Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide

Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager
User Guide
Release 13.0.0.0
B035-2513-088A
August 2008
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Preface
Purpose
This book provides information about Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager (Teradata
DWM), which is a component of the Teradata ASM suite of the Teradata Tools and Utilities
products. Teradata Tools and Utilities is a group of products designed to work with Teradata
Database.
Teradata DWM enables the database administrator (DBA) to manage queries submitted to the
Teradata Database.
Use this guide to learn about and utilize the Teradata DWM features.
Audience
This book is intended for DBAs.
Supported Releases
This book supports the following releases:
•
Teradata Database 12.00.00
•
Teradata Database 13.00.00
•
Teradata Tools and Utilities 13.00.00
•
Teradata DWM 13.0.0.0
Note: See “Help Menu” on page 59 to verify the Teradata DWM version number.
•
Unicode 4.0
To locate detailed supported-release information:
1
Go to http://www.info.teradata.com/.
2
Under Online Publications, click General Search.
3
Type 3119 in the Publication Product ID box.
4
Under Sort By, select Date.
5
Click Search.
6
Open the version of the Teradata Tools and Utilities ##.##.## Supported Platforms and
Product Versions spreadsheet associated with this release.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
3
Preface
Prerequisites
The spreadsheet includes supported Teradata Database versions, platforms, and product
release numbers.
Prerequisites
The following prerequisite knowledge is required for this product:
•
Relational database management systems
•
Teradata SQL
•
Basic concepts of the Teradata Database
•
Connectivity software, such as CLIv2
Changes to This Book
The following changes were made to this book in support of the current release. Changes are
marked with change bars. For a complete list of changes to the product, see the Teradata Tools
and Utilities Release Definition associated with this release.
4
Date and Release
Description
August 2008
13.0.0.0
Added instructions and information on:
• Chapter 4: “Getting Started with Teradata DWM” has been added to
give instructions on how to set a basic configuration using Teradata
DWM.
• Chapter 5: “Getting Started with the State Matrix” has been added to
discuss the state matrix which is managed with Teradata DWM.
• Use Teradata DWM in local mode. See “Launching Teradata DWM” on
page 47.
• Define other users for Teradata DWM. See “Launching Teradata DWM”
on page 47.
• Each operating environment, system condition and state must have a
unique name. When rule sets are loaded, checks are made and a warning
message will be issued.
• A global exception directive can be renamed after it has been defined.
See “To create a new global exception directive” on page 188.
• A split-screen feature has been added to the Teradata DWM GUI. Two
panes can display; the bottom pane accesses DIT features, while the
upper pane shows the state matrix. See “View Menu” on page 57 for
information on the new split-screen feature.
• When defining a new workload, specific data objects can be excluded as
classification criteria by using the Classify by Object dialog box. For an
example, see “Example: Classification by Included and Excluded Objects
Criteria” on page 178.
• Figure 88 on page 206 has been updated to show that the Priority
Scheduler uses a list instead of a pull-down menu to display states.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Preface
Additional Information
Date and Release
Description
August 2008
13.0.0.0
(continued)
• Note that the default values used for system condition duration time
and the event qualification time is the current event interval value.
Previously, the default values were listed as 180 seconds.
• The New Event dialog box uses the term AMP Threshold to describe an
event type instead of # of AMPs. See “To define a new event” on
page 110.
• When defining an event combination, a new event can be defined from
the Event Combinations and Actions - System Condition view. See “To
define an event combination” on page 118.
• Throttle and filter names can be changed after they are defined. See
Table 24 for a description of the name field format.
• “Asynchronous Operations and Throttle Limits” on page 139 discusses
the number of running queries when there is a throttle limit in effect
and a rule set change occurs.
• “Viewing Enabled and Disabled Status by State” on page 160 details how
to determine which filters and throttles are currently enabled for each
state.
• Queries can now be rejected by state. Set this control when specifying
throttle limits. See Table 34 on page 184.
• The procedures for creating filters and throttles contain updates to the
Teradata DWM GUI. See “Creating or Modifying a Filter” on page 126
and “Creating or Modifying a Throttle” on page 140.
• On the Block tab for throttles, the GUI items Deadlock Cycles and
Deadlock Action have been changed to Block Cycles and Block Action,
respectively.
• On the Description tab for object throttles, the Rule Type uses icons to
describe how each rule will be applied to database objects. See “To
define descriptive attributes for a throttle” on page 143.
• Figure 77 on page 186 shows that the Post to Queue Table feature is
available for exception processing. This item (called Queue Table in
earlier releases) was available previously in event processing.
• The Teradata DWM dump utility adds the -t option to display delay
queue and throttle statistics. See “About the Delay Queue Statistics
Information submenu” on page 247.
Additional Information
Additional information that supports this product and Teradata Tools and Utilities is available
at the web sites listed in the table that follows. In the table, mmyx represents the publication
date of a manual, where mm is the month, y is the last digit of the year, and x is an internal
publication code. Match the mmy of a related publication to the date on the cover of this book.
This ensures that the publication selected supports the same release.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
5
Preface
Additional Information
Type of Information
Description
Access to Information
Release overview
Use the Release Definition for the following
information:
1 Go to http://www.info.teradata.com/.
Late information
• Overview of all of the products in the
release
• Information received too late to be
included in the manuals
• Operating systems and Teradata
Database versions that are certified to
work with each product
• Version numbers of each product and
the documentation for each product
• Information about available training
and the support center
Additional product
information
Use the Teradata Information Products web
site to view or download specific manuals
that supply related or additional
information to this manual.
2 In the Online Publications section, click General
Search.
3 Type 2029 in the Publication Product ID box.
4 Click Search.
5 Select the appropriate Release Definition from
the search results.
1 Go to http://www.info.teradata.com/.
2 Under Online Publications subcategory, Browse
by Category, click Data Warehousing.
3 Do one of the following:
• For a list of Teradata Tools and Utilities
documents, click Teradata Tools and Utilities
and then select an item under Releases or
Products.
• Select a link to any of the data warehousing
publications categories listed.
Specific books related to Teradata DWM are as
follows:
• Release Summary
B035-1098-mmyx
• Teradata Administrator User Guide
B035-2502-mmyx
• Teradata Tools and Utilities Installation Guide for
Microsoft Windows
B035-2407-mmyx
• Teradata Manager User Guide
B035-2428-mmyx
• Workload Management API: PM/API and Open
API
B035-1090-mmyx
CD-ROM images
Access a link to a downloadable CD-ROM
image of all customer documentation for
this release. Customers are authorized to
create CD-ROMs for their use from this
image.
1 Go to http://www.info.teradata.com/.
2 Under the Online Publications subcategory,
Browse by Category, click Data Warehousing.
3
Click CD-ROM List and Images.
4 Follow the ordering instruction.
6
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Preface
Additional Information
Type of Information
Description
Access to Information
Ordering
information for
manuals
Use the Teradata Information Products web
site to order printed versions of manuals.
1 Go to http://www.info.teradata.com/.
2 In the Print & CD Publications section, click How
to Order.
3 Follow the ordering instructions.
General information
about Teradata
The Teradata home page provides links to
numerous sources of information about
Teradata. Links include:
1 Go to Teradata.com.
2 Select a link.
• Executive reports, case studies of
customer experiences with Teradata,
and thought leadership
• Technical information, solutions, and
expert advice
• Press releases, mentions, and media
resources
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
7
Preface
Additional Information
8
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Table of Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Supported Releases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Changes to This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Additional Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
Chapter 1:
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
What Is Teradata DWM? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Teradata DWM and Teradata Active System Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Teradata ASM Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
System Regulation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
State Matrix and States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Event Combinations and Actions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
31
32
33
What are Rules? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Filters and Throttles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
How Teradata DWM Rules Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overview of Teradata DWM Request Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Teradata DWM Exceptions Work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Teradata DWM Logging Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
36
38
38
Overview of Using Teradata DWM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Teradata DWM Terms to Know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Chapter 2:
Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Software Dependencies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Version Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
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Table of Contents
Teradata DWM Database. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
User Authorization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Preparing Your System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Modifying the HOSTS File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Verifying the Network Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Launching Teradata DWM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Chapter 3:
Navigating Teradata DWM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
About Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Reading the Status Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Showing and Hiding the Status Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Exploring the Teradata DWM Menu Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
File Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Edit Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Rules Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
View Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57
Window Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Help Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Reading the Rules Directory Information Tree (Rules DIT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Exploring the Properties Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
About the Database Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65
Exploring the Database Browser Menu Bar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
Reading the Database DIT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
Viewing the Elements Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
Chapter 4:
Getting Started with Teradata DWM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
Management Methods Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
Teradata DWM Administrator User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73
Establishing a Basic Rule Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73
Migrate an existing Rule Set from Priority Scheduler and Teradata Dynamic Query
Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74
About Service Level Goals (SLGs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
About Workloads. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Classifications and Workloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Mapping Workloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
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Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Table of Contents
Advanced Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Chapter 5:
Getting Started with the State Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Understanding the State Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding State Matrix Default Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
State Matrix Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Events and States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding to the State Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
87
88
88
91
91
Defining Event Combinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Event Combination Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Chapter 6:
Working with Events and States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Setting up Events and States. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Setting up the State Matrix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining System Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Operating Environments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting States. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
100
100
103
106
109
Working With Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Setting up Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Setting up Periods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Working with Event Combinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Event Combination Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Chapter 7:
Working with Filters and Throttles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Controlling Activity with Filters and Throttles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
About Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Object Access Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Query Resource Filters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Creating or Modifying a Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Choosing a Filter Type. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Defining Descriptive Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
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Choosing SQL Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Specifying Query Resource Processing Limits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
Examples of Creating Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Enabling by State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137
About Throttles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138
Object Throttles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138
Utility Throttles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Creating or Modifying a Throttle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Choosing a Throttle Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141
Defining Descriptive Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
Choosing SQL Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
Specifying Query Throttle Params . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145
Selecting Utility Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Example of Creating a Utility Throttle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149
Enabling by State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151
Linking Teradata Database Objects to Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154
About Object Linking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154
Unlinking Objects from a Rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Associating QueryBand with Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156
Granting Bypass Privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157
Removing Bypass Privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158
Enabling a Filter or Throttle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159
Disabling a Filter or Throttle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160
Viewing Enabled and Disabled Status by State. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160
Deleting a Filter or Throttle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
Chapter 8:
Working with Workload Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
About WDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
Determining the Number of WDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164
Grouping Requests into a Workload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Criteria for Grouping Requests into a Workload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Overhead. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Classification Criteria Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167
Setting Skew Exception Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167
Setting Skew Exception Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
Replacing Priority Scheduler Query Milestones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
Handling Concurrent Multiple Exception Directives for a WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169
Controlling Activity with WDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
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Creating New WDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Classification Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting SLGs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Query Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a New WD from an Existing WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
171
173
181
183
185
Setting Run-Time Exception Directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Setting Local and Global Exception Directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Setting Precedence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Enabling or Disabling a WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Modifying Existing WDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Evaluation Order and WDs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Deleting a WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Sample WD Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Mapping Console Utilities to WDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Using the Priority Scheduler View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PGs and AGs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RP Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying Priority Scheduler Settings for a State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining System-Level Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mapping WDs to AGs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating New RPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating New AGs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting RPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting AGs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving AGs to Different RPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
204
204
205
205
208
210
211
213
214
214
214
Comparing Weights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Deleting WDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Tuning WDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Creating a Lower Priority WD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Viewing Workload Summaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Viewing WD Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Chapter 9:
Managing Teradata DWM Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Defining Global Rule Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Controlled Access to tdwm Database and Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
Activating Rule Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
Viewing Active Rule Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
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Creating a New Rule Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .231
Saving and Activating a Rule Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
Loading a Rule Set. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
Deleting Rule Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233
Displaying Rule Set Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .234
Appendix A:
Teradata Database Result Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
Result Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .238
Appendix B:
Teradata DWM Dump Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239
Using the Teradata DWM Dump Utility Command Line Option. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .240
Using Teradata DWM Dump Utility in an Interactive Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .240
About the Teradata DWM Information Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .241
Getting Details about Rule Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .252
Getting Details about Global Teradata DWM Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .255
Viewing Memory Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .260
Navigating from the Events and States Information Submenu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
Navigating from the Rules Information Submenu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .277
Navigating from the Workload Classification Information Submenu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .284
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .307
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315
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Figure 1: Teradata DWM Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Figure 2: Teradata Active System Management and Supporting Components . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Figure 3: Teradata ASM Supporting Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Figure 4: Teradata ASM Software Relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Figure 5: Sample State Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Figure 6: Teradata Database Processing of Workload Rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Figure 7: HOSTS File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Figure 8: Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager Connect dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Figure 9: Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager Connect dialog box for Local Mode . . . . . 48
Figure 10: Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Figure 11: Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager Menu Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Figure 12: TDWM Options dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Figure 13: Sample about Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager Message Box . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Figure 14: Default Rules DIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Figure 15: Sample Object Access Objects DIT and Properties Pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Figure 16: Database Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Figure 17: Database Browser Menu Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Figure 18: Sample Database Browser DIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Figure 19: Sample Database Browser Elements Pane. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Figure 20: Table/View/Macro Definition Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Figure 21: Teradata DWM Management Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Figure 22: Connect to Teradata Database Dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Figure 23: Scheduled PD Sets in Scheduled PDset(s) dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Figure 24: Sample PD Sets Selected in Select PDset(s) Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Figure 25: Existing PSA Setting dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Figure 26: Migrated PSA Setting dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Figure 27: Activate Rule Set dialog box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Figure 28: SLG Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Figure 29: Default 1x1 State Matrix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Figure 30: User-Defined Event - Load Scenario. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Figure 31: Initial State Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Figure 32: New Item Dialog Box for New State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
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List of Figures
Figure 33: Initial State Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94
Figure 34: New Item Dialog Box for New System Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95
Figure 35: Initial State Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
Figure 36: New Item Dialog Box for New Operating Environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
Figure 37: User-Defined Business Event - Node Offline Scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Figure 38: Initial State Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
Figure 39: New Item Dialog Box for New System Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Figure 40: Split View of the State Matrix and Operating Environment tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
Figure 41: New Item Dialog Box for New Operating Environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Figure 42: Sample State Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Figure 43: Initial State Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
Figure 44: New Item Dialog Box for New State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Figure 45: New Event Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
Figure 46: Split View of the State Matrix and Periods tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Figure 47: New Period Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Figure 48: Specifying Month and Day. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Figure 49: Select Months Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Figure 50: Select Days of Month Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Figure 51: Sample Event Combination and Actions Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Figure 52: Sample Rule Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
Figure 53: SQL Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130
Figure 54: Query Throttle Params Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
Figure 55: Sample Enable By State View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137
Figure 56: Sample Rule Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
Figure 57: SQL Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145
Figure 58: Query Throttle Params Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146
Figure 59: Utility Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Figure 60: Utility Rule Dialog Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150
Figure 61: Utility Limit By State Tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150
Figure 62: Sample Values by State for an Object Throttle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151
Figure 63: Sample Values by State for a Utility Throttle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153
Figure 64: Sample Grant Bypass Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157
Figure 65: Select Users Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158
Figure 66: Rule Set Values Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160
Figure 67: Filters and Throttled Enabled Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
Figure 68: Workload Attributes dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .172
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Figure 69: Classification dialog box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Figure 70: Classify by Application dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Figure 71: Classify by Data Object dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Figure 72: Sample Include QueryBand Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Figure 73: Sample Exclude QueryBand Dialog Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Figure 74: Sample Classification Dialog Box with QueryBand and Database Defined . . . . 181
Figure 75: Sample Service Level Goals View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Figure 76: Query Limits View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Figure 77: Exception Criteria tab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Figure 78: Add Local Exception Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Figure 79: Sample Exception Apply Dialog Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Figure 80: Global Exceptions View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Figure 81: Add Global Exception Dialog Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Figure 82: Exception Apply Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Figure 83: Sample Exception Criteria View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Figure 84: Exception Precedence Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Figure 85: Workload Mapping Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Figure 86: Performance Group Mapping Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Figure 87: Add Performance Group Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Figure 88: Priority Scheduler View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Figure 89: Priority Scheduler System Level Parameters Dialog Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Figure 90: Choose AG for Workload Dialog Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Figure 91: New Resource Partition Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Figure 92: New Allocation Group Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Figure 93: Move Allocation Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Figure 94: Assigned Weights Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Figure 95: Sample Compare Weights View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Figure 96: Pictorial Representation of the Weights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Figure 97: Rule Set Intervals Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Figure 98: Rule Set Blocker Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Figure 99: Rule Set Estimates Tabs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Figure 100: Activate Rule Set Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
Figure 101: Sample Rule Set Inquiry Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
Figure 102: Sample Load Rule Set Dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
Figure 103: Delete Rule Set. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
Figure 104: Rule Set Values Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
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List of Figures
Figure 105: Teradata DWM Information Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .241
Figure 106: Teradata DWM Configuration Information Submenu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .252
Figure 107: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Rules Category Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253
Figure 108: Teradata DWM Configuration Information Submenu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .255
Figure 109: Sample Teradata DWM Configuration Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .255
Figure 110: Teradata DWM Configuration Information Submenu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .257
Figure 111: Sample Event and State Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .258
Figure 112: Teradata DWM Configuration Information Submenu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .259
Figure 113: Sample Workload Evaluation Order Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .259
Figure 114: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Memory Usage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .260
Figure 115: Teradata DWM Events and States Information Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
Figure 116: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Event Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .262
Figure 117: Teradata DWM Events and States Expressions Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .264
Figure 118: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Notify-only Expressions Information . . . . . . . .264
Figure 119: Sample Teradata DWM Dump OpEnv Expressions Information output. . . . . .265
Figure 120: Sample Teradata DWM Dump SysCon Expressions Information. . . . . . . . . . . .266
Figure 121: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Temporary Expressions Information . . . . . . . .267
Figure 122: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Expression Actions Information . . . . . . . . . . . .269
Figure 123: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Expression Conditions Information . . . . . . . . .270
Figure 124: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Actions Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .271
Figure 125: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Unresolved Actions for Expressions Information .
272
Figure 126: Sample Teradata DWM Dump System Conditions Information . . . . . . . . . . . .273
Figure 127: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Operating Environments Information . . . . . . .274
Figure 128: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Composite States Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . .275
Figure 129: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Composite States Mapping Matrix Information . .
276
Figure 130: Teradata DWM Rules Information Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .277
Figure 131: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Bypassed Objects Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . .278
Figure 132: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Account Object Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .279
Figure 133: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Databases and Database Objects . . . . . . . . . . . .280
Figure 134: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Performance Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .280
Figure 135: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Profile Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .281
Figure 136: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Non-Global Rules Information . . . . . . . . . . . . .281
Figure 137: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Global Rules Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .282
Figure 138: Teradata DWM Workload Classification Information Submenu . . . . . . . . . . . .284
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Figure 139: Teradata DWM Workload Class Information Submenu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285
Figure 140: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Class Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285
Figure 141: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Exception Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
Figure 142: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Classification Criteria for Workload Class
Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288
Figure 143: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Operating Environment Parameters for Workload
Class Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
Figure 144: Sample Teradata DWM Dump State-dependent Parameters for Workload Class
Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290
Figure 145: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Workload Class Evaluation Order for the Current
Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
Figure 146: Teradata DWM Workload Exceptions Information Submenu . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
Figure 147: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Exception Actions information . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
Figure 148: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Exception Criteria Information . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
Figure 149: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Workload Exception Directive Information. . 295
Figure 150: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Workload Exception Directives for all WDs/
OpEnvs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
Figure 151: Teradata DWM Priority Scheduler Information Submenu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Figure 152: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Global Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298
Figure 153: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Allocation Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299
Figure 154: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Resource Partition Information . . . . . . . . . . . . 301
Figure 155: Teradata DWM Dump Saved Settings Sample: Resource Partition. . . . . . . . . . 302
Figure 156: Teradata DWM Dump Saved Settings Sample: Allocation Group . . . . . . . . . . 303
Figure 157: Teradata DWM Dump Saved Settings Sample: Performance Group . . . . . . . . 304
Figure 158: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Performance Group Mappings. . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
Figure 159: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Utility Map Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
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List of Figures
20
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
List of Tables
Table 1: Event Classes and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Table 2: Teradata DWM Log Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Table 3: Teradata Dynamic Workload Connect Dialog Box Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Table 4: Teradata DWM GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Table 5: Teradata DWM Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Table 6: Status Bar Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Table 7: File Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Table 8: Rules Submenus and Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Table 9: View Menu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Table 10: Teradata DWM Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Table 11: Window Menu Commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Table 12: Help Menu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Table 13: Rules DIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Table 14: Properties Pane Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Table 15: Database Browser GUI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Table 16: Database Browser Menu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Table 17: Teradata DWM Management Methods as Control Points. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Table 18: Workload elements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Table 19: New Item Dialog Box Fields/Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Table 20: New Item Dialog Box Fields/Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Table 21: New Event Dialog Box Fields/Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Table 22: Event Combination and Actions Fields/Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Table 23: Filter and Throttles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Table 24: Description Tab Fields/Controls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Table 25: Query Resource Tab Fields/Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Table 26: Description Tab Fields/Controls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Table 27: Query Throttle Params Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Table 28: Utility Throttle Fields/Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Table 29: Values By State Tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Table 30: Managing Database Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Table 31: Workload Attributes Fields/Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Table 32: Classification Options for Criteria #2 and above. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
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List of Tables
Table 33: SLG Fields/Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182
Table 34: Query Limits Fields/Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .184
Table 35: Add Local Exception Fields/Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187
Table 36: Exception Criteria Fields/Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .191
Table 37: Exception Action Fields/Controls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
Table 38: Sample WD Setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200
Table 39: Recommended RP Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205
Table 40: Priority Scheduler View Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206
Table 41: Priority Scheduler System Level Parameters Dialog Box Fields/Controls. . . . . . . .209
Table 42: New Resource Partition Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212
Table 43: New Allocation Group Dialog Box Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Table 44: Tuning Your WDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
Table 45: Interval Fields/Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .224
Table 46: Blocker Fields/Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .226
Table 47: Estimates Tab Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .227
Table 48: Teradata Database Result Codes for Teradata DWM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
Table 49: Teradata DWM Information Menu Commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .241
Table 50: Configuration Information Submenu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242
Table 51: Events and States Information Submenu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242
Table 52: Event Expressions Information Submenu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .243
Table 53: Rules Information Submenu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .244
Table 54: Workload Classification Information Submenu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
Table 55: Workload Class Information Submenu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
Table 56: Workload Exception Information Submenu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .246
Table 57: Priority Scheduler Information Submenu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .246
Table 58: Delay Queue Statistics Information Submenu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .247
Table 59: Workload Class Information Submenu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250
Table 60: Workload Exception Information Submenu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .251
Table 61: Priority Scheduler Information Submenu Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .251
Table 62: Teradata DWM Rule Categories Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253
Table 63: Dynamic Rules Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .254
Table 64: Summary Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .254
Table 65: Teradata DWM Versions and Settings Information Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .256
Table 66: Teradata DWM Event and State Information Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .258
Table 67: Teradata DWM Workload Evaluation Order Information Output . . . . . . . . . . . .260
Table 68: Teradata DWM Memory Usage Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
22
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
List of Tables
Table 69: Sample Events Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Table 70: Sample Notify-Only Expressions Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
Table 71: Sample OpEnv Expressions Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
Table 72: Sample SysCon Expressions Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Table 73: Sample Temp Expressions Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268
Table 74: Sample Expression Actions Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
Table 75: Sample Expression Conditions Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
Table 76: Sample Actions Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
Table 77: Sample Unresolved Actions for Expressions Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
Table 78: Sample System Conditions Information Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
Table 79: Sample Operating Environments Information Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
Table 80: Sample Composite States Information Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275
Table 81: Sample State Mapping Matrix Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
Table 82: Sample Expression Conditions Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278
Table 83: Account Objects Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
Table 84: Rules Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
Table 85: Throttle Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
Table 86: Query Resource Filter Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
Table 87: Utility Throttle Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284
Table 88: Class Definitions Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286
Table 89: Exception Criteria Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
Table 90: Operating Environment Parameters for Workload Classes Information . . . . . . . 288
Table 91: Operating Environment Parameters for Workload Classes Information . . . . . . . 289
Table 92: State-dependent Parameters for Workload Class Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290
Table 93: Evaluation Order for Current Period Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
Table 94: Exception Actions Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
Table 95: Exception Criteria Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
Table 96: Operating Environment Parameters for Workload Exception Directives Information
295
Table 97: Workload Exception Directives Output for all WDs/OpEnvs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
Table 98: Priority Scheduler Information Submenu Items. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Table 99: Global Settings Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298
Table 100: Allocation Group Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299
Table 101: Resource Partition Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301
Table 102: Priority Scheduler Resource Partition Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
Table 103: Priority Scheduler Allocation Group Settings Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
23
List of Tables
Table 104: Priority Scheduler Performance Group Settings Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .304
Table 105: Performance Group Mapping Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .305
Table 106: Utility Mapping Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .306
24
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
CHAPTER 1
Introduction
Teradata DWM is a a main component of the Teradata Active System Management (Teradata
ASM) suite of products, managing the concurrent ongoing multi-channeled jobs that flow in
and out of the Teradata Database. Teradata DWM does its work before and during processing.
Browse these introductory topics:
•
What Is Teradata DWM?
•
Teradata DWM and Teradata Active System Management
•
Teradata ASM Components
•
System Regulation
•
What are Rules?
•
How Teradata DWM Rules Work
•
Overview of Using Teradata DWM
•
Teradata DWM Terms to Know
What Is Teradata DWM?
Along with other Teradata ASM products, Teradata DWM manages the Teradata Database.
Using the Teradata DWM graphical user interface (GUI), create rules to manage the Teradata
workload based on system states and system condition/operating environment events.
Global settings can also be set to tune the workload management configuration. See “Defining
Global Rule Parameters” on page 223.
Teradata DWM allows you to define workloads and specify how each workload behaves. This
is done by creating Workload Definitions (WDs), which include:
•
Classification criteria (which requests belong to this workload)
•
Exception rules (criteria for a request exception and actions to take when detected)
•
Execution behaviors (workload concurrency throttles and priority scheduler mappings)
•
Service Level Goals (SLGs) (response time or throughput-based goals)
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
25
Chapter 1: Introduction
Teradata DWM and Teradata Active System Management
Figure 1: Teradata DWM Flow
Operating Environment
(Business) Events
System
Performance
&
Availability
Events
System Regulation
Apply new working
value set as necessary
Priority
Scheduler
Query Delay Manager
Teradata
Dispatcher
Requests
Requests filtered
then classified into
workloads
Requests throttled
to not exceed workload
concurrency limits
Requests managed
for resource allowance and
exception actions
PRE-PROCESSING
PROCESSING
2514A010
You can define operating environment (business) event combinations and system condition
(performance and availability) event combinations with the system regulation state matrix.
System regulation involves detecting system-wide events, initiating actions (such as
notifications), and overlaying rules when event combinations are active. For more
information, see “System Regulation” on page 31.
When you send a request, the Dispatcher filters requests and classifies them into a workload. If
needed, the system will route the request to the Query Delay Manager to manage concurrency
throttles associated with the workload, as well as general system-level throttles. The Query
Delay Manager rejects or delays requests before they are executed.
After the Query Delay Manager releases the requests for execution, the Priority Scheduler
manages the requests. The Exception Monitor monitors executing queries for exception
conditions you define. When Teradata DWM executes the queries, the queries cannot be
rejected or delayed.
Teradata DWM and Teradata Active System
Management
Teradata DWM is a main component of Teradata ASM, a suite of products that provide
dynamic capabilities to manage the Teradata Database.
26
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Chapter 1: Introduction
Teradata DWM and Teradata Active System Management
Teradata ASM capabilities include:
•
Analyzing and defining workloads to accomplish business goals. The workload-centric
approach to database management differs from a system-centric approach: workloads
define “who, what, and where” criteria to provide detailed granularity for analysis.
•
Automatically regulating system resources by standardizing reactions to events and
operating conditions provides consistent, predictable response times to users.
•
Monitoring performance in real-time. Before Teradata ASM, DBAs could not take
automated corrective action while the job was running.
•
Visualizing trends to identify abnormalities and do resource planning.
Teradata ASM helps manage the system automatically and reduces the effort required by
DBAs, application developers, and support personnel. With careful planning, Teradata ASM
can improve and optimize your workload management and performance. It can also improve
response times and ensure more consistent response times for critical work.
Figure 2 illustrates the components that comprise and support Teradata ASM.
For information about other components see:
•
Teradata Workload Analyzer User Guide
•
Teradata Manager User Guide
•
Teradata Index Wizard User Guide
•
Teradata Statistics Wizard User Guide
•
Teradata System Emulation Tool User Guide
•
Teradata Visual Explain User Guide
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
27
Chapter 1: Introduction
Teradata DWM and Teradata Active System Management
Figure 2: Teradata Active System Management and Supporting Components
Client
Server
Teradata
Dynamic Workload
Manager
Teradata
DWM
Teradata
Workload
Analyzer
Data Collector Logs
Teradata Manager
Performance
Monitoring and
Production Control
Teradata Index
Wizard
Teradata DWM
Rules
Teradata Statistics
Wizard
2514D003
Teradata System
Emulation Tool
Teradata
Visual
Explain
28
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Chapter 1: Introduction
Teradata ASM Components
Teradata ASM Components
Figure 3: Teradata ASM Supporting Components
Teradata Database
TDWM
Regulator
TDWM
Rules
DBC Logs
Query Log (DBQL);
PM
&
Open APIs
Workload Log
(TDWM)
Teradata Manager
Data Collections
(TMGR)
Client Applications
Teradata
Workload
Analyzer
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager
(TDWM)
Rules based on Workload Definitions
Throttles, Filters
Teradata Manager (TMGR)
Workload Monitor; Workload Trend Analysis
2514A008
Figure 3 graphically depicts Teradata ASM and its related Teradata Database components. A
Teradata Database component called the Regulator dynamically executes to fulfill the
workload operating rules as defined with the Workload Administrator. Requests submitted to
the system are classified into the appropriate workload and managed against that workload’s
operating rules, such as throttling, resource priorities, and exception management. In
addition, the Regulator monitors queries as they run to check for exception conditions, and
then handles them according the rules defined in the workload definition configuration
tables.
A separate database called tdwm contains tables for storing workload definitions and related
data (TDWM Rules). The Teradata Manager Database setup utility installs this database.
Working in conjunction with Teradata Database software, Teradata ASM is comprised of
Teradata DWM and the following products:
•
Teradata Workload Analyzer (Teradata WA) provides migration of existing Priority
Scheduler settings and creates workload recommendations based on the system DBQL
history. It is also a general purpose tool for analyzing DBQL data.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
29
Chapter 1: Introduction
Teradata ASM Components
•
Teradata DWM creates workload definitions (WDs) that provide system management
points of control.
•
Teradata Manager and its products supporting workload management features:
•
Dashboard GUI for real-time workload monitoring
•
Workload Trend Analysis tool that generates reports from the Query Log and the
Workload Log
Figure 4: Teradata ASM Software Relationships
Teradata Database Software
Database
Objects
DBQL
Tables
TDWM
DBC Manager
DB for TMGR
TDWM Log
Tables
Clients
TDWM
Admin
TWA
TMGR
Data Collector
2514A007
Figure 4 depicts the relationship between Teradata Database components and the
management software of Teradata ASM. One way arrows denote read-only or write-only
capability.
Teradata ASM includes system tables and logs, that interact with each other and a common
data source. It facilitates automation in the following four key areas of system management:
30
•
Workload management
•
Performance tuning
•
Capacity planning
•
Performance monitoring
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Chapter 1: Introduction
System Regulation
System Regulation
Teradata DWM allows you to regulate workload performance based on system health and
what the system is doing at any given time. You can specify that rules (see “What are Rules?”
on page 33) dynamically adjust their behavior based on system condition and operating
environment events (see “Chapter 6 Working with Events and States” on page 99).
State Matrix and States
The state matrix is a user-friendly way to manage states and events. The matrix is made up of
two dimensions, as in the sample state matrix below:
•
System condition: The condition or health of the system. For example, system conditions
include system performance and availability considerations, such as number of AMPs in
flow control or number of nodes down at system startup.
•
Operating environment: The kind of work the system is expected to perform. It is usually
indicative of time periods or workload windows when particular critical applications, such
as a load or month end, are running.
Figure 5: Sample State Matrix
Each combination of system condition and operating environment defines a corresponding
state.
“Normal” is the default system condition, and “Always” is the default operating environment.
“Base” is the default state. “Base” represents the mapping of the default system condition and
operating environment combination. It is the base state of the system and of most of the rule
attributes.
Once you set up the state matrix, you can define the event combinations that activate each
system condition and operating environment.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
31
Chapter 1: Introduction
System Regulation
Events
An event is any detection that you think is pertinent to workload management. Teradata
DWM supports two classes of events:
•
System condition
•
Operating environment
You can define any number of events.
The following table provides more information on these event classes.
Table 1: Event Classes and Descriptions
Event
Type
Description
System
condition
Performance and
availability (e.g, node
down)
Statement or status indicating system health.
Internal to Teradata Database.
When Teradata DWM detects that a Teradata Database
component degrades or fails, or resources go below some
threshold for some period of time, it keeps the event in
effect until the component is back up or the resource
goes back above the threshold value for some userdefined amount of time.
When multiple system conditions are active at the same
time, Teradata DWM enforces the actions of the one with
the highest severity.
“Normal” is the default system condition, which
represents the normal condition of the system and always
exists. It has the lowest severity.
User-defined
performance and
availability (for
example, dual system
failures)
32
External to Teradata Database.
Use these events to convey to Teradata Database any
performance and availability event external to the system
that could impact how Teradata Database manages
workloads. The events last until rescinded or optionally
time out. A Performance Monitor and Production
Control (PM and PC) or Application Programming
Interface (API) call is used to trigger the setting of a
user-defined event.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Chapter 1: Introduction
What are Rules?
Table 1: Event Classes and Descriptions (continued)
Event
Type
Description
Operating
environment
Business type event
Statement or status indicating the type of work that is
anticipated.
Time period (intervals
of time during the day,
week, or month) (for
example, batch and
load windows,
operational and ad-hoc
query mix windows,
month-end processing
windows)
Internal to Teradata Database.
Teradata DWM monitors the system time, and
automatically activates an operating environment event
when the period starts. The event remains active until the
period ends.
When multiple operating environments are active at the
same time, Teradata DWM enforces the one with the
highest precedence.
“Always” is the default operating environment, which
represents “all day/everyday” and always exists. It has the
lowest precedence.
User-defined (for
example, load jobs
starting)
External to Teradata Database.
Use these events to convey anything that could change an
operating environment. The events last until rescinded or
optionally time out.
Event Combinations and Actions
Event combinations consist of one or more events. Each combination can trigger multiple
actions (such as notifications, system conditions, or operating environments).
What are Rules?
Rules define how the Teradata Database manages its workload. Three categories of rules
provide different kinds of workload control:
•
Category 1 filters reject (filter out) unwanted logon and query requests before they are
executed.
Filters restrict access to specific database objects for some or all types of SQL requests. You
can prohibit queries that are estimated to access too many rows, take too long, or perform
some types of joins.
See Chapter 7: “Working with Filters and Throttles” for more information.
•
Category 2 throttles (also called concurrency rules) enforce session and query
concurrency limits on specific objects. In other words, you can restrict the number of
requests simultaneously executed against a database object (such as requests made by a
user, or against a table). You can also apply throttles to Priority Scheduler Performance
Groups (PGs).
Throttles also enforce concurrency limits on FastLoad, MultiLoad, FastExport, and
Archive/Restore. In other words, you can restrict the type and number of utilities that run
simultaneously.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
33
Chapter 1: Introduction
What are Rules?
See Chapter 7: “Working with Filters and Throttles” for more information.
•
Category 3 WDs specify how the Teradata Database regulates and manages queries by
specifying parameters for up to 36 separate workloads.
For each workload, specify one or more of the following:
•
The classification criteria that determine whether a query will be assigned (to the
workload)
•
The execution behaviors (by mapping to a Priority Scheduler Allocation Group (AG),
and optionally defining a workload concurrency throttle)
•
The set of conditions that invoke an exception once a query starts running
•
SLGs (based on response time)
•
Logging options
Teradata DWM uses a permanent default (WD-Default) workload when no other class is
appropriate.
You can apply workload rules to a variety of classification criteria. See Chapter 8:
“Working with Workload Definitions” for more information.
For more information on how you can map rule categories by state or operating environment,
see “Chapter 7 Working with Filters and Throttles” on page 123 and “Chapter 8 Working
with Workload Definitions” on page 163.
Teradata DWM rules include attributes whose values can vary based on the state, and in some
cases also based on the operating environment. Rule attribute values that are in effect at any
given time are sometimes called working values.
A working value set corresponds to each state. The working value set includes all the limits for
all the rules that apply when the state is active.
You can make Teradata DWM rules adjust their working values based on the state. Teradata
DWM adjusts the state and its working value set based on actions you define.
Teradata DWM enforces different working values depending on the operating environment.
How Teradata DWM enforces the rules can change as time progresses.
Note: The Teradata Query Director/Dual Active product can perform the following using
open APIs that write to the Teradata DWM database:
•
Enable and disable filters and throttles.
•
Change throttle limits on objects
•
Enable a user-defined event that can, in turn, change the system condition or operating
environment of Teradata Database.
For more information on the Query Director/Dual Active product, see Workload Management
API: PM/API and Open API.
Filters and Throttles
A filter or throttle generally applies only to database objects that are specifically associated
with that rule.
34
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Chapter 1: Introduction
What are Rules?
Teradata DWM filters and throttles apply to the following objects:
•
Context Objects
•
Query Objects
Note the following:
•
Rules that apply to every object are global rules.
•
Teradata DWM uses object names to recognize objects.
Context Objects
Context objects are database objects that relate to the conditions or context for issuing a
request, such as the user, account, or profile.
The query band feature has been added to help identify the origin of a request. Note that a
query band can only be applied to filters not throttles, and client name, client address, and
application name cannot be associated with filters and throttles.
You can associate the following types of context objects with rules:
•
Users
•
Account names (unexpanded)
•
PGs (Priority Scheduler construct)
•
Account strings (PGs plus unexpanded account name)
•
Profiles
•
Client (network) name/ID
•
Client (network) address
•
Application name
•
QueryBand
Account names are defined only as the distinct account name portions of the system account
strings. They do not include the PG designation.
Create users, accounts, and profiles using Teradata Administrator. See Teradata Administrator
User Guide for more information.
Query Objects
Query objects are referenced in a SQL statement request. They are also called where objects
because they relate to where the database operation occurs. The types of query objects you can
associate with rules are:
•
Databases
Note: When linking a database object to a rule, all of the table, view, macro, and stored
procedure objects under that database are affected. Additionally, underlying objects within
views and macros are also resolved to the appropriate object type. However, databases that
are descended from the selected database object are not affected.
•
Tables
•
View
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
35
Chapter 1: Introduction
How Teradata DWM Rules Work
•
Macros
•
Stored procedures
How Teradata DWM Rules Work
The necessary information from a Teradata DWM Rule Set is loaded into the Dispatcher
component of the Teradata Database system when you activate a Rule Set. When a Teradata
client application issues a request to the Teradata Database system, the Teradata DWM
functions in the Dispatcher check the request.
Unless specifically bypassed, the system checks every logon in the SQL partition and every
query request for every Teradata Database session against the enabled Teradata DWM rules.
The queries can include any queries submitted from any supported Teradata Database
interface, such as BTEQ, CLIv2, ODBC, and JDBC.
Note: Teradata DWM automatically bypasses filter and throttle checking for DBC and
TDWM users. You can also specifically configure other users or accounts, for example, as
bypassing filter and throttle checking. See the “Granting Bypass Privileges” on page 157.
The sequence of rule checking proceeds from category 1 (filters), to category 2 (throttles), to
category 3 (WDs). Teradata DWM only checks rules that are enabled and belong to categories
that are activated. If category 2 and category 3 are both active, Teradata DWM ignores any
category 2 rules against PGs, because PGs are controlled by category 3 when it is active.
Rules defined in Teradata DWM and additionally in Teradata Replication Services (RS) can
also dynamically create and destroy filters and throttles. This RS capability ensures that
specified replicated tables are not accessed during critical RS operations.
Overview of Teradata DWM Request Processing
If the request is rejected by any of the steps below, the Teradata Database returns a result code
(3149-3153, 3156). See “Result Codes” on page 237 for a list of codes and their meaning.
The following is an overview of how Teradata DWM processes logon and query requests when
any rules are active. Teradata DWM:
36
1
Bypassed users are classified but they are not throttled. Checks the request for any context
objects that are bypassed. If so, classified queries are run. If not, for logon requests,
continue at step 4 on page 37.
2
Traverses the Optimizer’s execution step plan for the statement(s) in the query request to
obtain:
•
Types of steps
•
List of objects in the request
•
Resource estimates/requirements
•
Whether certain types of steps are all-AMP
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Chapter 1: Introduction
How Teradata DWM Rules Work
3
Uses step costs (estimated row count and processing time) only if the confidence level is
greater than or equal to the minimum confidence level that was configured.
4
Checks all context and query objects referenced in the request against any filters (including
global filters that might apply to them in the current state. If any object is currently
restricted, the request is rejected.
5
Checks all context and query objects referenced in the request against any object throttles
(including global object throttles) that might apply to them in the current state. If any
object is currently throttled, Teradata DWM sets a supplementary indicator to indicate
that object throttle checking is required.
6
Teradata DWM applies workload classification criteria.
7
If the workload has a throttle limit, Teradata DWM sets a supplementary indicator to
indicate that workload throttle checking is required.
8
The query will be delayed if an object or workload throttle is in effect, rejected if this
option is chosen, or run.
Figure 6 provides an overview of the flow of rule-based workload management operations
within the Teradata Database system.
Figure 6: Teradata Database Processing of Workload Rules
User, Administrator
WDs
(category 3)
object access query resource,
utility rules (category 1,2)
Filter
Teradata
Database
Classify and Map
Delay
Queue
Count queries
DBC database
Log
Yes
Throttle
Limit
Exceeded?
to AMPS
No
Exception
Monitor
2514A009
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
37
Chapter 1: Introduction
How Teradata DWM Rules Work
How Teradata DWM Exceptions Work
You can specify a set of exception criteria and exception actions to apply to each workload
individually (local exceptions), or to apply to some or all workloads collectively (global
exceptions). When Category 3 is active, Teradata DWM monitors each executing query for the
exception criteria you specified for the workload into which the request was classified.
Monitoring for exception criteria occurs in two ways:
•
Each query is monitored at the end of each step in its execution plan.
•
All queries are monitored according to the global Exception Interval setting. This is
primarily for monitoring queries that have long running steps, which otherwise would not
catch an exception condition until the step completed.
If all of the exception criteria are met, Teradata DWM logs the exception and performs the
exception action you specified for the workload. If you do not specify any other exception
actions, Teradata DWM logs the exception by default.
For details on the actions the Dispatcher takes based on the exception action(s) defined for a
workload, see Table 37 on page 194. Note that logging always occurs along with other chosen
actions.
How Teradata DWM Logging Works
The following log tables in the DBC database are used for Teradata DWM logging.
Table 2: Teradata DWM Log Tables
Log Table
Row Logging Causes
TDWMExceptionLog
For each exception or a rejection caused by throttling or filtering taken by
Teradata DWM on a request, including:
• Logon and query rejections (with error codes of 3149-3153).
• Exceptions due to WD exception handling. If separate occurrences for
exceptions are taken due to WD exception handling, multiple rows are
logged.
For each request with an exception, the SQL of the query is logged in the
DBQLogTbl (unless DBQL logging with the SQL option is already enabled
for the user).
The system caches the rows and writes them to disk on the Teradata DWM
Logging Interval you specified.
Query rejections are also logged in DBQLogTbl if DBQL is enabled for the
user.
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Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Chapter 1: Introduction
How Teradata DWM Rules Work
Table 2: Teradata DWM Log Tables (continued)
Log Table
Row Logging Causes
TDWMEventLog
When something of note happens that affects Teradata DWM, but that is
not related to a specific request, including:
• Rule set activations or deactivations
• Set session priority overrides
• User event messages
• State changes
The system caches the rows and writes them to disk on the Teradata DWM
Logging Interval you specified.
TDWMSummaryLog
By each PE vproc for each WD active during the given collection period.
The row includes:
• The number of queries classified into the WD
• The number of queries that completed
• Various summarized statistics (CPU and response times)
The system caches the rows and writes them to disk on the Teradata DWM
Logging Interval you specified.
TDWMEventHistory
For each activation or deactivation of an event, event combination, system
condition, operating environment, or state. This log allow you to
understand what events occurred, and how they directly or indirectly
affected the various states.
The system caches the rows and writes them to disk on the Teradata DWM
Logging Interval you specified.
The DBQLogTbl contains detailed information about queries. With respect to Teradata DWM,
queries are logged into this table if they are classified into a workload that you configured
using the Log Query Detail control to provide detailed logging.
Note: Application ID, client address, QueryBand, or client ID are only available to Teradata
DWM if Query Log data collection is enabled in Teradata Manager. Note also that Teradata
Manager includes the following workload-related Data Collector tables:
•
Dbcmngr.LogDbql
•
Dbcmngr.LogWDSummary
Consider the following when you select Log Query Detail and set DBQL logging to occur using
the DBQL enable logging by user or account options:
•
If you enable DBQL for detail logging, the system writes only one row to DBQLogTbl. The
system logs other tables specified by enable logging per the enable logging directive. There
is no duplication of detail logging data into the dbc.DBQLogTbl due to the Teradata
DWM WD logging directive.
•
If you enable Log Query Detail for a WD, enable DBQL for summary logging for a user, and
use DBQL for accounting, there could be a double accounting issue.
If you perform accounting by user by aggregating the rows in the DBQL summary and
DBQLogTbl tables, data may be duplicated.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
39
Chapter 1: Introduction
Overview of Using Teradata DWM
When WD classification criteria align well with users and accounts, enable DBQL for:
•
Summary logging for sub-second, well-known requests, including TPUMP load utility
requests
•
Detail logging for all other requests
When WD classifications criteria does not align well with users and accounts (that is,
classification is by other “Who”, “Where” and “What” criteria):
•
For sub-second, well-known requests, including TPUMP load utility requests, enable
DBQL for summary logging on the relevant user or accounts (even if the user or accounts
sometimes result in classification to other, longer running WDs)
•
For all other requests, select Log Query Detail.
Overview of Using Teradata DWM
Using Teradata DWM to work with rules involves the following procedures:
•
Load an existing Rule Set, or start with a default configuration. See “Loading a Rule Set”
on page 232.
•
Modify global settings. See “Defining Global Rule Parameters” on page 223.
•
Define the state matrix. See Chapter 6: “Working with Events and States.”
•
Define system condition and operating environment events and event combinations
associated with the matrix. See Chapter 6: “Working with Events and States.”
•
Create, edit, or delete workloads or utility mappings. See Chapter 8: “Working with
Workload Definitions.”
•
Create, edit, or delete Priority Scheduler settings. See “Using the Priority Scheduler View”
on page 204.
•
Associate workloads with Priority Scheduler AGs. See “Using the Priority Scheduler View”
on page 204.
•
Create, edit, or delete filters and throttles. See Chapter 7: “Working with Filters and
Throttles.”
•
Associate database objects with filters and throttles. See “Linking Teradata Database
Objects to Rules” on page 154.
•
Grant optional bypass privileges for filters and throttles. See “Granting Bypass Privileges”
on page 157.
•
Save the Rule Set, or create a new Rule Set. See“Saving and Activating a Rule Set” on
page 232 and “Creating a New Rule Set” on page 231.
•
Activate one or more categories for a Rule Set. See “Activating Rule Categories” on
page 229.
You can activate categories for any Rule Set, at any time. However, after you make any
changes to the Rule Set, you must save and reactivate the Rule Set so that the changes may
take effect.
40
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Chapter 1: Introduction
Teradata DWM Terms to Know
Note: You can view active rules and other Teradata DWM information using the Teradata
DWM Dump command-line option. For information, see Appendix B: “Teradata DWM
Dump Utility.”
Teradata DWM Terms to Know
This User Guide uses the following terms to describe Teradata DWM features and concepts:
•
Activate: alerts the Teradata Database system which Rule Set and categories of rules within
that Rule Set, to enforce.
•
Category: one of three general mechanisms of workload management (Category 1:Filter,
Category 2: Throttle, Category 3: WD) for which you can define rules.
•
Context object: a database object that relates to the conditions or context for issuing a
request, such as the user, account, or profile. The query band feature has been added to
help identify the origin of a request. Note that a query band can only be applied to filters
not throttles, and client name, client address, and application name cannot be associated
with filters and throttles.
•
Database Information Tree (DIT): a view of database objects in a hierarchical presentation.
This view appears in the left pane of the Teradata DWM GUI.
•
Enforcement priority: a value that specifies how to rank a particular workload in terms of
the importance of meeting its SLGs.
•
Event: any condition or indication that you think is pertinent to workload management.
You can make Teradata DWM rules adjust their behavior automatically based on event
combinations.
•
Event combination: a logical combination of one or more events. Each combination can
trigger multiple actions (such as notifications, system conditions, or operating
environments).
•
Exception directive: a set of metrics and actions that instruct Teradata DWM how to
monitor queries that are executing WDs, and what to do if a query exceeds exception
criteria while it is executing. An exception directive consists of a set of Exception Criteria
(exception metrics) and a set of Exception Actions (actions that Teradata DWM takes
when all of the metrics for a set of Exception Criteria are met).
•
Filters: the first category (Category 1) of workload management rules that causes logon
and query requests to be rejected. There are two kinds of filters: object access rules and
query resource rules. Filters are checked first.
•
Priority Scheduler: the Teradata subsystem for controlling the priority of executing
requests. Referred to in the Teradata DWM GUI as PSF.
•
Object access: a filter rule which restricts access to specified database objects by rejecting
requests that are issued by, or refer to, these objects.
Note: A single character can be referred to with “?” (the question mark character) and any
number of characters can be referred to with “*” (the asterisk character). These wildcard
characters can be used anywhere a DBS object name, query band name or value is
specified for a name comparison in Category 3 workload class rules.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
41
Chapter 1: Introduction
Teradata DWM Terms to Know
42
•
Object throttle: a sub-type of throttle rule which restricts concurrency for specified
database objects by delaying or rejecting requests that are issued by, or refer to, these
objects.
•
Operating environment: an identifier signifying the mix of work you expect the system to
perform.
•
Query object: a database object that relates to the entities referenced in a query request,
such as a database, table, view, macro, or stored procedure.
•
Query resource rule: a sub-type of filter rule which restricts access to specified database
objects by rejecting requests that are issued by, or refer to, these objects and also exceed
other conditions such as estimated row count limits, estimated processing time limits, or
whether certain types of joins are required.
•
Rule: a single filter or throttle, or WD.
•
Rule set: a complete set of related filter, throttle, and WD rules and settings, as well as
events/states. Teradata DWM enforces the rules for one Rule Set at a time.
•
Service Level Goal (SLG): stated goal for workload query performance. You can state
performance objectives either in terms of response time. Sometimes referred to in the
Teradata DWM GUI as SLG.
•
State: a complete set of working values for a Rule Set. Each system condition/operating
environment cell of the matrix must be associated with a single state, but states may be
associated with multiple system condition/operating environment pairs.
•
State matrix: a user-friendly way to manage for system events. The matrix contains system
conditions on one axis and operating environment elements on another axis, and
associates system condition/operating environment pairs to states and their working value
set.
•
System condition: an identifier signifying system health.
•
Throttles: the second category (Category 2) of workload management rules which limits
the number of active sessions, query requests, and/or utilities. There object and utility
throttles. There are also category 3 workload throttles. Throttles are checked after filters.
•
Utilities: the Teradata utilities which are optimized to perform bulk loads and unloads of
data, and which use the a common LSN table. These utilities include FastLoad, MultiLoad,
FastExport, and Archive/Restore.
•
Working value: the attributes of a rule whose value (behavior) can change depending on
the state.
•
Working value set: a complete set of working values for a Rule Set. You can define many
working values per Rule Set. There is one working value set per state.
•
Workload Definition (WD): the third category (Category 3) of workload management rules
that causes query requests to be classified, throttled, prioritized, and monitored for
exceptions during execution.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
CHAPTER 2
Prerequisites
Before using Teradata DWM, ensure that your system is correctly configured. Browse through
the following topics to learn more:
•
Software Dependencies
•
Version Compatibility
•
Teradata DWM Database
•
User Authorization
•
Preparing Your System
•
Launching Teradata DWM
Software Dependencies
The following software is supported on the server system:
•
Teradata Database 12.00.00
•
Teradata Database 13.00.00
The following software must be installed on the client system:
•
To support Teradata Database 12, run dbssetup 12 to configure the tdwm database.
•
To support Teradata Database 13, run dbssetup 13 to configure the tdwm database.
•
Teradata CLIv2 (Call-Level Interface version 2) release 13.00.00
•
tdicu13.00.00
•
TeraGSS 13.00.00
Note: These are CLIv2 dependencies.
•
Teradata Manager 13.00.00
Teradata Manager is required for data collection and reporting, and must be configured
for Dynamic Workload Management and DBQL (Database Query Log) data collection.
Additionally, both client and server PCs must run the same version of Teradata Manager.
See Teradata Manager User Guide for more information.
Note: From Teradata DWM, the Teradata Database cannot be connect to by logging into a
server. Even if the Teradata Manager client is in client/server mode, Teradata DWM will
always connect in direct mode. Teradata DWM will not operate from outside a firewall.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
43
Chapter 2: Prerequisites
Version Compatibility
Version Compatibility
Teradata DWM 13.0.0.0 is compatible with Teradata Database 13.00.00 and Teradata Database
12.00.00.
Note that the Teradata DWM 13.0.0.0 Administrator is compatible with the Teradata Database
12.00.00 and 13.00.00.
This version of Teradata DWM is not compatible with earlier releases of Teradata Dynamic
Query Manager (DQM) or Database Query Manager (DBQM).
Teradata DWM Database
Teradata DWM stores rules and related data in a custom database called tdwm.
You can run a migration script and program using the Database Setup tool in Teradata
Manager. For more information, see Teradata Manager User Guide.
Teradata DWM shares the tdwm database with Teradata Query Scheduler (Teradata QS).
However, Teradata QS maintains its own tables within the tdwm database where scheduled
request information is stored.
If you plan to use the Teradata QS features, you must also use the Teradata Query Scheduler
Setup utility to migrate scheduling information. See Teradata Query Scheduler Administrator
Guide to learn how.
Additionally, if running the Teradata Database on a Windows operating system and planning
to use Teradata stored procedures for the first time, the Microsoft Visual C++.Net 2003
compiler must be installed. Otherwise, error messages related to stored procedures appear
when the Teradata Manager DBSSetup program runs. Also, Teradata Dynamic Workload
Manager will not be able to save information to the tdwm database. For more information
about installing the Visual C++ compiler software, see Teradata Database V2R6.0 for Microsoft
Windows 2000 Installation Guide, B035-5403-mmyx. See “Additional Information” on page 5
for more information about supporting documentation.
User Authorization
To work with Teradata DWM, you must have access rights to the following:
44
•
tdwm database
•
DBQL
•
Teradata Manager summary tables
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Chapter 2: Prerequisites
Preparing Your System
Preparing Your System
Teradata DWM uses CLIv2 to connect with the Teradata Database. For information on
installing CLIv2, see the Teradata Tools and Utilities Installation Guide for Microsoft Windows.
You can install Teradata DWM as part of the Teradata Tools and Utilities installation, or as a
stand-alone application on a system already running Teradata Manager. For detailed
installation information, see Teradata Tools and Utilities Installation Guide for Microsoft
Windows.
After you install Teradata DWM, complete the following tasks to set up your system:
1
Install CLIv2 version 4.08 or greater on your system.
2
Create or upgrade the tdwm database using the Teradata Database Setup utility in Teradata
Manager. See Teradata Manager User Guide.
Note: Teradata DWM is automatically detected and configured by Teradata Manager so
that you can use Teradata Manager for administrative tasks.
3
Migrate scheduling information to the tdwm database using the Teradata Query Scheduler
Setup utility. See Teradata Query Scheduler User Guide.
4
(Optional) Modify your HOSTS file. See “Modifying the HOSTS File” on page 45.
Modifying the HOSTS File
If your site does not use a DNS, you must define the IP address and the Teradata Database
name you want to use in the system HOSTS file on your workstation.
To define the system IP address and Teradata Database name
1
Use Windows Explorer to navigate to the HOSTS file in the subdirectory of the directory in
which Windows is installed (for example, WINNT\system32\drivers\etc).
2
Double-click the HOSTS file.
If this file is not already mapped to an application, an Open With dialog box opens.
3
Select Notepad from the Programs list.
4
Click OK.
The HOSTS file opens in a Notepad window.
5
Add an entry to the file using the syntax: xxx.xx.xxx.xxx sssCOP1.
Where xxx.xx.xxx.xxx is the IP address and sss is the Teradata Database name. Figure 7
shows these sample entries.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
45
Chapter 2: Prerequisites
Preparing Your System
Figure 7: HOSTS File
6
From the File menu, choose Save.
7
From the File menu, choose Exit to close Notepad and return to the Windows desktop.
Now that the IP address and Teradata Database name are successfully defined, check that the
network connection is correct. Continue with “Verifying the Network Connection.”
Verifying the Network Connection
Before opening Teradata DWM and connecting to a Teradata Database, perform this
procedure to test the network connection.
To verify a network connection
1
Click Start and select Run.
A Run dialog box appears.
2
In the Open text box, enter the PING command followed by the name of the Teradata
Database and the COP1 suffix. For example: PING ssscop1
Where sss is the Teradata Database to which you want to connect.
3
The PING command returns the following message, where xxx.xx.xxx.xxx is the IP address
of the destination system:
Reply from xxx.xx.xxx.xxx
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Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Chapter 2: Prerequisites
Launching Teradata DWM
4
If the PING command does not receive a successful response from the network, see your
network administrator to determine the cause.
You have successfully verified your network connection. Continue with “Launching Teradata
DWM” to learn how start Teradata DWM.
Launching Teradata DWM
The following procedure assumes you have installed Teradata DWM, configured the tdwm
database, and configured your CLIv2 connection.
Note: If you do not disable Teradata DWM before changing system time, it may trigger a
premature exception action or not raise an exception when it is due.
Note: If the Teradata DWM feature is enabled, users may see an internal session with host id =
0 and user name = TDWM. This internal session is used for Teradata DWM processing. It will
logoff automatically after 20 minutes of inactivity, or you can force it off by submitting an
ABORT SESSION command with logoff option using the supervisor window or PM/API.
To start Teradata DWM
1
From your Start menu, choose Programs, and then choose Teradata Dynamic Workload
Manager 13.0.
OR
From the Administer menu in Teradata Manager, choose Workload Management, and then
choose Dynamic Workload Manager.
The Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager Connect dialog box (Figure 6) opens, prompting
you to connect to a Teradata DWM server.
Figure 8: Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager Connect dialog box
2
Complete the fields of the Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager Connect dialog box.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
47
Chapter 2: Prerequisites
Launching Teradata DWM
Table 3: Teradata Dynamic Workload Connect Dialog Box Fields
Field
Action/Description
DBC Name
Enter the name of the Teradata Database you want to use to manage your
workloads.
User Name
The default user name for Teradata DWM is tdwm. Another user name can
be defined and will have restricted permissions: read-only access to the
Teradata DWM tables and no ability to use the Activate command.
Password
Enter the password associated with the user name you entered in the User
Name box. The default password is tdwmadmin. Change this default
password as soon as possible; to do this, use the MODIFY USER statement.
For information about using this statement, see Database Administration.
Do Not Connect to
the Teradata
Database
[Optional] Click to work offline from the Teradata Database. Rule sets can
be viewed or modified while in local mode. See Figure 9.
If the Do Not Connect to the Teradata Database is unchecked, go to step 3. If checked, the
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager Connect dialog box expands.
Figure 9: Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager Connect dialog box for Local Mode
A Teradata Release section appears. Choose the release to use while in local mode.
3
Click OK.
Using a CLIv2 connection, Teradata DWM validates the Teradata Database logon parameters
and attempts to obtain information about the tdwm database. If the tdwm database is not
available, you are prompted to create the database.
If the tdwm database is found, the following occurs:
48
•
Some data from the tdwm database is loaded.
•
The Teradata Database is checked to determine whether Teradata DWM rules are enabled.
•
The Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager window opens.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Chapter 2: Prerequisites
Launching Teradata DWM
Note: Only one person can run Teradata DWM to write to the tdwm database and issue tdwm
commands on a Teradata Database at a time. Others may run Teradata DWM in read-only
mode.
To exit the Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager
✔ From the File menu, select Exit.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
49
Chapter 2: Prerequisites
Launching Teradata DWM
50
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
CHAPTER 3
Navigating Teradata DWM
Before using Teradata DWM, you might want to look over the graphical user interface (GUI)
to become familiar with the available features. Explore the following topics to learn more
about Teradata DWM user GUI:
•
About Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager
•
Reading the Status Bar
•
Exploring the Teradata DWM Menu Bar
•
Reading the Rules Directory Information Tree (Rules DIT)
•
Exploring the Properties Pane
•
About the Database Browser
•
Exploring the Database Browser Menu Bar
•
Reading the Database DIT
•
Viewing the Elements Pane
Note: This guide refers to the Teradata DWM GUI as the Teradata Dynamic Workload
Manager.
About Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager allows you to create and manage Teradata DWM rules.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
51
Chapter 3: Navigating Teradata DWM
About Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager
Figure 10: Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager GUI
The following table describes the Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager GUI.
Table 4: Teradata DWM GUI
GUI Item
Description
Menu bar
The menu bar is immediately below the title bar of the Teradata Dynamic
Workload Manager. You can access all the Teradata DWM functions from the
menu bar. The menu bar includes these menus:
• File
• Edit
• Rules
• View
• Window
• Help
To learn about the commands available from these menus, see “Exploring the
Teradata DWM Menu Bar” on page 54.
52
Rules DIT
The pane below the menu bar and to the left displays the Rules Directory
Information Tree (DIT). You can use the Rules DIT to create, delete, enable,
and bypass rules. See “Reading the Rules Directory Information Tree (Rules
DIT)” on page 60.
Properties pane
The pane below the menu bar and to the right includes tabs and controls for an
item you select in the Rules DIT. See “Exploring the Properties Pane” on
page 63.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Chapter 3: Navigating Teradata DWM
Reading the Status Bar
Table 4: Teradata DWM GUI (continued)
GUI Item
Description
Status bar
The status bar tells you about the state of the application and the database to
which you are connected. See “Reading the Status Bar” on page 53.
The following table describes tasks you can perform and where to find the associated
procedures documented in this guide.
Table 5: Teradata DWM Tasks
Task
Teradata DWM User Guide Section
Set up events and states
“Setting up Events and States” on page 99
Define global parameter settings for rule
processing
“Defining Global Rule Parameters” on page 223
Activate or deactivate rule categories
“Activating Rule Categories” on page 229
Create, modify, view, and delete filters,
throttles, and WDs
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Individually enable or disable specific
specific rules
• “Enabling a Filter or Throttle” on page 159
• “Disabling a Filter or Throttle” on page 160
• “Enabling or Disabling a WD” on page 197
Specify Teradata Database objects that
bypass filters and throttles
“Granting Bypass Privileges” on page 157
“Creating or Modifying a Filter” on page 126
“Deleting a Filter or Throttle” on page 161
“Viewing Filter or Throttle Information” on page 140
“Creating New WDs” on page 171
“Modifying Existing WDs” on page 198
“Deleting WDs” on page 219
“Viewing Workload Summaries” on page 221
“Viewing WD Information” on page 221
Reading the Status Bar
The status bar at the bottom of the Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager contains the
following fields:
Table 6: Status Bar Fields
Status Bar Field
Description
Status
Status of Teradata DWM or an explanation of the currently selected menu item.
DB Time or Local
Time
Current database time, updated once a minute. Or, if in local mode the local time
will display.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
53
Chapter 3: Navigating Teradata DWM
Exploring the Teradata DWM Menu Bar
Table 6: Status Bar Fields (continued)
Status Bar Field
Description
DB Date
Current database date, updated once a minute.
Showing and Hiding the Status Bar
You can show or hide the status bar by toggling it on or off. By default, the status bar is visible.
To show or hide the status bar
✔ In the View menu, choose Status bar.
Exploring the Teradata DWM Menu Bar
The Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager menu bar gives you access to all the functions and
features in Teradata DWM. You can use your mouse to select the commands in these menus:
•
“File Menu” on page 54
•
“Edit Menu” on page 55
•
“Rules Menu” on page 55
•
“View Menu” on page 57
•
“Window Menu” on page 59
•
“Help Menu” on page 59
Figure 11: Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager Menu Bar
File Menu
The following table describes the actions you can perform from the File menu.
Table 7: File Menu Options
54
File Menu Command
Description
Print
Displays the Print dialog box and defines properties for printing
definitions.
Save
Saves the current Rule Set to a file.
Open
Opens a saved Rule Set from a file.
Request TDWM Lock
Places an exclusive lock on the tdwm database so changes can be
controlled.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
Chapter 3: Navigating Teradata DWM
Exploring the Teradata DWM Menu Bar
Table 7: File Menu Options (continued)
File Menu Command
Description
Release TDWM Lock
Releases any tdwm database locks currently in effect.
Exit
Closes Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager.
Edit Menu
Use the Paste command in the Edit menu to add Teradata Database objects copied from the
Database Browser to the appropriate types of rules. You can also use Ctrl+V to paste objects
from the Database Browser.
Rules Menu
Use the commands in the Rules menu to manage Teradata DWM rules. The following table
describes the actions you can perform from the Rules menu:
Table 8: Rules Submenus and Commands
Rules Submenu
Command
Description
Rule Sets
Save to Database
Saves the Teradata DWM Rule Set in the tdwm database.
Load from Database
Selects a Rule Set from the to load into Teradata DWM.
Activate
Activates or deactivates rule categories, or selects a Rule Set to become
the active Rule Set in the Teradata Database. See “Activating Rule
Categories” on page 229.
Inquire
Shows the active rule categories on your Teradata Database. See
“Activating Rule Categories” on page 229.
New Rule Set
Re-initializes Teradata DWM to a Rule Set with default workloads.
Delete
Deletes a Rule Set.
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55
Chapter 3: Navigating Teradata DWM
Exploring the Teradata DWM Menu Bar
Table 8: Rules Submenus and Commands (continued)
Rules Submenu
Command
Description
Filter
Create
Choosing one of these options defines a filter:
• Object Access Rule
• Query Resource Rule
See “Creating or Modifying a Filter” on page 126.
Create From
Creates a new filter by copying the properties of an existing filter you
selected on the Rules DIT.
Delete
Choose one of these options:
• Delete Rule to remove a a filter from the tdwm database
• Delete Object to remove an object linked to a filter
Enable
Makes a filter available on your Teradata Database system.
Note: Changes in the enable or disable state take effect after you save
and activate the Rule Set.
Throttles
Bypass
Choose users, accounts, or profiles to circumvent a specific filter. See
“Granting Bypass Privileges” on page 157.
Create
Choose one of these options to create a throttle:
• Object Throttle Rule
• Utilities Rule
See “Creating or Modifying a Filter” on page 126.
Create From
create a new throttle by copying the properties of an existing throttle you
selected in the Rules DIT.
Delete
Choose one of these options:
• Delete Rule to remove a throttle from the tdwm database
• Delete Object to remove an object linked to a throttle
Enable
Makes a throttle available on your Teradata Database system.
Note: Changes in the enable or disable state take effect after you save
and activate the Rule Set.
Classes
Bypass
Choose users, accounts, or profiles to circumvent a specific throttle. See
“Granting Bypass Privileges” on page 157.
New Workload
Creates a new workload.
Create Workload From
Creates a new workload from existing workload you selected on the
Rules DIT (sometimes called cloning a workload).
Delete Workload
Deletes a workload you selected.
Enable Workload or Disable
Workload
Enables or disables a workload. This command toggles between Enable
Workload and Disable Workload depending on the status of the workload
you selected.
Note: Changes in the enable or disable state take effect after you save
and activate the Rule Set.
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Exploring the Teradata DWM Menu Bar
Table 8: Rules Submenus and Commands (continued)
Rules Submenu
Command
Description
Priority Scheduler
Compare Weights
Visually compares the weights of AGs. See “Comparing Weights” on
page 216.
System Regulation
• New Event
• New SysCon
• New SysCon Event
Combo
• New OpEnv
• New OpEnv Event Combo
• New State
Defines new events, system conditions, operating environments, and
states. See “Setting up Events and States” on page 99.
Show
Displays a text description for the item selected in the Rules DIT. You
can save to a text file or send the output to a printer.
Show All
Displays a listing of Rule Set settings. You can save to a text file or send
the output to a printer.
View Menu
The following table describes the actions you can perform from the View menu.
Table 9: View Menu Commands
View Menu Command
Description
Status Bar
Shows or hides the status bar. See “Showing and Hiding the Status Bar” on
page 54.
Cleanup
Verifies that each object associated with each rules still exists, and
modifies rule definitions if necessary. When you save the Teradata DWM
Rule Set, Teradata DWM updates the tables in the tdwm database to reflect
the cleaned-up rules.
Options
• Specifies Rule Set actions at startup.
• Automatically loads classification criteria at startup.
• Defines exception criteria when a new workload is created. Otherwise,
defines exception criteria after a workload is created.
See “To specify Teradata DWM options” on page 58 and “To restore
default options” on page 59.
Split View
Splits the right pane of the Teradata DWM GUI horizontally, keeping the
state matrix in the upper portion and displays tabs to view:
• Operating Environment
• Events
• Event Combinations
When the split view is enabled, the states view can display in the lower
pane.
Any updates done in the tab views are automatically shown in the state
matrix.
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Exploring the Teradata DWM Menu Bar
To specify Teradata DWM options
1
From the View menu, choose Options. The TDWM Options dialog box displays.
Figure 12: TDWM Options dialog box
2
Select options.
Table 10: Teradata DWM Options
Option
Description
At Startup
Selects the action for Rule Sets at Teradata DWM startup.
Choose from the following:
• Load New Rule Set (default) opens Teradata DWM with a
default new Rule Set.
• Load Active Rule Set allows you to load the currently
active Rule Set from the Teradata Database. If there is no
active Rule Set, an empty default Rule Set is loaded
instead.
• Show Load Dialog allows you to choose one of the Rule
Sets to load from the database from the Load dialog box.
3
58
Automatically Load “Classify by”
Lists
Automatically loads the list of available items in the Classify
By Data Object dialog box for classification criteria. See “To
define or modify classification criteria #2-6 for a WD” on
page 176.
Show Exception Criteria Screen
When Creating a New Workload
Displays the Exception view when creating a new workload.
Otherwise, you cannot define exception criteria until after
you create the workload. For more information, see “To
define exception criteria” on page 190.
Select OK to save or Cancel to discard your selections.
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Chapter 3: Navigating Teradata DWM
Exploring the Teradata DWM Menu Bar
To restore default options
1
From the View menu, choose Options. The TDWM Options dialog box displays.
2
Select Reset to restore the default options.
3
Select OK to close the dialog box.
Window Menu
The following table describes the actions you can perform from the Window menu.
Table 11: Window Menu Commands
Window Menu Command
Description
Database Browser
Opens and closes the Database Browser. See “About the Database
Browser” on page 65.
Migrate PSF Settings
(Migrate Priority Scheduler
Settings)
Converts priority definition sets to WDs. See “Converting Priority
Definition (PD) Sets to Workload Definitions (WDs)” on page 74.
Help Menu
The following table lists the actions you can perform from the Help menu.
Table 12: Help Menu Commands
Help Menu Command
Description
Contents
Opens the contents tab of the online Help so you can locate a topic
by category.
About Teradata Dynamic
Workload Manager
Views copyright and version information. See “Viewing Copyright
and Version Information” on page 59.
Viewing Copyright and Version Information
When you want to know the version of Teradata DWM you are using, you can open the About
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager message box.
To see copyright and version information for Teradata DWM
1
From the Help menu, choose About Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager.
The About Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager message box displays the product version
and copyright dates.
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Reading the Rules Directory Information Tree (Rules DIT)
Figure 13: Sample about Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager Message Box
2
Read the information, and then click OK to close the message box.
Reading the Rules Directory Information Tree
(Rules DIT)
The left frame of the Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager is the Rules DIT. You can use the
DIT to enable, disable, or delete rules, and to link Teradata Database objects to your rules.
The DIT shows the currently defined rules for the Teradata DWM Rule Set organized in the
following categories:
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Reading the Rules Directory Information Tree (Rules DIT)
Figure 14: Default Rules DIT
When you select a rule in the DIT, its properties (and any Teradata Database objects associated
with the rule) appear in the Properties pane. See “Exploring the Properties Pane” on page 63
for more information.
Right-click a rule to see a shortcut menu with available commands. The shortcut menus
provide access to some functions available from the Rules menu, such as creating a new rule of
the selected type. Click the plus sign beside each rule option (if present) to display a list of
defined rules of the selected type in the DIT.
You can also access the shortcut menu by using the key combination:
SHIFT +F10
Note: Disabled rules appears with a red “X” over the associated icon:
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Reading the Rules Directory Information Tree (Rules DIT)
The following table describes the options provided in the Rules DIT.
Table 13: Rules DIT
Option
Description
Settings
Defines global settings for Teradata DWM. See “Defining Global Rule
Parameters” on page 223.
System Regulation
Maintains a big-picture view of workload management, and to allows you
to:
• Display the state matrix.
• Define new system conditions, operating environment, and states.
• Set states.
• View Rule Set values.
See “Setting up the State Matrix” on page 100.
62
System Conditions
• Defines system conditions and view system condition event
combinations.
• Sets severity precedence.
See “Defining System Conditions” on page 100.
Event Combinations
Creates, edits, and deletes event combinations. See “Working with Event
Combinations” on page 118.
Operating Environments
• Defines operating environments and views operating event
combinations.
• Sets precedence.
See “Defining Operating Environments” on page 103.
Periods
Defines time periods that act as both events and operating environments.
See “Setting up Periods” on page 113.
States
• Defines states.
• Views Rule Set values for each state.
See “Defining States” on page 106 and “To view values by state” on
page 235.
Events
• Defines system condition events.
• Specifies user-defined system condition and operating environment
events.
See “Working With Events” on page 110.
Filter
Views a summary by name and type of all filters defined and saved to the
tdwm database. See “Creating or Modifying a Filter” on page 126.
Object Access
Views a list of all object access filters defined and saved to the tdwm
database.
Query Resource
Views a list of all query resource filters defined and saved to the tdwm
database.
Throttle
Views a summary by name and type of all throttles defined and saved to
the tdwm database. See “Creating or Modifying a Throttle” on page 140.
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Exploring the Properties Pane
Table 13: Rules DIT (continued)
Option
Description
Object Throttle
Views a list of all query object throttles defined and saved to the tdwm
database.
Utilities
Views a list of all utility throttles defined and saved to the tdwm database.
• Workloads
• Classes
• Views a summary of all workloads defined and saved to the tdwm
database, including enforcement priority, evaluation order and SLGs.
• Changes the evaluation order.
See “Evaluation Order and WDs” on page 198 and “Setting SLGs” on
page 181.
Global Exceptions
Sets exception directives that apply to several or all workloads. See
“Setting Local and Global Exception Directives” on page 186.
WDs
Views and modifies WDs. See “Modifying Existing WDs” on page 198.
Console Utility
• Maps utilities to WDs.
• Maps PGs to WDs.
See “Mapping Console Utilities to WDs” on page 200.
Priority Scheduler
Manages workloads and their associated AGs and RPs. See “Using the
Priority Scheduler View” on page 204.
Exploring the Properties Pane
The right frame of the Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager is the Properties pane. This frame
includes controls you use to define or modify global parameters. It also allows you view or
modify parameters of a filter, throttle, or workload you select on the Rules DIT.
The number of tabs in the Properties pane and the available controls vary based on the type of
rule you select from the Rules DIT.
When you select a filter or throttle you defined, the Objects DIT displays between the Rules
DIT and the Properties pane. Any Teradata Database objects you associated with a filter or
throttle display there. To learn about linking Teradata Database objects with rules, see
“Linking Teradata Database Objects to Rules” on page 154. The Objects DIT displays for
filters and object throttles only.
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Exploring the Properties Pane
Figure 15: Sample Object Access Objects DIT and Properties Pane
The following table describes the shared controls available from the Properties pane.
Table 14: Properties Pane Controls
64
Properties Pane
Control
Description
Accept
Saves any changes you made to a rule’s properties.
Restore
Replaces any changes you made to a rule’s properties with the original values.
Help
Opens the Teradata DWM online help system (filters and throttles only).
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About the Database Browser
About the Database Browser
The filters and throttles created using Teradata DWM require linking (associating) objects to
them to restrict Teradata Database access. Use the Database Browser to view and select
Teradata Database objects and link them to rules in Teradata DWM. Continue with the
following topics:
•
Exploring the Database Browser Menu Bar
•
Reading the Database DIT
•
Viewing the Elements Pane
To learn about linking Teradata Database objects, see “Linking Teradata Database Objects to
Rules” on page 154
Figure 16: Database Browser
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About the Database Browser
The following table describes the Database Browser.
Table 15: Database Browser GUI
GUI Item
Description
Menu bar
The menu bar is immediately below the title bar of the Database Browser.
Using the menu bar, you can access all the Database Browser functions. The
menu bar includes these menus:
• File
• Edit
• View
To learn about the commands available from these menus, see “Exploring the
Database Browser Menu Bar” on page 66.
Database DIT
The frame to the left below the menu bar is the Database DIT. This frame
shows the structure of the database to which you are connected. See “Reading
the Database DIT” on page 67.
Elements pane
The frame to the right below the menu bar is the Elements pane. This frame
shows the database elements for a node you select in the Database DIT. See
“Viewing the Elements Pane” on page 68.
Exploring the Database Browser Menu Bar
The menu bar in the Database Browser gives you access to all the functions and features in the
Database Browser.
Figure 17: Database Browser Menu Bar
You can select the following commands in these menus.
Table 16: Database Browser Menu Commands
Menu
Menu Command
Description
File
Close
Close the Database Browser.
Edit
Copy
Copy an object you select from the Elements pane to a clipboard.
You can also use Ctrl+C to copy objects. See “Viewing the
Elements Pane” on page 68.
Later, you can paste the object to a rule in the Rules DIT. You can
also paste objects in to the Objects DIT of the Properties pane.
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About the Database Browser
Table 16: Database Browser Menu Commands (continued)
Menu
Menu Command
Description
View
Sort by Name
Sort the database items in the Elements pane in ascending
alphabetical order by name.
Sort by Type
Sort the database items in the Elements pane in ascending
alphabetical order by type.
Refresh Now
Reload data from the Teradata Database into the Database
Browser.
Reading the Database DIT
The Database DIT is the frame to the left below the menu bar in the Database Browser. The
Database DIT is a graphical display of the directory structure of the Teradata Database to
which you are connected. The top-level, or root, directory represents the organization level.
Figure 18: Sample Database Browser DIT
Click the plus or minus symbol next to a database icon to expand or collapse the branches of
the Database DIT. Select a node in the Database DIT to see the objects associated with that
node in the Elements pane. You can select and copy any object in the Database DIT to a rule in
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About the Database Browser
the Rules DIT using drag-and-drop or copy and paste. See “Linking Teradata Database
Objects to Rules” on page 154 to learn how.
Viewing the Elements Pane
The frame to the right, below the menu bar in the Database Browser, is the Elements pane. It
shows the objects associated with any node you select in the Database DIT.
Note: RP information is not visible in the Database Browser if Category 3 is active on the
database.
Figure 19: Sample Database Browser Elements Pane
Select and copy any object in the Elements pane to a rule in the Rules DIT using drag-anddrop or the copy and paste. Double-click an object in the Elements pane to view the child
elements of a database selected in the Database DIT.
To view the object definition, double-click a table, view, or macro element in the Elements
pane to open the Table/View/Macro Definition dialog box.
Note: You can also copy and paste, or drag and drop objects from the Elements pane on to the
Objects DIT for filters, or the Objects DIT for object throttles. See Figure 15 on page 64 for an
example of Objects DIT.
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About the Database Browser
Figure 20: Table/View/Macro Definition Dialog Box
Now that you are familiar with the Database Browser, you are ready to use Teradata DWM.
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About the Database Browser
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CHAPTER 4
Getting Started with Teradata DWM
Teradata DWM works within the framework of Rule Sets. To get started, migrate existing Rule
Sets. This involves an awareness of the default settings and minimal changes to the basic
Teradata DWM features. To get an overview of Teradata DWM, its management methods are
discussed first so that Rule Set components are more easily understood. Teradata DWM
management methods function as system points of control. These management methods
include advanced features (like throttling) as control points to investigate as you become
familiar with Teradata DWM. Where to find detailed information and task instructions are
also included.
To get started, read these topics to learn more:
•
Management Methods Overview
•
Teradata DWM Administrator User
•
Establishing a Basic Rule Set
•
About Service Level Goals (SLGs)
•
About Workloads
•
Mapping Workloads
Note: To further your understanding of new terminology, refer to “Teradata DWM Terms to
Know” on page 41 and the “Glossary” on page 307.
Management Methods Overview
As illustrated in Figure 21, Teradata DWM uses management methods to establish six main
points of control. Table 17 discusses each management method.
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Management Methods Overview
Figure 21: Teradata DWM Management Methods
Table 17: Teradata DWM Management Methods as Control Points
Control
Point
Basic or
Advanced
Function
Management Method
(1)
Requests can be filtered as they enter the system and can be rejected at
this time. For example a filter rule can specify that certain DDL
statements cannot be done at a certain time period. For more
information, see “Controlling Activity with Filters and Throttles” on
page 123.
Advanced
(2)
A system throttle is a type of rule that limits the number of active
sessions, query requests, or utilities in the Teradata Database system.
There are object throttles and utility throttles. See “About Throttles” on
page 138.
Advanced
(3)
Requests are classified into workloads. This management method is
discussed in “Classifications and Workloads” on page 82.
Basic
(4)
In this position, the throttles control the maximum concurrent active
requests within a workload. See “About Throttles” on page 138.
Advanced
(5)
Priorities are assigned according to the Allocation Group (AG) the
workload uses.
Basic
(6)
Exception processing can occur that either aborts the request or
reassigns the request.
Advanced
To get started, a basic Rule Set that fine-tunes the methods depicted as points (3) and (5) is
recommended. Filtering (1) is considered an advanced feature of Teradata DWM. Throttling
(2) and (4) place concurrency limits on workloads, objects, utilities or sessions. Workload
throttles can be placed on a defined workload. Object throttle criteria can be established based
on a user, an account, a profile, or combinations of those objects. Utility throttling can be
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Teradata DWM Administrator User
placed on each of the individual utilities (ARC, FastLoad, MultiLoad and FastExport).
Teradata DWM will let as many utilities start as possible until either the number of jobs
reaches a throttle rule limit or the resource requirements of all active load jobs reach an
internal limit. At that time, new jobs are automatically delayed. See “About Throttles” on
page 138 for more information.
Exceptions (6) are considered an advanced feature of Teradata DWM. Exception processing is
discussed in “How Teradata DWM Exceptions Work” on page 38 and “Handling Concurrent
Multiple Exception Directives for a WD” on page 169.
Teradata DWM Administrator User
The tasks discussed in this chapter need to be done as the Teradata DWM administrator user,
tdwm. Manage the Teradata system workloads through rules defined by the Teradata DWM
administrator.
Establishing a Basic Rule Set
A Rule Set is a complete collection of related filters, throttles, events, states, and WD rules. All
or some of these components may already be defined and still valid. An existing Rule Set and
each individual Rule Set component can be migrated, incorporated, and mapped to Teradata
DWM.
There are two methods to establishing a basic Rule Set:
•
Use Teradata WA to migrate existing Priority Definition (PD) Rule Sets
•
Use Teradata WA’s DBQL analysis tool to suggest Rule Sets (not covered in this chapter)
Both of these methods achieve a basic Rule Set by migrating as many relevant Rule Sets and
components as possible from the existing management tool set and by working with the
default settings.
View the steps in Migrate an existing Rule Set from Priority Scheduler and Teradata Dynamic
Query Manager to migrate a basic Rule Set.
Read these sections to learn more about components in the Rule Set:
•
“About Service Level Goals (SLGs)” on page 81
•
“About Workloads” on page 82
•
“Mapping Workloads” on page 84
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Establishing a Basic Rule Set
Migrate an existing Rule Set from Priority Scheduler and Teradata Dynamic
Query Manager
When using the Database Setup application in Teradata Manager, select the Migrate TDWM
Database check box. A Rule Set called Migrated Rules is created by Teradata Manager. The new
Teradata DWM workload definitions must be created before selecting the Workloads check
box in the Activate Rule Set dialog box. See “Activating Rule Categories” on page 229 for more
information.
If you do not create workloads in Teradata DWM before activating the Migrate Rules Rule Set
and selecting the Workloads check box, an error message may display with a notice that the
Activate failed. Workloads must be defined before system-wide filters and throttles are
migrated.
Converting Priority Definition (PD) Sets to Workload Definitions
(WDs)
If the Priority Scheduler Administrator has been used to manage resource utilization by
database requests, Priority Definition (PD) sets are stored on the system. Transfer these PD
sets from Priority Scheduler Administrator and convert them to WD Sets for use with
Teradata DWM. The Migrate PSF (Priority Scheduler) Settings menu option in Teradata DWM
launches a subset of Teradata WA to provide this functionality. In general, the process is
automatic; however, a review of the new WD details is needed to adjust settings for cases when
PD set scheduling information cannot be directly or closely mapped to a state. For example,
the Priority Scheduler Migration option cannot convert multiple PD sets that use Time-ofday milestones or that repeat at defined intervals.
To perform a PD set conversion, first connect to the Teradata Database.
To migrate Priority Scheduler (PSF) settings to the Teradata Database
1
From the Teradata DWM Window menu, select Migrate PSF Settings.
Teradata WA appears in a new window.
2
74
In The Teradata Workload Analyzer window, select the Connect option to access the
Connect to Teradata Database dialog box. Do one of the following:
•
From the File menu, select Connect (or Ctrl+l)
•
From the tool bar, click the
button
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Establishing a Basic Rule Set
Figure 22: Connect to Teradata Database Dialog box
3
In the Connect to Teradata Database dialog box, enter these database connection
parameters and click OK.
•
System (DBS) Name
The name of the database to connect to; Teradata WA uses this to store WDs and related data.
•
User Name
The default user name is tdwm.
•
Password
The password associated with the user name entered above.
•
Default Database
The default database, if any, used.
•
Account String
The account string, if any.
When connected, the Teradata WA status bar shows the status as Ready and Logged On
To Database_name As User_name.
Continue by selecting PD sets for conversion.
4
From the Analysis menu in Teradata WA, select the Convert PDsets To Workloads Option
(Ctrl+D).
Teradata WA retrieves any scheduled PD sets.
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Figure 23: Scheduled PD Sets in Scheduled PDset(s) dialog box
To display properties for periods in the Define System Periods dialog box, click View
Periods.
To instruct Teradata WA to include only active Performance Groups (PGs), click DBQL
Inputs. In the Data Collection Interval dialog box, you can change the date and time range
of DBQL to search. Teradata WA then obtains the PGs for accounts which had activity
during the defined interval. Otherwise, Teradata WA uses the Data Dictionary (Dbc.users)
table to determine all possible PGs.
To obtain and display unscheduled PD sets, select Select PDsets.
5
76
Click the name of the PD set (scheduled or unscheduled) that you want converted and
verify:
•
A period is selected. This is required for conversion.
•
A PD set has been associated with the default period.
•
The entire row is selected (indicated by black shading), not just the cell containing the
PD set name.
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Figure 24: Sample PD Sets Selected in Select PDset(s) Dialog Box
Teradata WA associates the PD set with a period or operating environment in Teradata
DWM that most closely corresponds to the PD Set’s scheduling information.
6
Under Select PD Sets, also select a period and select or clear the Default check box as
appropriate. Only one PD set can be associated with the default period.
If the period you want does not appear in the Period list box, click the Define Periods
button to create additional periods as described in “Controlling Activity with WDs” on
page 170.
7
Click Proceed... to continue. The the Existing PSA Setting tab displays.
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Figure 25: Existing PSA Setting dialog box
Note: By default the Existing PSA Setting dialog box shows information for the base state.
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To specify conversion mapping
1
In the Existing PSA Setting dialog box, click Convert. The Migrated TASM Settings dialog
box appears next.
Figure 26: Migrated PSA Setting dialog box
2
Notice that the dialog box provides the following new WD information.
•
RP Weight
•
AG Name
•
Enforcement Priority
•
AG Weight
•
Relative Weight
•
Workload Name
•
Classify Criteria
By default, the conversion maps the PD set “as is.” However, if you select Simplified
Structure, Teradata DWM maps the PD set to conform to Teradata Best Practices. That is:
•
No workloads map to the default partition, so as to reserve the default RP for system
work.
•
all workloads are mapped to either a tactical or standard partition, which keeps tactical
work isolated from all other work for optimal performance.
Note that all AG relative weights are maintained in the conversion.
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3
Set Enforcement Priority for each workload by using the pull-down menu.Figure 26 shows
the Enforcement Priority column and the pull-down menu, with Background, Normal,
Priority, and Tactical as enforcement priorities.
Click Rules>Priority Scheduler>Compare Weights>Assigned Weights>Select All to get a
visual representation of the enforcement priorities.
4
After selecting either Remap As Is or Simplified Structure (recommended), click Continue
to complete the conversion.
Teradata WA displays usage information for each workload created.
5
Click Rule Sets -> Calculate All WD SLGs. A progress bar will display as Teradata WA
retrieves all throughput and response time data from the DBQL for all WDs. Then for each
workload that may need an SLG, expand the workload and click SLG Graph. The data will
display in the SLG Recommendations dialog box (see Figure 28). Create SLGs for as many
tactical and high priority workloads, but not necessarily for background workloads.
One example of setting an SLG is to set it to 50% higher than the current actual response
times being realized today at the 90% service percent. For more information, see “About
Service Level Goals (SLGs)” on page 81.
6
Save the migrated Rule Set. Using Teradata DWM, click Rule Sets -> Save to Database.
7
Activate the Rule Set in Teradata DWM by clicking Rules -> Rule Sets -> Activate. The
Activate Rule Set dialog box appears.
Figure 27: Activate Rule Set dialog box
Chose items from the Categories to Activate and the Rule Set list. A confirmation box will
verify that the activation was successful.
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About Service Level Goals (SLGs)
About Service Level Goals (SLGs)
Note: For ease of use, Teradata DWM and Teradata WA can look at the same Rule Set; a
locking mechanism is in place.
SLGs help determine whether workload management is meeting expectations. Note the
following when setting SLGs:
•
Note that an SLG does not need to be created for each workload. For example, an SLG in
not required for very low priority background workloads.
•
If uncertain about what would be an appropriate SLG for the workload, consider setting
the SLG originally based on a factor of the actual performance currently being realized.
For example, 1.5X current performance. If subsequent feedback is received, refine the SLG
from that to better meet business objectives.
•
The service parameters can be viewed or modified to generate Teradata WA SLG
recommendations. Click a service parameter in the list or accept the default (Response
Time) as appropriate.
•
When selecting a listed parameter:
•
That parameter appears as the horizontal axis of the chart
•
Edit the value of that parameter in the SLG Recommendations table displayed beneath
the chart; no other options are available for edit
Changing the setting prompts Teradata WA to update the graph immediately.
Figure 28: SLG Recommendations
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About Workloads
To define SLGs for converted PD sets
1
In the SLG Recommendations dialog box (Figure 28), view the default parameters and
resulting service level recommendations, along with the resulting chart. Change options as
appropriate.
2
When you are satisfied with the new values, click Apply.
About Workloads
Workload definitions (WDs) are one of the keys to a successful workload-centric approach to
database management. A workload is a portion of queries that share a commonality so that the
same workload management controls can be applied. A workload has defining characteristics
and working values. See Table 18. Working values can change for each state.
Table 18: Workload elements
Workload Defining Characteristics (fixed attributes)
Workload Working Values (variable attributes)
Classification Criteria
Workload throttles
Exception criteria and actions
Exception enabling
Priority Scheduler mappings
Priority Scheduler settings
Service Level Goals (SLGs)
Up to thirty five workloads can be defined, what criteria should be used in deciding how many
WDs to implement for your business needs?
Consider:
•
Additional WDs are defined for accounting granularity. Being able to identify the who,
what, and where of queries insures better system usage choices.
•
Improved resource control can be achieved by grouping requests by priority importance.
These requests can be expedited through the system, not waiting for a lesser priority
request to finish processing.
Classifications and Workloads
Workload definitions are derived from business objectives. Use classifications to channel
queries into workloads. Best Practice guidelines recommend the criteria to use for this
process.
Use these guidelines to determine the following:
•
First, answer the “who” question
Here are some examples:
•
82
Account - examine the un-expanded user’s account string [$HPAYROLL&D&H]
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About Workloads
•
User - the Teradata Database username [CTO, STEVE, ALICE, DBC]
•
ClientID - the logon name on the network client [MC128863]
•
ClientAddr - the IP address of the network client [150.132.22.16]
•
Profile - the Teradata profile name [DEVELOPERS]
•
Application - the application on the network client [SQLASSISTANT]
Also, the Teradata Database query band feature can be used to identify the query’s
originating source and purpose. For more information on the query band feature, see
Database Administration.
Note that defining the “who” criteria alone is often enough to exactly identify the source
and type of queries. However when it cannot identify to the granularity desired, additional
criteria based on “where” and “what” criteria may be necessary.
•
Second, if necessary, examine the “where” criteria
Examining the views and permissions being requested can determine the source or type of
the query. Determine what Teradata Database objects will be accessed by the query:
• Database
• Tables
• Views
• Macros
• Stored Procedures (SPs)
•
Third, if necessary, determine the “what” criteria
“What” criteria use various estimates given by the Optimizer.
Determine the types of query:
•
Amp limits - For example, single-AMP queries might indicate a critical workload that
needs fast response times.
•
Load utility type - FASTLOAD, MULTILOAD, FASTEXPORT, etc.
•
Statement type - SELECT, DDL, DML, etc.
•
Row count - minimum and maximum rows at each step
•
Final row count - minimum and maximum rows in the result set
•
Total processing time - minimum and maximum estimated processing time. Generally,
very short queries have reliable estimates and the longer and more complex the query
have less accurate estimates.
Note: Each of these criteria will be ANDed together.
WD Examples
For DBAs, critical questions arise when deciding what criteria to use for classifying workloads.
Determine workloads so that they provide granularity for reporting and accommodates the
flow of critical work versus less critical work through the Teradata Database. The following are
examples of the types of requests that may be categorized into workload definitions:
•
Batch jobs further subdivided by region or organization for reporting purposes.
•
Weekly and monthly reports follow a calendar, or timed-approach to defining workloads
and may be deemed more critical than other workloads at certain calendar times.
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Mapping Workloads
•
Real time updating is deemed more critical to complete quicker than other work.
Recommendations for Classifying Queries
•
Use the “who” criteria first. An example: divide queries into workloads on accounts,
account groupings, applications, or application groupings, with an occasional secondary
sub-division on query band name values.
•
Favor classification over exceptions. The goal is to classify requests correctly from the start
to yield the best workload management. This will reduce unintended priority boosts and
allow the workload throttles to assist in workload management.
•
Use Teradata ASM’s Teradata WA product to create workload definition classification
criteria and priority scheduling mapping and Teradata DWM to implement other
methods of workload management (throttles, filters, exceptions, system regulation). See
“Classification Criteria Guidelines” on page 167.
Mapping Workloads
The enforcement priority is the hierarchy of workloads for processing priority. After queries are
classified into workloads, the workload is mapped to an AG for priority management.
By default, each workload is associated with a specific AG based on the enforcement priority
assigned to the workload. There are four default AGs: Tactical, Priority, Normal, and
Background, correlating directly to the possible enforcement priorities that can be assigned to
a workload.These default AGs are allocated to RPs and hold assigned weights according to
Best Practice guidelines. To get started with a basic Rule Set, only an awareness of these
defaults is needed; these settings provide a solid base of versatility and efficiency.
These Priority Scheduler Best Practices defaults are automatically enforced by Teradata ASM
and use these guidelines in a basic Rule Set:
•
A low number of user-assigned active AGs (four to eight) is preferred.
•
One or two Resource Partitions (RPs) are used to cover all user work.
•
A default RP weight that is equal to the highest non-tactical RP weight.
•
A substantially higher weight assigned to tactical query components, compared to those
supporting other user work.
•
A separate RP to manage all tactical work.
Advanced Features
Now that a basic Rule Set is in place, investigate the advanced management methods
mentioned in Figure 21 on page 72.
84
•
Workload throttle concurrency limits
•
Exceptions
•
Filters
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Advanced Features
•
System throttles
•
Working values can change per state or operating environment. These aspects of rules can
be adjusted:
•
workload throttle concurrency limits
•
Priority Scheduler weights
•
Exception actions
•
Service Level Goals (SLGs)
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Advanced Features
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CHAPTER 5
Getting Started with the State Matrix
The state matrix acts like a traffic controller in the Teradata Database, keeping the flow of
queries moving and handling planned and unexpected events. Learn more about the state
matrix by reading:
•
Understanding the State Matrix
•
Understanding State Matrix Default Settings
•
State Matrix Guidelines
•
Defining Event Combinations
References to more detailed information and task instructions are also included in this
chapter.
Note: To further your understanding of new terminology, refer to “Teradata DWM Terms to
Know” on page 41 and the “Glossary” on page 307.
Understanding the State Matrix
A state is a complete set of working values for a Rule Set. Each cell in the state matrix
represents a state which is the database system being in a combination of a system condition
and operating environment. Each cell of the matrix must be associated with a single state, but
states may be associated with multiple system condition and operating environment pairs.
The initial Rule Set of the state matrix is shown in Figure 29. The state matrix is organized
along two axes: system conditions are presented as the left column with the Normal system
condition in the (1,1) position. By default, Teradata DWM has a 1x1 matrix; initially this may
be all that is needed. Defining the workload classifications is the real key to “getting started.”
At the onset, many installations have multiple operating environments which are managed
uniquely.
As system conditions are added, they appear not in alphabetical order but as progressing top
to bottom from least severity to highest severity. Reading left to right, operating environments
form the horizontal axis and the Always state having the lowest precedence. Operating
environments are added left to right in order of lowest-to-highest precedence. In case of
conflict, matrix elements with higher precedence or severity are in effect.
Note: Each operating environment, system condition and state must have a unique name.
When rule sets are loaded, name checks are done and a warning message may display to
suggest renaming the item.
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Understanding the State Matrix
Figure 29: Default 1x1 State Matrix
Understanding State Matrix Default Settings
When operating within the Teradata ASM framework, Teradata DWM defaults adhere to Best
Practice guidelines. It is helpful to understand these defaults, know when they become active,
and to be aware of some of the conditions that will override them.
Consider the following when default values are active or overridden:
•
System conditions are levels of system health and form one axis of the state matrix. The
default system condition is Normal. The Normal system condition is assigned the lowest
severity (this cannot be changed).
•
Teradata DWM provides a default “Always” operating environment. Teradata DWM uses
the default operating environment when no other operating environment is active. The
Always operating environment cannot be changed or deleted.
•
A state is a complete set of working values for a Rule Set. The default “Base” state
represents the state associated with the default “Always” operating environment and the
default “Normal” system condition.
State Matrix Guidelines
Best Practice guidelines recommend having as few as possible system conditions, operating
environments, and states. However, additional elements can be justified when:
88
•
There exists consistent peak workload hours (or days) where priority management is
strictly assigned and enforced.
•
There exists load or query windows where priority must exist to complete in a critical
window.
•
There exists a need to manage differently, for example, to give critical work higher priority
when system health is degraded in some way.
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Chapter 5: Getting Started with the State Matrix
Understanding the State Matrix
To help with the decision to enlarge the state matrix, consider the following examples:
•
Figure 30, depicts a load job with imprecise start and end times despite a scheduling desire
for the load to begin at 10pm and end at 8AM. Having a state matrix defined allows
Teradata DWM to recognize events so that different management rules can be in effect
during the duration of the load rather than having to manage based on the desired
schedule.
•
Figure 37 depicts a node offline situation.
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Understanding the State Matrix
Figure 30: User-Defined Event - Load Scenario
11 12 1
10
2
9
3
8
4
7 6 5
Before Event
8:00PM
Operating Environments
Operational Daily
Always
Queries
Loads
System
Condition
Teradata
Base
State
Caution
State
Normal
Event status
Load: disabled
Caution
Degraded
Degraded
State
Normal
State
Load
State
Load
State
Load
State
Caution
State
Degraded
State
In Effect at 8 pm, Monday night
SysCon = Normal
OpEnv =
Operational Queries
State = Normal State
Query
Application
During Event
2:12AM
(4:12 hours past “usual” load window start.)
Load
Utilities
Query
Request
System
Condition
Teradata
“Loading”
API
Call
Load
Event status
Requests Load: enabled
Normal
Caution
Degraded
Operating Environments
Operational Daily
Always
Queries
Loads
Base
State
Caution
State
Degraded
State
Query
Application
Normal
State
Caution
State
Degraded
State
Load
State
Load
State
Load
State
After Event
9:37AM
(1:37 minutes past “usual” window end.)
Load
Utilities
Query
Request
Teradata
“Loading
Deactivate”
API
Call
Event status
Load: disabled
System
Condition
Normal
Caution
Degraded
Operating Environments
Operational Daily
Always
Queries
Loads
Base
State
Caution
State
Degraded
State
Normal
State
Caution
State
Degraded
State
Load
State
Load
State
Load
State
2513B003
Query
request
11 12 1
10
2
9
3
8
4
7 6 5
Load starts at 2:12 am
SysCon = Normal
OpEnv = Daily Loads
State = Load State
2513B004
Load
Utilities
11 12 1
10
2
9
3
8
4
7 6 5
Load completes at 9:37 am,
Tuesday morning
SysCon = Normal
OpEnv =
Operational Queries
State = Normal State
2513B005
Query
Application
2513A009
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Understanding the State Matrix
Defining Events and States
Events and states are an important part of managing Teradata DWM rules. It is recommended
that events and states be defined as follows:
1
Define system conditions and operating environments to create a state matrix. See
“Defining System Conditions” on page 100 and “Defining Operating Environments” on
page 103.
2
Define states. See “Defining States” on page 106.
3
Map states to system condition/operating environment pairs on the state matrix. The state
matrix contains system conditions on one axis and operating environment elements on
another axis, and associates system condition/operating environment pairs to states and
their working value set. See “Setting States” on page 109.
4
Define the events your system will detect. Set up the following types of events:
•
System condition events (SysCons)
•
Operating environment events, including period events
For more information, see “Working With Events” on page 110 and “Setting up Periods”
on page 113.
5
Define event combinations to associate event detection with actions desired, such as
operating environment or system condition changes. See “Defining Event Combinations”
on page 92 for more information.
6
Link workloads to system regulation by defining working values per state per rule, which
includes:
•
Enabling filters by state
•
Enabling object throttles by state, as well as specifying session or query limits by state
•
Enabling utility throttles by state, as well as specifying utility limits by state
•
Applying local and global exceptions by operating environment
•
Adjusting SLG parameters by operating environment
•
Setting WD query limits by state
•
Vary Priority Scheduler settings for states
Adding to the State Matrix
Think of the state matrix as a system regulation tool that acts as a traffic controller. Events like
node down, resource depletion, dual-system down, and application starts and completion
events can be a reason to manage your workload mix differently; these may lead to defining
new operating environments or system conditions and are accommodated for in the state
matrix. Note there is no need to define a unique operating environment or system condition
for each new event you wish to recognize. Rather, create a new operating environment or
system condition to represent the general health or business environment that dictates a
change in workload management objectives.
Note: Those migrating from Teradata Database 6.1 can have operating periods migrated into
an equivalent state matrix.
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Defining Event Combinations
Defining Event Combinations
Event combinations can trigger one or more automated workload management actions. These
actions may include activating another operating environment, activating another system
condition, running a program, or acting as a “warning” mechanism or cooperative
management mechanism by writing a Qtable entry for some other application to pick up, or
by sending an alert. Event combinations are defined by creating an expression in the
Rules>System Regulation>New OpEnv Event Combo dialog box.
The following procedures are reproduced here and included in “Chapter 6 Working with
Events and States” on page 99, along with other procedures like editing and deleting states,
system conditions, and operating environments.
To define a state
1
Click Views-> Split View to enable the split view feature. The state matrix displays in the
upper pane as follows:
Figure 31: Initial State Matrix
Perform either of the following in the upper pane:
92
•
Select New Item.
•
Right-click in a system condition cell heading in the table, and select New.
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Chapter 5: Getting Started with the State Matrix
Defining Event Combinations
Alternatively, perform any of the following:
•
Select System Regulation > New State in the Rules menu.
•
Click on System Regulation > States on the DIT, and then select New.
•
Select System Regulation > States on the DIT to access the States view. In the States
view, you can perform either of the following:
•
Select New State.
•
Right-click in the body of the table, and select New.
The New Item dialog box displays.
Figure 32: New Item Dialog Box for New State
2
Select State, if it is not already selected.
3
Enter a state Name and optional Description.
Note: Each operating environment, system condition and state must have a unique name.
4
Select OK to close the dialog box and return to the States view.
5
Select Accept to save or Restore to discard your changes.
To define a system condition
1
To use the split screen feature, click View > Split Views. If no additional system conditions,
operating environments, or states have been defined, the state matrix displays in the upper
pane and the system condition view displays in the lower pane. Note that the lower pane
changes to access the DIT features:
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Defining Event Combinations
Figure 33: Initial State Matrix
Perform either of the following:
•
In the upper pane that shows the state matrix, select New Item.
•
Right-click in a system condition cell heading in the table, and select New.
Alternatively, perform any of the following:
94
•
The default views when first clicking to use the split screen feature shows the system
condition view in the lower pane and the state matrix in the upper pane.
•
Select System Regulation > New SysCon in the Rules menu.
•
Click on System Regulation > System Conditions on the DIT, and select New.
•
Select System Regulation > System Conditions on the DIT. The System Conditions view
displays. In the System Conditions view, you can perform either of the following:
•
Select New SysCon.
•
Right-click in the body of the table, and select New.
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Chapter 5: Getting Started with the State Matrix
Defining Event Combinations
The New Item dialog box displays.
Figure 34: New Item Dialog Box for New System Condition
2
Fill in the fields/controls as follows:
Table 19: New Item Dialog Box Fields/Controls
Field/Control.
Action/Comment
Item Type
Select System Condition, if it is not already selected.
Name
Define the system condition name.
Description
[Optional] Describe the system condition.
Minimum Duration
Set a minimum duration, expressed in seconds, for the
system condition.
If some level of system resources hovers at the values that
activate an event, the state can change each time the level
goes above or below the threshold. To minimize this
effect, the system condition remains active for the
Minimum Duration, even if the event that caused it is no
longer active. If some other event combination causes a
system condition of higher severity, this will happen
immediately.
The default value is the current value of the Event
Interval setting.
3
Select OK to close the dialog box and return to the System Conditions view.
4
Select Accept to save or Restore to discard your changes.
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Defining Event Combinations
To create a new operating environment
1
If you did not yet define system conditions, operating environments, or states, the state
matrix and are in split view mode, the state matrix displays as follows:
Figure 35: Initial State Matrix
Perform either of the following:
•
Select New Item.
•
Right-click in a system condition cell heading in the table, and select New.
Alternatively, perform any of the following:
•
Select System Regulation > New OpEnv in the Rules menu.
•
Right-click on System Regulation > Operating Environments on the DIT, and then
select New.
•
Select System Regulation > Operating Environments on the DIT. The Operating
Environments view displays. In the Operating Environments view, you can perform
either of the following:
•
Select New OpEnv.
•
Right-click in the body of the table, and select New.
The New Item dialog box displays.
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Defining Event Combinations
Figure 36: New Item Dialog Box for New Operating Environment
2
Select Operating Environment, if it is not already selected.
3
Enter an operational environment Name and optional Description.
4
Select OK to close the dialog box and return to the Operating Environments view.
5
Select Accept to save or Restore to discard your changes.
Event Combination Examples
When should event combinations be defined? Here are examples of events:
•
Notifications can be sent to applications which can then send messages to users when long
response times are expected. Given this insight, users can voluntarily defer requests to less
busy time periods. The flow control event or the node-down event are two examples of
events that are suggestive of long response time expectations.
•
Node Down Events degrade system performance. The Node Down Threshold is the
maximum percent of nodes down in a clique. When this threshold is reached an event
combination can be defined to change the system condition which in turn enables a new
state. The new state would have alternative AG weights and with throttle limits on
noncritical work. See Figure 37.
•
Load jobs vary in size. To run efficiently, event combinations can be defined to activate a
particular operating environment. That operating environment would in turn enable a
new state that manages differently when the load is executing. Figure 30 illustrates a load
scenario.
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Defining Event Combinations
Figure 37: User-Defined Business Event - Node Offline Scenario
Before Event
Node
5:30AM
11 12 1
10
2
9
3
8
4
7 6 5
Node
Normal
Caution
Node
Degraded
Operating Environments
Operational Daily
Always
Queries
Loads
Base
State
Caution
State
Degraded
State
Normal
State
Caution
State
Degraded
State
Load
State
Load
State
Load
State
During Event
Node
6:00AM
(Scheduled maintenance
a node is off line.)
Node
Teradata
One Node
Off Line
Node
System
Condition
Normal
Caution
Node
Degraded
Operating Environments
Operational Daily
Always
Queries
Loads
Base
State
Caution
State
Normal
State
Caution
State
Degraded
State
Degraded
State
Load
State
Load
State
Load
State
After Event
Node
8:14AM
(2 hours and 14 ,minutes past start of
scheduled maintenance.)
In Effect at 5:30 am, Sunday night
SysCon = Normal
OpEnv =
Operational Queries
State = Normal State
2513A006
All Nodes
On Line
Node
System
Condition
11 12 1
10
2
9
3
8
4
7 6 5
Scheduled maintenance starts
at 6:00 am
SysCon = Degraded
OpEnv =
Operational Queries
State = Degraded State
2513A008
TDBMS
11 12 1
10
2
9
3
8
4
7 6 5
Node
Node
Node
All Nodes
On Line
System
Condition
Normal
Caution
Degraded
Operating Environments
Operational Daily
Always
Queries
Loads
Base
State
Caution
State
Normal
State
Caution
State
Degraded
State
Degraded
State
Load
State
Load
State
Load
State
Offline Node back online
SysCon = Normal
OpEnv =
Operational Queries
State = Normal State
2513A007
TDBMS
2513A010
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CHAPTER 6
Working with Events and States
Events and states plan for and manage system health (system conditions) and the types of
work you expect the system to perform (operating environment).
For an overview of events and states, see “System Regulation” on page 31.
Review these topics to learn more:
•
“Setting up Events and States” on page 99
•
“Setting up the State Matrix” on page 100
•
“Working With Events” on page 110
•
“Working with Event Combinations” on page 118
Setting up Events and States
Events and states are an important part of managing Teradata DWM rules. It is recommended
that you set up events and states as follows:
1
Define system conditions and operating environments to create a state matrix. See
“Defining System Conditions” on page 100 and “Defining Operating Environments” on
page 103.
2
Define states. See “Defining States” on page 106.
3
Map states to system condition/operating environment pairs on the state matrix. The state
matrix contains system conditions on one axis and operating environment elements on
another axis, and associates system condition/operating environment pairs to states and
their working value set. See “Setting States” on page 109.
4
Set up the events your system will use to determine changes in the system conditions and
operating environments on your system. You can set up the following types of events:
•
System condition events
•
Period events
For more information, see “Working With Events” on page 110 and “Setting up Periods”
on page 113.
5
Set up event combinations. See “Working with Event Combinations” on page 118 for
more information.
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Setting up the State Matrix
6
Set up working values per state per rule, which includes:
•
Enabling filters by state
•
Enabling object throttles by state, as well as specifying session or query limits by state
•
Enabling utility throttles by state, as well as specifying utility limits by state
•
Applying local and global exceptions by operating environment
•
Adjusting SLG parameters by operating environment
•
Setting WD query limits by state
•
Vary Priority Scheduler settings for states
See “Chapter 7 Working with Filters and Throttles” on page 123 and “Chapter 8 Working
with Workload Definitions” on page 163 for more information.
Setting up the State Matrix
To manage system conditions and operating environments, the state matrix must be set up
first. Setting up the state matrix includes:
1
“Defining System Conditions” on page 100
2
“Defining Operating Environments” on page 103 and “Setting up Periods” on page 113
3
“Defining States” on page 106
Note: See Chapter 4: “Getting Started with Teradata DWM,” to learn about the default
configuration and how to migrate PD Sets using Teradata WA.
Defining System Conditions
System conditions are levels of system health. The system conditions you define display on the
state matrix. If you do not define any system conditions, Teradata DWM bases the state on the
default “Normal” system condition.
For more information on defining system conditions, see:
100
•
“To define a system condition” on page 101
•
“To set the order of severity” on page 103
•
“To delete a defined system condition” on page 103
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Chapter 6: Working with Events and States
Setting up the State Matrix
To define a system condition
1
To use the split-screen feature, click View > Split Views. The state matrix displays in the
upper pane and the system condition view displays in the lower pane. Note that the lower
pane changes to access the DIT features:
Figure 38: Initial State Matrix
Perform either of the following:
•
In the upper pane that shows the state matrix, select New Item.
•
Right-click in a system condition cell heading in the table, and select New.
Alternatively, perform any of the following:
•
The default views when first clicking to use the split screen feature shows the system
condition view in the lower pane and the state matrix in the upper pane.
•
Select System Regulation > New SysCon in the Rules menu.
•
Right-click on System Regulation > System Conditions on the DIT, and select New.
•
Select System Regulation > System Conditions on the DIT. The System Conditions view
displays. In the System Conditions view, you can perform either of the following:
•
Select New SysCon.
•
Right-click in the body of the table, and select New.
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Setting up the State Matrix
The New Item dialog box displays.
Figure 39: New Item Dialog Box for New System Condition
2
Fill in the fields/controls as follows:
Table 20: New Item Dialog Box Fields/Controls
Field/Control.
Action/Comment
Item Type
Select System Condition, if it is not already selected.
Name
Define the system condition name.
Note: Each operating environment, system condition
and state must have a unique name.
Description
[Optional] Describe the system condition.
Minimum Duration
Set a minimum duration, expressed in seconds, for the
system condition.
If some level of system resources hovers at the values that
activate an event, the state can change each time the level
goes above or below the threshold. To minimize this
effect, the system condition remains active for the
Minimum Duration, even if the event that caused it is no
longer active. If some other event combination causes a
system condition of higher severity, this will happen
immediately.
The default value is the current value of the Event
Interval setting.
102
3
Select OK to close the dialog box and return to the System Conditions view.
4
Select Accept to save or Restore to discard your changes.
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Chapter 6: Working with Events and States
Setting up the State Matrix
To set the order of severity
After you define all new system conditions, set the order of severity so that Teradata DWM can
determine which system conditions are more important to enforce than others. The highest
number has the highest severity, and displays in the state matrix as the last system condition.
The “Normal” default state is automatically assigned the lowest severity, and displays in the
state matrix as the first system condition. This default severity cannot be changed.
1
In the System Conditions view, select the system condition. The selected system condition
is highlighted.
2
Use the up and down arrows to move the selected system condition.
To delete a defined system condition
1
Perform either of the following:
•
Right-click on System Regulation on the DIT, right-click on the system condition to
delete, and select Delete.
•
In the System Conditions view, perform either of the following:
•
Select the system condition to delete, and select Delete SysCon.
•
Right-click on any cell in the system condition you want to delete, and select Delete.
Note that the default “Normal” system condition cannot be deleted.
2
Select Accept to save or Restore to discard the changes.
If you associated an event combination with a system condition, you cannot delete the system
condition until you delete the event combination.
Defining Operating Environments
An operating environment represents the type of work you expect the system to perform at
any given time. Operating environments you define display in the state matrix. If you want to
change an operating environment based on both periods and other business events, such as
application running, you can create a period event without an operating environment, create
a user-defined (application running) business event, create an operating environment
independent of a period, and then modify the event combination to add the user-defined
operating event. Defining operating environments includes:
•
“To create a new operating environment” on page 104, which display on the state matrix
•
“To set operating environment precedence” on page 105
•
“To delete an operating environment” on page 105
•
“Setting up Periods” on page 113
Note: Periods that you define display as operating environments and as event combinations.
However, operating environments you define do not display as periods or as event
combinations.
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Teradata DWM provides a default “Always” operating environment. You cannot modify or
delete the default operating environment. Teradata DWM uses the default operating
environment when no other operating environment is active. If you define more than one
operating environment, the system adjusts the rules each time a boundary is crossed between
one operating environment and the next.
To create a new operating environment
1
Click on System Regulation on the DIT. If the split-view feature is enabled, the state matrix
and Operating Environment tab displays as follows:
Figure 40: Split View of the State Matrix and Operating Environment tab
Perform either of the following:
•
Select New Item in the upper pane.
•
Right-click in a system condition cell heading in the table, and select New.
Alternatively, perform any of the following:
104
•
Select System Regulation > New OpEnv in the Rules menu.
•
Right-click on System Regulation > Operating Environments on the DIT, and then
select New.
•
Select System Regulation > Operating Environments on the DIT. The Operating
Environments view displays. In the Operating Environments view, you can perform
either of the following:
•
Select New OpEnv.
•
Right-click in the body of the table, and select New.
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The New Item dialog box displays.
Figure 41: New Item Dialog Box for New Operating Environment
2
Select Operating Environment, if it is not already selected.
3
Enter an operational environment Name and optional Description.
Note: Each operating environment, system condition and state must have a unique name.
4
Select OK to close the dialog box and return to the Operating Environments view.
5
Select Accept to save or Restore to discard your changes.
To set operating environment precedence
After you define all your operating environments, you must set the precedence so that
Teradata DWM can determine which operating environments are more important to enforce
than others. The highest number takes the highest precedence, and displays in the state matrix
as the last operating environment on the right.
The “Always” default state is automatically assigned the lowest precedence, and displays in the
state matrix as the first operating environment. You cannot change the default precedence.
1
In the Operating Environments view, select the operating environments. The operating
environments you select is highlighted.
2
Use the up and down arrows to move the selected operating environments.
To delete an operating environment
1
Perform either of the following:
•
Right-click on System Regulation on the DIT, right-click on the system condition you
want to delete, and select Delete.
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•
In the Operating Environments view, perform either of the following:
•
Select the operating environment you want to delete, and select Delete OpEnv.
•
Right-click on any cell in the operating environment you want to delete, and select
Delete.
Note that you cannot delete the default “Always” operating environment.
2
Select Accept to save or Restore to discard your changes.
If you delete a period, and you did not add other events to the event combination that
associates the period and the operating environment with the same name, and you did not
add other event combinations that use the period, the operating environment is deleted with
the period.
Defining States
A state is a complete set of working values for a Rule Set. Each system condition and operating
environment cell of the matrix must be associated with a single state, but states may be
associated with multiple system condition and operating environment pairs.
The default “Base” state represents the state associated with the default operating environment
“Always” and default system condition “Normal,” but you can associate this state with other
system condition/operating environment pairs you define as well.
When you define states, you might, for example, want to define a unique state “maint_wv” to
associate with the nightly maintenace workload mix operating environment “maint,” because it
requires different workload management behaviors. You might want to define another state
“restricted_wv” where too many system components are down (as represented by the system
condition you named “red”), and you want to restrict work if that occurs during the “Always”
operating environment.
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Figure 42: Sample State Matrix
For more information on defining states, see:
•
“To define a state” on page 92
•
“To delete a state” on page 109
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Setting up the State Matrix
To define a state
1
Click on System Regulation on the DIT. If the split-view feature is enabled, the state matrix
displays in the upper pane as follows:
Figure 43: Initial State Matrix
Perform either of the following in the upper pane:
•
Select New Item.
•
Right-click in a system condition cell heading in the table, and select New.
Alternatively, perform any of the following:
108
•
Select System Regulation > New State in the Rules menu.
•
Right-click on System Regulation > States on the DIT, and then select New.
•
Select System Regulation > States on the DIT to access the States view. In the States
view, you can perform either of the following:
•
Select New State.
•
Right-click in the body of the table, and select New.
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The New Item dialog box displays.
Figure 44: New Item Dialog Box for New State
2
Select State, if it is not already selected.
3
Enter a state Name and optional Description.
4
Select OK to close the dialog box and return to the States view.
5
Select Accept to save or Restore to discard your changes.
To delete a state
1
In the States view, select the state.
2
Select Delete State.
OR
Right-click on any cell in a state and select Delete.
Note that you cannot delete the default “Base” state.
3
Select Accept to save or Restore to discard your changes.
Setting States
After you define system conditions, operating environments, and states, you can set the state
at the intersection of each system condition/operating environment pair.
Note that you cannot change the default “Base” state at the intersection of the default “Always”
operating environment and default “Normal” system condition.
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To set states
1
In the System Regulation - State Matrix view, select the state you want to change from the
drop-down.
2
Select Accept to save or Restore to discard your changes.
Working With Events
After you complete the state matrix, you can set up the events that map to the system
conditions and operating environments you defined in the matrix. See:
•
“Setting up Events” on page 110
•
“Setting up Periods” on page 113 for more information on setting up period events
Teradata DWM checks for events regularly at the Event Interval you specified in the Intervals
tab (Settings on the DIT).
Note that several events of the same type, including period events, could be active at the same
time. The result of detecting an individual event on the system is determined by the event in
event combination(s), and subsequently in the activation of an operating environment or
system condition. For more information on event combinations, see “Working with Event
Combinations” on page 118.
Setting up Events
Setting up events includes:
•
Defining new system conditions and user-defined system conditions and operating
environments. See “To define a new event” on page 110.
•
Editing the system condition and user-defined events you created. See “To edit an event
you defined” on page 112.
•
Deleting system condition and user-defined events. See “To delete an event you defined”
on page 113.
To define a new event
1
110
Perform any of the following:
•
Select System Regulation > New Event in the Rules menu.
•
Right-click on System Regulation > Events on the DIT, and select New.
•
Select System Regulation > Events on the DIT. The Events view displays. In the Events
view, perform either of the following:
•
Select New Event.
•
Right-click in the body of the table, and select New.
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The New Event dialog box displays.
Figure 45: New Event Dialog Box
2
Fill in the fields/controls as follows:
Table 21: New Event Dialog Box Fields/Controls
Field/Control.
Action/Comment
Name
Enter the name the event.
Description
Optionally describe the event.
Event Type
Define the type of event and limit:
# of AMPS
• AMP Fatal: Number of AMPs reported as fatal at system startup.
• AWT Limit: Number of AWTs used for MSGWORKNEW and
MSGWORKONE work on an AMP. The levels of these two message
work types are a barometer of the work level for an AMP.
When you select AWT Limit, the # of AMPs field activates for
specifying the number of individual AMPs that must meet or
exceed this criteria. The number of AWTs can be also specified in
the AWT Limit field.
AWT Limit
• Flow Control: Number of AMPs in flow control.
• Gateway Fatal: Number of gateways reported as fatal at system
startup.
• Node Down: Maximum percent of nodes down in a clique.
• PE Fatal: Number of PEs reported as fatal at system startup.
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Table 21: New Event Dialog Box Fields/Controls (continued)
Field/Control.
Action/Comment
Qualification Time
Specify the qualification time in seconds for:
• AWT Limit
• Flow Control
The default value is the current value of the Event Interval setting.
This field does not apply to other event types because they are only
detected at Teradata Database startup, and are either active or inactive
for the entire time Teradata Database is running.
User Defined
Define your own event.
A component or application other than Teradata DWM detects these
events, and Teradata DWM is notified through an API when the event
occurs (becomes active). Teradata DWM may be notified again when
the event becomes inactive. The events you define can have a time-out
period, so if not specifically notified of event deactivation by the
outside component or application, Teradata DWM deactivates the
event at the end of the time-out period. The time-out period is
specified through the API when the event you defined is activated.
Therefore, the time-out period could be changed from one API call to
another. For more information on APIs, see Workload Management
API: PM/API and Open API.
Create Event
Combination
[Optional] Checked by default. After the event has been created, this
option displays the Event Combination and Actions dialog box so the
event conditions can be defined. The newly created event will be added
to the event list. See “To define an event combination” on page 118.
3
Select OK to close the dialog box and return to the Events view.
4
Select Accept to save your changes.
To edit an event you defined
1
In the Events view, select the event you want to edit. The event you select is highlighted.
2
Select Edit Event.
OR
Right-click on any cell in the event and select Edit.
The New Event dialog box displays with controls filled in.
3
Edit controls as appropriate.
4
Select OK to close the dialog box and return to the Events view.
5
Select Accept to save or Restore to discard your changes.
Alternatively, you can double-click on any field for an event except Class and Type, and type in
a new value.
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Working With Events
To delete an event you defined
1
In the Events view, select the event you want to delete. The event you select is highlighted.
2
Select Delete Event.
OR
Right-click on any cell in the event and select Delete.
3
Select Accept to save or Restore to discard your changes.
You cannot delete an event if it is used in an event combination.
Setting up Periods
When you create a period, Teradata DWM optionally creates a corresponding operating
environment and event combination by default. When selected, this allows you to change
working values based on time of day. If you want to change working values based on
something other than time of day, follow the instructions under “Defining Operating
Environments” on page 103. If you want to change an operating environment based on both
periods and other business events, such as application running, you can create a period event
without operating environment, create a user-defined (application running) business event,
create an operating environment independent of a period, and then modify the event
combination to add the user-defined operating event.
Typically, there is a direct relationship between a period event and an operating environment.
However, you can define a period event without an operating environment. This allows you to
combine a period event with a user-defined period event to determine the appropriate
operating environment.
Setting up period events includes:
•
“Creating New Period Events” on page 113
•
“Deleting a Period Event” on page 118
•
“Working with Event Combinations” on page 118
Creating New Period Events
You can define period events to indicate days and times when you would like a period event to
be in effect. If the current time falls in the range of a period event, that event becomes active
(true). When the current time falls outside of that time period, Teradata DWM deactivates the
associated active operating environment, and other active events determine the current
operating environment.
A period event can include:
•
Time of day when the period event begins and ends
•
Days and months when the period event is in effect
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Working With Events
To create a new period event
1
Click System Regulation > Operating Environments > Periods on the DIT. The Periods view
displays.
Figure 46: Split View of the State Matrix and Periods tab
2
Select New Period. The New Period dialog box appears.
Figure 47: New Period Dialog Box
3
Type a new name for Period Name.
Note: You can use alphanumeric, dash (-), underscore (_), and dollar sign ($) characters.
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4
Optionally type descriptive information for Description.
5
If you want to automatically create an operating environment and event combination
when you create the period, verify that Create Operating Environment is selected.
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6
Select OK to close the dialog box. The new operating environment name displays in the
Periods list.
7
Everyday is selected by default, causing the period event to be in effect daily. To specify
particular days of the week:
8
a
Clear Everyday.
b
Select Day of Week.
c
Select each day of the week you want.
To specify days of the month:
a
Clear Everyday. The display changes as in the figure below.
Figure 48: Specifying Month and Day
b
Select the Month/Day option.
c
Select Months... to specify the months you want. The following dialog box displays.
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Figure 49: Select Months Dialog Box
d
Select the months you want, or click Select All to select all the months, and click OK to
close the dialog box and return to the Periods view.
e
Click Days... to specify days for the month(s) you selected. The following dialog box
displays.
Figure 50: Select Days of Month Dialog Box
f
9
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Select the days of the month you want, or click Select All to select all the days, and click
OK to close the dialog box and return to the Periods view.
24 Hours is selected by default, causing the rule to be in effect all hours of the day. To
specify hours of the day:
a
Clear 24 Hours.
b
Enter the starting time in the From box.
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Working With Events
c
Enter the ending time in the To box.
Note the following about setting hours:
•
If the From time is later than the To time, the active time interval wraps around at
midnight.
•
When you define consecutive period events, the To/From times will overlap.
Otherwise, there will be a gap between period events. For example, if you define a
day_batch period event with a From of 09:00 and a To of 17:00, and you want
to define a night_batch period event that begins immediately afterwards, define
the night_batch From as 17:00. If you define a day_batch To as 16:59, and a
night_batch From as 17:00, there will be a one-minute gap before
night_batch begins.
10 Click Wrap Around Midnight to Next Day to wrap the period event around midnight. For
more information, see “Wrap Around Midnight” on page 117.
11 Select Accept to save or Restore to discard your changes.
Note: For a report of period events you defined, right-click Periods and select Show. For more
information, see “Displaying Rule Set Definitions” on page 234.
Wrap Around Midnight
Use Wrap Around Midnight to Next Day to specify a range in time that spans midnight for an
period event to be in effect.
When the From time is greater than the To time, two conceptual time segments are available:
•
Start at midnight until the To time.
•
Start at the From time until midnight.
Additionally, Wrap Around Midnight to Next Day becomes available.
When Wrap Around Midnight to Next Day is not selected, the period event is in effect for
segment 1 and segment 2 on each specified day.
For example, Monday and Tuesday are specified using the Day of Week option. The From text
box has 17:00 and the To text box has 08:00 specified. However, do not select Wrap Around
Midnight to Next Day. That period event is in effect on Monday from midnight until 08:00 and
from 17:00 until 23:59, and on Tuesday from midnight until 08:00 and from 17:00 until 23:59.
When Wrap Around Midnight to Next Day is selected, the period event is in effect for segment 2
on each specified day and for segment 1 on each day following the specified day.
Note: The following day does not need to be specified.
For example, Monday and Tuesday are spiced using the Day of Week option. The From text
box has 17:00 and the To text box has 08:00 specified. Next, select Wrap Around Midnight to
Next Day. That operating environment event is in effect on Monday from 17:00 until
midnight; on Tuesday from midnight until 08:00 and from 17:00 until 23:59; and on
Wednesday from midnight until 08:00.
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Deleting a Period Event
When a period event is deleted, also deleted are any corresponding environments from the
state matrix, and any event (combinations) that are mapped to that period event.
If deleting a period event when no other events were added to the event combination that
associate the period event and the operating environment with the same name, and no other
event combinations that use the period event were added, the operating environment is
deleted with the period event.
To delete a period event
1
Under System Regulation > Operating Environments on the DIT, select Periods.
2
Select the period event in the Periods box.
3
Select Delete Period.
Working with Event Combinations
You can use event combinations to associate a logical combination of events, when evaluated as
true, to one or more automated workload management actions. You can choose action types of
notifications, and/or to set the operating environment or system condition to result in a state
change.
After you define event combinations, Teradata DWM allows you:
•
“To edit event combinations” on page 121
•
“To display event combinations” on page 121
To define an event combination
1
118
Perform any of the following:
•
Select System Regulation > New SysCon Event Combo or System Regulation > New
OpEnv Event Combo in the Rules menu.
•
Right-click System Regulation on the DIT, and then select either New SysCon Event
Combo or New OpEnv Event Combo.
•
Right-click System Regulation > System Condition > Event Combination or System
Regulation > Operating Environments > Event Combination on the DIT, and then select
New.
•
Select System Regulation > System Conditions > Event Combination or System
Regulation > Operating Environments > Event Combination on the DIT to access the
Event Combinations and Actions view. In this view, perform either of the following:
•
Select New Combination.
•
Right-click in the body of the table, and select New.
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The Event Combination and Actions dialog box displays.
Figure 51: Sample Event Combination and Actions Dialog Box
2
Fill in the fields/controls as follows:
Table 22: Event Combination and Actions Fields/Controls
Field/Control.
Action/Comment
Name
Enter the name of the event combination.
Description
Optionally enter a description of the event combination.
Event List
1 Move an event from the Event List box to the Event Combination
New Event
box by double-clicking the event, or by selecting the event and
then selecting the >> button.
Event Combination
Operators
2 [Optional] A new event can be defined at this time. Click New
Event to access the New Event dialog box. See “To define a new
event” on page 110. After adding an event, the Event
Combination and Actions view will refresh to include the new
event.
3 If needed for a more complex set of events, insert an operator by
clicking on the appropriate button, and then select another
event. Use parenthesis to ensure correct evaluation of operators
when defining complex expressions.
4 Repeat the above step until you complete your combination.
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Table 22: Event Combination and Actions Fields/Controls (continued)
Field/Control.
Action/Comment
Include Operating
Environment Events
Typically, system condition event combinations include system
condition events, and operating environment event combinations
include period events. However, if you are creating a new system
condition event combination, you can optionally add period events
by selecting Include Operating Environment Events. This is typically
not advised, but allows you to perform more complex system
management.
You can include period events, even if you do not check this box, by
typing the event name.
This control is only available if you are creating a new system
condition event combination.
Notifications
Select one or more of the following when the event combination
becomes active, inactive, or both:
• Alert: Write to the Teradata Manager alert queue with the
Teradata Manager alert logical action.
• Run Program: Run the program you specify.
• Post to Queue Table: Write the following to the
DBC.SystemQTbl.
• Timestamp when the entry was made
• Name of the event combination that caused the action
• ID of the event combination that caused the action
• Indication of whether the entry was made because the event
combination was activated or deactivated
Note: If a comment is entered, it will be recorded in the
DBC.SystemQTbl table.
These items are always logged to the DBC.TdwmEventLog table.
You must define alerts and programs in Teradata Manager before
you can specify them in Alert and Run Program, respectively.
Change OpEnv or
Change SysCon
Activate an operating environment or system condition when the
event combination becomes active.
Change OpEnv displays for an operating environment event
combination. Change SysCon displays for a system condition event
combination.
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3
Select OK to close the dialog box and return to the Event Combinations and Actions view.
4
Select Accept to save or Restore to discard your changes.
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Working with Event Combinations
To edit event combinations
1
Select System Regulation > System Conditions > Event Combination or System Regulation >
Operating Environments > Event Combination on the DIT. The Event Combinations and
Actions view displays.
2
Select the event combination you want to edit. The event combination you select is
highlighted.
3
Select Edit Combination.
OR
Right-click on any cell in the event combination and select Edit.
The Event Combination and Actions dialog box displays with controls filled in.
4
Edit controls as appropriate.
5
Select OK to close the dialog box and return to the Event Combinations and Actions view.
6
Select Accept to save or Restore to discard your changes.
To display event combinations
Do one of the following:
✔ In the System Regulation - State Matrix view, right-click on an operating environment or
system condition, and then select Details.
✔ Right-click System Regulation > System Conditions > Event Combination or System
Regulation > Operating Environments > Event Combination on the DIT, and then select
Show.
✔ In the System Conditions or Operating Environments view, perform either of the following:
•
Select the event, and then select Details.
•
Right-click on the event, and then select Details.
Event Combination Examples
•
Assume you define an event combination for just the “Batch” operating environment.
When this event combination is active, you direct Teradata DWM to activate the “Batch”
operating environment.
•
Assume you define an event combination of 25% Nodes Migrated OR DualSystem-Down (user-defined event). You direct Teradata DWM to perform the following:
•
Activate the “Yellow” system condition when the event combination becomes active.
•
Write a Q-table entry (an external notification that the system is no longer degraded)
when the event combination becomes inactive.
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CHAPTER 7
Working with Filters and Throttles
Filters and throttles regulate the activity of your database by either rejecting or limiting
requests. You can create, modify, delete, enable, and disable filters and throttles. You can also
activate each Teradata DWM rule category separately to achieve the appropriate level of
database management without incurring unnecessary database overhead.
To learn more about working with filters and throttles, browse through these topics:
•
Controlling Activity with Filters and Throttles
•
About Filters
•
Creating or Modifying a Filter
•
Examples of Creating Filters
•
About Throttles
•
Creating or Modifying a Throttle
•
Associating QueryBand with Filters
•
Granting Bypass Privileges
•
Removing Bypass Privileges
•
Enabling a Filter or Throttle
•
Disabling a Filter or Throttle
•
Deleting a Filter or Throttle
•
Linking Teradata Database Objects to Rules
•
Unlinking Objects from a Rule
Controlling Activity with Filters and Throttles
Following are examples of the different types of rules you can create to examine logon and
query requests, reject or delay query requests, and restrict utilities.
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Table 23: Filter and Throttles
Issue
Solution
Control access to specific query
objects (database or table, for
example).
1 Define an object access filter. See “Creating or Modifying a
Filter” on page 126.
2 Link the query objects you want to restrict. See “Linking
Teradata Database Objects to Rules” on page 154.
Results are based on:
• States when the filter is in effect
• SQL statement type
Control access from specific context
objects (user or account, for
example).
1 Define an object access filter.
Control access from specific context
objects to specific query objects.
1 Define an object access filter.
2 Link the context objects you want to restrict.
2 Link objects you want to restrict.
3 Select Restrict object combinations. See “Defining
Descriptive Attributes” on page 128.
Control runaway queries that:
• Exceed limits on estimated row
counts, processing time
• Involve full table scans
• Require product joins for specific
tables
1 Define a query resource filter, specifying processing limits.
See “Specifying Query Resource Processing Limits” on
page 131.
2 Link the table objects you want to restrict.
To control runaway queries that exceed limits for everyone:
1 Define a query resource filter, specifying processing limits.
2 Select Global Rule - applies to all requests. See “Defining
Descriptive Attributes” on page 128.
Results are based on:
• States when the filter is in effect
• SQL statement type
• Processing time estimated by the Teradata Database
Optimizer
• Answer set size estimated by the Teradata Database
Optimizer for maximum row count
• Scan and join processing determined by the Teradata
Database Optimizer
Set the same limit on how many
sessions and queries can run for
several different users.
1 Define an object throttle with the limits on sessions and
queries.
2 Link the user objects you want to limit.
Results are based on:
• States when the filter is in effect
• SQL statement type
• Current number of active sessions or queries
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Table 23: Filter and Throttles (continued)
Issue
Solution
Limit the maximum number of a
specified utility type that can
simultaneously.
Define a utility throttle, specifying a limit for a specified
utility type. See “Selecting Utility Types” on page 148.
Results are based on:
• States when the filter is in effect
• Current number of active utilities
You can disable a filter or throttle without deleting the rule. If you enabled a rule, you can
enable or disable the rule for the various states you defined (assuming you enabled the use of
the filters or throttles at the Rule Set activation level).
Filters and throttles have default values for any attributes whose values can vary depending on
the state. Teradata DWM allows you to specify the values for these attributes for each state, but
they are optional. If you do not specify state-dependent values for these attributes for a
particular state, Teradata DWM uses the default value when in that state.
For information on the types of SQL requests to which you can apply filters and throttles, see
“Choosing SQL Types” on page 129.
About Filters
You can create two types of filters that can cause Teradata DWM to reject logon and query
requests:
•
“Object Access Filters” on page 125
•
“Query Resource Filters” on page 126
Object Access Filters
Object access filters limit access to all objects associated with the filter. Teradata DWM
immediately rejects session and query requests referencing restricted objects during the states
the filter is enabled.
When you define an object access filter, you can specify that only combinations of issuing and
query objects are restricted. This lets you selectively limit access to the Teradata Database,
tables, macros, and so on. For example, you could create a filter that never allows specific users
access to specific database tables.
Note: When you define object access filters for context objects, the filters apply to logon
requests as well as queries, and prevent users from logging on to the Teradata Database. See
“Context Objects” on page 35 to learn more.
Examples of Object Access Filters
•
Reject all non-SELECT queries that access the INVENTORY_HISTORY table.
•
User C cannot log on to the Teradata Database.
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•
No DML can be performed on Table B.
•
Database T (and all tables/views/macros in it) is not available to all users.
•
Users A and B cannot perform DDL on Table T.
•
No logon or query requests are allowed for non-bypassed users.
Query Resource Filters
Query resource filters limit database resources (for example, estimated row counts, processing
time, and joins) for any issuing object, query object, or object combinations associated with
this type of filter. Teradata DWM rejects queries affected by a rule of this type. Logon requests
are not impacted.
Remember that Teradata DWM checks the query against a query resource rule before the
Teradata Database executes the query. Therefore, Teradata DWM makes comparisons only on
estimated values for row counts and processing time, and not on the actual values associated
with the completion of a query. The actual row counts and CPU and response times of a query
do not effect this rule.
You can also configure how Teradata DWM enforces query resource filters by ignoring
Optimizer estimates below a specified level of confidence. For more information, see
“Defining Global Rule Parameters.”
Examples of Query Resource Filters
•
Table B cannot be involved in a Product Join AND the query cannot return more than 1
million rows.
•
Queries estimated to take longer than 30 minutes cannot run.
•
User A cannot run a query estimated to return more than 1 million rows.
•
Database C cannot be referenced in a query that requires a full table scan of any of its
tables.
Creating or Modifying a Filter
When you create or modify a filter specify the following properties:
•
Common properties (see “Defining Descriptive Attributes” on page 128)
•
The types of SQL requests to which the rule applies (see “Choosing SQL Types” on
page 129)
•
Enable by State
•
Additional filter properties, including:
•
Object combinations and warning mode (see “Defining Descriptive Attributes” on
page 128)
•
Processing limits (see “Specifying Query Resource Processing Limits” on page 131)
After you create the filter, its properties (except for the name or type of filter) can be modified
at any time by selecting the filter in the Rules DIT.
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After you create or modify a filter, you can link any number of objects with the rule. Only
objects linked with a rule are limited by the rule. You can link or unlink objects to /from any
filter or object throttle at any time. See “Linking Teradata Database Objects to Rules” on
page 154 to learn how to link objects to a rule. See “Unlinking Objects from a Rule” on
page 155 to learn how to unlink objects from a rule.
You must save and activate the Teradata DWM Rule Set to put these changes into effect. See
“Saving and Activating a Rule Set” on page 232 to learn how.
Choosing a Filter Type
You can create a filter or throttle from the Rules menu or Rules DIT.
To create a new filter
1
Open Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager and connect to the tdwm database. See
“Launching Teradata DWM” on page 47 to learn how.
2
Select one of these options from the Rules menu:
•
Filter > Create > Object Access Rule
•
Filter > Create > Query Resource Rule
OR, in the Rules DIT:
•
Right-click on Filter, and select either New Object Access or New Query Resource.
OR, in the Rules DIT:
•
Under Filter, right-click on either Object Access or Query Resource, and select New.
A dialog box opens with the Description tab selected by default.
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Figure 52: Sample Rule Dialog Box
Note: The name in the title bar of the Rule dialog box and the available tabs vary based on
the type of rule you are creating or modifying.
Rule
Dialog Box Name
Description
Tab
SQL
Tab
By
State
Other (as shown)
Object access
filter
Object Access Rule
X
X
X
not applicable
Query resource
filter
Query Resource Rule
X
X
X
Query Resource
Defining Descriptive Attributes
Use this tab to set common rule properties.
To define descriptive attributes for a filter
1
In the Description tab, set the following standard properties for a filter.
Table 24: Description Tab Fields/Controls
128
Field/Control
Action/Comment
Name
Enter up to 30 characters for the name of the rule. You can use
alphanumeric, dash (-), underscore (_), and dollar sign ($).
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Table 24: Description Tab Fields/Controls (continued)
Field/Control
Action/Comment
Description
(Optional) Enter up to 50 characters to explain the function of the
rule.
Rule Type
(Read only) Displays the rule type based on the commands you
used on the Rules menu.
Restrict object
combinations
Select this control to restrict users' access to all tables, views, or
macros, for example.
This control is only available when you associate context and query
objects with the rule. See “Linking Teradata Database Objects to
Rules” for details.
Global Rule - applies to all
requests
Select this control to apply global filters to all objects, and as a
result to all logon and/or query requests that meet the criteria of the
rule.
Because a global rule automatically applies to all Teradata Database
objects, you cannot associate individual objects with the rule.
For example, with a global filter rule, you could count all of the
queries on the Teradata Database system (except for bypassed
objects), depending on the SQL Type and other attributes.
Caution: A global object access rule rejects all of the specified
statement type requests except those from the DBC user
and any bypassed objects.
Warning Mode (Do not reject If you want to see the effects of a filter before you permanently
Query - Log Only
enable it, you can define it as operating in a warning mode.
When a rule is in a warning mode, the following events occur:
• Queries are evaluated as if the rule is in normal mode
• Errors are logged only for queries that would potentially be
rejected
• A error status code or message is not returned to the end-user
2
Select OK (if you are creating a new filter) or Accept (if you are modifying an existing
filter) to accept your settings.
Choosing SQL Types
Teradata DWM considers all SQL requests to be one of the following types of SQL statements:
•
DDL
•
DML (Insert, Update, Delete)
•
SELECT
•
ALL (all types plus DCL, miscellaneous, and logons)
For object throttles, specify the types of SQL requests to which the rule applies and then
associate one or more database objects with each throttle. Teradata DWM applies SQL type
rules only when the request is one of the types of SQL statements specified in the rule.
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Note that the Parser component of the Teradata Database determines the specific type of SQL
statement(s) that are included in a request. Teradata DWM then translates the specific
statement type into one of the following categories as are used in the rules: DDL, DML,
SELECT, and ALL other SQL statements. The order in which these categories are listed is the
precedence with which they are treated by Teradata DWM. When there are multiple SQL
statements (with multiple statement types) in a request, Teradata DWM uses the one that
maps into the highest precedence. That is, a multi-statement request with one DDL statement
is treated as a DDL request, no matter what other kinds of SQL statements are in the request.
To specify the type of SQL request managed by a filter
1
Select the SQL tab. SQL controls display as follows.
Figure 53: SQL Tab
130
2
The default is ALL. To choose other options, clear ALL and select one or more other types
as appropriate.
3
Select OK (if you are creating a new filter) or Accept (if you are modifying an existing
filter) to accept your settings.
4
Continue with “Specifying Query Resource Processing Limits” if you are creating or
modifying a query resource filter.
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Specifying Query Resource Processing Limits
When you create or modify a query resource filter, you must specify limits onTeradata
Database resources.
To set processing limits on query resource filters
1
Select the Query Resource tab. A view similar to the following displays.
Figure 54: Query Throttle Params Tab
2
Fill in the fields/controls as follows.
Table 25: Query Resource Tab Fields/Controls
Field/Control
Action/Comments
Apply Properties
Select OR to specify that the rule is triggered by any one of the
specified conditions.
Select AND to specify that the rule is triggered only when all of
the specified conditions are met.
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Table 25: Query Resource Tab Fields/Controls (continued)
Field/Control
Action/Comments
Maximum Row Count and
Rows
1 Specify the maximum estimated row count allowed for any
step in a query.
For comparison, Teradata DWM uses the maximum of the
estimated number of rows (of sufficient confidence)
processed by ANY step in the execution plan.
The default value is zero, which means the row count estimate
is not used in processing the rule.
Note: Define the minimum level of confidence you want to
use in the Estimates tab of the Settings dialog box.
2 Define the row count as one of the following values:
•
•
•
•
Final Row Count and Rows
Rows
Thousand Rows
Million Rows
Billion Rows
1 Specify the estimated answer set size of a query.
For comparison, Teradata DWM uses the last, non-zero,
estimated number of rows processed in the execution plan. If
this estimate is of insufficient confidence, Teradata DWM
uses a value of zero.
2 Define the row count as one of the following values:
•
•
•
•
Maximum Processing Time
Rows
Thousand Rows
Million Rows
Billion Rows
Enter the hours, minutes, seconds, and centiseconds you
estimate as the greatest amount of time a query is allowed to run.
Note that this value does not represent an estimated response
time, or any other recognizable time estimate. Instead, it is a selfrelative figure that is normalized by the Optimizer for the
current system configuration in a non-busy state.
For comparison, Teradata DWM uses the sum of the estimated
processing times (of sufficient confidence) for all steps in the
execution plan.
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Table 25: Query Resource Tab Fields/Controls (continued)
Field/Control
Action/Comments
Restricted Table Joins
Select the type of table joins you want to restrict from one of the
following items:
• None: Allow all joins.
• All Joins: Teradata DWM detects this condition for tables
associated with a join step.
• Product Joins: Teradata DWM detects this condition for tables
associated with a join step AND the join-mode is one of the
product join modes.
• Unconstrained Product Joins: Teradata DWM detects this
condition for tables associated with a join step AND the joinmode is one of the product join modes AND there are no
constraint instructions.
No Full Table Scans Allowed
Select this control to restrict full table (all row) scans while a
query is running. Clear the check box to allow full table (all row)
scans while a query is running.
Teradata DWM detects this condition for tables when the readmode of a table is All-Rows AND the partition indicator is zero
(that is, the full table scan is not just for a single partition of a
partitioned table).
3
Select OK (if you are creating a new query resource filter) or Accept (if you are modifying
an existing query resource filter) to accept your settings.
4
Go to “Enabling by State” on page 137 to learn how to enable filters and throttles by state.
Examples of Creating Filters
The following scenarios may assist you in defining filters.
Scenario 1
You administer the NewProducts development database, which many users with different
levels of expertise can access.
Sam is learning how to write SQL and has negatively impacted system performance on
multiple occasions due to his inexperience.
You want to create a rule to prohibit Sam from running a query on the NewProducts database
that takes longer than 15 minutes to process:
1
From the Rules menu, select Filter > Create > Query Resource Rule. The Query Resource
Rule dialog box opens.
a
On the Description tab, enter a rule name and description in the Name and Description
boxes.
b
Verify the ALL (default) setting on the SQL tab.
c
On the Query Resource tab, enter 15:00 in Maximum Processing Time.
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d
2
Select OK to close the Query Resource Rule dialog box and return to the Teradata
Dynamic Workload Manager.
In the Database Browser:
a
Open the Database Browser and locate Sam in the browser DIT.
b
Drag-and-drop Sam on your new rule in the Rules DIT.
c
Locate the NewProducts database in the browser DIT.
d
Drag-and-drop the NewProducts object on your new rule.
Both Sam and the NewProducts database appear in the Objects DIT to the left of the tabs
in the Properties pane when you click your 15-minute query rule.
3
On the Description tab, select Restrict object combination. Click Accept.
4
From the Rules menu, choose Filter > Enable.
OR
Right-click the filter in the Rules DIT to open a shortcut menu, and then choose Enable.
5
Save and activate your Rule Set. See “Saving and Activating a Rule Set” on page 232 to
learn how.
Scenario 2
The users in the finance division adversely impact system performance by generating large
financial reports during work hours (Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.).
The queries that generate these reports access the NewProducts development database, which
prompts complaints from the developers.
There are dozens of finance division users, whose logons are prefixed with fn_.
You want to create a rule to limit the Finance division from accessing the NewProducts
database during work hours:
1
Use Teradata Administrator to create a profile that includes all the fn_ users. See Teradata
Administrator User Guide for instructions.
2
Open Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager.
3
Under System Regulation on the Rules DIT, select Periods.
4
a
Select New Period, and create a period named WorkHours.
b
Clear Everyday.
c
Select Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday.
d
Clear the 24 Hours check box.
e
Enter 08:00 for From and 17:00 for To.
f
Select Accept to accept your changes.
From the Rules menu, select Filter > Create > Object Access Rule. The Object Access Rule
dialog box opens.
a
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Enter a rule name and description in the Name and Description boxes.
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5
b
Select the Restrict object combinations check box.
c
Select OK to close the Object Access Rule dialog box and return to the Teradata
Dynamic Workload Manager.
In the Database Browser:
a
Locate the Finance profile in the Database DIT.
b
Drag-and-drop Finance on your new rule in the Rule DIT.
c
Locate the NewProducts database.
d
Drag-and-drop the NewProducts database on your newly created rule.
Both Finance and the NewProducts database appear in the frame to the left of the tabs in
the Properties pane when you click your new rule.
6
From the Rules menu, choose Filter > Enable.
OR
Right-click the filter in the Rules DIT to open a shortcut menu, and then choose Enable.
7
Save and activate your Rule Set. See “Saving and Activating a Rule Set” on page 232 to
learn how.
Scenario 3
You want to prohibit queries with table joins involving the Teradata.employee table that take
longer than one hour to execute during weekdays:
1
Open Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager.
2
Under System Regulation on the Rules DIT, select Periods.
3
4
a
Select New Period, and create a period named Weekdays.
b
Clear Everyday.
c
Select Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday.
d
Select Accept to accept your changes.
From the Rules menu, select Filter > Create > Query Resource Rule. The Query Resource
Rule dialog box opens.
a
Enter a rule name and description in the Name and Description boxes.
b
On the Query Resource tab, select AND.
c
Enter 1:00:00 for Maximum Processing Time.
d
Select All Joins for Restricted Table Joins.
e
Click OK to close the Query Resource Rule dialog box and return to the Teradata
Dynamic Workload Manager.
Open the Database Browser:
a
Locate the Teradata.employee table in the browser hierarchy.
b
Drag-and-drop the Teradata.employee table on your new rule in the Rule DIT.
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The Teradata.employee table appears in the frame to the left of the tabs in the
Properties pane when you click your new rule.
5
From the Rules menu, choose Filter > Enable.
OR
Right-click the filter in the Rules DIT to open a shortcut menu, and then choose Enable.
6
Save and activate your Rule Set. See “Saving and Activating a Rule Set” on page 232 to
learn how.
Scenario 4
You wants to prohibit all users from running the Teradata.ResMem macro during the last
week of every month.
1
Open Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager.
2
Under System Regulation on the Rules DIT, select Periods.
a
Select New Period, and create a period named ResMemMacro.
b
Clear Everyday.
c
Select Month/Day.
d
Enter 1-12 for Months.
OR
Select Months, select Select All, and then select OK.
e
Enter 23-31 for Days.
OR
Select Days, select 23 through 31, and then select OK.
f
3
4
Select Accept to accept your changes.
From the Rules menu, select Filter > Create > Object Access Rule. The Object Access Rule
dialog box opens.
a
Enter a rule name and description in the Name and Description boxes.
b
Click OK to close the Object Access Rule dialog box and return to the Teradata
Dynamic Workload Manager.
Open the Database Browser:
a
Locate the Teradata.ResMem macro in the browser DIT.
b
Drag-and-drop the Teradata.ResMem macro on your new rule in the Rules DIT.
The Teradata.ResMem macro appears in the frame to the left of the tabs in the Properties
pane when you click your new rule.
5
From the Rules menu, choose Filter > Enable.
OR
Right-click the filter in the Rules DIT to open a shortcut menu, and then choose Enable.
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6
Save and activate your Rule Set. See “Saving and Activating a Rule Set” on page 232 to
learn how.
Enabling by State
You can specify whether or not Teradata DWM enables filters or throttles for each state
defined (see “To define a state” on page 92). Enable by default when creating or modifying a
filter.
After enabling filters and throttles by state, go to “Linking Teradata Database Objects to Rules”
to learn how to link Teradata Database objects with a rule.
To enable a filter by state
1
Select the Enable By State tab. A view similar to the following displays.
Figure 55: Sample Enable By State View
2
Enable is automatically selected for the Default state.
a
Uncheck Enable to disable the rule by default.
b
Select Override for the state in which the enabled condition from the default.
c
To differ from the default setting, check or uncheck Enable for each state.
To disable the state, deselect Enable.
3
Select OK (for a new filter) or Accept (for a filter you already created).
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To view a filter you enabled by state
1
In the Properties pane, select the Enable By State tab.
2
Select the Enable column.
3
Select Matrix View. A view-only dialog box displays the filter in a state matrix view.
Note: If you select the Override column, you cannot select Matrix View.
About Throttles
Throttles limit the number of active sessions, query requests, or utilities on your Teradata
Database. When the limit is reached, new queries are put in a FIFO delay queue until an active
query finishes. This alleviates congestion and blocking so there is greater throughput and
predictable response times.
System-level session and query throttling are created on user, account, profile, database, table,
or Performance Group (PG) objects. Performance Group Limits are ignored when workloads
are enabled. In workloads, this functionality is replaced by having throttle (limits) on queries
within a workload.
There are two kinds of throttles:
•
Object Throttles, which limit how many sessions or queries can run for specified objects
•
Utility Throttles, which limit how many utilities can run
Object Throttles
Object throttles limit the number of logon sessions and/or queries active for particular
Teradata Database objects. Teradata DWM rejects sessions that exceed the limit, and either
rejects or delays queries that exceed the limit and cannot be immediately processed. See
“Specifying Query Throttle Params” to learn how.
You can define object throttles that apply to most types of Teradata Database objects. You can
associate any type of object with a throttle rule. If more than one object throttle applies to an
object, Teradata DWM uses the throttle with the lowest limit.
You can also configure how Teradata DWM enforces object throttles by ignoring Optimizer
estimates below a specified level of confidence. For more information, see “Defining Global
Rule Parameters.”
Note the following:
•
You can set the throttle limit for queries to zero. This essentially stops new queries from
starting until the throttle limit is raised. This can be a useful strategy in some
environments.
If the requests running in a particular WD are likely to contain multi-statement
transactions, be aware of the potential for blocking caused by a low throttle limit defined
on the WD. When you set the throttle limit for queries to a small number (for example,
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1-3), a running query may be blocked by a session whose query is delayed by Teradata
DWM. That is, when one session holds a lock on a database or table and a query running
in another session needs that lock, the first session blocks the query in the second session.
If a query from the first session is on the Teradata DWM delay queue, it may be quite a
while before it can run (depending on the throttle limit, for example). Meanwhile, the
query running in the second session cannot proceed.
Teradata DWM receives an indication, based on the Exception Interval you set, of sessions
that are blocking other running queries. You can set Teradata DWM to ignore or to process
these blocking indications (based on the BlockCycles). Teradata DWM examines the
entries in the delay queue to determine whether any of the delayed queries are running in
sessions that are blockers. Teradata DWM always logs the occurrence, and you can also set
it (using Block Action) to abort the delayed query, or let the delayed query run.
See “Defining Global Rule Parameters” on page 223 for information on setting Exception
Interval, Block Cycles, and Block Action.
•
Teradata DWM ignores object throttles for PGs when WDs are active.
Note: Uncheck Throttle ALL-AMP Queries Only to include single-AMP queries in the throttle
limit.
For information on the types of SQL requests to which you can apply object throttles, see
“Choosing SQL Types” on page 129.
Examples of Object Throttles
•
No more than 10 queries from user MSI may run at one time.
•
User A cannot have more than five simultaneous sessions on the entire Teradata Database.
•
Account SALES cannot have more than 4 simultaneous queries running on the entire
Teradata Database.
•
Table T1 cannot have any DML queries running on the entire Teradata Database.
Asynchronous Operations and Throttle Limits
There is a brief period where the number of running requests may exceed the throttle limit
following a Rule Set change. Throttle limits are evaluated and enforced following a Rule Set
change or activation, either manual or automatic. This process involves asynchronous
operations by all the dispatchers in the Teradata Database system (there is one dispatcher for
each PE Vproc). The dispatcher tasks operate independently by evaluating the number of
requests it has running, the number of requests it has delayed and the new throttle limit.
Here is an example:
•
A Rule Set change or Rule Set activation occurs, changing the throttle limit from three to
four.
•
The delayed queues are emptied, sending all delayed queries back to the dispatchers to be
re-evaluated.
•
If Dispatcher 1 has one running request, this dispatcher will count the one running request
but then could accept three queries from the delay queue in order to match the defined
throttle value of four. The problem can arise when Dispatcher2 (which may run next) has
two active requests. Dispatcher 2 knows there are four running requests but must allow its
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running requests to continue, sending the active running count to six, which is over the
defined throttle value.
Teradata DWM responds to this situation by not allowing any more queries to start. The
throttle limit of four will be enforced after the active number of queries subsides to four.
When Object Throttle Limits are in Effect
Teradata DWM maintains a throttle limit counter for each object and rule combination.
When there are multiple object throttle rules in effect that pertain to the same object, the
throttle limit for each of these counters represents the throttle limit for one particular set of
rule parameters.
For example, if the following rules are in effect:
•
Rule 1, step time threshold = 3, limit = 2, for User A
•
Rule 2, step time threshold =1, limit = 4, for User A
If User A issues three queries when the step threshold times greater than three, then both
Rule1 and Rule 2 will apply, and Teradata DWM will maintain the throttle limits for both Rule
1 and Rule 2.
Viewing Filter or Throttle Information
Teradata DWM allows you to display information about filters and throttles to the screen, save
it to a text file, or send it to a printer. For details, see “Displaying Rule Set Definitions.”
Utility Throttles
Utility throttles control how many utilities simultaneously run on a Teradata Database at any
given time. You can specify a throttle rate (limit) for each utility option (FastLoad + MultiLoad,
Fastload, Multiload, FastExport, and Archive/Restore). The throttling rate you set for the
FastLoad +MultiLoad option overrides the MaxLoadTasks value; you don’t need to change it
using the DBS Control Utility. See Utilities to learn more about the DBS Control Utility.
Because utility throttles apply only to the type and number of utilities running on the Teradata
Database, you cannot associate Teradata Database objects with them.
Creating or Modifying a Throttle
When you create or modify or throttle, you can specify the following properties:
•
Common properties (see “Defining Descriptive Attributes” on page 142)
•
The types of SQL requests to which the rule applies (not available for utility throttles) (see
“Choosing SQL Types” on page 129)
•
Enable by default (see “Enabling by State” on page 137)
•
Additional throttle properties, including:
•
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Collective throttling and limiting users (see “Defining Descriptive Attributes” on
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•
Limits on logon and queries requests (see “Specifying Query Throttle Params” on
page 145)
•
Type of utility (see “Selecting Utility Types” on page 148)
After you create the throttle, you can modify its properties (except for the name or type of
throttle) at any time by selecting the throttle in the Rules DIT.
After you create or modify an object throttle, you can link any number of objects with the rule.
Only objects linked with a rule are limited by the rule. You can link or unlink objects to or
from an object throttle at any time. See “Linking Teradata Database Objects to Rules” on
page 154 to learn how to link objects to a rule. See “Unlinking Objects from a Rule” on
page 155 to learn how to unlink objects from a rule.
You must save and activate the Teradata DWM Rule Set to put these changes into effect. See
“Saving and Activating a Rule Set” on page 232 to learn how.
Choosing a Throttle Type
You can create a filter or throttle from the Rules menu or Rules DIT.
To create a new throttle
1
Open Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager and connect to the tdwm database. See
“Launching Teradata DWM” on page 47 to learn how.
2
Select one of these options from the Rules menu:
•
Throttles > Create > Object Throttle Rule
•
Throttles > Create > Utilities Rule
OR, in the Rules DIT:
•
Right-click on Throttle, and select either New Object Throttle or New Utilities.
OR, in the Rules DIT:
•
Under Throttle, right-click on either Object Throttle or Utilities, and select New.
A dialog box opens with the Description tab selected by default.
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Figure 56: Sample Rule Dialog Box
Note: The name in the title bar of the Rule dialog box and the available tabs vary based on
the type of rule you are creating or modifying.
Rule
Dialog Box Name
Description
Tab
Object throttle
Object Throttle Rule
X
Utility throttle
Utility Rule
X
SQL
Tab
Values
By
State
X
X
Other (as shown)
Query Throttle
Params
X
Defining Descriptive Attributes
Use this tab to set common rule properties.
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To define descriptive attributes for a throttle
1
In the Description tab, set the following standard properties for a throttle.
Table 26: Description Tab Fields/Controls
Field/Control
Action/Comment
Name
Enter up to 30 characters for the name of the rule. You can use
alphanumeric, dash (-), underscore (_), and dollar sign ($).
Description
(Optional) Enter up to 50 characters to explain the function of the
rule.
Rule Type
Select the option button corresponding to how throttle limits will
be applied to objects and users:
Individual: Throttle all
objects Individually
Collective: Single limit for
all associated objects
Members: Separate limit for
users associated with
objects
Individual Select this control to apply throttle limits to each
database object individually. This is the default setting.
Collective Select this control to apply a single throttle limit to all
objects associated with the rule collectively (as a group), and not to
each object individually.
For example, if you associate users George, Carmen, and Jack with
an object throttle with a collective limit of five queries, this group of
users can not actively run more than five queries at the same time.
Members Select this control to apply limits to all users who are
members of, or are associated with, objects (account, profile, or
PG, for example) that are associated with the rule. A limit applies to
each member individually. For example, a limit of five on an
account with five users means each usr can have five queries
running.
For example, if users George, Carmen, and Jack are associated with
an object throttle with a limit of five queries, George, Carmen and
Jack can each run no more than five queries, possibly being able to
run fifteen queries at the same time.
Global: Single limit for all
requests
Global Select this control to apply object throttles to all objects, and
as a result to all logon and/or query requests that meet the criteria
of the rule.
Because a global rule automatically applies to all Teradata Database
objects, you cannot associate individual objects with the rule.
For example, with a global object throttle rule, you could count all
of the queries on the Teradata Database system (except for bypassed
objects), depending on the SQL Type and other attributes.
Caution: A global object access rule throttles all of the specified
statement type requests except those from the DBC user
and any bypassed objects.
Caution: Global object access rules and global object throttle rules
could effect a significant number of queries.
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2
Select OK (if you are creating a new throttle) or Accept (if you are modifying an existing
throttle) to accept your settings.
Choosing SQL Types
Note: If you are creating or modifying a utility throttle, skip this topic and go to “Selecting
Utility Types.”
Teradata DWM considers all SQL requests to be one of the following types of SQL statements:
•
DDL
•
DML (Insert, Update, Delete)
•
SELECT
•
ALL (all types plus DCL, miscellaneous, and logons)
For object throttles, specify the types of SQL requests to which the rule applies and then
associate one or more of these kinds of SQL with each throttle. Teradata DWM applies SQL
type rules only when the request is one of the types of SQL statements specified in the rule.
Note the following:
144
•
Because you can specify whether an object throttle rule applies to logon or query requests,
the SQL type applies only to query requests. You do not need to specify the ALL SQL type
to limit logon requests.
•
The Parser component of the Teradata Database determines the specific type of SQL
statement(s) that are included in a request, and only saves the SQL type of the last
statement in the request. Teradata DWM checks requests within the Dispatcher
component of the Teradata Database after the Parser finishes processing a request, and
accesses the SQL type saved by the Parser. Therefore, for a multi-statement request,
Teradata DWM is only aware of the SQL type of the last statement in the request.
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To specify the type of SQL request managed by a throttle
1
Select the SQL tab. SQL controls display as follows.
Figure 57: SQL Tab
2
The default is ALL. To choose other options, clear ALL and select one or more other types
as appropriate.
3
Select OK (if you are creating a new object throttle) or Accept (if you are modifying an
existing object throttle) to accept your settings.
4
Go to “Specifying Query Throttle Params” on page 145 if you are creating or modifying a
throttle.
Specifying Query Throttle Params
When you create or modify an object throttle, you can specify additional limits in the Object
Throttling Limits tab in the Object Throttling Rule dialog box.
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To set query throttle params
1
Select the Query Throttle Params tab. A view similar to the following displays.
Figure 58: Query Throttle Params Tab
2
Fill in the fields/controls as follows.
Table 27: Query Throttle Params Controls
Field/Control
Action/Comment
Only limit queries with Step
Time Threshold
[Optional] Step time threshold is the value that will trigger an
object throttle. The value entered is compared against the value the
optimizer has estimated for each step. If any step estimate exceeds
the step time threshold value, the query will be subject to
throttling.
The following examples illustrate how the step time threshold
value is used:
• If the step time threshold is 100 and the longest step is 80, then
the query will be exempt from the rule.
• If the step time threshold is 100 and at least one step is greater
than or equal to 100, then the query will be controlled by the
rule.
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Table 27: Query Throttle Params Controls (continued)
Field/Control
Action/Comment
Disable Object Throttling
Rule Override
Select Disable Object Throttling Rule Override to specify that you
cannot override (abort or execute) any queries delayed by this rule.
Teradata DWM will only de-queue the query when all throttle
limits that apply to the query are satisfied.
Caution: You cannot manually manipulate queries affected by
this override.
Object throttles created by Replication Services (RS) use this
option to disable queries prohibited from executing against certain
replicated tables.
Throttle All-AMP Queries
Only
Select Throttle All-AMP Queries Only to limit object throttles to AllAMP queries.
When you select this control, at least one step in the step plan that
performs database access needs to involve all of the AMPs.
Otherwise, the rule does not apply to the query. The steps that
have the most overhead always involve all of the AMPs, but the
converse is not always true. Some all-AMP steps are very quick.
In some replication situations, RS dynamically creates object
throttles against replicated tables. RS does not want any requests to
be performed against its tables, so the All-AMP condition is not
specified.
3
Select OK (if you are creating a new object throttle) or Accept (if you are modifying an
existing object throttle) to accept your settings.
4
Go to “Linking Teradata Database Objects to Rules” to learn how to link Teradata
Database objects with a rule.
Example of Creating an Object Throttle
Assume you want to specify that application ABC cannot have more than three all-AMP
queries running concurrently that are estimated to take more than one minute of processing
time, and you want to reject any over-limit queries. To create an object throttle for this
scenario, follow these steps:
1
From the Rules menu, select Throttles > Create > Object Throttle Rule. The Object Throttling
Rule dialog box opens.
2
On the Description tab, enter Application ABC concurrency limit for Name.
3
On the Query Throttle Params tab:
a
Specify a one minute Step Time Threshold.
b
Select Disable Object Throttling Rule Override.
c
Select Throttle All-AMP Queries Only.
4
On the Values By State tab, enable the throttle for the Base state.
5
Click OK to close the Object Throttling Rule dialog box and return to the Teradata
Dynamic Workload Manager.
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6
From the Rules menu, choose Throttles > Enable.
OR
Right-click the throttle in the Rules DIT, and choose Enable.
7
Link the application to the rule. See “Linking Teradata Database Objects to Rules” on
page 154.
8
Save and activate the rule. See “Saving and Activating a Rule Set” on page 232.
Selecting Utility Types
To select the utility type limited by a utility throttle
1
Select the Description tab in the Utility Rule dialog box.
Figure 59: Utility Tab
2
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Fill in the fields or controls as follows.
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Table 28: Utility Throttle Fields/Controls
Field/Control
Action/Comment
Type
Select one of the following to specify the type of utility limited by the rule:
•
•
•
•
•
Limit
FastLoad + MultiLoad
FastLoad
MultiLoad
FastExport
Archive/Restore
Enter the maximum number of the specified type of utility that can
simultaneously run based on the state(s) you defined.
The limit you set here overrides the MaxLoadTasks value set using the DBS
Control Utility.
Maximum concurrency limits are:
•
•
•
•
•
FastLoad: 30
MultiLoad: 30
FastLoad+MultiLoad: 30
FastLoad+MultiLoad+FastExport: 60
Archive/Restore: 350
Example of Creating a Utility Throttle
Assume you want to allow a maximum of 30 concurrent MultiLoad jobs, and you want to
reject any new MultiLoad jobs exceeding this limit.
1
From the Rules menu, select Throttles > Create > Utilities Rule. The Utility Rule dialog box
opens.
2
On the Description tab, type MultiLoad concurrency Limit for Name. The
Description is optional.
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Figure 60: Utility Rule Dialog Box
3
On the Utility Type menu, select MultiLoad in the Utility Type list.
4
Click the Utility Limits By State tab.
Figure 61: Utility Limit By State Tab
5
6
150
For the Default row:
a
A Limit of 30 is the default. Optionally, this value can be changed.
b
Select Reject.
Select Accept to close the Utility Rule dialog box and return to Teradata DWM.
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7
Enable the rule. In the Rules DIT, right-click on the utility name to access the shortcut
menu. Click Enable.
8
Save the rule. Click Rules > Rule Sets > Save to Database.
9
Activate the Rule Set. See “Saving and Activating a Rule Set” on page 232.
Enabling by State
You can specify whether or not Teradata DWM enables filters or throttles for each state
defined (see “To define a state” on page 92). Enable by default when creating or modifying a
filter or throttle.
After enabling filters and throttles by state, go to “Linking Teradata Database Objects to Rules”
to learn how to link Teradata Database objects with a rule.
To enable an object throttle by state
1
Select the Values by State tab. A view similar to the following displays.
Figure 62: Sample Values by State for an Object Throttle
2
There is no explicit Enable by Default for throttles. If either Unlimited Sessions or Unlimited
Queries is unchecked, then the throttle is enabled.
3
Fill in the fields or controls. Table 29 details all the fields.
4
Select OK (for a new throttle) or Accept (for a throttle you already created).
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Table 29: Values By State Tab
Field/Control
Description
Override Defaults
Provides the ability to override default settings for each
state. When checked, activates the Unlimited Sessions,
Unlimited Queries, and Reject columns.
Unlimited Sessions and Unlimited
Queries
When checked, the throttle will be applied during all
sessions and for all queries. If unchecked, the Session Limit
and Query Limit columns activate.
Session Limit and Query Limit
Set the number of sessions and the number of queries for
throttling. These values become part of the throttle
whenever it is enabled. Enter the maximum number of
sessions or queries that can simultaneously run when the
state is active.
Query Limit
To determine if a block has occurred or how to
troubleshoot blockers, see Database Administration. Refer
Warning: Defining query limits of
two or less can result in to Database Design and Performance Management to learn
blocks between needed about preventing blocks in the Teradata environment
locks and requests being using SQL features, query structure, or DBS/PDE control
record parameters.
held by Teradata DWM.
Reject
Reject queries for a state.
You must select Override Default to activate this field for a
state.
Matrix View
152
For viewing the throttle settings for each operating
environment and system condition, highlight a column
and click Matrix View.
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To enable a utility throttle by state
1
Select the Values by State tab. A view similar to the following displays.
Figure 63: Sample Values by State for a Utility Throttle
2
On the Description tab, click Override Defaults for the state you want enable.
If you did not select Enable By State on the Description tab:
a
Select Override Defaults for the state you want enable.
b
Select Enable for the state you want enable.
To disable the state and deactivate the Utility Limit field, deselect Enable.
3
In the Utility Limit field, enter the maximum number of the specified type of utility that can
simultaneously run when the state is active. You can enter a value from zero up to the
Teradata Database value of 60. The limit you set here overrides the MaxLoadTasks value
set using the DBS Control Utility.
The maximum concurrency limits are:
4
•
FastExport: 60
•
FastLoad+MultiLoad, FastLoad, or MultiLoad: 30
•
Archive/Restore: 350
Select OK (for a new throttle) or Accept (for a throttle you already created).
To view throttles you enabled by state
1
In the Properties pane, select the Values By State tab.
2
Select a column that contains check boxes or numbers.
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3
Select Matrix View. A view-only dialog box displays information for the throttle column in
a state matrix view.
Note: If the Override Defaults column is selected, the Matrix View cannot be selected.
Linking Teradata Database Objects to Rules
In most cases, Teradata Database objects are associated with a rule to restrict access to the
Teradata Database. Generally, one or more Teradata Database objects are linked with a
Teradata DWM rule, and it is needed to link only those Teradata Database objects you want to
restrict. The types of database objects associated with filters and throttles are either context
objects or query objects. For more information on objects, see “Filters and Throttles” on
page 34.
About Object Linking
You need to link only those Teradata Database objects you want to restrict. Teradata DWM
does not restrict Teradata Database objects not associated with a Teradata DWM rule.
However, if an unrestricted user tries to access a restricted table, Teradata DWM applies the
table restriction to the user.
Generally, you link one or more Teradata Database objects to a Teradata DWM rule. However,
you cannot link some objects to certain types of rules. For example, you can link PGs only
with object throttles.
When you link both context and query objects with an object access or query resource filter
and select Restrict object combinations, the rule applies to all the combinations of context and
query objects. If you do not select Restrict object combinations, the rule applies to each
associated object separately.
If you restrict objects in combination, all the objects associated with a rule are separated into
two groups of context objects and query objects. Teradata DWM generates all the
combinations of context objects and query objects.
For example, assume you have the following items associated with a filter rule:
•
3 context objects, consisting of 2 users and 1 account
•
7 query objects, consisting of 2 databases and 5 tables
Teradata DWM generates 21 object combinations that are restricted (3 context objects
multiplied by 7 query objects).
Because a global rule implicitly applies to all objects, you cannot link objects to a global rule.
Global rules appear with a globe icon.
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Unlinking Objects from a Rule
You can choose any object in the Database Browser and attempt to link it to a rule in the Rule
DIT. If the type of object is incompatible with the destination rule, the icon changes to a circle
with a slash as shown in the following example:
Note: The objects associated with rules must already exist in order for them to appear in the
Database Browser.
There are two ways to link an object to a rule:
•
Drag-and-drop selected objects on to a rule
•
Copy and paste selected objects on to a rule
To link an object to a rule using drag-and-drop
1
2
From the Database Browser, select one or multiple objects using one of these methods:
•
Press and hold the Shift key to select multiple objects in a sequence.
•
Press and hold the Ctrl key to select multiple objects at random.
Drag-and-drop the selected objects on the rule name in the Rules DIT.
The objects appear in the Objects DIT to the left of the tabs in the Properties pane.
To link an object to a rule using copy and paste
1
From the Database Browser, press and hold the Shift key to select multiple objects in a
sequence.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Copy.
3
Click the Rule icon in the Rule Browser.
4
From the Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager, open the Edit menu and select Paste.
OR
Press Ctrl+V to paste objects from the Database Browser.
If the paste is successful, the object appears in the Objects DIT to the left of the tabs in the
Properties pane when you click the Rule icon.
Unlinking Objects from a Rule
You can unlink (disassociate) Teradata Database objects from a rule whenever you like. When
you unlink an object from a rule, the object is not deleted. The object still exists, but that
particular rule no longer applies to the object.
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Associating QueryBand with Filters
Objects already linked to a selected rule appear in Objects DIT, the frame to the left of the tabs
in the Properties pane.
To unlink an object from a rule
1
In the Objects DIT, select the object type you want to unlink.
Use one of the following options:
•
From the Rules menu, choose Filter or Throttles. Next, choose Delete > Delete Object.
•
Right-click the object to open a shortcut menu, and then choose Delete.
A confirm deletion dialog box opens.
2
Click Yes to confirm the deletion and close the dialog box.
The object is deleted from the Objects DIT.
Associating QueryBand with Filters
QueryBand allows you to define more granularity by defining one or more pairs of names and
associated values.
You can associate a QueryBand name/value pair with filters. Teradata DWM rejects requests
based on matching name/value pairs in the QueryBand associated with the request. Teradata
DWM compares QueryBand name/value pairs to the name in the Teradata DWM criteria to
determine if it a rule should be activated.
Note: QueryBand values for filters are OR’d.
(NameA=ValA1 OR …
OR NameA=ValAn ) OR
(NameB=ValB1 OR …
OR NameB=ValBm ) OR
…
(NameX=ValX1 OR …
OR NameX=ValXx )
Note that there is no ANDing with filters for Queryband.
To associate QueryBand name/value pairs to filters
1
Select the object access or query resource filter you created.
2
Select QueryBand. The QueryBand dialog box displays.
3
Select Load Names and select a name.
OR
Type a name in the QueryBand Names box.
4
Select Load Values and select a value.
OR
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Granting Bypass Privileges
Type a name in the QueryBand Values box.
5
Select Add.
6
If required, repeat steps 3-5 to add more name/value pairs.
7
Select OK to close the dialog box.
Granting Bypass Privileges
You can set up all context objects (other than QueryBand objects) to circumvent all filters and
object throttles by declaring them to be bypassed. This essentially turns off the filter and
object throttle checking mechanisms for all requests issued within the context of those objects.
In other words, granting bypass privileges means no Teradata DWM rules will apply to those
particular context objects. Additionally, their Teradata Database sessions are marked as
exempt so additional requests do not incur unnecessary database overhead.
Note: Define these objects using Teradata Administrator. See Teradata Administrator User
Guide to learn how.
To grant bypass privileges
1
From the Rules menu, select Filters or Throttle, and then choose Bypass.
OR
Right-click Filter or Throttle in the Rules DIT, and select Bypass.
The Grant Bypass dialog box displays similar to the following. By default, Users is selected
in the Type list.
Figure 64: Sample Grant Bypass Dialog Box
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2
From the Type list, select one of the following items:
•
Users
•
Accounts
•
Profiles
After you make a selection, the list at the left of the dialog box is populated with available
choices for that type.
3
From the Users, Accounts, or Profiles list, select the objects to which you want to give
bypass privileges.
OR
Click Select Users to open the Select Users dialog box. Type the character string you want
to match in the Expression box, and then click OK. Items matching the characters you
entered are highlighted in the Users, Accounts, or Profiles list.
Figure 65: Select Users Dialog Box
4
Click Add to move them to the Unrestricted… list. All the objects in this list are excluded
from rules.
5
Select OK to close the dialog box and return to the Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager.
You must save and activate the Rule Set for these bypass privileges to be in effect. See “Saving
and Activating a Rule Set” on page 232.
After the changes take effect, queries submitted by the users, accounts, or profiles you chose
are exempt or free from Teradata DWM rules.
Removing Bypass Privileges
You can remove bypass privileges any time you want.
To remove bypass privileges
1
From the Rules menu, select Filters or Throttle, and then choose Bypass.
OR
Right-click Filter or Throttle in the Rules DIT, and select Bypass.
The Grant Bypass dialog box displays.
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2
From the Type list, choose one of the following items:
•
Users (default)
•
Accounts
•
Profiles
After you make a selection, both lists are populated with available choices for that type.
3
From the Unrestricted… list, select the objects from which you want to remove bypass
privileges.
4
Click Remove.
5
Select OK to close the dialog box and return to the Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager.
You must save and activate the Rule Set to remove bypass privileges. See “Saving and
Activating a Rule Set” on page 232.
After these changes take effect, queries submitted by the users, accounts, or profiles chosen
conform to any Teradata DWM rules that might apply to them.
Enabling a Filter or Throttle
After defining a filter or throttle, it must be enabled in the Teradata Database before it can be
used.
Note that when a filter or throttle is enabled it can be used by many states in the Teradata
Database system. The By State settings will remain part of the filter or throttle when it is
disabled and will be used each time the filter or throttle is enabled. This is different than
enabling a filter or throttle for each state.
If you disable a filter or throttle, it will not be used in the Teradata Database system, no matter
which state is in effect.
To enable a filter or throttle
1
Select the filter or throttle you want to enable in the Rules DIT.
2
From the Rules menu, select Filters or Throttle, and then choose Enable. The red X
disappears from the rule icon.
OR
1
Right-click the rule in the Rule DIT.
2
Select Enable from the shortcut menu. The red X disappears from the rule icon.
You must save and activate the Teradata DWM Rule Set before changes to the status of a rule
take effect. See “Saving and Activating a Rule Set” on page 232.
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Disabling a Filter or Throttle
You can disable Teradata DWM filters or throttles any time you want.
To disable a filter or throttle
1
Select the filter or throttle you want to make unavailable in the Rules DIT.
2
From the Rules menu, select Filters or Throttle, and then choose Disable. The red X
appears over the rule icon.
OR
3
Right-click the rule in the Rules DIT.
4
Select Disable from the shortcut menu. The red X appears over the rule icon.
You must save and activate the Teradata DWM Rule Set before changes to the status of a rule
take effect.
Viewing Enabled and Disabled Status by State
Verify that a filter or throttle is enabled or disabled by viewing the Filters and Throttles Enabled
dialog box
To view values by state
1
On the DIT, click System Regulation to access the System Regulation - State Matrix view.
2
Select a state and select Details.
OR
Right-click on a state and select Details.
The Rule Set Values dialog box displays.
Figure 66: Rule Set Values Dialog Box
3
160
Click the Enabled Filters/Throttles button.
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4
The Filters and Throttles Enabled dialog box appears listing all filters and throttles, if
currently enabled, and the states for which the filter or throttle can be used. A column is
used for each state.See Figure 67. Note that settings can not be changed in the dialog box.
Figure 67: Filters and Throttled Enabled Dialog Box
Deleting a Filter or Throttle
Occasionally, you many want to remove a filter or throttle from the tdwm database.
To delete a filter or throttle
1
Select the filter or throttle you want to delete in the Rules DIT.
2
From the Rules menu, select Filters or Throttle. Next, choose Delete > Delete Rule.
OR
Select the rule you want to delete in the Rules DIT, and then press the Delete key.
OR
Right-click the rule in the Rules DIT, and then select Delete from the shortcut menu.
A confirmation box displays.
3
Click Yes to confirm the deletion.
You must save and activate the Teradata DWM Rule Set for the deletion to take effect. See
“Saving and Activating a Rule Set” on page 232.
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CHAPTER 8
Working with Workload Definitions
Additional to creating filters and throttles, Teradata DWM supports defining workload
definitions (WDs) that simplify the task of allocating resources for each workload. This
chapter describes WDs and how to create them.
•
About WDs
•
Controlling Activity with WDs
•
Creating New WDs
•
Setting Run-Time Exception Directives
•
Enabling or Disabling a WD
•
Modifying Existing WDs
•
Deleting a WD
•
Sample WD Setup
•
Mapping Console Utilities to WDs
•
Using the Priority Scheduler View
•
Comparing Weights
•
Deleting WDs
•
Tuning WDs
•
Creating a Lower Priority WD
•
Viewing Workload Summaries
•
Viewing WD Information
About WDs
Additional to filters and throttles, database activity can be managed with more precision and
greater flexibility by using WDs. A WD (also referred to in the GUI as a class) is a type of
Teradata DWM rule that groups requests based on their operational properties.
Submitted workloads are segmented into two stages: before processing, where the work is
parsed and optimized, and processing, where the work steps are dispatched for execution.
Before processing the work can be filtered at the system-level, but if allowed to run could be
classified into a default workload definition because no WD applies. Any query that is not
classified into one of the workload's created by the DBA, will be classified into a default
workload (WD-Default).
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Determining the Number of WDs
As you decide how many different WDs to create, try to achieve a balance between granularity
among workloads and ease of management. Too few workloads generally do not provide
enough granularity to pinpoint issues, tune candidates or predict workload growth. On the
opposite extreme, 36 workloads for accounting purposes can be too much to manage.
It is recommended that you define one workload for each set of applications and/or user
group that executes on the system. In many existing Teradata environments, these requests
were previously grouped through the assignment of user accounts, so workloads that align to
user accounts would be an appropriate starting point.
Typically, 10 to 20 WDs is reasonable for most environments. The maximum number of
possible workloads is 36, each with its own criteria for:
•
Queries to include (classify)
•
Throttle (concurrency) limit to use
•
Priority Scheduler priority to use
•
Run-time exception directives
•
SLGs
Teradata DWM predefines the following default WDs:
•
WD-ConsoleH, WD-ConsoleL, WD-ConsoleM, and WD-ConsoleR, which are used by
console utilities that map to the default R, H, M, and L PGs within the default RP of the
Teradata Priority Scheduler.
•
WD-Default
If a request does not qualify to run in any of the other defined workloads, it runs in this
mandatory WD-Default WD. You may choose to allow many requests to fall here, and
therefore assign a normal priority to this WD. Alternatively, you may allow unexpected
requests to fall here, and therefore assign a low priority to this WD.
It is recommended that you reserve WD-Default for unexpected requests. This allows you
to investigate the source of these unexpected requests and either create a new workload for
them, assign these requests to an existing workload, or filter the requests from future
execution.
Note that this WD cannot be deleted or disabled. It must exist to process query requests
that do not classify into any of the other WDs.
You can create up to 35 additional WDs. When you create a new WD, Teradata DWM presents
a wizard that displays an abbreviated sequence of the available tabs. After you complete the
wizard, you can access the WD and complete the additional tabs as appropriate. Note that the
Wd-Console workloads are included in the 35 WD limit. These may be deleted if they are not
needed.
For more information on the number of WDs you can create, see “PGs and AGs” on page 204.
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Grouping Requests into a Workload
There are two reasons for grouping requests into a workload:
•
Accounting granularity: Workloads allow visibility into who is using the system, and how
much of the various system resources are used by each workload. This is useful for:
•
Performance tuning (for example, tuning the heaviest workload)
•
Capacity planning (for example, predicting growth by workloads based on current
trends)
•
Performance monitoring/troubleshooting and workload management.
You can monitor groups of queries without singling out individual users.
You might choose accounting granularity based on the business environment, such as user
groups and/or application areas.
•
Improved control: Some requests require higher priority access to system resources than
others. You can prioritize access to system resources by workload. You can group requests
requiring the same priority into the same workload.
Criteria for Grouping Requests into a Workload
WDs support grouping requests into a workload based on:
•
“Who” is making the request, such as the account, application, username, profile, or client
IP address. Use “Who” classification criteria, which are most exact and use less overhead.
Use “Where” and “What” classification criteria only when “Who” classification criteria is
not granular enough.
“Who” criteria correspond to context objects (see “Context Objects” on page 35) and
QueryBand.
You can include or exclude “Who” attributes.
•
“What” are the characteristics of the request, such as the particular type of statement or
utility, or specified amounts for AMP limits, CPU time, current and final row counts.
“What” classification criteria assume that certain EXPLAIN characteristics are indicative
of all the requests within a workload and only that workload. Expect some “What” criteria
to misclassify requests into an incorrect workload. For example, if Teradata DWM
classifies short-running transactions into a tactical workload, but occasionally a normalpriority request creates a temporary table (also a short-running request), Teradata DWM
could misclassify that CREATE TABLE statement into the tactical workload. Use “What”
criteria in combination with “Who” and/or “Where” criteria to minimize the chances of
misclassification. Therefore, it is recommended to only utilize “What” criteria as a
secondary classification condition.
Use “What” criteria to identify requests that:
•
Use SELECT, DDL, or DML statements, individually or in combination
•
Run under one of the utilities (FastExport, FastLoad, MultiLoad, and Archive/Restore)
•
Are requests that use single or few AMPs.
•
Return spool files and result sets with estimated row counts that equal a defined
minimum or maximum, or that fall in a range between the two.
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•
•
Return results sets with estimated final row counts equal a defined minimum or
maximum, or that fall in a range between the two.
•
Use an estimated amount of CPU processing time that corresponds to a defined
minimum or maximum, or that falls within a range of the two.
•
Include join type.
“Where” the requested data is located, meaning which database object (database, table,
view, macro, or stored procedure) the query accesses. This may or may not provide exact
identification of a request into a workload, and depends on how you set up the
environment. However, you can set up a view or macro to correlate with a workload to
provide reasonable exactness in classification.
“Where” criteria corresponds to the query (data) objects (see “Query Objects” on
page 35).
You can include or exclude “Where” attributes.
•
Enforcement priority of the request, that is, how it ranks in importance or expediency
relative to other WDs.
•
SLGs, that is, the efficient response time or throughput of requests in this WD. For
information, see “Setting SLGs” on page 181.
•
Exception criteria and exception actions that trigger when the exception criteria are
exceeded during request execution. For information on setting exception criteria and
exception actions, see “Setting Skew Exception Criteria” on page 167 and “Setting RunTime Exception Directives” on page 185.
Exception criteria assume that certain run-time characteristics are indicative of all the
requests within a workload. If the exception criteria has a corresponding exception action
to change to another workload, it becomes an extension to the classification criteria for
that workload the request was changed to run in. Exception criteria detect conditions that
cannot be detected prior to query execution.
Overhead
To avoid or reduce exception monitoring overhead:
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•
If possible, attempt to properly classify requests without exception criteria to avoid any
exception monitoring overhead at all. Define classification criteria to properly assign a
request before execution begins. This prevents requests from running in a workload meant
for a legitimate high priority query, and avoids even a momentary misclassification of the
request in the unintended priority resource allocation.
•
If you do not use exception monitoring, set the exception interval to the maximum 3600
seconds.
•
If you must use exception monitoring, use the longest exception interval possible to reduce
exception monitoring overhead, yet still meet your goals for detecting exceptions in a
timely manner.
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Classification Criteria Guidelines
•
Keep the number of criteria associated with a workload as simple as possible.
•
Avoid complex classification criteria.
•
Avoid long include/exclude lists of “Who”/”Where” classification criteria. You can use
accounts (that combine many users into one logical group), rather than listing included/
excluded users. You can classify data objects by database rather than listing included/
excluded of tables.
Setting Skew Exception Criteria
When an AMP processes a single skewed query step, parallel efficiency is degraded because
other AMPs with less processing to perform must wait until the single skewed AMP completes
processing. Only the skewed AMP runs at capacity while the other AMPs sit idle. All requests
on a system can also degrade when the skewed AMP cannot respond to a mixed workload as
quickly as the other AMPs because it is backed up with skewed processing.
The system runs more efficiently when Teradata DWM is set to detect a skewed query and
automatically react so that all other queries present can run efficiently. Any exception action
results in logging the skewed query being logged so that you can identify and optimize it later.
Designate CPU or I/O skew exception criteria to eliminate the effects of a skewed query in real
time.
Teradata DWM detects skew on a per-request basis based the number of AMPs active in the
request step, which is not necessarily all the AMPs in the system. Teradata DWM calculates
skew at the end of each exception interval and considers the CPU or I/O consumed only
during that interval in computing skew percent. Teradata DWM calculates skew asynchronous
at the end of intervals, rather than synchronously at the end of query steps.
If you specify IO Skew and/or CPU Skew, be aware that when multiple applications (besides
Teradata DWM asynchronous exception checking) issue monitor session commands, the
system flushes the internal collection cache and accumulations restart at the shortest interval
being used. Therefore, it is recommended that you set other PM/PC applications that use
monitor session (such as Teradata Manager) to an interval greater than the exception interval,
so that the other PMPC applications always receive the PMPC statistics collected by Teradata
DWM, and Teradata DWM can accurately compute skew difference values.
To avoid interval problems and false skew detections, it is recommended that you set up skew
detection as follows:
•
Set Qualification Time to ensure that Teradata DWM detects a real skew rather than a
momentary situation. Note that if you do not enter a Qualification Time value, Teradata
DWM uses the Exception Interval.
•
Specify IO Skew Percent and/or CPU Skew Percent.
•
If Qualification Time plus IO Skew Percent and/or CPU Skew Percent result in false skew
detections, also specify IO Skew and/or CPU Skew.
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Setting Skew Exception Actions
The safest way to deal with a skew is to set up Teradata DWM to alert or run a program so that
you can research and manually abort the request causing the skew. However, you may not be
able to identify and abort the true skewed request effectively or in a timely manner,
prolonging the issue.
You can alternatively set up Teradata DWM to automatically abort when it detects a skew. An
automated abort can effectively and quickly eliminate the skewed query from the system.
However, it can be difficult for Teradata DWM to automatically distinguish the request that
caused the skew from another innocent request that displays a skew as a result of the true
skewed request. Acting quickly with a smaller qualification time minimizes the risk.
Another alternative is to set up Teradata DWM to automatically change workload to a lower
priority workload when it detects a skew. See “Creating a Lower Priority WD” on page 220 for
lower-priority workload considerations.
Replacing Priority Scheduler Query Milestones
Teradata DWM exception processing replaces and expands upon Priority Scheduler CPU/
query milestones. Read this section if you currently use Priority Scheduler query milestones.
You can follow the steps below to replace Priority Scheduler query milestones with Teradata
DWM exception criteria and actions. Depending on your system, you may only need to use
the first step, or the first and second step.
1
Add more classification criteria. See “Grouping Requests into a Workload” on page 165
and “Classification Criteria Guidelines” on page 167 for further discussion and guidelines.
You can also directly convert to a classification criteria by specifying the Estimated
Processing Time classification criteria. To determine a reasonable value for estimated
processing time that matches the old milestone value, execute the following query against
the Query Log:
select TDWMEstTotalTime
from DBQLogTable
where AcctString = (your account) and TotalCPUTime <=
(milestone value * # of nodes)
order by 1;
Cross-check the range of processing time against a heterogeneous analysis from Teradata
Workload Analyzer that displays a distribution of estimated processing times for all
queries defined through classification criteria excluding estimated processing time, to
show a clear clustering of low against higher estimated processing times.
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2
Define exception type CPU Sum Over All Nodes after defining as much classification
criteria granularity as possible. Consider using this approach when it is acceptable for
Teradata DWM to not detect the exception for the length of the exception interval.
3
Define exception type Tactical CPU Usage Threshold when a workload is shared by both
highly-tuned tactical queries (for example, single or few-AMP requests) and more
resource-intensive, less critical, but still tactical queries (typically all-AMP). Note that you
will lose accountability of which AG contributed to the resource consumption of a given
query, and that the query effected by the milestone will execute for a time in another,
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probably higher priority. If the preceding steps are not sufficient for your business needs,
add this step. To prevent potential performance impact, this control is available only if you
set:
•
The workload to Tactical enforcement priority.
•
Sum Over All Nodes to a non-zero value.
Sum Over All Nodes must be greater than Tactical CPU Usage Threshold.
•
The AG weight of the change-to workload to at least 4 times less than the AG weight of
this workload to lessen the chance that the query will receive a boost in CPU.
•
Tactical CPU Usage Threshold between 0.1 and 5 seconds. If the set value is greater than
3 seconds, Teradata DWM warns that the value be under 3 seconds for optimal
performance.
If Tactical CPU Usage Threshold is defined, the exception action must include Change
Workload.
Handling Concurrent Multiple Exception Directives for a WD
Teradata DWM follows these guidelines when multiple exception directives (multiple
exception criteria/actions) are applicable at the same time for a WD.
Teradata DWM evaluates all exception directives. It is possible that multiple exception
directives are exceeded together. If so, Teradata DWM performs all the corresponding
exception actions that do not conflict.
A conflict occurs when two exception actions to be performed are either:
•
Abort and change WD or
•
Change to different WDs (for example, change to WD-A and change to WD-B).
Teradata DWM follows these guidelines to resolve conflicting exception actions when
necessary:
•
Local exception actions take precedence over global exception actions.
•
Teradata DWM orders local and global exception actions to their defined precedence for
resolving situations similar to the following case:
if Maximum Rows > 100, Change Workload to WD-M
if Sum Over All Nodes > 200, Change Workload to WD-N
If Maximum Rows and Sum Over All Nodes both exceed their limits at the same time, the
defined precedence determines to which WD Teradata DWM changes.
•
If Teradata DWM must perform several exception actions because one or more exception
criteria occur simultaneously, Teradata DWM always executes all Raise Alert, Run Program,
and Post to Queue Table exception actions. Other actions occur as follows:
•
If you did not specify Abort and Log or Abort on Select and Log, and you specified
multiple global Change Workload exception actions, the global Change Workload
exception action with highest precedence occurs. Teradata DWM logs all other Change
Workload exception actions as overridden.
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•
If you did not specify Abort and Log or Abort on Select and Log, and you specified
multiple local Change Workload exception actions, the local Change Workload
exception action with highest precedence occurs. Teradata DWM logs all other Change
Workload exception actions as overridden.
•
If you did not specify Abort and Log or Abort on Select and Log, and you specified
multiple global and local Change Workload exception actions, the local Change
Workload exception action with highest precedence occurs, since local exception
actions take precedence over global exception actions. Teradata DWM logs all other
Change Workload exception actions as overridden.
•
Aborts take precedence over any Change Workload exception actions. If you specified
Abort and Log or Abort on Select and Log, and you specified multiple global and local
Change Workload exception actions, Teradata DWM aborts the query and logs all
Change Workload exception actions as overridden.
Controlling Activity with WDs
Shared resources, such as AMP worker tasks (AWTs) or spool, are not controlled by the
Priority Scheduler Facility (a database function). The Priority Scheduler Facility controls
priority usage of the system, primarily through the CPU resource so that high priority
requests get more CPU resource than low priority requests.
As for shared resources, high and low priority requests get equal access to these limited share
resources. This can result in shared resources being the limiting resource on the system.
For example, low priority requests may hold on to a limited resource while high priority
requests wait for the low priority request to release them. Since the low priority requests get
limited access to the CPU, it increases the delay for the high priority requests to get access to
the shared resource.
The following table provides examples of ways that you can manage database activity through
the use of WDs.
Table 30: Managing Database Activity
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If you want to...
Then define...
Avoid higher priority requests
waiting for shared resources
held by lower priority requests
• A workload concurrency throttle to limit the number of
concurrent queries executing within a workload.
• A category 1 query filter to reject undesirable queries.
• A reserved AWT pool on the AGs mapped to tactical WDs to
allow only them to that pool.
• A WD exception to abort queries that are out of character for
the workload and/or are causing performance issues (for
example, high skew or high CPU to IO ratio, or CPU
consumption that is longer than expected for the WD.
Note: Avoid using exceptions to reassign the request to lowerpriority WDs for the reasons stated above.
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Table 30: Managing Database Activity (continued)
If you want to...
Then define...
Avoid overloading your system
• A workload concurrency throttle to limit the number of
concurrent queries executing within a workload.
• An object throttle to limit the number of concurrent queries.
• A WD exception to demote long-running queries to lowerpriority workloads.
Address poor tactical response
time
• A workload concurrency throttle to limit the number of
concurrent queries executing within a workload.
• WDs that map tactical queries to their own RP.
• A WD exception to abort queries that run too long.
Creating New WDs
You can create new WDs using Teradata DWM or load them from the Teradata Workload
Analyzer into Teradata DWM. New WDs display under Classes in the DIT.
You can also configure how Teradata DWM enforces WDs by ignoring Optimizer estimates
below a specified level of confidence. For more information, see “Defining Global Rule
Parameters.”
For considerations and guidelines on creating new WDs, see “About WDs” on page 163.
Follow the instructions below to create a new WD using Teradata DWM.
To create a new WD
1
In Teradata DWM, perform one of the following:
•
From the Rules menu, select Classes > New Workload
•
In the DIT, right-click Workloads and select New Definitions.
•
Under Workloads in the DIT, right-click Classes and select New.
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The Workload Attributes dialog box displays.
Figure 68: Workload Attributes dialog box
2
Fill in the fields/controls as follows.
Table 31: Workload Attributes Fields/Controls
Field/Control
Action/Comment
Name
Enter a unique name for the new WD. Although not required,
typically WD names begin with the prefix “WD-” for easy
identification.
The maximum name length is 30 characters.
Caution:
When naming WDs, keep name length as short as
practical. Long WD names can cause display problems in
Teradata Manager report functions.
Note: If you enter a name containing single quotation marks, the
application discards the quotation marks.
Description
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Optionally enter a description to identify this WD.
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Table 31: Workload Attributes Fields/Controls (continued)
Field/Control
Action/Comment
Log Query Detail
Select this control to specify detailed logging of each query to
DBQLogTbl. Logging detail includes query identification
information, Optimizer values for making Teradata DWM decisions,
the WD for each query, and resulting runtime values. Teradata DWM
generates a detail data row for each query run in this WD and writes
the data to disk based on the Logging Interval you specify (see
“Defining Global Rule Parameters” on page 223) and/or the
DBQLFlushRate DBS Control value.
When you select Log Query Detail, Workload Definitions Trend
Reporting is available for the WD. Because one of the dimensions
tracked in the DBQL table is the WD in which the request ran (both
original and final WD if you specify the Change Workload exception
action), you can either utilize the Teradata Manager DBQL Trend
reports or derive you own reports from the DBQLogTbl.
Teradata DWM always performs summary logging, whether or not
you select Log Query Detail.
For considerations in using this control, see “How Teradata DWM
Logging Works” on page 38.
Enforcement Priority
Select one of the following enforcement priorities:
• Tactical: Critical, short queries with a fixed response-time
requirement.
• Priority: Important queries that may be able to use extra resources.
• Normal: Normal queries. This is the default.
• Background: Low-priority queries with no response-time
requirement, or SLGs.
You must specify an enforcement priority. Teradata DWM uses this
attribute to determine how the Priority Scheduler prioritizes queries
for this WD. These enforcement priority attributes correspond exactly
to enforcement priority attributes in the underlying Teradata DWM
Priority Scheduler configuration that you must specify. See “Using the
Priority Scheduler View” on page 204 for more information.
3
Select Next to set up classification criteria for your new WD. See“To define or modify
classification criteria #1 for a WD” on page 174 and then “To define or modify
classification criteria #2-6 for a WD” on page 176.
4
After you set classification criteria, select Next to set SLGs. See “Setting SLGs” on page 181.
5
After you set SLGs, select Next to set query limits. See “Setting Query Limits” on page 183.
Classification Criteria
Classification criteria identify the “who,” “what,” and “where” of requests as a way of grouping
them for better control, to ensure resources are allocated as appropriate to your needs. For
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more information on classification criteria, see “Criteria for Grouping Requests into a
Workload” on page 165 and “Classification Criteria Guidelines” on page 167.
Teradata Database detects classification criteria before executing queries.
For example, if you wanted to allocate more resources to requests originating from a
particular department in your company, your classification criteria would specify the
application or account that corresponds to those requests. Conversely, using classification
criteria, you can isolate workloads that you want to give a lower priority.
You can choose up to six classification criteria. It is recommended that you select at least one
item from the “who” criteria; you can combine additional criteria in accord with the following
limitations.
•
You cannot select a classification type more than one time.
•
You cannot combine a utility type with anything other than a “who” characteristic, so if
you pick a utility as criteria 2, criteria 3 must be a “who” criteria item. If your second
criteria item is a “what” or “where,” you cannot follow it with a utility.
If you do not specify classification attributes for a WD, Teradata DWM will initially not place
any queries into that WD. However, you could use that WD as a lower-priority WD, for
example, when queries encounter run-time exceptions in their original WDs and are
downgraded to a lower priority WD. See “Creating a Lower Priority WD” on page 220.
Classification criteria for WDs are constant, and do not vary by state or operating
environment.
To define or modify classification criteria #1 for a WD
1
Under Classification, select a criteria category in the Criteria #1 list box.
Figure 69: Classification dialog box
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For Criteria #1, the following categories are available (which identify the “who” of the
workload):
•
Account Name
Note: The Account Name criteria only includes the names of accounts. PG
information is not included. For example, an Account Name criteria containing
DBC-MANAGER only affects accounts such as $H-DBC-MANAGER and
$M-DBC-MANAGER.
•
Account String
•
Application
•
Client Address
Client Address can be specified using:
•
IPv4 address format, where XXX is the range 0 to 255 decimal:
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX
•
Client ID (for logon)
•
Profile
•
Username
•
Include QueryBand and Exclude QueryBand
QueryBand enables requests all coming from a single or common logon to be classified
into different workloads based on the query band set by the originating application.
This enables an application to influence different priorities for different requests. For
example, the GUI for an application may have dialogs that require quick responses and
other dialogs that submit long running reports that run in the background. The
application can set a different query band for each type of job, causing the requests to be
classified into different workloads and run at different priorities. Instead of running the
entire application in a single workload, the application can execute the requests in
different workloads, each with a different priority, enabling better use of system resources.
Teradata DWM compares QueryBand name/value pairs to the name in the Teradata DWM
criteria to determine WD usage.
QueryBand values with the same name are OR’ed. QueryBand values with different names
are AND’ed.
(NameA=ValA1 OR …
OR NameA=ValAn ) AND
(NameB=ValB1 OR …
OR NameB=ValBm ) AND
…
(NameX=ValX1 OR …
OR NameX=ValXx )
See “Associating QueryBand with Filters” on page 156 for more information on OR’ing
QueryBand name/value pairs, and on expression limits.
2
Click the Choose another selection criteria button to display another dialog box where you
can select available items for that criteria category. For examples of how to set up
attributes, see “Example: QueryBand Criteria” on page 179 and “Example: QueryBand
Criteria” on page 179.
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3
When finished, click OK to return to the Classification dialog box and specify additional
criteria. (Use Cancel to discard classification selections and start over.) See the next
procedure “To define or modify classification criteria #2-6 for a WD” on page 176.
To define or modify classification criteria #2-6 for a WD
1
Under Classification, select the Choose another selection criteria check box. Different items
are available for Criteria #2. Additional to the ones listed previously, criteria listed in
Table 32 can also be used.
Table 32: Classification Options for Criteria #2 and above
Selected Item
Also select...
Data Objects
the data objects to include or exclude in the Classify by Data
Objects dialog box. This appears after selecting Data Objects and
clicking the Choose button.
These data objects can be selected:
• database
• table
• view
• macro
• stored procedure
In the Classify by Data Object dialog box, select objects to
include or exclude, and select the type of object to add to the
criteria. Load the objects and choose the specific object by
selecting it and clicking the Add button. See Example:
Classification by Included and Excluded Objects Criteria for
more information.
Statement Type
the statement types you want by selecting the appropriate check
boxes.
Utility Type
the name of the utility (FastLoad, FastExport, MultiLoad, all
three, or Archive/Restore) that you want to control in the list
box.
Teradata DWM utility rules apply to FastLoad, MultiLoad,
FastExport, TPT Load/Update/Export operator, JDBC FastLoad,
and ARCMAIN. Teradata DWM classifies the first utilityspecific SQL request from a utility job into a WD. All subsequent
requests for the utility job run under the same WD (priority).
AMP Limits
the check box for Include single or few AMP queries only if
appropriate.
Note: Selecting this checkbox causes the workload to accept
only queries that are not all-AMP queries. If AMP Limits is
selected but this checkbox is left cleared, no AMP limit is defined
and an error message will appear because the classification data
is missing for this criteria.
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Table 32: Classification Options for Criteria #2 and above (continued)
Selected Item
Also select...
Row Count
either the Minimum Rows or the Maximum Rows check box or
both and type the corresponding values as appropriate.
Final Row Count
either the Minimum Final Rows or the Maximum Final Rows check
box or both, and type the corresponding values, as appropriate.
Estimated Processing Time
either the Minimum Time or Maximum Time by selecting the
appropriate check box and specifying the CPU limits for each.
You can specify CPU time in hundredths of a second (using the
format HHH:MM:SS.dd).
For information on using this item to replace Priority Scheduler
query milestones, see “Replacing Priority Scheduler Query
Milestones” on page 168.
Join Type
the type of joins you want to include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
2
All Joins
No Joins
All Product Joins
No Product Joins
All Unconstrained Product Joins
No Unconstrained Product Joins
To select a additional criteria, repeat step 1. You may select a maximum of six classification
criteria. When criteria selections are complete, click Next.
Select Show to display of a report of WD classification settings.
Example: Application Criteria
Assuming that you selected Application as Criteria #1 and clicked Choose another selection
criteria, the Classify by Application dialog box would appear next.
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Figure 70: Classify by Application dialog box
1
Click Load to display all available items for the criteria selected.
2
Select the appropriate items and click Include or Exclude. (Use Remove to discard
unwanted selections.)
Note: To select multiple, consecutive items, press and hold the SHIFT key while clicking
the items in the list. To select several nonconsecutive items at once, press and hold the
CTRL key while clicking.
3
When finished, click OK to return to the Classification dialog box and specify additional
criteria. (Use Cancel to discard classification selections and start over.)
Example: Classification by Included and Excluded Objects Criteria
After selecting None as Criteria #1, selecting Data Object as Criteria #2, and clicking Choose
another selection criteria, the Classify by Data Object dialog box appears.
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Figure 71: Classify by Data Object dialog box
1
In the Object Type criteria_category (where criteria_category depends on the
criteria category selected), select the object type to specify whether the WD includes or
excludes the classification criteria.
2
Click Load to display all available items for the criteria selected.
3
From the Available list, select an item. To select multiple, consecutive items, press and
hold the SHIFT key while clicking the items in the list. To select several nonconsecutive
items at once, press and hold the CTRL key while clicking. Click Include to move the items
to the Included criteria list. To discard unwanted selections, select in the Included list and
click Remove.
4
From the Available list, select a data object to exclude. To select multiple, consecutive
items, press and hold the SHIFT key while clicking the items in the list. To select several
nonconsecutive items at once, press and hold the CTRL key while clicking. Click Exclude to
move the items to the Excluded criteria list. To discard unwanted selections, select in the
Excluded list and click Remove.
5
When finished, click OK to return to the Classification dialog box and specify additional
criteria. Use Cancel to discard classification selections and start over.
Example: QueryBand Criteria
Assume that a WD is being created for batch requisition types by north or east regions, but an
exception is needed to exclude account jobs.
1
For Criteria #1, select Include QueryBand. The Include QueryBand dialog box displays.
2
Select Load Names to display all the QueryBand names and select the Region name.
Alternatively, type the Region name in the QueryBand Names box.
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3
Select Load Values to display all the QueryBand values, and select the North values.
Alternatively, type the North value in the QueryBand Names box. In this example the
value you select or type red.
4
Select Add to add the name and value pair.
5
Repeat steps 2-4 steps to add the East region.
The Include QueryBand dialog box displays as follows.
Figure 72: Sample Include QueryBand Dialog Box
6
Select OK to close the dialog box and return to the Classification dialog box.
7
For Criteria #2, select Exclude QueryBand. Notice that Include QueryBand is not an option
in the list.
The Exclude QueryBand dialog box displays.
8
Follow the same steps as for the Include QueryBand dialog box to define the Acct Job you
want to exclude.
The Exclude QueryBand dialog box displays as follows.
Figure 73: Sample Exclude QueryBand Dialog Box
9
Select OK to close the dialog box and return to the Classification dialog box.
10 For Criteria #3, select the data object of your DBreq database.
The Classification dialog box now displays as follows.
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Figure 74: Sample Classification Dialog Box with QueryBand and Database Defined
Setting SLGs
If you specify SLGs, Teradata DWM can determine whether workload management is meeting
expectations. You can specify SLGs for each WD and you can vary the SLG for each operating
environment within each WD. If you do not specify SLGs by operating environment, the
operating environment defaults to “Always.” In general, it is good practice to establish SLGs
for the important workloads, especially tactical workloads.
Note: SLGs define the expected behavior of the workload; Teradata DWM provides them for
logging and reporting purposes only. Teradata DWM does not attempt to enforce these goals.
If you are unsure of the SLGs for your workloads, use the optional product, Teradata
Workload Analyzer, to analyze your current usage statistics and generate SLG
recommendations.
WhenTeradata DWM logs or reports (by using PMPC functions) SLG-related summary
information:
•
Arrivals refers to the number of queries that begin processing in a WD per log interval.
•
Met SLG Count can be determined only for per-query SLG attributes, such as Response
Time and Average CPU Seconds. Teradata DWM cannot reasonably make a throughput
determination for a small interval, especially since each vproc accumulates and logs
information independently.
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To define SLGs
1
Select the Service Level Goals tab. A view similar to the following displays.
Figure 75: Sample Service Level Goals View
2
Fill in the fields/controls as follows.
Table 33: SLG Fields/Controls
Field/Control.
Action/Comment
Operating Environment
Select the operating environment to which the SLG applies. You can
vary the SLG for each operating environment within each WD.
Teradata DWM sets the default operating environment for the
default SLG to “Always.” Teradata DWM applies these default
settings to any SLG operating environments you do not define for
the WD.
Note: Use “Always” when no other period is applicable. It covers a
period that is 24 hours and 365 days long (that is, every day for a
year).
182
Response Time
Enter the clock time, including centiseconds, to completion. This is
the maximum amount of time that you expect to be required for
completion of requests in this workload.
Service Percent
Enter an integer for the percentage of completed queries needed to
meet the Response Time goal.
Arrival Rate (per hour)
Enter an integer for the number of queries you expect Teradata
DWM to classify (receive) per hour.
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Table 33: SLG Fields/Controls (continued)
3
Field/Control.
Action/Comment
Throughput (per hour)
Enter an integer for the number of queries you expect Teradata
DWM to execute (complete) per hour.
CPU Time
Enter the average CPU seconds and centiseconds (processor time)
you expect to be required to execute each query.
Select Accept to accept your changes.
Setting Query Limits
Query limits reduce resource competition and associated processing overhead inherent in very
high concurrency environments. With query limits, a shorter response time can be
maintained for some of the requests while the other requests are held in the queue and run
longer, resulting in a smaller average response time. You can use the Query Limits view to:
•
Specify a maximum number of queries that can run concurrently in this WD.
It is recommended that you set query limits for lower or medium priority workloads to
prevent over-consumption of uncontrolled shared resources needed by the higher priority
workloads. This leaves the higher priority workloads to operate regardless of their peak
flow cycles.
•
Vary or disable the limit for one or more states, if necessary.
For example, when a hardware component is down and the system is running in degraded
state, you might further limit the lower priority workloads so that the critical high priority
workloads can still process their work.
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To set query limits
1
Select the Query Limits tab. A view similar to the following displays.
Figure 76: Query Limits View
2
For each state, set the controls as follows.
Table 34: Query Limits Fields/Controls
Fields/Controls
Action/Comment
Override Default
Select this control to override the default limit for each state you
specified (see “Defining States” on page 106).
When you select this control, Unlimited is also automatically selected.
If you select this option, and deselect Unlimited for a state, you can
define a new limit in the Limit field.
Unlimited
Set the limit to unlimited for a state.
You must select Override Default to activate this field for a state.
Limit
Set a limit for a state.
You must select Override Default and deselect Unlimited to activate this
field.
Reject
Reject queries for a state.
You must select Override Default to activate this field for a state.
3
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Select Accept to accept your changes or Restore to show prior settings.
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Setting Run-Time Exception Directives
Creating a New WD from an Existing WD
If you already created a WD that is similar to a new one you want to create, you can copy the
existing WD and modify the copy to meet your needs.
To create a new WD from an existing WD
1
Right-click the WD you want to copy from and click Create From. Notice that the
Workload Attributes tab shows a WD based on the one you selected but with “new”
appended to its name. Change the name to something more meaningful if appropriate.
2
Modify the WD as appropriate. For information, see “Modifying Existing WDs.”
Setting Run-Time Exception Directives
After you create new WDs, you define exception directives that instruct Teradata DWM how
to monitor queries, and what to do if a query exceeds exception criteria while it is executing.
An exception directive consists of a set of exception criteria (exception metrics) and a set of
exception actions (actions that Teradata DWM takes when all of the metrics for a set of
exception criteria are exceeded). If a request exceeds all exception metrics (for example, a
request exceeds 1000 CPU seconds), it is potentially disqualified from the workload and
conforms to the enabled exception actions.
When specifying multiple metrics in one exception criteria set for a WD, they act as a set of
AND'ed conditions.
Multiple exception directives can be defined for a WD. When you define multiple exception
directives for a WD with different sets of exception criteria but the same set of exception
actions, each exception criteria set is treated as alternative (OR'd) conditions.See “Handling
Concurrent Multiple Exception Directives for a WD” on page 169 for guidelines Teradata
DWM follows when multiple exception directives are applicable at the same time for a WD.
It is recommended that you avoid overly complex combinations of exception criteria in an
exception directive until you have experience about how your system performs.
Exception directives are operating environment-dependent. You can vary exception directives
for different operating environments. In one operating environment, a WD may use several
exception directives, while in another operating environment the same WD may not use any
exception directives.
Note: You cannot specify exception directives for WDs that use utilities as classification
criteria.
For considerations and guidelines on setting exception directives, see “About WDs” on
page 163.
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Setting Local and Global Exception Directives
You can define both local and global exception directives for a WD. A local exception directive
applies only to the current WD. A global exception directive applies to several (or all) WDs.
Note: Exception actions are unavailable if you selected a utility type in the Classification tab.
To create a new local exception directive for a WD
1
Select a WD and click the Exception tab. The following view displays.
Figure 77: Exception Criteria tab
2
186
Click New. The Add Local Exception dialog box displays.
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Figure 78: Add Local Exception Dialog Box
3
Fill in the fields/controls as follows.
Table 35: Add Local Exception Fields/Controls
Field/Control.
Action/Comment.
Exception Name
Enter the name of the new local exception.
Description
Specify an optional description.
Apply to Operating
Environment(s)
Apply the local exception to one or more operating environment
periods. By default, all operating environments are selected.
Note that you can select Overview in the Exception tab to view the
operating environment periods you selected for a local exception.
4
Select OK to close the dialog box and return to the Exception tab.
5
To specify exception criteria for the new exception directive, go to “To define exception
criteria” on page 190.
6
To specify exception actions for the new exception directive, go to “To define exception
actions” on page 194.
7
To apply operating environments to your new exception directive, select Apply. The
Exception Apply dialog box displays with the operating environments you defined (see
“Defining Operating Environments” on page 103).
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Figure 79: Sample Exception Apply Dialog Box
8
Select the operating environments you want to apply to the exception directive, and select
OK to close the dialog box.
9
Select Accept to save your settings, Restore to reverse them
Select Overview to view the operating environments you applied to the exception directive.
To create a new global exception directive
1
In the DIT, under Workloads, select Global Exceptions. A view similar to the following
displays.
Figure 80: Global Exceptions View
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2
Click New. The Add Global Exception dialog box displays.
Figure 81: Add Global Exception Dialog Box
3
Enter a global Exception Name and optional Description, and then select OK to close the
dialog box.
Note: An exception directive can be renamed after it has been defined. Select the name in
the Exceptions list and change the name in the editable box. A click on another control in
the view will provide a dialog box that will ask to confirm or reset the exception name.
4
To specify exception criteria for the new exception directive, go to “To define exception
criteria” on page 190.
5
To specify exception actions for the new exception directive, go to “To define exception
actions” on page 194.
6
To apply operating environments to your new exception directive, select Apply. The
Exception Apply dialog box displays with the operating environments you defined (see
“Defining Operating Environments” on page 103).
Figure 82: Exception Apply Dialog Box
7
Select the WDs to which you want each operating environment to apply. You can select
one or several WDs, or you can select ALL WDs. Then select OK to close the dialog box.
8
Click Accept to save your settings, Restore to reverse them.
Select Overview to view the operating environments, workloads, and exceptions you applied to
the exception directive.
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To delete exception directives
1
From the Exception tab, click Delete. The Exception Delete dialog box appears with the
current exception directive selected.
2
Under Exception Name, select one or more exception directives to delete.
3
Click OK.
To define exception criteria
1
Access the exception directive you defined.
For a local exception directive:
a
Select the WD under Workloads > Classes on the Rules DIT.
b
Select the Exception tab.
For a global exception directive, select Workloads > Global Exceptions on the Rules DIT.
A view similar to the following displays.
Figure 83: Sample Exception Criteria View
190
2
Select the exception directive you want to define under Exceptions.
3
Fill in the fields/controls as follows.
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Table 36: Exception Criteria Fields/Controls
Field/Control
Action/Comment
Maximum Rows
1 Select the control.
2 Enter the per step maximum rows in a spool file.
IO Count
1 Select the control.
2 Enter the maximum number of disk I/O's performed on behalf of
the query.
Spool Size
1 Select the control.
2 Enter the maximum size of a spool file (per step).
3 Choose whether the size is in:
•
•
•
•
Number of Amps
Bytes
Thousand Bytes
Million Bytes
Billion Bytes
1 Select the control.
2 Enter the number of AMPs that participate in the query.
Blocked Time
1 Select the control.
2 Enter the length of time the query is blocked by another query.
Elapsed Time
1 Select the control.
2 Enter the length of time the query has been running (that is,
response time).
This time is stored in the Teradata Database as centiseconds.
Sum Over All Nodes
1 Select the control.
2 Enter the total amount of CPU time consumed by the query over
all nodes.
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Table 36: Exception Criteria Fields/Controls (continued)
Field/Control
Action/Comment
Tactical CPU Usage
Threshold (per node)
1 Select the control.
2 Enter a positive value. Note the following:
• Specify a value less than the value specified for Sum Over All
Nodes.
• Specify a value less than 3 seconds to optimize performance.
• Specify Change Workload and another WD mapped to an AG
in the same RP as one of the exception actions.
For more information on setting this control, see “Replacing
Priority Scheduler Query Milestones” on page 168.
Note the following:
• This parameter is enabled only if the WD is Tactical in the
Workload Attributes tab and there is a positive value for CPU Sum
Over All Nodes.
• This control is not available for global exceptions.
• All exceptions in the same operating environment with Tactical
CPU Usage Threshold (per node) must use the same value and
have the same WD in a Change Workload exception action.
Qualification Time
1 Select the control. The Qualification Time box becomes active
when a skew control is checked.
2 Enter the length of time the following exception conditions must
persist before the following criteria are satisfied (in CPU
seconds):
• CPU millisec per IO
• IO Skew
• CPU Skew
• IO Skew Percent
• CPU Skew Percent
You must select one of these criteria to activate Qualification Time.
Note that if you do not enter a Qualification Time value, Teradata
DWM uses the Exception Interval.
Qualification Time must be an integer multiple of the global the
Exception Interval and greater than zero. See “Setting Skew
Exception Criteria” on page 167 and “Setting Skew Exception
Actions” on page 168.
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Table 36: Exception Criteria Fields/Controls (continued)
Field/Control
Action/Comment
IO Skew
1 Select the control.
CPU Skew
2 Enter a value:
• IO Skew: The maximum difference in disk I/O counts between
the busiest AMP and the average of all involved AMPs during
the last exception interval.
• CPU Skew: The maximum difference in CPU consumption
between the busiest AMP and the average of all involved
AMPs during the last exception interval.
A value of zero means there is no skew. A value greater than
zero indicates skew that accumulates to a larger and larger
value as long as the skew continues, up until the skew exceeds
the Qualification Time.
For more information, see “Setting Skew Exception Criteria” on
page 167.
Note the following:
• The skew must exceed the Qualification Time before Teradata
DWM performs the action you specify. See “Setting Skew
Exception Actions” on page 168.
• The skew must persist for a specifiable length of time, in CPU
seconds, that is greater than one global Exception Interval, to
qualify as an exception.
CPU millisec per IO
1 Select the control.
2 Enter the maximum ratio of CPU consumption to disk I/O
during the last exception interval.
You can use this control to detect queries that have an unusually
high ratio of CPU processing relative to logical I/Os incurred (for
example, an accidental unconstrained product join performed on
a very large table). Because of their very high CPU usage, these
queries can steal CPU resources from other higher priority
workloads, impacting the ability of the Priority Scheduler to
favor higher priority requests.
It is recommended that you initially set this control to 5 or
greater.
You must select this control to activate Qualification Time.
Note the following:
• The ratio must exceed the Qualification Time before Teradata
DWM performs the action you specify.
• The ratio must persist for a specifiable length of time, in CPU
seconds, that is greater than one global Exception Interval, to
qualify as an exception.
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Table 36: Exception Criteria Fields/Controls (continued)
Field/Control
Action/Comment
IO Skew Percent
1 Select the control.
CPU Skew Percent
2 Enter a value:
• IO Skew Percent: The maximum percentage difference in disk
I/O counts between the busiest AMP and the average of all
involved AMPs during the last exception interval.
• CPU Skew Percent: The maximum percentage difference in
CPU consumption between the busiest AMP and the average
of all involved AMPs during the last exception interval.
A value of 0% means there is no skew. A value greater than 0%
indicates skew. The larger the percentage, the worse the skew
is. The impact of that skew grows exponentially.
For more information, see “Setting Skew Exception Criteria” on
page 167.
The skew must exceed the Qualification Time before Teradata DWM
performs the action you specify. See “Setting Skew Exception
Actions” on page 168.
4
Select Accept to accept your changes.
5
Next, specify the exception actions Teradata DWM performs when the exception criteria
are exceeded.
To define exception actions
✔ Under Exception Actions, select the appropriate fields/controls. You must specify at least
one exception criteria to access these controls.
Table 37: Exception Action Fields/Controls
Field/Control
Action/Comment
No Exception Monitoring
Select this control to prevent logging.
This control temporarily disables the exception directive without
deleting it.
Continue and Log
Select this control to log the exception and choose another action.
If you select this option, you can select Change Workload, Raise
Alert, and Run Program.
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Table 37: Exception Action Fields/Controls (continued)
Field/Control
Action/Comment
Change Workload
1 Select Continue and Log.
Change Workload is only available with Continue and Log.
2 Select Change Workload.
3 Select the WD in the list box to log the exception and move the
request to the specified WD.
If you specify a positive value for Tactical CPU Usage Threshold
(per node), you must specify Change Workload and another WD
mapped to an AG in the same RP as one of the exception
actions.
All exceptions in the same operating environment with Tactical
CPU Usage Threshold (per node) must use the same value and have
the same WD in a Change Workload exception action.
If you specified values for Blocked Time, Elapsed Time, or both,
Change Workload is not an option as an exception action.
When specifying Change Workload as the exception action that is
not to be applied to all operating environments, the following
warning will display:
Warning: By not applying an Exception with a Change Workload
action to all operating Environments, a request may not
consistently route to the same final Workload across
different Operating Environments. This may lead to
misleading or confusing workload accounting.
You may not specify Change Workload for the default workload
(WD-default).
Raise Alert
1 Select Continue and Log, Abort and Log, or Abort on Select and
Log to access Raise Alert.
2 Select Raise Alert to log the exception and raise an alert.
3 Enter the name of the alert you specified in Teradata Manager.
Run Program
1 Select Continue and Log, Abort and Log, or Abort on Select and
Log to access Run Program.
2 Select Run Program to log the exception and run a program.
3 Enter the name of the program whose path you specified in
Teradata Manager.
Post to Queue Table
1 Select Continue and Log, Abort and Log, or Abort on Select and
Log to access Post to Queue Table.
2 Select Post to Queue Table to log to the DBC.SystemQtbl table.
Note that the Query ID is recorded and can be used to connect
information from the TDWMExceptionLog and the
DBQLSqlTbl.
3 [Optional] Enter a comment (maximum 120 characters) in the
text box.
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Table 37: Exception Action Fields/Controls (continued)
Field/Control
Action/Comment
Abort and Log
Select this control to log the exception and abort the request.
When you select this option, Raise Alert and Run Program are
enabled.
Abort on Select and Log
Select this control to log the exception and abort the request if it
contains only SELECT statement(s) and the current transaction
has not executed any UPDATE, DELETE, or INSERT statements.
Otherwise, select Continue and Log.
When you select this option, Raise Alert and Run Program are
enabled.
Setting Precedence
After you define two or more local or global exception directives, you can set the precedence.
Teradata DWM uses the precedence to determine the exception directives that are more
important to honor in the event of a conflict. For more information on the guidelines
Teradata DWM follows in the event of a conflict, see “Handling Concurrent Multiple
Exception Directives for a WD” on page 169.
Teradata DWM typically honors local exception directives before global exception directives.
Note that Teradata DWM does not consider precedence when evaluating exception directives.
Teradata DWM only considers precedence when performing the actions you specified.
To set precedence
1
196
On the Exception tab for a WD, or in the Global Exceptions view, select Precedence. The
Exception Precedence dialog box displays.
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Enabling or Disabling a WD
Figure 84: Exception Precedence Dialog Box
2
Select each exception directive as appropriate, and then select the up or down arrow to
arrange the exception directives in priority order.
3
Select OK to set the precedence and close the dialog box.
Enabling or Disabling a WD
When you create a WD, it is automatically enabled. You can toggle between disabling and
enabling the WD depending on the status of the workload you selected.
To disable/enable a Teradata DWM WD
1
Select the workload you want to enable in the Rules DIT.
2
From the Rules menu, select Workload > Disable Workload or Workload > Enable Workload.
OR
1
Right-click the rule in the Rule DIT.
2
Select Disable Workload or Enable Workload.
If disabled, a red X appears on the rule icon. If enabled, no red X displays on the rule icon.
from the shortcut menu. The red X disappears from the rule icon
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Modifying Existing WDs
You must save and activate the Teradata DWM Rule Set before changes to the status of a rule
take effect.
Modifying Existing WDs
After you save a WD, Teradata DWM allows you:
•
“To modify an existing WD” on page 198
•
“To create a new WD from an existing WD” on page 185
To modify an existing WD
1
Under Workloads on the DIT, click Classes, and then click the name of the WD you want
to update.
2
Click the appropriate tab for the type of information you want to modify.
3
•
For information about completing Workload Attributes, Classification, Workload
Period, see “Creating New WDs.”
•
For information about completing the Exception Criteria tab, see “To define exception
criteria” on page 190.
Click Accept to save your changes or Restore to start over.
Note: Accept and Restore become available after you have selected your changes for each
tab.
To rename and replace an existing workload
1
Under Workloads, select Classes and select the name of the WD you want to update.
2
On the Workload Attributes tab, select the name of the WD in the Name field.
3
Enter a new name for the WD in the Name field.
4
Select Accept. A confirmation dialog box appears.
5
Select Yes to confirm the name change and replace the selected WD with the renamed
WD.
The renamed WD displays under Classes in the DIT. The original WD is deleted.
Evaluation Order and WDs
Sometimes query characteristics can match classification aspects of several different WDs.
Teradata Database evaluates a query against WDs in the sequence you can specify. The first
WD matching the query characteristics is selected.
Typically, the same evaluation order applies to all operating environments. In some
circumstances, you may want the evaluation order to differ over operating environments.
It is recommended that you not use this feature, as it can have unintended results.
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Deleting a WD
Deleting a WD
Occasionally, you many want to remove a workload from the tdwm database.
To delete a WD
1
Select the workload you want to delete in the Rules DIT.
2
From the Rules menu, select Classes > Delete Workload.
OR
Select the WD you want to delete in the Rules DIT, and then press the Delete key.
OR
Right-click the rule in the Rules DIT, and then select Delete Workload from the shortcut
menu.
A confirmation box displays.
3
Click Yes to confirm the deletion.
You must save and activate the Teradata DWM Rule Set for the deletion to take effect. See
“Saving and Activating a Rule Set” on page 232 to learn how.
Sample WD Setup
Following is a simple example of how you might set up WDs.
Assume your Teradata Database system services both a CRM application and a payroll
application. Customer service representatives use the CRM application for fast answers to
simple queries and some longer-running analytic queries. Business analysts use the CRM
application to execute long running analytical queries.
The payroll application does not run often, but takes precedence over the CRM analytical
queries.
You decide to categorize queries into the following WDs:
•
CRM_TACTICAL (for customer service queries)
•
CRM_ANALYTICS (for business analyst queries)
•
PAYROLL
Assume that you use FastLoad to regularly load CRM data into the Teradata Database, and
you can load this data at a low priority. You use FastLoad to load payroll just before the payroll
application runs, and this load has a higher priority. You decide to categorize these data loads
into two additional WDs:
•
CRM_DATALOAD
•
PAYROLL_DATALOAD
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Mapping Console Utilities to WDs
Assume employees use the following account strings:
•
Customer service representatives: CRM1
•
Business analysts: CRM2
•
Payroll analysts: PAY
You might set up the WDs for your system as follows:
Table 38: Sample WD Setup
WD
Priority
Classification
Exceptions
Query Limit
CRM_TACTICAL
Tactical
• Account String: CRM1
• Maximum Estimated
Processing Time: < 10
seconds
• Tactical CPU Usage
Threshold: 5 seconds
• Change Workload:
CRM_ANALYTICS
Unlimited
CRM_ANALYTICS
Background
Account String: CRM1, CRM2
None
Set Limit: 5
PAYROLL
Normal
Account String: PAY
None
Set Limit: 20
CRM_DATALOAD
Background
• Account String: CRM2,
CRM2
• Utility Type: FastLoad
None
Unlimited
PAYROLL_DATALOAD
Normal
• Account String: PAY
• Utility Type: FastLoad
None
Unlimited
You do not assign query limits to FastLoad because you can use a utility throttle to control the
number of FastLoad jobs, and because most utility requests bypass the Dispatcher.
Mapping Console Utilities to WDs
You must map console utilities to a WD so thatTeradata DWM can prioritize them with other
work it manages.
You can map console utilities both by utility name and by the PG commonly used by the
utility, since the utilities vary in how they allow their default run-time priority to be changed.
Console utilities are assigned to run in a WD by using two mapping tables:
•
The Console Utility to Workload Mapping table, which maps a utility to a workload. For
example, Checktable is mapped to workload WD-Normal.
•
The Performance Group to Workload Mapping table, which maps a PG name to a
workload. For example, M is mapped to WD-ConsoleM.
Both tables are used in determining the workload for a utility.
Console utilities do not process work in the standard method (parsing, optimizing, and
dispatching). Instead, the default mapping is initialized to WD-Console-M for all utilities
except Recovery Manager, which is initialized to WD-Console-L. Teradata DWM maps the
standard PGs (L, M, H, and R) to predefined WDs. If you remove any of these predefined WDs
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Mapping Console Utilities to WDs
or mappings, or if Teradata DWM cannot find a PG to be mapped, the default mapping is to
the WD-Default workload.
Instead, each console utility runs in a default priority (usually $M), or has an option for the
user to set the priority. The Check table utility has the option PRIORITY=pgname. The
Ferret, Filer, Table Rebuild, and Recovery Manager utilities have the option to set the priority
to Low, Medium, or High. The syntax for setting priority in the console utilities is the same
with Teradata DWM as when it is inactive.
The following is the order of evaluation:
1
If a priority has specifically been set for the console utility using the utility syntax, the
priority name specified will be used to look up a workload mapping in the Performance
Group to Workload Mapping table. The utility will then run this workload.
Examples are:
•
Check all tables at level one PRIORITY=$HMKTG’;
•
RECOVERY PRIORITY HIGH
•
Ferret - Set priority = LOW
If the priority name ($HMKTG, HIGH, LOW) matches a PG name in the Performance
Group to Workload Mapping table, the utility will run in the workload mapped to the
name.
Note: LOW, MEDIUM, HIGH, and RUSH are equivalent to “L,” “M,” “H,” and “R” and
matches these names in the mapping table.
2
If there is no priority syntax for the utility, the utility checks for the utility name in the
Console Utility to Workload Mapping table. If there is a mapping for the utility, the utility
runs in the workload mapped to the utility.
3
If a workload has not been determined for the utility, the Performance Group to Workload
Mapping table is used to get the workload mapped to the default priority for the utility.
To map console utilities to WDs
1
Under Workloads in the DIT, expand Classes and click Console Utility.
The Workload Mapping and Performance Group Mapping tabs display.
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Figure 85: Workload Mapping Tab
2
3
Under Workload Mapping, first select a Console Utility. The utilities are:
•
Check Table
•
Configuration/Reconfiguration
•
Ferret
•
Query Configuration
•
Query Session
•
Recovery Manager
•
Table Rebuild
•
Filer
•
Replication Services
In the Workload Name list box, select the WD that is appropriate for the utility.
This list box contains the WDs you have created plus the predefined WDs (WD-ConsoleL,
WD-Default, and so on). Teradata DWM automatically sets all console utilities to the WDConsoleM (except for Recovery Manager, which defaults to WD-ConsoleL) until you
change the setting.
4
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Repeat step 2 and step 3 for each utility.
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Figure 86: Performance Group Mapping Tab
5
Click the Performance Group Mapping tab and under the Performance Group column,
select a PG.
6
Under Workload Name, select the WD that you want to associate with the PG. The
mappings for R, H, M, and L PGs default to WD-ConsoleR, WD-ConsoleH, WDConsoleM, and WD-ConsoleL.
7
To add a new PG, select New Perf Group. The New Performance Group dialog box displays.
Figure 87: Add Performance Group Dialog Box
8
Type in a the new PG name in the Performance Group to Map text box. Select a WD in the
the Workload to Map to drop-down list.
9
Click OK.
Note: For a report of console utility mappings, right-click Console Utilities and select Show.
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Using the Priority Scheduler View
Using the Priority Scheduler View
Teradata DWM provides a view that assembles all Priority Scheduler information for a state in
one dialog box. From this view, you can update existing values and create new values,
including:
•
“Defining System-Level Parameters” on page 208
•
“Mapping WDs to AGs” on page 210
•
“Creating New RPs” on page 211
•
“Creating New AGs” on page 213
•
“Deleting RPs” on page 214
•
“Deleting AGs” on page 214
•
“Moving AGs to Different RPs” on page 214
When you activate WDs, Teradata DWM creates its own Priority Scheduler configuration
based on the Priority Scheduler configuration already in place, and then modifies the
configuration to incorporate the requirements you define for the workloads and Priority
Scheduler configuration. Teradata DWM saves the original Priority Scheduler configuration
and restores it when you deactivate WD rules.
Note: When you activate WDs, you cannot use schmon and xschmon to make changes to
Priority Scheduler. Teradata DWM sets up the Priority Scheduler configuration based on the
Teradata DWM Rule Set.
PGs and AGs
Teradata DWM automatically defines a separate PG for each defined WD, primarily for system
usage logging, as the lower levels of the Teradata Database system are familiar with PGs but
not with WDs.
The Priority Scheduler only allows 40 PGs to be defined. Four PGs must be reserved for “L,”
“M,” “H,” and “R” in the Default RP. This leaves only 36 PGs for use by Teradata DWM. Of the
5 WDs predefined by TDWM, you must only retain WD-Default. This leaves 35 more WDs
that you can define for whatever purpose you choose.
Priority Scheduler can only effectively differentiate about 6-10 levels of work at the AG level.
Teradata DWM predefines 8 AGs. Four of the AGs are reserved for the default RP, and are
typically inactive (that is, no WD is assigned to it, and only some occasional, internal database
work goes there), so they are not considered part of the 6-10 levels of work. Teradata DWM
uses the other predefined 4 AGs for facilitating simpler, default Priority Scheduler settings (1
AG per enforcement priority).
Teradata DWM allows you to map multiple WDs (PGs) into AGs only when they have the
same enforcement priority. For example, you can map WDs with an enforcement priority of
Priority into AGs with an enforcement priority of Priority.
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When assigning AG Weights and when analyzing workload response time/throughput that
WDs mapped into the same AG must share the resources assigned by Priority Scheduler to the
AG, and different AGs in the same RP share resources.
RP Setup
The recommended (and default) RP setup includes two RPs, as well as the standard RP.
Table 39: Recommended RP Setup
RP
Weight
Description
Default
20
Internal Teradata Database work. It is strongly advised that you not map
any workloads to AGs in this partition.
Tactical
60
This RP holds only those AGs and workloads with a tactical enforcement
priority. This recommended setup assumes that tactical queries are highly
tuned and demonstrate these characteristics:
• Single or few-AMP queries only
• All-AMP queries that consumes less than 1 CPU second per node
The standard RP (default weight of 20) includes all other AGs and workloads. Benefits for
including all non-tactical AGs and workloads in the same partition include:
•
Distribution. Every AG is associated with a relative weight that tells Teradata Priority
Scheduler how much of the system resources to allocate to the requests running under that
AG. When no requests are running under that AG, the AG weight is given up first to the
other AGs within its RP; if no requests are active in the entire RP, the entire RP relative
weight is distributed to the other RPs and their AGs. When a tactical AG is inactive, it is
best if the unused relative weight is first distributed to the other tactical AGs in the system
rather than to lower priority AGs. This can be enforced as long as tactical AGs are held
exclusively in their own RP, separate from the other AGs.
•
Easier to understand priority differences among AGs.
•
Simpler to setup and tune.
•
Less complex when faced with growth.
•
Easier to share lower-priority WDs.
While you can create additional RPs, this is typically not necessary.
Modifying Priority Scheduler Settings for a State
To modify state parameters in the Priority Scheduler view
1
From the DIT, click Priority Scheduler. A view similar to the following displays.
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Figure 88: Priority Scheduler View
2
In the State list, select the state you want to view or modify.
You must always specify values for Base.
3
For any state other than Base, select Specify Values for this State to make changes. This
field is located above the Map WD to AG button and will be inactive when the Base state is
selected.).
Teradata DWM copies and displays the values for any state other than Base from the Base
state. Teradata DWM uses Base values as default values for other states for which you do
not specify values.
4
Enter values as appropriate for the following options.
Table 40: Priority Scheduler View Options
Option
Description
RP Name
Name assigned to the RP. Teradata DWM provides the following RPs:
• Default: reserved for internal Teradata Database work
• Tactical: Dedicated to tactical work
• Standard: Configured for all other work
Tactical and Standard can be deleted. Default cannot be deleted.
206
RP Weight
Required. Weight value for the number used to compute a relative weight
to determine the proportion of resources that the sessions controlled by
this RP are to receive.
RP Rel Wgt
Weight of this RP relative to the sum of the weights of all RPs.
RP CPU Limit
Optional. The percentage limit on total CPU usage (on each node by all
sessions controlled by this RP.
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Table 40: Priority Scheduler View Options (continued)
Option
Description
AG Name
Name of the AG:
• Required: L (Low), M (Medium), H (High), and R (Rush) in the Default
RP
• Tactical in the Tactical RP
• Background, Normal, and Priority in the Standard RP
Tactical, Background, Normal and Priority can be deleted. L, M, H, and R
cannot be deleted.
Teradata DWM replaces numbering of AGs with descriptive names to
reflect the workload priorities.
Priority
Priority (Background, Normal, Priority, and Tactical) associated with the
AG.
AG Weight
Required. Number Teradata DWM uses to compute the proportion of
resources each session receives.
Active
Dynamically recalculates the weight structure to help determine how to
assign weights. For example, this setting can be used to see the effect of no
WDs in an AG or if there are no queries active in the WD currently in the
AG. This setting has no effect on the operation of the Priority Scheduler or
Teradata ASM. By Default, all checkboxes are checked denoting that all
listed Priorities in the AGs are active.
To redistribute the weight, change the Active box setting. The weight
structure will dynamically recalculate.
The Active box setting can be:
• Unchecked to indicate that the WD is inactive. The %Within RP and Rel
Weight% associated with the WD will show a value of zero. The overall
weight structure calculation will use this value during recalculation.
• Checked to indicate that the WD is active. The %Within RP and Rel
Weight% associated with the WD will dynamically recalculate.
Note that the Active setting is not saved when the Rule Set is saved to a file
or database.
% Within RP
Percentage of the AG weight in relation to all AG weights in this RP.
Rel Wt%
Relative amount of all CPU time Teradata DWM allocates this AG.
AG CPU Limit
Optional. Percentage limit on total CPU usage on each node by all sessions
controlled by this AG.
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Table 40: Priority Scheduler View Options (continued)
Option
Description
Expedited
Indicates that work requests for sets controlled by the AG are to be
expedited through the AWT invocation procedures. Expedited work
requests have access to a pool of reserved AWTs that you dedicate for this
expedited work
This is typically enabled for AGs associated with WDs with Tactical
enforcement priority. Work requests controlled by the AG are favored over
unexpedited work requests controlled by other AGs during the invocation
procedure. Expedited work requests receive increased priority in the work
request input queue. They bypass normal work requests in the input
queue and have quicker access to an AWT.
Caution: Teradata recommends that only AGs supporting short
response-sensitive work, such as single-AMP operations, be
expedited. Work performed in this mode will have some
impact on resources available to non-expedited work. Use this
option judiciously.
WD’s
Names of workloads assigned to this AG.
To reduce the number of columns displayed so that you only see RP name, AG name,
priority and workload, select Hide Details. Hide Details excludes weights and details that
vary from period to period. Use this view to see the relationship between RPs, AGs, and
workloads more clearly.
Defining System-Level Parameters
The following procedure describes using Teradata DWM to set limits on CPU and AWTs for
Priority Scheduler Administrator from within Teradata DWM.
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To define system-level parameters
1
Select System Level Parameters. The Priority Scheduler System Level Parameters dialog
box displays.
Figure 89: Priority Scheduler System Level Parameters Dialog Box
2
Fill in the field/controls as follows.
Note that you must fill in these parameters for the Base state. Teradata DWM uses these
Base values as default values for other states for which you do not specify values.
Table 41: Priority Scheduler System Level Parameters Dialog Box Fields/Controls
Field/Control
Action/Comment
System CPU Limit
Percent
Optionally define a percentage value to limit the total amount of CPU
resources (per node) all the Teradata Database sessions use. This usage
does not include non-Teradata work, such as time-share users, I/O or
other interrupt services, Gateway processing, or streams work. This limit:
• Limits the total CPU resources consumed to a specified percentage
value
• Has no affect on the scheduling strategy defined by other Teradata
Priority Scheduler parameters
• Is applied separately on each individual node of the system
The range is 1 through 100. The default is 100. A value of 100 indicates
that no limit is to be enforced.
It is recommended that the value be left at 100. However, when you
upgrade the system, you may want to limit the response time
improvements the users see to maintain expectations at normal levels. To
do so, limit the amount of available CPU resources to represent just a little
over the size of the system before the upgrade, and gradually raise it back
to 100 as the workload and data volumes grow into the upgrade.
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Table 41: Priority Scheduler System Level Parameters Dialog Box Fields/Controls (continued)
Field/Control
Action/Comment
Reserved
Define the number of AWTs reserved within each AMP vproc for work
requests assigned to AGs with the Expedite attribute.
This reserve ensures that at least this specified number of AWTs are ready
to service a work request when it arrives. When the number of expedited
work requests exceeds this reserve, arriving expedited work requests might
be forced to wait in an input queue, depending on overall work load
conditions. This reserve determines the minimum number of expedited
work requests that will run concurrently.
This reserve, multiplied by three, is deducted from the general pool of
AMP work tasks and impacts the number of tasks available for normal
non-expedited work requests.
The range is 0 through 10. The default is 0.
It is recommended that you enable the Expedite attribute plus this setting
only as a last resort, and only if you determined that a shortage of AWTs is
impacting tactical query response times. Pursue other means of
preventing AWT exhaustion, such as setting query limits (concurrency
throttles) on lower priority workloads before changing the default. If the
default must change:
• Initially select a low number (1-3).
• Expedite only AGs supporting short, response-sensitive queries.
For more information, see the Priority Scheduler chapter of the Teradata
Utilities documentation.
Limit
Define the maximum number of AMP work tasks (AWTs) that can run at
any time. The number of tasks that run might be less than this maximum,
depending on the current limit.
The range is 0 through 120. The default is 80.
There is a global setting outside of Teradata DWM. If the global setting is
less than 120 (for example 100) and there is a Rule Set with a Limit value
for a state that is greater than 100, then the Rule Set activation will fail.
In case there is an activation failure, inspect the dbc.tdwmeventlog log
table for more information and see the Priority Scheduler chapter of
Utilities.
3
When finished, select OK to save your settings and return to the Priority Scheduler view.
Mapping WDs to AGs
Teradata DWM automatically assigns each WD to an AG based on the enforcement priority
that you specified when you created the workload. You can modify the assigned AG in the Map
WD to AG dialog box.
The AGs are weighted to determine the amount of resources allocated to workloads associated
with those groups. Workloads are mapped to the same AG for all states; however, the
weighting of AGs may differ over a specific state.
For more information on mapping WDs to AGs, see “PGs and AGs” on page 204.
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To map WDs to AGs
1
Under Priority Scheduler in the DIT, click Map WD to AG.
The Choose AG for Workload dialog box displays.
Figure 90: Choose AG for Workload Dialog Box
2
Under Workloads at Each Enforcement Priority Level, find the name of the workload that
you want to change.
Workloads are listed under the enforcement priority defined for the workload in the
Workload Attributes tab.
3
Under Allocation Groups at Priority Level of Workload, click the new AG that you want for
the workload and click OK.
Notice that the Priority Scheduler window is remapped, placing the workload in the WD’s
column associated with the new priority level.
4
On the Priority Scheduler window, click Accept to save your changes. To reject your
changes, click Restore.
Creating New RPs
You can define up to five new RPs to set up different behavior for workloads in the Priority
Scheduler view.
For RP setup recommendations, see “RP Setup” on page 205.
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To create a new RP
1
Click the New RP button.
2
The New Resource Partition dialog box displays.
Figure 91: New Resource Partition Dialog Box
3
Fill in fields/controls as follows.
Table 42: New Resource Partition Dialog Box
Field/Control
Action/Comment
RP Name
Enter the name of the RP.
You can enter up to 16 characters.
Weight
Enter the RP weight.
To modify the current value:
1 Press the Backspace key as needed to erase the current value.
2 Type in a new value.
CPU Limit
Enter the CPU limit for the RP.
To modify the current value:
1 Press the Backspace key as needed to erase the current value.
2 Type in a new value.
Description
Enter a description of the RP.
You can enter up to 80 characters.
4
Select OK to close the New Resource Partition dialog box.
The new RP appears in a new row in the Priority Scheduler view.
5
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On the Priority Scheduler window, click Accept to save your changes. To reject your
changes, click Restore.
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Creating New AGs
You can define a new AG for managing your workloads in the Priority Scheduler view.
To define a new AG
1
Click the New AG button. The New Allocation Group dialog box displays.
Figure 92: New Allocation Group Dialog Box
2
Fill in fields/controls as follows.
Table 43: New Allocation Group Dialog Box Controls
Field/Control
Action/Comment
AG Name
Enter the name of the AG.
Enter up to 16 characters. You can use alphanumeric, dash (-),
underscore (_), and dollar sign ($) characters.
Expedited
Indicate that, because the workload is tactical, Teradata DWM will run
it at a high priority. This control is only available with the Tactical
enforcement priority.
Weight
Enter the AG weight.
To modify the current value:
1 Press the Backspace key as needed to erase the current value.
2 Type in a new value.
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Table 43: New Allocation Group Dialog Box Controls (continued)
Field/Control
Action/Comment
CPU Limit
Enter the CPU limit for the AG.
To modify the current value:
1 Press the Backspace key as needed to erase the current value.
2 Type in a new value.
Description
Enter an AG description.
You can enter up to 80 characters.
Enforcement Priority
Select the enforcement priority for the new AG.
Note: Combining AGs with tactical and nontactical priority in the
tactical RP is not recommended practice. If Tactical is selected, select
Expedited to indicate that, because the workload is tactical, Teradata
DWM will run it at a high priority.
Resource Partition
Select the RP for the new AG.
3
Select OK to close the New Allocation Group dialog box.
4
On the Priority Scheduler window, click Accept to save your changes. To reject your
changes, click Restore.
Deleting RPs
If AGs are associated with an RP you want to delete, you must reassign or delete them before
deleting the RP.
To delete an RP
✔ Select the RP you want to delete, and then select Delete RP.
Deleting AGs
If WDs are associated with the AG you want to delete, you must reassign or delete them before
deleting the AG.
To delete an AG
✔ Select the AG you want to delete, and then select Delete AG.
Moving AGs to Different RPs
You can change the association between an AG and an RP in the Priority Scheduler view.
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To move AGs to different RPs
1
Click the Move AG button. The Move Allocation dialog box displays.
Figure 93: Move Allocation Dialog Box
2
Under Allocation Groups in Each Resource Partition, click the AG you want to reassign.
3
Under Resource Partitions, click the RP to which you want to assign the AG.
4
Click OK.
Notice that the Priority Scheduler view now reflects the change in assignments by placing
the AG in the new RP.
5
On the Priority Scheduler window, click Accept to save your changes. To reject your
changes, click Restore.
Moving AGs with Tactical Priority and Special Conditions
When an AG has tactical enforcement priority and one or more WDs mapped to that AG have
an exception criterion of Tactical CPU Usage Threshold (per node) greater than zero, special
conditions must be met before you can move that AG to another RP.
For ease of understanding, the following terminology is defined:
•
Special tactical WD: a WD with tactical enforcement priority and an exception criterion of
Tactical CPU Usage Threshold (per node) greater than zero
•
Destination WD: The WD you specify for a Change Workload exception action.
Special tactical WDs must have a destination WD in the same RP as the WD. For a WD with
any other enforcement priority, the destination WD can be any other WD.
Before saving a Rule Set (either to the database or to a file), Teradata DWM verifies that each
special tactical WD has a destination WD in the same RP. If a single special tactical WD exists
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in an RP, you must create a second tactical WD in the RP so that the special tactical WD can
have a different destination WD. Teradata DWM can save the Rule Set after this condition is
met.
When the conditions are met to save a Rule Set, you cannot move the AG that contains the
special tactical WD between RPs. If you attempt to move the AG containing the special tactical
WD, an error message displays. You must change the WDs as indicated on the error message,
move the AG, and then restore the WDs.
Example of error message:
Allocation Group AG-XYZ has one or more workloads that have CPU Time Per
Node Exceptions specified.
Some of these Workloads have an Exception Action to Change the Workload
to a Workload in a different Allocation Group. This move would violate
conditions in the Priority Scheduler.
Before this Allocation Group can be moved to a different Resource
Partition: Either move the Workload(s) to a different Allocation Group,
or Remove the CPU Time Per Node Exception Criterion (set to 0) from all
WD’s mapped to this AG\n. Move the AG to the desired RP and restore the
CPU Time Per Node Exception Criterion to the desired value.
Comparing Weights
Teradata DWM provides a version of the Compare Weights option that is similar to Priority
Scheduler Administrator in Teradata Manager. This option provides a table of RPs and their
associated AGs, with their assigned and relative weights. Teradata DWM assigns names to the
AGs instead of AG IDs, making it easier to distinguish them.
To compare weights in Teradata DWM
1
Perform either of the following:
•
On the Rules menu, select Priority Scheduler > Compare Weights.
•
Right-click Priority Scheduler on the DIT, and then select Compare Weights.
The Assigned Weights dialog box displays so that you can select the appropriate AGs.
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Figure 94: Assigned Weights Dialog Box
2
Select the state.
3
In the Resource Partitions window, only active AGs within the RP will be listed. If none of
the AGs are active, the RP will not display in the list. Under Resource Partitions, click the
RP name.Then, either click an individual AG under Allocation Groups and click the Add
button or click Add All to select all AGs for the RP.
4
When all the appropriate information appears under Selected AGs, click OK.
The Compare Weights of Selected Allocation Groups view displays as in the sample below,
showing a column of weight values.
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Figure 95: Sample Compare Weights View
You can now also select Priority Scheduler > Base - Weights to access this view.
5
To view distribution of weights in a graph, click Visualize.
You can now also select Priority Scheduler > Weights - Graph to access this view.
Figure 96: Pictorial Representation of the Weights
6
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To display weight values for an AG in the graph display, pause the mouse cursor over the
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Deleting WDs
To delete Base - Weights or Weights - Graph on the Rules DIT, select the item and press
Delete.
Deleting WDs
In the Console Utility view, the user can assign workloads to console utilities and PGs. Verify
that neither use a WD before attempting to delete it. Otherwise, a warning message will
appear.
To delete a WD
1
From the Rules DIT, right-click the name of the WD you want to delete.
2
Select Delete from the shortcut menu.
Tuning WDs
Use this table as a quick-reference to tune your WDs so that you can meet SLGs.
Table 44: Tuning Your WDs
Issue
Potential Solution
Accounting granularity is too small for the
workload, for example, many similar
workloads generate only fractional percents
of usage each.
Merging multiple workloads into one workload.
You are having difficulty pinpointing issues.
Split a workload into two or more distinct workloads.
Be careful not to create too many different workloads.
Managing more than between 10 and 20 workloads
can be difficult.
SLGs are not being met for some of the
queries within a workload AND the queries
within the workload are highly
heterogeneous.
• If the issue is with all queries, adjust Priority
Scheduler weights.
• If the issue is with certain types of queries, split the
workload into two or more workloads.
For example, if your groupings include queries
with different operational characteristics (such as
quick, tactical queries mixed with long-running
strategic queries), separating the two types into
different workloads lets you define appropriate
allocations for each type of workload.
Be careful not to create too many different
workloads. Managing more than between 10 and
20 workloads can be difficult.
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Table 44: Tuning Your WDs (continued)
Issue
Potential Solution
Lower priority requests take over resources
required for higher priority requests and/or
overload your system
• Define an object throttle rule with limits on
queries, and link the low priority Priority
Scheduler PGs you want to limit.
• Define a workload query (throttle) limit for low
priority workloads.
• Define an exception for workloads to abort queries
that are out of character for the workload and/or
that cause performance issues (for example, high
skew or high CPU/IO ratio, or high CPU
consumption).
Queries classified into a workload are not
always accurate.
Adjust classification criteria or exception criteria.
Requests classified into a workload are
impacted by a few problem requests also
classified in that workload.
Add exception criteria and exception actions to abort,
alert or move problem requests to another workload.
Workload performance is impacted by
external system conditions or other
workloads.
• Add system condition event with an action to
change to a different system condition, and assign
the system condition event to a new state with
different working values.
• Add concurrency throttles on lower priority work.
• Add exception criteria and exception actions to
abort, alert or move problem requests to another
workload.
All workloads sharing an AG are not
meeting SLGs.
Adjust Priority Scheduler weights.
One of the workloads sharing an AG with
other workloads is not meeting SLGs.
Add concurrency throttles to distribute share of the
AG allocation appropriately among the workloads.
A tactical workload is not meeting SLGs.
• Increase the weight of the tactical AG.
• Use the Expedite option to allow the workload to
utilize the AWT reserve pool.
• Define one or more object throttles to limit nontactical queries.
Creating a Lower Priority WD
In some cases, you might want to use a lower priority WD to improve resource control for
workloads. This WD is mapped to an AG that receives a very low priority (background) with
low weight and a low CPU Limit value. This results in the lower-priority requests receiving a
very small allocation of system resources—typically from two to three percent. Lower-priority
WDs are appropriate for resource-intensive requests that you must allow to run but want to
do so without draining resources from higher-priority requests.
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Viewing Workload Summaries
Nevertheless, requests that qualify for lower-priority treatment can still impact other
workloads, particularly when running on overburdened systems. Even though the WD can
limit CPU consumption, it cannot control usage of other resources such as disk, memory,
spool, AWTs, and locks. A resource-intensive request might not only use a large share of these
resources but also might be slow to relinquish them because doing so would require them to
have a larger share of the CPU. Consequently, high-priority requests might still have to wait
on the resource-hungry requests to complete to get the other resources they need.
You can alleviate this problem somewhat by using classification criteria to detect resourcedemanding queries before they begin execution and then applying throttles to limit the
number of low-priority requests holding onto critical resources. This reduces the chance that
lack of resources will affect the higher-priority requests.
If you decide to use a lower-priority approach within your workload management plan, it is
recommended that you keep it to a single lower-priority workload and its dedicated AG
within the standard RP.
Viewing Workload Summaries
For a quick reference to existing WDs, Teradata DWM provides a summary listing WD
settings by operating environment. This summary is similar to the one displayed for an
individual WD except that it:
•
Groups settings for a specific operating environment
•
Includes the enforcement priority setting
•
Provides the Evaluation Order button to arrange the listing as needed
For information on workload evaluation order and viewing workload summaries, see
“Evaluation Order and WDs” on page 198.
Viewing WD Information
Teradata DWM provides the capability of displaying information about workload periods or
definitions to the screen, saving it to a text file, or sending it to a printer. For details, see
“Displaying Rule Set Definitions” on page 234.
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CHAPTER 9
Managing Teradata DWM Rules
After you create your rules and associated Teradata Database objects with them, you can
further manage rules using the Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager. Read through these
topics to learn how to manage Teradata DWM rules:
•
Defining Global Rule Parameters
•
Controlled Access to tdwm Database and Functions
•
Activating Rule Categories
•
Viewing Active Rule Categories
•
Creating a New Rule Set
•
Saving and Activating a Rule Set
•
Loading a Rule Set
•
Deleting Rule Sets
•
Displaying Rule Set Definitions
Defining Global Rule Parameters
The following parameters affect how rules perform on your Teradata Database.
•
Intervals (Intervals tab)
You can set WD and event intervals
•
Blocker detection (Blocker tab)
You can set blocker detection processing criteria to handle potential block situations
involving queries that Teradata DWM delays. This applies to a blocking situation that can
occur when individual requests within multi-request transactions are delayed through the
use of concurrency throttles. For more information, see “Object Throttles” on page 138.
•
Minimum explain confidence level (Estimates tab)
Teradata Database uses this global parameter to determine if the Optimizer estimates are
of sufficient accuracy (or confidence) to be used in making rule decisions. The Optimizer
typically makes a lower estimate and a higher estimate for most steps in the execution plan
of the request, and each step has its own confidence level. Teradata DWM always uses the
lower estimates, if both are available. If the confidence level of the Optimizer’s lower
estimate is below the Teradata DWM confidence level, Teradata DWM ignores the
estimates. This impacts the evaluation of query resource filters, object throttles, and WDs.
Note that collecting statistics benefits the accuracy of Optimizer estimates and their
associated confidence levels.
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Defining Global Rule Parameters
Before creating new rules, define these global parameters. They are saved with the rules when
a Rule Set is saved.
To view, save, or print global rule parameters, see “Displaying Rule Set Definitions” on
page 234.
To define global rule parameters
1
When logging into Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager, it will open to the global
settings view, with the Intervals tab selected by default. If not, click Settings in the Rules
DIT and select the Intervals tab.
Figure 97: Rule Set Intervals Tab
2
Fill in the fields/controls as follows to set intervals.
Table 45: Interval Fields/Controls
Field/Control
Action/Comment
Dashboard Interval
Specify how often summary data is saved to a “completed” cache and
reset for use by the Teradata Manager dashboard.
Valid values are 1 to 600 seconds. Dashboard reports are refreshed every
60 seconds.
Note that the Logging Interval you set determines when Teradata DWM
writes all rows in the “completed” cache to the Summary log.
Event Interval
Specify how often Teradata Database asynchronously checks for current
time and system condition values.
Valid values are 1 to 3600 seconds. Default is 180 seconds.
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Table 45: Interval Fields/Controls (continued)
Field/Control
Action/Comment
Exception Interval
Specify how often the Teradata Database asynchronously checks queries
executing within the current set of WDs to determine if they meet the
exception criteria. This interval is also used for the Teradata DWM block
detection interval.
Valid values are 1 to 3600 seconds. Default is 600 seconds.
A shorter exception interval means a quicker identification and
automated action on an exception condition. But a shorter interval, a
larger system and a heavier workload can create greater exception
monitoring overhead.
If you set an exception interval less than 30 seconds on a large system
that experiences heavy demand, monitor the TDWMEventLog to assure
that Async exception monitoring out of sync… error
messages do not occur. If they occur, increase the exception interval until
the error message is no longer logged.
If you did not define exception criteria for your workloads, you can
minimize exception monitoring overhead by setting this interval closer
to the maximum value of 3600 seconds. Note that a longer exception
interval impacts the ability of Teradata DWM to detect and resolve
blocking situations on a timely basis.
Logging Interval
Specify how often event, exception, summary, and detail log table entries
are written to disk from the memory cache where the data is collected.
Valid values are 1 to 3600 seconds. Default is 600 seconds.
Note: This interval impacts when statistical/logging data is available in
the DBQL/Teradata DWM log tables. Logging statistics are not available
for use until memory cached buffers are flushed based on the time you
specify for this interval. Because cache flushing contributes to Teradata
Database overhead, do not set this interval to a low value.
3
Click Accept.
4
Select the Blocker tab to set blocker detection processing criteria.
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Defining Global Rule Parameters
Figure 98: Rule Set Blocker Tab
5
Fill in the fields/controls as follows.
Table 46: Blocker Fields/Controls
Fields/Controls
Action/Comment
Block Cycles
Specify the number of Teradata Database block detection cycles in which
a delayed query is identified as a blocker of already executing queries
before an action is taken on the delayed query.
Valid values are zero through three. Zero indicates that no block
detection is used.
It is recommended that you set this control to a value other than zero,
and that you set Block Action to Release. This gives the system a good
chance to resolve the block in a normal manner first. After that time, if
the blocking request is released, a lock needed by any other requests is
freed.
The only disadvantage is that the concurrency limits are a little softer (for
example, if the concurrency limit is set to five, the system may
occasionally run six or more queries). Additionally, an exception action
that moves a request to a workload with a concurrency limit defined
could result in momentarily exceeding that new workload concurrency
limit. Consider monitoring concurrency levels with dashboard or trend
reporting for softness.
Note: Define the block checking interval by using the Exception Interval
on the Intervals tab.
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Table 46: Blocker Fields/Controls (continued)
Fields/Controls
Action/Comment
Block Action
Indicate the action on a delayed query that Teradata DWM identifies as a
blocker for the specified number of block cycles.
Options are:
• Log
• Abort
• Release
Aborted or released queries are also logged. The information is logged in
the TDWMExceptionLog.
Note: Queries cannot be released if their Block Cycles value is zero or if
they disabled administrator override.
6
Click Accept.
7
Select the Estimates tab to set the minimum explain confidence level.
Figure 99: Rule Set Estimates Tabs
8
Select one of the following controls.
Table 47: Estimates Tab Controls
Control
Description
High
Ignore all cost estimates below a high confidence level.
Medium
Ignore all cost estimates below a medium (index) confidence level
Low
ignore all cost estimates below a low confidence level.
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Controlled Access to tdwm Database and Functions
Table 47: Estimates Tab Controls (continued)
9
Control
Description
None
Use all cost estimates. This is the default.
Click Accept.
10 Continue with “Saving and Activating a Rule Set” on page 232 to activate your global
parameters.
Controlled Access to tdwm Database and
Functions
Only one user can write to the tdwm database and issue tdwm commands at a time. Access is
controlled by a lock on a table in the tdwm database. You can only save modifications to
workload rules if you obtain an exclusive lock on the TDWM.TDWMLock table. If no other
users are performing tasks that place exclusive locks on the table when you start Teradata
DWM, you can modify the Teradata DWM tables. If not, the following Rules menu options
are unavailable, and Teradata DWM displays a message indicating that you cannot modify the
tdwm database:
•
Activate
•
Delete
•
Save
Although you can still load Rule Sets from the database, modify the Rule Sets locally, and save
the Rule Set definition to a file, you cannot write any changes back to the database. To attempt
to acquire a lock after application startup, use the Request TDWM Lock command on the File
menu. When you finish your modifications and are ready to allow others to modify the
database, click Release TDWM Lock on the File menu.
Note: If the Teradata Database crashes or resets while Teradata DWM is running, the lock is
released. Save any changes to your current Rule Set to a file, and start a new Teradata DWM
session. See “Saving and Activating a Rule Set” on page 232.
Note: When the Teradata DWM GUI aborts abnormally, the lock can be left on the tdwm
database. This lock will not allow subsequent instances Teradata DWM to update the
database. In this case, an error message appears, stating that the database is locked and can
only be used in read-only mode.
To unlock the lock in this situation:
1
Start Teradata Manager and log on to the database as appropriate. For details see Teradata
Manager User Guide.
2
From the Teradata Manager menu, point to Administer and select BTEQ Window.
3
When the window appears, type:
sel * from TDWM.TDWMLock;
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Notice that the BTEQ session fails to respond. This is expected.
4
From the Teradata Manager menu, point to Monitor, Sessions, and select Blocked.
5
In the resulting dialog box, locate the BTEQ session that you attempted to initiate in the
Blocked Sessions window. This will be a Teradata DWM user. Notice the information
displayed under Logon Source to verify that you have located the correct session.
6
When verified, abort the blocked session. To do this, right-click the session and point to
Abort Session.
7
To find additional Teradata DWM sessions with the same logon source, under Filter, select
All. Abort each Teradata DWM session logged on to the same server.
This removes the TDWM lock.
8
If Teradata DWM is currently running, select Request TDWM Lock from the File menu; if
not, restart Teradata DWM.
If you deplete the Monitor partition on the database server, and cannot use Teradata Manager
to view or abort the Teradata DWM sessions, use the Teradata Manager Remote Console to
abort the Monitor session(s) first. For information about aborting the Monitor session, see
Teradata Manager User Guide.
Activating Rule Categories
Each Teradata DWM rule category can be activated separately to achieve the appropriate level
of workload management and avoid incurring unnecessary overhead.
You can activate a different Rule Set or activate different Rule categories in the currently active
Rule Set.
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Viewing Active Rule Categories
To activate rule categories
1
From the Rules menu, choose Rule Sets > Activate. The Activate Rule Set dialog box
displays similar to the following.
Figure 100: Activate Rule Set Dialog Box
2
Choose one or more of the controls for each category.
Or, select Disable All to deactivate all rule categories.
3
If any categories are active, the currently active Rule Set name is selected in the list box.
You can select another Rule Set if rule categories for that rule set need to be activated.
4
Select OK to close the dialog box.
A message box appears indicating the categories were successfully activated.
5
Select OK to close the message box.
Viewing Active Rule Categories
You can view the categories of rules that are active/inactive on your Teradata Database for the
current Rule Set.
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Creating a New Rule Set
To view enabled rule categories
1
From the Rules menu, select Rule Sets > Inquire. The Rule Set Inquiry dialog box displays
similar to the following.
Figure 101: Sample Rule Set Inquiry Dialog Box
The ID field contains an internal Teradata Database number associated with the Rule Set.
2
Select OK to close the dialog box.
Creating a New Rule Set
Selecting the New Rule Set option on the Rule Sets menu sets up a new Rule Set based on
default settings and named NewWDSet by default. You can modify these settings and save the
Rule Set under a unique name to define a new Rule Set. For information about saving Rule
Sets, see “Saving and Activating a Rule Set.”
To create a new Rule Set
1
From the Rules menu, select Rule Sets > New Rule Set.
Default values appear in the properties pane and the title bar displays NewRuleSet.
2
Define the following for your new Rule Set:
•
Events and states. See “Chapter 6 Working with Events and States” on page 99.
•
Global settings. See “Defining Global Rule Parameters” on page 223.
•
Filters or throttles. See “Creating or Modifying a Filter” on page 126.
•
WDs. See “Controlling Activity with WDs” on page 170.
•
Mappings of console utilities, AGs, or PGs to workloads. See “Mapping Console
Utilities to WDs” on page 200 and “Using the Priority Scheduler View” on page 204.
Note: If you try to save an existing Rule Set that includes a new workload with the same name
as a workload that you previously deleted in that Rule Set, the new workload uses the same
WlcId in the tdwm.wlcdefs table as the previously deleted workload.
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Saving and Activating a Rule Set
For example, suppose that you already defined a Rule Set rs1 that contained a workload wd1
with ID=5, which you later deleted. Then assume that a user loads rs1 and creates a new
workload named wd1. The new wd1 uses ID=5 instead of a new ID.
Saving and Activating a Rule Set
After you create and enable events and states, filters, throttles, and workloads, you must save
them to the tdwm database.
If you want the changes to your Rule Set to take effect immediately, you must activate the Rule
Set. Activating loads the data in the tdwm database into the Dispatcher components of the
Teradata Database that control Teradata DWM functions.
To save and activate a Rule Set
1
From the Rules menu, select Rule Sets > Save to Database.
2
In the Save Rule Set dialog box, select the appropriate option:
•
Select Save with Current Name to save the Rule Set with the name displayed in the text
box (the name cannot be change here).
•
Select Save as New Rule Set and type a unique name for your Rule Set.
Note: Enter up to 30 characters for the name of the Rule Set. You can use alphanumeric,
dash (-), underscore (_), and dollar sign ($) characters.
3
Select OK to close the dialog box.
Teradata DWM displays a message indicating whether the save was successful.
Note: If you attempt to save a Rule Set before defining any rules, Teradata DWM displays
an error message dialog box.
4
From the Rules menu, select Rule Sets > Activate.
Loading a Rule Set
You can load an existing Rule Set from Teradata DWM.
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Deleting Rule Sets
To load a Rule Set
1
From the Rules menu, select Rule Sets > Load from Database. The Load Rule Set dialog
box displays similar to the following.
Figure 102: Sample Load Rule Set Dialog box
2
Either select the Load Active check box for the currently active Rule Set, or select a Rule Set
in the list box.
Note: The Load Active check box is unavailable if no Rule Set is active in the database.
3
Select OK.
The dialog box closes automatically and Teradata DWM displays a message indicating
whether or not Rule Set loading was successful.
Deleting Rule Sets
Remove obsolete Rule Sets that are no longer needed using the Delete function on the Rule
Sets menu.
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Displaying Rule Set Definitions
To delete a Rule Set
1
From the Rules menu, choose Rule Sets > Delete.
Figure 103: Delete Rule Set
2
In the list box, select the Rule Set you want to delete and select OK.
Note: The currently active Rule Set does not appear in the Delete Rule Set list box because
you cannot delete the currently active Rule Set.
Displaying Rule Set Definitions
You can view information about individual system regulation settings or global rule
parameters, individual rules, rule types, and the entire Rule Set in a formatted report or as
plain text. You can save this information to a file or send it to a printer.
You can also view Rule Set values by state.
To display formatted Rule Set information
✔ To display formatted information for global rule parameters you defined, perform either
of the following:
•
Right-click on Settings in the Rules DIT and select Show.
•
Select Settings in the Rules DIT, then select Show from the Rules menu.
✔ To display formatted information for an individual rule you defined, perform either of the
following:
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Displaying Rule Set Definitions
•
Right-click on the rule in the Rules DIT and select Show.
•
Select the rule in the Rules DIT, then select Show from the Rules menu.
✔ To display formatted information for a rule type (for example, query resource filter),
perform either of the following:
•
Right-click on the rule type in the Rules DIT and select Show.
•
Select the rule in the Rules DIT, then select Show from the Rules menu.
✔ To display formatted information for a rule category (for example, throttles), perform
either of the following:
•
Right-click on the rule category in the Rules DIT and select Show.
•
Select the rule in the Rules DIT, then select Show from the Rules menu.
✔ To display information for the entire Rule Set, select Show All from the Rules menu.
To save or print formatted Rule Set information
1
Display the Rule Set information. See To display formatted Rule Set information.
2
Select Save or Print.
To display, save, or print plain text Rule Set information
1
Display the Rule Set information. See To display formatted Rule Set information.
2
Select Plain Text to display a plain text report.
3
Select one of the following:
•
OK to close the view
•
Save
•
Print
To view values by state
1
On the DIT, click System Regulation to access the System Regulation - State Matrix view.
2
Select a state and select Details.
OR
Right-click on a state and select Details.
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The Rule Set Values dialog box displays.
Figure 104: Rule Set Values Dialog Box
3
236
Select the button for the Rule Set you want to view for that state.
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
APPENDIX A
Teradata Database Result Codes
When Teradata DWM is activated, it enforces all Teradata DWM rules by examining all query
requests submitted to the Teradata Database. For user requests meeting a rule criteria,
Teradata DWM generates an error code and message.
Note: You can also use the Teradata Manager Remote console application to run the Teradata
DWM Dump utility in interactive mode. See Teradata Manager User Guide for more
information.
Read these topics for details:
•
Result Codes
•
Error Messages
Result Codes
Teradata DWM returns the following Teradata Database result codes when an error is
encountered.
Table 48: Teradata Database Result Codes for Teradata DWM
This error code…
Indicates the…
3149
Query request was rejected because of an Object Access Filter rule.
3150
Query request was rejected due to a Query Resource Filter rule.
3151
Query request was rejected because of an Object Throttle rule.
3152
Logon request was rejected due to an Object Access Filter rule.
3153
Logon request was rejected because of an Object Throttle rule.
3154
TDWM Workload Classes Not Enabled (not returned); for SET SESSION WD.
3155
TDWM Application Mapping Not Found (not returned); for console utilities.
3156
Request aborted by TDWM. Exception Criteria exceeded.
3162
TWM Limit for this utility type was exceeded (not returned); for utilities.
3163
TWM Limit for all utilities has been exceeded (not returned); for utilities.
3298
Request rejected, PMI/API SET SESSION ACCOUNT is not allowed with
TDWM Workload Classes.
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Appendix A: Teradata Database Result Codes
Error Messages
Error Messages
If any of the error codes are generated, Teradata DWM also builds an associated text message
with information about why the request was rejected. Messages are logged in the Teradata
DWM exception log (the DBC.TDWMExceptionLog table; its corresponding view is
DBC.QryLogExceptions).
The message includes the following information:
•
What type of rule was encountered
•
The numeric estimates and thresholds, if applicable
Note: When displaying an estimated value in an error message, the valued will be
constrained to eleven digits.
238
•
The name of the Teradata Database object involved, if applicable
•
An additional context object name, if a combination of objects was involved
•
The name of the current state
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APPENDIX B
Teradata DWM Dump Utility
Teradata DWM Dump is a command line utility you run from a Teradata Command Prompt
window. You use Teradata DWM Dump to view information about Teradata DWM rules
active on your Teradata Database system. To learn more about Teradata DWM Dump, browse
through these topics:
•
Overview
•
Using the Teradata DWM Dump Utility Command Line Option
•
Using Teradata DWM Dump Utility in an Interactive Mode
Overview
Using Teradata DWM, you can create, delete, modify, enable, disable, and save Teradata DWM
rules to the tdwm database at any time. You also use Teradata DWM to activate Teradata
DWM rule categories. You must make Teradata DWM rule categories active before they can be
used on your Teradata Database.
Any time you make changes to a rule, you need to save your Rule Set to the tdwm database,
and then apply the changes to your Teradata Database (by reactivating the rules categories)
before the rules are in effect on your Teradata Database.
Currently, Teradata DWM reads rules from the tdwm database and shows you only what has
been saved to the tdwm database. It does not show you which rule categories and rules have
been applied to your Teradata Database and which ones have not.
Teradata DWM Dump shows you which rules categories and rules information were read
from the tdwm database and stored in the Teradata DWM global data object (GDO) at the
time of the last rules activation. These are the rules that are currently in effect on your
Teradata Database.
Teradata DWM Dump reads and interprets the Teradata DWM global data object (gdo) file so
that you can see the following:
•
Active Teradata DWM configuration parameters
•
Active rule information
•
Active event and state information
•
Active workload classification information
•
Teradata DWM cache memory usage
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Appendix B: Teradata DWM Dump Utility
Using the Teradata DWM Dump Utility Command Line Option
You can run Teradata DWM Dump in an interactive mode or use a single command line
option to view all the available Teradata DWM information.
Using the Teradata DWM Dump Utility
Command Line Option
You can use a single command line option with Teradata DWM Dump to display all the
available Teradata DWM information to your monitor or stdout.
To use the Teradata DWM Dump command line option
✔ Enter the following:
C:Documents and Settings\Administrator>tdwmdmp -a > file
Where
•
-a or -A is the Teradata DWM Dump option
•
> file redirects stdout to file.
Using Teradata DWM Dump Utility in an
Interactive Mode
Running Teradata DWM Dump in an interactive mode lets you use menus to navigate and
view Teradata DWM information.
To use the Teradata DWM Dump command line option
✔ Enter tdwmdmp with no parameters as follows:
C:Documents and Settings\Administrator>tdwmdmp
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Appendix B: Teradata DWM Dump Utility
Using Teradata DWM Dump Utility in an Interactive Mode
The following information appears on your console window:
Figure 105: Teradata DWM Information Menu
If no Teradata DWM rules are active on your Teradata Database, the following message
appears:
C:Documents and Settings\Administrator>tdwmdmp
TDWM is not active.
About the Teradata DWM Information Menu
When you run Teradata DWM Dump in an interactive mode, you can use the following menu
items to navigate and view Teradata DWM information:
Table 49: Teradata DWM Information Menu Commands
Command
Description
Results
a
List All information
Shows all Teradata DWM information:
•
•
•
•
•
Configuration parameters
Rules
Events and states
Workload classification
Teradata DWM cache memory usage
c
List configuration information
Shows the Configuration Information submenu. See “About the
Configuration Information Submenu” on page 242 to learn more about the
Configuration Information submenu.
e
List events and states
information
Shows the Events and States Information submenu. See “About the Events
and States Information Submenu” on page 242 to learn more about Events
and States Information options
r
List rule information
Shows the Rules Information submenu. See “About the Rules Information
Submenu” on page 244 to learn more about the Rules Information options.
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Using Teradata DWM Dump Utility in an Interactive Mode
Table 49: Teradata DWM Information Menu Commands (continued)
Command
Description
Results
w
Workload Class Information
Shows the Workload Classification Information submenu. See “About the
Workload Classification Information submenu” on page 245 for more details.
m
List memory usage
Shows the memory cache sizes used by Teradata Database to keep the
Teradata DWM rules in memory. See “Viewing Memory Usage” on page 260
for details.
t
Display delay queue and throttle Shows the Delay Queue Statistics Information submenu. See “About the
statistics
Delay Queue Statistics Information submenu” on page 247.
+
Increment lines
Increases the number of lines that appear on a page.
-
Decrements lines
Decreases the number of lines that appear on a page.
x
Exit
Closes the Teradata DWM Dump utility.
About the Configuration Information Submenu
Using the c command from the Teradata DWM Information menu gives you access to the
Configuration Information submenu with the following commands:
Table 50: Configuration Information Submenu Commands
Command
Description
Results
c
List rule categories information
Shows information about the rule categories. See “Getting Details about
Rule Categories” on page 252 to learn more.
s
List current state information
Shows information about the current state. See “Navigating from the
Events and States Information Submenu” on page 261 to learn more.
v
List version/global information
Shows information about the versions and global settings. See “Getting
Details about Global Teradata DWM Parameters” on page 255 to learn
more.
w
List workload evaluation order
Shows the order in which the workload classes are currently being
evaluated. See “Navigating from the Workload Classification
Information Submenu” on page 284
x
Exit
Return to the previous menu.
About the Events and States Information Submenu
Using the e command from the Teradata DWM Information menu gives you access to the
Events and States Information submenu with the following commands:
Table 51: Events and States Information Submenu Commands
Command
Description
Results
e
List events
Shows the details about individual Teradata DWM events that have
been defined. See “Viewing Events” on page 262 to learn more.
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Table 51: Events and States Information Submenu Commands (continued)
Command
Description
Results
p
List (event) expressions (also called
event combinations)
Shows the Event Expressions Information submenu. See “Navigating
from the Event Expressions Information Submenu” on page 263 to
learn more.
a
List (event) actions
Shows the details about event actions that have been defined. See
“Viewing Actions” on page 270 to learn more.
u
List unresolved actions for
expressions
Shows any unresolved actions for expressions. See “Viewing Unresolved
Actions for Expressions” on page 271 to learn more.
c
List system conditions
Shows the details about System Conditions that have been defined. See
“Viewing System Conditions” on page 272 to learn more.
o
List operating environments
Shows the details about Operating Environments. See “Viewing
Operating Environments” on page 274 to learn more.
s
List composite states
Shows the details about (composite) States that have been defined. See
“Viewing Composite States” on page 275 to learn more.
m
List the states mapping matrix
Shows the details about how System Conditions and Operating
Environments have been mapped to (composite) States. See “Viewing
the Composite States Mapping Matrix” on page 276 to learn more.
x
Exit
Return to the previous menu.
About the Event Expressions Information Submenu
Using the e command from the Events and States Information submenu gives you access to
the Event Expressions Information submenu with the following commands:
Table 52: Event Expressions Information Submenu Commands
Command
Description
Results
n
List notify-only expressions
Shows the details about event expressions that only cause notification
actions. See “Navigating from the Event Expressions Information
Submenu” on page 263 to learn more.
o
List operating environment
expressions
Shows the details about event expressions that cause an operating
environment to become active. See “Viewing Operating Environmentdependent Parameters” on page 288 to learn more.
s
List system condition expressions
Shows the details about event expressions that cause system conditions
to become active. See “Viewing System Condition Expressions” on
page 266 to learn more.
t
List temporary expressions
Shows the details about raw event expression data before they are
processed in accord with their actions. See “Viewing Temporary
Expressions” on page 267 to learn more.
a
List expression actions
Shows the details about the event actions that are associated with the
selected expression. See “Viewing Expression Actions” on page 268 to
learn more.
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Table 52: Event Expressions Information Submenu Commands (continued)
Command
Description
Results
c
List expression conditions
Shows the details about event-related conditions that are associated
with the selected expression. See “Viewing Expression Conditions” on
page 269 to learn more.
x
Exit
Return to the previous menu.
About the Rules Information Submenu
Using the r command from the Teradata DWM Information menu gives you access to the
Rules Information submenu with the following commands:
Table 53: Rules Information Submenu Commands
Command
Description
Results
r
List non-global rules
Shows the details about individual non-global rules active on your
Teradata Database. See “Viewing Individual Teradata DWM Rules” on
page 281 to learn more.
o
List global rules
Shows the details about individual global Filter and Throttle rules active
on your Teradata Database. See “Viewing Individual Teradata DWM
Rules” on page 281 to learn more.
v
List rule values
Shows the state-dependent values for the selected rule. See “Navigating
from the Rules Information Submenu” on page 277 to learn more.
b
List bypassed objects
Shows objects for which rule checking is turned off. See “Viewing
Bypassed Objects” on page 277 to learn more.
a
List accounts
Shows the account objects associated with rules. See “Viewing Account
Objects” on page 278 to learn more.
s
List account strings
Shows the account strings (including any Performance Group
designation) associated with rules. See “Viewing Performance Groups”
on page 280 to learn more.
c
List client names
Shows the client names associated with rules. See “Viewing
Performance Groups” on page 280 to learn more.
d
List databases/tables
Shows the databases and database objects (tables, views, macros, stored
procedures) associated with rules. See “Viewing Databases/Tables” on
page 279 to learn more.
g
List performance groups
Shows the performance groups associated with rules. See “Viewing
Performance Groups” on page 280 to learn more.
l
List application names
Shows the application names associated with rules.
n
List network addresses
Shows network addresses associated with rules.
p
List profiles
Shows the profile objects associated with rules. See “Viewing Profiles”
on page 280 to learn more.
q
List query bands
Shows the query bands associated with queues.
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Table 53: Rules Information Submenu Commands (continued)
Command
Description
Results
u
List users
Shows the user objects associated with rules.
x
Exit
Return to the previous menu.
About the Workload Classification Information submenu
Using the w command from the Teradata DWM Information menu gives you access to the
Workload Classification Information submenu with the following commands:
Table 54: Workload Classification Information Submenu Commands
Command
Description
Results
c
List class information
Shows the Workload Class Information submenu. See “About the
Workload Class Information Submenu” on page 245 to learn more.
e
List exception information
Shows the Workload Exception menu. For more information, see
“About the Workload Exception Information Submenu” on page 246.
s
List Priority Scheduler information
Shows the Priority Scheduler Information submenu. For more
information, see “About the PSF (Priority Scheduler) Submenu” on
page 246.
p
List Performance Group mappings
Shows any Performance Group to workload class mappings.
u
List utility mappings
Shows any console utility to workload class mappings.
x
Exit
Return to the previous menu.
* Requires an item from the d option (List class definitions) to be
selected before entering this command.
About the Workload Class Information Submenu
Using the c command from the Workload Classification Information submenu gives you
access to the Workload Class Information submenu with the following commands:
Table 55: Workload Class Information Submenu Commands
Command
Description
Results
d
List Definitions
Shows the details about or definitions of the individual workload
classes. See “Navigating from the Workload Class Information
Submenu” on page 284 for more information.
e
List OpEnv exceptions
Shows the exceptions associated with the selected workload class for the
current operating environment.See “Viewing Defined Sets of Exception
Criteria” on page 286 to learn more.
c
List classification criteria
Shows the details about the classification criteria that are associated with
the selected workload class. See “Viewing Classification Criteria” on
page 287 to learn more.
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Table 55: Workload Class Information Submenu Commands (continued)
Command
Description
Results
o
List operating environment
dependent parameters
Shows the details about the parameters of the selected workload class
that are associated with the various operating environments. See
“Viewing Operating Environment-dependent Parameters” on page 288
to learn more.
s
List state-dependent parameters
Shows the details about the parameters of the selected workload class
that are associated with the various states. See “Viewing Statedependent Parameters” on page 290 to learn more.
v
List evaluation order
Shows the evaluation order for the selected workload class associated
with the various operating environments. See “Viewing Evaluation
Order” on page 291 to learn more.
x
Exit
Return to the previous menu.
About the Workload Exception Information Submenu
Using the e command from the Workload Classification Information submenu gives you
access to the Workload Exception Information submenu with the following commands:
Table 56: Workload Exception Information Submenu Commands
Command
Description
Results
a
List exception actions
Shows information about the workload exception actions. See “Viewing
Defined Sets of Exception Actions” on page 292 to learn more.
c
List exception criteria
Shows information about the workload exception criteria. See “Viewing
Defined Sets of Exception Criteria” on page 294 to learn more.
d
List exception directives
Shows information about the workload exception directives. See
“Viewing Workload Exception Directives” on page 294 to learn more.
w
List all wlc exceptions
Shows the workload exceptions associated with all workload classes for
all operating environments. See “Viewing Exception Directives for all
WDs/OpEnvs” on page 296 for more information.
x
Exit
Return to the previous menu.
About the PSF (Priority Scheduler) Submenu
Using the p command from the Workload Classification Information submenu gives you
access to the Workload Exception Information submenu with the following commands:
Table 57: Priority Scheduler Information Submenu Commands
Command
Description
Results
g
List global settings
Shows the global Priority Scheduler parameters that are associated with
the various states. See “Viewing the Global Settings Display” on
page 298 to learn more.
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Using Teradata DWM Dump Utility in an Interactive Mode
Table 57: Priority Scheduler Information Submenu Commands (continued)
Command
Description
Results
a
List allocation groups
Shows the Priority Schedule allocation groups and their associated
parameters that are associated with the various states. See “Viewing the
AGs Display” on page 299 to learn more.
r
List resource partitions
Shows the Priority Schedule resource partitions and their associated
parameters that are associated with the various states. See “Viewing RPs
in Current Workload Configurations” on page 300 to learn more
s
List saved settings
Shows the Priority Scheduler configuration that was saved when
TDWM was first activated for workload classification. See “Viewing the
Saved Settings Display” on page 302 to learn more
x
Exit
Return to the previous menu.
About the Delay Queue Statistics Information submenu
Using the t command from the Teradata DWM Information menu gives you access to the
Delay Queue Statistics Information submenu with the following commands:
To scroll within the submenu outputs screens, press Enter. To return to the Delay Queue
Information submenu, type x.
Table 58: Delay Queue Statistics Information Submenu Commands
Command
Description
Results
1
List object query Counts
Displays the following columns:
• TYPE The numeric representation of the object type, as used in the
Teradata DWM STATISTICS PMPC interface. For example, 1=user,
12=WLC (workload class).
• RULE/WLC <ID> NAME The name and internal identifier (ID) of
the Object Throttle rule or workload class (WLC) that is causing
requests to be throttled.
• OBJ NAME For requests throttled because of Object Throttle rules,
displays object names.
• SUB NAME For objects with qualified names (for example, tables
and macros) displays the name of the object. The OBJ NAME
column contains the qualifying database name.
• LIMIT The Query Limit for the Object Throttle rule or workload
class.
• ACTIV The number of requests that are currently active against the
Query Limit.
• DELAY The number of requests that are currently delayed (queued)
over the Query Limit.
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Table 58: Delay Queue Statistics Information Submenu Commands (continued)
Command
Description
Results
2
List object session Counts
Displays the following columns:
• TYPE The numeric representation of the object type, as used in the
Teradata DWM STATISTICS PMPC interface. For example, 1=user,
12=WLC (workload class).
• RULE/WLC <ID> NAME The name and internal identifier (ID) of
the Object Throttle rule or workload class (WLC) that is causing
requests to be throttled.
• OBJ NAME For requests throttled because of Object Throttle rules,
displays object names.
• SUB NAME For objects with qualified names (for example, tables
and macros) displays the name of the object. The OBJ NAME
column contains the qualifying database name.
• LIMIT The Query Limit for the Object Throttle rule or workload
class.
• ACTIV The number of requests that are currently active against the
Query Limit.
• DELAY The number of requests that are currently delayed (queued)
over the Query Limit.
3
List object query delay Queue
Displays the following columns:
USER NAME The name of the user that issued the delayed request.
HOST The host number of the delayed request.
SESSION The session number of the delayed request.
REQUEST The request number of the delayed request.
RULE/WLC <ID> NAME The name and internal identifier (ID) of
the Object Throttle rule or workload class (WLC) that is causing
requests to be throttled.
• DELAY The number of seconds that are request has been currently
delayed.
• OV Indicates whether the Administrator can override (release or
abort) the delayed request. A value of one indicates the ability to
override; a zero value indicates that no override is permitted.
• BL Indicates the number of consecutive intervals for the session in
which this request is running has been identified as blocking
requests that are already running.
•
•
•
•
•
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Table 58: Delay Queue Statistics Information Submenu Commands (continued)
Command
Description
Results
4
List WLC query Counts
Displays the following columns:
• TYPE The numeric representation of the object type, as used in the
Teradata DWM STATISTICS PMPC interface. For example, 1=user,
12=WLC (workload class).
• RULE/WLC <ID> NAME The name and internal identifier (ID) of
the Object Throttle rule or workload class (WLC) that is causing
requests to be throttled.
• OBJ NAME For requests throttled because of Object Throttle rules,
displays object names.
• SUB NAME For objects with qualified names (for example, tables
and macros) displays the name of the object. The OBJ NAME
column contains the qualifying database name.
• LIMIT The Query Limit for the Object Throttle rule or workload
class.
• ACTIV The number of requests that are currently active against the
Query Limit.
• DELAY The number of requests that are currently delayed (queued)
over the Query Limit.
5
List WLC query delay Queues
Displays the following columns:
USER NAME The name of the user that issued the delayed request.
HOST The host number of the delayed request.
SESSION The session number of the delayed request.
REQUEST The request number of the delayed request.
RULE/WLC <ID> NAME The name and internal identifier (ID) of
the Object Throttle rule or workload class (WLC) that is causing
requests to be throttled.
• DELAY The number of seconds that are request has been currently
delayed.
• OV Indicates whether the Administrator can override (release or
abort) the delayed request. A value of one indicates the ability to
override; a zero value indicates that no override is permitted.
• BL Indicates the number of consecutive intervals for the session in
which this request is running has been identified as blocking
requests that are already running.
•
•
•
•
•
6
List utility Counts
Displays the following columns:
• TYPE The abbreviated string representation of the utility type.
• LIMIT The lowest Utility Limit for all of the utility Throttle rules
associated with the utility, or the system default if there are no
associated rules for the utility.
• ACTIV The number of sessions that are currently active for the
utility.
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Table 58: Delay Queue Statistics Information Submenu Commands (continued)
Command
Description
Results
7
List utility delay Queues
Displays the following columns:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
x
exit
USER NAME The name of the user that issued the delayed request.
HOST The host number of the delayed request.
SESSION The session number of the delayed request.
REQUEST The request number of the delayed request.
RULE/WLC <ID> NAME The name and internal identifier (ID) of
the Object Throttle rule or workload class (WLC) that is causing
requests to be throttled.
DELAY The number of seconds that are request has been currently
delayed.
OV Indicates whether the Administrator can override (release or
abort) the delayed request. A value of one indicates the ability to
override; a zero value indicates that no override is permitted.
BL Indicates the number of consecutive intervals for the session in
which this request is running has been identified as blocking
requests that are already running.
IFPID The processor number which issued the request.
Return to the previous menu.
About the Workload Class Information Submenu
Using the c command from the Workload Classification Information submenu gives you
access to the Workload Class Information submenu with the following commands:
Table 59: Workload Class Information Submenu Commands
Command
Description
Results
d
List Definitions
Shows the details about or definitions of the individual workload
classes. See “Navigating from the Workload Class Information
Submenu” on page 284 for more information.
e
List OpEnv exceptions
Shows the exceptions associated with the selected workload class for the
current operating environment.See “Viewing Defined Sets of Exception
Criteria” on page 286 to learn more.
c
List classification criteria
Shows the details about the classification criteria that are associated with
the selected workload class. See “Viewing Classification Criteria” on
page 287 to learn more.
o
List operating environment
dependent parameters
Shows the details about the parameters of the selected workload class
that are associated with the various operating environments. See
“Viewing Operating Environment-dependent Parameters” on page 288
to learn more.
s
List state-dependent parameters
Shows the details about the parameters of the selected workload class
that are associated with the various states. See “Viewing Statedependent Parameters” on page 290 to learn more.
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Table 59: Workload Class Information Submenu Commands (continued)
Command
Description
Results
v
List evaluation order
Shows the evaluation order for the selected workload class associated
with the various operating environments. See “Viewing Evaluation
Order” on page 291 to learn more.
x
Exit
Return to the previous menu.
About the Workload Exception Information Submenu
Using the e command from the Workload Classification Information submenu gives you
access to the Workload Exception Information submenu with the following commands:
Table 60: Workload Exception Information Submenu Commands
Command
Description
Results
a
List exception actions
Shows information about the workload exception actions. See “Viewing
Defined Sets of Exception Actions” on page 292 to learn more.
c
List exception criteria
Shows information about the workload exception criteria. See “Viewing
Defined Sets of Exception Criteria” on page 294 to learn more.
d
List exception directives
Shows information about the workload exception directives. See
“Viewing Workload Exception Directives” on page 294 to learn more.
w
List all wlc exceptions
Shows the workload exceptions associated with all workload classes for
all operating environments. See “Viewing Exception Directives for all
WDs/OpEnvs” on page 296 for more information.
x
Exit
Return to the previous menu.
About the PSF (Priority Scheduler) Submenu
Using the p command from the Workload Classification Information submenu gives you
access to the Workload Exception Information submenu with the following commands:
Table 61: Priority Scheduler Information Submenu Commands
Command
Description
Results
g
List global settings
Shows the global Priority Scheduler parameters that are associated with
the various states. See “Viewing the Global Settings Display” on
page 298 to learn more.
a
List allocation groups
Shows the Priority Schedule allocation groups and their associated
parameters that are associated with the various states. See “Viewing the
AGs Display” on page 299 to learn more.
r
List resource partitions
Shows the Priority Schedule resource partitions and their associated
parameters that are associated with the various states. See “Viewing RPs
in Current Workload Configurations” on page 300 to learn more
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Table 61: Priority Scheduler Information Submenu Commands (continued)
Command
Description
Results
s
List saved settings
Shows the Priority Scheduler configuration that was saved when
TDWM was first activated for workload classification. See “Viewing the
Saved Settings Display” on page 302 to learn more
x
Exit
Return to the previous menu.
Getting Details about Rule Categories
Using the c command in the Configuration Information submenu, you can get details about
active rule categories. See “Activating Rule Categories” on page 229 to learn how to make rule
categories active.
To view details about Teradata DWM rule categories
1
Use the c command from the Teradata DWM Information menu to access the
Configuration Information submenu.
Figure 106: Teradata DWM Configuration Information Submenu
2
Use the c command from the Configuration Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears on your console window:
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Figure 107: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Rules Category Information
The output displayed on your console window consists of three sections:
•
The first section displays information about the rules defined using the Teradata DWM
Administration utility, by category.
•
The second section displays information about rules defined dynamically by
Replication Services.
•
The third section displays information about “summary toggles,” which are used
internally in decision-making processes.
The following tables explain the columns of information in the output:
Table 62: Teradata DWM Rule Categories Output
This column…
Shows you…
RULE CATEGORY
The following Teradata DWM rule categories:
• Filters
• Object throttles
• Workload classes
CURR ACTIV
Whether the rule category is currently active.
RULES CHANG
Whether any rules in the category were modified.
OPENV CHANG
Indicates whether a change in the operating environment affected this
rules category.
STATE CHANG
Indicates whether a change in the state affected this rules category.
VALUE CHANG
Indicates whether a change in the state caused rules in this category to
become enabled, or any throttle limits to change.
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Table 62: Teradata DWM Rule Categories Output (continued)
This column…
Shows you…
CLEAN CACHE
Indicates whether a deactivate or rules change in this category requires
the previous rules information to be removed from the rules memory
cache.
Table 63: Dynamic Rules Output
This column…
Shows you…
RULE CATEGORY
The Replication dynamic rule category.
FILTER COUNT
The number of filters rules defined dynamically.
THROTL COUNT
The number of object throttles rules defined dynamically.
BYPASS COUNT
The number of bypass objects defined dynamically.
FILTR CHANG
Whether filters rules in the category were added or removed during the
last dynamic rules change.
THRTL CHANG
Whether throttles rules in the category were added or removed during
the last dynamic rules change.
BYPAS CHANG
Whether bypassed objects were added or removed during the last
dynamic rules change.
Table 64: Summary Output
254
This column…
Shows you…
STATIC RULES
Whether there are any active rules categories.
REPLIC RULES
Whether there are any rules dynamically defined by Replication Services.
CHECK FILTRS
Whether the filter category is active, or if there are any filters defined by
Replication Services.
CHECK THRTLS
Whether the throttles category is active, or if there are any throttles rules
defined by Replication Services.
CHECK PGS
Whether the throttles category is active, and the workload classification
category is inactive.
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Using Teradata DWM Dump Utility in an Interactive Mode
Getting Details about Global Teradata DWM Parameters
Using the v command in the Configuration Information submenu, you can get details about
global Teradata DWM parameters. To learn how to set global Teradata DWM parameters, see
“Defining Global Rule Parameters” on page 223.
To view global Teradata DWM parameters
1
Use the c command from the Teradata DWM Information menu to access the
Configuration Information submenu.
Figure 108: Teradata DWM Configuration Information Submenu
2
Use the v command from the Configuration Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears on your console window:
Figure 109: Sample Teradata DWM Configuration Settings
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The following table explains the columns of information in the output:
Table 65: Teradata DWM Versions and Settings Information Output
This column…
Shows you…
DBS Version#
The current version of the Teradata Database software.
TDWM Version#
The number that generally corresponds to the TDWM_VERSION
attribute on the TDWM.GlobalParams table. For example, DB Version
1200 corresponds to a TDWM_VERSION value of ‘120a.’
Config ID
The configuration number activated by the Teradata DWM. This number
may be zero if only Replication Services rules are present in the Teradata
DWM cache.
Gdo Version#
The Teradata DWM cache ‘format’ key. Each time a change is made to the
format in the cache, the version number is incremented. If the Teradata
Database reads a GDO with old version number, it deletes the GDO and
TDWM deactivates itself.
Gdo Sequence#
This number is incremented when a new cache is rebuilt. When all rules
are deactivated, the number is set back to zero.
Last Cache Change
Reason
The event that caused the last gdo update. A RULES MODIFIED entry in
this column indicated that the GDO was updated because a rule changed.
A STATE CHANGE entry in this column indicates that the GDO was
updated because of an event-related State change. A REPLICATION entry
in this column indicates that the GDO was updated because of a
Replication Services-related rules change.
Last Cache Change
Date
The date when the Teradata DWM cache was rebuilt, in YY/MM/DD
format.
Last Cache Change
Time
The time when the Teradata DWM cache was rebuilt.
Minimum Explain
Confidence
Confidence level set for query resource filters which can be None, Low,
Medium, or High. Explain estimates below the specified level of
confidence are ignored. See “Defining Global Rule Parameters” on
page 223 for more details.
Throttle Block Cycles
The number of Teradata Database block detection cycles in which a query
must be identified as a “blocker” of already executing queries before an
action is taken on the delayed query. Valid values are zero to three. Zero
indicates that no block detection is used. See “Defining Global Rule
Parameters” on page 223 for more details.
Throttle Block Action The kind of action taken on a delayed query identified as a “blockers” for
the specified number of block cycles. Options are Log, Abort, and Release.
See “Defining Global Rule Parameters” on page 223 for more details.
256
Exception Interval
How often the Teradata Database asynchronously checks queries
executing with a current set of workload classes. See “Defining Global
Rule Parameters” on page 223 for more details.
Logging Interval
How often log table entries are generated from the memory cache where
data is collected. See “Defining Global Rule Parameters” on page 223 for
more details.
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Using Teradata DWM Dump Utility in an Interactive Mode
Table 65: Teradata DWM Versions and Settings Information Output (continued)
This column…
Shows you…
Dashboard Interval
How often Summary data is saved and reset for use by the Teradata
Manager dashboard. See “Defining Global Rule Parameters” on page 223.
Event Interval
How often event checking is performed. See “Defining Global Rule
Parameters” on page 223 for more details.
To view current Event and State Information
1
Use the c command from the Teradata DWM Information menu to access the
Configuration Information submenu.
Figure 110: Teradata DWM Configuration Information Submenu
2
Use the s command from the Configuration Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears on your console window:
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Figure 111: Sample Event and State Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the output:
Table 66: Teradata DWM Event and State Information Output
258
This column…
Shows you…
STATE TYPE
The type of event-related states being reported.
DFLT ID
The internal identifier for the default state of this type.
PREV ID
The internal identifier for the previously enforced state of this type.
CURR ID
The internal identifier for the currently enforced state of this type.
CHANGE DATE
The date when the current ID began to be enforced.
CHANGE TIME
The time when the current ID began to be enforced.
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Appendix B: Teradata DWM Dump Utility
Using Teradata DWM Dump Utility in an Interactive Mode
To view current Workload Evaluation Order Information
1
Use the c command from the Teradata DWM Information menu to access the
Configuration Information submenu.
Figure 112: Teradata DWM Configuration Information Submenu
2
Use the w command from the Configuration Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears on your console window:
Figure 113: Sample Workload Evaluation Order Information
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The following table explains the columns of information in the output:
Table 67: Teradata DWM Workload Evaluation Order Information Output
This column…
Shows you…
ORDER
The sequential order in which Workload Classes are evaluated for
classification criteria.
WLC ID
The internal identifier for the Workload Class.
WLC Name
The name for the Workload Class.
Viewing Memory Usage
You can get details about the cache sizes used by your Teradata Database to keep Teradata
DWM rules in memory from the Information menu.
To view memory usage
✔ Use the m command from the Teradata DWM Information menu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 114: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Memory Usage
The following table explains the columns of information in the output:
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Table 68: Teradata DWM Memory Usage Output
This column…
Shows you…
Rules Cache Free
Memory Blocks
This list shows the “free memory blocks” within the rules cache segment.
OFFSET = the location within the cache or the free block
SIZE = indicates the size of the free block. Note that the last free block of
zero size indicates the end of the “free block list”
NEXT-BLOCK = the location (offset) of the next free block
CurrCacheSize
Shows the size in bytes of the current rules cache segment.
CurrFreeCache
Shows the number of bytes within the current rules cache segment that
are free (unused), and its percentage of the total rules cache size.
MaxCacheSize
Shows the maximum size that the rules cache segment can be.
MaxFreeCache
Shows the amount of free space that is potentially available for future
rules expansion and its percentage of the maximum rules cache size.
TotalAllocs
Shows the number of blocks that have been allocated within the current
and previous incarnations of the rules cache segment.
TotalFrees
Shows the number of blocks that have been freed within the current and
previous incarnations of the rules cache segment.
CurrAllocs
Shows the number of blocks that are allocated within the current rules
cache segment.
Navigating from the Events and States Information Submenu
Using the e command in the Teradata DWM Information menu gives you access to the Events
and States Information submenu. The commands in the Events and States Information
submenu give you access to details about events related to Teradata DWM and how they affect
operating environments and system conditions, which in turn may affect the properties of the
rules.
Figure 115: Teradata DWM Events and States Information Menu
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Viewing Events
This display lists information about all of the events that were defined for the current
configuration when it was last activated.
To see detailed information about an event
✔ Use the e command from the Events and States Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 116: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Event Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the output. Similar columns
appear in the output that results from using any of the commands in the Events and States
submenu.
Table 69: Sample Events Output
262
This column…
Shows you…
ID
The internal identifier for the event.
EVENT NAME
The user-specified name for the event.
CLASS
Indicates whether the event pertains to system conditions
(SysCon) or operating environments (OpEnv).
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Table 69: Sample Events Output (continued)
This column…
Shows you…
TYPE
The specific type of the event.
USER-OpEnv: User-defined operating environment.
USER-SysCon: User-defined system condition.
PERIOD: Time range (period).
IN-USE-AWT: Number of in-use AWTs.
AMP-FLOW: Number of AMPs in flow control.
AMP-SKEW: Number of Skewed AMPS
AMP-FATAL: Number of AMPS with status of FATAL
PE-FATAL: Number of PEs with status of FATAL
GTW-FATAL: Number of Gateways with status of FATAL.
NODE-DOWN: Number of inactive nodes.
ENAB
Indicates whether the event is enabled, that is, in use.
MinDur
For user-defined events, the minimum duration the event stays
active.
Kind
For Period events, the granularity of the period: All (every day),
DoW (days of the week), or DoM (days of the month)
From
For Period events, the start time (HHMM).
To
For Period events, the end time (HHMM).
Days
For Period events, hex bit representation of the days of the week
or month.
Months
For Period events which are of DoM kind, hex bit representation
of the months of the year.
QualTime
For some kinds of events, the minimum time the condition must
be met in order for the event to be considered active.
Navigating from the Event Expressions Information Submenu
Using the p command in the Events and States Information submenu gives you access to the
Event Expressions Information submenu. From this menu, you are able to view details about
systems condition (SysCon) and operating environment (OpEnv), as well as expression
actions and conditions.
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Figure 117: Teradata DWM Events and States Expressions Menu
Viewing Notify-only Expressions
This display lists information about all of the event-related Expressions that were not
associated with System Conditions or Operating Environments, and that were defined for the
current configuration when it was last activated
To see detailed information about a notify-only expression
✔ Use the n command from the Event Expressions Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 118: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Notify-only Expressions Information
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The following table explains the columns of information in the Global and Non-Global
Rules output:
Table 70: Sample Notify-Only Expressions Output
This column…
Shows you…
SEQ #
A sequence number that can be used to select an expression for
the purpose of obtaining additional information about the
expression from other displays.
OPENV or SYSCON NAME
This name is blank for notify-only expressions.
EXPRES ID
The internal identifier for the expression.
EXPRESSION NAME
The name of the expression.
Viewing Operating Environment Expressions
This display lists information about all of the event-related Expressions for Operating
Environments (OpEnv) that were defined for the current configuration when it was last
activated.
To see detailed information about an operating environment expression
✔ Use the o command from the Event Expressions Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 119: Sample Teradata DWM Dump OpEnv Expressions Information output
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The following table explains the columns of information in the Operating Environment
Expressions output:
Table 71: Sample OpEnv Expressions Output
This column…
Shows you…
SEQ #
A sequence number that can be used to select an expression for
the purpose of obtaining additional information about the
expression from other displays.
OPENV or SYSCON NAME
The name of the Operating Environment to which the
expression is associated.
EXPRES ID
The internal identifier for the expression.
EXPRESSION NAME
The name of the expression.
Viewing System Condition Expressions
This display lists information about all of the event-related System Condition (SysCon)
Expressions that were defined for the current configuration when it was last activated.
To see detailed information about a system condition expression
✔ Use the s command from the Event Expressions Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 120: Sample Teradata DWM Dump SysCon Expressions Information
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The following table explains the columns of information in the System Conditions
Expressions output:
Table 72: Sample SysCon Expressions Output
This column…
Shows you…
SEQ #
A sequence number that can be used to select an expression for
the purpose of obtaining additional information about the
expression from other displays.
OPENV or SYSCON NAME
The name of the System Condition to which the expression is
associated.
EXPRES ID
The internal identifier for the expression.
EXPRESSION NAME
The name of the expression.
Viewing Temporary Expressions
This display lists information about all of the event-related Temporary Expressions that were
defined for the current configuration when it was last activated.
To see detailed information about a temporary expression
✔ Use the t command from the Event Expressions Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 121: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Temporary Expressions Information
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The following table explains the columns of information in the Temp Expressions
Information output:
Table 73: Sample Temp Expressions Output
This column…
Shows you…
TOP EXP ID
The internal identifier of the top (highest) level expression to
which this expression belongs.
SUB EXP ID
The internal identifier assigned to this expression.
EXPRESSION NAME
The user-specified name of the expression.
CL
Indicates the Class of the expression:
O = Operating Environment
S = System Condition
EN
Indicates whether the expression is Enabled.
TL
Indicates whether the expression is a Top Level expression.
N1
Indicates whether the first argument of the expression is to be
logically NOT’ed.
N2
Indicates whether the second argument of the expression is to be
logically NOT’ed.
ARG1 ID
The internal identifier of the first argument, which may be an
event or an expression.
ARG1 TYPE
The type of the first argument, which may be an event (‘Evnt’) or
an expression (‘Expr’).
LOG OP
The logical operator to use when two arguments are present in
the expression (‘AND’ or ‘OR’)
ARG2 ID
The internal identifier of the optional second argument, which is
zero if not present.
ARG2 TYPE
The type of the optional second argument, which is ‘None’ if not
present.
Viewing Expression Actions
This display lists information about all of the event-related Actions that were defined for the
currently selected expression.
To see detailed information about an expression action
✔ Use the a command from the Event Expressions Information submenu.
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Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 122: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Expression Actions Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the Expression Actions output:
Table 74: Sample Expression Actions Output
This column…
Shows you…
EXPRES ID
The internal identifier for the expression.
ACTION ID
The internal identifier for the event action.
ACTION NAME
The user-specified name for the action.
BEGIN ACTION
Indicates whether the action is taken when the expression
becomes active (Begin) or when it becomes inactive (End).
Viewing Expression Conditions
This display lists information about all of the conditions that were defined for the currently
selected expression.
To see detailed information about an expression condition
✔ Use the c command from the Event Expressions Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
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Figure 123: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Expression Conditions Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the Expression Conditions
Information output:
Table 75: Sample Expression Conditions Output
This column…
Shows you…
EXPRESS/EVENT ID
The internal identifier for the sub-expression or event that is an
element of the expression.
EXPRESSION CONDITIONS The logical conditions for the expression which involve the subexpression or event.
Viewing Actions
This display lists information about all of the Actions that were defined for the current
configuration when it was last activated.
To see detailed information about an action
✔ Use the a command from the Events and States Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
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Figure 124: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Actions Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the output.
Table 76: Sample Actions Output
This column…
Shows you…
ACTION ID
The internal identifier for the action.
ACTION NAME
The user-specified name for the action
ACTION KIND
The kind of action, either operating environment or system
condition.
OPENV ID
The internal identifier of the operating environment.
SYSCON ID
The internal identifier of the system condition.
SYSCON or OPENV NAME
The user-specified name of the system condition or operating
environment
Viewing Unresolved Actions for Expressions
This display shows any Unresolved Actions for Expressions.
To see detailed information about unresolved actions for expressions:
✔ Use the u command from the Events and States Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
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Figure 125: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Unresolved Actions for Expressions Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the output.
Table 77: Sample Unresolved Actions for Expressions Output
This column…
Shows you…
EXPRESS ID
The internal identifier for the expression.
ACTION ID
The internal identifier for the action.
ACTION NAME
The user-specified name of the action,
BEGIN ACTION
Indicates whether the action is taken when the expression
becomes active (Begin) or when it becomes inactive (End).
Viewing System Conditions
This display lists information about all of the System Conditions that have been defined.
To see detailed information about System Conditions
✔ Use the c command from the Events and States Information submenu.
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Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 126: Sample Teradata DWM Dump System Conditions Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the output. Similar columns
appear in the output that results from using any of the commands in the Events and States
submenu.
Table 78: Sample System Conditions Information Output
This column…
Shows you…
SEVERITY
The severity of the system condition.
SYSCON ID
The internal identifier for the system condition.
SYSTEM CONDITION
NAME
The user-specified name for the system condition.
MIN DUR
For user-defined system conditions, the minimum duration the
system condition stays active.
ENAB
Indicates whether the system condition is enabled, that is, in use.
DFLT
The default state of the this system condition.
CURR
The current state of this system condition.
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Viewing Operating Environments
This display lists information about all of the operating environment parameters.
To see detailed information about operating environments
✔ Use the o command from the Events and States Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 127: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Operating Environments Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the output.
Table 79: Sample Operating Environments Information Output
274
This column…
Shows you…
PRECEDENCE
The internal identifier for the operating environment.
OPENV ID
The internal identifier for the operating environment.
OPERATING
ENVIRONMENT NAME
The user-specified name for the operating environment.
ENAB
Indicates whether the operating environment is enabled, that is,
in use.
DFLT
The default state of the this operating environment.
CURR
The current state of the this operating environment.
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Viewing Composite States
This display lists information about all defined composite states.
To see detailed information about all defined composite states:
✔ Use the s command from the Events and States Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 128: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Composite States Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the output.
Table 80: Sample Composite States Information Output
This column…
Shows you…
STATE ID
The internal identifier for the composite state.
(COMPOSITE) EVENT
NAME
The user-specified name for the composite state.
DFLT
The default setting for the composite state.
CURR
The current setting for the composite state.
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Viewing the Composite States Mapping Matrix
This display lists information about how SysCons and OpEnvs have been mapped to
composite states.
To see detailed information about the Composite States Mapping Matrix
✔ Use the m command from the Events and States Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 129: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Composite States Mapping Matrix Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the output.
Table 81: Sample State Mapping Matrix Output
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This column…
Shows you…
OPENV ID
The internal identifier for the operating environment.
OPENV NAME
The user-specified name for the operating environment.
SYSCON ID
The internal identifier for the system condition.
SYSCON NAME
The user-specified name for the system condition.
STATE ID
The internal identifier for the composite state.
(COMPOSITE) STATE
NAME
The user-specified name for the composite state.
CURR
The current setting for the composite state.
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Using Teradata DWM Dump Utility in an Interactive Mode
Navigating from the Rules Information Submenu
Using the r command from the Teradata DWM Information menu gives you access to the
Rules Information submenu. The commands in the Rules Information submenu give you
access to details about individual DWM Filter and Throttle rules, and bypassed objects.
Figure 130: Teradata DWM Rules Information Menu
Viewing Bypassed Objects
You can turn off rule checking by bypassing an object. See “Granting Bypass Privileges” on
page 157 to learn how.
To see the bypassed objects associated with rules
✔ Use the b command from the Rules Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
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Figure 131: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Bypassed Objects Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the Bypassed Objects
Information output:
Table 82: Sample Expression Conditions Output
This column…
Shows you…
BYPASSED OBJECT NAME
The name of the bypassed object.
OBJECT TYPE
The type of the bypassed object.
REPL
Indicates whether the bypassed object was dynamically added by
the replication services.
Viewing Account Objects
Accounts are context objects you can link to rules. See “Context Objects” on page 35 to learn
more.
To see the account objects associated with rules
✔ Use the a command from the Rules Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
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Figure 132: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Account Object Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the output. Similar columns
appear in the output that results from using any of the commands in the Rules
Information submenu that list object-related information.
Table 83: Account Objects Output
This column…
Shows you…
OBJECT NAME
The name of the object.
RULE <ID> NAME
The rule ID number and the name of the rule. The ID number is
the internal number assigned to a rule. The name is defined
when the rule is created.
COMB OBJ TYPE
The type of object when a combination of objects are associated
with a rule.
COMBINATION OBJECT
NAME
The name of the combined object.
Viewing Databases/Tables
Databases and database objects are query objects you can associate with rules. See “Query
Objects” on page 35 to learn more.
To see the database and database objects associated with rules
✔ Use the d command from the Rules Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
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Figure 133: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Databases and Database Objects
Viewing Performance Groups
Performance groups are context objects you can associate with rules. See “Context Objects”
on page 35 to learn more.
To see the performance groups associated with rules
✔ Use the g command from the Rules Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 134: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Performance Groups
Viewing Profiles
Profiles are context objects you can associate with rules. See “Context Objects” on page 35 to
learn more.
To see the profile objects associated with rules
✔ Use the p command from the Rules Information submenu.
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Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 135: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Profile Objects
Viewing Individual Teradata DWM Rules
You can see the parameters of all the Teradata DWM rules uploaded to your Teradata
Database. See “Creating or Modifying a Filter” on page 126 to learn about defining Teradata
DWM rule parameters.
To see details of all Teradata DWM Rules
✔ Use the r and o commands from the Rules Information submenu.
Output similar to one of the following information screens appears in your console
window:
Figure 136: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Non-Global Rules Information
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Figure 137: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Global Rules Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the Global and Non-Global
Rules output:
Table 84: Rules Details
Column
Displayed Information
SEQ#
The sequence used to select a rule used to obtain additional information
for the rule in other output displays.
RULE (ID) NAME
The rule ID number and the rule name specified by the user. The ID
number is the unique internal number assigned to a rule by DVM. The
name is defined when the rule is created.
RULE TYPE
The specific sub-category of the rule:
ACCESS = Object Access Filter
RESOURCE = Query Resource Filter
THROTTLE = Object Throttle
UTILITY = Utility Throttle
282
ENAB
Whether the rule is enabled for use.
GLOB
Whether the rule is a global (applies to every object/request).
WARN
Whether the rule generates a warning, not an error.
OBJ COMB
Whether the rule applies to combinations of ‘context’ and ‘query’ objects.
DYN REPL
Whether the rule was created dynamically by Replication Services.
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Table 84: Rules Details (continued)
Column
Displayed Information
SqlTypes
The kinds of SQL statements to which the rule applies:
ALL = all types
SEL = select statements
DML = data manipulation statements
DDL = data definition statements
The following columns appear for Object or Load Utility Throttles:
Table 85: Throttle Information
Column
Displayed Information
SessionLimit
Whether sessions are limited by the rule.
QueryLimit
Whether queries are limited by the rule.
Reject
Whether queries are rejected once the throttle limit is reached.
StepTimeThreshold
The estimated step processing time which, if exceeded by any step, can
cause a query to be throttled. If set to zero, then any query can be
throttled.
AllAmpSteps
Whether queries with all-AMP steps can be throttled.
NoOverride
Whether the DBA is prohibited from overriding (dequeueing queries that
are delayed.
Group
Whether the throttle limit(s) are enforced for the collection of all of the
objects associated with the rule, rather than for each object individually.
AllUsers
Whether the throttle limit(s) are enforced for any user that is a member
of (associated with) the account or profile (for example) object that is
associated with the rule.
The following columns also appear for Query Resource Filters:
Table 86: Query Resource Filter Information
Column
Displayed Information
ProcTime
The processing time limit for the filter.
RestJoins
The types of joins restricted by the filter.
All = all joins
Product = product joins
UnconstProduct = unconstrained product joins
RestScans
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Yes = all full table scans are restricted by the filter.
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Table 86: Query Resource Filter Information (continued)
Column
Displayed Information
ReturnRows
The answer set size limit for the rule.
MaxRows
The limit on the number of rows for any step of a query.
MeetAll
Whether all of the specified conditions must be met to trigger the rule.
The following columns also appear for Utility Throttles:
Table 87: Utility Throttle Information
Column
Displayed Information
Type
The type of utility to be throttled. FastLoad, MultiLoad, FastLoad +
MultiLoad, Fast Export, or ARC.
Reject
Whether utilities are rejected once the throttle limit is reached.
Navigating from the Workload Classification Information Submenu
Using the w command from the Teradata DWM Information menu gives you access to the
Workload Classification Information submenu. The commands in the Workload
Classification Information submenu give you access to additional submenus and commands
that give details about workload class definitions, exception derivatives, priority scheduler
configuration, and utility and performance group mappings.
Figure 138: Teradata DWM Workload Classification Information Submenu
Navigating from the Workload Class Information Submenu
Using the c command from the Teradata DWM Information menu displays the Workload
Class Information submenu. The commands in the Workload Class Information submenu
give you access to a details about workload class definitions.
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Figure 139: Teradata DWM Workload Class Information Submenu
Viewing Defined Workload Classes
The definition of workload classes is the basis for workload management.
To view the defined workload classes
✔ Use the d command from the Workload Class Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 140: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Class Definitions
The following table explains the column of information in the output:
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Table 88: Class Definitions Information
Column
Displayed Information
SEQ#
A sequence number that can be used to select a workload class
definition for the purpose of obtaining additional information
about the expression from other displays.
WLC ID
The internal identifier assigned to the workload class.
WORKLOAD CLASS NAME
The user-specified name for the workload class.
NOTES
Indicates whether the workload class is the default, or if it is
disabled, that is, not in use.
SLG PRI
Specifies the priority (1-4) of the Service Level Goals (SLG),
where 1 is highest priority.
AG ID
The internal identifier for the Allocation Group with which this
workload class is associated.
PG NUM
The number of the Performance Group assigned to the
workload class.
LOG MODE
Specifies the kind of logging for the workload class: summary
(Summ), detail (Detl), or None.
Viewing Defined Sets of Exception Criteria
This display lists information about all of the workload exceptions that were defined for the
currently selected workload class in the current Operating Environment
To see defined sets of exception criteria
✔ Use the e command from the Workload Class Information submenu.
Note: To view output from this command, first select a SEQ # from the Class Definitions
output (the d command). See “Viewing Defined Workload Classes” on page 285.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
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Figure 141: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Exception Criteria
The following table explains the columns of information in the output:
Table 89: Exception Criteria Information
Column
Displayed Information
WLC ID
The internal identifier for the workload class.
OPENV ID
The internal identifier for the operating environment.
EXCEPT ID
The internal identifier for the exception.
Viewing Classification Criteria
This display lists information about all of the classification criteria that were defined for the
currently selected workload class.
To see Classification Criteria for the selected workload class
✔ Use the c command from the Workload Class Information submenu.
Note: To view output from this command, first select a SEQ # from the Class Definitions
output (the d command). See “Viewing Defined Workload Classes” on page 285.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
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Figure 142: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Classification Criteria for Workload Class Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the output:
Table 90: Operating Environment Parameters for Workload Classes Information
Column
Displayed Information
CLASSIFY ID
The internal identifier for the classification condition(s).
CLASSIFY CONDITIONS
The logical conditions for the criteria.
Viewing Operating Environment-dependent Parameters
This display lists information about all of the parameters that can vary by Operating
Environment, that were defined for the currently selected workload class.
To see Operating Environment -Dependent Parameters for the selected workload class
✔ Use the o command from the Workload Class Information submenu.
Note: To view output from this command, first select a SEQ # from the Class Definitions
output (the d command). See “Viewing Defined Workload Classes” on page 285.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
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Figure 143: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Operating Environment Parameters for Workload Class Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the output:
Table 91: Operating Environment Parameters for Workload Classes Information
Column
Displayed Information
WLC ID
The internal identifier for the workload class.
OPENV ID
The internal identifier for the operating environment.
SLG ARRIV
The expected number of queries that enter the workload class per hour.
SLG PCT
The expected percentage of completed queries that meet the Response
Time goal.
RESP TIME
The expected wall clock time to process a query in the workload class, in
centiseconds.
AVG CPU
The expected average actual CPU time, in centiseconds.
THRU-PUT
The expected number of queries that complete within the workload class
per hour.
DFLT
Indicates whether these values are the default for the workload class.
CURR
Indicates whether these values are the values currently being used for the
workload class.
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Viewing State-dependent Parameters
This display lists information about all of the parameters that can vary by State, that were
defined for the currently selected workload class.
To see State-dependent Parameters for the selected workload class
✔ Use the s command from the Workload Class Information submenu.
Note: To view output from this command, first select a SEQ # from the Class Definitions
output (the d command). See “Viewing Defined Workload Classes” on page 285.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 144: Sample Teradata DWM Dump State-dependent Parameters for Workload Class Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the output:
Table 92: State-dependent Parameters for Workload Class Information
290
Column
Displayed Information
WLC ID
The internal identifier for the workload class.
STATE ID
The internal identifier for the State.
DELAY LIMIT
The number of queries that can be simultaneously executing in the
workload class.
DFLT
Indicates whether these values are the default for the workload class.
CURR
Indicates whether these values are the values currently being used for
the workload class.
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Viewing Evaluation Order
The order in which the classification criteria for the various workload classes is checked may
determine the workload class into which a query is placed, especially if the classification
criteria overlap somewhat.This display lists information about the evaluation order that can
vary by OpEnv, that were defined for the currently selected workload class.
To see the evaluation order for the workload classes in a current period
✔ Use the v command from the Workload Class Information submenu.
Note: To view output from this command, first select a SEQ # from the Class Definitions
output (the d command). See “Viewing Defined Workload Classes” on page 285.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 145: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Workload Class Evaluation Order for the Current Period
The following table explains the columns of information in the output:
Table 93: Evaluation Order for Current Period Information
This column…
Shows you…
WLC ID
The internal identifier for the workload class.
OPENV ID
The internal identifier for the operating environment.
CLASSIFY ORDER
The classification order for the workload class for the operating
environment.
DFLT
Indicates whether these values are the default for the workload class.
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Table 93: Evaluation Order for Current Period Information (continued)
This column…
Shows you…
CURR
Indicates whether these values are the values currently being used for
the workload class.
Navigating from the Workload Exceptions Information Submenu
Using the e command from the Workload Classification Information sub-menu gives you
access to the Workload Exceptions Information submenu. The commands in the Workload
Exceptions Information submenu give you access to information about workload exceptions.
Figure 146: Teradata DWM Workload Exceptions Information Submenu
Viewing Defined Sets of Exception Actions
Exception actions are sets of one or more actions used in the workload classification rules to
specify how the execution of a query is adjusted. This display lists information about all of the
exception-related Actions that were defined for the current configuration when it was last
activated.
To see defined sets of exception actions
✔ Use the a command from the Workload Class Information submenu.
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Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 147: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Exception Actions information
The following table explains the columns of information in the output:
Table 94: Exception Actions Information
This column…
Shows you…
ACTION ID
The internal identifier assigned to this set of exception actions. These
identifiers are referenced in the display of operating environmentspecific workload class parameters.
ACTION CODES
The character codes for the actions to take when an exception is
detected. Possible actions are one or more of the following:
N = No action (disable)
L = Log
A = Abort
C = Change WD
T = Send Alert
E = Execute Program
S = Abort on Select
EXCEPTION
PROGRAM/ALERT
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Specifies additional program or alert information for those kinds of
actions.
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Viewing Defined Sets of Exception Criteria
Exception criteria are sets of one or more conditions used in the workload classification rules
to specify whether the execution of a query will be adjusted. This display lists information
about all of the exception-related criteria that were defined for the current configuration when
it was last activated.
To see defined sets of exception criteria
✔ Use the c command from the Workload Exception Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 148: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Exception Criteria Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the output:
Table 95: Exception Criteria Information
This column…
Shows you…
CRITERIA ID
The internal identifier for the set of exception criteria.
EXCEPTION CONDITIONS
A free form display of the exception conditions for this set of
exception criteria. If more than one condition is specified, all of
the conditions must be met to satisfy the requirements of this set
of exception criteria.
Viewing Workload Exception Directives
This display lists all of the exception-related Criteria/Action associations (directives) that were
defined for the current configuration when it was last activated
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To see workload exception directives
✔ Use the d command from the Workload Exception Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 149: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Workload Exception Directive Information
The following table explains the columns of information in the output:
Table 96: Operating Environment Parameters for Workload Exception Directives Information
This column…
Shows you…
EXCEPT ID
The internal identifier for the exception (directive).
EXCEPTION NAME
The user-specified name of the exception directive.
CRITERIA ID
The internal identifier for the set of exception criteria to use for the
exception directive.
ACTION ID
The internal identifier for the set of exception actions to use for the
exception directive.
PREC-DENC
Specifies the order, or precedence, in which exception directives are
acted upon when there are ambiguities, such as when two “change
WD” actions apply. A value of one is the highest precedence.
GLOB
Indicates whether the exception directive is defined as a “shared” or
“global” exception, which means it may be used by more than one
workload class.
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Viewing Exception Directives for all WDs/OpEnvs
This display lists all of the exception directives, with the workload classes that use them in
particular Operating Environments, that were defined for the current configuration when it
was last activated.
To see Exception Directives for all WDs and OpEnvs
✔ Use the w command from the Workload Class Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 150: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Workload Exception Directives for all WDs/OpEnvs
The following table explains the columns of information in the output:
Table 97: Workload Exception Directives Output for all WDs/OpEnvs
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This column…
Shows you…
WLC ID
The internal identifier for the workload class.
OPENV ID
The internal identifier for the Operating Environment.
EXCEPT ID
The internal identifier for the exception directive used by the
workload class when in the Operating Environment.
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Navigating from the Priority Scheduler Information Submenu
The Priority Scheduler Information menu is a submenu from the Workload Class
Information submenu. The Priority Scheduler Information submenu allows you to view
details of allocation groups and resource partitions in a current workload configuration. You
can also view details of the Priority Scheduler configuration.
Using the s command from the Workload Class Information submenu gives you access to the
Priority Scheduler Information submenu with the following commands:
Figure 151: Teradata DWM Priority Scheduler Information Submenu
Table 98: Priority Scheduler Information Submenu Items
Command
Description
Results
g
List global settings
Shows information about global settings used in the
current workload configuration. See “Viewing the Global
Settings Display” on page 298 to learn more.
a
List allocation groups
Shows information about allocation groups used in the
current workload configuration. See “Viewing the AGs
Display” on page 299 to learn more.
r
List resource partitions
Shows information about resource partitions used in the
current workload configuration. See “Viewing RPs in
Current Workload Configurations” on page 300 to learn
more.
s
List saved settings
Shows information on Priority Scheduler configuration.
See “Viewing the Saved Settings Display” on page 302 to
learn more.
x
Exit
Return to the previous menu.
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Viewing the Global Settings Display
This display lists all of the global Priority Scheduler settings for the various States, that were
defined for the current configuration when it was last activated.
To view the global settings display
✔ Use the g command from the Priority Scheduler Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 152: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Global Settings
The following table explains the column of information in the output:
Table 99: Global Settings Information
298
This column…
Shows you…
STATE ID
The internal identifier for the State.
RESRV AWT
The number of AWTs per AMP that are reserved for work assigned
to AGs having the Expedited attribute.
LIMIT AWT
The maximum number of AWTs per AMP than can be executing
concurrently.
LIMIT CPU
Percentage value of total CPU resources used by all Teradata
sessions, applied on each node separately.
SLG PRI
The priority for meeting the SLG for the workload classes in the
Allocation Group.
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Table 99: Global Settings Information (continued)
This column…
Shows you…
DFLT
Indicates whether these values are the defaults.
CURR
Indicates whether these values are the values currently being used.
Viewing the AGs Display
This display lists all of the Priority Scheduler AGs that are used in the current workload
configuration for the various periods.
To view the allocation groups display
✔ Use the a command from the Priority Scheduler Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 153: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Allocation Groups
The following table explains the column of information in the output:
Table 100: Allocation Group Information
This column…
Shows you…
AG ID
The internal identifier for the Allocation Group.
ALLOCATION GROUP
NAME
The user-specified name for the Allocation Group.
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Table 100: Allocation Group Information (continued)
This column…
Shows you…
RP ID
The internal identifier for the Resource Partition to which the
Allocation Group belongs.
AG NUMBER
Not used.
SLG PRI
The SLG priority assigned to the Allocation Group.
STATE ID
The internal identifier for the State.
EXP
Indicates that work requests for sessions controlled by the
Allocation Group are to be expedited through the AMP work task
(AWT) invocation procedures.
AG WGHT
An assigned “weight” relative to other AGs in the same RP, for the
State.
CPU LIMIT
Percentage value of CPU resources used by this AG, applied on each
node separately.
Viewing RPs in Current Workload Configurations
The RPs output lists all of the Priority Scheduler Resource Partition settings for the various
states that were defined for the current configuration when it was last activated.
To see resource partitions in current workload configurations for different periods
✔ Use the r command from the Priority Scheduler Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
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Figure 154: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Resource Partition Information
Table 101: Resource Partition Information
This column…
Shows you…
RP ID
The internal identifier for the Resource Partition.
RESOURCE PARTITION
NAME
The name of the Resource Partition assigned by Teradata DWM to
Priority Scheduler.
RP NUMBER
A numeric Priority Scheduler identifier that is unique for each
Resource Partition.
STATE ID
The internal identifier for the state.
RP WEIGHT
An assigned weight relative to other RPs, for the state
CPU LIMT
The percentage limit on total CPU usage by all processes using the
RP.
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Viewing the Saved Settings Display
The Saved Settings display lists all of the Priority Scheduler settings that were being used
before the current workload configuration was activated, and will be restored when the
current workload configuration is deactivated. Separate columns listing the RP, AG, and PG
attributes are displayed.
To see saved settings
✔ Use the s command from the Priority Scheduler Information submenu.
Output similar to the following three information screens appears in your console
window:
Figure 155: Teradata DWM Dump Saved Settings Sample: Resource Partition
The following table explains the columns of information in the output:
Table 102: Priority Scheduler Resource Partition Information
This column…
Shows you…
RP NUMBER
The existing numeric Priority Scheduler identifier that is unique
for each Resource Partition.
RESOURCE PARTITION
NAME
The existing name for the Resource Partition.
RP WEIGHT
The assigned “weight” for the Resource Partition.
CPU LIMIT
Percentage value of CPU resources used by this RP
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Figure 156: Teradata DWM Dump Saved Settings Sample: Allocation Group
The following table explains the column of information in the output:
Table 103: Priority Scheduler Allocation Group Settings Information
This column…
Shows you…
AG NUMBER
The existing numeric Priority Scheduler identifier that is unique for
each AG.
ATTRS
Attribute codes specific to Allocation Groups.
CPU LIMT
Percentage value of CPU resources used by this AG.
AG WGHT
An assigned weight relative to other AGs in the same RP.
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Figure 157: Teradata DWM Dump Saved Settings Sample: Performance Group
The following table explains the column of information in the output:
Table 104: Priority Scheduler Performance Group Settings Information
This column…
Shows you…
PG NUMBER
The existing numeric Priority Scheduler identifier that is unique
for each Performance Group.
PERFORMANCE GROUP
NAME
The existing name for the Performance Group.
RP NUMBER
The number of Resource Partition in which the Performance
Group executes.
ATTRS
Attribute codes specific to Performance Groups.
ALLOCATION GROUPS
The number of Allocation Group to which the Performance
Group belongs.
Viewing the Performance Group Mapping Display
The Performance Group Mapping display allows the work done by some tasks, such as console
utilities, in basic Performance Groups to be mapped into workload classes. This display lists all
of the mappings from Performance Groups to workload classes, that were defined for the
current configuration when it was last activated.
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To see all currently defined Performance Group mappings
✔ Use the p command from the Workload Classification Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 158: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Performance Group Mappings
The following table explains the column of information in the output:
Table 105: Performance Group Mapping Information
This column…
Shows you…
PERFORMANCE GROUP
NAME
The name for an existing Performance Group.
WLC ID
The internal identifier for the workload class to which (console)
utilities using the PG are to be mapped.
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Viewing the Utility Map Display
The Utility Map Display allows the work done by some tasks, such as console utilities, to be
mapped directly into workload classes. This display lists all of the currently defined mappings.
Viewing the utility map display
✔ Use the u command from the Workload Classification Information submenu.
Output similar to the following information appears in your console window:
Figure 159: Sample Teradata DWM Dump Utility Map Display
The following table explains the column of information in the output:
Table 106: Utility Mapping Information
306
This column…
Shows you…
UTILITY NAME
The name for a Teradata utility.
WLC ID
The internal identifier for the workload class to which (console)
utilities using the PG are to be mapped.
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Glossary
A
account The distinct account name portion of the system account strings, excluding the
Performance Group designation. Accounts can be employed wherever a user object can be
specified.
activate To turn categories such as filters or throttles on or off. Activating a category does
not enable each rule in the category. Enabling and activating are separate operations. See also
enable.
all joins In Teradata SQL, a join is a SELECT operation that allows you to combine columns
and rows from two or more tables to produce a result. Join types restricted by DWM are inner
join, outer join, merge join, product join, and all joins.
all joins are a combination of the above types, depending on how the user selects the
information to be returned. Adding to the four types listed above, selecting all joins may
include an exclusion join, nested join, and RowID join.
Allocation Group (AG) A Priority Scheduler concept for a set of parameters that determine
the amount of resources available to the sessions assigned to a specific AG. An AG has an
assigned weight that is compared to other AG weights. An AG can limit the total amount of
CPU used by sessions under its control.
Access Module Processor (AMP) Virtual processors (vprocs) that receive steps from PEs
(Parsing Engines) and perform database functions to retrieve or update data. Each AMP is
associated with one virtual disk (vdisk), where the data is stored. An AMP manages only its
own vdisk, not the vdisk of any other AMP.
AMP worker task (AWT) Processes (threads on some platforms) dedicated to servicing the
Teradata Database work requests. For each AMP vproc, a fixed number of AWTs are preallocated during Teradata Database initialization. Each AWT looks for a work request to arrive
in the Teradata Database, services the request, and then looks for another. An AWT can
process requests of any work type. Each Teradata Database query is composed of a series of
work requests that are performed by AWTs. Each work request is assigned a work type
indicating when the request will be executed relative to other work requests waiting to execute.
Application Program Interface (API) An interface (calling conventions) by which an
application program accesses an operating system and other services. An API is defined at
source code level and provides a level of abstraction between the application and the kernel
(or other privileged utilities) to ensure the portability of the code. A language and message
format used by an application program to communicate with the operating system or some
other control program such as a database management system (DBMS) or communications
protocol.
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An API can also provide an interface between a high level language and lower level utilities
and services written without consideration for the calling conventions supported by compiled
languages. In this case, the API may translate the parameter lists from one format to another
and the interpret call-by-value and call-by-reference arguments in one or both directions.
B
bypass objects Specific users, groups, and accounts can be set up to circumvent DWM
query management by declaring them to be bypassed. Basically, this turns off the DWM query
checking mechanism for all of the requests issued by those users and/or using those accounts.
C
category A type of DWM rule. DWM supports filters (category 1), throttles (category 2),
and workloads (category 3).
Call-Level Interface version 2 (CLIv2)
to the Teradata Database.
Central Processing Unit (CPU)
controls all the other parts.
The application used by Teradata DWM to connect
Central Processing Unit. The part of a computer which
D
Database Administrator (DBA) Generally, a person responsible for the design and
management of one or more databases and for the evaluation, selection and implementation
of database management systems.
DBC The default database associated with user DBC. When you first install Teradata
Database on your server, it has only one user. This user is called User DBC and it owns all
other databases and users in the system.
DBQL Database Query Log. DBQL are a series of system tables created in the DBC database
during the Teradata Database installation process. They are used to track query processing.
See Database Administration to learn more about the DBQL.
Database Query Manager (DBQM) The first generation of Teradata’s query management
product.
Data Definition Language (DDL) SQL statements used to define, revise, and remove
database objects. See SQL Data Definition Language to learn more.
Directory Information Tree (DIT) A graphical display of an organization's directory
structure, sites, and servers, shown as a branching structure. The top-level (root) directory
usually represents the organization level.
Data Manipulation Language (DML) SQL statements that handle database data. To learn
about DML statements, see SQL Data Manipulation Language.
Dynamic Query Manager (DQM) Second generation of Teradata’s query management
product used for scheduling SQL requests.
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E
enable To instruct DWM to use a rule for query management. DWM users can enable
individual rules. A rule becomes effective when a user both enables it and activates its
corresponding category. See also activate.
event either a system condition or operating environment you can define. You can make
Teradata DWM rules adjust their behavior automatically based on event combinations.
event combination A logical combination of one or more events. Each combination can
trigger multiple actions (such as notifications, system conditions, or operating environments).
exception directive A set of metrics and actions that instruct Teradata DWM how to
monitor queries that are executing WDs, and what to do if a query exceeds exception criteria
while it is executing. An exception directive consists of a set of Exception Criteria (exception
metrics) and a set of Exception Actions (actions that Teradata DWM takes when all of the
metrics for a set of Exception Criteria are met).
exclusion join In Teradata SQL, a product join or merge join where only the rows that do
not satisfy (are NOT in) the conditional specified in the SELECT are joined.
execution time frame
waiting to run.
A period of time when DWM can execute scheduled requests that are
F
filter A type of rule that causes logon and query requests to be rejected. DWM supports
object access filters and query resource filters.
G
global rule Object Access and Query Resource rules can be specified as being global, that is,
they apply to all objects, and therefore to all requests. When a rule is specified as being global,
no query objects need be (or can be) associated with the rule because all objects are implicitly
included. Take care in defining a global access rule, as it causes all requests to be rejected
except those from the DBC user and any bypassed objects.
I
ID
Identifier or Identification.
inner join In Teradata SQL, a join operation on two or more tables, in response to a join
condition that returns the qualifying rows from each table.
J
join In Teradata SQL, a join is a SELECT operation that allows you to combine columns and
rows from two or more tables to produce a result. Join types restricted by DWM are inner join,
outer join, merge join, product join, and all joins. For more information, see all joins,
exclusion join, inner join, merge join, nested join, and RowId join.
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M
merge join In Teradata SQL, the type of join that occurs when the WHERE conditional of a
SELECT statement causes the system first to sort the rows of two tables based on a join field
(specified in the statement), then traverse the result while performing a merge/match process.
Massively Parallel Processing (MPP) Multiple SMP nodes that work together. The nodes
are connected through the BYNET, a combination of hardware and software that allows the
vprocs (PEs and AMPs) to communicate with each other. Teradata is a linearly expandable
database system because as additional nodes and vprocs are added, the system capacity scales
in a linear fashion.
N
nested join In Teradata SQL, this join occurs when the user specifies a field that is a unique
primary index on one table and which is in itself an index (unique/non-unique primary or
secondary) to the second table.
O
object access filter Object access filters limit access to all objects associated with the filter.
Teradata DWM rejects immediately rejects session and query requests referencing restricted
objects during the states the filter is enabled.
object throttle Object throttles let you limit the number of logon sessions and/or queries
active for particular Teradata Database objects. Teradata DWM rejects sessions that exceed the
limit, and either rejects or delays queries that exceed the limit and cannot be immediately
processed.
operating environment An identifier signifying the mix of work you expect the system to
perform.
outer join In Teradata SQL, an extension of an inner join operation. Besides returning
qualifying rows from tables joined during an inner join, an outer join returns non-matching
rows from one or both of its tables. Multiple tables are joined two at a time.
P
Parallel Database Extension (PDE) A software layer that runs on the operating system on
each node. This additional software layer was created by Teradata to support the parallel
environment.
Parsing Engine (PE) Vprocs that receive SQL requests from the client and break the
requests into steps. The PEs send the steps to the AMPs and subsequently return the answer to
the client.
Performance Group A collection of parameters used to control and prioritize resource
allocation for a particular set of Teradata Database sessions within the Priority Scheduler.
Every Teradata Database session is assigned to a Performance Group during the logon process.
Performance groups are the primary consideration in partitioning the working capacity of the
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Teradata Database. To learn more about performance groups, see the Priority Scheduler
section of Utilities.
Performance Period A Priority Scheduler concept for a threshold or limit value that
determines when a session is under the control of that Performance Period.
Period
The days and time interval during a day that a rule applies.
Performance Monitoring/Production Control (PMPC) A Teradata Database
administrative API. Teradata DWM receives Performance Group information from PMPC.
priority definition set A collection of data that includes the Resource Partition,
Performance Group, Allocation Group, Performance Period type, and other definitions that
control how the Priority Scheduler manages and schedules session execution.
Priority Scheduler Administrator (PSA)
of Priority Scheduler usage.
A user-level application for managing the details
Priority Scheduler Facility A database function for managing the details of allocation of
CPU time to sessions based on information in the user’s account string. Priority Scheduler
includes resource partitions, performance groups, Performance Periods, Allocation Groups,
and several global flags.
product join In Teradata SQL, the type of join that occurs when the WHERE conditional of
a SELECT statement causes the Teradata Database database system to compare all qualifying
rows from one table to all qualifying rows from the other table. Because each row of one table
is compared to each row of another table, this join can be costly in terms of system
performance.
Note that product joins without an overall WHERE constraint are considered unconstrained
(Cartesian). If the tables to be joined are small, the effect of an unconstrained join on
performance may be negligible, but if they are large, there may be a severe negative effect on
system performance.
profiles A profile is a set of parameters you assign to a user, group of users, or an account
that determines what scheduling capabilities are available and how your Teradata Query
Scheduler scheduled requests server handles their scheduled requests.
Q
query analysis A feature that estimates the answer set size (number of rows) and processing
time of a SELECT type query.
query management The primary function of DWM is to manage logons and queries. This
feature examines logon and query requests before they are dispatched for execution within the
Teradata Database, and may reject logons, and may reject or delay queries. It does this by
comparing the objects referenced in the requests to the types of DBA-defined rules.
query resource filter Query resource filters lets you limit database resources (for example,
estimated row counts, processing time, and joins) for any issuing object, query object, or
object combinations associated with this type of filter. You define how resource usage is
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Glossary
limited, as well as the dates and times the resource usage limits apply. Teradata DWM rejects
queries affected by a rule of this type. Logon requests are not impacted
Query Scheduler (QS)
A Teradata tool used to schedule SQL requests.
R
request A message sent from an application program, such as DWM, to the Teradata
Database. In the Teradata Query Scheduler schedule request environment, a request is the
definition of the parameters and text associated with a schedule request.
Resource Partition (RP) A Priority Scheduler concept for a collection of prioritized PGs
related by their users’ associations. Has an assigned weight that determines the proportion of
resources available to that partition relative to the other partitions defined for that Teradata
Database.
results table/file In the Schedule Request environment, a results table or file is a database
table or a Windows file into which result data for a schedule request that is not self-contained
are stored.
results file storage A symbolic name to a root directory where scheduled requests results are
stored. You map a file storage location to a Windows root directory where results are stored.
RowID join In Teradata SQL, this join occurs when one of the join tables has a non-unique
primary index constant, and another column of that table matches weakly with a non-unique
secondary index column of the second table.
rule Rules are the name given to the method used by Teradata DWM to define how requests
are managed and which requests are prohibited from being immediately executed on the
Teradata Database. That is, the rules enforced by Teradata DWM provide query management
capabilities. Rules include filters, throttles, and WDs.
Rule Set a complete set of related filter, throttle, and WD rules. Teradata DWM enforces the
rules for one Rule Set at a time.
S
scheduled requests The capability to store scripts of SQL requests and execute them at a
scheduled later time.
Service Level Goal (SLG) Stated goal for workload query performance. You can state
performance objectives either in terms of throughput or response time with a service
percentage.
SQL An industry-standard language for creating, updating and, querying relational
database management systems. SQL was developed by IBM in the 1970s. It is the de facto
standard as well as being an ISO and ANSI standard. It is often embedded in general purpose
programming languages. Programming language used to communicate with the Teradata
Database.
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state A complete set of working values for a Rule Set. Each system condition/operating
environment cell of the matrix must be associated with a single state, but states may be
associated with multiple system condition/operating environment pairs.
state matrix A user-friendly way to manage for system events. The matrix contains system
conditions on one axis and operating environment elements on another axis, and associates
system condition/operating environment pairs to states and their working value set.
Symmetric Multi-Processing (SMP) A single Teradata node. An SMP system has multiple
CPUs that work together. All applications run under a single operating system on the node.
The AMPs and PEs on an SMP system communicate through the BYNET software that
handles the message queuing and flow control.
step time threshold The minimum estimated amount of time that any step will take to
execute for a rule to apply to the query. This time estimate is determined by the execution
plan.
system condition An identifier signifying system heath.
system period
Another name for operating period.
T
tdwm The database shared by Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager and Teradata Query
Scheduler. Previously called the dbqrymgr database.
Teradata Director Program (TDP) An interface for messages communicated between the
client and the Teradata system. TDP transforms headers and parcels into one or more channel
blocks and sends the channel blocks over the block multiplexer channel to the Teradata
system. It provides the data communications component of the Teradata Database. Every
channel-attached client system connected to a Teradata system has at least one TDP associated
with it.
throttle A type of rule that limits the number of active sessions, query requests, or utilities
on your Teradata Database. There are object throttles and utility throttles. There are also
category 3 workload throttles.
U
utility throttle Utility throttles lets you control how many utilities are simultaneously
running on a Teradata Database at any given time.
W
Workload Definition (WD) The third category (Category 3) of workload management
rules that causes query requests to be classified, throttled, prioritized, and monitored for
exceptions during execution.
workgroups Workgroups represent collections of related scheduled request work for users,
user groups, or accounts. Each workgroup is assigned a maximum number of requests that
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Glossary
can be executing from that workgroup simultaneously thereby ensuring that requests for all
workgroups get a fair share of their scheduled work done within the execution time frames.
working value The attributes of a rule whose value (behavior) can change depending on the
state or operating environment.
working value set A complete set of working values for a Rule Set. You can define many
working values per Rule Set. There is one working value set per state.
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Index
A
access control, tdwm database 228
actions 33
activating
rule categories 230
rule set 232
adding AGs to WD 216
AGs
and PGs 204
defining 213
deleting 214
mapping to WDs 211
maximum number 204
moving to different RPs 215
moving with Tactical priority 215
authorization 44, 73
AWTs
setting AWT limits in system-level parameters 210
B
blocker detection, setting 225
bypass
defined 157
granting privileges 157
removing privileges 158
C
category 1 rules 33
category 2 rules 33
category 3 rules 34
choosing SQL type 129, 144
classification criteria
application example 177
by excluded objects example 178
defined 165, 173
defining #1 for WDs 174
defining #2-6 for WDs 176
displaying 177
guidelines 167
overhead 166
QueryBand example 179
cleaning up rules 57
client address formats 175
comparing weights 216
console utilities
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
evaluation order 201
mapping to WDs 201
context objects 35
conversion
specifying mapping 79
copyright, viewing 59
creating
filters 127, 141
global exception directives 188
local exception directives 186
operating environments 96, 104
periods 114
RPs 212
rule set 231
throttles 127, 141
WDs 171
WDs from existing 185
D
Dashboard, Teradata Manager GUI 30
Database Browser
Edit menu 66
Elements pane 66
exiting 59
File menu 66
GUI 66
menu bar 66
opening 59
overview 65
Refresh Now 67
Sort by 67
View menu 67
Database DIT 66, 67
DBQLogTbl 38, 39
DBQLSQLTbl 195
default settings
Best Practice guidelines 88
defining
AGs 213
descriptive attributes 128, 143
event combinations 118
exception actions 194
exception criteria 190
global rule parameters 224
IP address 45
operating environment events 113
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Index
options 58
query limits 183
SLGs 182
SLGs for converted PD sets 82
state 92, 108
system condition events 110
system conditions 93, 101
system-level parameters 209
Teradata Database name 45
user-defined events 110
deleting
AGs 214
events 113
filters 161
operating environments 105
periods 118
RPs 214
rule set 234
state 109
system conditions 103
throttles 161
WDs 199, 219
weights views 219
disabling
filters 160
throttles 160
WDs 197
displaying
event combinations 121
formatted rule set information 234
global rule parameter information 234
individual rule information 234
plain text rule set information 235
rule category information 235
rule set information 235
rule type information 235
DIT
Database 66, 67
Objects 63
Rules 52, 60
E
Edit menu
Database Browser 66
Teradata DWM 55
editing
event combinations 121
events 112
Elements pane 66
enabling
by default 137, 151
filters 159
filters by state 137
316
object throttles by state 151
rule categories 230
throttles 159
utility throttles by state 153
WDs 197
error messages 238
evaluation order
console utilities 201
WDs 198
event combinations
defined 33
defining 118
displaying 121
editing 121
examples 121
event-related action 33
events
defined 32
defining 110, 113
deleting 113
editing 112
operating environments 33
setting up 91, 99
system conditions 32
exception actions 38
defined 166, 185
defining 194
setting skew 168
exception criteria 38
defined 166, 185
defining 190
deleting 190
guidelines 167
overhead 166
setting skew 167
exception directives 169
defined 185
global 186
local 186
setting precedence 196
exception handling guidelines 169
exception monitoring overhead 166
exiting
Database Browser 59
Teradata DWM 49
F
File menu
Database Browser 66
Teradata DWM 54
filters
and QueryBand 156
creating 127, 141
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Index
deleting 161
description 33
descriptive attributes 128, 143
disabling 160
enabling 159
enabling by state 137
examples 133
modifying 126, 141
object access 125
properties 126, 140
query resource 126
viewing by state 138
viewing information 140
G
global exception directives 186
creating 188
global rule parameters
defining 224
described 223
displaying information 234
granting bypass privileges 157
GUI
Database Browser 66
Teradata DWM 52
menu bar
Database Browser 66
Teradata DWM 52, 54
menus
accessing shortcut 61
Edit 55, 66
File 54, 66
Help 59
Rules 55
View 57, 67
Window 59
migrating
PSF (Priority Scheduler) settings 74
tdwm database 44
minimum explain confidence level, setting 227
modifying
filters 126, 141
HOSTS file 45
state parameters 205
throttles 126, 141
WDs 198
moving
AGs to different RPs 215
AGs with Tactical Priority 215
N
H
network connection, verifying 46
handling concurrent multiple 169
Help menu 59
help, opening 59
hiding status bar 54
HOSTS file, modifying 45
O
I
intervals, setting 224
IP address, defining 45
L
linking objects to rules 35, 154
loading rule set 233
local exception directives 186
creating 186
local mode 48
locking tdwm database 228
logging 38
lower priority WD 220
M
mapping
console utilities to WDs 201
WDs to AGs 211
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
object access filters 125
examples 125
object throttles 138
defining rule type 143
enabling by state 151
examples 139, 147
setting limits 146
objects 35
linking considerations 154
linking to rules 35, 154
examples 133
with copy and paste 155
with drag-and-drop 155
unlinking from rules 156
Objects DIT 63
opening
Database Browser 59
help 59
rule set from a file 54
operating environments
creating 96, 104
defined 33, 103
deleting 105
different from periods 103
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Index
setting precedence 105
options
defining 58
restoring default 59
overhead 166
avoiding or reducing exception monitoring 166
examples 126
processing limits 131
QueryBand
and filters 156
classification criteria example 179
purpose 156
P
R
PD sets
converting to WDs 74
defining SLGs 82
periods
creating 114
defined 113
deleting 118
different from operating environments 103
setting up 113
PGs
and AGs 204
maximum number 204
Post to Queue Table
exception action relationships 169
for events 120
for exception events 195
precedence
exception directives 196
operating environments 105
system conditions 103
preparing system 45
printing
formatted rule set information 235
plain text rule set information 235
Priority Scheduler
creating RPs 212
defining AGs 213
defining system-level parameters 209
deleting AGs 214
deleting RPs 214
maximum number of PGs 204
migrating settings 74
modifying state parameters 205
moving AGs to different RPs 215
processing limits 131
product version numbers 3
Properties pane 52, 63
PSF (Priority Scheduler) settings, migrating 74
Refresh Now 67
removing bypass privileges 158
renaming workloads 198
replacing workloads 198
request processing 36
restoring default options 59
result codes 237
RPs
creating 212
deleting 214
moving AGs 215
setup 205
rule categories
activating 230
displaying information 235
enabling 230
rule set
activating 232
creating 231
deleting 234
displaying formatted information 234
displaying information 235
displaying plain text information 235
loading 233
opening from a file 54
printing formatted information 235
printing plain text information 235
saving formatted information 235
saving plain text information 235
saving to a file 54
saving to the database 232
viewing active rule categories 231
viewing by state 160, 235
rules
category 1 33
category 2 33
category 3 34
cleaning up 57
displaying information 234
linking objects 35, 154
examples 133
with copy and paste 155
with drag-and-drop 155
object linking considerations 154
process 40
Q
query limits
defined 183
setting 184
query objects 35
query resource filters 126
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Index
purpose 33
unlinking objects 156
Rules DIT 52, 60
Rules menu 55
S
saving
formatted rule set information 235
plain text rule set information 235
rule set to a file 54
rule set to the database 232
schmon 204
setting
AWT limits 205
blocker detection 225
intervals 224
minimum explain confidence level 227
object throttle limits 146
query limits 184
query resource filter processing limits 131
skew exception actions 168
skew exception criteria 167
SLGs 181
setting up
events 91, 99
periods 113
state matrix 100
states 91, 99
shortcut menu, accessing 61
showing status bar 54
skew
setting exception actions 168
setting exception criteria 167
SLGs
defining 182
defining for converted PD sets 82
setting 181
software
dependencies 43
supported releases 3
Sort by 67
specifying conversion mapping 79
SQL type, choosing 129, 144
starting
Teradata DWM 47
state
defined 31, 87, 106
defining 92, 108
deleting 109
enabling filters 137
enabling object throttles 151
enabling utility throttles 153
setting in state matrix 110
Teradata Dynamic Workload Manager User Guide
setting up 91, 99
viewing filters 138
viewing rule sets 160, 235
viewing throttles 153
state matrix
defined 31
setting states 110
setting up 100
state parameters, modifying 205
status bar 53
reading 53
showing and hiding 54
system conditions
defined 32, 100
defining 93, 101
deleting 103
setting precedence 103
system preparation 45
system-level parameters
defining 209
setting AWT limits 210
T
tdwm database
abnormal GUI abort 228
access control 228
crash 228
locking 228
locks 228
migrating 44
purpose 44
reset 228
unlocking 228
tdwmdmp utility 239
TDWMEventHistory 39
TDWMEventLog 39
TDWMExceptionLog 38, 195
TDWMSummaryLog 39
Teradata ASM 26
components 29
Teradata Database, defining name 45
Teradata DWM
exiting 49
File menu 54
flow 26
GUI 52
menu bar 52, 54
Properties pane 52
purpose 25
request processing 36
Rules menu 55
starting 47
tasks 53
319
Index
View menu 57
working with rules 40
Teradata Manager, Teradata ASM product 30
Teradata Workload Analyzer (Teradata WA), Teradata ASM
product 29
throttles
asynchronous operations and throttle limits 139
concurrent object throttle rules 140
creating 127, 141
deleting 161
description 33
descriptive attributes 128, 143
disabling 160
enabling 159
modifying 126, 141
object 138
properties 126, 140
utilities 140
viewing by state 153
viewing information 140
tuning WDs 219
U
unlocking tdwm database 228
user names 48
utility throttles 140
enabling by state 153
V
verifying network connection 46
version
compatibility 44
information, viewing 59
numbers 3
View menu
Database Browser 67
Teradata DWM 57
viewing
active rule categories 231
copyright information 59
enabled rule categories 231
filter or throttle information 140
filters by state 138
throttles by state 153
version information 59
WD information 221
weight distribution 218
weight values 217
workload summaries 221
adding AGs 216
controlling activity 170
converting PD sets 74
creating 171
creating a lower priority WD 220
creating from existing 185
defaults 164
defining classification criteria #1 174
defining classification criteria #2-6 176
deleting 199, 219
disabling 197
displaying classification criteria 177
enabling 197
evaluation order 198
grouping requests into a workload 165
mapping to AGs 211
mapping to console utilities 201
maximum number 164
modifying 198
sample setup 199
tuning 219
viewing information 221
weights
comparing 216
deleting views 219
viewing distribution 218
viewing values 217
Window menu 59
Workload Analysis, Teradata Manager component 30
workload classifications 34
workload summaries, viewing 221
wrap around midnight 117
X
xschmon 204
W
WDs
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