AWS Management Console - Getting Started

AWS Management Console
Getting Started Guide
Version 1.0
AWS Management Console Getting Started Guide
AWS Management Console: Getting Started Guide
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AWS Management Console Getting Started Guide
Table of Contents
Working with the AWS Management Console ........................................................................................ 1
What Is the AWS Management Console? ....................................................................................... 1
Getting Started with a Service ..................................................................................................... 1
Adding and Removing Shortcuts .................................................................................................. 2
Selecting a Region ..................................................................................................................... 2
Changing Your Password ............................................................................................................. 2
Getting Billing Information .......................................................................................................... 3
Using the Device of Your Choice .................................................................................................. 3
Troubleshooting ......................................................................................................................... 4
Fix Page Load Issues with Internet Explorer 11 ...................................................................... 4
Working with Resource Groups ............................................................................................................ 5
What Are Resource Groups? ......................................................................................................... 5
How Resource Groups Work ................................................................................................ 7
How Tagging Works ........................................................................................................... 7
Obtaining Permissions ................................................................................................................ 7
Permissions for Individual Services ....................................................................................... 8
Granting Permissions for Using Resource Groups and Tag Editor ............................................... 8
Creating a Resource Group ........................................................................................................ 10
Supported Resources ................................................................................................................ 12
Supported Resources for Resource Groups (Console) ............................................................. 12
Supported Resources for Tag Editor Tagging (Console) .......................................................... 13
Accessing a Resource Group ....................................................................................................... 14
Managing Resources ................................................................................................................. 15
Getting Information About a Resource ................................................................................ 15
Taking Action on a Resource .............................................................................................. 16
Managing Resource Groups ........................................................................................................ 16
Modifying What Resources Are in a Group ........................................................................... 16
Customizing Your Resource Group Display ........................................................................... 17
Updating Your Resource Group Display ............................................................................... 17
Sharing a Resource Group ................................................................................................. 18
Deleting a Resource Group ................................................................................................ 18
Working with Tag Editor ................................................................................................................... 19
Obtaining Permissions .............................................................................................................. 19
Searching for Resources to Tag .................................................................................................. 19
Finding Untagged Resources ...................................................................................................... 20
Customizing Tag Search Results ................................................................................................. 21
Tagging Resources .................................................................................................................... 22
Scenario: Implementing a New Tagging Strategy .......................................................................... 23
AWS Glossary .................................................................................................................................. 25
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What Is the AWS Management Console?
Working with the AWS Management
Console
Welcome to the AWS Management Console. This guide provides a short introduction to working with the
console. To learn how to work with individual services in the console, see AWS Documentation.
Topics
• What Is the AWS Management Console? (p. 1)
• Getting Started with a Service (p. 1)
• Adding and Removing Shortcuts (p. 2)
• Selecting a Region (p. 2)
• Changing Your Password (p. 2)
• Getting Billing Information (p. 3)
• Using the Device of Your Choice (p. 3)
• Troubleshooting (p. 4)
What Is the AWS Management Console?
The AWS Management Console is a web application that comprises and refers to a broad collection of
service consoles for managing Amazon Web Services. When you first sign in, you see the console home
page.
The home page provides access to each service console as well as an intuitive user interface for exploring
AWS and getting helpful tips. Among other things, the individual service consoles offer tools for
working with Amazon S3 buckets, launching and connecting to Amazon EC2 instances, setting Amazon
CloudWatch alarms, and getting information about your account and about billing.
Getting Started with a Service
The AWS Management Console provides multiple ways for navigating to individual service consoles.
To open a console for a service
Do one of the following:
• Type the name of the service in the search box. Then choose the service that you want from the list of
search results.
• Choose one of your recently visited services under the search box.
• Choose Services to open a full list of services. On the upper right of the page, choose Group to see the
services listed by category or choose A–Z to see an alphabetical listing. Then choose the service that
you want.
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Adding and Removing Shortcuts
Adding and Removing Shortcuts
You can add shortcuts for the consoles that you use most.
To add a shortcut
1.
On the navigation bar, choose the pushpin icon.
2.
Drag a service from the menu to the navigation bar.
You can add more shortcuts and drop them onto the navigation bar in any order that you want.
To remove a shortcut
1.
On the navigation bar, choose the pushpin icon.
2.
Drag the shortcut off the navigation bar.
Selecting a Region
For many services, you can select a region that specifies where your resources are managed. You do not
select a region for the AWS Management Console or for some services, such as IAM.
To select a region
1.
In the AWS Management Console, choose a service (p. 1) to go to that service's console.
2.
In the navigation bar, choose the name of the currently selected region.
When you select a region, that region becomes the default in the console.
Note
If you have created AWS resources, but you don’t see those resources in the console, the console
might be displaying resources from a different region. Some resources (such as EC2 instances)
are created in a specific region. To see them, use the region selector to choose the region in
which the resources were created.
Changing Your Password
If you are an account owner, you can change your AWS account password from the AWS Management
Console.
To change your password
1.
In the navigation bar, choose your account name.
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Getting Billing Information
2.
Choose Security Credentials.
3.
The page you see varies with the type of account that you used to sign in. Follow the console
instructions to get to the page for changing your password.
4.
Type your current password once and your new password twice.
The new password must be at least eight characters long and must include a symbol, a number, an
uppercase letter, and a lowercase letter.
When you've completed the password form, choose Change Password or Save changes.
5.
Getting Billing Information
If you have the necessary permissions, you can get information about your AWS charges from the
console.
To get your billing information
1.
In the navigation bar, choose your account name.
2.
Choose My Billing Dashboard.
3.
Use the AWS Billing and Cost Management dashboard to find a summary and a breakdown of your
monthly spending. To learn more, see the AWS Billing and Cost Management User Guide.
Using the Device of Your Choice
The AWS Management Console has been designed to work on tablets as well as other kinds of devices:
• Horizontal and vertical space is maximized to show more on your screen.
• Buttons and selectors are larger for a better touch experience.
The AWS Management Console is also available as an app for Android and iOS. This app provides mobilerelevant tasks that are a good companion to the full web experience. For example, you can easily view
and manage your existing Amazon EC2 instances and Amazon CloudWatch alarms from your phone.
Here's what the Android app looks like running on a Kindle Fire HDX 7":
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Troubleshooting
You can download the AWS Console mobile app from Amazon Appstore, Google Play, or iTunes.
Troubleshooting
Fix Page Load Issues with Internet Explorer 11
If you use the AWS Management Console with Internet Explorer 11, the browser might fail to load some
pages of the console. This is a problem related to Internet Explorer's Compatibility View. To address
this issue, in Internet Explorer, open Compatibility View Settings and disable Display intranet sites in
Compatibility View.
For more information, see Fix site display problems with Compatibility View.
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What Are Resource Groups?
Working with Resource Groups
Note
This content describes legacy Resource Groups. For information about the new AWS Resource
Groups service, see the AWS Resource Groups User Guide.
You can maximize your effectiveness with AWS offerings by working with resource groups. This guide
provides a short introduction to creating and managing resource groups in the AWS Management
Console. To learn more about the AWS Management Console in general, see Working with the AWS
Management Console (p. 1).
To work with resource groups
1.
Sign in to the AWS Management Console.
2.
On the navigation bar, choose Resource Groups.
3.
Choose the name of an existing resource group or choose Create a Resource Group.
Topics
• What Are Resource Groups? (p. 5)
• Obtaining Permissions for Resource Groups and Tag Editor (p. 7)
• Creating a Resource Group (p. 10)
• Supported Resources (p. 12)
• Accessing a Resource Group (p. 14)
• Managing Resources (p. 15)
• Managing Resource Groups (p. 16)
What Are Resource Groups?
Note
This content describes legacy Resource Groups. For information about the new AWS Resource
Groups service, see the AWS Resource Groups User Guide.
In AWS, a resource is an entity that you can work with. Examples include an Amazon EC2 instance, an
AWS CloudFormation stack, and an Amazon S3 bucket. If you work with multiple resources, you might
find it useful to manage them as a group rather than move from one AWS service to another for each
task.
Resource Groups helps you do just that. By default, the AWS Management Console is organized by
AWS service. But with the Resource Groups tool, you can create a custom console that organizes and
consolidates information based on your project and the resources that you use. If you manage resources
in multiple regions, you can create a resource group to view resources from different regions on the same
page.
Resource Groups can display metrics, alarms, and configuration details. If you need more detailed
information or you want to change a setting for a given resource, choosing a link takes you to the page
you need.
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What Are Resource Groups?
For example, let's say you are developing a web application, and you are maintaining separate sets
of resources for your alpha, beta, and release environments. Each version runs on Amazon EC2 with
an Amazon Elastic Block Store storage volume. You use Elastic Load Balancing to manage traffic
and Route 53 to manage your domain. Without the Resource Groups tool, you might have to access
multiple consoles just to check the status of your services or modify the settings for one version of your
application.
With the Resource Groups tool, you use a single page to view and manage your resources. For example,
let’s say you use the tool to create a resource group for each version—alpha, beta, and release—of
your application. To check your resources for the alpha version of your application and see whether any
CloudWatch alarms have been triggered, simply open your resource group. Then view the consolidated
information on your resource group page. To modify a specific resource, choose the appropriate links on
your resource group page to quickly access the service console with the settings that you need.
As other examples, you could also use the Resources Groups tool for the following types of projects:
• A blog that has different phases, such as development, staging, and production
• Projects managed by multiple departments or individuals
• A set of AWS resources that you use together for a common project or that you want to manage or
monitor as a group
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How Resource Groups Work
How Resource Groups Work
A resource group is a collection of resources that share one or more tags or portions of tags. To create a
resource group, you simply identify the tags that contain the items that members of the group should
have in common.
If you or your administrator uses the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) service to create
multiple users in the same account, those users have their own individual resource groups. These groups
are not visible to other users. However, each user can share a resource group with others in the same
account by sharing a URL, which lets another user create a resource group with the same parameters. For
information about creating IAM users, see Creating an IAM User in the IAM User Guide. For information
about sharing resources, see Sharing a Resource Group (p. 18).
The tags themselves function like properties of a resource, so they are shared across the entire account.
That way, users in a department can draw from a common vocabulary (tags) within the department
or account to create resource groups that are meaningful to their roles and responsibilities. Having a
common pool of tags also means that when users share a resource group (p. 18), they don't have to
worry about missing or conflicting tag information.
How Tagging Works
Tags are words or phrases that act as metadata for organizing your AWS resources. With most AWS
resources, you have the option of adding tags when you create the resource, whether it's an Amazon EC2
instance, an Amazon S3 bucket, or other resource. However, you can also add tags to multiple resources
at once by using Tag Editor. You simply search for resources of various types and then add, remove, or
replace tags for the resources in your search results.
For more information about Tag Editor, see Working with Tag Editor (p. 19) in this guide. For more
information about tagging, see Tag Basics in the Amazon EC2 User Guide for Linux Instances.
Obtaining Permissions for Resource Groups and
Tag Editor
Note
This content describes legacy Resource Groups. For information about the new AWS Resource
Groups service, see the AWS Resource Groups User Guide. The managed policies that are
used for legacy Resource Groups, ResourceGroupsandTagEditorFullAccess and
ResourceGroupsandTagEditorReadOnlyAccess, do not grant access to the new AWS
Resource Groups service.
To make full use of Resource Groups and Tag Editor, you might need additional permissions to tag
resources or to see a resource's tag keys and values. These permissions fall into two categories:
• Permissions for individual services so that you can tag resources from those services and include them
in resource groups
• Permissions that are required to use the Resource Groups and Tag Editor consoles
If you need additional permissions, contact your administrator and request the permissions that you
need.
If you are an administrator, you can provide permissions for your users by creating policies through
the AWS Identity and Access Management (AWS IAM) service. You first create IAM users or groups, and
then apply the policies with the permissions that they need. For general information about creating and
attaching IAM policies, see Working with Policies.
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Permissions for Individual Services
Permissions for Individual Services
Important
This section describes permissions required for individual services if you want to tag resources
from those services' consoles and APIs and include them in resource groups.
As explained in How Resource Groups Work (p. 7), each resource group represents a collection of
resources that share one or more tag keys or values. In order to add tags to a resource, you need the
necessary permissions for the service that the resource belongs to. For example, if you want to tag
Amazon EC2 instances, your administrator must give you permissions to the tagging actions in that
service's API, such as those listed in the Amazon EC2 user guide.
In addition, to make full use of the Resource Groups feature, you need other permissions that allow
you to access a service's console and interact with the resources there. For examples of such policies for
Amazon EC2, see Example Policies for Working in the Amazon EC2 Console in the Amazon EC2 User Guide
for Linux Instances.
Granting Permissions for Using Resource Groups and
Tag Editor
Important
This section describes permissions that are required if you want to tag resources via the the
Resource Groups and Tag Editor consoles and Resource Groups Tagging APIs.
If you want to tag resources that belong to AWS services from those services' individual consoles
or APIs, see the above section - Permissions for Individual Services.
If you’re an administrator, you can grant permissions to others to use Resource Groups and Tag Editor. To
do that, you create and attach IAM policies to users, groups, or roles. For information about creating and
working with users, groups, and roles, see Identities (Users, Groups, and Roles) in the IAM User Guide. To
attach a policy for Resources Groups and Tag Editor, see the following procedures.
Using AWS Managed Policies for Resource Groups and Tag
Editor
The easiest way to attach a policy is to use one of the AWS managed policies found in the AWS
Management Console. It provides a full-access policy as well as a read-only policy for the Resource
Groups and Tag Editor services. For more information about managed IAM policies, see Managed Policies
and Inline Policies in the IAM User Guide.
To attach a Resource Groups and Tag Editor policy to an IAM user or group
1.
2.
3.
4.
Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the IAM console at https://
console.aws.amazon.com/iam/.
In the navigation pane, choose Policies.
In the Filter: Policy Type search box, start typing ResourceGroupsandTagEditor to display the
Resource Groups and Tag Editor policies.
Select the check box next to the policy that you want:
• ResourceGroupsandTagEditorReadOnlyAccess allows users to access and use Resource Groups
and Tag Editor but does not allow them to edit tags in the Tag Editor.
5.
• ResourceGroupsandTagEditorFullAccess allows users complete use of all Resource Groups and
Tag Editor features.
Choose Policy Actions, and then choose Attach.
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Granting Permissions for Using
Resource Groups and Tag Editor
6.
Select the check box next to the name of each user or group that you want the policy to apply to,
and then choose Attach policy.
Creating Your Own IAM Policies for Resource Groups and Tag
Editor
If the built-in IAM policies (known as AWS managed policies) for Resource Groups and Tag Editor do not
meet your needs, you can create your own. For information about creating IAM policies, see Overview of
IAM Policies. Then use the following examples of IAM policies as a guide to creating the policies that you
need.
The tag:getResources permission is required to list resources that share a particular tag, such as
when viewing a Resource Group or searching for resources in Tag Editor. You could grant this permission
by using a policy like the following:
{
}
"Version" : "2012-10-17",
"Statement" : [{
"Effect" : "Allow",
"Action" : "tag:GetResources",
"Resource" : "*"
}]
Additional permissions are required to get full use of the Resource Groups and Tag Editors consoles. The
tag:getTagKeys and tag:getTagValues permissions allow you to see existing tag keys and values
for resources in your account. You can grant both permissions by using a policy like the following:
{
}
"Version" : "2012-10-17",
"Statement" : [{
"Effect" : "Allow",
"Action" : [
"tag:GetTagKeys",
"tag:GetTagValues"
],
"Resource" : "*"
}]
To use these consoles to add and remove tags, you need the permissions in the following policy:
{
}
"Version" : "2012-10-17",
"Statement" : [{
"Effect" : "Allow",
"Action" : [
"tag:AddResourceTags",
"tag:RemoveResourceTags",
"tag:TagResources",
"tag:UntagResources"
],
"Resource" : "*"
}]
Finally, the following policy ensures that users have access to all features of Resource Groups and Tag
Editor.
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Creating a Resource Group
{
}
"Version" : "2012-10-17",
"Statement" : [{
"Effect" : "Allow",
"Action" : "tag:*",
"Resource" : "*"
}]
Creating a Resource Group
Note
This content describes legacy Resource Groups. For information about the new AWS Resource
Groups service, see the AWS Resource Groups User Guide.
To create a resource group, you start by tagging your resources (if you have not already done so). Next,
you create a view of resources that have common tags or common strings in those tags. You can create
your own custom tags or use tags created by others in your same account. You also can use the tags
that AWS automatically creates, such as the stack name in AWS CloudFormation. To use Tag Editor to
add, remove, and manage tags, see Working with Tag Editor (p. 19). For a list of ways to tag resources
within their respective services, see Applying Tags.
Every tag consists of a key and a value. In search engine terms, adding values is like searching for them
with the OR operator (all items found are included). But adding keys is like searching for them with AND
(only items with all keys are included). As a result, adding more values to each tag key that you specify
can increase the size of your resource group, but adding more keys might reduce the group size.
For example, suppose that you have an account with only two resources, a pair of Amazon EC2 instances.
To each instance you assign a tag with the key name Stack. One of the stack keys has the value
Production and the other has the value Test. One of the instances also has a tag with the key name
Owner and the value Jan.
If you create a resource group with the Stack key and both Production and Test values, your group
has two members. If you then add the Owner key to your group definition, your group shrinks to one
because only one instance has that key.
You can also create groups based on a portion of a tag value. For example, if you have alpha, beta,
and release versions of a project, you might have a naming scheme for each resource's name key that
includes multiple points of information. For example, you might have several Amazon S3 buckets whose
Name keys have values like John Alpha Bucket, John Beta Bucket, Mary Alpha Bucket, and so on. To
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Creating a Resource Group
create a resource group for your alpha version, you would specify only tags whose value includes Alpha.
Or you could create a group of all buckets by specifying that the tag value include Bucket.
Not every AWS resource can be included in a resource group. For a list of currently supported resources,
see Supported Resources (p. 12).
To create a resource group, you begin by searching for tags or tag strings that your group has in
common. You perform this search either on the Create a resource group page or with Tag Editor.
To create a resource group
1.
Sign in to the AWS Management Console. On the navigation bar, choose Resource Groups, and then
choose Create a Resource Group.
2.
On the Create a resource group page, for Group name, type a name for your group.
3.
For Tags, choose the name of a tag key in the first box. You can type in the box to search for a key
based on characters it contains.
4.
(Optional) Choose the box next to that and do any of the following:
• Leave the box empty to find tags with the specified key and any value.
• Select Empty value to find tags with the specified key but no value.
• Type one or more characters to find the values that you are looking for. Select a value from the
list to find an exact match or select the Contains: option to find values that contain the characters
that you typed.
If you don’t see any values listed, you might not have permissions to view available tags. In that
case, you can simply type in a complete value and press Enter to start searching.
• Choose the x next to an item that you added to remove it from the search criteria.
You can repeat any of the preceding steps to search for multiple values for each tag key. Resources
whose values have any of the criteria for that particular key are included in the resource group. The
searches are case sensitive.
For more information about tag keys and values, see What Is a Tag?
Note
Before a key and its values appear in the autocomplete list, they must have been applied to
at least one resource in the current account. If you don’t see a tag that you just applied to a
resource, try refreshing your browser window.
If the autocomplete list still doesn't work, you might need to contact your administrator
to get the necessary permissions. For more information, see Obtaining Permissions for
Resource Groups and Tag Editor (p. 7).
5.
(Optional) To further refine your group, use another row of Tags boxes to specify more tag keys and
values. The group now contains only those resources that have all the specified tags, so the more
tags that you specify, the fewer resources your group contains. If you change your mind, choose
Remove next to any row.
6.
(Optional) For Regions, choose the regions that you want to include in your group. Repeat for as
many regions as you want. To remove a region, choose the x by its name. Leave the box empty to
include all regions.
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Supported Resources
7.
(Optional) For Resource types, choose the kind of resources that you want to include in your group.
Repeat for as many resource types as you want. To remove a resource type, choose the x by its name.
Leave the box empty to include all resource types.
8.
(Optional) When you have your preferred settings, choose Preview to see which resources are
included based on your current settings. You can change any of the previous settings, and then
choose Preview again.
9.
When you are satisfied with your group, choose Save.
If you need to change the settings later, see Modifying What Resources Are in a Group (p. 16).
To create a resource group from Tag Editor search results
1.
In Tag Editor, search for the resources (p. 19) that you want in your group. You must include at
least one tag key in your search.
2.
When the search is complete, choose View as resource group.
3.
In the space provided, type a name for your resource group.
4.
(Optional) Modify the settings for the resource group as explained in the preceding procedure. To
see your changes, choose Preview.
5.
When you are satisfied with your group, choose Save.
Supported Resources
Note
This content describes legacy Resource Groups. For information about the new AWS Resource
Groups service, see the AWS Resource Groups User Guide.
You can add tags to your AWS resources from the AWS Management Console.
Topics
• Supported Resources for Resource Groups (Console) (p. 12)
• Supported Resources for Tag Editor Tagging (Console) (p. 13)
Supported Resources for Resource Groups (Console)
You can use the Resource Groups tool in the AWS Management Console to create resource groups for the
following tagged AWS resources. For more information, see Creating a Resource Group (p. 10).
Service
Resources
AWS CloudFormation
• Stack
AWS Elastic Beanstalk
• Environment
Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2)
• Instance
• Load balancer
• Security group
• Snapshot
• Volume
Amazon ElastiCache
• Cache cluster
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Supported Resources for Tag Editor Tagging (Console)
Service
Resources
• Snapshot
Amazon EMR
• Cluster
Amazon Glacier
• Vault
Kinesis
• Stream
Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon
RDS)
• Database instance
• Snapshot
Amazon Redshift
• Cluster
Amazon Route 53
• Domain
• Health check
• Hosted zone
Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3)
• Bucket
AWS Storage Gateway
• Gateway
Amazon Virtual Private Cloud
• VPC
Supported Resources for Tag Editor Tagging
(Console)
You can use Tag Editor in the AWS Management Console to tag the following AWS resources. For more
information, see Searching for Resources to Tag (p. 19).
Service
Resources
Amazon ElastiCache
• Cache cluster
• Snapshot
Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2)
• AMI
• Instance
• Network interface
• Reserved Instance
• Security group
• Snapshot
• Spot Instance request
• Volume
Elastic Load Balancing
• Load balancer
Amazon EMR
• Cluster
Amazon Glacier
• Vault
Kinesis
• Stream
Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon
RDS)
• Database instance
• Database option group
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Accessing a Resource Group
Service
Resources
• Database parameter group
• Database security group
• Database snapshot
• Database subnet group
• Event subscription
• Reserved database instance
Amazon Redshift
• Cluster
• Hardware security module (HSM) client
certificate
• HSM connection
• Parameter group
• Snapshot
• Subnet group
Amazon Route 53
• Domain
• Health check
• Hosted zone
Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3)
• Bucket
AWS Storage Gateway
• Gateway
Amazon Virtual Private Cloud
• Customer gateway
• DHCP option set
• Internet gateway
• Network access control list (ACL)
• Route table
• Subnet
• Virtual private gateway
• VPC
• VPN connection
Accessing a Resource Group
Note
This content describes legacy Resource Groups. For information about the new AWS Resource
Groups service, see the AWS Resource Groups User Guide.
To view and work with resource groups, use the AWS Management Console to navigate to one of your
resource groups. The console provides two ways to open a group.
To access a resource group from any console page
•
From any AWS Management Console page, choose Resource Groups on the navigation bar and
choose the group that you want.
To modify what you see on a resource group page, see Customizing Your Resource Group
Display (p. 17).
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Managing Resources
Managing Resources
Note
This content describes legacy Resource Groups. For information about the new AWS Resource
Groups service, see the AWS Resource Groups User Guide.
Resource groups provide information about your resources at a glance. You can monitor what is
happening with your resources and use the links to take corrective or other actions.
Getting Information About a Resource
The Resource Groups tool displays detailed information about your resources. It also uses a red icon to
indicate when a CloudWatch metric has triggered an alarm. This icon appears in multiple places:
• Next to each resource type in the resource group’s navigation pane
• In each row of the resource group table
To get detailed information about a resource
1.
Open a resource group, as explained in Accessing a Resource Group (p. 14).
2.
In the navigation pane, select a resource type.
3.
In the resource table, locate the resource that you want to monitor.
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Taking Action on a Resource
Tip
To simplify locating a resource, filter and otherwise customize the table of resources, as
explained in Customizing Your Resource Group Display (p. 17).
4.
Choose the triangle icon to expand the row for a resource to get more information.
Taking Action on a Resource
You might need to act on the information that you see in the resource group table. For example, if an
Amazon EC2 instance has triggered an alarm, you might want to go to the CloudWatch console for more
details. Or you might need to go to the Amazon EC2 console to correct a problem. Resource Groups
makes it easy to get to the controls that you need quickly.
To take action on a resource
1.
Display details for the selected resource, as explained in Getting Information About a
Resource (p. 15).
2.
Do one of the following:
• To go to the console that controls the resource, choose the blue icon (
row, or choose Manage resource in the details pane.
) in the resource’s table
• To take action on a CloudWatch alarm, choose the link for the alarm to open the CloudWatch
console.
Managing Resource Groups
Note
This content describes legacy Resource Groups. For information about the new AWS Resource
Groups service, see the AWS Resource Groups User Guide.
At any time you can modify the settings of your resource groups to change what resources appear. You
can also customize the display so that you can see the information that you need most.
Topics
• Modifying What Resources Are in a Group (p. 16)
• Customizing Your Resource Group Display (p. 17)
• Updating Your Resource Group Display (p. 17)
• Sharing a Resource Group (p. 18)
• Deleting a Resource Group (p. 18)
Modifying What Resources Are in a Group
If you need to change what resources the group includes or other group settings, you can do so at any
time.
To modify the composition of a resource group
1.
2.
Open an existing resource group, as explained in Accessing a Resource Group (p. 14).
In the resource group page, choose the pencil icon (
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Customizing Your Resource Group Display
3.
Modify any of the settings (name, resource types, regions, tags) and choose Preview. Repeat until
you are satisfied with your group. Then choose Save.
Customizing Your Resource Group Display
You can change the appearance of your resource group to show the information that you need most.
To customize the data displayed in a resource group page
1.
Select and open a group, as explained in Accessing a Resource Group (p. 14).
2.
Do any of the following:
• To determine which type of resource is displayed, choose the resource type in the navigation pane.
• To limit the display to resources containing a keyword, type the keyword in the filter box above
the table. For example, you could type stopped to see all stopped instances or us-east-2 to see
only instances for that region.
• To sort the list by any column, choose the column heading name. To reverse the sort order, choose
the name again.
• To change the width of a table column, drag the divider between the column headings.
• To customize what columns appear in the table, choose the cog icon ( ) above the table and
select or deselect the type of data that appears. You can add or remove columns for the types of
information available for a resource (listed under Properties) or for individual tags (listed under
Tag Keys).
Selecting or deselecting an item in the list toggles a corresponding table column. To search for
and limit what items appear in the list, type a full or partial keyword or words in the box at the
top.
Updating Your Resource Group Display
As you create or remove resources or apply or modify the tags your resources use, you might need to
update the information that you see on a resource group page.
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Sharing a Resource Group
To update the information displayed on a resource group page
•
Choose the refresh icon (
) before the list of resources.
Sharing a Resource Group
If your account consists of multiple IAM users, each of those users has his own resource groups, which
are not visible to other users. However, each user can share the settings that make up a resource group
with other users in the same account. The share feature creates a URL that takes a user to the Create
Resource Group page with the settings already entered in the form. The recipients can then save a new
resource group for their own use.
For information on creating users, see Creating an IAM User in IAM User Guide.
To share a resource group
1.
Select and open a group, as explained in Accessing a Resource Group (p. 14).
2.
Choose the share icon above the resource table.
3.
Copy the URL that appears on the page, and send it to other users in your AWS account.
Deleting a Resource Group
You can permanently remove any resource groups that you no longer need.
To delete a resource group
1.
2.
Select and open a group, as explained in Accessing a Resource Group (p. 14).
3.
Choose Delete and then OK to confirm.
On the resource group page, choose the pencil icon (
Note
) next to the group name.
Deleting a resource group has no effect on the resources within the group.
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Obtaining Permissions
Working with Tag Editor
Tags are words or phrases that act as metadata for identifying and organizing your AWS resources. The
tag limit varies with the resource, but most can have up to 50 tags. Each tag consists of a key and a
value. For more about tagging, see Using Cost Allocation Tags in the AWS Billing and Cost Management
User Guide.
You can add tags to resources when you create the resource or add, change, or remove those tags one
resource at a time within each resource’s console. To add to multiple resources at once, you need to use
Tag Editor. With Tag Editor, you search for the resources that you want to tag, and then add, remove, or
edit tags for the resources in your search results.
To start Tag Editor
1.
Sign in to the AWS Management Console.
2.
On the navigation bar, choose Resource Groups, and then choose Tag Editor.
Not all resources can have tags applied. To see if a resource supports tagging, consult the documentation
for that resource's service.
Topics
• Obtaining Permissions for Tagging (p. 19)
• Searching for Resources to Tag (p. 19)
• Finding Untagged Resources (p. 20)
• Customizing Tag Search Results (p. 21)
• Tagging Resources (p. 22)
• Scenario: Implementing a New Tagging Strategy (p. 23)
Obtaining Permissions for Tagging
To make full use of Resource Groups and Tag Editor, you might need additional permissions to tag
resources or to see a resource's tag keys and values. For more information, see Obtaining Permissions for
Resource Groups and Tag Editor (p. 7)
Searching for Resources to Tag
With Tag Editor, you can locate all the resources that are available for tagging. For more information, see
Supported Resources for Tag Editor Tagging (Console) (p. 13).
To search for resources to tag
1.
Sign in to the AWS Management Console, choose Resource Groups, and then choose Tag Editor.
2.
For Regions, choose the regions that you want to search in. Repeat for as many regions as you want.
To remove a region, choose the x by its name.
3.
For Resource types, choose the kind of resources that you want to locate. Repeat for as many
resource types as you want. To remove a region or resource type, choose the x by its name. To search
for all resource types or all regions, select All resource types.
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Finding Untagged Resources
4.
(Optional) To limit your search to resources that already have certain tag keys or values, in the first
Tags box choose the name of a tag key. Type in the box to search for a key based on characters that
it contains.
5.
(Optional) In the next Tags box, do any of the following:
• Leave the box empty to search for all resources with the specified key and any value.
• Select Not tagged to search for resources that do not have the specified tag key.
• Select Empty value to search for resources that have the specified tag key but no value.
• Type one or more characters to find resources with the values that you are looking for. Select
a value from the list to find an exact match or select the Contains: option to find values that
contain the characters that you typed.
If you don’t see any values listed, you might not have permissions to view available tags. In that
case, you can simply type in a complete value and press Enter to start searching.
• Choose the x next to an item that you added to remove it from the search criteria.
You can add multiple values for each tag key. Doing so potentially increases the number of resources
in the search results because the results include resources tagged with any of the selected values.
The search is case sensitive.
Note
Before a key and its values appear in this list, they must have been applied to at least one
resource in the current account. If you don’t see a tag that you just applied to a resource, try
refreshing your browser window.
6.
(Optional) To further refine your group, continue using the Tags boxes at the bottom to specify
more tag keys and values. The search results contain only those resources that have all the specified
tags, so the more tags you specify, the fewer resources Tag Editor finds.
7.
When you have the settings that you want, choose Find resources.
Tip
To create a legacy resource group based on these search results, choose View as resource
group. Note that this does not create or save a new group in AWS Resource Groups. For more
information, see To create a resource group from Tag Editor search results (p. 12).
Finding Untagged Resources
You might find it useful to know what resources in your account have yet to be tagged. You might also
want to know what resources have tag keys but no tag values. You can use Tag Editor to find these
resources.
1.
Sign into the AWS Management Console and open Tag Editor at https://
resources.console.aws.amazon.com/r/tags.
2.
For Regions, select the regions that you want to include.
3.
For Resource types, select the resource types that you want to search for.
4.
For Tags, select a tag key that you want to apply to resources that do not already have it.
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Customizing Tag Search Results
5.
In the next box, do either or both of the following, depending on your goal:
• Choose Not tagged to find resources with no tags.
• Choose Empty value to find resources that are tagged with your specified key but that have no
tag value.
6.
Choose Find Resources to have Tag Editor find all such resources and list them at the bottom of the
page.
7.
(Optional) Use any of the methods discussed in Tagging Resources (p. 22) to add tags to the
resources in the search results.
Customizing Tag Search Results
After completing a search, you can sort and filter the results of your tag search to find the tags and
resources that you need to work with.
To customize tag search results
Do any of the following:
• To limit the display to resources that contain a keyword, type the keyword in the filter box above the
table. For example, you could type elasticbeanstalk to see all resources whose ID indicates that
they are associated with the Elastic Beanstalk service.
• To sort the list by any column, choose the column heading name. To reverse the sort order, choose the
name again.
• To change the width of a table column, drag the divider between the column headings.
• To add or remove columns of existing tag keys to the results, choose the cog icon ( ) above the table
and select or deselect a tag key. To search for and limit what items appear in the list, type a full or
partial keyword or words in the box at the top.
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Tagging Resources
Tagging Resources
After you have located the resources (p. 19) that you want to tag, you can add, remove, or edit the
tags for all or some of your search results as a group.
To apply a new tag to one or more resources, you begin by creating a tag key.
To create a tag key
1.
Search for the resources (p. 19) whose tags you want to manage.
2.
Choose Create a new tag key.
3.
Type the name of your new key, and then choose Add key. Repeat for as many tag keys as you want
to create.
Note
The new tag key does not actually exist until a value for the new key is applied to a
resource. A tag does not exist unless it is applied to a resource.
To edit or apply tags for a single resource
1.
Search for the resources (p. 19) whose tags you want to manage.
2.
Customize the search results (p. 21) table to make it easy to find the resource that you want.
3.
Do any of the following:
•
To add a tag to a resource, choose the + ( ) icon, type a value, and choose the check mark icon
( ). You can apply a tag to a resource without specifying a value.
•
To edit the tag value of a resource, choose the pencil icon (
Choose the check mark icon or press Enter.
) by its value and edit the value.
•
To remove an existing tag value, choose the X icon (
) next to the value.
• To apply an existing tag key, choose the cog icon ( ) and select the key that you want, as
explained in Customizing Tag Search Results (p. 21). Then choose the + icon in the column for
that key, type a new value, and either choose the check mark icon or press Enter.
• To modify a resource’s tag in its own console, choose the blue icon (
that console to edit or apply tags.
). Then use the settings in
To edit or apply tags for multiple resources
1.
Search for the resources (p. 19) whose tags you want to manage.
2.
Customize the search results (p. 21) table to make it easy to find the resource that you want.
3.
Select the check box for each resource whose tags you want to modify. To manage tags for all the
resources in the list, select the check box in the column heading row.
4.
Choose Edit tags for selected. Modify the keys or values, and then choose Apply changes.
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Scenario: Implementing a New Tagging Strategy
5.
Repeat the preceding step as needed.
Scenario: Implementing a New Tagging Strategy
Consider a situation where you have a medium to large working environment with multiple resources
used by various employees. You decide to use tagging to help you organize and get better oversight of
your account’s resources. But how to proceed when there are dozens of resources to tag? Fortunately,
Tag Editor can simplify the process.
1.
Make a plan.
Before you begin, sketch out a plan of the tag keys and values that will help you organize your
resources. For example, you might want all resources to have tag keys like Project, Cost Center, and
Environment. Remember, too, that each resource cannot have more than 50 tags.
2.
Open Tag Editor.
Sign into the AWS Management Console and open Tag Editor at https://
resources.console.aws.amazon.com/r/tags.
3.
Find all resources in your account.
For Regions, select all regions that apply. For Resource types, select All resource types. Leave both
Tags boxes empty. Then choose Find resources. For more information, see Searching for Resources
to Tag (p. 19).
4.
Select all the found resources.
The Tag Editor search results appear at the bottom of the page. When the list shows the resources
that you want to tag, select the top check box to select all resources. Choose Edit tags for selected.
5.
Apply tag keys with empty elements.
In Add/edit tags, under Add tags, in the space provided, type the key name that you want to add,
such as Project. Repeat for your other new keys, such as Cost Center and Environment.
Choose Apply changes.
Tip
If any of your selected resources have reached the maximum of 50 tags, a message warns
you before you choose Apply changes. You can pause the pointer over the number of
affected resources in the message to see a pop-up list of the specific resources.
6.
Add values for each tag key.
The next step is to add tag values that will help you distinguish individual resources that share tag
keys. There are a couple of ways to do this depending on whether you plan on adding the same
values to many resources or just a few.
a.
Bulk add values.
Start by selecting the check box at the top of the table again to clear all the check boxes. Then
select individual check boxes for just those resources that need a specific tag value.
Choose Edit tags for selected. In Add/edit tags, under Applied tags, type a new value in the
Value column next to a tag key. For example, you might add a billing code in the value for the
Cost Center key or type Production for the Environment key.
Note that if the Value column shows Multiple values, you can still type in a new value.
However, your new value will replace all the key’s existing values for the selected resources.
When you’re done, choose Apply changes.
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Scenario: Implementing a New Tagging Strategy
b.
Add individual tag values.
If you want each resource to have its own unique value, you can edit tag values right in the
search results table. Start by choosing the cog icon above the table and selecting the check
boxes for your new keys. To continue our example, you might select the check boxes for Project,
Cost Center, and Environment. This makes your keys appear as columns in the search results
table.
For a given resource, locate the column that displays the tag key whose value you want to edit.
Choose the pencil icon, and then type the new value in the box. Press Enter to complete the
editing.
7.
Repeat Step 6 for other resources in your list.
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AWS Glossary
For the latest AWS terminology, see the AWS Glossary in the AWS General Reference.
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