stealth tactical - German Sport Guns
RIFLE SCOPES
INSTRUCTION MANUAL
Industrias ÉTGamo, S.A.U, PO. Box 16,
08830 Sant Boi de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain).
Made in China. Printed in China.
—
PROLOGUE
We are proud to present a new rifle scope line with unique tactical vision and technology
from the 21st century. This scope comes with the most innovative windage and elevation
adjustment turrets on the market. The patented, revolutionary, all weather, Pull/Push system
makes zeroing your new scope fast and effortless. The precise .25 MOA adjustments are
easy to grip even while wearing gloves. Furthermore, as our most innovative technical in-
troduction, this scope has the capability to control the image brightness, with only a simple
turn of the objective lens adjusting rim.
TABLE Or CONTENTS
|) Fundamentals of a riflescope
Il) Focusing the scope
lI) Mounting the scope
IV) Zeroing the scope
V) Reticle
VI) Maintaining your riflescope
Rheostat Switch
Elevation (IR Models only)
Adjustment
Ocular Lens
with TWIST CAP™
Windage
Adjustment
Objective Lens
with TWIST CAP™
Fast Focus
etachable
Power Adjustment
Side Parallax Wheel
(Zoom) Ring
FUNDAMENTALS OF A RIFLESCOPE
FIVE BASIC ELEMENTS FORM THE SYSTEM OF A RIFLE SCOPE.
В The objective lens performs three important functions:
a) It allows the light to get inside the scope.
b) It creates an image to be magnified by the other optical elements. This image is always
upside down.
c) It is responsible for the resolution of the scope. The larger the objective lens is, the better
the resolution becomes.
Il. The erector system is a small plastic or metal tube with three or four elements or lenses.
Depending if the optical system is a fixed magnification or a variable one and has three
functions:
a) Primary magnification of the objective image.
b) To align the reticle to the image optical axis.
c) As its name indicates, it erects or flips the image right-side up.
Ш. Windage and elevation system:
Since the erector tube is fixed at one end and free at the other closest to the objective lens,
the windage and elevation screws serve as supports for this end while providing movement
or correction to the reticle to adjust the aiming point to the real point of impact of the bullet.
IV. Reticle:
The reticle replaces the iron sight system that usually comes with rifles.
V. Ocular lens:
This lens does the secondary and final magnification of the image and plays a very impor-
tant role in the eye relief length.
VI. Parallax.
The Parallax will manifest itself as apparent movement of the reticle against the target.
For a scope to be Parallax-free the target must be located at the same distance for which
scope is focused. This means that the target image and the reticle must be focused at the
same focal plain.
Rifle scopes equipped with variable Parallax adjustment allow focusing at different chosen
distances.
"NOTE: The location of the parallax adjustment may vary between models. The adjustment may be
located on the objective, in front of the eye bell or in the saddle, a detachable big wheel is included with
the saddle parallax adjustment.
в «фи
\
Objective with adjustable parallax ~~ Side parallax knob
Side parallax wheel
FocusING THE SCOPE
CAUTION: DIRECT VIEWING OF THE SUN CAN CAUSE PERMANENT EYE DAMAGE.
DO NOT ATTEMPT TO VIEW THE SUN WITH EITHER THIS PRODUCT OR THE NAKED EYE.
STANDARD Focus: | В
To focus hold the scope three to four inches from your eye in the direction of
a plane surface like a wall or the sky. If the reticle does not appear sharp and
well defined, loosen the eye bell lock-ring while looking through the scope and
rotate the eyepiece in either direction until perfect focus is obtained. (This may
require more than one turn). |
It is possible that when turning in one direction the focus worsens. To correct this,
turn the eyepiece in the opposite direction.
FasT-Focus:
On models with a fast focus ocular system, rotate only the end portion of the eyebell clock-
wise or counter clockwise to obtain the desired degree of sharpness while looking at a flat,
featureless surface. The fast focus works as a macro focus; therefore fewer revolutions are
needed to get the desired effect if compared with the standard eye bell system.
Standard Focus
Fast-Focus
2 _—
Cortes
-purpose TWIST CAP™
OcuLAR
Looking through the scope turn the ocular rim clockwise to open the TWIST CAP ™ dia-
phragm and counterclockwise to close it.
OBJECTIVE
Looking through the scope turn the objective rim counterclockwise to open the
TWIST CAP™ diaphragm and clockwise to close it.
To control brightness, adjust the objective diaphragm to eliminate extra glare or unwanted
light.
Both diaphragms, once closed, serve as dust covers or lens protection.
MOUNTING THE SCOPE
CAUTION: BE SURE THAT THE FIREARM IS NOT LOADED.
PRACTICE SAFE FIREARM HANDLING PROCEDURES AT ALL TIMES.
Separate the top and bottom halves of the rings. Pre-install the bottom halves. Set the
scope in the cradles formed by the bottom ring halves. Position the scope toward the
objective lens. Rotate the scope to position the elevation turret on top (at 12 o' clock).
With the firearm in a steady rest position, while looking though the scope slowly
pull it close to the eye until the full field of view becomes visible.
Check the orientation of the reticle. The vertical post of the reticle can be aligned with the
corner of a wall, a light post, or the vertical axis of the rifle if an optical collimator is not
available. Misalignment of the reticle will not affect accuracy at short distances but can
become a problem at long distances.
OcuLAR |
With the scope properly positioned and the reticle aligned with the axes, tighten the top
halves of the rings and secure the rings to the base or receiver.
CAUTION: MAKE SURE THAT THE SCOPE IS NOT IN CONTACT WITH THE RIFLE, AND THAT
NO SECTION OF IT BLOCKS THE OPERATION OF THE ACTION. AVOID OVER-TIGHTENING
THE RINGS. THIS CAN DAMAGE THE SCOPE, AFFECTING PERFORMANCE OR RENDERING
IT INOPERABLE. THERE SHOULD BE A SLIGHT EVEN GAP ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT SIDES
OF BOTH SETS OF RINGS, BETWEEN THE TOP AND BOTTOM HALVES.
ZEROING THE SCOPE
CAUTION: BE SURE THAT THE FIREARM IS NOT LOADED.
PRACTICE SAFE FIREARM HANDLING PROCEDURES AT ALL TIMES.
ApJusTing PusH-PuLt WinpaGE AND ELEVATION TURRETS
ELEVATION:
Pull the elevation turret up until it stops. The turret has now
engaged the adjustment body. Turn the turret clockwise to
lower the point of impact and counterclockwise to raise the
point of impact. Once you have adjusted the point of impact
push the turret down until it stops. Your elevation adjustment S и
turret is now locked in place. —
To place the center of
the reticle on the point of
impact, turn the elevation
turret counterclockwise to
raise the point of impact.
Then, turn the windage
turret counterclockwise to
move the point of impact to
the left.
WINDAGE:
Pull the windage turret up until it stops. The turret has now
engaged the adjustment body. Turn the turret clockwise to
move the point of impact to the left and counterclockwise
to move the point of impact to the right. Once you have
adjusted the point of impact push the turret down in until
it stops. Your windage adjustment turret is now locked
in place.
Zero sighting can be done either manually or with an optical collimator (boresighter).
If you have a bolt action rifle: With the firearm in a steady rest position, remove the windage
and elevation caps to expose the turret knobs.
ManuaLLy:
Open the action of the firearm and remove the bolt. If your rifle scope has an adjustable
objective, rotate the parallax ring to the 50 yards position. Set variable-power scopes to
mid-power. Looking through the bore of the rifle at the target, make sure that the center of
the target is in the center of your view. To pre-zero the scope you will adjust the windage
and elevation screws so that the image appearing at the center of your bore is the same
centered in the riflescope reticle.
If your firearm is not a bolt action, we recommend the use of an optical collimator. Make
sure to follow the collimator instructions and the safety rules.
If a considerable amount of adjustment is required to align the reticle and you have
adjustable rings or mounts, make the larger adjustments using these devices and the micro
adjustments with the windage and elevation turrets of the scope.
If you do not have the above mentioned mounting systems, make approximately one-half
of the required windage correction, then approximately one-half of the required elevation
correction. Finish by applying the balance of windage and elevation correction. Making
large adjustments in small increments will prevent damage to the scope’s spring.
CAUTION: ALL DISCHARGING OF FIREARMS SHOULD BE DONE AT AN APPROVED RANGE
OR EQUALLY SAFE AREA. THE USE OF EYE AND EAR PROTECTION IS RECOMMENDED.
DANGER: If a bore sighting collimator or any other bore obstructing device was used, it
must be removed before proceeding. An obstruction can cause serious damage to the gun
and possible injury to yourself and others nearby.
Set the scale on the parallax adjustable models to the 100 yard position.
Set variable-power scopes to highest power.
From a steady rest position, fire three rounds at a target 100 yards away.
Observe point of impact on the target and adjust windage and elevation screws as needed
to correct aim. Repeat if necessary.
NOTE: Each click of adjustment changes bullet strike at a shooting distance of 100 yards by the amount
indicated on the windage and elevation turrets.
There are many different illuminated rifle scope systems. The rheostat switches come in 12-
or 8-position versions. Each of the positions or clicks represent an increment in the intensity
of the light to a maximum of 11 or 7. The positions 12, 8, or 0 mean that the switch is off. |
The Rheostat switch can be located on top or on one side of the ocular bell and on the
left side of the scope saddle. These scopes are powered by a 3-Volt coin style battery.
Replacement for this cell are Duracell DL2032, Sunrise CR2032 or Energizer ECR2032.
MiL-pot RETICLE
The Mil-dot reticle is based on a heavy artillery ranging principle. The main purpose of the
reticle was to give a better tool to the Marine snipers to range distances. After almost a
quarter of a century, it is the standard reticle in all branches of the military.
WHAT is A MiL-po1?
Mil-dot stands for Mil-radian. A Mil is one of the ways an angle can be measured. It is equal
to 1/6400th of a circle, and measures 3.6 inches at 100 yards, or 36 inches at 1000 yards.
For long distance shooting, one Mil equals one yard at 1000 yards.
One Mil in the reticle is the distance from the center of one dot to the center of the next.
Contrary to popular belief, the Mil-Dots on the reticle measure .75 Mil instead of one Mil.
The following table shows width equivalents at different distances between the Mil and the
MOA.
To use the Mil-dot range finding capabilities you must know the size of the target.
The formula used to calculate range to the target is: (Size of targets in yards X 1000 divided
by the numbers of mills the target covers in the reticle). To obtain the size in yards divide the
target height in inches by 36 inches.
Target Height X 1000
= Range in yards
Height of target in Mils
EXAMPLE:
The known height of a target is 24 inches and covers 1.5 mils in the reticle.
Divide 24 into 36" to obtain the correct size in yards.
24/36 = .66 yards 1.66 X 1000 660
= = 440 yards
1.5 mils 1.5 Windage and elevation.
8
This Table shows the click
values of the Mil-dot reticle
and their equivalent in MOA
at different distances.
Distance One Mil Width One MOA Width
In Yards in Inches in inches
1000 36 10
900 32.4 9
800 28.8 8
700 25.2 7
600 21.6 6
500 18 5
400 14.4 4
300 10.8 3
200 7.2 2
100 3.6 1
WINDAGE AND ELEVATION
The table below shows the click values of the Mil-dot reticle
and their equivalent in MOA at different distances.
Distance One Mil Width Click Value One MOA Width Click Value
in Yards in Inches in Mils in Inches in MOA
1000 36.00 4.50 10.00 1.25
900 32.40 4.05 9.00 1.13
800 28.80 3.60 8.00 1.00
700 25.20 3.15 7.00 0.88
600 21.60 2.70 6.00 0.75
500 18.00 2.25 5.00 0.63
400 14.40 1.80 4.00 0.50
300 10.80 1.35 3.00 0.38
200 7.20 0.90 2.00 0.25
100 3.60 0.45 1.00 0.13
9
The Mil-dot was originally designed to be used at 10X
power. However, as most marksmen prefer the flexibility
and advantage of variable powers, we have incorporated
this reticle in some of our zoom scopes. The following
Mil-dot Key table shows the angular value at different
magnification settings.
Mi.-Dor MaGnIFICATION CHART
2X 3X 4X 6X 7X 8X 9X
MLS | MOA | MILS | MOA | MILS | MOA | MiLS | MOA | MiLS | MOA | MLS | MOA | MLS | MOA
A | 4500 | 15471 | 30.00 | 103.14 | 2250 | 77.36 | 15.00 | 51.57 | 12.86 | 44.21 | 11.25 | 3868 | 10 | 3438
B | 2250 | 77.36 | 1500 | 5157 | 11.25 | 3868 | 750 | 2579 | 643 | 2211 | 562 | 1934 | 5 | 17.19
C | 45 | 1548 | 300 | 1032 | 225 | 7.74 | 150 | 516 | 129 | 442 | 113 | 387 | 1 | 34
D | 081 | 338 | 054 | 225 | 004 | 169 | 027 | 1.13 | 023 | 096 | 020 | 084 | 0.18 | 075
10X 12X 14X 16X 24X 32X 40X
MLS | MOA | MILS | MOA | MLS | MOA | Mits | MOA | MLS | MOA | MLS | MOA | MILS | MOA
A | 900 | 3094 | 750 | 2579 | 643 | 2211 | 563 | 19.34 | 375 | 1289 | 281 | 967 | 2.25 | 7.74
B | 450 | 1547 | 375 | 1289 | 322 | 11.05 | 281 | 967 | 1.88 | 645 | 141 | 483 | 1.13 | 387
C | 09 | 310 | 075 | 258 | 064 | 221 | 056 | 194 | 038 | 129 | 028 | 0.97 | 023 | 077
D | 016 | 068 | 014 | 056 | 012 | 048 | 010 | 042 | 007 | 028 | 0.05 | 021 | 0.04 | 0.17
10
RANGERTM RETICLE
The two fine lines above the main horizontal line of the cross are 3.5 inches at 100 yards or
35.5 inches at 1000 yards.The two divisions cover the size of target 5'10” tall at 1000 yards
and one division covers the size of an equal target at 2000 yards.
The distance between the first two lines above the main horizontal line is 3.5” at 100 yards
or 35.5” at 1000 yards. If the height of the target covers only one of the two divisions, the
target is 2000 yards away.
These two measurements work for Deer ranging since the body of an average size adult
Whitetail buck will fit into the 30 moa/inches section at 100 yards and to the 15 moa/inches
at 200 yards.
The two lines below the main horizontal line of the cross, as indicated, are aiming points for
two and three hundred yards.
NOTE: Altitude, wind, temperature, and shooting angle will affect the final results.
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