Confidential Home Inspection Report

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Confidential Home Inspection Report
Prepared for: Mr. House Hunter
Any Street
Lynnwood, WA 98000
March 3, 2016
Seaview Home Inspections, LLC
6624- 163rd Pl. SW
Lynnwood, WA 98037
425-742-1735
Michael A. Brisbin, ACI
Owner/Home Inspector
WA State Home Inspector License #278
SeaviewInspections@comcast.net
www.SeaviewHomeInspections.com
This report is the exclusive property of the inspection company and the client whose name appears herewith
and its use by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
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Inspection Report- Table of Contents
Cover page
1
INSPECTION INFORMATION
3
MAIN STRUCTURE
5
CRAWL SPACE
8
WOOD DESTROYING ORGANISMS (WDO/WDI) and PESTS
11
HEATING/HVAC SYSTEM
14
PLUMBING
17
BATHROOMS
20
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
22
KITCHEN
25
LAUNDRY
27
VENTING/ENERGY/CONDENSATION
28
INTERIOR
30
FIREPLACE(S)
33
ATTIC SPACE
34
GARAGE/CARPORT
36
ROOF and COMPONENTS
38
EXTERIOR
41
GROUNDS
43
PHOTO GALLERY
44
Report Summary Pages
Pre- Inspection Agreement
ASHI Standards of Practice
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INSPECTION INFORMATION
The purpose of the inspection is to identify significant visible and identifiable defects, problems and/or conditions that may adversely
affect the function and integrity of the items, components and systems inspected. An inspection is intended to assist the
Customer/Client in the evaluation of the overall condition of the home. The inspection is based on the observation of the visible and
apparent condition of the building and its components at the time of the inspection. The inspection is of readily accessible areas of
the home and is limited to visual observations only.
When an item is reported to "Appear Serviceable" it is defined as capable of being used as it was intended with no significant
visible defects or problems noted. Some "serviceable" items may, however, show signs of wear and tear or age- but should be
considered to give generally satisfactory service with the limits of its age and the type of system/component it is. Visible defects,
concerns and potential problems are reported during the inspection.
Life expectancy of a component will not be determined during the inspection.
Any area which is not exposed to view, is concealed, or is inaccessible because of soil, shrubs, walls, floors, carpet, ceilings,
furnishings, siding, insulation, being locked or by design is not included in this report. These areas will be deemed as:
inaccessible, no/limited visibility, unable to verify/inspect, not visible and so on. The inspector may elect not to go into areas that
may be deemed unsafe or could cause potential damage to the home or injury (i.e. crawl spaces, attic spaces, the roof, etc.). Every
effort will be made to traverse, enter or inspect all components and areas of the home.
The inspection report is based upon the standard of what is typical, standard or average wear for a home of this age, compared to
homes of comparable age, style and type. Houses are not considered perfect or without flaw (even new construction). Items reported
in the Summary Page(s) may be considered significant concerns, maintenance items, things to be aware of (and budget for
replacement) or potential problems in the near and upcoming future. The Customer will need to determine which item(s) poses the
greatest concern when making the decision to have items repaired, replaced, serviced, etc.
Maintenance and other items may be discussed, but are not part of this inspection. This report is not a compliance inspection, code
conformity or certification for past or present building codes, mechanical, plumbing, fire codes and regulations of any kind. Codes
will not be discussed or referenced during this visual inspection. The inspection report should not be construed as a compliance
inspection of any governmental or non-governmental codes or regulations.
The report is not intended to be a warranty or guarantee of the present or future adequacy or performance of the structure, its
systems, or their component parts. This report does not constitute any expressed or implied warranty of merchantability or fitness for
use regarding the condition of the property and it should not be relied upon as such. Any opinions expressed regarding adequacy,
capacity, or expected life of components are general estimates based on information about similar components and occasional wide
variations are to be expected between such estimates and actual experience.
Follow-up Inspections:
Follow-up Inspections may need to be performed to determine if the items or areas of concern, during the original Home Inspection,
have been repaired, replaced, removed or corrected in a satisfactory and workmanlike manner. Wherever possible, all work
requested to be repaired/replaced or corrected, should be performed by a qualified, licensed professional in that particular field
and warranty provided as needed. Having a Homeowner/Seller repair or correct a defect will probably not provide a warranty for the
work.
A written document (Addendum/Amendment) shall be provided to this Company as to what repairs/work are to be re-inspected,
prior to the Follow-up Inspection. Sufficient notice is needed to allow the Follow-up Inspection to be worked into the schedule
of the Inspector. Please allow 5-7 working days to allow for proper scheduling.
A Third-Party Agreement should be utilized in all transactions of repair/work performed. This Company will not take any
responsibility of repairs, replacement, corrections performed by other companies or individuals. Concealed and hidden repairs
cannot be inspected, attempts should be made to inspect items during the repair or renovation stage to determine if these repairs are
being completed in a satisfactory manner and that all necessary repairs are being performed. An earnest effort will be made to
determine/discover that all the repairs or replacements were made (based upon the requests from the initial inspection). Follow-up
Inspections do not imply warranty or guarantees, implied or expressed.
A minimum Fee of $ 250.00 will be charged for all Follow-up Inspections performed.
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Customer & Site Information:
Report File #
WSDA Inspection Control #
WA State Licensed Home
Inspector:
Date of Inspection:
Client Name:
Inspection Location:
030316.
10000BE000.
Michael A. Brisbin, ACI- License # 278
ASHI Certified Home Inspector
WSDA- Structural Pest Inspector # 44353.
March 3, 2016.
Mr. House Hunter.
Any Street
Lynnwood, WA 98000.
Climatic Conditions:
Weather/Temperature and
Soils:
Overcast, Rain. Approx. Temperature: 40's
Soil Conditions: Wet.
Building Characteristics:
Est. Age of House:
Approximate Size:
Property Information:
Years: 10.
Square Footage: 2879.
Single Family.
Utility Services:
Water Source:
Sewage Disposal:
Utilities Status:
Public (this was not verified- recommend making an inquiry with the Seller/Homeowner)
Public (this was not verified- recommend making an inquiry with the Seller/Homeowner)
All utilities are on at the time of the inspection.
General Information:
House is currentlyPersons' present at the
Inspection:
Inspection Start/Finish
Times:
Disclosure Form:
Occupied and furnished- limitations apply.
Buyer(s), Present during the Inspection process; Buyer's agent/representative.
9:00 AM- 12 Noon.
Was not available for review at this time.
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MAIN STRUCTURE
The structural support framing of a house is generally inspected for visual and apparent problems. Because most of the exterior frame
is covered with cladding/siding, on the exterior, and wall coverings on the inside, it is usually not possible to inspect these
components/areas. Sub-framing can be inspected from the crawl space sub-area, in most cases, or from unfinished basements. The
roof framing usually can be inspected from the attic space, if one is available. These areas are inspected for defects in installation
practices and alterations/modifications to the structure, damage from wood-decay fungal rot and moisture/insect damage.
Determining structural integrity is not part of this visual inspection. Visible or known defects and damage will be referred to
professionals who specialize in these fields- general contractors or engineers.
The foundation system has two functions. First, it supports the building structurally by keeping it level, minimizing settling,
preventing uplift from forces of frost or expansion soils and resisting horizontal forces such as winds and earthquakes. Second, a
foundation system keeps the wooden parts of the building above the ground and away from the organisms and moisture, in the soil,
that may destroy wood and cause fungal rot wood-decay. There are three common foundation types: Slab-on-grade, crawl spaces,
basements.
Minor cracks are typical in many foundation walls and most do not represent a structural issue/problem. If major cracks are present,
along with bowing, this company routinely recommends further evaluation be made by a qualified structural engineer.
All exterior grades should allow for surface and roof water to flow away from the foundation and house wall. This will help prevent
excessive moisture build-up around the house and possibly under it, as well.
All concrete floor slabs experience some degree of cracking due to shrinkage in the drying process. This is often visible in the
garage flooring, but may also be present under the floor covering of a basement or lower level (Split and Tri-level houses). The cause
of the cracks may be from soil type or soils compaction, rapid drying of the concrete slab, minimal or no reinforcing in the concrete.
In most instances floor coverings prevent recognition of cracks or settlement in all but the most severe cases. Where carpeting and
other floor coverings are installed, the materials and condition of the flooring underneath cannot be determined.
Structure Type:
Two Story, with crawl space.
Foundation Stem Wall:
Type:
Conditions:
Concrete (solid), With cripple/pony walls construction; 2x4's used.
Overall Condition- Appears serviceable; No apparent structural defects noted at the time of the
inspection. Anchor bolts/strapping was installed on the foundation wall, holding down the sill
plate to the foundation wall.
Floor Support:
Type:
Sub-Flooring:
Engineered "I" Joists- manufactured Truss Joist framing.
OSB (Oriented Strand Board)
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Conditions:
Overall condition- Appears serviceable. No significant problems noted at the time of the
inspection.
Beams/Girders:
Type/Size:
Conditions:
Solid/Built-up: 4x10's.
Overall condition- Appears serviceable. No visible evidence of structural issues/problems noted
during the inspection.
Posts/Columns:
Type/Size:
Conditions:
Solid/Built-up: 4x4's, 4x6's.
Concerns/issues noted at the time of the inspection;
- Several of the structural posts are in standing water in the crawl space at this time, or have
been wet recently. Despite being pressure-treated wood, the wood posts are prone to fungal rot
damage overtime. The metal brackets attached to the posts are rusted/corroded and may not
restrain the posts anymore.
Recommend further evaluation of all the posts in the sub-structure framing after the water is
removed, to determine if replacement is needed for the posts. Possible need to add raised
footings and replace the posts, to allow for the proper clearance above the soils grade level.
Recommend contacting a qualified, licensed contractor to make further evaluations and make all
necessary repairs/corrections as needed.
Footings/Piers:
Type Material(s):
Conditions:
Concrete- Continuous/strip footings.
Appears Serviceable- Overall condition. No visible evidence of significant structural
issues/problems noted during the inspection.
Bearing Walls:
Type/Conditions:
2x6 Construction; Overall Condition- Appears Serviceable. Limited access/inspection; these
areas may not be completely visible or accessible, verification of these components is limited.
Roof Framing:
Type:
Rafter Size(s):
Sheathing:
Conditions:
Engineered trusses; 2x4- Top chord. Conventional, stick-framed on the side attic space.
2x6's.
OSB (Oriented Strand Board)
Overall Condition- Appears Serviceable. No visible defects or concerns noted at the time of the
inspection.
Roofs are constructed either with rafters (conventional stick-framed), engineered trusses (most common for newer construction),
open beams or some combination of these types and styles. Stick-framed roofs are usually made with dimensional lumber (2x
material), but may also use composite/engineered materials. Stick-framed is still used in many cases because it is the most flexible
roof framing system. This is often found in complicated roofing systems, vaulted ceiling and low pitched roofing.
Trusses (engineered) are usually of small wood members (usually 2x3, 2x4's or 2x6's) joined in the factory to make a long structural
assembly. Trusses can span much farther than stick-framed roofs, leaving large open areas below them or permitting partition walls
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to be located without consideration of the roof structure above. Trusses go up quickly, usually resulting in a cost saving over
stick-framed roofs on simple shaped building. Trusses are designed to use the minimal amount of lumber , span longer distances
and provide adequate support to the roof covering. Altering, modifying or damage to the trusses will usually result in inadequately
supported framing- this is common to find when new skylights, chimneys or pull-down ladders have been installed in the roof
framing. Correcting/repairing trusses should always to done by a qualified, licensed contractor. It is recommended that a truss
engineer, or truss designer/manufacturer, evaluate and determine the best repair solution for the truss repair.
Basements (lower levels- which are below grade-level) can come in several forms; the completely finished, the completely
unfinished and any form in between. The finished basement is considered livable space; finished walls/ceiling (drywall), floor
coverings (carpet, vinyl, tile, laminated materials, etc.), mechanical systems (heat, plumbing, outlets/fixtures, etc.). The unfinished
basement may be in the same condition as when the house was built- open walls, framing, exposed plumbing, wiring, heating
systems, exposed concrete walls and flooring.
Finished basement may be difficult to completely inspect due to the wall, ceilings and floor coverings. The inspection is usually
based on how the basement was finished. Many homeowners will finish the basement themselves- whether they're qualified or not.
Items to be aware of will be recent repairs, patching or painting; newer carpet or floor covering- were these items installed to cover
problems? Were electrical outlets/receptacles/fixtures installed properly in the walls and ceilings- the locations installed, the quantity
and are they safe? Recommend making inquiries with the Seller/Owner about any recent finish work in the basement.
Unfinished (or partially finished) basements are a little easier to inspect- most of the components are exposed and are more readily
accessible for inspection. It may be easier to inspect the foundation walls for cracks and water entry, the floor for water staining;
improper wiring or plumbing and heating systems. The main restriction in basements in the amount of storage and personal
belongings that may be present during the inspection. Shelving, benches and storage may not allow a complete inspection of the
outer walls , floor or framing in some cases. The conditions, visible in the basement, may be quite different when the house is
vacant. This company recommends a follow-up inspection of the basement if concerns/problems are present (and become visible)
after the basement has been cleared of belongings.
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CRAWL SPACE
The crawl space inspection has several purposes and is considered the most difficult part of the inspection. The inspection of the
sub-area consists of several components; the sub-structure framing (joists, beams, posts, sub-flooring, etc.); the floor insulation;
dampness/moisture problems and ventilation; wood-destroying insects and wood-decay fungal rot; mechanical systems (plumbing,
heating ducts, electrical, etc.); accessibility of the entire sub-area.
The minimum requirement for the crawl space clearances is 18" below all the floor joists and 14" below the structural beams/girders.
This provides adequate clearances for ventilation and "workable" space. However, there may be restrictions other than framing. The
heat ducts and plumbing pipes (potable water and drain-waste pipes) also play a role in the accessibility of the crawl space. Many
crawl spaces will have limited access due to the installation of these components. Other factors, which will limit access into the crawl
space, may be excessive water on the floor, fallen floor insulation and excessive animal/rodent activity.
The floor insulation (when installed in the sub-framing) will obstruct the complete inspection of the sub-structure area. All areas
hidden by floor insulation are excluded from this inspection. The majority of the sub-structure area may be excluded from the
inspection when insulation is present; removing all the floor insulation, to inspect the framing, is very time consuming and is not part
of this inspection. Every effort will be made to inspect areas that may be prone to problems. Exposed areas will be inspected; the
inside perimeter of the crawl space, the corners of the crawl space, plumbing/bathroom areas, behind patios, porches, concrete steps
and where staining or WDO signage may exist. Where floor insulation is fallen down/hanging, the removal of all fallen/damaged is
recommended and an interim inspection should be performed to determine if any additional work is necessary.
Conditions Observed:
Access Location:
Access Conditions:
Interior of the house; Entry closet.
Access opening/framing to the sub-structure crawl space, appears serviceable and is functioning
as intended.
Accessibility into Sub-Area: Sub-structure crawl space is reasonably accessible- clearances are ample/adequate at this time,
in most areas. Entered the sub-area for a full inspection.
Floor Type:
Dirt/Silt-type soils.
Dampness/Moisture:
Evidence of excessive water/moisture conditions in the crawl space. Standing water
under/above the plastic vapor barrier; standing water is present in over half the crawl space
sub-area (limited access to all areas). Several of the wood posts are below the water level, or
are covered with mud-sediment.
Water entry through the foundation wall, located under the fireplace area; most of the water
appears to be from high ground water.
Recommend consulting a qualified, licensed professional drainage contractor for evaluation and
recommendation for the best solution on removing/eliminating any excessive moisture conditions
that may be present and provide a drainage solution to permanently remove any excess
water/moisture from the sub-area. Recommend evaluations of the roof drainage system (dye
testing if needed), surface drainage around the house and ground water to determine if these
contribute to the water/moisture issues in the crawl space. Recommend eliminating all
excessive moisture and conditions that may be present in the crawl space sub-area.
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Photo:
Vapor Barrier:
Ventilation:
Sub-Floor Insulation:
Conducive Conditions:
The vapor barrier appears to be in poor condition: Plastic is covered with, mud/silt from past
flooding, fallen/damaged fiberglass insulation. Recommend complete removal of the old plastic
vapor barrier(s) in the crawl space sub-area, prior to installing the new materials. Recommend
installing new 6 mil., black polyethylene plastic sheeting to cover all soils in the crawl space.
Overlap plastic at least 12" at all joints; do not run plastic up the base of the wood posts or
framing, and secure the plastic with stones/bricks or fasteners to prevent movement.
Ventilation appears to be adequate/sufficient at this time. The quantity and location of the
foundation vents appear to provide adequate air flow in the crawl space sub-area.
Fiberglass; Estimated R-factor: 19 (+/-).
Evidence of rodent nesting and/or damage to the sub-floor insulation; urine staining, droppings
and debris noted on/in the sub-floor insulation. Recommend removing and replacing all the
damaged and infested sub-floor insulation in the crawl space sub-area as needed. All infested
insulation should be removed. Recommend replacing insulation with similar R-value or improve
as needed. Recommend contacting a qualified, licensed insulation specialist about the
replacement of the sub-floor insulation.
High moisture conditions observed during inspection- potential for wood-decay rot, molds/mildew
and rodent and insect infestation.
Posts are at/below grade level and are sitting in the water through the middle of the house.
The plastic vapor barrier is needed throughout the crawl space sub-area to cover all the soils and to control moisture rising from the
soils. Despite the appearance of dry soil in the sub-area, soil can produce several quarts of water per day. This moisture rises up
through the crawl space and sub-framing, and possibly into the house, walls and attic space. Controlling this relative moisture is
critical to the health of the house. The solution is to control the moisture with heavy plastic spread over all the soils, preferably 6
mil., black polyethylene. The heavy plastic, laid over the soil, will trap the moisture below the plastic and not allow it to rise into the
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air. Black plastic is preferred because sunlight will not pass through it, and will also help prevent the growth of molds, fungi and
organic growth.
Old, worn/torn and deteriorating plastic may not control moisture as needed and replacement is recommended. Complete removal the
old plastic is highly recommended; laying new plastic over old plastic may trap moisture and water between the layers. Where high
moisture conditions in the sub-area are present, proper installation is critical. The plastic should cover all the exposed soils through
the crawl space sub-area; it should be overlapped at least 12", and secured in place with bricks or stones. The plastic should not be
installed up to, or on, the base of the wood support posts and structural members, which may allow condensation to trap against the
wood framing and cause wood-decay rot damage or insect infestation.
Construction and cellulose/wood debris should always be removed from the sub-area (as required); the presence of cellulose/wood
materials is conducive to wood-destroying fungal rot and insect infestations, which may lead to other issues. Cardboard forms, often
found around newer concrete footing pads, should be removed where needed (not as critical as wood forms). It some regions of the
Puget Sound area, these cardboard forms are prone to subterranean termite infestations, which may lead to infestation in the wood
framing also.
Crawl Space Conditions:
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WOOD DESTROYING ORGANISMS (WDO/WDI) and PESTS
The definition of a Wood Destroying Organism/Insect Inspection (WDO/WDI): An inspection of a structure for the purpose of
determining (i) evidence of infestation(s), (ii) fungal rot damage to the structure, and (iii) conducive conditions which leads to
damage to the structure. The WDO/WDI inspection will be performed by a licensed Structural Pest Inspector (SPI), in accordance
with the provisions of RCW 15.58.210 and WAC 16-228-2005 through 16-228-2045.
The wood destroying organism inspection report is a written opinion of a qualified Washington State Licensed Structural Pest
Inspector based upon what is visible and evident at the time of the inspection. As such, the inspection report does not in any way
represent or guarantee the structure to be free from wood destroying organisms or their damage, nor does it represent or guarantee
that the total damage or infestation is limited to that disclosed in this report.
The WDO/WDI inspector shall make a thorough inspection of the subject structure to render an opinion of the presence and extent of
wood destroying organisms, as well as, those conditions which are conducive to such wood-destroying organisms. This full
Inspection Report is considered a Complete Wood Destroying Organism (WDO/WDI) Inspection. This WDO/WDI section of
the report will identify what WDO/WDI's were discovered, the general location and how significant the problem may be at the time
of the inspection. The Diagram provided (where needed) will also help with locations of concerns.
The Complete Wood Destroying Organism Inspection report may not be complete without other sections of this full
Inspection Report; these other sections of the report may include, but not limited to: the Exterior section, Crawl space
section, Plumbing and Bathrooms sections, etc. The Structural Pest inspector will determine what sections of the report are needed
to make a complete WDO Inspection Report.
To meet the needs of FHA and VA Pest Inspection requests, and to provide a Form 33 for these transactions, a complete and
separate Wood Destroying Organism Inspection Report will be needed. All items called out on this WDO Inspection Report
shall be corrected/completed prior to issuing the Form 33 report. Additional time will be needed to complete this separate WDO
Inspection Report; if repairs and/or corrections are called for, an additional Re-Inspection* will also be needed to complete the
transaction, and provide all necessary Forms. *A Fee of $250.00 will be charged for all Re-Inspections.
Wood-Decay Fungi Rot (WDO)
Findings/Location(s)Exterior Roof Eaves/Trim:
Evidence of fungal rot decay/damage to the trim, located (but not limited to): at the trellis on the
front of the house. Replace damaged wood as needed.
Wood-Destroying Insects (WDI)
Findings:
No visible evidence of wood-destroying insects noted/discovered at the time of the inspection.
Conducive Conditions:
Sub-area Crawl space:
Excessive moisture conditions observed during inspection- potential for wood-decay, insect
infestation, mold/mildew, etc.
Fallen sub-structure floor insulation, restricts and limits air flow in crawl space area.
Several of the wood posts are at/below soils grade and several of the posts are currently in
the standing water.
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Rodent/Animal/Vermin Activity:
Type of Infestation(s) noted: Rats.
Evidence of Infestation:
Rodent droppings noted, on the plastic vapor barrier, on/in the sub-floor insulation batts, on the
heat ducting/insulation, throughout the crawl space sub-area.
Insulation has been effected/damaged: sub-floor insulation has been pulled-down and/or
damaged in the crawl space sub-area, staining from rodent droppings/urine
Unable to determine if this infestation/problem is active or inactive- a specialist is needed to
determine activity status.
Recommendations:
Recommend locating all the sources of the rodent/vermin entry into the house; (attic, garage
and/or sub-area) and correct and seal off as needed, using approved methods and materials.
Recommend contacting a licensed specialist in rodent clean-up and remediations. Make all
necessary corrections/repairs to prevent further infestation and clean/sanitize the area(s) of
infestation for health reasons. Recommend contacting a licensed, professional and certified
pest management company (PCO) to prevent or remedy the pest activity/damage.
"Wood destroying organisms/insects" means organisms including, but not limited to: Subterranean termites, Dampwood termites,
Carpenter ants, Wood- boring beetles of the family Anobiidae (Deathwatch beetles), and Wood-decay fungi (wood rot). Moisture
ants also, but these are considered a secondary wood-destroying insect. Note: Molds/mildew are considered a wood inhabiting
organism, that does not cause structural damage, and therefore is not part of a WDO inspection.
"Conducive conditions" means those conditions which may lead to or enhance an infestation of the wood destroying organisms.
Conducive conditions shall include, but not limited to: Inadequate clearances to sub-framing, wood-soil contact, cellulose/wood
debris in the sub-area and cardboard forms, vegetation- in direct contact with the exterior, restricted or non-functioning gutter
systems, inadequate ventilation in the substructure area, bare/unimproved ground in the sub-area and excessive moisture/water or
evidence of seasonal standing water in the sub-area, failed/missing caulk or grout water splash areas, plumbing leaks and other
sources that may contribute to damage by WDO's.
Due to the natural habits of the Carpenter ants to go dormant during the colder/winter months, Carpenter ants may go undetected if
this inspection was performed during their dormant season. We do not assume any responsibility for the Carpenter ant infestations
that were not detected during their dormant season.
Structural assessment may be possible, during the inspection, for severely damaged materials. However, structural integrity may not
always be possible with minor rot problems or wood-destroying insect damage. It is recommended that a qualified, licensed
contractor or professional Engineer evaluate damaged building materials, if there is any doubt about the overall condition or
structural strength. When in doubt, it is better to remove and replace all damaged materials then to leave it behind, to be discovered
by the next inspector.
Inaccessible Areas (where applicable): The following areas are considered inaccessible for inspection and may not be economically
practical to make these areas accessible for inspection. However, these areas may be subject to attack by wood destroying organisms.
No opinion is rendered concerning the conditions in these areas and is therefore excluded from the scope of the inspection:
A) The interiors of hollow walls, and all enclosed spaces, such as between floor and porch/deck and the ceiling or soffit below.
B) Portions of the sub-floor concealed or made inaccessible by heating systems or ducting or sub-floor insulation.
C) Enclosed bay windows.
D) Areas beneath wood floors over concrete (sleeper floors).
E) Areas concealed by built-in cabinets
F) Areas concealed by floor coverings, such as wall-to-wall carpeting, linoleum/vinyl, ceramic tile, etc.
G) Areas concealed by built-in appliances; refrigerators, washer/dryers, dishwashers, etc.
H) Exterior decks concealed by artificial turf, planters, hot tubs, minimal clearances to the ground, etc.
Currently, no opinion is rendered concerning the condition in these areas, at this time, and is specifically excluded from the scope of
the inspection:
A) Areas concealed by interior furnishings and stored items (covering walls and flooring).
B) Areas concealed by "free standing" appliances such as washer/dryer, refrigerator, dishwasher, freezers, etc.
C) Areas concealed by heavy vegetation on the exterior of the house.
D) Areas/rooms which are locked, remain inaccessible and/or prevent access.
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Rodent Infestations (where applicable): Rodents are considered a nuisance pest- whether they're rats or mice. They typically do not
fall under the same category as wood-destroying insects. These typically need some type of control- whether a home owner or a
professional company is contracted. The perfect rodenticide is one which will eliminate, repel, or change the habit of the rodent.
Houses and buildings are prone to both rat and mice infestations. Rodents are attracted to easy food sources, living habitats in the
crawl space, attic space, wall cavities, garages and storage sheds. Controlling the rodents in the house is only part of the problem, the
main concern is attempting to locate how the rodents have entered the house. Common areas to check: Trees, limbs, vines in contact
with the roof or gutters; vines running along the house wall or chimney; openings in or damage to foundation vent screens;
improperly or inadequately installed crawl space access openings; animal doors cut into exterior doors; foundation drain pipes that
open into the crawl space and the list goes on. They may be attracted to an easy food or water source: pockets of water under the
house; lakes/ponds, streams or drainage ditches in the surrounding area; fruit trees nearby; feeding animals outdoors (dog food); bird
feeders; feeding squirrels; household garbage.
Rats and mice are not effected by fiberglass insulation- in fact, this is one of their favorite nesting materials. That is why sub-floor
and attic insulation is often damaged or destroyed and will need replacing in many cases. Other types of insulation will not be
effected as much- cellulose and mineral wool materials.
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HEATING/HVAC SYSTEM
The Heating system design may be as simple as a single baseboard heater in each room, or more complicated, such as air distribution
systems, heat pumps or hydronic systems (hot water). All systems, however, have four things in common. Each system has a heat
producer, oil or gas burners or an electric element, and a heat exchanger- a furnace where air is heated or a boiler where water is
heated. A heat distribution system- which may be ducts and registers that circulates air flow, or pipes/tubes and radiators that
circulate water. Finally, a control for the system- a thermostat of some type.
Air distribution systems: When the thermostat calls for heat, air is warmed by gas, oil or electric burners, electric heating elements
(strips) or heat pump coils in the furnace. The blower distributes the heated air throughout the house via a ducting system (ducts and
registers). Adjustable dampers in the ducts can regulate the flow of air to different parts of the house and adjustable registers
regulate the air flow to particular rooms.
Water distribution systems (hydronic): When the thermostat calls for heat, water is warmed in a boiler by gas- or oil-fired burners.
The pump distributes the heated water via pipes or tubes to radiators, registers. baseboards or convectors. Systems vary, in series
loop- radiators are connected in series; one pipes systems and two pipe systems- the most efficient. Each radiator draws hot water
from the supply main and returns it to a return main. The water in the last radiator is almost as warm as the first one. Newer systems
commonly use plastic tubes (PEX) to distribute warm water.
Heating System Description:
Location- Primary HVAC
system:
Central Forced-Air system:
Capacity of Unit:
Approximate Age:
Observations of the Heating
system- prior to operation:
Garage.
Trane: Fuel Type; Natural Gas.
BTU Rating (Input): 80,000.
Original equipment, Years: 10+
No Service stickers noted on the HVAC system at the time of the inspection. Recommend
inquiring with the Seller/Homeowner about the last known service call.
HVAC; Air Distribution system:
Forced-Air Operation:
System appears to be operational/serviceable. No significant problems noted with the furnace
operation at time of the inspection.
Recommend contacting a qualified, licensed HVAC contractor for a complete Tune-up and
general maintenance of the heating system as needed.
Burners/Heat Exchanger*:
Gas Pipe/Valve:
Blower Fan:
Combustion Air:
Exhaust Venting:
In-Shot burners appear to be serviceable- with no apparent visible issues noted.
Valve is located next to the furnace compartment; Appears Serviceable.
Appears Serviceable- no visible problems detected.
Appears serviceable/adequate at this time.
Overall condition- Appears serviceable.
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Plenums:
Thermostat/Controls:
Filter Condition:
Appears serviceable, with visible issues noted.
Appears serviceable/operational.
Filter system currently installed; Disposable. Appears serviceable; Clean or change on a regular
basis.
Observations/Recommendati Bi-Annual service calls/inspections of the heating system for general maintenance, service and
ons:
Tune-up.
Heating/Air Distribution components:
Type(s):
Overall Conditions:
Sheet metal air ducting, insulated, Flexible round air ducts (insulated)
Appears serviceable, heat (and/or airflow) appears to be distributed/provided to all habitable
rooms as intended; With the notable concerns/issues/exception:
Air Quality/Conditions:
Debris noted in the heat/air ducts, visible through the floor registers. Recommend cleaning the
ducts as needed.
Concerns/Issues- Metal/Flex Conditions noted with the metal/flex ducting:
ducts:
- The flex ducting appears to be damaged in the dining room; the inside of the ducting is
torn/damaged (fiberglass is exposed). Recommend replacing the flex-ducting as needed.
- Recommend replacing the damaged duct insulation in the crawl space as needed.
Recommend contacting licensed HVAC/Mechanical contractor, or handyman, to make further
evaluations of the ductwork system. Repair/replace ducting as needed using approved materials
and installation practices.
Photo:
The Heat Exchanger* is a component of the gas furnace (where applicable) in which combustion occurs. As the heat exchanger
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wears out, cracks or holes may develop and the combustion gases may mix with the household air. A test for Carbon Monoxide
(CO) gas will be made at the furnace vent pipe, as well as visible inspection of the flame, burners and the burner compartment, using
a Bacharach Monoxer II. The furnace and house may be checked for excessive CO build-up (measured in parts per million). The
heat exchanger, in both oil and gas furnaces, is mostly hidden from view; it cannot be completely examined and its condition
determined without being disassembled. Gas furnaces with In-shot burners (newer style), closed systems (high efficiency furnaces)
and some older models cannot be easily inspected due to the design. Every effort will be made to inspect these systems.
The inspector is not equipped to inspect the furnace heat exchangers for evidence of cracks or holes, during the visual Home
Inspection. This is beyond the scope of this inspection. Some closed furnaces are designed in such a way that inspection of the heat
exchanger is almost impossible.
The inspector can not light pilot lights. Safety devices are not tested by the inspector.
Heat ducts are a common source of the heat loss in the most house. As much as 25% of the heat could be leaking from the heat ducts
and registers. This not only is a significant waste of energy, but may be a potential health hazard as well. Leaking ducts in the livable
space may not be significant, but loosing heat into the crawl space, sub-area or attic space, could pose serious health issues. Older
gray "duct" tape has been found to deteriorate over time and loose it's adhesiveness, and the duct joints would separate and open.
Dark staining on duct insulation is an indication of heat loss into the crawl space and is common on most houses older than 10 years.
To save energy and limit contamination into the heating system, the ducts should be re-sealed at all the joints and the floor registers
attached and sealed at the floor. Recommend removing and replacing all old duct tape with an ASTM approved taping system or
sealants. This can accomplished by the homeowner or a licensed heating contractor.
Limitations of the Heating System Inspection:
Thermostats are not checked for calibration or timed functions. They will be activated during the operation of the heating system.
Adequacy, efficiency or the even distribution of air throughout a building cannot be addressed by a visual inspection. Electronic air
cleaners, humidifiers and dehumidifiers are beyond the scope of this inspection. Have these systems evaluated by a qualified
individual.
The inspector does not perform pressure tests on coolant systems, therefore no representation is made regarding coolant charge or
line integrity. Subjective judgment of system capacity is not a part of the inspection. Normal service and maintenance is
recommended on a yearly basis.
Determining the condition of Oil tanks, whether exposed or buried, is beyond the scope of this inspection. Leaking oil tanks
represent an environmental hazard which is sometimes costly to remedy.
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PLUMBING
Potable water lines (drinking water) and Drain-Waste-Vent pipes are inspected for leaks, installation techniques and non-professional
workmanship. Proper sizing of pipes, venting and plumbing codes are not part of this inspection. All underground piping related to
water supply, waste, gas or lawn sprinkler system use, are excluded from this inspection. Leakage or corrosion in underground
piping cannot be detected by a visual inspection. Excluded from this report will be piping that is part of any manufacturer recalls
and their conditions. These pipes will be identified but an overall analysis of their condition should be determined by a professional
licensed plumbing contractor.
Water pressure and water flow for houses; these two are not always directly related, you may have high water pressure, but low
water flow. This is often caused by a constriction in the supply pipes. The constriction is usually a result of mineral deposits built-up
inside the pipes (common for aging galvanized pipes) or undersized pipes. A normal water flow in a house should be able to deliver
4 or more gallons per minute. Replacement of older galvanized water pipes may be the only solution for better water flow into
houses. The average life span for galvanized potable water pipes is 40-50+ years (average); these will last longer, but restrictions
will occur and the potential for leaks increases.
Static water pressure, for most residential houses is typically between 40-60 psi (pounds per square inch) or up to 75 psi. With
private/community wells, the pressure may be as low as 30 PSI.
If the water pressure exceeds 80 PSI, on a continuous basis, it is recommended (required by most codes) that a pressure reducing
valve (PRV) be installed to protect the pipes, fixtures and appliances in the house. With the installation of the PRV valve, an
expansion tank should also be installed in the system. With the installation of the pressure reducing valve, the water supply system
becomes a "closed" system; as the water heats up, it will expand in the pipes, but the PRV valve will prevent the excessive pressure
to push back into the main water line. The pressure reducing valve allows water to expand into the house, putting pressure on the
system. The expansion tank with "absorb" the thermal expansion and pressure that builds-up when the water is heated. This is
currently required in most new construction and new installations. Water temperature for the potable water supply, in the house,
should not exceed 120F (Fahrenheit) degrees. The safe temperature for humans is considered 120F degrees; this temperature should
be adequate for cleaning, sanitizing and bathing in the house. When the temperature exceeds 125F it is potentially dangerous,
causing scalding and burns, not to mention it is a waste of resources. The water heater tank has to hold and maintain the higher water
temperatures, thus wasting fuel. This also causes the tank to wear prematurely. Recommend insulating all exposed water pipes, lines
and tubing in the garage and sub-areas of the house to prevent heat loss and freezing.
Main Water Supply:
Material:
Condition(s):
Copper to the house.
Water Main Shut-off Valve is located, in the Garage, Front corner. Valve appears to beOperational (but not tested, testing may cause it to leak). Appears serviceable, no visible issues
noted.
Pressure/Flow:
Static Water pressure (PSI): 55-60; Appears to be adequate (within normal range) at the time of
the inspection. Water Flow: Appears to be Average flow for the age of the house. A pressure
reducing valve is currently installed in the system. Valve is located near the Main water shut-off.
Potable Water Temperature: Temperature Settings; 130F+ degrees (considered excessive). Adjust/correct the potable water
temperature as needed- standard/acceptable temperature is 120F degrees (most Water Heater
Manufacturer's recommend no greater than 125F degrees)
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Water Supply Lines:
Materials (visible):
Conditions noted:
Plastic(s)- PEX (Cross-linked polyethylene- black, red, blue, white or clear plastic). Braided
stainless steel (usually supplying fixtures in the house).
Overall condition- Appears serviceable, with no visible concerns noted. No evidence of
active/current leaks detected or significant problems/concerns noted at the time of the
inspection.
Gas Supply Lines:
Materials (visible):
Conditions:
Black Iron pipe, Flex steel connectors.
Overall condition- Appears Serviceable, no gas leaks detected at this time, no significant visible
problems noted.
Note: Extra gas pipe noted under the kitchen area (terminates at the outside wall). This may
have been designed for an exterior gas connection?
Drain-Waste Lines:
Materials (visible):
Conditions noted:
Plastic(s); ABS (Black), PVC.
Overall condition- Appears serviceable. No visible problems detected at this time. No evidence
of significant leaks detected or concerns/problems noted at time of the inspection. With the
concerns/issues/exception noted during the inspection:
- Open drain-waste pipe located under the kitchen sink (drain system was modified with the
replacement of the sink). Recommend replacing with the proper drain pipes/fitting. Recommend
contacting a qualified, licensed plumbing contractor for evaluation and repair/correct as needed.
Hose Faucet/ Bibb:
Operation/Condition:
A sample exterior spigot/faucet(s) was tested and operated- Appears serviceable/operational.
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Water Heater:
Location:
Type and Size:
Estimated Age:
Gas Pipe/Valve:
Water Heater Installation:
Garage.
Gas appliance, 50 Gallons.
Original equipment. Years: 10+ (Manufactured in 2005).
Water heater is approaching the end of it's useful life (average life expectancy is approx. 10-12
years). Recommend replacing in the near future. Recommend installing the new water heater
with all updated requirements (as they apply); recommend installed with proper/improved
earthquake strapping, expansion tank and in a pan, on a foam pad or platform where applicable,
for safety.
Valve is located next to the water heater; Appears Serviceable.
Overall condition- Appears serviceable; with no visible issues noted at this time.
- Temperature & Pressure relief valve (T&P or TPR)- appears to be installed properly in the tank.
(Note: This is not tested for operation). The overflow discharge pipe, on the T&P valve, appears
to be installed properly. This overflow pipe/tube is designed to drain the hot water out of the tank
and prevent the tank from bursting. The overflow discharge pipe terminates, to the exterior of
the house (visible).
- Exhaust vent appears serviceable, no visible issues noted.
- Earthquake/seismic strapping appears to be, adequate/serviceable.
- An Expansion tank, has been installed and appears serviceable at this time.
Plumbing Maintenance for the Home:
- Always remove garden hoses from the hose bibb /spigot (sillcock) when not in use; this is most critical during colder, winter
months when the pipes are prone to freeze. Leaving the hoses attached may freeze the water in the hose and has the potential to
freeze water in the spigots and water pipes also (even if it's frost-proof sillcock).
Newer hose bibbs come with an anti-siphon device built-in to the spigot, but older models do not, and may allow water from the hose
to be pulled back into the house drinking water. Older hose bibbs should be upgraded or replaced where possible to prevent
cross-contamination
- Recommend insulating all potable water pipes and lines in the house, garage and/or crawl space areas. This will conserve energy
and protect pipes/lines from freezing in colder weather.
- Recommend turning down the water temperature at the water heater to vacation mode (approximately <100F degrees) during
extended leaves or vacations to prevent wasting hot water. Upon returning from the vacation you should turn the water temperature
back to high (130-140F+ degrees) for a short period, to kill off any bacteria that may be in the tank. The standard potable water
temperature should be set at approximately 120F degrees to protect against scalding and burns.
Note: Anti-scalding (tempering) devices are being installed in many new homes, with the intent to keep the temperature in the water
heater tank high, to kill bacteria, but maintaining a reasonable temperature at the faucets and supply lines. Tankless water heaters do
not have this issue, because there is no standing water in the system.
- Many water heater manufacturer's will recommend draining the tank once a year to keep it clear of sediment and debris. This is
probably a good idea, but only if this has been completed annually, since the tank was new. Starting this draining maintenance after
the water heater has been used for a number of years, may cause damage to the tank and significant leaks.
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BATHROOMS
The inspection of the bathroom is to check the main components; the toilet, sink and cabinets, shower and/or tub surrounds, flooring,
ventilation and electrical components (noted in the Electrical section). The most significant concern in most bathrooms is
moisture-related damage. Damage may occur in the tub or shower surrounds and/or in the flooring. These areas will be inspected
for past and current concerns/problems or potential problems- leading to damage.
Caulking and sealing all the edges and openings, of the tub/shower surround (and door assembly, if it applies), will help control
water intrusion and potential for damage.
Shower pans are visually checked for leakage, but leaks often do not show except when the shower is in actual use. Determining
whether shower pans, tub/shower surrounds are water-tight is beyond the scope of this inspection. It is very important to maintain all
grouting and caulking in the bath areas. Very minor imperfections can allow water to get into the wall or floor areas and cause
moisture damage. Often, recommendations are made to prevent problems from occurring. This may as simple as replacing existing
caulking or regrout. But, it may include replacement of existing floor covering, tub surround materials or repairing fixtures.
Ventilation is essential in the bathroom. Without proper ventilation, discoloring and molds/mildews will form on the walls and
ceilings; wallboard fasteners may rust and discolor the walls/ceilings over time. Windows are used for ventilation and are commonly
found in older houses (usually in bathrooms on the outer portion of the house), but may not be readily used during colder weather.
Exhaust fans are the best solution for ventilation. Quality exhaust fans are powerful and quiet, and are more readily used than
windows. Consider installing fans in all bathrooms and replace all noisy fans.
BATH #1:
Location:
Type:
Condition of Toilet:
Bathroom components:
Ventilation:
Floor Covering(s):
Flooring Condition(s):
Main Floor, Hallway.
1/2 Powder Room.
Appears serviceable and operates/functions as intended.
Overall the sink/component conditions- Appear serviceable. Pedestal sink/stand- Appears
Serviceable. Drain line appears serviceable at this time.
Exhaust fan- Appears serviceable (operated when tested).
Hardwood.
Overall Condition- Appears Serviceable.
BATH #2:
Location:
Type:
Tub/Shower Enclosure:
Enclosure Conditions:
Master Bedroom.
Full- Tub surround and Shower surround.
Tile- Ceramic/Porcelain/Stone, with Plastic pan.
Overall condition of the shower enclosure appears serviceable.
- Recommend sealing (clean as needed) the grout lines in the surround to protect against water
penetration.
- Replace caulking at the door frame as needed.
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Tub Condition(s):
Tub/Shower Plumbing
Fixtures:
Condition of Toilet:
Bathroom components:
Ventilation:
Floor Covering(s):
Flooring Condition(s):
Tub appears serviceable. The tub enclosure/surround appears serviceable.
Appears serviceable- fixtures were operational/functional when tested. Tub spout appears to be
serviceable. Shower head appears serviceable/operational. Drain appears serviceable- visual
inspection only, with limited testing.
Appears serviceable and operates/functions as intended.
Overall the sink/component conditions- Appear serviceable. Counters/cabinets appear
serviceable.
- The right sink drain appears to be clogged- drained very slowly when tested.
Exhaust fan- Appears serviceable (operated when tested).
Vinyl.
Overall Condition- Appears Serviceable.
BATH #3:
Location:
Type:
Tub/Shower Enclosure:
Enclosure Conditions:
Tub/Shower Plumbing
Fixtures:
Condition of Toilet:
Bathroom components:
Ventilation:
Floor Covering(s):
Flooring Condition(s):
Upstairs Hallway.
Full- Tub & Shower surround combination.
Thermoplastic/Fiberglass.
Overall condition of the tub/shower enclosure appears serviceable.
Appears serviceable- fixtures were operational/functional when tested. Tub spout appears to be
serviceable. Shower head appears serviceable/operational. Drain appears serviceable- visual
inspection only, with limited testing.
Appears serviceable and operates/functions as intended.
Overall the sink/component conditions- Appear serviceable. Counters/cabinets appear
serviceable. Drain line appears serviceable at this time.
Exhaust fan- Appears serviceable (operated when tested).
Vinyl.
Overall Condition- Appears Serviceable.
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ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Electrical Inspections- Any electrical repairs or corrections attempted by anyone, other than a qualified, licensed Electrical
contractor, should be approached with caution. Repairs and/or corrections should always to completed by a qualified, licensed
electrical contractor (or Handyman), for safety reasons. Licensed electricians will guarantee that the repairs made are completed to
current safety and industry standards, and electrical codes.
Please note that every outlet/receptacle in the house cannot be tested or checked during the inspection due to: time restraints and/or
personal belongings, which may block access and be present in the house during the inspection. If defects or problems are noted
during the inspection, careful attention will be placed on the outlets and any safety problems they may pose. Light fixtures are now
commonly referred to as "luminaires", so as not to confuse them with plumbing "fixtures".
The minimum required electrical service for a single-family residence is 100-amps. This is often found in older homes where the
service has not been upgraded. The round meter base (or "A" base) is often an indicator of older/original services- despite the newer
panel boxes which may be installed in the home. Upgrading the service conductor is as important as a new panel box.
Recommend changing out the smoke detectors in the house (not just the batteries) every 10 years; most ionization smoke
detectors will not adequately function past this point, and may not detect smoke and fires at all. Recommend replacing with a
new Photoelectric smoke detector(s)- which is less likely to nuisance trip.
As of the 2009 Electrical Code cycle (2009 IRC), CO detectors are required in all new construction homes; the installation began in
2011, as cities and counties adopted the new rules. Houses with fuel-fired appliances or with a garage attached to the house, require
at least one detector outside the sleeping areas of the house; for one-story houses this would mean the main hallway, for multi-level
houses it may mean one on each level of the house. If the house has no gas appliances of any type and there is no garage attached,
there will probably not be a CO detector installed. WA State requirement (as of April 2012) went one step further and require CO
detectors in all houses, condos, Manufactured homes, etc., regardless of the gas appliances or the garage installation.
Electrical Service:
Service Drop:
Service Grounding:
Underground cable; buried from the pole/vault to the meter. Overall condition- Appears
serviceable at the time of the inspection.
Conditions noted: Limited observation of the grounding components; grounding-conductor wire
is visible, but the grounding-electrode (rod) is not visible (typically buried in the ground).
Main Electrical Panel:
Main Panel
Location/Condition:
Main Service Conductors:
Service Equipment & Main
Disconnect:
Overcurrent Protection:
Observations/Notes:
Garage. Overall condition- Appears serviceable; no significant problems noted with the panel
box and cover.
Size Wire (approx.): 4/0 Aluminum (Stranded wire is considered safe and used in current
building practices); Anti-oxidant paste is visible/present (this paste prevents oxidation/corrosion
on the aluminum wire conductors).
Voltage Rating- 120/240 Volts. Amperage Rating- 200 amps. Main service disconnect is present
in the panel box.
Circuit breakers. Expansion appears to be currently available.
Panel Appears Serviceable- No significant problems noted at time of the inspection.
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Wiring/Conductors:
Wiring Overview:
Conditions:
Wiring methods/types noted or visible during the inspection; Thermoplastic-sheathed wiring
(trade name- Romex). Overall Condition- Appears serviceable; No significant problems with the
wiring observed during the inspection. The electrical system, in the house, appears to be
grounded (random testing in various rooms of the house).
Bonding wire/clamp for the interior metal water pipes/system, is visible/accessible at the gas
pipe.
Overall wiring practices appear to be serviceable/operational.
Switches/Receptacles/Fixtures:
Conditions noted:
A representative sampling of switches and receptacles/outlets were tested. As a whole,
receptacles/outlets and switches throughout the house, appear to be in serviceable condition.
Fixtures appear to be in overall serviceable condition.
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI):
GFCI's protected locations:
Operation/Condition(s):
Kitchen- countertop. Bathroom(s)- All locations. Exterior, Garage.
The installed Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter(s) appears to be serviceable/operational when
tested. With the notable exception/concern/issues;
- The garage GFCI was painted and may not trip off as intended. Recommend replacing the
GFCI for safety reasons.
Smoke Detector(s):
Location(s) and Type(s):
Condition:
Installed detectors are located in, all areas which require smoke detectors, when the house was
built; Hallways (all levels), bedrooms and habitable spaces.
Hardwired- with a battery back-up.
Appear to be operational/functional (but were not tested at this time)- All areas where detectors
are installed, with the exception noted;
- Detector is missing in the middle bedroom. Replace as needed, for safety reasons.
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Carbon Monoxide Detectors:
Type/Location:
Battery only. Kitchen wall.
Condition:
Appears functional/operational, but was not tested.
- The CO detector is poorly located and should be re-located into the center hallway area.
- Recommend installation of a CO detector(s) in all levels of the house and near the sleeping
areas of the house, as required by WA State RCW 19.27.530 and the State Building Code. CO
detectors should comply with UL 2034; as required by WAC 51-51-0315. Install CO detectors
according to the Manufacturer's installation instructions.
Knob-n-Tube wiring (where applicable; circa. 1950 and earlier homes) is the earliest form of residential wiring. This was named for
the ceramic insulators used to secure the wires to the wood framing (knobs on the wood, tubes through the wood). This rubber or
cloth-wrapped wiring system has separate hot and neutral wires, running parallel in the framing.
Knob-n-tube wiring is not considered inherently unsafe, but it is considered substandard for several reasons: it lacks grounding; it
typically does not include a sufficient numbers of circuits for contemporary use; and burial beneath the attic insulation can cause
overheating of the wires. Upgrading is generally not mandatory, but it is advised where the system may be over used- such at the
kitchen outlets, appliances, bathrooms and garages. Upgrading is also recommended where electronic equipment is being used;
computers, TV/Media, stereo systems and other sensitive equipment.
Two-prong outlets (not equipped with grounding), located in older homes, may be associated with knob-n-tube wiring. This is
considered obsolete, but replacement in most areas is not required. However, where electronic equipment, computers and appliances
are installed, grounded outlets are strongly advised, as they are needed for proper function of surge suppressors.
Altering, modifying and splices into the Knob-n-Tube wiring, and also burying the Knob-n-tube wring in the attic insulation, can be
a potential hazard and some of the most common problems and concerns with this style of wiring. Any modification to this wiring
should be completed by a qualified, licensed electrical contractor. Recommend consulting with your Homeowners Insurance
company about having this type of wiring in the house.
Fuse boxes, with multiple sub-panel boxes, is typically an indication of a over-extended and outdated electrical service. This usually
is an indication that the service needs to be replaced and upgraded. The replacement may include the electrical mast, meter and panel
box. This should always be evaluated by a licensed electrical contractor to determine what is needed. Recommend increasing the
service panel to meet the needs of the existing house and future needs.
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KITCHEN
The kitchen is one of the most used rooms in the house. There are several components that are inspected in the kitchen; besides the
appliances, there are plumbing, electrical and mechanicals systems to be inspected, the counters/cabinets and general interior
components.
Countertops and cabinets are usually inspected for wear and tear. There is a potential for water-related damage to the countertops
around the sink and the cabinet compartment under the sink. The cabinet compartments under the sink is closely inspected for
plumbing, electrical and mechanical problems. The most common problems under sinks are poor plumbing installations and poorly
installed wiring to disposals and switches/outlets.
Countertops are prone to damage if all the edges are not sealed properly. The sink may not be sealed at the countertop, the
backsplash may not be caulked along the edge. If the countertop is ceramic tile with grout, has it been sealed properly? All new tile
and grout should be sealed as soon as possible to prevent moisture penetration. In new construction houses, the tile and grout
countertops and floors, are not sealed by the Builder.
The electrical system, in the kitchen, is a key issue also. The kitchen is supposed to have two appliance circuits along the
countertops, and the appliances have their own separate circuits. However, this only applies to newer homes; older homes may only
have one circuit for the entire kitchen. Older houses were not designed for dishwashers, disposals, microwaves, etc. This may mean
upgrading the electrical in the kitchen, to avoid overloading the circuit(s). If the kitchen has 2-prong (ungrounded receptacles) this
should be the first upgrade. These receptacles are not equipped for modern, grounded appliances and could be a potential hazard.
Interior Components:
Countertops:
Cabinets:
Flooring:
Tiles; Granite. Overall condition- Appears Serviceable. Appears to be functional/useable, with
no apparent significant defects.
Recommend sealing the countertop surfaces (stone sealer) and backsplashes (grout sealer), as
needed, to prevent moisture penetration and discoloring/staining.
Overall Condition- Appear serviceable. Appear to be functional/operational- as intended.
Hardwood. Overall Condition- Appears serviceable.
Kitchen Sink(s):
Type & Condition(s):
Hardware conditions:
Stainless Steel; Overall condition- appears serviceable. Appears to be functioning as intended.
Faucet appears operation/serviceable at this time. Sprayer appears serviceable/operational as
intended. Drain line/system appears to be serviceable and functional at this time.
Garbage Disposer:
Condition:
Appears operational/serviceable. Appears to be functioning as intended.
Dishwasher:
Condition:
Appears serviceable. Dishwasher was operated during the inspection and appears to be
functional/operational.
An air gap is not provided in the dishwasher drain line. This drain line may hold water and not
drain properly; recommend adding a high loop under the sink or add an air gap (if
possible/practical).
Range/Oven:
Type/Condition:
Electric appliance; Appears serviceable, and appears to be operating/functioning as intended.
The oven and broiler elements appear to be operational. (Note: These are not tested for
accuracy).
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Cooktop:
Type/Condition:
Gas cooktop; Appears serviceable. Burners appear to be functional/operational as intended.
Ventilation:
Type/Condition:
Exhaust Hood/Fan system- Appears operational/functional and appears to be operating as
intended. Appears to be venting out of the kitchen area.
- Exhaust fan/filter system is dirty and needs cleaning for efficiency.
- Rust/corrosion on the metal duct in the crawl space. This duct was not insulated. Recommend
adding insulation to reduce condensation issue.
Refrigerator:
Condition:
Appears serviceable- limited inspection of this component.
No opinion is offered as to the adequacy of dishwasher operation. Dishwashers will be operated, when possible, during the
inspection process. These are typically checked for leaks and damage.
Portable dishwashers are typically not inspected (as they require a special connection to facilitate testing) because they are
considered personal items- not "built-in" appliances. Recommend having the Seller demonstrate the dishwasher or guarantee their
operation.
Self or continuous cleaning operations of the oven, clocks, timing devices, lights and thermostat accuracy are not tested/inspected
during this inspection.
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LAUNDRY
Laundry Facilities and components
Laundry appliances are tested only if they are a part of the sale of the property (clothing will not be removed to test system).
Recommend having Homeowner/Seller demonstrate appliances if needed to determine how the plumbing functions. Appliances will
not be moved during the inspection and the condition of any walls or flooring hidden by them cannot be judged. Stackable units, in
closets, are often very difficult to evaluate/inspect and most of the components are inaccessible for visual inspections.
Drain lines and water supply valves serving washing machines are not operated/tested, unless they are part of the sales
transaction. Drain lines in older houses (metal) are prone to clog over time and back-up. These may need to be tested or
demonstrated by the Homeowner or a written guarantee that this pipe will function properly.
Water supply valves may be subject to leaking if turned on during the inspection. Electrical receptacles, hoses, exhaust lines, etc.
may not be readily accessible for inspection in some instances.
Laundry Facilities:
Location:
Plumbing:
Electrical:
Dryer Exhaust:
Ventilation:
Flooring:
Utility Room.
Overall plumbing appears serviceable, No visible problems noted. Did not test the water supply
valves/lines or drain system for operation at this time.
- Water supply lines/valves: recessed in the wall (plastic washer box); Appears serviceable, no
visible problems noted.
- Washer drainage: Drain line (standpipe)- is recessed in the wall (plastic washer box); Appears
Serviceable, but was not tested for operation.
- A 120-volt electrical outlet for the washer, appears to be grounded and operational.
- A 240-volt outlet/receptacle was installed for the electric dryer. Outlet type provided- with
four-prongs (newer wiring requirements- two hot wires, one neutral, one ground), Appears
Operational.
Appears to vent properly to the exterior of the house.
Exhaust fan- Appears Serviceable and is operational and functioning as intended.
Flooring appears serviceable.
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VENTING/ENERGY/CONDENSATION
Whole House Ventilation System:
System type:
Intake Air Source:
Exhaust System:
Condition:
Intermittent Ventilation using Exhaust fans and Fresh Air intake, (WA State Ventilation and Air
Quality Code 303.4.1), This balanced fresh-air system uses an oversized exhaust fan, with
outdoor air inlets. Fresh-air inlets are distributed in each habitable room of the house (typically
through the window or door frame). The exhaust fan is energized by a 24-hour clock timer; the
fan will draw stale air out of the house and replace it with fresh air, via the inlet vents.
Ventilators built-into the windows and/or doors; located in the habitable rooms of the house.
Whole house exhaust fan is located, in the laundry room.
The 24-hour timer is located, in the laundry room.
The ventilation system appears serviceable/operational and is functioning as designed/intended,
but the window ventilators were not installed in all the bedrooms, as designed. The first and third
smaller bedrooms do not have window ventilators; the family room has ventilators in both
windows instead.
The system will not function as intended.
Molds/mildews (as applicable) are a symptom of a moisture problems in the home. Molds are naturally occurring microorganisms
that exist in a wide range of environments. Mold growth is based upon several factors in and around the house; temperature
(warmth), oxygen (air), water/moisture and a food source. Remove one of these factors and mold will have a hard time growing.
Since temperature and oxygen are difficult to eliminate in a house, the food source and the water need to be controlled. Food sources
for molds/mildew can be almost anything; furniture, clothing, wallboard/drywall, carpet, not to mention wood (cellulose). Therefore,
controlling the moisture (vapor or liquid form) is the only real controllable solution in most cases. Simply cleaning mold/mildews
off the walls, ceiling, floors, attic spaces (or wherever), isn't going to solve the problem. Reducing or eliminating the moisture is the
key to controlling molds.
Mold colonies that are visible can have a variety of appearances. They can be small circles to large sheets; the surface may be fuzzy,
velvety, powdery or slimy. Their colors range from white, yellow, green, gray, brown, red, blue, and black depending on the food
source and the environmental conditions. The visual observation of black mold is not sufficient to conclude that it is toxic. Many
common, non-toxic mold species can also be black in appearance.
If there are significant concerns with the presence of molds/mildews in the house, it is recommended that a licensed or certified
hygienist be contacted for further inspections and evaluations/testing to determine the type of molds, possible causes and any
abatement (if needed) that may be necessary. Simply testing for the presence of molds will not inform you about the cause
molds/mildew and how to rectify the problem.
Condensation of moisture on windows and other cold surfaces should be controlled as much as possible. Excessive moisture can
cause nuisance staining of window frames and wall finishes, growth of molds/mildew, and can lead to serious structural damage,
insect infestations and health problems. Generally, improved control of moisture/condensation can be achieved by increasing
ventilation and reducing moisture sources. "Tight" or new construction is prone to these conditions due to the lack of air
movement/circulation. Whole house ventilation systems, in newer homes, should be utilized as much as possible.
Building materials such as gypsum wallboard (drywall) and plaster can appear to be dry and intact upon visual observation and may
even be dry to the touch, while actually containing enough moisture to support mold growth. Handheld, battery-powered moisture
meters are used to detect and locate excess moisture. The two common types of meters work through electrical conductivity or radio
waves- these are used to test wet and dry materials. Pin-type and pad-type are the most frequently used meters; pin-type require
insertion of metal pins directly into the material being tested. Consequently, these meters leave holes in the material and may be
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unsightly in some areas. Pad-type meters are placed on the material to be tested and do not cause any damage. Both meters have
limitations and can cause false readings at times. One or both of these type of meters will be used during most inspections, to
determine if there are any moisture conditions exist in the house.
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INTERIOR
Interior Inspections: This includes, but not limited to, the walls, ceilings, windows, doors and floor coverings. There are limitations
for a full inspection of all these components when the house is occupied and/or furnished. Furniture is not moved to inspect hidden
areas. Possible need for an additional inspection of the house, prior to closing, to inspect walls, flooring and doors for hidden issues.
The problems normally encountered during the interior portion of the inspection are usually cosmetic in nature and will only need
minor repairs or adjustments. Occasionally a crack in the wall or ceiling may be symptomatic of structural problems, but this is not
common. Water staining is usually tested (when readily accessible) for active moisture conditions. Recommend inquiring with the
Owner/Seller when any recent patching/painting or repairs are noted in the ceiling areas.
There are often minor problems with interior doors in the house; doors rubbing or not latching properly, hardware missing, holes and
damage to the doors. These typically need minor repairs/adjustments and in some cases will require the door to be replaced.
As a general rule, cosmetic deficiencies and discoloring in the carpet are considered normal wear and tear and may not be reported.
The Seller/Owner should be consulted for possible allowances to repair or replace as needed. Careful attention should be made
during the initial walk-through of the house; wall coverings (pictures/posters, drapes) may be covering water staining, holes and
damage. A final "walk-through" is recommended, prior to taking possession of your new home, to determine if there are conditions
that were not readily visible due to personal belongings covering the floor/walls, etc.
Floor Coverings:
Type(s):
Conditions:
Hardwood, Carpet.
Overall condition- Appears serviceable, with no significant issues noted.
Walls:
Type(s):
Conditions:
Drywall/Gypsum wallboard.
Overall condition- Appears serviceable, with no significant defects or concerns visible at this
time.
- Small holes in the wallboard, located on both sides of the fireplace. Recommend sealing off all
wall openings to keep the fire-stops intact, prevent heat loss and air movement through the
walls.
Ceilings:
Type(s):
Conditions:
Drywall/Gypsum wallboard.
Overall condition- Appears serviceable, with no significant defects or concerns visible at this
time.
Nail/screw pops noted in the ceilings (upper hall bathroom). Truss-lift is a possible cause of nail
pops; wood-framed roof trusses can expand and contract significantly due to temperature
changes in the attic space. This may cause the lower truss chord to lift and pull away from the
interior wall framing. The wallboard, attached to the lower chord, may move as well- causing
fasteners to pull out over time.
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Stairs & Handrails:
Conditions:
Interior stairs- Appear serviceable. Stair handrail appears serviceable, but is not fastened to the
wall/framing sufficiently. Check brackets and fasten to the stud framing as needed.
Guard rail, around the stairwell, appears serviceable. Balusters are loose, but functional.
Doors:
Main Entry Door:
Exterior Door:
Interior Doors:
Fiberglass/Composite, Overall condition- Appears serviceable and operating properly.
Weatherstripping around door appears serviceable.
Located in, the Kitchen; Sliding glass- Vinyl. Overall condition- Appears serviceable.
Overall condition- Appears serviceable/operational. With the exception/concerns/issues noted;
- Minor damage behind the master bath and master closet doors. Add door stops as needed.
- Door stops are missing the rubber bumpers also- replace as needed.
Windows:
Frame Material(s):
Frame Styles:
Vinyl/fiberglass.
Fixed, Sliding, Single-hung (lower sash slides vertically)
Ventilators installed in the frame of the windows, located in the habitable rooms (part of the
Whole house ventilation system).
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Glazing type:
Conditions:
Double pane.
A representative sampling of windows were tested during the inspection process (as
accessibility allows). Windows, as a grouping, are generally operational/serviceable.
Window/door screens, storm windows (interior or exterior) and window awnings are typically not inspected and are not part of this
inspection. These type items may be considered removable and not a permanent fixtures with the house. They will not be addressed
as deficient, defective/damaged or missing. If these items are in need of repair/replacement we recommend you contact the
Owner/Seller directly to make requests for repair/replacement.
The condition of the underlayment, under floor coverings (carpet over hardwoods, multiple layers of flooring, etc.), cannot be
inspected and is considered inaccessible.
Asbestos* (where applicable): A common concern of many home buyers is whether there is any asbestos in the house, if there is, is it
in a condition that would be considered a health hazard? Asbestos is a naturally occurring fibrous mineral found in certain types of
rocks. Asbestos fibers are strong, won't burn, resists corrosion, and insulates well. When the fibers are mixed, during processing with
a material which binds them together, they can be used in many construction products such as vinyl flooring (backing for sheet
vinyl, 9"& 12" resilient tiles and the glue mastic), ceiling acoustic tiles, textured paints or coatings, blown-in insulation (vermiculite),
cement board siding products, flexible fabric connections on ductwork, boiler insulation, pipe insulation, roofing materials/mastic
and portions of wood-burning stoves, artificial logs and the list goes on. Amounts of asbestos can vary from 1%- 11% and up to
75%.
Asbestos-containing material in the home doesn't necessarily pose a health risk. Asbestos materials become hazardous only when
there is damage, disturbance or deterioration over time, they release fibers into the air. Of particular concern is asbestos-containing
material that is friable. (Friable material can be crumbled, pulverized or reduced to powder by hand pressure.) As long as the
asbestos-containing material is intact, it does not pose a health hazard. Always seek professional advice when dealing with asbestos
materials.
Asbestos has been used in building products for decades; it can be found in houses from the turn of the last century to the late 1980's.
When in doubt, assume there is asbestos. You should always assume it contains asbestos and take the necessary precautions to avoid
harm to you and your family. State law requires homeowners to manage and dispose of asbestos materials in certain ways- be sure
you know what they are. Recommend contacting the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency for further information and an Asbestos
Removal form.
Clean Air Agency, 110 Union St. Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98101-2038; www.pscleanair.org
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FIREPLACE(S)
Fireplaces or stoves come in many different forms. There are some basic forms: Masonry fireplaces, a hearth and fire chamber of
solid masonry units, such as bricks or stones, listed masonry units or reinforced concrete, provided with suitable chimney.
Factory-Built (or Pre-Fab) fireplaces: a fireplace composed of listed components, assembled in accordance with the terms of the
Manufacturer's specifications. Usually a metal housing, with refractory panels of the sides and back of the fireplace. Fireplace
Inserts- whether wood-burning, gas-burning or pellet, designed to retrofit an existing masonry or factory-built fireplace. Pellet
stoves, Free-standing or inserts; Gas fireplaces, Free-standing, Inserts or Heatilators; Zero Clearance fireplaces and the list goes on.
Inspection of the fireplace usually includes the firebox itself, where the burning and combustion takes place; the inspection of the
damper and/or direct venting system; the hearth, and clearances to combustible materials. This inspection is primarily for safety
reasons. Testing for proper drafting and chimney draw is not performed during this visual inspection. Recommend consulting a
licensed chimney contractor about testing and evaluating the installation.
Damage to the firebox or hearth area, excessive soot build-up in chimney flues and inadequate clearances to combustible materials
may lead to fires. Always burn seasoned wood and burn as hot as possible to prevent soot/creosote build-up and excessive carbon
monoxide.
Combustible materials: The definition is made up of, or surfaced with wood, compressed paper, plant fiber, plastics or other materials
that will ignite and burn, whether flame proofed or not, or whether plastered or not. Examples could be carpet, rugs, vinyl and
wallboard/drywall, plaster board, to mention a few.
In most cases, the walls of a home are constructed of combustible materials. Wood studs with drywall/plasterboard is considered a
combustible assembly. It is only a matter of time, in proportion to the amount of heat applied, before pyrolysis occurs in the wood
framing. This can often result in spontaneous combustion if oxygen is present. (Pyrolysis is the chemical alteration of wood, by
action of heat alone, in the absence of oxygen and hence without burning). Clearances to combustible materials should always be
followed according to the Manufacturer's specifications (on Listed appliances). Air spaces and air circulation are the best protection
available. For this reason, it should be obvious that applying brick, tile cement board or other noncombustible materials directly to
the surface of a combustible wall will not provide adequate protection. The dense, noncombustible material will conduct the heat
right through to the wall. Pyrolysis can still occur.
Fireplace #1:
Location:
Type:
Conditions:
Family room.
Heatilator-type.
Overall condition appears serviceable. No visible problems with the firebox. Direct vent systemappears serviceable.
Gas logs/line appears operational/serviceable at this time. Gas valve has been installedinside/under the cabinet.
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ATTIC SPACE
The attic area is inspected for damaged, sub-standard and/or altered framing (See Structural section of report); determining the
amount and condition/adequacy of the insulation and ventilation. In addition, the plumbing, electrical, mechanical and chimney
conditions within the attic space are inspected.
Ventilation is also important in the attic space. Proper and adequate ventilation will allow moisture, that has accumulated in this area,
to dissipate and helps to reduce the heat build-up that develops on sunny days. Some of the moisture, generated in the house, may
work its way into the attic space. If this area is inadequately vented, the moisture build-up can lead to delaminated roof sheathing,
dark staining/molds/mildew and possible wood rot, in extreme cases. Additional roof venting may be called for, during the
inspection, due to conditions noted in the attic space. Another factor for moisture in the attic space is ceiling penetrations; fan
housing, recessed lighting, light fixtures, ceiling fans, speakers, etc. These openings, if not sealed properly, can leak warm moist air
from the house and trap in the attic pace
Contributing to the moisture conditions in the attic space are exhaust fans and vents; passing into or through the attic spaces from
bathrooms, the kitchen and laundry rooms. Exhaust fans, in the older homes, quite often vented directly into the attic space, with no
attempt to terminate them to the exterior of the attic or house. Another common practice is to vent exhaust fans into the soffit area.
This practice often leads to moisture problems and damage to the underside of the roof, near the lower edges.
It is always recommended that exhaust fans vent through the roof or sidewall (exit to the exterior) using appropriate roof cap or
housewall cap vents with back-draft dampers and screens. The ducting used (solid or flex materials) should be sealed at all joints and
insulated (if possible). Cheap, flex hoses are not recommended for this use because they are prone to deteriorate over time, they
collect condensation and were not designed for this purpose.
Limitations in the attic space may be due to the installation of the insulation- which may affect several factors of the inspection
process; deep insulation may prevent access because the framing is not visible and entering may significantly alter or damage the
insulation and/or there is a potential to damage the ceiling materials below. The visible layer of insulation may be covering other
layers (original materials) which may include asbestos-type materials (vermiculite) and covering mechanical systems and electrical
wiring (knob-n-tube). Items and areas which are not readily accessible and visible are exempt from the inspection.
Attic Conditions:
Access Location(s):
Accessibility:
Garage (2 locations) and Master bedroom closet.
Scuttlehole opening (in ceiling). Entered this area for a visual inspection.
Viewed the garage attic from the openings.
- Access scuttle is partially damaged in the master bedroom closet- drywall is cracked or broken.
Watch for heat loss in this area.
Overall Conditions:
No significant structural issues/problems noted at the time of the inspection. Water staining
noted in the attic space during the inspection- appears to be inactive, old and/or dry at the time
of the inspection.
Water staining at the fall arrest roof anchor bracket- the cap was re-installed during the
inspection, which should stop the leaks from re-occurring.
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Mechanical
components/systems in
Attic:
All the Bathroom exhaust fans vent/terminate to the exterior of the home, as required.
Ventilation:
Venting in the attic space appears to be adequate/sufficient at time of the inspection, with no
adverse problems noted.
Insulation/Conditions:
Type(s):
Fiberglass- Blown-in/loose, Batts.
Approx. Depth and R-value: 14-17 inches, R-38 value.
Conditions:
Overall Condition- Appears serviceable, the insulation appears to be providing adequate and
uniform coverage at this time.
- Insulation was partially disturbed over the bathroom area- the exhaust vent was re-connected.
Insulation R-Factors: The effectiveness of insulation is rated by its ability to slow heat transfer, as measured by its R-factor. Because
the R-factor varies according to the density and other properties of a material, it is also related to thickness. Typically, the
deeper/thicker the insulation, the higher the R-value. In older homes, you may find minimal amounts of insulation, or you may also
find multiple layers of different types of insulation, where they were added over the years.
Common types of insulation: Fiberglass, mineral/fiber wool, cellulose fiber, polystyrene, polyisocyanurate foam, fiberboard,
vermiculite (contains asbestos), Silvawool (wood-fibers).
Attic spaces should be insulated to minimize heat loss from the house. Most installation practices would have the insulation on the
floor of the attic space or on the sidewalls. The amount of insulation depends on the type and when it was applied. The correct
installation is essential for maximum benefit of the insulation.
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GARAGE/CARPORT
Garages and Fire Safety: It's important that any fire that breaks out in the garage doesn't spread to any living space, attic space or
area attached to the house. To contain the fire within the garage, surfaces between the garage and living spaces must be fireproof.
The definition of fireproof is normally given as being able to hold back a fire for a certain period of time. Acceptable time period is
usually a one-hour fire rating. All repairs should be made with approved materials- fire-rated drywall, sheet metals, fire-rated
sealants, etc.
Fire-rated drywall is typically 5/8" (doubled in some cases of newer construction) and fire-resistant door should be minimum of 1
3/8" thick. Typically doors are metal clad, solid-wood or vinyl-clad. Determining the heat resistance rating of fire walls and doors is
beyond the scope of this inspection. Flammable materials should not be stored within closed garage areas and should be kept away
from the gas appliances.
Garage door openers and operational safety: Federal law states that residential garage door openers manufactured after 1992 must be
equipped with photoelectric eye sensors, or some other safety-reverse feature that meets UL 325 standards. It is always
recommended that garage door openers have all the safety equipment that is available and in good working order. If the current
garage door opener is older than 1992, you should consider upgrading the garage door opener. Recommend testing the safety
equipment, at least once a year and correct/repair the equipment as needed.
Type Structure:
Style:
Location:
Garage.
Attached to house, Two vehicle.
Roof:
Type(s)/Material:
Condition:
Same material as the house.
Same as the House, See House Roof section of the report.
Floor:
Conditions:
Overall condition- Appears serviceable, with no significant issues noted.
Fire Wall:
Conditions:
Overall condition of the firewall- Appears serviceable, and appears to be providing adequate
separate between the garage and house.
Fire/Man Door (Interior):
Type/Condition:
Step/Landing:
Solid Core; The door Appears to be Serviceable/Operational and Fire-rated (or equivalent). The
door closes and latches automatically, as required- the spring-loaded hinges are operational.
Appears serviceable/functional. The handrail on the landing/stairs appears to be serviceable
and adequate.
Railing was modified to install the ramp to the storage area.
Vehicle Door(s):
Condition(s):
Overall condition- Appears serviceable and functions as intended. With the concerns/issues
noted;
- Slight bent at the upper bracket. Possible need for reinforcement of this bracket and door
connection. Recommend contacting a qualified/trained door system technician for further
evaluations and make all corrections/repairs to the garage door as needed, for safety.
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ROOF and COMPONENTS
The foregoing is an opinion of the general quality and condition of the roofing material. The inspector cannot and does not offer an
opinion or warranty as to whether the roof leaks or may be subject to future leakage. This report is issued in consideration of the
foregoing disclaimer. The only way to determine whether a roof is absolutely water tight is to observe it during a prolonged rainfall.
Many times, this situation is not present during the inspection. Every effort will be made to determine the condition of the existing
roof.
Standard roof shingles are available varying degrees of quality, rated for 15-50 years of expected life. Materials are checked for
proper installation, degree of wear, physical damage and areas where leakage appears likely. Multiple layers of roofing may shorten
the life expectancy. Most newer houses have 30-year laminated asphalt shingle roofing installed.
Wood shakes and wood shingles also come in varying degrees of quality, from 15-40 years of duration. Wood shakes have lost
popularity for several reasons, fire hazards, lesser quality materials and higher maintenance costs. These roofs' require ongoing
maintenance to keep them water-tight. Pressure washing (and air cleaning) and keeping debris off the roof will prolong the life of the
roof.
Low-slope roofing is often with a minimal (or no) slope and is prone to holding water and leaking. Low slope roofing may be
installed with asphalt-impregnated papers installed with hot tar, modified-bitumen single-ply materials (torch-down) or various
synthetic products. Concerns are usually based on installation practices, patching/repairs, signs of leakage, weathering and wear.
Roofing/Components/Venting:
Style:
Primary Materials:
Accessibility:
Specific conditions of
roofing materials;
Ventilation for the roof:
Gable roof- Triangular end portion of a building from the eaves to the ridge of the roof.
Asphalt/fiberglass composition shingles; made with fiberglass/organic felt base that is
impregnated with asphalt and covered on the surface with granulated stone (which protects
against UV damage and provides the color). Architectural grade; multiple-layer laminated
construction shingles. Heavyweight shingles with an average life-span of 25-50 years
(depending on the type and thickness).
Walked on the roof.
Asphalt shingles with the following conditions visible:
- Evidence of prior pressure washing noted on the roofing materials; surface granules are
loose/missing/worn-off. Minor wear and damage to the front porch roof.
Vent type(s) installed in the roof; jack/roof cap vents, soffit/eave, gable ends. Venting appears to
be adequate/sufficient at time of the inspection.
Exposed Flashing:
Types noted:
Overall Conditions:
Metal- galvanized, Neoprene/thermoplastic/flex-flashing.
Overall condition- Appears serviceable, no significant issues noted at this time. With the
exception/concern/issues noted;
- Kick-out flashing is needed at the roof/housewall intersection or junction- located at the end of
the step flashing. This will divert water run-off on to the roof or into the gutter system and not
behind the siding/cladding or trim.
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Roof Layers:
Findings:
Approximate number of layers of roofing materials observed: One layer (visible); this is the
preferred installation and will help to achieve the life expectancy of the roofing materials.
Overall Condition of the Roof:
Conditions/Findings:
General condition- Appears Serviceable; conditions are based on the age/type and the typical
wear of the roofing material. No significant problems or issues noted at the time of the
inspection.
Build-up and debris noted on roofing material; Moss/fungus (green mass build-up/staining).
Recommend cleaning off the excessive debris from the roofing materials, to prevent premature
wear and tear. Recommend cleaning off and treating the roof with an approved fungicide, or
moss inhibitor, to prevent further growth of the moss.
Gutter System:
Types/Conditions:
Metal gutters; Overall Condition- Appears serviceable. The overall gutter system appears to be
controlling the water run-off as needed.
- Debris in the gutters (and holding water)- recommend cleaning the complete gutter system and
check for leaks. Recommend detaching the downspout drain pipes when cleaning, so that debris
does not drain into the underground drain system.
Downspouts/Drain pipes:
Type/Conditions:
Metal, Overall condition- Appears serviceable. Appears to be controlling water drainage
adequately, as intended.
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Roof drainage control:
Draining system(s) installed: Underground piping system, plastic drain lines; solid tightline.
Conditions:
Overall Condition- Appears serviceable. The drainage system appears to controlling the majority
of water run-off as intended. Limited viewing of this type of underground system. (Underground
drainage systems cannot be inspected during this visual inspection)
Controlling roof drainage is critical to protect the housewall from water/moisture problems and damage, and preventing excessive
surface water at the foundation wall. This may be controlled as easy as cleaning the gutter system; replacing all rusted/leaking
gutters/downspouts; making sure all connections are water-tight and made appropriately; and that all gutter system components have
been installed.
The most effective way to control drainage is to tightline the system- connecting all downspouts to a solid plastic pipe, to move water
away from the house (preferably a gravity system). Older systems commonly used concrete (or clay) drain tiles, but these are not as
reliable, often clogging, deteriorating/breaking and leaking. The least expensive way to control roof drainage is with elbows and
splashblocks (as long as they are sloped appropriately away from the foundation).
The roof drainage, gutter system is not tested during the inspection. Gutters, downspouts and drain pipes can only be inspected
effectively during rainy periods. Visual inspections, of these systems during dry periods, are limited to staining on the gutters and
wood members. If the gutters are full of debris they should be disconnected from the downspouts and cleaned. Inspect the joints,
corners and outlets for openings and wear. Plastic/vinyl gutter systems, though inexpensive, are not as reliable as continuous metal
gutter systems, because they are more prone to sag, leak and over-flow if not installed properly.
Older, wood gutters will rot and deteriorate over time and have a limited life span. These gutters are also very shallow and cannot
control water as well as deeper, metal gutters.
Galvanized metal gutters and downspouts also have a limited life span (approximately 25 years) before rusting through and leaking
also. Aluminum is the preferred gutter system and has an extended life expectancy. Professionally installed, these systems will last
decades, with minimal maintenance (cleaning and sealing joints).
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EXTERIOR
Exterior Cladding: The main purpose of the exterior cladding/siding is designed to protect the building from water penetration and
the weather (moisture, wind, temperatures). Moisture barriers, located under the cladding/siding, have the potential to prolong the
life of the wall framing beyond the life of the siding alone. As long as the siding materials are installed in a shingle-type manner,
moisture should not be an issue for the house. It is essential that the exterior housewall be maintained to prevent premature wear and
tear and damage to the house.
Exterior cladding/siding comes in many forms; Wood (horizontal/vertical, shingles, plywood), OSB/hardboards, Cement-fiber,
Vinyl, Aluminum, Brick/Stone veneers, Stucco and EIFS and the list goes on. The basic inspection of exterior cladding/siding is for
installation practices, soil clearances/contact and damage. Soils should never be built-up against the housewall/siding, regardless of
the materials. Even if the exterior wall is not wood (brick, vinyl, stucco, etc.) built-up soils on the walls, can have an effect on the
house.
Flashing: Flashing is essential to keeping water away (shedding) from the structure and the interior of the building. It is used
wherever there is a horizontal or sloped penetration of the outer building skin or a juncture of dissimilar materials that is likely to be
exposed to the weather. Flashing provides a permanent barrier to the water and directs it to the outer surface of the building, where
gravity carries the water down to the ground. All housewall penetrations should be flashed watertight.
Common flashing materials include galvanized steel, baked-enamel steel and aluminum (less common materials- stainless, copper
and lead). Caulking and sealants should not be considered permanent and adequate flashing, as these will require ongoing
maintenance and replacement over time.
Walls/Cladding:
Materials Used:
Conditions Observed:
Fiber-cement materials (lapped, panels and/or shingles)- Hardiplank products. Cultured Stone
Veneer.
Overall Condition of the siding materials- Appears Serviceable, and the exterior cladding
appears to be performing as intended.
- Prior repairs to the lapped siding at the back steps- gas pipe was passing through the wall at
this location.
Eaves/Trim/Flashing:
Materials used:
Conditions noted:
Wood.
Overall condition- Appears Serviceable. With the notable concerns/issues/exception;
- The front column trim boards are separating at the joints and will be prone to water intrusion
and moisture-related damage. Recommend re-installing the boards tight and caulk/seal the
joints and re-paint as needed.
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Porch #1:
Location:
Type:
Conditions:
Front.
Concrete landing/steps.
Overall condition- Appears Serviceable.
Chimney #1:
Location:
Material/Type:
Conditions:
Sidewall mounted.
Metal.
Appears Serviceable- no significant problems noted at the time of the inspection.
Exterior/Grounds
This inspection is designed to evaluate the conditions on the exterior, around the house/building and how these conditions may effect
the house structure; siding, foundation, roof and other components. If these components are a sufficient distance from the housewall
there overall condition may not effect the house and may be considered aesthetic only and not a functional part of the house. Fences
that are in average or poor condition may not directly effect the house and may not be reported as a significant issue; but this does
not mean you don't want to negotiate with the Homeowner about possible compensation for repairs or replacement. Retaining walls
may be considered a significant problem in some cases, despite not directly effecting the house. These walls may be preventing soil
movement and erosion, which may indirectly effect the house and property.
This inspection is not intended to address or include any geological conditions or site stability information. For information
concerning these conditions, a geologist or geotect engineer should be consulted. Determining soil type or stability conditions is not
part of this inspection. Any reference to grade is limited to immediate areas around the exterior of the exposed areas of the
foundation or exterior housewalls. This inspection is visual in nature and does not attempt to determine drainage performance of the
site or the condition of any underground piping, including municipal water and sewer service piping or septic systems.
Surface water should always be drained away from the foundation/housewall using protective slopes: approximately 3% grade for
grassy/landscaped areas and approximately 1% for paved/impervious surfaces. Trenching or built-up yards, around the foundation
and structure can potentially cause moisture related problems for the building. Corrections are recommended.
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GROUNDS
Exterior/Grounds
This inspection is designed to evaluate the conditions on the exterior, around the house/building and how these conditions may effect
the house structure; siding, foundation, roof and other components. If these components are a sufficient distance from the housewall
there overall condition may not effect the house and may be considered aesthetic only and not a functional part of the house. Fences
that are in average or poor condition may not directly effect the house and may not be reported as a significant issue; but this does
not mean you don't want to negotiate with the Homeowner about possible compensation for repairs or replacement. Retaining walls
may be considered a significant problem in some cases, despite not directly effecting the house. These walls may be preventing soil
movement and erosion, which may indirectly effect the house and property.
This inspection is not intended to address or include any geological conditions or site stability information. For information
concerning these conditions, a geologist or geotect engineer should be consulted. Determining soil type or stability conditions is not
part of this inspection. Any reference to grade is limited to immediate areas around the exterior of the exposed areas of the
foundation or exterior housewalls. This inspection is visual in nature and does not attempt to determine drainage performance of the
site or the condition of any underground piping, including municipal water and sewer service piping or septic systems.
Surface water should always be drained away from the foundation/housewall using protective slopes: approximately 3% grade for
grassy/landscaped areas and approximately 1% for paved/impervious surfaces. Trenching or built-up yards, around the foundation
and structure can potentially cause moisture related problems for the building. Corrections are recommended.
Grading/Site Drainage:
Site Conditions:
The site is relatively flat or has a positive slope (away from the house) around most of the
foundation/housewall. Overall condition- Appears Serviceable. No apparent significant drainage
problems noted at the housewall at this time.
Driveway:
Type(s):
Condition:
Concrete.
Overall condition- Appears serviceable; appears to be functioning as intended. Overall drainage
for the driveway- Appears serviceable, with no adverse affects to the house/garage areas.
Sidewalk/Walkway:
Type:
Conditions:
Concrete.
Overall condition- Appears serviceable.
Patio:
Type:
Condition:
Concrete. Pavers.
Overall condition- Appears serviceable.
Fences & Gates:
Type:
Condition:
Wood.
Overall condition- Appears serviceable.
Landscaping:
Conditions:
Generally maintained- adequate clearances of shrubs and trees to the housewall and/or roof
components.
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PHOTO GALLERY
Photo #1
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REPORT SUMMARY
The following items are Significant/Major deficiencies and/or areas of concern noted during the inspection and
should be addressed as soon as possible. The Summary page is not a substitute for reading the entire Inspection
Report. Items noted below will included on the corresponding pages. Diagrams and photos, of pertinent issues, are
provided in the main body of this Inspection Report:
MAIN STRUCTURE
Posts/Columns:
Conditions:
Concerns/issues noted at the time of the inspection;
- Several of the structural posts are in standing water in the crawl space at this time, or have been wet recently.
Despite being pressure-treated wood, the wood posts are prone to fungal rot damage overtime. The metal brackets
attached to the posts are rusted/corroded and may not restrain the posts anymore.
Recommend further evaluation of all the posts in the sub-structure framing after the water is removed, to
determine if replacement is needed for the posts. Possible need to add raised footings and replace the posts, to
allow for the proper clearance above the soils grade level. Recommend contacting a qualified, licensed contractor
to make further evaluations and make all necessary repairs/corrections as needed.
CRAWL SPACE
Conditions Observed:
Dampness/Moisture:
Evidence of excessive water/moisture conditions in the crawl space. Standing water under/above the plastic vapor
barrier; standing water is present in over half the crawl space sub-area (limited access to all areas). Several of the
wood posts are below the water level, or are covered with mud-sediment.
Water entry through the foundation wall, located under the fireplace area; most of the water appears to be from
high ground water.
Recommend consulting a qualified, licensed professional drainage contractor for evaluation and recommendation
for the best solution on removing/eliminating any excessive moisture conditions that may be present and provide
a drainage solution to permanently remove any excess water/moisture from the sub-area. Recommend evaluations
of the roof drainage system (dye testing if needed), surface drainage around the house and ground water to
determine if these contribute to the water/moisture issues in the crawl space. Recommend eliminating all
excessive moisture and conditions that may be present in the crawl space sub-area.
Vapor Barrier:
The vapor barrier appears to be in poor condition: Plastic is covered with, mud/silt from past flooding,
fallen/damaged fiberglass insulation. Recommend complete removal of the old plastic vapor barrier(s) in the
crawl space sub-area, prior to installing the new materials. Recommend installing new 6 mil., black polyethylene
plastic sheeting to cover all soils in the crawl space. Overlap plastic at least 12" at all joints; do not run plastic up
the base of the wood posts or framing, and secure the plastic with stones/bricks or fasteners to prevent movement.
Sub-Floor Insulation:
Fiberglass; Estimated R-factor: 19 (+/-).
Evidence of rodent nesting and/or damage to the sub-floor insulation; urine staining, droppings and debris noted
on/in the sub-floor insulation. Recommend removing and replacing all the damaged and infested sub-floor
insulation in the crawl space sub-area as needed. All infested insulation should be removed. Recommend
replacing insulation with similar R-value or improve as needed. Recommend contacting a qualified, licensed
insulation specialist about the replacement of the sub-floor insulation.
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HEATING/HVAC SYSTEM
HVAC; Air Distribution system:
Forced-Air Operation:
System appears to be operational/serviceable. No significant problems noted with the furnace operation at time of
the inspection.
Recommend contacting a qualified, licensed HVAC contractor for a complete Tune-up and general maintenance
of the heating system as needed.
Heating/Air Distribution components:
Concerns/Issues- Metal/Flex ducts:
Conditions noted with the metal/flex ducting:
- The flex ducting appears to be damaged in the dining room; the inside of the ducting is torn/damaged (fiberglass
is exposed). Recommend replacing the flex-ducting as needed.
- Recommend replacing the damaged duct insulation in the crawl space as needed.
Recommend contacting licensed HVAC/Mechanical contractor, or handyman, to make further evaluations of the
ductwork system. Repair/replace ducting as needed using approved materials and installation practices.
The following items are Minor deficiencies, and areas of concern, and potential problems with the house; General
maintenance and upkeep items. Diagrams and photos, of pertinent issues, are provided in the main body of this
Inspection Report. Further evaluation/attention may be needed; action may be required at this time:
WOOD DESTROYING ORGANISMS (WDO/WDI) and PESTS
Wood-Decay Fungi Rot (WDO)
Findings/Location(s)- Exterior Roof Eaves/Trim:
Evidence of fungal rot decay/damage to the trim, located (but not limited to): at the trellis on the front of the
house. Replace damaged wood as needed.
HEATING/HVAC SYSTEM
Heating/Air Distribution components:
Air Quality/Conditions:
Debris noted in the heat/air ducts, visible through the floor registers. Recommend cleaning the ducts as needed.
PLUMBING
Drain-Waste Lines:
Conditions noted:
Overall condition- Appears serviceable. No visible problems detected at this time. No evidence of significant
leaks detected or concerns/problems noted at time of the inspection. With the concerns/issues/exception noted
during the inspection:
- Open drain-waste pipe located under the kitchen sink (drain system was modified with the replacement of the
sink). Recommend replacing with the proper drain pipes/fitting. Recommend contacting a qualified, licensed
plumbing contractor for evaluation and repair/correct as needed.
BATHROOMS
BATH #2:
Location:
Master Bedroom.
Bathroom components:
Overall the sink/component conditions- Appear serviceable. Counters/cabinets appear serviceable.
- The right sink drain appears to be clogged- drained very slowly when tested.
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ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI):
Operation/Condition(s):
The installed Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter(s) appears to be serviceable/operational when tested. With the
notable exception/concern/issues;
- The garage GFCI was painted and may not trip off as intended. Recommend replacing the GFCI for safety
reasons.
Smoke Detector(s):
Condition:
Appear to be operational/functional (but were not tested at this time)- All areas where detectors are installed, with
the exception noted;
- Detector is missing in the middle bedroom. Replace as needed, for safety reasons.
Carbon Monoxide Detectors:
Condition:
Appears functional/operational, but was not tested.
- The CO detector is poorly located and should be re-located into the center hallway area.
- Recommend installation of a CO detector(s) in all levels of the house and near the sleeping areas of the house, as
required by WA State RCW 19.27.530 and the State Building Code. CO detectors should comply with UL 2034;
as required by WAC 51-51-0315. Install CO detectors according to the Manufacturer's installation instructions.
KITCHEN
Dishwasher:
Condition:
Appears serviceable. Dishwasher was operated during the inspection and appears to be functional/operational.
An air gap is not provided in the dishwasher drain line. This drain line may hold water and not drain properly;
recommend adding a high loop under the sink or add an air gap (if possible/practical).
Ventilation:
Type/Condition:
Exhaust Hood/Fan system- Appears operational/functional and appears to be operating as intended. Appears to
be venting out of the kitchen area.
- Exhaust fan/filter system is dirty and needs cleaning for efficiency.
- Rust/corrosion on the metal duct in the crawl space. This duct was not insulated. Recommend adding insulation
to reduce condensation issue.
INTERIOR
Stairs & Handrails:
Conditions:
Interior stairs- Appear serviceable. Stair handrail appears serviceable, but is not fastened to the wall/framing
sufficiently. Check brackets and fasten to the stud framing as needed.
Guard rail, around the stairwell, appears serviceable. Balusters are loose, but functional.
GARAGE/CARPORT
Vehicle Door(s):
Condition(s):
Overall condition- Appears serviceable and functions as intended. With the concerns/issues noted;
- Slight bent at the upper bracket. Possible need for reinforcement of this bracket and door connection.
Recommend contacting a qualified/trained door system technician for further evaluations and make all
corrections/repairs to the garage door as needed, for safety.
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ROOF and COMPONENTS
Exposed Flashing:
Overall Conditions:
Overall condition- Appears serviceable, no significant issues noted at this time. With the exception/concern/issues
noted;
- Kick-out flashing is needed at the roof/housewall intersection or junction- located at the end of the step flashing.
This will divert water run-off on to the roof or into the gutter system and not behind the siding/cladding or trim.
Overall Condition of the Roof:
Conditions/Findings:
General condition- Appears Serviceable; conditions are based on the age/type and the typical wear of the roofing
material. No significant problems or issues noted at the time of the inspection.
Build-up and debris noted on roofing material; Moss/fungus (green mass build-up/staining). Recommend
cleaning off the excessive debris from the roofing materials, to prevent premature wear and tear. Recommend
cleaning off and treating the roof with an approved fungicide, or moss inhibitor, to prevent further growth of the
moss.
Gutter System:
Types/Conditions:
Metal gutters; Overall Condition- Appears serviceable. The overall gutter system appears to be controlling the
water run-off as needed.
- Debris in the gutters (and holding water)- recommend cleaning the complete gutter system and check for leaks.
Recommend detaching the downspout drain pipes when cleaning, so that debris does not drain into the
underground drain system.
EXTERIOR
Eaves/Trim/Flashing:
Conditions noted:
Overall condition- Appears Serviceable. With the notable concerns/issues/exception;
- The front column trim boards are separating at the joints and will be prone to water intrusion and
moisture-related damage. Recommend re-installing the boards tight and caulk/seal the joints and re-paint as
needed.
The following items are future expenditures or items with a limited life expectancy. Recommend budgeting
accordingly and/or anticipate replacement in the near future:
PLUMBING
Water Heater:
Estimated Age:
Original equipment. Years: 10+ (Manufactured in 2005).
Water heater is approaching the end of it's useful life (average life expectancy is approx. 10-12 years).
Recommend replacing in the near future. Recommend installing the new water heater with all updated
requirements (as they apply); recommend installed with proper/improved earthquake strapping, expansion tank
and in a pan, on a foam pad or platform where applicable, for safety.
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The following items are Pest Inspection (WDO/WDI/Rodent)- related items/issues- action may be needed:
WOOD DESTROYING ORGANISMS (WDO/WDI) and PESTS
Rodent/Animal/Vermin Activity:
Type of Infestation(s) noted:
Rats.
Evidence of Infestation:
Rodent droppings noted, on the plastic vapor barrier, on/in the sub-floor insulation batts, on the heat
ducting/insulation, throughout the crawl space sub-area.
Insulation has been effected/damaged: sub-floor insulation has been pulled-down and/or damaged in the crawl
space sub-area, staining from rodent droppings/urine
Unable to determine if this infestation/problem is active or inactive- a specialist is needed to determine activity
status.
Recommendations:
Recommend locating all the sources of the rodent/vermin entry into the house; (attic, garage and/or sub-area) and
correct and seal off as needed, using approved methods and materials. Recommend contacting a licensed
specialist in rodent clean-up and remediations. Make all necessary corrections/repairs to prevent further
infestation and clean/sanitize the area(s) of infestation for health reasons. Recommend contacting a licensed,
professional and certified pest management company (PCO) to prevent or remedy the pest activity/damage.
Seaview Home Inspections, LLC (425) 742-1735
Michael A. Brisbin- Owner/Inspector
WA State Home Inspector License #278
E-Mail: seaviewinspections@comcast.net
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