Nebraska’s Guide to Healthy Beverages at Work
Nebraska’s Guide to Healthy Beverages at Work
Acknowledgments
Special Recognition to the primary developers:
Bob Rauner, MD, MPH Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln
Danielle Herbert, MPH Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln
Holly Dingman, MS, RD, Nebraska DHHS
Tami Frank, BS, Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln
Tonya Vyhlidal, M.Ed Nebraska Safety Council/WorkWell
Other Partners Include:
Brian Cross, Wellness Coordinator, Bryan Health
Greg Howe, Wellness Manager, Lincoln Industries
Jackie Varicak, Wellness Coordinator, Nebraska Safety Council/WorkWell
Jan Zoucha, Director of Marketing, Assurity Life Insurance
Jeanne Sands, Wellness Coordinator, Lincoln Surgical Hospital
Jeannie Dryburgh, Office Manager, Nebraska Association of Resource Districts
Jessica Davies, Wellness Coordinator, Panhandle Worksite Wellness Council
Kay Sudbeck, Director of HR, Speedway Motors
Laura Feyerherm, Grant Project Manager, WELCOM
Libby Raetz, VP of Nursing; Chief Nursing Officer, CHI Health St. Elizabeth
Marika Brack, Wellness Coordinator, Duncan Aviation
Michelle Welch, Wellness Facilitator, Lincoln Public Schools
Rachel Huggins, Wellness Manager, Union Bank & Trust
Rebecca Vinton Dorn, Executive Director, WELCOM
Sarah Schram, Douglas County Health Department
Teena Kesler, Benefits Manager, Nelnet
Will Henry, Wellness Coordinator, Kawasaki Motors
www.healthynebraska.org
2
Nebraska’s Guide to Healthy Beverages at Work
Table of Contents
Introduction & Beverage Definitions........................................................................ 1
Convene a Healthy Beverage Workgroup..............................................................
3
Complete a Beverage Assessment........................................................................
4
Develop a Healthy Beverage Policy.......................................................................
5
Educate and Engage Employees...........................................................................
6
Implement The Healthy Beverage Policy..............................................................
7
Track Changes......................................................................................................
8
Celebrate a Healthier Workplace!..........................................................................
9
www.healthynebraska.org
3
Nebraska’s Guide to Healthy Beverages at Work
Appendices
A-Beverage Definitions
Beverage Standards
B-Convene a Healthy Beverage Workgroup
Sign-On
Quick Reference Guide
Workplace FAQ’s
C-Complete a Beverage Assessment
Workplace Beverage Scan
Vending Machine Assessment
Employee Survey
Beverage Sales Assessment
D-Develop a Healthy Beverage Policy
Sample Beverage Policies
E-Educate and Engage Employees
Stoplight Flyer
Stoplight Poster
Sample Communications
Table Tent
Brochure
PowerPoint
Nutritional Info
F- Implement the Healthy Beverage Policy
Sample Letter to Vendor
Sample Vendor Contract
Vendor FAQs
Rethink Your Drink Signs (8 1/2x11 & 11x17)
G-Celebrate a Healthier Workplace!
Local Successes
Sample News Release
H-Resources & References
www.healthynebraska.org
4
Nebraska’s Guide to Healthy Beverages at Work
The purpose of this guide is to assist businesses of all sizes to create a healthier
workplace by setting a healthy beverage policy. The ultimate goal of the beverage
policy is to increase access to and promote water and other “green beverages”, while
reducing access to “red beverages” at workplace events, vending machines and
meetings. This Guide outlines the process to positively shift the beverage environment
in the workplace and empower employees to make healthier beverage choices.
WHY? Read the following summaries for the research behind eliminating sugar-sweetened beverages:
The Health Consequences of Drinking Soda and Other Sugar-Sweetened Beverages.
How Sugar Sweetened Beverages Became a Leading Contributor to the Obesity Epidemic.
FACT SHEET: Sugary Drink Supersizing and the Obesity Epidemic
Sugar-sweetened beverages are the #1 contributor of added sugar in the American diet (Figure 1). Drinking too
many sugary beverages can lead to weight gain and is a leading contributor of the obesity epidemic. Limiting sugarsweetened beverages is a recognized best practice for obesity prevention. This Guide uses stoplight color symbols
to help business leaders and employees understand how to choose healthier beverages. Worksite wellness groups
can use this Guide to promote healthy, green beverages while
reducing access and promotion of red, sugar-sweetened
beverages.
Bottom Line: Water is the best choice and should be available
13
.5%
%
49.7
at all times – whenever, wherever beverages are served.
Sugar Sweetened Beverages account for nearly
of added sugar in the American diet.
3.8%
5.4%
%
2.1
1%
Figure 1
6.
12
.9
%
6.5%
50%
1
“Red” beverages* contain high amounts of added sugar and contain
many “empty” calories with little or no nutrients. Calories from red beverages
can add up and increase the risk of overweight and obesity. Milk is a recognized
nutrient-rich beverage. However, whole milk is high in saturated fat and flavored
milk has a significant amount of added sugar. Red beverages should be reduced or
eliminated.
• Regular sodas
• Energy drinks
• Sports drinks
Maybe not.
• Sugar sweetened coffee or tea drinks
• Juice drinks with added sugar
• Unflavored whole milk
• Flavored milk (Whole, 2%, or 1%)
• 100% Juice (>8 ounces portions)
“Yellow” beverages* are reduced or no calorie beverages that often
contain artificial sweeteners and sometimes added sugars. Diet and “light” drinks
that are artificially flavored can be substitutes for red beverages. However, they
still contribute a “sweet” flavor, which may lead a preference of sweets. While
100% juice provides nutritional benefits, serving sizes should be limited to 8
ounces or less as larger portions can contribute significant extra calories. Yellow
beverages can be consumed occasionally.
• Diet sodas
• Diet iced teas
• Low calorie or low sugar drinks*
Ok sometimes.
• 100% Juice (≤ 8 ounce portions)
• Low-calorie sports drinks*
• 2% Unflavored milk
• Skim Flavored Milk (≤ 8 ounce portions)
“Green” beverages* are the healthiest, go-to beverages.
They do not contain any added sugar or artificial sweeteners and therefore
do not contribute extra calories. Water, 1% and skim unflavored milk, and
unsweetened coffee and tea are placed in the “green” category. Green
beverages should be consumed daily.
• Water is the best choice!
Go for it.
• Seltzer or mineral water
• 1% or skim unflavored milk
• Unsweetened coffee or tea
*Resources for this page in Appendix A.
2
ˆˆConvene a Healthy Beverage Workgroup
The first step to creating a workplace with healthy beverages is to utilize
an existing wellness committee to guide the journey and establish buy-in
from leadership and employees. Be sure to have broad representation
and include senior management in the process.
Workgroup Activities:
•
Sign on to the initiative*
•
Identify a champion(s)
•
Share the Quick Reference to outline the process*
•
Utilize The Guide and PowerPoint presentation to initiate conversations
•
Review the FAQs for answers to common concerns*
Don’t have a wellness
committee?
Need to know more about
making a business case for
wellness? Check out the
Nebraska Worksite Wellness
Toolkit.
One of the most common questions when looking to implement changes
in vending policy is with regard to sales. See what one large Lincoln
organization found when they stopped providing free red beverages to
their employees:
“We signed on to the Rethink Your Drink initiative in 2013. Our worksite wellness group and internal
champions decided to eliminate all “red” beverages across our organization. The first year, we saved $27,000
by not offering sugar-sweetened beverages in staff and hospitality sites. It became a win-win initiative.”
-Libby Raetz, Vice President of Nursing, Chief Nursing Officer, CHI Health St. Elizabeth
*Resources for this page in Appendix B.
3
ˆˆComplete a Beverage Assessment
Assessing the current beverage environment is the next
critical step. The following resources can be found in the
appendix of this guide.
• Workplace Beverage and Vending Scan*
When assessing the beverage environment consider:
• Where beverages are placed in the vending machine; where beverages are available in the facility.
• How beverages are promoted.
• How beverages are priced.
• What types of beverage products are available.
• Employee Interest Survey*
Engaging employees early on in the process is recommended to:
• Gauge interest
• Get buy-in
• Provide education
To reduce the burden of compiling results, consider using a free on-line survey tool.
• Beverage Vending Contract Review
Vending contracts may only renew every1-3 years, so it’s never too early to check:
• Who is involved in the contracting process?
• Which pieces of the contract are negotiable and which are non-negotiable?
• When is the current contract up for renewal and what is the timeline for negotiating changes?
• What are the vending company’s product content guidelines?
• Beverage Sales Assessment*
Many vendors are concerned about an initial drop in sales, but after a period of time find that employees
become accustom to the change and resume their normal spending habits, albeit on healthier beverages!
Consider tracking sales in two categories:
1)
Green and Yellow beverages
2)
Red beverages
*Resources for this page in Appendix C.
4
ˆˆDevelop a Healthy Beverage Policy
After assessing the beverage environment and gauging employee interest, develop a written policy that sets the
standard across the workplace for healthy beverage products, placement, promotion, and pricing. Consider the
assessment results when identifying areas of improvement. Keep the policy simple and straightforward. If there is a
concern about reducing all red beverages at first, consider a phased approach to reach the policy goal. Utilize the
sample policies* in this guide as a starting point.
The Healthy Beverage Policy should reflect ideal, yet practical beverage standards for the organization. When
drafting the beverage policy, consider necessary changes to the current vending contract so that when it is reissued,
the beverage policy is reflected in the new contract.
Policy Components:
Policy Goal:
● Statement of Purpose or Intent
● Product
○ Define healthy beverages using the stoplight approach
○ Specify portion sizes to reflect recommended guidelines
○ Set a timeline for reducing sugar-sweetened beverages, consider taking a
phased approach
● Placement
○ Identify desired location of beverages available within the facility
○ Distinguish product placement, keeping green beverages at eye-level
○ Establish guidelines for beverages served at events and meetings
● Promotion
○ Focus education and promotion on water
○ Eliminate advertising of unhealthy beverages on your organization’s property
Increase access to
water at all company
events and locations
while reducing or
eliminating access
to sugar-sweetened
beverages.
● Price
○ Establish pricing standards to ensure green beverages are competitively priced
○ Consider lowering the price of water and other green/yellow beverages
○ Consider increasing the price of red beverages to encourage healthier beverage selection
● Contract
○ Incorporate an agreement that all vending must promote health and failure to comply is a breach of contract
*Resources for this page in Appendix D.
Why A Formal Healthy Beverage Policy?
● Gives credibility and ensures sustainability to the changes being made to the healthy beverage
access at work
● Communicates to employees and managers the importance and intent of healthy beverage changes
● Can more easily be incorporated into vending contracts and requests for bids
5
ˆˆEducate and Engage Employees
Providing education to employees before, during, and after implementation of the
healthy beverage policy will build awareness and buy-in. Explore these resources
to help educate and engage employees:
Beverage Board Displays
Place in a prominent location to show
employees the amount of sugar in
popular beverages. These lightweight
interactive Stop! Rethink Your Drink.
Go On
STOP!
GREEN
Go on Green boards are available for
check-out from your local Worksite
Wellness Council. An accompanying
resource sheet can be found in the
appendix.*
Mountain Frappuccino Sprite
Dew
Coca
Cola
Capri
Sun
Juicy Juice
100% Juice
G2
Monster
Gatorade
290 Calories
290 Calories
240 Calories
240 Calories
210 Calories
130 Calories
60 Calories
60 Calories
45 Calories
77 grams= 18 1/4 tsp of sugar
46 grams= 11 tsp of sugar
63 grams= 15 tsp of sugar
65 grams= 15 1/2 tsp of sugar
54 grams= 12 3/4 tsp of sugar
34 grams= 8 tsp of sugar
16 grams= 3 3/4 tsp of sugar
14 grams= 3 1/4 tsp of sugar
12 grams= 2 3/4 tsp of sugar
Also contains artificial sweetener
Similar to other iced coffee drinks
Similar to Sierra Mist, 7 Up or
other lemon lime sodas
Similar to Pepsi and other regular cola
Similar to other energy drinks
Similar to Powerade and
other sports drinks
Contains 10% Juice
Contains 100% Juice
Similar to other low calorie sports drinks
Mio
1% Milk
Unsweetened
Iced Tea
Water
5 Calories
0 Calories
0 Calories
110 Calories
0 Calories
0 Calories
0 Calories
.8 grams= .2 tsp of sugar
Also contains artificial sweetener
Contains artificial sweetener
Contains artificial sweetener
12 grams= 3 tsp of sugar
No sugar or artificial sweetener
No sugar or artificial sweetener
No sugar or
artificial sweetener
Similar to other artificially
sweetened ice teas
Similar to Diet Coke and other diet soda
Similar to Crystal Lite or other water
enhancing drops
Unflavored skim or 1% Milk or Soymilk
Diet Snapple
Diet Pepsi
Unsweetened
Coffee
Signs*
Simple messages promoting water or the stoplight message can raise
awareness and communicate to employees the changes that are being made.
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Welcome Feedback
However you choose to educate and engage
employees, be sure to ask for and respond to
feedback through a suggestion box or periodic email.
*Resources for this page in Appendix E.
6
ˆˆImplement the Healthy Beverage Policy
After developing the policy and timeline for implementation, it is time to make changes to the work environment.
Before talking to vendors, review the FAQs* for answers that address common concerns.
Talk to the Vendor
Maintain open and ongoing communication during contract negotiation.
• Start the conversation with a letter to the vendor*
• Discuss the new healthy beverage policy
• Identify available healthy beverages that meet the policy guidelines
• Discuss a reasonable timeline to implement the changes
Update the Vending Contract
Once the beverage policy has been developed, the vending contract will need to be negotiated to reflect
the policy. Here are some things to consider and include in the contract:
• Contracts trump policies so incorporate the healthy beverage policy into the vending contract. The
sample contract in the appendix* illustrates how to do this.
• Definitions of healthy beverages may be different between the organization and the vendor. Be sure
healthy beverages are defined and address how substitutions will be handled.
• Include how compliance of the contract will be monitored and corrected, as needed
Change the Beverage Environment
Consider the following changes to vending machines based around the 4 P’s of marketing:
ˆˆ Placement
Move green and yellow beverages to eye level and red beverages towards the bottom
ˆˆ Promotion
Change the front panel of the vending machine to showcase water or “Cold Drinks” and utilize
signage and promotion materials*
ˆˆ Price
Green beverages should be priced as the least expensive option, if possible, followed by yellow with
the most expensive options being red beverages
ˆˆ Products
Based on the policy and timeline, start reducing the amount of red beverages within the machine
and increasing the amount of healthier, green and yellow beverage options.
*Resources for this page in Appendix F.
7
ˆˆTrack Changes
Tracking change over time is key to evaluating whether the healthy beverage policy
Before
is successful. This does not need to be a complicated process. Consider these
simple ways to track changes in the workplace and adjust as any challenges arise.
Compare pre/post sales data in the two categories*
1
4
2 3
5 6
7 8
* 0
1) Green and Yellow beverages and
9
#
2) Red beverages.
Take before and after photos of your vending machines or other locations
where changes occurred to use as documentation.
Reassess your beverage environment quarterly* to ensure maintenance of
implemented changes.
Collect ongoing feedback from employees.
After
1
4
2 3
5 6
7 8
* 0
9
#
*Resources for this page in Appendix C.
8
ˆˆCelebrate a Healthier Workplace
Celebrating accomplishments is a frequently overlooked component of successful
policy implementation. In an effort to maintain a healthy workplace environment
and promote ongoing enthusiasm, reflect on lessons learned, recognize
accomplishments, and celebrate successes. Keep employees and the community
engaged by sharing successes in the following ways:
Use internal communication such as workplace newsletter or
intranet article to share sales trends and assessment results
along with employee feedback and success stories.
Inspire other businesses to make similar changes by sharing successes
and lessons learned with a Nebraska Worksite Wellness Council.
Utilize the web and social media by documenting photo success using
#RethinkYourDrinkNE
Announce successes using the sample news release* to illustrate the
organization’s leadership and commitment to community health.
#
*Resources for this page in Appendix G.
9
Appendix A
Beverage Definitions
QQNutrition Standards
QQ Nutrition Standards: Explanation
and Definitions
Nebraska’s Guide to Healthy Beverages at Work
Nutrition Standards
QQ Green
Water
No portion limit for plain water
Unsweetened Coffee & Tea:
0 Calories
0 g of Added Sugar
0 tsp of sugar
≤ 20 oz
QQ Yellow
QQ Red
Low/Reduced Calorie
Beverages:
Sugar-Sweetened
Beverages & Energy Drinks:
≤ 60 Calories, 12 oz max
≤ 10 Calories, 20 oz max
> 60 Calories, 12 oz
1 – 15 g of added sugar per
container
≤ 3.75 tsp of added sugar per
container
100% Juice (Fruit or
Vegetable)
9 – 36 g natural sugar per 8oz
Juice Drinks that are not 100%
juice:
> 65 Calories per 12 oz
> 15 g of added sugar per
container
> 4 tsp of added sugar per
container
≤ 200 mg sodium per 8 oz
≤ 12 oz:
12 g of natural sugar per 8 oz
3 tsp of natural sugar per 8 oz
Unsweetened, fortified milk
alternatives
≤12 oz
> 4 tsp of added sugar per
container
100% Juice (Fruit or
Vegetable)
≤ 8 oz:
Plain Skim or 1 % Milk*
> 15 g of added sugar per
container
2% Milk
> 8 oz
Whole Milk
≤ 8 oz
Any amount
Skim Flavored Milk*
Skim Flavored Milk
25 g of total sugar per 8 oz
12g of natural sugar
13 g of added sugar
6.25 tsp sugar per 8 oz
Flavored Milk (Whole, 2% or
1%)
Flavored Milk Alternatives
Flavored Milk Alternatives
≤ 8 oz:
≤ 8 oz
> 8 oz
Any amount
> 8 oz
These standards align with USDA Smarter Snack Guidelines and 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans
www.healthynebraska.org
B
Nutrition Standards: Explanation and Definitions
The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently established science-based nutrition
standards, called Smart Snacks, for beverages and foods sold to students during the school day. These
recommendations are based on an Institute of Medicine (IOM) report and provide standards that make it easier
to identify healthy and healthier beverages. The Nebraska Healthy Beverage Guide aligns with Smarter Snack
standards to aim for consistency across the community so that both youth and their parents have a similar
understanding of healthy beverages.
Added Sugars: Added sugars are those sugars, syrups and other caloric sweeteners that are added
to beverages and are not naturally occurring. Names for added sugars include: high-fructose corn syrup,
dextrose, sucrose, honey, maltose, lactose, agave, and brown sugar. Added sugars in beverages should be
consumed in limited amounts, if at all. For a 2,000 calorie diet plan, sweets and added sugars (including both
from foods and sugary beverages) should be consumed 5 or less times per week (1 serving = 3 tsp of sugar).
Juice: The US Department of Agriculture’s serving size for juice is 4oz and 4oz contributes to ½ cup of
recommended daily fruit or vegetable intake. Daily, up to 8 ounces of 100% juice can contribute to 1 cup of
fruit or vegetable intake. Most Americans do not consume enough fruits or vegetables. 100% fruit juice is
an easy way to add fruit or vegetables to your diet and many of the same nutrients are founds in whole fruits
and veggies such as vitamins, minerals, and plant nutrients such as polyphenols. However, it’s easy to drink
too much juice (> 8 ounces per day). 100% juice is placed in the yellow category to note that portion control
is important and over consumption (> 8 ounces per day) of 100% juice can contribute to “empty” calories.
Whole fruits and vegetables are a better choice than 100% juice because they provide fiber. Incorporate whole
fruits and vegetables into all meal and snacks to reach daily requirements. 100% juice should be consumed
in moderation (4-8 ounces daily). Many juice drinks on the market can contain as little as 5-10% juice and
contain added sugars. Check the nutrition fact label to be sure it contains 100% juice with no added sugars.
Milk: Consuming fat-free or low-fat milk provides many nutrients, especially for bone health. These nutrients
include calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and protein. Higher fat milk (whole or 2% milk) should be limited due
to saturated fats and cholesterol. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that men and women
consume 3 cups of low-fat/fat-free dairy (milk, yogurt, cheese, fortified soymilk, etc) per day.
Artificial Sweeteners: Diet sodas and calorie-free beverages often contain one or more artificial
sweeteners such as, aspartame, acesulfame-K, saccharin, sucralose, neotame. Research on the
healthfulness of artificially sweetened beverages is inconclusive. Although calorie-free, these beverages still
produce a sweet flavor which may encourage a preference for sweet drinks and foods. These beverages may
be a useful in helping transition away from sugary drinks, but consumption is not encouraged over the long
term.
Portion Vs. Serving Size: A portion size is the amount given or served, while a serving size is a
standardized amount. Many beverage serving sizes are standard at 1 cup or 8 oz; however, are often served
in containers much larger (12oz – 20oz). These oversized beverage portions lead to over consumption of
beverages. Read the nutrition label to check the number of servings per container.
www.healthynebraska.org
C
Appendix B
Convene a Healthy
Beverage Workgroup
QQSign-On
QQQuick Reference Guide
QQQuick Reference Beverage
Standards
QQFAQ’s
Nebraska’s Guide to Healthy Beverages at Work
Sign-On Letter
I,
(Organization representative) representing
(Organization name) sign-on to Nebraska’s Rethink
Your Drink Initiative and agree to develop a healthy beverage policy for my organization
to improve the health of our employees, customers and associates by making the
healthy choice the easy choice.
I am aware of the resources available to me through Nebraska’s Guide to Healthy
Beverages at Work including resources to:
• Convene a Healthy Beverage Workgroup
•
•
•
•
•
•
Complete a Beverage Assessment
Develop a Healthy Beverage Policy
Educate and Engage Employees
Implement the Healthy Beverage Policy
Track Changes
Celebrate a Healthier Workplace
I understand the ultimate goal of developing a healthy beverage policy for my
organization is to increase access to water and other green beverages at company
events and locations, while reducing access to “red” beverages.
We are committed to making a healthy beverage policy to encourage a healthier work
environment.
Signature Date ______________
www.healthynebraska.org
C
Nebraska’s Guide to Healthy Beverages at Work
Quick Reference Guide
ˆˆ Convene a Healthy Beverage Workgroup
ˆˆ Complete a Beverage Assessment
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
* 0 #
ˆˆ Develop a Healthy Beverage Policy
ˆˆ Educate and Engage Employees
ˆˆ Implement the Healthy Beverage Policy
ˆˆ Track Changes
ˆˆ Celebrate a Healthier Workplace!
www.healthynebraska.org
D
Nebraska’s Guide to Healthy Beverages at Work
Quick Reference Beverage Standards
Category
Green
Plain or Carbonated Water
Any Size
Coffee or Tea (Unsweetened) ≤ 20 ounces
Milk, Unflavored*
Skim/1% Milk, 8-12oz
Flavored Milk*
Yellow
2% Milk, 8 oz
Fat Free Flavored,
≤ 8 oz
Red
Whole Milk, 8 oz
Whole Milk, 2% Flavored, 8 ounces
100% Juice
≤ 8 oz
> 8 oz
No Calorie Beverages
≤ 20 oz
> 20 oz
Low Calorie Beverages
≤ 12 oz
> 12 oz
Sugary Drinks: Soda &
> 65 calories per 12
Energy Drinks
oz container
* Including nutritionally equivalent milk alternatives (unsweetened/sweetened milk alternatives)
www.healthynebraska.org
E
Workplace FAQs
Being prepared for tough questions from employees, visitors and the press is an important
part of selling your organization’s efforts. Below are some frequently asked questions and
common concerns that your organization may encounter when promoting your efforts.
Why focus on sugar-sweetened beverages? French fries, ice cream, and candy
are all unhealthy as well.
Researchers have found significant evidence linking sugar-sweetened beverage consumption to obesity and
other health-related issues. One study found that consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages had a stronger
association with being overweight or obese than any other food. Nearly 10% of Americans’ calories come from
sugar-sweetened beverages, and these drinks don’t fill us up like the calories in solid food do.
Shouldn’t we educate people about healthy eating, not force them to behave in
a certain way?
Education is an important part of any effort to get people to change their behavior, but it is usually ineffective
if used alone. Education is most effective when coupled with other efforts to help people be healthier, such
as making healthy options more available, making unhealthy options less available, or increasing the price of
unhealthy items. Educating people about healthy choices is only effective if we work in an environment where
the healthy choices are the easy choices. A study conducted in two Boston teaching hospitals indicated that
an educational campaign in hospital cafeterias decreased purchases of soda only when it coupled with an
increase in the price of the soda.
Being healthy is all about balancing calories in and calories out. Isn’t soda fine
as long as individuals properly manage calories?
Managing calories consumed in food and beverages and those burned off in physical activity is
the key to maintaining a healthy weight. Soda consumption makes it hard to find this balance,
because it contains a lot of calories without any nutrients for the body and represents extra
calories consumed in addition to a meal or snack. Practically speaking, in order to burn off the
calories in one 20oz soda, an adult would have to walk for over 40 minutes at a moderate pace!
What about sports drinks? Don’t they provide sugars and electrolytes that are
important to staying hydrated?
Intense marketing has led many to believe that sports drinks are necessary to remain healthy during exercise.
The truth is that we don’t need to replace lost electrolytes unless we’ve been exercising at an intense level for
over an hour. Even then, simply snacking on healthy foods is a great way to replenish electrolytes without the
extra unnecessary sugar found in most sports drinks. Water is the best way to stay hydrated during exercise.
Used with permission from the Boston Public Health Commission Healthy Beverage Toolkit
Have More Questions?
Contact your local Worksite Wellness Council for additional information.
For council information please see the resource section of this guide.
www.healthynebraska.org
F
Appendix C
Complete a Beverage
Assessment
QQ Workplace Beverage Scan
QQ Sample Vending Machine
Assessment
QQ Vending Machine
Assessment
QQ Employee Survey
QQ Beverage Sales
Assessment
Workplace Beverage Environmental Scan
Consider the 4 P’s: Product, Place, Promotion, and Price
What, where and when are beverages made available in your worksite? What beverages are
promoted? Is there a difference in how the red, yellow, and green beverages are priced?
Beverages
Location
% Red
Promotion
% Yellow % Green Price
(Circle lowest
priced product)
(Circle product
promoted)
R
Y
G
R
Y
G
R
Y
G
R
Y
G
R
Y
G
R
Y
G
R
Y
G
R
Y
G
Cafeteria:
R
Y
G
R
Y
G
Company Events:
R
Y
G
R
Y
G
Company Supported Meetings:
R
Y
G
R
Y
G
Staff Fridge:
R
Y
G
R
Y
G
Hospitality Areas:
R
Y
G
R
Y
G
Other:
R
Y
G
R
Y
G
Beverage Vending Machines*:
Total #:_____
Average all machines
Beverage Vending Machine #1:
Location:
Beverage Vending Machine #2:
Location:
Beverage Vending Machine #3:
Location:
Purchasing
Responsibility**
Comments: Identify locations that can be improved.
* Use the Beverage Vending Diagram for each machine and summarize on this scan.
**Note the person or party responsible for purchasing decision. Include comments on contracts, dates of contract renewal, and opportunities for
negotiation
www.healthynebraska.org
D
Sample Vending Machine Assessment
Appendix C
For each beverage vending machine located within your organization, fill in the
example machine below to indicate contents of each machine.
1. Indicate the size of your machine by placing an X over
extra slots.
2. To indicate current product and placement, color
in each beverage slot using the red, yellow, and green
beverage categories.
Product:
# Red
XXXXX
7
# Green
3
Placement:
Mark cans to the right with red,
yellow, or green or take a picture.
3. Indicate the price range for each category of beverage.
Red
XXXXX
10
# Yellow
Price:
Sample Machine
$ 1.00
- $ 1.50
Yellow $ 1.00
- $ 1.50
Green $
- $ 1.50
1.25
XXXXX
XXXXX
XXXXXXXXXX
4. Note which products are being promoted on the
machine.
Promotion:
Indicate beverage promoted on
machine if applicable.
Full sugar, high-calorie beverages
Red
Coca-Cola
Yellow
Diet Pepsi
Green
Aquafina
Low/no-calorie beverages with
artificial sweetener
Neutral
Cold Drinks
Naturally sugar free
5. Complete the assessment for each machine in the facility.
Machine Location
www.healthynebraska.org
E
Vending Machine Assessment
Product:
# Red
# Yellow
# Green
Placement:
Mark cans to the right with red,
yellow, or green or take a picture.
Price:
Red
$
-$
Yellow $
-$
Green $
-$
Promotion:
Indicate beverage promoted on
machine if applicable.
Red
Yellow
Green
Neutral
Full sugar, high-calorie beverages
Low/no-calorie beverages with
artificial sweetener
Naturally sugar free
Machine Location
Adapted from NEMS
Date
www.healthynebraska.org
F
Appendix A
Employee Survey
Date: ____________________
1. How many times per week do you buy beverages from vending machines?
A. Less than 1 time/week
B. 1-3 times/week
C. 4-5 times/week
D. More than 5 times/week
2. When making a choice at a vending machine, how important is:
Not Important
Somewhat Important
Very Important
Choosing a Healthy Option
Beverage Price
Calorie Count
of Sugar
Amount
Taste
Number of Servings
3. Do you think healthy vending machines are important for the health of your workplace?
A. Yes
B. No
4. Are you able to distinguish healthier beverages in your worksite vending machines?
A. Yes
B. No
5. If healthier beverage options were made available to you, would you purchase them?
A. Yes
B. No
6. Comments:
www.healthynebraska.org
G
Appendix B
Employee Survey
Of the following green and yellow beverage options, please indicate
your preference for purchasing these beverages at work.
Suggested Beverages
J
K
L
Bottled Water
1% Milk
Skim Milk
Unsweetened Tea
100% Apple Juice
100% Orange Juice
Low cal Sports Drink
Diet Cola
Diet flavored/sweetened Iced
Tea
Flavored Water
Diet Lemon-Lime Soda
Other
www.healthynebraska.org
H
Beverage Sales Assessment
Many vendors have the capability to provide a report of beverage sales
within your organization. This may be available upon request.
Below is an example of the beverage assessment tool. Use the link to
input your company beverage sales to determine your changes in sales
as you move towards healthier beverage options in your workplace.
https://healthylincolnorg.presencehost.net/file_download/256162d6-1636-410e-8c43-47608a1cfde6
Adapted from Healthcare Without Harm
www.healthynebraska.org
I
Appendix D
Develop a Healthy
Beverage Policy
QQ Worksite Beverage Policies –
SAMPLES
Worksite Beverage Policy – SAMPLE:
At
(Organization)
, we are committed to helping our employees achieve a healthy lifestyle
and have access to healthy beverage. We support our employee healthy beverage choices by:
ˆˆ
ˆˆ
ˆˆ
ˆˆ
ˆˆ
Making
% of our options GREEN beverages as of ____________.
Making
% of our options YELLOW beverages as of ____________.
Eliminating RED beverages or limiting to
% of our options as of ____________.
Promoting water and GREEN beverage options.
Educating employees on healthy beverages using GREEN, YELLOW, RED
Nutrition Standards for Beverages:
Category
Green
Plain or Carbonated Water
Any Size
Coffee or Tea (Unsweetened) ≤ 20 ounces
Milk, Unflavored*
Skim/1% Milk, 8-12oz
Flavored Milk*
Yellow
2% Milk, 8 oz
Fat Free Flavored,
≤ 8 oz
Red
Whole Milk, 8 oz
Whole Milk, 2% Flavored, 8 ounces
100% Juice
≤ 8 oz
> 8 oz
No Calorie Beverages
≤ 20 oz
> 20 oz
Low Calorie Beverages
≤ 12 oz
> 12 oz
Sugary Drinks: Soda &
> 65 calories per 12
Energy Drinks
oz container
* Including nutritionally equivalent milk alternatives (unsweetened/sweetened milk alternatives)
Pricing and Placement Standards
• GREEN and YELLOW beverages that meet the nutrition standards must be sold at a price lower
(or equivalent) to RED beverages.
• GREEN beverages meeting the standards will be placed within the vending machine so that they
are visible at eye level.
Marketing Strategies
• This policy recognizes that promotional efforts such as labels and motivational signs on vending
machines can increase awareness and selection of healthier beverages.
• As such, signs and labels for healthy beverages will be displayed at point of purchase.
• Company (insert communication modes – ie, email, newsletter, website, etc) will be used (insert
time frame – daily, weekly, monthly) to promote healthy beverage choices to employees.
Adapted from: Nemours Healthy Vending Guide
http://www.nemours.org/content/dam/nemours/www/filebox/service/preventive/nhps/resource/healthyvending.pdf
www.healthynebraska.org
E
Appendix E
Educate and Engage
Employees
QQ Stoplight Flyer (8 1/2 x 11)
QQ Stoplight Posters (11x17)
QQ Sample Promotional Messages
QQ Table Tent
QQ Brochure
QQ PowerPoint
STOP!
Rethink your
DRINK
Go On GREEN
Drink Rarely, if at all
• Regular Sodas
• Sports Drinks*
• Sweetened Coffee
Drinks
• Energy Drinks
• Sweetened Tea
• Fruit & Juice Drinks with
added sugar
Drink Sometimes
•
•
•
•
Diet Sodas
Diet Iced Tea
100% Juice
Low Calorie Drinks
• Low Sugar Drinks
• Low Calorie Sports
Drinks
Drink Freely
• Water
• Seltzer Water
• Skim or 1% Milk
• Unsweetened Tea
• Unsweetened Coffee
*Sports drinks are unnecessary for general consumption. They are for
rehydration during high-intensity exertion such as marathon running or
strenuous exercise outdoors on high heat index days (ex: summer
soccer or football).
Choose the road to a
healthier you!
healthynebraska.org
Just know the colors....
How popular beverages rank
Popular Beverages
Container
Size
Calories
per
container
Sugar Type
Mountain Dew
20 oz
290 Cal
Added Sugar
19.25 tsp
3 1/2 mi
Fanta
20 oz
270 Cal
Added Sugar
18.5 tsp
3 1/2 mi
Pepsi
20 oz
250 Cal
Added Sugar
17.25 tsp
3 1/4 mi
Coca Cola
20 oz
240 Cal
Added sugar
16.25 tsp
3 mi
Sprite/Sierra Mist/7 Up
20 oz
240 Cal
Added Sugar
16 tsp
3 mi
Dr. Pepper
20 oz
250 Cal
Added Sugar
16 tsp
3 mi
Whole Chocolate Milk
8 oz
220 Cal
Added Sugar & Natural Sugar
6.75 tsp
2 3/4 mi
Monster
16 oz
210 Cal
Added Sugar
13.5 tsp
2 1/2 mi
Frappuccino
13.7 oz
290 Cal
Added sugar & Natural sugar
11.5 tsp
3 1/2 mi
Gatorade
20 oz
130 Cal
Added Sugar
8.5 tsp
1 1/2 mi
Red Bull
8.4 oz
110 Cal
Added Sugar
6.75 tsp
1 1/2 mi
Pepsi Next
20 oz
100 Cal
Artificial Sweetener & Added Sugar
6.5 tsp
1 1/4 mi
1% Chocolate Milk
8 oz
140 Cal
Added Sugar & Natural Sugar
4.5 tsp
1 3/4 mi
Capri Sun
6 oz
60 Cal
Added Sugar & Natural Sugar
4 tsp
3/4 mi
V8 Fusion-Vegetable & Fruit
8 oz
120 Cal
Natural Sugar
6.25 tsp
1 1/2 mi
Skim Chocolate Milk
8 oz
120 Cal
Added Sugar & Natural Sugar
4.5 tsp
1 1/2 mi
Juicy Juice 100% Juice
4.2 oz
60 Cal
Natural Sugar
3.5 tsp
3/4 mi
G2
20 oz
45 Cal
Added Sugar & Artificial Sweetener
3 tsp
1/2 mi
Diet Mountain Dew
20 oz
10 Cal
Artificial Sweetener & Added Sugar
.25 tsp
1/4 mi
Diet Snapple
16 oz
10 Cal
Natural Sugar & Artificial Sweetener
.25 tsp
1/4 mi
Mio
1 squeeze
0 Cal
Artificial Sweetener
0 tsp
0 mi
Diet Pepsi
20 oz
0 Cal
Artificial Sweetener
0 tsp
0 mi
Diet Dr. Pepper
20 oz
0 Cal
Artificial Sweetener
0 tsp
0 mi
Coke Zero/Pepsi Max
20 oz
0 Cal
Artificial Sweetener
0 tsp
0 mi
1% Unflavored Milk
8 oz
110 Cal
Natural Sugar
3 tsp
1 1/2 mi
Skim Unflavored Milk
8 oz
90 Cal
Natural Sugar
3 tsp
1 1/2 mi
Unsweetened Tea
18.5 oz
0 Cal
Sugar-free
0 tsp
0 mi
Unsweetened Coffee
16 oz
0 Cal
Sugar-free
0 tsp
0 mi
Bottled Water
Any Size
0 Cal
Sugar-Free
0 tsp
0 mi
Maybe not.
Ok sometimes.
Go for it.
4 grams = 1 teaspoon sugar Mileage based on 150 lb person at 3 miles per hour (79.5 cal/mile)
Teaspoons Miles to
sugar per walk off a
container container
STOP!
Rethink your
DRINK
Go On
GREEN
Drink Rarely, if at all
• Regular Sodas
• Sports Drinks*
• Sweetened Coffee
Drinks
• Energy Drinks
• Sweetened Tea
• Fruit & Juice Drinks with
added sugar
Drink Sometimes
•
•
•
•
Diet Sodas
Diet Iced Tea
100% Juice
Low Calorie Drinks
• Low Sugar Drinks
• Low Calorie Sports
Drinks
Drink Freely
• Water
• Seltzer Water
• Skim or 1% Milk
• Unsweetened Tea
• Unsweetened Coffee
*Sports drinks are unnecessary for general consumption. They are for rehydration during high-intensity exertion
such as marathon running or strenuous exercise outdoors on high heat index days (ex: summer soccer or football).
Choose the road to a
healthier you!
healthynebraska.org
Appendix F
Sample Promotional Messages
There is as much sugar in a 16 oz energy drink as 2 candy bars. Do you
consider your energy drink a treat?
Maybe not.
Rethink Your Drink
Do you walk 4 miles for every sweetened latté?
Maybe not.
Rethink Your Drink.
Would you eat 16 teaspoons of sugar? That’s how much is in a regular 20
oz cola.
Maybe not.
Rethink Your Drink
Like juice with breakfast? Don’t get carried away. Even 4 oz of 100% apple
juice has over 3 teaspoons of natural sugar.
Ok sometimes.
Rethink Your Drink
Think you need a post workout recovery drink? Don’t undo your workout.
Consider swapping a regular sports drink for a low cal option and save 95
calories.
Ok sometimes.
Rethink Your Drink
Want a guilt free beverage? Swapping 1 regular soda (20 oz) a day for water
saves you more than 240 calories a day. That’s about 25 pounds a year!
Go for it!
Rethink Your Drink.
Want to go green? Go green with your beverage. Tap water is sugar free,
calorie free, all natural and costs nothing!!
Go for it!
Rethink Your Drink.
www.healthynebraska.org
F
healthynebraska.org
Naturally sugar-free drinks
Go for it!
Low and no calorie drinks
with artificial sweeteners
Ok Sometimes
Full sugar, high calorie drinks
Maybe not
DRINK
Rethink your
GREEN
Go On
Just know the colors....
How popular beverages rank
Popular Beverages
Bottled Water
4 tsp
Unsweetened Coffee
4.5 tsp
8 oz
6.5 tsp
20 oz
6.75 tsp
8.4 oz
8.5 tsp
20 oz
11.5 tsp
13.7 oz
Frappuccino
13.5 tsp
16 oz
Monster
16 tsp
20 oz
16 tsp
20 oz
16.25 tsp
20 oz
17.25 tsp
20 oz
18.5 tsp
20 oz
Juicy Juice 100% Juice
19.25 tsp
20 oz
Skim Chocolate Milk
Teaspoons
sugar per
container
Popular Beverages
Size
Mountain Dew
Fanta
Pepsi
Coca Cola
Sprite/Sierra Mist/7 Up
Dr. Pepper
Gatorade
Red Bull
Pepsi Next
Whole Chocolate Milk
Capri Sun
Maybe not.
6 oz
Ok sometimes.
G2
Diet Mountain Dew
Diet Snapple
Mio
Diet Pepsi
Diet Dr. Pepper
Coke Zero/Pepsi Max
1% Unflavored Milk
Skim Unflavored Milk
Unsweetened Tea
STOP!
0 tsp
Any Size
0 tsp
16 oz
0 tsp
18.5 oz
3 tsp
8 oz
3 tsp
8 oz
0 tsp
20 oz
0 tsp
20 oz
0 tsp
20 oz
0 tsp
1 squeeze
.25 tsp
16 oz
.25 tsp
20 oz
3 tsp
20 oz
3.5 tsp
4.2 oz
4.5 tsp
8 oz
Teaspoons
sugar per
container
Size
Go for it.
4 grams = 1 teaspoon sugar Mileage based on 150 lb person at 3 miles per hour (79.5 cal/mile)
Rethink Your Drink
It’s easy to make a healthy choice.
Just know the colors:
• Most sugary drinks lack any nutritional
value and contain only empty calories.
• It takes the average adult more than 45
minutes of jogging to burn off the 240
calories in a 20-ounce soda with sugar.
• Sugar sweetened beverages are the
single largest source of added sugars
in the American diet.
• One 20 oz Cola contains 16 teaspoons
of sugar.
• Most adults (2 out of 3) in Nebraska
are either overweight or obese.
• Obesity in Nebraska costs $750 Million
annually in medical costs
• Swapping water for soda or other
sugar-sweetened beverages is a
recognized obesity prevention strategy.
Serving size: Check the nutrition facts label to find the
number of servings per container. Multiply this number
to calories or grams of sugars to find the total calories
and total sugar per container.
Ex Above: 2 Servings per container
Calories: This is a number that describes the amount
of energy you get from one serving of that product.
Again, note serving size or servings per container.
Ex Above: 2 x 70 calories = 140 calories per
container
Maybe not
Sugar: This is the amount of sugar contained in a
single serving of this product. Roughly 4 grams of
sugar equals 1 teaspoon of sugar (4g=1tsp).
Ex Above: 2 x 16g sugar = 32g of sugar / 4 = 8 tsp
of sugar per container.
Ok sometimes.
% Juice: This is a number that displays how much of
this product is actual expressed juice from fruit versus
other added ingredients or flavors. Look for 100% juice.
Go for it.
For more information go to
healthynebraska.org.
STOP!
Go On
GREEN
.
Red Beverages
Red beverages contain high amounts of
added sugar and contain many “empty”
calories with little or no nutrients. Calories
from red beverages can add up and increase
the risk of overweight and obesity. Milk
is a recognized nutrient-rich beverage.
However, whole milk is high in saturated fat
and flavored milk has a significant amount
of added sugar. Red beverages should be
reduced or eliminated.
• Regular sodas
• Energy drinks
• Sports drinks
• Sugar sweetened coffee or tea drinks
• Juice drinks with added sugar
• Unflavored whole milk
• Flavored milk (Whole, 2%, or 1%)
• 100% Juice (>8 ounces portions
Maybe not.
*Sports drinks may be necessary for rehydration during
high-intensity exertion such as marathon running or
strenuous exercise outdoors on high heat index days (ex:
summer soccer or football), but are unnecessary for general
consumption.
Yellow Beverages
Yellow beverages are reduced or no
calorie beverages that often contain
artificial sweeteners and sometimes added
sugars. Diet and “light” drinks that are
artificially flavored can be substitutes for red
beverages. However, they still contribute a
“sweet” flavor, which may lead a preference
of sweets. While 100% juice provides
nutritional benefits, serving sizes should be
limited to 8 ounces or less as larger portions
can contribute significant extra calories.
Yellow beverages can be consumed
occasionally.
Green Beverages
Green beverages are the healthiest, go-to
beverages. They do not contain any added
sugar or artificial sweeteners and therefore
do not contribute extra calories. Water, 1%
and skim unflavored milk, and unsweetened
coffee and tea are placed in the “green”
category. Green beverages should be
consumed daily.
• Diet sodas*
• Diet iced teas*
• Low calorie or low sugar drinks**
• 100% Juice (≤ 8 ounce portions)
• Low-calorie sports drinks**
• Water is the best choice!
• Seltzer or mineral water
• 1% or skim unflavored milk
• Unsweetened coffee or tea
• 2% Unflavored milk
• Skim Flavored Milk (≤ 8 ounce)
Ok sometimes.
* No Calorie Beverages: Limit 20 oz portion
** Low Calorie Beverage: Limit 12 oz portion
Go for it!
Why a Healthy
Beverage Policy?
Healthy Beverage
Vending Policy
THE NEW (AB)NORMAL
Why a Healthy Beverage Policy?
• Sugar-Sweetened Beverages are the largest
source of extra calories in our diet.
• Healthier employees are more productive and
workplace wellness saves money.
• Education alone doesn’t work.
• Education plus environmental changes are
most effective.
Drinks with added refined sugar, such as:
What are Sugar-Sweetened
Beverages?
•
•
•
•
Soft Drinks: Coke, Pepsi, Mountain Dew, Dr. Pepper
Fruit Drinks: Sunny D, Hawaiian Punch, Capri Sun
Sports Drinks: Gatorade, Powerade, Propel
Tea/Coffee Drinks: Arizona Iced Tea, Starbucks
Frappuccino
• Energy Drinks: Red Bull, Monster, Rock Star
• Sweetened Milk: Chocolate Milk
1
Red – Maybe not.
•
•
•
•
•
Regular Sodas
Sports Drinks
Energy Drinks
Sweetened Tea
Fruit & Juice Drinks
with added sugar
Yellow – Ok sometimes.
•
•
•
•
•
Diet Sodas
Diet Iced Tea
100% Juice
Chocolate/Flavored Milk
Low Calorie Drinks
Green – Go for it!
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Water
Seltzer Water
Skim or 1% Milk
Unsweetened Tea
Unsweetened Coffee
Developing a Healthy
Beverage Policy
Convene a Healthy Beverage Workgroup
Complete a Beverage Assessment
Develop a Healthy Beverage Policy
Educate and Engage Employees
Implement the Healthy Beverage Policy
Track Changes
Celebrate a Healthier Workplace!
Download the guide at www.healthynebraska.org
2
Appendix F
Implement the Healthy
Beverage Policy
QQ Sample Letter to Vendor
QQ Sample Vendor Contract
QQ Rethink Your Drink Signs
(8 1/2x11 & 11x17)
Sample Letter to Vendor
Appendix E
VENDOR NAME
VENDOR ADDRESS
Dear (Vending company),
(Company name) has decided to take on the challenge of improving the health of our employees.
As of (date) we will begin making changes to our vending machines that serve beverages. We are
hopeful that we may maintain a working relationship with your organization during this transitional
time for us and that we can make these accommodations together.
Based on employee feedback, our wellness committee has provided a list of products that meet
the given criteria that our employees would be interested in seeing in their machines. We would
gladly welcome any input and expertise on the products we are choosing as we move forward.
In an attempt to educate our employees during this transition we will be utilizing promotional items
to encourage employees to Rethink Your Drink. The machines will be surveyed periodically to
ensure that all guidelines are continuing to be met as determined by our updated contract.
We will be learning together as we move through the process of developing a healthier workplace.
As we work through these modifications we may need to reevaluate periodically to provide the
most beneficial impact for both your business and our organization’s health.
We look forward to working together to meet these goals and intend to begin making changes to
our vending machines by (date). We thank you for your willingness to work with our organization
on this project. Please feel free to contact us with any further questions.
Sincerely,
NAME
BUSINESS NAME
PHONE NUMBER
EMAIL ADDRESS
*You may want to provide a sample time line of your intended changes with your letter.
www.healthynebraska.org
G
Sample Vending Contract
Appendix D
It is recognized that there are a limited number of vendors in the
marketplace. You may feel like you have to put certain things in your
vending machines based on vendor recommendation. Vending selections
should align with your new workplace healthy beverage practice.
Some organizations may have a vending contract. The reference below
may be a useful tool in altering an existing or developing a new vending
contract.
http://changelabsolutions.org/publications/healthy-beverage-vending-agreement
www.healthynebraska.org
H
Maybe not.
Full sugar, high-calorie drinks
Ok sometimes.
Low/no-calorie drinks
Go for it!
Naturally sugar free drinks
healthynebraska.org
Maybe not.
Full sugar, high-calorie drinks
Ok sometimes.
Low/no-calorie drinks
Go for it!
Naturally sugar-free drinks
healthynebraska.org
Appendix G
Celebrate a Healthier
Workplace
QQ Local Successes
QQ Sample News Release
Local Successes
Appendix G
“Overhauling our vending services is one of the most important things we’ve
done as a company. Prioritizing beverages, primarily water, has been key to
improving the health of our organization.”
Kay Sudbeck, Human Resources Director, Speedway Motors
“At Assurity, we create awareness around healthy choices and have monthly
5-minute presentations about one aspect of wellness. We have used “Rethink
your Drink” for information on hidden calories in drinks. This vending initiative
helps take it to the next level of everyday awareness.”
Jan Zoucha, West Coast Regional Sales Manager, Assurity Life Insurance Company
“We always attempt to make the healthy choice the easy choice at Lincoln
Industries. We have done this with the addition of an on-site fitness center and
medical clinic. The vending change will be another step towards helping people
develop healthy behaviors.”
Greg Howe, Wellness Coordinator, Lincoln Industries
“Organizations must be prepared to champion the vendor services as many
vendors will prioritize beverage selections based off of what is selling. Keeping
a close eye on the beverage machines and constant communication with the
vendor may be necessary to keep the project on track.”
Marika Brack, Wellness Coordinator, Duncan Aviation
“At St. Elizabeth, we believe we need to be involved in moving healthcare
into the future. Leaders in healthcare are obligated to help create a new era
of healthier communities! To that end Saint Elizabeth is proud to be one of
Lincoln’s large employers to support the initiative and lead the way.”
Libby Raetz, Vice President of Nursing, Chief Nursing Officer, CHI Health St. Elizabeth
“Because we had the leadership support, changing out beverage selections and
providing water as a main source in our machines was easy. However, don’t
underestimate the power of communication. Communication regarding healthy
beverages is key to the success of the program.”
Jeanne Sands, Wellness Coordinator, Lincoln Surgical Hospital
www.healthynebraska.org
H
Appendix G
Sample News Release
Organization/Company Name or Logo
Contact: (Name, Phone/Email)
For Immediate Release: (Date)
(Organization) Signs on to Rethink Your Drink Initiative
Making the Healthy Choice the Easy Choice to promote wellness and improve health
As of (Date), (Organization) has signed on to the Rethink Your Drink Initiative in order to improve
the health and wellness of its employees (and patrons/visitors).
(About your organization, how will this initiative impact your organization; number of people,
current wellness initiatives, etc.) Although the obesity epidemic has a number causes such as too
many processed foods, increased portion sizes, and too little physical activity, the single biggest
contributor is the number of calories consumed through beverages.
The initiative calls on businesses and organizations across Nebraska to institute healthy
beverage policies to help make the healthy choice the easy choice. Even subtle changes in the
food environment can make major decreases in the calories consumed. The approach includes
changes in the placement, price, promotion, and availability of beverage products.
(Organization) joins other local organizations such as Assurity Life insurance Company, Lincoln
Industries, CHI Health St. Elizabeth, and Central District Health Department in the initiative along
with many communities across the country including Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, and Kansas
City have chosen to focus on similar initiatives.
Organizations interested in offering healthier beverage options can sign on to the Rethink Your
Drink Initiative at www.rethinkyourdrink.ne.gov
###
www.healthynebraska.org
I
Appendix H
QQ Resources
QQ References
Resources
Facts:
Kick The Can: Giving the Boot to Sugary Drinks:
http://www.kickthecan.info/
Sugary Drink F.A.C.T.S. - Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity:
http://www.sugarydrinkfacts.org/
Sweetened Beverages: Extra Sugar, Extra Calories, and Extra Weight:
http://publichealthadvocacy.org/_PDFs/soda/soda_fact_sheet_english_Sept%202011.pdf
Videos:
How Many Packets of Sugar Are You Drinking?
http://www.choosehealthla.com/multimedia/
Nursing students at Mankato State University in Minnesota made this video about sugary beverages on campus:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kWs-1muUfo&feature=youtu.be
Pour One Out:
http://www.cspinet.org/liquidcandy/pouroneout.html
The Real Sugar Bears:
http://www.therealbears.org/#video
Water Promotion:
Drink Up: You are What You Drink Videos:
http://www.youarewhatyoudrink.org/media/
Just Add Water – Refresh Kansas:
http://www.refreshkansas.org/
Take Back the Tap:
http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/water/take-back-the-tap/Water First for Thirst: Handout for parents:
http://columbus.gov/uploadedfiles/Public_Health/Content_Editors/Planning_and_Perfomance/Healthy_Children_Healthy_
Weights/HCHWHandouts_8.5x11_3Logos_5.20.2013%208%20Water%20first.pdf
Complimentary Efforts:
A Blueprint for Healthier Vending-Consortium to Lower Obesity in Chicago Children:
http://www.cityofchicago.org/content/dam/city/depts/cdph/CDPH/BlueprintHealthierVending2013.pdf
Building Blocks for Success, A Guide for Developing Healthy Beverage Programs, Public Health Law Center:
http://publichealthlawcenter.org/sites/default/files/resources/phlc-guide-healthy-beverages-collection-2013.pdf
www.healthynebraska.org
I
Resources
Complimentary Efforts Continued:
The CDC Guide to Strategies for Reducing the Consumption of Sugar Sweetened Beverages:
http://www.cdph.ca.gov/SiteCollectionDocuments/StratstoReduce_Sugar_Sweetened_Bevs.pdf
Center for Science in the Public Interest:
https://www.cspinet.org/nutritionpolicy/healthy-vending.html
Central District Health Department, Rethink Your Drink Initiative,
http://www.cdhd.ne.gov/component/content/article/168-sugar-sweetened-beverages
Healthy Beverages Best Practices, Health Care Without Harm:
https://noharm-uscanada.org/issues/us-canada/healthy-beverages-best-practices
Healthy Beverage Toolkit, Boston Public Health Commission:
http://www.bphc.org/whatwedo/healthy-eating-active-living/healthy-beverages/Documents/HealthyBeverageToolkitFinal.pdf
Healthy Meeting Toolkit:
http://cspinet.org/nutritionpolicy/Healthy-Meeting-Toolkit.pdf
Healthy Vending Guide:
http://www.nemours.org/content/dam/nemours/www/filebox/service/preventive/nhps/resource/healthyvending.pdf
Making Change-A Guide to Healthier Vending for Municipalities- ChangeLab Solutions
http://changelabsolutions.org/publications/healthier-vending-municipalities
The New (AB)Normal:
http://makinghealtheasier.org/newabnormal
Rethink Your Drink, Partners for a Healthy City:
http://partnersforahealthycity.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Rethink-your-Drink-3.pdf
Sip All Day, Get Decay:
http://www.sipallday.org/
Videos:
Soda Guy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhKl-smK7NQ&feature=player_embedded
Juice Mom: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y1ZGj8va77k&feature=player_embedded
Post Game: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9COptVIrsg&feature=player_embedded
Soda Girl: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcLCYkbDRBI&feature=player_embedded
Soda Free Summer:
http://www.sodafreesummer.org/
Sugar-loaded Drinks – Sugar Calculator:
http://www.choosehealthla.com/eat-healthy/sugar-loaded-beverages/
You Wouldn’t Eat 22 Packs of Sugar. Why Are You Drinking Them?
http://www.choosehealthla.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Sugar-Loaded-Drinks_Soda1.jpg
www.healthynebraska.org
J
References
1. Artificial Sweeteners. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/healthydrinks/artificial-sweeteners/
2. The CDC Guide to Strategies for Reducing the Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages.
(2012). Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Guide. Retrieved from http://www.cdph.ca.gov/
SiteCollectionDocuments/StratstoReduce_Sugar_Sweetened_Bevs.pdf
3. Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010. (2010, December 1). Retrieved from http://www.health.gov/
dietaryguidelines/dga2010/DietaryGuidelines2010.pdf
4. Drewnowski, A, Rehm, CD, Constant, F. Water and beverage consumption among adults in the
United States: cross-sectional study using data from NHANES 2005–2010. BMC Public Health. Nov
2013; 13: 1068.
5. Healthy Beverage Implementation. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://noharm-uscanada.org/issues/uscanada/healthy-beverages-implementation
6. Inst. of Medicine [IOM], Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention, Solving the Weight of the
Nation 166-184; 190-20; and 303-308 (Dan Glickman et al. eds., 2012)
7. Model Healthy Beverage Vending Agreement. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://changelabsolutions.org/
publications/healthy-beverage-vending-agreement
8. Nutrition Environment Measures Suley (NEMS) lndividual Vending Machine Graphic. (n.d.).
Retrieved from http://www.nems-v.com/NEMS-VTools.html
9. Pan A, Hu FB. Effects of carbohydrates on satiety: differences between liquid and solid food. Curr
Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. Jul 2011;14(4):385-390.
10. Smart Snacks in School, USDA’s “All Foods Sold in Schools” Standards, http://www.fns.usda.gov/
sites/default/files/allfoods_flyer.pdf
11. Vartanian, LR, Schwartz, MB, Brownell, KD. Effects of Soft Drink Consumption on Nutrition and
Health: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Am J Public Health. Apr 2007; 97(4): 667–675.
12. Welsh JA, Sharma AJ, Grellinger L, Vos MB. Consumption of added sugars is decreasing in the
United States. Am J Clin Nutr. Sep 2011;94(3):726-734.
13. Woodward-LopezG, Kao J, Ritchie L. To what extent have sweetened beverages contributed to the
obesity epidemic? PublicHealthNutr. Mar 2011;14(3):499-509.
www.healthynebraska.org
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