Tips and Recipes for Quantity Cooking

Tips and
Recipes for
Quantity
Cooking:
Nourishing
Minds and
Bodies
Tips and Recipes for Quantity Cooking: Nourishing Minds and
Bodies has been created to assist people who prepare food for
sale to students – such as food services staff, chef instructors,
caterers, school teams, students, Parent Advisory Councils and
others – in implementing the Guidelines for Food and Beverage
Sales in BC Schools. It includes tips on how to choose healthy
recipes, substitutions to make favourite recipes healthier and a
selection of recipes that meet the Guidelines.
The Guidelines were developed to support a healthy school environment
– making healthy choices the easy choices – and apply to all foods
and beverages sold to students. They divide items into categories
based on nutrient criteria. Only Choose Most and Choose Sometimes
foods and beverages may be sold to students.
Remember to consider food and nutrition policies in place at your
school (e.g. food allergies) when using the tips and recipes in this book.
Why provide healthy foods
in school food services?
Healthy students learn better.
Table of Contents
Research shows that well-nourished children learn
better, behave better and feel better.
Meeting the Guidelines
To support classroom learning.
Vegetables and Fruit ............................. 4
Offering healthy foods supports healthy lifestyle
choices, which in turn reinforce curricula such as
Health and Career Education, Foods and Nutrition
and Physical Education.
Milk and Alternatives ............................. 6
For a healthy school environment.
Primer on Fat, Sugar, and Salt ............ 13
Preparing and offering healthy foods shows a
commitment to promoting healthy behaviours
among students, staff, families and the community
at large. Schools that put health first discover that
they are also supporting learning and development
in students, a sense of community, and social
inclusion.
– where to begin ................................... 2
Menu Planning Tips ............................... 3
Grain Products ...................................... 5
Meat and Alternatives ........................... 7
Plan seasonally, buy close to home ...... 9
Sensational Substitutions – Cooking ... 10
Sensational Substitutions – Baking ..... 12
Recipes
Soups and Sauces .............................. 15
Salads and Sides ............................... 33
Dips and Dressings ............................. 48
Pasta and Pizza ................................... 53
Entrées ................................................ 58
Sandwiches ........................................ 77
Baked Goods and Desserts ................ 81
Resources .......................................... 96
1
Meeting the Guidelines – where to begin
Start with Canada’s Food Guide!
The Guidelines are based on Eating Well with Canada’s
Food Guide (2007). Use the recommendations in the
Food Guide to plan menus and prepare meals. This is
the most important step in implementing the Guidelines.
For information on school meal program planning, see the
School Meal and School Nutrition Program Handbook at
www.bced.gov.bc.ca/health/ (available fall 2009).
The Food Guide divides foods into four food groups:
Cafeterias stock some packaged
and ready-to-serve foods for sale too.
To find out if they are Choose Most
or Choose Sometimes, use the
Brand Name Food List at
www.brandnamefoodlist.ca
and/or the Criteria Chart for Food
and Beverage Sales Guidelines at
www.bced.gov.bc.ca/health/
healthy_eating/food_guidelines/
resources.htm
•
Vegetables and Fruit
•
Grain Products
•
Milk and Alternatives
•
Meat and Alternatives
•
Plan lunch and dinner to include items from all four food groups and breakfast
to include items from at least three. Plan snacks to include foods from at least
two of the four food groups.
•
Serve moderate portions that will suit many appetites – large enough to satisfy
hungry kids, but not so large that they encourage overeating and/or result in a
lot of waste. Students with higher energy needs may choose to add a side dish
to satisfy their bigger appetites.
Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide
is available from Health Canada.
Go to www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/foodguide-aliment/index-eng.php or call
1-866-225-0709.
2
Emphasize
Limit
•
Vegetables and fruit
•
•
Whole grains and products
(brown rice, rolled oats, whole grain
breads, whole grain cereals)
Saturated fats (in butter, ghee, lard,
coconut oil, palm kernel and palm oils,
deli meats, bacon, and sausages)
•
Trans fats (in partially-hydrogenated
margarine, shortening and oils and in
products that contain these fats, such
as baked goods, fried foods and
processed foods)
•
Salt (in processed foods, added in
cooking and at the table)
•
Sugar (in sugary drinks, juice,
baked goods, many dry breakfast
cereals, candies)
•
Refined grains (white flour, white
rice, white pasta, many dry breakfast
cereals, cream of wheat)
•
Legumes (dried beans, peas, lentils)
•
Fish
•
Calcium-rich foods (low-fat milk,
yogourt, low-fat fortified soy beverage,
canned salmon and sardines)
•
Unsaturated fats
(from vegetable oils, nuts, seeds)
•
Lean meat and poultry
•
Water to drink
Menu Planning Tips:
•
Use fresh foods simply prepared rather than highly processed and ready-to-serve products.
•
Include a serving of at least one vegetable in the entrée and promote sides of vegetables
and/or fruit.
•
Include at least one fresh fruit or fruit-based item in dessert offerings.
•
Make low-fat milk and/or low-fat fortified soy beverage available at all times.
•
Offer meat alternatives – such as beans, lentils, and tofu – often.
•
Offer fish, not battered or fried, at least once a week
•
Plan a seasonal menu and use BC products as often as possible.
•
Limit the number and types of condiments offered to two.
•
Take regular tea and coffee off the student menu.
•
Do not use artificial sweeteners in elementary and middle schools. Artificial sweeteners
are generally discouraged for use by all students except those with diabetes.
•
Follow allergy policies or guidelines in place at your school.
See Allergy Aware School and Childcare Settings at www.bcsta.org/anaphylaxis
3
Vegetables and Fruit
Feature vegetables and fruit prominently in menu planning –
they should take up the most space on the plate. A healthy
eating pattern is one that is rich in plant foods.
Offer vegetables
and/or fruit at all meals
and snacks
• Include at least one serving of
vegetables in the entrée, and
promote sides of vegetables
and/or fruit.
• Include at least one fresh fruit
or fruit-based item in dessert
offerings.
Maximize nutrition and
flavour; add little or no
fat, sugar, and salt when
preparing vegetables
and fruit
• Serve in-season vegetables
and fruit, simply prepared.
• Retain fibre by washing but not
peeling thin-skinned vegetables
such as new carrots and
potatoes.
• Steam or boil vegetables rather
than fry. Use herbs, spices,
flavoured vinegars or lemon juice
instead of adding fat or salt.
• Use frozen or canned vegetables
and fruit when fresh are not
available. Use no added salt
or reduced-sodium canned
vegetables, and fruit canned
in its own juice or water.
• Bake, boil, or mash potatoes.
Add buttermilk instead of cream,
sour cream or butter to mashed
potatoes.
4
• Stir-fry using only small
amounts of oil and salty
sauces, or use reduced-sodium
sauces (e.g., soy sauce, hoisin
sauce, fish sauce).
Offer dark green and
orange vegetables often
• Give preference to deeply
coloured greens over lightly
coloured. Try spinach or
romaine lettuce instead of
iceberg lettuce in a salad.
Serve orange vegetables such
as carrots, squash and yams;
use them or canned pumpkin
purée to make soup.
Offer vegetables and fruit
more often than juice
• Make juice portions small
– not more than 360 mL
in secondary schools, and
250 mL in elementary schools.
Grain Products
Use whole grain products often to boost fibre and
Offer cereals that are a high
nutrients. Introduce grains in salads and soups, which
source of fibre. Students
will find hot cereals more
are popular lunch items.
Offer whole grain
products rather than refined
grain products at least
half of the time
• Use a variety of grains, such as
cereals, rice, pasta, couscous,
quinoa, bulgur and millet. Try
brown or wild rice in recipes that
call for white, and whole grains
in soups and salads.
• Read labels and favour grain
products that provide at least 2 g of
fibre per serving. Try whole wheat
pasta instead of white pasta.
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appealing if a selection
Prepare grain products
with little or no added fat,
sugar, and salt
of toppings are offered,
• Use water, homemade stock or
milk to cook grain products. If
commercial stock is used, choose
reduced-sodium.
www.brandnamefoodlist.ca
• Serve pasta with reduced-sodium
sauce made with low-fat ingredients.
and Choose Sometimes
e.g., dried fruit, seeds,
nuts and yogourt. Check
for cereals and yogourt
that meet the Choose Most
categories.
Cooking Common Grains
The amount of time and the amount of liquid required to cook grains varies
depending on the type and size of the grain, as does the yield of the cooked grain.
The table below is a guideline only. When in doubt, check the package directions.
Grain (250 mL)
Water or broth
Cooking time
Yield
Brown rice
Wild rice
Millet
Pearl barley
Pot barley
Quinoa
Kamut or wheat berries
500 mL
750 mL
750 mL
750 mL
750 mL
500 mL
500 mL
45 minutes
60 minutes
25 minutes
35 minutes
60 minutes+
15 minutes
60 minutes
750 mL
1L
875 mL
875 mL
875 mL
625 mL
750 mL
To cook, combine grain and liquid in a large pot with a tight-fitting lid; bring to a
boil. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, for the suggested cooking time or until
liquid is absorbed. Fluff with a fork.
Recipe reprinted from Simply Great Food: 250 quick, easy & delicious recipes
© 2007 with permission of Dietitians of Canada. Published by Robert Rose Inc.
www.dietitians.ca
5
Milk and Alternatives
Make milk and alternatives available at all times.
Shakes and smoothies are popular with students and
can pack a nutritious punch.
Choose low-fat milk
and milk products (skim,
1%, 2%) and lower fat
alternatives to milk
• Include plain and flavoured
milk, yogourt drinks, fortified
soy beverages, shakes and
smoothies.
• Offer yogourt in breakfast bars,
as a topping for soups and
burritos, and as a base for
salad dressings and spreads.
• Boost protein and calcium by
adding skim milk powder to
casseroles, soups and baked
goods such as muffins.
• Add small amounts of shredded
cheese to pizzas, pastas,
casseroles, sandwiches, etc.
Limit added sugar and
ingredients high in sugar
• Sweeten shakes and smoothies
with fresh, canned (no added
sugar), or frozen fruit rather
than juice, sugar or honey.
6
Meat and Alternatives
Make quality rather than quantity count! Choose
products that are high in nutrients, low in fat and salt.
Serve alternatives such
as beans, lentils, and tofu
at least twice a week
• Replace all the meat, or some
of it, with legumes or tofu in
recipes such as chili, pasta
sauce, shepherd’s pie, curry,
stir-fry, casseroles, fajitas,
tacos and burritos.
• Serve bean salads and soups.
• Try burgers made with lentils
or other beans.
Serve fish at least once
a week
• Use salmon or tuna to
make sandwiches, burgers
or chowders.
• Make fish cakes by mixing
canned fish with potatoes.
• Use fresh or frozen fish
that has not been breaded,
battered or deep-fried.
Select lean meats and
alternatives prepared with
little or no added fat
and salt
• Use lean meats and low-fat
cooking methods. Choose
roasting, steaming or grilling
over frying. Do not deep-fry.
• Replace deli meats with
unprocessed meats such
as roast beef, pork, lamb,
turkey or chicken.
• Remove the skin and fat from
poultry before cooking. Choose
lean cuts of beef and pork,
such as “loin” or “round”.
Reduce the amount of fat in
meat by trimming visible fat
before cooking, draining fat
off meat after cooking and
removing the solid fat from
the surface after cooked
meat has been refrigerated.
• Make breading with toasted
whole wheat bread crumbs
or crushed whole grain cereal
flakes and bake rather than fry.
• Rinse canned beans and lentils
or use dried legumes instead.
• Use herbs and fresh salsas
instead of salt to flavour fish,
meat and poultry.
• Bake, boil, poach or steam
eggs instead of frying them.
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7
Cooking Dried Beans
Soaking
All dried beans need to be soaked before they are cooked to replace the water lost in
drying. A general rule is to use 750 mL water for every 250 mL beans. After soaking,
discard soaking water, rinse and replace with fresh water before cooking (this helps cut
down on the substance that causes gas). Note that while dried lentils are classified as a
legume, they don’t need to be presoaked.
• Overnight Soak: Let beans and water stand overnight in refrigerator. Drain. (Beans soaked
using this method cook more quickly and keep their shape better).
• Quick Soak: In a large saucepan, bring water and beans to a boil; cover and boil for 2 minutes.
Remove from heat and let stand for 1 hour. Drain.
• Microwave Soak: In a microwave-safe casserole dish, combine hot water and beans.
Cover and microwave on High for 15 minutes or until boiling. Let stand for 1 hour. Drain.
Cooking
To cook soaked beans, use 750 mL water for every 250 mL soaked beans and follow one
of the methods below. The longer you store beans, the more they dry out and the longer
you need to cook them. Never add salt or seasoning until the beans are tender; otherwise,
the skin will toughen and they will never soften.
• Stovetop Cooking: In a large saucepan, combine water and soaked beans. Cover and bring
to a full, rolling boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 45 to 60 minutes or until fork tender.
• Microwave Cooking: In a microwave-safe casserole dish, combine water and soaked beans.
Cover and microwave on High for 10 to 15 minutes or until boiling. Stir and microwave
on Medium (50%) for 15 minutes. Stir again and microwave on Medium (50%) for 10 to
20 minutes or until fork-tender.
Recipe reprinted from Simply Great Food: 250 quick, easy & delicious recipes
© 2007 with permission of Dietitians of Canada. Published by Robert Rose Inc. www.dietitians.ca
8
Plan seasonally, buy close to home
Make the choice for healthy foods, a healthy environment and a healthy economy by supporting producers
at home. Buy local and BC as often as possible.
Start small
• If you are not buying local already, start small and begin by
replacing even one imported item a month with something local.
• Support grocers, farmers and suppliers that offer local food.
• Start or expand a school garden.
Preserve the bounty
• Take advantage of the abundance of produce available in BC in the
late summer and early fall.
• Make preserving food a learning opportunity for students – drying,
freezing and even canning are becoming more popular in the food
service industry.
Learn what’s in season
Increase variety, a cornerstone of healthy eating, by planning a
seasonal menu.
Availability Chart of BC Grown Vegetables and Fruit
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Vegetables
Beans
Beets
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Celery
Corn
Cucumbers
Leeks
Lettuce
Onions
Parsnips
Peppers
Potatoes
Radishes
Rhubarb
Rutabagas
Spinach
Turnips
Zucchini
Fruit
Apples
Blackberries
Blueberries
Cherries
Currants
Gooseberries
Pears
Plums
Prunes
Raspberries
Saskatoon Berries
Strawberries
Adapted with permission from: Action Schools! BC (www.actionschoolsbc.ca). (2008) Availability Chart of BC Grown Vegetables and Fruit.
9
Sensational Substitutions – Cooking
Improve the nutritional value and lower the amount of fat, sugar, and salt
To
Instead of
Try
Use less fat
Frying
• Grilling, baking, roasting, broiling, or poaching
Butter, margarine,
or oil in the amount
called for
• Less than the recipe calls for
• Replacing with cooking spray, water, or broth, or
Fatty cuts of beef,
pork, lamb, or sausage
• Lean cuts of meat such as “loin” or “round”, and trimming visible fat
• Extra-lean ground meat, or draining off fat after browning lean or regular
• Fish, dried peas, beans, or lentils
Cooking poultry with
skin on
• Removing the skin and excess fat and cooking in a moist medium,
Large portions of meat,
poultry, or fish
• Mixed dishes with smaller portions of meat, such as casseroles,
using a non-stick frying pan
e.g., reduced-sodium broth
• Adding colour with paprika, herbs, or tomato sauce
stir-fry, stews, salads, and pasta
• Emphasizing vegetables, fruit, and grains
Ground beef or pork in
hamburgers, meatloaf,
meat balls, etc.
• Replacing 25 to 50% of the meat in the recipe with cooked beans,
Browning meat in oil
or other fat for a stew
or sauce
• Adding it raw and cooking until tender in the liquid, or browning in
Canned fish packed
in oil
• Canned fish packed in water, or rinsing if packed in oil
Whole milk or
half and half
• Skim, 1% or 2% milk, evaporated low-fat or skim milk, fortified milk
Cream
• Skim, 1% or 2% milk, or evaporated milk or equal parts
brown rice, crumbled soft or medium tofu, or whole grain bread crumbs
a non-stick skillet or one that has been sprayed with a non-stick
cooking spray
(one part skim milk powder to four parts low-fat or skim milk), or
plain low-fat calcium fortified soy milk
of low-fat milk and evaporated milk
• Fortified milk (one part skim milk powder to four parts
low-fat or skim milk)
• Low-fat sour cream
• Buttermilk
• Puréed potatoes, carrots, or tofu as thickeners in soups
Full-fat hard cheese in
amount called for
• Slicing or shredding and using less than called for
• Reduced fat cheese (less than 20% milk fat)
• Grating firm tofu and replace part of the cheese in pizza,
lasagna, and casseroles
Full-fat cream cheese
• Fat-free or low-fat cream cheese, yogourt cheese,
or cottage cheese puréed until smooth
Full-fat sour cream
• Replacing all or part with fat-free or low-fat sour cream, cottage
cheese, part-skim ricotta, yogourt cheese, or plain yogourt (250 mL
yogourt blended with 15 mL cornstarch if it will be cooked)
10
To
Instead of
Try
Use less fat
Whipping cream
• Whipping well-chilled, evaporated skim milk
Mayonnaise
• Replacing up to 100% with plain low-fat yogourt; part skim ricotta
cheese; blended tofu; blended low-fat cottage cheese; low-fat sour
cream; or reduced-calorie, reduced-fat mayonnaise
Oil-based marinades
• A combination of dealcoholized wine, balsamic vinegar, fruit juice,
or fat-free broth
Salad dressing with a
high ratio of oil (or
mayonnaise) to vinegar
• Replacing up to 50% of the oil called for with balsamic, raspberry,
rice, or sherry vinegar; fruit juice; tomato juice; buttermilk; plain
yogourt; soft cheese or puréed vegetables
• Fat-free or reduced-calorie, reduced-sodium commercial dressing
Using stock or broth
• Making ahead, degreasing, chilling, and skimming hardened fat
immediately after cooking
High-fat baked goods
• Using the suggestions in Sensational Substitutions – Baking
on page 12
Use less sugar Fruit canned in syrup
• Fresh fruit or fruit canned in its own juice or water
Fruit yogourt
• Plain yogourt mixed with fresh fruit or canned fruit (drained)
Syrup
• Puréed fruit or small amounts of syrup
High-sugar baked goods
• Using the suggestions in Sensational Substitutions – Baking
on page 12
Use less sodium Canned broth
• Homemade stock, or commercial reduced-sodium or salt-free stock,
or bouillon in soups, gravies, sauces, dressings, etc.
Regular canned foods
•
•
•
•
Processed, cured, or
smoked meats
• Fresh or frozen meat or poultry cooked without salt or high-sodium
Salted snack foods
• Unsalted or lightly salted products such as nuts, seeds, crackers,
Foods canned in water, preferably with no salt added
Reduced-sodium products
Draining and rinsing canned foods
Using fresh foods as much as possible
ingredients
• Small amounts of salty meats, served with larger amounts of vegetables
and fruit, grains or grain products
popcorn or pretzels
• Dried fruit
• Emphasizing vegetables and fruit
Instant packaged
foods, especially with
salty powder or
sauce packets
• Preparing product from scratch using fresh ingredients
• Using only a small amount of the prepared powder or sauce
Commercial condiments
•
•
•
•
Homemade herb and spice mixtures
Chopped or sliced vegetables or fruit instead of pickles
Homemade chunky fruit or vegetable sauces like salsa, chutney or relish
Small amounts of condiments such as ketchup, soy sauce,
commercial salad dressings and salsas, pickles, etc.
• Substituting reduced-sodium products
11
Sensational Substitutions – Baking
Improve the nutritional value and lower the amount of fat, sugar, and salt
To
Instead of
Try
Boost fibre
250 mL white flour
• 125 mL white flour plus 125 mL whole wheat or whole grain flour
• 175 mL white flour plus 50 mL ground flaxseed
• Adding wheat bran or oatmeal to breads and muffins
Use less fat
125 mL fat
e.g., oil, margarine,
or butter
• 50 mL mashed fruit plus 50 mL fat; use applesauce, apple butter,
250 mL fat e.g., oil,
margarine,or butter
• 150 to 175 mL fat
250 mL solid fat
e.g., margarine, butter, or
shortening in yeast breads
• 175 mL ricotta cheese plus 50 mL solid fat
Double-crust pies
• Single-crust pies, pies with graham cracker crumb crusts, fruit
mashed banana, puréed prunes, or puréed pumpkin (using
mashed fruit may reduce the baking time by 25%)
cobblers with crumb topping or phyllo pastry
(15 mL fat to 3 sheets of phyllo)
Whole milk
• Skim, 1%, or evaporated skim milk, or plain low-fat
calcium fortified soy beverage
Cream
• Milk, low-fat evaporated milk, or low-fat sour cream
Use less salt
Using the amount called for
• Omitting the salt or using less
Use less sugar
250 mL sugar
• 150 to 175 mL sugar; add cinnamon, vanilla, or almond extract
250 mL
chocolate chips
• 125 mL mini chocolate chips; 125 to 250 mL chopped
Fruit canned in syrup
• Fruit canned in its own juice or water, or fresh fruit
Fruit yogourt
• Plain yogourt mixed with fresh fruit
Frosting or icing
• Sliced fresh fruit, puréed fruit, or light dusting of
nuts or chopped dried fruits such as cranberries, raisins,
apricots or cherries (or a combination)
powdered or icing sugar
Boost iron
125 mL fat e.g., oil,
margarine, or butter
• 50 mL fat plus 50 mL pumpkin purée
• Adding raisins, dried apricots, pumpkin or sesame
seeds, nuts, oatmeal, wheat germ
375 mL sugar in
breads, muffins,
cookies
12
• 250 mL molasses and 175 mL sugar; add 2 mL of baking soda
for each 250 mL molasses; omit baking powder or use half the
amount. Molasses should not replace more than half of the sugar
called for in a recipe.
Primer on Fat, Sugar, and Salt
Fats and Oils
A small amount of sugar added to some nutritious foods
makes them palatable
Rhubarb, for example, is a hard sell without some sugar added!
Use added sugar to sweeten nutritious foods but limit high-sugar
foods and beverages that add calories but not nutrients, such
as candies, baked goods and sugary drinks. Be cautious with
100% fruit juice. The sugar content is high because the juice has
all the natural sugar that was in the fruit used to make the juice.
Both the type and amount of fat used is important.
Fat is described as:
• saturated, e.g., animal fats such as butter or lard, and
vegetable oils that are solid at room temperature, like
coconut and palm oils
• trans, e.g. partially-hydrogenated oils and margarine
and shortening made with these oils
• unsaturated (polyunsaturated and monounsaturated),
e.g., vegetable oils that are liquid at room temperature
like canola and olive oils
Choose mostly unsaturated fats such as vegetable oils,
and the type of fat found in nuts, seeds and fatty fish.
Limit saturated and trans fat.
•
•
•
•
•
Limit high-fat ingredients and use little or no added
fat when preparing and serving foods
Choose lean meats, such as “loin” or “round” cuts and
remove skin from poultry.
Avoid processed meats such as bologna, wieners, bacon,
sausage and pepperoni.
Choose low-fat dairy products such as skim, 1%, or 2% milk
and yogourt, and cheeses with less than 20% milk fat.
Limit the use of gravy, sour cream, table cream and
whipping cream.
Choose low-fat cooking methods such as boiling, baking,
broiling or grilling rather than frying. Avoid deep-frying.
Use fats and oils that are primarily unsaturated,
and limit saturated and trans fats
• Use vegetable oils such as those made from canola,
olives, corn, safflower, peanuts and soybeans.
• Choose margarine, shortening and vegetable oil that
does not contain the words ‘hydrogenated’ or ‘partially
hydrogenated’ in the ingredient list.
• Substitute non-hydrogenated margarine or vegetable oil
for butter, lard or beef tallow.
Sugar
Choose foods and beverages that are lower in sugar
• Choose vegetables and fruit more often than juice.
• Limit foods that are high in added sugar such as cakes,
candies, chocolate, cookies, doughnuts, ice cream, muffins,
pastries, pies, energy drinks, fruit-flavoured drinks, soft
drinks, sports drinks and hot chocolate syrups.
Salt
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Choose foods and beverages that are lower in salt,
and prepare foods with little or no added salt
Choose fresh, simply prepared foods as often as possible.
Limit packaged, processed, and ready-to-serve foods such as
snack foods, processed luncheon meats, regular canned and
dried soups, frozen meals, cheese, gravies, dressings and sauces.
Use no added salt or reduced-sodium ingredients whenever possible.
Read labels – if the sodium content in the Nutrition Facts
table is 5% or less of the DV (Daily Value), then the product
is considered low in salt.
Use salty foods like cured meats, bacon, sauerkraut,
dill pickles, and soy sauce as flavour enhancers, rather
than the basis of an entrée, e.g.,
Use only one strip of crispy bacon on a sandwich or burger.
Limit dill pickles to one slice.
Use lower sodium ingredients in place of salty ingredients,
e.g., spinach or broccoli instead of bacon in a Quiche Lorraine.
Use prepared sauces – e.g., soy sauce – with a light hand in
cooking; do not offer as a condiment.
Offer only small amounts of commercial salsa. Better yet,
make your own with little added salt.
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di
so
d
reduce
esh foods an
emphasize fr
products, and
ingredients.
13
Recipe Table of Contents
Soups and Sauces
Dips and Dressings
Sandwiches
Chicken Noodle Soup ........................ 16
Tofu Caesar Salad Dressing................ 49
Breakfast Club Sandwich ................... 78
Kashmiri Carrot Soup ......................... 17
Oriental Vinaigrette............................. 49
Grilled Vegetable Roll-Ups .................. 79
Beef Chili Soup .................................. 18
Dip for Vegetables .............................. 50
Grilled Chicken
Cauliflower Sweet Potato
Hummus ............................................ 51
Clubhouse Sandwich.......................... 80
Curry Soup......................................... 19
Tortilla Chips....................................... 52
Cream of Asparagus Soup.................. 20
Pasta and Pizza
Rocky Mountain Café Muffins............. 82
French Lentil Soup ............................. 21
Pasta Primavera ................................. 53
Fruit Muffins ....................................... 83
Moroccan Lentil Soup ........................22
Rotini with Chorizo Sausage............... 54
Honey Whole Wheat Buns .................. 84
Roasted Tomato and
Chickpea and Zucchini Curry.............. 55
All Purpose Dough: Cheese Buns....... 85
White Bean Soup ............................... 23
All Purpose Dough: Pizza Crust........... 57
Fibre Feast Bread............................... 86
Smoky Pumpkin Soup........................ 24
Entrées
Apple Flax Bread................................ 87
Chicken Stock .................................... 25
Chicken Breasts with Onion,
Blueberry Oat Bars............................. 88
Beef Stock ......................................... 26
Garlic, and Basil................................. 58
Irish Soda Bread ................................ 89
Fish Stock .......................................... 27
Vegetable Stock ................................. 27
Chicken Souvlaki................................ 59
Chicken Enchilada.............................. 60
Tomato Sauce .................................... 28
Alfredo Sauce..................................... 29
Thai Chicken Stir-fry
with Spicy Peanut Sauce.................... 61
Roasted Red Pepper Pasta
Sauce with Caramelized Onion........... 30
Special Tomato Sauce........................ 31
Roasted Tomato Sauce....................... 32
Thai Pork Tenderloin............................ 62
Greek Pasta Salad .............................34
Chili Ginger Rice Noodle Salad .......... 35
Cafeteria Burgers................................ 63
Roasted Basa..................................... 65
Cod Fillet with Tomato
and Herb Sauce ................................. 66
Paella................................................. 67
Seafood Casserole ............................. 68
Taco Salad ......................................... 38
Savory Seafood Burgers ..................... 69
Tomato, Feta and
Black Bean Chili................................. 70
Wheat Berry Salad............................. 39
Veggie Burgers.................................... 71
Middle Eastern Chickpea,
Breakfast Burrito with
Parsley and Cabbage Salad ............... 40
Pan Fried Yukon Gold Potatoes
Soba Noodle Salad............................ 41
and Fresh Fruit................................... 72
Barley and Corn Risotto ..................... 42
Tofu Burritos ....................................... 73
Steamed Asian Vegetable Medley....... 43
Curried Vegetables with Dahl.............. 74
Homemade Sweet Potato Fries .......... 44
Three Sisters Stew.............................. 75
Dijon Scalloped Potatoes ................... 45
Punjabi Spiced Chickpeas.................. 76
Caponata ........................................... 46
Apple and Rutabaga Crisp ................. 47
14
Basic Recipe
for Oatmeal Cookies........................... 91
Gingersnaps ....................................... 92
Fruit Yogourt Smoothies...................... 93
Parfaits............................................... 94
Oriental Salad with Beef .................... 36
Taboule............................................... 37
Baked Bannock.................................. 90
Vernon Senior Secondary
Shepherd’s Pie ................................... 64
Salads and Sides
Baked Goods & Desserts
Conversion Table .............................. 95
Soups and Sauces
A hearty bowl of soup served with whole grain crackers
or bread, salad or fruit, and milk makes an excellent lunch.
Sauces add interest to foods by enhancing flavour, colour,
healthy ingredients and served in appropriate amounts.
prepared with commercial stock bases,
will not meet the Guidelines because
they are too high in sodium. To make
soups that are Choose Most or Choose
Sometimes use the tips on this page.
When using homemade stock and
low-sodium ingredients, do not add
more salt than what is indicated in
the table. If using commercial soup
base or salty ingredients, add less salt
(e.g. no more than 30 mL/50 servings).
When using no salt added or
reduced-sodium ingredients,
an acceptable amount of
added salt is approximately:
Servings
of recipe
(no.)
• Use in-season vegetables
to add variety, flavour and
nutrients.
• Boost iron by adding lean meat,
whole grains and legumes.
and even nutrients, provided they are prepared with
Many ready-to-serve soups, or soups
Emphasize vegetables,
legumes, lean meats,
and whole grains
Salt called for
is less than
(mL)
(g)
1
1
1
12
15
18
50
60
74
Prepare products
with reduced-sodium
ingredients and limit
added salt
• Use homemade stock, or a
reduced-sodium commercial
stock base, and low-sodium
ingredients (e.g., no added
salt tomatoes). Flavour with
herbs, spices and a small
amount of salt if desired.
• Rinse canned beans and lentils,
or use dried legumes instead.
Prepare products with
lower fat ingredients and
limit added fat
• Degrease homemade stock,
and substitute low-fat ingredients for high-fat ingredients.
Replace cream with milk,
fortified milk (four parts skim
milk to one part skim milk
powder), or equal parts of lowfat milk and evaporated milk.
• Prepare tomato or low-fat
white sauces in favour of
cream sauces.
• Serve fresh salsas instead of
creamy sauces, for example
with fish and chicken dishes.
15
Chicken Noodle Soup
Yield: approximately 60 x 250 mL portions
750 g
diced carrots
750 g
diced celery
750 g
diced onion
50 g
minced garlic
30 mL
oil
10 L
chicken stock (recipe
page 25 or reconstituted
reduced-sodium chicken
stock powder)
800 g
chicken, skin removed,
cooked and diced
800 g
cooked whole
wheat noodles
50 mL
minced parsley
To Taste
pepper
To Taste
ground nutmeg
5 mL
salt
1. Sauté the carrots, celery, onion and garlic in the oil on medium heat
until the onions are translucent. Add the stock and chicken and cook for
30 minutes.
2. Just before serving, add the pasta, parsley and seasonings.
The Rocky Mountain Café, David Thompson Secondary School
Cook Training, Invermere
up with
Prepare stock so
nts of vegetables
generous amou
, which will act
including potato
Purée and add
as a thickener.
of cream or
a small amount
r 4 L of soup)
milk (250 mL pe
to finish.
16
Kashmiri Carrot Soup
Yield: approximately 23 x 250 mL portions
30 mL
canola oil
575 g
diced onion
30 g
minced garlic
15 g
minced ginger
15 mL
ground cumin
15 mL
ground coriander
15 mL
turmeric powder
5 mL
cayenne pepper
2 kg
diced carrots
2-3
large potatoes, diced
3.5 L
vegetable stock (recipe
page 27 or reconstituted
reduced-sodium vegetable
stock powder)
500 mL
evaporated milk (1%)
~125 mL
plain yogourt
1. Heat oil in soup pot and sauté the
onions, garlic and ginger until the
onions begin to caramelize. Add spices
and cook for 2 minutes. Add carrots
and sauté for a further 5 minutes.
2. Add the potatoes and stock. Bring
to a boil, reduce heat and simmer until
vegetables are tender. Remove from
heat and add evaporated milk.
3. Purée in blender. If too thick, thin
with extra stock or water.
4. Serve garnished with a spoonful of
plain yogourt and minced cilantro or
diced green onions.
minced cilantro or diced
green onions
The Rocky Mountain Café, David Thompson Secondary School
Cook Training, Invermere
17
Beef Chili Soup
Yield: approximately 20 L or 80 x 250 mL portions
2 kg
lean ground beef, browned
and fat removed
50 g
canola or olive oil
2 kg
1.15 kg
tomato sauce (recipe page 28)
1
2.84 L can red kidney
beans, drained and rinsed
onions, medium dice
100 g
onion soup mix
50 g
garlic, chopped
50 g
chili powder
2 kg
carrots, medium dice
To Taste
pepper
1 kg
celery, medium dice
15 L
750 g
yams, peeled and diced
1
2.84 L can diced tomatoes
beef stock (recipe page 26 or
reconstituted reduced-sodium
beef stock powder)
1. Sauté the ground beef and remove excess fat. Set aside.
2. In a clean stockpot sauté onions, garlic, carrots and celery in oil until transparent.
3. Add yams. Sauté for 5 minutes more.
4. Add tomatoes, tomato sauce, kidney beans, onion soup mix, chili powder and pepper
to the onion mixture. Add beef and beef stock.
5. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 45 minutes.
6. Serve.
Miriam Borys, Cafeteria Teaching Kitchen Instructor, Burnaby Central Secondary
18
The Burnaby Mountain Secondary Advanced Foods 12 students serve soup
and bread every Wednesday from the “Soup Cellar”, so named because the
kitchen is in the basement of the school. Students and staff can purchase soup,
served in their own mug, and bread, or they can put a deposit on a mug which
is returned when the mug is returned. Compostable spoons are provided
which eventually find their way into the soil in either the school garden or
greenhouse in which the herbs for the soups are grown. They’ve discovered
kids love soup, especially on cold, rainy days. They’ve also discovered that
puréed soup sells better – they surmise it’s because one can’t readily identify
the variety of ingredients in the final product! For example, the “Cauliflower
Sweet Potato Curry” soup was a great seller – the cauliflower made it creamy
and the potato made it sweet.
Cauliflower Sweet Potato Curry Soup
Yield: approximately 20 x 350 mL servings
40 mL
vegetable oil
40 mL
crushed garlic
1L
chopped onion
20 mL
medium curry powder
10 mL
cinnamon
1 mL
freshly ground black pepper
2L
chopped cauliflower
4L
vegetable stock (recipe page 27)
or chicken stock (recipe page 25
or reconstituted reducedsodium stock powder)
3.5 L
peeled, diced sweet potatoes
90 mL
honey
1. In a large, non-stick saucepan sprayed with vegetable spray, heat the oil.
Sauté the garlic and onion until softened, about 5 minutes.
2. Add the curry powder, cinnamon, pepper, cauliflower, stock, sweet
potatoes and honey and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat and simmer
for 25 minutes or until the potatoes are tender.
3. Transfer to a food processor or blender, and purée until creamy and smooth.
Return to the saucepan and thin with more stock if desired. Heat and serve.
Anthony Mah and Will Haberl, modified by Burnaby Mountain Secondary
Advanced Foods 12 students
This soup was serv
ed with Honey
Whole Wheat Buns
(recipe page
84). For a nutrition
ally balanced
meal, add an item
from both the
Milk and Alteratives
and Meat
and Alternatives fo
od groups.
For example, add a
glass of milk
and bean spread fo
r the bun.
19
Cream of Asparagus Soup
Yield: approximately 4 L or 16 x 250 mL servings
A
100 g
D
olive oil
4L
B
chicken stock (recipe page 25
or reconstituted reducedsodium chicken stock powder)
400 g
onion, diced
200 g
celery, diced
4
garlic cloves, minced
750 mL
1 kg
asparagus, tips reserved
for garnish
F
Pinch
salt
Yukon Gold potatos, diced
To Taste
pepper
600 g
C
200 mL
E
1% milk, heated
G
dealcoholized white wine
16 each
thin (.5 cm) slices baguette,
baked
Method
1. Heat A.
2. Add B, lightly season with salt and pepper and smother for 8-10 minutes.
Do not brown.
3. Add C, and cook until volume reduces by half.
4. Add D, and simmer until the vegetables are soft, approximately 15-20 minutes.
5. Purée soup and add E.
6. Season with a pinch of salt and pepper to taste.
7. Garnish with blanched asparagus tips and fresh crostini.
Trevor Randle, Chef Instructor, Maple Ridge Secondary School
relatively
a
is
s
u
g
ble
Aspara
lly availa
a
c
lo
,
p
o
te
early cr
. Celebra
e
n
u
J
d
n
in May a
th
n of grow
o
s
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s
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soup.
with this
20
French Lentil Soup
Yield: 8.3 L or 26/27 x 300 mL portions
80 mL
olive oil
300 g
finely chopped onions
4
2 bunches
sorrel or spinach leaves,
finely sliced
cloves garlic, chopped
2 each
bay leaves
750 mL
lentils
150 g
small dice carrots
6L
chicken stock (recipe page 25
or reconstituted reducedsodium chicken stock powder)
350 g
small cube potatoes
500 mL
chopped tomatoes
24 g
salt
100 g
finely diced celery
To Taste
pepper
200 g
small dice turnip
250 mL
cooked rice (optional)
1. Sauté the onion and garlic in olive oil without colouration in a soup pot, for about 5 minutes.
2. Wash and rinse the lentils and add them to the soup pot.
3. Add the chicken stock and vegetables, except for the sorrel or spinach.
4. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and cook slowly for 1 hour.
5. Add the sorrel or spinach.
6. Season to taste and remove the bay leaves at the end of the cooking process.
Add cooked rice if desired.
Brother Victor-Antoine d’Avila-Latourette, submitted by Chef Daniel Lesnes,
Garibaldi Secondary, Maple Ridge
21
Moroccan Lentil Soup
Yield: 7.3 L or 24 x 300 mL portions
40 mL
olive oil
500 g
finely chopped onions
5
garlic cloves, chopped
15 mL
grated ginger
4L
chicken stock (recipe page 25
or reconstituted reducedsodium chicken stock powder)
625 mL
cooked cannellini beans
(see recipe page 8) or canned,
drained and rinsed
500 mL
chopped tomatoes
200 g
brunoise (small cube) carrots
200 g
small dice celery
30 mL
garam masala
625 mL
lentils
15 mL
ground cardamom
625 mL
cooked garbanzo beans
(see recipe page 8) or canned,
drained and rinsed
10 mL
cayenne pepper
15 mL
ground cumin
1. In a large pot, sauté the onion, garlic and ginger in the olive oil until translucent.
2. Add the chicken stock, lentils, garbanzo beans, cannellini beans, tomatoes, carrots, celery,
garam masala, cardamom, cayenne pepper and cumin. Bring to a boil for a few minutes,
reduce heat and simmer for about 1 hour, until the lentils are soft.
3. Purée half the soup in food processor or blender. Return the puréed
soup to the pot and stir.
Brother Victor-Antoine d’Avila-Latourette, submitted by Chef Daniel Lesnes,
Garibaldi Secondary, Maple Ridge
22
Roasted Tomato and White Bean Soup
Yield: approximately 6 L or 20 x 300 mL portions
15
medium tomatoes
12
cloves garlic, minced
5 mL
kosher salt
5 mL
paprika
50 mL
canola oil
5 mL
seasoned salt
30 turns
grinder
whole black peppercorns
100 mL
white dealcoholized wine
2L
cooked white beans
5 mL
dried chipotle pepper
3.5 L
30 mL
balsamic vinegar
vegetable stock (recipe page 27
or reconstituted reducedsodium vegetable stock powder)
15 mL
canola oil
1
medium onion, diced
10 mL
dried chipotle pepper
1
large carrot, diced
1
bunch parsley, chopped
5
stalks celery, diced
1. Stem and cut tomatoes in half. Place into large bowl and add salt, 50 mL oil, black pepper,
chipotle pepper and vinegar. Toss well.
2. Place into insert and roast in 160°C (325°F) oven for 40 minutes or until tomatoes turn
soft and lightly brown. Set aside.
3. In a large stockpot, sauté onion, carrot, celery and garlic in 15 mL oil for 3 minutes.
4. Add paprika and seasoned salt and cook for 1 minute.
5. Add tomatoes, beans and stock. Bring to a simmer and simmer for 45 minutes.
6. Purée until smooth.
7. Just before serving add chipotle pepper and parsley.
L. Bourne, Culinary Instructor, New Westminster Secondary School Café
23
Smoky Pumpkin Soup
Yield: 3.9 L or 12/13 x 300 mL portions
250 g
small dice leeks
70 g
margarine, non-hydrogenated
5
bacon slices, diced
60 g
all-purpose flour
150 g
small dice carrots
250 mL
plain yogourt (2% MF or less)
750 mL
cooked pumpkin
10 mL
salt
2.5 L
chicken stock (recipe page 25
or reconstituted reducedsodium chicken stock powder)
To Taste
pepper
5 sprigs
parsley, finely chopped
1. Sauté the bacon over medium heat until it starts to become crisp, add leeks and carrots,
cook for 5 minutes, add flour.
2. Add 500 mL of chicken stock and continue to cook until carrots are tender.
3. Add the cooked pumpkin and blend in food processor until puréed.
4. Place mixture into soup pot and add remaining stock and margarine.
5. Just before serving, stir yogourt into the soup.
6. Season with salt and pepper and garnish with chopped parsley.
Chef Daniel Lesnes, Garibaldi Secondary, Maple Ridge
n
the autum
e
t
ra
b
le
e
C
n with
Hallowe’e
r
o
t
s
e
v
r
ha
nal soup.
this seaso
24
Chicken Stock
Yield: 8, 16 or 32 cups
x8
x16
x32
Chicken parts (backs,
necks, wings, legs or thighs)
4 lbs
8 lbs
16 lbs
Cold water
16 cups
32 cups
64 cups
Onions, coarsely chopped
1
2
3
Medium carrots, peeled
and coarsely chopped
1
2
3
Celery stalks, coarsely chopped
1
2
3
Sprigs parsley
1
2
3
Bay leaves
1
2
3
Large pinches dried thyme
1
2
3
1. Combine chicken parts and water in a large pot and bring to a boil.
Turn down to a simmer. Skim off the scum that rises to the top and discard.
Simmer for half an hour, skimming frequently.
2. Add onion, carrot, celery, parsley, bay leaf and thyme. Simmer uncovered
for 3 hours, adding water as needed to replenish the water level.
3. Strain into a pot or other heatproof container. Cool and refrigerate.
4. Remove the fat and transfer to smaller containers. Keeps for 3 days,
covered and refrigerated. Freeze for up to 3 months.
Recipe reprinted from Many Hands: Community Kitchens Share Their Best
© 2005 with permission of Community Kitchens Publishing. Vancouver Community
Kitchen Project www.communitykitchens.ca
Degrease
stock by u
sing a
“separato
r cup” (wit
h a spout
at the bott
om to dra
in off the
stock and
leave the
fat behind
a “degrea
),
sing mop”
, or paper
towels to
soak up th
e fat and
leave the
stock beh
ind.
Refrigerate
stock over
night
and skim
any remain
ing fat
from the to
p.
25
Beef Stock
Yield: approximately 10, 20 or 30 cups
x10
x20
x30
Beef bones, sawed into 1- to 2-inch pieces
4 lbs
8 lbs
12 lbs
Onions, unpeeled and quartered
2
4
6
Carrots, scrubbed and cut into chunks
2
4
6
Celery stalks, cut into chunks
2
4
6
Bay leaves
1
Dried thyme
1
1
3
Sprigs parsley
2
4
6
Cloves garlic, unpeeled
1
2
3
Tomatoes, seeded and chopped
1
2
3
⁄4 tsp
2
⁄2 tsp
3
⁄4 tsp
1. Preheat the oven to 450°F. Arrange the bones in a roasting pan(s) in a single layer.
Roast 35-40 minutes or until browned.
2. Add the onions, carrots and celery. Roast until browned, about 30 minutes or more.
3. Transfer the bones and vegetables to a large stock pot(s), leaving behind any fat in
the roasting pan. Add cold water to come 6 inches above the bones. Bring to a boil
and reduce heat to a simmer. Remove any scum that rises to the top.
4. Add the bay leaf (leaves), thyme, parsley, garlic and tomato. Simmer, skimming
scum off the surface, for 4-6 hours, replenishing the water level as necessary.
5. Strain, discarding the bones and vegetables. Refrigerate overnight and remove the
fat from the surface.
4. For easier storage and a stronger flavour, reduce the stock by half. Refrigerate up to
3 days or freeze until needed.
Recipe reprinted from Many Hands: Community Kitchens Share Their Best
© 2005 with permission of Community Kitchens Publishing.
Vancouver Community Kitchen Project www.communitykitchens.ca
to store
The easiest way
them in
stocks is to seal
d freeze in
zip lock bags an
hen frozen,
a single layer. W
stacked in
the bags can be
the freezer.
26
Fish Stock
Yield: 4, 8 or 12 cups
x4
x8
x12
Vegetable oil
1 tsp
2 tsp
1 tbsp
Small onions, chopped
1
2
3
Leeks, white and light green part only, chopped
1
2
3
Celery stalks, chopped
1
2
3
Small carrots, chopped
1
2
3
Sprigs parsley
2
4
6
Fish bones, from lean white fish only,
cut into pieces
1 1⁄2 lbs
3 lbs
4 1⁄2 lbs
Water
5 cups
10 cups
15 cups
1. Over medium heat, heat the oil in a large, heavy pot and sauté the vegetables until soft.
2. Add the parsley, fish bones and water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer,
uncovered, for about 30-40 minutes, skimming off the scum as it rises to the top.
3. Strain and cool. Refrigerate for up to 3 days or freeze for up to 3 months, until needed.
Vegetable Stock
Yield: approximately 16, 32 or 48 cups
To make a
double-strength stock:
1. make the stock.
2. repeat, using the
already-made vegetable
stock as the liquid in
the recipe.
Recipes reprinted from Many
Hands: Community Kitchens
Share Their Best © 2005 with
permission of Community
Kitchens Publishing. Vancouver
Community Kitchen Project
www.communitykitchens.ca
x16
x32
Vegetable oil
4 tbsp
1
3
Medium onions, chopped
4
8
12
Celery stalks, chopped
2
4
6
Medium carrots, sliced
2
4
6
Small white turnips, chopped
1
2
3
Heads garlic, unpeeled and cut in half crosswise
1
2
3
Mushrooms, chopped
1
⁄2 lb
1 lb
1 1⁄2 lbs
Tomatoes, chopped
2
4
6
Bay leaves
2
4
6
Water
20 cups
40 cups
60 cups
⁄2 cup
x48
⁄4 cup
1. In a large pot, heat the vegetable oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions, celery,
carrots, turnips, garlic and mushrooms. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables
soften, about 15 minutes.
2. Add the tomatoes, bay leaves and water. Bring to a boil, then turn down to a simmer.
Cook for 1 hour.
3. Strain, pressing down on the solids to extract the flavour.
Cool and refrigerate for up to 3 days or freeze for up to 3 months for longer storage.
27
Tomato Sauce
Yield: approximately 15 to 16 L or 125 x 125 mL portions
250 mL
canola oil
3 kg
onion, diced
1. Sauté onions and garlic in oil until
the onions are lightly browned.
100 g
garlic, minced
2. Add tomato paste and spices.
500 g
tomato paste
3. Sauté for another minute.
30 mL
dried basil
45 mL
dried oregano leaves
4. Add remaining ingredients and
simmer, covered, on a very low heat
for 2 hours.
15 mL
dried rosemary
2
bay leaves
30 mL
black pepper
5
2.84 L cans tomatoes,
no added salt
50 mL
Worcestershire sauce
5. Adjust seasoning.
The Rocky Mountain Café, David Thompson Secondary School Cook Training, Invermere
28
Alfredo Sauce
Yield: approximately 3 L or 24 x 125 mL portions
30 g
margarine, non-hydrogenated
or butter
2L
1% milk
50 mL
dealcoholized white wine
100 mL
canola oil
2 mL
kosher salt
12
cloves garlic, minced
whole black peppercorns
2
whole bay leaves,
broken in half
30 turns
grinder
1 mL
ground nutmeg
2
whole cloves
100 g
parmesan cheese, grated
125 g
all-purpose flour
This sauce served over
200 mL whole grain pasta,
garnished with a small
portion (15 mL) parmesan
cheese, makes a great
“Mini Pasta Bowl”.
Pump up the nutrition
by serving with a side of
veggies or salad.
1. Over medium-low heat, melt margarine or butter with oil in a medium pot.
Add, garlic, bay leaves and cloves. Cook for 2 minutes.
2. Add flour and cook for 5 minutes, making sure not to burn.
3. Pour in half of the milk and whisk until smooth.
4. Add remaining milk, wine, salt, pepper and nutmeg.
5. Over low heat, bring sauce to a simmer. Simmer until thick, about 7 minutes,
while constantly stirring so sauce will not burn.
6. Add parmesan cheese 5 minutes before serving.
L. Bourne, Culinary Instructor, New Westminster Secondary School Café
Prepare a low-fat
white sauce
by making some
alterations to
a traditional whi
te sauce. Use
skim, 1%, 2%, or
evaporated
milk instead of
whole milk.
Instead of all-pu
rpose flour,
use cake flour,
which is higher
in starch.
29
Roasted Red Pepper Pasta Sauce with
Caramelized Onions
Yield: approximately 3 L or 24 x 120 mL portions
8
large red peppers, halved
15 mL
paprika
15 mL
red wine vinegar
50 mL
balsamic vinegar
15 mL
canola oil
1.4 L
canned tomatoes, no added salt
20 turns
grinder
whole black peppercorns
15 mL
seasoned salt
50 mL
canola oil
50 mL
canola oil
2
large red onions, sliced
2
large onions, sliced
3
large yellow onions, sliced
12
cloves garlic, minced
1
bunch fresh parsley, chopped
15 mL
oregano
1. Combine peppers with red wine vinegar, oil and pepper, grill until soft, about 5 minutes.
2. Dice the peppers and set aside.
3. In a medium sauce pan, sauté onions in oil. Add garlic, oregano and paprika and cook for
3 minutes on low heat. Add the balsamic vinegar and cook for 2 minutes to reduce.
4. Add tomatoes, seasoned salt and the diced peppers. Simmer for 30 minutes.
5. Purée until smooth.
6. Sauté onions in oil over low heat until caramelized.
7. Serve sauce over whole wheat pasta and top with caramelized onions and parsley.
L. Bourne, Culinary Instructor, New Westminster Secondary School Café
30
Special Tomato Sauce
Yield: approximately 1.25 L or 10 x 125 mL portions
2 cloves
garlic, minced
(or 30 mL garlic powder)
25 mL
dried oregano
25 mL
dried basil
1
large onion, chopped
(or 30 mL onion powder)
1
bay leaf
30 mL
oil
5 mL
dried thyme
300 g
lean ground beef
For Spicy Sauce add:
1
796 mL can tomatoes
30 mL
Mexican chilli powder
1
398 mL can tomato sauce
15 mL
cayenne powder
1
156 mL can tomato paste
1. Sauté the onion and garlic in the oil until soft.
2. Add the ground beef and cook until all the pink is gone. Drain off any fat.
3. Add all the tomato products and then the dried herbs. Add the “Spicy Sauce” ingredients
at the same time, if using. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to simmer for at least
30 minutes.
4. Taste the sauce and season with more spice as desired.
Vernon Secondary School Cafeteria Program
31
Roasted Tomato Sauce
Yield: 2 L or 20 x 100 mL servings
50 mL
olive oil
50 mL
brown sugar
15
medium tomatoes, halved
100 mL
dealcoholized red wine
2
large onions, sliced
125 mL
tomato paste
3 mL
chipotle pepper
500 mL
15 mL
oregano
5 mL
seasoned salt
vegetable stock (recipe
page 27 or reconstituted
reduced-sodium vegetable
stock powder)
8
cloves garlic, minced
30 turns
grinder
whole black peppercorns
1. Combine olive oil, tomatoes, onions, chipotle pepper, oregano, seasoned salt,
garlic and black pepper into insert. Roast at 190°C (375°F) for 30 minutes.
2. Pour roasted tomato and onion mixture into medium saucepan. Add the sugar,
wine and tomato paste and bring to a simmer for 30 minutes.
3. Purée sauce.
L. Bourne, Culinary Instructor, New Westminster Secondary School Café
od served with
This sauce is go
a (page 65)
the Roasted Bas
Corn Risotto
and Barley and
(page 42).
32
Salads and Sides
Feature vegetables, fruit, whole grains, lean meats and/or
legumes in salads. Keep vegetable dishes simple; with no
added fat, sugar, or salt they are always Choose Most items.
Use BC grown vegetables and fruit in season whenever
possible (see availability chart on page 9).
How to assess an acceptable
amount of added fat:
How to assess an acceptable
amount of added sugar:
Servings
of recipe
Servings
of recipe
Fat called for
is less than
Sugar called for
is less than
(no.)
(mL)
(g)
(no.)
(mL)
(g)
1
10
9
1
10
8
12
125
115
12
120
100
50
500
460
50
500
420
Use the tables
to assess an
acceptable amou
nt of added
fat, salt, and su
gar when
making salad dr
essings. If the
salad is made w
ith higher fat
or salty ingredie
nts, such as
cheese and oliv
es, use less fat
and salt in the
dressing.
How to assess an acceptable
amount of added salt:
Servings
of recipe
Salt called for
is less than
(no.)
(mL)
(g)
1
–
–
12
5
6
50
20
24
33
Greek Pasta Salad
Yield: approximately 25 x 250 mL portions
Salad ingredients
Dressing ingredients
1 kg
whole wheat pasta
200 mL
red wine vinegar
250 g
diced red peppers
200 mL
olive oil
250 g
diced green peppers
200 mL
water
250 g
diced yellow peppers
100 mL
lemon juice
500 g
English cucumber,
cut into small cubes
30 mL
Dijon mustard
60 mL
minced garlic
250 g
medium tomatoes,
seeded and chopped
3 mL
black pepper
75 mL
500 g
feta cheese, crumbled
fresh oregano or basil,
minced (or 15 mL dried)
250 g
minced red onions
200 g
black olives,
pitted and sliced
1. Bring a saucepan of water to boil and add a pinch of salt. Cook pasta.
2. While the pasta is cooking prepare all of the remaining ingredients.
Put into a large bowl.
3. Mix the dressing ingredients in a small bowl and let sit until pasta is ready.
4. When pasta is cooked, strain it and rinse under cold water until it is cool.
Drain well.
5. Add the pasta to the other ingredients and pour the dressing over the salad.
6. Toss to mix.
The Rocky Mountain Café, David Thompson Secondary School
Cook Training, Invermere
34
Chili Ginger Rice Noodle Salad
Yield: approximately 30 x 300 mL portions
1.3 kg
rice noodles, cooked as
per package directions
40 g
gingerroot, minced
4
small red chilies, minced
1
medium red onion,
sliced thin
50 mL
lime juice
100 mL
unseasoned rice vinegar
1
head cabbage,
sliced thin
250 mL
tomato paste
3
medium red peppers,
sliced thin
50 mL
brown sugar
300 mL
cold water
300 mL
canola oil
1
bunch fresh cilantro,
chopped
15 mL
reduced-sodium soy sauce
3
medium green peppers,
sliced thin
2
large carrots, julienned
4
stalks celery, julienned
10
cloves garlic, minced
1. Combine the cooked noodles, onion, cabbage, peppers, carrots and celery in
a large bowl. Toss lightly.
2. In a medium bowl, combine the garlic, gingerroot, chilies, lime juice, vinegar,
tomato paste, sugar, water, oil, cilantro and soy sauce. Add to the noodles and
vegetables and toss lightly to mix.
L. Bourne, Culinary Instructor, New Westminster Secondary School Café
35
Oriental Salad with Beef
Yield: approximately 20 x 150 g portions
680 g
cold, well trimmed,
lean cooked roast beef
110 g
chopped green onions
110 g
sliced almonds, toasted
500 g
bean sprouts
680 g
450 g
snow peas, blanched
shredded Chinese
cabbage
230 g
julienned carrots
300 mL
340 g
sliced water chestnuts,
canned, drained
Oriental Vinaigrette
(recipe follows)
1. Slice the beef into thin strips.
2. About 2 hours before serving, marinate the beef in some (approximately
150 mL) Oriental Vinaigrette.
3. Mix together the bean sprouts, snow peas, carrots, water chestnuts,
green onions and almonds.
4. Add the mixed vegetables to the beef. Season with remaining vinaigrette.
Toss well.
Oriental Vinaigrette
Yield: 790 mL or approximately 50 x 15 mL portions
200 mL
unseasoned rice
vinegar
15 g
grated ginger
4g
black peppercorns, crushed
60 mL
soy sauce
5 mL
chopped garlic
450 mL
vegetable oil
2 mL
hot red pepper sauce
60 mL
sesame oil
pinch
salt (if needed)
1. Combine all the ingredients except salt in a bowl and mix well.
2. Taste the dressing and add salt if necessary (the soy sauce may contain
enough salt).
3. Mix or stir again before using.
Chef Daniel Lesnes, Garibaldi Secondary, Maple Ridge
36
Taboule
Yield: approximately 20 x 150 g portions
500 g
(650 mL)
couscous
14 g
salt per litre boiling water
6
1
⁄4
onion, small dice
2
chives, finely chopped
50 mL
chopped parsley
tomatoes cut in wedges
30 mL
chopped mint
1
cucumber, sliced
10 mL
dried tarragon
1
green pepper, small dice
100 mL
olive oil
1
red pepper, small dice
150 mL
lemon juice
15
black olives (kalamata)
1. Measure by volume the couscous and put in a shallow dish.
2. Pour the equal amount of salted boiling water over the couscous.
3. Let the couscous swell for 5 minutes, covered, then stir with a fork
to separate the grain.
4. Cut all the vegetables.
5. Chop the chives, parsley and mint, keeping the mint separate.
6. Mix all the ingredients thoroughly and season to taste.
7. Chill before serving and decorate with the mint.
Al Badia, submitted by Chef Daniel Lesnes, Garibaldi Secondary, Maple Ridge
37
Taco Salad
Yield: 12 x 500 mL portions
750 g
extra lean ground beef
325 mL
water
1
onion, diced
5 mL
salt
750 mL
cooked kidney beans
(recipe page 8) or
1 1⁄2 cans (540 mL each),
drained and rinsed
50 mL
chili powder
1
head romaine lettuce, chopped
12
green onions, sliced
250 mL
grated cheddar cheese
750 mL
corn chips, crushed
325 mL
reduced-calorie French
salad dressing
1. Heat a non-stick frying pan over medium heat. Fry ground beef until no pink remains,
breaking into very small pieces. Add diced onion and cook until onion is tender.
2. Stir kidney beans, salad dressing, water, salt and chili powder into beef mixture and
simmer for 5 minutes.
3. Combine lettuce and green onions in a large bowl. Add the cheese and corn chips*
and toss lightly.
4. Add the meat mixture and toss. Serve immediately.
*Alternatively sprinkle corn chips (approximately 60 mL per portion) on top of each
serving of the meat mixture, so the chips stay crisp.
Jennifer L. Lactin, Home Economics Teacher, Home Economics Department Head,
Seycove Secondary School, North Vancouver
38
Limit trans fat – read the
Nutrition Facts Table and
choose a corn chip that
contains no trans fat.
Or, read the ingredient
list and choose a product
that does not contain
the words ‘hydrogenated’,
‘partially hydrogenated’,
‘margarine’ or ‘shortening’.
Tomato, Feta and Wheat Berry Salad
Yield: approximately 20 x 300 mL portions
Step 1
Step 2
800 g
wheat or rye berries, cooked
(recipe page 5)
12
cloves garlic, minced
2
medium lemons, juiced, one zested
5
medium tomatoes, diced
150 mL
unseasoned rice vinegar
1
large cucumber, diced
10 mL
sugar
1
medium purple onion, minced
1
2.5-cm piece gingerroot, minced
2
stalks celery, diced
10 mL
Dijon mustard
2
large bunches spinach, sliced
100 mL
olive oil
1
bunch fresh parsley, minced
100 mL
canola oil
100 g
feta cheese, shredded
2 mL
kosher salt
40 turns
grinder
whole black peppercorns
1
pinch cayenne pepper
5 mL
dried dill
10 mL
dried mint
Students may be
unfamiliar with many
whole grains. Let
them taste before
committing – offer
small free samples,
a “low risk” way
for students to try
new foods.
1. Combine Step 1 into a large bowl. Mix lightly.
2. Combine Step 2 into a medium bowl and whisk until smooth. Pour over Step 1
and mix thoroughly.
L. Bourne, Culinary Instructor, New Westminster Secondary School Café
well
rain works
g
le
o
h
w
y
An
pot
Substitute
.
d
la
a
s
is
r
in th
s or bulga
ie
r
r
e
b
t
u
m
barley, ka
heat
) for the w
m
iu
d
e
m
(
ral
wheat
5 for gene
e
g
a
p
e
e
S
berries.
king
about coo
n
io
t
a
m
r
info
ckage
ow the pa
ll
fo
r
o
,
s
grain
.
directions
39
Middle Eastern Chickpea, Parsley and
Cabbage Salad
Serves approximately 8, 16 or 24
x8
x16
x24
Dried chickpeas
or
19 oz cans chickpeas, drained and rinsed
3 cups
6 cups
9 cups
2
4
6
Lemon juice
6 tbsp
3
⁄4 cup
1 1⁄4 cup
Cloves garlic, minced
2
4
6
Salt
1 tsp
Pepper
1
1
3
Dried mint
1 tbsp
2 tbsp
3 tbsp
Dried oregano
1 tsp
2 tsp
1 tbsp
Vegetable oil
1
⁄2 cup
1 cup
1 1⁄2 cups
Parsley, finely chopped
1 cup
2 cups
3 cups
Green onions, thinly sliced
6
12
18
Green cabbage, cored and finely shredded
1
⁄2 lb
1 lb
1 1⁄2 lbs
⁄4 tsp
2 tsp
⁄2 tsp
2 tsp
⁄4 tsp
1. In a large pot cover the chickpeas with plenty of cold water and bring to a boil.
Turn down to a simmer, cover and cook for 3-4 hours until tender, adding more water as
necessary to keep the chickpeas covered. Drain.
2. Stir the lemon juice, garlic, salt, pepper, mint and oregano together. Stir into the warm
chickpeas. Let stand for an hour, or cover and refrigerate for as long as overnight.
3. Add the oil, parsley, green onion and cabbage. Toss well. Keeps for 3-4 days, covered
and refrigerated.
Recipe reprinted from Many Hands: Community Kitchens Share Their Best
© 2005 with permission of Community Kitchens Publishing. Vancouver Community
Kitchen Project www.communitykitchens.ca
40
Soba Noodle Salad
Yield: approximately 18 x 250 mL portions
720 g
buckwheat noodles
30 mL
sesame oil
450 g
snow or sugar snap peas
or celery
30 mL
soy sauce
90 mL
unseasoned rice or
red wine vinegar
3
red peppers, thinly sliced
or finely chopped
5 mL
pepper
6
green onions, chopped
5 mL
salt
60 mL
canola oil
1. Bring water to a boil and parboil peas for 1 minute. Remove with slotted spoon and
rinse under cold water. If using celery, do not parboil.
2. Use the same water to cook the noodles to al dente stage, about 6 minutes, then drain
and rinse with cold water.
3. Chop peas or celery thinly on a diagonal.
4. Combine canola oil, sesame oil, soy sauce, vinegar, pepper and salt and mix well.
5. Combine the noodles, vegetables and dressing in a large bowl, tossing until mixed well.
Susan Petersen, Home Economics Teacher, Churchill Secondary, Vancouver
41
Barley and Corn Risotto
Yield: 5 L or 20 x 250 mL servings
1L
barley
5 mL
seasoned salt
1
medium red onion,
minced
30 turns
grinder
whole black peppercorns
2
stalks celery, minced
1.5 L
1
medium carrot, minced
8
cloves garlic, minced
vegetable stock (recipe page 27
or substitute reduced-sodium
vegetable stock powder)
1L
frozen corn, thawed
1 bunch
parsley, minced
1
medium red pepper,
minced
50 mL
grated parmesan cheese
1. Cook barley in boiling water for 7 minutes. Strain, rinse well and set aside
(barley will be cooked 50%).
2. Sweat off onions, celery, carrot, garlic and corn.
3. Add dry spices and cook for 2 minutes.
4. Add barley and half of the vegetable stock. Cook over low heat until the liquid
is almost gone.
5. Add remaining stock and cook until dry. Add more stock or water if needed
until barley is cooked.
6. Add parsley and cheese 5 minutes before serving.
L. Bourne, Culinary Instructor, New Westminster Secondary School Café
served with
This dish is good
a (page 65)
the Roasted Bas
mato Sauce
and Roasted To
(page 32).
42
How to assess the acceptable
amount of added fat:
How to assess the acceptable
amount of added salt:
Servings
of recipe
Servings
of recipe
Fat called for
is less than
Salt called for
is less than
(no.)
(mL)
(g)
(no.)
(mL)
(g)
1
5
5
1
1
1
12
60
55
12
7
9
50
250
227
50
30
37
Prepare vegetable
dishes
simply; with no adde
d fat, salt
or sugar they are al
ways Choose
Most items. Use th
e table to
assess an acceptab
le amount
of added fat or salt.
Add only
very small amounts,
if at all,
of sugar, to vegetabl
e or fruit
side dishes.
Steamed Asian Vegetable Medley
Yield: Allow 175 mL assorted vegetables per serving
Offer more vegetables
and fruit through a salad
bar. Feature locally grown
produce and produce
from school gardens and
greenhouses. Check
out A Fresh Crunch in
School Lunch – the BC
Farm to School Guide
at www.phabc.org/
farmtoschool
Ingredients: Choose a selection from each of the colour groups
Green: Sugar snap peas, snow peas,
finely chopped bok choy, chopped spinach
Yellow/orange: Baby corn, julienned
yellow or orange bell peppers, yellow squash
slices, carrot slices
Red: Julienned red bell peppers,
cherry tomatoes, radishes
White: Bean sprouts, water chestnuts,
turnip strips
1. In a medium saucepan, bring
250 mL water to boil. Place steamer
basket over boiling water and fill with
vegetables. Drizzle with a small amount
of sesame oil and soy sauce. Cover and
steam until vegetables are tender-crisp.
2. Transfer to a serving dish and sprinkle
with toasted sesame seeds, if desired.
Sesame oil
Soy sauce
Toasted sesame seeds (optional)
Recipe reprinted from Simply Great Food:
250 quick, easy & delicious recipes
© 2007 with permission of Dietitians of Canada.
Published by Robert Rose Inc. www.dietitians.ca
43
as a “starch”,
Often thought of
vegetable that is
the potato is a
s and low in fat
high in nutrient
w the potato is
and salt. It’s ho
at
is added to it th
t
ha
w
or
ed
ok
co
it is a healthy
affects whether
ple, deep-frying
choice. For exam
and sour cream
or adding butter
less healthy.
make potatoes
Kids love fries – and they can have them too.
Make baked “fries” instead of deep-frying!
Preheat a sheet or roasting pan in a 200°C (400°F) oven.
Cut potatoes into wedges. Toss potato wedges in a small amount
of olive oil (about 25 mL for 900 g potatoes), sprinkle with
herbs of choice (e.g., rosemary, garlic, black pepper) and a small
amount of salt (about 2 mL). Spread the potatoes in a single
layer on the preheated pan, and roast until browned on one
side, about 20 minutes. Turn the wedges and continue roasting
about 25 minutes until they are golden brown on the second
side and tender.
Homemade Sweet Potato Fries
Yield: 12 portions
6
medium sweet potatoes or
yams (about 1.8 kg)
To Taste
seasonings of choice
(suggest oregano, basil)
60 mL
olive oil
To Taste
pepper
30 mL
paprika
To Taste
salt, up to 7 mL
1. Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F).
2. Wash and peel sweet potatoes or yams (or leave the skin on if desired).
Cut each into 2.5-cm strips or wedges and put into a large bowl.
3. Add the olive oil, paprika and seasonings to the bowl and toss
sweet potatoes or yams until evenly coated.
4. Place oiled strips on a foil covered baking sheet.
5. Bake for 15 minutes on one side. Turn them over and bake
15 minutes on the other side. If desired, crisp further by
putting under broiler for 2 to 3 minutes.
Ann Marie Jury, Home Economics Teacher, South Kamloops
Senior Secondary, Kamloops, adapted and reprinted with
permission from Low-Glycemic Meals in Minutes by
Laura Kalina and Cheryl Christian
44
Dijon Scalloped Potatoes
Yield: 18 x 75 mL portions
2.5 kg
baking potatoes, peeled
and thinly sliced
1L
2% milk
125 mL
grainy Dijon mustard
250 mL
thinly sliced red onions
90 mL
chopped parsley
3 cloves
garlic, crushed
300 mL
125 mL
skim milk yogourt
125 mL
1% cottage cheese
shredded reduced-fat cheese
(e.g. cheddar, mozzarella or a
combination)
45 mL
parmesan cheese
45 mL
pimentos (optional)
1. Preheat oven to 180°C (350°F).
2. Dry sauté onions and garlic until tender.
3. Reduce heat to low and add the yogourt, cottage cheese, milk and mustard.
Cook together for about 5 minutes.
4. Remove from heat and stir in 45 mL of parsley.
5. In a greased shallow hotel pan, put in half the potatoes and half the sauce.
Top with the rest of the potatoes and then the rest of the sauce. Top with the cheeses
and pimentos if using.
6. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes or until potatoes are tender.
Let stand for 5 minutes and then garnish with the remaining parsley.
Vernon Secondary School Cafeteria Program
Roast seasonal vegetables to serve
hot as a side dish, or chill and
serve as a salad. Roast vegetables
together that require about the
same length of cooking. For
example roast yams, potatoes,
turnips, beets and rutabagas
together, while on another tray roast
mushrooms, peppers, zucchini,
eggplant, fennel, onion and garlic.
Wash the vegetables and peel if desired. Cut
them into pieces that are about the same size
to ensure even cooking. Toss with a small
amount of vegetable oil if desired (about
25 mL/8 servings), and roast in a baking dish
in a 160°C (325°F) oven until tender. Add
minced rosemary, thyme or basil near the end
of roasting if desired. Toss with balsamic
vinegar, pepper and a light sprinkling of salt.
45
Caponata
Yield: 16 x 125 mL servings
960 mL
(~480 g)
small broccoli florets
2
bunches Swiss chard,
stems and center vein
removed, cut crosswise
into 2-cm strips
50 mL
1
stalk celery, small dice
2
cloves garlic, minced
100 mL
raisins
350 mL
reduced-sodium tomato sauce
50 mL
red wine vinegar
extra virgin olive oil, divided
30 mL
sugar
2
medium onions, chopped
100 mL
pine nuts
500 g
Asian or regular eggplant,
small cube
4 mL
salt
4 mL
ground black pepper
1. Steam the broccoli and the chard over water until brightly coloured and tender.
2. Heat 25 mL of the oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and
sauté until it starts to brown, about 5 minutes.
3. Add the remaining oil, and then arrange the eggplant cubes in 1 layer in the pan. Cook
3 minutes. Stir to turn cubes, and cook 3 minutes, or until the eggplant is lightly colored.
4. Add the celery, garlic, raisins and tomato sauce. Add the steamed vegetables and
mix to combine. Cook over low heat, covered, until the broccoli is very soft, 10 minutes,
stirring occasionally.
5. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, combine the vinegar and sugar. Add them to the skillet.
Add the pine nuts and cook 2 minutes, stirring 3 or 4 times. Season with salt and pepper.
6. Transfer the caponata to a container and set aside to cool to room temperature.
Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
Miriam Borys, Cafeteria Teaching Kitchen Instructor,
Burnaby Central Secondary, adapted and reprinted with permission
from the American Institute for Cancer Research www.aicr.org
46
d French bread
Ser ve on toaste
as a condiment
as an appetizer,
or tofu,
with chicken, fish
green salad.
or in place of a
e a good
Mushrooms mak
gplant.
alternative to eg
Apple and Rutabaga Crisp
Yield: 8 portions
1
large rutabaga or turnip
pinch
cinnamon
7 mL
margarine, non-hydrogenated
50 mL
all purpose flour
15 mL
apple juice
50 mL
quick rolled oats
2
apples
75 mL
brown sugar (not packed)
50 mL
brown sugar (not packed)
15 mL
margarine, non-hydrogenated
⁄2
lemon, juiced
1
1. Peel, dice and steam the rutabaga until soft enough to mash. Add margarine.
2. Peel, core and slice the apples. Toss with lemon juice, brown sugar and cinnamon.
3. Lightly grease a 2 L (11-in x 8-in) casserole dish. In alternate layers, spread rutabaga
and apple, ending with rutabaga. Combine crust ingredients until crumbled and pat on
top of casserole. Bake at 180°C (350°F) for 1 hour.
Karen Birkenhead, Registered Dietitian
47
Dips and Dressings
Tasty dips and dressings are a great way to get reluctant
vegetable eaters to try their veggies!
e of eggs or
Use tofu in plac
oducts in
high-fat dair y pr
d
lad dressings an
sa
e
yl
st
ym
ea
cr
can be a hard
mayonnaise. Tofu
– offer small,
sell to students
n introducing
free samples whe
Marketing tofu
something new.
alternative may
as a vegetarian
students.
appeal to some
48
Prepare homemade
dressings rather than use
ready-to-serve
• Use lower fat products
(e.g., reduced-fat mayonnaise)
instead of regular products.
Substitute buttermilk, puréed
cottage cheese or yogourt
for sour cream.
• Use yogourt cheese in place
of cream cheese or sour
cream. Make it by draining
plain yogourt through
cheesecloth or a coffee filter,
overnight in the refrigerator.
• Emphasize herbs, fruit
juices (e.g., lemon, orange),
vinegars, spices, garlic,
garlic powder, ginger, etc. for
flavouring rather than salts
(e.g., garlic, celery, and
onion salts).
• Serve fresh vegetables,
oven-toasted pitas or tortillas
with a high-protein, low-fat
dip (e.g., bean dip, hummus).
Tofu Caesar Dressing
Yield: approximately 8 x 25 mL portions
30 mL
lemon juice
1. Combine all ingredients in a food
processor and process until smooth.
Taste, and if too acidic add a pinch
of sugar.
30 mL
water
5 mL
Dijon mustard
1 mL
salt
100 mL
soft or silken tofu
3 mL
minced garlic
15 mL
olive oil
30 mL
grated parmesan cheese
To Taste
ground pepper or
chili flakes
The Rocky Mountain Café, David Thompson
Secondary School Cook Training, Invermere
Students may be reluctant to try
this dressing when they see “tofu”
in the name, but once they do they
like it! Let them check it out first
by offering small, free samples.
2. Serve 25 mL portions with
salad made with diced romaine and
croutons or a mix of greens.
essing with
Prepare salad dr
of oil, vinegar,
equal amounts
r with herbs,
and water. Flavou
ices, lemon
dr y mustard, sp
garlic. Cover
juice, ginger or
and refrigerate.
What’s an ap
propriate
amount to se
rve?
• Salad dressi
ngs and side
sauces/condim
ents:
5 to 15 mL for m
ost items.
Oriental Vinaigrette
Yield: 790 mL or approximately 50 x 15 mL portions
200 mL
unseasoned rice vinegar
60 mL
soy sauce
450 mL
vegetable oil
60 mL
sesame oil
15 g
grated ginger
4g
black peppercorns, crushed
5 mL
chopped garlic
2 mL
hot red pepper sauce
pinch
salt (if needed)
1. Combine all the ingredients
except salt in a bowl and mix well.
2. Taste the dressing and add salt
if necessary (the soy sauce may
contain enough salt).
3. Mix or stir again before using.
Chef Daniel Lesnes, Garibaldi Secondary, Maple Ridge
49
How do you know if a salad dressing recipe contains a lot or a little fat, sugar, or salt?
How to assess an acceptable
amount of added fat:
How to assess an acceptable
amount of added sugar:
How to assess an acceptable
amount of added salt:
Servings
of recipe
Servings
of recipe
Servings
of recipe
Fat called for
is less than
Sugar called for
is less than
(no.)
(mL)
(g)
(no.)
(mL)
(g)
(no.)
(mL)
(g)
1
10
9
1
10
8
1
–
–
12
125
115
12
120
100
12
5
6
50
500
460
50
500
420
50
20
24
Dip for Vegetables
Yield: approximately 80 x 30 mL portions
1L
low-fat plain yogourt
(skim, 1%, 2%)
15 mL
Dijon mustard
1L
reduced-fat mayonnaise
15 mL
minced garlic
Optional additions:
15 mL curry powder
250 mL
lemon juice
15 mL lemon zest
80 mL
minced green onions
80 mL
minced parsley
15 mL
dried dill weed
The Rocky Mountain Café, David Thompson
Secondary School Cook Training, Invermere
50
Salt called for
is less than
1. Combine all ingredients in mixing
bowl. Divide into 30 mL portions and
serve with assorted raw vegetables.
Hummus
Yield: approximately 36 x 85 mL portions
2 kg
cooked chick peas (recipe
page 8) or 1 can (2.84 L),
drained and rinsed)
250 mL
water
250 mL
fresh lemon juice
500 mL
tahini (sesame paste)
45 mL
minced garlic
250 mL
chopped fresh parsley
3 mL
cayenne (or to taste)
15 mL
salt
water
1. Purée all ingredients in batches
in a food processor until creamy.
Add water to reach the desired
consistency.
The Rocky Mountain Café, David Thompson Secondary School
Cook Training, Invermere
Use hummus as a spread on sandwiches, bagels and pitas, or as a
dip, with fresh vegetables, pita or tortilla chips. Make your own
chips (recipe page 52) or find chips that fit into the Choose Most
and Choose Sometimes categories at www.brandnamefoodlist.ca.
51
Tortilla Chips
Yield: 16 portions, 8 chips per portion
16
small, 20-cm (8-in)
whole wheat flour tortillas
30 mL
olive oil
seasonings of choice
(Italian, garlic and red pepper,
lemon and herb)
60 mL
parmesan cheese
1. Preheat oven to 190°C (375°F).
2. Lightly spread olive oil on top of each
tortilla with brush or paper towel. Stack
4 tortillas, then with kitchen scissors or
a long knife, cut into eight triangles or
wedges. Repeat until all 16 tortilla have
been cut.
3. Place on cookie sheet. Sprinkle with
seasonings and parmesan cheese and
bake for 10-12 minutes. Watch carefully
so as not to over bake!
Limit trans fat – read the
Nutrition Facts Table and
choose a tortilla that
contains no trans fat. Or,
read the ingredient list
and choose a product that
does not contain the words
‘hydrogenated’, ‘partially
hydrogenated’, ‘margarine’
or ‘shortening’.
4. Store in an airtight container at
room temperature.
Ann Marie Jury, Home Economics Teacher, South Kamloops Senior Secondary, Kamloops.
Recipe adapted and reprinted with permission from Low-Glycemic Meals in Minutes by
Laura Kalina and Cheryl Christian
Serve with hu
mmus
(recipe page
51), tzatziki
or
salsa for a g
reat snack.
52
Pasta and Pizza
Kids love pasta and pizza and the options
for sauces and toppings are seemingly
endless, limited only by the imagination!
Pasta Primavera
Yield: approximately 15 x 500 mL portions
10 mL
salt
3
yellow peppers, sliced
2.25 L
rotini noodles
1.5 L
15 mL
oil
1 ⁄2
small onion, diced
tomato sauce (recipe
page 28) or commercial
reduced-sodium
6
cloves garlic, minced
25 mL
dried basil
12
mushrooms, sliced
To Taste
pepper
6
small zucchini, sliced
Optional ingredients
3
red peppers, sliced
• broccoli and peas
1
• parmesan cheese
1. Fill to three-quarters a large pot with cold water (approximately 8 L).
Add 10 mL salt and bring to a boil.
2. When the water is boiling, add the rotini. Stir occasionally until al dente,
about 7-10 minutes.
3. Heat oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and turn heat down
to medium-low. Cook until soft, about 3 minutes.
4. Add minced garlic. Cook for 1 minute longer.
5. Add vegetables to onion mixture. Cook until tender-crisp, about 3 minutes.
6. Add tomato sauce and basil. Turn the heat up to medium and bring sauce
to a boil. Lower heat and simmer for 10 minutes.
Emphasize whole wheat
noodles, and sauces that
are rich in vegetables and
lower in fat and sodium
• Make red sauces more often
than white sauces.
• Brown and drain the fat off of
ground meat products.
• Use no added salt tomato
products.
• Use small amounts of cheese,
if at all, to garnish.
7. Add pepper to taste.
8. Stir pasta and sauce together. Sprinkle with parmesan cheese if desired.
Jennifer L. Lactin, Home Economics Teacher, Home Economics Department Head,
Seycove Secondary School, North Vancouver
53
Rotini with Chorizo Sausage
Yield: approximately 16 x 300 g portions
60 mL
olive oil
500 g
chorizo sausage
250 mL
2
cans (596 mL each)
diced tomatoes
chopped onions
1 kg
rotini noodles
250 mL
chopped green peppers
80 mL
chopped parsley
250 mL
chopped red peppers
250 mL
reduced-fat parmesan cheese
cilantro sprigs
1. Cook the sausage in 30 mL of oil. Remove when cooked, drain off the fat and cut
the sausage into rounds.
2. In the same pan, lightly sauté the onions and peppers in the remaining oil. Add the
diced tomatoes and simmer together for 8-10 minutes.
3. Cook the pasta to al dente. Drain the pasta and place into a large pot. Add the
cooked sausage and the sautéed vegetables.
4. As each plate is dished, top with chopped parsley, 15 mL parmesan cheese and a
sprig of cilantro.
Vernon Secondary School Cafeteria Program
eal to add up
It’s easy for a m
grain servings
to four or more
ost people!),
(too much for m
e portion size
depending on th
d is offered
and whether brea
ain portions
as well. Limit gr
od Guide
to one or two Fo
250 mL).
Ser vings (125 to
54
Chickpea and Zucchini Curry
Serves 6, 12 or 18
x6
x12
x18
Oil
2 tbsp
3 tbsp
4 tbsp
Small onions, diced
1
2
3
Cloves garlic, minced
1
2
3
Medium zucchini, thinly sliced
2
4
6
Large tomatoes, chopped
2
4
6
14-oz cans of chickpeas, drained and rinsed
1
2
3
Curry powder
2 tsp
4 tsp
1 tbsp
Tomato paste
1 tbsp
2 tbsp
3 tbsp
Salt and pepper
To taste
To taste
To taste
Dried pasta
1 lb
2 lbs
3 lbs
1. In a large frying pan, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic and zucchini
and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender. Stir in the tomato, chickpeas, curry powder and
tomato paste. Reduce the sauce to low and cook until slightly thickened, 5-6 minutes.
Season to taste.
2. While you are preparing the other ingredients, cook the pasta in a large pot of rapidly
boiling, salted water. Drain and toss with the zucchini mixture and season to taste.
Recipe reprinted from Many Hands: Community Kitchens Share Their Best
© 2005 with permission of Community Kitchens Publishing. Vancouver Community
Kitchen Project www.communitykitchens.ca
55
Emphasize whole grain crust,
and vegetables and fruit
• Use whole grain or 50% whole
wheat crust.
• Use two or more vegetable or
fruit toppings, such as mushroom,
tomato, onion, broccoli, spinach,
cauliflower, bell pepper and
pineapple.
Limit high-fat and
high-sodium ingredients
• Emphasize low-sodium tomato
sauce over white or barbeque
sauces.
• Use small amounts of shredded
low-fat cheese. Avoid processed
cheese. Feature vegetable and
fruit toppings.
• Limit deli meats and favour lean
meats, poultry and alternatives
such as tofu and legumes.
• Enhance flavour by adding fresh
herbs such as basil or oregano. If
fresh is not available, used dried.
What’s an appropriate
amount to serve?
• 30 to 38-cm round pizza
crust will make six to
eight servings
• Cut square pizzas into
6 x 10-cm pieces
56
be made
Pizza dough can
d store it in
ahead. Wrap it an
for up to two
the refrigerator
eezer for up
days, or in the fr
Thaw frozen
to three months.
ed, in the
dough, still wrapp
night.
refrigerator over
To identify whole
grain products
make sure the w
ord “whole grain”
is
on the label and
in the ingredient
list. Look for the
words “whole
grain” followed
by the name of
the
grain, e.g., whole
grain wheat, who
le
grain rye, etc. P
roducts labeled
with
“multigrain” may
not contain who
le
grains, they mig
ht just be made
with
a variety of refine
d grains or flours
.
All Purpose Dough: Pizza Crust
Yield: 2 L of dough makes 3 pizza crusts or approximately 18 slices
2L
4L
8L
Salt
5g
10 g
20 g
Margarine, non-hydrogenated
60 g
120 g
240 g
All purpose flour
875 g
1.75 kg
3.5 kg
Whole wheat flour
875 g
1.75 kg
3.5 kg
Sugar
10 g
20 g
40 g
Yeast (Fermipan)
20 g
40 g
80 g
Choose Most or Choose
Warm water
1.25 L
2.5 L
5L
Sometimes go to
To find meat slices and
vegetarian options that are
www.brandnamefoodlist.ca.
1. Mix all weighed dry ingredients in a Hobart mixer. Add the warm water
and mix with the dough hook until well combined.
2. Weigh into 850 g pieces for each crust and roll out onto a lightly
greased, long, shallow hotel pan, or half-size commercial cookie sheet.
For vegetarian options,
search using the key word
“vegetarian”.
3. Build your pizza using the sauce and toppings of your choice.
4. Bake at 190°C (375°F) for approx. 35-40 minutes.
Vernon Secondary School Cafeteria Program
57
Entrées
Plan menus to include a variety of entrées featuring meats, fish, poultry
and alternatives. Even meat eaters enjoy vegetarian selections. Pair
entrées with sides and beverages to create meals that include choices
from each of the four food groups.
Chicken Breasts with Onion, Garlic,
and Basil
Yield: 36 portions
36
boneless skinless
chicken breasts
(approximately 4.5 kg total)
50 mL
canola oil, for chicken
15 mL
canola oil, for sauce
300 g
finely diced onion
100 g
minced garlic
500 mL
white dealcoholized wine
90 mL
lemon juice
1 kg
diced fresh tomatoes or
reduced-sodium canned,
drained
500 mL
chicken stock
250 mL
finely sliced basil leaves
To Taste
Salt, up to 25 mL
To Taste
Pepper
Chicken
1. Brush chicken breasts with canola oil. Grill on
high heat for 3-5 minutes to score evenly, flip
and finish cooking on medium heat for a further
10 minutes, or until juices run clear. Transfer to
a baking sheet and hold in a warming oven until
sauce is ready.
Alternatively, brush the chicken breasts with
oil, place on a parchment paper-lined baking
sheet and bake at 190°C (375°F) until lightly
browned and the juices run clear, approximately
20 minutes.
Sauce
1. Heat oil in saucepan over medium heat.
Add onions and sauté for 5 minutes, or
until lightly browned. Add garlic and sauté
for 3 minutes. Add wine, lemon juice,
tomatoes and chicken stock and simmer
for 20 minutes. Add basil and season
with salt and pepper to taste.
2. Serve chicken garnished with sauce.
The Rocky Mountain Café, David Thompson Secondary School
Cook Training, Invermere
58
Chicken Souvlaki
Yield: 15 portions
180 mL
minced onion
1. Combine the onion, garlic, oil, lemon juice,
salt, pepper and oregano in a bowl. Add chicken
cubes and stir well.
3
cloves garlic, minced
125 mL
olive oil
135 mL
lemon juice
10 mL
salt
2. Label a large plastic bag and place the
contents of the bowl into the bag. Marinate in
the refrigerator for at least 1 hour or overnight.
3 mL
pepper
3. Soak wooden skewers in water.
3 mL
oregano
4. Drain the chicken, reserving the marinade.
1 kg
boneless, skinless chicken
breasts or thighs, cut into
2.5-cm cubes
5. Skewer the chicken and the vegetables,
alternating, onto the wooden skewers.
30
mushrooms, stems removed
6. Line a baking sheet with tin foil. Grease the tin
foil and place the skewers on the lined sheet.
3
red peppers, cut into
2.5-cm cubes
7. Place under broiler for 10 minutes, brushing
with marinade and turning frequently.
15
wooden skewers
Jennifer L. Lactin, Home Economics Teacher, Home Economics Department Head,
Seycove Secondary School, North Vancouver
59
Chicken Enchiladas
Yield: 20 servings
Limit trans fat – read the
Nutrition Facts Table and
choose a tortilla that
contains no trans fat. Or,
read the ingredient list
and choose a product that
does not contain the words
‘hydrogenated’, ‘partially
hydrogenated’, ‘margarine’
or ‘shortening’.
250 mL
light cream cheese
250 mL
sour cream
250 mL
125 mL
chopped and seeded
jalapeños
no fat yogourt
125 mL
chopped green onion
750 mL
salsa
10 mL
chili powder
1.5 L
boneless, skinless chicken
breast meat, cooked and
chopped
2 mL
ground coriander
2 mL
salt
20
medium, 25-cm (10-in)
whole wheat, spinach
or tomato tortillas
750 mL
shredded reduced-fat
cheese
1. In a bowl combine cream cheese, sour cream, yogourt and half the salsa. Mix in the
chicken, half the cheese, jalapeños, green onions, chilli powder, coriander and salt.
2. Use this as the filling for the enchiladas. Divide the filling evenly between the
20 tortillas. Place the filling in the centre of each tortilla and roll up jelly roll style
– fold in the two ends, fold over the top and roll until completely closed.
3. Place the enchiladas in a hotel pan. Space them far enough apart so they can be
easily removed individually from the pan. Top the enchiladas with the remaining salsa
and cheese.
4. Bake at 180°C (350°F) until bubbly, about 20-25 minutes. Serve with salad.
Vernon Secondary School Cafeteria Program
60
Thai Chicken Stir-fry
with Spicy Peanut Sauce
Yield: approximately 12 x 240 mL portions
900 g
boneless, skinless chicken
breasts, thinly sliced
1. In a small bowl, blend peanut butter, water,
soy sauce and sugar. Set aside.
325 mL
reduced-fat peanut butter
325 mL
water
2. In a wok or large skillet, heat oil over high heat.
Add garlic and crushed pepper. Stir-fry 30 seconds.
90 mL
reduced-sodium soy sauce
45 mL
brown sugar
25 mL
vegetable oil
6-9
cloves garlic, minced
3-4 mL
crushed red pepper
1.5 L (~400 g) broccoli
3. Add chicken, stir-fry until firm and white, about
5 minutes.
4. Add broccoli and cauliflower, stir-fry until broccoli
is bright green, about 3 minutes.
5. Stir in peanut butter mixture. Cook, stirring
constantly until sauce is smooth, about 3 minutes.
6. Serve with steamed rice (125-250 mL per portion).
1.5 L (~640 g) cauliflower
Jennifer L. Lactin, Home Economics Teacher, Home Economics Department Head,
Seycove Secondary School, North Vancouver
61
For a vegetarian
version,
replace pork wit
h 2 x 396 g
packages of ex
tra firm tofu,
cut into 1-cm sl
ices; marinate
as above. Grill
for 6 to 8
minutes, turnin
g once.
Thai Pork Tenderloin
Yield: 6 portions
A
B
75 mL
reduced-sodium soy sauce
2
pork tenderloins
(about 340 g each)
75 mL
honey
60 mL
fresh lime juice
C
30 mL
peanut or vegetable oil
1
bunch cilantro, chopped
3
cloves garlic, finely chopped
1
15 mL
curry powder
bunch green onion,
cut on the bias
15 mL
grated fresh ginger
1
red pepper, small dice
5 mL
ground black pepper
1
Thai chili, diced (or 5 mL
dried chili flakes)
30 mL
chopped cilantro
lime wedges
1. In a small bowl, combine A and mix until well blended.
2. Place B in a large container or plastic bag; pour marinade over pork in
bag. Close bag tightly; marinate in refrigerator for 1 hour or up to overnight.
3. Remove pork from marinade; reserve marinade. Sear pork on all
sides and place into 190°C (375°F) oven until medium doneness
(meat thermometer registers 71°C or 160°F).
4. Place reserved marinade in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil;
reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes. Serve with sliced pork;
garnish with C.
5. Serve with steamed basmati rice.
Trevor Randle, Chef Instructor, Maple Ridge Secondary School
62
Vernon Senior Secondary Cafeteria
Burgers
Yield: approximately 34 x 128 g hamburgers
5 kg
lean ground beef
3
large onions, grated
1. Mix everything together in a large
mixing bowl.
30 mL
coriander
2. Portion into 180 g servings and flatten.
30 mL
paprika
15 mL
fresh black pepper
150 mL
Worcestershire Sauce
3. Grill until cooked and finish under
broiler, or Individually Quick Freeze and
use as needed (grill frozen and finish
under broiler).
10
large eggs
Vernon Secondary School Cafeteria Program
usly portioned
This is a genero
1 ½ and 2
burger, between
Canada’s Food
Eating Well with
Alternative
Guide Meat and
e smaller
servings. To mak
ger children,
burgers for youn
uct into 100 g
portion raw prod
oximately
servings, or appr
64 hamburgers.
63
Shepherd’s Pie
Yield: 2 x 3 L pans, approximately 16 x 300 mL servings
1
onion, diced
30 mL
vegetable oil
1. Sauté onion lightly in the oil. Add the
ground beef and brown. Drain off any fat.
1 kg
lean ground beef
2. Add the soup and 1 can of water.
2
cans (284 mL each)
reduced-sodium cream of
chicken soup
3. Cook carrots till tender crisp.
6
carrots, diced
375 mL
frozen peas
8
large potatoes, peeled, cooked
15 mL
margarine, non-hydrogenated
125 mL
2% milk
4. Add carrots and peas to the meat and
soup mixture. Place in a shallow greased
3 L baking pan.
5. Mash the potatoes adding the
margarine and milk.
6. Place mashed potatoes on top of the
meat mixture and bake for 20 minutes at
180°C (350°F).
Vernon Secondary School Cafeteria Program
nd meats
Drain fat off grou
After draining
after browning.
lar ground beef
off the fat, regu
t content to
has a similar fa
beef. It’s
extra-lean ground
o.
less expensive to
64
Roasted Basa
Yield: 20 x 120 g servings
20
basa fillets
(approximately 120 g each)
1. Place basa on baking tray.
50 mL
olive oil
15 mL
dealcoholized white wine
3. Roast basa at 200°C (400°F) for
5-7 minutes or until cooked.
4
cloves garlic, minced
1
medium lemon, juiced
3 mL
capers, minced
30 turns
grinder
whole black peppercorns
5 mL
sugar
⁄4 bunch
parsley, minced
Marinade
1
L. Bourne, Culinary Instructor,
New Westminster Secondary School Café
2. Combine marinade ingredients in a
small bowl. Brush basa with marinade.
Ser ve the basa
with Roasted To
mato
Sauce (page 32
) and Barley an
d
Corn Risotto (p
age 42). Ladle
120 mL
of the sauce on
to the centre of
the
plate, and spre
ad to cover abou
t
three-quarters
of the plate. Pla
ce
175 mL of the
risotto in the ce
nter of
the plate, top w
ith the basa. Gar
nish
with sunflower
sprouts or pars
ley.
65
Cod Fillet with Tomato and Herb Sauce
Yield: 15 portions
Fish
2.25 kg
Garnish
300 g
cod fillets (15 x 150 g)
finely chopped onions
Sauce
150 mL
dealcoholized white wine
450 mL
fish stock
70 g
roux (30 g butter or
margarine, non-hydrogenated
and 40 g flour)
7
medium tomatoes,
peeled and chopped
300 g
mushrooms, sliced
45 mL
coarsely chopped parsley
Seasoning
Pinch
salt
20 mL
coarsely chopped basil
Pinch
pepper
1. Butter a baking pan with a pastry brush, season with salt and pepper.
2. Sprinkle the pan with the onions, tomatoes and mushrooms.
3. Arrange the fish fillets in the pan, with the skin side uppermost.
4. Add wine and fish stock.
5. Cover and bake in an oven heated to 200°C (400°F) for 7 to 10 minutes.
6. When the fish is done, transfer it into a serving dish or insert, skin side down, with
the vegetable garnish. Keep hot until serving. Pour the juice into a saucepan, heat and
reduce by half.
7. Thicken with the roux to obtain a light texture sauce. Add half of the parsley and basil,
adjust seasoning.
8. At serving time, cover the fish with the sauce and sprinkle with remaining parsley and basil.
Chef Daniel Lesnes, Garibaldi Secondary, Maple Ridge
66
Paella
Yield: 16 servings
2
medium chickens, 1.1-1.4 kg each
1.5 L
chicken stock
50 mL
olive oil
5 mL
saffron
900 g
pork butt
110 g
frozen green peas
225 g
chorizo sausage, sliced
2
medium lemons, cut into
16 wedges
16
large shrimp (21/25 count),
peeled and deveined
350 g
small dice onions
900 g
squid, cut into rings
6
cloves garlic, crushed
2
medium red peppers, large dice
900 g
tomatoes, chopped
2
medium green peppers, large dice
10 mL
dried rosemary
16
small clams
900 g
arborio rice
16
medium mussels
pinch
salt and pepper
250 mL
water
1. Cut each chicken into 8 pieces and remove the skin. Trim the fat off the pork and cut into large dice.
2. In a large sauté pan, brown the chicken and the pork in olive oil. Remove and set aside.
Pour off the fat, reserving 50 mL.
3. Sauté the chorizo, remove and set aside. Drain off the fat. Use reserved oil if needed to briefly ´
sauté each of the shrimp, squid and peppers. Sauté each ingredient separately and reserve in
separate containers.
4. Combine the clams and mussels with the water in a covered pot. Steam them just until they open.
5. Remove the shellfish and set aside. Strain liquid, and add enough chicken stock to measure 2 L.
6. Add the saffron to the stock mixture.
7. In the skillet used for browning the meats, sauté the onion and garlic until soft.
8. Add the tomatoes and the rosemary. Cook until most of the liquid has evaporated and the
tomatoes form a rather dry paste.
9. Add the rice and stir. Add chicken and pork.
10. Bring the stock mixture to a boil in a separate pot, then add to the rice and stir.
Season with salt and pepper if necessary. Keep in mind the seafood contains natural salt and the
chorizo is spicy.
11. Bring to a simmer, cover and put in an oven heated to 180°C (350°F) for 20 minutes.
12. Remove the pan from the oven. Check the moisture level and add more stock if necessary.
It should be quite moist, but not soupy.
13. Sprinkle the peas over the top of the rice. Arrange the shrimp, clams, mussels and chorizo
on top. Cover loosely and let stand for 10 minutes to heat the shellfish to an internal temperature of
72°C (160°F).
14. Garnish each portion with a lemon wedge.
Chef Daniel Lesnes, Garibaldi Secondary, Maple Ridge
67
Seafood Casserole
Yield: 14 servings
Seafood
Garnish
600 g
cooked flaked cod
500 g
mushrooms, quartered
14
scallops (about 250 g, 20/30 count)
30 g
butter
14
prawns (about 250 g, 21/25 count)
30 mL
lemon juice
300 g
baby shrimp
100 mL
water
2 mL
salt
To Taste
pepper
50 g
bread crumbs
Sauce (Veloute)
80 g
butter
100 g
flour
1L
seafood or fish broth/mushroom broth
500 mL
2% milk
3g
dried whole fennel seeds
1. Pick over the fish to make sure it contains no bones or pieces of shell.
2. Warm the milk, remove from heat and add the fennel seeds. Set aside.
3. Poach the mushrooms for 5 minutes in the combination of water, butter and lemon juice.
Strain and reserve broth for the sauce.
4. Poach the scallops, prawns and shrimp each in the seafood or fish stock separately, using the
same broth over for each type of seafood. Reserve broth for the sauce.
5. For the sauce, make a roux with butter and flour, add both the reserved seafood and
mushroom broths up to 1 L. Bring to a boil, stirring the whole time and simmer for 15 minutes.
Remove fennel seeds from the milk and add the milk to the sauce. Season with salt and pepper
if necessary.
6. Divide the fish, seafood and mushrooms evenly into individual casserole serving dishes.
7. Cover with the veloute sauce and sprinkle with bread crumbs.
8. Heat in an oven heated to 180°C (350°F) until the top of each dish is lightly browned and the
inside temperature reaches 85°C (185°F).
Chef Daniel Lesnes, Garibaldi Secondary, Maple Ridge
68
Savory Seafood Burgers
Yield: 12 burgers
Patties
3
cans (170 g each) water-packed
salmon or tuna, drained
Frying
10 mL
Garnish
12
canola oil
175 mL
finely chopped celery
90 mL
sweet pickle relish
3
green onions, chopped
12
lettuce leaves
6
eggs, lightly beaten
12
tomato slices
3 mL
freshly ground black pepper
12
red onion slices
225 mL
dry bread crumbs
hamburger buns,
Kaisers or crusty rolls
1. In a large bowl, combine the patty ingredients.
2. Divide mixture evenly and form into 12 patties.
3. Heat oil in a non-stick skillet over medium heat.
4. Cook patties until both sides are nicely browned, about 3 minutes per side.
5. Serve on warm buns with lettuce, tomato, red onion and mayonnaise, if desired.
Variation: Good with a bit of finely chopped broccoli added to the patty.
Jennifer L. Lactin, Home Economics Teacher, Home Economics Department Head,
Seycove Secondary School, North Vancouver
69
Black Bean Chili
Yield: approximately 6.5 L or 26 x 250 mL portions
15 mL
canola oil
1L
diced carrots
500 mL
diced celery ribs
500 mL
diced onion
1
jalapeño seeded, minced
4
garlic cloves, minced
4
diced red peppers
(approximately 1 L)
4
diced green peppers
(approximately 1 L)
30 mL
ground cumin
15 mL
chili powder or chipotle
paste
5 mL
ground cinnamon
60 mL
brown sugar
2L
cooked black beans
(recipe page 8) or
4 cans (540 mL each)
drained and rinsed
5 limes
juice and zest
1
2.84 L can diced tomatoes,
no added salt
84 g
unsweetened chocolate,
grated (or 50 g cocoa powder)
15 mL
Salt
To Taste
Pepper
Garnish with minced cilantro
The Rocky Mountain Café, David Thompson
Secondary School Cook Training, Invermere
70
1. Heat the oil over medium heat
in a large saucepan. Sauté carrots,
celery and onion for 10 minutes, or
until lightly browned. Add jalapeño,
garlic, red and green peppers, cumin,
chili powder or chipotle paste and
cinnamon. Sauté for a further
5 minutes.
2. Add the sugar, beans, lime juice and
zest, tomatoes and chocolate. Simmer
for 30 minutes. Season with salt and
pepper. Garnish with minced cilantro.
Variation: Replace 1 L of cooked
black beans with 1 kg cooked, drained
ground turkey.
Veggie Burgers
Yield: approximately 42 x 75 g patties
2L
cooked black beans or
kidney beans (recipe
page 8) or 4 cans (540 mL
each) drained and rinsed
1. Process the beans, grains and
tofu until coarsely ground in a food
processor and transfer to a mixing
bowl.
500 g
cooked grains (bulgur,
barley, brown rice, etc.)
2 x 396 g
firm tofu
30 mL
canola oil
200 g
diced onion
200 g
diced peppers
2. Sauté the onions and peppers
in the oil until lightly browned. Add
the garlic, chili or chipotle paste,
cumin and optional curry paste. Stir
to combine and cook for a further
3 minutes. Add onion mixture to
beans.
30 mL
minced garlic
15 mL
red pepper flakes or
chipotle paste
30 mL
ground cumin
15 mL
curry paste or curry powder
175 mL
tahini paste (sesame paste)
1L
dry bread crumbs
10 mL
salt
cornmeal for coating
3. Stir in the tahini paste, salt and
bread crumbs and form into patties.
4. Coat patties with cornmeal.
5. Heat oven to 200°C (400°F) and
bake on a lightly oiled baking sheet
for 10 minutes. Turn and continue
to bake for another 10 minutes or
until lightly browned.
Serve in a whole wheat bun, brushed
with 15 mL of Dip for Vegetables
(recipe page 50) and garnished with
tomatoes and lettuce.
These burgers are mildly spiced.
Add more of the spices if desired.
The Rocky Mountain Café, David Thompson Secondary School
Cook Training, Invermere
71
Breakfast Burrito with Pan Fried
Yukon Gold Potatoes and Fresh Fruit
Yield: 12 servings
Pan Fried Yukon Gold Potatoes
Burritos
A
12
A
small, 15 to 20-cm (6 to
8-in) whole wheat tortillas
B
6
olive oil
B
12
slices bacon, diced
C
15 mL
3
3
4
5 mL
To Taste
2
30 mL
medium Yukon Gold
potatoes, 1 cm dice
C
olive oil
bell peppers, diced
fresh tomatoes, diced
green onions, finely sliced
kosher salt
pepper
jalapeño peppers, seeded
and diced (optional)
fresh chives, finely sliced
kosher salt
pepper
Fresh Fruit Skewers
A
12
bamboo skewers
assorted fruit, large dice
D
18
large eggs
E
180 mL
grated aged cheddar or
Swiss cheese
F
12
25 mL portions of salsa
Burritos
1. Cook B in a sauté pan until crisp.
Drain on paper towel.
2. Sauté C and season with salt and
pepper.
3. Crack D into a bowl and mix.
4. Cook D over medium heat until eggs
are cooked but still moist.
5. Warm A on flat top grill until heated
through.
6. Begin to assemble the dish by placing
equal portions of egg on each tortilla.
7. Top the egg with approximately 15 mL
of E and equal portions of each of the
cooked bacon and vegetable mixture.
8. Roll tightly and return to the flat top
grill, seam side down. Grill until golden
brown. This will help keep it sealed for
service.
9. Turn the burrito over to brown the
other side.
10. Serve with portions of F.
Pan Fried Yukon Gold Potatoes
1. Heat A in a large sauté pan.
2. Add B and cook until browned
and tender.
3. Season with C and serve.
Fresh Fruit Skewer
1. Skewer one piece of each kind
of the diced fruit onto bamboo skewer.
Trevor Randle, Chef Instructor, Maple Ridge Secondary
72
Tofu Burritos
Yield: 12 burritos
15 mL
canola oil
375 mL
finely diced onions
30 mL
minced garlic
20 mL
chili powder or chipotle
paste
1L
finely diced peppers
of any colour, or a
combination
10 mL
paprika
30 mL
ground cumin
10 mL
dried oregano leaves
500 mL
corn, canned (drained
and rinsed) or frozen
2 pkgs
(396 g each)
extra firm tofu,
coarsely grated
150 mL
(1 small tin)
tomato paste
30 mL
reduced-sodium soy sauce
125 mL
chopped black olives
12
medium, 25-cm (10-in)
whole wheat tortillas
To Taste
Pepper
1. Sauté the onions, garlic and chili
powder or chipotle paste in oil for
3 minutes.
2. Add peppers and continue cooking
on medium heat until the vegetables
are soft. Add the paprika, cumin,
oregano, corn and tofu and continue
to sauté.
3. When the vegetables are tender,
stir in the tomato paste, soy sauce,
olives and pepper to taste.
4. Place about 150 mL of filling into
the centre of each tortilla and form
into a burrito. Place seam side down
onto a parchment-lined hotel pan or
baking dish.
5. Bake at 180°C (350°F), covered
with foil for 15 to 20 minutes, or until
heated through.
Recipe modified from Moosewood Restaurant Cooks for a Crowd:
Recipes With a Vegetarian Emphasis for 24 or More.
73
Curried Vegetables with Dahl
Serves 6, 12 or 18
x6
x12
x18
Red lentils or yellow split peas
1 ⁄2 cups
3 cups
4 1⁄2 cups
Vegetable oil
3 tbsp
4 tbsp
5 tbsp
Small onions, chopped
1
2
3
Fresh green chili, seeded and minced
1
2
3
Small sweet potato, peeled and diced
2
4
6
Mild curry powder
1 tbsp
2 tbsp
3 tbsp
Ground cumin
1 tsp
2 tsp
Fresh ginger, grated
2 tbsp
1
1
Water
2 cups
4 cups
6 cups
Cauliflower florets, approximately
1
⁄2, 1, or 1 1⁄2 heads
4 cups
8 cups
12 cups
Green or red bell peppers, seeded and chopped
3
6
9
Fresh spinach
10 oz
20 oz
30 oz
Fresh lemon juice
2 tbsp
1
1
Salt and pepper
To taste
To taste
To taste
1
⁄4 cup
⁄4 cup
1 tbsp
⁄3 cup
⁄3 cup
Note: Lentils cook faster and absorb less water than split peas so use 4 (8) (12) cups of
water for lentils and 5 (10) (15) cups of water for split peas.
1. In a covered saucepan, bring the water and lentils or peas to a boil. Skim off any scum
that rises to the top. Reduce the heat to low, uncover and simmer for about 30-40 minutes,
until tender, stirring frequently.
2. In a large pot, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion and chili. Cook, stirring
occasionally until the onion is translucent. Add the sweet potatoes, curry powder, cumin and
ginger and continue to cook 2-3 minutes, stirring often. Add the water and bring to a boil.
Add the cauliflower and bell peppers. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes.
3. While the vegetables simmer, pour the lentil mixture into a blender or food processor and
purée, or mash by hand until smooth. When the sweet potato is tender, stir in the puréed
lentils or peas, spinach and lemon juice. Simmer until spinach is wilted. Season to taste.
Recipe reprinted from Many Hands: Community Kitchens Share Their Best
© 2005 with permission of Community Kitchens Publishing. Vancouver Community
Kitchen Project www.communitykitchens.ca
74
Good served hot with
rice or pasta and a bit of
yogourt; this dish is also
good cold, wrapped up in
a whole-grain pita bread.
Three Sisters Stew
Serves 6, 12 or 18
x6
x12
x18
Olive oil
1 tbsp
2 tbsp
2 tbsp
Large onion, thinly sliced
1
2
3
Cloves garlic, minced
1
2
3
Jalapeño chili, finely chopped
1
2
3
Medium tomatoes, chopped
3
6
9
Dried thyme
1 tsp
2 tsp
1 tbsp
Peeled, cubed butternut squash
4 cups
8 cups
12 cups
Sliced yellow summer squash
4 cups
8 cups
12 cups
Cubed (1-in) zucchini
4 cups
8 cups
12 cups
Green beans, cut into 1-in pieces
3 cups
6 cups
9 cups
Frozen whole kernel corn, thawed
1 cup
2 cups
3 cups
19-oz cans kidney beans, drained and rinsed
2
4
6
Salt and pepper
To taste
To taste
To taste
A colourful
Southwestern-style, late
summer concoction. Use
fresh corn cut from the
cob if you prefer.
1. In a large pot, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion and chili. Cook, stirring
occasionally, until the onion is tender. Add the tomatoes, thyme and butternut squash. Cover
and cook over low heat until the squash starts to soften. Stir in the yellow squash, zucchini
and green beans. Cook over low heat for 10-15 minutes, stirring frequently, until the squash
is tender. Stir in the corn and kidney beans. Cover and cook until piping hot. Season to taste.
Recipe reprinted from Many Hands: Community Kitchens Share Their Best
© 2005 with permission of Community Kitchens Publishing. Vancouver Community
Kitchen Project www.communitykitchens.ca
75
Punjabi Spiced Chickpeas
Serves 6, 12 or 18 or as part of a meal
x6
x12
x18
Vegetable oil
2 tbsp
3 tbsp
4 tbsp
Black or yellow mustard seeds
1 ⁄2 tsp
1 tbsp
4 1⁄2 tsp
Cumin seeds
1 tsp
2 tsp
1 tbsp
Ground coriander
1
⁄2 tsp
1 tsp
1 1⁄2 tsp
Pinches ground cardamom
1
2
3
Tumeric
1
⁄2 tsp
1 tsp
1 1⁄2 tbsp
Fresh ginger, grated
2 tsp
4 tsp
2 tbsp
Garlic cloves, minced
2
4
6
Shallots, finely chopped
2
4
6
Canned, drained or fresh tomatoes, chopped
1 cup
2 cups
3 cups
19-oz cans chickpeas, drained and rinsed
1
2
3
Water or vegetable stock
1 1⁄2 cups
3 cups
4 1⁄2 cups
Frozen peas, thawed
1 cup
2 cups
3 cups
Chopped fresh cilantro
1
1
3
Salt and cayenne pepper
To taste
To taste
To taste
1
⁄4 cup
⁄2 cup
⁄4 cup
1. In a large pot, heat the vegetable oil over high heat. Add the mustard seeds. When they
pop, add the cumin, coriander, cardamom and tumeric. Stir for a moment, then add the
ginger, garlic and shallots. Cook, stirring for 1 minute.
2. Add the tomatoes and cook, stirring, until the tomatoes thicken and become pasty.
3. Add the chickpeas and water or stock. Cover and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer
for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
4. Mix in the peas and cilantro and simmer until the peas are warmed through.
5. Season to taste with the salt and cayenne pepper.
Recipe reprinted from Many Hands: Community Kitchens Share Their Best
© 2005 with permission of Community Kitchens Publishing. Vancouver Community
Kitchen Project www.communitykitchens.ca
76
If all you’ve ever had is
commercially prepared
curry powder, this dish
will be a revelation of
flavour. Chickpeas are
also known as garbanzo
beans. You can use
kidney or pinto beans in
place of the chickpeas
if you like.
Sandwiches
Nothing says lunch quite like a sandwich, except maybe
soup and sandwich! Use a variety of breads, fillings and
sides to keep sandwiches interesting.
Prepare sandwiches
with one item from at
least three of the four
food groups in Canada’s
Food Guide:
• Vegetables and Fruit
• Grain Products
• Milk and Alternatives
• Meat and Alternatives
Emphasize whole grain
products and vegetables
• Offer a variety of breads, pitas,
tortillas, roti and buns. Favour
products with at least 2 g of
fibre per serving.
• Choose deeply coloured
vegetables such as dark green
lettuce, bell peppers and
tomatoes.
• Add apple or banana to nut
butter or cheese sandwiches.
Offer alternatives to meat,
fish, and poultry often
• Try egg, roasted vegetables,
salad, chickpea curry or bean
spread in a tortilla, pita pocket
or roti.
Prepare sandwiches with
low-fat, reduced-sodium
ingredients and limit
added fat and salt
• Choose lean, roasted meats.
Avoid meats that have been
processed, cured or smoked.
• Use small amounts, if any at
all, of added fat such as
non-hydrogenated margarine,
mayonnaise and cream cheese.
• Avoid processed cheese.
• Avoid adding pickles and
pickled foods, relishes and
other condiments when
preparing sandwiches.
77
Breakfast Club Sandwich
Yield: 1 sandwich
Instead of using white bread
for sandwiches, gradually shift
1
slice of whole grain toast
1. Cut toast on the diagonal.
2
slices tomato
to whole wheat bread by first
1
scrambled egg
(no added salt)
25 g
shredded cheese or
1 slice crisp bacon
2. Top one-half of the toast with
egg, tomato slices, lettuce, cheese
or bacon. Top with other one-half
of toast and hold together with
toothpick.
3. Serve with fresh fruit salad
and/or baked yam “fries” (recipe
page 44) tossed in lime zest and
reduced-sodium Cajun spice
seasoning.
using one slice each of whole
shredded lettuce
Recipe developed by the students in the “Breakfast Club” program
at David Thompson Secondary School, Invermere
78
introducing 60% whole wheat
and later move on to 100%.
Make a “crazy sandwich” by
wheat and white bread. If you
don’t like the whole wheat,
turn the sandwich over and
now you’ve got white!
Grilled Vegetable Roll-Ups
Yield: 12 portions
12
small, 15 to 20-cm (6 to 8-in)
whole wheat tortillas
6
lettuce leaves,
each cut in half
2
red peppers, grilled
30 mL
capers, chopped
2
small zucchini, grilled
3 mL
pepper
30 mL
canola oil
3 mL
salt
250 g
light cream cheese
1. Wash and then remove stem, seeds and pith from the red peppers.
Slice into strips, toss with 15 mL oil and 2 mL each salt and pepper.
2. Wash and then remove stem from zucchini. Cut in half crosswise and then
slice lengthwise into strips, (approximately 6-mm thick slices). Toss with the
remaining oil, salt and pepper.
3. Place vegetables in a single layer on jelly roll pans and broil until soft,
turning several times. If the zucchini is very moist, blot with paper towels.
Limit trans fat – read the
Nutrition Facts Table and
choose a tortilla that
contains no trans fat. Or,
read the ingredient list
and choose a product that
does not contain the words
‘hydrogenated’, ‘partially
hydrogenated’, ‘margarine’
or ‘shortening’.
4. Cool the vegetables.
5. Lay tortillas on a flat surface and spread evenly with cream cheese.
6. Sprinkle with capers.
7. Divide the grilled vegetables evenly, placing on one half of each tortilla,
then place lettuce on top.
8. Roll up tightly and serve whole, or cut into 3-4 pieces each.
Susan Petersen, Home Economics Teacher, Churchill Secondary, Vancouver
79
Grilled Chicken Clubhouse
Sandwich
Yield: 15 sandwiches
30
slices whole grain bread
75 mL
olive oil or soft margarine,
non-hydrogenated
75 mL
pesto
15
skinless, boneless chicken
breasts, grilled
15
crispy bacon slices
45
tomato slices
15
lettuce leaves
1. Lightly coat the bread slices with
olive oil or margarine and toast.
2. Spread 5 mL of pesto onto each of
15 slices of the bread.
3. Top with one chicken breast, one
bacon slice, three tomato slices, one
lettuce leaf and a second slice of
bread.
4. Secure with two skewers or
toothpicks and cut in half.
5. Serve immediately with fresh salad
or bowl of soup.
Trevor Randle, Chef Instructor, Maple Ridge Secondary School
can get out of
Sandwich sizes
portion of bread
hand if a large
e bread portion
is used. Keep th
a submarine
moderate, e.g.,
than six inches,
bun that is less
folded for a
and one tortilla
quesadilla.
80
Use deeply coloured greens to
garnish sandwiches, increasing
nutrients and eye appeal. Try
romaine or red leaf lettuce,
or even finely shredded kale
or chard.
Baked Goods and Desserts
Most baked goods and desserts such as cupcakes, muffins, cookies,
pastries, cakes, and pies are foods to be enjoyed occasionally and
in small amounts. Look for recipes that emphasize higher fibre
ingredients and call for less fat, sugar, and salt.
Emphasize whole grain
products and iron sources
• Replace half of the white
flour in many baked goods
with whole grain flour.
• Boost iron by adding
blackstrap molasses, raisins,
dried apricots, pumpkin or
sesame seeds, oatmeal, wheat
germ or canned pumpkin.
• Emphasize nuts and seeds.
Prepare baked goods and
desserts with small amounts
of added fat and sugar; limit
high-fat and high-sugar
ingredients
• Replace up to 50% of the fat
with mashed fruit (applesauce,
mashed banana, puréed prunes,
puréed pumpkin).
• Use low-fat milk or plain, low-fat,
calcium-fortified soy beverage in
place of cream or whole milk.
• Use mini chocolate chips and
half the amount called for instead
of regular chocolate chips.
• Replace chocolate chips with
chopped dried fruit or chopped
nuts or a combination.
• Use fresh or puréed fruit in place
of frosting or icing.
For more baked
goods
recipes refer to
Bake Better
Bites: Recipes an
d Tips for
Healthier Baked
Goods at
www.healthyeati
ngatschool.ca
Prepare baked goods and
desserts with the least
possible amount of salt
• Make muffins, cookies,
and cakes from scratch rather
than from mixes.
Artificial sweeteners are not
permitted in baked goods for
sale in elementary and middle
schools, and are generally
discouraged for use by
all students except those
with diabetes.
81
What’s an appropriate
amount to serve?
• Cookie: not more than
6 cm in diameter
• Loaf slice: not more than
2 cm thick
• Muffin: size of tennis ball
or smaller
How do you know if a recipe contains a lot or a little fat,
sugar, or salt?
How to assess an acceptable
amount of added fat:
How to assess an acceptable
amount of added sugar:
Servings
of recipe
Servings
of recipe
Fat called for
is less than
Sugar called for
is less than
(no.)
(mL)
(g)
(no.)
(mL)
(g)
1
7
7
1
15
13
12
75
72
12
175
150
50
350
336
50
750
634
How to assess an acceptable
amount of added salt:
Rocky Mountain Café Muffins
Servings
of recipe
Yield: approximately 110 muffins
600 g
vegetable oil
200 g
quick oats
12
eggs
1.3 kg
white sugar
450 g
applesauce, unsweetened
60 mL
baking soda
60 mL
vanilla
30 mL
salt
3L
1% buttermilk
2.5 kg
1.75 kg
white flour
1.75 kg
whole wheat flour
berries, fresh or frozen,
unsweetened and do
not thaw
1. Whisk eggs into oil until emulsified.
2. Combine remaining wet ingredients and add to the oil and eggs.
3. Combine the dry ingredients. Fold the wet ingredients into the
dry until about half mixed. Fold the fruit until it is just mixed.
Do not overmix.
4. Place in silicone muffin forms with the #12 scoop (80 mL)
and bake at 160°C (325°F) in convection oven for 20-25 minutes.
The Rocky Mountain Café, David Thompson Secondary School
Cook Training, Invermere
82
Salt called for
is less than
(no.)
(mL)
(g)
1
1
1
12
10
12
50
50
62
Muffin Variations
, raspberries,
Mixed Berry: Blueberries
rries.
blackberries and strawbe
peaches,
Okanagan Fruit: Chopped
rines.
pears, cherries and necta
and cranberries.
Razzelberry: Raspberries
berries with
Carrot Nut Spice: Replace
0 g diced,
2 kg grated carrots and 50
d 50 mL
unsweetened pineapple. Ad
ice.
cinnamon and 15 mL allsp
oats before baking.
You may also sprinkle with
Fruit Muffins
Yield: 48 muffins
500 mL
quick oats
5 mL
salt
500 mL
whole wheat flour
500 mL
frozen fruit*
250 mL
oat bran
125 mL
flax seed
375 mL
low-fat plain yogurt
250 mL
sugar
250 mL
250 mL
shredded unsweetened
coconut
melted margarine,
non-hydrogenated
2
large eggs
10 mL
baking powder
10 mL
vanilla
10 mL
cinnamon
300 mL
skim milk
5 mL
baking soda
Frozen blueberries and
peaches are the best! Use
peach slices that are fairly
large, about twice the
size of a blueberry.
1. Preheat the oven to 190°C (375°F). Line muffin tins with paper liners.
2. Mix dry ingredients together.
3. Add the fruit and coat with the dry ingredients.
4. Set aside 150 mL milk.
5. Mix the wet ingredients, including the remaining milk, together.
6. Add the wet ingredients to the dry, and mix just enough to combine.
Add more milk as needed to make a thick batter.
7. Fill cups level with paper liners.
8. Bake 15-20 minutes or until firm.
Vernon Secondary School Cafeteria Program
83
Honey Whole Wheat Buns
Yield: 2.6 kg or approximately 42 x 60 g buns
30 mL
quick rise yeast
10 mL
salt
1L
warm water
1.5 L
whole wheat flour
125 mL
margarine,
non-hydrogenated
1L
all purpose flour
125 mL
crushed flax seed
75 mL
molasses
125 mL
honey
1. Dissolve yeast in warm water.
2. In a large bowl, combine margarine, molasses, honey and salt. Mix well.
3. Add yeast mixture then gradually add flours and flax.
4. Turn onto floured surface and knead until smooth.
5. Punch down and let rest for a few minutes.
6. Divide dough into four parts and shape into buns.
7. Bake at 190°C (375°F) for 35 to 40 minutes.
Burnaby Mountain Secondary Advanced Foods 12 students
84
All Purpose Dough: Cheese Buns
Yield: each 2L quantity of dough makes approximately 30 buns
This dough makes great pizza
2L
4L
8L
Salt
5g
10 g
20 g
Margarine, non-hydrogenated
60 g
120 g
240 g
All purpose flour
875 g
1.75 kg
3.5 kg
Whole wheat flour
875 g
1.75 kg
3.5 kg
Sugar
10 g
20 g
40 g
Yeast (Fermipan)
20 g
40 g
80 g
Warm water
1.25 L
2.5 L
5L
Shredded reduced-fat cheese
625 mL
1.25 L
2.5 L
crust too. See recipe page 57.
1. Mix all weighed dry ingredients in a Hobart mixer. Add the warm water
and mix with the dough hook until well combined.
2. Weigh into 500 g pieces and roll out into a rectangle.
3. Sprinkle each rectangle with approximately 125 mL shredded reduced-fat
cheese or soy cheese.
4. Roll up jelly roll style, tuck in the short ends and cut each roll into 6 pieces.
5. Place on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper and put in proofer for
approximately 12 to 15 minutes before baking.
6. Bake the buns at 190°C (375°F) for approximately 20 minutes or until
browned and done.
Vernon Secondary School Cafeteria Program
85
Fibre Feast Bread
Yield: 1 loaf (16 slices)
250 mL
old-fashioned rolled
oats
egg, beaten
250 mL
100% bran cereal
50 mL
brown sugar
50 mL
wheat germ
250 mL
buttermilk
7 mL
baking soda
250 mL
whole wheat flour
2 mL
salt
125 mL
boiling water
250 mL
raisins
1
1. Preheat oven to 180°C (350°F).
2. Lightly oil a loaf pan with non-stick spray.
3. In a large bowl, pour boiling water over raisins, and leave to cool. Add egg,
sugar and buttermilk.
4. In another bowl, combine flour, oats, cereal, wheat germ, soda and salt
and mix well.
5. Stir dry ingredients into raisin mixture until well blended.
6. Pour into loaf pan. Bake for 45-50 minutes, or until loaf tests done.
Ann Marie Jury, Home Economics Teacher, South Kamloops Senior Secondary, Kamloops.
Recipe adapted and reprinted with permission from Low-Glycemic Meals in Minutes by
Laura Kalina and Cheryl Christian
86
Apple Flax Bread
Yield: 4 loaves, approximately 64 slices
300 mL
canola oil
170 g
ground flax seed
600 g
white sugar
4
8
eggs
apples, small dice,
peeling optional
30 mL
vanilla
15 mL
cinnamon (optional)
300 mL
low fat plain yogourt
1.5 kg
1200 g
whole wheat or spelt flour
unsweetened
applesauce
25 g
baking soda
460 g
10 g
salt
chopped walnuts
(optional)
170 g
whole flax seed
To make muffins adjust
time to 18-20 minutes.
1. Cream together oil and sugar, add eggs and beat. Stir in the vanilla
and the yogourt.
2. Sift together dry ingredients and mix in the apples.
3. Add applesauce to egg mixture.
4. Combine dry and wet ingredients and mix just enough to combine.
5. Fold in walnuts if using.
6. Divide batter evenly into 4 greased loaf pans.
7. Bake at 160°C (325°F) in oven for 45-60 minutes (check with a wooden skewer).
The Rocky Mountain Café, David Thompson Secondary School
Cook Training, Invermere
87
Blueberry Oat Bars
Serves 16, 32 or 48 bars
Cut into larger squares
x16
x32
x48
and serve warm with yogourt
Flour
1 cup
2 cups
3 cups
as a dessert.
Quick-cooking rolled oats
3
⁄4 cup
1 1⁄2 cups
2 1⁄4 cups
Packed brown sugar
3
⁄4 cup
1 1⁄2 cups
2 1⁄4 cups
Wheat germ
1
⁄4 cup
1
Natural bran
1
⁄4 cup
Salt
1
Ground cinnamon
1
Baking soda
1
Apple juice
1
Vegetable oil
1
Blueberries
3
⁄2 cup
3
1
⁄2 cup
3
⁄2 tsp
1 tsp
1 1⁄2 tsp
⁄2 tsp
1 tsp
1 1⁄2 tsp
⁄4 tsp
1
⁄3 cup
2
⁄4 cup
1
⁄4 cup
1 ⁄2 cups
2 1⁄4 cups
Cornstarch
1 tbsp
2 tbsp
3 tbsp
Lemon juice
1 tbsp
2 tbsp
3 tbsp
⁄2 tsp
⁄4 cup
⁄4 cup
⁄4 tsp
3
⁄3 cup
1 cup
⁄2 cup
3
1
⁄4 cup
1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Combine the flour, rolled oats, brown sugar, wheat germ, bran,
salt, cinnamon and baking soda. Mix well. Beat the apple juice and oil together. Add to the
dry ingredients and mix until crumbly. Press half of the mixture into 1 (2) (3) 9-inch square
baking dishes. Bake for 10 minutes. Let cool.
2. Combine the blueberries, cornstarch and lemon juice together. Spread evenly over
the cooled base. Sprinkle with the remaining oat mixture. Return to the oven and bake for
34-45 minutes, until the topping is browned and the fruit bubbling. Cool completely
before cutting.
Recipe reprinted from Many Hands: Community Kitchens Share Their Best
© 2005 with permission of Community Kitchens Publishing. Vancouver Community
Kitchen Project www.communitykitchens.ca
88
Irish Soda Bread
Makes 1, 2 or 3 loaves
You can add a cup of
x1
x2
x3
currants or raisins to the
Buttermilk
2 cups
4 cups
6 cups
dry ingredients for a sweeter
Honey
2 tbsp
4 tbsp
6 tbsp
bread. If you like caraway
Whole wheat flour
2 ⁄2 cups
5 cups
7 ⁄2 cups
seeds, add 1 teaspoon per
Unbleached white flour
2 cups
4 cups
6 cups
loaf for a traditional taste.
Millet
1
1
3
Baking soda
1 1⁄2 tsp
1 tbsp
4 1⁄2 tsp
Salt
1
⁄2 tsp
1 tsp
1 1⁄2 tsp
1
⁄4 cup
⁄2 cup
1
⁄4 cup
1. Preheat the over to 325°F. Grease and flour 1 (2) (3) baking sheets.
2. Whisk the buttermilk into the honey.
3. In a large bowl, whisk the flours, millet, baking soda and salt together.
4. Add wet mixture all at once to the dry mixture and stir until just blended. Do not overmix.
5. Place dough on floured surface and knead for 2 minutes. Shape the dough into
a round loaf.
6. Place on the baking sheets and bake for 60-70 minutes. Transfer to a rack to cool.
Recipe reprinted from Many Hands: Community Kitchens Share Their Best
© 2005 with permission of Community Kitchens Publishing. Vancouver Community
Kitchen Project www.communitykitchens.ca
89
Baked Bannock
Makes 30, 60 or 90 servings
x30
x60
x90
5 cups
10 cups
15 cups
Baking powder
3 tbsp
6 tbsp
9 tbsp
Powdered milk
1
⁄2 cup
1 cup
1 1⁄2 cups
Salt
1
⁄2 tsp
1 tsp
1 1⁄2 tsp
Sugar
1
⁄2 cup
1 cup
1 1⁄2 cups
Vegetable oil
1
⁄2 cup
1 cup
1 1⁄2 cups
Cold water, approximately
2 cups
4 cups
6 cups
Flour
1. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Grease 3 (6) (9) baking sheets.
2. Mix together the flour, baking powder, powdered milk, salt and sugar.
3. Make a hole in the center of the dry ingredients. Put the oil into the hole and,
using your hands, gently mix in the flour mixture until the oil is absorbed.
4. Rapidly stir in the cold water, stopping when a soft dough is formed.
5. Divide the dough into 30 (60) (90) equal pieces and pat out to 1⁄2-inch-thick buns.
Place 10 buns, 1 inch apart, on each baking sheet.
6. Bake for 20 minutes until golden brown.
Recipe reprinted from Many Hands: Community Kitchens Share Their Best
©2005 with permission of Community Kitchens Publishing. Vancouver Community
Kitchen Project www.communitykitchens.ca
90
Basic Recipe for Oatmeal Cookies
Yield: 48 cookies
250 mL
brown sugar
5 mL
baking soda
250 mL
white sugar
5 mL
salt
250 mL
margarine,
non-hydrogenated
5 mL
baking powder
500 mL
quick oats
2
large eggs
250 mL
30 mL
milk
10 mL
vanilla
250 mL
all purpose flour
of one of the following
or a combination:
diced dried apricots,
diced figs, craisins,
raisins or chocolate chips
250 mL
whole wheat flour
1. Preheat oven to 180°C (350°F).
2. Cream together both sugars and the margarine.
3. Add the eggs, milk and vanilla and beat until well combined.
4. Add the flour, soda, salt and baking powder and beat again.
5. Add the oats and the dried fruit or chocolate chips.
6. Mix until well combined.
7. Using a 1 oz ice cream scoop, drop onto parchment-lined cookie sheets.
8. Bake 8-10 minutes. Remove from cookie sheets and cool on wire rack.
Vernon Secondary School Cafeteria Program
91
Ginger Snaps
Makes 100, 200 or 300 ginger snaps
This recipe calls for
x100
x200
x300
shortening. To limit trans
5 cups
10 cups
15 cups
fat, choose a shortening
Baking soda
1 tsp
2 tsp
1 tbsp
that is non-hydrogenated,
Salt
1
⁄2 tsp
1 tsp
1 1⁄2 tsp
Ground ginger
1 tbsp
2 tbsp
3 tbsp
Shortening
1 cup
2 cups
3 cups
White sugar
3 cups
6 cups
9 cups
You could also use butter
Molasses
1 cup
2 cups
3 cups
instead of shortening in
Large eggs
3
6
9
this recipe.
Sifted flour
1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Grease and flour, or line with parchment paper, as many
cookie sheets as you have!
2. Whisk the flour, baking soda, salt and ginger together.
3. In a separate bowl, cream the shortening. Beat in the sugar until fluffy. Beat in the
molasses, then the eggs.
4. Add the flour mixture and stir until well mixed.
5. Using 2 teaspoons of the dough for each cookie, roll into balls and place 2 inches apart
on cookie sheets and flatten slightly.
6. Bake for 15-20 minutes, until firm. Transfer to a rack to cool. Wash, grease and flour the
sheets between batches, or re-use the parchment paper.
Recipe reprinted from Many Hands: Community Kitchens Share Their Best
© 2005 with permission of Community Kitchens Publishing. Vancouver Community
Kitchen Project www.communitykitchens.ca
hes of cookie
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92
or substitute with
non-hydrogenated margarine.
To determine if ready-to-serve shakes, puddings,
What’s an appropriate
amount to serve?
• Shakes and smoothies:
250 mL (no larger than
360 mL in middle and
secondary schools)
• Puddings and custards:
and yogourts are suitable for sale, check if they
fit into the Choose Most and Choose Sometimes
categories at www.brandnamefoodlist.ca.
Fruit Yogourt Smoothie
Yield: 1 smoothie
about 100 g or 125 mL
125 mL
plain low-fat yogourt
(skim, 1% or 2%)
75 mL
ice
125 mL
frozen berries,
unsweetened
1/2
medium banana
1. Put all ingredients
into a blender and
blend until well mixed.
Serve.
The Rocky Mountain Café, David Thompson
Secondary School Cook Training, Invermere
93
Parfaits
Yield: 1 portion
175 mL
frozen fruit
5 mL
maple syrup or honey
125 mL
plain 1% yogourt
30 mL
granola
1. Combine fruit and maple syrup in a bowl.
2. Place about one-third of the fruit at the bottom of a 9 oz serving cup.
3. Place about half of the yogourt on top of fruit.
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until cup is full.
5. Sprinkle granola on top of parfait.
The Rocky Mountain Café, David Thompson Secondary School
Cook Training, Invermere
94
Limit trans fat – read the
Nutrition Facts Table and
choose a granola that
contains no trans fat. Or,
read the ingredient list
and choose a product that
does not contain the words
‘hydrogenated’, ‘partially
hydrogenated’, ‘margarine’
or ‘shortening’.
Conversion tables:
Rounded measures for quick reference
Reminder!
A fluid ounce (fl oz) is a
measure of volume.
An ounce (16 per pound) is
a measure of weight.
Convert fluid ounces to mL.
Convert ounces to grams.
Volume
Weight
For ingredient volumes up
to 1 cup use the approximate
conversions in Table 1.
For ingredient weights up
to 2 lb use the approximate
conversions in Table 2.
Metric
Equivalents for
Larger Quantities
Table 1 : Equivalent Volumes
Table 2 : Equivalent Weights
Table 3: Equivalent Amounts
Imperial
mL
Imperial
grams
Imperial
Metric
⁄8 tsp
0.5 mL
1
⁄2 oz
15 g
1 lb
450 g
1 cup
240 mL
1 fl oz*
28.4 mL
1
⁄4 tsp
1 mL
1 oz
30 g
1
⁄2 tsp
2 mL
2 oz
60 g
1 tsp
5 mL
1
⁄4 lb
125 g
1 tbsp
15 mL
1
⁄2 lb
250 g
2 tbsp
25 mL
3
⁄4 lb
350 g
3 tbsp
50 mL*
1 lb
500 g
Gal/Qt
Metric
⁄4 cup
50 mL*
1 1⁄2 lb
750 g
1 gallon (Can)
4.5 L
⁄3 cup
75 mL
1 3⁄4 lb
875 g
1 quart (Can)
1.1 L
⁄2 cup
125 mL
2 lb
1 kg
⁄3 cup
150 mL
1 gallon (US)
3.8 L
3
⁄4 cup
175 mL
1 quart (US)
950 mL
1 cup
250 mL
1
1
1
1
2
*The equivalent volumes in Table 1
reflect the general principle that
not more than two different measures should be used to measure
an amount. As a result 50 mL is
the accepted rounded quantity for
both 3 tbsp and 1⁄4 cup.
*Use only for converting can sizes
expressed in imperial fluid ounces.
Table 4: Equivalent Volumes
If the original recipe contains
gallon or quart measures:
• first establish whether the
measures you have been using
are US or Canadian (imperial)
• and then use the appropriate
conversion factor(s) from Table 4.
95
Resources
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Recommended Cookbooks
•
Not all the recipes in these cookbooks will meet the
Guidelines. Use the tips in this resource to decide if
recipes will meet the Guidelines and be suitable for
sale to students.
Cook Great Food: 450 Delicious Recipes.
Dietitians of Canada. Robert Rose. 2001.
•
Simply Great Food: 250 quick, easy,
& delicious recipes.*
Patricia Chuey, Eileen Campbell, &
Mary Sue Waisman. Robert Rose. 2007.
Quantity Cooking
Healthwise Quantity Cookbook.*
Stephanie Turner & Vivienne Aronowitz.
Center for Science in the Public Interest. 1990.
Healthy & Delicious:
400 Professional Recipes.*
Sandy Kapoor. John Wiley & Sons. 1999.
Many Hands: Community Kitchens
Share Their Best.
Community Kitchens Publishing. 2005.
Moosewood Restaurant Cooks
for a Crowd: Recipes With a Vegetarian
Emphasis for 24 or More.
The Moosewood Collective.
John Wiley & Sons. 1996.
Techniques of Healthy Cooking, Second
Edition. The Culinary Institute of America.
Editor Jennifer S. Armentrout.
John Wiley & Sons. 2000.
Techniques of Healthy Cooking, Professional
Edition. The Culinary Institute of America.
John Wiley & Sons. 2008.
Family Size Cooking
Dietitians of Canada
Bake Better Bites: Recipes and Tips for
Healthier Baked Goods. Dietitians of Canada.
2009. www.healthyeatingatschool.ca
96
•
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada
HeartSmart Chinese Cooking.
Stephen Wong. Douglas & McIntyre. 1996.
•
HeartSmart Flavours of India.
Krishna Jamal. Douglas & McIntyre. 1998.
•
The Best of HeartSmart Cooking.
Bonnie Stern. Random House Canada. 2006.
•
The New Lighthearted Cookbook:
Recipes for Heart Healthy Cooking.
Anne Lindsay. Key Porter Books. 2005.
•
•
•
•
Canadian Diabetes Association
Canada’s Best Cookbook for Kids
with Diabetes.
Colleen Bartley. Robert Rose. 2005.
Diabetes Comfort Food.
Johanna Burkhard. Robert Rose. 2006.
Other
Low Glycemic Meals in Minutes:
Fast Track Your Family to Healthy Eating
and Active Living.
Laura Kalina and Cheryl Christian. 2008.
One Smart Cookie: All Your Favourite
Cookies, Squares, Brownies and Biscotti...
With Less Fat!
Julie Van Rosendaal. Whitecap Books. 2002.
•
•
Nutrient Analysis Software
The Complete Light Kitchen.
Rose Reisman. Whitecap Books. 2007.
Software programs are available to analyze
the nutrients in recipes and the analysis can
be compared to the Guidelines. This takes
time, and for accurate results is best done by
someone with experience and expertise in this
area. It should also be done with a program
that uses the most recent version of the
Canadian Nutrient File as its database.
The Good Food Book for Families.
Brenda Bradshaw and Cheryl Mutch.
Random House Canada. 2008.
Web Resources
•
•
•
•
Brand Name Food List
(www.brandnamefoodlist.ca)
Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide
www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-guidealiment/index-eng.php
Guidelines for Food and Beverage Sales
in BC Schools and Tools to Support
Implementation
www.bced.gov.bc.ca/health/
healthy_eating/food_guidelines/)
Making It Happen: Healthy Eating at School
www.healthyeatingatschool.ca
•
A Fresh Crunch in School Lunch
– The BC Farm to School Guide
www.phabc.org/farmtoschool
•
School Meal and School Nutrition Program
Handbook
www.bced.gov.bc.ca/health/
•
Chef Ann Lunch Lessons:
Changing the Way We Feed Our Children
www.lunchlessons.org/
•
Healthy Eating Active Living Information
www.dietitians.ca
Nutrition Information Hotline
•
Tips and Recipes for Quantity Cooking:
Nourishing Minds and Bodies has been
developed to assist users in determining if
recipes will meet the Guidelines without
having to do recipe analysis.
Dietitian Services at HealthLink BC
Toll-free in BC 8-1-1
www.HealthLinkBC.ca)
Sources
Resources marked with an asterisk (*) and those listed
below were used in the preparation of this resource.
•
On Cooking:
A Textbook of Culinary Fundamentals.
Sarah R. Labensky, Alan M. Hause, Fred L.
Malley, Anthony Bevan & Settimio Sicoli.
Pearson Education Canada. 2006.
•
Recipe Substitutions to Lower Fat and Sugar.
www.HealthLinkBC.ca
•
The New American Plate Comfort Foods:
Recipes for a Healthy Weight and a Healthy
Life. American Institute for Cancer Research,
Revised Edition.
•
Techniques of Healthy Cooking, Second
Edition. The Culinary Institute of America.
Editor Jennifer S. Armentrout.
John Wiley & Sons. 2000.
97
Tips and Recipes for Quantity Cooking:
Nourishing Minds and Bodies
This resource is published by Dietitians of Canada with funding from the BC Healthy
Living Alliance. Dietitians of Canada gratefully acknowledges the chef instructors,
home economics teachers, students and dietitians throughout BC who have
supported the development and review of this resource. A special thank you to
everyone who submitted and tested recipes. Without you, this resource would not
have been possible.
Download a copy and other resources at www.healthyeatingatschool.ca
If you have questions about healthy eating at school contact Dietitian Services
at HealthLink BC at 8-1-1.
An initiative of these
BC Healthy Living Alliance members