points for Tunneled Packets
Endpoint Type
Ingress Interface
Egress Interface
Source (encapsulating)
inner header
outer header
Remote (de-encapsulating)
Cannot filter packets on ingress interface
inner header
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Using a Firewall Filter to De-encapsulate GRE Traffic on a QFX5100, QFX10000, and OCX Series
Switches
You can also use a firewall filter to de-encapsulate GRE traffic on switches . This feature
provides significant benefits in terms of scalability, performance, and flexibility because
you don't need to create a tunnel interface to perform the de-encapsulation. For example,
you can terminate many tunnels from multiple source IP addresses with one firewall
term. See Configuring a Firewall Filter to De-Encapsulate GRE Traffic for information about
how to configure a firewall filter for this purpose.
Configuration Limitations
Table 21 on page 104 lists features that are not supported with GRE.
Table 21: Features Not Supported with GRE
EX Switches
QFX Switches
MPLS over GRE tunnels
MPLS over GRE tunnels
GRE keepalives
GRE keepalives
GRE keys, payload packet fragmentation, and sequence numbers for
fragmented packets
GRE keys, payload packet fragmentation, and
sequence numbers for fragmented packets
BGP dynamic tunnels
BGP dynamic tunnels
Outer IP address must be IPv4
Outer IP address must be IPv4
Virtual routing instances
On QFX10002 and QFX10008 switches, If you
configure GRE tunneling with the underlying ECMP
next-hop instead of a Unicast next-hop, GRE tunnel
encapsulation fails and network traffic is dropped
Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) protocol over GRE distributed
mode
OSPF limitation—Enabling OSPF on a GRE interface creates two
equal-cost routes to the destination: one through the Ethernet network
or uplink interface and the other through the tunnel interface. If data is
routed through the tunnel interface, the tunnel might fail. To keep the
interface operational, we recommend that you use a static route, disable
OSPF on the tunnel interface, or configure the peer not to advertise the
tunnel destination over the tunnel interface.
Related
Documentation
104
•
Configuring Generic Routing Encapsulation Tunneling (CLI Procedure)
•
Configuring Generic Routing Encapsulation Tunneling on page 105
•
Configuring a Firewall Filter to De-Encapsulate GRE Traffic
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 4: Understanding GRE
Configuring Generic Routing Encapsulation Tunneling
Generic routing encapsulation (GRE) provides a private, secure path for transporting
packets through an otherwise public network by encapsulating (or tunneling) the packets.
GRE tunneling is accomplished through tunnel endpoints that encapsulate or
de-encapsulate traffic.
You can also use a firewall filter to de-encapsulate GRE traffic on QFX5100 and OCX
Series switches. This feature provides significant benefits in terms of scalability,
performance, and flexibility because you don't need to create a tunnel interface to perform
the de-encapsulation. For example, you can terminate many tunnels from multiple source
IP addresses with one firewall term. For more information on this feature, see Configuring
a Firewall Filter to De-Encapsulate GRE Traffic.
This topic describes:
1.
Configuring a GRE Tunnel on page 105
Configuring a GRE Tunnel
To configure a GRE tunnel interface:
1.
Create a GRE interface with a unit number and address:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set gr-0/0/0 unit number family inet address
NOTE: The base name of the interface must be gr-0/0/0.
This is a pseudo interface, and the address you specify can be any IP address. The
routing table must specify gr-0/0/0.x as the outgoing interface for any packets that
will be tunneled.
If you configure a GRE interface on a QFX5100 switch that is a member of a Virtual
Chassis and later change the Virtual Chassis member number of the switch, the name
of the GRE interface does not change in any way (because it is a pseudo interface).
For example, if you change the member number from 0 to 5, the GRE interface name
does not change from gr-0/0/0.x to gr-5/0/0.x.
2. Specify the tunnel source address for the logical interface:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set gr-0/0/0 unit number tunnel (Legacy Switches) source
source-address
3. Specify the destination address:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set gr-0/0/0 unit number tunnel (Legacy Switches) destination
destination-address
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The destination address must be reachable through static or dynamic routing. If you
use static routing, you must get the destination MAC address (for example, by using
ping) before user traffic can be forwarded through the tunnel.
NOTE: On QFX10002 and QFX10008 switches, If you configure GRE tunneling
with the underlying ECMP next-hop instead of Unicast next-hop, GRE tunnel
encapsulation fails and the network traffic is dropped.
Related
Documentation
•
Verifying That Generic Routing Encapsulation Tunneling Is Working Correctly on page 106
•
Understanding Generic Routing Encapsulation on page 101
•
Configuring a Firewall Filter to De-Encapsulate GRE Traffic
Verifying That Generic Routing Encapsulation Tunneling Is Working Correctly
Purpose
Action
Verify that the generic routing encapsulation (GRE) interface is sending tunneled traffic.
Display status information about the specified GRE interface by using the command
show interfaces.
user@switch> show interfaces gr-0/0/0.0
Physical interface: gr-0/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 132, SNMP ifIndex: 26
Type: GRE, Link-level type: GRE, MTU: Unlimited, Speed: 800mbps
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Input rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Output rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Logical interface gr-0/0/0.0 (Index 68) (SNMP ifIndex 47)
Flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps 16384
IP-Header 1.1.1.2:1.1.1.1:47:df:64:0000000000000000 Encapsulation: GRE-NULL
Input packets : 0
Output packets: 0
Protocol inet, MTU: 1476
Flags: None
Addresses, Flags: Is-Primary
Local: 10.0.0.0
Meaning
Related
Documentation
106
The output indicates that the GRE interface gr-0/0/0 is up. The output displays the name
of the physical interface and the traffic statistics for this interface---the number of and
the rate at which input and output bytes and packets are received and transmitted on
the physical interface.
•
Configuring Generic Routing Encapsulation Tunneling (CLI Procedure)
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 4
IP Directed Broadcast
•
Understanding IP Directed Broadcast on page 109
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108
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CHAPTER 5
Understanding IP Directed Broadcast
•
Understanding IP Directed Broadcast on page 109
•
Configuring IP Directed Broadcast (CLI Procedure) on page 111
•
Example: Configuring IP Directed Broadcast on page 112
Understanding IP Directed Broadcast
IP directed broadcast helps you implement remote administration tasks such as backups
and wake-on-LAN (WOL) application tasks by sending broadcast packets targeted at
the hosts in a specified destination subnet. IP directed broadcast packets traverse the
network in the same way as unicast IP packets until they reach the destination subnet.
When they reach the destination subnet and IP directed broadcast is enabled on the
receiving switch, the switch translates (explodes) the IP directed broadcast packet into
a broadcast that floods the packet on the target subnet. All hosts on the target subnet
receive the IP directed broadcast packet.
This topic covers:
•
IP Directed Broadcast Overview on page 109
•
IP Directed Broadcast Implementation on page 110
•
When to Enable IP Directed Broadcast on page 110
•
When Not to Enable IP Directed Broadcast on page 110
IP Directed Broadcast Overview
IP directed broadcast packets have a destination IP address that is a valid broadcast
address for the subnet that is the target of the directed broadcast (the target subnet).
The intent of an IP directed broadcast is to flood the target subnet with the broadcast
packets without broadcasting to the entire network. IP directed broadcast packets cannot
originate from the target subnet.
When you send an IP directed broadcast packet, as it travels to the target subnet, the
network forwards it in the same way as it forwards a unicast packet. When the packet
reaches a switch that is directly connected to the target subnet, the switch checks to see
whether IP directed broadcast is enabled on the interface that is directly connected to
the target subnet:
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•
If IP directed broadcast is enabled on that interface, the switch broadcasts the packet
on that subnet by rewriting the destination IP address as the configured broadcast IP
address for the subnet. The switch converts the packet to a link-layer broadcast packet
that every host on the network processes.
•
If IP directed broadcast is disabled on the interface that is directly connected to the
target subnet, the switch drops the packet.
IP Directed Broadcast Implementation
You configure IP directed broadcast on a per-subnet basis by enabling IP directed
broadcast on the Layer 3 interface of the subnet’s VLAN. When the switch that is
connected to that subnet receives a packet that has the subnet’s broadcast IP address
as the destination address, the switch broadcasts the packet to all hosts on the subnet.
By default, IP directed broadcast is disabled.
When to Enable IP Directed Broadcast
IP directed broadcast is disabled by default. Enable IP directed broadcast when you want
to perform remote management or administration services such as backups or WOL
tasks on hosts in a subnet that does not have a direct connection to the Internet.
Enabling IP directed broadcast on a subnet affects only the hosts within that subnet.
Only packets received on the subnet’s Layer 3 interface that have the subnet’s broadcast
IP address as the destination address are flooded on the subnet.
When Not to Enable IP Directed Broadcast
Typically, you do not enable IP directed broadcast on subnets that have direct connections
to the Internet. Disabling IP directed broadcast on a subnet’s Layer 3 interface affects
only that subnet. If you disable IP directed broadcast on a subnet and a packet that has
the broadcast IP address of that subnet arrives at the switch, the switch drops the
broadcast packet.
If a subnet has a direct connection to the Internet, enabling IP directed broadcast on it
increases the network’s susceptibility to denial-of-service (DoS) attacks.
For example, a malicious attacker can spoof a source IP address (use a source IP address
that is not the actual source of the transmission to deceive a network into identifying the
attacker as a legitimate source) and send IP directed broadcasts containing Internet
Control Message Protocol (ICMP) echo (ping) packets. When the hosts on the network
with IP directed broadcast enabled receive the ICMP echo packets, they all send replies
to the victim that has the spoofed source IP address. This creates a flood of ping replies
in a DoS attack that can overwhelm the spoofed source address; this is known as a smurf
attack. Another common DoS attack on exposed networks with IP directed broadcast
enabled is a fraggle attack, which is similar to a smurf attack except that the malicious
packet is a User Datagram Protocol (UDP) echo packet instead of an ICMP echo packet.
Related
Documentation
110
•
Configuring IP Directed Broadcast (CLI Procedure) on page 111
•
Example: Configuring IP Directed Broadcast on page 112
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Understanding IP Directed Broadcast
Configuring IP Directed Broadcast (CLI Procedure)
You can use IP directed broadcast on a switch to facilitate remote network management
by sending broadcast packets to hosts on a specified subnet without broadcasting to
the entire network. IP directed broadcast packets are broadcast on only the target subnet.
The rest of the network treats IP directed broadcast packets as unicast packets and
forwards them accordingly.
Before you begin to configure IP directed broadcast:
•
Ensure that the subnet on which you want broadcast packets using IP direct broadcast
is not directly connected to the Internet.
•
Configure an integrated routing and bridging (IRB) interface or routed VLAN interface
(RVI) for the subnet that will be enabled for IP direct broadcast. See Configuring
Integrated Routing and Bridging Interfaces (CLI Procedure) or Configuring VLANs.
NOTE: We recommend that you do not enable IP directed broadcast on
subnets that have a direct connection to the Internet because of increased
exposure to denial-of-service (DoS) attacks.
To enable IP directed broadcast for a specified subnet:
NOTE: In a mixed Virtual Chassis, when you configure targeted broadcast,
you can only configure one interface. Otherwise, targeted broadcast will not
work.
1.
Add the target subnet’s logical interfaces to the VLAN:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set ge-0/0/0.0 family ethernet-switching vlan members v1
user@switch# set ge-0/0/1.0 family ethernet-switching vlan members v1
2. Configure the Layer 3 interface on the VLAN that is the target of the IP directed
broadcast packets:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set irb.1 family inet address 10.1.2.1/8
3. Associate a Layer 3 interface with the VLAN:
[edit vlans]
user@switch# set v1 l3-interface irb.1
4. Enable the Layer 3 interface for the VLAN to receive IP directed broadcasts:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set irb.1 family inet targeted-broadcast
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Related
Documentation
•
Example: Configuring IP Directed Broadcast on page 112
•
Understanding IP Directed Broadcast on page 109
Example: Configuring IP Directed Broadcast
IP directed broadcast provides a method of sending broadcast packets to hosts on a
specified subnet without broadcasting those packets to hosts on the entire network.
This example shows how to enable a subnet to receive IP directed broadcast packets
so you can perform backups and other network management tasks remotely:
•
Requirements on page 112
•
Overview and Topology on page 112
•
Configuration on page 113
Requirements
This example uses the following software and hardware components:
•
Junos OS Release 15.1 or later for QFX Series switches
•
One PC
•
One QFX Series switch
Before you configure IP directed broadcast for a subnet:
•
Ensure that the subnet does not have a direct connection to the Internet.
•
Configure routed VLAN interfaces (RVIs) for the ingress and egress VLANs on the
switch. See Configuring VLANs.
Overview and Topology
You might want to perform remote administration tasks such as backups and
wake-on-LAN (WOL) application tasks to manage groups of clients on a subnet. One
way to do this is to send IP directed broadcast packets targeted at the hosts in a particular
target subnet.
The network forwards IP directed broadcast packets as if they were unicast packets.
When the IP directed broadcast packet is received by a VLAN that is enabled for
targeted-broadcast, the switch broadcasts the packet to all the hosts in its subnet.
In this topology, a host is connected to an interface on an EX Series switch to manage
the clients in subnet 10.1.2.1/8. When the switch receives a packet with the broadcast IP
address of the target subnet as its destination address, it forwards the packet to the
subnet’s Layer 3 interface and broadcasts it to all the hosts within the subnet.
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Chapter 5: Understanding IP Directed Broadcast
Table 22 on page 113 shows the settings of the components in this example.
Table 22: Components of the IP Directed Broadcast Topology
Property
Settings
Switch hardware
QFX Series switch
Ingress VLAN name
v0
Ingress VLAN IP address
10.1.1.1/8
Egress VLAN name
v1
Egress VLAN IP address
10.1.2.1/8
Interfaces in VLAN v0
ge-0/0/3.0
Interfaces in VLAN v1
ge-0/0/0.0 and ge-0/0/1.0
Configuration
To configure IP directed broadcast on a subnet to enable remote management of its
hosts:
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure the switch to accept IP directed broadcasts targeted at subnet
10.1.2.1/8, copy the following commands and paste them into the switch’s terminal
window:
[edit]
set interfaces ge-0/0/0.0 family ethernet-switching vlan members v1
set interfaces ge-0/0/1.0 family ethernet-switching vlan members v1
set interfaces vlan.1 family inet address 10.1.2.1/8
set interfaces ge-0/0/3.0 family ethernet-switching vlan members v0
set interfaces vlan.0 family inet address 10.1.1.1/8
set vlans v1 l3-interface vlan.1
set vlans v0 l3-interface vlan.0
set interfaces vlan.1 family inet targeted-broadcast
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To configure the switch to accept IP directed broadcasts targeted at subnet 10.1.2.1/8:
1.
Add logical interface ge-0/0/0.0 to VLAN v1:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set ge-0/0/0.0 family ethernet-switching vlan members v1
2.
Add logical interface ge-0/0/1.0 to VLAN v1:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set ge-0/0/1.0 family ethernet-switching vlan members v1
3.
Configure the IP address for the egress VLAN, v1:
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[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set vlan.1 family inet address 10.1.2.1/8
4.
Add logical interface ge-0/0/3.0 to VLAN v0:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set ge-0/0/3.0 family ethernet-switching vlan members v0
5.
Configure the IP address for the ingress VLAN:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set vlan.0 family inet address 10.1.1.1/8
6.
To route traffic between the ingress and egress VLANs, associate a Layer 3 interface
with each VLAN:
[edit vlans]
user@switch# set v1 l3-interfacevlan.1
user@switch# set v0 l3–interface vlan.0
7.
Enable the Layer 3 interface for the egress VLAN to receive IP directed broadcasts:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set vlan.1 family inet targeted-broadcast
Results
Check the results:
user@switch# show
interfaces {
ge-0/0/0 {
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching {
vlan {
members v1;
}
}
}
}
ge-0/0/1 {
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching {
vlan {
members v1;
}
}
}
}
ge-0/0/3 {
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching {
vlan {
members v0;
}
}
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Chapter 5: Understanding IP Directed Broadcast
}
}
vlan {
unit 0 {
family inet {
targeted-broadcast;
address 10.1.1.1/8;
}
}
unit 1 {
family inet {
targeted-broadcast;
address 10.1.2.1/8;
}
}
}
vlans {
default;
v0 {
l3-interface vlan.0;
}
v1 {
l3-interface vlan.1;
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring IP Directed Broadcast (CLI Procedure) on page 111
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116
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 5
Layer 3 Logical Interfaces
•
Understanding Layer 3 Logical Interfaces on page 119
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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118
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 6
Understanding Layer 3 Logical Interfaces
•
Understanding Layer 3 Logical Interfaces on page 119
•
Configuring a Layer 3 Logical Interface on page 120
•
Verifying That Layer 3 Logical Interfaces Are Working on page 120
Understanding Layer 3 Logical Interfaces
A Layer 3 logical interface is a logical division of a physical interface that operates at the
network level and therefore can receive and forward 802.1Q VLAN tags. You can use
Layer 3 logical interfaces to route traffic among multiple VLANs along a single trunk line
that connects a Juniper Networks switch to a Layer 2 switch. Only one physical connection
is required between the switches. .
NOTE: You can also use Layer 3 logical interfaces to provide alternative
gateway addresses for smart DHCP relay
To create Layer 3 logical interfaces on a switch, enable VLAN tagging, partition the
physical interface into logical partitions, and bind the VLAN ID to the logical interface.
We recommend that you use the VLAN ID as the logical interface number when you
configure the logical interface. QFX Series and EX4600 switches support a maximum
of 4089 VLANs, which includes the default VLAN. You can, however, assign a VLAN ID
in the range of 1 to 4094, but five of these VLAN IDs are reserved for internal use.
VLAN tagging places the VLAN ID in the frame header, allowing each physical interface
to handle multiple VLANs. When you configure multiple VLANs on an interface, you must
also enable tagging on that interface. Junos OS on switches supports a subset of the
802.1Q standard for receiving and forwarding routed or bridged Ethernet frames with
single VLAN tags and running Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP) over
802.1Q-tagged interfaces.
Related
Documentation
•
Interfaces Overview on page 3
•
Configuring a Layer 3 Logical Interface on page 120
•
Configuring DHCP and BOOTP Relay
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
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Configuring a Layer 3 Logical Interface
Devices use Layer 3 logical interfaces to divide a physical interface into multiple logical
interfaces, each corresponding to a VLAN. Layer 3 logical interfaces route traffic between
subnets.
To configure Layer 3 logical interfaces, enable VLAN tagging and partition one or more
physical ports into multiple logical interfaces, each corresponding to a VLAN ID.
Before you begin, make sure you set up your VLANs. See Configuring VLANs on Switches.
To configure Layer 3 logical interfaces:
1.
Enable VLAN tagging:
[edit interfaces interface-name]
user@switch# set vlan-tagging
2. Bind each VLAN ID to a logical interface:
[edit interfaces interface-name]
user@switch# set unit logical-unit-number vlan-id vlan-id-number
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding Layer 3 Logical Interfaces on page 119
•
Verifying That Layer 3 Logical Interfaces Are Working on page 120
Verifying That Layer 3 Logical Interfaces Are Working
Purpose
Action
After configuring Layer 3 logical interfaces, verify that they are set up properly and
transmitting data.
1.
To determine if you have successfully created the logical interfaces and the links are
up:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch> show interfaces interface-name terse
Interface
Admin Link Proto
Local
ge-0/0/0
up
up
ge-0/0/0.0
up
up
inet
10.0.0.1/8
ge-0/0/0.1
up
up
inet
10.0.0.2/8
ge-0/0/0.2
up
up
inet
10.0.0.3/8
ge-0/0/0.3
up
up
inet
10.0.0.4/8
ge-0/0/0.4
up
up
inet
10.0.0.5/8
ge-0/0/0.32767
up
up
Remote
2. Use the ping command from a device on one subnet to an address on another subnet
to determine if packets were transmitted correctly on the logical interface VLANs:
user@switch> ping ip-address
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Chapter 6: Understanding Layer 3 Logical Interfaces
PING 10.1.1.1 (1.1.1.1): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 10.1.1.1: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.157
64 bytes from 10.1.1.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.238
64 bytes from 10.1.1.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.255
64 bytes from 10.1.1.1: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.128
--- 10.1.1.1 ping statistics --4 packets transmitted, 4 packets received, 0% packet
Meaning
Related
Documentation
ms
ms
ms
ms
loss
The output confirms that the logical interfaces have been created and the links are up.
•
Configuring a Layer 3 Logical Interface on page 120
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122
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 6
Link Aggregation Groups (LAGs) and Link
Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP)
•
Understanding LAGs and LACP on page 125
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124
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CHAPTER 7
Understanding LAGs and LACP
•
Understanding Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces and LACP on page 125
•
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP on page 128
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation Between a QFX Series Product and an
Aggregation Switch on page 132
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation with LACP Between a QFX Series Product and
an Aggregation Switch on page 137
•
Verifying the Status of a LAG Interface on page 142
•
Verifying That LACP Is Configured Correctly and Bundle Members Are Exchanging LACP
Protocol Packets on page 142
•
Troubleshooting an Aggregated Ethernet Interface on page 143
Understanding Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces and LACP
IEEE 802.3ad link aggregation enables you to group Ethernet interfaces to form a single,
aggregated Ethernet interface, also known as a link aggregation group (LAG) or bundle.
Link aggregation is used to aggregate Ethernet interfaces between two devices. You can
create a LAG between a Juniper Networks device and a router, switch, aggregation switch,
server, or other devices. (Platform support depends on the Junos OS release in your
installation.) The aggregated Ethernet interfaces that participate in a LAG are called
member links. Because a LAG is composed of multiple member links, even if one member
link fails, the LAG continues to carry traffic over the remaining links.
NOTE: On QFX5100, EX4600, QFX10002 standalone switches, and on a
QFX5100 Virtual Chassis and EX4600 Virtual Chassis, you can configure a
mixed rate of link speeds for the aggregated Ethernet bundle. Only link speeds
of 40G and 10G are supported. Load balancing will not work if you configure
link speeds that are not supported.
NOTE: The QFX5200 switches do not support mixed rate aggregated Ethernet
bundles.
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Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) is a subcomponent of the IEEE 802.3ad
standard and is used as a discovery protocol.
NOTE: To ensure load balancing across the aggregated Ethernet (AE)
interfaces on a redundant server Node group, the members of the AE must
be equally distributed across the redundant server Node group.
NOTE: During a network Node group switchover, traffic might be dropped
for a few seconds.
•
Link Aggregation Group on page 126
•
Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) on page 127
Link Aggregation Group
To create a LAG:
1.
Create a logical aggregated Ethernet interface.
2. Define the parameters associated with the logical aggregated Ethernet interface, such
as a logical unit, interface properties, and Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP).
3. Define the member links to be contained within the aggregated Ethernet interface—for
example, two 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.
4. Configure LACP for link detection.
Keep in mind these hardware and software guidelines:
•
Up to 32 Ethernet interfaces can be grouped to form a LAG on a redundant server Node
group, a server Node group, and a network Node group on a QFabric system. Up to 48
LAGs are supported on redundant server Node groups and server Node groups on a
QFabric system, and up to 128 LAGs are supported on network Node groups on a
QFabric system. You can configure LAGs across Node devices in redundant server Node
groups, server Node groups, and network Node groups.
NOTE: If you try to commit a configuration containing more than 32 Ethernet
interfaces in a LAG, you will receive an error message saying that the group
limit of 32 has been exceeded, and the configuration checkout has failed.
•
126
Up to 64 Ethernet interfaces can be grouped to form a LAG, and up to 448 LAGs are
supported on QFX3500, QFX3600, EX4600, and OCX Series switches, and up to 1,000
LAGs are supported on QFX5100, QFX5200, QFX5110, QFX10002, QFX10008, and
QFX10016 switches.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Understanding LAGs and LACP
NOTE: If you try to commit a configuration containing more than 64
Ethernet interfaces in a LAG, you will receive an error message saying that
the group limit of 64 has been exceeded, and the configuration checkout
has failed.
•
Up to 64 Ethernet interfaces can be grouped to form a LAG, and In a Junos Fusion, up
to 1,000 LAGs are supported on QFX10002 switches acting as aggregation devices.
•
The LAG must be configured on both sides of the link.
•
The interfaces on either side of the link must be set to the same speed and be in
full-duplex mode.
NOTE: Junos OS assigns a unique ID and port priority to each port. The ID
and priority are not configurable.
•
QFabric systems support a special LAG called an FCoE LAG, which enables you to
transport FCoE traffic and regular Ethernet traffic (traffic that is not FCoE traffic) across
the same link aggregation bundle. Standard LAGs use a hashing algorithm to determine
which physical link in the LAG is used for a transmission, so communication between
two devices might use different physical links in the LAG for different transmissions.
An FCoE LAG ensures that FCoE traffic uses the same physical link in the LAG for
requests and replies in order to preserve the virtual point-to-point link between the
FCoE device converged network adapter (CNA) and the FC SAN switch across a QFabric
system Node device. An FCoE LAG does not provide load balancing or link redundancy
for FCoE traffic. However, regular Ethernet traffic uses the standard hashing algorithm
and receives the usual LAG benefits of load balancing and link redundancy in an FCoE
LAG. See Understanding FCoE LAGs for more information.
Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP)
LACP is one method of bundling several physical interfaces to form one logical aggregated
Ethernet interface. The LACP mode can be active or passive. The transmitting link is
known as the actor, and the receiving link is known as the partner. If the actor and partner
are both in passive mode, they do not exchange LACP packets, and the aggregated
Ethernet links do not come up. If either the actor or partner is active, they do exchange
LACP packets. By default, LACP is in passive mode on aggregated Ethernet interfaces.
To initiate transmission of LACP packets and response to LACP packets, you must enable
LACP active mode. You can configure Ethernet links to actively transmit protocol data
units (PDUs), or you can configure the links to passively transmit them, sending out LACP
PDUs only when they receive them from another link. You can configure both VLAN-tagged
and untagged aggregated Ethernet interfaces without LACP enabled. LACP is defined
in IEEE 802.3ad, Aggregation of Multiple Link Segments.
LACP was designed to achieve the following:
•
Automatic addition and deletion of individual links to the LAG without user intervention.
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•
Link monitoring to check whether both ends of the bundle are connected to the correct
group.
When a dual-homed server is deployed with a switch, the network interface cards form
a LAG with the switch. During a server upgrade, the server may not be able to exchange
LACP PDUs. In such a situation you can configure an interface to be in the up state even
if no PDUs are exchanged. Use the force-up statement to configure an interface when
the peer has limited LACP capability. The interface selects the associated LAG by default,
whether the switch and peer are both in active or passive mode. When there are no
received PDUs, the partner is considered to be working in the passive mode. Therefore,
LACP PDU transmissions are controlled by the transmitting link.
If the remote end of the LAG link is a security device, LACP might not be supported
because security devices require a deterministic configuration. In this case, do not configure
LACP. All links in the LAG are permanently operational unless the switch detects a link
failure within the Ethernet physical layer or data link layers.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation Between a QFX Series Product and an
Aggregation Switch on page 132
•
Verifying the Status of a LAG Interface on page 142
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP
For aggregated Ethernet interfaces, you can configure the Link Aggregation Control
Protocol (LACP). LACP is one method of bundling several physical interfaces to form
one logical interface. You can configure aggregated Ethernet with or without LACP
enabled.
Before you configure LACP, be sure you have configured the aggregated Ethernet
bundles—also known as link aggregation groups (LAGs).
When LACP is enabled, the local and remote sides of the aggregated Ethernet links
exchange protocol data units (PDUs), containing information about the state of the link.
You can configure Ethernet links to actively transmit PDUs, or you can configure the links
to passively transmit them, sending out LACP PDUs only when they receive them from
another link. One side of the link must be configured as active for the link to be up.
NOTE: Do not add LACP to a LAG if the remote end of the LAG link is a security
device, unless the security device supports LACP. Security devices often do
not support LACP because they require a deterministic configuration.
To configure LACP:
1.
128
Enable the LACP mode:
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Understanding LAGs and LACP
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set aex aggregated-ether-options lacp mode
For example, to specify the mode as active, execute the following command:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set aex aggregated-ether-options lacp active
NOTE: LACP decides active and back up state of links. When configuring
LACP, state of the backup link should not be configured manually as down.
2. Specify the interval and speed at which the interfaces send LACP packets:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set aex aggregated-ether-options lacp periodic interval
For example, to specify the interval as fast, execute the following command:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set aex aggregated-ether-options lacp periodic fast
Configuring Link Aggregation
Use the link aggregation feature to aggregate one or more links to form a virtual link or
aggregation group. The MAC client can treat this virtual link as if it were a single link. Link
aggregation increases bandwidth, provides graceful degradation as failure occurs, and
increases link availability.
NOTE: An interface with an already configured IP address cannot form part
of the aggregation group.
NOTE: On QFX5100, QFX5200, EX4600, QFX10002 , and QFX10008
standalone switches and on QFX5100 Virtual Chassis and EX4600 Virtual
Chassis, you can configure a mixed rate of link speeds for the aggregated
Ethernet bundle. Load balancing will not work if you configure link speeds
that are not supported. (Platform support depends on the Junos OS release
in your installation.)
1.
Creating an Aggregated Ethernet Interface on page 130
2. Configuring the VLAN Name and VLAN ID Number on page 130
3. Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP on page 131
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Creating an Aggregated Ethernet Interface
To create an aggregated Ethernet interface:
1.
Specify the number of aggregated Ethernet interfaces to be created:
[edit chassis]
user@switch# set aggregated-devices interfaces device-count device-count
For example, to specify 5:
[edit chassis]
user@switch# set aggregated-devices interfaces device-count
2. Specify the minimum number of links for the aggregated Ethernet interface (aex),
that is, the defined bundle, to be labeled “up”:
NOTE: By default only one link must be up for the bundle to be labeled
“up”.
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set interface-name aggregated-ether-options minimum-links minimum-links
For example, to specify 5:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set interface-name aggregated-ether-options minimum-links 5
3. Specify the link speed for the aggregated Ethernet bundle:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set interface-name aggregated-ether-options link-speed link-speed
For example, to specify 10g:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set interface-name aggregated-ether-options link-speed 10g
4. Specify the members to be included within the aggregated Ethernet bundle:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set interface-name ether-options 802.3ad aex
user@switch# set interface-name ether-options 802.3ad aex
Configuring the VLAN Name and VLAN ID Number
NOTE: VLANs are not supported on OCX Series switches.
[edit vlans]
user@switch# set vlan-name vlan-id vlan-id-number
130
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Chapter 7: Understanding LAGs and LACP
For example, 100.
NOTE: When you add or remove a vlan from a LAG interface, the interface
goes down and comes back (flaps). The flapping happens when a low speed
SFP is plugged into a relatively high speed port. To avoid flapping, configure
the port speed to match the speed of the SFP.
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP
For aggregated Ethernet interfaces, you can configure the Link Aggregation Control
Protocol (LACP). LACP is one method of bundling several physical interfaces to form
one logical interface. You can configure aggregated Ethernet with or without LACP
enabled.
Before you configure LACP, be sure you have configured the aggregated Ethernet
bundles—also known as link aggregation groups (LAGs).
When LACP is enabled, the local and remote sides of the aggregated Ethernet links
exchange protocol data units (PDUs), containing information about the state of the link.
You can configure Ethernet links to actively transmit PDUs, or you can configure the links
to passively transmit them, sending out LACP PDUs only when they receive them from
another link. One side of the link must be configured as active for the link to be up.
NOTE: Do not add LACP to a LAG if the remote end of the LAG link is a security
device, unless the security device supports LACP. Security devices often do
not support LACP because they require a deterministic configuration.
To configure LACP:
1.
Enable the LACP mode:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set aex aggregated-ether-options lacp mode
For example, to specify the mode as active, execute the following command:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set aex aggregated-ether-options lacp active
NOTE: LACP decides active and back up state of links. When configuring
LACP, state of the backup link should not be configured manually as down.
2. Specify the interval and speed at which the interfaces send LACP packets:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set aex aggregated-ether-options lacp periodic interval
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For example, to specify the interval as fast, execute the following command:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set aex aggregated-ether-options lacp periodic fast
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding Interface Naming Conventions on page 5
•
Configuring an FCoE LAG
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation Between a QFX Series Product and an
Aggregation Switch on page 132
•
Verifying the Status of a LAG Interface on page 142
•
Verifying That LACP Is Configured Correctly and Bundle Members Are Exchanging LACP
Protocol Packets on page 142
•
show lacp statistics interfaces (View) on page 461
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation Between a QFX Series Product and an
Aggregation Switch
A QFX Series product allows you to combine multiple Ethernet links into one logical
interface for higher bandwidth and redundancy. The ports that are combined in this
manner are referred to as a link aggregation group (LAG) or bundle. The number of
Ethernet links you can combine into a LAG depends on your QFX Series product model.
You can configure LAGs to connect a QFX Series product to other switches, like
aggregation switches, servers, or routers. This example describes how to configure LAGs
to connect a QFX3500, QFX3600, EX4600, QFX5100, and QFX10002 switch to an
aggregation switch.
•
Requirements on page 132
•
Overview and Topology on page 133
•
Configuration on page 133
•
Verification on page 136
•
Troubleshooting on page 136
Requirements
This example uses the following software and hardware components:
132
•
Junos OS Release 11.1 or later for the QFX3500 and QFX3600 switches, Junos OS 13.2
or later for the QFX5100 and EX4600 switch. and Junos OS Release 15.1X53-D10 for
QFX10002 switches.
•
One QFX3500, QFX3600, EX4600, QFX5100, QFX10002 switch.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Understanding LAGs and LACP
Overview and Topology
In this example, the switch has one LAG comprising two 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.
This LAG is configured in port mode trunk so that the switch and the VLAN to which it
has been assigned can send and receive traffic.
Configuring the Ethernet interfaces as LAGs has the following advantages:
•
If one physical port is lost for any reason (a cable is unplugged or a switch port fails),
the logical port transparently continues to function over the remaining physical port.
•
Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) can optionally be configured for link
monitoring and automatic addition and deletion of individual links without user
intervention.
NOTE: If the remote end of the LAG link is a security device, LACP might not
be supported because security devices require a deterministic configuration.
In this case, do not configure LACP. All links in the LAG are permanently
operational unless the switch detects a link failure within the Ethernet physical
layer or data link layers.
The topology used in this example consists of one switch with a LAG configured between
two of its 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces. The switch is connected to an aggregation
switch.
Aggregation
Switch
xe-0/0/2
ae0
g040704
xe-0/0/3
Table 23 on page 133 details the topology used in this configuration example.
Table 23: Components of the Topology for Configuring a LAG Between a QFX3500 Switch and
Aggregation Switch
Hostname
Base Hardware
Trunk Port
switch
QFX3500, QFX3600, EX4600,
QFX5100, or QFX10002 switch
ae0 is configured as a trunk port and
combines the following two interfaces:
xe-0/0/2 and
xe-0/0/3
.
Configuration
To configure a LAG between two 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces:
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure a LAG between two 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces on a switch, copy
the following commands and paste them into the switch terminal window:
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NOTE: If you are configuring a LAG using Enhanced Layer 2 software, use the
interface-mode statement instead of the port-mode statement. For ELS details,
see Getting Started with Enhanced Layer 2 Software.
[edit]
set chassis aggregated-devices ethernet device-count 1
set interfaces ae0 aggregated-ether-options minimum-links 1
set interfaces ae0 aggregated-ether-options link-speed 10g
set interfaces ae0 unit 0 family ethernet-switching vlan members green
set interfaces xe-0/0/2 ether-options 802.ad ae0
set interfaces xe-0/0/3 ether-options 802.ad ae0
set interfaces ae0 unit 0 family ethernet-switching port-mode trunk
set interfaces ae0 aggregated-ether-options lacp active
set interfaces ae0 aggregated-ether-options lacp periodic fast
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To configure a LAG between a QFX Series switch and an aggregation switch:
1.
Specify the number of LAGs to be created on the switch:
[edit chassis]
user@switch# set aggregated-devices ethernet device-count 1
2.
Specify the number of links that need to be present for the ae0 LAG interface to be
up:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set ae0 aggregated-ether-options minimum-links 1
3.
Specify the media speed of the ae0 link:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set ae0 aggregated-ether-options link-speed 10g
4.
Specify the members to be included within the aggregated Ethernet bundle:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set interfaces xe-0/0/2 ether-options 802.ad ae0
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set interfaces xe-0/0/3 ether-options 802.ad ae0
5.
Assign a port mode of trunk to the ae0 link:
NOTE: If you are configuring a LAG on the QFX5100 switch, use the
interface-mode statement instead of the port-mode statement. For ELS
details, see Getting Started with Enhanced Layer 2 Software.
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set ae0 unit 0 family ethernet-switching port-mode trunk
134
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Chapter 7: Understanding LAGs and LACP
or
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set ae0 unit 0 family ethernet-switching interface-mode trunk
6.
Assign the LAG to a VLAN:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set ae0 unit 0 family ethernet-switching vlan members green vlan-id 200
7.
(Optional): Designate one side of the LAG as active for LACP:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set ae0 aggregated-ether-options lacp active
8.
(Optional): Designate the interval and speed at which the interfaces send LACP
packets:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set ae0 aggregated-ether-options lacp periodic fast
Results
Display the results of the configuration on a QFX3500 or QFX3600 switch:
[edit]
chassis {
aggregated-devices {
ethernet {
device-count 1;
}
}
}
green {
vlan-id 200;
}
}
interfaces {
ae0 {
aggregated-ether-options {
link-speed 10g;
minimum-links 1;
}
unit 0 {
family ethernet-switching {
port-mode trunk;
vlan {
members green;
}
}
}
xe-0/0/2 {
ether-options {
802.ad ae0;
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}
}
xe-0/0/3 {
ether-options {
802.ad ae0;
}
}
}
Verification
To verify that switching is operational and one LAG has been created, perform these
tasks:
•
Verifying That LAG ae0.0 Has Been Created on page 136
•
Verifying That LAG ae0 Has Been Created on page 136
Verifying That LAG ae0.0 Has Been Created
Purpose
Action
Verify that LAG ae0.0 has been created on the switch.
show interfaces ae0 terse
Interface
ae0
ae0.0
Meaning
Admin Link Proto
Local
up
up
up
up eth-switch
Remote
The output confirms that the ae0.0 link is up and shows the family and IP address assigned
to this link.
Verifying That LAG ae0 Has Been Created
Purpose
Action
Verify that LAG ae0 has been created on the switch
show interfaces ae0 terse
Interface
ae0
ae0.0
Meaning
Admin Link Proto
Local
up
down
up
down eth-switch
Remote
The output shows that the ae0.0 link is down.
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting a LAG That Is Down
Problem
136
The show interfaces terse command shows that the LAG is down.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Understanding LAGs and LACP
Solution
Related
Documentation
Check the following:
•
Verify that there is no configuration mismatch.
•
Verify that all member ports are up.
•
Verify that a LAG is part of family ethernet switching (Layer 2 LAG) or family inet (Layer
3 LAG).
•
Verify that the LAG member is connected to the correct LAG at the other end.
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Verifying the Status of a LAG Interface on page 142
•
Verifying That LACP Is Configured Correctly and Bundle Members Are Exchanging LACP
Protocol Packets on page 142
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation with LACP Between a QFX Series Product and
an Aggregation Switch on page 137
•
show lacp statistics interfaces (View) on page 461
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation with LACP Between a QFX Series Product and
an Aggregation Switch
QFX Series products allow you to combine multiple Ethernet links into one logical interface
for higher bandwidth and redundancy. The ports that are combined in this manner are
referred to as a link aggregation group (LAG) or bundle. The number of Ethernet links
you can combine into a LAG depends on your QFX Series product model. On a standalone
switch, you can group up to 32 Ethernet interfaces to form a LAG. On a QFabric system,
you can group up to 8 Ethernet interfaces to form a LAG. QFX Series products allow you
to further enhance these links by configuring Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP).
This example describes how to overlay LACP on the LAG configurations that were created
in “Example: Configuring Link Aggregation Between a QFX Series Product and an
Aggregation Switch” on page 132:
•
Requirements on page 137
•
Overview and Topology on page 138
•
Configuring LACP for the LAG on the QFX Series on page 138
•
Verification on page 139
•
Troubleshooting on page 140
Requirements
This example uses the following software and hardware components:
•
Junos OS Release 11.1 or later for the QFX3500 switch, Junos OS Release 12.1 or later
for the QFX3600 switch, Junos OS Release 13.2 or later for the QFX5100 switch, and
Junos OS Release 15.1X53-D10 or later for the QFX10002 switch.
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•
One QFX3500, QFX3600, QFX5100, QFX10002 switch.
Before you configure LACP, be sure you have:
•
Configured the ports on the switches as trunk ports.
•
Configured the LAG.
Overview and Topology
The topology in this example is exactly the same as the topology used in the Configuring
a LAG Between a QFX Switch and an Aggregation Switch example. This example shows
how to use LACP to enhance the LAG functionality.
LACP exchanges are made between actors (the transmitting link) and partners (the
receiving link). The LACP mode can be either active or passive.
NOTE: If the actor and partner are both in passive mode, they do not exchange
LACP packets, which results in the aggregated Ethernet links not coming up.
By default, LACP is in passive mode. To initiate transmission of LACP packets
and responses to LACP packets, you must enable LACP in active mode.
By default, the actor and partner send LACP packets every second. You can configure
the interval at which the interfaces send LACP packets by including the periodic statement
at the [edit interfaces interface-name aggregated-ether-options lacp] hierarchy level.
The interval can be fast (every second) or slow (every 30 seconds).
Configuring LACP for the LAG on the QFX Series
To configure LACP for a QFX Series LAG, perform these tasks:
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure LACP for the access switch LAGs, copy the following commands
and paste them into the switch terminal window:
[edit]
set interfaces ae0 aggregated-ether-options lacp active periodic fast
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To configure LACP for LAG ae0 :
1.
Specify the aggregated Ethernet options for the LAG:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set ae0 aggregated-ether-options lacp active periodic fast
Results
Display the results of the configuration:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# show
ae0 {
138
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Chapter 7: Understanding LAGs and LACP
aggregated-ether-options {
lacp {
active;
periodic fast;
}
}
}
Verification
To verify that LACP packets are being exchanged, perform the following tasks:
•
Verifying the LACP Settings on page 139
•
Verifying That the LACP Packets Are Being Exchanged on page 139
Verifying the LACP Settings
Purpose
Action
Verify that LACP has been set up correctly.
Use the show lacp interfaces interface-name command to check that LACP has been
enabled as active on one end.
user@switch> show lacp interfaces xe-0/02
Aggregated interface: ae0
LACP state:
Role
Def
Dist
Col
Syn
Aggr
Timeout
Activity
xe-0/0/2
Actor
No
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
Fast
Active
xe-0/0/2
Partner
No
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
Fast
Passive
LACP protocol:
xe-0/0/2
Meaning
Exp
Receive State
Defaulted
Transmit State
Mux State
Fast periodic
Detached
The output indicates that LACP has been set up correctly and is active at one end.
Verifying That the LACP Packets Are Being Exchanged
Purpose
Action
Verify that LACP packets are being exchanged.
Use the show interfaces aex statistics command to display LACP information.
user@switch> show interfaces ae0 statistics
Physical interface: ae0, Enabled, Physical link is Down
Interface index: 153, SNMP ifIndex: 30
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: Unspecified, Loopback: Disabled,
Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Disabled, Minimum links needed: 1,
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Minimum bandwidth needed: 0
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Hardware-Down SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x0
Current address: 02:19:e2:50:45:e0, Hardware address: 02:19:e2:50:45:e0
Last flapped
: Never
Statistics last cleared: Never
Input packets : 0
Output packets: 0
Input errors: 0, Output errors: 0
Logical interface ae0.0 (Index 71) (SNMP ifIndex 34)
Flags: Hardware-Down Device-Down SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: ENET2
Statistics
Packets
pps
Bytes
bps
Bundle:
Input :
0
0
0
0
Output:
0
0
0
0
Protocol inet
Flags: None
Addresses, Flags: Dest-route-down Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 10.10.10/8, Local: 10.10.10.1, Broadcast: 10.10.10.255
Meaning
The output here shows that the link is down and that no PDUs are being exchanged.
Troubleshooting
To troubleshoot a nonworking LACP link, perform these tasks:
•
Troubleshooting a Nonworking LACP Link on page 140
Troubleshooting a Nonworking LACP Link
Problem
The LACP link is not working.
Solution
Check the following:
Related
Documentation
140
•
Remove the LACP configuration and verify whether the static LAG is up.
•
Verify that LACP is configured at both ends.
•
Verify that LACP is not passive at both ends.
•
Verify whether LACP protocol data units (PDUs) are being exchanged by running the
monitor traffic-interface lag-member detail command.
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Verifying the Status of a LAG Interface on page 142
•
Verifying That LACP Is Configured Correctly and Bundle Members Are Exchanging LACP
Protocol Packets on page 142
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation Between a QFX Series Product and an
Aggregation Switch on page 132
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Understanding LAGs and LACP
•
Example: Configuring an FCoE LAG on a Redundant Server Node Group
•
show lacp statistics interfaces (View) on page 461
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Verifying the Status of a LAG Interface
Purpose
Action
Verify that a link aggregation group (LAG) (ae0) has been created on the switch.
To verify that the ae0 LAG has been created:
[edit interfaces]
show interfaces ae0 terse
Interface
Meaning
Related
Documentation
Admin
Link
ae0
up
up
ae0.0
up
up
Proto
inet
Local
Remote
10.10.10.2/8
The output confirms that the ae0 link is up and shows the family and IP address assigned
to this link.
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Verifying That LACP Is Configured Correctly and Bundle Members Are Exchanging LACP
Protocol Packets on page 142
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation Between a QFX Series Product and an
Aggregation Switch on page 132
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation with LACP Between a QFX Series Product and
an Aggregation Switch on page 137
•
show lacp statistics interfaces (View) on page 461
Verifying That LACP Is Configured Correctly and Bundle Members Are Exchanging
LACP Protocol Packets
Verify that LACP has been set up correctly and that the bundle members are transmitting
LACP protocol packets.
1.
Verifying the LACP Setup on page 142
2. Verifying That LACP Packets Are Being Exchanged on page 143
Verifying the LACP Setup
Purpose
142
Verify that the LACP has been set up correctly.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Understanding LAGs and LACP
Action
To verify that LACP has been enabled as active on one end:
user@switch>show lacp interfaces xe-0/0/0
Aggregated interface: ae0
LACP state:
Role
Exp
Def Dist Col Syn
xe-0/1/0
Actor No
Yes
No
No
No
xe-0/1/0
PartnerNo
Yes
No
No
No
LACP protocol:
Receive State
Transmit State
xe-0/1/0
Defaulted
Fast periodic
Meaning
Aggr
Yes
Yes
Timeout Activity
Fast
Active
Fast
Passive
Mux
State
Detached
This example shows that LACP has been configured with one side as active and the other
as passive. When LACP is enabled, one side must be set as active in order for the bundled
link to be up.
Verifying That LACP Packets Are Being Exchanged
Purpose
Action
Verify that LACP packets are being exchanged between interfaces.
Use the show lacp statistics interfaces interface-name command to display LACP BPDU
exchange information.
show lacp statistics interfaces ae0
Aggregated interface: ae0
LACP Statistics:
LACP Rx
xe-0/0/2
1352
xe-0/0/3
1352
Meaning
Related
Documentation
LACP Tx
2035
2056
Unknown Rx
0
0
Illegal Rx
0
0
The output here shows that the link is up and that PDUs are being exchanged.
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Verifying the Status of a LAG Interface on page 142
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation Between a QFX Series Product and an
Aggregation Switch on page 132
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation with LACP Between a QFX Series Product and
an Aggregation Switch on page 137
•
show lacp statistics interfaces (View) on page 461
Troubleshooting an Aggregated Ethernet Interface
Problem
Description: The show interfaces terse command shows that the LAG is down.
Solution
Check the following:
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•
Verify that there is no configuration mismatch.
•
Verify that all member ports are up.
•
Verify that a LAG is part of family ethernet-switching (Layer 2 LAG) or family inet (Layer
3 LAG).
NOTE: Layer 2 LAGs are not supported on OCX Series switches.
Related
Documentation
144
•
Verify that the LAG member is connected to the correct LAG at the other end.
•
Verify that the LAG members belong to the same switch.
•
Verifying the Status of a LAG Interface on page 142
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation Between a QFX Series Product and an
Aggregation Switch on page 132
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 7
LAG Local Link Options
•
Understanding Local Link Bias on page 147
•
Understanding Local Minimum Links on page 151
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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146
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CHAPTER 8
Understanding Local Link Bias
•
Understanding Local Link Bias on page 147
•
Configuring Local Link Bias (CLI Procedure) on page 149
Understanding Local Link Bias
NOTE: The QFX5200 switches do not support Virtual Chassis or Virtual
Chassis ports.
Local link bias conserves bandwidth on Virtual Chassis ports (VCPs) by using local links
to forward unicast traffic exiting a Virtual Chassis or Virtual Chassis Fabric (VCF) that
has a Link Aggregation group (LAG) bundle composed of member links on different
member switches in the same Virtual Chassis or VCF. A local link is a member link in the
LAG bundle that is on the member switch that received the traffic. Because traffic is
received and forwarded on the same member switch when local link bias is enabled, no
VCP bandwidth is consumed by traffic traversing the VCPs to exit the Virtual Chassis or
VCF using a different member link in the LAG bundle. The traffic flow of traffic exiting a
Virtual Chassis or VCF over a LAG bundle when local link bias is enabled is illustrated in
Figure 1 on page 147.
Figure 1: Egress Traffic Flow with Local Link Bias
When local link bias is disabled, egress traffic exiting a Virtual Chassis or VCF on a LAG
bundle can be forwarded out of any member link in the LAG bundle. Traffic forwarding
decisions are made by an internal algorithm that attempts to load-balance traffic between
the member links in the bundle. VCP bandwidth is frequently consumed by egress traffic
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when local link bias is disabled because the egress traffic traverses the VCPs to reach
the destination egress member link in the LAG bundle. The traffic flow of traffic exiting
a Virtual Chassis or VCF over a LAG bundle when local link bias is disabled is illustrated
in Figure 2 on page 148.
Figure 2: Egress Traffic Flow without Local Link Bias
Starting in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D25, local link bias can be enabled globally for all
LAG bundles in a Virtual Chassis or VCF, or individually per LAG bundle in a Virtual Chassis.
In prior Junos OS releases, local link bias could be enabled individually per LAG bundle
only.
A Virtual Chassis or VCF that has multiple LAG bundles can contain bundles that have
and have not enabled local link bias. Local link bias only impacts the forwarding of unicast
traffic exiting a Virtual Chassis or VCF; ingress traffic handling is not impacted by the
local link bias setting. Egress multicast, unknown unicast, and broadcast traffic exiting
a Virtual Chassis or VCF over a LAG bundle is not impacted by the local link bias setting
and is always load-balanced among the member links. Local link bias is disabled, by
default.
You should enable local link bias if you want to conserve VCP bandwidth by always
forwarding egress unicast traffic on a LAG bundle out of a local link. You should not
enable local link bias if you want egress traffic load-balanced across the member links
in the LAG bundle as it exits the Virtual Chassis or VCF.
Release History Table
Related
Documentation
148
•
Release
Description
14.1X53-D25
Starting in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D25, local link bias can be enabled
globally for all LAG bundles in a Virtual Chassis or VCF, or individually per
LAG bundle in a Virtual Chassis.
Configuring Local Link Bias (CLI Procedure) on page 149
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 8: Understanding Local Link Bias
Configuring Local Link Bias (CLI Procedure)
Local link bias is used to conserve bandwidth on Virtual Chassis ports (VCPs) by using
local links to forward unicast traffic exiting a Virtual Chassis or Virtual Chassis Fabric
(VCF) that has a Link Aggregation group (LAG) bundle composed of member links on
different member switches in the same Virtual Chassis or VCF. A local link is a member
link in the LAG bundle that is on the member switch that received the traffic. Because
traffic is received and forwarded on the same member switch when local link bias is
enabled, no VCP bandwidth is consumed by traffic traversing the VCPs to exit the Virtual
Chassis or VCF on a different member link in the LAG bundle.
You should enable local link bias if you want to conserve VCP bandwidth by always
forwarding egress unicast traffic on a LAG out of a local link. You should not enable local
link bias if you want egress traffic load-balanced as it exits the Virtual Chassis or VCF.
Local link bias can be enabled or disabled globally or per LAG bundle on a Virtual Chassis
or VCF. In cases where local link bias is enabled at both the global and per LAG bundle
levels, the per LAG bundle configuration takes precedence. For instance, if local link bias
is enabled globally but disabled on a LAG bundle named ae1, local link bias is disabled
on the LAG bundle named ae1.
To enable local link bias on a LAG bundle:
[edit]
user@switch# set interface aex aggregated-ether-options local-bias
where aex is the name of the aggregated Ethernet link bundle.
For instance, to enable local link bias on aggregated Ethernet interface ae0:
[edit]
user@switch# set interface ae0 aggregated-ether-options local-bias
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding Local Link Bias on page 147
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150
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CHAPTER 9
Understanding Local Minimum Links
•
Understanding Local Minimum Links on page 151
Understanding Local Minimum Links
NOTE: When describing the local minimum links feature, member links are
links that are part of an aggregated Ethernet bundle (LAG), member switches
are chassis that are members in a Virtual Chassis or Virtual Chassis Fabric
(VCF), and local member links (or simply local links) are member links of the
same LAG that are local to a particular Virtual Chassis or VCF member switch.
A link aggregation group (LAG) can include member links on different chassis, and multiple
local member links on member switches in a Virtual Chassis or VCF. If member links in
the LAG fail, the LAG continues to carry traffic over the remaining member links that are
still active. When multiple member links are local to one chassis and one or more of those
links fail, LAG traffic coming into that chassis will be redistributed over the remaining
local links. However, the remaining active local links can suffer traffic loss if the failed
links result in sufficiently reduced total bandwidth through the chassis.
Introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D40, the local minimum links feature helps avoid
traffic loss due to asymmetric bandwidth on LAG forwarding paths through a Virtual
Chassis or VCF member switch when one or more local member links have failed.
NOTE: The local minimum links feature is supported on Virtual Chassis or
VCFs with QFX5100 member switches only.
Based on a user-configured threshold value, when one or more member links fail, this
feature marks any remaining active local links as “down,” forcing LAG traffic to be
redistributed only through member links on other chassis. To enable this feature on a
particular aggregated Ethernet interface (aex), you set the local-minimum-links-threshold
configuration statement with a threshold value that represents the percentage of local
member links that must be up on a chassis for any local member links on that chassis to
continue to be active in the aggregated Ethernet bundle.
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The configured threshold value:
•
Applies to a specified aggregated Ethernet interface.
•
Applies to any chassis that has links in the specified aggregated Ethernet bundle.
•
Represents a percentage of active local member links out of the total number of local
member links for the chassis.
When the local minimum links feature is enabled for a LAG, if one or more member links
on a chassis fail, the feature compares the percentage of local member links that are
still up to the threshold. If the percentage of “up” links is less than the threshold, the
feature forces down the remaining active local links, and no traffic for the aggregated
Ethernet interface will be forwarded through the member links on that chassis. If the
percentage of links that are “up” is greater than or equal to the threshold, the status of
the active links remains unchanged, and LAG traffic will continue to be distributed over
available member links on that chassis.
For example, consider a member switch in a Virtual Chassis Fabric that has four links
that are active member links of a LAG, and the local minimum links feature is enabled
with the threshold set to 60:
•
If one member link goes down, 75 percent (three out of four) of the links are still up,
which is greater than the threshold (60 percent), so the remaining links stay up.
•
If two member links go down, only 50 percent (two out of four) of the links are “up”,
so the local minimum links feature forces the remaining two active links “down.” The
same is true if three member links fail, the remaining link is forced down as well.
The local minimum links feature tracks whether links are down because the link failed
or the link was forced down, as well as when active, failed, or forced-down member links
are added or removed. As a result, the feature can respond dynamically when:
•
Failed local member links come back up.
•
You change the configured threshold value, or you disable the local minimum links
feature.
•
Adding or removing local member links changes the total number of local member
links, or changes the ratio of “up” links to total local member links as compared to the
threshold.
For example, if a failed member link causes all local member links to be forced down,
then that link comes back up and brings the percentage of “up” links above the current
threshold, the system adjusts the status of the forced-down links to mark them up again
as well.
152
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Chapter 9: Understanding Local Minimum Links
You should enable this feature only if your system closely manages ingress and egress
traffic forwarding paths on LAGs for individual chassis in a Virtual Chassis and VCFs,
especially where local link bias is also enabled.
•
Configuring Local Minimum Links on page 153
•
Local Minimum Links Effect on LAG Minimum Links on page 153
•
Local Minimum Links and Local Link Bias on page 153
Configuring Local Minimum Links
The local minimum links feature is disabled by default. To enable this feature for a LAG
bundle (which then applies to any chassis that has local member links in the LAG), simply
configure a threshold value for the LAG interface, as follows:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set aggregated-ether-options aex local-minimum-links-threshold threshold-value
To update the threshold value, use the same command with the new threshold value.
To disable the local minimum links feature, delete the local-minimum-links-threshold
statement from the configuration. Any links that were forced down by this feature are
automatically brought up again within a few seconds.
Local Minimum Links Effect on LAG Minimum Links
The per-chassis local minimum links threshold is similar to the minimum-links setting
for a LAG bundle, which configures the minimum number of member links in the bundle
that should be up for the aggregated Ethernet interface as a whole to be considered “up.”
(See “Configuring Link Aggregation” on page 129 for details.) Local member links that fail
or are forced down by the local minimum links feature contribute to the count of “up”
links for the LAG as a whole. As a result, this feature can cause the entire LAG to be
brought down if enough local links are forced down. Enabling and configuring the local
minimum links feature is independent of LAG minimum links configuration, but you should
carefully consider the combined potential effect on the LAG as a whole when configuring
both features.
Local Minimum Links and Local Link Bias
The local minimum links and local link bias features operate independently, but can
influence each other’s traffic forwarding results. For example, when local link bias is
enabled and would otherwise favor forwarding traffic out of local links in the aggregated
Ethernet bundle, but those links are down because the local minimum links threshold is
not currently met, outgoing traffic will be redirected through the VCPs to other Virtual
Chassis or VCF member switches for forwarding. In that case, unanticipated increased
VCP traffic can impact Virtual Chassis or VCF performance.
See “Understanding Local Link Bias” on page 147 for details on the local link bias feature.
Related
Documentation
•
local-minimum-links-threshold on page 304
•
Understanding Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces and LACP on page 125
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154
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Understanding Local Link Bias on page 147
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 8
Redundant Trunk Groups
•
Understanding Redundant Trunk Groups on page 157
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156
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CHAPTER 10
Understanding Redundant Trunk Groups
•
Understanding Redundant Trunk Links (Legacy RTG Configuration) on page 158
•
Example: Configuring Redundant Trunk Links for Faster Recovery on Devices with ELS
Support on page 160
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Understanding Redundant Trunk Links (Legacy RTG Configuration)
In a typical enterprise network composed of distribution and access layers, a redundant
trunk link provides a simple solution for network recovery when a trunk port on a switch
goes down. In that case, traffic is routed to another trunk port, keeping network
convergence time to a minimum.
NOTE: For information on redundant trunk link configurations that include
Q-in-Q support and use LAGs with link protection, see Q-in-Q Support on
Redundant Trunk Links Using LAGs with Link Protection.
To configure a redundant trunk link, create a redundant trunk group. The redundant trunk
group is configured on the access switch and contains two links: a primary or active link,
and a secondary link. If the active link fails, the secondary link automatically starts
forwarding data traffic without waiting for normal spanning-tree protocol convergence.
Data traffic is forwarded only on the active link. Data traffic on the secondary link is
dropped and shown as dropped packets when you issue the operational mode command
show interfaces interface-name extensive.
While data traffic is blocked on the secondary link, Layer 2 control traffic is still permitted.
For example, an LLDP session can be run between two switches on the secondary link.
Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) is enabled by default on the switches to create a
loop-free topology, but an interface is not allowed to be in both a redundant trunk group
and in a spanning-tree protocol topology at the same time. You must disable RSTP on
an interface if a redundant trunk group is configured on that interface. For example, in
Figure 3 on page 159, in addition to disabling RSTP on the Switch 3 interfaces, you must
also disable RSTP on the Switch 1 and Switch 2 interfaces connected to Switch 3.
Spanning-tree protocols can, however, continue operating on other interfaces on those
switches—for example on the link between Switch 1 and Switch 2.
Figure 3 on page 159 shows three switches in a basic topology for redundant trunk links.
Switch 1 and Switch 2 make up the distribution layer, and Switch 3 makes up the access
layer. Switch 3 is connected to the distribution layer through trunk ports ge-0/0/9.0 (Link
1) and ge-0/0/10.0 (Link 2). Link 1 and Link 2 are in a redundant trunk group called group1.
Link 1 is designated as the primary link. Traffic flows between Switch 3 in the access layer
and Switch 1 in the distribution layer through Link 1. While Link 1 is active, Link 2 blocks
traffic.
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Chapter 10: Understanding Redundant Trunk Groups
Figure 3: Redundant Trunk Group, Link 1 Active
Figure 4 on page 159 illustrates how the redundant trunk link topology works when the
primary link goes down.
Figure 4: Redundant Trunk Group, Link 2 Active
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When Link 1 between Switch 1 and Switch 3 goes down, Link 2 takes over as the active
link. Traffic between the access layer and the distribution layer is then automatically
switched to Link 2 between Switch 1 and Switch 2.
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Configuring Redundant Trunk Links for Faster Recovery
•
Example: Configuring Redundant Trunk Links for Faster Recovery on page 160
Example: Configuring Redundant Trunk Links for Faster Recovery on Devices with ELS
Support
NOTE: This example uses Junos OS for EX Series switches or QFX Series with
support for the Enhanced Layer 2 Software (ELS) configuration style.. For
ELS details, see Getting Started with Enhanced Layer 2 Software.
You can manage network convergence by configuring both a primary link and a secondary
link on a switch; this is called a redundant trunk group (RTG). If the primary link in a
redundant trunk group fails, it passes its known MAC address locations to the secondary
link, which automatically takes over after one minute.
This example describes how to create a redundant trunk group with a primary and a
secondary link:
•
Requirements on page 160
•
Overview and Topology on page 161
•
Disabling RSTP on Switches 1 and 2 on page 163
•
Configuring Redundant Trunk Links on Switch 3 on page 163
•
Verification on page 164
Requirements
This example uses the following hardware and software components:
•
Two EX Series or QFX Series distribution switches
•
One EX Series or QFX Series access switch
•
The appropriate software release for your platform:
•
For EX Series switches: Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D10 or later
•
For the QFX Series: Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D15 or later
Before you configure the redundant trunk links network on the access and distribution
switches, be sure you have:
160
•
Configured interfaces ge-0/0/9 and ge-0/0/10 on the access switch, Switch 3, as
trunk interfaces.
•
Configured one trunk interface on each distribution switch, Switch 1 and Switch 2.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Understanding Redundant Trunk Groups
•
Connected the three switches as shown in the topology for this example (see
Figure 5 on page 162).
Overview and Topology
In a typical enterprise network composed of distribution and access layers, a redundant
trunk link provides a simple solution for trunk interface network recovery. When a trunk
interface fails, data traffic is routed to another trunk interface after one minute, thereby
keeping network convergence time to a minimum.
This example shows the configuration of a redundant trunk group that includes one
primary link (and its interface) and one unspecified link (and its interface) that serves as
the secondary link.
A second type of redundant trunk group, not illustrated in the example, consists of two
unspecified links (and their interfaces); in this case, neither of the links is primary. The
software selects an active link by comparing the port numbers of the two links and
activating the link with the higher port number. For example, if the two link interfaces use
interfaces ge-0/1/0 and ge-0/1/1, the software activates ge-0/1/1. (In the interface names,
the final number is the port number.)
The two links in a redundant trunk group generally operate the same way, whether they
are configured as primary/unspecified or unspecified/unspecified. Data traffic initially
passes through the active link but is blocked on the inactive link. While data traffic is
blocked on the secondary link, note that Layer 2 control traffic is still permitted if the link
is active. For example, an LLDP session can be run between two switches on the secondary
link. If the active link either goes down or is disabled administratively, it broadcasts a list
of its known MAC addresses for data traffic; the other link immediately picks up and adds
the MAC addresses to its address table, becomes active, and begins forwarding traffic.
The one difference in operation between the two types of redundant trunk groups occurs
when a primary link is active, goes down, is replaced by the secondary link, and then
reactivates. When a primary link is re-enabled while the secondary link is active, the
primary link waits 1 second (you can change the time interval by using the preempt cutover
timer to accommodate your network) and then takes over as the active link. In other
words, the primary link has priority and is always activated if it is available. This differs
from the behavior of two unspecified links, both of which act as equals. Because the
unspecified links are equal, the active link remains active until it either goes down or is
disabled administratively; this is the only time that the other unspecified link learns the
MAC addresses and immediately becomes active.
The example given here illustrates a primary/unspecified configuration for a redundant
trunk group because that configuration gives you more control and is more commonly
used.
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NOTE: Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) is enabled by default on the
switches to create a loop-free topology, but an interface is not allowed to be
in both a redundant trunk group and in a spanning-tree protocol topology at
the same time. You will need to disable RSTP on the two distribution switches
in the example, Switch 1 and Switch 2. Spanning-tree protocols can, however,
continue operating in other parts of the network—for example, between the
distribution switches and also in links between distribution switches and the
enterprise core.
Figure 5 on page 162 displays an example topology containing three switches. Switch 1
and Switch 2 make up the distribution layer, and Switch 3 makes up the access layer.
Switch 3 is connected to the distribution layer through trunk interfaces ge-0/0/9.0
(Link 1) and ge-0/0/10.0 (Link 2).
Table 24 on page 163 lists the components used in this redundant trunk group.
Because RSTP and RTGs cannot operate simultaneously on a switch, you disable RSTP
on Switch 1 and Switch 2 in the first configuration task, and you disable RSTP on Switch
3 in the second task.
The second configuration task creates a redundant trunk group called example 1 on
Switch 3. The trunk interfaces ge-0/0/9.0 and ge-0/0/10.0 are the two links configured
in the second configuration task. You configure the trunk interface ge-0/0/9.0 as the
primary link. You configure the trunk interface ge-0/0/10.0 as an unspecified link, which
becomes the secondary link by default.
Figure 5: Topology for Configuring the Redundant Trunk Links
162
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Chapter 10: Understanding Redundant Trunk Groups
Table 24: Components of the Redundant Trunk Link Topology
Property
Settings
Switch hardware
•
Switch 1–1 EX Series or QFX Series distribution switch
•
Switch 2–1 EX Series or QFX Series distribution switch
•
Switch 3–1 EX Series or QFX Series access switch
Trunk interfaces
On Switch 3 (access switch): ge-0/0/9.0 and ge-0/0/10.0
Redundant trunk group
rtg0
Disabling RSTP on Switches 1 and 2
To disable RSTP on Switch 1 and Switch 2, perform this task on each switch:
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly disable RSTP on Switch 1 and Switch 2, copy the following command and
paste it into each switch terminal window:
[edit]
set protocols rstp disable
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To disable RSTP on Switch 1 and Switch 2:
1.
Disable RSTP on Switch 1 and Switch 2:
[edit]
user@switch# set protocols rstp disable
Results
Check the results of the configuration:
[edit]
user@switch# show
protocols {
rstp {
disable;
}
}
Configuring Redundant Trunk Links on Switch 3
To configure redundant trunk links on Switch 3, perform this task:
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure the redundant trunk group rtg0 on Switch 3, copy the following
commands and paste them into the switch terminal window:
[edit]
set protocols rstp disable
set switch-options redundant-trunk-group group rtg0 interface ge-0/0/9.0 primary
set switch-options redundant-trunk-group group rtg0 interface ge-0/0/10.0
set redundant-trunk-group group rtg0 preempt-cutover-timer 60
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Step-by-Step
Procedure
Configure the redundant trunk group rtg0 on Switch 3.
1.
Turn off RSTP:
[edit]
user@switch# set protocols rstp disable
2.
Name the redundant trunk group rtg0 while configuring trunk interface ge-0/0/9.0
as the primary link and ge-0/0/10 as an unspecified link to serve as the secondary
link:
[edit switch-options]
user@switch# set redundant-trunk-group group rtg0 interface ge-0/0/9.0 primary
user@switch# set redundant-trunk-group group rtg0 interface ge-0/0/10.0
3.
(Optional) Change the time interval (from the default of 1 second) that a re-enabled
primary link waits to take over for an active secondary link:
[edit switch-options]
user@switch# set redundant-trunk-group group rtg0 preempt-cutover-timer 60
Results
Check the results of the configuration:
[edit]
user@switch# show
switch-options
redundant-trunk-group {
group rtg0 {
preempt-cutover-timer 60;
interface ge-0/0/9.0 {
primary;
}
interface ge-0/0/10.0;
}
}
protocols {
rstp {
disable;
}
}
Verification
To confirm that the configuration is set up correctly, perform this task:
•
Verifying That a Redundant Trunk Group Was Created on page 164
Verifying That a Redundant Trunk Group Was Created
Purpose
164
Verify that the redundant trunk group rtg0 has been created on Switch 1 and that trunk
interfaces are members of the redundant trunk group.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Understanding Redundant Trunk Groups
Action
List all redundant trunk groups configured on the switch:
user@switch> show redundant-trunk-group
Group
Interface
State
Time of last flap
name
rtg0
Meaning
Related
Documentation
ge-0/0/9.0 Up/Pri
ge-0/0/10.0 Up
Never
Never
Flap
count
0
0
The show redundant-trunk-group command lists all redundant trunk groups configured
on the switch as well as the interface names and their current states (up or down for an
unspecified link, and up or down and primary for a primary link). For this configuration
example, the output shows that the redundant trunk group rtg0 is configured on the
switch. The Up beside the interfaces indicates that both link cables are physically
connected. The Pri beside trunk interface ge-0/0/9.0 indicates that it is configured as
the primary link.
•
Understanding Redundant Trunk Links on page 158
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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166
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 9
Resilient Hashing
•
Understanding Resilient Hashing on page 169
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
167
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
168
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 11
Understanding Resilient Hashing
•
Understanding the Algorithm Used to Hash LAG Bundle and Egress Next-Hop ECMP
Traffic on page 169
•
Understanding the Use of Resilient Hashing to Minimize Flow Remapping in Trunk/ECMP
Groups on page 175
•
Configuring the Fields in the Algorithm Used To Hash LAG Bundle and ECMP Traffic
(CLI Procedure) on page 177
•
Configuring Resilient Hashing for Trunk/ECMP Groups on page 179
Understanding the Algorithm Used to Hash LAG Bundle and Egress Next-Hop ECMP
Traffic
Juniper Networks EX Series and QFX Series use a hashing algorithm to determine how
to forward traffic over a link aggregation group (LAG) bundle or to the next-hop device
when equal-cost multipath (ECMP) is enabled.
The hashing algorithm makes hashing decisions based on values in various packet fields,
as well as on some internal values like source port ID and source device ID. You can
configure some of the fields that are used by the hashing algorithm.
NOTE: Platform support depends on the Junos OS release in your installation.
This topic contains the following sections:
•
Understanding the Hashing Algorithm on page 169
•
IP (IPv4 and IPv6) on page 171
•
MPLS on page 172
•
MAC-in-MAC Packet Hashing on page 173
•
Layer 2 Header Hashing on page 174
Understanding the Hashing Algorithm
The hashing algorithm is used to make traffic-forwarding decisions for traffic entering a
LAG bundle or for traffic exiting a switch when ECMP is enabled.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
169
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
For LAG bundles, the hashing algorithm determines how traffic entering a LAG bundle is
placed onto the bundle’s member links. The hashing algorithm tries to manage bandwidth
by evenly load-balancing all incoming traffic across the member links in the bundle.
For ECMP, the hashing algorithm determines how incoming traffic is forwarded to the
next-hop device.
The hashing algorithm makes hashing decisions based on values in various packet fields,
as well as on some internal values like source port ID and source device ID. The packet
fields used by the hashing algorithm varies by the packet’s EtherType and, in some
instances, by the configuration on the switch. The hashing algorithm recognizes the
following EtherTypes:
•
IP (IPv4 and IPv6)
•
MPLS
•
MAC-in-MAC
Traffic that is not recognized as belonging to any of these EtherTypes is hashed based
on the Layer 2 header. IP and MPLS traffic are also hashed based on the Layer 2 header
when a user configures the hash mode as Layer 2 header.
You can configure some fields that are used by the hashing algorithm to make traffic
forwarding decisions. You cannot, however, configure how certain values within a header
are used by the hashing algorithm.
Note the following points regarding the hashing algorithm:
•
The fields selected for hashing are based on the packet type only. The fields are not
based on any other parameters, including forwarding decision (bridged or routed) or
egress LAG bundle configuration (Layer 2 or Layer 3).
•
The same fields are used for hashing unicast and multicast packets. Unicast and
multicast packets are, however, hashed differently.
•
The same fields are used by the hashing algorithm to hash ECMP and LAG traffic, but
the hashing algorithm hashes ECMP and LAG traffic differently. LAG traffic uses a trunk
hash while ECMP uses ECMP hashing. Both LAG and ECMP use the same RTAG7 seed
but use different offsets of that 128B seed to avoid polarization. The initial config of
the HASH function to use the trunk and ECMP offset are set at the PFE Init time. The
different hashing ensures that traffic is not polarized when a LAG bundle is part of the
ECMP next-hop path.
•
The same fields are used for hashing regardless of whether the switch is or is not
participating in a mixed or non-mixed Virtual Chassis or Virtual Chassis Fabric (VCF).
The fields used for hashing by each EtherType as well as the fields used by the Layer 2
header are discussed in the following sections.
170
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Understanding Resilient Hashing
IP (IPv4 and IPv6)
Payload fields in IPv4 and IPv6 packets are used by the hashing algorithm when IPv4 or
IPv6 packets need to be placed onto a member link in a LAG bundle or sent to the
next-hop device when ECMP is enabled.
The hash mode is set to Layer 2 payload field, by default. IPv4 and IPv6 payload fields
are used for hashing when the hash mode is set to Layer 2 payload.
If the hash mode is configured to Layer 2 header, IPv4, IPv6, and MPLS packets are hashed
using the Layer 2 header fields. If you want incoming IPv4, IPv6, and MPLS packets hashed
by the source MAC address, destination MAC address, or EtherType fields, you must set
the hash mode to Layer 2 header.
Table 25 on page 171 displays the IPv4 and IPv6 payload fields that are used by the hashing
algorithm, by default.
•
✓—Field is used by the hashing algorithm, by default.
•
Χ—Field is not used by the hashing algorithm, by default.
•
(configurable)—Field can be configured to be used or not used by the hashing algorithm.
Table 25: IPv4 and IPv6 Hashing Fields
Fields
EX4300
QFX5100
QFX5110
QFX5200
LAG
ECMP
LAG
ECMP
LAG
ECMP
LAG
ECMP
Source
MAC
X
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
X
Destination
MAC
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
EtherType
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
VLAN ID
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
(confg
iurabe
l)
(confg
i urable)
(cong
fiurabe
l)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(configurable)
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
Χ
Χ
(confg
iurabe
l)
(confg
i urable)
(cong
fiurabe
l)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(configurable)
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
Χ
Χ
(confg
iurabe
l)
(confg
i urable)
(cong
fiurabe
l)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(configurable)
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
Χ
Χ
(confg
iurabe
l)
(confg
i urable)
(cong
fiurabe
l)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(configurable)
Source IP
or IPv6
Destination
IP or IPv6
Protocol
(IPv4
only)
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 25: IPv4 and IPv6 Hashing Fields (continued)
Fields
EX4300
QFX5100
QFX5110
Next
header
(IPv6
only)
✓
QFX5200
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
Χ
Χ
(confg
iurabe
l)
(confg
i urable)
(cong
fiurabe
l)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(configurable)
Layer 4
Source
Port
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
Χ
Χ
(confg
iurabe
l)
(confg
i urable)
(cong
fiurabe
l)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(configurable)
Layer 4
Destination
Port
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
Χ
Χ
(confg
iurabe
l)
(confg
i urable)
(cong
fiurabe
l)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(confg
i urable)
(configurable)
IPv6 Flow
label
(IPv6
only)
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
MPLS
The hashing algorithm hashes MPLS packets using the source IP, destination IP, MPLS
label 0, MPLS label 1, and MPLS label 2 fields. On the QFX5110 and QFX5200 switches,
, LSR routers also support ECMP. ECMP uses these fields for hashing on an LSR router:
•
Layer 3 VPN: MPLS Labels (top 3 labels), source IP, destination IP, and ingress port ID
•
Layer 2 Circuit: MPLS Labels (top 3 labels) and ingress port ID
Table 26 on page 172 displays the MPLS payload fields that are used by the hashing
algorithm, by default:
•
✓—Field is used by the hashing algorithm, by default.
•
Χ—Field is not used by the hashing algorithm, by default.
The fields used by the hashing algorithm for MPLS packet hashing are not
user-configurable.
The source IP and destination IP fields are not always used for hashing. For non-terminated
MPLS packets, the payload is checked if the bottom of stack (BoS) flag is seen in the
packet. If the payload is IPv4 or IPv6, then the IP source address and IP destination
address fields are used for hashing along with the MPLS labels. If the BoS flag is not seen
in the packet, only the MPLS labels are used for hashing.
Table 26: MPLS Hashing Fields
172
Field
EX4300
QFX5100
QFX5110
QFX5200
Source MAC
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Destination MAC
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Understanding Resilient Hashing
Table 26: MPLS Hashing Fields (continued)
Field
EX4300
QFX5100
QFX5110
QFX5200
EtherType
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
VLAN ID
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Source IP
✓
✓
✓
✓
Destination IP
✓
✓
✓
✓
Protocol (for IPv4
packets)
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Next header (for
IPv6 packets)
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Layer 4 Source Port
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Layer 4 Destination
Port
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
IPv6 Flow lab
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
MPLS label 0
✓
✓
✓
✓
MPLS label 1
✓
✓
✓
✓
MPLS label 2
✓
✓
✓
✓
Ingress Port ID
X
X
✓
✓
(LSR and
L2Circuit)
(LSR and
L2Circuit)
X
MAC-in-MAC Packet Hashing
Packets using the MAC-in-MAC EtherType are hashed by the hashing algorithm using
the Layer 2 payload source MAC, Layer 2 payload destination MAC, and Layer 2 payload
EtherType fields. See Table 27 on page 174.
Hashing using the fields in the MAC-in-MAC EtherType packet is first supported on
EX4300 switches in Release 13.2X51-D20. Hashing using the fields in the MAC-in-MAC
EtherType is not supported on earlier releases.
The fields used by the hashing algorithm for MAC-in-MAC hashing are not
user-configurable.
•
✓—Field is used by the hashing algorithm, by default.
•
Χ—Field is not used by the hashing algorithm, by default.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Table 27: MAC-in-MAC Hashing Fields
Field
EX4300
QFX5100
QFX5110
QFX5200
Layer 2 Payload
Source MAC
✓
✓
✓
✓
Layer 2 Payload
Destination MAC
✓
✓
✓
✓
Layer 2 Payload
EtherType
✓
✓
✓
✓
Layer 2 Payload Outer
VLAN
Χ
Χ
Χ
Χ
Layer 2 Header Hashing
Layer 2 header fields are used by the hashing algorithm when a packet’s EtherType is
not recognized as IP (IPv4 or IPv6), MPLS, or MAC-in-MAC. The Layer 2 header fields are
also used for hashing IPv4, IPv6, and MPLS traffic instead of the payload fields when the
hash mode is set to Layer 2 header.
•
✓—Field is used by the hashing algorithm, by default.
•
Χ—Field is not used by the hashing algorithm, by default.
•
(configurable)—Field can be configured to be used or not used by the hashing algorithm.
Table 28: Layer 2 Header Hashing Fields
Field
EX4300
QFX5100
QFX5110
QFX5200
Source MAC
✓
✓
✓
✓
(configurable)
(configurable)
(configurable)
(configurable)
✓
✓
✓
✓
(configurable)
(configurable)
(configurable)
(configurable)
✓
✓
✓
✓
(configurable)
(configurable)
(configurable)
(configurable)
Χ
Χ
✓
✓
(configurable)
(configurable)
(configurable)
(configurable)
Destination MAC
EtherType
VLAN ID
Related
Documentation
174
•
Configuring the Fields in the Algorithm Used To Hash LAG Bundle and ECMP Traffic
(CLI Procedure) on page 177
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Understanding Resilient Hashing
Understanding the Use of Resilient Hashing to Minimize Flow Remapping in Trunk/ECMP
Groups
You use resilient hashing to minimize flow remapping across members of a trunk/ECMP
group in a load-balanced system. You can configure resilient hashing in link aggregation
groups (LAGs) and in equal cost multipath (ECMP) groups.
•
Why You Might Want to Use Resilient Hashing and How It Works with Static
Hashing on page 175
•
Limitations and Caveats for Resilient Hashing on page 176
•
Resilient Hashing on LAGs on page 176
•
Resilient Hashing on ECMP on page 177
Why You Might Want to Use Resilient Hashing and How It Works with Static Hashing
Resilient hashing works in conjunction with the default static hashing algorithm. When
members are added to or deleted from a trunk/ECMP group, the static hashing algorithm
might remap destination paths. Resilient hashing distributes traffic across all members
of a group by tracking the flow’s member utilization. When a flow is affected by a member
change, the Packet Forwarding Engine rebalances the flow by reprogramming the flow
set table.
Resilient hashing thus provides the following benefits:
•
Minimizes traffic-distribution imbalances among members of a trunk/ECMP group
when members are added to or deleted from the group.
•
Minimizes the impact on flows bound to unaffected members when a new member is
added or an existing member is deleted from the group.
In normal hash-based load balancing, with the static hashing algorithm used alone, flows
are assigned to members through the mathematical mod (%) operation. Any increase
or decrease in the number of group members results in a complete remapping of flows
to member IDs, as shown in the following example:
•
Member ID = Hash (key) mod (number of members in group)
•
Example:
•
Hash (key) = 10
•
10 mod 5 = 0 (member with ID 0 is selected for flow)
•
10 mod 4 = 2 (member with ID 2 is selected for the same flow when the number of
members is decreased by 1)
Resilient hashing minimizes the destination path remapping when a member in the
trunk/ECMP group is added or deleted.
When the flow is affected by a member change in the group, resilient hashing rebalances
the flow by reprogramming the flow set table.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Table 29: Destination Path Results for Static Hashing and for Resilient Hashing When Members
Are Added to or Deleted from Trunk Groups
Trunk
Group
Size
Normal (Static) Hashing Result
Resilient Hashing Result
Notes
4
Hash(10) % 4 = 2
Flow is assigned to member ID 2.
Flow is assigned to one of four group
members based on flow set table
entries.
Original trunk/ECMP group size is
4.
3
Hash(10) % 3 = 1
Flow is assigned to member ID 1.
Flow is assigned to same member as in
the previous case.
Delete one member from original
trunk/ECMP group. Trunk/ECMP
group size is 3.
5
Hash(10) % 5 = 0
Flow is assigned to member ID 0.
There is minimal redistribution of flows
from other members to this newly added
member.
Add one member to original trunk
group. Trunk/ECMP group size is
5.
Limitations and Caveats for Resilient Hashing
Notice the following limitation and caveats for the resilient hashing feature:
•
Resilient hashing applies only to unicast traffic.
•
Resilient hashing supports a maximum of 1024 trunk groups, with each group having
a maximum of 256 members.
•
Resilient hashing does not guarantee that traffic distribution is even across all group
members—it depends on the traffic pattern and on the organization of the resilient
hashing flow set table in hardware. Resilient hashing minimizes remapping of flows to
destination links when members are added to or deleted from the group.
•
If resilient hashing is enabled on a trunk group or ECMP group and if set
forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key with one of the options hash-mode, inet, inet6,
or layer2 is used, some flows might change destination links, because the new hash
parameters might generate new hash indexes for the flows, and hence the new
destination links.
•
Resilient hashing is not supported on Virtual Chassis port (VCP) links.
Resilient Hashing on LAGs
A LAG combines Ethernet interfaces (members) to form a logical point-to-point link that
increases bandwidth, provides reliability, and allows load balancing. Resilient hashing
minimizes destination remapping behavior when a new member is added or deleted from
the LAG.
A resilient hashing configuration on LAGs is per-aggregated-Ethernet-interface–based.
176
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Understanding Resilient Hashing
Resilient Hashing on ECMP
An ECMP group for a route contains multiple next-hop equal cost addresses for the same
destination in the routing table. (Routes of equal cost have the same preference and
metric values.)
Junos OS uses the static hashing algorithm to choose one of the next-hop addresses in
the ECMP group to install in the forwarding table. Resilient hashing enhances ECMPs by
minimizing destination remapping behavior when a new member is added or deleted
from the ECMP group.
A resilient hashing configuration on ECMP is global—it applies to all ECMP groups.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Resilient Hashing for Trunk/ECMP Groups on page 179
Configuring the Fields in the Algorithm Used To Hash LAG Bundle and ECMP Traffic
(CLI Procedure)
Juniper Networks EX Series and QFX Series switches use a hashing algorithm to determine
how to forward traffic over a Link Aggregation group (LAG) bundle or to the next-hop
device when equal-cost multipath (ECMP) is enabled.
The hashing algorithm makes hashing decisions based on values in various packet fields..
You can configure some of the fields that are used by the hashing algorithm.
Configuring the fields used by the hashing algorithm is useful in scenarios where most
of the traffic entering the bundle is similar and the traffic needs to be managed in the
LAG bundle. For instance, if the only difference in the IP packets for all incoming traffic
is the source and destination IP address, you can tune the hashing algorithm to make
hashing decisions more efficiently by configuring the algorithm to make hashing decisions
using only those fields.
NOTE: Configuring the hash mode is not supported on QFX10002 and
QFX10008 switches.
•
Configuring the Hashing Algorithm to Use Fields in the Layer 2 Header for
Hashing on page 177
•
Configuring the Hashing Algorithm to Use Fields in the IP Payload for Hashing on page 178
•
Configuring the Hashing Algorithm to Use Fields in the IPv6 Payload for
Hashing on page 179
Configuring the Hashing Algorithm to Use Fields in the Layer 2 Header for Hashing
To configure the hashing algorithm to use fields in the Layer 2 header for hashing:
1.
Configure the hash mode to Layer 2 header:
[edit forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key]
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
user@switch# set hash-mode layer2-header
The default hash mode is Layer 2 payload. Therefore, this step must be performed if
you have not previously configured the hash mode.
2. Configure the fields in the Layer 2 header that the hashing algorithm uses for hashing:
[edit forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key]
user@switch# set layer2 {no-destination-mac-address | no-ether-type |
no-source-mac-address | vlan-id}
By default, the hashing algorithm uses the values in the destination MAC address,
Ethertype, and source MAC address fields in the header to hash traffic on the LAG.
You can configure the hashing algorithm to not use the values in these fields by
configuring no-destination-mac-address, no-ether-type, or no-source-mac-address.
You can also configure the hashing algorithm to include the VLAN ID field in the header
by configuring the vlan-id option.
If you want the hashing algorithm to not use the Ethertype field for hashing:
[edit forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key]
user@switch# set layer2 no-ether-type
Configuring the Hashing Algorithm to Use Fields in the IP Payload for Hashing
To configure the hashing algorithm to use fields in the IP payload for hashing:
1.
Configure the hash mode to Layer 2 payload:
[edit forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key]
user@switch# set hash-mode layer2-payload
The IP payload is not checked by the hashing algorithm unless the hash mode is set
to Layer 2 payload. The default hash mode is Layer 2 payload.
2. Configure the fields in the IP payload that the hashing algorithm uses for hashing:
[edit forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key]
user@switch# set inet {no-ipv4-destination-address | no-ipv4-source-address |
no-l4-destination-port | no-l4-source-port | no-protocol | vlan-id}
For instance, if you want the hashing algorithm to ignore the Layer 4 destination port,
Layer 4 source port, and protocol fields and instead hash traffic based only on the
IPv4 source and destination addresses:
[edit forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key]
user@switch# set inet no-l4-destination-port no-l4-source-port no-protocol
178
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Understanding Resilient Hashing
Configuring the Hashing Algorithm to Use Fields in the IPv6 Payload for Hashing
To configure the hashing algorithm to use fields in the IPv6 payload for hashing:
1.
Configure the hash mode to Layer 2 payload:
[edit forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key]
user@switch# set hash-mode layer2-payload
The IPv6 payload is not checked by the hashing algorithm unless the hash mode is
set to Layer 2 payload. The default hash mode is Layer 2 payload.
2. Configure the fields in the IPv6 payload that the hashing algorithm uses for hashing:
[edit forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key]
user@switch# set inet6 {no-ipv6-destination-address | no-ipv6-source-address |
no-l4-destination-port | no-l4-source-port | no-next-header | vlan-id}
For instance, if you want the hashing algorithm to ignore the Layer 4 destination port,
Layer 4 source port, and the Next Header fields and instead hash traffic based only
on the IPv6 source and IPv6 destination address fields only:
[edit forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key]
user@switch# set inet6 no-l4-destination-port no-l4-source-port no-next-header
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding the Algorithm Used to Hash LAG Bundle and Egress Next-Hop ECMP
Traffic on page 169
•
Understanding the Algorithm Used to Hash LAG Bundle and Egress Next-Hop ECMP
Traffic (QFX 10002 and QFX 10008 Switches)
•
Understanding Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces and LACP
Configuring Resilient Hashing for Trunk/ECMP Groups
You use resilient hashing to minimize flow remapping across members of a trunk/ECMP
group in a load-balanced system. You can configure resilient hashing in link aggregation
groups (LAGs) and in equal cost multipath (ECMP) sets.
This topic includes:
1.
Configuring Resilient Hashing on LAGs on page 180
2. Configuring Resilient Hashing on ECMP Groups on page 180
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Configuring Resilient Hashing on LAGs
To enable resilient hashing for a LAG:
•
Configure resilient hashing on the aggregated Ethernet interface:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set aex aggregated-ether-options resilient-hash
Configuring Resilient Hashing on ECMP Groups
To enable resilient hashing for ECMP groups:
•
Configure resilient hashing for ECMP:
[edit forwarding-options]
user@switch# set enhanced-hash-key ecmp-resilient-hash
Related
Documentation
180
•
Understanding the Use of Resilient Hashing to Minimize Flow Remapping in Trunk/ECMP
Groups on page 175
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 10
Uplink Failure Detection
•
Understanding Uplink Failure Detection on page 183
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CHAPTER 12
Understanding Uplink Failure Detection
•
Overview of Uplink Failure Detection on page 183
•
Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 185
•
Example: Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 186
•
Verifying That Uplink Failure Detection Is Working Correctly on page 190
Overview of Uplink Failure Detection
Uplink failure detection allows a switch to detect link failure on uplink interfaces and to
propagate this information to the downlink interfaces, so that servers connected to those
downlinks can switch over to secondary interfaces.
Uplink failure detection supports network adapter teaming and provides network
redundancy. In network adapter teaming, all of the network interface cards (NICs) on a
server are configured in a primary or secondary relationship and share the same IP address.
When the primary link goes down, the server transparently shifts the connection to the
secondary link. With uplink failure detection, the switch monitors uplink interfaces for
link failures. When it detects a failure, it disables the downlink interfaces. When the server
detects disabled downlink interfaces, it switches over to the secondary link to help ensure
that the traffic of the failed link is not dropped.
This topic describes:
•
Uplink Failure Detection Configuration on page 183
•
Failure Detection Pair on page 184
Uplink Failure Detection Configuration
Uplink failure detection allows switches to monitor uplink interfaces to spot link failures.
When a switch detects a link failure, it automatically disables the downlink interfaces
bound to the uplink interface. A server that is connected to the disabled downlink interface
triggers a network adapter failover to a secondary link to avoid any traffic loss.
Figure 6 on page 184 illustrates a typical setup for uplink failure detection.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Figure 6: Uplink Failure Detection Configuration on Switches
Switch
Switch
link-to-monitor
Switch 1
Switch 2
link-to-disable
Server
NIC
2
g040577
NIC
1
For uplink failure detection, you specify a group of uplink interfaces to be monitored and
downlink interfaces to be brought down when an uplink fails. The downlink interfaces
are bound to the uplink interfaces within the group. If all uplink interfaces in a group go
down, then the switch brings down all downlink interfaces within that group. If any uplink
interface returns to service, then the switch brings all downlink interfaces in that group
back to service.
The switch can monitor both physical interface links and logical interface links for uplink
failures, but you must put the two types of interfaces into separate groups.
NOTE: For logical interfaces, the server must send keepalives between the
switch and the server to detect failure of logical links.
Failure Detection Pair
Uplink failure detection requires that you create pairs of uplink and downlink interfaces
in a group. Each pair includes one of each of the following:
•
A link-to-monitor interface—The link-to-monitor interfaces specify the uplinks the
switch monitors. You can configure a maximum of 48 uplink interfaces as
link-to-monitor interfaces for a group.
•
A link-to-disable interface—The link-to-disable interfaces specify the downlinks the
switch disables when the switch detects an uplink failure. You can configure a maximum
of 48 downlinks to disable in the group.
The link-to-disable interfaces are bound to the link-to-monitor interfaces within the
group. When a link-to-monitor interface returns to service, the switch automatically
enables all link-to-disable interfaces in the group.
184
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Chapter 12: Understanding Uplink Failure Detection
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 185
•
Example: Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 186
Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection
You can configure uplink failure detection to help ensure balanced traffic flow. Using this
feature, switches can monitor and detect link failure on uplink interfaces and can
propagate the failure information to downlink interfaces, so that servers connected to
those downlinks can switch over to secondary interfaces.
Follow these configuration guidelines:
•
Configure an interface in only one group.
•
Configure a maximum of 48groups for each switch.
•
Configure a maximum of 48 uplinks to monitor and a maximum of 48 downlinks to
disable in each group.
•
Configure physical links and logical links in separate groups.
To configure uplink failure detection on a switch:
1.
Specify a name for an uplink failure detection group:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set uplink-failure-detection group group-name
2. Add an uplink interface to the group:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set uplink-failure-detection group group-name link-to-monitor interface-name
3. Repeat Step 2 for each uplink interface you add to the group.
4. Add a downlink interface to the group:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set uplink-failure-detection group group-name link-to-disable interface-name
5. Repeat Step 4 for each downlink interface you add to the group.
NOTE: After you have configured an uplink failure detection group, use the
show uplink-failure-detection group (Uplink Failure Detection) group-name
command to verify that all interfaces in the group are up. If the interfaces are
down, uplink failure detection does not work.
Related
Documentation
•
Overview of Uplink Failure Detection on page 183
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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•
Example: Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 186
•
Verifying That Uplink Failure Detection Is Working Correctly on page 190
Example: Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection
Uplink failure detection allows a switch to detect link failure on uplink interfaces and to
propagate the failure information to the downlink interfaces. All of the network interface
cards (NICs) on a server are configured as being either the primary link or the secondary
link and share the same IP address. When the primary link goes down, the server
transparently shifts the connection to the secondary link to ensure that the traffic on the
failed link is not dropped.
This example describes:
•
Requirements on page 186
•
Overview and Topology on page 186
•
Configuring Uplink Failure Detection on Both Switches on page 187
•
Verification on page 189
Requirements
This example uses the following software and hardware components:
•
Junos OS Release 12.1 or later for the QFX Series
•
Two QFX3500 switches
•
Two aggregation switches
•
One dual-homed server
Overview and Topology
The topology in this example illustrates how to configure uplink failure detection on
Switch A and Switch B. Switch A and Switch B are both configured with a link-to-monitor
interface (the uplink interface to the aggregation switch) and a link-to-disable interface
(the downlink interface to the server). For simplicity, only one group of link-to-monitor
interfaces and link-to-disable interfaces is configured for each switch. The server is
dual-homed to both Switch A and Switch B. In this scenario, if the link-to-monitor interface
to Switch A is disabled, the server uses the link-to-monitor interface to Switch B instead.
NOTE: This example does not describe how to configure the dual-homed
server or the aggregation switches. Please refer to the documentation for
each of these devices for more information.
Figure 6 on page 184 illustrates a typical setup for uplink failure detection.
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Chapter 12: Understanding Uplink Failure Detection
Figure 7: Uplink Failure Detection Configuration on Switches
Switch
Switch
link-to-monitor
Switch 1
Switch 2
link-to-disable
NIC
2
g040577
NIC
1
Server
Table 30 on page 187 lists uplink failure settings for each QFX3500 switch.
Table 30: Settings for Uplink Failure Protection Example
Switch A
Switch B
•
Group name: Group1
•
Group name: Group2
•
Link-to-monitor interface: xe-0/0/0
•
Link-to-monitor interface: xe-0/0/0
•
Link-to-disable interface: xe-0/0/1
•
Link-to-disable interface: xe-0/0/1
Configuring Uplink Failure Detection on Both Switches
To configure uplink failure detection on both switches, perform these tasks:
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure uplink failure protection on Switch A and Switch B, copy the following
commands and paste them into the switch terminal window:
[edit protocols]
set uplink-failure-detection group group1
set uplink-failure-detection group group2
set uplink-failure-detection group group1 link-to-monitor xe-0/0/0
set uplink-failure-detection group group2 link-to-monitor xe-0/0/0
set uplink-failure-detection group group1 link-to-disable xe-0/0/1
set uplink-failure-detection group group2 link-to-disable xe-0/0/1
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Step-by-Step
Procedure
To configure uplink failure protection on both switches:
1.
Specify a name for the uplink failure detection group on Switch A:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set uplink-failure-detection group group1
2.
Add an uplink interface to the group on Switch A:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set uplink-failure-detection group group1 link-to-monitor xe-0/0/0
3.
Add a downlink interface to the group on Switch A:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set uplink-failure-detection group group1 link-to-disable xe-0/0/1
4.
Specify a name for the uplink failure detection group on Switch B:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set uplink-failure-detection group group2
5.
Add an uplink interface to the group on Switch B:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set uplink-failure-detection group group2 link-to-monitor xe-0/0/0
6.
Add a downlink interface to the group on Switch B:
[edit protocols]
user@switch# set uplink-failure-detection group group2 link-to-disable xe-0/0/1
Results
Display the results of the configuration:
uplink-failure-detection {
group {
group1 {
link-to-monitor {
xe-0/0/0;
}
link-to-disable {
xe-0/0/1;
}
}
group2 {
link-to-monitor {
xe-0/0/0;
}
link-to-disable {
xe-0/0/1;
}
}
}
}
188
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Chapter 12: Understanding Uplink Failure Detection
Verification
To verify that uplink failure detection is working correctly, perform the following tasks
on Switch A and Switch B:
•
Verifying That Uplink Failure Detection is Working Correctly on page 189
Verifying That Uplink Failure Detection is Working Correctly
Purpose
Action
Verify that the switch disables the downlink interface when it detects an uplink failure.
1.
View the current uplink failure detection status:
user@switch> show uplink-failure-detection
Group
: group1
Uplink
: xe-0/0/0*
Downlink
: xe-0/0/1*
Failure Action
: Inactive
NOTE: The asterisk (*) indicates that the link is up.
2. Disable the uplink interface:
[edit]
user@switch# set interface xe-0/0/0 disable
3. Save the configuration on the switch.
4. View the current uplink failure detection status:
user@switch> show uplink-failure-detection
Group
: group1
Uplink
: xe-0/0/0
Downlink
: xe-0/0/1
Failure Action
: Active
Meaning
The output in Step 1 shows that the uplink interface is up, and hence that the downlink
interface is also up, and that the status of Failure Action is Inactive.
The output in Step 4 shows that both the uplink and downlink interfaces are down (there
are no asterisks after the interface name) and that the status of Failure Action is changed
to Active. This output shows that uplink failure detection is working.
Related
Documentation
•
Overview of Uplink Failure Detection on page 183
•
Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 185
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Verifying That Uplink Failure Detection Is Working Correctly
Purpose
Action
Verify that the switch disables the downlink interface when it detects an uplink failure.
1.
View the current uplink failure detection status:
user@switch> show uplink-failure-detection
Group
: group1
Uplink
: xe-0/0/0*
Downlink
: xe-0/0/1*
Failure Action
: Inactive
NOTE: The asterisk (*) indicates that the link is up.
2. Disable the uplink interface:
[edit]
user@switch# set interface xe-0/0/0 disable
3. Save the configuration on the switch.
4. View the current uplink failure detection status:
user@switch> show uplink-failure-detection
Group
: group1
Uplink
: xe-0/0/0
Downlink
: xe-0/0/1
Failure Action
: Active
Meaning
The output in Step 1 shows that the uplink interface is up, and hence that the downlink
interface is also up, and that the status of Failure Action is Inactive.
The output in Step 4 shows that both the uplink and downlink interfaces are down (there
are no asterisks after the interface name) and that the status of Failure Action is changed
to Active. This output shows that uplink failure detection is working.
Related
Documentation
190
•
Overview of Uplink Failure Detection on page 183
•
Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 185
•
Example: Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 186
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 11
Configuration Statements and
Operational Commands
•
Interfaces Configuration Statements on page 193
•
Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Configuration Statements on page 261
•
GRE Configuration Statements on page 285
•
IP Directed Broadcast Configuration Statement on page 289
•
LAGs and LACP Configuration Statements on page 291
•
LAG Local Link Options Configuration Statements on page 303
•
Redundant Trunk Groups Configuration Statements on page 307
•
Resilient Hashing Configuration Statements on page 313
•
Uplink Failure Detection Configuration Statements on page 325
•
Interfaces Operational Commands on page 329
•
Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Operational Command on page 449
•
LAGs and LACP Operational Commands on page 455
•
Redundant Trunk Group Operational Command on page 463
•
Resilient Hashing Operational Command on page 467
•
Uplink Failure Detection Operational Command on page 473
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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CHAPTER 13
Interfaces Configuration Statements
•
address on page 195
•
alarm (chassis) on page 198
•
auto-negotiation on page 199
•
autostate-exclude on page 200
•
ccc on page 201
•
channel-speed on page 202
•
configured-flow-control on page 203
•
craft-lockout on page 204
•
description (Interfaces) on page 205
•
ethernet (Alarm) on page 206
•
ethernet-switching on page 207
•
ether-options on page 208
•
eui-64 on page 209
•
family on page 210
•
fec (gigether) on page 214
•
fibre-channel (Alarm) on page 215
•
filter on page 216
•
flow-control on page 218
•
fpc on page 219
•
gratuitous-arp-reply on page 220
•
hold-time (Physical Interface) on page 221
•
irb (Interfaces) on page 223
•
inet (interfaces) on page 226
•
inet6 (interfaces) on page 227
•
interface-mode on page 228
•
interface-range on page 230
•
interfaces on page 232
•
link-down on page 239
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194
•
link-mode on page 240
•
link-speed on page 241
•
loopback (Aggregated Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, and 10-Gigabit Ethernet) on page 242
•
mac on page 242
•
management-ethernet (Alarm) on page 243
•
member on page 244
•
member-range on page 245
•
mtu on page 246
•
no-gratuitous-arp-request on page 247
•
pic on page 248
•
rx-buffers on page 249
•
short-reach-mode on page 250
•
source on page 251
•
speed on page 252
•
targeted-broadcast on page 253
•
traceoptions (Individual Interfaces) on page 254
•
traps on page 255
•
tx-buffers on page 256
•
unit on page 258
•
vlan-id on page 259
•
vlan-tagging on page 260
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
address
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
address address {
arp ip-address (mac | multicast-mac) mac-address <publish>;
broadcast address;
destination address;
destination-profile name;
eui-64;
master-only;
multipoint-destination address dlci dlci-identifier;
multipoint-destination address {
epd-threshold cells;
inverse-arp;
oam-liveness {
up-count cells;
down-count cells;
}
oam-period (disable | seconds);
shaping {
(cbr rate | rtvbr peak rate sustained rate burst length | vbr peak rate sustained rate burst
length);
queue-length number;
}
vci vpi-identifier.vci-identifier;
}
primary;
preferred;
virtual-gateway-address
(vrrp-group | vrrp-inet6-group) group-number {
(accept-data | no-accept-data);
advertise–interval seconds;
authentication-type authentication;
authentication-key key;
fast-interval milliseconds;
(preempt | no-preempt) {
hold-time seconds;
}
priority-number number;
track {
priority-cost seconds;
priority-hold-time interface-name {
interface priority;
bandwidth-threshold bits-per-second {
priority;
}
}
route ip-address/mask routing-instance instance-name priority-cost cost;
}
virtual-address [ addresses ];
}
}
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family family],
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[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number
family family]
Release Information
Description
Options
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Configure the interface address.
address—Address of the interface.
•
In Junos OS Release 13.3 and later, when you configure an IPv6 host address and an
IPv6 subnet address on an interface, the commit operation fails.
•
In releases earlier than Junos OS Release 13.3, when you use the same configuration
on an interface, the commit operation succeeds, but only one of the IPv6 addresses
that was entered is assigned to the interface. The other address is not applied.
NOTE: If you configure the same address on multiple interfaces in the same
routing instance, Junos OS uses only the first configuration, and the remaining
address configurations are ignored and can leave interfaces without an
address. Interfaces that do not have an assigned address cannot be used as
a donor interface for an unnumbered Ethernet interface.
For example, in the following configuration the address configuration of
interface xe-0/0/1.0 is ignored:
interfaces {
xe-0/0/0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 192.168.1.1/8;
}
}
}
xe-0/0/1 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 192.168.1.1/8;
}
}
}
For more information on configuring the same address on multiple interfaces,
see “Configuring the Interface Address” on page 51.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
NOTE: The edit logical-systems hierarchy is not available on QFabric systems.
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Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Protocol Family
•
Junos OS Administration Library
•
family
•
negotiate-address
•
unnumbered-address (Ethernet)
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alarm (chassis)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
alarm {
interface-type {
alarm-name (ignore |red | yellow);
}
}
[edit chassis],
[edit chassis interconnect-device name],
[edit chassis node-group name]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for the ACX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the chassis alarms and whether they trigger a red or yellow alarm, or whether
they are ignored. Red alarm conditions light the RED ALARM LED on either the router’s
craft interface or the switch’s LCD screen and trigger an audible alarm if one is connected
to the contact on the craft interface or LCD screen. Yellow alarm conditions light the
YELLOW ALARM LED on either the router’s craft interface or the switch’s LCD screen and
trigger an audible alarm if one is connected to the craft interface or LCD screen.
To configure more than one alarm, include multiple alarm-name lines.
Options
alarm-name—Alarm condition. For a list of conditions, see System-Wide Alarms and Alarms
for Each Interface Type.
ignore—The specified alarm condition does not set off any alarm.
interface-type—Type of interface on which you are configuring the alarm: atm, ethernet,
sonet, or t3.
red—The specified alarm condition sets off a red alarm.
yellow—The specified alarm condition sets off a yellow alarm.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
198
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Understanding Alarms
•
Chassis Conditions That Trigger Alarms
•
Chassis Alarm Messages on a QFX3500 Device
•
Interface Alarm Messages
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
auto-negotiation
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
(auto-negotiation | no-auto-negotiation);
[edit interfaces interface-name ether-options]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Explicitly enable or disable autonegotiation. Autonegotiation is enabled by default, and
will autonegotiate the speed with the link partner. We recommend that you keep
autonegotiation enabled for interfaces operating at 100M, 1G, and 10G.
NOTE: In Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D35 on QFX5100-48T-6Q devices using
10-Gigabit Ethernet Copper interfaces, autonegotiation is disabled by default
on the copper ports, and the interfaces operate at a speed of 100M. You can,
however, enable auto-negotiation by issuing the set interface name
ether-options auto-negotiation command on the interface for which you want
to change the interface speed. With autonegotiation enabled, the interface
auto-detects the speed in which to operate.
•
auto-negotiation—Enable autonegotiation.
•
no-auto-negotiation—Disable autonegotiation. When autonegotiation is disabled, you
must explicitly configure link mode and speed options.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
speed on page 252
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
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autostate-exclude
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
autostate-exclude;
[edit interface interface-name ether-options]
Release Information
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1x53-D40 and Junos OS Release 17.3R1 on
QFX5100 switches.
Description
Specify not to include an IRB interface in the state calculation for VLAN members. The
default behavior is not to exclude an IRB interface in the state calculation unless all the
ports on the interface go down. Because an IRB interface often has multiple ports in a
single VLAN, the state calculation for a VLAN member might include a port that is down,
possibly resulting in traffic loss. This feature enables you to exclude a trunk or access
interface from the state calculation, which results in the IRB interface being marked as
down as soon as the port specifically assigned to a VLAN goes down.
IRB interfaces are used to bind specific VLANs to Layer 3 interfaces, enabling a switch
to forward packets between those VLANs— without having to configure another device,
such as a router, to connect VLANs. In a typical scenario, a port on the interface is assigned
to a specific VLAN, while a different port on that interface is assigned to an 802.1Q trunk
interface to carry traffic between multiple VLANs, and a third port on that interface is
assigned to an access interface used to connect the VLAN to network devices.
To ensure that an interface is marked as down and thereby excluded from the state
calculation for VLAN members when the port assigned to the VLAN goes down, configure
this statement on the trunk or access interface. The trunk or port interface is automatically
excluded from the state calculation of the IRB interface. In this way, when a port assigned
to a specified VLAN goes down, the IRB interface assigned to that VLAN is also marked
as down.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
200
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration
•
Excluding an IRB Interface from State Calculations
•
port-mode
•
show ethernet-switching interface
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
ccc
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
ccc;
[edit interfaces ge-fpc/slot/ port unit logical-unit-number family]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Configure the logical interface as a circuit cross-connect (CCC).
NOTE: On QFX10002 switches, circuit cross-connects are not supported on
aggregated Ethernet interfaces.
Default
Required Privilege
Level
You must configure a logical interface to be able to use the physical device.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
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channel-speed
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
channel-speed (10g | 25g | 50g; | 100g | disable-auto-speed-detection) ;
[edit chassis fpc slot-number pic pic-number (port port-number | port-range port-range-low
port-range-high)]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
—Enable the specified port on the Physical Interface Card (PIC) to perform in the specified
channel speed. Additionally, you can disable auto-speed detection.
40g (40-Gigabit Ethernet).
10g—Set the channel speed to 10g (10-Gigabit Ethernet).
25g—Set the channel speed to 25g (25-Gigabit Ethernet).
50g—Set the channel speed to 50g (50-Gigabit Ethernet).
100g—Set the channel speed to 100g (100-Gigabit Ethernet).
disable-auto-speed-detection—Disable auto-speed detection.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
202
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Channelizing Interfaces on page 64
•
Channelizing Interfaces on QFX5200 Switches on page 76
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
configured-flow-control
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
configured-flow-control {
rx-buffers (on | off);
tx-buffers (on | off);
}
[edit interfaces interface-name ether-options]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Configure Ethernet PAUSE asymmetric flow control on an interface. You can set an
interface to generate and send PAUSE messages, and you can set an interface to respond
to PAUSE messages sent by the connected peer. You must set both the rx-buffers and
the tx-buffers values when you configure asymmetric flow control.
Use the flow-control and no-flow-control statements to enable and disable symmetric
PAUSE on an interface. Symmetric flow control and asymmetric flow control are mutually
exclusive features. If you attempt to configure both, the switch returns a commit error.
NOTE: Ethernet PAUSE temporarily stops transmitting all traffic on a link
when the buffers fill to a certain threshold. To temporarily pause traffic on
individual “lanes” of traffic (each lane contains the traffic associated with a
particular IEEE 802.1p code point, so there can be eight lanes of traffic on a
link), use priority-based flow control (PFC) by applying a congestion
notification profile to the interface.
Ethernet PAUSE and PFC are mutually exclusive features, so you cannot
configure both of them on the same interface. If you attempt to configure
both Ethernet PAUSE and PFC on an interface, the switch returns a commit
error.
Default
Flow control is disabled. You must explicitly configure Ethernet PAUSE flow control on
interfaces.
Options
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
congestion-notification-profile
•
flow-control on page 218
•
Configuring CoS Asymmetric Ethernet PAUSE Flow Control
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
•
Enabling and Disabling CoS Symmetric Ethernet PAUSE Flow Control
•
Understanding CoS Flow Control (Ethernet PAUSE and PFC)
craft-lockout
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
204
craft-lockout {
alarm {
interface-type {
link-down (red | yellow | ignore);
}
}
container-devices {
device-count number;
}
}
fpc slot {
pic pic-number {
fibre-channel {
port-range {
port-range-low port-range-high;
}
}
}
}
routing-engine
on-disk-failure {
disk-failure-action (halt | reboot);
}
}
}
}
[edit chassis -interconnect-device]
Statement introduced in Junos Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Disable the physical operation of the craft interface front panel.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Junos OS to Disable the Physical Operation of the Craft Interface
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
description (Interfaces)
Syntax
description text;
Hierarchy Level
[edit interfaces interface-name],
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number]
Release Information
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for ACX Series Universal Access Routers.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Provide a textual description of the interface or the logical unit. Any descriptive text you
include is displayed in the output of the show interfaces commands, and is also exposed
in the ifAlias Management Information Base (MIB) object. It has no effect on the operation
of the interface on the router or switch.
The textual description can also be included in the extended DHCP relay option 82 Agent
Circuit ID suboption.
Options
text—Text to describe the interface. If the text includes spaces, enclose the entire text
in quotation marks.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Interface Description
•
Adding a Logical Unit Description to the Configuration
•
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces (CLI Procedure)
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
•
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces (CLI Procedure)
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Using DHCP Relay Agent Option 82 Information
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
•
Example: Connecting Access Switches to a Distribution Switch
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ethernet (Alarm)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
206
ethernet {
link-down (red | yellow | ignore);
}
[edit chassis alarm],
[edit chassis interconnect-device name alarm],
[edit chassis node-group name alarm]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure alarms for an Ethernet interface.
The remaining statement is explained separately.—
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
ethernet-switching
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
ethernet-switching {
filter {
group filter-group-number;
input filter-name;
input-list [ filter-names ];
output filter-name;
output-list [ filter-names ];
}
interface-mode (access | trunk);
recovery-timeout seconds;
storm-control profile-name;
vlan {
members (vlan-name |[-vlan-names] | all);
}
}
[edit interfaces ge-chassis/slot/port unit logical-unit-number] family
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Configure Ethernet switching protocol family information for the logical interface.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
You must configure a logical interface to be able to use the physical device.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
JUNOS Software Network Interfaces Configuration Guide
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ether-options
Syntax
The auto-negotation and speed statements are not supported on the OCX Series.
ether-options {
802.3ad aex {
lacp {
force-up;
(primary |backup);
}
}
(auto-negotiation| no-auto-negotiation);
autostate-exclude
configured-flow-control {
rx-buffers (on | off);
tx-buffers (on | off);
}
ethernet-switch-profile
storm-control storm-control-profile;
}
(flow-control | no-flow-control);
link-mode mode;
(loopback | no-loopback);
speed (auto-negotiation | no-auto-negotiation);
}
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
[edit interfaces interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
autostate-exclude option introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1x53-D40 for QFX5100
switches only.
Configure ether-options properties for a Gigabit Ethernet or 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface.
NOTE: The auto-negotation and speed statements are not supported on the
OCX Series.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
208
Enabled.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
eui-64
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
eui-64;
[edit interfaces interface-name unit number family inet6 address address]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.3 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
For interfaces that carry IP version 6 (IPv6) traffic, automatically generate the host
number portion of interface addresses.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Interface Address on page 51
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
family
Syntax
The ethernet-switching statement and all of its substatements are not supported on
OCX Series switches.
family {
ethernet-switching {
filter {
group filter-group-number;
input filter-name;
input-list [ filter-names ];
output filter-name;
output-list [ filter-names ];
}
interface-mode (access | trunk);
recovery-timeout seconds;
storm-control profile-name;
vlan {
members (vlan-name |[-vlan-names] | all);
}
}
fibre-channel {
port-mode (f-port | np-port);
}
inet {
accounting {
destination-class-usage;
source-class-usage {
input;
output;
}
}
address ipv4-address {
arp ip-address (mac | multicast-mac) mac-address <publish>;
broadcast address;
preferred;
primary;
vrrp-group group-number {
(accept-data | no-accept-data);
advertise–interval seconds;
advertisements-threshold number;
authentication-key key;
authentication-type authentication;
fast-interval milliseconds;
(preempt | no-preempt) {
hold-time seconds;
}
priority number;
track {
interface interface-name {
priority-cost number;
}
priority-hold-time seconds;
route ip-address/mask routing-instance instance-name priority-cost cost;
210
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Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
}
virtual-address [addresses];
vrrp-inherit-from {
active-group group-number;
active-interface interface-name;
}
}
}
filter {
group filter-group-number;
input filter-name;
input-list [ filter-names ];
output filter-name;
output-list [ filter-names ];
}
mtu bytes;
no-neighbor-learn;
no-redirects;
primary;
rpf-check {
fail-filter filter-name;
mode {
loose;
}
}
}
inet6 {
accounting {
destination-class-usage;
source-class-usage {
input;
output;
}
}
address address {
eui-64;
ndp ip-address (mac | multicast-mac) mac-address <publish>;
preferred;
primary;
vrrp-inet6-group group-id {
accept-data | no-accept-data;
advertisements-threshold number;
authentication-key key;
authentication-type authentication;
fast-interval milliseconds;
inet6-advertise-interval milliseconds;
preempt | no-preempt {
hold-time seconds;
}
priority number;
track {
interface interface-name {
priority-cost number;
}
priority-hold-time seconds;
route ip-address/mask routing-instance instance-name priority-cost cost;
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}
virtual-inet6-address [addresses];
virtual-link-local-address ipv6–address;
vrrp-inherit-from {
active-group group-name;
active-interface interface-name;
}
}
}
(dad-disable | no-dad-disable);
filter {
group filter-group-number;
input filter-name;
input-list [ filter-names ];
output filter-name;
output-list [ filter-names ];
}
mtu bytes;
nd6-stale-time time;
no-neighbor-learn;
no-redirects;
policer {
input policer-name;
output policer-name;
}
rpf-check {
fail-filter filter-name;
mode {
loose;
}
}
mpls {
filter {
group filter-group-number;
input filter-name;
input-list [ filter-names ];
output filter-name;
output-list [ filter-names ];
}
mtu bytes;
}
}
}
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
212
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number],
[edit interfaces interface-range interface-name unit logical-unit-number family]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure protocol family information for the logical interface on the QFX Series and
OCX Series product.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
Default
NOTE: The ethernet-switching statement and all of its substatements are
not asupported on OCX Series switches.
Access interfaces on the QFX Series are set to family ethernet-switching by default. If
you are going to change the family setting for an interface, you might have to delete this
default setting or any user-configured family setting first.
You must configure a logical interface to be able to use the physical device.
Options
Interface types on the switch are:
•
Aggregated Ethernet (ae)
•
Gigabit Ethernet (ge)
•
Loopback (lo0)
•
Management Ethernet (me0)
•
Routed VLAN interface (RVI) (vlan)
NOTE: Routed VLAN interfaces, also referred to as integrated routing and
bridging (IRB) interfaces, are not supported on OCX Series switches.
•
10-Gigabit Ethernet (xe)
Not all interface types support all family substatements. Check your switch CLI for
supported substatements for a particular protocol family configuration.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Configuring IRB Interfaces on Switches
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
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fec (gigether)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
fec (fec91 |fec74 |none)
[edit interfaces interface-name gigether-options]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 17.3R1.
Enable or disable RS-FEC (Reed-Solomon Forward Error Correction) for a 100-Gigabit
Ethernet interface. By default, the Junos OS software enables or disables forward error
correction based on the plugged-in optics. For instance, Junos OS software enables
RS-FEC for 100G SR4 optics and disables RS-FEC for 100G LR4 optics.
This statement allows you to override the default behavior and explicitly enable or disable
RS-FEC. For instance, you can extend the reach of 100G LR4 optics when you explicitly
enable RS-FEC for the optics. RS-FEC is compliant with IEEE 802.3-2015 Clause 91.
Once you enable or disable RS-FEC using this statement, this behavior applies to any
100-Gigabit Ethernet optical transceiver installed in the port associated with the interface.
Delete the statement and commit the configuration to return to the default behavior.
Default
Junos OS software automatically enables or disables RS-FEC based on the type of
pluggable optics used.
Options
fec91—Enables RS-FEC. RS-FEC is compliant with IEEE 802.3-2015 Clause 91.
fec74—Enables RS-FEC. RS-FEC is compliant with IEEE 802.3-2015 Clause 74.
none—Disables RS-FEC.
Required Privilege
Level
214
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
fibre-channel (Alarm)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
fibre-channel {
link-down (red | yellow | ignore);
}
[edit chassis alarm],
[edit chassis interconnect-device name alarm],
[edit chassis node-group name alarm]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Configure alarms for a Fibre Channel interface.
The remaining statement is explained separately.—
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
filter
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
filter {
group filter-group-number;
input filter-name;
input-list [ filter-names ];
output filter-name;
output-list [ filter-names ];
}
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family family],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number
family family]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Description
NOTE: On EX Series switches, the group, input-list, output-filter statements
are not supported under the [edit interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number family inet], [edit interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number family inet6], and [edit interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number family mpls] hierarchies.
Apply a filter to an interface. You can also use filters for encrypted traffic. When you
configure filters, you can configure them under the family ethernet-switching, inet, inet6,
mpls, or vpls only.
Options
group filter-group-number—Define an interface to be part of a filter group. The default
filter group number is 0.
Range: 0 through 255
input filter-name—Name of one filter to evaluate when packets are received on the
interface.
output filter-name—Name of one filter to evaluate when packets are transmitted on the
interface.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
216
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Applying a Filter to an Interface
•
Junos OS Administration Library
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
•
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces (CLI Procedure)
•
Configuring Firewall Filters (CLI Procedure)
•
family
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flow-control
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
(flow-control | no-flow-control);
[edit interfaces interface-name ether-options]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Explicitly enable or disable symmetric Ethernet PAUSE flow control, which regulates the
flow of packets from the switch to the remote side of the connection by pausing all traffic
flows on a link during periods of network congestion. Symmetric flow control means that
Ethernet PAUSE is enabled in both directions. The interface generates and sends Ethernet
PAUSE messages when the receive buffers fill to a certain threshold and the interface
responds to PAUSE messages received from the connected peer. By default, flow control
is disabled.
You can configure asymmetric flow control by including the configured-flow-control
statement at the [edit interfaces interface-name ether-options hierarchy level. Symmetric
flow control and asymmetric flow control are mutually exclusive features. If you attempt
to configure both, the switch returns a commit error.
NOTE: Ethernet PAUSE temporarily stops transmitting all traffic on a link
when the buffers fill to a certain threshold. To temporarily pause traffic on
individual “lanes” of traffic (each lane contains the traffic associated with a
particular IEEE 802.1p code point, so there can be eight lanes of traffic on a
link), use priority-based flow control (PFC).
Ethernet PAUSE and PFC are mutually exclusive features, so you cannot
configure both of them on the same interface. If you attempt to configure
both Ethernet PAUSE and PFC on an interface, the switch returns a commit
error.
OCX Series switches do not support PFC.
•
flow-control—Enable flow control; flow control is useful when the remote device is a
Gigabit Ethernet switch.
•
Default
Required Privilege
Level
218
no-flow-control—Disable flow control.
Flow control is disabled.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
Related
Documentation
•
configured-flow-control on page 203
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Understanding CoS Flow Control (Ethernet PAUSE and PFC)
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
fpc
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
fpc slot {
auto-speed-detection disable;
pic pic-number{
tunnel-port port-number tunnel-services;
port port-number{
channel-speed (speed|disable-auto-speed-detection) ;
}
port-range port-range-low port-range-high {
channel-speed (speed|disable-auto-speed-detection);
}
}
}
[edit chassis]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the FPC slot number. For QFX3500 switches, the slot is a line card slot.
For generic routing encapsulation (GRE) tunneling, use the tunnel-port statement to
specify the port that you want to convert to a GRE tunnel port.
Options
slot—Number of the FPC slot. For QFX3500, QFX3600, QFX5200, and OCX Series devices,
the slot number is always 0.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
show chassis fpc
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gratuitous-arp-reply
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
(gratuitous-arp-reply | no-gratuitous-arp-reply);
[edit interfaces interface-name],
[edit interfaces interface-range interface-range-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Enable processing of ARP updates received via gratuitous ARP reply messages.
Updating of the ARP cache is disabled on all Ethernet interfaces.
gratuitous-arp-reply—Update the ARP cache.
no-gratuitous-arp-reply—Do not update the ARP cache.
Required Privilege
Level
220
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
hold-time (Physical Interface)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
hold-time up milliseconds down milliseconds;
[edit interfaces interface-name],
[edit interfaces interface-range interface-range-name]
Release Information
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 10.4R5 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for ACX Series Universal Access Routers.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the SRX Series.
Description
Specify the hold-time value to use to damp shorter interface transitions milliseconds.
The hold timer enables interface damping by not advertising interface transitions until
the hold timer duration has passed. When a hold-down timer is configured and the
interface goes from up to down, the down hold-time timer is triggered. Every interface
transition that occurs during the hold-time is ignored. When the timer expires and the
interface state is still down, then the router begins to advertise the interface as being
down. Similarly, when a hold-up timer is configured and an interface goes from down to
up, the up hold-time timer is triggered. Every interface transition that occurs during the
hold-time is ignored. When the timer expires and the interface state is still up, then the
router begins to advertise the interface as being up.
NOTE:
•
We recommend that you configure the hold-time value after determining
an appropriate value by performing repeated tests in the actual hardware
environment. This is because the appropriate value for hold-time depends
on the hardware (XFP, SFP, SR, ER, or LR) used in the networking
environment.
•
The hold-time option is not available for controller interfaces.
NOTE: On MX Series routers with MPC3E and MPC4E, we recommend that
you do not configure the hold-down timer to be less than 1 second. On MX
Series routers with MPC5EQ-100G10G (MPC5EQ) or MPC6E (MX2K-MPC6E)
with 100-Gigabit Ethernet MIC with CFP2 OTN interfaces, we recommend
that you do not configure the hold-down timer to be less than 3 seconds.
Default
Interface transitions are not damped.
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Options
down milliseconds—Hold time to use when an interface transitions from up to down.
Junos OS advertises the transition within 100 milliseconds of the time value you
specify.
Range: 0 through 4,294,967,295
Default: 0 (interface transitions are not damped)
up milliseconds—Hold time to use when an interface transitions from down to up. Junos
OS advertises the transition within 100 milliseconds of the time value you specify.
Range: 0 through 4,294,967,295
Default: 0 (interface transitions are not damped)
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
222
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
advertise-interval
•
interfaces (for EX Series switches)
•
Physical Interface Damping Overview
•
Damping Shorter Physical Interface Transitions
•
Damping Longer Physical Interface Transitions
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
irb (Interfaces)
Syntax
irb {
accounting-profile name;
arp-l2-validate;
description text;
(gratuitous-arp-reply | no-gratuitous-arp-reply);
hold-time up milliseconds down milliseconds;
mtu bytes;
no-gratuitous-arp-request;
traceoptions {
flag flag;
}
(traps | no-traps);
unit logical-unit-number {
accounting-profile name;
bandwidth rate;
description text;
enhanced-convergence;
disable;
encapsulation type;
family inet {
accounting {
destination-class-usage;
source-class-usage {
input;
output;
}
}
address ipv4-address {
arp ip-address (mac | multicast-mac) mac-address <publish>;
broadcast address;
preferred;
primary;
vrrp-group group-number {
(accept-data | no-accept-data);
advertise–interval seconds;
advertisements-threshold number;
authentication-key key;
authentication-type authentication;
fast-interval milliseconds;
(preempt | no-preempt) {
hold-time seconds;
}
priority number;
track {
interface interface-name {
bandwidth-threshold bandwidth;
priority-cost number;
}
priority-hold-time seconds;
route ip-address/mask routing-instance instance-name priority-cost cost;
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}
virtual-address [ addresses ];
vrrp-inherit-from {
active-group group-number;
active-interface interface-name;
}
}
}
filter {
input filter-name;
output filter-name;
}
mtu bytes;
no-neighbor-learn;
no-redirects;
primary;
rpf-check {
fail-filter filter-name;
mode {
loose;
}
}
targeted-broadcast {
forward-and-send-to-re;
forward-only;
}
}
family inet6 {
accounting {
destination-class-usage;
source-class-usage {
input;
output;
}
}
address address {
eui-64;
ndp ip-address (mac | multicast-mac) mac-address <publish>;
preferred;
primary;
vrrp-inet6-group group-id {
accept-data | no-accept-data;
advertisements-threshold number;
authentication-key key;
authentication-type authentication;
fast-interval milliseconds;
inet6-advertise-interval milliseconds;
preempt | no-preempt {
hold-time seconds;
}
priority number;
track {
interface interface-name {
bandwidth-threshold bandwidth priority-cost number;
priority-cost number;
}
224
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Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
priority-hold-time seconds;
route ip-address/mask routing-instance instance-name priority-cost cost;
}
virtual-inet6-address [addresses];
virtual-link-local-address ipv6–address;
vrrp-inherit-from {
active-group group-number;
active-interface interface-name;
}
}
}
(dad-disable | no-dad-disable);
filter {
input filter-name;
output filter-name;
}
mtu bytes;
nd6-stale-time seconds;
no-neighbor-learn;
no-redirects;
policer {
input policer-name;
output policer-name;
}
rpf-check {
fail-filter filter-name;
mode {
loose;
}
}
}
family iso {
address interface-address;
mtu bytes;
}
family mpls {
filter {
input filter-name;
output filter-name;
}
mtu bytes;
policer {
input policer-name;
output policer-name;
}
}
native-inner-vlan-id vlan-id;
proxy-arp (restricted | unrestricted);
(traps | no-traps);
vlan-id-list [vlan-id’s];
vlan-id-range [vlan-id-range];
}
}
Hierarchy Level
[edit interfaces interface-name
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Release Information
Description
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3R2 for EX Series switches.
irb option introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX Series.
Configure the properties of a specific integrated bridging and routing (IRB) interface.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
inet (interfaces)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family],
[edit interfaces interface-range interface-name unit logical-unit-number family]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the primary IP address for the logical interface.
Default
You must configure a logical interface to be able to use the physical device.
Options
The remaining statements are explained separately.—
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
226
inet {
address address {
primary;
filter input filter-name;
filter output filter-name;
targeted-broadcast;
}
}
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.interface-control—To add this
statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
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Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
inet6 (interfaces)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
inet6 {
address address {
eui-64
preferred
primary;
filter input filter-name;
filter output filter-name;
}
}
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family],
[edit interfaces interface-range interface-name unit logical-unit-number family]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the primary IP address for the logical interface.
Default
You must configure a logical interface to be able to use the physical device.
Options
The remaining statements are explained separately.—
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.interface-control—To add this
statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
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interface-mode
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
interface-mode (access | trunk <inter-switch-link>);
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family bridge],
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family ethernet-switching],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number
family bridge]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.2.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D10 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 15.1.
inter-switch-link option introduced in Junos OS Release 14.2 for MX240, MX480, and
MX960 routers in enhanced LAN mode.
NOTE: This statement supports the Enhanced Layer 2 Software (ELS)
configuration style. If your switch runs software that does not support ELS,
see port-mode. For ELS details, see Getting Started with Enhanced Layer 2
Software.
(QFX3500 and QFX3600 standalone switches)—Determine whether the logical interface
accepts or discards packets based on VLAN tags. Specify the trunk option to accept
packets with a VLAN ID that matches the list of VLAN IDs specified in the vlan-id or
vlan-id-list statement, then forward the packet within the bridge domain or VLAN
configured with the matching VLAN ID. Specify the access option to accept packets with
no VLAN ID, then forward the packet within the bridge domain or VLAN configured with
the VLAN ID that matches the VLAN ID specified in the vlan-id statement.
NOTE: On MX Series routers, if you want IGMP snooping to be functional for
a bridge domain, then you should not configure interface-mode and irb for
that bridge. Such a configuration commit succeeds, but IGMP snooping is
not functional, and a message informing the same is displayed. For more
information, see Configuring a Trunk Interface on a Bridge Network.
Options
access—Configure a logical interface to accept untagged packets. Specify the VLAN to
which this interface belongs using the vlan-id statement.
trunk—Configure a single logical interface to accept packets tagged with any VLAN ID
specified with the vlan-id or vlan-id-list statement.
trunk inter-switch-link—For a private VLAN, configure the InterSwitch Link protocol (ISL)
on a trunk port of the primary VLAN in order to connect the switches composing the
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PVLAN to each other. You do not need to configure an ISL when a PVLAN is configured
on a single switch. This configuration specifies whether the particular interface
assumes the role of interswitch link for the PVLAN domains of which it is a member.
This option is supported only on MX240, MX480, and MX960 routers in enhanced
LAN mode.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Access Mode on a Logical Interface
•
Configuring a Logical Interface for Trunk Mode
•
Example: Connecting Access Switches to a Distribution Switch
•
Tunnel Services Overview
•
Tunnel Interface Configuration on MX Series Routers Overview
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interface-range
Syntax
The vlan-id statement is not supported on OCX Series switches.
interface-range interface-range-name {
disable;
description text;
ether-options {
802.3ad aex {
lacp {
force-up;
}
}
(auto-negotiation| no-auto-negotiation);
(flow-control | no-flow-control);
link-mode mode;
speed (auto-negotiation | speed);
}
hold-time milliseconds down milliseconds;
member interface-name;
member-range starting-interface-name to ending-interface-name;
mtu bytes;
unit logical-unit-number {
description text;
disable;
family family-name {...}
(traps | no traps);
vlan-id vlan-id-number;
}
}
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
[edit interfaces]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
NOTE: The vlan-id statement and Fibre Channel interfaces are not supported
on OCX Series switches.
NOTE: The interface range definition is supported only for Gigabit Ethernet,
10-Gigabit Ethernet, and Fibre Channel interfaces. Interface ranges are not
supported on channelized interfaces.
Group interfaces that share a common configuration profile.
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Options
interface-range-name—Name of the interface range.
NOTE: You can use regular expressions and wildcards to specify the interfaces
in the member range configuration. Do not use wildcards for interface types.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Understanding Interface Ranges on page 16
•
Interfaces Overview on page 3
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
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interfaces
Syntax
The following statements and their associated substatements are not supported on OCX
Series switches: auto-negotiation, speed, ethernet-switching, fcoe-lag, fibre-channel,
fibrechannel-options, mc-ae, vlan, vlan-id, and vlan-tagging.
interfaces {
aex {
disable;
aggregated-ether-options {
configured-flow-control {
rx-buffers (on | off);
tx-buffers (on | off);
}
(fcoe-lag | no-fcoe-lag);
flexible-vlan-tagging;
(flow-control | no-flow-control);
lacp mode {
admin-key key;
force-up;
periodic interval;
system-id mac-address;
}
link-speed speed;
local-bias;
loopback;
no-loopback;
minimum-links number;
}
mc-ae {
chassis-id chassis-id;
mc-ae-id mc-ae-id;
mode (active-active);
status-control (active | standby);
}
description text;
gratuitous-arp-reply | no-gratuitous-arp-reply)
hold-time down milliseconds up milliseconds;
mtu bytes;
no-gratuitous-arp-request;
traceoptions;
(traps | no traps);
unit logical-unit-number {
disable;
description text;
family {
ethernet-switching {
filter input filter-name;
filter output filter-name;
native-vlan-id vlan-id;
port-mode mode;
reflective-relay;
vlan {
members [ (all | names | vlan-ids) ];
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}
}
inet {
address address {
primary;
}
filter input filter-name;
filter output filter-name;
primary;
targeted-broadcast;
}
(traps | no traps);
vlan-id vlan-id-number;
}
vlan-tagging;
}
interface-range interface-range-name {
disable;
description text;
ether-options {
802.3ad aex {
lacp {
force-up;
}
}
(auto-negotiation| no-auto-negotiation);
configured-flow-control {
rx-buffers (on | off);
tx-buffers (on | off);
}
(flow-control | no-flow-control);
link-mode mode;
speed (auto-negotiation | speed);
}
hold-time milliseconds down milliseconds;
member interface-name;
member-range starting-interface-name to ending-interface-name;
mtu bytes;
unit logical-unit-number {
disable;
description text;
family family-name {...}
(traps | no traps);
vlan-id vlan-id-number;
}
}
lo0 {
disable;
description text;
hold-time milliseconds down milliseconds;
traceoptions;
(traps | no traps);
unit logical-unit-number {
disable;
description text;
family {
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inet {
address address {
primary;
}
filter input filter-name;
filter output filter-name;
primary;
targeted-broadcast;
}
(traps | no traps);
}
}
mex {
disable;
description text;
hold-time milliseconds down milliseconds;
(gratuitous-arp-reply | no-gratuitous-arp-reply);
no-gratuitous-arp-request;
traceoptions;
traps;
unit logical-unit-number {
disable;
description text;
family {
ethernet-switching {
filter input filter-name;
filter output filter-name;
native-vlan-id vlan-id;
port-mode mode;
reflective-relay;
vlan {
members [ (all | names | vlan-ids) ];
}
}
inet {
address address {
primary;
filter input filter-name;
filter output filter-name;
primary;
targeted-broadcast;
}
}
traps;
vlan-id vlan-id-number;
}
vlan-tagging;
vlan {
disable;
description text;
(gratuitous-arp-reply| no-gratuitous-arp-reply);
hold-time milliseconds down milliseconds;
mtu bytes;
no-gratuitous-arp-request;
traceoptions;
(traps | no traps);
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unit logical-unit-number {
description text;
disable;
family {
inet {
address address {
primary;
}
filter input filter-name;
filter output filter-name;
primary;
targeted-broadcast;
}
(traps | no traps);
}
}
fc-0/0/port {
fibrechannel-options {
bb-sc-n;
(loopback | no-loopback);
speed (auto-negotiation | 2g | 4g | 8g);
}
unit logical-unit-number {
disable;
description text;
family {
fibre-channel {
port-mode np-port;
}
(traps | no traps);
}
ge-0/0/port {
disable;
description text;
ether-options {
802.3ad aex {
lacp {
force-up;
primary;
}
}
(auto-negotiation | no-auto-negotiation);
configured-flow-control {
rx-buffers (on | off);
tx-buffers (on | off);
}
flexible-vlan-tagging;
(flow-control | no-flow-control);
link-mode mode;
loopback;
no-loopback;
speed (auto-negotiation | speed);
}
gratuitous-arp-reply| no-gratuitous-arp-reply);
hold-time milliseconds down milliseconds;
mac
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mtu bytes;
no-gratuitous-arp-request;
traceoptions;
(traps | no traps);
unit logical-unit-number {
description text;
disable;
family {
ethernet-switching {
filter input filter-name;
filter output filter-name;
native-vlan-id vlan-id;
port-mode mode;
reflective-relay;
vlan {
members [ (all | names | vlan-ids) ];
}
}
inet {
address address {
primary;
}
filter input filter-name;
filter output filter-name;
primary;
targeted-broadcast;
}
(traps | no traps);
vlan-id vlan-id-number;
}
vlan-tagging;
}
vrrp-group group-id {
(accept-data | no-accept-data);
advertise-interval seconds;
authentication-key key;
authentication-type authentication;
fast-interval milliseconds;
(preempt | no-preempt) {
hold-time seconds;
}
priority number;
track {
interface interface-name {
bandwidth-threshold bits-per-second priority-cost priority;
priority-cost priority;
}
priority-hold-time seconds;
route prefix/prefix-length routing-instance instance-name priority-cost priority;
}
}
virtual-address [ addresses ];
}
xe-0/0/port {
disable;
description text;
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ether-options {
802.3ad aex {
lacp {
force-up;
(primary | backup);
}
}
configured-flow-control {
rx-buffers (on | off);
tx-buffers (on | off);
}
flexible-vlan-tagging;
(flow-control | no-flow-control);
loopback;
no-loopback;
}
(gratuitous-arp-reply| no-gratuitous-arp-reply
hold-time milliseconds down milliseconds;
mac
mtu bytes;
no-gratuitous-arp-request;
traceoptions;
(traps | no traps);
unit logical-unit-number {
disable;
description text;
family {
ethernet-switching {
filter input filter-name;
filter output filter-name;
native-vlan-id vlan-id;
port-mode mode;
reflective-relay;
vlan {
members [ (all | names | vlan-ids) ];
}
}
fibre-channel {
port-mode (f-port | np-port);
}
inet {
address address {
primary;
}
filter input filter-name;
filter output filter-name;
primary;
targeted-broadcast;
}
(traps | no traps);
vlan-id vlan-id-number;
}
vlan-tagging;
}
}
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Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
[edit]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the interfaces on the QFX Series and OCX Series.
The following statements and their associated substatements are not supported on OCX
Series switches: auto-negotiation, ethernet-switching, fcoe-lag, fibre-channel,
fibrechannel-options, mc-ae, speed, vlan, vlan-id, and vlan-tagging
Most standard Junos OS configuration statements are available in the Junos OS for a
switch. This topic lists Junos OS statements that you commonly use when configuring a
switch as well as statements added to support switches only.
Options
aex—Configure an aggregated Ethernet interface.
xe-0/0/port/—Configure a 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface.
ge-0/0/port/—Configure a Gigabit Ethernet interface.
fc-0/0/port/—Configure a Fibre Channel interface.
meX/—Configure a management interface.
mc-ae—Configure a multichassis aggregated Ethernet (MC-AE) interface.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
238
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Interfaces Overview on page 3
•
Understanding Interface Ranges on page 16
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Configuring a Layer 3 Logical Interface on page 120
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
link-down
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
link-down (red | yellow | ignore);
[edit chassis alarm ethernet],
[edit chassis alarm fibre-channel],
[edit chassis interconnect-device name alarm ethernet],
[edit chassis node-group name alarm fibre-channel]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify either red, yellow, or ignore to display when the link is down.
red—Indicates that one or more hardware components have failed or exceeded
temperature thresholds, or an alarm condition configured on an interface has triggered
a critical warning.
yellow—Indicates a noncritical condition on the device that, if left unchecked, might
cause an interruption in service or degradation in performance. A yellow alarm
condition requires monitoring or maintenance.
ignore—Suppresses or ignores the alarm.
Required Privilege
Level
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
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link-mode
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
link-mode mode;
[edit interfaces interface-name ether-options]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Set the device’s link-connection characteristic.
The full-duplex mode is enabled.
mode —Link characteristic:
•
full-duplex—Connection is full duplex.
•
half-duplex—Connection is half duplex.
•
automatic—Link mode is negotiated.
If no-auto-negotiation is specified in the ether-options option, you can select only
full-duplex or half-duplex. If auto-negotiation is specified in the ether-options option,
you can select any mode.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
240
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
link-speed
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
link-speed speed;
[edit interfaces aex aggregated-ether-options]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
For aggregated Ethernet interfaces only, set the required link speed.
speed—For aggregated Ethernet links, you can specify the speed in bits per second either
as a complete decimal number or as a decimal number followed by the abbreviation
k (1000), m (1,000,000), or g (1,000,000,000).
On QFX5100 and EX4600 standalone switches and on a QFX5100 Virtual Chassis and
EX4600 Virtual Chassis, you can configure a mixed rate of link speeds for the
aggregated Ethernet bundle. Only link speeds of 40G and 10G are supported. Load
balancing will not work if you configure link speeds that are not supported.
Aggregated Ethernet links on the QFX Series can have one of the following speed values:
NOTE: OCX Series switches only support 10g and 40g interfaces. Mixed rate
aggregated Ethernet interfaces are not support on the OCX Series.
Required Privilege
Level
•
100g—Links are 100 Gbps.
•
100m—Links are 100 Mbps.
•
10g—Links are 10 Gbps.
•
1g—Links are 1 Gbps.
•
40g—Links are 40 Gbps.
•
50g—Links are 50 Gbps.
•
80g—Links are 80 Gbps.
•
8g—Links are 8 Gbps.
•
0c192—Links are OC-192.
•
mixed—Links are 10 Gbps and 40Gbps.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
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Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
loopback (Aggregated Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, and 10-Gigabit Ethernet)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
(loopback | no-loopback);
[edit interfaces interface-name aggregated-ether-options],
[edit interfaces interface-name ether-options]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
For aggregated Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, and 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, enable or
disable loopback mode.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet Loopback Capability on page 60
mac
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
mac mac-address;
[edit interfaces interface-name]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Set the MAC address of the interface.
Use this statement at the [edit interfaces ... ps0] hierarchy level to configure the MAC
address for a pseudowire logical device that is used for subscriber interfaces over
point-to-point MPLS pseudowires.
Options
mac-address—MAC address. Specify the MAC address as six hexadecimal bytes in one
of the following formats: nnnn.nnnn.nnnn or nn:nn:nn:nn:nn:nn. For example,
0000.5e00.5355 or 00:00:5e:00:53:55.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
242
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the MAC Address on the Management Ethernet Interface
•
Configuring a Pseudowire Subscriber Logical Interface Device
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
management-ethernet (Alarm)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
management-ethernet {
link-down (red | yellow | ignore);
}
[edit chassis alarm],
[edit chassis interconnect-device name alarm],
[edit chassis node-group name alarm]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure alarms for a management Ethernet interface.
NOTE: If you configure a yellow alarm on the Interconnect device, it will be
handled as a red alarm.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
The remaining statement is explained separately.—
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
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member
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
244
member interface-name;
[edit interfaces interface-range interface-range-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify the name of the member interface belonging to an interface range on the QFX
Series switch.
interface-name—Name of the interface.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
•
Interfaces Overview on page 3
•
Interfaces Overview
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
member-range
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
member-range starting-interface-name ending-interface-name;
[edit interfaces interface-range interface-range-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify the names of the first and last members of a sequence of interfaces belonging
to an interface range.
starting interface-name ending interface-name—Name of the first member and the name
of the last member in the interface sequence.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Understanding Interface Ranges on page 16
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces
•
Interfaces Overview on page 3
•
Interfaces Overview
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
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mtu
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
mtu bytes;
[edit interfaces interface-name],
[edit interfaces interface-range interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify the maximum transmission unit (MTU) size for the media. Changing the media
MTU size causes an interface to be deleted and added again. On QFX3500, QFX3600,
QFX5100, and OCX Series switches, either standalone or as part of the QFabric system,
the maximum MTU value on an untagged packet transiting through an ingress Gigabit
Ethernet interface must be no more than the currently configured MTU value plus four,
whereas the maximum MTU value on a tagged packet transiting through an ingress
Gigabit Ethernet interface must be no more than the currently configured MTU value plus
eight. The maximum MTU value on an untagged or tagged packet transiting through an
ingress 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface must be no more than the currently configured MTU
value plus eight.
Keep the following points in mind if you are configuring MTU size for jumbo frames on
these special types of interfaces:
•
For LAG interfaces—Configuring the jumbo MTU size on a link aggregation group (LAG)
interface (aex) automatically configures the jumbo MTU size on the member links.
•
For RVIs—Jumbo frames of up to 9216 bytes are supported on the routed VLAN interface
(RVI), which is named vlan. The RVI functions as a logical router. To route jumbo data
packets on the RVI, you must configure the jumbo MTU size on the member physical
interfaces of the RVI and not on the RVI itself (the vlan interface). However, for jumbo
control packets—for example, to ping the RVI with a packet size of 6000 bytes or
more—you must explicitly configure the jumbo MTU size on the interface named vlan
(the RVI). On a QFX5100 switch jumbo frames on the RVI are configured on the basis
of the interface MTU.
NOTE: RVIs are not supported on OCX Series switches.
CAUTION: Setting or deleting the jumbo MTU size on the RVI (the vlan
interface) while the switch is transmitting packets might result in dropped
packets.
Options
246
bytes —MTU size.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
Range: 64 through 9216 bytes
Default: 1514 bytes
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
no-gratuitous-arp-request
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
no-gratuitous-arp-request;
[edit interfaces interface-name],
[edit interfaces interface-range interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Configure the switch not to respond to gratuitous ARP requests. You can disable responses
to gratuitous ARP requests on both Layer 2 Ethernet switching interfaces and routed
VLAN interfaces (RVIs).
Gratuitous ARP responses are enabled on all Ethernet switching interfaces and RVIs.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring IRB Interfaces on Switches
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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pic
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
pic pic-number{
tunnel-port port-number tunnel-services;
port port-number{
channel-speed (speed|disable-auto-speed-detection) ;
}
port-range port-range-low port-range-high {
channel-speed (speed|disable-auto-speed-detection) ;
}
}
[edit chassis fpc slot]
Option channel-speed introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX Series.
NOTE: This statement is not supported on the OCX Series.
Description
Options
(QFX3500, QFX3600, and QFX5100 standalone switches running Enhanced Layer 2
Software only)—Configure a specific port or a range of ports to operate as 10-Gigabit
Ethernet ports or 40-Gigabit Ethernet ports.
pic pic-number—(QFX3500 standalone switch only) Number of the physical interface
card (PIC) on which you want to configure port types. Specify 1 to configure 10-Gigabit
Ethernet or 40-Gigabit Ethernet type ports.
(QFX3600 standalone switch only) Number of the physical interface card (PIC) on
which you want to configure port types. Specify 0 to configure 10-Gigabit Ethernet
or 40-Gigabit Ethernet type ports.
port physical-port-number—Port number on which you want to configure the port type.
port-range-low—Lowest-numbered port in the range of ports.
port-range-high—Highest-numbered port in the range of ports.
channel-speed (speed |disable-auto-speed-detection) —Configure 10g for 10-Gigabit
Ethernet type ports, and configure disable-auto-speed-detection) to disable
auto-channelization.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
248
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Channelizing Interfaces on page 64
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
rx-buffers
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
rx-buffers (on | off);
[edit interfaces interface-name ether-options configured-flow-control]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Enable or disable an interface to generate and send Ethernet PAUSE messages. If you
enable the receive buffers to generate and send PAUSE messages, when the receive
buffers reach a certain level of fullness, the interface sends a PAUSE message to the
connected peer. If the connected peer is properly configured, it stops transmitting frames
to the interface on the entire link. When the interface receive buffer empties below a
certain threshold, the interface sends a message to the connected peer to resume sending
frames.
Ethernet PAUSE prevents buffers from overflowing and dropping packets during periods
of network congestion. If the other devices in the network are also configured to support
PAUSE, PAUSE supports lossless operation. Use the rx-buffers statement with the
tx-buffers statement to configure asymmetric Ethernet PAUSE on an interface. (Use the
flow-control statement to enable symmetric PAUSE and the no-flow-control statement
to disable symmetric PAUSE on an interface. Symmetric flow control and asymmetric
flow control are mutually exclusive features. If you attempt to configure both, the switch
returns a commit error.)
NOTE: Ethernet PAUSE temporarily stops transmitting all traffic on a link
when the buffers fill to a certain threshold. To temporarily pause traffic on
individual “lanes” of traffic (each lane contains the traffic associated with a
particular IEEE 802.1p code point, so there can be eight lanes of traffic on a
link), use priority-based flow control (PFC).
Ethernet PAUSE and PFC are mutually exclusive features, so you cannot
configure both of them on the same interface. If you attempt to configure
both Ethernet PAUSE and PFC on an interface, the switch returns a commit
error.
Default
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Flow control is disabled. You must explicitly configure Ethernet PAUSE flow control on
interfaces.
on | off—Enable or disable an interface to generate and send Ethernet PAUSE messages.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Related
Documentation
•
flow-control on page 218
•
tx-buffers on page 256
•
Configuring CoS Asymmetric Ethernet PAUSE Flow Control
•
Enabling and Disabling CoS Symmetric Ethernet PAUSE Flow Control
•
Understanding CoS Flow Control (Ethernet PAUSE and PFC)
short-reach-mode
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
[edit chassis fpc fpc-slot pic pic-slot],
[edit chassis fpc fpc-slot pic pic-slot port-range port-range-low port-range-high]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D30 for the QFX Series.
Configure short-reach mode for individual as well as a range of copper-based 10-Gigabit
Ethernet interfaces using short cable lengths (less than 10m) on the QFX5100-48T
switch. Short-reach mode reduces power consumption up to 5W on these interfaces.
Default
This feature is disabled by default.
Options
The following options are available:
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
250
short-reach-mode (enable | disable);
•
enable
•
disable
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Short Reach Mode on page 59
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
source
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
source source-address;
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number tunnel]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify the source address of the tunnel.
Default
If you do not specify a source address, the tunnel uses the unit’s primary address as the
source address of the tunnel.
Options
source-address—Address of the local side of the tunnel. This is the address that is placed
in the outer IP header’s source field.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Tunnel Services Overview
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
speed
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
speed (10g | 1g | 100m)
[edit interfaces interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Use this statement to set the speed of an interface. On 10-Gigabit Ethernet SFP interfaces,
autonegotiation is enabled by default and auto-detects the speed to be either 1 Gbps or
10 Gbps. On QFX5100-48S, QFX5100-96S, and QFX5100-24Q devices using 10-Gigabit
Ethernet SFP interfaces, the speed is set to 10 Gbps by default and cannot be configured
to operate in a different speed. On QFX5100-48S and QFX5100-96S devices using
1-Gigabit Ethernet SFP interfaces, the speed is set to 1 Gbps by default and cannot be
configured to operate in a different speed.
NOTE: In Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D35 on QFX5100-48T-6Q devices using
10-Gigabit Ethernet Copper interfaces, autonegotiation is disabled by default
on the copper ports, and the interfaces operate at a speed of 100M. You can,
however, enable auto-negotiation by issuing the set interface name
ether-options auto-negotiation command on the interface for which you want
to change the interface speed. With autonegotiation enabled, the interface
auto-detects the speed in which to operate.
NOTE: Only 10 Gbps and 40 Gbps interfaces are supported on OCX Series
switches.
NOTE: When displaying interface information with show interfaces commands,
you might see speed values for 1 Gbps interfaces displayed as 1000mbps.
Default
Options
Required Privilege
Level
252
•
10g—10 Gbps
•
1g—1 Gbps
•
100m—100 Mbps
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
Related
Documentation
•
auto-negotiation on page 199
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
targeted-broadcast
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
targeted-broadcast;
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet],
[edit interfaces interface-range interface-range-name unit logical-unit-number family inet]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Specify whether the IP packets destined for a Layer 3 broadcast need to be forwarded
to both an egress interface and the Routing Engine, or to an egress interface only. The
packets are broadcast only if the egress interface is a LAN interface.
Default
When this statement is not included, broadcast packets are sent to the Routing Engine
only.
Required Privilege
Level
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
traceoptions (Individual Interfaces)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
traceoptions {
flag flag;
}
[edit interfaces interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Define tracing operations for individual interfaces.
To specify more than one tracing operation, include multiple flag statements.
The traceoptions statement for interfaces does not support a trace file. The logging is
done by the kernel, so the tracing information is placed in the system syslog file in the
directory /var/log.
NOTE: The traceoptions statement is not supported on the QFX3000 QFabric
system.
Default
If you do not include this statement, no interface-specific tracing operations are performed.
Options
flag—Tracing operation to perform. To specify more than one tracing operation, include
multiple flag statements. The following are the interface-specific tracing options.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
254
•
all—All interface tracing operations
•
event—Interface events
•
ipc—Interface interprocess communication (IPC) messages
•
media—Interface media changes
•
q921—ISDN Q.921 frames
•
q931—ISDN Q.931 frames
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Tracing Operations of an Individual Router or Switch Interface
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
traps
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
(traps | no-traps);
[edit interfaces interface-name],
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number],
[edit interfaces interface-range interface-range-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Enable or disable the sending of SNMP notifications when the state of the connection
changes.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling or Disabling SNMP Notifications on Physical Interfaces
•
Enabling or Disabling SNMP Notifications on Logical Interfaces
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
tx-buffers
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
tx-buffers (on | off);
[edit interfaces interface-name ether-options configured-flow-control]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Enable or disable an interface to respond to received Ethernet PAUSE messages. If you
enable the transmit buffers to respond to PAUSE messages, when the interface receives
a PAUSE message from the connected peer, the interface stops transmitting frames on
the entire link. When the receive buffer on the connected peer empties below a certain
threshold, the peer interface sends a message to the paused interface to resume sending
frames.
Ethernet PAUSE prevents buffers from overflowing and dropping packets during periods
of network congestion. If the other devices in the network are also configured to support
PAUSE, PAUSE supports lossless operation. Use the tx-buffers statement with the
rx-buffers statement to configure asymmetric Ethernet PAUSE on an interface. (Use the
flow-control statement to enable symmetric PAUSE and the no-flow-control statement
to disable symmetric PAUSE on an interface. Symmetric flow control and asymmetric
flow control are mutually exclusive features. If you attempt to configure both, the switch
returns a commit error.)
NOTE: Ethernet PAUSE temporarily stops transmitting all traffic on a link
when the buffers fill to a certain threshold. To temporarily pause traffic on
individual “lanes” of traffic (each lane contains the traffic associated with a
particular IEEE 802.1p code point, so there can be eight lanes of traffic on a
link), use priority-based flow control (PFC).
Ethernet PAUSE and PFC are mutually exclusive features, so you cannot
configure both of them on the same interface. If you attempt to configure
both Ethernet PAUSE and PFC on an interface, the switch returns a commit
error.
Default
Options
Required Privilege
Level
256
Flow control is disabled. You must explicitly configure Ethernet PAUSE flow control on
interfaces.
on | off—Enable or disable an interface to respond to an Ethernet PAUSE message.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
Related
Documentation
•
flow-control on page 218
•
rx-buffers on page 249
•
Configuring CoS Asymmetric Ethernet PAUSE Flow Control
•
Enabling and Disabling CoS Symmetric Ethernet PAUSE Flow Control
•
Understanding CoS Flow Control (Ethernet PAUSE and PFC)
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
unit
Syntax
The ethernet-switching and fibre-channel statements and all of their substatements are
not supported on OCX Series switches.
unit logical-unit-number {
family {
ethernet-switching {
filter input filter-name;
filter output filter-name;
native-vlan-id vlan-id;
port-mode mode;
vlan {
members [ (all | names | vlan-ids) ];
}
}
fibre-channel {
port-mode (f-port | np-port);
}
inet {
address address {
primary;
}
filter input filter-name;
filter output filter-name;
primary;
targeted-broadcast;
}
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
[edit interfaces interface-name],
[edit interfaces interface-range interface-range-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
NOTE: The ethernet-switching and fibre-channel statements and all of their
substatements are not supported on OCX Series switches.
Configure a logical interface on the physical device. You must configure a logical interface
to be able to use the physical device.
Default
Options
You must configure a logical interface to be able to use the physical device.
logical-unit-number—Number of the logical unit.
Range: 0 through 16,384
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
258
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Chapter 13: Interfaces Configuration Statements
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
vlan-id
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
vlan-id vlan-id-number;
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
For 10-Gigabit Ethernet and aggregated Ethernet interfaces only, bind an 802.1Q VLAN
tag ID to a logical interface.
NOTE: The VLAN tag ID cannot be configured on logical interface unit 0. The
logical unit number must be 1 or higher.
Options
vlan-id-number—Valid VLAN identifier.
Range: 1 through 4094
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
vlan-tagging on page 260
•
Configuring Gigabit and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces on page 53
•
Configuring a Layer 3 Logical Interface on page 120
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
vlan-tagging
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
260
vlan-tagging;
[edit interfaces interface-name ]
[edit interfaces interface-range interface-range-name ]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Enable VLAN tagging. The platform receives and forwards single-tag frames with 802.1Q
VLAN tags.
VLAN tagging is disabled by default.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
vlan-id on page 259
•
Configuring a Layer 3 Logical Interface on page 120
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 14
Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management
Configuration Statements
•
action (OAM LFM) on page 262
•
action-profile on page 263
•
allow-remote-loopback on page 264
•
ethernet (OAM LFM) on page 265
•
event-thresholds on page 267
•
event (OAM LFM) on page 268
•
frame-error on page 269
•
frame-period on page 270
•
frame-period-summary on page 271
•
oam on page 272
•
interface (OAM LFM) on page 274
•
link-adjacency-loss on page 275
•
link-discovery on page 275
•
link-down on page 276
•
link-event-rate on page 276
•
link-fault-management on page 277
•
negotiation-options on page 278
•
no-allow-link-events on page 278
•
pdu-interval on page 279
•
pdu-threshold on page 280
•
remote-loopback on page 280
•
symbol-period on page 281
•
syslog (OAM LFM) on page 281
•
traceoptions (OAM LFM) on page 282
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action (OAM LFM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
action {
syslog;
link-down;
}
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Define the action or actions to be taken when the OAM link fault management (LFM)
fault event occurs.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
262
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 14: Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Configuration Statements
action-profile
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
action-profile profile-name;
action {
syslog;
link-down;
}
event {
link-adjacency-loss;
link-event-rate {
frame-error count;
frame-period count;
frame-period-summary count;
symbol-period count;
}
}
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Configure an Ethernet OAM link fault management (LFM) action profile by specifying a
profile name.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
profile-name—Name of the action profile.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
allow-remote-loopback
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
allow-remote-loopback;
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Advertise that the interface is capable of getting into loopback mode. Enable remote
loopback in Ethernet OAM link fault management (LFM) on all Ethernet interfaces or the
specified interface on the EX Series switch.
WARNING: If you disable this statement on a peer interface, LFM loopback
enable and disable commands will not work. Before disabling this
configuration, please make sure the remote-loopback interface is disabled.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
264
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 89
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 14: Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Configuration Statements
ethernet (OAM LFM)
Syntax
ethernet {
connectivity-fault-management {
action-profile profile-name {
action {
interface-down;
}
default-actions {
interface-down;
}
event {
adjacency-loss;
}
}
esp-traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <no-stamp> <replace> <size size> <world-readable |
no-world-readable>;
flag (all |error | esp | interface | krt | lib |normal |task |timer);
}
linktrace {
age (30m | 10m | 1m | 30s | 10s);
path-database-size path-database-size;
}
maintenance-domain domain-name {
level number;
mip-half-function (none | default |explicit);
name-format (character-string | none | dns | mac+2oct);
maintenance-association ma-name {
continuity-check {
hold-interval minutes;
interface-status-tlv;
interval (10m | 10s | 1m | 1s| 100ms);
loss-threshold number;
port-status-tlv;
}
mep mep-id {
auto-discovery;
direction down;
interface interface-name;
priority
remote-mep mep-id {
action-profile profile-name;
sla-iterator-profile profile-name {
data-tlv-size size;
iteration-count count-value;
priority priority-value;
}
}
}
short-name-format (character-string | vlan | 2octet | rfc-2685-vpn-id);
}
}
performance-monitoring {
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sla-iterator-profiles {
profile-name {
calculation-weight {
delay delay-value;
delay-variation delay-variation-value;
}
cycle-time cycle-time-value;
iteration-period iteration-period-value;
measurement-type two-way-delay;
passive;
}
}
}
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <match regex> <size size> <world-readable |
no-world-readable>;
flag flag ;
no-remote-trace;
}
}
link-fault-management {
action-profile profile-name;
action {
syslog;
link-down;
}
event {
link-adjacency-loss;
link-event-rate {
frame-error count;
frame-period count;
frame-period-summary count;
symbol-period count;
}
}
interface interface-name {
link-discovery (active | passive);
pdu-interval interval;
pdu-threshold threshold-value;
remote-loopback;
event-thresholds {
frame-errorcount;
frame-period count;
frame-period-summary count;
symbol-period count;
}
negotiation-options {
allow-remote-loopback;
no-allow-link-events;
}
}
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <match regex> <size size> <world-readable |
no-world-readable>;
flag flag ;
no-remote-trace;
266
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Chapter 14: Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Configuration Statements
}
}
}
Hierarchy Level
[edit protocols oam]
Release Information
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
connectivity-fault-management introduced in Junos OS Release 10.2 for EX Series switches.
Description
Provide IEEE 802.3ah Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) support for
Ethernet interfaces on EX Series switches or configure connectivity fault management
(CFM) for IEEE 802.1ag Operation, Administration, and Management (OAM) support on
the switches.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 89
•
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Connectivity Fault Management on EX Series Switches
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Connectivity Fault Management (CLI Procedure)
event-thresholds
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
event-thresholds {
frame-error count;
frame-period count;
frame-period-summary count;
symbol-period count;
}
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management interface interface-name]
Release Information
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Description
Configure threshold limit values for link events in periodic OAM PDUs.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
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event (OAM LFM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
event {
link-adjacency-loss;
link-event-rate {
frame-error count;
frame-period count;
frame-period-summary count;
symbol-period count;
}
}
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management action-profile profile-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Configure link events in an action profile for Ethernet OAM link fault management (LFM).
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
268
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 14: Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Configuration Statements
frame-error
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
frame-error count;
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management event link-event-rate],
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management interface interface-name
event-thresholds]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Configure the threshold value for sending frame error events or taking the action specified
in the action profile.
Frame errors occur on the underlying physical layer. The threshold is reached when the
number of frame errors reaches the configured value.
Options
count—Threshold count in seconds for frame error events.
Range: 1 through 100 seconds
Default: 1 second
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
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frame-period
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
frame-period count;
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management event link-event-rate],
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management interface interface-name
event-thresholds]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Configure the number of frame errors within the last N frames that has exceeded a
threshold.
Frame errors occur on the underlying physical layer. The threshold is reached when the
number of frame errors reaches the configured value.
Options
count—Threshold count in seconds for frame error events.
Range: 1 through 100 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
270
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 14: Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Configuration Statements
frame-period-summary
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
frame-period-summary count;
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management event link-event-rate],
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management interface interface-name
event-thresholds]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Configure the threshold value for sending frame period summary error events or taking
the action specified in the action profile.
An errored frame second is any 1-second period that has at least one errored frame. This
event is generated if the number of errored frame seconds is equal to or greater than the
specified threshold for that period.
Options
count—Threshold count in seconds for frame period summary error events.
Range: 1 through 100 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
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oam
Syntax
272
oam {
ethernet{
connectivity-fault-management {
action-profile profile-name {
action {
interface-down;
}
default-actions {
interface-down;
}
event {
adjacency-loss;
}
}
linktrace {
age (30m | 10m | 1m | 30s | 10s);
path-database-size path-database-size;
}
maintenance-domain domain-name {
level number;
mip-half-function (none | default |explicit);
name-format (character-string | none | dns | mac+2oct);
maintenance-association ma-name {
continuity-check {
hold-interval minutes;
interface-status-tlv;
interval (10m | 10s | 1m | 1s| 100ms);
loss-threshold number;
port-status-tlv;
}
mep mep-id {
auto-discovery;
direction down;
interface interface-name;
remote-mep mep-id {
action-profile profile-name;
}
}
}
}
performance-monitoring {
sla-iterator-profiles {
profile-name {
calculation-weight {
delay delay-value;
delay-variation delay-variation-value;
}
cycle-time cycle-time-value;
iteration-period iteration-period-value;
measurement-type two-way-delay;
passive;
}
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 14: Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Configuration Statements
}
}
}
link-fault-management {
action-profile profile-name;
action {
syslog;
link-down;
}
event {
link-adjacency-loss;
link-event-rate {
frame-error count;
frame-period count;
frame-period-summary count;
symbol-period count;
}
}
interface interface-name {
link-discovery (active | passive);
pdu-interval interval;
pdu-threshold threshold-value;
remote-loopback;
event-thresholds {
frame-errorcount;
frame-period count;
frame-period-summary count;
symbol-period count;
}
negotiation-options {
allow-remote-loopback;
no-allow-link-events;
}
}
}
}
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
[edit protocols]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
connectivity-fault-management introduced in Junos OS Release 10.2 for EX Series switches.
Provide IEEE 802.3ah Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) link fault
management (LFM) support for Ethernet interfaces on EX Series switches or configure
connectivity fault management (CFM) for IEEE 802.1ag Operation, Administration, and
Management (OAM) support on the switches.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
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Related
Documentation
•
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 89
•
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Connectivity Fault Management on EX Series Switches
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Connectivity Fault Management (CLI Procedure)
interface (OAM LFM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
interface interface-name {
link-discovery (active | passive);
pdu-interval interval;
pdu-threshold threshold-value;
remote-loopback;
event-thresholds {
frame-errorcount;
frame-period count;
frame-period-summary count;
symbol-period count;
}
negotiation-options {
allow-remote-loopback;
no-allow-link-events;
}
}
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Configure Ethernet OAM link fault management (LFM) for all interfaces or for specific
interfaces.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
274
interface-name—Name of the interface to be enabled for IEEE 802.3ah OAM link fault
management (LFM) support.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 89
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 14: Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Configuration Statements
link-adjacency-loss
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
link-adjacency-loss;
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management action-profile event]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Configure loss of adjacency event with the IEEE 802.3ah link fault management (LFM)
peer. When included, the loss of adjacency event triggers the action specified under the
action statement.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 89
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
link-discovery
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
link-discovery (active | passive);
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Specify the discovery mode used for IEEE 802.3ah Operation, Administration, and
Maintenance (OAM) link fault management (LFM) support. The discovery process is
triggered automatically when OAM 802.3ah functionality is enabled on an interface. Link
monitoring is done when the interface sends periodic OAM PDUs.
active—In active mode, the interface discovers and monitors the peer on the link if the
peer also supports IEEE 802.3ah OAM functionality.
passive—In passive mode, the peer initiates the discovery process.
Once the discovery process is initiated, both sides participate in discovery.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
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link-down
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
link-down;
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management action-profile action]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Mark the interface as down for transit traffic.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
link-event-rate
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
link-event-rate {
frame-error count;
frame-period count;
frame-period-summary count;
symbol-period count;
}
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management action-profile event]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Configure the number of link fault management (LFM) events per second.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
276
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 14: Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Configuration Statements
link-fault-management
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
link-fault-management {
action-profile profile-name;
action {
syslog;
link-down;
}
event {
link-adjacency-loss;
link-event-rate {
frame-error count;
frame-period count;
frame-period-summary count;
symbol-period count;
}
}
interface interface-name {
link-discovery (active | passive);
pdu-interval interval;
pdu-threshold threshold-value;
remote-loopback;
event-thresholds {
frame-errorcount;
frame-period count;
frame-period-summary count;
symbol-period count;
}
negotiation-options {
allow-remote-loopback;
no-allow-link-events;
}
}
}
[edit protocols oam ethernet]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Configure Ethernet OAM link fault management (LFM) for all interfaces or for specific
interfaces.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 89
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
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negotiation-options
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
negotiation-options {
allow-remote-loopback;
no-allow-link-events;
}
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Enable and disable IEEE 802.3ah Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM)
link fault management (LFM) features for Ethernet interfaces.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
no-allow-link-events
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
278
no-allow-link-events;
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management interface interface-name
negotiation-options]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Disable the sending of link event TLVs.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 14: Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Configuration Statements
pdu-interval
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
pdu-interval interval;
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Specify the periodic OAM PDU sending interval for fault detection. It is used for IEEE
802.3ah Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) link fault management
(LFM) support.
interval—Periodic OAM PDU sending interval.
Range: 400 through 1000 milliseconds
Default: 1000 milliseconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 89
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
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pdu-threshold
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
pdu-threshold threshold-value;
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Configure how many protocol data units (PDUs) are missed before declaring the peer
lost in Ethernet OAM link fault management (LFM) for all interfaces or for specific
interfaces.
threshold-value —Number of PDUs missed before declaring the peer lost.
Range: 3 through 10 PDUs
Default: 3 PDUs
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
remote-loopback
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
280
remote-loopback;
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Set the data terminal equipment (DTE) in loopback mode. Remove the statement from
the configuration to take the DTE out of loopback mode. It is used for IEEE 802.3ah
Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) link fault management (LFM) support.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 89
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 14: Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Configuration Statements
symbol-period
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
symbol-period count;
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management action-profile profile-name; event
link-event-rate] ,
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management interface interface-name
event-thresholds]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Configure the threshold for sending symbol period events or taking the action specified
in the action profile.
Symbol code errors occur on the underlying physical layer. The symbol period threshold
is reached when the number of symbol errors reaches the configured value within the
period. You cannot configure the default value to a different value.
Options
count—Threshold count in seconds for symbol period events.
Range: 1 through 100 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
syslog (OAM LFM)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
syslog;
[edit protocols oam ethernet link-fault-management action-profile profile-name; action]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Generate a system log message for the Ethernet Operation, Administration, and
Maintenance (OAM) link fault management (LFM) event.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
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traceoptions (OAM LFM)
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <match regex> <size size> <world-readable |
no-world-readable>;
flag flag ;
no-remote-trace;
}
Statement introduced in JUNOS Release 10.2 for EX Series switches.
Configure tracing options the link fault management.
file filename—Name of the file to receive the output of the tracing operation. Enclose the
name within quotation marks. All files are placed in the directory /var/log.
files number—(Optional) Maximum number of trace files. When a trace file named
trace-file reaches its maximum size, it is renamed trace-file.0, then trace-file.1, and
so on, until the maximum xk to specify KB, xm to specify MB, or xg to specify GB
number of trace files is reached. Then the oldest trace file is overwritten. If you specify
a maximum number of files, you also must specify a maximum file size with the size
option.
Range: 2 through 1000
Default: 3 files
flag flag—Tracing operation to perform. To specify more than one tracing operation,
include multiple flag statements. You can include the following flags:
•
action-profile—Trace action profile invocation events.
•
all—Trace all events.
•
configuration—Trace configuration events.
•
protocol—Trace protocol processing events.
•
routing socket—Trace routing socket events.
match—(Optional) Refine the output to log only those lines that match the given regular
expression.
no-world-readable—(Optional) Restrict file access to the user who created the file.
no-remote-trace—(Optional) Disable the remote trace.
size size—(Optional) Maximum size of each trace file, in kilobytes (KB), megabytes (MB),
or gigabytes (GB). When a trace file named trace-file reaches its maximum size, it
is renamed trace-file.0, then trace-file.1, and so on, until the maximum number of
trace files is reached. Then the oldest trace file is overwritten. If you specify a
maximum number of files, you also must specify a maximum file size with the files
option.
282
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Chapter 14: Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Configuration Statements
Syntax: xk to specify KB, xm to specify MB, or xg to specify GB
Range: 10 KB through 1 GB
Default: 128 KB
Default: If you do not include this option, tracing output is appended to an existing trace
file.
world-readable—(Optional) Enable unrestricted file access.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 89
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
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284
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 15
GRE Configuration Statements
•
destination (Tunnels) on page 286
•
tunnel on page 287
•
tunnel-port on page 287
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
destination (Tunnels)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
286
destination address;
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet address address],
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet unnumbered-address
interface-name],
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number tunnel],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number
family inet address address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number
family inet unnumbered-address interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number
tunnel]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
For encrypted, PPP-encapsulated, and tunnel interfaces, specify the remote address of
the connection.
address—Address of the remote side of the connection.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Interface Address on page 51
•
Configuring Generic Routing Encapsulation Tunneling (CLI Procedure)
•
Junos OS Services Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
•
point-to-point
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 15: GRE Configuration Statements
tunnel
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
tunnel {
destination destination-address;
source source-address;
ttl number;
}
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure a tunnel. You can use the tunnel for unicast and multicast traffic or just for
multicast traffic. You can also use tunnels for encrypted traffic.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Generic Routing Encapsulation Tunneling (CLI Procedure)
tunnel-port
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
tunnel-port port-number tunnel-services;
[edit chassis fpc slot pic pic-number]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the port number for generic routing encapsulation (GRE) tunneling.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Generic Routing Encapsulation Tunneling (CLI Procedure)
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288
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CHAPTER 16
IP Directed Broadcast Configuration
Statement
•
targeted-broadcast on page 289
targeted-broadcast
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
targeted-broadcast;
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet],
[edit interfaces interface-range interface-range-name unit logical-unit-number family inet]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Specify whether the IP packets destined for a Layer 3 broadcast need to be forwarded
to both an egress interface and the Routing Engine, or to an egress interface only. The
packets are broadcast only if the egress interface is a LAN interface.
Default
When this statement is not included, broadcast packets are sent to the Routing Engine
only.
Required Privilege
Level
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
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290
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 17
LAGs and LACP Configuration Statements
•
aggregated-devices on page 292
•
aggregated-ether-options on page 293
•
chassis on page 295
•
802.3ad on page 296
•
device-count on page 297
•
ethernet on page 297
•
force-up on page 298
•
lacp (802.3ad) on page 299
•
lacp (Aggregated Ethernet) on page 300
•
minimum-links on page 301
•
periodic on page 302
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aggregated-devices
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
aggregated-devices {
ethernet {
device-count number;
}
}
[edit chassis],
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.2R3
Configure properties for aggregated devices on the switch.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
292
Aggregated devices are disabled.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Understanding Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces and LACP on page 125
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation Between a QFX Series Product and an
Aggregation Switch on page 132
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 17: LAGs and LACP Configuration Statements
aggregated-ether-options
Syntax
The fcoe-lag and mc-ae statements are not supported on OCX Series switches.
aggregated-ether-options {
configured-flow-control {
rx-buffers (on | off);
tx-buffers (on | off);
}
ethernet-switch-profile {
tag-protocol-id;
(fcoe-lag | no-fcoe-lag);
(flow-control | no-flow-control);
lacp mode {
admin-key key;
periodic interval;
system-id mac-address;
force-up;
}
}
(link-protection | no-link-protection);
link-speed speed;
local-bias;
local-minimum-links-threshold threshold-value;
(loopback | no-loopback);
mc-ae {
chassis-id chassis-id;
mc-ae-id mc-ae-id;
mode (active-active);
status-control (active | standby);
}
minimum-links number;
rebalance-periodic;
resilient-hash;
source-address-filter filter;
(source-filtering | no-source-filtering);
}
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
[edit interfaces aex]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statements fcoe-lag and no-fcoe-lag introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X52-D10 for
the QFX Series.
Statements force-up, lacp, and resilient-hash introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D10
for the QFX Series.
Statement local-minimum-links-threshold introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D40
for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure properties specific to a specific aggregated Ethernet interface.
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NOTE: The fcoe-lag and mc-ae statements are not supported on OCX Series
switches.
NOTE: The force-up statement is not supported on QFX10002 switches.
NOTE: The resilient-hash statement is not supported on QFX10002 switches.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
294
Options are not enabled.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Understanding Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces and LACP on page 125
•
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP on page 128
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation with LACP Between a QFX Series Product and
an Aggregation Switch on page 137
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 17: LAGs and LACP Configuration Statements
chassis
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
chassis {
routing-engine
redundancy {
failover {
on-disk-failure {
disk-failure-action (halt | reboot);
}
on-loss-of-keepalives;
}
graceful-switchover;
}
aggregated-devices {
ethernet {
device-count number;
}
alarm {
interface-type {
alarm-name (red | yellow | ignore);
}
}
}
forwarding-options profile-name {
num-65-127-prefix value
}
fpc slot {
auto-speed-detection disable
pic pic-number{
port port-number{
tunnel-port port-number tunnel-services;
channel-speed speed;
}
port-range port-range-low port-range-high {
channel-speed speed;
}
}
}
maximum-ecmp next-hops;
}
[edit]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.2R3
Configure chassis-specific properties for the switch.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
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Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Understanding Link Aggregation and Link Aggregation Control Protocol in a Junos Fusion
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
802.3ad
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
802.3ad aex;
lacp {
force-up;
(primary | backup);
}
port-priority;
}
[edit interfaces interface-name ether-options]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Specify the aggregated Ethernet logical interface number.
NOTE: The port-priority statement is not supported on QFabric systems.
NOTE: The force-up statement is not supported on QFX10002 switches.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
296
aex—Aggregated Ethernet logical interface number.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP on page 128
•
Understanding Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces and LACP on page 125
•
Troubleshooting an Aggregated Ethernet Interface on page 143
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 17: LAGs and LACP Configuration Statements
device-count
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
device-count number;
[edit chassis aggregated-devices ethernet],
[edit chassis node-group name aggregated-devices ethernet]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.2R3
Configure the number of aggregated Ethernet logical devices available to the switch.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Understanding Link Aggregation and Link Aggregation Control Protocol in a Junos Fusion
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation Between a QFX Series Product and an
Aggregation Switch on page 132
ethernet
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
ethernet {
device-count number;
}
[edit chassis aggregated-devices],
[edit chassis node-group aggregated-devices]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.2R3
Configure properties for aggregated Ethernet devices on the switch.
The remaining statement is explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Understanding Link Aggregation and Link Aggregation Control Protocol in a Junos Fusion
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
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force-up
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
force-up;
[edit interfaces interface-name ether-options 802.3ad lacp;
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the state of the interface as up when the peer has limited LACP capability. You
can also configure the peer interface (in MC-LAG) to remain up even with limited LACP
capability.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Understanding Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces and LACP on page 125
•
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP on page 128
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation with LACP Between a QFX Series Product and
an Aggregation Switch on page 137
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
•
298
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Chapter 17: LAGs and LACP Configuration Statements
lacp (802.3ad)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
lacp {
force-up;
(primary |backup);
port-priority;
}
[edit interfaces interface-name ether-options 802.3ad]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) parameters for interfaces. The
remaining statement is explained separately.
NOTE: The port-priority statement is not supported on QFabric systems.
NOTE: The force-up statement is not supported on QFX10002 switches.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP on page 128
•
Understanding Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces and LACP on page 125
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lacp (Aggregated Ethernet)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
lacp (active | passive) {
admin-key key;
fast-failover;
link-protection {
disable;
(revertive | non-revertive);
}
periodic interval
system-ID mac-address;
system-priority priority;
force-up;
}
[edit interfaces interface-nameaggregated-ether-options]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) parameters for interfaces. The
remaining statement is explained separately.
NOTE: The force-up statement is not supported on QFX10002 switches.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
300
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP on page 128
•
Understanding Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces and LACP on page 125
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 17: LAGs and LACP Configuration Statements
minimum-links
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
minimum-links number;
[edit interfaces aex aggregated-ether-options]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
For an aggregated Ethernet interface, set the minimum number of links that must be up
for the bundle to be labeled up.
number—Number of links.
Range: 1 through 8
Default: 1
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
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periodic
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
302
periodic (fast | slow);
[edit interfaces aex aggregated-ether-options lacp]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Configure the interval for periodic transmission of LACP packets.
fast
interval—Interval at which to periodically transmit LACP packets:
•
fast—Receive packets every second. This is the default.
•
slow—Receive packets every 30 seconds.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP on page 128
•
Understanding Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces and LACP on page 125
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 18
LAG Local Link Options Configuration
Statements
•
local-bias on page 303
•
local-minimum-links-threshold on page 304
local-bias
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
local-bias;
[edit interfaces aex aggregated-ether-options]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D20 for EX Series switches and QFX
Series devices.
Enable local link bias for all links in the aggregated Ethernet interface.
Local link bias conserves bandwidth on Virtual Chassis ports (VCPs) by using local links
to forward unicast traffic exiting a Virtual Chassis or Virtual Chassis Fabric (VCF) that
has a Link Aggregation group (LAG) bundle composed of member links on different
member switches in the same Virtual Chassis or VCF. A local link is a member link in the
LAG bundle that is on the member switch that received the traffic.
You should enable local link bias if you want to conserve VCP bandwidth by always
forwarding egress unicast traffic on a LAG bundle out of a local link. You should not
enable local link bias if you want egress traffic load-balanced as it exits the Virtual Chassis
or VCF.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Local Link Bias (CLI Procedure) on page 149
•
Understanding Local Link Bias on page 147
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local-minimum-links-threshold
Syntax
local-minimum-links-threshold threshold-value
Hierarchy Level
[edit interfaces aex aggregated-ether-options]
Release Information
Description
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D40 for QFX5100 switches.
For an aggregated Ethernet interface (LAG bundle) with member links spanning multiple
chassis (member switches) in a Virtual Chassis or Virtual Chassis Fabric (VCF), set a
threshold for the percentage of member links local to any particular chassis that must
be up for that chassis to continue to be active in the aggregated Ethernet bundle.
NOTE: This statement is available only on member switches in a non-mixed
mode QFX5100 Virtual Chassis or VCF.
You configure a threshold for a particular aggregated Ethernet interface (aex). When set,
the threshold applies locally to any chassis with links in the specified LAG bundle. The
threshold value represents a percentage of active local member links out of the total
number of local member links for the chassis. When one or more member links on a
chassis go down, the system compares the percentage of local member links that are
“up” to the threshold. If the percentage of local member links that are “up” is less than
the threshold, any remaining active local links are forced down as well, to prevent
forwarding traffic for the aggregated Ethernet interface through any member links on
that chassis. If the percentage of “up” links is greater than or equal to the threshold, the
status of the active links remains unchanged and they can forward LAG traffic.
For example, consider a case where the threshold is set to 52, and one local LAG member
link goes down on one switch in a Virtual Chassis Fabric that has a total of four local LAG
member links. In this case, 75 percent of the links are still up (greater than the threshold,
52 percent), so the remaining local member links stay up. However, if two local member
links go down, only 50 percent of the links are up, so the local minimum links feature
forces the remaining two active local member links down as well.
This feature also adjusts local member link status accordingly when failed links come
up again, if you reconfigure the threshold value, or if you add or remove local member
links in the LAG bundle.
The local minimum links feature helps avoid traffic loss due to asymmetric bandwidth
on the forwarding paths across a chassis when some local aggregated Ethernet member
links fail and some remain active. Enable this feature only if you want to closely manage
ingress and egress traffic forwarding paths on aggregated Ethernet interfaces, especially
where local link bias is also enabled.
Default
304
The local minimum links feature is disabled by default.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 18: LAG Local Link Options Configuration Statements
Options
threshold-value—Percentage of member links in an aggregated Ethernet bundle local to
a chassis that must be up for any local member links on that chassis to be active in
the aggregated Ethernet bundle.
Range: 1 through 100 (decimal)
Default: none—This option is not enabled by default.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Understanding Local Minimum Links on page 151
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306
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 19
Redundant Trunk Groups Configuration
Statements
•
group (Redundant Trunk Groups) on page 308
•
interface (Redundant Trunk Groups) on page 309
•
preempt-cutover-timer on page 310
•
redundant-trunk-group on page 311
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
group (Redundant Trunk Groups)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
group name {
interface interface-name <primary>;
interface interface-name;
preempt-cutover-timer seconds;
}
•
For platforms with ELS:
[edit switch-options redundant-trunk-group]
•
For platforms without ELS:
[edit ethernet-switching-options redundant-trunk-group]
Release Information
Description
Options
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Hierarchy level [edit switch-options] introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D10 (ELS).
(See Getting Started with Enhanced Layer 2 Software for information about ELS.)
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D15 for the QFX Series.
Create a redundant trunk group.
name—The name of the redundant trunk group.
•
For platforms with ELS:
The group name must be a string “rtgn” where n is a number from 0 through 15, such
as “rtg2” or “rtg10”.
•
For platforms without ELS:
The group name must start with a letter and can consist of letters, numbers, dashes,
and underscores.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
308
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system–control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Redundant Trunk Links for Faster Recovery
•
Example: Configuring Redundant Trunk Links for Faster Recovery on page 160
•
Understanding Redundant Trunk Links on page 158
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 19: Redundant Trunk Groups Configuration Statements
interface (Redundant Trunk Groups)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
interface interface-name <primary>;
interface interface-name;
For platforms with ELS:
[edit switch-options redundant-trunk-group group name]
For platforms without ELS:
[edit ethernet-switching-options redundant-trunk-group group name]
Release Information
Description
Options
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Hierarchy level [edit switch-options] introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D10 (ELS).
(See Getting Started with Enhanced Layer 2 Software for information about ELS.)
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D15 for the QFX Series.
Configure a primary link and secondary link on trunk ports. If the primary link fails, the
secondary link automatically takes over as the primary link without waiting for normal
STP convergence.
interface interface-name—A logical interface or an aggregated interface containing multiple
ports.
primary—(Optional) Specify one of the interfaces in the redundant group as the primary
link. The interface without this option is the secondary link in the redundant group.
If a link is not specified as primary, the software compares the two links and selects
the link with the highest port number as the active link. For example, if the two
interfaces are ge-0/1/0 and ge-0/1/1, the software assigns ge-0/1/1 as the active link.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system–control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Redundant Trunk Links for Faster Recovery
•
Example: Configuring Redundant Trunk Links for Faster Recovery on page 160
•
Understanding Redundant Trunk Links on page 158
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preempt-cutover-timer
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
preempt-cutover-timer seconds;
•
For platforms with ELS:
[edit switch-options redundant-trunk-group group name]
[edit interfaces name aggregated-ether-options lacp link-protection rtg-config]
[edit interfaces name aggregated-ether-options link-protection rtg-config]
•
For platforms without ELS:
[edit ethernet-switching-optionsredundant-trunk-group group name]
Release Information
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for EX Series switches.
Hierarchy level [edit switch-options] introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D10 (ELS).
(See Getting Started with Enhanced Layer 2 Software for information about ELS.)
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D15 for the QFX Series.
Description
Change the length of time that a re-enabled primary link waits to take over from an active
secondary link in a redundant trunk group (RTG).
Default
Options
If you do not change the time with the preempt-cutover-timer statement, a re-enabled
primary link takes over from the active secondary link after 1 second.
seconds—Number of seconds that the primary link waits to take over from the active
secondary link.
Range: 1 through 600 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
310
admin—To view this statement in the configuration.
admin-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Redundant Trunk Links for Faster Recovery
•
Example: Configuring Redundant Trunk Links for Faster Recovery on page 160
•
Q-in-Q Support on Redundant Trunk Links Using LAGs with Link Protection
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 19: Redundant Trunk Groups Configuration Statements
redundant-trunk-group
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
redundant-trunk-group {
group name {
interface interface-name <primary>;
interface interface-name;
preempt-cutover-timer seconds;
}
}
•
For platforms with ELS:
[edit switch-options]
•
For platforms without ELS:
[edit ethernet-switching-options]
Release Information
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Hierarchy level [edit switch-options] introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D10 (ELS).
(See Getting Started with Enhanced Layer 2 Software for information about ELS.)
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D15 for the QFX Series.
Description
Configure a primary link and secondary link on trunk ports. If the primary link fails, the
secondary link automatically takes over without waiting for normal spanning-tree protocol
convergence.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system–control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Redundant Trunk Links for Faster Recovery
•
Example: Configuring Redundant Trunk Links for Faster Recovery on page 160
•
Understanding Redundant Trunk Links on page 158
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312
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 20
Resilient Hashing Configuration
Statements
•
ecmp-resilient-hash on page 313
•
enhanced-hash-key on page 314
•
hash-mode on page 317
•
inet (enhanced-hash-key) on page 319
•
inet6 (enhanced-hash-key) on page 321
•
resilient-hash on page 323
ecmp-resilient-hash
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
ecmp-resilient-hash;
[edit forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D10 for the QFX Series.
Enable resilient hashing for ECMP groups, to minimize remapping of destination paths.
NOTE:
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Resilient Hashing for Trunk/ECMP Groups on page 179
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enhanced-hash-key
List of Syntax
Syntax (EX Series and QFX5100 Switches) on page 314
Syntax (QFX10002 and QFX10008 Switches) on page 314
Syntax (EX Series and
QFX5100 Switches)
enhanced-hash-key {
ecmp-resilient-hash;
fabric-load-balance {
flowlet {
inactivity-interval interval;
}
per-packet;
}
hash-mode {
layer2-header;
layer2-payload;
}
inet {
no-ipv4-destination-address;
no-ipv4-source-address;
no-l4-destination-port;
no-l4-source-port;
no-protocol;
vlan-id;
}
inet6 {
no-ipv6-destination-address;
no-ipv6-source-address;
no-l4-destination-port;
no-l4-source-port;
no-next-header;
vlan-id;
}
layer2 {
no-destination-mac-address;
no-ether-type;
no-source-mac-address;
vlan-id;
}
}
Syntax (QFX10002
and QFX10008
Switches)
enhanced-hash-key {
hash-seed seed-value;
inet {
no-ipv4-destination-address;
no-ipv4-source-address;
no-l4-destination-port;
no-l4-source-port;
}
inet6 {
ipv6-flow-label;
no-ipv6-destination-address;
no-ipv6-source-address;
314
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Chapter 20: Resilient Hashing Configuration Statements
no-l4-destination-port;
no-l4-source-port;
}
layer2 {
destination-mac-address
inner-vlan-id;
no-ether-type;
no-vlan-id;
source-mac-address;
}
no-mpls;
gre {
key;
protocol;
}
vxlan-vnid
}
}
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
[edit forwarding-options]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D20 for QFX Series devices.
The fabric-load-balance statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D10.
The fabric-load-balance statement deprecated starting in Junos OS Releases 14.1X53-D46,
16.1R6, and 17.2R2.
The hash-seed statement introduced in Junos OS Release 15.1X53-D30.
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Description
Configure the hashing key used to hash link aggregation group (LAG) and equal-cost
multipath (ECMP) traffic, or enable adaptive load balancing (ALB) in a Virtual Chassis
Fabric (VCF).
NOTE: Starting in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D46, 16.1R6, and 17.2R2, the ALB
feature is deprecated. If fabric-load-balance is enabled in the configuration
for a VCF, delete the configuration item upon upgrading Junos OS.
The hashing algorithm is used to make traffic-forwarding decisions for traffic entering a
LAG bundle or for traffic exiting a switch when ECMP is enabled.
For LAG bundles, the hashing algorithm determines how traffic entering a LAG bundle is
placed onto the bundle’s member links. The hashing algorithm tries to manage bandwidth
by evenly load-balancing all incoming traffic across the member links in the bundle.
When ECMP is enabled, the hashing algorithm determines how incoming traffic is
forwarded to the next-hop device.
On QFX10002 and QFX10008 switches, you can configure the hash seed for load
balancing.
By default, the QFX10002 and QFX10008 switches use the system MAC address to
generate a hash seed value. You can configure the hash seed value using the hash-seed
statement at the [edit forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key] hierarchy level. Set a value
between 0 and 4294967295. If you do not configure a hash seed value, the system will
by generate a hash seed value based on the system MAC address.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
316
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Fields in the Algorithm Used To Hash LAG Bundle and ECMP Traffic
(CLI Procedure) on page 177
•
Understanding the Algorithm Used to Hash LAG Bundle and Egress Next-Hop ECMP
Traffic on page 169
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 20: Resilient Hashing Configuration Statements
hash-mode
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
hash-mode {
layer2-header;
layer2-payload;
}
[edit forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D20 for QFX Series devices.
Statement is not supported on QFX10002 and QFX 10008 switches.
Select the mode for the hashing algorithm.
The hashing algorithm is used to make traffic-forwarding decisions for traffic entering a
LAG bundle or for traffic exiting a switch when ECMP is enabled.
For LAG bundles, the hashing algorithm determines how traffic entering a LAG bundle is
placed onto the bundle’s member links. The hashing algorithm tries to manage bandwidth
by evenly load-balancing all incoming traffic across the member links in the bundle.
When ECMP is enabled, the hashing algorithm determines how incoming traffic is
forwarded to the next-hop device.
The hash mode that is set using this statement determines which fields are inspected
by the hashing algorithm. You must set the hash mode to layer2-payload if you want the
hashing algorithm to inspect fields in the Layer 2 payload when making hashing decisions.
You must set the hash mode to layer2-header if you want the hashing algorithm to inspect
fields in the Layer 2 header when making hashing decisions.
If the hash mode is set to layer2-payload, you can set the fields used by the hashing
algorithm to hash IPv4 traffic using the set forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key inet
statement. You can set the fields used by the hashing algorithm to hash IPv6 traffic using
the set forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key inet6 statement.
If the hash mode is set to layer2-header, you can set the fields that the hashing algorithm
inspects in the Layer 2 header using the set forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key layer2
statement.
Default
Options
layer2-payload
layer-2-payload—Set the hashing algorithm to use fields in the Layer 2 payload to make
hashing decisions.
layer-2-header—Set the hashing algorithm to use fields in the Layer 2 header to make
hashing decisions.
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Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
318
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Fields in the Algorithm Used To Hash LAG Bundle and ECMP Traffic
(CLI Procedure) on page 177
•
Understanding the Algorithm Used to Hash LAG Bundle and Egress Next-Hop ECMP
Traffic on page 169
•
enhanced-hash-key on page 314
•
inet on page 319
•
inet6 on page 321
•
layer2
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 20: Resilient Hashing Configuration Statements
inet (enhanced-hash-key)
List of Syntax
Syntax (EX Series and QFX5100 Switch) on page 319
Syntax (QFX10002 and QFX10008 Switches) on page 319
Syntax (EX Series and
QFX5100 Switch)
inet {
no-ipv4-destination-address;
no-ipv4-source-address;
no-l4-destination-port;
no-l4-source-port;
no-protocol;
vlan-id;
}
Syntax (QFX10002
and QFX10008
Switches)
inet {
no-ipv4-destination-address;
no-ipv4-source-address;
no-l4-destination-port;
no-l4-source-port;
}
Hierarchy Level
[edit forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key]
Release Information
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D20 for QFX Series devices.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 15.1X53-D30 on QFX10002 and QFX10008
Switches.
Description
Select the payload fields in IPv4 traffic used by the hashing algorithm to make hashing
decisions.
When IPv4 traffic enters a LAG and the hash mode is set to Layer 2 payload, the hashing
algorithm checks the fields configured using the inet statement and uses the information
in the fields to decide how to place traffic onto the LAG bundle’s member links or how
to forward traffic to the next hop device when ECMP is enabled.
The hashing algorithm, when used to hash LAG bundle traffic, always tries to manage
bandwidth by evenly load-balancing all incoming traffic across the member links in the
bundle.
The hashing algorithm only inspects the IPv4 fields in the payload to make hashing
decisions when the hash mode is set to layer2-payload. The hash mode is set to Layer 2
payload by default. You can set the hash mode to Layer 2 payload using the set
forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key hash-mode layer2-payload statement.
Default
The following fields are used by the hashing algorithm to make hashing decisions for
IPv4 traffic:
•
IP destination address
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Options
•
IP source address
•
Layer 4 destination port
•
Layer 4 source port
•
Protocol
no-ipv4-destination-address—Exclude the IPv4 destination address field from the hashing
algorithm.
no-ipv4-source-address—Exclude the IPv4 source address field from the hashing algorithm.
no-l4-destination-port—Exclude the Layer 4 destination port field from the hashing
algorithm.
no-l4-source-port—Exclude the Layer 4 source port field from the hashing algorithm.
no-protocol—Exclude the protocol field from the hashing algorithm.
vlan-id—Include the VLAN ID field in the hashing algorithm.
NOTE: The vlan-id option is not supported and should not be configured
on a Virtual Chassis or Virtual Chassis Fabric (VCF) that contains any of
the following switches as members: EX4300, EX4600, QFX3500,
QFX3600, QFX5100, or QFX5110 switches.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
320
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Fields in the Algorithm Used To Hash LAG Bundle and ECMP Traffic
(CLI Procedure) on page 177
•
Understanding the Algorithm Used to Hash LAG Bundle and Egress Next-Hop ECMP
Traffic on page 169
•
Understanding the Algorithm Used to Hash LAG Bundle and Egress Next-Hop ECMP
Traffic (QFX 10002 and QFX 10008 Switches)
•
hash-seed
•
enhanced-hash-key on page 314
•
hash-mode on page 317
•
inet6 on page 321
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 20: Resilient Hashing Configuration Statements
inet6 (enhanced-hash-key)
List of Syntax
Syntax (EX Series and QFX5100 Switch) on page 321
Syntax (QFX10002 and QFX10008 Switches) on page 321
Syntax (EX Series and
QFX5100 Switch)
inet6 {
no-ipv6-destination-address;
no-ipv6-source-address;
no-l4-destination-port;
no-l4-source-port;
no-next-header;
vlan-id;
}
Syntax (QFX10002
and QFX10008
Switches)
inet6 {
ipv6-flow-label;
no-ipv6-destination-address;
no-ipv6-source-address;
no-l4-destination-port;
no-l4-source-port;
}
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
[edit forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 on EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D20 on QFX Series devices.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 15.1X53-D30 on QFX10002 and QFX 10008
switches.
Select the payload fields in an IPv6 packet used by the hashing algorithm to make hashing
decisions.
When IPv6 traffic enters a LAG and the hash mode is set to Layer 2 payload, the hashing
algorithm checks the fields configured using this statement and uses the information in
the fields to decide how to place traffic onto the LAG bundle’s member links or to forward
traffic to the next hop device when ECMP is enabled.
The hashing algorithm, when used to hash LAG traffic, always tries to manage bandwidth
by evenly load-balancing all incoming traffic across the member links in the bundle.
The hashing algorithm only inspects the IPv6 fields in the payload to make hashing
decisions when the hash mode is set to Layer 2 payload. The hash mode is set to Layer
2 payload by default. You can set the hash mode to Layer 2 payload using the set
forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key hash-mode layer2-payload statement.
Default
The data in the following fields are used by the hashing algorithm to make hashing
decisions for IPv6 traffic:
•
IP destination address
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Options
•
IP source address
•
Layer 4 destination port
•
Layer 4 source port
•
Next header
no-ipv6-destination-address—Exclude the IPv6 destination address field from the hashing
algorithm.
no-ipv6-source-address—Exclude the IPv6 source address field from the hashing algorithm.
no-l4-destination-port—Exclude the Layer 4 destination port field from the hashing
algorithm.
no-l4-source-port—Exclude the Layer 4 source port field from the hashing algorithm.
no-next-header—Exclude the Next Header field from the hashing algorithm.
vlan-id—Include the VLAN ID field in the hashing algorithm.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
322
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Fields in the Algorithm Used To Hash LAG Bundle and ECMP Traffic
(CLI Procedure) on page 177
•
Understanding the Algorithm Used to Hash LAG Bundle and Egress Next-Hop ECMP
Traffic on page 169
•
Understanding the Algorithm Used to Hash LAG Bundle and Egress Next-Hop ECMP
Traffic (QFX 10002 and QFX 10008 Switches)
•
hash-seed
•
enhanced-hash-key on page 314
•
hash-mode on page 317
•
inet on page 319
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 20: Resilient Hashing Configuration Statements
resilient-hash
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
resilient-hash;
[edit interfaces aex aggregated-ether-options]]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D10 for the QFX Series.
Enable resilient hashing for a LAG to minimize remapping of destination paths.
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Resilient Hashing for Trunk/ECMP Groups on page 179
•
Configuring Resilient Hashing for LAGs and ECMP Groups
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324
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CHAPTER 21
Uplink Failure Detection Configuration
Statements
•
group on page 325
•
link-to-disable on page 326
•
link-to-monitor on page 326
•
uplink-failure-detection on page 327
group
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
group group-name {
link-to-monitor interface-name;
link-to-disable interface-name;
}
[edit protocols uplink-failure-detection]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Configure a group of uplink and downlink interfaces for uplink failure detection.
group-name—Name of the uplink failure detection group.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
admin—To view this statement in the configuration.
admin-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Overview of Uplink Failure Detection on page 183
•
Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 185
•
Example: Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 186
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link-to-disable
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
link-to-disable interface-name;
[edit protocols uplink-failure-detection group group-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Configure the downlink interfaces to be disabled when the switch detects an uplink
failure. The switch can monitor a maximum of eight downlink interfaces in a group.
interface-name—Name of the downlink interface in an uplink failure detection group. The
interface can be a physical interface or a logical interface.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
admin—To view this statement in the configuration.
admin-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Overview of Uplink Failure Detection on page 183
•
Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 185
•
Example: Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 186
link-to-monitor
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
link-to-monitor interface-name;
[edit protocols uplink-failure-detection group group-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Configure the uplink interfaces to be monitored for uplink failure detection. The switch
can monitor a maximum of eight uplink interfaces in a group.
interface-name—Name of the uplink interface in an uplink failure detection group. The
interface can be a physical interface or a logical interface.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
326
admin—To view this statement in the configuration.
admin-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Overview of Uplink Failure Detection on page 183
•
Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 185
•
Example: Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 186
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 21: Uplink Failure Detection Configuration Statements
uplink-failure-detection
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
uplink-failure-detection {
group group-name {
link-to-monitor interface-name;
link-to-disable interface-name;
}
}
[edit protocols]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for the QFX Series.
Configure uplink and downlink interfaces in a group to monitor uplink failures and to
propagate uplink failure information to the downlink interfaces.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
admin—To view this statement in the configuration.
admin-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Overview of Uplink Failure Detection on page 183
•
Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 185
•
Example: Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 186
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328
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CHAPTER 22
Interfaces Operational Commands
•
monitor interface
•
show interfaces diagnostics optics
•
show interfaces ge
•
show interfaces (GRE)
•
show interfaces irb
•
show interfaces queue
•
show interfaces xe
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monitor interface
Syntax
Release Information
Description
monitor interface
<interface-name | traffic <detail>>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Display real-time statistics about interfaces, updating the statistics every second. Check
for and display common interface failures, such as SONET/SDH and T3 alarms, loopbacks
detected, and increases in framing errors.
NOTE: This command is not supported on the QFX3000 QFabric switch.
Options
none—Display real-time statistics for all interfaces.
detail—(Optional) With traffic option only, display detailed output.
interface-name—(Optional) Display real-time statistics for the specified interface. In a
TX Matrix or TX Matrix Plus router, display real-time statistics for the physical
interfaces on the specified line-card chassis (LCC) only.
traffic—(Optional) Display traffic data for all active interfaces. In a TX Matrix or TX Matrix
Plus router, display real-time statistics for the physical interfaces on the specified
LCC only.
Additional Information
The output of this command shows how much each field has changed since you started
the command or since you cleared the counters by pressing the c key. For a description
of the statistical information provided in the output of this command, see the show
interfaces extensive command for a particular interface type in the CLI Explorer. To control
the output of the monitor interface command while it is running, use the keys listed in
Table 31 on page 330. The keys are not case-sensitive.
Table 31: Output Control Keys for the monitor interface interface-name
Command
330
Key
Action
c
Clears (returns to zero) the delta counters since monitor interface was started. This
does not clear the accumulative counter. To clear the accumulative counter, use
the clear interfaces interval command.
f
Freezes the display, halting the display of updated statistics and delta counters.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Table 31: Output Control Keys for the monitor interface interface-name
Command (continued)
Key
Action
i
Displays information about a different interface. The command prompts you for the
name of a specific interface.
n
Displays information about the next interface. The monitor interface command
displays the physical or logical interfaces in the same order as the show interfaces
terse command.
q or Esc
Quits the command and returns to the command prompt.
t
Thaws the display, resuming the update of the statistics and delta counters.
To control the output of the monitor interface traffic command while it is running, use
the keys listed in Table 32 on page 331. The keys are not case-sensitive.
Table 32: Output Control Keys for the monitor interface traffic Command
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Key
Action
b
Displays the statistics in units of bytes and bytes per second (bps).
c
Clears (return to 0) the delta counters in the Current Delta column. The statistics
counters are not cleared.
d
Displays the Current Delta column (instead of the rate column) in bps or packets
per second (pps).
p
Displays the statistics in units of packets and packets per second (pps).
q or Esc
Quits the command and returns to the command prompt.
r
Displays the rate column (instead of the Current Delta column) in bps and pps.
trace
monitor interface (Physical) on page 333
monitor interface (OTN Interface) on page 334
monitor interface (MX480 Router with MPC5E and 10-Gigabit Ethernet OTN
Interface) on page 335
monitor interface (MX480 Router with MPC5E and 100-Gigabit Ethernet
Interface) on page 336
monitor interface (MX2010 Router with MPC6E and 10-Gigabit Ethernet OTN
Interface) on page 337
monitor interface (MX2010 Router with MPC6E and 100-Gigabit Ethernet OTN
Interface) on page 337
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monitor interface (MX2020 Router with MPC6E and 10-Gigabit Ethernet OTN
Interface) on page 338
monitor interface (Logical) on page 339
monitor interface (QFX3500 Switch) on page 339
monitor interface traffic on page 340
monitor interface traffic (QFX3500 Switch) on page 340
monitor interface traffic detail (QFX3500 Switch) on page 341
Output Fields
Table 33 on page 332 describes the output fields for the monitor interface command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 33: monitor interface Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
router1
Hostname of the router.
All levels
Seconds
How long the monitor interface command has been running or how long since
you last cleared the counters.
All levels
Time
Current time (UTC).
All levels
Delay x/y/z
Time difference between when the statistics were displayed and the actual
clock time.
All levels
•
x—Time taken for the last polling (in milliseconds).
•
y—Minimum time taken across all pollings (in milliseconds).
•
z—Maximum time taken across all pollings (in milliseconds).
Interface
Short description of the interface, including its name, status, and encapsulation.
All levels
Link
State of the link: Up, Down, or Test.
All levels
Current delta
Cumulative number for the counter in question since the time shown in the
Seconds field, which is the time since you started the command or last cleared
the counters.
All levels
Local Statistics
(Logical interfaces only) Number and rate of bytes and packets destined to the
router or switch through the specified interface. When a burst of traffic is
received, the value in the output packet rate field might briefly exceed the peak
cell rate. It usually takes less than 1 second for this counter to stabilize.
All levels
332
•
Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface.
•
Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface.
•
Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface.
•
Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Table 33: monitor interface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Remote Statistics
(Logical interfaces only) Statistics for traffic transiting the router or switch.
When a burst of traffic is received, the value in the output packet rate field might
briefly exceed the peak cell rate. It usually takes less than 1 second for this
counter to stabilize.
All levels
Traffic statistics
Description
•
Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface.
•
Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface.
•
Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface.
•
Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.
Total number of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the interface.
These statistics are the sum of the local and remote statistics. When a burst of
traffic is received, the value in the output packet rate field might briefly exceed
the peak cell rate. It usually takes less than 1 second for this counter to stabilize.
•
Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface.
•
Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface.
•
Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface.
•
Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.
With the traffic option, displays the interface description configured at the
[edit interfaces interface-name] hierarchy level.
All levels
detail
Sample Output
monitor interface (Physical)
user@host> monitor interface so-0/0/0
router1
Seconds: 19
Interface: so-0/0/0, Enabled, Link is Up
Encapsulation: PPP, Keepalives, Speed: OC48
Traffic statistics:
Input packets:
6045 (0
Input bytes:
6290065 (0
Output packets:
10376 (0
Output bytes:
10365540 (0
Encapsulation statistics:
Input keepalives:
1901
Output keepalives:
1901
NCP state: Opened
LCP state: Opened
Error statistics:
Input errors:
0
Input drops:
0
Input framing errors:
0
Policed discards:
0
L3 incompletes:
0
L2 channel errors:
0
L2 mismatch timeouts:
0
Carrier transitions:
1
Output errors:
0
Output drops:
0
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Time: 15:46:29
pps)
bps)
pps)
bps)
Current Delta
[11]
[13882]
[10]
[9418]
[2]
[2]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
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Aged packets:
Active alarms : None
Active defects: None
SONET error counts/seconds:
LOS count
LOF count
SEF count
ES-S
SES-S
SONET statistics:
BIP-B1
BIP-B2
REI-L
BIP-B3
REI-P
Received SONET overhead:
F1
: 0x00 J0
K2
: 0x00 S1
C2(cmp) : 0x00 F2
Z4
: 0x00 S1(cmp)
Transmitted SONET overhead:
F1
: 0x00 J0
K2
: 0x00 S1
F2
: 0x00 Z3
:
:
:
:
0
[0]
1
1
1
0
0
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
458871
460072
465610
458978
458773
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
K1
C2
Z3
: 0x00
: 0x00
: 0x00
: 0x01
: 0x00
: 0x00
K1
C2
Z4
: 0x00
: 0xcf
: 0x00
Next='n', Quit='q' or ESC, Freeze='f', Thaw='t', Clear='c', Interface='i'
monitor interface (OTN Interface)
user@host> monitor interface ge-7/0/0
Interface: ge-7/0/0, Enabled, Link is Up
Encapsulation: Ethernet, Speed: 10000mbps
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes:
0 (0
Output bytes:
0 (0
Input packets:
0 (0
Output packets:
0 (0
Error statistics:
Input errors:
0
Input drops:
0
Input framing errors:
0
Policed discards:
0
L3 incompletes:
0
L2 channel errors:
0
L2 mismatch timeouts:
0
Carrier transitions:
5
Output errors:
0
Output drops:
0
Aged packets:
0
Active alarms : None
Active defects: None
Input MAC/Filter statistics:
Unicast packets
0
Broadcast packets
0
Multicast packets
0
Oversized frames
0
Packet reject count
0
DA rejects
0
SA rejects
0
334
bps)
bps)
pps)
pps)
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Output MAC/Filter Statistics:
Unicast packets
0
Broadcast packets
0
Multicast packets
0
Packet pad count
0
Packet error count
0
OTN Link 0
OTN Alarms: OTU_BDI, OTU_TTIM, ODU_BDI
OTN Defects: OTU_BDI, OTU_TTIM, ODU_BDI, ODU_TTIM
OTN OC - Seconds
LOS
2
LOF
9
OTN OTU - FEC Statistics
Corr err ratio
N/A
Corr bytes
0
Uncorr words
0
OTN OTU - Counters
BIP
0
BBE
0
ES
0
SES
0
UAS
422
OTN ODU - Counters
BIP
0
BBE
0
ES
0
SES
0
UAS
422
OTN ODU - Received Overhead
APSPCC 0-3:
0
monitor interface (MX480 Router with MPC5E and 10-Gigabit Ethernet OTN Interface)
user@host> monitor interface xe-0/0/3
Interface: xe-0/0/3, Enabled, Link is Up
Encapsulation: Ethernet, Speed: 10000mbps
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes:
0 (0
Output bytes:
0 (0
Input packets:
0 (0
Output packets:
0 (0
Error statistics:
Input errors:
0
Input drops:
0
Input framing errors:
0
Policed discards:
0
L3 incompletes:
0
L2 channel errors:
0
L2 mismatch timeouts:
0
Carrier transitions:
5
Output errors:
0
Output drops:
0
Aged packets:
0
Active alarms : None
Active defects: None
PCS statistics:
Seconds
Bit Errors
0
Errored blocks
4
Input MAC/Filter statistics:
Unicast packets
0
Broadcast packets
0
Multicast packets
0
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
bps)
bps)
pps)
pps)
Current delta
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
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Oversized frames
Packet reject count
DA rejects
SA rejects
Output MAC/Filter Statistics:
Unicast packets
Broadcast packets
Multicast packets
Packet pad count
Packet error count
0
0
0
0
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
0
0
0
0
0
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
Next='n', Quit='q' or ESC, Freeze='f', Thaw='t', Clear='c', Interface='i'
monitor interface (MX480 Router with MPC5E and 100-Gigabit Ethernet Interface)
user@host> monitor interface et-2/1/0
Interface: et-2/1/0, Enabled, Link is Up
Encapsulation: Ethernet, Speed: 100000mbps
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes:
0 (0
Output bytes:
0 (0
Input packets:
0 (0
Output packets:
0 (0
Error statistics:
Input errors:
0
Input drops:
0
Input framing errors:
0
Policed discards:
0
L3 incompletes:
0
L2 channel errors:
0
L2 mismatch timeouts:
0
Carrier transitions:
263
Output errors:
0
Output drops:
0
Aged packets:
0
OTN Link 0
OTN Alarms:
OTN Defects:
OTN OC - Seconds
LOS
129
LOF
2
OTN OTU - FEC Statistics
Corr err ratio
<8E-5
Corr bytes
169828399453
Uncorr words
28939961456
OTN OTU - Counters
BIP
0
BBE
0
ES
24
SES
0
UAS
1255
OTN ODU - Counters
BIP
0
BBE
0
ES
24
SES
0
UAS
1256
OTN ODU - Received Overhead
APSPCC 0-3:
00 00 00 00
336
bps)
bps)
pps)
pps)
Current delta
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Next='n', Quit='q' or ESC, Freeze='f', Thaw='t', Clear='c', Interface='i'
monitor interface (MX2010 Router with MPC6E and 10-Gigabit Ethernet OTN Interface)
user@host> monitor interface xe-6/1/0
Interface: xe-6/1/0, Enabled, Link is Up
Encapsulation: Ethernet, Speed: 10000mbps
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes:
0 (0
Output bytes:
0 (0
Input packets:
0 (0
Output packets:
0 (0
Error statistics:
Input errors:
0
Input drops:
0
Input framing errors:
0
Policed discards:
0
L3 incompletes:
0
L2 channel errors:
0
L2 mismatch timeouts:
0
Carrier transitions:
1
Output errors:
0
Output drops:
0
Aged packets:
0
Active alarms : None
Active defects: None
PCS statistics:
Seconds
Bit Errors
0
Errored blocks
1
Input MAC/Filter statistics:
Unicast packets
0
Broadcast packets
0
Multicast packets
0
Oversized frames
0
Packet reject count
0
DA rejects
0
SA rejects
0
Output MAC/Filter Statistics:
Unicast packets
0
Broadcast packets
0
Multicast packets
0
Packet pad count
0
Packet error count
0
bps)
bps)
pps)
pps)
Current delta
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
Next='n', Quit='q' or ESC, Freeze='f', Thaw='t', Clear='c', Interface='i'
monitor interface (MX2010 Router with MPC6E and 100-Gigabit Ethernet OTN Interface)
user@host> monitor interface et-9/0/0
Interface: et-9/0/0, Enabled, Link is Up
Encapsulation: Ethernet, Speed: 100000mbps
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes:
0 (0
Output bytes:
0 (0
Input packets:
0 (0
Output packets:
0 (0
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
bps)
bps)
pps)
pps)
Current delta
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
337
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Error statistics:
Input errors:
Input drops:
Input framing errors:
Policed discards:
L3 incompletes:
L2 channel errors:
L2 mismatch timeouts:
Carrier transitions:
Output errors:
Output drops:
Aged packets:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
Next='n', Quit='q' or ESC, Freeze='f', Thaw='t', Clear='c', Interface='i'
monitor interface (MX2020 Router with MPC6E and 10-Gigabit Ethernet OTN Interface)
user@host> monitor interface xe-3/0/0
host name
Seconds: 67
Interface: xe-3/0/0, Enabled, Link is Up
Encapsulation: Ethernet, Speed: 10000mbps
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes:
0 (0
Output bytes:
0 (0
Input packets:
0 (0
Output packets:
0 (0
Error statistics:
Input errors:
0
Input drops:
0
Input framing errors:
0
Policed discards:
0
L3 incompletes:
0
L2 channel errors:
0
L2 mismatch timeouts:
0
Carrier transitions:
3
Output errors:
0
Output drops:
0
Aged packets:
0
OTN Link 0
OTN Alarms:
OTN Defects:
OTN OC - Seconds
LOS
0
LOF
0
OTN OTU - FEC Statistics
Corr err ratio
N/A
Corr bytes
0
Uncorr words
0
OTN OTU - Counters
BIP
0
BBE
0
ES
0
SES
0
UAS
0
OTN ODU - Counters
BIP
0
BBE
0
338
bps)
bps)
pps)
pps)
Time: 23:46:46
Delay: 0/0/13
Current delta
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
ES
0
SES
0
UAS
0
OTN ODU - Received Overhead
APSPCC 0-3:
00 00 00 00
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
Next='n', Quit='q' or ESC, Freeze='f', Thaw='t', Clear='c', Interface='i'
monitor interface (Logical)
user@host> monitor interface so-1/0/0.0
host name
Seconds: 16
Time: 15:33:39
Delay: 0/0/1
Interface: so-1/0/0.0, Enabled, Link is Down
Flags: Hardware-Down Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Encapsulation: PPP
Local statistics:
Input bytes:
0
Output bytes:
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Remote statistics:
Input bytes:
0 (0 bps)
Output bytes:
0 (0 bps)
Input packets:
0 (0 pps)
Output packets:
0 (0 pps)
Traffic statistics:
Destination address: 192.168.8.193, Local: 192.168.8.21
Current delta
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
Next='n', Quit='q' or ESC, Freeze='f', Thaw='t', Clear='c', Interface='i'
monitor interface (QFX3500 Switch)
user@switch> monitor interface ge-0/0/0
Interface: ge-0/0/0, Enabled, Link is Down
Encapsulation: Ethernet, Speed: Unspecified
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes:
0 (0 bps)
Output bytes:
0 (0 bps)
Input packets:
0 (0 pps)
Output packets:
0 (0 pps)
Error statistics:
Input errors:
0
Input drops:
0
Input framing errors:
0
Policed discards:
0
L3 incompletes:
0
L2 channel errors:
0
L2 mismatch timeouts:
0
Carrier transitions:
0
Output errors:
0
Output drops:
0
Aged packets:
0
Active alarms : LINK
Active defects: LINK
Input MAC/Filter statistics:
Unicast packets
0
Broadcast packets
0 Multicast packet
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Current delta
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
[0]
339
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Interface warnings:
o Outstanding LINK alarm
monitor interface traffic
user@host> monitor interface traffic
host name
Seconds: 15
Interface
so-1/0/0
so-1/1/0
so-1/1/1
so-1/1/2
so-1/1/3
t3-1/2/0
t3-1/2/1
t3-1/2/2
t3-1/2/3
so-2/0/0
so-2/0/1
so-2/0/2
so-2/0/3
so-2/1/0
so-2/1/1
so-2/1/2
so-2/1/3
at-2/3/0
at-2/3/1
Link
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Up
Up
Up
Up
Up
Down
Down
Up
Up
Down
Input packets
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
211035
192753
211020
211029
189378
0
0
0
0
0
Time: 12:31:09
(pps)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
Output packets
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
36778
36782
36779
36776
36349
18747
16078
80338
0
0
(pps)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
Bytes=b, Clear=c, Delta=d, Packets=p, Quit=q or ESC, Rate=r, Up=^U, Down=^D
monitor interface traffic (QFX3500 Switch)
user@switch> monitor interface traffic
switch
Interface
ge-0/0/0
ge-0/0/1
ge-0/0/2
ge-0/0/3
ge-0/0/4
ge-0/0/5
ge-0/0/6
ge-0/0/7
ge-0/0/8
ge-0/0/9
ge-0/0/10
ge-0/0/11
ge-0/0/12
ge-0/0/13
ge-0/0/14
ge-0/0/15
ge-0/0/16
ge-0/0/17
ge-0/0/18
ge-0/0/19
ge-0/0/20
ge-0/0/21
ge-0/0/22
340
Link
Down
Up
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Up
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Up
Input packets
0
392187
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
392184
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
392172
Seconds: 7
(pps)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
Time: 16:04:37
Output packets
0
392170
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
392171
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
392187
(pps)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
ge-0/0/23
vcp-0
vcp-1
ae0
bme0
Up
Down
Down
Down
Up
392185
0
0
0
0
(0)
(0)
392173
0
0
0
1568706
(0)
(0)
monitor interface traffic detail (QFX3500 Switch)
user@switch> monitor interface traffic detail
switch
Time: 16:03:02
Interface
Description
ge-0/0/0
ge-0/0/1
ge-0/0/2
ge-0/0/3
ge-0/0/4
ge-0/0/5
ge-0/0/6
ge-0/0/7
ge-0/0/8
ge-0/0/9
ge-0/0/10
ge-0/0/11
ge-0/0/12
ge-0/0/13
ge-0/0/14
ge-0/0/15
ge-0/0/16
ge-0/0/17
ge-0/0/18
ge-0/0/19
ge-0/0/20
ge-0/0/21
ge-0/0/22
ge-0/0/23
vcp-0
vcp-1
ae0
bme0
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Seconds: 74
Link
Input packets
(pps)
Output packets
(pps)
Down
Up
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Up
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Down
Up
Up
Down
Down
Down
Up
0
392183
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
392181
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
392169
392182
0
0
0
0
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
0
392166
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
392168
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
392184
392170
0
0
0
1568693
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(1)
(0)
(0)
(0)
341
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show interfaces diagnostics optics
Syntax
Release Information
Description
show interfaces diagnostics optics interface-name
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D15 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Display diagnostics data and alarms for Gigabit Ethernet optical transceivers (SFP, SFP+,
XFP, QSFP+, or CFP) installed in EX Series or QFX Series switches. The information
provided by this command is known as digital optical monitoring (DOM) information. For
a list of transceivers supported on EX Series switches and their specifications, including
DOM support, see Pluggable Transceivers Supported on EX Series Switches.
Thresholds that trigger a high alarm, low alarm, high warning, or low warning are set by
the transponder vendors. Generally, a high alarm or low alarm indicates that the optics
module is not operating properly. This information can be used to diagnose why a
transceiver is not working.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
342
interface-name—Name of the interface associated with the port in which the transceiver
is installed: ge-fpc/pic/port, xe-fpc/pic/port, or et-fpc/pic/port.
view
•
Monitoring Interface Status and Traffic
•
Monitoring Interface Status and Traffic on page 81
•
Installing a Transceiver
•
Installing a Transceiver in a QFX Series Device
•
Removing a Transceiver
•
Removing a Transceiver from a QFX Series Device
•
Junos OS Ethernet Interfaces Configuration Guide
show interfaces diagnostics optics ge-0/1/0 (SFP Transceiver) on page 349
show interfaces diagnostics optics xe-0/1/0 (SFP+ Transceiver) on page 350
show interfaces diagnostics optics xe-0/1/0 (XFP Transceiver) on page 351
show interfaces diagnostics optics et-3/0/0 (QSFP+ Transceiver) on page 352
show interfaces diagnostics optics et-4/1/0 (CFP Transceiver) on page 353
Table 34 on page 343 lists the output fields for the show interfaces diagnostics optics
command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Table 34: show interfaces diagnostics optics Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Physical interface
Displays the name of the physical interface.
Laser bias current
Displays the magnitude of the laser bias power setting current,
in milliamperes. The laser bias provides direct modulation of
laser diodes and modulates currents.
Laser output power
Displays the laser output power, in milliwatts (mW) and
decibels referred to 1.0 mW (dBm).
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser temperature
Displays the laser temperature, in Celsius and Fahrenheit.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Module temperature
Displays the temperature, in Celsius and Fahrenheit.
Module voltage
Displays the voltage, in Volts.
(Not available for XFP transceivers)
Laser rx power
Displays the laser received optical power, in milliwatts (mW)
and decibels referred to 1.0 mW (dBm).
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, QSFP+, and CFP transceivers)
Receiver signal average optical power
Displays the receiver signal average optical power, in milliwatts
(mW) and decibels referred to 1.0 mW (dBm).
(Not available for XFP, QSFP+, and CFP transceivers)
Laser bias current high alarm
Displays whether the laser bias power setting high alarm is On
or Off.
Laser bias current low alarm
Displays whether the laser bias power setting low alarm is On
or Off.
Laser bias current high warning
Displays whether the laser bias power setting high warning is
On or Off.
Laser bias current low warning
Displays whether the laser bias power setting low warning is
On or Off.
Laser output power high alarm
Displays whether the laser output power high alarm is On or
Off.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser output power low alarm
Displays whether the laser output power low alarm is On or Off.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser output power high warning
Displays whether the laser output power high warning is On or
Off.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
343
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 34: show interfaces diagnostics optics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Laser output power low warning
Displays whether the laser output power low warning is On or
Off.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser temperature high alarm
Displays whether the laser temperature high alarm is On or Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser temperature low alarm
Displays whether the laser temperature low alarm is On or Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser temperature high warning
Displays whether the laser temperature high warning is On or
Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser temperature low warning
Displays whether the laser temperature low warning is On or
Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Module temperature high alarm
Displays whether the module temperature high alarm is On or
Off.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Module temperature low alarm
Displays whether the module temperature low alarm is On or
Off.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Module temperature high warning
Displays whether the module temperature high warning is On
or Off.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Module temperature low warning
Displays whether the module temperature low warning is On
or Off.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Module voltage high alarm
Displays whether the module voltage high alarm is On or Off.
(Not available for XFP and QSFP+ transceivers)
Module voltage low alarm
Displays whether the module voltage low alarm is On or Off.
(Not available for XFP and QSFP+ transceivers)
Module voltage high warning
Displays whether the module voltage high warning is On or Off.
(Not available for XFP and QSFP+ transceivers)
Module voltage low warning
Displays whether the module voltage low warning is On or Off.
(Not available for XFP and QSFP+ transceivers)
344
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Table 34: show interfaces diagnostics optics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Laser rx power high alarm
Displays whether the receive laser power high alarm is On or
Off.
(Not available for QSFP+ and CFP transceivers)
Laser rx power low alarm
Displays whether the receive laser power low alarm is On or Off.
(Not available for QSFP+ and CFP transceivers)
Laser rx power high warning
Displays whether the receive laser power high warning is On or
Off.
(Not available for QSFP+ and CFP transceivers)
Laser rx power low warning
Displays whether the receive laser power low warning is On or
Off.
(Not available for QSFP+ and CFP transceivers)
Laser bias current high alarm threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser bias current
high alarm.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Module not ready alarm
Displays whether the module not ready alarm is On or Off. When
the output is On, the module has an operational fault.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Module low power alarm
Displays whether the module low power alarm is On or Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Module initialization incomplete alarm
Displays whether the module initialization incomplete alarm is
On or Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Module fault alarm
Displays whether the module fault alarm is On or Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
PLD Flash initialization fault alarm
Displays whether the PLD Flash initialization fault alarm is On
or Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Power supply fault alarm
Displays whether the power supply fault alarm is On or Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Checksum fault alarm
Displays whether the checksum fault alarm is On or Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Tx laser disabled alarm
Displays whether the Tx laser disabled alarm is On or Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
345
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 34: show interfaces diagnostics optics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Module power down alarm
Displays whether the module power down alarm is On or Off.
When the output is On, module is in a limited power mode, low
for normal operation.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, QSFP+, and CFP transceivers)
Tx data not ready alarm
Any condition leading to invalid data on the transmit path.
Displays whether the Tx data not ready alarm is On or Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, QSFP+, and CFP transceivers)
Tx not ready alarm
Any condition leading to invalid data on the transmit path.
Displays whether the Tx not ready alarm is On or Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, QSFP+, and CFP transceivers)
Tx laser fault alarm
Laser fault condition. Displays whether the Tx laser fault alarm
is On or Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, QSFP+, and CFP transceivers)
Tx CDR loss of lock alarm
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Rx not ready alarm
Transmit clock and data recovery (CDR) loss of lock. Loss of
lock on the transmit side of the CDR. Displays whether the Tx
CDR loss of lock alarm is On or Off.
Any condition leading to invalid data on the receive path.
Displays whether the Rx not ready alarm is On or Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, QSFP+, and CFP transceivers)
Rx loss of signal alarm
(Not available for SFP and SFP+ transceivers)
Rx CDR loss of lock alarm
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser bias current low alarm threshold
Receive loss of signal alarm. When the output is On, indicates
insufficient optical input power to the module. Displays whether
the Rx loss of signal alarm is On or Off.
Receive CDR loss of lock. Loss of lock on the receive side of the
CDR. Displays whether the Rx CDR loss of lock alarm is On or
Off.
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser bias current
low alarm.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser bias current high warning threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser bias current
high warning.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser bias current low warning threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser bias current
low warning.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser output power high alarm threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser output
power high alarm.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser output power low alarm threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser output
power low alarm.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
346
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Table 34: show interfaces diagnostics optics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Laser output power high warning threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser output
power high warning.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser output power low warning threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser output
power low warning.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Module temperature high alarm threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the module
temperature high alarm.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Module temperature low alarm threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the module
temperature low alarm.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Module temperature high warning threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the module
temperature high warning.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Module temperature low warning threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the module
temperature low warning.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Module voltage high alarm threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the module voltage
high alarm.
(Not available for XFP and QSFP+ transceivers)
Module voltage low alarm threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the module voltage
low alarm.
(Not available for XFP and QSFP+ transceivers)
Module voltage high warning threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the module voltage
high warning.
(Not available for XFP and QSFP+ transceivers)
Module voltage low warning threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the module voltage
low warning.
(Not available for XFP and QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser rx power high alarm threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser rx power
high alarm.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser rx power low alarm threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser rx power
low alarm.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser rx power high warning threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser rx power
high warning.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
347
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 34: show interfaces diagnostics optics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Laser rx power low warning threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser rx power
low warning.
(Not available for QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser temperature high alarm threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser
temperature high alarm, in Celsius and Fahrenheit.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser temperature low alarm threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser
temperature low alarm, in Celsius and Fahrenheit.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser temperature high warning threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser
temperature high warning, in Celsius and Fahrenheit.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser temperature low warning threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for the laser
temperature low warning, in Celsius and Fahrenheit.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
SOA bias current high alarm threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for SOA bias current
high alarm.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
SOA bias current low alarm threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for SOA bias current
low alarm.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
SOA bias current high warning threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for SOA bias current
high warning.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
SOA bias current low warning threshold
Displays the vendor-specified threshold for SOA bias current
low warning.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Laser receiver power high alarm
Displays whether the laser receiver power high alarm is On or
Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, and XFP transceivers)
Laser receiver power low alarm
Displays whether the laser receiver power low alarm is On or
Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, and XFP transceivers)
Laser receiver power high warning
Displays whether the laser receiver power high warning is On
or Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, and XFP transceivers)
Laser receiver power low warning
Displays whether the laser receiver power low warning is On or
Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, and XFP transceivers)
348
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Table 34: show interfaces diagnostics optics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Laser receiver power
Displays the laser receiver power, in milliwatts (mW) and
decibels referred to 1.0 mW (dBm).
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, and XFP transceivers)
Tx loss of signal functionality alarm
Displays whether the Tx loss of signal functionality alarm is On
or Off.
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, and XFP transceivers)
Displays whether the APD supply fault alarm is On or Off.
APD supply fault alarm
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Displays whether the TEC fault alarm is On or Off.
TEC fault alarm
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Displays whether the Wavelength unlocked alarm is On or Off.
Wavelength unlocked alarm
(Not available for SFP, SFP+, XFP, and QSFP+ transceivers)
Sample Output
show interfaces diagnostics optics ge-0/1/0 (SFP Transceiver)
user@switch> show interfaces diagnostics optics ge-0/1/0
Physical interface: ge-0/1/0
Laser bias current
: 5.444 mA
Laser output power
: 0.3130 mW / -5.04 dBm
Module temperature
: 36 degrees C / 97 degrees F
Module voltage
: 3.2120 V
Receiver signal average optical power
: 0.3840 mW / -4.16 dBm
Laser bias current high alarm
: Off
Laser bias current low alarm
: Off
Laser bias current high warning
: Off
Laser bias current low warning
: Off
Laser output power high alarm
: Off
Laser output power low alarm
: Off
Laser output power high warning
: Off
Laser output power low warning
: Off
Module temperature high alarm
: Off
Module temperature low alarm
: Off
Module temperature high warning
: Off
Module temperature low warning
: Off
Module voltage high alarm
: Off
Module voltage low alarm
: Off
Module voltage high warning
: Off
Module voltage low warning
: Off
Laser rx power high alarm
: Off
Laser rx power low alarm
: Off
Laser rx power high warning
: Off
Laser rx power low warning
: Off
Laser bias current high alarm threshold
: 15.000 mA
Laser bias current low alarm threshold
: 1.000 mA
Laser bias current high warning threshold : 12.000 mA
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
349
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Laser bias current low warning threshold
Laser output power high alarm threshold
Laser output power low alarm threshold
Laser output power high warning threshold
Laser output power low warning threshold
Module temperature high alarm threshold
Module temperature low alarm threshold
Module temperature high warning threshold
Module temperature low warning threshold
Module voltage high alarm threshold
Module voltage low alarm threshold
Module voltage high warning threshold
Module voltage low warning threshold
Laser rx power high alarm threshold
Laser rx power low alarm threshold
Laser rx power high warning threshold
Laser rx power low warning threshold
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
2.000 mA
0.6300 mW /
0.0660 mW /
0.6300 mW /
0.0780 mW /
109 degrees
-29 degrees
103 degrees
-13 degrees
3.900 V
2.700 V
3.700 V
2.900 V
1.2589 mW /
0.0100 mW /
0.7939 mW /
0.0157 mW /
-2.01 dBm
-11.80 dBm
-2.01 dBm
-11.08 dBm
C / 228 degrees F
C / -20 degrees F
C / 217 degrees F
C / 9 degrees F
1.00 dBm
-20.00 dBm
-1.00 dBm
-18.04 dBm
Sample Output
show interfaces diagnostics optics xe-0/1/0 (SFP+ Transceiver)
user@switch> show interfaces diagnostics optics xe-0/1/0
Physical interface: xe-0/1/0
Laser bias current
: 4.968 mA
Laser output power
: 0.4940 mW / -3.06 dBm
Module temperature
: 27 degrees C / 81 degrees F
Module voltage
: 3.2310 V
Receiver signal average optical power
: 0.0000
Laser bias current high alarm
: Off
Laser bias current low alarm
: Off
Laser bias current high warning
: Off
Laser bias current low warning
: Off
Laser output power high alarm
: Off
Laser output power low alarm
: Off
Laser output power high warning
: Off
Laser output power low warning
: Off
Module temperature high alarm
: Off
Module temperature low alarm
: Off
Module temperature high warning
: Off
Module temperature low warning
: Off
Module voltage high alarm
: Off
Module voltage low alarm
: Off
Module voltage high warning
: Off
Module voltage low warning
: Off
Laser rx power high alarm
: Off
Laser rx power low alarm
: On
Laser rx power high warning
: Off
Laser rx power low warning
: On
Laser bias current high alarm threshold
: 10.500 mA
Laser bias current low alarm threshold
: 2.000 mA
Laser bias current high warning threshold : 9.000 mA
Laser bias current low warning threshold : 2.500 mA
Laser output power high alarm threshold
: 1.4120 mW / 1.50 dBm
Laser output power low alarm threshold
: 0.0740 mW / -11.31 dBm
Laser output power high warning threshold : 0.7070 mW / -1.51 dBm
Laser output power low warning threshold : 0.1860 mW / -7.30 dBm
Module temperature high alarm threshold
: 75 degrees C / 167 degrees F
Module temperature low alarm threshold
: -5 degrees C / 23 degrees F
Module temperature high warning threshold : 70 degrees C / 158 degrees F
Module temperature low warning threshold : 0 degrees C / 32 degrees F
350
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Module voltage
Module voltage
Module voltage
Module voltage
Laser rx power
Laser rx power
Laser rx power
Laser rx power
high alarm threshold
low alarm threshold
high warning threshold
low warning threshold
high alarm threshold
low alarm threshold
high warning threshold
low warning threshold
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
3.630 V
2.970 V
3.465 V
3.135 V
1.5849 mW
0.0407 mW
0.7943 mW
0.1023 mW
/
/
/
/
2.00 dBm
-13.90 dBm
-1.00 dBm
-9.90 dBm
Sample Output
show interfaces diagnostics optics xe-0/1/0 (XFP Transceiver)
user@switch> show interfaces diagnostics optics xe-0/1/0
Physical interface: xe-0/1/0
Laser bias current
: 8.029 mA
Laser output power
: 0.6430 mW / -1.92 dBm
Module temperature
: 4 degrees C / 39 degrees F
Laser rx power
: 0.0012 mW / -29.21 dBm
Laser bias current high alarm
: Off
Laser bias current low alarm
: Off
Laser bias current high warning
: Off
Laser bias current low warning
: Off
Laser output power high alarm
: Off
Laser output power low alarm
: Off
Laser output power high warning
: Off
Laser output power low warning
: Off
Module temperature high alarm
: Off
Module temperature low alarm
: Off
Module temperature high warning
: Off
Module temperature low warning
: Off
Laser rx power high alarm
: Off
Laser rx power low alarm
: On
Laser rx power high warning
: Off
Laser rx power low warning
: On
Module not ready alarm
: On
Module power down alarm
: Off
Tx data not ready alarm
: Off
Tx not ready alarm
: Off
Tx laser fault alarm
: Off
Tx CDR loss of lock alarm
: Off
Rx not ready alarm
: On
Rx loss of signal alarm
: On
Rx CDR loss of lock alarm
: On
Laser bias current high alarm threshold
: 13.000 mA
Laser bias current low alarm threshold
: 2.000 mA
Laser bias current high warning threshold : 12.000 mA
Laser bias current low warning threshold : 3.000 mA
Laser output power high alarm threshold
: 0.8310 mW / -0.80 dBm
Laser output power low alarm threshold
: 0.1650 mW / -7.83 dBm
Laser output power high warning threshold : 0.7410 mW / -1.30 dBm
Laser output power low warning threshold : 0.1860 mW / -7.30 dBm
Module temperature high alarm threshold
: 90 degrees C / 194 degrees F
Module temperature low alarm threshold
: 0 degrees C / 32 degrees F
Module temperature high warning threshold : 85 degrees C / 185 degrees F
Module temperature low warning threshold : 0 degrees C / 32 degrees F
Laser rx power high alarm threshold
: 0.8912 mW / -0.50 dBm
Laser rx power low alarm threshold
: 0.0912 mW / -10.40 dBm
Laser rx power high warning threshold
: 0.7943 mW / -1.00 dBm
Laser rx power low warning threshold
: 0.1023 mW / -9.90 dBm
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
351
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Sample Output
show interfaces diagnostics optics et-3/0/0 (QSFP+ Transceiver)
user@switch> show interfaces diagnostics optics et-3/0/0
Physical interface: et-3/0/0
Module temperature
: 33 degrees
Module voltage
: 3.3060 V
Lane 0
Laser bias current
: 7.182 mA
Laser receiver power
: 0.743 mW /
Laser bias current high alarm
: Off
Laser bias current low alarm
: Off
Laser bias current high warning
: Off
Laser bias current low warning
: Off
Laser receiver power high alarm
: Off
Laser receiver power low alarm
: Off
Laser receiver power high warning
: Off
Laser receiver power low warning
: Off
Tx loss of signal functionality alarm
: Off
Rx loss of signal alarm
: Off
Lane 1
Laser bias current
: 7.326 mA
Laser receiver power
: 0.752 mW /
Laser bias current high alarm
: Off
Laser bias current low alarm
: Off
Laser bias current high warning
: Off
Laser bias current low warning
: Off
Laser receiver power high alarm
: Off
Laser receiver power low alarm
: Off
Laser receiver power high warning
: Off
Laser receiver power low warning
: Off
Tx loss of signal functionality alarm
: Off
Rx loss of signal alarm
: Off
Lane 2
Laser bias current
: 7.447 mA
Laser receiver power
: 0.790 mW /
Laser bias current high alarm
: Off
Laser bias current low alarm
: Off
Laser bias current high warning
: Off
Laser bias current low warning
: Off
Laser receiver power high alarm
: Off
Laser receiver power low alarm
: Off
Laser receiver power high warning
: Off
Laser receiver power low warning
: Off
Tx loss of signal functionality alarm
: Off
Rx loss of signal alarm
: Off
Lane 3
Laser bias current
: 7.734 mA
Laser receiver power
: 0.768 mW /
Laser bias current high alarm
: Off
Laser bias current low alarm
: Off
Laser bias current high warning
: Off
Laser bias current low warning
: Off
Laser receiver power high alarm
: Off
Laser receiver power low alarm
: Off
Laser receiver power high warning
: Off
Laser receiver power low warning
: Off
Tx loss of signal functionality alarm
: Off
Rx loss of signal alarm
: Off
352
C / 92 degrees F
-1.29 dBm
-1.24 dBm
-1.03 dBm
-1.15 dBm
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Sample Output
show interfaces diagnostics optics et-4/1/0 (CFP Transceiver)
user@switch> show interfaces diagnostics optics et-4/1/0
Physical interface: et-4/1/0
Module temperature
: 38 degrees C / 101 degrees F
Module voltage
: 3.2500 V
Module temperature high alarm
: Off
Module temperature low alarm
: Off
Module temperature high warning
: Off
Module temperature low warning
: Off
Module voltage high alarm
: Off
Module voltage low alarm
: Off
Module voltage high warning
: Off
Module voltage low warning
: Off
Module not ready alarm
: Off
Module low power alarm
: Off
Module initialization incomplete alarm
: Off
Module fault alarm
: Off
PLD Flash initialization fault alarm
: Off
Power supply fault alarm
: Off
Checksum fault alarm
: Off
Tx laser disabled alarm
: Off
Tx loss of signal functionality alarm
: Off
Tx CDR loss of lock alarm
: Off
Rx loss of signal alarm
: Off
Rx CDR loss of lock alarm
: Off
Module temperature high alarm threshold
: 75 degrees C / 167 degrees F
Module temperature low alarm threshold
: -5 degrees C / 23 degrees F
Module temperature high warning threshold : 70 degrees C / 158 degrees F
Module temperature low warning threshold : 0 degrees C / 32 degrees F
Module voltage high alarm threshold
: 3.5000 V
Module voltage low alarm threshold
: 3.0990 V
Module voltage high warning threshold
: 3.4000 V
Module voltage low warning threshold
: 3.2000 V
Laser bias current high alarm threshold
: 250.000 mA
Laser bias current low alarm threshold
: 37.500 mA
Laser bias current high warning threshold : 225.000 mA
Laser bias current low warning threshold : 50.000 mA
Laser output power high alarm threshold
: 3.9800 mW / 6.00 dBm
Laser output power low alarm threshold
: 0.4670 mW / -3.31 dBm
Laser output power high warning threshold : 3.5480 mW / 5.50 dBm
Laser output power low warning threshold : 0.5240 mW / -2.81 dBm
Laser rx power high alarm threshold
: 3.5481 mW / 5.50 dBm
Laser rx power low alarm threshold
: 0.0616 mW / -12.10 dBm
Laser rx power high warning threshold
: 3.1622 mW / 5.00 dBm
Laser rx power low warning threshold
: 0.0691 mW / -11.61 dBm
Laser temperature high alarm threshold
: 67 degrees C / 153 degrees F
Laser temperature low alarm threshold
: 35 degrees C / 95 degrees F
Laser temperature high warning threshold : 62 degrees C / 144 degrees F
Laser temperature low warning threshold
: 40 degrees C / 104 degrees F
SOA bias current high alarm threshold
: 0.000 mA
SOA bias current low alarm threshold
: 0.000 mA
SOA bias current high warning threshold
: 0.000 mA
SOA bias current low warning threshold
: 0.000 mA
Lane 0
Laser bias current
: 131.684 mA
Laser output power
: 1.002 mW / 0.01 dBm
Laser temperature
: 54 degrees C / 128 degrees F
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
353
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Laser receiver power
Laser bias current high alarm
Laser bias current low alarm
Laser bias current high warning
Laser bias current low warning
Laser output power high alarm
Laser output power low alarm
Laser output power high warning
Laser output power low warning
Laser temperature high alarm
Laser temperature low alarm
Laser temperature high warning
Laser temperature low warning
Laser receiver power high alarm
Laser receiver power low alarm
Laser receiver power high warning
Laser receiver power low warning
Tx loss of signal functionality alarm
Tx CDR loss of lock alarm
Rx loss of signal alarm
Rx CDR loss of lock alarm
APD supply fault alarm
TEC fault alarm
Wavelength unlocked alarm
Lane 1
Laser bias current
Laser output power
Laser temperature
Laser receiver power
Laser bias current high alarm
Laser bias current low alarm
Laser bias current high warning
Laser bias current low warning
Laser output power high alarm
Laser output power low alarm
Laser output power high warning
Laser output power low warning
Laser temperature high alarm
Laser temperature low alarm
Laser temperature high warning
Laser temperature low warning
Laser receiver power high alarm
Laser receiver power low alarm
Laser receiver power high warning
Laser receiver power low warning
Tx loss of signal functionality alarm
Tx CDR loss of lock alarm
Rx loss of signal alarm
Rx CDR loss of lock alarm
APD supply fault alarm
TEC fault alarm
Wavelength unlocked alarm
Lane 2
Laser bias current
Laser output power
Laser temperature
Laser receiver power
Laser bias current high alarm
Laser bias current low alarm
Laser bias current high warning
Laser bias current low warning
354
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
0.497 mW / -3.03 dBm
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
122.345 mA
1.002 mW / 0.01 dBm
51 degrees C / 124 degrees F
0.611 mW / -2.14 dBm
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
112.819 mA
1.000 mW / 0.00 dBm
50 degrees C / 122 degrees F
0.540 mW / -2.67 dBm
Off
Off
Off
Off
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Laser output power high alarm
Laser output power low alarm
Laser output power high warning
Laser output power low warning
Laser temperature high alarm
Laser temperature low alarm
Laser temperature high warning
Laser temperature low warning
Laser receiver power high alarm
Laser receiver power low alarm
Laser receiver power high warning
Laser receiver power low warning
Tx loss of signal functionality alarm
Tx CDR loss of lock alarm
Rx loss of signal alarm
Rx CDR loss of lock alarm
APD supply fault alarm
TEC fault alarm
Wavelength unlocked alarm
Lane 3
Laser bias current
Laser output power
Laser temperature
Laser receiver power
Laser bias current high alarm
Laser bias current low alarm
Laser bias current high warning
Laser bias current low warning
Laser output power high alarm
Laser output power low alarm
Laser output power high warning
Laser output power low warning
Laser temperature high alarm
Laser temperature low alarm
Laser temperature high warning
Laser temperature low warning
Laser receiver power high alarm
Laser receiver power low alarm
Laser receiver power high warning
Laser receiver power low warning
Tx loss of signal functionality alarm
Tx CDR loss of lock alarm
Rx loss of signal alarm
Rx CDR loss of lock alarm
APD supply fault alarm
TEC fault alarm
Wavelength unlocked alarm
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
100.735 mA
1.002 mW / 0.01 dBm
50 degrees C / 122 degrees F
0.637 mW / -1.96 dBm
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
355
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show interfaces ge
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show interfaces device-name:type-fpc/pic/port
<brief | detail | extensive | terse>
<descriptions>
<media>
<routing-instance (all | instance-name)>
<snmp-index snmp-index>
<statistics>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Display status information about the specified Gigabit Ethernet interface. This command
does not display statistics for routed VLAN interfaces.
brief | detail | extensive | terse—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
device-name:type-fpc/pic/port—The device name is either the serial number or the alias
of the QFabric system component, such as a Node device, Interconnect device, or
QFabric infrastructure. The name can contain a maximum of 128 characters and
cannot contain any colons.
descriptions—(Optional) Display interface description strings.
media—(Optional) Display media-specific information about network interfaces.
routing instance (all | instance-name)—(Optional) Display the name of an individual
routing-instance or display all routing-instances.
snmp-index snmp-index—(Optional) Display information for the specified SNMP index
of the interface.
statistics—(Optional) Display static interface statistics.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
356
view
•
Monitoring Interface Status and Traffic on page 81
•
Troubleshooting Network Interfaces on page 81
•
Troubleshooting an Aggregated Ethernet Interface on page 143
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
show interfaces on page 364
show interfaces brief on page 364
show interfaces detail (Symmetric Flow Control and Autonegotiation
Enabled) on page 364
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
show interfaces detail (Asymmetric Flow Control and Autonegotiation
Enabled) on page 365
show interfaces extensive (Symmetric Flow Control and Autonegotiation
Enabled) on page 366
show interfaces extensive (Asymmetric Flow Control and Autonegotiation
Enabled) on page 368
show interfaces terse on page 370
show interfaces terse (QFabric Systems) on page 370
Output Fields
Table 35 on page 357 lists the output fields for the show interfaces ge command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 35: show interfaces ge Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Physical interface
Name of the physical interface.
All levels
Enabled
State of the interface: Enabled or Disabled.
All levels
Interface index
Index number of the physical interface, which reflects its initialization sequence.
detail extensive none
SNMP ifIndex
SNMP index number for the physical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Description
Optional user-specified description.
brief detail extensive
Link-level type
Encapsulation being used on the physical interface.
All levels
MTU
Maximum transmission unit size on the physical interface. The default is 1514.
All levels
Speed
Speed at which the interface is running.
All levels
Loopback
Loopback status: Enabled or Disabled. If loopback is enabled, type of loopback:
Local or Remote.
All levels
Source filtering
Source filtering status: Enabled or Disabled.
All levels
Flow control
Flow control status: Enabled or Disabled.
detail extensive
Physical Interface
NOTE: This field is only displayed if asymmetric flow control is not configured.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
357
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 35: show interfaces ge Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Configured-flowcontrol
Configured flow control for the interface transmit buffers (tx-buffers) and receive
buffers (rx-buffers):
detail extensive
•
tx-buffers—On if the interface is configured to respond to Ethernet PAUSE
messages received from the connected peer.
Off if the interface is not configured to respond to received PAUSE messages.
•
rx-buffers—On if the interface is configured to generate and send Ethernet
PAUSE messages to the connected peer.
Off if the interface is not configured to generate and send PAUSE messages.
NOTE: This field is only displayed if asymmetric flow control is configured.
Auto-negotiation
Autonegotiation status: Enabled or Disabled.
All levels
Remote-fault
Remote fault status:
All levels
•
Online—Autonegotiation is manually configured as online.
•
Offline—Autonegotiation is manually configured as offline.
Device flags
Information about the physical device.
All levels
Interface flags
Information about the interface.
All levels
Link flags
Information about the link.
All levels
CoS queues
Number of CoS queues configured.
detail extensive none
Hold-times
Current interface hold-time up and hold-time down, in milliseconds.
detail extensive
Current address
Configured MAC address.
detail extensive none
Hardware address
MAC address of the hardware.
detail extensive none
Last flapped
Date, time, and how long ago the interface went from down to up. The format
is Last flapped: year-month-day hour:minute:second timezone (hour:minute:second
ago). For example, Last flapped: 2008–01–16 10:52:40 UTC (3d 22:58 ago).
detail extensive none
Statistics last
cleared
Time when the statistics for the interface were last set to zero.
detail extensive
Traffic statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the physical
interface.
detail extensive
•
Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface.
•
Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface.
•
Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface
•
Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.
NOTE: The bandwidth bps counter is not enabled on the switch.
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Table 35: show interfaces ge Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Input errors
Input errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters
whose meaning might not be obvious:
extensive
•
Errors—Sum of the incoming frame aborts and FCS errors.
•
Drops—Number of packets dropped by the input queue of the I/O Manager
ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every
packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
•
Framing errors—Number of packets received with an invalid frame checksum
(FCS).
•
Runts—Number of frames received that are smaller than the runt threshold.
•
Policed discards—Number of frames that the incoming packet match code
discarded because they were not recognized or not of interest. Usually, this
field reports protocols that Junos OS does not handle.
•
L3 incompletes—Number of incoming packets discarded because they failed
Layer 3 sanity checks of the headers. For example, a frame with less than
20 bytes of available IP header is discarded.
•
L2 channel errors—Number of times the software did not find a valid logical
interface for an incoming frame.
•
L2 mismatch timeouts—Number of malformed or short packets that caused
the incoming packet handler to discard the frame as unreadable.
•
FIFO errors—Number of FIFO errors in the receive direction that are reported
by the ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably
malfunctioning.
•
Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.
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Table 35: show interfaces ge Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Output errors
Output errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters
whose meaning might not be obvious:
extensive
•
Carrier transitions—Number of times the interface has gone from down to up.
This number does not normally increment quickly, increasing only when the
cable is unplugged, the far-end system is powered down and then up, or
another problem occurs. If the number of carrier transitions increments quickly
(perhaps once every 10 seconds), the cable, the far-end system, or the PIC
or PIM is malfunctioning.
•
Errors—Sum of the outgoing frame aborts and FCS errors.
•
Drops—Number of packets dropped by the output queue of the I/O Manager
ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every
packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
•
Collisions—Number of Ethernet collisions. The Gigabit Ethernet PIC supports
only full-duplex operation, so for Gigabit Ethernet PICs, this number should
always remain 0. If it is nonzero, there is a software bug.
•
Aged packets—Number of packets that remained in shared packet SDRAM
so long that the system automatically purged them. The value in this field
should never increment. If it does, it is most likely a software bug or possibly
malfunctioning hardware.
•
FIFO errors—Number of FIFO errors in the send direction as reported by the
ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably
malfunctioning.
•
HS link CRC errors—Number of errors on the high-speed links between the
ASICs responsible for handling the switch interfaces.
•
MTU errors—Number of packets whose size exceeded the MTU of the interface.
•
Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.
Egress queues
Total number of egress queues supported on the specified interface.
detail extensive
Queue counters
(Egress )
CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name.
detail extensive
•
Queued packets—Number of queued packets.
•
Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.
•
Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
Queue Number
The CoS queue number and the forwarding classes mapped to the queue
number. The Mapped forwarding class column lists the forwarding classes
mapped to each CoS queue.
detail extensive
Active alarms and
Active defects
Ethernet-specific defects that can prevent the interface from passing packets.
When a defect persists for a certain amount of time, it is promoted to an alarm.
Based on the switch configuration, an alarm can ring the red or yellow alarm
bell on the switch or turn on the red or yellow alarm LED on the front of the
switch. These fields can contain the value None or Link.
detail extensive none
•
None—There are no active defects or alarms.
•
Link—Interface has lost its link state, which usually means that the cable is
unplugged, the far-end system has been turned off, or the PIC is
malfunctioning.
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Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Table 35: show interfaces ge Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
MAC statistics
Receive and Transmit statistics reported by the PIC's MAC subsystem.
extensive
•
Total octets and total packets—Total number of octets and packets. For
Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs, the received octets count varies by interface type.
•
Unicast packets, Broadcast packets, and Multicast packets—Number of unicast,
broadcast, and multicast packets.
•
CRC/Align errors—Total number of packets received that had a length
(excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets) of between 64 and 1518
octets, inclusive, and had either a bad FCS with an integral number of octets
(FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment
Error).
•
FIFO error—Number of FIFO errors that are reported by the ASIC on the PIC.
If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably malfunctioning.
•
MAC control frames—Number of MAC control frames.
•
MAC pause frames—Number of MAC control frames with pause operational
code.
•
Oversized frames—Number of packets that exceeds the configured MTU.
•
Jabber frames—Number of frames that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding
framing bits, but including FCS octets), and had either an FCS error or an
alignment error. This definition of jabber is different from the definition in
IEEE-802.3 section 8.2.1.5 (10BASE5) and section 10.3.1.4 (10BASE2). These
documents define jabber as the condition in which any packet exceeds 20 ms.
The allowed range to detect jabber is from 20 ms to 150 ms.
•
Fragment frames—Total number of packets that were less than 64 octets in
length (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets), and had either an
FCS error or an alignment error. Fragment frames normally increment because
both runts (which are normal occurrences caused by collisions) and noise
hits are counted.
•
VLAN tagged frames—Number of frames that are VLAN tagged. The system
uses the TPID of 0x8100 in the frame to determine whether a frame is tagged
or not. This counter is not supported on EX Series switches and is always
displayed as 0.
•
Code violations—Number of times an event caused the PHY to indicate “Data
reception error” or “invalid data symbol error.”
Filter Statistics
Receive and Transmit statistics reported by the PIC's MAC address filter
extensive
subsystem.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 35: show interfaces ge Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Autonegotiation
information
Information about link autonegotiation:
extensive
•
Negotiation status:
•
Incomplete—Ethernet interface has the speed or link mode configured.
•
No autonegotiation—Remote Ethernet interface has the speed or link mode
configured or does not perform autonegotiation.
•
Complete—Ethernet interface is connected to a device that performs
autonegotiation and the autonegotiation process is successful.
•
Link partner status—OK when the Ethernet interface is connected to a device
that performs autonegotiation and the autonegotiation process is successful.
•
Link partner:
•
Link mode—Depending on the capability of the attached Ethernet device,
either Full-duplex or Half-duplex.
•
Flow control—Types of flow control supported by the remote Ethernet
device. For Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, types are Symmetric (link partner
supports PAUSE on receive and transmit), Asymmetric (link partner supports
PAUSE on transmit), and Symmetric/Asymmetric (link partner supports
PAUSE on both receive and transmit or PAUSE only on receive).
•
Remote fault—Remote fault information from the link partner—Failure
indicates a receive link error. OK indicates that the link partner is receiving.
Negotiation error indicates a negotiation error. Offline indicates that the
link partner is going offline.
•
•
Link partner speed—Speed of the link partner.
Local resolution:
•
Flow control—Types of flow control supported by the remote Ethernet
device. For Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, types are Symmetric (link partner
supports PAUSE on receive and transmit), Asymmetric (link partner supports
PAUSE on transmit), and Symmetric/Asymmetric (link partner supports
PAUSE on both receive and transmit or PAUSE only on receive).
For asymmetric PAUSE, shows if the PAUSE transmit and PAUSE receive
states on the interface are enable or disable.
•
Remote fault—Remote fault information. Link OK (no error detected on
receive), Offline (local interface is offline), and Link Failure (link error
detected on receive).
Packet Forwarding
Engine
configuration
Information about the configuration of the Packet Forwarding Engine:
•
extensive
Destination slot—FPC slot number.
Logical Interface
Logical interface
Name of the logical interface.
All levels
Index
Index number of the logical interface, which reflects its initialization sequence.
detail extensive none
SNMP ifIndex
SNMP interface index number for the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Flags
Information about the logical interface.
All levels
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Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Table 35: show interfaces ge Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Encapsulation
Encapsulation on the logical interface.
All levels
Protocol
Protocol family.
detail extensive none
Traffic statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets received (input) and transmitted (output)
on the specified interface.
detail extensive
IPv6 transit
statistics
If IPv6 statistics tracking is enabled, number of IPv6 bytes and packets received
and transmitted on the logical interface.
extensive
Local statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets destined to and from the switch.
extensive
Transit statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets transiting the switch.
extensive
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Route Table
Route table in which the logical interface address is located. For example, 0
refers to the routing table inet.0.
detail extensive none
Input Filters
Names of any input filters applied to this interface.
detail extensive
Output Filters
Names of any output filters applied to this interface.
detail extensive
Flags
Information about protocol family flags.
detail extensive
If unicast reverse-path forwarding (RPF) is explicitly configured on the specified
interface, the uRPF flag is displayed. If unicast RPF was configured on a different
interface (and therefore is enabled on all switch interfaces) but was not explicitly
configured on the specified interface, the uRPF flag is not displayed even though
unicast RPF is enabled.
protocol-family
Protocol family configured on the logical interface. If the protocol is inet, the IP
address of the interface is also displayed.
brief
Flags
Information about the address flags.
detail extensive none
Destination
IP address of the remote side of the connection.
detail extensive none
Local
IP address of the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Broadcast
Broadcast address of the logical interlace.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Sample Output
show interfaces
user@switch> show interfaces ge-0/0/15
Physical interface: ge-0/0/15, Enabled, Physical link is Down
Interface index: 660, SNMP ifIndex: 535
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, MRU: 0, Speed: Auto, Duplex: Auto, BPDU
Error: None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering:
Disabled, Flow control: Enabled, Auto-negotiation: Enabled, Remote fault: Online,
Media type: Copper, IEEE 802.3az Energy Efficient Ethernet: Disabled
Device flags
: Present Running Down
Interface flags: Hardware-Down SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x0
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 12 supported, 12 maximum usable queues
Current address: f4:b5:2f:41:cf:92, Hardware address: f4:b5:2f:41:cf:92
Last flapped
: 2017-07-15 16:04:46 PDT (3w1d 11:16 ago)
Input rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Output rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Active alarms : LINK
Active defects : LINK
Interface transmit statistics: Disabled
show interfaces brief
user@switch> show interfaces ge-0/0/9 brief
Physical interface: ge-0/0/9, Enabled, Physical link is Down
Description: voice priority and tcp and icmp traffic rate-limiting filter at i
ngress port
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: Unspecified, Loopback: Disabled,
Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled, Auto-negotiation: Enabled,
Remote fault: Online
Device flags
: Present Running Down
Interface flags: Hardware-Down SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x0
Link flags
: None
Logical interface ge-0/0/9.0
Flags: Device-Down SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: ENET2
eth-switch
show interfaces detail (Symmetric Flow Control and Autonegotiation Enabled)
user@switch> show interfaces ge-0/0/9 detail
Physical interface: ge-0/0/9, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 193, SNMP ifIndex: 206, Generation: 196
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: Auto, Duplex: Auto,
BPDU Error: None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: Disabled,
Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled, Auto-negotiation: Enabled,
Remote fault: Online
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x0
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:1f:12:30:ff:40, Hardware address: 00:1f:12:30:ff:40
Last flapped
: 2009-05-05 06:03:05 UTC (00:22:13 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
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Input bytes :
0
0
Output bytes :
0
0
Input packets:
0
0
Output packets:
0
0
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
bps
bps
pps
pps
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
0
0
0
1 assured-forw
0
0
0
5 expedited-fo
0
0
0
7 network-cont
0
0
0
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
Logical interface ge-0/0/9.0 (Index 65) (SNMP ifIndex 235)
Flags: SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: ENET2
Bandwidth: 0
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Protocol eth-switch, Generation: 146, Route table: 0
Flags: Is-Primary
Input Filters: f1,
Output Filters: f2,,,,
(Generation 130)
0
0
0
0
bps
bps
pps
pps
show interfaces detail (Asymmetric Flow Control and Autonegotiation Enabled)
user@switch> show interfaces ge-0/0/9 detail
Physical interface: ge-0/0/9, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 193, SNMP ifIndex: 206, Generation: 196
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: Auto, Duplex: Auto,
BPDU Error: None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: Disabled,
Source filtering: Disabled, Configured-flow-control tx-buffers: off
rx-buffers: on ,
Auto-negotiation: Enabled,
Remote fault: Online
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x0
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
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Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:1f:12:30:ff:40, Hardware address: 00:1f:12:30:ff:40
Last flapped
: 2009-05-05 06:03:05 UTC (00:22:13 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
0
0
0
1 assured-forw
0
0
0
5 expedited-fo
0
0
0
7 network-cont
0
0
0
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
Logical interface ge-0/0/9.0 (Index 65) (SNMP ifIndex 235)
Flags: SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: ENET2
Bandwidth: 0
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Protocol eth-switch, Generation: 146, Route table: 0
Flags: Is-Primary
Input Filters: f1,
Output Filters: f2,,,,
(Generation 130)
0
0
0
0
bps
bps
pps
pps
show interfaces extensive (Symmetric Flow Control and Autonegotiation Enabled)
user@switch> show interfaces ge-0/0/12 extensive
interface: ge-0/0/12, Enabled, Physical link is Down
Interface index: 49164, SNMP ifIndex: 574, Generation: 142
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 1000mbps, Duplex: Full-Duplex,
BPDU Error: None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: Disabled,
Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled, Auto-negotiation: Enabled,
Remote fault: Online
Device flags
: Present Running Down
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Interface flags: Hardware-Down SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x0
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:22:83:2a:d8:dc, Hardware address: 00:22:83:2a:d8:dc
Last flapped
: 2011-02-25 00:45:03 UTC (22:42:48 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0,
L3 incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 0, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 8 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
0
0
0
2 no-loss
0
0
0
3 fcoe
0
0
0
7 network-cont
0
0
0
Queue number:
Mapped forwarding classes
0
best-effort
2
no-loss
3
fcoe
7
network-control
Active alarms : LINK
Active defects : LINK
MAC statistics:
Receive
Total octets
0
Total packets
0
Unicast packets
0
Broadcast packets
0
Multicast packets
0
CRC/Align errors
0
FIFO errors
0
MAC control frames
0
MAC pause frames
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
MAC Priority Flow Control Statistics:
Priority : 0
0
Priority : 1
0
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0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
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Priority : 2
0
Priority : 3
0
Priority : 4
0
Priority : 5
0
Priority : 6
0
Priority : 7
0
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
0
Input packet rejects
0
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
Output packet pad count
Output packet error count
CAM destination filters: 1, CAM source filters: 0
Autonegotiation information:
Negotiation status: Incomplete
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 0
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Limit
%
bps
%
0 best-effort
75
750000000
75
none
7 network-control
5
50000000
5
none
8 mcast-be
15
150000000
15
none
11 mcast-nc
5
50000000
5
none
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Buffer Priority
usec
0
low
0
low
0
low
0
low
show interfaces extensive (Asymmetric Flow Control and Autonegotiation Enabled)
user@switch> show interfaces ge-0/0/12 extensive
interface: ge-0/0/12, Enabled, Physical link is Down
Interface index: 49164, SNMP ifIndex: 574, Generation: 142
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 1000mbps, Duplex: Full-Duplex,
BPDU Error: None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: Disabled,
Source filtering: Disabled, Configured-flow-control tx-buffers: off
rx-buffers: on
Auto-negotiation: Enabled,
Remote fault: Online
Device flags
: Present Running Down
Interface flags: Hardware-Down SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x0
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:22:83:2a:d8:dc, Hardware address: 00:22:83:2a:d8:dc
Last flapped
: 2011-02-25 00:45:03 UTC (22:42:48 ago)
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
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Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0,
L3 incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 0, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Egress queues: 8 supported, 8 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
0
0
0
2 no-loss
0
0
0
3 fcoe
0
0
0
7 network-cont
0
0
0
Queue number:
Mapped forwarding classes
0
best-effort
2
no-loss
3
fcoe
7
network-control
Active alarms : LINK
Active defects : LINK
MAC statistics:
Receive
Total octets
0
Total packets
0
Unicast packets
0
Broadcast packets
0
Multicast packets
0
CRC/Align errors
0
FIFO errors
0
MAC control frames
0
MAC pause frames
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
MAC Priority Flow Control Statistics:
Priority : 0
0
Priority : 1
0
Priority : 2
0
Priority : 3
0
Priority : 4
0
Priority : 5
0
Priority : 6
0
Priority : 7
0
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
0
Input packet rejects
0
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
Output packet pad count
Output packet error count
CAM destination filters: 1, CAM source filters: 0
Autonegotiation information:
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
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Negotiation status: Complete
Link Partner:
Link mode: Full-duplex, Flow control: None, Remote fault: OK,
Link partner Speed: 1000 Mbps
Local resolution:
Flow control: enable PAUSE transmit and Disable PAUSE receive, Remote
fault: Link OK
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 0
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Buffer Priority
Limit
%
bps
%
usec
0 best-effort
75
750000000
75
0
low
none
7 network-control
5
50000000
5
0
low
none
8 mcast-be
15
150000000
15
0
low
none
11 mcast-nc
5
50000000
5
0
low
none
show interfaces terse
user@switch> show interfaces ge-0/0/12 terse
Interface
Admin Link Proto
ge-0/0/12
up
up
Local
Remote
show interfaces terse (QFabric Systems)
user@switch> show interfaces node1:ge-0/0/0 terse
Physical interface: node1:ge-0/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Down
Interface index: 129, SNMP ifIndex: 2884086
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 1000mbps, Duplex: Full-Duplex,
BPDU Error: None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None,
Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled
Interface flags: Internal: 0x4000
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Current address: 02:00:09:03:00:00, Hardware address: 02:00:09:03:00:00
Last flapped
: Never
Input rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Output rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
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show interfaces (GRE)
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show interfaces interface-type
<brief | detail | extensive | terse>
<descriptions>
<media>
<snmp-index snmp-index>
<statistics>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 17.3R1.
Display status information about the specified generic routing encapsulation (GRE)
interface.
interface-type—On M Series and T Series routers and EX Series switches, the interface
type is gr-fpc/pic/port.
brief | detail | extensive | terse—(Optional) Display the specified output level of interface
information.
descriptions—(Optional) Display interface description strings.
media—(Optional) Display media-specific information about network interfaces.
snmp-index snmp-index—(Optional) Display information for the specified SNMP index
of the interface.
statistics—(Optional) Display static interface statistics.
NOTE: You can configure generic routing encapsulation (GRE) interfaces
(gre-x/y/z) only for GMPLS control channels. GRE interfaces are not
supported or configurable for other applications. For more information about
GMPLS, see the MPLS Applications Feature Guide.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
view
show interfaces (GRE) on page 376
show interfaces brief (GRE) on page 376
show interfaces detail (GRE) on page 376
show interfaces (Layer 2 Services Over GRE Interfaces) on page 377
show interfaces extensive (Layer 2 Services Over GRE Interfaces) on page 377
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show interfaces detail (GRE) on an EX4200 Virtual Chassis Member Switch on page 378
show interfaces extensive (GRE) on page 379
show interfaces gr-2/0/10 for GRE IPv6 tunnel on page 379
Output Fields
Table 36 on page 372 lists the output fields for the show interfaces (GRE) command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 36: GRE show interfaces Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Physical interface
Name of the physical interface.
All levels
Enabled
State of the interface. Possible values are described in the “Enabled Field”
section under Common Output Fields Description.
All levels
Interface index
Physical interface's index number, which reflects its initialization sequence.
detail extensive none
SNMP ifIndex
SNMP index number for the physical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Type
Type of interface.
All levels
Link-level type
Encapsulation used on the physical interface.
All levels
MTU
MTU size on the physical interface.
All levels
Speed
Speed at which the interface is running.
All levels
Hold-times
Current interface hold-time up and hold-time down, in milliseconds.
detail extensive
Device Flags
Information about the physical device. Possible values are described in the
“Device Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.
All levels
Interface Flags
Information about the interface. Possible values are described in the “Interface
Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.
All levels
Input rate
Input rate in bits per second (bps) and packets per second (pps).
None specified
Output rate
Output rate in bps and pps.
None specified
Statistics last
cleared
Time when the statistics for the interface were last set to zero.
detail extensive
Physical Interface
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Table 36: GRE show interfaces Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Traffic statistics
The number of and the rate at which input and output bytes and packets are
received and transmitted on the physical interface.
detail extensive
•
Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface.
•
Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface.
•
Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface.
•
Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.
Logical Interface
Logical interface
Name of the logical interface.
All levels
Index
Logical interface index number, which reflects its initialization sequence.
detail extensive none
SNMP ifIndex
Logical interface SNMP interface index number.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support.
detail extensive
Flags
Information about the logical interface. Possible values listed in the “Logical
Interface Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description. describe
general information about the logical interface.
All levels
GRE-specific information about the logical interface is indicated by the presence
or absence of the following value in this field:
•
Reassemble-Pkts—If the Flags field includes this string, the GRE tunnel is
configured to reassemble tunnel packets that were fragmented after tunnel
encapsulation.
IP-Header
IP header of the logical interface. If the tunnel key statement is configured, this
information is included in the IP Header entry.
All levels
GRE-specific information about the logical interface is indicated by the presence
or absence of the following value in this field:
•
df—If the IP-Header field includes this string immediately following the 16 bits
of identification information (that is, if :df: displays after the twelfth byte),
the GRE tunnel is configured to allow fragmentation of GRE packets after
encapsulation.
Encapsulation
Encapsulation on the logical interface.
All levels
L2 Routing Instance
Name of the Layer 2 routing instance associated with the GRE interface.
All levels
L3 Routing Instance
Name of the Layer 3 routing instance associated with the GRE interface.
All levels
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Table 36: GRE show interfaces Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Copy-tos-toouter-ip-header
Status of type of service (ToS) bits in the GRE packet header:
detail extensive
•
On—ToS bits were copied from the payload packet header into the header
of the IP packet sent through the GRE tunnel.
•
Off—ToS bits were not copied from the payload packet header and are set
to 0 in the GRE packet header.
NOTE: EX Series switches do not support copying ToS bits to the encapsulated
packet, so the value of this field is always Off in switch output.
Gre keepalives
configured
Indicates whether a GRE keepalive time and hold time are configured for the
GRE tunnel.
detail extensive
NOTE: EX Series switches do not support configuration of GRE tunnel keepalive
times and hold times, so the value of this field is always Off in switch output.
Gre keepalives
adjacency state
Status of the other end of the GRE tunnel: Up or Down. If keepalive messages
are not received by either end of the GRE tunnel within the hold-time period,
the GRE keepalive adjacency state is down even when the GRE tunnel is up.
detail extensive
Input packets
Number of packets received on the logical interface.
None specified
Output packets
Number of packets transmitted on the logical interface.
None specified
Traffic statistics
Total number of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the logical
interface. These statistics are the sum of the local and transit statistics. When
a burst of traffic is received, the value in the output packet rate field might briefly
exceed the peak cell rate. It takes awhile (generally, less than 1 second) for this
counter to stabilize.
detail extensive
•
Input rate—Rate of bits and packets received on the interface.
•
Output rate—Rate of bits and packets transmitted on the interface.
Local statistics
Statistics for traffic received from and transmitted to the Routing Engine. When
a burst of traffic is received, the value in the output packet rate field might briefly
exceed the peak cell rate. It takes awhile (generally, less than 1 second) for this
counter to stabilize.
detail extensive
Transit statistics
Statistics for traffic transiting the router. When a burst of traffic is received, the
value in the output packet rate field might briefly exceed the peak cell rate. It
takes awhile (generally, less than 1 second) for this counter to stabilize.
detail extensive none
Protocol
Protocol family configured on the logical interface, such as iso, inet6, or mpls.
detail extensive none
protocol-family
Protocol family configured on the logical interface. If the protocol is inet, the IP
address of the interface is also displayed.
brief
MTU
MTU size on the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
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Table 36: GRE show interfaces Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Route table
Routing table in which the logical interface address is located. For example, 0
refers to the routing table inet.0.
detail extensive
Flags
Information about the protocol family flags. Possible values are described in
the “Family Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.
detail extensive none
Addresses, Flags
Information about the address flags. Possible values are described in the
“Addresses Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.
detail extensive none
Destination
IP address of the remote side of the connection.
detail extensive none
Local
IP address of the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Broadcast
Broadcast address of the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
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Sample Output
show interfaces (GRE)
user@host> show interfaces gr-1/2/0
Physical interface: gr-0/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 132, SNMP ifIndex: 26
Type: GRE, Link-level type: GRE, MTU: Unlimited, Speed: 800mbps
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Input rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Output rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Logical interface gr-0/0/0.0 (Index 68) (SNMP ifIndex 47)
Flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps 16384
IP-Header 192.0.2.2:192.0.2.1:47:df:64:0000000000000000 Encapsulation: GRE-NULL
Input packets : 0
Output packets: 0
Protocol inet, MTU: 1476
Flags: None
Addresses, Flags: Is-Primary
Local: 198.51.100.1
show interfaces brief (GRE)
user@host> show interfaces gr-1/2/0 brief
Physical interface: gr-1/2/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Type: GRE, Link-level type: GRE, MTU: Unlimited, Speed: 800mbps
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Logical interface gr-1/2/0.0
Flags: Hardware-Down Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps 0x4000
IP-Header 10.10.0.2:10.10.0.1:47:df:64:0000000000000000
Encapsulation: GRE-NULL
inet 10.100.0.1/30
mpls
show interfaces detail (GRE)
user@host> show interfaces gr-1/2/0 detail
Physical interface: gr-0/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 132, SNMP ifIndex: 26, Generation: 13
Type: GRE, Link-level type: GRE, MTU: Unlimited, Speed: 800mbps
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
Logical interface gr-0/0/0.0 (Index 68) (SNMP ifIndex 47) (Generation 8)
Flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps 16384
IP-Header 192.0.2.2:192.0.2.1:47:df:64:0000000000000000 Encapsulation: GRE-NULL
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Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
Protocol inet, MTU: 1476, Generation: 12, Route table: 0
Flags: None
Addresses, Flags: Is-Primary
Destination: Unspecified, Local: 198.51.100.1, Broadcast: Unspecified,
Generation: 15
show interfaces (Layer 2 Services Over GRE Interfaces)
user@host> show interfaces gr-2/2/10
show interfaces gr-2/2/10
Physical interface: gr-2/2/10, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 214, SNMP ifIndex: 690
Type: GRE, Link-level type: GRE, MTU: Unlimited, Speed: 1000mbps
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Input rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Output rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Logical interface gr-2/2/10.0 (Index 342) (SNMP ifIndex 10834)
Flags: Up Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps 0x4000 IP-Header
203.0.113.1:203.0.113.254:47:df:64:0000000000000000 Encapsulation: GRE-NULL
L2 Routing Instance: vs1, L3 Routing Instance: default
Copy-tos-to-outer-ip-header: Off
Gre keepalives configured: Off, Gre keepalives adjacency state: down
Input packets : 2
Output packets: 0
Protocol bridge, MTU: 1476
Flags: Sendbcast-pkt-to-re
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 6/8, Local: 6.0.0.1, Broadcast: 6.255.255.255
show interfaces extensive (Layer 2 Services Over GRE Interfaces)
user@host> show interfaces gr-2/2/10.0 extensive
Flags: SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: ENET2
L2 Routing Instance: vs1, L3 Routing Instance: default
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
58851250
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
1279375
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
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Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
58851250
75136 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
1279375
204 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
Protocol bridge, MTU: 1476, Generation: 175, Route table: 7
Flags: Access-Mode
show interfaces detail (GRE) on an EX4200 Virtual Chassis Member Switch
user@host> show interfaces gr-2/0/15 detail
Physical interface: gr-2/0/15, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 195, SNMP ifIndex: 846, Generation: 198
Type: GRE, Link-level type: GRE, MTU: Unlimited, Speed: 1000mbps
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:00:5e:00:53:d2, Hardware address: 00:00:5e:00:53:d2
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Statistics last cleared: 2011-09-14 17:43:15 UTC (00:00:18 ago)
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
5600636
0 bps
Output bytes :
5600636
0 bps
Input packets:
20007
0 pps
Output packets:
20007
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Logical interface gr-2/0/15.0 (Index 75) (SNMP ifIndex 847) (HW Token 4093)
(Generation 140)
Flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps 0x0
IP-Header 192.168.30.2:192.168.20.3:47:df:64:0000000000000000
Encapsulation: GRE-NULL
Copy-tos-to-outer-ip-header: Off
Gre keepalives configured: Off, Gre keepalives adjacency state: down
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
5600886
Output bytes :
2881784
Input packets:
20010
Output packets:
10018
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
398
Output bytes :
264
Input packets:
5
Output packets:
3
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
5600488
0 bps
Output bytes :
2881520
0 bps
Input packets:
20005
0 pps
Output packets:
10015
0 pps
Protocol inet, Generation: 159, Route table: 0
Flags: None
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 10.10.10/8, Local: 10.10.10.10, Broadcast: 10.10.10.255,
Generation: 144
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Logical interface gr-2/0/15.1 (Index 80) (SNMP ifIndex 848) (HW Token 4088)
(Generation 150)
Flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps 0x0
IP-Header 192.168.40.2:192.168.30.1:47:df:64:0000000000000000
Encapsulation: GRE-NULL
Copy-tos-to-outer-ip-header: Off
Gre keepalives configured: Off, Gre keepalives adjacency state: down
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
260
Output bytes :
2880148
Input packets:
4
Output packets:
10002
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
112
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
2
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
148
0 bps
Output bytes :
2880148
0 bps
Input packets:
2
0 pps
Output packets:
10002
0 pps
Protocol inet, Generation: 171, Route table: 0
Flags: None
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 10.10.10/8, Local: 10.10.10.10, Broadcast: 10.10.10.255,
Generation: 160
show interfaces extensive (GRE)
The output for the show interfaces extensive command is identical to that for the show
interfaces detail command. For sample output, see show interfaces detail (GRE) on
page 376 and show interfaces detail (GRE) on an EX4200 Virtual Chassis Member
Switch on page 378.
show interfaces gr-2/0/10 for GRE IPv6 tunnel
user@host> show interfaces gr-2/0/10
show interfaces gr-2/0/10
Physical interface: gr-2/0/10, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 140, SNMP ifIndex: 559
Type: GRE, Link-level type: GRE, MTU: Unlimited, Speed: 1000mbps
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps
Input rate
: 4952 bps (3 pps)
Output rate
: 200 bps (0 pps)
Logical interface gr-2/0/10.0 (Index 355) (SNMP ifIndex 857)
Flags: Up Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps 0x4000 IP-Header
1000::11:0:11:1-1000::11:2:13:2-47-64-0-0-0000000000000000 Encapsulation: GRE-NULL
Copy-tos-to-outer-ip-header: Off, Copy-tos-to-outer-ip-header-transit: Off
Gre keepalives configured: Off, Gre keepalives adjacency state: down
Input packets : 60
Output packets: 83
Protocol inet, MTU: 9082
Max nh cache: 0, New hold nh limit: 0, Curr nh cnt: 0, Curr new hold cnt: 0,
NH drop cnt: 0
Flags: Sendbcast-pkt-to-re
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Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 14.0.13/24, Local: 14.0.13.1, Broadcast: 14.0.13.255
Protocol iso, MTU: 9082
Protocol inet6, MTU: 9082
Max nh cache: 0, New hold nh limit: 0, Curr nh cnt: 0, Curr new hold cnt: 0,
NH drop cnt: 0
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 1400::14:0:13:0/120, Local: 1400::14:0:13:1
Addresses, Flags: Is-Preferred
Destination: fe80::/64, Local: fe80::2a0:a520:2875:4992
Protocol mpls, MTU: 9070, Maximum labels: 3
Flags: Is-Primary
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show interfaces irb
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show interfaces irb
<brief | detail | extensive | terse>
<descriptions>
<media>
<routing-instance instance-name>
<snmp-index snmp-index>
<statistics>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3R2.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3R2 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2 for the QFX Series
Display integrated routing and bridging interfaces information.
brief | detail | extensive | terse—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
descriptions—(Optional) Display interface description strings.
media—(Optional) Display media-specific information about network interfaces.
routing-instance instance-name—(Optional) Display information for the interface with
the specified SNMP index.
snmp-index snmp-index—(Optional) Display information for the interface with the specified
SNMP index.
statistics—(Optional) Display static interface statistics.
Additional Information
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
Integrated routing and bridging (IRB) provides simultaneous support for Layer 2 bridging
and Layer 3 IP routing on the same interface. IRB enables you to route local packets to
another routed interface or to another VLAN that has a Layer 3 protocol configured.
view
show interfaces irb extensive on page 385
show interfaces irb snmp-index on page 386
Table 37 on page 381 lists the output fields for the show interfaces irb command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 37: show interfaces irb Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Name of the physical interface.
All levels
Physical Interface
Physical interface
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Table 37: show interfaces irb Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Enabled
State of the physical interface. Possible values are described in the “Enabled
Field” section under Common Output Fields Description.
All levels
Proto
Protocol configured on the interface.
terse
Interface index
Physical interface index number, which reflects its initialization sequence.
detail extensive none
SNMP ifIndex
SNMP index number for the physical interface.
detail extensive none
Type
Physical interface type.
detail extensive none
Link-level type
Encapsulation being used on the physical interface.
detail extensive brief
none
MTU
MTU size on the physical interface.
detail extensive brief
none
Clocking
Reference clock source: Internal or External. Always unspecified on IRB
interfaces.
detail extensive brief
Speed
Speed at which the interface is running. Always unspecified on IRB interfaces.
detail extensive brief
Device flags
Information about the physical device. Possible values are described in the
“Device Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.
detail extensive brief
Information about the interface. Possible values are described in the “Interface
Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.
detail extensive brief
Physical interface link type: full duplex or half duplex.
detail extensive
Interface flags
Link type
none
none
none
Link flags
Information about the link. Possible values are described in the “Links Flags”
section under Common Output Fields Description.
detail extensive none
Physical Info
Physical interface information.
All levels
Hold-times
Current interface hold-time up and hold-time down, in milliseconds.
detail extensive
Current address
Configured MAC address.
detail extensive none
Hardware address
MAC address of the hardware.
detail extensive none
Alternate link
address
Backup address of the link.
detail extensive
Last flapped
Date, time, and how long ago the interface went from down to up. The format
is Last flapped: year-month-day hours:minutes:seconds timezone
(hours:minutes:seconds ago). For example, Last flapped: 2002-04-26 10:52:40
PDT (04:33:20 ago).
detail extensive none
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Table 37: show interfaces irb Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Statistics last
cleared
Time when the statistics for the interface were last set to zero.
detail extensive
Traffic statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the physical
interface.
detail extensive
IPv6 transit statistics
Input errors
•
Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface.
•
Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface.
•
Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface
•
Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.
Number of IPv6 transit bytes and packets received and transmitted on the
physical interface if IPv6 statistics tracking is enabled.
•
Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface.
•
Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface.
•
Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface.
•
Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.
Input errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters
whose meaning might not be obvious:
•
Errors—Sum of the incoming frame aborts and FCS errors.
•
Drops—Number of packets dropped by the input queue of the I/O Manager
detail extensive
detail extensive
ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every
packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
•
Framing errors—Number of packets received with an invalid frame checksum
(FCS).
•
Runts—Number of frames received that are smaller than the runt threshold.
•
Giants—Number of frames received that are larger than the giant threshold.
•
Policed discards—Number of frames that the incoming packet match code
discarded because they were not recognized or not of interest. Usually, this
field reports protocols that the Junos OS does not handle.
•
Output errors
Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.
Output errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters
whose meaning might not be obvious:
•
detail extensive
Carrier transitions—Number of times the interface has gone from down to
up. This number does not normally increment quickly, increasing only when
the cable is unplugged, the far-end system is powered down and up, or
another problem occurs. If the number of carrier transitions increments
quickly (perhaps once every 10 seconds), the cable, the far-end system, or
the DPC is malfunctioning.
•
Errors—Sum of the outgoing frame aborts and FCS errors.
•
Drops—Number of packets dropped by the output queue of the I/O Manager
ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every
packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
•
MTU errors—Number of packets whose size exceeded the MTU of the
interface.
•
Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.
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Table 37: show interfaces irb Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Logical interface
Name of the logical interface.
All levels
Index
Index number of the logical interface (which reflects its initialization sequence).
detail extensive
Logical Interface
none
SNMP ifIndex
SNMP interface index number of the logical interface.
detail extensive
none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Flags
Information about the logical interface. Possible values are described in the
“Logical Interface Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.
detail extensive
Encapsulation
Encapsulation on the logical interface.
detail extensive
Bandwidth
Dummy value that is ignored by an IRB interface. IRB interfaces are pseudo
interfaces and do not have physical bandwidth associated with them.
detail extensive
Routing Instance
Routing instance IRB is configured under.
detail extensive
Bridging Domain
Bridging domain IRB is participating in.
detail extensive
Traffic statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the logical
interface.
detail extensive
IPv6 transit statistics
•
Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface.
•
Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface.
•
Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface
•
Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.
Number of IPv6 transit bytes and packets received and transmitted on the
logical interface if IPv6 statistics tracking is enabled.
•
Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface.
•
Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface.
•
Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface.
•
Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.
detail extensive
Local statistics
Statistics for traffic received from and transmitted to the Routing Engine.
detail extensive
Transit statistics
Statistics for traffic transiting the router.
detail extensive
Protocol
Protocol family configured on the local interface. Possible values are described
in the “Protocol Field” section under Common Output Fields Description.
detail extensive
MTU
Maximum transmission unit size on the logical interface.
detail extensive
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Table 37: show interfaces irb Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Maximum labels
Maximum number of MPLS labels configured for the MPLS protocol family on
the logical interface.
detail extensive
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Route table
Routing table in which the logical interface address is located. For example, 0
refers to the routing table inet.0.
detail extensive
Addresses, Flags
Information about address flags. Possible values are described in the “Addresses
Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.
detail extensive
Policer
The policer that is to be evaluated when packets are received or transmitted
on the interface.
detail extensive
Flags
Information about the logical interface. Possible values are described in the
“Logical Interface Flags” section under Common Output Fields Description.
detail extensive
none
Sample Output
show interfaces irb extensive
user@host> show interfaces irb extensive
Physical interface: irb, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 129, SNMP ifIndex: 23, Generation: 130
Type: Ethernet, Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Clocking: Unspecified,
Speed: Unspecified
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps
Link type
: Full-Duplex
Link flags
: None
Physical info : Unspecified
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 02:00:00:00:00:30, Hardware address: 02:00:00:00:00:30
Alternate link address: Unspecified
Last flapped
: Never
Statistics last cleared: Never
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Giants: 0, Policed discards:
0, Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 0, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors:
0
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Logical interface irb.0 (Index 68) (SNMP ifIndex 70) (Generation 143)
Flags: Hardware-Down SNMP-Traps 0x4000 Encapsulation: ENET2
Bandwidth: 1000mbps
Routing Instance: customer_0 Bridging Domain: bd0
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500, Generation: 154, Route table: 0
Addresses, Flags: Dest-route-down Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 10.51.1/8, Local: 10.51.1.2, Broadcast: 10.51.1.255,
Generation: 155
Protocol multiservice, MTU: 1500, Generation: 155, Route table: 0
Flags: Is-Primary
Policer: Input: __default_arp_policer
show interfaces irb snmp-index
user@host> show interfaces irb snmp-index 25
Physical interface: irb, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 128, SNMP ifIndex: 25
Type: Ethernet, Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps
Link type
: Full-Duplex
Link flags
: None
Current address: 02:00:00:00:00:30, Hardware address: 02:00:00:00:00:30
Last flapped
: Never
Input packets : 0
Output packets: 0
Logical interface irb.0 (Index 68) (SNMP ifIndex 70)
Flags: Hardware-Down SNMP-Traps 0x4000 Encapsulation: ENET2
Bandwidth: 1000mbps
Routing Instance: customer_0 Bridging Domain: bd0
Input packets : 0
Output packets: 0
Protocol inet, MTU: 1500
Addresses, Flags: Dest-route-down Is-Preferred Is-Primary
Destination: 10.51.1/8, Local: 10.51.1.2, Broadcast: 10.51.1.255
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Protocol multiservice, MTU: 1500
Flags: Is-Primary
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show interfaces queue
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show interfaces queue
<aggregate | remaining-traffic>
<both-ingress-egress>
<egress>
<forwarding-class forwarding-class>
<ingress>
<interface-name interface-name>
<l2-statistics>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
both-ingress-egress, egress, and ingress options introduced in Junos OS Release 7.6.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
l2-statistics option introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Display class-of-service (CoS) queue information for physical interfaces.
none—Show detailed CoS queue statistics for all physical interfaces.
aggregate—(Optional) Display the aggregated queuing statistics of all logical interfaces
that have traffic-control profiles configured. (Not on the QFX Series.)
both-ingress-egress—(Optional) On Gigabit Ethernet Intelligent Queuing 2 (IQ2) PICs,
display both ingress and egress queue statistics. (Not on the QFX Series.)
egress—(Optional) Display egress queue statistics.
forwarding-class forwarding-class—(Optional) Forwarding class name for this queue.
Shows detailed CoS statistics for the queue associated with the specified forwarding
class.
ingress—(Optional) On Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PICs, display ingress queue statistics. (Not
on the QFX Series.)
interface-name interface-name—(Optional) Show detailed CoS queue statistics for the
specified interface.
l2-statistics—(Optional) Display Layer 2 statistics for MLPPP, FRF.15, and FRF.16 bundles
remaining-traffic—(Optional) Display the remaining-traffic queue statistics of all logical
interfaces that have traffic-control profiles configured.
Overhead for Layer 2
Statistics
Transmitted packets and transmitted byte counts are displayed for the Layer 2 level
with the addition of encapsulation overheads applied for fragmentation, as shown
in Table 38 on page 389. Others counters, such as packets and bytes queued (input)
and drop counters, are displayed at the Layer 3 level. In the case of link fragmentation
388
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Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
and interleaving (LFI) for which fragmentation is not applied, corresponding Layer
2 overheads are added, as shown in Table 38 on page 389.
Table 38: Layer 2 Overhead and Transmitted Packets or Byte Counts
Protocol
Fragmentation
LFI
First fragmentation
Second to n fragmentations
Bytes
Bytes
MLPPP (Long)
13
12
8
MLPPP (short)
11
10
8
MLFR (FRF15)
12
10
8
MFR (FRF16)
10
8
-
MCMLPPP(Long)
13
12
-
MCMLPPP(Short)
11
10
-
Layer 2 Statistics—Fragmentation Overhead Calculation
MLPPP/MC-MLPPP Overhead details:
===============================
Fragment 1:
Outer PPP header
Long or short sequence MLPPP header
Inner PPP header
HDLC flag and FCS bytes
:
:
:
:
4
4
1
4
bytes
bytes or 2 bytes
byte
bytes
Fragments 2 .. n :
Outer PPP header
Long or short sequence MLPPP header
HDLC flag and FCS bytes
MLFR (FRF15) Overhead details:
=============================
Fragment 1:
Framerelay header
: 2
Control,NLPID
: 2
Fragmentaion header
: 2
Inner proto
: 2
HDLC flag and FCS
: 4
: 4 bytes
: 4 bytes or 2 bytes
: 4 bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
Fragments 2 ...n :
Framerelay header
Control,NLPID
Fragmentaion header
HDLC flag and FCS
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
:
:
:
:
2
2
2
4
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
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MFR (FRF16) Overhead details:
==============================
Fragment 1:
Fragmentaion header
: 2 bytes
Framerelay header
: 2 bytes
Inner proto
: 2 bytes
HDLC flag and FCS
: 4 bytes
Fragments 2 ...n :
Fragmentaion header
Framerelay header
HDLC flag and FCS
:
:
:
2 bytes
2 bytes
4 bytes
Overhead with LFI
MLPPP(Long & short sequence):
============================
Outer PPP header
: 4 bytes
HDLC flag and FCS
: 4 bytes
MLFR (FRF15):
=============
Framerelay header
Control,NLPID
HDLC flag and FCS
:
:
:
2 bytes
2 bytes
4 bytes
The following examples show overhead for different cases:
•
A 1000-byte packet is sent to a mlppp bundle without any fragmentation. At the
Layer 2 level, bytes transmitted is 1013 in 1 packet. This overhead is for MLPPP long
sequence encap.
•
A 1000-byte packet is sent to a mlppp bundle with a fragment threshold of
250byte. At the Layer 2 level, bytes transmitted is 1061 bytes in 5 packets.
•
A 1000-byte LFI packet is sent to an mlppp bundle. At the Layer 2 level, bytes
transmitted is 1008 in 1 packet.
remaining-traffic—(Optional) Display the queuing statistics of all logical interfaces that
do not have traffic-control profiles configured. (Not on the QFX Series.)
Additional Information
390
For rate-limited interfaces hosted on Modular Interface Cards (MICs), Modular Port
Concentrators (MPCs), or Enhanced Queuing DPCs, rate-limit packet-drop operations
occur before packets are queued for transmission scheduling. For such interfaces, the
statistics for queued traffic do not include the packets that have already been dropped
due to rate limiting, and consequently the displayed statistics for queued traffic are the
same as the displayed statistics for transmitted traffic.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
NOTE: For rate-limited interfaces hosted on other types of hardware,
rate-limit packet-drop operations occur after packets are queued for
transmission scheduling. For these other interface types, the statistics for
queued traffic include the packets that are later dropped due to rate limiting,
and consequently the displayed statistics for queued traffic equals the sum
of the statistics for transmitted and rate-limited traffic.
On M Series routers (except for the M320 and M120 routers), this command is valid only
for a PIC installed on an enhanced Flexible PIC Concentrator (FPC).
Queue statistics for aggregated interfaces are supported on the M Series and T Series
routers only. Statistics for an aggregated interface are the summation of the queue
statistics of the child links of that aggregated interface. You can view the statistics for a
child interface by using the show interfaces statistics command for that child interface.
When you configure tricolor marking on a 10-port 1-Gigabit Ethernet PIC, for queues 6
and 7 only, the output does not display the number of queued bytes and packets, or the
number of bytes and packets dropped because of RED. If you do not configure tricolor
marking on the interface, these statistics are available for all queues.
For the 4-port Channelized OC12 IQE PIC and 1-port Channelized OC48 IQE PIC, the
Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues field represents traffic bound for a particular
physical interface on the PIC. For all other PICs, the Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis
Queues field represents the total traffic bound for the PIC.
For Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PICs, the show interfaces queue command output does not
display the number of tail-dropped packets. This limitation does not apply to Packet
Forwarding Engine chassis queues.
When fragmentation occurs on the egress interface, the first set of packet counters shows
the postfragmentation values. The second set of packet counters (under the Packet
Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues field) shows the prefragmentation values.
The behavior of the egress queues for the Routing Engine-Generated Traffic is not same
as the configured queue for MLPPP and MFR configurations.
For information about how to configure CoS, see the Junos OS Network Interfaces Library
for Routing Devices. For related CoS operational mode commands, see the CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
view
show interfaces queue (Rate-Limited Interface on a Gigabit Ethernet MIC in an
MPC) on page 397
show interfaces queue (Aggregated Ethernet on a T320 Router) on page 398
show interfaces queue (Gigabit Ethernet on a T640 Router) on page 400
show interfaces queue aggregate (Gigabit Ethernet Enhanced DPC) on page 400
show interfaces queue (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC) on page 404
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show interfaces queue both-ingress-egress (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC) on page 407
show interfaces queue ingress (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC) on page 409
show interfaces queue egress (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC) on page 410
show interfaces queue remaining-traffic (Gigabit Ethernet Enhanced DPC) on page 412
show interfaces queue (Channelized OC12 IQE Type 3 PIC in SONET Mode) on page 414
show interfaces queue (QFX Series) on page 424
show interfaces queue l2-statistics (lsq interface) on page 425
show interfaces queue lsq (lsq-ifd) on page 426
show interfaces queue (Aggregated Ethernet on a MX series Router) on page 427
Output Fields
Table 39 on page 392 lists the output fields for the show interfaces queue command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 39: show interfaces queue Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Physical interface
Name of the physical interface.
Enabled
State of the interface. Possible values are described in the “Enabled Field” section under Common
Output Fields Description.
Interface index
Physical interface's index number, which reflects its initialization sequence.
SNMP ifIndex
SNMP index number for the interface.
Forwarding classes
supported
Total number of forwarding classes supported on the specified interface.
Forwarding classes in
use
Total number of forwarding classes in use on the specified interface.
Ingress queues
supported
On Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PICs only, total number of ingress queues supported on the specified interface.
Ingress queues in use
On Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PICs only, total number of ingress queues in use on the specified interface.
Output queues
supported
Total number of output queues supported on the specified interface.
Output queues in use
Total number of output queues in use on the specified interface.
Egress queues
supported
Total number of egress queues supported on the specified interface.
Egress queues in use
Total number of egress queues in use on the specified interface.
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Table 39: show interfaces queue Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Queue counters
(Ingress)
CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name. Displayed on IQ2
interfaces.
•
Queued packets—Number of queued packets.
NOTE: This field is not supported on QFX5100, QFX5110, and QFX5200 switches due to hardware
limitations.
Burst size
•
Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.
•
Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
(Logical interfaces on IQ PICs only) Maximum number of bytes up to which the logical interface can
burst. The burst size is based on the shaping rate applied to the interface.
The following output fields are applicable to both interface component and Packet Forwarding component in the show interfaces
queue command:
Queue
Queue number.
Forwarding classes
Forwarding class name.
Queued Packets
Number of packets queued to this queue.
NOTE: For Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 interfaces, the Queued Packets count is calculated by the Junos OS
interpreting one frame buffer as one packet. If the queued packets are very large or very small, the
calculation might not be completely accurate for transit traffic. The count is completely accurate for
traffic terminated on the router.
For rate-limited interfaces hosted on MICs or MPCs only, this statistic does not include traffic dropped
due to rate limiting. For more information, see “Additional Information” on page 390.
NOTE: This field is not supported on QFX5100, QFX5110, and QFX5200 switches due to hardware
limitations.
Queued Bytes
Number of bytes queued to this queue. The byte counts vary by interface hardware. For more
information, see Table 40 on page 396.
For rate-limited interfaces hosted on MICs or MPCs only, this statistic does not include traffic dropped
due to rate limiting. For more information, see “Additional Information” on page 390.
NOTE: This field is not supported on QFX5100, QFX5110, and QFX5200 switches due to hardware
limitations.
Transmitted Packets
Number of packets transmitted by this queue. When fragmentation occurs on the egress interface,
the first set of packet counters shows the postfragmentation values. The second set of packet counters
(displayed under the Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues field) shows the prefragmentation
values.
NOTE: For Layer 2 statistics, see “Overhead for Layer 2 Statistics” on page 388
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Table 39: show interfaces queue Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Transmitted Bytes
Number of bytes transmitted by this queue. The byte counts vary by interface hardware. For more
information, see Table 40 on page 396.
NOTE: On MX Series routers, this number can be inaccurate when you issue the command for a
physical interface repeatedly and in quick succession, because the statistics for the child nodes are
collected infrequently. Wait ten seconds between successive iterations to avoid this situation.
NOTE: For Layer 2 statistics, see “Overhead for Layer 2 Statistics” on page 388
Tail-dropped packets
Number of packets dropped because of tail drop.
NOTE: The Tail-dropped packets counter is not supported on the PTX Series Packet Transport Routers.
RL-dropped packets
Number of packets dropped due to rate limiting.
For rate-limited interfaces hosted on MICs, MPCs, and Enhanced Queuing DPCs only, this statistic
is not included in the queued traffic statistics. For more information, see “Additional Information” on
page 390.
NOTE: The RL-dropped packets counter is not supported on the PTX Series Packet Transport Routers,
and is omitted from the output.
RL-dropped bytes
Number of bytes dropped due to rate limiting.
For rate-limited interfaces hosted on MICs, MPCs, and Enhanced Queuing DPCs only, this statistic
is not included in the queued traffic statistics. For more information, see “Additional Information” on
page 390.
RED-dropped packets
Number of packets dropped because of random early detection (RED).
•
•
(M Series and T Series routers only) On M320 and M120 routers and the T Series routers, the total
number of dropped packets is displayed. On all other M Series routers, the output classifies dropped
packets into the following categories:
•
Low, non-TCP—Number of low-loss priority non-TCP packets dropped because of RED.
•
Low, TCP—Number of low-loss priority TCP packets dropped because of RED.
•
High, non-TCP—Number of high-loss priority non-TCP packets dropped because of RED.
•
High, TCP—Number of high-loss priority TCP packets dropped because of RED.
(MX Series routers with enhanced DPCs, and T Series routers with enhanced FPCs only) The output
classifies dropped packets into the following categories:
•
Low—Number of low-loss priority packets dropped because of RED.
•
Medium-low—Number of medium-low loss priority packets dropped because of RED.
•
Medium-high—Number of medium-high loss priority packets dropped because of RED.
•
High—Number of high-loss priority packets dropped because of RED.
NOTE: Due to accounting space limitations on certain Type 3 FPCs (which are supported in M320
and T640 routers), this field does not always display the correct value for queue 6 or queue 7 for
interfaces on 10-port 1-Gigabit Ethernet PICs.
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Table 39: show interfaces queue Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
RED-dropped bytes
Number of bytes dropped because of RED. The byte counts vary by interface hardware. For more
information, see Table 40 on page 396.
•
(M Series and T Series routers only) On M320 and M120 routers and the T Series routers, only the
total number of dropped bytes is displayed. On all other M Series routers, the output classifies
dropped bytes into the following categories:
•
Low, non-TCP—Number of low-loss priority non-TCP bytes dropped because of RED.
•
Low, TCP—Number of low-loss priority TCP bytes dropped because of RED.
•
High, non-TCP—Number of high-loss priority non-TCP bytes dropped because of RED.
•
High, TCP—Number of high-loss priority TCP bytes dropped because of RED.
NOTE: Due to accounting space limitations on certain Type 3 FPCs (which are supported in M320
and T640 routers), this field does not always display the correct value for queue 6 or queue 7 for
interfaces on 10-port 1-Gigabit Ethernet PICs.
Queue-depth bytes
Displays queue-depth average, current, peak, and maximum values for RTP queues. Because
queue-depth values cannot be aggregated, displays the values for RTP queues regardless of whether
aggregate, remaining-traffic, or neither option is selected.
Queue-depth bytes
Displays queue-depth average, current, peak, and maximum values for RTP queues. Because
queue-depth values cannot be aggregated, displays the values for RTP queues regardless of whether
aggregate, remaining-traffic, or neither option is selected.
Last-packet enqueued
Starting with Junos OS Release 16.1, Last-packet enqueued output field is introduced. If
packet-timestamp is enabled for an FPC, shows the day, date, time, and year in the format
day-of-the-week month day-date hh:mm:ss yyyy when a packet was enqueued in the CoS queue.
When the timestamp is aggregated across all active Packet Forwarding Engines, the latest timestamp
for each CoS queue is reported.
Byte counts vary by interface hardware. Table 40 on page 396 shows how the byte counts
on the outbound interfaces vary depending on the interface hardware. Table 40 on page 396
is based on the assumption that outbound interfaces are sending IP traffic with 478 bytes
per packet.
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Table 40: Byte Count by Interface Hardware
Interface
Hardware
Output
Level
Gigabit
Ethernet IQ and
IQE PICs
Interface
Byte Count Includes
Comments
Queued: 490 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes of
Layer 3 packet + 12 bytes
The 12 additional bytes
include 6 bytes for the
destination MAC address +
4 bytes for the VLAN + 2 bytes
for the Ethernet type.
Transmitted: 490 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet + 12 bytes
Packet
forwarding
component
RED dropped: 496 bytes per packet representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet + 18 bytes
For RED dropped, 6 bytes are
added for the source MAC
address.
Queued: 478 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes of
Layer 3 packet
–
Transmitted: 478 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet
Non-IQ PIC
Interface
T Series, TX Series, T1600, and MX Series routers:
•
Queued: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
•
Transmitted: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
The Layer 2 overhead is 14
bytes for non-VLAN traffic
and 18 bytes for VLAN traffic.
T4000 routers with Type 5 FPCs :
•
Queued: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet + the full Layer 2
overhead including 4 bytes CRC + the full Layer 1 overhead
8 bytes preamble + 12 bytes Inter frame Gap.
•
Transmitted: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet + the full Layer
2 overhead including 4 bytes CRC + the full Layer 1
overhead 8 bytes preamble + 12 bytes Interframe Gap.
M Series routers:
•
Queued: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
•
Transmitted: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet + the full Layer
2 overhead.
PTX Series Packet Transport Routers:
396
•
Queued: The sum of the transmitted bytes and the RED
dropped bytes.
•
Transmitted: Full Layer 2 overhead (including all L2
encapsulation and CRC) + 12 inter-packet gap + 8 for the
preamble.
•
RED dropped: Full Layer 2 overhead (including all L2
encapsulation and CRC) + 12 inter-packet gap + 8 for the
preamble (does not include the VLAN header or MPLS
pushed bytes).
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Table 40: Byte Count by Interface Hardware (continued)
Interface
Hardware
Output
Level
IQ and IQE PICs
with a
SONET/SDH
interface
Interface
Byte Count Includes
Comments
Queued: 482 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes of
Layer 3 packet + 4 bytes
The additional 4 bytes are for
the Layer 2 Point-to-Point
Protocol (PPP) header.
Transmitted: 482 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet + 4 bytes
RED dropped: 482 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet + 4 bytes
Packet
forwarding
component
Queued: 478 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes of
Layer 3 packet
Transmitted: 486 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet + 8 bytes
Non-IQ PIC
with a
SONET/SDH
interface
Interface
T Series, TX Series, T1600, and MX Series routers:
•
Queued: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
•
Transmitted: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
For transmitted packets, the
additional 8 bytes includes 4
bytes for the PPP header and
4 bytes for a cookie.
For transmitted packets, the
additional 5 bytes includes 4
bytes for the PPP header and
1 byte for the packet loss
priority (PLP).
M Series routers:
•
Queued: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
•
Transmitted: 483 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet + 5 bytes
•
RED dropped: 478 bytes per packet, representing 478 bytes
of Layer 3 packet
Interfaces
configured with
Frame Relay
Encapsulation
Interface
The default Frame Relay overhead is 7 bytes. If you configure
the Frame Check Sequence (FCS) to 4 bytes, then the
overhead increases to 10 bytes.
1-port
10-Gigabit
Ethernet IQ2
and IQ2–E PICs
Interface
Queued: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet + the full Layer 2
overhead including CRC.
4-port 1G IQ2
and IQ2-E PICs
8-port 1G IQ2
and IQ2-E PICs
The Layer 2 overhead is 18
bytes for non-VLAN traffic
and 22 bytes for VLAN traffic.
Transmitted: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet + the full Layer 2
overhead including CRC.
Packet
forwarding
component
Queued: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
–
Transmitted: 478 bytes of Layer 3 packet.
Sample Output
show interfaces queue (Rate-Limited Interface on a Gigabit Ethernet MIC in an MPC)
The following example shows queue information for the rate-limited interface ge-4/2/0
on a Gigabit Ethernet MIC in an MPC. For rate-limited queues for interfaces hosted on
MICs or MPCs, rate-limit packet drops occur prior to packet output queuing. In the
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command output, the nonzero statistics displayed in the RL-dropped packets and
RL-dropped bytes fields quantify the traffic dropped to rate-limit queue 0 output to
10 percent of 1 gigabyte (100 megabits) per second. Because the RL-dropped traffic
is not included in the Queued statistics, the statistics displayed for queued traffic are the
same as the statistics for transmitted traffic.
user@host> show interfaces queue ge-4/2/0
Physical interface: ge-4/2/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 203, SNMP ifIndex: 1054
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
131300649
Bytes
:
11287964840
Transmitted:
Packets
:
131300649
Bytes
:
11287964840
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RL-dropped packets
:
205050862
RL-dropped bytes
:
13595326612
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
141751 pps
99793248 bps
141751
99793248
0
602295
327648832
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
show interfaces queue (Aggregated Ethernet on a T320 Router)
The following example shows that the aggregated Ethernet interface, ae1, has traffic on
queues af1 and af12:
user@host> show interfaces queue ae1
Physical interface: ae1, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 158, SNMP ifIndex: 33 Forwarding classes: 8 supported, 8 in use
Output queues: 8 supported, 8 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: be
Queued:
Packets
:
5
0 pps
Bytes
:
242
0 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
5
0 pps
Bytes
:
242
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: af1
Queued:
Packets
:
42603765
595484 pps
398
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RED-dropped packets :
RED-dropped bytes
:
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes:
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RED-dropped packets :
RED-dropped bytes
:
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes:
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RED-dropped packets :
RED-dropped bytes
:
Queue: 4, Forwarding classes:
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RED-dropped packets :
RED-dropped bytes
:
Queue: 5, Forwarding classes:
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RED-dropped packets :
RED-dropped bytes
:
Queue: 6, Forwarding classes:
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RED-dropped packets :
RED-dropped bytes
:
Queue: 7, Forwarding classes:
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
5453281920
609776496 bps
42603765
5453281920
0
0
0
595484
609776496
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
ef1
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
nc
45
3930
0 pps
0 bps
45
3930
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
af11
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
ef11
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
af12
31296413
4005940864
437436 pps
447935200 bps
31296413
4005940864
0
0
0
437436
447935200
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
nc2
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
399
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Transmitted:
Packets
Bytes
Tail-dropped packets
RED-dropped packets
RED-dropped bytes
:
:
:
:
:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
show interfaces queue (Gigabit Ethernet on a T640 Router)
user@host> show interfaces queue
Physical interface: ge-7/0/1, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 150, SNMP ifIndex: 42
Forwarding classes: 8 supported, 8 in use
Output queues: 8 supported, 8 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: be
Queued:
Packets
:
13
Bytes
:
622
Transmitted:
Packets
:
13
Bytes
:
622
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: af1
Queued:
Packets
:
1725947945
Bytes
:
220921336960
Transmitted:
Packets
:
1725947945
Bytes
:
220921336960
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: ef1
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: nc
Queued:
Packets
:
571
Bytes
:
49318
Transmitted:
Packets
:
571
Bytes
:
49318
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
372178 pps
381110432 bps
372178
381110432
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
336 bps
0
336
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
show interfaces queue aggregate (Gigabit Ethernet Enhanced DPC)
user@host> show interfaces queue ge-2/2/9 aggregate
400
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Physical interface: ge-2/2/9, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 238, SNMP ifIndex: 71
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use
Ingress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
148450735
Bytes
:
8016344944
Transmitted:
Packets
:
76397439
Bytes
:
4125461868
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
72053285
Low
:
72053285
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
3890877444
Low
:
3890877444
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
410278257
Bytes
:
22156199518
Transmitted:
Packets
:
4850003
Bytes
:
261900162
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
405425693
Low
:
405425693
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
21892988124
Low
:
21892988124
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
947295 pps
409228848 bps
487512 pps
210602376 bps
459783
459783
0
0
0
198626472
198626472
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
473940 pps
204742296 bps
4033 pps
1742256 bps
469907
469907
0
0
0
203000040
203000040
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
401
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use
Egress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
76605230
Bytes
:
5209211400
Transmitted:
Packets
:
76444631
Bytes
:
5198235612
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
160475
Low
:
160475
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
10912300
Low
:
10912300
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
4836136
Bytes
:
333402032
Transmitted:
Packets
:
3600866
Bytes
:
244858888
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
402
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
485376 pps
264044560 bps
484336 pps
263478800 bps
1040
1040
0
0
0
565760
565760
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
3912 pps
2139056 bps
1459 pps
793696 bps
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
RED-dropped packets :
1225034
Low
:
1225034
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
83302312
Low
:
83302312
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues:
Queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
77059796
Bytes
:
3544750624
Transmitted:
Packets
:
77059797
Bytes
:
3544750670
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
2450
2450
0
0
0
1333072
1333072
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
486384 pps
178989576 bps
486381
178988248
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
403
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
4846580
Bytes
:
222942680
Transmitted:
Packets
:
4846580
Bytes
:
222942680
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
3934 pps
1447768 bps
3934
1447768
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
show interfaces queue (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC)
user@host> show interfaces queue ge-7/1/3
Physical interface: ge-7/1/3, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 170, SNMP ifIndex: 70 Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in
use Ingress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
418390039
10 pps
Bytes
:
38910269752
7440 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
418390039
10 pps
Bytes
:
38910269752
7440 bps
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
404
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
7055
1 pps
Bytes
:
451552
512 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
7055
1 pps
Bytes
:
451552
512 bps
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use Egress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
1031
0 pps
Bytes
:
143292
0 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
1031
0 pps
Bytes
:
143292
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RL-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
RED-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RL-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
RED-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
405
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RL-dropped packets
:
0
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
77009
Bytes
:
6894286
Transmitted:
Packets
:
77009
Bytes
:
6894286
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RL-dropped packets
:
0
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0
0
0
0
11 pps
7888 bps
11 pps
7888 bps
0
0
0
0
Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues:
Queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
1031
Bytes
:
147328
Transmitted:
Packets
:
1031
Bytes
:
147328
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
406
pps
bps
pps
bps
pps
bps
pps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
94386
Bytes
:
13756799
Transmitted:
Packets
:
94386
Bytes
:
13756799
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low, non-TCP
:
0
Low, TCP
:
0
High, non-TCP
:
0
High, TCP
:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
12 pps
9568 bps
12
9568
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
show interfaces queue both-ingress-egress (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC)
user@host> show interfaces queue ge-6/2/0 both-ingress-egress
Physical interface: ge-6/2/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 175, SNMP ifIndex: 121
Forwarding classes: 8 supported, 4 in use
Ingress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
254
Bytes
:
16274
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
407
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Forwarding classes: 8 supported, 4 in use
Egress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
3
Bytes
:
126
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
408
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues:
Queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
80564692
Bytes
:
3383717100
Transmitted:
Packets
:
80564692
Bytes
:
3383717100
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
80564685
Bytes
:
3383716770
Transmitted:
Packets
:
80564685
Bytes
:
3383716770
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
9397
Bytes
:
3809052
Transmitted:
Packets
:
9397
Bytes
:
3809052
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
232 bps
0
232
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
show interfaces queue ingress (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC)
user@host> show interfaces queue ge-6/2/0 ingress
Physical interface: ge-6/2/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 175, SNMP ifIndex: 121
Forwarding classes: 8 supported, 4 in use
Ingress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
288
Bytes
:
18450
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
409
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
show interfaces queue egress (Gigabit Ethernet IQ2 PIC)
user@host> show interfaces queue ge-6/2/0 egress
Physical interface: ge-6/2/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 175, SNMP ifIndex: 121
Forwarding classes: 8 supported, 4 in use
Egress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
3
Bytes
:
126
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
410
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
: Not Available
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues:
Queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
80564692
Bytes
:
3383717100
Transmitted:
Packets
:
80564692
Bytes
:
3383717100
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
80564685
Bytes
:
3383716770
Transmitted:
Packets
:
80564685
Bytes
:
3383716770
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
9538
Bytes
:
3819840
Transmitted:
Packets
:
9538
Bytes
:
3819840
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show interfaces queue remaining-traffic (Gigabit Ethernet Enhanced DPC)
user@host> show interfaces queue ge-2/2/9 remaining-traffic
Physical interface: ge-2/2/9, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 238, SNMP ifIndex: 71
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use
Ingress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
110208969
Bytes
:
5951284434
Transmitted:
Packets
:
110208969
Bytes
:
5951284434
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
412
472875 pps
204282000 bps
472875 pps
204282000 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use
Egress queues: 4 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
109355853
Bytes
:
7436199152
Transmitted:
Packets
:
109355852
Bytes
:
7436198640
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
0 bps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
471736 pps
256627968 bps
471736 pps
256627968 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
413
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
RED-dropped bytes
:
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
RED-dropped packets :
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
RED-dropped bytes
:
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
0
0 bps
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
show interfaces queue (Channelized OC12 IQE Type 3 PIC in SONET Mode)
user@host> show interfaces queue t3-1/1/0:7
Physical interface: t3-1/1/0:7, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 192, SNMP ifIndex: 1948
Description: full T3 interface connect to 6ce13 t3-3/1/0:7 for FR testing Lam
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 9 in use
Egress queues: 8 supported, 8 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: DEFAULT
Queued:
Packets
:
214886
13449 pps
Bytes
:
9884756
5164536 bps
:
214886
13449 pps
Transmitted:
Packets
414
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Bytes
:
9884756
5164536 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: REALTIME
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: PRIVATE
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
415
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: CONTROL
Queued:
Packets
:
60
0 pps
Bytes
:
4560
0 bps
Packets
:
60
0 pps
Bytes
:
4560
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
Transmitted:
416
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 4, Forwarding classes: CLASS_B_OUTPUT
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 5, Forwarding classes: CLASS_C_OUTPUT
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
Transmitted:
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
417
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 6, Forwarding classes: CLASS_V_OUTPUT
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 7, Forwarding classes: CLASS_S_OUTPUT, GETS
Queued:
418
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Packet Forwarding Engine Chassis Queues:
Queues: 8 supported, 8 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: DEFAULT
Queued:
Packets
:
371365
23620 pps
Bytes
:
15597330
7936368 bps
Packets
:
371365
23620 pps
Bytes
:
15597330
7936368 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
Transmitted:
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
419
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: REALTIME
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: PRIVATE
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
:
0
0 pps
Transmitted:
Packets
420
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: CONTROL
Queued:
Packets
:
32843
0 pps
Bytes
:
2641754
56 bps
Packets
:
32843
0 pps
Bytes
:
2641754
56 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 4, Forwarding classes: CLASS_B_OUTPUT
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
421
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 5, Forwarding classes: CLASS_C_OUTPUT
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
Transmitted:
422
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Queue: 6, Forwarding classes: CLASS_V_OUTPUT
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
Transmitted:
RED-dropped bytes
Queue: 7, Forwarding classes: CLASS_S_OUTPUT, GETS
Queued:
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Packets
:
0
0 pps
Bytes
:
0
0 bps
Tail-dropped packets :
0
0 pps
Transmitted:
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
423
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
RED-dropped packets
:
0
0 pps
Low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-low
:
0
0 pps
Medium-high
:
0
0 pps
High
:
0
0 pps
:
0
0 bps
Low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-low
:
0
0 bps
Medium-high
:
0
0 bps
High
:
0
0 bps
RED-dropped bytes
show interfaces queue (QFX Series)
user@switch> show interfaces queue xe-0/0/15
Physical interface: xe-0/0/15, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 49165, SNMP ifIndex: 539
Forwarding classes: 12 supported, 8 in use
Egress queues: 12 supported, 8 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
Total-dropped packets:
0
Total-dropped bytes :
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: fcoe
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
Total-dropped packets:
0
Total-dropped bytes :
0
0 bps
Queue: 4, Forwarding classes: no-loss
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
Total-dropped packets:
0
Total-dropped bytes :
0
424
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
0 bps
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Queue: 7, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
Total-dropped packets:
Total-dropped bytes :
Queue: 8, Forwarding classes: mcast
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets : Not Available
Total-dropped packets:
Total-dropped bytes :
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
show interfaces queue l2-statistics (lsq interface)
user@switch> show interfaces queue lsq-2/2/0.2 l2-statistics
Logical interface lsq-2/2/0.2 (Index 69) (SNMP ifIndex 1598)
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Burst size: 0
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: be
Queued:
Packets
:
1
Bytes
:
1001
Transmitted:
Packets
:
5
Bytes
:
1062
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: ef
Queued:
Packets
:
1
Bytes
:
1500
Transmitted:
Packets
:
6
Bytes
:
1573
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: af
Queued:
Packets
:
1
Bytes
:
512
Transmitted:
Packets
:
3
Bytes
:
549
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: nc
Queued:
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0
0
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0
0
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
0 pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
0
0
0
0
425
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Packets
Bytes
Transmitted:
Packets
Bytes
Tail-dropped packets
RED-dropped packets
RED-dropped bytes
=========
:
:
0
0
0 pps
0 bps
:
:
:
:
:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
show interfaces queue lsq (lsq-ifd)
user@switch> show interfaces queue lsq-1/0/0
Logical interface lsq-1/0/0 (Index 348) (SNMP ifIndex 660)
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Burst size: 0
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: be
Queued:
Packets
:
55576
Bytes
:
29622008
Transmitted:
Packets
:
55576
Bytes
:
29622008
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RL-dropped packets
:
0
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: ef
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RL-dropped packets
:
0
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: af
Queued:
Packets
:
0
426
1206 pps
5145472 bps
1206
5145472
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RL-dropped packets
:
RL-dropped bytes
:
RED-dropped packets :
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
RED-dropped bytes
:
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: nc
Queued:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Transmitted:
Packets
:
Bytes
:
Tail-dropped packets :
RL-dropped packets
:
RL-dropped bytes
:
RED-dropped packets :
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
RED-dropped bytes
:
Low
:
Medium-low
:
Medium-high
:
High
:
0
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
22231
11849123
482 pps
2057600 bps
22231
11849123
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
482
2057600
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
Sample Output
show interfaces queue (Aggregated Ethernet on a MX series Router)
user@host> show interfaces queue ae0 remaining-traffic
Physical interface: ae0
, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 128, SNMP ifIndex: 543
Forwarding classes: 16 supported, 4 in use
Egress queues: 8 supported, 4 in use
Queue: 0, Forwarding classes: best-effort
Queued:
Packets
:
16
Bytes
:
1896
Transmitted:
Packets
:
16
Bytes
:
1896
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RL-dropped packets
:
0
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
427
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue-depth bytes
:
Average
:
0
Current
:
0
Peak
:
0
Maximum
:
119013376
Queue: 1, Forwarding classes: expedited-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RL-dropped packets
:
0
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue-depth bytes
:
Average
:
0
Current
:
0
Peak
:
0
Maximum
:
32768
Queue: 2, Forwarding classes: assured-forwarding
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RL-dropped packets
:
0
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue-depth bytes
:
Average
:
0
Current
:
0
Peak
:
0
428
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Maximum
:
32768
Queue: 3, Forwarding classes: network-control
Queued:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Transmitted:
Packets
:
0
Bytes
:
0
Tail-dropped packets :
0
RL-dropped packets
:
0
RL-dropped bytes
:
0
RED-dropped packets :
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
RED-dropped bytes
:
0
Low
:
0
Medium-low
:
0
Medium-high
:
0
High
:
0
Queue-depth bytes
:
Average
:
0
Current
:
0
Peak
:
0
Maximum
:
6258688
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
0 pps
0 bps
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
pps
bps
pps
pps
bps
pps
pps
pps
pps
pps
bps
bps
bps
bps
bps
429
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show interfaces xe
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show interfaces device-name:type-fpc/pic/port
<brief | detail | extensive | terse>
<descriptions>
<media>
<routing-instance (all | instance-name)>
<snmp-index snmp-index>
<statistics>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Display status information about the specified 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface. This
command does not display statistics for routed VLAN interfaces.
device-name:type-fpc/pic/port—(QFabric systems only) The device name is either the
serial number or the alias of the QFabric system component, such as a Node device,
Interconnect device, or QFabric infrastructure. The name must contain a maximum
of 128 characters and not contain any colons.
brief | detail | extensive | terse—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
descriptions—(Optional) Display interface description strings.
media—(Optional) Display media-specific information about network interfaces.
routing-instance (all | instance-name)—(Optional) Display the name of an individual
routing instance or display all routing instances.
snmp-index snmp-index—(Optional) Display information for the specified SNMP index
of the interface.
statistics—(Optional) Display static interface statistics.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
430
view
•
Monitoring Interface Status and Traffic on page 81
•
Troubleshooting Network Interfaces on page 81
•
Troubleshooting an Aggregated Ethernet Interface on page 143
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
show interfaces on page 438
show interfaces (Asymmetric Flow Control) on page 439
show interfaces brief on page 439
show interfaces detail on page 439
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
show interfaces detail (Asymmetric Flow Control) on page 441
show interfaces extensive on page 442
show interfaces extensive (Asymmetric Flow Control) on page 444
show interfaces terse on page 446
show interfaces (QFabric System) on page 446
Output Fields
Table 41 on page 431 lists the output fields for the show interfaces xe command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 41: show interfaces xe Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Physical interface
Name of the physical interface.
All levels
Enabled
State of the interface.
All levels
Interface index
Index number of the physical interface, which reflects its initialization sequence.
detail extensive none
SNMP ifIndex
SNMP index number for the physical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Link-level type
Encapsulation being used on the physical interface.
All levels
MTU
Maximum transmission unit size on the physical interface.
All levels
Speed
Speed at which the interface is running.
All levels
Duplex
Duplex mode of the interface, either Full-Duplex or Half-Duplex.
All levels
Loopback
Loopback status: Enabled or Disabled. If loopback is enabled, type of loopback:
Local or Remote.
All levels
Source filtering
Source filtering status: Enabled or Disabled.
All levels
LAN-PHY mode
10-Gigabit Ethernet interface operating in Local Area Network Physical Layer
Device (LAN PHY) mode. LAN PHY allows 10-Gigabit Ethernet wide area links
to use existing Ethernet applications.
All levels
Unidirectional
Unidirectional link mode status for 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface: Enabled or
Disabled for parent interface; Rx-only or Tx-only for child interfaces.
All levels
Flow control
Flow control status: Enabled or Disabled.
All levels
Physical Interface
NOTE: This field is only displayed if asymmetric flow control is not configured.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
431
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 41: show interfaces xe Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Configured-flowcontrol
Configured flow control for the interface transmit buffers (tx-buffers) and receive
buffers (rx-buffers):
All levels
•
tx-buffers—On if the interface is configured to respond to Ethernet PAUSE
messages received from the connected peer.
Off if the interface is not configured to respond to received PAUSE messages.
•
rx-buffers—On if the interface is configured to generate and send Ethernet
PAUSE messages to the connected peer.
Off if the interface is not configured to generate and send PAUSE messages.
NOTE: This field is only displayed if asymmetric flow control is configured.
Auto-negotiation
Autonegotiation status: Enabled or Disabled.
All levels
Remote-fault
Remote fault status:
All levels
•
Online—Autonegotiation is manually configured as online.
•
Offline—Autonegotiation is manually configured as offline.
Device flags
Information about the physical device.
All levels
Interface flags
Information about the interface.
All levels
Link flags
Information about the link.
All levels
Wavelength
Configured wavelength, in nanometers (nm).
All levels
Frequency
Frequency associated with the configured wavelength, in terahertz (THz).
All levels
CoS queues
Number of CoS queues configured.
detail extensive none
Schedulers
Number of CoS schedulers configured.
extensive
Hold-times
Current interface hold-time up and hold-time down, in milliseconds.
detail extensive
Current address
Configured MAC address.
detail extensive none
Hardware address
Hardware MAC address.
detail extensive none
Last flapped
Date, time, and how long ago the interface went from down to up. The format
is Last flapped: year-month-day hour: :minute:second:timezone (hour:minute:second
ago). For example, Last flapped: 2008–01–16 10:52:40 UTC (3d 22:58 ago).
detail extensive none
Input Rate
Input rate in bits per second (bps) and packets per second (pps).
None specified
Output Rate
Output rate in bps and pps.
None specified
Statistics last
cleared
Time when the statistics for the interface were last set to zero.
detail extensive
432
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Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Table 41: show interfaces xe Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Traffic statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets received and transmitted on the physical
interface.
detail extensive
•
Input bytes—Number of bytes received on the interface.
•
Output bytes—Number of bytes transmitted on the interface.
•
Input packets—Number of packets received on the interface.
•
Output packets—Number of packets transmitted on the interface.
NOTE: The bandwidth bps counter is not enabled.
Input errors
Input errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters
whose meaning might not be obvious:
•
Errors—Sum of the incoming frame aborts and FCS errors.
•
Drops—Number of packets dropped by the input queue of the I/O Manager
extensive
ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every
packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
•
Framing errors—Number of packets received with an invalid frame checksum
(FCS).
•
Runts—Number of frames received that are smaller than the runt threshold.
•
Policed discards—Number of frames that the incoming packet match code
discarded because they were not recognized or not of interest. Usually, this
field reports protocols that Junos OS does not handle.
•
L3 incompletes—Number of incoming packets discarded because they failed
Layer 3 sanity checks of the header. For example, a frame with less than
20 bytes of available IP header is discarded. L3 incomplete errors can be
ignored if you configure the ignore-l3-incompletes statement.
•
L2 channel errors—Number of times the software did not find a valid logical
interface for an incoming frame.
•
L2 mismatch timeouts—Number of malformed or short packets that caused
the incoming packet handler to discard the frame as unreadable.
•
FIFO errors—Number of FIFO errors in the receive direction that are reported
by the ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably
malfunctioning.
•
Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 41: show interfaces xe Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Output errors
Output errors on the interface. The following paragraphs explain the counters
whose meaning might not be obvious:
extensive
•
Carrier transitions—Number of times the interface has gone from down to up.
This number does not normally increment quickly, increasing only when the
cable is unplugged, the far-end system is powered down and then up, or
another problem occurs. If the number of carrier transitions increments quickly
(perhaps once every 10 seconds), the cable, the far-end system, or the PIC
or PIM is malfunctioning.
•
Errors—Sum of the outgoing frame aborts and FCS errors.
•
Drops—Number of packets dropped by the output queue of the I/O Manager
ASIC. If the interface is saturated, this number increments once for every
packet that is dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
•
Collisions—Number of Ethernet collisions. The Gigabit Ethernet PIC supports
only full-duplex operation, so for Gigabit Ethernet PICs, this number should
always remain 0. If it is nonzero, there is a software bug.
•
Aged packets—Number of packets that remained in shared packet SDRAM
so long that the system automatically purged them. The value in this field
should never increment. If it does, it is most likely a software bug or possibly
malfunctioning hardware.
•
FIFO errors—Number of FIFO errors in the send direction as reported by the
ASIC on the PIC. If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably
malfunctioning.
•
HS link CRC errors—Number of errors on the high-speed links between the
ASICs responsible for handling the router interfaces.
•
MTU errors—Number of packets whose size exceeded the MTU of the interface.
•
Resource errors—Sum of transmit drops.
Egress queues
Total number of egress queues supported on the specified interface.
detail extensive
Queue counters
(Egress)
CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name.
detail extensive
•
Queued packets—Number of queued packets.
•
Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.
•
Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
Queue Number
The CoS queue number and the forwarding classes mapped to the queue
number. The Mapped forwarding class column lists the forwarding classes
mapped to each CoS queue.
detail extensive
Ingress queues
Total number of ingress queues supported on the specified interface.
extensive
Queue counters
(Ingress)
CoS queue number and its associated user-configured forwarding class name.
extensive
434
•
Queued packets—Number of queued packets.
•
Transmitted packets—Number of transmitted packets.
•
Dropped packets—Number of packets dropped by the ASIC's RED mechanism.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Table 41: show interfaces xe Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Active alarms and
Active defects
Ethernet-specific defects that can prevent the interface from passing packets.
When a defect persists for a certain amount of time, it is promoted to an alarm.
Based on the switch configuration, an alarm can ring the red or yellow alarm
bell on the switch, or turn on the red or yellow alarm LED on the craft interface.
These fields can contain the value None or Link.
detail extensive none
•
None—There are no active defects or alarms.
•
Link—Interface has lost its link state, which usually means that the cable is
unplugged, the far-end system has been turned off, or the PIC is
malfunctioning.
PCS statistics
Physical Coding Sublayer (PCS) fault conditions from the LAN PHY device.
detail extensive
MAC statistics
Receive and Transmit statistics reported by the PIC's MAC subsystem.
extensive
•
Total octets and total packets—Total number of octets and packets. For
Gigabit Ethernet IQ PICs, the received octets count varies by interface type.
•
Unicast packets, Broadcast packets, and Multicast packets—Number of unicast,
broadcast, and multicast packets.
•
CRC/Align errors—Total number of packets received that had a length
(excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets) of between 64 and 1518
octets, inclusive, and had either a bad FCS with an integral number of octets
(FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment
Error).
•
FIFO error—Number of FIFO errors that are reported by the ASIC on the PIC.
If this value is ever nonzero, the PIC is probably malfunctioning.
•
MAC control frames—Number of MAC control frames.
•
MAC pause frames—Number of MAC control frames with pause operational
code.
•
Oversized frames—Number of packets that exceeds the configured MTU.
•
Jabber frames—Number of frames that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding
framing bits, but including FCS octets), and had either an FCS error or an
alignment error. This definition of jabber is different from the definition in
IEEE-802.3 section 8.2.1.5 (10BASE5) and section 10.3.1.4 (10BASE2). These
documents define jabber as the condition in which any packet exceeds 20
ms. The allowed range to detect jabber is from 20 ms to 150 ms.
•
Fragment frames—Total number of packets that were less than 64 octets in
length (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets), and had either an
FCS error or an alignment error. Fragment frames normally increment because
both runts (which are normal occurrences caused by collisions) and noise
hits are counted.
•
VLAN tagged frames—Number of frames that are VLAN tagged. The system
uses the TPID of 0x8100 in the frame to determine whether a frame is tagged
or not. This counter is not supported on EX Series switches and is always
displayed as 0.
•
Code violations—Number of times an event caused the PHY to indicate “Data
reception error” or “invalid data symbol error.”
Filter statistics
Receive and Transmit statistics reported by the PIC's MAC address filter
extensive
subsystem.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
435
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 41: show interfaces xe Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Autonegotiation
information
Information about link autonegotiation.
extensive
•
Negotiation status:
•
Incomplete—Ethernet interface has the speed or link mode configured.
•
No autonegotiation—Remote Ethernet interface has the speed or link mode
configured, or does not perform autonegotiation.
•
Complete—Ethernet interface is connected to a device that performs
autonegotiation and the autonegotiation process is successful.
•
Link partner status—OK when the Ethernet interface is connected to a device
that performs autonegotiation and the autonegotiation process is successful.
•
Link partner:
•
Link mode—Depending on the capability of the attached Ethernet device,
either Full-duplex or Half-duplex.
•
Flow control—Types of flow control supported by the remote Ethernet
device. For Fast Ethernet interfaces, the type is None. For Gigabit Ethernet
interfaces, types are Symmetric (link partner supports PAUSE on receive
and transmit), Asymmetric (link partner supports PAUSE on transmit), and
Symmetric/Asymmetric (link partner supports both PAUSE on receive and
transmit or only PAUSE receive).
•
Remote fault—Remote fault information from the link partner—Failure
indicates a receive link error. OK indicates that the link partner is receiving.
Negotiation error indicates a negotiation error. Offline indicates that the
link partner is going offline.
•
Local resolution:
•
Flow control—Types of flow control supported by the remote Ethernet
device. For Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, types are Symmetric (link partner
supports PAUSE on receive and transmit), Asymmetric (link partner supports
PAUSE on transmit), and Symmetric/Asymmetric (link partner supports
both PAUSE on receive and transmit or only PAUSE receive).
For asymmetric PAUSE, shows if the PAUSE transmit and PAUSE receive
states on the interface are enable or disable.
•
Remote fault—Remote fault information. Link OK (no error detected on
receive), Offline (local interface is offline), and Link Failure (link error
detected on receive).
436
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Table 41: show interfaces xe Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Packet Forwarding
Engine
configuration
Information about the configuration of the Packet Forwarding Engine:
extensive
•
Destination slot—FPC slot number.
•
CoS transmit queue—Queue number and its associated user-configured
forwarding class name.
•
Bandwidth %—Percentage of bandwidth allocated to the queue.
•
Bandwidth bps—Bandwidth allocated to the queue (in bps).
•
Buffer %—Percentage of buffer space allocated to the queue.
•
Buffer usec—Amount of buffer space allocated to the queue, in microseconds.
This value is nonzero only if the buffer size is configured in terms of time.
•
Priority—Queue priority: low or high.
•
Limit—Displayed if rate limiting is configured for the queue. Possible values
are none and exact. If exact is configured, the queue transmits only up to the
configured bandwidth, even if excess bandwidth is available. If none is
configured, the queue transmits beyond the configured bandwidth if
bandwidth is available.
Logical Interface
Logical interface
Name of the logical interface.
All levels
Index
Index number of the logical interface, which reflects its initialization sequence.
detail extensive none
SNMP ifIndex
SNMP interface index number for the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Flags
Information about the logical interface.
All levels
Encapsulation
Encapsulation on the logical interface.
All levels
Protocol
Protocol family.
detail extensive none
Traffic statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets received (input) and transmitted (output)
on the specified interface.
detail extensive
IPv6 transit
statistics
If IPv6 statics tracking is enabled, number of IPv6 bytes and packets received
and transmitted on the logical interface.
extensive
Local statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets destined to and from the switch.
extensive
Transit statistics
Number and rate of bytes and packets transiting the switch.
extensive
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Route Table
Route table in which the logical interface address is located. For example, 0
refers to the routing table inet.0.
detail extensive none
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
437
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 41: show interfaces xe Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Input Filters
Names of any input filters applied to this interface.
detail extensive
Output Filters
Names of any output filters applied to this interface.
detail extensive
Flags
Information about protocol family flags.
detail extensive
If unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (uRPF) is explicitly configured on the
specified interface, the uRPF flag appears. If uRPF was configured on a different
interface (and therefore is enabled on all switch interfaces) but was not explicitly
configured on the specified interface, the uRPF flag does not appear even though
uRPF is enabled.
Addresses, Flags
Information about the address flags.
detail extensive none
protocol-family
Protocol family configured on the logical interface. If the protocol is inet, the IP
address of the interface is also displayed.
brief
Flags
Information about the address flag.
detail extensive none
Destination
IP address of the remote side of the connection.
detail extensive none
Local
IP address of the logical interface.
detail extensive none
Broadcast
Broadcast address of the logical interlace.
detail extensive none
Generation
Unique number for use by Juniper Networks technical support only.
detail extensive
Sample Output
show interfaces
user@switch> show interfaces xe-0/0/1
Physical interface: xe-0/0/1, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 49195, SNMP ifIndex: 591
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 10Gbps, Duplex: Full-Duplex, BPDU
Error: None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering:
Disabled,
Flow control: Disabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x0
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 12 supported, 12 maximum usable queues
Current address: 00:1d:b5:f7:4e:e1, Hardware address: 00:1d:b5:f7:4e:e1
Last flapped
: 2011-06-01 00:42:03 PDT (00:02:42 ago)
Input rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Output rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
Logical interface xe-0/0/1.0 (Index 73) (SNMP ifIndex 523)
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x0 Encapsulation: ENET2
438
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Input packets : 0
Output packets: 0
Protocol eth-switch, MTU: 0
Flags: Trunk-Mode
show interfaces (Asymmetric Flow Control)
user@switch> show interfaces xe-0/0/1
Physical interface: xe-0/0/1, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 49195, SNMP ifIndex: 591
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 10Gbps, Duplex: Full-Duplex, BPDU
Error: None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering:
Disabled,
Configured-flow-control tx-buffers: off rx-buffers: on
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x0
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 12 supported, 12 maximum usable queues
Current address: 00:1d:b5:f7:4e:e1, Hardware address: 00:1d:b5:f7:4e:e1
Last flapped
: 2011-06-01 00:42:03 PDT (00:02:42 ago)
Input rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Output rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
Logical interface xe-0/0/1.0 (Index 73) (SNMP ifIndex 523)
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x0 Encapsulation: ENET2
Input packets : 0
Output packets: 0
Protocol eth-switch, MTU: 0
Flags: Trunk-Mode
show interfaces brief
user@switch> show interfaces xe-0/0/1 brief
Physical interface: xe-0/0/1, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 1000mbps, Loopback: Disabled,
Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x0
Link flags
: None
Logical interface xe-0/0/1.0
Flags: SNMP-Traps Encapsulation: ENET2
eth-switch
show interfaces detail
user@switch> show interfaces xe-0/0/1 detail
Physical interface: xe-0/0/1, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 49195, SNMP ifIndex: 591, Generation: 169
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 10Gbps, Duplex: Full-Duplex, BPDU
Error: None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering:
Disabled,
Flow control: Disabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x0
Link flags
: None
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
CoS queues
: 12 supported, 12 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:1d:b5:f7:4e:e1, Hardware address: 00:1d:b5:f7:4e:e1
Last flapped
: 2011-06-01 00:42:03 PDT (00:02:50 ago)
Statistics last cleared: 2011-06-01 00:44:39 PDT (00:00:14 ago)
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Egress queues: 12 supported, 9 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
0
0
0
1 fc7
0
0
0
2 no-loss
0
0
0
3 fcoe
0
0
0
4 fc4
0
0
0
5 fc5
0
0
0
6 fc6
0
0
0
7 network-cont
0
0
0
8 mcast
0
0
0
Queue number:
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
Mapped forwarding classes
best-effort
fc7
no-loss
fcoe
fc4
fc5
fc6
network-control
mcast
Logical interface xe-0/0/1.0 (Index 73) (SNMP ifIndex 523) (Generation 143)
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x0 Encapsulation: ENET2
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
440
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Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0
Output bytes :
0
0
Input packets:
0
0
Output packets:
0
0
Protocol eth-switch, MTU: 0, Generation: 170, Route table:
Flags: Trunk-Mode
bps
bps
pps
pps
0
show interfaces detail (Asymmetric Flow Control)
user@switch> show interfaces xe-0/0/1 detail
Physical interface: xe-0/0/1, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 49195, SNMP ifIndex: 591, Generation: 169
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 10Gbps, Duplex: Full-Duplex, BPDU
Error: None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering:
Disabled,
Configured-flow-control tx-buffers: off rx-buffers: on
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x0
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 12 supported, 12 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:1d:b5:f7:4e:e1, Hardware address: 00:1d:b5:f7:4e:e1
Last flapped
: 2011-06-01 00:42:03 PDT (00:02:50 ago)
Statistics last cleared: 2011-06-01 00:44:39 PDT (00:00:14 ago)
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Egress queues: 12 supported, 9 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
0
0
0
1 fc7
0
0
0
2 no-loss
0
0
0
3 fcoe
0
0
0
4 fc4
0
0
0
5 fc5
0
0
0
6 fc6
0
0
0
7 network-cont
0
0
0
8 mcast
0
0
0
Queue number:
0
1
2
3
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Mapped forwarding classes
best-effort
fc7
no-loss
fcoe
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
4
5
6
7
8
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
fc4
fc5
fc6
network-control
mcast
Logical interface xe-0/0/1.0 (Index 73) (SNMP ifIndex 523) (Generation 143)
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x0 Encapsulation: ENET2
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
Protocol eth-switch, MTU: 0, Generation: 170, Route table: 0
Flags: Trunk-Mode
show interfaces extensive
user@switch> show interfaces xe-0/0/1 extensive
Physical interface: xe-0/0/1, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 49195, SNMP ifIndex: 591, Generation: 169
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 10Gbps, Duplex: Full-Duplex, BPDU
Error: None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering:
Disabled,
Flow control: Disabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x0
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 12 supported, 12 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:1d:b5:f7:4e:e1, Hardware address: 00:1d:b5:f7:4e:e1
Last flapped
: 2011-06-01 00:42:03 PDT (00:03:08 ago)
Statistics last cleared: 2011-06-01 00:44:39 PDT (00:00:32 ago)
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0, L3
incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0, FIFO errors: 0,
Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 0, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
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Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Egress queues: 12 supported, 9 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
0
0
0
1 fc7
0
0
0
2 no-loss
0
0
0
3 fcoe
0
0
0
4 fc4
0
0
0
5 fc5
0
0
0
6 fc6
0
0
0
7 network-cont
0
0
0
8 mcast
0
0
0
Queue number:
Mapped forwarding classes
0
best-effort
1
fc7
2
no-loss
3
fcoe
4
fc4
5
fc5
6
fc6
7
network-control
8
mcast
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
MAC statistics:
Receive
Total octets
0
Total packets
0
Unicast packets
0
Broadcast packets
0
Multicast packets
0
CRC/Align errors
0
FIFO errors
0
MAC control frames
0
MAC pause frames
0
Oversized frames
0
Jabber frames
0
Fragment frames
0
VLAN tagged frames
0
Code violations
0
MAC Priority Flow Control Statistics:
Prioity : 0
0
Prioity : 1
0
Prioity : 2
0
Prioity : 3
0
Prioity : 4
0
Prioity : 5
0
Prioity : 6
0
Prioity : 7
0
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
0
Input packet rejects
0
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Transmit
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
Output packet pad count
Output packet error count
CAM destination filters: 1, CAM source filters: 0
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 0
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
Limit
%
bps
%
0 best-effort
75
7500000000
75
none
7 network-control
5
500000000
5
none
8 mcast
20
2000000000
20
none
0
0
0
Buffer Priority
usec
0
low
0
low
0
low
Logical interface xe-0/0/1.0 (Index 73) (SNMP ifIndex 523) (Generation 143)
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x0 Encapsulation: ENET2
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
Protocol eth-switch, MTU: 0, Generation: 170, Route table: 0
Flags: Trunk-Mode
show interfaces extensive (Asymmetric Flow Control)
user@switch> show interfaces xe-0/0/1 extensive
Physical interface: xe-0/0/1, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 49195, SNMP ifIndex: 591, Generation: 169
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 10Gbps, Duplex: Full-Duplex, BPDU
Error: None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None, Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering:
Disabled,
Configured-flow-control tx-buffers: off rx-buffers: on
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x0
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 12 supported, 12 maximum usable queues
Hold-times
: Up 0 ms, Down 0 ms
Current address: 00:1d:b5:f7:4e:e1, Hardware address: 00:1d:b5:f7:4e:e1
Last flapped
: 2011-06-01 00:42:03 PDT (00:03:08 ago)
Statistics last cleared: 2011-06-01 00:44:39 PDT (00:00:32 ago)
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
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Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Output packets:
0
0 pps
IPv6 transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Input errors:
Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Framing errors: 0, Runts: 0, Policed discards: 0, L3
incompletes: 0, L2 channel errors: 0, L2 mismatch timeouts: 0, FIFO errors: 0,
Resource errors: 0
Output errors:
Carrier transitions: 0, Errors: 0, Drops: 0, Collisions: 0, Aged packets: 0,
FIFO errors: 0, HS link CRC errors: 0, MTU errors: 0, Resource errors: 0
Egress queues: 12 supported, 9 in use
Queue counters:
Queued packets Transmitted packets
Dropped packets
0 best-effort
0
0
0
1 fc7
0
0
0
2 no-loss
0
0
0
3 fcoe
0
0
0
4 fc4
0
0
0
5 fc5
0
0
0
6 fc6
0
0
0
7 network-cont
0
0
0
8 mcast
0
0
0
Queue number:
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
MAC statistics:
Total octets
Total packets
Unicast packets
Broadcast packets
Multicast packets
CRC/Align errors
FIFO errors
MAC control frames
MAC pause frames
Oversized frames
Jabber frames
Fragment frames
VLAN tagged frames
Code violations
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Mapped forwarding classes
best-effort
fc7
no-loss
fcoe
fc4
fc5
fc6
network-control
mcast
Receive
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Transmit
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
MAC Priority Flow Control Statistics:
Prioity : 0
0
Prioity : 1
0
Prioity : 2
0
Prioity : 3
0
Prioity : 4
0
Prioity : 5
0
Prioity : 6
0
Prioity : 7
0
Filter statistics:
Input packet count
0
Input packet rejects
0
Input DA rejects
0
Input SA rejects
0
Output packet count
Output packet pad count
Output packet error count
CAM destination filters: 1, CAM source filters: 0
Packet Forwarding Engine configuration:
Destination slot: 0
CoS information:
Direction : Output
CoS transmit queue
Bandwidth
%
bps
%
0 best-effort
75
7500000000
75
7 network-control
5
500000000
5
8 mcast
20
2000000000
20
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Buffer Priority
usec
0
low
0
low
0
low
Limit
none
none
none
Logical interface xe-0/0/1.0 (Index 73) (SNMP ifIndex 523) (Generation 143)
Flags: SNMP-Traps 0x0 Encapsulation: ENET2
Traffic statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Local statistics:
Input bytes :
0
Output bytes :
0
Input packets:
0
Output packets:
0
Transit statistics:
Input bytes :
0
0 bps
Output bytes :
0
0 bps
Input packets:
0
0 pps
Output packets:
0
0 pps
Protocol eth-switch, MTU: 0, Generation: 170, Route table: 0
Flags: Trunk-Mode
show interfaces terse
user@switch> show interfaces xe-0/0/1 terse
Interface
Admin Link Proto
xe-0/0/1
xe-0/0/1.0
up
up
up
up
Local
Remote
eth-switch
show interfaces (QFabric System)
user@switch> show interfaces node1:xe-0/0/0
446
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 22: Interfaces Operational Commands
Physical interface: node1:xe-0/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Down
Interface index: 129, SNMP ifIndex: 2884086
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 10Gbps, Duplex: Full-Duplex, BPDU
Error: None, MAC-REWRITE Error: None,
Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled
Interface flags: Internal: 0x4000
CoS queues
: 8 supported, 8 maximum usable queues
Current address: 02:00:09:03:00:00, Hardware address: 02:00:09:03:00:00
Last flapped
: Never
Input rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Output rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
447
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
448
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 23
Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management
Operational Command
•
show oam ethernet link-fault-management
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
449
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show oam ethernet link-fault-management
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show oam ethernet link-fault-management
<brief | detail>
<interface-name>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4 for EX Series switches.
Displays Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) link fault management
(LFM) information for Ethernet interfaces.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
interface-name —(Optional) Display link fault management information for the specified
Ethernet interface only.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
Example: Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management on page 89
•
Configuring Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management (CLI Procedure) on page 86
show oam ethernet link-fault-management brief on page 454
show oam ethernet link-fault-management detail on page 454
Table 42 on page 450 lists the output fields for the show oam ethernet
link-fault-management command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in
which they appear.
Table 42: show oam ethernet link-fault-management Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Status
Indicates the status of the established link.
All levels
Discovery state
Peer address
450
•
Fail—A link fault condition exists.
•
Running—A link fault condition does not exist.
State of the discovery mechanism:
•
Passive Wait
•
Send Any
•
Send Local Remote
•
Send Local Remote Ok
Address of the OAM peer.
All levels
All levels
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Operational Command
Table 42: show oam ethernet link-fault-management Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Flags
Information about the interface.
All levels
•
Remote-Stable—Indicates remote OAM client acknowledgment of, and
satisfaction with local OAM state information. False indicates that remote
DTE has either not seen or is unsatisfied with local state information. True
indicates that remote DTE has seen and is satisfied with local state
information.
•
Local-Stable—Indicates local OAM client acknowledgment of, and satisfaction
with remote OAM state information. False indicates that local DTE either has
not seen or is unsatisfied with remote state information. True indicates that
local DTE has seen and is satisfied with remote state information.
•
Remote-State-Valid—Indicates the OAM client has received remote state
information found within Local Information TLVs of received Information
OAM PDUs. False indicates that OAM client has not seen remote state
information. True indicates that the OAM client has seen remote state
information.
Remote loopback
status
Indicates the remote loopback status. An OAM entity can put its remote peer
into loopback mode using the Loopback control OAM PDU. In loopback mode,
every frame received is transmitted back on the same port (except for OAM
PDUs, which are needed to maintain the OAM session).
All levels
Remote entity
information
Remote entity information.
All levels
•
Remote MUX action—Indicates the state of the multiplexer functions of the
OAM sublayer. Device is forwarding non-OAM PDUs to the lower sublayer or
discarding non-OAM PDUs.
•
Remote parser action—Indicates the state of the parser function of the OAM
sublayer. Device is forwarding non-OAM PDUs to higher sublayer, looping
back non-OAM PDUs to the lower sublayer, or discarding non-OAM PDUs.
•
Discovery mode—Indicates whether discovery mode is active or inactive.
•
Unidirectional mode—Indicates the ability to operate a link in a unidirectional
mode for diagnostic purposes.
•
Remote loopback mode—Indicates whether remote loopback is supported or
not supported.
•
Link events—Indicates whether interpreting link events is supported or not
supported on the remote peer.
•
Variable requests—Indicates whether variable requests are supported or not
supported. The Variable Request OAM PDU, is used to request one or more
MIB variables from the remote peer.
OAM Receive Statistics
Information
The number of information PDUs received.
detail
Event
The number of loopback control PDUs received.
detail
Variable request
The number of variable request PDUs received.
detail
Variable response
The number of variable response PDUs received.
detail
Loopback control
The number of loopback control PDUs received.
detail
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Table 42: show oam ethernet link-fault-management Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Organization
specific
The number of vendor organization specific PDUs received.
detail
OAM Transmit Statistics
Information
The number of information PDUs transmitted.
detail
Event
The number of event notification PDUs transmitted.
detail
Variable request
The number of variable request PDUs transmitted.
detail
Variable response
The number of variable response PDUs transmitted.
detail
Loopback control
The number of loopback control PDUs transmitted.
detail
Organization
specific
The number of vendor organization specific PDUs transmitted.
detail
OAM Received Symbol Error Event information
Events
The number of symbol error event TLVs that have been received after the OAM
sublayer was reset.
detail
Window
The symbol error event window in the received PDU.
detail
The protocol default value is the number of symbols that can be received in
one second on the underlying physical layer.
Threshold
The number of errored symbols in the period required for the event to be
generated.
detail
Errors in period
The number of symbol errors in the period reported in the received event PDU.
detail
Total errors
The number of errored symbols that have been reported in received event TLVs
after the OAM sublayer was reset.
detail
Symbol errors are coding symbol errors.
OAM Received Frame Error Event Information
Events
The number of errored frame event TLVs that have been received after the OAM
sublayer was reset.
detail
Window
The duration of the window in terms of the number of 100 ms period intervals.
detail
Threshold
The number of detected errored frames required for the event to be generated.
detail
Errors in period
The number of detected errored frames in the period.
detail
452
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 23: Ethernet OAM Link Fault Management Operational Command
Table 42: show oam ethernet link-fault-management Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Total errors
The number of errored frames that have been reported in received event TLVs
after the OAM sublayer was reset.
detail
A frame error is any frame error on the underlying physical layer.
OAM Received Frame Period Error Event Information
Events
The number of frame seconds errors event TLVs that have been received after
the OAM sublayer was reset.
detail
Window
The duration of the frame seconds window.
detail
Threshold
The number of frame seconds errors in the period.
detail
Errors in period
The number of frame seconds errors in the period.
detail
Total errors
The number of frame seconds errors that have been reported in received event
TLVs after the OAM sublayer was reset.
detail
OAM Transmitted Symbol Error Event Information
Events
The number of symbol error event TLVs that have been transmitted after the
OAM sublayer was reset.
detail
Window
The symbol error event window in the transmitted PDU.
detail
Threshold
The number of errored symbols in the period required for the event to be
generated.
detail
Errors in period
The number of symbol errors in the period reported in the transmitted event
PDU.
detail
Total errors
The number of errored symbols reported in event TLVs that have been
transmitted after the OAM sublayer was reset.
detail
OAM Transmitted Frame Error Event Information
Events
The number of errored frame event TLVs that have been transmitted after the
OAM sublayer was reset.
detail
Window
The duration of the window in terms of the number of 100 ms period intervals.
detail
Threshold
The number of detected errored frames required for the event to be generated.
detail
Errors in period
The number of detected errored frames in the period.
detail
Total errors
The number of errored frames that have been detected after the OAM sublayer
was reset.
detail
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Sample Output
show oam ethernet link-fault-management brief
user@host> show oam ethernet link-fault-management brief
Interface: ge-0/0/1
Status: Running, Discovery state: Send Any
Peer address: 00:90:69:72:2c:83
Flags:Remote-Stable Remote-State-Valid Local-Stable 0x50
Remote loopback status: Disabled on local port, Enabled on peer port
Remote entity information:
Remote MUX action: discarding, Remote parser action: loopback
Discovery mode: active, Unidirectional mode: unsupported
Remote loopback mode: supported, Link events: supported
Variable requests: unsupported
show oam ethernet link-fault-management detail
user@host> show oam ethernet link-fault-management detail
Interface: ge-0/0/1
Status: Running, Discovery state: Send Any
Peer address: 00:90:69:0a:07:14
Flags:Remote-Stable Remote-State-Valid Local-Stable 0x50
OAM receive statistics:
Information: 186365, Event: 0, Variable request: 0, Variable response: 0
Loopback control: 0, Organization specific: 0
OAM transmit statistics:
Information: 186347, Event: 0, Variable request: 0, Variable response: 0
Loopback control: 0, Organization specific: 0
OAM received symbol error event information:
Events: 0, Window: 0, Threshold: 0
Errors in period: 0, Total errors: 0
OAM received frame error event information:
Events: 0, Window: 0, Threshold: 0
Errors in period: 0, Total errors: 0
OAM received frame period error event information:
Events: 0, Window: 0, Threshold: 0
Errors in period: 0, Total errors: 0
OAM transmitted symbol error event information:
Events: 0, Window: 0, Threshold: 1
Errors in period: 0, Total errors: 0
OAM transmitted frame error event information:
Events: 0, Window: 0, Threshold: 1
Errors in period: 0, Total errors: 0
Remote entity information:
Remote MUX action: forwarding, Remote parser action: forwarding
Discovery mode: active, Unidirectional mode: unsupported
Remote loopback mode: supported, Link events: supported
Variable requests: unsupported
454
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 24
LAGs and LACP Operational Commands
•
show lacp interfaces
•
show lacp statistics interfaces (View)
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
455
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show lacp interfaces
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show lacp interfaces
<interface-name>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.2R3
Display Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) information about the specified
aggregated Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet interface.
none—Display LACP information for all interfaces.
interface-name—(Optional) Display LACP information for the specified interface:
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
456
•
Aggregated Ethernet—aex
•
Gigabit Ethernet—ge-fpc/pic/port
•
10-Gigabit Ethernet—xe-fpc/pic/port
view
•
Example: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet High-Speed Uplinks Between an EX4200
Virtual Chassis Access Switch and an EX4200 Virtual Chassis Distribution Switch
•
Example: Configuring Aggregated Ethernet High-Speed Uplinks with LACP Between an
EX4200 Virtual Chassis Access Switch and an EX4200 Virtual Chassis Distribution Switch
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation Between a QFX Series Product and an
Aggregation Switch on page 132
•
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet Links (CLI Procedure)
•
Configuring Link Aggregation on page 129
•
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP (CLI Procedure)
•
Configuring Aggregated Ethernet LACP on page 128
•
Configuring LACP Link Protection of Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces (CLI Procedure)
•
Understanding Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces and LACP
•
Understanding Aggregated Ethernet Interfaces and LACP on page 125
•
Junos OS Interfaces Fundamentals Configuration Guide
show lacp interfaces (EX Series Switches) on page 458
show lacp interfaces (QFX Series) on page 459
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 24: LAGs and LACP Operational Commands
Output Fields
Table 43 on page 457 lists the output fields for the show lacp interfaces command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 43: show lacp interfaces Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Aggregated interface
Aggregated Ethernet interface name.
LACP State
LACP state information for each aggregated Ethernet interface:
•
For a child interface configured with the force-up statement, LACP state displays FUP along with
the interface name.
•
Role—Role played by the interface. It can be one of the following:
•
•
Actor—Local device participating in the LACP negotiation.
•
Partner—Remote device participating in the LACP negotiation.
Exp—Expired state. Yes indicates that the actor or partner is in an expired state. No indicates that
the actor or partner is not in an expired state.
•
Def—Default. Yes indicates that the actor’s receive machine is using the default operational partner
information, which is administratively configured for the partner. No indicates that the operational
partner information in use has been received in an LACP PDU.
•
Dist—Distribution of outgoing frames. No indicates that the distribution of outgoing frames on the
link is currently disabled and is not expected to be enabled. Otherwise, the value is Yes.
•
Col—Collection of incoming frames. Yes indicates that the collection of incoming frames on the
link is currently enabled and is not expected to be disabled. Otherwise, the value is No.
•
Syn—Synchronization. If the value is Yes, the link is considered to be synchronized. The link has
been allocated to the correct link aggregation group, the group has been associated with a
compatible aggregator, and the identity of the link aggregation group is consistent with the system
ID and operational key information transmitted. If the value is No, the link is not synchronized. The
link is currently not in the right aggregation.
•
Aggr—Ability of the aggregation port to aggregate (Yes) or to operate only as an individual link
(No).
•
Timeout—LACP timeout preference. Periodic transmissions of LACP PDUs occur at either a slow
or a fast transmission rate, depending upon the expressed LACP timeout preference (Long Timeout
or Short Timeout).
•
Activity—Actor’s or partner’s port activity. Passive indicates the port’s preference for not transmitting
LAC PDUs unless its partner’s control value is Active. Active indicates the port’s preference to
participate in the protocol regardless of the partner’s control value.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Table 43: show lacp interfaces Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
LACP Protocol
LACP protocol information for each aggregated interface:
•
Link state (active or standby) indicated in parentheses next to the interface when link protection
is configured.
•
Receive State—One of the following values:
•
Current—The state machine receives an LACP PDU and enters the Current state.
•
Defaulted—If no LACP PDU is received before the timer for the Current state expires a second
time, the state machine enters the Defaulted state.
•
Expired—If no LACP PDU is received before the timer for the Current state expires once, the state
machine enters the Expired state.
•
Initialize—When the physical connectivity of a link changes or a Begin event occurs, the state
machine enters the Initialize state.
•
LACP Disabled—If the port is operating in half duplex, the operation of LACP is disabled on the
port, forcing the state to LACP Disabled. This state is similar to the Defaulted state, except that
the port is forced to operate as an individual port.
•
•
Port Disabled—If the port becomes inoperable and a Begin event has not occurred, the state
machine enters the Port Disabled state.
Transmit State—Transmit state of the state machine. The transmit state is one of the following
values:
•
•
Fast periodic—Periodic transmissions are enabled at a fast transmission rate.
•
No periodic—Periodic transmissions are disabled.
•
Periodic timer—Transitory state entered when the periodic timer expires.
•
Slow periodic—Periodic transmissions are enabled at a slow transmission rate.
Mux State—State of the multiplexer state machine for the aggregation port. The state is one of the
following values:
•
Attached—The multiplexer state machine initiates the process of attaching the port to the
selected aggregator.
•
Collecting—Yes indicates that the receive function of this link is enabled with respect to its
participation in an aggregation. Received frames are passed to the aggregator for collection. No
indicates the receive function of this link is not enabled.
•
Collecting distributing—Collecting and distributing states are merged together to form a combined
state (coupled control). Because independent control is not possible, the coupled control state
machine does not wait for the partner to signal that collection has started before enabling both
collection and distribution.
•
Detached—Process of detaching the port from the aggregator is in progress.
•
Distributing—Yes indicates that the transmit function of this link is enabled with respect to its
participation in an aggregation. Frames can be passed down from the aggregator’s distribution
function for transmission. No indicates the transmit function of this link is not enabled.
•
Waiting—The multiplexer state machine is in a holding process, awaiting an outcome.
Sample Output
show lacp interfaces (EX Series Switches)
user@switch> show lacp interfaces ae5
Aggregated interface: ae5
LACP state:
Role
Exp
Def
xe-2/0/7
Actor
No
No
xe-2/0/7
Partner
No
No
458
Dist
Yes
Yes
Col
Yes
Yes
Syn
Yes
Yes
Aggr
Yes
Yes
Timeout
Fast
Fast
Activity
Active
Passive
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 24: LAGs and LACP Operational Commands
xe-4/0/7
xe-4/0/7
Actor
Partner
LACP protocol:
xe-2/0/7(Active)
xe-34/0/7(Standby)
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Fast
Fast
Active
Passive
Receive State Transmit State
Mux State
Current
Fast periodic Collecting distributing
Current
Fast periodic
Waiting
show lacp interfaces (QFX Series)
user@switch> show lacp interfaces nodegroup1:ae0 extensive
Aggregated interface: nodegroup1:ae0
LACP state:
Role
Exp
Def Dist Col Syn
node1:xe-0/0/1FUP
Actor
Active
node1xe-0/0/1FUP Partner
Passive
node2:xe-0/0/2
Actor
Active
node2:xe-0/0/2
Partner
Passive
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
Aggr
No
No
Timeout
Yes
Yes
Activity
Fast
Fast
No
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
Fast
No
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
Fast
459
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
LACP protocol:
node1:xe-0/0/1FUP
distributing
node2:xe-0/0/2
distributing
node1:xe-0/0/1 (active)
distributing
node2:xe-0/0/2 (standby)
460
Receive State
Current
Transmit State
Fast periodic
Mux State
Collecting
Current
Fast periodic
Collecting
Current
Fast periodic
Collecting
Current
Fast periodic
WAITING
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 24: LAGs and LACP Operational Commands
show lacp statistics interfaces (View)
Syntax
show lacp statistics interfaces interface-name
Release Information
Command modified in Release 10.2 of Junos OS.
Command introduced in Release 11.1 of Junos OS for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Display Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) statistics about the specified
aggregated Ethernet interface or redundant Ethernet interface. If you do not specify an
interface name, LACP statistics for all interfaces are displayed.
Options
interface-name—(Optional) Name of an interface.
Required Privilege
Level
view
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
•
Verifying LACP on Redundant Ethernet Interfaces
•
Verifying the Status of a LAG Interface on page 142
•
Verifying That LACP Is Configured Correctly and Bundle Members Are Exchanging LACP
Protocol Packets on page 142
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation Between a QFX Series Product and an
Aggregation Switch on page 132
•
Example: Configuring Link Aggregation with LACP Between a QFX Series Product and
an Aggregation Switch on page 137
show lacp statistics interfaces on page 462
Output Fields
Table 44 on page 461 lists the output fields for the show lacp statistics interfaces command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 44: show lacp statistics interfaces Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Aggregated interface
Aggregated interface value.
LACP Statistics
LACP statistics provide the following information:
•
LACP Rx—LACP received counter that increments for each normal hello.
•
LACP Tx—Number of LACP transmit packet errors logged.
•
Unknown Rx—Number of unrecognized packet errors logged.
•
Illegal Rx—Number of invalid packets received.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
461
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Sample Output
show lacp statistics interfaces
user@host> show lacp statistics interfaces ae0
Aggregated interface: ae0
LACP Statistics:
LACP Rx
LACP Tx
ge-2/0/0
1352
2035
ge-2/0/1
1352
2056
ge-2/2/0
1352
2045
ge-2/2/1
1352
2043
462
Unknown Rx
0
0
0
0
Illegal Rx
0
0
0
0
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 25
Redundant Trunk Group Operational
Command
•
show redundant-trunk-group
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
463
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show redundant-trunk-group
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
show redundant-trunk-group <group-name group-name>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X50-D15 for the QFX Series.
Display information about redundant trunk groups.
group-name group-name—Display information about the specified redundant trunk
group.
view
•
Example: Configuring Redundant Trunk Links for Faster Recovery
•
Example: Configuring Redundant Trunk Links for Faster Recovery on page 160
•
Understanding Redundant Trunk Links on page 158
show redundant-trunk-group group-name Group1 on page 465
Table 45 on page 464 lists the output fields for the show redundant-trunk-group command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 45: show redundant-trunk-group Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Group name
Name of the redundant trunk port group.
Interface
Name of an interface belonging to the trunk port group.
State
Operating state of the interface.
•
Up denotes the interface is up.
•
Down denotes the interface is down.
•
Pri denotes a primary interface.
•
Act denotes an active interface.
Time of last flap
Date and time at which the advertised link became unavailable, and then, available again.
Flap count
Total number of flaps since the last switch reboot.
464
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 25: Redundant Trunk Group Operational Command
Sample Output
show redundant-trunk-group group-name Group1
user@switch> show redundant-trunk-group group-name Group1
Group
name
Interface
State
Time of last flap
Flap
Count
Group1
ge-0/0/45.0
ge-0/0/47.0
UP/Pri/Act
UP
Never
Never
0
0
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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466
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 26
Resilient Hashing Operational Command
•
show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key
Syntax
show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key
Release Information
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D20 for QFX Series devices.
Fabric Load Balancing Options output fields introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D10.
Description
Display information about which packet fields are used by the hashing algorithm to make
hashing decisions.
You can configure the fields that are inspected by the hashing algorithm to make hashing
decisions for traffic entering a LAG bundle using the forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key
statement.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
view
•
Configuring the Fields in the Algorithm Used To Hash LAG Bundle and ECMP Traffic
(CLI Procedure) on page 177
•
Understanding the Algorithm Used to Hash LAG Bundle and Egress Next-Hop ECMP
Traffic on page 169
•
enhanced-hash-key on page 314
List of Sample Output
show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key (Layer 2 Payload Hash Mode) on page 470
show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key (Layer 2 Header Hash Mode) on page 470
show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key (Fabric Load Balancing
Options) on page 471
show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key (QFX10002 and QFX 10008
Switches) on page 471
Output Fields
Table 46 on page 468 lists the output fields for the show forwarding-options
enhanced-hash-key command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which
they first appear. Output fields vary by platform.
Table 46: show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key Output Fields
468
Field Name
Field Description
Hash-Mode
Current hash mode: Layer 2 header or Layer 2 payload.
Protocol
Indicates whether the Protocol field is or is not used by the hashing algorithm: Yes or
No.
Destination L4
Port
Indicates whether the Destination L4 Port field is or is not used by the hashing
algorithm: Yes or No.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 26: Resilient Hashing Operational Command
Table 46: show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Source L4 Port
Indicates whether the Source L4 Port field is or is not used by the hashing algorithm:
Yes or No.
Destination IPv4
Addr
Indicates whether the Destination IPv4 Addr field is or is not used by the hashing
algorithm: Yes or No.
Source IPv4 Addr
Indicates whether the Source IPv4 Addr field is or is not used by the hashing algorithm:
Yes or No.
Vlan id
Indicates whether the Vlan ID field is or is not used by the hashing algorithm: Yes or
No.
Inner-Vlan ID
indicates whether the inner Vlan field is or is not used by the hashing algorithnm: Yes
or No.
Next Hdr
Indicates whether the Next Hdr field is or is not used by the hashing algorithm: Yes or
No.
Destination IPv6
Addr
Indicates whether the Destination IPv6 Addr field is or is not used by the hashing
algorithm: Yes or No.
Source IPv6 Addr
Indicates whether the Source IPv6 Addr field is or is not used by the hashing algorithm:
Yes or No.
Ether Type
Indicates whether the Ether Type field is or is not used by the hashing algorithm: Yes
or No.
Destination MAC
Address
Indicates whether the Destination MAC Address field is or is not used by the hashing
algorithm: Yes or No.
Source MAC
Address
Indicates whether the Source MAC Address field is or is not used by the hashing
algorithm: Yes or No.
Load Balancing
Method
Indicates the load balancing method for adaptive load balancing (ALB): flowlet or
per-packet.
The load balancing method is flowlet by default, and can be configured using the
fabric-load-balance statement.
Fabric Link Scale
Indicates the fabric link scale, in mbps.
Inactivity Interval
Indicates the fabric load balance inactivity interval, in microseconds (us).
The inactivity interval is 16 microseconds by default, and can be configured using the
inactivity-interval statement.
Hash Region
Size/Trunk
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Indicates the hash region size, in buckets per fabric trunk.
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Table 46: show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Seed
A hash seed value, between 0 and 4294967295. If a hash-seed value is not configured
it is automatically assigned on the QFX10002 and QFX10008 switches. A hash-seed
prevents traffic polarization to same links on the next hop QFX switch when two are
connected with LAG/ECMP.
Key
Indicates whether the GRE key field is or is not used by the hashing algorithm: Yes or
No.
Protocol
Indicates if a Generic Router Encapsulation (GRE) endpoint over routes was
dynamically learned by a routing protocol such as RIP or OSPF.
MPLS Enabled
Indicates if MPLS is enabled under L2 switching.
VXLAN VNID
A 24-bit virtual network identifier (VNID) that uniquely identifies the Virtual Extensible
Local Area Networks (VXLAN) segment.
Sample Output
show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key (Layer 2 Payload Hash Mode)
user@switch> show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key
Slot 0
Current Hash Settings
---------------------Hash-Mode
:layer2-payload
inet Hash settings-------------------inet packet fields
Protocol
Destination L4 Port
Source L4 Port
Destination IPv4 Addr
Source IPv4 Addr
Vlan id
:
:
:
:
:
:
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
inet6 Hash settings--------------------inet6 packet fields
Next Hdr
Destination L4 Port
Source L4 Port
Destination IPv6 Addr
Source IPv6 Addr
Vlan id
:
:
:
:
:
:
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key (Layer 2 Header Hash Mode)
user@switch> show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key
470
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 26: Resilient Hashing Operational Command
Slot 0
Current Hash Settings
---------------------Hash-Mode
: layer2-header
layer2 Hash settings---------------------layer2 packet fields
Ether Type
Destination MAC Address
Source MAC Address
VLAN ID
:
:
:
:
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key (Fabric Load Balancing Options)
user@switch> show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key
<some output removed for brevity>
Fabric Load Balancing Options
-----------------------------------------------------------Load Balancing Method : Flowlet
Fabric Link Scale
: 40960 (mbps)
Inactivity Interval
: 16 (us)
Hash Region Size/Trunk : 1024 (buckets)
show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key (QFX10002 and QFX 10008 Switches)
user@switch> show forwarding-options enhanced-hash-key
Slot 0
Seed
Seed
Seed
Seed
value
value
value
value
for
for
for
for
Hash
Hash
Hash
Hash
function
function
function
function
Inet settings:
-------------IPV4 dest address:
IPV4 source address:
L4 Dest Port:
L4 Source Port:
Inet6 settings:
-------------IPV6 dest address:
IPV6 source address:
L4 Dest Port:
L4 Source Port:
L2 settings:
-----------Dest Mac address:
Source Mac address:
Vlan Id:
Inner-vlan Id:
Incoming port:
GRE settings:
-------------
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
0:
1:
2:
3:
3626023417
3626023417
3626023417
3626023417
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
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Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
Key:
Protocol:
MPLS settings:
-------------MPLS Enabled:
VXLAN settings:
--------------VXLAN VNID:
472
No
No
Yes
No
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 27
Uplink Failure Detection Operational
Command
•
show uplink-failure-detection
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
473
Interfaces Feature Guide for the QFX Series
show uplink-failure-detection
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show uplink-failure-detection
<group group-name>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for EX Series switches.
Display information about the uplink-failure-detection group, the member interfaces,
and their status.
none—Display information about all groups configured for uplink failure detection.
group group-name—(Optional) Display information about the specified group only.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
Overview of Uplink Failure Detection on page 183
•
Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 185
•
Example: Configuring Interfaces for Uplink Failure Detection on page 186
show uplink-failure-detection on page 475
Table 47 on page 474 lists the output fields for the show uplink-failure-detection command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 47: show uplink-failure-detection Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Group
Name of the group.
Uplink
The uplink interface or interfaces configured as link-to-monitor.
NOTE: The asterisk (*) indicates that the link is up.
Downlink
The downlink interface or interfaces configured as link-to-disable.
NOTE: The asterisk (*) indicates that the link is up.
Failure Action
474
Status of uplink failure detection:
•
Active—The switch has detected an uplink failure and has brought the downlink down.
•
Inactive—The uplink or uplinks are up.
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 27: Uplink Failure Detection Operational Command
Sample Output
show uplink-failure-detection
user@switch> show uplink-failure-detection
Group
: group1
Uplink
: ge-0/0/0*
Downlink
: ge-0/0/1*
Failure Action
: Inactive
Group
Uplink
Downlink
Failure Action
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
: group2
: ge-0/0/3.0
: ge-0/0/4.0
: Active
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476
Copyright © 2018, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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