Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Practice

Health & Safety
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Practice
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Manager, Health & Safety Centre of Excellence
Custodian
H&S Programs & Projects
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Program
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Practice
COMS
See COMS Standards
Document Number
CEN-EHS108
Version
3.6
Review Cycle
3 years
Revised Date
November 20, 2017
Issued Date
February 20, 2007
Version
Description
Date
Sign Off
Requester
Reviewer
Owner
3.5
Revised April 05,
2016
April 05,
2016
EHS Doc
Mgmt.
EHS Doc
Mgmt.
H&S
Programs
3.6
Multiple Revisions
Nov 20,
2017
EHS Doc
Mgmt.
Dir, H&S
Mgr., H&S
COE
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Practice
CEN-EHS108 | Version 3.6
Issued February 20, 2007 | Revised November 20, 2017
Table of Contents
1.0 Purpose ...........................................................................................................4
2.0 Scope...............................................................................................................4
3.0 Personal Protective Equipment Requirements .................................................4
3.1
Head Protection .......................................................................................... 4
3.1.1 Hard Hats......................................................................................... 4
3.1.1.1 Minimum Requiremets........................................................... 4
3.1.2 All-terrain (ATV), Off-road (UTV) and Snow Vehicle Helmets................... 5
3.1.3 Minimum Helmet Requirements........................................................... 5
3.1.4 Welding Helmets ............................................................................... 5
3.1.5 Bicycles ........................................................................................... 6
3.2
Eye Protection ............................................................................................ 6
3.2.1 Safety Eyewear ................................................................................. 6
3.2.2 Contact Lenses ................................................................................. 6
3.2.3 Prescription Safety Eyewear ............................................................... 6
3.2.4 Eyesafe Program – Cenovus Employees ............................................... 6
3.2.5 Task Specific Eye Protection ............................................................... 7
3.3
Body and Limb ............................................................................................ 7
3.3.1 Flame-Resistant Clothing.................................................................... 7
3.3.1.1 Flame-Resistant Undergarments ............................................. 8
3.3.1.2 Flame Resistant Clothing Care ................................................ 9
3.3.1.3 Flame-Resistant Rainwear...................................................... 9
3.3.2 Electrical Arc Flash Protective Clothing ................................................. 9
3.3.2.1 Arc Flash Protective Rainwear................................................. 9
3.3.3 Flame-Resistant Clothing Exceptions.................................................. 10
3.3.4 High Visibility Vests/Jackets.............................................................. 10
3.3.5 Hoods (hooded sweatshirts, jackets, parkas, coveralls) ........................ 10
3.3.6 Disposable Protective Clothing .......................................................... 11
3.3.7 Personal Flotation Devices ................................................................ 11
3.3.8 Winter Wear ................................................................................... 11
3.4
Foot Protection ......................................................................................... 11
3.4.1 Protective Footwear ......................................................................... 11
3.4.2 Anti-slip Traction Aids ...................................................................... 12
3.5
Hearing Protection ..................................................................................... 12
3.6
Hand Protection ........................................................................................ 12
3.6.1 Leather Glove ................................................................................. 12
3.6.2 Cotton Glove .................................................................................. 12
3.6.3 Impact Resistant Glove .................................................................... 12
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Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Practice
CEN-EHS108 | Version 3.6
Issued February 20, 2007 | Revised November 20, 2017
3.6.4 Chemical Resistant Glove ................................................................. 12
3.6.5 Cut Resistant Glove ......................................................................... 13
3.6.6 Anti-Vibration Glove ........................................................................ 13
3.6.7 Electrical Work Glove ....................................................................... 13
3.7
Respiratory Protection................................................................................ 13
3.8
Personal Gas Detection Monitors ................................................................. 13
3.9
Fall Protection ........................................................................................... 13
3.10 Electrical .................................................................................................. 13
3.11 Hot Fluid Handling ..................................................................................... 14
4.0 Roles and Responsibilities .............................................................................14
5.0 Training and Competency ..............................................................................15
5.1
Training ................................................................................................... 15
5.2
Competency Verification............................................................................. 15
6.0 Quality Assurance ..........................................................................................15
6.1
Performance Measurement ......................................................................... 15
6.2
Management of Change ............................................................................. 15
6.3
Practice Verification ................................................................................... 16
7.0 Glossary.........................................................................................................16
8.0 PPE Purchasing ..............................................................................................16
9.0 References.....................................................................................................17
9.1
External Documents .................................................................................. 17
9.2
Internal Documents ................................................................................... 18
List of Tables
Table 1: Roles and Responsibilities ............................................................................. 14
Table 2: Terms and Definitions .................................................................................. 16
Table 3: External Document References ...................................................................... 17
Table 4: Internal Document References ...................................................................... 18
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Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Practice
CEN-EHS108 | Version 3.6
Issued February 20, 2007 | Revised November 20, 2017
1.0
Purpose
The Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Practice defines the minimum regulatory
requirements and Cenovus-specific requirements for PPE that includes hard hats, hand
protection, body and limb protection, eye protection, hearing protection, respiratory
protective equipment (RPE), fall protection and electrical arc flash equipment.
2.0
Scope
This PPE Practice applies to all employees, contractors, and service providers working at
Cenovus worksites.
3.0
Personal Protective Equipment Requirements
3.1
Head Protection
3.1.1 Hard Hats
The use of hard hats is mandatory for all workers and visitors attending Cenovus
worksites where there is a risk of head injury. This includes office, warehouse, and
maintenance areas.
3.1.1.1
Minimum Requiremets
�
Type I, Class E helmet that meets or exceeds the following:
�
CAN/CSA-Z94.1-05 or Z94.1-15 (Industrial Protective
Headwear)
�
ANSI Z89.1-2003 (American National Standard for
Industrial Head Protection)
�
Metal and Stetson-type hard hats are not allowed
�
No painting of or structural modifications are allowed on the shell
of the hard hat
�
Any decals applied must be compatible with the surface material
and be known not to affect the integrity of the hard hat shell
�
Replace hard hats that have taken a blow, an electrical shock, or
are more than five years old
�
Hard hat suspensions should be inspected before each use and are
recommended to be replaced every 12 months or when wear and
damage are noticed
�
No items are to be stored between the hard hat shell and
suspension that might affect the proper function of the hard hat if
there was to be an impact to the suspension and hard hat
�
Winter accessories (e.g. liners, toques) or summer accessories
(e.g. welders beanies, bandanas) worn under the hard hat shall not
interfere with its fit, form and function
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CEN-EHS108 | Version 3.6
Issued February 20, 2007 | Revised November 20, 2017
�
Items such as hoodies and baseball caps or items that contain
metal parts are prohibited as they can affect the overall
performance of a hard hat
�
Where accessories are worn under the hard hat they must also
meet the requirements of section 3.3.1 Flame-Resistant Clothing
�
“Useful Life” of hard hat does not begin until hard hat is placed into
service
�
Note: In British Columbia, chin straps or other equally effective
means of retention must be used on safety headgear when
climbing from height exceeding 10 feet or are exposed to high
winds or other conditions that may cause loss of the headgear
3.1.2 All-terrain (ATV), Off-road (UTV) and Snow Vehicle Helmets
All workers who are required to operate an all-terrain vehicle (ATV), off-road vehicle
(UTV) or snow vehicle as a part of their job function are required to wear an
approved safety helmet whenever the vehicle is in operation.
3.1.3 Minimum Helmet Requirements
The helmet must meet or exceed the following standard as well as being
conspicuously marked stating it meets or exceed such standard:
�
CAN3-D230-M85 (Protective Headgear in Motor Vehicle Applications)
�
U.S.A. Federal Motor Vehicle Standard FMVSS 218 (Motorcycle helmets)
�
BSI Standard BS 6658: 05 (Specification for Protective Helmets for Vehicle
Users)
�
Snell Memorial Foundation Standard M2000 or 2005
�
Replacement of the helmet must be done immediately if:
o
There was a fall that resulted in an impact to the helmet
o
The helmet fits loose due to frequent use
o
There is physical damage to the helmet shell
3.1.4 Welding Helmets
�
Welding helmets or shields must be worn in combination with an approved
hard hat if there is a foreseeable danger to the worker’s head
OR
�
If it is impractical for the worker to utilize the combination headgear during a
particular work process then an alternative means of overhead protection is to
be established. If a welding helmet or shield is used by itself to complete a
process then approved industrial headgear must be worn immediately after
completing the work process and leaving the area
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Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Practice
CEN-EHS108 | Version 3.6
Issued February 20, 2007 | Revised November 20, 2017
3.1.5 Bicycles
At some Cenovus worksites bicycles are utilized for personnel movement. In these
cases a hard hat may be worn as long as a chin strap is utilized to avoid
dislodgement.
3.2
Eye Protection
3.2.1 Safety Eyewear
The use of safety or prescription safety glasses is mandatory for all workers and
visitors at a Cenovus worksite where there is a risk of the eye being injured or
irritated.
�
All workplace eye protection is required to meet or exceed the following
standards:
o
CSA Z94.3-07 (Eye and Face Protectors)
o
ANSI Z87.1-2003 Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face
Protection Devices
3.2.2 Contact Lenses
All workers who may be wearing contact lenses that could pose a potential hazard to
their eyes in the work environment (e.g. handling chemicals) are required to remove
their contact lenses and utilize alternative means of eye protection.
3.2.3 Prescription Safety Eyewear
All workers who are required to wear prescription eyewear are required to either
wear CSA approved safety glasses for over top of their prescription eyewear or
obtain approved prescription safety eyewear which meets the following standards:
�
CSA Z94.3-07 (eye and face protectors)
o
�
Note: only permanently-affixed or integrated side shields are now
recognized
ANSI Standard Z87, 1-2003 (Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and
Face Protection Devices), provided the lenses meet the requirements of CSA
Standard Z94.3-07
3.2.4 Eyesafe Program – Cenovus Employees
Cenovus’s protective eyewear program is a mandatory program offered to all
employees who wear prescription eyewear and are required to wear protective
eyewear as a part of their work function. Employees may obtain prescription safety
eyewear through the Alberta or Saskatchewan Eyesafe program.
For more information on the process, please reference the Eyesafe (OVC) Program
Standard.
All workplace prescription eye protection is required to meet or exceed the following
standards:
�
CSA Z94.3-07 (eye and face protectors)
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CEN-EHS108 | Version 3.6
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o
�
Note: only permanently-affixed or integrated side shields are now
recognized
ANSI Standard Z87, 1-2003 (Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and
Face Protection Devices), provided the lenses meet the requirements of CSA
Standard Z94.3-07
3.2.5 Task Specific Eye Protection
Specialty equipment may have to be sourced for tasks which require enhanced eye
and face protection, such as welding, grinding, chipping, hammering, handling
chemicals, pressure washing, hot fluid handling and other tasks where there is
potential for gases, liquids, or objects to strike the eye.
Where face shields are required to protect the worker from flying debris or liquids,
approved safety glasses or goggles must also be worn under the shield as a
secondary means of protection.
3.3
Body and Limb
All workers and visitors at a Cenovus worksite are required to dress in a manner
which minimizes the severity of or eliminates injuries. The clothing must be
appropriate to the hazards at the work site which may include but is not limited to
chemical exposure, rotating equipment, catch/pinch points, abrasions, heat sources,
frostbite, flash fires, explosive atmospheres, arc flashover, etc.
Garments must meet the minimum following expectations:
�
All outer garments whether fire-resistant or not must be long sleeve and full
leg length to ensure complete coverage of the arms, torso and legs
�
All outer garments must have high visibility stripes/bands permanently
attached to the garment. If permanently attached reflective striping is not
available, reflective vests or jackets shall be used
�
Torn or ragged clothing must not be worn
�
Dirty or soiled clothing that could be rendered ineffective due to
contamination with a destructive or toxic substance must be cleaned,
decontaminated or promptly replaced with a clean garment
�
Safety pants or chaps must be worn when using a chainsaw or performing
other tasks where there is a risk of a cut, puncture, irritation or abrasion to
the lower body. Note: In British Columbia, the leg protection devices must
meet the standards of the WorkSafeBC Standard – leg protective devices
3.3.1 Flame-Resistant Clothing
Cenovus staff and service providers are required to wear flame-resistant (FR)
garments as the outer most layer of clothing when conducting:
�
work at a live operational worksite (i.e. brownfield sites; drilling and
production sites) where flammable gases, vapours or liquids exist, are
produced, or are used in the execution of work activities
�
hot work at any worksite where a flash fire may occur
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Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Practice
CEN-EHS108 | Version 3.6
Issued February 20, 2007 | Revised November 20, 2017
3.3.1.1
Flame-Resistant Undergarments
Undergarments are recommended to be worn under flame-resistant
protective outerwear for an extra layer of protection in a flash fire
situation. The undergarment will provide a buffer zone for heat dissipation
if the FR outerwear has sustained heat from a flash fire. All
undergarments worn beneath flame-resistant protective outerwear must
be made of 100% natural materials such as wool or cotton or must be
constructed of flame-resistant materials. Synthetic materials such as
nylon and polyester are prohibited to be worn under flame-resistant
outerwear due to their melting properties which have been proven to
produce severe burn injuries in flash fire situations.
Garment materials which have a high potential to produce a static electric
spark must not be worn in environments where a flash fire hazard may
exist.
All flame-resistant clothing (not including rainwear or speciality arc flash
protective garments) worn on a Cenovus worksites must:
�
Be constructed of a minimum six ounce fabric weight
�
Have a primary closure systems (e.g. zippers, snaps) that will
continue to function after a flash fire
�
Be comfortable and non-restrictive. There should be a layer of air
between the outer fabric and undergarment to provide additional
insulation against thermal exposu
Meet also the requirements of all the following standards:
�
NFPA 2112-2007 Standard on Flame Resistant Garments for
Protection of Industrial Personnel Against Flash Fire
�
CAN/CGSB-155.20-2000 Workwear for Protection Against
Hydrocarbon Flash Fire
�
CSA Z96-15 High Visibility Safety Apparel Standard (FR rated CSA
Class 1, Level 2 side-by-side stripes/bands)
All Cenovus provided coveralls will also be required to meet the following:
�
The garment will be constructed of core materials such as DuPont®
Nomex IIIA, Nomex Multi-Hazard Protection (MHP), Westex
UltraSoft or GlenGuard FR or other equally effective, certified and
approved materials
�
The garment will be produced in Cenovus’s standard colour – Royal
Blue
�
Cenovus crest and name bar affixed to the garment
�
The garment must contain retro-reflective striping as per CSA
Z96.02-09 Class 1 high-visibility and flame-resistant application
requirements
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Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Practice
CEN-EHS108 | Version 3.6
Issued February 20, 2007 | Revised November 20, 2017
3.3.1.2
3.3.1.3
Flame Resistant Clothing Care
�
Follow the manufacturer’s laundry recommendations
�
Garment cleanliness is of extreme importance as any
contamination of the fabric will continue to burn (e.g. grease, oil
residues and hydrocarbons). Wash heavily soiled garments using
hot water temperature settings and less soiled with lower water
temperatures to retain garment colour
�
All garments must be maintained in their close to original
condition. Rips, tears and abrasions to the fabric are normal
consequences of use and they should be repaired as soon as
possible with the appropriate FR material
�
Laundry products such as chlorine bleach, fabric softeners and
starch should not be used as they only affect the textiles flame
resistance properties
Flame-Resistant Rainwear
All flame-resistant protective rainwear worn on Cenovus worksites must
comply with the following standards:
�
�
ASTM F2733-09 Standard Specification for Flame Resistant
Rainwear for Protection Against Flame Hazards (Protection against
flash fire only)
CSA Z96-15 High Visibility Safety Apparel Standard (Class 1
stripe/band compliance and flame-resistant retroreflective
requirements)
3.3.2 Electrical Arc Flash Protective Clothing
Cenovus staff and service providers are required to wear arc rated (AR) garments as
the outer most layer of clothing when conducting:
�
electrical work at any worksite where an electrical arc flash may occur
�
electrical circuits or conductors are energized and arc flash hazardous
conditions exist
Undergarments must be worn under arc flash protective outerwear. All
undergarments worn beneath arc flash protective outerwear must be made of 100%
natural materials such as wool or cotton or must be constructed of flame-resistant
materials. Synthetic materials such as nylon and polyester are absolutely prohibited
to be worn under arc flash protective outerwear.
3.3.2.1
Arc Flash Protective Rainwear
All flame-resistant or arc flash protective rainwear worn on Cenovus
worksites must comply with the following standards:
�
�
ASTM F1891-12 Standard Specification for Arc and Flame Resistant
Rainwear (Protection against electrical arc flashover only)
CSA Z96-15 High Visibility Safety Apparel Standard (Class 1
stripe/band compliance and flame-resistant retroreflective
requirements)
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CEN-EHS108 | Version 3.6
Issued February 20, 2007 | Revised November 20, 2017
For detailed information on electrical arc flash protective requirements,
please refer to CENP126 Electrical Work Practice Brochure.
3.3.3 Flame-Resistant Clothing Exceptions
The following exceptions can apply:
�
For Cenovus representatives only, there may be situations where time
constraints, short notice, or other factors negate using the Cenovus supplied
FR clothing available on “The Store”, FR clothing may be purchased locally by
a Cenovus approved vendor providing that it meets the requirements of this
practice
�
Welders must wear flame-resistant clothing in addition to appropriate welding
garments and accessories
�
Accessory garments that are worn over primary flame-resistant clothing, such
as high visibility vests, aprons, lab coats, smocks or disposable coveralls (this
does not include rain suits or chemical suits) must be designed, as a
minimum, to be flame-retardant. Materials that are inherently flame-resistant
are still preferred, but flame-retardant treated materials that are
manufactured to be a secondary flame-resistant garment are permitted
3.3.4 High Visibility Vests/Jackets
A high visibility garment is required to be worn in work areas where there is
movement of vehicle or equipment.
If this garment is being worn within a Cenovus worksite that is considered a live
operational worksite (see section 3.3.1 for definition), the vest/jacket material,
including the high visibility striping, must be constructed of flame-resistant material
that meets the following standards:
�
CSA Z96-15 (High Visibility Safety Apparel Garment Classes and Illustrations)
– Class 1, 2, or 3
�
NFPA 2112-2007 (Standard on Flame Resistant Garments for Protection of
Industrial Personnel Against Flash Fire)
�
CAN/CGSB-155.20-2000 (Workwear for Protection Against Hydrocarbon Flash
Fire)
3.3.5 Hoods (hooded sweatshirts, jackets, parkas, coveralls)
Specific hooded clothing is permitted on Cenovus worksites provided the work scope
and hazard assessment indicate it is safe to wear them. The hazards associated with
hooded garments to consider include (but are not limited to): entanglement in
rotating equipment, flammability (see section 3.3.1), visibility (mobile equipment),
and interference with other safety equipment (hard hats). Hooded sweatshirts
“hoodies” are not allowed on any Cenovus worksite.
Examples of workwear with hoods allowed on site used for the protection of a worker
are:
�
Winter parkas with a detachable hood when working in extreme cold
temperatures where a hard hat liner or balaclava is not sufficient
�
Disposable coveralls with a hood when working with airborne particulates
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CEN-EHS108 | Version 3.6
Issued February 20, 2007 | Revised November 20, 2017
�
Chemical suits with a hood when working with hazardous chemicals
�
Rainwear with a hood to protect worker from water based mixtures when
working outside in the rain, washing, cleaning, steaming or handling of hot
fluids
If the worker could also be exposed to a flash fire where hydro carbons exist then
the flotation device is to be constructed of fire-resistant materials.
A personal flotation device need not be worn if other safety measures are in place to
protect the worker from the hazard of drowning such as guardrails, fall arrest or fall
restraint systems.
3.3.6 Disposable Protective Clothing
When selecting disposable protective clothing, consideration must be given to FR
requirements, nature of contamination (e.g. asbestos, refractory ceramic fibres,
lead, NORM’s, etc.) sizing and disposal requirements
3.3.7 Personal Flotation Devices
When working around water bodies when there is a foreseeable danger that the
worker could be exposed to the hazard of drowning a personal flotation device must
be worn. The flotation devices must meet the following standards:
�
CGSB Standard CAN/CGSB-65.7M88, Lifejackets, Inherently Buoyant Type
�
CGSB Standard CAN/CGSB-65.11-11M88, Personal Flotation Device
3.3.8 Winter Wear
All winter wear used for flash fire or arc flash protection must meet the requirements
of section 3.3.1 Flame-Resistant Clothing.
3.4
Foot Protection
3.4.1 Protective Footwear
The use of safety footwear is mandatory for Cenovus employees and contractors
while attending a Cenovus worksite. Depending on the hazards present at the
worksite, the appropriate footwear that best suites the workplace hazards must be
selected as per the hazard assessment.
At a minimum, all footwear must meet the following requirements:
�
CAN/CSA Z195-02 (Protective Footwear) OR ASTM Standard F2413-05,
Specification for Performance Requirements for Protective Footwear
�
Visible green triangular label attached in accordance with the CSA standard
�
At a minimum, a 15cm (6inch) boot height to protect and support the ankle
�
Soles will be acid and oil resistant
�
No ventilation holes will be allowed below the ankle bone
�
Metatarsal protection (protection to the top part of the foot) if a hazard exists
of injuring the top of the foot where regular safety footwear is insufficient
�
Approved cut resistant protective footwear when operating a chainsaw
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3.4.2 Anti-slip Traction Aids
If the hazard assessment indicates slippery ground conditions on snow or ice then
anti-slip traction aids should be part of your PPE selection.
3.5
Hearing Protection
Hearing protection is required for all Cenovus employees and contractors who work
in areas with a noise level that exceeds 85 dBA in Alberta and British Columbia or 80
dBA in Saskatchewan.
All hearing protection equipment used must meet the following requirements:
�
CAN/CSA Z94.2-02 (Hearing Protection Devices – Performance, Selection,
Care and Use)
�
Hearing protection is to be used in conjunction with engineering and
administrative controls
�
Only CSA Class A hearing protection is allowed on Cenovus worksites
For more information on hearing protection, please reference CEN-EHS042 Hearing
Conservation Practice.
3.6
Hand Protection
If there is the risk of a worker’s hand becoming injured on the worksite, workers
must be fitted with the appropriate hand protection. Depending on the level of
protection needed, some hand protection items may not have a CSA rating and
therefore the hand protection should be chosen based on the application and hazard
assessment.
3.6.1 Leather Glove
A leather glove is a durable and flexible material commonly used for reducing the
risk of abrasion. The degree of protection depends on the grade of leather used to
manufacture the glove.
3.6.2 Cotton Glove
Cotton gloves are generally used as an insulator for mild low and high temperatures.
The tasks appropriate for a cotton glove depends on the gauge of fabric used as well
as additional material added to the glove, such as Kevlar ®.
3.6.3 Impact Resistant Glove
Impact resistant gloves help reduce or eliminate the impact of injuries such as
crushed hands, bruises and broken bones. Extra protection added to the back side of
the glove is meant to stop or buffer an impact before it can reach the hand.
3.6.4 Chemical Resistant Glove
Chemical resistant gloves provide protection against specific chemicals. A chemical
resistant glove is not resistant to all chemicals. The manufacturer specifications
should also be referenced and reviewed in conjunction with the products safety data
sheet (SDS) when determining a suitable glove type during the hazard assessment.
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3.6.5 Cut Resistant Glove
There are many types of cutting tasks on the jobsite and many types of gloves that
will provide hand protection. Use the following ANSI Standard as a guide for cut
resistant glove selection:
�
ANSI/ISEA 105-2016 Cut Protection Classifications
3.6.6 Anti-Vibration Glove
Jobs involving repetitive impact and vibration can lead to carpal tunnel syndrome
and other debilitating injuries. If you are handling pneumatic tools, rivet guns,
jackhammers or tampers, anti-vibration-dampening gloves with impact
resistance will help reduce the risk of injury.
3.6.7 Electrical Work Glove
For detailed information on the electrical work personal protective equipment
requirements, please reference CENP126 Electrical Work Practice Brochure.
3.7
Respiratory Protection
The selection of appropriate respiratory protection equipment (RPE) must be
determined by a suitable hazard assessment. All RPE must meet the following
standards:
�
In Alberta, CAN/CSA Z94.4-02 (Selection, Use and Care of Respirators)
�
In British Columbia, CAN/CSA Z94.4-93 (Selection, Use and Care of
Respirators)
For more information on the selection and usage of RPE, please reference CENEHS010 Respiratory Protection Code of Practice.
For more detailed information on selection and usage of RPE for Benzene, please
reference Benzene Management Code of Practice.
3.8
Personal Gas Detection Monitors
As part of performing working or visiting Cenovus worksites personal gas detection
monitors may have to be worn if atmospheric hazards have the potential to exist.
3.9
Fall Protection
For information on the Cenovus fall protection requirements, please reference
CEN-EHS038 Fall Protection Practice.
3.10
Electrical
For information on the Cenovus electrical PPE requirements beyond those covered in
section 3.3.2 Electrical Arc Flash Protective Clothing, please reference CENP126
Electrical Work Practice Brochure.
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3.11
Hot Fluid Handling
For hot fluid handling and sampling hot fluids where a sampling cabinet is not
available additional PPE is to worn where temperatures exceed 60ºC. Minimum
requirements include but may not be limited to:
�
Rubber boots
�
Fire resistant rainwear that cover over the rubber boots (not tucked in)
�
Insulated temperature resistant gloves
�
Face shield /safety glasses combination
For more information on PPE requirements when handling hot fluids, please
reference:
4.0
�
CEN-EHS8213 Flammable and Combustible Liquids Handling Practice
�
CEN-EHS110795 Process Fluid Sampling Practice
Roles and Responsibilities
The following responsibilities apply to this practice:
Table 1: Roles and Responsibilities
Role
Description
Cenovus personnel who direct
workers that are required to
wear PPE
�
�
�
�
Workers who wear PPE
�
�
�
Contractors
�
�
�
Health & Safety Solutions
Uncontrolled when printed
Ensure workers wear PPE that is correct for
the hazard
Ensure workers properly use and wear the
PPE
Ensure PPE is in a condition to perform the
function for which is was designed
Ensure workers are trained in the correct
use, care, limitations and assigned
maintenance of the PPE
Must use and wear the appropriate PPE
properly as specified in accordance with the
training and instruction received
Must inspect the PPE before using it
Must not use PPE that is unable to perform
the function for which it is designed
Ensure workers wear PPE that is correct for
the hazard
Ensure workers properly use and wear the
PPE
Ensure PPE is in a condition to perform the
function for which is was designed
Review PPE practice at a minimum every 3 years
© Cenovus | All rights reserved
Page 14 of 19
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Practice
CEN-EHS108 | Version 3.6
Issued February 20, 2007 | Revised November 20, 2017
5.0
Training and Competency
Competency describes the knowledge and skills required to successfully perform the
technical aspects of a job. A worker must be able to demonstrate competency in safely
performing work tasks or using equipment. All Cenovus staff must be adequately trained in
the usage, limitations, and maintenance of any personal protective equipment items
assigned while working at Cenovus.
5.1
Training
It is expected that all personnel involved in the use of personal protective equipment
will have training and the appropriate competency for how to select, how to fit and
wear it, how to adjust it for maximum protection and how to maintain the PPE to
perform their roles.
5.2
Competency Verification
Where applicable competency is to be validated through formal, theory-based
evaluations and practical skill demonstration. Personal Protective Equipment training
may include but is not limited to courses such as H2S Alive, Fall Protection, Gas
Detection Equipment and Respirator Fit Testing depending on the tasks to be
performed. Practical skill assessments of task completion and equipment use must
be conducted by a competent supervisor, mentor or instructor.
Workers may be required to attended additional training sessions or complete further
on-the-job training if performance deficiencies are identified through formal
assessments.
If the worker is a Cenovus employee or a Cenovus representative then all written
evaluations and practical skill assessments must be documented and retained in the
worker’s LMS file.
6.0
Quality Assurance
6.1
Performance Measurement
Compliance with this practice and program effectiveness shall be assessed through
program assessments and internal audits, or other measurement criteria as specified
in the COMS Assurance Standard. Measurement can also be accomplished through
the tracking of appropriate Key Performance Indicators (KPI).
Business functions or departments impacted by this practice must include compliance
and program effectiveness verifications in their business assurance program.
Performance will be monitored and reported within the responsible departments at
least every three years.
Health & Safety Solutions will review Cenovus-wide program KPIs at a minimum
every three years in conjunction with program review and update activities.
6.2
Management of Change
Proposed changes to this practice can be directed to H&S Programs and Projects.
Uncontrolled when printed
© Cenovus | All rights reserved
Page 15 of 19
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Practice
CEN-EHS108 | Version 3.6
Issued February 20, 2007 | Revised November 20, 2017
6.3
Practice Verification
The document owner will complete and document reviews of this practice, as follows:
�
At minimum once every three years
�
If there is a significant regulation or industry best practice change that indicates
the need for review
�
If an incident investigation indicates the causes were related to unclear or
inadequate written instructions described within this practice
If frequent and multiple variances are required due to operational needs, the
reason(s) will be investigated and the document owner will determine if there is a
business need to update the practice.
If submitted MOC requests indicate gaps or significant improvement opportunities,
the document owner will determine if there is a business need to update the
practice.
7.0
Glossary
Definitions and acronyms for safety documents are described in CEN-EHS243, H&S
Definition and Acronym Standard. The following definitions and acronyms are specific to this
document:
Table 2: Terms and Definitions
Term
8.0
Definition
ANSI
American National Safety Institute
ASTM
American Society for Testing and Materials
CGSB
Canadian General Standards Board
CSA
Canadian Standards Association
Fire or Flame Resistant
Material that deters fire from spreading but also resists
ignition. Fire resistant material will not continue to burn
once the fire source is removed and the material will
self-extinguish
Fire Retardant
Material that is treated or coated with a chemical
substance to slowdown combustion and often prevent
fire from spreading
NFPA
National Fire Protection Association
PPE Purchasing
For Cenovus representatives only “The Store” should be used as the primary source for
personal protective equipment as the product contained within are offered at a competitive
price and meet the requirements of this standard. For items that are not offered on “The
Store”, local sourcing should be done as per the Functional Team’s policy while ensuring any
purchased goods meet the requirements of this standard.
Uncontrolled when printed
© Cenovus | All rights reserved
Page 16 of 19
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Practice
CEN-EHS108 | Version 3.6
Issued February 20, 2007 | Revised November 20, 2017
9.0
References
9.1
External Documents
The following external documents support this practice:
Table 3: External Document References
Document Type
Document Title
ANSI
ANSI Z89.1-2003 (American National Standard for
Industrial Head Protection)
ANSI
ANSI/ISEA 105-2016 (Cut Protection Classifications)
ASTM
ASTM F2733-09 (Standard Specification for Flame
Resistant Rainwear for Protection Against Flame
Hazards)
ASTM
ASTM F1891-12 (Standard Specification for Arc and
Flame Resistant Rainwear)
ASTM
ASTM Standard F2413-05 (Specification for Performance
Requirements for Protective Footwear)
BSI Standard
BS 6658: 05 (Specification for Protective Helmets for
Vehicle Users)
CGSB
CAN/CGSB-65.7M88 (Lifejackets, Inherently Buoyant
Type)
CGSB
CAN/CGSB-65.11-11M88 (Personal Flotation Device)
CSA
CAN/CSA-Z94.1-05 or Z94.1-15 (Industrial Protective
Headwear)
CSA
CSA Standard CAN3-D230-M85 (Protective Headgear in
Motor Vehicle Applications)
CSA
CSA Z94.3-07 (Eye and Face Protectors)
CSA
CAN/CGSB-155.20-2000 (Workwear for Protection
Against Hydrocarbon Flash Fire)
CSA
CEN/CGSB-155.21-2000 (Recommended Practices for
the Provision and Use of Workwear for Protection Against
Hydrocarbon Flash Fire)
CSA
CSA Z96-15 (High Visibility Safety Apparel Garment
Classes and Illustrations)
Uncontrolled when printed
© Cenovus | All rights reserved
Page 17 of 19
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Practice
CEN-EHS108 | Version 3.6
Issued February 20, 2007 | Revised November 20, 2017
Document Type
9.2
Document Title
CSA
CAN/CSA Z195-02 (Protective Footwear)
CSA
CAN/CSA Z94.2-02 (Hearing Protection Devices – Performance,
Selection, Care and Use)
CSA
CAN/CSA Z94.4-02 (Selection, Use and Care of Respirators)
NFPA
NFPA 2112-2007 (Standard on Flame Resistant Garments for
Protection of Industrial Personnel Against Flash Fire)
Regulatory
Alberta OHS Code (2009) – Part 2, Part 9, Part 18
Regulatory
Saskatchewan OHS Regulation – Part 3, Part 7, Part 8
Regulatory
British Columbia OHS Regulation Part 7, Part 8
Snell Memorial
Foundation
Standard M2000 or 2005 or 2010
US Federal Motor Vehicle
Standard
FMVSS 218 (Motorcycle helmets)
Internal Documents
The following Cenovus documents support this practice:
Table 4: Internal Document References
Document Type or
Number
Document Title
Policy
Corporate Responsibility Policy
Framework
COMS Standards
Policy
Enterprise Risk Management Policy
Practice
Hazard Assessment and Control Practice
Practice
Fall Protection Practice
Practice (brochure)
Electrical Work Practice
Practice
Flammable and Combustible Liquids Handling Practice
Practice
Process Fluid Sampling Practice
Practice
Eyesafe (OVC) Program Standard
Uncontrolled when printed
© Cenovus | All rights reserved
Page 18 of 19
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Practice
CEN-EHS108 | Version 3.6
Issued February 20, 2007 | Revised November 20, 2017
Document Type or
Number
Document Title
Practice
Hearing Conservation Practice
Practice
Respiratory Protection Equipment Code of Practice
Practice
Benzene Management Code of Practice
Glossary
H&S Definition and Acronym Standard
Uncontrolled when printed
© Cenovus | All rights reserved
Page 19 of 19