427-0032-00-12 v180 PT-Series Installation Guide

Installation
Manual
PT-Series
© 2016 FLIR Systems, Inc. All rights reserved worldwide. No parts of this manual, in whole or in part, may be copied,
photocopied, translated, or transmitted to any electronic medium or machine readable form without the prior written
permission of FLIR Systems, Inc.
Names and marks appearing on the products herein are either registered trademarks or trademarks of FLIR Systems,
Inc. and/or its subsidiaries. All other trademarks, trade names, or company names referenced herein are used for
identification only and are the property of their respective owners.
This product is protected by patents, design patents, patents pending, or design patents pending.
The contents of this document are subject to change.
FLIR Systems, Inc.
6769 Hollister Avenue
Goleta, CA 93117
Support: http://www.flir.com/security/display/?id=71083
Important Instructions and Notices to the User:
Modification of this device without the express authorization of FLIR Commercial Systems, Inc. may void the user’s
authority under FCC rules to operate this device.
Modification of this device without the express authorization of FLIR Systems, Inc., may void the user’s authority
under the FCC Rules to operate this device.
Note 1: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to
part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference
when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio
frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful
interference in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at his own expense. Shielded cables
must be used to connect this device to other devices.
Note 2: If ferrites are supplied with this equipment, the equipment was tested for compliance with the FCC limits for a
Class A digital device using power cables with the ferrites installed. When connecting one or two power cables to the
equipment, the supplied ferrites must be used with this equipment.
Industry Canada Notice:
This Class A digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.
Avis d’Industrie Canada:
Cet appareil numérique de la classe A est conforme à la norme NMB-003 du Canada.
Proper Disposal of Electrical and Electronic Equipment (EEE)
The European Union (EU) has enacted Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive 2002/96/
EC (WEEE), which aims to prevent EEE waste from arising; to encourage reuse, recycling, and
recovery of EEE waste; and to promote environmental responsibility.
In accordance with these regulations, all EEE products labeled with the “crossed out wheeled bin”
either on the product itself or in the product literature must not be disposed of in regular rubbish bins,
mixed with regular household or other commercial waste, or by other regular municipal waste
collection means. Instead, and in order to prevent possible harm to the environment or human health,
all EEE products (including any cables that came with the product) should be responsibly discarded or
recycled.
To identify a responsible disposal method where you live, please contact your local waste collection or
recycling service, your original place of purchase or product supplier, or the responsible government
authority in your area. Business users should contact their supplier or refer to their purchase contract.
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
PT-Series Camera Installation
1.1 References ............................................................................................................................. 1-5
1.2 Camera Overview .................................................................................................................. 1-6
1.3 Installation Overview .............................................................................................................. 1-6
1.3.1 Camera Connection Options ........................................................................................ 1-6
1.3.2 Supplied Components .................................................................................................. 1-7
1.3.3 Required Components ................................................................................................. 1-7
1.4 Location Considerations ........................................................................................................ 1-7
1.4.1 Bench Testing .............................................................................................................. 1-7
1.4.2 Prior to Cutting/Drilling Holes ....................................................................................... 1-8
1.5 Camera Mounting .................................................................................................................. 1-8
1.5.1 Galvanic Isolation ......................................................................................................... 1-8
1.5.2 Earth Ground Connection ............................................................................................. 1-8
1.5.3 Installation of PT-Series Camera and Galvanic Isolation Kit ...................................... 1-10
1.6 Camera Connections ........................................................................................................... 1-11
1.6.1 Removing the Back Cover .......................................................................................... 1-11
1.6.2 Cable Gland Sealing .................................................................................................. 1-11
1.6.3 Cable Glands and Spare Parts Kit ............................................................................. 1-12
1.6.4 Cable Gland Seal Inserts ........................................................................................... 1-12
1.6.5 Connecting power ...................................................................................................... 1-12
1.6.6 Video Connections ..................................................................................................... 1-13
1.6.7 Ethernet Connection ................................................................................................... 1-13
1.6.8 Serial Connection ....................................................................................................... 1-13
1.7 Serial Communications Overview ........................................................................................ 1-15
1.8 Serial Communications Settings - Hardware DIP Switches ................................................. 1-15
1.9 PT-Series Camera Specifications ........................................................................................ 1-18
Basic Operation and Configuration
2.1 Nexus IP Camera ................................................................................................................. 2-19
2.1.1 Nexus Server Configuration ....................................................................................... 2-19
2.1.2 Serial and/or IP Communications ............................................................................... 2-19
2.1.3 Serial Communications .............................................................................................. 2-20
2.1.4 Ethernet Communications .......................................................................................... 2-20
2.2 Basic Test and Configuration Steps ..................................................................................... 2-21
2.3 Camera Bench Test ............................................................................................................. 2-21
2.4 Web Browser Interface ........................................................................................................ 2-22
2.4.1 Log into the Camera Web Page ................................................................................. 2-22
2.4.2 Live Video Page ......................................................................................................... 2-22
2.5 Bench Test Using FSM ........................................................................................................ 2-26
2.5.1 Running FSM ............................................................................................................. 2-26
2.6 Basic Camera Configuration ................................................................................................ 2-27
2.6.1 Expert and Admin Accounts ....................................................................................... 2-27
2.6.2 Maintenance Menus ................................................................................................... 2-27
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2.7 Thermal Imaging Overview .................................................................................................. 2-37
2.8 Troubleshooting Tips ........................................................................................................... 2-38
2.9 FSM General Errors ............................................................................................................. 2-41
2.10 Restoring the Factory Settings ........................................................................................... 2-43
2.11 Setting the IP address on a Windows PC .......................................................................... 2-44
Serial Address: Decimal To Binary Conversion
3.1 Address Conversion Table ................................................................................................... 3-47
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PT-Series Camera Installation
This manual describes the installation of the PT-Series cameras. If you need help during the
installation process, please call to speak with our support experts. All installers and integrators are
encouraged to take advantage of the training offered by FLIR; visit
http://www.flir.com/training for more information.
This manual includes the following topics:
•
Installation Overview
•
Mounting the camera and its components
•
Connecting the electronics
•
Bench testing the camera
•
Basic configuration and operation of the camera
•
Camera Specifications
For safety, and to achieve the highest levels of performance from the PT-Series camera system,
always follow the warnings and cautions in this manual when handling and operating the camera
system.
Warning!
If mounting the PT-Series camera on a pole, tower or any elevated location, use industry standard
safe practices to avoid injuries.
Caution!
Except as described in this manual, do not open the PT-Series camera for any reason. Disassembly
of the camera can cause permanent damage and will void the warranty.
Be careful not to leave fingerprints on the PT-Series camera’s infrared optics.
The PT-Series camera requires a power supply of 24 Volts. Operating the camera outside of this input
voltage range or the specified operating temperature range can cause permanent damage.
1.1
References
PT-Series Camera Mechanical Interface Control Document (ICD)
(FLIR Doc # 427-0032-00-19)—available from the FLIR website, provides further details regarding
mechanical dimensions and mounting for the PT-Series camera.
Nexus IP Camera Configuration Guide
(FLIR Doc # 427-0030-00-28)—Available from the FLIR website, provides further details on using a
web browser to configure the PT-Series camera.
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1.2
Camera Overview
The PT-Series camera is both an analog and an Internet Protocol (IP) camera. The video from the
camera can be viewed over a traditional analog video network or it can be viewed by streaming it over
an IP network using MPEG-4, M-JPEG and H.264 encoding. Analog video will require a connection to
a video monitor or an analog matrix/switch. The IP video will require a connection to an Ethernet
network switch and a computer with the appropriate software for viewing the video stream or a network
video recorder.
1.3
Installation Overview
The PT-Series Camera is a multi-sensor camera system on a pan/tilt platform. Combinations of an
infrared camera and a visible-light video camera are intended for outdoor installations.
Shipping plugs only Remove before installing
Figure 1-1: PT-Series Camera
The PT-Series camera is intended to be mounted on a medium-duty fixed pedestal mount or wall
mount commonly used in the CCTV industry. Cables will exit from the back of the camera housing. The
mount must support up to 45 lbs. (20 KG). The camera can be controlled through either serial or IP
communications. The camera operates on 21 - 30 Vac or 21 - 30 Vdc. In order to access the electrical
connections and install the cables, it is necessary to temporarily remove the back cover of the camera
housing.
1.3.1
Camera Connection Options
Camera connections are made through water-tight cable gland seals on the rear of the camera. Refer
to “Cable Gland Sealing” on page 11 to ensure the glands are used correctly and the connections are
properly sealed.
The camera can be powered with a conventional power supply, using 21 - 30 Vac or 21 - 30 Vdc.
The PT-Series Camera can produce analog or digital video output (or both). Analog video will require
at least one connection to a video monitor or an analog video matrix switch. In most analog
installations, two video connections will be used—one for the thermal camera video, and one for the
daylight camera video. The camera provides two BNC connectors for these video channels.
An Ethernet connection is provided for IP video streaming and for command and control
communications (pan/tilt/zoom/etc.). A web browser can be used for IP video streaming, command
and control, and camera configuration and maintenance (software/firmware updates).
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For analog installations that are not using Ethernet/IP, a serial cable (RS232 or RS422) can optionally
be connected and used for command and control communications, supporting either Pelco D or Bosch
protocols. In installations using analog video and serial communications, it is recommended an
Ethernet cable should also be installed for camera configuration, operation, and troubleshooting.
For installations where the camera is mounted on a tower or pole or other location that may be difficult
to access, it is recommended that the Ethernet connection be installed from the camera down to
ground level at a minimum, to allow access.
1.3.2
Supplied Components
The PT-Series camera includes these standard components:
•
Multi-sensor Pan/Tilt Camera Unit
•
Galvanic Isolation Kit (PN 4204960)
•
Cable Glands and Spare Parts kit
1.3.3
Required Components
The installer will need to supply the following items; the lengths are specific to the installation.
•
Electrical wire, for system power; up to 100’ (3-conductor, shielded, gauge determined by cable
length and supply voltage. See Figure 1-4 on page 14 for additional information)
•
Camera grounding strap
•
Coaxial RG59U video cables (BNC connector at the camera end) for analog video
•
Shielded Category 6 Ethernet cable for control, streaming video, and for software updates.
•
Optional serial cable for serial communications.
•
Miscellaneous electrical hardware, camera mount (with stainless steel washers and bolts),
connectors, and tools
1.4
Location Considerations
Install the camera in a location that will allow access for regular periodic cleaning (fresh water rinse),
inspection of mounting integrity and mechanical soundness, and preventative maintenance. Ensure
the camera and the camera mount are routinely inspected on a periodic basis.
The camera will require connections for power, communications (IP Ethernet, serial), and video
(analog, IP digital).
•
Install all cameras with an easily accessible Ethernet connection to support future software
updates.
•
Ensure that cable distances do not exceed the specifications and that cables adhere to all local
and Industry Standards, Codes, and Best Practices.
1.4.1
Bench Testing
Connect the power, analog video, serial, and Ethernet connections and confirm that the video is
displayed on a monitor when the power is turned on. Confirm the camera can be controlled by moving
it (pan/tilt). For configuration and basic setup information using the onboard web server, refer to “Basic
Operation and Configuration” on page 19.
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1.4.2
Prior to Cutting/Drilling Holes
When selecting a mounting location for the PT-Series camera, consider cable lengths and cable
routing. Ensure the cables are long enough given the proposed mounting locations and cable routing
requirements.
Use cables that have sufficient dimensions to ensure safety (for power cables) and adequate signal
strength (for video and communications).
1.5
Camera Mounting
Caution!
Always use stainless steel washers on the four camera base mounting holes, especially in locations
where the camera base is exposed to a damp or salt environment. Ensure that the camera base is
electrically isolated and properly grounded when it is secured to its mount. Contact between the
stainless steel fasteners and any bare aluminum may cause galvanic corrosion which will shorten
the life of the installation and may void the camera warranty. Following this procedure is critical to
maintaining the warranty on your PT-Series product.
Galvanic isolation is critical in preventing corrosion. Proper installation of galvanic isolation pad and
washers is important for long product life.
There are two critical steps related to proper galvanic isolation camera mounting:
•Installation of Galvanic Isolation Kit
•Proper grounding (bonding) to earth ground
1.5.1
Galvanic Isolation
The Galvanic Isolation Kit (FLIR PN 4204960) is for use with all PT-Series cameras (PT-3XX, PT-6XX,
A310-PT, PT-602CZ). The isolation plate and nylon shoulder or flat washers provide electrical isolation
between the stainless steel fasteners and the aluminum camera base, and electrically isolates the
complete PT-Series camera from the customer mount.
Galvanic isolation is critical in preventing corrosion. Proper installation of galvanic isolation pad and
washers is important for long product life. Refer to “Installation of PT-Series Camera and Galvanic
Isolation Kit” on page 10 for specific instructions.
1.5.2
Earth Ground Connection
Earth ground connection is very important to
protect PT-series from surge induced failures
and corrosion caused by stray current/ground
loops. Attach ground wire (16AWG or larger) to
ground lug on access panel. Use the large hex
nut to secure ground wire to stud on access
panel. Ground stud is #8-32 thread.
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Ground Lug
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PT-Series Camera Installation
Caution!
When lifting the PT-Series camera use the camera body and base, not the tubes.
Not to scale
All dimensions in inches
0
2X 2.72 ± .02
PT-Series cameras must be mounted upright on top of the mounting surface, with the base below the
camera. The unit should not be hung upside down.
2X 2.72 ± .02
1
4X Ø.354 THRU
2X 3.19 ± .02
0
Tilt Axis
0.28
2X 3.19 ± .02
Pan Axis
Figure 1-2: PT-Series Camera Mounting
Once the mounting location has been selected, verify both sides of the mounting surface are
accessible.
Use a thread locking compound such as Loctite 242 or equivalent with all metal to metal threaded
connections.
Once the holes are drilled in the mounting surface, install four (4) stainless steel 5/16 or M8 bolts with
stainless steel washers and lock washers through the base of the camera.
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1.5.3
Installation of PT-Series Camera and Galvanic Isolation Kit
Important Safeguards and Warnings
•
Installation and servicing should be done by qualified installation and service personnel only.
•
Installation should be done according to all local and national electrical and mechanical codes,
using only approved materials.
•
Use stainless steel hardware to fasten mounts to outdoor surfaces.
•
To prevent damage from water leakage when installing outdoors, apply sealant around the bolt
holes between the mount and the mounting surface.
Caution!
Following this procedure is critical to maintaining the warranty on your PT-Series product.
Failure to follow these instructions can potentially void the camera warranty.
Table 1-1: Kit Contents
Description
Qty
Isolation plate
1
M8 nylon flat washera
M8 nylon shoulder washer
6
6
M8 split washer, S.S.
6
M8 washer, S.S.
6
Tef-Gel TG .25, 3 cc syringea
a.
Two extra pieces of each attaching part are
supplied in the kit.
optional
Use the alternate nylon flat washers and Tef-Gel lubricant on fasteners for PT-Series camera bases with
mounting holes that are too small to accept the shoulder washers. A syringe of Tef-Gel may be supplied in
the mounting kit when the nylon flat washer is expected to be required.
Step 1
Step 2
Determine the correct positioning of the isolation plate (See Figure 1-3 on page 11).
Place the isolation plate and the camera on the mounting structure aligning the bolt holes or
studs.
Step 3
Install nylon shoulder washers (4x) or alternate nylon flat washers (4x) onto camera base.
If using nylon flat washers, apply a generous coat of Tef-Gel filling all gaps and voids.
Step 4
Secure the camera using 5/16” or M8 fasteners (4x) with stainless steel flat washers and
split washers on top of the nylon washers.
Step 5
Ensure the camera is properly grounded. FLIR requires using a 14 AWG to 16 AWG
grounding strap anchored to the ground lug on the back plate of the camera housing and
then terminated to the nearest earth-grounding point.
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PT-Series Camera Installation
M8 or 5/16” fasteners (not supplied)
4 places, minimum length 1 in.
(dependent on mounting structure)
If using nylon flat washers,
apply a generous coat of Tef-Gel
filling all gaps and voids.
(4 places)
M8 split lock washer (4 places)
M8 flat washer (4 places)
M8 nylon shoulder washer or
nylon flat washer (4 places)
isolation plate
If using nylon flat washers,
apply a generous coat of Tef-Gel
filling all gaps and voids.
(4 places)
example mounting structure
(FLIR PN 500-0461-00)
Figure 1-3: PT-Series Galvanic Isolation Kit (4204960)
1.6
1.6.1
Camera Connections
Removing the Back Cover
Use a 2.5mm hex key to loosen the four
captive screws and remove the cover,
exposing the connections at the back of
the camera. There is a grounding wire
connected between the case and the
back cover
1.6.2
Cable Gland Sealing
Proper installation of cable sealing glands
and use of appropriate elastomer inserts
is critical to long term reliability. Cables
enter the camera mount enclosure
through liquid-tight compression glands.
Be sure to insert the cables through the
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PT-Series Camera Installation
cable glands on the enclosure before terminating and connecting them (the connectors will not fit
through the cable gland). Leave the gland nuts loosened until all cable installation has been
completed. Inspect and install gland fittings in the back cover with suitable leak sealant and tighten to
ensure water tight fittings. Teflon tape or pipe sealant (i.e. DuPont RectorSeal T™) are suitable for this
purpose.
1.6.3
Cable Glands and Spare Parts Kit
The kit contains the two 3/4” cable glands and gland
seal plugs required for non-conduit installations.
The remaining parts included in the kit are:
•
a spare ground wire
•
a spare ground nut and lock washer
•
two spare power terminal block plugs
•
two spare serial port terminal block plugs
•
four spare F-Series back cover screws
•
four spare PT-Series back cover screws
1.6.4
Cable Gland Seal Inserts
The PT-Series camera comes with two 3/4”
NPT cable glands, each with a three hole gland
seal insert. Cables may be between 0.23" to
0.29" OD. Up to six cables may be installed.
Plugs are required for the insert hole(s) not
being used. The photograph at the right shows
two power cables, an Ethernet cable, a serial
control cable (no analog video is installed), and
two gland seal plugs.
Gland seal plugs
Ground
Lug
Ethernet
Camera
Power
If non-standard cable diameters are used, you
may need to locate or fabricate the appropriate
insert to fit the desired cable. FLIR Systems,
Inc. does not provide cable gland inserts other
than what is supplied with the system.
Serial Control
Heater
Power
Note
Insert the cables through the cable glands on the enclosure before terminating and connecting them.
(In general, the terminated connectors will not fit through the cable gland.) If a terminated cable is
required, you can make a clean and singular cut in the gland seal to install the cable into the gland
seal.
1.6.5
Connecting power
The camera itself does not have an on/off switch. Generally the PT-Series camera will be connected to
a circuit breaker and the circuit breaker will be used to apply or remove power to the camera. If power
is supplied to it, the camera will be in one of two modes: Booting Up or Powered On.
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PT-Series Camera Installation
The power cable supplied by the installer must use wires that are sufficient size gauge (16 AWG
recommended) for the supply voltage and length of the cable run, to ensure adequate current carrying
capacity. Always follow local building codes!
Ensure the camera is properly grounded. The camera chassis ground should be provided using the
lowest resistance path possible. FLIR requires using a 14 AWG to 16 AWG grounding strap anchored
to the grounding lug on the back plate of the camera housing and connected to the nearest earthgrounding point.
Note
The terminal blocks for power connections will accept a maximum 16 AWG wire size.
1.6.6
Video Connections
The analog video connections on the back of the camera are BNC connectors. The camera also
provides an RCA video connector that can be used to temporarily monitor the video output.
The video cables used should be rated as RG59U or better to ensure a quality video signal.
1.6.7
Ethernet Connection
The cable gland seal is designed for use with Shielded Category 6 Ethernet cable.
1.6.8
Serial Connection
For serial communications, it is necessary to set the parameters such as the signaling standard (RS232 or RS-422), baud rate, number of stop bits, parity and so on. It is also necessary to select the
communication protocol (either Pelco D or Bosch) and the camera address. By default, the serial
interface uses Pelco D, RS-422 standard, 9600 baud rate, 8/1/none, and address 1.
Note
Typical Bosch systems operate using a biphase connection and the FLIR cameras do not accept
biphase signals directly. It may be necessary to install a biphase converter in order to use the Bosch
protocol.
Connect the wires of the serial cable as show in Figure 1-4 on page 14. When using the RS-422
standard, ensure the transmit pair of the camera goes to the receive pair of the other device, and vice
versa.
Note
The terminal blocks for serial connections will accept a maximum 20 AWG wire size.
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PT-Series Camera Installation
Serial and IP Communications
Main Analog Video
Auxiliary Analog Video and Power
Male
BNC
Ethernet
Male
BNC
3
2
1
{
{
24 VAC/DCEarth Ground
24 VAC/DC+
3/4” NPT for Cable
Gland or Conduit
{
RS422
TX+
GND
RX+
RS232
Auxiliary
Port
3
2
1
Main
Port
24 VAC/DCEarth Ground
24 VAC/DC+
5 4 3 2 1
TD(B)+
TD(A)GND
RD(B)+
RD(A)-
1
20 AWG MAX
Chassis
GND
16 AWG Shielded
Back Cover
16 AWG Shielded
Serial
Control
Ethernet
Video
Video
24
VAC/DC
24
VAC/DC
Gland B Camera End
Gland A Camera End
Analog Video
(monitoring output only)
IP Network
Local
GND
Analog Visible Video
Not used
Serial Connector
for local control
Camera Power
Heater Power
Analog Infrared Video
Figure 1-4: PT-Series Camera Connections
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PT-Series Camera Installation
1.7
Serial Communications Overview
The installer must decide if the serial communications settings will be configured via hardware (DIP
switch settings) or software. If the camera has an Ethernet connection, then generally it will be easier
(and more convenient in the long run) to make configuration settings via software. Then configuration
changes can be made over the network without physically accessing the camera. Also the settings can
be saved to a file and backed up or restored as needed.
If the camera is configured via hardware, then configuration changes in the future may require
accessing the camera on a tower or pole, dismounting it, and removing the back and so on. If the
camera does not have an Ethernet connection, the DIP switches must be used to set the serial
communication options.
Note
The serial communications parameters for the PT-Series camera are set or modified either via
hardware DIP switch settings or via software, through a web browser interface. A single DIP switch
(SW103-9), Software Override determines whether the configuration comes from the hardware DIP
switches or the software settings.
Note
The DIP switches are only used to control serial communications parameters. Other settings, related
to IP camera functions and so on, must be modified via software (using a web browser).
1.8
Serial Communications Settings - Hardware DIP Switches
Note
The PT-Series camera reads the settings of the hardware DIP switches only at power up. After serial
communications parameters are set or modified via hardware DIP switch settings, the PT-Series
camera must be power cycled before the settings take affect.
The camera has two blocks of DIP switches that are used to configure the serial communications
settings. One block of switches has 8 switches and is used to set the serial address (or ID) of the
camera. The other block of switches has 10 switches and is used to set baud rate, hardware protocol
(RS-232 or RS-422), serial protocol (Pelco D or Bosch), and Software Override.
The figure below shows the locations of dip switches SW102 and SW103.
SW102
SW103
Switch
Position
Off
On
Figure 1-5: PT-Series Camera Configuration
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PT-Series Camera Installation
If the Software Override DIP switch is set to the software position (as it is by default), all of the other
DIP switches will be ignored, and configuration changes must be made through software. If the switch
is set to the hardware position, all configuration settings related to serial communications are made
with the DIP switches, and changes that are made via software (with a web browser) will be ignored.
Serial Address: Use the block of switches on the left (SW102) to set the serial address of the
camera. The available range of values is from decimal 1 to 255. The dip switches are interpreted as a
binary number, with switch 1 representing the least significant bit (the switches are in the reverse order
of the bits). For convenience, a table of serial addresses and their binary equivalents is included at the
end of the manual. “Serial Address: Decimal To Binary Conversion” on page 47
Table 1-2: Dip Switch Address/ID Settings—SW101
ID
Sw 1
LSB
Sw 2
Sw 3
Sw 4
Sw 5
Sw 6
Sw 7
Sw 8
MSB
1
On
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
2
Off
On
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
3
On
On
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
255
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
Other Serial Communication Parameters: The tables below defines the switch locations, bit
numbering and on/off settings used in controlling the other serial communication parameters.
Table 1-3: Dip Switch Settings—SW103
Settings
Baud rate: This is the baud rate of the system user serial
port. The available values are 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200
kbaud.
Camera Control Protocol: This is the communication
protocol selected for the system when operating over the
serial port. The available protocols are Pelco-D and
Bosch.
Serial Communication Standard: This determines the
electrical interface selected for the user serial port. The
available settings are RS422 and RS232.
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Description
Bit 1
Bit 2
OFF
OFF
2400
ON
OFF
4800
OFF
ON
9600
ON
ON
19200
Bit 3
Bit 4
OFF
OFF
Pelco-D
ON
OFF
NA
OFF
ON
Bosch
ON
ON
NA
Bit 5
Bit 6
OFF
OFF
NA
ON
OFF
RS422
OFF
ON
RS232
ON
ON
N/A
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Table 1-3: Dip Switch Settings—SW103
Settings
Bit 7
Not Used
Software Override DIP Switch: This setting determines
whether the system will use software settings for
configuration or if the dip switch settings will override the
software settings. Default is Off.
Bit 8
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Bit 9
OFF
Software select
ON
Hardware select
Bit 10
Not Used
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1.9
PT-Series Camera Specifications
THERMAL CAMERA SPECS
Resolution
160 x 120
Detector Type
Long-Life, Uncooled
VO× Microbolometer
Pixel Pitch
25 μm
Focal Length (lens/model dependent)
9 mm, 13 mm, 19 mm
9 mm, 13 mm, 19 mm,
35 mm, 65 mm, 100 mm
13 mm, 25 mm, 35 mm,
50 mm, 65 mm, 100 mm
Field Of View (lens/model dependent)
24° × 20° (PT-124; 9 mm)
17° × 14° (PT-117; 13 mm)
12° × 10° (PT-112; 19 mm)
48° × 39° (PT-348; 9 mm)
34° × 28° (PT-334; 13 mm)
24° × 19° (PT-324; 19 mm)
13° × 10° (PT-313; 35 mm)
7° × 5° (PT-307; 65 mm)
4.6° × 3.7° (PT-304; 100 mm)
45° × 37° (PT-645; 13 mm)
25° × 20° (PT-625; 25 mm)
18° × 14° (PT-618; 35 mm)
12° × 10° (PT-612; 50 mm)
10° × 8° (PT-610; 65 mm)
6.2° × 5° (PT-606; 100 mm)
Zoom (model dependent)
2× E-zoom
2× & 4× E-zoom
320 x 240
25 μm
17 μm
2× & 4× E-zoom
Continuous e-zoom
on PT-6xxE models
Spectral Range
Focus Range
640 x 480
Athermalized, focus-free
OUTPUTS
Composite Video NTSC or PAL
Video Over Ethernet
Standard
Two independent channels of streaming MPEG-4, H.264, or M-JPEG
for each of two cameras.
CONTROL
Point To Point (stand alone)
Ethernet
Standard
Standard
Serial
Network Enabled
RS-232/-422; Pelco D, Bosch
Standard
PAN/TILT PERFORMANCE
Pan Angle/Speed
Tilt Angle/Speed
Continuous 360°; 0.1° to 70°/sec
+90° to -90°; 0.1° to 30°/sec
GENERAL
Weight
36 lb (configuration dependent)
Dimensions (L,W,H)
13.7” × 18.4” × 12.8” (348 mm × 467 mm × 326 mm)
Power Requirements
24 Vac (21-30 Vac)
24 Vdc (21-30 Vdc)
Power Consumption
24 Vac: 85 VA max no heater, 215 VA max w/heater
24 Vdc: 65 W max no heater, 195 W max w/heater
Inrush Current
<10 A for dc power supply with slew rate > 10 ms
<38 A for ac power supply with slew rate > 4.17 ms
ENVIRONMENTAL
Dust, Water Protection Rating
Operating Temperature
IP66
-40° C to +70 °C (-40 °F to +158 °F)
DAY/NIGHT CCD CAMERA
Sensor Type
Lens Field Of View
Focal Length
Zoom
F/#
Sony FCB-EX1010
1/4” Exview HAD CCD
57.8° (h) to 1.7° (h)
3.4 mm to 122.4 mm
36× Optical zoom, 12× E-zoom
1.6 to 4.5
Effective pixels (NTSC)
380,000
Power consumption is independent of the input voltage when the heater is off. The power drawn
by the heaters increases with the input voltage to a maximum at 30 Volts.
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This chapter provides basic information on how to operate a new camera that has not yet been
configured. A bench test can be used to verify camera operation before the camera is configured for
the local network. This chapter also provides basic configuration information.
2.1
Nexus IP Camera
The PT-Series camera is an IP camera with Nexus capabilities, which means there is a microprocessor
inside that runs the Nexus Server software. The Nexus Server provides a number of services,
including camera control, video streaming, and geo-referencing capabilities. The Nexus
communications protocol is an open, standards-based protocol that allows the server to communicate
with a video management client, such as FLIR Sensors Manager or with a third-party ONVIFcompatible VMS client.
There are two main components to the Nexus Server software. One is a web server process that
listens on the network for web browser requests, and is used for the initial (and perhaps ongoing or
occasional) configuration changes to the camera, as well as to view video and operate the camera.
The other process, known as the Nexus Server, listens on the network for connections from clients
such as FSM or other VMS clients. These clients are used to control the camera and stream video
during day-to-day operations of the camera.
2.1.1
Nexus Server Configuration
It may be necessary for the installer to make a limited number of configuration changes for each
camera, such as setting the serial and/or IP communication parameters. For example, each camera
comes from the factory with the same default IP address, so adding more than one camera to an IP
network requires each camera to be configured with a different IP address, at a minimum. On the other
hand, many of the configuration parameters will remain unchanged from the factory default settings.
2.1.2
Serial and/or IP Communications
For a camera that is installed in a legacy-type CCTV network using analog video, the camera may
commonly be controlled with serial communications. The serial cable from the camera will be
connected to a keyboard/joystick device, or to a video switch, encoder, or DVR that has a serial
communication port. In this case the installer may want to configure parameters such as the address of
the camera, the baud rate, and so on. On Nexus IP cameras that support serial communications, these
parameters can be set through software using a web browser. The parameters can also be set using
DIP switches when IP communications are not used.
For a camera installed in an IP network, the camera will commonly be controlled over Ethernet by a PC
or laptop running FLIR Sensors Manager (FSM) or a third-party Video Management System (VMS).
FSM is a client program that communicates with the Nexus Server on the camera. It allows control of
the camera and video streaming and many other functions.
In many cases, a camera will be installed with both serial and Ethernet communications. As such, the
camera can be controlled by means of a serial device or through software. When someone tries to
control the camera with a serial device at the same time as someone does through the software IP
interface, the serial device takes priority.
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2.1.3
Serial Communications
Cameras that have a serial interface support a limited set of pan/tilt/zoom and focus commands over
RS-422 or RS-232 serial communications using common protocols (Pelco D or Bosch). By default, the
camera is configured for RS-422 standard, 9600 Baud, 8 bits, no parity, 1 stop bit, using the Pelco D
protocol, and address 1. If the camera will be controlled only through serial communications, it may still
be necessary to connect it to an IP network, at least temporarily, to adjust any of the serial
communications settings.
2.1.4
Ethernet Communications
The camera has an Ethernet connection that allows streaming video over an IP network as well as
configuration and control of the camera1. It is possible to stream video and control the camera as it is
from the factory, without making any configuration changes. However in most cases the camera will
have at least some configuration changes to allow it to connect with other devices on the existing
network.
Once the camera is connected to a network and powered on, the user can choose to use either a web
browser2 or the FLIR Sensors Manager (FSM) software to view the video and control the camera. The
FSM software can be run under Microsoft Windows. The FSM software is a free download from the
FLIR web page.
A web browser can be used to operate the camera (view video, pan/tilt/zoom, and so on) and it can be
used to make configuration changes. This manual has basic configuration information; refer to the
Nexus IP Camera Configuration Guide (FLIR Doc. 427-0030-00-28) for more details about camera
configuration.
Getting the camera IP interface set up and working may require a level of familiarity with managing IP
networks that is new to many security professionals. Prior to configuring the IP interface and streaming
video parameters, make sure you know how to manage and configure the other equipment in the
network (for example, any PC or device that will connect to the camera, any router or firewall that will
carry the IP traffic, and so on). FLIR technical support can only provide limited support in this regard.
1. For this chapter, it is assumed the camera will be connected to a network via Ethernet. For installations that use only analog video output, it is not possible to make configuration changes unless an
Ethernet connection is also used.
2. The web interface is supported on Microsoft Internet Explorer version 9, as well as the latest versions
of Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox®.
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2.2
Basic Test and Configuration Steps
Assuming the existing network uses IP addresses that are unique and different than the default
address on the camera, configuring the camera for IP communications generally involves the following
steps:
Step 1
Step 2
Step 3
Step 4
Connect the Ethernet port of the camera to an IP network that is isolated from the existing
camera network (for example, a standalone switch).
Connect a PC or laptop to the same network.
Temporarily set the IP address of the PC or laptop to be compatible with the factory network
address of the camera (for example, 192.168.250.1).
If you are unsure how to set the IP address on the PC or laptop, refer to “Setting the IP
address on a Windows PC” on page 44.
Perform a bench test of the camera using FSM, prior to making any parameter changes (this
step is optional but recommended).
Step 5
Using a web browser, configure the camera settings, such as IP address, camera date/time,
and other parameters, so the camera is compatible with the existing network equipment.
Step 6
Save the configuration changes and restart the server.
Step 7
Connect the camera to the existing network and test the camera.
Step 8
Make a backup of the new configuration.
2.3
Camera Bench Test
Since the camera offers both analog video and IP video, there are several ways to bench test the
camera. It is recommended the installer should test the camera using the same type of connections as
the final installation.
Even if using analog video and serial communications in the final installation, it is a good idea to test
the IP communications when performing the bench test. If any image adjustments are necessary, they
can be done using a web browser over the IP connection, and saved as power-on default settings.
With the camera powered up, analog video can be tested at the BNC connectors. Connect the camera
video output to a video monitor and confirm the live video is displayed on the monitor.
Connect the camera and a PC or laptop to the same Ethernet switch (or back-to-back with an Ethernet
crossover cable3). The PT-Series camera is shipped with an IP address set to 192.168.250.116 with a
netmask of 255.255.255.0. Set the PC or laptop network adapter to a compatible IP address (for
example: 192.168.250.1).
If using serial communications, connect the serial cable from the camera to a serial device such as a
keyboard, and confirm that the camera is responding to serial commands. Before using serial
communications, it may be necessary to configure the serial device interface to operate with the
camera. When the camera is turned on, the video temporarily displays system information including
the serial number, IP address, Pelco address, and the Baud rate. For example:
S/N: 1234567
IP Addr: 192.168.250.116
PelcoD (Addr:1): 9600 SW
3. In most cases, a straight Ethernet cable can be used, because many PCs have auto-detect Ethernet
interfaces.
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2.4
Web Browser Interface
Use a web browser to connect to the camera as described below, and confirm it is streaming video.
Once the bench test is complete, use the web browser to make configuration changes as needed (for
example, set the IP address to an address that is compatible with the existing network). It is also a
good idea to run the FSM software and confirm it is working with the camera as expected.
It is possible to log into the camera using one of three User Names: user, expert, and admin (the
corresponding passwords by default are user, expert, and fliradmin respectively). The user login can
be used to do the initial bench test of the camera. The expert or admin login must be used to make
configuration changes such as setting the IP address. The login passwords can (and should) be
changed by the system administrator to prevent unauthorized access. For information on how to
change the passwords, refer to “Maintenance Menus” on page 27.
2.4.1
Log into the Camera Web Page
Step 1
Open a web browser and enter: http:\\192.168.250.116. The login screen with a picture of
the camera will appear.
Enter user for the User Name and user for the Password, and click Login.
Step 2
Figure 2-1: Camera Web Page Login Screen
2.4.2
Live Video Page
The Live Video page will be displayed, with a live image from the camera on the left part of the page
and a virtual joystick and function buttons on the right part of the page. Next to the FLIR logo along the
top of the screen are some menu choices, including Live Video (the red text indicates it is selected),
Setup, Maintenance, Help, and Log out.
Help
At the top of the page, select the Help menu to display software version information. This page has
information about the camera including hardware and software revision numbers, part numbers, and
serial numbers. If it is necessary to contact FLIR Technical Support for assistance, it will be helpful to
have the information from this page (such as Software Version) on hand.
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Toggle Time
Figure 2-2: Live Video Page
Toggle Camera/PC time
Use this button to view either the PC time or the camera time.
Log out
Use the Log out menu entry to disconnect from the camera.
If the live video is not displayed, refer to “Troubleshooting Tips” on page 38. In the lower right of the
web page there is a frame rate selector. This selector allows the user to change the rate at which the
frames are displayed in the browser. This rate controls this user’s own web browser only, and does not
affect the video streams to other destinations.
Camera Control and Status
In the lower left of the screen are two indicator “lights”: Control and Status.
Initially the Control light is off, as in the image above, indicating the user is not
able to control the camera immediately. When multiple users are connected to
a camera, only one user at a time can issue commands to the camera. If
another user has control of the camera, the Control light is yellow.
A user is able to request control of the camera by clicking on the yellow or black
“light”, or simply by sending a command to the camera. For example, move the
cursor over the video and select the “Zoom In” control (magnifying glass with
“+”) that appears in the lower left of the screen. The Status light may turn off
temporarily while waiting for the response from the camera. After a short pause,
the Control light should turn green. Observe what happens to the image when
the “Zoom In” control is clicked several times. Be patient, there may be a slight
delay between each command while the browser waits for a response from the camera.
If a command is sent to the camera when the user does not have control, the command will not be
executed, and it is necessary to send the command again once the light is green.
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Web Control Panel
The control buttons on the right side of the page provide a way to control the
camera. When the mouse cursor is positioned over a button, a screen tip is
displayed which explains the function of the button.
This same web interface is used with various FLIR thermal cameras; some are
fixed mount cameras, such as the F-Series and FC-Series S cameras, and
some have pan/tilt capabilities, such as the PT-Series and D-Series. As a result,
some buttons appearing in the control panel may be disabled if they do not
apply to the camera in use.
When the web interface is used with a pan/tilt camera, an image of a joystick
appears below the control panel buttons. When the mouse is positioned over
the joystick, the camera can be moved (up-down and/or left-right) by dragging
the joystick in the appropriate direction.
For a pan/tilt camera, when the mouse is positioned over the video window, some
controls appear in the lower left of the video image which allow the camera to be panned
left or right, or to be tilted up or down. To move the camera, click on one of the arrows.
To zoom in, click on the Zoom In control (+); to zoom out, click the Zoom Out control (-).
For a camera with continuous zoom or e-zoom, to zoom the camera all the way in or out,
click on either zoom control (+ or -) and drag it onto the video image.
Save Snapshot
This button allows the user to save an image as a .jpg file. The destination folder for the
image is determined by the web browser that is used.
Perform IR NUC Calibration
This button causes the camera to perform a Non-Uniformity Correction operation (refer to
the “Image freezes momentarily” on page 38).
Toggle Scene Preset
This button causes the camera to cycle through 5 different image settings. The Scene
Presets cause the image brightness and contrast to adjust. Depending on the time of day,
weather, and other conditions, one Scene Preset may be preferable to the others.
Toggle Polarity
This button changes the way various objects are displayed in the image, with hot objects
displayed as white and cold objects as black, or vice versa.
Start Scan List
This button will cause the camera to start the current scan list, which is a set of preset
locations (each preset has a specific azimuth, elevation and zoom setting). The presets are
programmed on the camera using the web interface or the FSM software.
Stop Scan List
This button causes the camera to stop (discontinue) the scan list.
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Toggle Video Source
For a multi-sensor system with more than one video source (for example, a PT-Series
camera with a thermal IR camera and a daylight camera), this button causes the “active” video source
to be switched from one camera to the next. If the thermal IR camera is active and the button is
selected, it causes the daylight camera to become active, and vice versa. This also causes the new
active video source to be displayed in the Live Video window.
Initialize Pan/Tilt
For a long-range multi-sensor system with a pan/tilt platform, this button causes the pan/tilt
to go through its startup initialization. For most pan/tilt security cameras, this button is not needed
since the pan/tilt will initialize automatically. For safety reasons, long-rage systems with large camera
lenses do not initialize automatically, so this button is used.
Pan/Tilt Home
This button causes the camera to go to the Home position. The Home position can be set
using the FSM software.
Autofocus
This button causes the active video source to perform an autofocus operation. If the active
source is a thermal camera with a fixed-focus lens, selecting this button causes an error message to
be displayed below the video window (“Function not available for this driver.”).
Function
Some cameras have additional features or functions which can be accessed using an extra
numeric function keypad. It is possible to create customized camera functions through a “macro”
interface which can be programmed through XML commands. Contact FLIR Technical Support for
information about the Nexus XML-Based Control Interfaces.
When the Function button is selected, the keypad changes to a numeric
keypad. As digits are selected, they are displayed below the keypad. To
execute the function, select the FN Function button again.
If an invalid function is entered, an error message appears below the video
window (“Function is not available in current mode.”). To return to the Control
Panel, select the Back button (left arrow).
Goto Preset
A camera can have a set of predetermined pan/tilt locations,
each of which is known as a “preset”. For example, a preset may be
configured for each of the locations where security surveillance is most
needed, such as a gate, doorway, and other point of access.
When the Goto Preset button is selected, the keypad changes to a numeric
keypad. As digits are selected, they are displayed below the keypad. To
cause the camera to go to the preset, select the Goto Preset button again.
To return to the Control Panel, select the Back button (left arrow).
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2.5
Bench Test Using FSM
IF FSM is to be used in the final installation, it is a good idea to perform a bench test with it, as
described below, prior to making configuration changes. The FSM software is included with the
camera; the software installation will begin automatically when the CD is inserted into the PC. Once
the bench test is complete, use a web browser to make configuration changes as needed (for
example, set the IP address to an address that is compatible with the existing network).
The following provides a brief description of how to use FSM to control a camera and stream video
from the camera. For more detailed information on how to use FSM, refer to the FLIR Sensors
Manager User Manual. The latest version of the software is available from http://support.flir.com/ on
the Downloads page.
2.5.1
Running FSM
Run the FSM software by double clicking the FLIR Sensors Manager icon on the desktop, or click on
the Windows Start button and select Programs > FLIR Sensors Manager > FLIR Sensors Manager.
Initially the FLIR Sensors Manager splash screen will be displayed. After a brief while, the FSM main
window will appear. A popup FSM Notification window will appear in the lower right of the screen
indicating that no cameras (servers) have been discovered yet.
The FLIR Sensors Manager uses a “client/server” architecture. The FSM software is considered a
client, and the cameras are considered servers or sensors. The Sensors Panel in the upper left of the
window indicates no sensors have been discovered and added to the list of Active Sensors.
No sensors
discovered initially
Pan/Tilt/Zoom controls
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Click on Setup, if required, then the Discovery button on the side panel to bring up the Discovery
Panel. The FSM software can automatically discover FLIR cameras on the network.
When the Discovery Panel is displayed, click Refresh. The FLIR camera will appear in the list of
Discovered Sensors. The camera will be called “FLIR”, and the asterisk in parenthesis “(*)” indicates
the camera has not been added to the list of Active Sensors on the right.
Click on the center bar “>” to move the camera to the list of Active Servers. The
name of the camera should appear in the Sensors Panel, with a green joystick icon.
By default, the FSM software will automatically discover sensors in the network,
connect to the first camera it finds, take control of the camera, and display the video
from the camera in Video Wall 0.
Click on Video Wall 0 and confirm that video is streamed to the monitor and it is possible to control the
camera using the pan/tilt/zoom controls in the Control Panel. For example, click on the zoom button
(magnifying glass with +), and the video will zoom in. Once operation of the camera has been
confirmed, the camera can be configured to an IP address that matches the installation network.
2.6
Basic Camera Configuration
The following procedures describe how to do the most common basic camera configuration steps,
such as setting the camera IP address and hostname and changing the user passwords. To make
these changes, it is necessary to login using the admin user account.
Note
In most installations, the only camera settings needed are available from the Live Video page
(using Scene Presets or Polarity). Use caution when modifying the camera settings described in
this section. Some settings may adversely affect the thermal image over time or may completely
disable the camera or the network interface.
2.6.1
Expert and Admin Accounts
When a user logs in as expert, additional menus are available. The
Setup menu can be used to make adjustments to the thermal and
daylight cameras, pan/tilt platform, Surveillance modes, and Preset
camera locations. The expert log in can also access the Maintenance > Server pages to modify the
network settings, including the IP address of the camera, setup system services (such as date and
time), and change some of the security settings. When a user logs in as admin, all the Maintenance
pages are accessible. The Maintenance menu provides access to many other configuration options.
2.6.2
Maintenance Menus
Initially, when the Maintenance page is selected, the Server > LAN Settings page is displayed.
Note, In order to make some configuration changes through the Maintenance menu, it is necessary to
save the changes, then stop and restart the server to make the changes take effect.
The basic camera configuration steps are accessed through the Maintenance menu, using the Server
submenu on the left side of the page.The LAN Settings, Services, and Security Options selections
are described below. Generally with these settings it is necessary to save the changes to make them
effective, but it is not necessary to stop and restart the server.
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Step 1
Step 2
If you are logged into the Nexus Server user account, select Log out or direct your web
browser to: http:\\192.168.250.116.
Enter admin for the User Name and fliradmin for the Password, and click Login.
Step 3
Select Maintenance from the top menu. The following LAN Settings page appears.
LAN Settings: The LAN Settings page can be used to set the hostname, default gateway, and IP
address for the camera. The default IP Address mode is static; the mode can also be set to DHCP.
Scroll down
to Save
When the LAN settings are changed and the Save button is
clicked, a pop-up message will appear to indicate the network
interface should be restarted. Once all the changes have been
made and saved, click on the Restart Network button at the
bottom of the page.
Once the IP address of the camera is changed, the PC may no longer be on the same network and
therefore may not be able to access the camera until the IP address on the PC is changed also. For
that reason, you may wish to change the IP address after making other configuration changes.
If the Hostname is changed, the new name may not show up in FSM until the camera is rebooted. To
reboot the camera, save any configuration changes, then select Server Status and click the Reboot
button.
Note
The IP address is temporarily displayed on the video for a short while after the camera boots up.
If you are unsure what the camera IP address is set to, it may useful to reboot the camera and
watch for the IP Address information after the camera boots up.To reset the IP address to the
factory default, refer to “Restoring the Factory Settings” on page 43.
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Services Menu
Date and Time: The Date and Time settings page is used to configure the date and time settings.
The date, time, and time zone can be obtained from an NTP server, or can be entered manually. If the
NTP mode is selected, the NTP server information can be entered. The NTP server address can be
entered as a static address or can be obtained via DHCP. The Nexus server must be stopped before
changes can be saved. After saving changes, it is necessary to restart the server to make them
effective.
Toggle Server (Stop/Start)
If the Custom mode is selected, a pop-up window
allows the information to be entered manually. Set
the date and time parameters, then select the Save
button at the bottom.
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Server Status: The Server Status page provides an indication of the current server status (either
running or stopped) and buttons for starting or stopping the server or for rebooting the system.
Toggle Server (Stop/Start)
After making configuration changes, it is necessary to save the changes to the server (there is a Save
button at the bottom of each configuration page). The configuration changes do not take effect
immediately. Generally, it is also necessary to stop and restart the server for the changes to become
effective. The server has a configuration that is active and running, and another configuration that is
saved (and possibly different than the running configuration).
The message at the bottom of the page indicates the
saved configuration is different than the active (running)
configuration, and it is necessary to restart the server.
It may take up to 20 seconds or more to stop the server,
especially when there are multiple video streams open. Be
patient when stopping the server.
When the server is stopped and the page is refreshed, the
status will show Server Stopped and the Start button will be
enabled.
Click on the Start button to restart the server, and when the
page refreshes, the status will again show Server Running.
The Start button will be replaced by a Stop button when the
startup procedure has completed.
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Security Options: Use the Security Options page to restrict access through the camera web server
to specific IP addresses and to set and change passwords.
Add IP
address
Scroll down
to Save
Allow change
password
As an additional security measure, it is possible to limit which computers have access to the web
browser interface. At the top of the page under “Restrict Web Configuration”, add a computer’s IP
address and click “Add”. After all the allowed IP addresses are entered, select the Save button to save
the changes. Note, once one or more addresses has been added to this list, only these computers will
be able to log in to the web interface. Be sure to remember which addresses are allowed.
To maintain security of your systems set passwords for each of the three login accounts. After a
password is set and confirmed, select the Save button at the bottom (scroll down the page, if
necessary).
• user—The user account can only use the Live Video page and controls.
•
expert—The expert account can use the Live Video page, the camera Setup page,
and the Server pages on the Maintenance menu.
•
admin—The admin account can use all pages.
Selecting the Allow Change Password check box will allow
that login to change their own password from an icon at the
top of all pages.
It is also possible to limit access to the camera
from a client program (such as FSM) by IP
address. To do so, in the Maintenance menu
select Sensor, then Networking. Set the “Allow
anonymous clients” parameter to No, and then
add in the allowed addresses in the Remote
Clients list and click Save.
Note, once one or more addresses has been
added to this list, only these computers will be
able to access the camera as a client. Be sure
to remember which addresses are allowed.
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Modules Menu
The Modules page is accessed through the Maintenance menu, using the Sensor submenu on the
left side of the page. The Video pages and the On-screen display (OSD) page are described below.
Use the Video page to modify the video stream parameters that affect both image quality and
transmission bandwidth. With the settings on the OSD page, text information (for example, camera
name, date/time, etc.) can be added as an overlay on the video. The OSD text will appear on the IP
video streams as well as the analog video output. Use the Alarm Manager page to define rules for
camera alarms from Video Analytics or GPIO.
Video Pages: By default, four video streams are enabled for the camera: Video 0, Video 1, Video 2,
Video 3. Video 0 and Video 1 are IR streams; Video 2 and Video 3 are visible streams. All video
streams are available for viewing from a client program such as FSM, a stand-alone video player, or a
third-party VMS. By default, Video 0 and Video 2 use H.264 encoding while Video 1 and Video 3 use
MJPEG encoding. To modify parameters that affect a particular IP Video stream from the camera,
select the appropriate link (for example, Video 0).
With the factory configuration, the default parameters provide high-quality full frame-rate video
streams with reasonable bandwidth usage. The default settings for each video stream provide highquality, full frame-rate video. In general, for most installations it will not be necessary to modify the
default parameters. However in some cases, such as when a video stream is sent over a wireless
network, it may be useful to “tune” the video stream to try to reduce the bandwidth requirements. In
particular, the RTSP Settings, Network Options, and the Settings parameters are described below.
Caution!
Adjustments to these settings should only be made by someone trained with thermal cameras
and a thorough understanding of how the various settings affect the image.
Haphazard changes can lead to image problems including a complete loss of video.
The parameters in the Video Settings section will have a significant impact on the quality and
bandwidth requirements of the video stream. In general it is recommended that the default values are
used initially, and then individual parameters can be modified and tested incrementally to determine if
the bandwidth and quality requirements are met.
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Video 0 and Video 2
For the streams Video 0 and Video 2, the
codec options are H.264, MPEG4, or
MJPEG. The MPEG4 codec requires the
least amount of processing, while MJPEG
requires the most.
When the Rate Control parameter is set to
CBR (Constant Bit Rate), the Bit Rate
parameter is used for as average target rate;
the system attempts to keep the stream at or
near the target bit rate. (Note that the Quality
setting does not affect the bit rate.)
Scroll down
to Save
When the Rate Control parameter is set to
CVBR (Constrained Variable Bit Rate), the Bit
Rate parameter is used as an upper limit bit
rate and the Quality setting further adjusts the
amount of video data in the stream; the
system keeps the stream at or under the
target bit rate.
The I-Frame Interval parameter controls the number of P-frames used between I-frames. I-frames are
full frames of video and the P-frames contain the changes that occurred since the last I-frame. A
smaller I-Frame Interval results in higher bandwidth (more full frames sent) and better video quality. A
higher I-Frame Interval number means fewer I-frames are sent and therefore results in lower
bandwidth and possibly lower quality.
The Image Size parameter controls the video
resolution and therefore can have a large impact
on bandwidth usage. The larger the size of the
frame, the better the resolution and the larger the
network bandwidth required. Table 2-1 provides
the corresponding resolution for each setting.
Table 2-1: Image Size Settings
Resolution
NTSC
PAL
D1
720 x 480
720 x 576
4SIF
704 x 480
704 x 576
VGA
640 x 480
640 x 480
SIF
352 x 240
352 x 288
QVGA
320 x 240
320 x 240
As a rule of thumb, if the video will be viewed on its own and on a reasonably large screen, a large
image size setting may look better. On the other hand, if the video is shown as a tile in a video wall, a
smaller image size may look as good and consume less bandwidth.
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Video 0 and Video 2 Multicast
By default, the video streams from the camera are sent using
unicast packets rather than multicast. This means a given packet
of IP Video will be sent separately to each client that has that video
stream open. Therefore each additional client will cause the
bandwidth to increase and cause more overhead on the system in
comparison to multicast. With Multicast enabled, video packets are
shared by streaming clients, so additional clients do not cause
bandwidth to increase as dramatically. If the video streams are
used by more than one client/location, it may be wise to use
multicast for more efficient bandwidth usage.
With Multicast enabled, new fields are shown, Destination Network
IP address and Destination Port, as well as TTL (time-to-live).
If more than one camera is providing multicast streams on the
network, be sure to configure each stream with a unique multicast
Destination Network IP address and Destination Port combination.
The time-to-live field controls the ability of IP packets to traverse network or router boundaries. A value
of 1 restricts the stream to the same subnet. Values greater than 1 allow ever increasing access
between networks.
Video 0 and Video 2 RTP Streaming
There are some challenges with streaming video over an IP network, when compared to IP
applications which are less time-critical, such as email and web browsing. There are many parameters
and factors related to network infrastructure, protocols, codecs, and so on that can affect the quality
and bit rate of a video stream when it is established between the camera and a client.
The video streaming is done using a protocol generally referred to
as Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP), but there are actually
many protocols involved, including Real-Time Transport Control
Protocol (RTCP) and Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP). In the
background, a “negotiation” takes place to establish a session
between the client (such as FSM, or a third party VMS or video
player) and the camera.
The ports which form a session are negotiated using a protocol
such as RTSP. A client typically requests a video stream using its
preferred settings, and the camera can respond with its preferred
settings. As a result, many of the details are established
dynamically, which may run contrary to network security
requirements.
In some networks, the RTP/RTSP traffic is carried (tunneled) over
Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) as that may allow the traffic to
cross network boundaries and firewalls. While this method
involves more overhead due to encapsulation, it may be
necessary for clients to access the video streams when HTTP
proxies are used.
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RTSP is originated and received on even port numbers and the associated RTCP communication uses
the next higher odd port number; the default RTSP Port is 554. The default value for the stream from
VIDEO 0 is ch0.
For example, the complete connection string is: rtsp://192.168.251.201:554/ch0. This stream name
can be used to open a video stream with a third-party video player. By default the video stream uses
the IP address of the camera.
Video 1 and Video 3 - MJPEG
For the streams Video 1 and Video 3, the only codec
option is MJPEG. The MJPEG codec provide the highest
quality.
The qFactor parameter controls the perceived quality of
the video. A setting of 75 results in higher bandwidth and
the best video quality. A setting of 25 results in the lowest
bandwidth usage and possibly lower quality.
The Image Size parameter controls the video resolution
and can have a large impact on bandwidth usage. The
larger the frame size, the better the resolution and the
larger the bandwidth required. Table 2-1 provides the
corresponding resolution for each setting.
OSD Page: Use the OSD page to turn on and configure the On Screen Display (OSD) options.
Selected camera-related information (such as camera name, date, time, etc) can be shown as an
overlay on the analog video and in the IP video streams.
Scroll down
to Save
For example, the Label Text Mode can show the Friendly Name (configured on the Product Info page),
Hostname (configured on the LAN Settings page), or a Custom text string (select Custom). Options for
each text item control the “background” Transparency, Color, Text Mode, Style Mode, Size, and
Location.
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Files Menu
Configuration: The Configuration page allows the Nexus Server configuration to be displayed or
backed up locally (on the camera). The configuration file can also be downloaded to another computer
for backup, or a new configuration file can be uploaded from a computer to the camera. Shown at the
top of the screen is the configuration script file in a scrollable window. This can be useful if you ever
need help from a support engineer.
Change
window size
Restore from
backup
Backup current
configuration
In the Backup & Recovery section, click the Restore link associated with the factory.defaults
configuration to restore the camera to its factory settings. This file can not be modified or deleted, so it
is always available.
To make a backup of your system settings, enter a name in the box and click Backup. This will make a
backup file of the current configuration and store it locally on the camera.
In the Upload & Download section, the Download Configuration File link can be used to save a copy to
a PC for safe keeping. A pop-up window will ask for a file name and destination folder. The Upload
button is used to transfer a configuration file from a PC to the camera.
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2.7
Thermal Imaging Overview
When power is applied to the PT-Series camera, a FLIR splash screen is displayed for less than two
seconds, and then the camera outputs the live video image. No operator action or intervention is
required and no configuration of the camera is necessary.
The thermal camera makes an image based on temperature differences. In the thermal image, by
default the hottest item in the scene appears as white and the coldest item is black, and all other items
are represented as a gray scale value between white and black.
It may take some time to get used to the thermal imagery from the camera, especially for someone
who only has experience with normal daylight cameras. Having a basic understanding of the
differences between thermal and daylight cameras can help with getting the best performance from the
thermal camera.
Both thermal and daylight cameras have detectors (pixels) that detect energy. One difference between
thermal and daylight cameras has to do with where the energy comes from to create an image. When
viewing an image with an ordinary camera, there has to be some source of visible light (something hot,
such as the sun or lights) that reflects off the objects in the scene to the camera. The same is true with
human eyesight; the vast majority of what people see is based on reflected light energy.
On the other hand, the thermal camera detects energy that
is directly radiated from objects in the scene. Most objects
in typical surroundings are not hot enough to radiate visible
light, but they easily radiate the type of infrared energy that
the thermal camera can detect. Even very cold objects, like
ice and snow, radiate this type of energy.
The camera is capable of sensing very small temperature
differences, and produces a video image that typically has
dramatic contrast in comparison to daylight cameras. This
high contrast level from the thermal video enables intelligent
video analytic software to perform more reliably.
The performance of the camera will likely vary throughout the day. Right after sunset, objects warmed
by the sun will appear warmest. Early in the morning, many of these objects will appear cooler than
their surroundings, so be sure to look for subtle differences in the scene, as opposed to just hot
targets.
Originally developed for the military, thermal imaging cameras are now deployed in numerous
commercial applications where it is impractical or too expensive to use active illumination (lights). They
are perfect for a wide variety of applications including transportation, maritime, security, fire fighting,
and medical applications. The cameras often provide improved daytime viewing in environments
where traditional video camera performance suffers, such as in shadows or backlit scenes.
The PT-Series camera is a state-of-the-art thermal imaging system that will provide excellent night
visibility and situational awareness, without any form of natural or artificial illumination. The system is
easy to use, but it is useful to understand how to interpret what is displayed on the monitor.
While the imagery on the monitor may at first look similar to ordinary black and white daylight video,
experience with the camera in varying conditions and seasons will lead to an appreciation of the
characteristics that make thermal imaging distinct. A few tips on how to interpret some of the imagery
may help you to make the most of your system.
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The thermal camera does not sense light like conventional cameras; it senses heat or temperature
differences. The camera senses small “differences” in apparent radiation from the objects in view, and
displays them as either white (or lighter shades of gray) for warmer objects, and black (or darker
shades of gray) for colder objects.
The thermal imaging camera relies on the fact that all objects, even very cold objects like ice, emit
thermal energy in the portion of the infrared spectrum that this camera can “see”, the long wave
infrared (LWIR). Therefore, unlike an illuminated infrared camera, a thermal camera does not need an
additional active illumination source, and creates video based on directly radiated rather than reflected
energy.
This is why hot objects such as parts on an engines and exhaust pipes appear white, while the sky,
puddles of water and other cold objects appear dark (or cool)4. Scenes with familiar objects will be
easy to interpret with some experience. The camera automatically optimizes the image to provide you
with the best contrast in most conditions.
2.8
Troubleshooting Tips
If you need help during the installation process, contact your local FLIR representative, or call the
appropriate support number listed at: http://www.flir.com/security/display/?id=71083. FLIR Systems,
Inc. offers a comprehensive selection of training courses to help you to get the best performance and
value from your thermal imaging camera. Find out more at the FLIR training web page: http://
www.flir.com/training.
Image freezes momentarily: By design, the camera image will freeze momentarily on a periodic
basis during the Flat Field Correction (FFC) cycle (also known as Non-Uniformity Correction or NUC).
Every few minutes, the image will momentarily freeze for a fraction of a second while the camera
performs a flat field correction. A shutter activates inside the camera and provides a target of uniform
temperature, allowing the camera to correct for ambient temperature changes and provide the best
possible image. Just prior to the FFC, a small green square will appear in the corner of the screen.
Using FSM, it is possible to adjust the frequency of how often the FFC operation occurs. Using the
Advanced Sensor Control, it is possible to change the FFC interval or to disable the automatic FFC
entirely by setting it to Manual mode. For the best possible image, it is recommended the factory
settings are used.
No video: If the camera will not produce an image, check the video connection at the camera and at
your display. If the connectors appear to be properly connected but the camera still does not produce
an image, ensure that power has been properly applied to the camera and the circuit breaker is set
properly. If a fuse was used, be sure the fuse is not blown. If the video cabling is suspected as a
possible source of the problem, plug a monitor into the RCA connection inside the camera and
determine if it produces an image.
When the camera is powered on, it will do a NUC operation shortly after startup. If you are uncertain if
the camera is receiving power, it may be useful to listen to the camera to hear if the click-click of the
shutter mechanism can be heard. It may be only be possible to perform this test when the camera is
on a work bench rather than in its installed position.
4. By default, the camera represents hot objects as white and cold objects as black. The camera can be set to use
the Black Hot polarity setting, which displays hot objects as black and cold objects as white and is effectively the
negative of White Hot polarity.
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If the camera still does not produce an image, contact the FLIR dealer or reseller who provided the
camera, or contact FLIR directly (contact information is provided on the rear cover of this manual).
Performance varies with time of day: You may observe differences in the way the camera performs
at different times of the day, due to the diurnal cycle of the sun. Recall that the camera produces an
image based on temperature differences.
At certain times of the day, such as just before dawn, the objects in the image scene may all be roughly
the same temperature, compared to other times of the day. Compare this to imagery right after sunset,
when objects in the image may be radiating heat energy that has been absorbed during the day due to
solar loading. Greater temperature differences in the scene generally will allow the camera to produce
high-contrast imagery.
Performance may also be affected when objects in the scene are wet rather than dry, such as on a
foggy day or in the early morning when everything may be coated with dew. Under these conditions, it
may be difficult for the camera to show the temperature the object itself, rather than of the water
coating.
Unable To Communicate Over Ethernet: First check to ensure the physical connections are intact
and that the camera is powered on and providing analog video to the monitor. When the camera is
turned on, confirm the startup information is displayed on the analog monitor after approximately 90
seconds. For example:
S/N: 1234567
IP Addr: 192.168.250.116
Confirm that the IP address for the PC (for example, 192.168.250.1) is on the same network as the
camera.
Next determine if Windows Personal Firewall is blocking the packets. You can turn off the firewall or
add an exception for the FSM program. Typically when FSM runs for the first time, a pop-up
notification may ask for permission to allow the FLIR Sensors Manager (fsm.exe) to communicate on
the network. Select the check boxes (domain/private/public) that are appropriate for your network.
By default the camera will broadcast a “discovery” packet two times per second. When FSM starts up,
it listens to the network for the discovery packets. If no cameras are listed in the Discovered Servers
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list, press the Refresh button. If the list is still empty, it indicates no discovery packets were received.
This could be due to a wide variety of problems with the network, the PC, or the camera.
If necessary, use a packet sniffer utility such as Wireshark to capture packets and confirm the packets
are being received by the PC from the camera.
Unable to control the camera from FSM: If the camera does not respond to commands from FSM
(for example, the camera does not zoom when the zoom in button is clicked), the camera may not be
the “Active” camera, or you may not have control of the camera. By default FSM will automatically
request control of the camera and make it active, but if there are multiple cameras and/or multiple FSM
clients, it may be necessary to manually make the camera active and take control of it.
Also, if the camera has a serial control interface connected to it, the serial device has the highest
priority, and a command from the serial device can automatically take control of the camera away from
any FSM client.
In the Sensors Panel, if the camera is the active sensor, there will be an “(Active)”
notification next to the name of the camera. Only one camera or sensor can be
active at a time. To make the camera active, right click on the icon to the left of the
camera name and select “Set Active”, or simply double-click on the icon.
The icon to the left of the camera name indicates the status of the sensor. The following is a list of the
possible icons and the meaning of each one.
Connected and Controlled
This icon indicates the camera has been discovered and added to the list of active servers, and the
camera is actively “connected” to the FSM client and receiving status updates. The joystick in the icon
indicates the user has control of the camera. To release control of the camera, right click on the icon
and select “Release Control”.
Discovered
This icon indicates the camera has been discovered and added to the list of
active servers, but the camera is not actively “connected” to FSM, and
therefore FSM is not receiving status updates. To connect to the camera, right
click on the icon and select “Connect”. Alternatively, it is possible to doubleclick the icon to connect.
Connected
This icon indicates the camera has been discovered and added to the list of
active servers, and the camera is actively “connected” to FSM and receiving
status updates. To take control of the camera, right click on the icon and select
“Request Control”. Alternatively, it is possible to double-click the icon to take
control.
Not Connected
This icon indicates the camera has been discovered and added to the list of
active servers, and FSM is trying to connect to the camera, but some kind of problem is preventing
FSM from receiving status updates the camera. This could be do to a wide variety of problems in the
camera, network or PC. Most often this situation occurs when a firewall allows certain packets (such as
the discovery packets) but not others (the packets needed for a “connection”).
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2.9
FSM General Errors
In the status bar at the bottom of the FSM screen there may be an indication that an error has
occurred. When you position the cursor over the error icon (exclamation mark), the error will be
displayed in a temporary pop-up. It is possible to view all the error messages by selecting the Tools tab
at the top of he screen, and then select the Log button to the left.
Unable to View Video Stream: If the video stream from the camera is not displayed in FSM, it could
be that the packets are blocked by the firewall, or there could be a conflict with video codecs that are
installed for other video programs.
When displaying video with FSM for the first time, the Windows Personal Firewall may ask for
permission to allow the FLIR Video Player (vp.exe) to communicate on the network. Select the check
boxes (domain/private/public) that are appropriate for your network.
If necessary, test to make sure the video from the camera can be viewed by a generic video player
such as VLC media player (http://www.videolan.org/vlc/).To view the video stream, specify RTSP port
554 and the appropriate stream name such as “ch0”. For example:
rtsp://192.168.250.116:554/ch0
Noisy image: A noisy image is usually attributed to a cable problem (too long or inferior quality) or the
cable is picking up electromagnetic interference (EMI) from another device. Although coax cable has
built-in losses, the longer the cable is (or the smaller the wire gauge/thickness), the more severe the
losses become; and the higher the signal frequency, the more pronounced the losses. Unfortunately
this is one of the most common and unnecessary problems that plagues video systems in general.
Cable characteristics are determined by a number of factors (core material, dielectric material and
shield construction, among others) and must be carefully matched to the specific application.
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Moreover, the transmission characteristics of the cable will be influenced by the physical environment
through which the cable is run and the method of installation. Use only high quality cable and ensure
the cable is suitable to the marine environment.
Check cable connector terminations. Inferior quality connections may use multiple adapters which can
cause unacceptable noise. Use a high-quality video distribution amplifier when splitting the signal to
multiple monitors.
Image too dark or too light: By default the PT-Series thermal camera uses an Automatic Gain
Control (AGC) setting that has proven to be superior for most applications, and the camera will
respond to varying conditions automatically. The installer should keep in mind that the sky is quite cold
and can strongly affect the overall image. It may be possible to avoid a problem by slightly moving the
camera up or down to include (or exclude) items with hot or cold temperatures that influence the
overall image. For example, a very cold background (such as the sky) could cause the camera to use
a wider temperature range than appropriate.
Eastern or Western Exposure: Once installed, the camera may point directly east or west, and this
may cause the sun to be in the field of view during certain portions of the day. We do not recommend
intentionally viewing the sun, but looking at the sun will not permanently damage the sensor. In fact the
thermal imaging camera often provides a considerable advantage over a conventional camera in this
type of back-lit situation. However, the sun may introduce image artifacts that will eventually correct
out. and it may take some time for the camera to recover. The amount of time needed for recovery will
depend on how long the camera was exposed to the sun. The longer the exposure, the longer the
recovery time needed.
Figure 2-3: Images facing sun from standard camera (left) and thermal camera
(right)
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2.10
Restoring the Factory Settings
The camera comes configured from the factory with default settings for the IP address
(192.168.250.116), the login passwords, and all of the other configuration parameters (stored in a file
called server.ini). In some cases, it may be necessary to restore the settings of the camera to the
original factory settings. If necessary, this can be accomplished by temporarily connecting a loopback
device to the Ethernet port during initial power-up. Approximately 30 seconds after power is turned on,
the loopback should be removed to allow the camera to finish booting up.
Note
The camera will not finish booting up while the loopback device is connected to the camera. The
camera will display analog video, but the Nexus Server will not start until the loopback is removed
from the camera.
At each power-up, the system transmits a packet and then checks to determine if that same packet
has been received. Detection of the received packet indicates the camera has a custom loopback
connector installed on its Ethernet interface. The detection of the loopback packet cues the camera to
restore Factory Defaults (including the IP settings, user passwords, and configuration file), reverting to
the same configuration and behavior as when the camera left the factory.
The custom loopback connector is described below.
Pin #
Signal
Tied to pin #
1
Transmit +
3
2
Transmit -
6
3
Receive +
1
4
Unused
N/A
5
Unused
N/A
6
Receive -
2
7
Unused
N/A
8
Unused
N/A
The RJ45 loopback termination ties pin 1 to pin 3, and pin 2 to pin 6. The other pins are not connected.
This type of device is available commercially (the Smartronix Superlooper Ethernet Loopback Jack
and Plug is one example), or it can be easily made with an RJ45 plug, a couple wires, and a crimp tool.
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After the camera boots up, confirm the startup information is displayed on the analog monitor after
approximately 90 seconds. For example:
S/N: 1234567
IP Addr: 192.168.250.116
PelcoD (Addr:1): 9600 SW
2.11
Setting the IP address on a Windows PC
To set the computer IP address in Windows, first connect the PC to a switch, or connect it to the
camera and ensure the camera has power.
Step 1
With the PC or laptop connected to the switch (or if back-to-back with the camera, with the
camera powered on), open the Control Panel, Network and Sharing Center (a Windows 7
example is shown). The connection to the camera should show in your Active Networks.
Click to select
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Step 2
Click to select the Local Area Connection then click Properties, as shown at the right.
Click Properties
Step 3
Select Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) as shown. Then click Properties.
Click to select
Click Properties
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Step 4
Select Use the following IP address, then enter 192.168.250.xxx, where xxx is any
number between 1-255, other than 116 (the camera default).
Step 5
Set the Subnet mask to 255.255.255.0, then click OK.
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Serial Address: Decimal To Binary
Conversion
Note, the order of the switches 1-8 is the reverse of the binary digits. For example, for address 1 the
binary equivalent is 00000001 and the left-most switch (switch1) is on.
3.1
Address Conversion Table
Address
Sw1
Sw 2
Sw 3
1
ON
OFF
OFF
2
OFF
ON
3
ON
…
255
Sw4
Sw 5
Sw 6
Sw 7
Sw 8
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
…
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
The following table shows the binary equivalent for each decimal address between 1 and 255.
Decimal
Binary
Decimal
Binary
Decimal
Binary
Decimal
Binary
1
00000001
65
01000001
129
10000001
193
11000001
2
00000010
66
01000010
130
10000010
194
11000010
3
00000011
67
01000011
131
10000011
195
11000011
4
00000100
68
01000100
132
10000100
196
11000100
5
00000101
69
01000101
133
10000101
197
11000101
6
00000110
70
01000110
134
10000110
198
11000110
7
00000111
71
01000111
135
10000111
199
11000111
8
00001000
72
01001000
136
10001000
200
11001000
9
00001001
73
01001001
137
10001001
201
11001001
10
00001010
74
01001010
138
10001010
202
11001010
11
00001011
75
01001011
139
10001011
203
11001011
12
00001100
76
01001100
140
10001100
204
11001100
13
00001101
77
01001101
141
10001101
205
11001101
14
00001110
78
01001110
142
10001110
206
11001110
15
00001111
79
01001111
143
10001111
207
11001111
16
00010000
80
01010000
144
10010000
208
11010000
17
00010001
81
01010001
145
10010001
209
11010001
18
00010010
82
01010010
146
10010010
210
11010010
19
00010011
83
01010011
147
10010011
211
11010011
20
00010100
84
01010100
148
10010100
212
11010100
21
00010101
85
01010101
149
10010101
213
11010101
22
00010110
86
01010110
150
10010110
214
11010110
23
00010111
87
01010111
151
10010111
215
11010111
24
00011000
88
01011000
152
10011000
216
11011000
25
00011001
89
01011001
153
10011001
217
11011001
26
00011010
90
01011010
154
10011010
218
11011010
427-0032-00-12, Version 180
June 2016
47
3
Serial Address: Decimal To Binary Conversion
27
00011011
91
01011011
155
10011011
219
11011011
28
00011100
92
01011100
156
10011100
220
11011100
29
00011101
93
01011101
157
10011101
221
11011101
30
00011110
94
01011110
158
10011110
222
11011110
31
00011111
95
01011111
159
10011111
223
11011111
32
00100000
96
01100000
160
10100000
224
11100000
33
00100001
97
01100001
161
10100001
225
11100001
34
00100010
98
01100010
162
10100010
226
11100010
35
00100011
99
01100011
163
10100011
227
11100011
36
00100100
100
01100100
164
10100100
228
11100100
37
00100101
101
01100101
165
10100101
229
11100101
38
00100110
102
01100110
166
10100110
230
11100110
39
00100111
103
01100111
167
10100111
231
11100111
40
00101000
104
01101000
168
10101000
232
11101000
41
00101001
105
01101001
169
10101001
233
11101001
42
00101010
106
01101010
170
10101010
234
11101010
43
00101011
107
01101011
171
10101011
235
11101011
44
00101100
108
01101100
172
10101100
236
11101100
45
00101101
109
01101101
173
10101101
237
11101101
46
00101110
110
01101110
174
10101110
238
11101110
47
00101111
111
01101111
175
10101111
239
11101111
48
00110000
112
01110000
176
10110000
240
11110000
49
00110001
113
01110001
177
10110001
241
11110001
50
00110010
114
01110010
178
10110010
242
11110010
51
00110011
115
01110011
179
10110011
243
11110011
52
00110100
116
01110100
180
10110100
244
11110100
53
00110101
117
01110101
181
10110101
245
11110101
54
00110110
118
01110110
182
10110110
246
11110110
55
00110111
119
01110111
183
10110111
247
11110111
56
00111000
120
01111000
184
10111000
248
11111000
57
00111001
121
01111001
185
10111001
249
11111001
58
00111010
122
01111010
186
10111010
250
11111010
59
00111011
123
01111011
187
10111011
251
11111011
60
00111100
124
01111100
188
10111100
252
11111100
61
00111101
125
01111101
189
10111101
253
11111101
62
00111110
126
01111110
190
10111110
254
11111110
63
00111111
127
01111111
191
10111111
255
11111111
64
01000000
128
10000000
192
11000000
427-0032-00-12 Version 180
June 2016
48
FLIR Systems, Inc.
6769 Hollister Ave
Goleta, CA 93117
USA
Support: http://www.flir.com/security/display/?id=71083
Corporate Headquarters
FLIR Systems, Inc.
27700 SW Parkway Ave.
Wilsonville, OR 97070
USA
PH: +1 503.498.3547
FX: +1 503.498.3153
sales@flir.com
Document:
427-0032-00-12
Version: 180
Date: June 2016
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