drone training system online manual v 2.0

D RO N E T RA IN IN G SYSTE M
O N L I N E M A NUAL V 2.0
DRONE TRAINING SYSTEM
GETTING STARTED
WARNING: Always operate this product in a responsible
SPECIFICATIONS
manner and observe laws covering model airplanes and/
or drones. Do not fly near other people, over roadways or in
The Fat Shark 101 bundle contains everything needed to get
protected nature areas.
started in the world of drone racing.
WARNING: The Fat Shark 101 system is not a toy. This
REGISTER THE FAT SHARK 101 SYSTEM: Go to fatshark.
product contains small parts and is intended to be
com/register to register your kit for FREE simulator access and
operated by adults. It is ot for children under 14 years old.
FREE AMA membership + 3 months of insurance
AMA (Academy of Model Aeronautics) membership is
IMPORTANT: Always fly with a spotter.
recommended for all hobby fliers in the United States.
NOTE: The Shark Quad flies without GPS stablization; some
AMA membership includes liability insurance, competition
organization and a monthly print magazine.
during flight is normal. For more information, visit fatshark.
com/training.
BEFORE YOU BEGIN: Fat Shark recommends all beginner
pilots initially start training with a simulator to get comfortable
BOX CONTENTS
1.
Quadcopter with propeller guards installed
2.
Two batteries
3.
USB charger
4.
RC controller
5.
Recon headset with 18650 Lithium Battery
6.
Antenna for Recon headset
7.
Extra set of propellers
8.
Fat Shark stickers
9.
USB cable for simulator
with the mehanics of flight. Use the controller and USB cable
within this package to plug into a computer, explore the controls
and gain a foundation of skills on the simulator before flying the
real thing.
IMPORTANT: Always fly with a spotter.
Product
Fat Shark 101 Drone Training
System
Motors
2s rated 8025 Brushed
Battery
2s 260mAh in plastic case
Charger
USB power 500mAh
Recon Headset Battery
One 2600mAh 18650 Li-ion
Propellers
58mm press fit
Aircraft weight
50g
Control Frequency
2.4GHz
Video Frequency
5.8GHz
Integrated Video Camera
130° CMOS
Integrated antennas
2.4GHz and 5.8GHz
DON’T CUT OFF THE BATTERY TETHER!
Each battery comes with a tether wrapped around it which
is used for initial flight raining. For beginner pilots, leave the
string in place and follow the training program.
NOTE: The Shark Quad flies without GPS stablization; some
during flight is normal. For more information, visit fatshark.
com/training.
10. Four AA dry cell batteries
11. Two Fat Shark race gates with stands
QUADCOPTER
RECON HEADSET
CONTROLLER/RADIO
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SIMULATOR
BASIC OPERATION OF CONTROLLER
CHARGING BATTERIES
1.
IMPORTANT: All RC controls are proportional. Moving the
control stick a small amount will result in a slow response.
Moving the stick a large amount will result in a fast response.
To charge the quadcopter battery, plug the charger into a USB
Connect the USB cable between the computer and the
FLIGHT MODES
once charging is complete, the green LED stays illuminated.
controller and allow it to install the driver if necessary. The
Beginner: With the radio in your hands, move the flight mode
To charge the Recon headset, plug the included micro USB
Fat Shark Radio does not need batteries to operate on the
switch in the top left corner to the top position (away from
cable into the port on the side of the goggles. The LED is
USB connection.
you) for Beginner mode. In this mode, the quadcopter will
green when charging and changes to red when the charge is
3.
Open the DRL Simulator.
automatically level and flight controls will be eased. When the
complete.
4.
Configure the radio by clicking on SETTINGS then CHOOSE
To get free DRL Simulator access, first register your product
at fatshark.com/register. Follow the instructions to
download and install the simulator.
2.
CONTROLLER.
5.
6.
7.
Follow the on-screen prompts to calibrate the controller.
At the final setup screen, click the box for RAW input.
Fat Shark recommends acquiring a level of comfort with the
controls on the simulator before moving onto the full
training program..
Throttle/Yaw Control Stick
Flight Mode Switch
Pitch/Roll Control Stick
Motor Start/Stop Switch
LiPO BATTERY WARNINGS:
quadcopter to tilt in the desired direction. This mode is also
• Only charge batteries with the included USB charger.
called Angle mode because the control stick position dictates a
• Lithium batteries can become a safety and fire hazard and must
be handled properly
bank angle.
• Never attempt to charge a damaged LiPo battery
position for Intermediate mode. In this mode, the quadcopter will
• Never attempt to charge a hot LiPo battery
automatically level when the stick is centered but if the control
• Never cut, puncture, bend or otherwise damage a LiPo battery
stick is moved near full deflection the model will be allowed to
• Never expose the battery to fire or other sources of heat
flip or roll. This mode is also called Horizon mode because the
• Do not expose the batteries to water
model will return automatically to level flight from any aerobatic
position.
what the pilot commands with no automatic stabilization. In
general, the quadcopter will hold an attitude when the stick is
USB Port
• Only use chargers intended for LiPo batteries
Intermediate: Move the flight mode switch to the middle
for Advanced mode. When flying in this mode, the aircraft does
Power Button
the charger has power. During charging, the green LED flashes;
pitch and roll sticks are centered, the aircraft will maintain a
level attitude*. Moving the pitch and roll stick will cause the
Advanced: Move the flight mode switch to the lower position
Battery
Power Indicator
power supply and connect the battery. A red LED indicates
• Do not discharge the battery cells below 3.0 volts
• Do not modify the batteries
• Do not dispose of battries in the garbage; proper disposal required
TURNING THE QUADCOPTER ON AND OFF
There is no power switch on the quadcopter; it will turn on
released, and when then stick is moved again the aircraft will
when the battery is connected. Fully charge the battery first.
continue to flip or roll as long as the stick is held. This mode is
1. Connect the battery to the quad by placing the battery on
also called Rate command because the aircraft will rotate at a
the bottom of the Shark Quad and sliding back to engage
constant rate equal to how far the control stick is moved.
the tabs at the front of the battery. Press the rear of the
*NOTE: The 101 system flies without GPS stabilization; some
DRIFT during flight is normal.
battery into the quad to snap the rear tabs into place.
2.Plug the connector into the battery.
MOTOR START/STOP SWITCH
3.Unplug the battery after use to turn the aircraft off.
Begin with the motor start/stop switch in the upward position.
IMPORTANT: In the event of a crash, stop the motors with the
After powering on the radio and Shark quad, flip the switch down
arm switch on the radio. Always stop the motors before picking
to turn the motors on. The throttle must be in the low position
up the quadcopter. Do not turn the motors on while holding the
for the motors to arm. The propellers will turn when the switch
aircraft. Failure to unplug the battery after a flight will drive the
is flipped, flip the switch off as soon as possible in the event of a
battery too low to recharge.
crash.
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FLYING
1. Fly in an area free of obstructions and wind.
RC FLIGHT CONTROLS
THROTTLE
PITC H
2.Power on the headset and find an open channel.
3.Power up the quadcopter.
4.If necessary, change the channel on the headset or the
quadcopter to receive a signal on the Recon goggles.
UP
5.Find a comfortable position in which to fly.
6.With the goggles on, arm the motors with the top right switch
D OW N
YAW
FO RWAR D
BACKWAR D
RO L L
on the radio.
7.Explore pitch, roll and yaw controls at lot throttle settings
before flying aggressively.
8.Always unplug the battery when the flight is complete
LEFT
RI G H T
LOW BATTERY WARNING
The Fat Shark 101 system has a special warning to indicate if
LE F T
R I G HT
EXPECTED LIMITS OF THE Shark Quad
the power on the quadcopter is low: when the battery on the
quadcopter is low, the image on the goggles will turn black and
The Fat Shark 101 is capable of flying indoor or out, at ranges up to
white. In addition, the red LEDs near the eyes of the aircraft will
approximately 100 feet (30meters) away from the operator. The
begin to flash red. At that time, land, unplug and recharge.
range is heavily dependent on direct line of sight operation and
IMPORTANT: Extending flights to the last second will drain the
battery voltage aggressively and reduce the expected lifespan
the environment. An open environment is the ideal setting, and
the model will deliver its best performance and longest range.
of the LiPo battery. Damage to a LiPo battery is permanent and
Indoors in metal or reinforced concrete buildings can be
irreversible. LiPo Batteries that have been drawn too low during
challenging environments. The video system will begin to lose
use are not covered under the manufacturer’s warranty.
signal before the control signal is lost, so the quality of the video
reception naturally limits range.
WARNING:
Do not climb beyond reasonable low altitudes, or try to push the range to see how
far the FS101 will fly. Pushing the limits before learning the basics can quickly lead
to the FS101 getting lost, stuck in a tree, or run over on a busy street. The FS101 is
intended for close range, low-level racing, and was not designed to climb high or
travel great distances from the user.
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OPERATION OF THE WIRELESS VIDEO SYSTEM
Video frequencies for this product operate on 5.8GHz bands.
The available frequencies are divided up into five frequency
groups, called bands. Each band has eight channels on it. These
bands also overlap and use the same frequency range so it’s not
recommended to fly on multiple bands when in a group.
*Video frequencies available on the headset, but not on the
Shark Quad.
TOP VIEW
CHANGING THE VIDEO FREQUENCY ON THE SHARK QUAD
The small button on the left side of the Shark Quad labeled
CHANNEL will change the video frequency and band.
Antenna
Connector
5-Way Button
Changing the Frequency
A short press of the CHANNEL button will change to the next
Only one video transmitter can occupy a channel at any
Channel Buttons
given time. If more than one transmitter is transmitting on a
channel. Scroll through channels until a suitable image is shown
on the Recon goggles.
frequency, if there is a user on an overlapping channel from
Changing the Band
another band or if there is outside interference, video reception
can be disrupted.
Press and hold the Channel button to change the band.
BOTTOM VIEW
The Fat Shark Recon headset works on all five bands. The Shark
Quad uses the two most popular bands; Fat Shark band (FS)
Power Switch
The Shark Quad will flash the blue LED next to the Channel
USB Charge Port
and Raceband.
button twice to indicate Raceband.
The Shark Quad will flash the blue LED
next to the Channel button three
HEADSET OPERATION
The Recon Headset can be charged with the built-in charger by
connecting a micro USB power supply to the port on the side of
times to indicate Fat Shark band.
2600mAh
18650 Li-Ion
Battery
the goggles.
Slide the 5-way button left and right or forward and back for
brightness and contrast adjustment.
Press and hold the 5-way button to access the menu, and then
use the 5-way button to navigate menu options. Press the 5-way
button to make menu selections.
Tap the 5-way button to scan for the strongest channel on your
band.
•
Tap the channel buttons to manually change frequencies
•
Press and hold the channel buttons to change bands
Channel/ Frequency (MHz)
Band
A*
B*
E*
FS
R
1
5865
5733
5705
5740
5658
2
5845
5752
5685
5760
5695
3
5825
5771
5665
5780
5732
4
5805
5790
5645
5800
5769
5
5785
5809
5885
5820
5806
6
5765
5828
5905
5840
5843
7
5745
5847
5925
5860
5880
8
5725
5866
5945
5880
5917
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FIRST FLIGHTS
The following training program has been developed to teach beginner
pilots how to control a drone racer.
Before you begin, keep these tips in mind:
• To get started, run all early flights via line-of-sight, or without the
goggles on.
• In flight, apply measured, deliberate movements of the control
sticks; do not jam the controls to the limits. The controls will
respond proportionally, move them a little bit and the response
Step 1: Hover Training
1. Each battery delivered with the Shark Quad comes with a tether 1. Spend the duration of this battery giving the quad minimal
wrapped around it. For this step, tie the end of the string to a
thrust and sliding on the ground, steering the Shark Quad
water bottle, power on the quadcopter and radio and set the
around the flying area.
quadcopter on the ground behind the water bottle.
2. With your left hand, advance the throttle to make the
quadcopter rise into the air.
3. Find the balance between more or less power to command the
will be slow, move them aggressively and the response will be
quadcopter to hover. The tether is a hard limit that will prevent
fast.
the Shark Quad from getting too high or too fast at first.
• For the first flights, all flying should take place in the beginner
mode (with the left switch up or away from the pilot).
In advanced flying modes the Shark Quad will fly more
aggressively, limiting the efficacy of this training program.
• Avoid applying throttle movement aggresively up or down,
which will cause the quad to rise or plummet sinusoidally.
Get accustomed to carefully managing throttle to manage a
Step 2: Ground Flight
2. With the aircraft on the ground and the throttle just below hover
power, press forward on the pitch stick and observe how the
model moves forward.
3. Experiment with forward and back (pitch), and side to side
(roll) control, making the Shark Quad slide on the ground.
4.Balance the position of the quadcopter by using your right hand
to gently correct forward, back, left and right movement.
5. In this step, the goal is to keep the quadcopter hovering above
the anchor without making the tether taut.
TIP: If the pilot struggles with hitting the end of the string and
then the ground and back and forth, try shortening the tether.
controlled rise or decent.
• Select a flying area with a level, smooth surface, no
obstructions and no wind.
• During early line-of-sight training, keep an eye on the LEDs near
the eye of the Shark Quad, which will indicate a low battery with
4.Experiment with yaw control, making the Shark Quad rotate
on the ground. Observe how when the front of the quadcopter
changes, the controls on the right stick also change in relative
meaning.
red flashing when the battery is low.
• Each step in this guide is intended to be performed with at
least one complete battery. Take your time and if you’re not
comfortable with a certain step, fly a few extra batteries.
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Step 3: Unrestrained Hover Training
Step 4: Forward Training Hops
This step adds positional movement to hover training, showing the Now, let’s expand to hops across a set distance.
pilot how to navigate linearly between gates.
1. Place a single race gate flat on the ground. Place the
quadcopter in the center.
2. Raise the throttle slowly until the Shark Quad lifts off the
ground. Let the aircraft rise to approximately one foot in the air
then reduce the throttle gently so it descends and lands.
3. In the air, use forward backward pitch commands, and side to
1. Set two racing gates flat on a smooth surface approximately
4. Practice slow, deliberate hops, focusing on learning throttle
control, and trying to keep the Shark Quad positioned directly
Apply the same formula to hops left and right.
1. Set two racing gates flat on a smooth surface approximately six
six feet apart and directly in front of one another in a line with
feet apart and next to one another in front of the pilot. Place the
the pilot.Place the Shark Quad in the center of the closest gate,
Shark Quad in the center of the closest gate, pointed away from
pointed at the other gate.
the pilot.
2. Raise the throttle to bring the Shark Quad into the air, and apply 2. Raise the throttle to bring the Shark Quad into the air and apply
a small amount of forward pressure on the pitch to cause the
a small amount of sideways pressure on the roll stick to tip the
quad to tip forward and fly toward the other race gate.
aircraft sideways and fly toward the other race gate.
side roll commands to keep the Shark Quad positioned over the 3. Release the forward pitch control to level the aircraft. A slight
gate.
Step 5: Sideways Training Hops
3. Release the sideways roll control to level the aircraft. A slight
amount of back pressure for a brief moment will help slow the
amount of opposite roll control for a brief moment will help
forward speed.
slow the sideways speed.
4.Once above the second gate, reduce the throttle only slightly
4.Once above the second gate, reduce the throttle only slightly
over the gate. Before moving on, you should know how to balance
and attempt to land the aircraft in the center of the other race
and attempt to land the aircraft in the center of the other race
throttle demands to ascend slowly under control and descend
gate.
gate.
slowly under control to make a soft landing before moving to the
next step.
5. At any point during flight, flip the disarm switch on the radio to cut
power to the motors and restart the exercise.
5. Now try the same action in reverse. Take off and pull back on the
5. Now try the same action in reverse. Take off and fly back toward
pitch control to fly the Shark Quad backward, back to the first gate.
the first gate, and repeat the process of hopping between gates
Repeat the process back and forth without changing the yaw on the
facing away from the pilot.
aircraft to get comfortable with the pitch forward and backward
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Step 6: Free Flight
Now try flying forward, backward left and right without rotating
the aircraft. Remember, this is all line-of-sight without the goggles
on.
1. From a comfortable position in front of the pilot, try taking off,
hovering gently at one to three feet and moving forward, back
left and right with the right stick. Use yaw control to keep the
Shark Quad pointed away from the pilot at all times
2. Focus on maintaining specific altitudes and maintaining control
at all times with slow, controlled flight -- not speed.
3. Practice take offs and landings from forward flight, focusing
on deliberate, measured control inputs. Before moving on, you
should know how to balance throttle demands to maintain
altitude and consistent speed during flight and you should be
able to descend slowly under control to make a soft landing at
any time during the flight, before moving to the next step.
4.Always keep your finger near the disarm button in case you lose
control.
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FIRST FPV FLIGHTS
Now it’s time to don the goggles and start flying FPV (or First
Person View). Many pilots find flying in FPV easier because yaw
simply changes the view on the goggles and forward, back, left and
right move relative to that view. Either way, it’s important to take
your time to learn basic movements (above) before you begin this
section.
Step 1: Short Hops and Yaw Control
Step 2: Longer Hops
First FPV flights while wearing the goggles should concentrate
Now try making the same flights over a longer distance.
on simple takeoffs and landings between two fixed points with
minimal yaw movement.
1.
six feet apart and directly in front of one another in a line with
Power the headset on first, and check the band for other users
IMPORTANT: Wait for other pilots to land before powering on.
The transmitter will output a video signal which could impair
another user’s video reception and cause a crash. Only select video
2.
sticks; do not jam the controls to the limits. The controls will
slow down and land under control in the other gate.
Put on the goggles and ensure that you are receiving a strong
3.
Take off, try to hold an altitude of one foot or so and press
forward on the pitch to fly towards the other gate.
4.
After landing in the second gate, give the quadcopter a little bit
of throttle and use the yaw control to spin the quad back facing
5.
Step 3: Flying a Circuit and Landing
the other gate.
Now let’s combine yaw and flight.
Take off and repeat the process.
1.
2.
fast.
In advanced flying modes the Shark Quad will fly more
aggressively, limiting the efficacy of this training program.
Take off, and fly away from the gate then make a wide
coordinated turn to one side using a little of both yaw and roll
to fly through the turn. Steer with yaw; shift sideways with roll.
• For the first flights, all flying should take place in the beginner
mode (with the left switch up or away from the pilot).
Leave one gate out flat on the ground in the center of the flight
area. Place the quadcopter in the gate and put on the goggles.
respond proportionally, move them a little bit and the response
will be slow, move them aggressively and the response will be
Do not go faster than you can control, you need to be able to
signal.
Before you begin, keep these tips in mind:
• In flight, apply measured, deliberate movements of the control
2.
pointed at the other gate.
frequencies and verify there is no interference when there is nobody
flying.
Attempt to pick up a little more speed while still maintaining
full control.
the pilot. Place the Shark Quad in the center of the closest gate,
before powering up the quadcopter. If necessary, select an open
channel on the aircraft and headset.
Set two racing gates flat on a smooth surface approximately
1.
3.
Keep moving forward in the turn until you complete a circle
around the flight area.
4.
• Avoid applying throttle movement aggresively up or down,
which will cause the quad to rise or plummet sinusoidally.
Get accustomed to carefully managing throttle to manage a
controlled rise or decent.
• Each step in this guide is intended to be performed with at
least one complete battery. Take your time and if you’re not
comfortable with a certain step, fly a few extra batteries.
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Step 4: Flying a Figure 8
Step 5: Gates as Flags
Step 7-:Advanced Fight Modes
This step will introduce you to more aggressive yaw controls.
It’s time to start flying around hoops.
To access advanced flight mode, flip the flight mode switch down In
1.
1.
Place the quadcopter in the center of the flight area, take off
and make a coordinated turn like in the previous step.
2.
Attempt to come through the center of the flight area as you
Set up the gates using the cardboard supports spaced on
either side of the flight area
2.
complete your first circle then level out through the center of
Fly the figure 8 pattern, but go around the race gates as if they
were flags to define the center of the circles
the flight area, keeping the model moving forward
3.
these modes the aircraft will not self-level. Be prepared to balance
the controls for level flight, not unlike balancing a long stick on your
finger.
Small inputs will have slow, measured responses while large erratic
inputs will result in erratic flight.
•
Turn the opposite direction and make a coordinated turn in a
area, and at least ten feet of altitude .
circle in the opposite direction, to complete the figure 8 pattern.
4.
To attempt a flip or roll, make sure you have a large enough
Continue the figure 8 pattern, focusing on holding a consistent
speed and altitude through the maneuver as you progress.
•
“Pop” the throttle a little to start a climb.
•
Immediately reduce the throttle and apply full pitch or roll
command.
•
Be prepared to release the control, apply throttle, and make
pitch/roll corrections to get the aircraft back to level flight.
It will take some practice for most people to feel comfortable flying
in advanced flight modes. In intermediate mode the aircraft will still
self level when you let go of the pitch/roll stick. In advanced mode it
will only do what the pilot commands.
TIP: Avoid reactive flying. Lead the aircraft with deliberate inputs
and the aircraft will follow the commands.
Step 6: Going Through Gates
1.
Leave the setup from before, but attempt to fly through the
gates instead of around them.
2.
Add more gates, set up flags and start to put up challenges or
fly through tunnels or around obstacles. If you got this far you
should be ready to start racing!
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Common Terminology
• Acro mode- A neutrally stable flight mode, when a drone
• CCD- sensor that are full frame capture which makes them
is flying in this mode it will try to retain the attitude it was
immune to prop vibration distortion and generally have better
commanded to when the pitch/roll stick is centered.
light handling as the imager is fully dedicated to light capture.
• Active braking- A feature in electronic speed controls where
• Channel- Refers to a single command from the control stick.
motor braking is part of the control system. Decelerating motors
Each command occupies one channel. Roll, pitch, yaw, and
as part of the control loop has a distinct advantage; It causes
throttle each occupy a single channel. Flight modes, motor cut,
the motors to reach the commanded RPM quicker, making
and similar features all occupy a single channel each.
stability and control more precise.
• Analog video- CVBS video signal that is not encoded,
commonly used for FPV.
• Attitude- Refers to the position an aircraft is in; it describes
what angle the aircraft is occupies in pitch and roll.
• Attitude mode- An Inherently stable flight mode, when a drone
is flying in this mode it wants to return to level flight when the
pitch/roll stick is centered
• ATV- Amateur television, the category of activity in the amateur
radio hobby that RC hobbyists use to gain legal access to
wireless video frequencies for FPV.
• Bank angle- The angle or attitude an aircraft occupies. Bank
angles are referenced off the horizon, level flight is 0 degrees.
• Bi, Tri, quad, penta, hex, etc copter- refers to the number of
propellers on a multicopter. A bicopter has two, a tricopter has
three, a quadcopter has four, etc.
• Bin file- Raw data file that contains firmware.
• CMOS- Image sensors used for video cameras that use
processing on the sensor, thus cheaper to produce. CMOS
typically generate an image by scanning top to bottom and
can be subject to jello image from prop vibration. Industry
development is pushing CMOS so the performance gap
• Common frequencies for control- 2.4 GHz is the most common
frequency for all types of RC control. Some extreme hobbyists
also dabble with 433MHz, 900MHz and others for FPV. Each
frequency has different advantages and disadvantages, and
different legalities worldwide. For the vast majority of hobbyists,
2.4GHz control is the right choice and will have sufficient range
on the shaft to spin.
elevator controls the pitch of the aircraft, aileron controls the
roll of the aircraft and rudder controls the yaw.
• ESC- Electronic Speed Control, a circuit which connects to
battery power and the flight controller and manages motor
speed.
• Field of view(FOV), camera and headset: Field of view
wide the camera will see. When talking in terms of the headset
FOV, the angle describes how large the screen appears. A very
large FOV would be similar to sitting in the front row of a movie
theatre, while a very small FOV is similar to watching a small
television from a distance.
• Firmware- Programming code that determines how circuits
with sufficient bandwidth to enable 100+ aircraft to fly at the
behave. Firmware code includes calculations and instructions
same time. Be sure to research legal operation locally before
which is the operational heart of every circuit with microchips.
transmitting.
• Common frequencies for video- 5.8 GHz is the most common
• First person vs 3rd person RC flying- First person RC is FPV
where the pilot experiences the vehicle through a video feed
frequency for FPV. Other frequencies include 900MHz, 1.3 GHz,
from the first person perspective. 3rd person RC is conventional
2.4GHz and 3.3 GHz. Each frequency has different advantages
where the operator watches the vehicle.
electrical power from the power leads to the spinning armature. • Computer radio- Transmitter that has a small screen with
The Armature contains coils of wire which act on the fixed
buttons or programming wheel, etc to enable the user to
magnets in the case. The coils make contact with brushes
manipulate settings in the controller.
windings on and off and correct intervals to cause the magnet
• Elevator, aileron, rudder- Terms carried over from airplanes,
When talking about a camera FOV, the angle describes how
to research legal operation locally before transmitting.
to cause a motor to spin by switching the magnetic field in the
• DVR- Digital Video Recorder
describes how wide the view is in the camera and headset.
• Brushed motor- Uses mechanical means (brushes) to transmit
• Brushless motor- Uses 3 phase (half) AC power from the ESC
• Damped light- Popular active braking feature found in BLHeli
solution for micro sized cameras.
and disadvantages, and different legalities worldwide. Be sure
motor to spin.
to the fore-aft and side to side tilt of the aircraft
between CCD and CMOS is diminishing. CMOS is the only
• BLHeli- open source ESC firmware
which supply voltage during appropriate intervals to cause the
• Cyclic- A term primarily associated with helicopters, cyclic refers
• Configurator- A piece of software that enables a user to set up
and configure settings and features in flight controllers.
• CP antenna- commonly used for 5.8 GHz video applications,
these antennas work best when paired with other CP antennas,
and have better multipath rejection than linear as the signal
polarity reverses when reflected.
• Flight Controller- The microcomputer on-board an aircraft that
accepts sensor input (gyros, accelerometers, etc), and manages
motor speed to control an aircraft.
• Flight envelope- Describes the limits of an aircraft such as how
fast, how maneuverable, stable, etc
• Flight Modes- Different configurations to enable the model to
respond differently to control stick inputs. Differences in flight
modes might include a different stabilization mode, different
rates, control mixes, lights, etc.
• Flip and roll- A flip is a forward or backward rotation about a
horizontal axis, a roll is a rotation to the side about a lengthwise
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axis.
• Nose in and Nose out- These terms come from the model
• Gimbal- 1. Two or three axis stick on a controller 2. Two or three
axis camera mount for stabilized video footage
• Goggles- Video goggles use micro display(s) to show a video
signal in a headset, otherwise known as a video headsets.
• Ground station- A ground based assembly designed to support
equipment. These might include a video receiver, antennas,
batteries, video monitor, etc. Often set up on a tripod.
• Hover- When the forces of lift and gravity and all torque forces
are properly balanced, a drone or helicopter can maintain its
position in space. Maintaining fine control while holding position
and altitude is called a hover.
• Hover Power- The amount of power it takes to produce enough
lift to counteract the weight of the aircraft and hover.
• IPD- Inter-pupillary distance- distance between one’s eyes
• Linear antenna- These antennas are simple with reasonable
performance.
• LiPo- Lithium Polymer battery- energy dense batteries that
deliver high performance.
• Loop times- Determines how many times per second the flight
controller calculates the PID control loops.
• LOS- Line Of Site- Refers to the direct line between an observer
and an object, where the object is visible to the naked eye.
• Multi-GP- Grassroots racing organization with chapters in
virtually every metropolitan area across the US.
• Multicopter- A flying aircraft that balances the forces of two or
helicopter community and describe how the model is oriented
from the pilot’s perspective. When the model is “nose in” the
model is pointed at the pilot, and when the model is “nose out”
the model is pointed away from the pilot.
• NTSC/PAL- Analog video standards, NTSC is for North America,
oneshot.
Betaflight, and Raceflight* (*Raceflight began with open
source based code, but they have moved to a proprietary code
base with Raceflight One)
not return to level flight when the stick is centered, but will
maintain the attitude it was commanded to. Flip and roll rates
are determined by how far the control stick is deflected, moving
the stick a small amount away from center will result in the
aircraft continuing a slow rotation. Moving the control stick to
headsets automatically select which mode is being used.
the extremes will result in the aircraft continuing to rotate fast
• Oneshot- a PPM sum signal which operates faster than
conventional PPM
• Open source- projects which are available to the internet for
free, with the understanding developers will receive credit, etc.
• Orientation- Refers to the quadcopter’s position relative to the
operator for 3rd person RC. Refers to the ability to understand
the aircraft’s location in space in FPV flight
• Oscillation- a back and forth movement which could take place
on any or all axis of the aircraft during flight. Oscillations of
different frequencies and magnitude indicate different issues
with setup. Oscillations are a normal part of the tuning PID
(how fast the aircraft rotates with full stick input is determined
by the rate settings).
• Rates- Determines how quickly the aircraft rotates in each axis.
Sometimes values are adjusted to a scale from 0-100 or 1-150,
sometimes Rates are determined with a measured maximum
rotation rate defined as degrees per second.
• Rx- Receiver that picks up the control commands and sends
them to the flight controller.
• Serial- A serialized data stream which can be transmitted on a
single transmission wire
• Stability- Refers to the aircrafts inherent tendencies to maintain
tuning process as the limits of the gain values are explored.
a commanded course and how smooth and accurately it
Oscillations can also result from an operator over-controlling
responds to control inputs.
a vehicle, and can happen in cars, airplanes, helicopters, or
virtually any control system when the operator starts to chase
the control inputs with too large of a response.
• OSD- On Screen Displays generate graphics on top of a video
signal. This could be as simple as a name/callsign being
displayed, or as complicated as a full instrument panel packed
with telemetry data.
• PDB- Power Distribution Board, used to manage electrical
distribution on a quadcopter
• MultiWii- Original open source project to make a flight controller • PID- A method of augmenting stability, PID control loops are
for a quadcopter. Original project utilized an Arduino paired with
calculations used by the flight controller to create a balance of
the IMU sensors from a Nintendo Wii controller. Subsequent
control and stability.
branches of the project have included BaseFlight, Cleanflight,
• Rate mode (Acro mode)- A flight mode where the aircraft will
PAL is used in most other areas around the world. Fat Shark
more propellers to maintain controlled flight with no other flying • PCB- Printed Circuit Board, a fiberglass board with copper
or control surfaces.
layers, this is the “chassis” for circuit boards.
• Multishot- A PPM sum signal which operates faster than
width of a signal to provide discreet control.
• PPM- Pulse Position Modulation, a sum signal that combines
multiple PWM control signals on one signal wire.
• Telemetry- sending data remotely. In this case telemetry is a
communication conduit for the quadcopter to report back on
a variety of metrics. Common telemetry data might include
how well the control receiver is picking up the signal, what the
battery condition is, what the altitude is, etc.
• Tiny-Whoop- Micro racing drones with ducted fans, defined
as being “punch safe” or cannot carry enough energy to hurt a
person if it hits them in the face.
• Tx- Transmitter that pilot holds and manipulates a pair of
gimbals to transmit control signals to the drone.
• VRX- video receiver
• VTX- video transmitter
• Yaw, pitch, roll. Yaw is when the aircraft spins or rotates about a
vertical axis. Pitch is when the aircraft tilts forward or backward
about a Horizontal axis. Roll is when the aircraft tilts side to side
about a lengthwise axis.
• PWM- Pulse Width Modulation, a method of adjusting the pulse
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Common tools
Binding
• Allen/Hex wrenches
• Socket wrenches
In the event the Shark Quad needs to be bound (connected) to
the radio, follow the steps below. The Shark quad can also be
• Solder
bound to any Fly Sky Compatible transmitter.
• Soldering iron
1.
indicate that the radio is on.
• Sponge
• Zip ties
Turn on the radio. The LED on the radio will turn green to
2.
While holding down the BIND button on the quadcopter, plug
it in. A red LED on the shark’s heart will blink rhythmically. This
means that the aircraft is in binding mode.
3.
Ensuring that the radio is already on, hold down the power button
for 10-15 seconds until the green LED starts to blink quickly. That
REPLACEMENT PARTS
PART
PART NUMBER
Shark Quad
FSV2703
Recon Headset
FSV1131
Fat Shark Radio
FSV2704
2s 260 mAh Shark Quad
Battery (2) and USB charger
FSV1819
Replacement Motors (4)
FSV2709
Spare Propellers (8)
FSV2706
Racing Gates and Gate Holders FSV2705
(2)
puts the radio in binding mode.
4.
With both units in binding mode, the systems should
automatically pair within seconds. The heartbeat of the shark
will change pattern to reflect this, but be advised: it may
happen quickly.
5.
No other indication will show that the radio and quadcopter
are bound. To test the bind, power off the entire system then
turn everything back on. At this point, try testing the ARM
switch on the top right corner of the radio to check to see if
the switches are configured. Flip the arm switch a few times
to see if the quadcopter blades power up. If the propellers
don’t spin up, the switches will need to be configured in
BetaFlight.
For more information on switch configuration in BetaFlight,
click here for more instructions
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