the essence of life - City of Athens, Ohio

C I T Y
O F
AT H E N S
2 0 1 7
ANNUAL DRINKING WATER
CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT
Second Crop
It was a difficult winter, difficult
spring. Rain. Too much rain.
The lilies all rotted, the iris and white
beam. My favorite greenery swam,
some replanted while there was still
time. But what was more important?
Food. Something to pull from the dust,
knock the earth off the ends,
and bring in. Something with which
to keep going. Keep going, though
my fingers, wrists, and ankle bones
ached. He grew two sharp teeth.
• SOURCE WATER • GUIDE TO PROTECTING SOURCE WATER • TREATED WATER • WATER QUALITY TEST RESULTS
• GENERAL HEALTH INFORMATION
The roads washed out, dark skies under
dreams. There were slugs in the marigolds,
rose petals faded as a dress. But
strawberries grew and pumpkins grew.
Morels grew—and grew and grew, wild
in the dead logs, in the massacred acres,
last year’s mess of leaf and fern. And that
is why we lived. That is why we loved.
That is why we planted anything—to see that.
- Alison Stine, Athens’ Poet Laureate
Water
the essence of life
THE CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT is required as part of the Safe Drinking Water Act Reauthorization of 1996.
Information about Lead in the Water Supply
Recent news has brought lead in the public water systems of
the U.S. into media prominence. Under the authority of the
Safe Drinking Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) established the action level for lead in drinking
water at 15 micrograms/liter (ug/L), or parts per billion (ppb).
The rule requires Public Water Systems (PWS) ensure that
water from taps used for human consumption do not exceed
this level in at least 90 percent of the sites sampled around
the system (90th percentile value). The “action level” is the
concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers
additional treatment or other requirements which a PWS
must follow. Because lead may pose serious health risks, the
EPA established a Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG)
of zero for lead. The MCLG is the level of a contaminant in
drinking water below which there is no known or expected
risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
What Are The Sources of Lead?
Lead is a common, natural, toxic, and often useful metal
that was used for years in products found around the home.
It can be found throughout the environment in lead-based
paint, air, soil, household dust, and certain types of pottery,
porcelain, and pewter. Although most lead exposure,
especially in children, occurs when paint chips are ingested,
dust inhaled, or absorbed from contaminated soil, the U.S.
EPA estimates that 10 to 20 percent of human exposure of
lead may come from lead in drinking water.
Lead is unusual among drinking water contaminants in that
it seldom occurs naturally in water supplies like rivers and
lakes. Lead enters drinking water primarily as a result of
corrosion or the wearing of materials containing lead in the
plumbing. Buildings built prior to 1986 are more likely to
have lead pipes, fixtures, and solder. New buildings can also
be at risk, since even post-1986 ‘lead-free’ plumbing could
still legally contain up to 8 percent lead. The most common
problem is with brass or chrome-plated brass fixtures which
can leach significant amounts of lead into water, especially
hot water. In 2011 Congress passed the Reduction of Lead
in Drinking Water Act (RLDWA). This revised the definition
of lead free by lowering the maximum lead content of the
wetted surfaces of plumbing products from 8% to a weighted
average of 0.25% and established a statutory method for
the calculation of lead content. Existing inventories were
allowed to be sold but components manufactured after this
must comply.
How Does a Public Water System Prevent lead
Contamination?
Water providers regularly test both source water and finished
water leaving the treatment plant for its corrosiveness and
effects on plumbing. Athens Public Water System controls
these levels very carefully to ensure water remains stable in
order to limit its corrosive potential. Additionally, since 1992
the City under U.S. EPA mandate has tested many homes
around the community on a tri-annual basis. In all cases
the 90th percentile value of these tests has been 5 ppb or
lower and has generally trended down over time. However,
it is important to remember that water has a natural solvent
capability, and water that sits in pipes unused for extended
periods of time (months or more) still has the potential to
leach lead from those pipes. Portions of household plumbing
systems that go unused for a long time should be flushed
before drinking water from that section of the building by
running the water for a few minutes.
For More Information Please Contact: Athens City Laboratory
at 593-3502, visit US EPA’s Web site at www.epa.gov/lead,
call the National Lead Information Center at 800-424-LEAD,
or contact your health care provider.
Water First for Thirst is a statewide campaign that aims to encourage people to drink
more water and less sugar sweetened beverages. The goal is to help communities increase
visibility and access to water through policy and environmental changes. This can be done
by encouraging worksites, schools, parks, etc. to stock their vending machines with water
and low calorie beverages, while limiting or removing sugar sweetened beverages and by
making sure water is freely accessible throughout the day via water fountains, water bottle
refill stations, or pitchers. Athens City-County Health Department is partnering with many
local sites to increase access to water. Partner sites include the Tri-County Career Center,
the Athens Community Center, ARTS/West, Athens Public Library, many worksites such as
Rocky Brands, HAPCAP,COAD, and several other libraries throughout the county. For more
information on water promotion, contact Megan Buskirk at the Athens City-County Health
Department at 740-592-4431 x246. Providing drinking water instead of sugary drinks is one of the easiest ways to manage
your weight, stay focused, and have more energy throughout your day. Choose Water First for Thirst!
conserve water
2
CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT 2017
source water
HISTORY OF THE CITY OF ATHENS SOURCE WATER
According to this study, the aquifer that supplies
water to the City of Athens has a high susceptibility to
contamination. This determination is based on:
1. Lack of a protective layer of clay overlying the
aquifer
2. Shallow depth of the aquifer (less than 20 feet
below ground surface)
3. Presence of significant potential contaminant
sources in the wellhead protection area
4. Presence of manmade contaminants in the well
water
New bike path spur thru Armitage wellfield
The sources of drinking water, both tap water and
bottled water, include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds,
reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over
the surface of the land or through the ground, it
dissolves naturally occurring minerals and in some
cases, radioactive material and can pick up substances
resulting from the presence of animals or from human
activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water
include:
Since 1894, the City of Athens has depended on
ground water for its public drinking water source.
Ground water is stored beneath the earth’s surface
in geological formations called aquifers. Water is
pumped out of the aquifer by wells.
More information
about contaminants
and potential health
effects can be
obtained by calling the
Environ­men­tal Protec­
tion Agency’s
SAFE DRINKING
WATER HOTLINE:
800-426-4791
1. MICROBIAL CONTAMINANTS, such as viruses and
bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment
plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations
and wildlife;
The first well was located about 4400 feet west of
the Court House and about 2000 feet north of the
Hocking River, in the vicinity of the present West State
St. well field.
2. INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS, such as salts and
metals, which can be naturally occurring or result
from urban storm runoff, industrial or domestic
wastewater discharges, oil and gas production,
mining or farming;
By 1954, the well system had expanded to supply a
daily water usage of about 1.3 million gallons.
3. PESTICIDES AND HERBICIDES, which may come
from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban
storm water runoff and residential uses;
The current well water system supplies enough
water to meet the daily water usage of about 3.8
million gallons. Drinking water is supplied to the City
of Athens, The Plains and some surrounding rural
customers.
4. ORGANIC CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS, which may
include synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which
are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum
production and can also come from gas stations, urban
storm water runoff and septic systems;
In 2003, the Ohio EPA and the City of Athens
ground water consultant conducted a ground water
investigation and study for the following purposes:
1. To evaluate the sporadic detection of volatile
organic compounds (VOC’s) in the well water and
to determine their origin.
2. To identify potential contaminant sources
3. To provide guidance on protecting the drinking
water source
5. RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS which can be
naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas
production and mining activities.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink,
EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of
certain contaminants in water provided by public water
systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contam­
inants in bottle water which must provide the same
protection for public health. Drinking water, including
bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain
at least small amounts of some contaminants. The
presence of contam­inants does not necessarily indicate
that water poses a health risk.
CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT 2017
3
source water
Wellhead Protection Area
City of Athens
Well Head Protection Map
´
0
437.5 875
1,750
2,625
Feet
3,500
WELLHEAD (SOURCE WATER)
PROTECTION PROGRAM
(Ordinance 0-76-02, 0-58-09)
1. Established the recharge area
of the source water well system
(approved by the EPA). The
wellhead protection recharge area
is the surface and subsurface area
supplying water to the well system
2. Determined the susceptibility of the
aquifer (approved by EPA)
3. Identifies and inventories any
past, present or future potential
contaminant sources in the
wellhead (source water) protection
recharge area
Legend
Streets
4. Established the Source Water
Protection Plan (approved by EPA)
Hocking River
City Boundary
Wellhead Protection Buffer Zone
One Year Capture Zone
Five Year Capture Zone
How contaminants can infiltrate the ground water
Municipal
Water Well
RU
NO
GAS
TANKS
FF
DRAINAGE
from chemicals,
solvents, degreasers,
pains oil, etc.
OIL
TANKS
LAWN CARE
CHEMICALS
WATER
TREATMENT
PLANT
FF
NO
RU
INFILTRATION
INFILTRATION
WATER TABLE
SAND & GRAVEL
CONTAMINATED WATER
CLAY
Some contaminants cannot be removed by the Water Treatment Plant. For example, high concentrations of chlorides (salt)
cannot be removed unless an additional treatment process is added to the current processes.
4
CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT 2017
source water
STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION
In
2011,
Athens
City Council passed
Ordinance
0-52-11
creating Title 5.07 Storm Water Regulations,
in response to a growing
national concern over
urban
storm
water
pollution. Urban storm
water carries sediment,
oil, grease, gasoline,
lawn care chemicals, dust
Keep Storm Water Clean
from tires and brakes,
and bacteria from animal waste all of which are pollutants that
impair the streams and the Hocking River in the Athens area.
Ordinance 0-52-11:
• Establishes rules to govern runoff into the river, streams, and the storm drainage system.
• Keeps the storm drain system free from harmful pollutants.
• Keeps the well system recharge area free from harmful pollutants.
Ordinance 0-52-12:
• Ordinance amending Athens City Code, Title 39, Wellhead Protection Plan.
In the fall of 2012 the city began contracting with the Athens
Soil and Water Conservation District for the services of an Urban
Conservation Technician to help develop and implement a Storm
Water Management Program.
The City’s Storm Water Pollution Prevention Team oversees the
program, which includes:
• Mapping all the outfalls (pipes and drainage courses) on the Hocking River, Coates Run, Dairy Run, Cable Lane run, and several unnamed streams within the City limits.
• Mapping the rest of the storm sewer system.
• Sampling outfalls and manholes to look for illicit discharge to the storm sewers.
• A construction project storm water permit and plan review process with the Code Enforcement Office.
• A construction site storm water inspection program.
In 2016, the technician and the City performed:
• Review of 24 stormwater plans
• 78 construction site inspections
• Mapping 293 stormwater catch basins and manholes
• 8 sampling events for potential illicit discharges
• Mapping 5 miles of Margaret Creek
• 6 Storm water training events for the public
CHANGING STORM WATER MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES By Cliff
Hamilton, Ohio University, P.E.
In the past, the traditional approach to storm water management
has been to route the water from parking lots, downspouts and
other impervious areas onto storm sewers, through progressively
larger pipes, until it reaches a stream, lake, or river. Then it becomes
someone else’s issue to deal with.
This approach was effective at keeping parking lots and
streets dry, however it does have several key disadvantages. This
traditional approach also promotes a surge of water and pollutants
during rain events, and provides little or no treatment to remove
pollutants from the storm water before it reaches the stream, lake,
or river. These pollutants include salt used to melt ice, oil or other
fluids dripping from vehicles, soot from tires, and soil from erosion
or construction activities.
As this infrastructure of pipe ages, maintenance or replacement
costs are also a substantial obstacle to maintenance of the
traditional storm water system.
To address the concerns with treatment, surge flow during
rain events, infrastructure costs and maintenance, and aesthetics,
several strategies have evolved to manage storm water quality and
quantity differently.
These strategies are collectively known as Best Management
Practices or BMPs.
These practices are developed or selected and designed for a
specific location based upon site specific needs and conditions.
These practices can include rain gardens (such as the ones installed
on W. Union Street in front of the old train station), filter strips,
bio-swales, bio-retention basins, and permeable pavement.
The major advantage of these BMPs is the filtration of sediment
and pollutants from the storm
runoff prior to water entering the
receiving stream or river. Most of
the BMPs also provide a source of
recharge to the groundwater at
the point where the water falls to
the earth, thus also slowing the
rush of water into the receiving
stream and reducing the danger
of flooding downstream.
We need to fundamentally
change the way we look at storm
water. For regulatory, natural
Section of split 16” water main
resource, and ethical reasons, we
from West State Street
need to treat storm water as a
resource to utilize and manage, instead of a waste product to be
passed on to someone else downstream.
CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT 2017
5
6
CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT 2017
CAR BATTERIES Take old car batteries to a retailer. Check
your yellow pages under “Batteries” for stores that sell
new batteries and take used batteries to be recycled.
BLEACH Even old bleach can be used according to label
directions as a cleaning agent and disinfectant. If you
can’t use it, see if a neighbor can. NEVER mix bleach
with ammonia or with acidic products such as some
drain, toilet bowl and metal cleaners. Toxic fumes (strong
enough to be fatal) will result.
ANTIFREEZE Used antifreeze can be diluted thoroughly
with water and poured down the sanitary sewer drain. Do
not pour antifreeze into an outdoor storm sewer, where
it may go directly to a waterway without treatment.
Animals and children are attracted to the sweet taste of
antifreeze, so store or dispose of it where they won’t be
tempted to drink it.
AEROSOLS Be sure to empty aerosol containers
completely before disposing with other trash to prevent
an explosion hazard. If the can still has some product
in it, remove the propellant by turning the can upside
down and pushing the nozzle. Check to see if your local
recycling program accepts aerosol cans. Purchase products
in non-aerosol forms (pump-spray, roll-on or liquid).
ACIDS/ALKALINES Acids (hydrochloric, muriatic, sulfuric)
and alkalines or caustics (ammonia, lye) are typically
the main ingredients in cleaning compounds and drain
openers. Use these materials up according to label
directions whenever possible. These products are usually
usable even when a few years old. However, be sure not
to mix products together or dangerous fumes could result.
WASTE MANAGEMENT
GUIDELINES
If saving material for a collection event, keep in the
original container. If necessary, store the original container
in a second leak-proof container that is labeled and dated.
Keep out of reach of children and pets and away from
open flames and sources of heat.
SAFETY MEASURES AND BEST
MANAGEMENT PRACTICES
USED MOTOR OIL Motor oil is easily recycled. Contact
your local solid waste management district office to
obtain information about the recycling outlet nearest you,
or call local service stations and ask if they will accept
your used oil. A convenient way to hold oil for recycling
is to funnel it into a cleaned, old plastic milk jug or gallon
container.
SOLVENTS You can clean used solvents (paint thinner,
turpentine, varnish, stripper) by allowing the paint or dirt
particles to settle out in a glass container. Gently pour
the cleared solvent into another container to use again
and discard the sludge in the trash. Do not dump onto
soil, or down sewers, drains, or the toilet. Large amounts
of solvents (more than 10 gallons) should be taken to
a recycler. Contact your local solid waste management
district for ideas on finding outlets for your solvents.
PESTICIDES/HERBICIDES Use pesticides and herbicides
according to label directions. Avoid disposal whenever
possible. If you can’t use the material, see if a neighbor or
local garden club can. Also, never reuse the containers.
Empty containers should be rinsed three times in water.
Then spray the rinse water on your lawn or garden.
Contact your Ohio State University Extension Office or
the Ohio Department of Agriculture for information on
handling large amounts of pesticides that can’t be used.
should be donated to a neighbor, school, theater group,
or community organization in your area.
OVEN CLEANERS
For baked on grease, heat oven to 200 degrees, turn
off, and leave 1/4 cup ammonia in a dish in the oven for
several hours to loosen. Then scrub with baking soda.
Save the ammonia to be used again.
HERBICIDES Cover garden with plastic in the fall to
prevent weed germination. Also, use biological controls
such as lady bugs or praying mantises. Use baking soda
for scouring.
HOUSEPLANT INSECTICIDE
Spray soapy water on leaves, then rinse, or rub infested
leaves with cotton ball soaked with rubbing alcohol. Hand
pull weeds or mulch generously.
PESTICIDES
Learn which insects are beneficial in managing “pests.”
Keep your lawn and garden weed-free. Remove and
destroy infected plants. Refer to an organic gardening
book.
PAINT REMOVER/STRIPPER
Heat guns may be used for removing many paints, but
only in well-ventilated areas. Avoid using them for leadbased paints.
PAINTS AND SOLVENTS
Use water-based (latex, acrylic) paint if possible.
CHLORINE BLEACH
Baking soda and water, Borax, or natural sunlight
(you must use bleach as a disinfectant).
DRAIN CLEANERS
Pour boiling water down the drain. Use a plunger or a
plumber’s “snake”.
PRODUCTS
for businesses and households
Guide to Waste Management
PROTECTING OUR SOURCE WATER
CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT 2017
CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT 2017
7
PAINT Small amounts of paint can be hardened by taking
the lid off the can and adding sand or cat litter or a
commercially available paint hardener. Once the paint is
solid, you can put it in the trash. Paint that is still usable
MERCURY Mercury is highly toxic and can be absorbed
through the skin. Remember three important things:
DON’T TOUCH MERCURY. DON’T THROW MERCURY
IN THE GARBAGE. DON’T CLEAN UP MERCURY WITH
A VACUUM CLEANER. If you have spilled mercury by
breaking a thermometer, wear gloves and collect the small
drops with a wet paper towel, a cotton ball or an eye
dropper. Place the debris in a zip-lock bag, and dispose
in the trash. (There is currently no better disposal option
for broken thermometers) For larger amounts of mercury,
your local high school or university laboratory, or local
dentist may be interested in taking it. Otherwise you can
send mercury to a recycler. Ohio EPA maintains a list of
mercury recyclers; however, all of these are located out of
state. Contact your local solid waste management district
office for additional ideas on locating mercury recyclers.
KEROSENE Avoid buying more than you can use within a
year, and store in a cool dry place.
GASOLINE Avoid buying more than you can use in six
months and store in a cool dry place. Gas less than one
year old can be safely used as fuel in your car, lawnmower
or snowblower, etc., when first strained through a paint
filter and then mixed with at least an equal amount of
fresh gasoline. For older gasoline or gas/oil mixes, look
under “Oils-Waste” in the yellow pages for a company
that will take residential material.
GAS CYLINDERS Butane, propane, or other pressurized
gas cylinders should not be disposed of with other refuse
because of the serious explosion hazard. Contact a retailer
(under “Gas” in the yellow pages) to have the cylinder
refilled or disposed of properly. If you are sure a cylinder is
completely empty, is no longer under pressure and can’t
be reused, then it can be disposed of in the trash.
DISINFECTANTS Disinfectants contain strong chemicals,
so use them up according to label instructions and with
caution.
CLEANERS AND POLISHES Cleaners and polishes (rug,
door and oven cleaners; furniture polish) should be used
up whenever possible. Seal empty containers and dispose
of them with the rest of your garbage.
ROACH REPELLENT
Cut hedge apples (Osage oranges) in half and place in the
basement, in the cabinets, or under the house to repel
roaches. Mix equal parts baking soda and powdered sugar
and sprinkle in the infested area.
MOTHBALLS
Use cedar chests or place cedar chips around clothes.
TOILET BOWL CLEANER
Use toilet brush and baking soda, mild detergent or
1/2 cup bleach.
WINDOW CLEANER
Use a pump spray container filled with 2 tbsp. vinegar in
1 quart water (label and date container), or rub
newspaper on the glass.
SILVER CLEANER
Soak silver in 1 quart warm water with 1 tsp. baking soda,
1 tsp. salt, and a small piece of aluminum foil.
SPOT REMOVER
Immediately soak in water, lemon juice, club soda, or corn
meal and water.
FURNITURE POLISH
Make a non-toxic polish by melting 1 tbsp. Carnauba Wax
into 2 cups mineral oil. For lemon oil polish: dissolve 1 tsp.
lemon oil into 1 pint mineral oil.
district is doing. Encourage local government agencies — such as your county or city health department, extension
office, fire department and local chamber of commerce — to organize and help sponsor a household hazardous
waste education and exchange program for your community.
Another Way To Help Contact your county commissioners to find out what your local solid waste management
City of Athens Engineering and Public Works (740) 593-7636
Ohio EPA Division of Solid and Infectious Waste Management — (614) 644-2621.
For general information about solid waste management. http://www.epa.state.oh.us/dsiwm/
Ohio Department of Agriculture Pesticide Regulation Section 1-800-282-1955 (In Ohio) ext. 31
For information about banned or restricted pesticides, or for information about the agricultural pesticide collection
program. http://www.ohioagriculture.gov/pesticides/
Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Recycling and Litter Prevention (614) 265-6333.
For information on recycling of aluminum cans, newspapers, and other solid wastes.
http://www.dnr.state.oh.us/recycling/
Poison Information Center. Check the front of your local telephone book. Ohio State University Extension Office
Check the blue pages of your local phone book under “County Government Offices.”
Ohio Contact Information
DON’T:
• Mix materials or wastes together.
• Dispose of large quantities of any toxic materials in a
septic system.
• Bury or burn containers of leftover materials.
• Dispose of materials into the storm sewer.
• Breathe fumes from toxic materials.
• Buy aerosols; use pump sprays instead.
(From a Publication of Ohio EPA Public Interest Center P.O.
Box 1049 Columbus, Ohio 43216-1049 (614) 644-2160.
DO:
• Buy and use less hazardous substitutes whenever
possible.
• Buy only what you need.
• Wear gloves and protective clothing to prevent skin
contact.
• Handle the substance gently, especially if you don’t
know what it is.
• Follow directions carefully when using any hazardous
products.
• Keep hazardous substances out of the reach of children
and pets and away from heat sources or open flame.
• Always read labels before you buy a product to be sure
it will meet your needs.
• Keep labels on all your containers.
• Try to find someone else to use your unwanted
material, but be sure you know what you have and
inform them fully.
• Use non-aerosol products in reusable containers.
drinking water
After treatment and distribution, how does the City of Athens
protect against contaminants that would pollute our drinking water?
The Ohio EPA recommends public water suppliers to
issue a boil order any time the pressure in the water
distribution system falls below 20 psi (pressure per
square inch). Water main breaks, hydrant flushing,
structure fires and normal operational maintenance
in the distribution system can cause low-pressure or
no pressure events. Boil orders are issued for these
areas of the water distribution system where these
events have taken place. Because extreme care is
taken not to introduce any contaminates into our
water distribution system during repairs, most boil
orders last only 24 hours.
Cross Connection Control Program
[Ordinance 0-46-86]
With the use of a Backflow Preventer valve, this
program protects against a potential backflow or
backsiphon of contaminates from the customer’s
property into the City’s treated drinking water
supply.
WHAT IS A “CROSS CONNECTION?”
A permanent or temporary piping arrangement
which can allow your drinking water to be
contaminated if a backflow condition occurs.
What is a “Boil Order”?
Boil Order Hotline
740-594-5078
When a BOIL ORDER
is issued:
• Boil all water
used for human
consumption
• Boil water for 2-3
minutes at a rolling
boil
• Cool water before
consumption
• Discard icemaker ice
WHAT IS “BACKFLOW”?
Water flowing in the opposite direction from its
normal flow, with the direction of flow reversed,
due to a change in pressures, backflow can allow
contaminants to enter our drinking water system
through cross connections.
Backflow Preventers are specially designed valves
used to protect our potable (drinking) water supply
from contaminants due to backflow from cross
connections. They are required to be tested annually.
A precautionary measure taken when the
distribution system pressure drops below 20 psi.
to allow a 24 hour water test to confirm the water
quality is still safe and was not affected by the
depressurization event.
WHO ISSUES A “BOIL ORDER”
Typically the Water Distribution Maintenance
Supervisor issues boil orders through the water
treatment plant.
Who needs to take Special Precautions
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immunocomprised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ
transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly people and infants can be particularly
at risk from infection. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC
guidelines on appropriate means lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are
available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at: 800-426-4791.
COMPARISON CHART FOR WATER USAGE AND SAVINGS
Gals. Used
Less than 1% of the world’s fresh
water supplies are available for
human consumpton
8
Normal Water Usage
Method
Shower (10 min)
50
Shower head running continuously
Tub Bath
36
Standard tub, full
Toilet Flushing
5-7
Depends on tank size
Washing Hands
5
With tap running continuously
Brushing Teeth
10
Shaving
20
Washing Dishes
Conservation Usage
Gals. Used
25
25
12.5
Method
Savings
Shorter showers (5 min)
Low flow shower head (10 min)
Low flow shower head (5 min)
50%
50%
75%
18
Standard tub half full
50%
4.6
Use a displacement bag, or milk jug in
tank reservoir
Replace with low flow toilet
20%
1
Fill a standard basin
80%
With tap running continuously
1
Wet brush with brief rinses
90%
With tap running continuously
1
Fill a standard basin
95%
30
With tap running continuously
10
Wash & rinse with a half filled standard
sink
66%
Dishwasher
16
Full Cycle
7
Short Cycle
56%
Washing Machine
60
Full cycle, Highest water level
27
Short Cycle
55%
Outdoor Watering
10
Per minute; Average garden hose
Eliminate, night watering, etc.
varies
1.6
varies
73%
“The City of Athens is in compliance with the new 2014 EPA Lead Rules”
CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT 2017
system improvements
HOW DOES THE CITY OF ATHENS PROTECT OUR SOURCE WATER?
City of Athens 2016 Water
System Maintenance Improvements
PROTECTIVE STRATEGY
COMPONENTS
Here is an approximate breakdown of water
distribution jobs completed in 2016
• Repaired 187 water main breaks and service leaks
• Responded to and completed 117 customer service calls
No. 2 - Ground water monitoring
• 148 Fire hydrants and main line gate •Annual ground water monitoring was valves were installed, repaired or conducted
replaced; this does not include all work done in capital waterline construction projects
• 221 water meters were installed or replaced
No. 3 -­­ Wellhead Protection
• Assisted the Water and Wastewater Divers preparing to
Program 2016 - present
plants with 28 repairs
clean reservoir
• 67 requests for leak detection and water Projects
investigations for our customers
•Title 39 ordinance review/ revisions concerning
• 187 roadway repairs, sidewalk repairs or landscaping to agricultural operations in the WHPA
repair water main break holes
•Ongoing facility updates and inspections
•Brine well investigation in Armitage wellfield.
Major 2016 Water Distribution System Accomplishments:
10 geo-probes drilled to determine extent of
• 1775’ of new 8” water mains were installed on Grand contamination. Excavated around casing to help
Park Blvd plus 972’ of customer service lines
determine possible abandonment procedures
• 250’ of 8’ bypass line was installed around Kimes Reservoir to allow for inspection and future repairs
Enforcement
•Regular patrols of the WHPA
We strive to maintain a high level of customer service to the
residents of the City of Athens. To
ensure that the City of Athens has
No. 4 — Education and Outreach
safe drinking water, we fully comply
•Preventing contamination through education and
with all regulations to operate and
cooperation
govern the safe operation of our
water distribution system.
No. 1 - Emergency preparedness and response
•Contingency plans to address threats to our drinking water source
Wellhead Protection 2016 Accomplishments
• As part of the education and outreach
component of the program:
• Participated in Water fest (an
elementary school educational event)
• Educational presentation at Discovery Kids Camp in The Plains
• Provided a display of educational
materials at the Athens County Fair
• Gave educational tours of the Water Plant
WTP 2016 Accomplishments
2016 Water Treatment Plant
Major Accomplishments:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
New screen with smaller holes was installed in well #3 to prevent
gravel pack intrusion. Cleaned and put online
Wells #5 and 19A were cleaned
New pressure transmitter installed in new vault at Peach Ridge Tank
Increased ramp up/down times for Stroud’s Run VFD and installed air release units in station to help mitigate a rash of water breaks.
(2) separate leak detection surveys were completed on the
distribution system to located unknown leaks to reduce water loss
Contributed around $40,000 from WTP budget to purchase
new water meters
Selected Engineering firm for WTP upgrade
Street department installed culverts in our (2) worst access roads.
Results have been great; will prevent considerable road maintenance
in the future.
Tool bed installed on 312 – first WTP truck to be well stocked with
tools for field work
CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT 2017
9
LABORATORY TEST RESULTS
Detected Contaminants
Level
Range of
(after treatment)
Sample
MCLG
MCL
Found
Detection
Violation
Year
Typical source of contamination found
4
4
1.04
0.86 -1.21
0
2016
Water additive; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from fertilizer/ aluminum factories
4MRDLG
4MRDL
1.10
1.09 -1.11
0
2016
Water additive for disinfection
Copper (ppb) system
0
AL=1300
380
18-1500
0
2015
Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits
Lead (ppb) system
0
AL=15
2.5
<2.0 -3.0
0
2015
Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits
Nitrate/Nitrate-N (ppm) plant tap
10
10
0.50
NA
0
2016
Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits
2000
2000
28.8
NA
0
2014
discharge of drilling waste; discharge from metal refineries; erosions of natural deposits
0
-
3.9
NA
0
2011
Fluoride (ppm) plant tap
1.02
.10 - 1.11
Asbestos (millions fibers/liter) system
0.2
NA
0
2011
Inorganic Contaminants
Fluoride (ppm) system
Total Chlorine residual (ppm) system
Barium (ppb) plant tap
Bromoform (ppb) plant tap
2016
Disinfection By Products (system)
Total Trihalomethane (ppb)
-
80
59.45
24.7 -69.6
0
2016
By product of drinking water disinfection
Total Haloacetic Acids (ppb)
-
60
9.65
<6.0-14.0
0
2016
By product of drinking water disinfection
Bromodichloromethane (ppb)
0
-
13.33
NA
0
2014
By product of drinking water disinfection
Chloroform (ppb)
-
-
6.48
NA
0
2014
By product of drinking water disinfection
60
-
18.48
NA
0
2014
By product of drinking water disinfection
Level
Range of
MCLG
MCL
Found
Detection
Violation
Year
0
0
0
NA
0
2016
naturally present in the environment
0
0
0
NA
0
2016
human and animal fecal waste
Gross Alpha emitters (pCi/L)
0
15
3.0
NA
0
2014
erosion of natural deposits of certain minerals that are radioactive
Radium-228 (pCi/L)
0
5
0.90
NA
0
2014
erosion of natural deposits
Arsenic (ppb)
0
10
<3.00
NA
0
2014
erosion of natural deposits; runoff from orchards, glass & electronics production waster
Beryllium (ppb)
4
4
<0.500
NA
0
2014
discharge from metal refineries, coal-burning factories, electrical, aerospace, and defense industry
Cadmium (ppb)
5
5
<0.500
NA
0
2014
corrosion of galvanized pipes; erosion of natural deposits; metal/refineries discharge, battery/paint waste runoff
Chromium (ppb)
100
100
<10.0
NA
0
2014
discharge from steel and pulp mills; erosion of natural deposits
Cyanide (ppb)
200
200
<0.005
NA
0
2014
discharge from steel/metal factories; discharge from plastic and fertilizer factories
Mercury (ppb)
2
2
<0.2
NA
0
2014
erosion of natural deposits; discharge from refineries and factories; runoff from landfills and croplands
Nickel (ppb)
100
100
<10.0
NA
0
2014
erosion of natural deposits; electroplating/stainless steel/alloy products discharge; mining/refining operations
Selenium (ppb)
50
50
<3.00
NA
0
2014
discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from mines
Thallium (ppb)
0.5
2
<1.00
NA
0
2014
leaching from ore-processing sites; discharge from electronics glass, and drug factories
Level
Range of
MCLG
MCL
Found
Detection
Violation
Sample
Benzene (ppb)
0
5
<0.50
NA
0
2014
discharge from factories; leaching from gas storage tanks and landfills
Carbon tetrachloride (ppb)
0
5
<0.50
NA
0
2014
discharge from chemical plants and other industrial activities
100
100
<0.50
NA
0
2014
discharge from chemical and agricultural chemical factories
Volatile Organic Compounds plant tap
Dibromochloromethane (ppb)
Undetected Contaminants
Sample
Microbiological contaminants (system)
Total Coliform Bacteria
(MCL: presence of bacteria in >5% of
monthly samples)
Fecal Coliform bacteria
Radioactive plant tap
Inorganic Contaminants plant tap
Undetected Contaminants
Typical source of contamination found
Volatile Organic Compounds (plant tap)
Chlorobenzene (ppb)
10
CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT 2017
LABORATORY TEST RESULTS
1,2-Dichlorobenzene (ppb)
-
-
<0.50
NA
0
2014
1,4-Dichlorobenzene (ppb)
-
-
<0.50
NA
0
2014
1,1-Dichloroethene (ppb)
-
-
<0.50
NA
0
2014
1,2-Dichloroethane (ppb)
0
5
<0.50
NA
0
2014
discharge from industrial chemical factories
cis-1,2-Dichloroethene (ppb)
70
70
<0.50
NA
0
2014
discharge from industrial chemical factories
trans-1,2-Dichloroethene (ppb)
100
100
<0.50
NA
0
2014
discharge from industrial chemical factories
0
5
<0.50
NA
0
2014
discharge from industrial chemical factories
700
700
<0.5
NA
0
2014
discharge from petroleum refineries
-
-
<0.5
NA
0
2014
100
100
<0.5
NA
0
2014
discharge from rubber and plastic factories, leaching landfills
0
5
<0.5
NA
0
2014
discharge from factories and dry cleaners
1000
1000
<0.5
NA
0
2014
discharge from petroleum factories
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene (ppb)
70
70
<0.5
NA
0
2014
discharge from textile finishing factories
1,1,1-Trichloroethane (ppb)
200
200
<0.5
NA
0
2014
discharge from metal degreasing sites and other factories
1,1,2-Trichloroethane (ppb)
3
5
<0.5
NA
0
2014
discharge from industrial chemical factories
Trichloroethylene (ppb)
0
5
<0.5
NA
0
2014
discharge from metal degreasing factories and other factories
O-Xylene (ppb)
-
-
<0.50
NA
0
2014
Vinyl Chloride (ppb)
0
2
<0.5
NA
0
2014
leaching from plastic pipes; discharge from plastic factories
10000
10000
<1.5
NA
0
2014
discharge from petroleum factories and chemical factories
-
-
<1.0
NA
0
2014
Alachlor (ppb)
0
2
<0.10
NA
0
2014
Runoff from herbicide used on row crops
Atrazine (ppb)
3
3
<0.072
NA
0
2014
Runoff from herbicide used on row crops
Simazine (ppb)
4
4
<0.052
NA
0
2014
Runoff from herbicide used on row crops
1,2-Dichloropropane (ppb)
Ethylbenzene (ppb)
Methylene chloride (ppb)
Styrene (ppb)
Tetrachloroethylene (ppb)
Toluene (ppb)
Xylene (ppb)
M&P Xylene (ppb)
(after treatment)
Synthetic Organic Compounds (plant tap)
Additional Plant tap Water Quality
Parameters - Annual Averages
Chlorine, Free (ppm)
1.24
2016
Hardness, (ppm)
144
2016
Alkalinity, (ppm)
181
2016
Chloride, (ppm)
64
2016
Iron, (ppm)
<0.04
2016
Manganese, (ppm)
<0.01
2016
103
2016
Sodium, (ppm)
DEFINITION OF TERMS
(MCLG) Maximum Contaminant Level Goal: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which
there is no known or expected risk to health. MCGLs allow for a margin of safety.
(AL) Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers
treatment or other
(MCL) Maximum Contaminant Level: The highest level of contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.
MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology
(MRDLG) Maximum Residual Disinfection Level Goal
(MRDL) Maximum Residual Disinfection Level
(MRL) Minimum Reporting Level
Parts per billion (ppb): Units of measure for concentration of a contaminant. A ppb corresponds to one
second in 31.7 years.
requirements which a water system must follow.
Parts per million (ppm): Units of measure for concentration of a contaminant. A ppm
corresponds to one second in approximately 11.5 days.
The < symbol: A symbol which means less than. A result of
<5 means that the lowest level that could be detected
was 5 and the contaminant in that sample was not detected.
Picocuries per liter (pCi/L): A measure of radioactivity in water
EPA SAMPLING REQUIREMENT
The EPA requires regular sampling to ensure drinking water
safety. The City of Athens Water Treatment Plant conducted
sampling for bacteria, inorganic, radiological, synthetic organic,
volatile organic from 2008-2013. The Ohio EPA requires us to
monitor for some contaminants less than once per year because
the concentrations of these contaminants do not change
frequently. Some of our data, though accurate, is more than
one year old. The City of Athens Laboratory Test Results can be
found on pages 10 and 11.
Range of Detection: The lowest test result to the highest test result
CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT 2017
11
ATHENS WATER TREATMENT PLANT
Presorted Std.
U.S. Postage
PAID
Athens, OH
Permit
No. 1030
395 West State St., Athens, OH 45701
OCCUPANT
THE CITY OF ATHENS
WATER DEPARTMENT
License to Operate status: We have a current unconditional license to operate our water system.
Water Water Laboratory
Treatment Distribution
740-593-3502, 7:30-4pm
PlantMaintenance
740-592-3344
740-593-7636City of Athens online:
24 hrs 7 days
7:30-4pm
www.ci.athens.oh.us
Utilities Billing Office
740-592-3347 8am-4pm M-F
Engineering Public Works Dept.
740-593-7636 7:30-4pm M-F
www.facebook.com/athensohio
Boil Order
Hotline
740-594-5078
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
Q.
A.
Why is the fire hydrant running?
The running of the hydrant releases the air in the water line.
Q. I reported a break an hour ago and there is no one digging
yet, why not?
A. We have to have responses from member utilities for
the Ohio Utilities Protection Service (OUPS) underground utilities
locators before we dig. Sometimes this can take an hour or two.
Locators commonly come from Columbus, Chillicothe, etc. When
the gas, electric, and communications lines have been located,
then we can safely begin digging.
Q.
A.
12
What is the hardness of the water in grains per gallon?
The average hardness of the water is around 150 mg/l which equals 8.76 grains per gallon (1 grain per gallon equals 17.12 mg/l).
CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT 2017