one of the major south korean corporations chooses lilla´s opus third

A PUBLICATION FOR THE COFFEE MARKET
Roller Grinder
3G Roaster
ONE OF THE MAJOR SOUTH
KOREAN CORPORATIONS CHOOSES
LILLA´S OPUS THIRD GENERATION
TECHNOLOGY
ISSUE #9 - WWW.LILLAROASTERS.COM
SEE PAGE 2
BRAZILIAN SPECIALITY COFFEE MARKET
PAGE 3
TECHNICAL OUTLOOK
PAGE 4
Very
1
2
3
4
5
6
Emphasis on Reduction of
acidity
acidy
Lightest Body Increase in body
Pronounced
bright
aromas
7
8
9
Balance point of
body and acidity
Muting of bright
aromas with
added depth
10
Very Dark
11 12
13
Emphasis on
body
Further
reduction of
acidity
Loss of body
and acidity
Loss of
unique origin
character
Increase of
carbony
characteristics
Even though this model gives us a rough idea
of which aspects of a coffee’s character will
be emphasized at a given roast level, it in no
way gives us a clear profile of how a specific
coffee may react and develop. This can only
be discovered by taking a coffee and roasting
samples across the roast degree spectrum.
“Spectral” roasting and cupping allows us to
discover the relative strengths, weaknesses, and
subtleties, of each coffee. In doing so what is
quickly uncovered are the roast degrees wherein
a particular coffee shows its greatest virtues. For
some coffees this may be only one or two points
along the spectrum and anything outside those
points the coffee simply fails to deliver anything
special. For the best of coffees we will find that
they respond well to virtually every degree of
roast and at each degree present another facet of
their special and desirable character.
However the most common result will be the
discovery of multiple points wherein the roast
flavor is highly desirable yet unique as it moves
along from light roasts emphasizing acidity
and bright vivid aromas but with little body, to
medium roasts with a balance point of body
and acidity with deeper perhaps richer aromas,
and further into deep roasts that accentuate
body over acidity and rich aromas but without
the earlier aromatic complexity, and then finally
into the darkest roasts where body also begins
to diminish and the carbony notes of flavor and
aroma take over most of the coffees individuality.
Each roast master will have to select for
themselves how many points across the roast
spectrum they want to roast and cup. For some
that choice may be limited to the roasting
range the company is focused on, for others the
range will cover the entire spectrum and here
some practical decisions need to be made. One
guideline for this choice might be the Roast Color
Classification System developed a few years ago
by the SCAA. In this system eight levels of roast
were selected as spanning the potential spectrum
of quality roast degrees. These ranged as follows
with corresponding Agtron M Basic levels.
VERY LIGHT
LIGHT
MODERATELY LIGHT
LIGHT MEDIUM
MEDIUM
MODERATELY DARK
DARK
VERY DARK
95
85
75
65
55
45
35
25
What is not made reference to in this
classification or in anything discussed so far
is how the speed of the roasting cycle may
also affect coffee character. Some years back
equipment designers began to engineer roasters
that were capable of reducing roasting times
considerably. Conventional 15-minute roast levels
were achieved in less than 5 minutes.
The results of these designs proved quite
interesting on several levels. For one the beans
themselves were appreciably larger in volume
having generated greater internal pressures due
to the heat transfer building much quicker than
normal and the internal bean pressure not having
the time to release as fully during roasting. But
more significantly the acidity of the coffee was
also greatly enhanced.
Although the level of enhancement may or
may not be desirable for a specific flavor target
objective, understanding that it can occur, is
useful in selecting the roasting profile for a
given coffee. The following chart illustrates this
principal.
As illustrated, samples 1, 2, and 3 have each
achieved an Agtron roast level of approximately
60. However what is significant to note that
is each case the overall roasting time and
temperature vary considerably, and the flavor
and aromatic profiles will likewise exhibit
significant and easily discernable differences.
While this may not enable roast masters to create
the proverbial silk purse out of a sows ear, it
does undoubtedly give a very significant added
capability in deriving flavors and aromas that
otherwise would remain unexpressed.
Of course even though we may understand the
principal of how major shifts in roast speed can
alter coffee character we may be constrained by
the limits of what a specific roasting machine is
capable of. In the past the achievement of rapid
roasts versus conventional roasts also meant
the investment in separate roasting machines
each designed to work with one spectrum or
the other. However some select breakthrough
roasting designs today have transcended this
limitation and offer on a single roaster the
ability to selectively adjust a whole range of
operational parameters that can allow full batch
roasting to targeted roast degrees achievable
anywhere from a high speed 3 minutes out to
more conventional speeds of 15 minutes or more
according to the operators choice of settings.
There is no question that the options available
today are marvelous. However even with the
best equipment we can still run the risk of roast
induced imperfections if we stray outside the
limits a quality roasting spectrum that is always a
marriage of both bean and machine.
BAKED
S in
Fast
gl
e
Ro
as
tD
eg
re
e
ROAST TIME
15
TEMP
8
7
Sample 1
20
6
4
35
3
2
45
1
95
85
75
TIME
page 4
Under Roasted
TEMP
Tipped
As our final chart aptly illustrates, as long
as roast masters keep a watchful eye on the
excesses that can ruin the best of coffees, there
remains a wide spectrum of wonderful coffees
for the palates of coffee lovers everywhere.
With the production and lab equipment available
today roast masters can develop wonderful
coffees bringing out the full range of flavor
and aromatic nuances, with a complexity,
sophistication, and programmable repeatability
never before available.
Yet as in all the history of coffee there will
never be a substitute for good cupping training
and the sensitivity of our palates, and, just as
importantly, the palates of our customers.
25
5
Sample 2
Spectrum of Quality Roasting
Slow
Understand this principle allows us to return
once again to our spectral roast sampling and
consider how we might utilize the boost in acidity
a more rapid roast can achieve with the fuller
development of body that a darker roast can
create. Once this is really understood then the
possibilities of achieving varying flavor profiles
while maintaining the same degree of roast,
opens up another level of creativity for the
roast master. The following chart combines a
view of three samples with widely varying time
temperature profiles but with equal final roast
degree levels.
Sample 3
BURNT
Zone of Roasted Induced Imperfections
TIME
Reducing to graph form how roasting parameters
influence the spectrum of aromatics, is no
easy task. In fairness to our coffees it is in fact
probably impossible to do so without lopping off
a whole range of nuanced subtleties that coffee
aromatics contain. Nevertheless we can make a
crude working model of how roasting influences
aromatics and relative levels of acidity and body
in the following way:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
ACIDITY
Considering aromatics is actually quite essential
as it is generally in the aromas that we can
make significant assessments of coffee quality.
This can be especially helpful in guiding us in
considering what kind of time temperature profile
to apply in roasting.
65
55
Robert Hensley is the owner of Equip For
Coffee representing Lilla Roasters for western
North America and the founder and chief
trainer of the Coffee Training Institute. Anyone
interested in learning more may visit his website,
www.specialtycoffee.com, or contact Mr. Hensley
through his office at 650 259-9308.
A PUBLICATION FOR THE COFFEE MARKET
By Robert Hensley
Roller Grinder
3G Roaster
ONE OF THE MAJOR SOUTH
KOREAN CORPORATIONS CHOOSES
LILLA´S OPUS THIRD GENERATION
TECHNOLOGY
SEE PAGE 2
ISSUE #9 - WWW.LILLAROASTERS.COM
ROASTING FOR FLAVOR - PART II
Lilla Gazette is a publication of Cia. Lilla de Máquinas Ind. e Com. for the coffee market • Address: Rua Constâncio Colalillo, 382 - Guarulhos - SP - 07024-150 – Brazil • Phone: +55 11 3511-4488 • Fax: +55 11 3511-9424 • E-mail: adm@lilla.com.br
Supervision: Marketing Department • Graphic Project: Idéia e Imagem Comunicação • Read the electronic version of this publication in our Web Site: www.lillaroasters.com • Issue # 9 - September 2008.
technical outlook
BRAZILIAN SPECIALITY COFFEE MARKET
PAGE 3
TECHNICAL OUTLOOK
PAGE 4
Customer Insight
MAJOR SOUTH KOREAN
CORPORATION CHOOSES
LILLA´S OPUS THIRD GENERATION
TECHNOLOGY!
After a highly competitive evaluation
of the worlds most prestigious coffee
equipment and suppliers, the Lotte
Group business conglomerate with
38,000 employees and operations in
9 countries, has chosen the Lilla Opus
20 3rdGeneration roasting unit, to
place them at the forefront of coffee
roasting technology.
The Lotte Group is South Korea’s fifth
largest business conglomerate with
interests including candy, beverages,
fast food networks, hotels, industrial
chemicals, and even computer
equipment. With operations in
Korea, Japan, China, the Philippines,
Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam, Russia,
and the United States, Lotte is clearly
a global business with tremendous
market reach. As would be expected
from such a major company, the
Lotte Group closely examined the
equipment, technology and support
from all major roaster manufacturers.
Included in the evaluation were close
examinations of roasting performance
and coffee quality and visits to
Lilla equipped facility in the Czech
Republic. Making their final choice
for Lilla, the Lotte Group highlighted
these features as key in selecting Lilla’s
3rd Generation Opus 20;
❚ Roast profiling flexibility - Total
programmability with unprecedented
user control variables which allow
the operator to obtain several distinct
product and flavor characteristics from
the same raw ingredients by selecting
high yield or conventional roasting
speeds on a single roaster.
❚ Less shrinkage – Lilla’s precooling cycle of introducing cold
air and controlled water injection
into the roasting chamber, makes
it possible to rapidly and precisely
stop pyrolisis (the roast process) and
obtain better retention of the coffee
aromatics, improving quality and
consistency while also minimizing
shrinkage.
❚ Low fuel consumption Lilla´s integrated smoke elimination
system ”built-in” afterburner.
Approx. fuel consumption of 2,8
liters of diesel per bag (60 Kg.).
❚ Beverage quality – the use
of Lilla’s 3rdGeneration Profile
Roasting makes it possible to
achieve excellent sensorial analysis
results by changing the roast profile
parameters to control the beverage
characteristics, such as reducing
bitterness, changing acidity levels,
or even, emphasizing particular
aroma and flavor characteristics.
Equally, oil migration and other bean
appearance characteristics, which
can be altered according to the
desired results.
Lotte’s new Opus 20 3rd Generation
roaster is now installed in its new
3.000 m2 plant facility in South
Korea. With an output production
of 4000 tons of roasted coffee per
year, the new factory will service the
entire South Korean market.
Lilla is pleased to add the Lotte
Group to its growing family of
satisfied customers worldwide.
New Agent
Lilla welcomes Mr. Alberto Tenorio from Grupo Solpersa as its new agent
for Mexico.
Solpersa has vast experience in the market, whose agencies ranges from packaging
equipment to the food industry to telecommunication solutions.
We understand that this partnership will be very fruitful not only for both
companies, but also for the present and future Mexican customers.
Please feel free to contact Mr. Tenorio for any assistance or inquiries on
Lilla products.
Grupo Solpersa
Tel.: + 52 55 2652 4588
Tel.: + 52 55 5673 2356
Tel.: + 52 55 5523 3055
ventas@gruposolpersa.com.mx
www.gruposolpersa.com.mx
page 2
Trends
BRAZILIAN SPECIALITY COFFEE MARKET
Brazil is one of the largest coffee
consumers in the world, second
only to the USA. The quality of the
product was in past years widely
accepted in Brazil, and used as
components in blends elsewhere in
the world - accepted for its unique
characteristics, but not valued as
mountain grown arabicas from
Central America and parts of Africa,
and not priced as premium coffee.
Foreign companies were prohibited
by law from entering the Brazil
market, and prices were fixed by
the government.
The scenario began to change
when Brazil refused to sign on to
the International Coffee Agreement
(ICA) in 1989. For one thing, several
international companies entered
the market, forcing local roasters
to change their strategies in order
to survive in the new competitive
environment, and to respond to the
change in consumer demands. In
that year, 1989, ABIC (Association of
Brazilian Coffee Industry – Founded
in 1971) introduced the Pureness
Seal program, its first initiative to
increase coffee consumption by
improving product quality. In 2004,
ABIC launched the PQC (Coffee
Quality Program) with the goal of
recruiting roasters committed to
the adoption of standards for raw
material, flavor consistency and
good manufacturing practices; and,
ultimately, to convince Brazilian
consumers that all coffee is not
the same.
The end of the ICA of 1989, also
allowed the formation of the
BSCA – Brazilian Specialty Coffee
Association - bringing together
producers of specialty coffees
and to promote Brazilian specialty
coffees, also known as gourmet
coffees, while stimulating constant
technical improvement and more
efficient services during their
commercialization. Founded in
1991, it has been present in major
international events related to
the specialty coffees. Since 1992,
BSCA has attended all conferences
and shows of the Specialty Coffee
Association of America (SCAA).
It has its own booth with a large
variety of Brazilian gourmet
coffees, and organizes lectures and
promotional events as well.
Another great step towards the
improvement of the quality of
Brazilian coffee was taken recently
with the implementation of PSI in
2002, a project headed by São Paulo
State Coffee Roasters Association
(Sindicafé-SP) in conjunction of
APEX (Brazil´s Trade and Investment
Promotion Agency) with the
participation of about 20 companies,
including coffee roasters, exporters
page 3
and producers. The main goal of the
project was to increase the exports
of roasted and ground coffee, by
improving its quality and promoting
the brand “Cafes do Brasil”
(translation: Coffees from Brazil)
worldwide.
The efforts described above have
resulted in Brazil today producing
about 10% of the specialty coffees
consumed in the world, which
ranges from 8 to 10 million bags
annually. This is no small feat, and
justifies the efforts of the Brazilian
coffee trade to raise the image of
Brazilian coffee not only at home,
but abroad.
Since the sales of specialty coffees
grow more rapidly than the
traditional types, and there is a
trend indicating lower grades of
coffee sales are losing ground in
Brazil, one should expect to see
an increase in the demand for
compact coffee roasters with more
sophisticated resources, such as
profile roasting controls. Lilla believes
strongly in this trend, and to meet
it has developed and introduced
the Opus compact roasters. In
the short time they have been
available these roasters have met
with considerable success in the
marketplace, being sold to Europe,
Africa and Central America.