Ecodesign Preparatory Studies
Lot 25: Non-Tertiary Coffee Machines
1st Stakeholder Meeting
Paris – June 23rd 2010
A study being conducted for DG ENER by BIO Intelligence Service
and ARTS
Agenda of the meeting
10:00 – 10:30
Welcome, “Tour de table”, Introduction to the Ecodesign
Directive, schedule update
10:30 – 11:15
Task 1 - Definition: Presentation and discussion
11:15 – 11:30
COFFEE BREAK
11:15 – 12:00
12:15 – 13:00
Task 2 – Economic and Market Analysis: Presentation and
discussion
Task 3 – Consumer Behaviour: Presentation and
discussion
13:00 – 14:00
LUNCH BREAK
14:00 – 14:30
Task 4 – Technical Analysis: Presentation and discussion
14:30 – 15:00
Task 5 – Base Case Analysis: Preliminary discussion
15:00 – 15:30
Next Steps – Tasks 6, 7 and 8 and Conclusion
2
ENER Lot 25 team
BIO Intelligence Service:
(Shailendra Mudgal)
Benoît Tinetti
Perrine Lavelle
Ian Kuwahara
Lorcan Lyons
ARTS:
(Alain Cornier)
Charlotte Sannier
Marie-Aude Jean-Jean
Commission project officer:
Villö Lelkes
3
BIO Intelligence Service
Pioneer in quantification tools and support for decision-making
Specialists in the measurement environmental and health quality of products and
services in France and Europe
At the interface of the environment and products, a large range of services for public
and private decisions makers
Life cycle assessment
Environmental labelling of products
Eco-design of products
Greening the supply chain
Assessment of public policies
Energy
Agri-food
Construction
Retail
Industry
Transport
Waste
Services
4
BIO’s activities
Since 1989,
our references
include:
5
ARTS
ARTS is a Research & Technological Organization.
ARTS is a non profit organization, created in 1973, whose
aim is to develop strong relationships between the
industrial world and Arts&Métiers ParisTech.
Some key figures:
• Annual turnover : 10 M€
• 130 employees associated with more than 350 Arts&Métiers
ParisTech’s teachers and research staff.
• Over 600 industrial contracts per year.
6
Ecodesign Directive (1/4)
Directive 2009/125/EC of the European Parliament, Framework
Directive for the setting of ecodesign requirements for Energyrelated Products (ErP)
Promotion of sustainable development through free movement of
energy using products, environmental protection and increased
security of energy supply
Better regulation: efficient decision making, consultation and self
regulation
“Energy-related product means any good that has an impact on energy
consumption during use which is placed on the market and/or put into
service”
This Directive supersedes the former EuP Directive (2005/32/EC)
which covered only Energy-using Products.
7
Ecodesign Directive (2/4)
Scope of the Directive:
All Energy-related Products (except transport)
Specific product categories for ecodesign requirements
Measures of action:
Setting of ecodesign requirements (Implementing Measures)
8
Ecodesign Directive (3/4)
Implementing Measures
could be proposed for product categories which:
represent a significant volume of products placed on the EU
market (> 200.000 units/year),
involve a significant environmental impact, and
present a significant potential for improvement
are to be based on
environmental assessments / relevant product characteristics
and functionality
products and technologies available on the market should be
taken as reference
IM should preserve the interests of industry, consumers and
other stakeholders
9
Ecodesign Directive (4/4)
From a Preparatory Study to Implementing Measures
1
European Commission
Working Plan
3
Consultation Forum
Impact
assessment
4
Draft
Implementing
Measure
Regulatory Committee
Working
Document
5
EU Parliament
Consultants
2
Eco-design
Preparatory Study
Adoption
Stakeholder Consultation
10
Ecodesign preparatory
studies
2007: 5+1 lots DG ENER (completed)
lot 15
solid fuel small
boilers and combi-boilers
combustion installations
water heaters
lot 16
laundry dryers
personal computers
lot 17
vacuum cleaners
imaging equipment
lot 18
complex set-top boxes
consumer electronics (TV) *
lot 19
domestic lighting *
standby and off-mode losses *
+
simple set-top boxes *
battery chargers and external power supplies *
office lighting *
2008: 8 lots DG ENER
(public) street lighting *
lot 20
individual room heating
residential room conditioning appliances
lot 21
central heating (hot air)
ovens
electric motors 1-150 kW, pumps, circulators, fans * lot 22
lot 23
hobs and grills
commercial refrigerators and freezers
lot 24
washing machines, etc. PRO
domestic refrigerators and freezers *
lot 25
coffee machines
domestic dishwashers and washing machines
lot 26
network standby
2006: 14 lots DG ENER (completed)
lot 1
lot 2
lot 3
lot 4
lot 5
lot 6
lot 7
lot 8
lot 9
lot 10
lot 11
lot 12
lot 13
lot 14
2008: 3 lots DG ENTR
lot 1
commercial refrigerators and freezers
lot 2
transformers (power and distribution)
lot 3
DVD players, video projectors, etc.
2009: 3 lots DG ENTR
lot 4
industrial furnaces and ovens
lot 5
machine tools
lot 6
air-co and ventilation systems
* Implementing Measures already in place
11
Methodology
(1/2)
A uniform approach adopted for all the lots, Methodology for Ecodesign of Energy-using Products - MEEuP:
Tasks 1 to 5
Present
situation
Tasks 6 to 8
Improvement
potential
12
Methodology
(2/2)
Definition
Econ. and Market Analysis
Consumer Behaviour
Technical Analysis
Assessment of Base-case
BAT – BNAT analysis
Improvement Potential
Macro Analyses
(Policy, Impact,...)
Task 1
Task 2
Task 3
Task 4
Task 5
Task 6
Task 7
Task 8
13
13
Task 1
Task 1 - Definition:
Define the product category and define the system boundaries of the
‘playing field’ for eco-design
Identify the harmonised test standards and additional sector-specific
procedures for product-testing
Identify the existing relevant legislation, voluntary agreements, and
labelling initiatives at the EU and MS level, as well as outside Europe
1.1
1.2
1.3
Product category and performance assessment
Test Standards
Existing legislation (including labelling and voluntary programs)
14
Task 2
Task 2 – Economic & market analysis:
Place the product group within the total of EU industry and trade policy
Provide market and cost inputs for the EU-wide environmental impact
of the product group
Provide insight in the latest market trends
Provide a practical dataset of prices and rates to be used in a Life Cycle
Cost (LCC) calculation
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
Generic economic data
Market and stock data
Market trends
Consumer expenditure base data
15
Task 3
Task 3 – Consumer Behaviour and Local Infrastructure:
Quantify relevant user-parameters that influence the environmental
impact during product-life and that are different from Standard test
conditions
Identify barriers and restrictions to possible eco-design measures, due
to social, cultural or infra-structural factors
3.1
3.2
3.3
Real life efficiency
End-of-life behaviour
Local infra-structure
16
Task 4
Task 4 – Technical Analysis Existing Products:
General technical analysis of current products on the EU market during
the whole life cycle
Objective is to capture the market on the whole, both “good” and “bad”
products
Functional analysis of the system to which the product belongs (e.g.
heating/ventilation), including a rough estimate of the overall impacts
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
Production phase
Distribution phase
Use phase (product)
Use phase (system)
End-of-life phase
Recommendations on mandates for measurement standards
17
Task 5
(1/9)
Task 5 – Base-Cases:
Building on the results of Tasks 1 – 4,
“one or two average EU product(s)” or product category(ies) have to be
defined as the “Base-case” for the whole of the EU-27
On these Base-Cases most of the environmental and Life Cycle Cost
analyses will be built throughout the rest of the study
The Base-Case is a conscious abstraction of reality
(5.0 Base case definition)
5.1 Product-specific inputs
5.2 Base-Case Environmental Impact Assessment
5.3 Base-Case Life Cycle Costs
5.4 EU Totals
5.5 EU-27 Total System Impact
18
Task 5
(2/9)
Task 5 – Base-Cases:
Base-Cases analysed using EcoReport Tool
Input from previous tasks:
(1) Bill of materials (BOM)
Example BOM: “Imaginary product”
Nr
Product name
Date Author
Imaginary average stove
MATERIALS Extraction & Production
Description of component
Pos
nr
27/02/2008 BIO
Weight
in g
Category
Material or Process
Click &select
select Category first !
1
2 Iron structure
3 Front "window"
200000.0
1000.0
3-Ferro 23-Cast iron
7-Misc. 54-Glass for lamps
4
19
Task 5
(3/9)
Task 5 – Base-Cases:
Input from previous tasks:
(2) Manufacturing phase inputs – Percentage of sheetmetal scrap
Example: “Imaginary product”
Pos
nr
MANUFACTURING
Description
Weight
Percentage
in g
A djus t
201 OEM Plastics Manufacturing (fixed)
0
202 Foundries Fe/Cu/Zn (fixed)
0
203 Foundries Al/Mg (fixed)
0
204 Sheetm etal Manufacturing (fixed)
1
205 PWB Manufacturing (fixed)
0
206 Other m aterials (Manufacturing already included)
20
207 Sheetm etal Scrap (Please adjust percentage only)
0
20%
Task 5
(4/9)
Task 5 – Base-Cases:
Input from previous tasks:
(3) Use phase inputs - Energy consumption
Example: “Imaginary product”
Pos
USE PHASE
nr
Description
unit
211 Product Life in years
Subtotals
15 years
Electricity
212 On-mode: Consumption per hour, cycle, setting, etc.
0 kWh
213 On-mode: No. Of hours, cycles, settings, etc. / year
0 #
214 Standby-mode: Consumption per hour
0 kWh
215 Standby-mode: No. Of hours / year
0 #
216 Off-mode: Consumption per hour
0 kWh
217 Off-mode: No. Of hours / year
0
0
0
0 #
TOTAL over Product Life
0.00 MWh (=000 kWh)
65
Heat
218 Avg. Heat Power Output
15 kW
219 No. Of hours / year
730 hrs.
220 Type and efficiency (Click & select)
78.0%
TOTAL over Product Life
591.32 GJ
16 77-Wood logs, higher eff.
74
Task 5
(5/9)
Task 5 – Base-Cases:
Input from previous tasks:
(4) End-of-life
Example: “Imaginary product”
Pos
DISPOSAL & RECYCLING
nr
Description
unit
Subtotals
Substances released during Product Life and Landfill
Disposal: Environmental Costs perkg final product
231 Landfill (fraction products not recovered) in g en %
10050
232 Incineration (plastics & PWB not re-used/recycled)
0 g
233 Plastics: Re-use & Recycling ("cost"-side)
0 g
Re-use, Recycling Benefit
5%
88-fixed
91-fixed
92-fixed
% of plastics
fraction
in g
234 Plastics: Re-use, Closed Loop Recycling (please edit%)
0
235 Plastics: Materials Recycling (please edit% only)
0
9%
4
236 Plastics: Thermal Recycling (please edit% only)
0
90%
72
237 Electronics: PWB Easy to Disassemble ? (Click&select)
0
238 Metals & TV Glass & Misc. (95% Recycling)
190950
1%
YES
4
98
fixed
22
Task 5
(6/9)
Task 5 – Base-Cases:
Input from previous tasks:
(5) Economic / market inputs
Example:
“Imaginary product”
nr
A
B
C
INPUTS FOR EU-Totals & economic Life Cycle Costs
Description
Product Life
Annual sales
EU Stock
unit
15
1.5
13
Product price
Installation/acquisition costs (if any)
Fuel rate (gas, oil, wood)
Electricity rate
Water rate
Aux. 1: None
Aux. 2 :None
Aux. 3: None
Repair & maintenance costs
2400
1000
11.1
N
Discount rate (interest minus inflation)
Present Worth Factor (PWF) (calculated automatically)
5.0%
10.38
O
Overall Improvement Ratio STOCK vs. NEW, Use Phase
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
420
years
mln. Units/year
mln. Units
Euro/unit
Euro/ unit
Euro/GJ
Euro/kWh
Euro/m3
Euro/kg
Euro/kg
Euro/kg
Euro/ unit
%
(years)
1.00
23
Task 5
(7/9)
Task 5:
Nr
Life cycle Impact per product:
0
Imaginary example stove
Date Author
27/02/2008
Life Cycle phases -->
PRODUCTION
Material Manuf.
Resources Use and Emissions
Results per
product:
“Imaginary
product”
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Materials
Bulk Plastics
TecPlastics
Ferro
Non-ferro
Coating
Electronics
Misc.
Total weight
DISTRI-
Total
BIO
END-OF-LIFE*
USE
BUTION
Disposal
TOTAL
Total
Recycl.
unit
g
g
g
g
g
g
g
g
0
0
200000
0
0
0
1000
201000
0
0
10000
0
0
0
50
10050
0
0
200000
0
0
0
1000
201000
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
debet
687
0
0
0
12321
0
credit
-11
0
0
0
0
0
697
0
0
0
12321
0
784408
309
275
865
320831
6
51
-1
52
8331
101
3
85
201
0
894
-1
0
0
0
0
0
102
3
85
201
0
894
63604
175185
2283
624
24113
48540
57
3
0
0
57
3
241
9
0
0
190000
0
0
0
950
190950
see note!
8
9
10
11
12
13
Other Resources & Waste
Total Energy (GER)
of which, electricity (in primary MJ)
Water (process)
Water (cooling)
Waste, non-haz./ landfill
Waste, hazardous/ incinerated
Emissions (Air)
14 Greenhouse Gases in GWP100
15 Ozone Depletion, emissions
16 Acidification, emissions
17 Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC)
18 Persistent Organic Pollutants (POP)
19 Heavy Metals
PAHs
20 Particulate Matter (PM, dust)
Emissions (Water)
21 Heavy Metals
22 Eutrophication
23 Persistent Organic Pollutants (POP)
2016
40
269
732
63085
0
439
264
4
125
1376
0
2455
304
272
857
64461
0
212
24
237
g SO2 eq.
g
ng i-Teq
mg Ni eq.
mg Ni eq.
g
649
24
1200
397
3
2800
105
0
0
0
0
16
754
24
1200
397
3
2816
mg Hg/20
g PO4
182
5
0
0
182
6
MJ
MJ
ltr
ltr
g
g
kg CO2 eq.
mg R-11 eq.
ng i-Teq
607
1
0
0
278
6
780649
3
3
9
243772
0
37
8005
negligible
112
10
2
14
25
1709
62636
175148
996
12
24086
43120
0
0
negligible
2
0
24
Task 5
Allows to identify the most significant phases of the life-cycle and
components/functionalities in terms of environmental impacts
(8/9)
Split up of the impacts per life cycle
phase is nearly the same for all basecases = Materials acquisition, use,
and end-of-life are all of relevancy.
Regarding the modes both, on-mode
and active standby need further
attention, whereas off-mode is of
minor relevancy.
25
25
Task 5
(9/9)
Task 5:
Example Life Cycle Cost results per product and per product stock:
“Imaginary product”
Table . Life Cycle Costs per product and Total annual expenditure (2005) in the EU-25
Imaginary average stove
LCC new product
Item
D
Product price
E
Installation/ acquisition costs (if any)
1000 €
1500 mln.€
F
Fuel (gas, oil, wood)
5728 €
7175 mln.€
F
Electricity
0 €
0 mln.€
G
Water
0 €
0 mln.€
H
Aux. 1: None
0 €
0 mln.€
I
Aux. 2 :None
0 €
0 mln.€
J
Aux. 3: None
K
Repair & maintenance costs
Total
2400 €
total annual consumer
expenditure in EU25
3600 mln.€
0 €
0 mln.€
291 €
364 mln.€
9419 €
12639 mln.€
26
Task 6
Task 6 – Technical Analysis BAT:
Technical analysis of advanced technologies (“BAT candidates”)
Provides part of the input for Task 7 (identification of BAT)
6.1 State of the art in applied research for the product
(prototype level)
6.2 State of the art at component level
(prototype, test and field trial level)
6.3 State of the art of best existing product technology outside the EU
27
Task 7
(1/2)
Task 7 – Improvement potential:
Identify design options, their monetary consequences in terms of Life
Cycle Cost for the consumer and their environmental costs and benefits
Life Cycle Costs: indicate whether design solutions might negatively or
positively impact the total EU consumer’s expenditure over the total product
life (purchase, running costs, etc.)
Pinpoint the solution with the Least Life Cycle Costs (LLCC) and
the Best Available Technology (BAT)
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
Options
Impacts
Costs
Analysis LLCC and BAT
Long-term targets (BNAT) and systems analysis
28
Task 7
(2/2)
Task 7 – Improvement potential:
Example of options analysis considering a key environmental indicator
& LCC: 2600
70
Primary
Energy
Consumption
[MJ]
2400
60
2200
50
2000
40
1800
30
1600
20
1400
10
1200
0
Base
Case
1
2
2+3
4
2+4
Options
2+3+4
6
2+6
LLCC
Life
Cycle
Costs
[€]
7
BAT
29
Task 8
(1/2)
Task 8 – Scenario, Policy, Impact and Sensitivity analysis:
Summarise and total the outcomes of all previous tasks
Look at suitable policy means to achieve the potential e.g. implementing
LLCC as a minimum and BAT as a promotional target, using legislative or
voluntary agreements, labeling and promotion
Scenarios 1990 – 2020 quantifying the improvements that can be achieved
vs. a Business-as-Usual scenario
Impacts on consumers and industry
Robustness of the outcome
8.1 Policy and scenario analysis
8.2 Impact analysis industry and consumers
8.3 Sensitivity analysis of the main parameters
30
Task 8
(2/2)
Task 8 – Scenario, Policy, Impact and Sensitivity analysis:
Example scenarios:
60
BAU
Option: LLCC
Total
energy
consumption
PJ .
50
Option: BAT
40
30
20
2005
2010
2015
2020
31
Schedule for Lot 25
1st Stakeholder meeting
Definition
Econ. and Market Analysis
Consumer Behaviour
Technical Analysis
Assessment of Base-case
BAT – BNAT analysis
Improvement Potential
Macro Analyses
(Policy, Impact,...)
Task 1
Task 2
Task 3
Task 4
Task 5
Task 6
Task 7
Task 8
32
32
Agenda of the meeting
10:00 – 10:30
Welcome, “Tour de table”, Introduction to the Ecodesign
Directive, schedule update
10:30 – 11:15
Task 1 - Definition: Presentation and discussion
11:15 – 11:30
COFFEE BREAK
11:15 – 12:00
12:15 – 13:00
Task 2 – Economic and Market Analysis: Presentation and
discussion
Task 3 – Consumer Behaviour: Presentation and
discussion
13:00 – 14:00
LUNCH BREAK
14:00 – 14:30
Task 4 – Technical Analysis: Presentation and discussion
14:30 – 15:00
Task 5 – Base Case Analysis: Preliminary discussion
15:00 – 15:30
Next Steps – Tasks 6, 7 and 8 and Conclusion
33
Task 1.1 – Findings Lot 25
1.1. Product Definition
In this study coffee machines are defined as machines that heat water, with
or without an independent source of energy, and pass it through the
coffee, so as to produce a hot drink. This coffee can be dispensed in various
containers, such as cups, pots or in the machine itself.
PRODCOM code 29.71.24.30
Domestic electric coffee or tea makers (including percolators)
Modes of use
Ready mode
Standby mode
Off mode
Other functions
Auto-power down (auto-off) / auto-power-down delay (switch-off delay)
Energy saving mode
34
Task 1.1 – Findings Lot 25
1.1. Product Definition
Functional Unit
The functional unit of a coffee machine is basically the part which produces
the coffee. Life Cycle Analyses found in literature propose functional units
which are structured following three main aspects:
Coffee production
e.g. to produce a 20cL cup of coffee
Keeping warm function
e.g. to maintain a cup of coffee at a serving temperature (55°C)
for one hour
Stand-by function
e.g. maintaining stand-by functionality for one hour
In this study, the warming function has been distinguished from the stand-by
function because appliances do not present both functions.
35
Task 1.1 – Findings Lot 25
1.1. Product Definition
In the scope
The following product types are considered to be within the scope of the
Lot 25 study:
Drip / filter coffee machines
Zero, or very little steam pressure to extract flavors from
coffee beans
Percolation typically induced with steam entrainment, no
mechanical pressure action
36
Task 1.1 – Findings Lot 25
1.1. Product Definition
In the scope
The following product types are considered to be within the scope of the
Lot 25 study:
Espresso machines
High pressure flavor extraction (~15 bars)
Mechanical pump pressure
37
Task 1.1 – Findings Lot 25
1.1. Product Definition
In the scope
The following product types are considered to be within the scope of the
Lot 25 study:
Low pressure pod / pad machines
Low pressure coffee flavor extraction (~3 bars)
Typically mechanically driven pressure
38
Task 1.1 – Findings Lot 25
1.1. Product Definition
In the scope
The following product types are considered to be within the scope of the
Lot 25 study:
Electric or traditional percolator, moka pot, vacuum coffee
machine, Neapolitan flip coffee pot
Low to medium pressure with steam or buoyant forces driving
the flavor extraction
Independent heat source not necessary at this point in the
study to be included
39
Task 1.1 – Findings Lot 25
1.1. Product Definition
Overview of the main product groups to be covered in Lot 25
LOT 25 – Non-tertiary Coffee machines
Manual
versions
Manual
percolator
Manual
moka pot
Manual
vacuum coffee
machine
Pod filter coffee
machines
Drip/filter coffee machines
Traditional coffee machines
Traditional filter coffee
maker, using ground coffee
Electric
versions
Insulated
container
Electric moka
pot
Electric vacuum
coffee machine
Steam/non-pump coffee
espresso machines
Combo filter
coffee maker
Electric
percolator
Non insulated
container
Insulated
carafe
Non-insulated
carafe
1 insulated
cup
1 non-insulated
cup
2 insulated
cups
2 non-insulated
cups
Espresso coffee machines
Capsule
espresso
machines
Pump espresso
machine, semi
automatic
Automatic
espresso machines
Pump espresso
machine,
automatic
Pump espresso
machine, fully
automatic
Single boiler, dual
use machines
Single boiler, heat
exchanger machines
Dual boiler
machines
40
Task 1.1 – Findings Lot 25
1.1. Product Definition
Out of the scope
The following product types are considered NOT to be within the scope
of the Lot 25 study:
Kettles
Tertiary coffee machines
Manual coffee machines,
without any independent
heat source or direct heat
application
41
Task 1.1 – Comments
1.1. Product Definition
Questions
Any complementary items to mention in/out of the scope of
the study?
Products in use that are non-compliant with public safety
standards should be in scope of study?
Are there any other parameters which should be considered
for classification?
Any comments?
42
Task 1.2 – Findings Lot 25
1.2. Test Standards
Standards at international level
International Electro-Technical Commission (IEC):
IEC 60661 - Methods for measuring the performance of electric
household coffee makers
IEC 62301 - Household electrical appliances - Measurement of
standby power
43
Task 1.2 – Findings Lot 25
1.2. Test Standards
Standards at European Community level
EN 13248:2002 - Coffee makers for domestic use with an independent
heat source - Definitions, requirements and test methods
Standards at Member State level
Germany: RAL-UZ 136 – Espresso machines
Germany: DIN 10764 – 10768 - Analysis of coffee and coffee products
Third Country Standards
Switzerland: CECED / FEA
Switzerland: S.A.F.E. – Topten
USA: ANSI / AHAM; CM-1-2007
Russia: Gosudarstvennyy Standart – State Standards; GOST 20888-81
TC59X/WG15 is currently working to mandate a new performance standard
44
for coffee machines
Task 1.2 – Findings Lot 25
1.2. Test Standards
Focus: Calculation method CECED / FEA
Criteria assessment tool energy label Espresso machines
Version: 11 May 2009
Declaration for energy use of Coffee Machines
Machine brand:
Date:
4.4 Ready to use time
60 min measurement
4.5 Standby time
According to IEC 62301
4.6 Heating up after
standby
4.7 "off" mode time
One time heating up
20
1
55,8 55,8
20
0
0%
55,8
0
0%
Measured result for function
20
Benchmark result based on calibration
1
Relative performance per item
4.3 Steaming
Sum of 1xsingle and 1x doubles of
40g and same for 120g.
Avrg of 3 measurements
Calculated real consumption [Wh]
4.2 Brewing coffee
Function available? (yes=1; no=0)
Ref
Task
Procedure
4.1 Heating up from "off" One time heating up
Calculated std consumption [Wh]
Signature:
Benchmark for function [Wh]
Prepared by:
Results reflect energy consumption in Wh over 24 hr use.
Weight based on use frequency
Type number:
1
15
15
15
0
0%
5
15
75
75
0
0%
11
2
22
22
0
0%
2
16
32
32
0
0%
Tcoffee =
76
According to IEC 62301
8
1
8
8
0
0%
Avrg Cup=
80
Twater,brewing
23
(Automatic) rinsing
Measured as part of heating up
1
3
3
1
3
0
DeltaTsteam
40
Grinding
Minor impact, no measurement
1
2
2
1
2
0
233
0
1
Corrections
Total consumption
Calibration inputs:
°C
g
°C
K
0%
Tolerances shall not exceed limits as given in the implementing directive 2005/32/EC on standby energy
Tolerances shall not exceed 10% in case not covered by this directive.
Tolerances include testlab inaccuracy and production tolerances
45
Task 1.2 – Findings Lot 25
1.2. Test Standards
Focus: Calculation method for standard coffee machine use by S.A.F.E Topten International Group
46
Task 1.2 – Findings Lot 25
1.2. Test Standards
Main test standards relevant for coffee machines
Reference
Title
"Cookware - Coffee makers for domestic use with an independent heat source - Definitions,
requirements and test methods"
EN 13248
Contents: Scope, Normative references, Terms and definitions, Requirements, Tests, Marking and
labelling, Instructions for use and maintenance
“Methods for measuring the performance of electric household coffee makers”
EN 60661 (IEC )
Defines the main performance characteristics which are of interest to the user and describes the
standard methods for measuring these characteristics.
“Method for Measuring Performance of Household Coffee Makers”
ANSI/AHAM CM1-2007
CECED/FEA
S.A.F.E. and
Topten
Establishes a uniform, repeatable procedure for measuring specified product characteristics of
household electric coffee makers.
“Measurement method for the determination of the energy consumption of Espresso machines”
Applicable to all manual and automatic espresso and multipurpose hot beverage machines
characterized by the fact that they are based on high pressure (> 5 bar maximum working
pressure) espresso technology and on a cup by cup system.
“Electrical Consumption of Coffee Machines: Measuring Method”
Suggests a measuring method for several operating modes: ready, standby, etc.
47
Task 1.2 – Comments
1.3. Test Standards
Questions
Do you agree with this main list of test standards related to
energy performance?
Is the CECED/FEA measurement method representative of
the real use of high pressure espresso machines and
applicable at EU level?
Is the CECED/FEA measurement method applicable to other
types of coffee machines (low pressure and drip filter)?
Any comments?
48
Task 1.3 – Findings Lot 25
1.3. Existing Legislation
At EU level:
Scope
Legislation
Environmental Legislation
Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive
2002/96/EC (category 2. Small household appliances)
Entire Product
Restriction of the use of certain Hazardous Substances in
electric and electronic equipment Directive 2002/95/EC
(category 2. Small household appliances)
REACH Regulation No 1907/2006
Energy Legislation
Standby and off mode
power consumption
Commission Regulation (EC) No 1275/2008
of 17 December 2008
Legislation related to Safety
General Product Safety Directive 2001/95/EC
Low Voltage Equipment Directive 73/23/EEC
Entire product
Materials and articles intended to come into contact with
foodstuffs – Directive 89/109/EEC
Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Directive 89/336/EEC
49
Task 1.3 – Findings Lot 25
1.3. Existing Legislation
Legislation and Agreements at Member State level
France - NF Environnement - NF 397 – Electric Filter Coffee Machines
for Domestic Use
Germany - Blue Angel (for automatic single-serve coffee makers)
Finland, Norway and Sweden - Nordic Swan scheme (for coffee filters)
Third Country Legislation and Initiatives
Switzerland – L’EtiquetteEnergie (Energy Label)
Australia’s Standby Power Strategy 2002-2012
Korea - The “e-Standby Program”
Korea - Eco-Label (for domestic electric coffee makers)
Russia - GOST 20888-81 Standard (for electric household coffee makers)
50
Task 1.3 – Findings Lot 25
1.3. Existing Legislation
Focus – Switzerland (CECED / FEA voluntary initiative)
51
Task 1.3 – Comments
1.3. Existing Legislation
Questions
Do you agree with this list?
Any complementary legislation to integrate?
Any comments?
52
Agenda of the meeting
10:00 – 10:30
Welcome, “Tour de table”, Introduction to the Ecodesign
Directive, schedule update
10:30 – 11:15
Task 1 - Definition: Presentation and discussion
11:15 – 11:30
COFFEE BREAK
11:15 – 12:00
12:15 – 13:00
Task 2 – Economic and Market Analysis: Presentation and
discussion
Task 3 – Consumer Behaviour: Presentation and
discussion
13:00 – 14:00
LUNCH BREAK
14:00 – 14:30
Task 4 – Technical Analysis: Presentation and discussion
14:30 – 15:00
Task 5 – Base Case Analysis: Preliminary discussion
15:00 – 15:30
Next Steps – Tasks 6, 7 and 8 and Conclusion
53
Task 2.1 – Data required
Task 2 – Economic and market analysis
2.1 Generic economic data
EU-27 Production
Extra-EU Trade
Intra-EU Trade
Apparent EU-consumption = Production + Imports – Exports
Ideally, data should be in physical volume and in money units,
including estimations per country divided on coffee machine type
(drip/filter or espresso, etc.)
54
Task 2.2 – Data required
Task 2 – Economic and market analysis
2.2 Market and stock data
Current stock
Past and estimation of future stock
Current sales
Annual sales growth rate
Replacement sales / New sales (derived from annual sales)
Average product life (both in standard and real life conditions)
Ideally, data should be in physical volume and in money units (for
sales data), including estimations per Member State.
55
Task 2.3 – Data required
Task 2 – Economic and market analysis
2.3 Market trends
Distribution structure (directly from the manufacturer to the
end-user, via a distributor, other)
Market structure (number of major manufacturers, and their
share of the EU-27 sales)
Production structure (major EU-27 countries of production,
number of manufacturers in these countries)
General trends in product-design and product-features (from a
marketing point of view)
Duration of the product redesign cycle
56
Task 2.4 – Data required
Task 2 – Economic and market analysis
2.4 Consumer expenditure base data
Average consumer (end-user) price
Installation costs, if any
Repair and maintenance costs, if any
Consumable costs
Disposal costs
57
Task 2.1
General Economic Data
Prodcom 2007 data:
Units sales totals for EU-27:
Domestic electric coffee
Production
or tea makers (including
Quantity
percolators)
EU27 TOTALS
7 364 594
Imports
Quantity
Exports
Quantity
Apparent Consumption
Quantity
(Prod + Imp - Exp)
22 732 962
2 199 948
27 897 608
Imports
Value
Exports
Value
Apparent Consumption
Value
(Prod + Imp - Exp)
Value totals for EU-27:
Domestic electric coffee
Production
or tea makers (including
Value
percolators)
EU27 TOTALS
369 328 860 563 559 550 182 463 230
750 425 180
58
Task 2.2
Market Analysis - Sales
Source: Topten (www.topten.info), Gfk 2007
59
Task 2.2
Market Analysis - Sales
Source: Topten (www.topten.info), Gfk 2007
60
Task 2.2
Market Analysis - Sales
Source: Topten (www.topten.info), Gfk 2007
61
Task 2.2
Market Analysis - Sales
Prices of electric coffee machines in France
(Source: GfK Retail and Technology Conférence PEM GIFAM Benoit LEHUT-Julie KUNLIN, 16 September 2008, Petit Electroménager;
Objectif : Création de Valeur)
62
Task 2.2
Market Analysis - Sales
Proportions of units sold by categorization in Task 1:
Source: Topten (www.topten.info), Gfk 2007
63
Task 2.2
Market Analysis - Lifetime
First proposal for lifetimes:
Lot 25 Product Category
Lifetime
Filter/drip
10
Pod / pad
6
Espresso capsules
6
Espresso trad. steam / pump / semi auto
10
Espresso full-auto
10
64
Task 2.2
Market Analysis - Lifetime
New proposal for lifetimes based on the industry’s feedback:
Lot 25 Product Category
Lifetime
Filter/drip
6
Pod / pad
6
Espresso capsules
5
Espresso trad. steam / pump / semi auto
7
Espresso full-auto
7
65
Task 2.2
Market Analysis – Sales
66
Task 2.2
Market Analysis - Stock
Lot 25 Product Category
Stock 2010
(units)
Filter/drip
58 800 000
Pod / pad
20 300 000
Espresso capsules
11 500 000
Espresso trad. steam / pump / semi auto
9 000 000
Espresso full-auto
5 500 000
67
Task 2.3
Market Analysis – Sales Trends
68
Task 2.3
Market Analysis – Sales Trends
Sales
Lot 25 Product Category
2010
2012
2015
2020
Filter drip
9 240 000
9 260 000
8 630 000
6 480 000
Soft pad
3 530 000
3 750 000
4 090 000
4 750 000
Hard capsule espresso
3 010 000
3 770 000
5 110 000
7 510 000
Espresso (trad and semi)
1 160 000
1 040 000
900 000
900 000
810 000
900 000
1 040 000
1 140 000
Espresso (fully-auto)
69
Task 2.3
Market Analysis – Sales Trends
70
Task 2.3
Market Analysis – Stock Trends
Stock
Lot 25 Product Category
2010
2012
2015
2020
Filter drip
58 820 000 57 120 000 54 500 000 45 710 000
Soft pad
20 320 000 21 420 000 22 840 000 26 480 000
Hard capsule espresso
11 450 000 15 240 000 21 220 000 32 390 000
Espresso (trad and semi)
9 010 000
8 290 000
7 320 000
6 310 000
Espresso (fully-auto)
5 550 000
5 820 000
6 360 000
7 520 000
71
Task 2.3
Market Analysis – Stock Trends
72
Task 2.4
Consumer Expenditures
Purchase prices:
Lot 25 Product Category
Filter/drip
Pod / pad
Espresso capsules
Espresso trad. steam / pump / semi
auto
Espresso full-auto
Average
Price (EUR)
35
80
150
300
600
73
Task 2.4
Consumer Expenditures
Category
Cost items
Units
Value for Lot 25 Study
35 - 600
Purchase
Purchase price PP
€/product
Use
Electricity rate
€/kWh
Use
Water rates
€/m3
Use
Ground coffee
€/cup of coffee
Use
Coffee filter
€/product
0.03
Use
Coffee pods – soft
€/product
0.15
Use
Coffee pods – hard
€/product
0.30
Use
Interest-inflation
rate
%
4.0
0.166
2.64
0.07 – 0.11
74
Task 2 – Comments
2. Economic and market analysis
Questions
Are lifetime estimates more accurate?
Market data (past and future trends) have significant impact
Are there new technology trends foreseeable in the range of
years of this study?
Any comments?
75
Agenda of the meeting
10:00 – 10:30
Welcome, “Tour de table”, Introduction to the Ecodesign
Directive, schedule update
10:30 – 11:15
Task 1 - Definition: Presentation and discussion
11:15 – 11:30
COFFEE BREAK
11:15 – 12:00
12:15 – 13:00
Task 2 – Economic and Market Analysis: Presentation and
discussion
Task 3 – Consumer Behaviour: Presentation and
discussion
13:00 – 14:00
LUNCH BREAK
14:00 – 14:30
Task 4 – Technical Analysis: Presentation and discussion
14:30 – 15:00
Task 5 – Base Case Analysis: Preliminary discussion
15:00 – 15:30
Next Steps – Tasks 6, 7 and 8 and Conclusion
76
Task 3: Consumer Behaviour
and Local infrastructure
Objectives
Quantify relevant user-parameters influencing the use phase of the coffee
machine
Identify actual consumer behaviour in maintenance and end-of-life
Identify barriers and restrictions to possible eco-design measures
77
Task 3: Consumer Behaviour
and Local infrastructure
Switching behaviour at home:
78
Task 3: Consumer Behaviour
and Local infrastructure
Any electric espresso
machine
Auto cup by cup
Manual cup by cup
Ready made doses
Any other coffee
machine
Low pressure cup
cup-bycup
Jug type
Switching behaviour at home according to the type of machine:
2902
845
951
1106
1173
471
702
Switches off automatically
19%
38%
10%
12%
17%
14%
19%
In the evening
8%
11%
5%
8%
2%
3%
1%
After 'coffee times'
12%
18%
8%
11%
5%
6%
4%
After each use
55%
27%
73%
60%
70%
72%
69%
Never
6%
5%
4%
8%
5%
5%
6%
Don't know
1%
0%
1%
1%
1%
0%
1%
ALL
79
Task 3: Consumer Behaviour
and Local infrastructure
Switching behaviour at work:
80
Task 3: Consumer Behaviour
and Local infrastructure
Any electric espresso
machine
Auto cup by cup
Manual cup by cup
Ready made doses
Any other coffee
machine
Low pressure cup
cup-bycup
Jug type
Switching behaviour at work according to the type of machine:
596
244
86
266
607
180
427
Switches off automatically
21%
31%
20%
12%
15%
26%
10%
In the evening
39%
32%
38%
47%
17%
18%
16%
After 'coffee times'
4%
3%
7%
4%
15%
7%
19%
After each use
11%
5%
23%
13%
45%
39%
47%
Never
20%
21%
8%
22%
5%
8%
4%
Don't know
5%
8%
3%
2%
3%
2%
4%
ALL
81
Task 3: Consumer Behaviour
and Local infrastructure
Assumed use pattern of the coffee machine over the whole product
lifetime
82
Task 3: Consumer Behaviour
and Local infrastructure
End-of-life management
All producers of coffee machines are obliged by the WEEE directive
to take responsibility for the collection and treatment of their
product for a fee. The customer might give his coffee machine to the
municipal recycling authority or take it back to the reseller.
Possible barriers to Ecodesign
Buying decision: focus on first price
Lack of available information
83
Task 3 – Comments
3. Consumer Behaviour and Local Infrastructure
Questions
Consensus on user behaviour patterns for performance
testing
Any comments?
84
Agenda of the meeting
10:00 – 10:30
Welcome, “Tour de table”, Introduction to the Ecodesign
Directive, schedule update
10:30 – 11:15
Task 1 - Definition: Presentation and discussion
11:15 – 11:30
COFFEE BREAK
11:15 – 12:00
12:15 – 13:00
Task 2 – Economic and Market Analysis: Presentation and
discussion
Task 3 – Consumer Behaviour: Presentation and
discussion
13:00 – 14:00
LUNCH BREAK
14:00 – 14:30
Task 4 – Technical Analysis: Presentation and discussion
14:30 – 15:00
Task 5 – Base Case Analysis: Preliminary discussion
15:00 – 15:30
Next Steps – Tasks 6, 7 and 8 and Conclusion
85
Task 4: Technical Analysis of
Existing Products
Objectives
Technical analysis of existing coffee machines on the EU-market
Key parameters : Bill of materials and resources consumption during
product life
General inputs for the definition of the base cases in Task 5
86
Task 4: Technical Analysis of
Existing Products
Base case selection
A different base case for major product categories sold on the
market is the main driving factor for selecting base cases
The base cases selected must best represent the broadest categories
of the non-tertiary coffee maker market
Technical differences can justify the distinction of a new base case
such as significant differences in the energy use, materials used, and
process for making coffee
87
Task 4: Technical Analysis of
Existing Products
Base case selection
1. Drip filter coffee machine
2. Soft pad coffee machine (low pressure, e.g. Senseo)
3. Hard cap coffee machine (high pressure, e.g. Nespresso)
4. Espresso coffee maker
5. Fully automatic espresso machine
88
Task 4: Technical Analysis of
Existing Products
Base case selection
The improvement potential of the product’s environmental impacts
is also a consideration that must be used to distinguish a base case.
Moka pots and other products not directly consuming energy
themselves do not have a base case
Electric percolators and electric moka pots were not selected as
their stock at EU-27 level is very low compared to other nontertiary coffee machine types (80 000 machines in 2008).
Other functionalities such as automatic on/off options will be
modelled through base cases as they are important, however they
will not justify the distinction of base cases.
89
Task 4: Technical Analysis of
Existing Products
•
Filter drip machine
–
–
–
–
•
Housing
Plate unit
Electric circuit
Water circuit
Soft pad machine
–
–
–
–
–
Housing
Percolation system
Button system
Electric circuit and resistance
Pump system
90
Task 4: Technical Analysis of
Existing Products
•
Hard cap espresso machine
–
–
–
–
•
Housing
Percolator capsule system
Electric and resistance system
Pump system
Espresso maker
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Housing
Percolation system
Pump system
Control system
Resistance system
Steam system
Filter holder system
91
Task 4: Technical Analysis of
Existing Products
Energy Consumption (based on EN 60661)
92
Task 4: Technical Analysis of
Existing Products
Maintenance
Ave. Number
coffee per
week
Less than 7
From 7 to 20
Over 20
Soft water
(<19°th)
Hard water
(<19-30°th)
Very hard
water (<30°th)
Once a year
Every 4 months
Every 4 months
Every 8 months
Every 3 months
Every 2 months
Every 6 months
Every 2 months
Every month
Filter drip
Soft pad
Espresso maker
Power (W)
Time for one
descaling (h)
Consumption
for one
descaling (Wh)
1340
1120
1380
0,17
0,17
0,21
227,8
190,4
289,8
93
Task 4: Technical Analysis of
Existing Products
End-of-Life (1/2)
WEEE status-quo
In 2005, 40% of WEEE arising in the EU 27 (consumer electronics
only) has been collected and treated (WEEE Review Study, UNU
2007)
It is not known, where the remaining 60% end up: Some of the
appliances will be stored at home (which just shifts disposal to a
later point in time), some might go for second hand use in
countries outside the EU 27. Assuming that the remaining 60% end
up (sooner or later, inside EU 27 or outside) in the municipal
household waste
In the EU 27 47% of municipal household waste is landfilled.
94
Task 4: Technical Analysis of
Existing Products
End-of-Life (2/2)
WEEE status-quo
Pos
DISPOSAL & RECYCLING
nr
Description
unit
Subtotals
Substances released during Product Life and Landfill
227 Refrigerant in the product (Click & select)
1-none
0 g
228 Percentage of fugitive & dumped refrigerant
0%
229 Mercury (Hg) in the product
0 g Hg
230 Percentage of fugitive & dumped mercury
0%
Disposal: Environmental Costs perkg final product
231 Landfill (fraction products not recovered) in g en %
232 Incineration (plastics & PWB not re-used/recycled)
149
234 Plastics: Re-use, Closed Loop Recycling (please edit%)
88-fixed
1342 g
91-fixed
149 g
92-fixed
233 Plastics: Re-use & Recycling ("cost"-side)
Re-use, Recycling Benefit
5%
% of plastics
fraction
in g
15
1%
4
235 Plastics: Materials Recycling (please edit% only)
134
9%
4
236 Plastics: Thermal Recycling (please edit% only)
1342
90%
72
237 Electronics: PWB Easy to Disassemble ? (Click&select)
238 Metals & TV Glass & Misc. (95% Recycling)
0
1409
YES
98
fixed
95
Task 4: Technical Analysis of
Existing Products
Questions
Are there further best practices for maintenance of coffee
machines?
How do older machines perform in performance tests verses
new machines?
Any comments?
96
Agenda of the meeting
10:00 – 10:30
Welcome, “Tour de table”, Introduction to the Ecodesign
Directive, schedule update
10:30 – 11:15
Task 1 - Definition: Presentation and discussion
11:15 – 11:30
COFFEE BREAK
11:15 – 12:00
12:15 – 13:00
Task 2 – Economic and Market Analysis: Presentation and
discussion
Task 3 – Consumer Behaviour: Presentation and
discussion
13:00 – 14:00
LUNCH BREAK
14:00 – 14:30
Task 4 – Technical Analysis: Presentation and discussion
14:30 – 15:00
Task 5 – Base Case Analysis: Preliminary discussion
15:00 – 15:30
Next Steps – Tasks 6, 7 and 8 and Conclusion
97
Task 5: Definition of Base
Case
Objectives
Assessment of average EU products, the so called “base cases”
A base case is “a conscious abstraction of reality”
The description of the Base Cases is the synthesis of the results of Tasks
1 to 4
Most of the environmental and life cycle cost analysis are built on these
Base Cases throughout the rest of the study and it serves as the pointof-reference for Task 6 (technical analysis of BAT), Task 7 (improvement
potential), and Task 8 (policy analyses)
98
Task 5: Definition of Base
Case
Methodology (1/2)
EcoReport tool
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
material
Bulk Plastics
LDPE
HDPE
LLDPE
PP
PS
EPS
HI-PS
PVC
SAN
ABS
TecPlastics (incl. Fillers, reinforcement, additives)
PA 6
PC
PMMA
Epoxy
Rigid PUR
Flex PUR
Talcum filler
E-glass fibre
Aramid fibre
Ferro metals
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
38
39
40
41
Ferro metals
St sheet galv.
St tube/profile
Cast iron
Ferrite
Stainless 18/8 coil
Non ferro metals
Al sheet/extrusion
Al diecast
Cu winding wire
Cu wire
Cu tube/sheet
CuZn38 cast
ZnAl4 cast
MgZn5 cast
Coating / plating (per g coating)
pre-coating coil
powder coating
Cu/Ni/Cr plating
Au/Pt/Pd
41 Au/Pt/Pd
Electronics
42 LCD per m2 scrn
43 CRT per m2 scrn
44 big caps & coils
45 slots / ext. ports
46 large IC
47 small IC
48 SMD/ LED's avg.
49 PWB 1/2 lay 3.75kg/m2
50 PWB 6 lay 4.5 kg/m2
51 PWB 6 lay 2 kg/m2
52 Solder SnAg4Cu0.5
Miscellaneous
54 Glass for lamps
55 Bitumen
56 Cardboard
57 Office paper
58 Concrete
99
Task 5: Definition of Base
Case
Methodology (2/2)
Task 5: Definition of Base
Case
Example base case 1: Drip filter coffee machine
Preliminary inputs:
6 year lifetime (10 year previous)
Electricity consumption: 2000 cups per year, (0.125L)
Electricity consumption: 1000 cups kept warm for 2 hours per year
Electricity consumption: 7300 hours of off mode consumption per year
276 L water per year
13.8kg coffee beans per year
0.35kg coffee filter material per year
35 EUR installation cost
BOM for production inputs
101
Task 5: Definition of Base
Case
Life cycle cost inputs:
nr
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
INPUTS FOR EU-Totals & econom ic Life Cycle Costs
Description
Product Life
Annual sales
EU Stock
Product price
Installation/acquisition costs (if any)
Fuel rate (gas, oil, w ood)
Electricity rate
Water rate
Aux. 1: None
Aux. 2 :None
Aux. 3: None
Repair & maintenance costs
unit
6
9,24
58,82
35
0
0
0,166
2,64
12
33
4,0%
N
Discount rate (interest minus inflation)
Present Worth Factor (PWF) (calculated automatically)
O
Overall Improvement Ratio STOCK vs. NEW, Use Phase
1,00
M
5,24
years
mln. Units/year
mln. Units
Euro/unit
Euro/ unit
Euro/GJ
Euro/kWh
Euro/m3
Euro/kg
Euro/kg
Euro/kg
Euro/ unit
%
(years)
102
Task 5: Definition of Base
Case
Env. Imp. Assessment (1/5)
Base Case 1: Drip Filter coffee machine
103
Task 5: Definition of Base
Case
Env. Imp. Assessment (2/5)
Base Case 1
Materials acquisition is clearly dominating the total environmental impacts in
the categories:
Waste, non-hazardous / landfill
Heavy metals emissions to air and to water (mainly from)
Eutrophication
Manufacturing is not dominating any of the categories.
Distribution is dominating :
Particulate Matter emissions to air
104
Task 5: Definition of Base
Case
Env. Imp. Assessment (3/5)
Base Case 1
The use phase is dominating (>70%) :
Total Energy, and electricity
Water (process)
Waste, non haz.
VOC / POP / PAHs
Greenhouse Gases
Acidification
End-of-life impacts are dominating in categories :
Waste, hazardous / incinerated
Particulate Matter emissions to air
105
Task 5: Definition of Base
Case
Env. Imp. Assessment (4/5)
Base Cases: Comparison
Correlations are stable
but absolute values differ…
106
Task 5: Definition of Base
Case
Env. Imp. Assessment (5/5)
Base Cases : Comparison
Global Warming Potential, whole life cycle
(1) Drip filter coffee machine
193 kg CO2-eq.
(2) Soft pad coffee machine
234 kg CO2-eq.
(3) Hard cap espresso machine
136 kg CO2-eq.
(4) Espresso maker
201 kg CO2-eq.
107
Task 5: Definition of Base
Case
Life cycle costs
Base Case 1
Life cycle cost results:
Products
LCC new product
Item
D
Product price
E
total annual consum er
expenditure in EU25
35 €
323 mln.€
Installation/ acquisition costs (if any)
0 €
0 mln.€
F
Fuel (gas, oil, w ood)
0 €
0 mln.€
F
Electricity
32 €
355 mln.€
G
Water
4 €
43 mln.€
H
Aux. 1: None
868 €
9741 mln.€
I
Aux. 2 :None
61 €
679 mln.€
J
Aux. 3: None
0 €
0 mln.€
K
Repair & maintenance costs
0 €
0 mln.€
999 €
11141 mln.€
Total
Aux. 1: coffee; Aux. 2: filters
108
Task 5: Definition of Base
case
Questions
Are the 5 base-cases representative of the current EU market?
According to which measurement method the electricity
consumption should be specified?
What maintenance costs should be taken into consideration for
the calculation of the LCC?
Any comments?
109
Agenda of the meeting
10:00 – 10:30
Welcome, “Tour de table”, Introduction to the Ecodesign
Directive, schedule update
10:30 – 11:15
Task 1 - Definition: Presentation and discussion
11:15 – 11:30
COFFEE BREAK
11:15 – 12:00
12:15 – 13:00
Task 2 – Economic and Market Analysis: Presentation and
discussion
Task 3 – Consumer Behaviour: Presentation and
discussion
13:00 – 14:00
LUNCH BREAK
14:00 – 14:30
Task 4 – Technical Analysis: Presentation and discussion
14:30 – 15:00
Task 5 – Base Case Analysis: Preliminary discussion
15:00 – 15:30
Next Steps – Tasks 6, 7 and 8 and Conclusion
110
Next actions
Revise the Task reports 1-3
Standards and Legislation (Task 1)
Sales and Stocks until 2020 (Task 2)
User patterns (Task 3)
Agreement on base-cases and energy consumption per base-case based
on measurement method agreed
2nd stakeholder meeting date to be defined
111
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