Recycling coffee wastes for healthy urban agriculture: do spent

Open Archive TOULOUSE Archive Ouverte (OATAO)
OATAO is an open access repository that collects the work of Toulouse researchers and
makes it freely available over the web where possible.
This is an author-deposited version published in : http://oatao.univ-toulouse.fr/
Eprints ID : 18333
To cite this version : Pierart, Antoine and Dumat, Camille and
Séjalon-Delmas, Nathalie and Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan Carlos
Recycling coffee wastes for healthy urban agriculture: do spent
coffee ground and its biochar reduce the impact of antimony on soil
quality and plant growth? (2017) In: Sustainable Urban Agricultures
(UA) : Vector for Ecological Transition, 6 June 2017 - 9 June 2017
(Toulouse, France). (Unpublished)
Any correspondence concerning this service should be sent to the repository
administrator: staff-oatao@listes-diff.inp-toulouse.fr
S3
EXHIBITION OF
THE INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM,
Sustainable Urban Agricultures (UA) :
Vector for Ecological Transition !
0-(+!*!,1,--3
*,--%+.* )'3+ *$ ,--%*'&+2/+!'*'+2
--&) *,-"'(+!$(-+-#) )$+,-%,-#,-"%,-!*'&+
--#,-"'(+!$(-+-#) )$+,-%,-#,-"#,-!*'&+
--%,-"'(+!$(-+-#) )$+,-"%,-%,-!*'&+
--&))-*,-*&-)-'-%&(-*'-()&+
,-"'(+!$(-)-*$( *--*-*'&*,-%*('
Contact: apierart@gmail.com,
Ecotox. Lab, Fac. of Env. Sci. and Biochem., University of Castilla - La Mancha, Spain
Recycling coffee wastes for healthy urban agriculture:
do spent coffee ground and its biochar reduce the impact of antimony on soil
quality and plant growth?
Context
Challenge of soil quality for Urban Agriculture
Concept of coupling remediation and amendment in one-shot:
Revalorization of wastes is a matter of current concern! (fresh, composted, biochar…)
Spent coffee ground (SCG) or its charred by-product (SCGc) showed intriguing outcomes:
Suitable in remediation actions as ‘buffer’ amendments in soils receiving contaminants
Direct interaction between biochar and rhizospheric microorganisms…
Objectives
To determine whether addition of SCG and SCG-derived biochar reduce the impact of Sb on
selected extracellular enzyme activities and plant performance.
Material and methods
Scale - Microcosm pot experiment under greenhouse condition
Plant - Peas (Pisum sativum L.)
Soil - Loam agricultural loam
Treatments - 5% (w/w) of SCG or SCGc.
- Half of the pots were spiked with antimony tartrate (KSb)
Measurements - Soil enzyme activities, at sowing and harvest
- Pea yield, plant growth
- Colonization of SCGc by microorganisms
Analysis – Use of the “Integrated Biological Response” index (IBRv2)
Results
SCG caused a phytotoxic effect on plant growth and pea yield
SCGc enhanced plant performance and was colonized by microorganisms
SCG and SCGc impacted soil enzymes activity (time & treatment-dependent)
SCGc activated extracellular enzymes implied in C- and P-cycling
SCGc decreased Sb toxicity at the end of the experiment
Variation of enzyme activity for different amendments (SCG, SCGc, OM-). CARBOX, carboxylesterase; CATAL, catalase; DEHY, dehydrogenase;
GLUCO, β-glucosidase; PHO_ACI and PHO_ALK, acid and alkaline phosphatases; PROTEA, protease; UREA, urease. The dotted grey line (zero) represents the activity in the control soil (No Sb, OM-).
SCGc provides a recalcitrant shelter for microbial
development and buffers Sb toxicity in soil
Interactions are complex between Sb, SCG/SCGc
and soil microbial communities