LEAVING CERTIFICATE 2009
MARKING SCHEME
HOME ECONOMICS –
SCIENTIFIC AND SOCIAL
FOOD STUDIES COURSEWORK
18
Food Studies Practical Coursework General Marking Criteria
(to be read in conjunction with 2009 Assignments)
Investigation: Analysis/Research - 30 marks
= 20
Research and analysis
Band A 16-20 marks (very good – excellent)
Investigation
shows evidence of a thorough exploration and comprehensive analysis of all the
issues and factors directly relevant to the key requirements of the assignment
is accurate, derived from a range of sources and presented coherently
uses evidence from research as basis for making relevant choices in relation
to selection of menus/dishes/products
Band B 11-15 marks (very competent – good)
Investigation
shows evidence of exploration and some analysis of the issues and factors
which are generally relevant to the key requirements of the assignment
is accurate, derived from a range of sources and presented coherently
uses evidence from research as basis for making relevant choices in relation
to selection of menus/dishes/products
Band C 6-10 marks (basic to competent)
Investigation
shows evidence of exploration of the issues and factors which are generally
relevant to the key requirements of the assignment
is reasonably accurate, derived from a range of sources and presented coherently
uses evidence from research as basis for making choices in relation to selection
of menus/dishes/products
Band D 0-5 marks (very basic – limited)
Investigation
shows evidence of a very basic and limited understanding of the key
requirements of the assignment
some or all of the information is vague and accurate only in parts, presentation lack s coherence
uses evidence from research as basis for making choices in relation to selection
of menus/dishes/products
All Assignments. - 2 two course meals /2 dishes / 2 products -
(2 x 2 marks)
=4
If dish prepared is not investigated -1 / -2 marks in Investigation.
(menu – starter/desert = 1 mark , main course = 1 mark)
suitable meals / dishes / products having regard to factors identified and analysed in
the investigation
Menus/main course/dishes must be balanced – accept 3 out of 4 food groups
Reasons / selection criteria - (2 x 2 marks)
clearly indicates criteria that determined choice of dish or product selected to prepare.
=4
Sources including source of recipe - 2 x 1 mark (2 marks)
=2
19
Preparation and Planning - 6 marks
=3
Resources (ingredients incl. costing, equipment)
-
main ingredients, unit cost, key equipment used as determined by dish
(expect cost for all except AOP E)
=3
Time allocation / Work sequence
- Preparation, sequence of tasks, evaluation
Band A 3 marks - all key steps identified, correct sequence Band B
2 marks - some key steps identified or sequence incorrect
Band C 1 mark - few key stages identified and sequence incorrect
Implementation - 28 marks

Outline of the procedure followed to include preparation, food preparation processes,
cooking time /temperature, serving /presentation, wash –up, tasting/evaluation.
(Information / account should be in ca ndidate’s own words)
= 16
Band A 13 - 16 marks (very good – excellent)
All essential stages in preparation of dish identified, summarised and presented in
candidate’s own words, in correct sequence with due reference to relevant food
preparation process/es used
Band B 9 -12 marks (very competent – good)
Most essential stages in preparation of dish identified, summarised and presented in
correct sequence with due reference to relevant food preparation process/es used
Band C 5 - 8 marks (basic to competent)
Some essential stages in preparation of dish identified, summarised and presented in
correct sequence with due reference to relevant food preparation process/es used
Band D 1-4 marks (very basic – limited)
Few or any essential stages in prepar ation of dish identified, summarised and presented
in sequence with due reference to relevant food preparation process/es used

Key factors considered (must relate to specific dish / test)
2 x 4 marks
Identification (2) and clear explanation of importance (2) of two factors considered which
were critical to success of dish
=8

=4
Safety/hygiene
2 x 2 marks
(must relate to specific ingredients being used / dish being cooked)
Identification (1) and explanation (1) of one key safety issue and one key hygiene issue
considered when preparing and cooking dish/conducting test
Evaluation - 16 marks
Evaluate the assignment in terms of:


Implementation
2 x 4 marks each
Band A -4 marks - identified and analysed specific weaknesses/streng ths in carrying
out the task, modifications, where suggested, were clearly justified, critical analysis
of use of resources / planning
Band B- 3 marks - identified weaknesses / strengths in carrying out task, some justification
of proposed modifications, limited analysis of use of resources / planning
Band C- 2 mark - some attempt made at identifying weaknesses or strengths in completion
of task, modifications where suggested not justified, reference made to use of resources / planning
The specific requirements of the assignment
2 x 4 marks each
Band A 4 marks - draws informed conclusions in relation to two key
requirements of the assignment
Band B 3 marks - draws limited conclusions in relation to two key
requirements of the assignment
Band C 2 mark - summarises two outcomes in relation to the assignment
20
=8
=8
Area of Practice A – Application of Nutritional
Principles Assignment 1
Special consideration should be given when planning meals for young people who are involved
in active sport on a regular basis.
Research and elaborate on the nutritional needs and the meal planning guidelines that should
be considered when planning meals for young people who participate in act ive sport.
Keeping in mind these considerations, suggest a menu for one day (three meals and snacks)
suitable for this group of people.
Prepare, cook and serve the main course of the main meal of the day.
Evaluate the assignment in terms of (a) implementation and (b) the specific requirements of
the assignment.
Key requirements of the assignment
- dietary/nutritional needs with specific reference to young people who participate in active sport .
- relevant meal planning guidelines
- menu suitable for one day (three meals and snacks)
- reasons for choice.
Investigation
Dietary / nutritional requirements – nutritional balance – helps training & a quick recovery, physical
growth increases the need for intake of all nutrients, daily requirements of macr o / micro nutrients including
protein / cho / fat / iron / calcium requirements as appropriate to young people who participate in active
sport with reasons for possible variations, high fibre, Vitamin C / iron absorption, Vitamin D / calcium
absorption, en ergy balance vis a vis activity levels – fuel stores used up during training & matches and
needs to be replaced, current nutritional guidelines re nutrient and food intake etc.
Meal planning guidelines – use of food pyramid to ensure balance, eat at le ast five balanced meals each day –
can be achieved by balanced snacking every 2 -3 hours, small meals better than 3 -4 large ones, avoid skipping
meals, variety of foods, personal likes and dislikes, resource issues, use foods in season, chose healthy snack s
( i.e. high protein, high carbohydrate, high GI foods, low fat, low refined sugar foods), avoid foods high in
salt, saturated fat and sugar i.e. convenience foods, 60% of total calories consumed should come from
carbohydrates, avoid the use of food su pplements unless prescribed by doctor, select low GI foods to provide
a sustained source of energy and high GI foods to restore energy after exercise, replace water lost during
exercise to avoid dehydration – recommended daily fluid intake 35 – 45ml per kilogram of body weight,
drinking water v sports drinks, ensure glycogen stores are full before training/games, cost of meals, time
available for preparation, avoid high spicy and unfamiliar foods before training/matches, portions will
depend on weight, sport and training schedule etc.
Dishes selected – menu for one day (three meals and snacks)
- must meet the nutritional requirements for young people who participate
in active sport
- must be a main course.
Evaluation (specific requirements of assignment)
Analysis of findings regarding the nutritional requirements of dishes/meals for young people who participate
in active sport.
Meal planning guidelines – range of foods / dishes suitable for young people who participate in active sport
etc., how the selected dish meets the requirements as identified in the investigation.
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Assignment 2
A recent survey of iron levels in Irish women aged between eighteen and fifty years,
shows that 48% had inadequate iron intakes.
With reference to the above statement, identify and discuss (i) the causes and (ii) the effects
of low iron intakes among Irish women.
Investigate and elaborate on the nutritional needs and meal planning guidelines that should
be considered when planning and preparing meals for wom en who wish to increase the
intake of iron in the diet.
Having regard to the factors identified in your research, suggest a range of menus suitable
for the main meal of the day.
Prepare, cook and serve one of the main courses that you have investigated.
Evaluate the assignment in terms of (a) implementation and (b) the specific requirements
of the assignment.
Key requirements of the assignment
- causes of low iron intake among Irish women
- effects of low iron intake
- dietary/nutritional requirements with particular reference to women
-
relevant meal planning guidelines
- range of menus for the main meal of the day
- reasons for choice .
Investigation
Dietary / nutritional requirements – nutritional balance, daily requirements of macro / micro - nutrients
including protein / cho / fat / iron / calcium requireme nts as appropriate, high fibre, Vitamin C / iron
absorption, Vitamin D / Calcium absorption, current nutritional guidelines re nutrient and f ood intake,
knowledge of haem and non haem -iron foods etc.
Causes of low iron intake – unbalanced diet, lack of vitamin C, excess fibre in diet, tannins in tea coffee and
cocoa, phytic acid in cereals and pulses, oxalic acid in vegetables, herb oregano red uces absorption, poorly
monitored diets i.e. vegetarian/weight reducing diets, medical conditions such as coeliac disease can reduce
amount of iron absorbed, excessive blood loss after surgery and menstruation, not being able to absorb iron
etc.
Effects of low iron intake – anaemia, tiredness, fatigue, irritability, lethargy, lack of concentration, headache,
palpitations, breathlessness, dizziness, pale skin, feeling weak, muscle tiredness, dryness in mouth and throat,
mouth soreness, brittle hair/nails e tc.
Meal planning guidelines – use of food pyramid to ensure balanced meals, establish pattern of eating three
regular balanced meals each day - breakfast should include a fortified breakfast cereal, eat wide variety of
fruit and vegetables, increase intake of iron rich foods and vitamin C for absorption of iron, haem -iron from
animal source is better absorbed than non -haem iron from plant sources, consume haem and non -haem iron
foods together to increase absorption of iron in diet, foods that conta in phytic acid and oxalic acid should
not be consumed at the same time as iron rich foods, avoid foods high in salt and sugar i.e. processed foods,
choose low fat/ products with polyunsaturated fats, avoid refined carbohydrate foods and replace with
wholemeal products but do not include excess fibre in diet, etc.
Dishes selected – menus for main course of the day
- should meet the nutritional requirements as identified to increase the
intake of iron
- must be a main course
Evaluation (specific requirements of assignment)
Analysis of findings regarding what you learned from the investigation regarding the management of a diet for
women who wish to increase the intake of iron in their diet, factors that should be considered when planning
meals for women in order to increase the intake of iron in their diet and to ensure nutritional adequacy , what
foods are suitable/unsuitable, what special aspects of meal planning have to be considered etc.,
how the selected dish meets the requirements as identified in the investigation.
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Area of Practice B – Food Preparation and Cooking Processes
Assignment 3
A soufflé is a light aerated dish, which may either be sweet or savoury, cooked or
uncooked, hot or cold.
Carry out research on (i) how soufflés are made and (ii) a range of dishes that illustrate the
skill of soufflé making.
Investigate and elaborate on the key points that should be observed to ensure success
when making soufflés. Prepare, make and serve a hot or cold soufflé of your choice.
Evaluate the assignment in terms of (a) implementation, (b) success in achieving a light
aerated texture.
Key requirements of the assignment
- research on how soufflés are made
- range of dishes that illustrate the skill of soufflé making
- the key points that should be observed to ensure success when making soufflés
- chosen dish and reasons for choice.
Investigation
How soufflés are made:
Hot/cooked/sweet/savoury: can be baked(dry heat) or steamed(bain-marie), light aerated dish, rising depends on
entrapping air and expansion of air when heated, usually consists of a panard or white binding sauce, gelatinisation
occurs when starch grains burst and absorb liquid when heated, egg yolks are adde d for richness and small pieces of
meat, fish or vegetables for flavour (savoury soufflé), fruit, chocolate, coffee etc.( hot sweet soufflé) , stiffly beaten
whites are folded into the mixture to aerate it and give a light texture, during cooking some ste am is generated and the
air in the foam expands causing the soufflé to rise, the egg white coagulates and sets, can be cooked in a large or
individual soufflé dishes/ swiss roll tin and rolled - roulade or on frying pan – puffed omelette etc.
Cold/uncooked/sweet: made using eggs and substituting panard sauce with gelatine as thickening agent, gelatine can
be in powdered or leaf form, colourless and flavourless, dissolved in hot water, must be added to mixture from height
while stirring to prevent streaking, absorbs large amounts of water to form a gel, sets on cooling, lightly whipped
cream is added to give a light spongy texture, stiffly beaten egg whites are folded in to aerate the mixture, cream & egg
white give volume and lightness to the mixture, if adding chopped fruit mixture must be partially set first to avoid fruit
sinking, when set cold soufflé should hold it’s own weight over the top of the dish etc.
Dishes that illustrate the skill of soufflé making:
Hot/cooked/sweet/savoury: chocolate, coffee, orange, vanilla, cheese, spinach, mushroom, fish, ham/chicken,
twice baked soufflé etc.
Cold/uncooked/sweet: lemon, strawberry, raspberry, chocolate etc.
Key points to ensure success when making soufflés:
Hot soufflés must be put into a pre -heated oven, if too hot soufflé will be cooked on outside and raw inside, if temperature too
low soufflé will not rise, greasing dish is essential to prevent soufflé sticking, mixture must be cleaned from rim as this may
cook first and prevent mixture from rising, the smaller the soufflé dish used the more uniformly cooked the mixture will be,
base mixture should be highly seasoned as egg whites dull flavours, soufflé base mixture must be correct consistency, use
straight sided dish so soufflé will not change shape in cooking, place soufflé low in oven to allow for expansion, avoid
opening door of oven to prevent collapsing, avoid using fats in flavourings as they tend to make egg whites collapse, serve
immediately as hot soufflés loose their lightness if kept hot an d shrink as they cool, cool sauce before adding egg white, a
double band of grease proof paper around top will prevent soufflé from falling over, beat egg whites into a really stiff foam to
trap air and make soufflé ligh t, use clean grease free bowl when beating egg whites, use thin bladed spoon to fold in egg
white as wooden spoon can knock out air, fold in egg whites gently but thoroughly, sponge gelatine in water that is hot but
not boiling or it will loose setting qualities, use a double layer of greaseproof paper around top of dish, add chopped fruit to
gelatine mixture when partially set to prevent fruit from sinking to bottom, acids in fruit juices weake n setting power of
gelatine, fresh pineapple destroys setting power etc.
Dishes selected – must be a hot or cold soufflé
Evaluation (as specified in assignment)
What you learned from the assignment regarding how a light aerated texture was achieved in relation to
method used to make soufflé etc.
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Area of Practice C: Food Technology
Assignment 4
A wide range of yoghurts are available on the market for the consumer to choose from.
Carry out research on the range of commercially available yoghurts.
Investigate (i) how commercially prepared yoghurt is made (processed) and (ii) how yoghurt can
be made in the home. Explain the principle involved in each case.
Prepare and make one type of yoghurt that you have investigated. Include details of the type of
storage containers and labelling you would recommend for the yoghurt.
Evaluate the assignment in terms of (a) implementation, (b) practicability of making yoghurt in
the home and (c) cost in comparison to a similar commercial variety.
Key requirements of the assignment
-
research on the range of commercially available yoghurt
- investigate how commercially prepared yoghurt is made
- investigate how yoghurt can be made at home
- explain underlying principle of commercially prepared and home made yoghurt
- storage containers and labelling ( for home made yoghurt)
Investigation
Research on the range of commercially available yoghurt
Range of yoghurt: set, stirred (thick or pouring with fruit pieces added), natural, fruit flavoured yoghurt,
whole/real fruit yoghurt, thick and creamy with fruit packed separately, custard style, bio-yoghurts, yoghurt
drinks, frozen yoghurt ice cream, soya/goats milk yoghurts, probiotic yoghurt drinks, functional - pro-active and cholesterol
lowering, diet/low fat/ fat free/full fat/ skimmed yoghurt etc.
Flavours: strawberry, mixed berries, raspberry, chocolate, hazelnut, prune, vanilla etc.
Brands: Yoplait, Danone, Muller, Glenisk, Yeo Valley, Onken, Rachel Organics, Benecol, Own Brands etc .
Research may include definition of ‘yoghurt’ quantity/ weight per carton/jar, ingredients, nutritive value,
packaging/containers, labelling, shelf life, cost etc.
How commercially prepared yoghurt is made including principle:
Milk is homogenised to give product a smooth, creamy texture, milk pasteurised, cooled to between 40 -43°C (ideal for
fermentation process), bacteria (starter cultures) mixture of lactobacillus bulgaricus and streptococcus thermophilus
added(inoculation), incubated between 37 – 44° C for 4-6 hours when fermentation takes place, the yoghurt bacilli use
the sugar in the milk (lactose) as food enabling the m to reproduce, lactose changes to lactic acid and mixture becomes
acidic, flavours develop, protein coagulates, when level of acidity reaches between 0.8 -1.8% bacteria growth stops but
bacteria remain alive, yoghurt cooled 4.5°C, vits A & D , stabilizers . gelatine/pectin, sucrose, colours, flavours added,
packed, labelled, despatched etc.
How yoghurt can be made at home including principle:
Vacuum flask- sterilise all equipment by boiling, heat milk to boiling point, cool 43°C stirring to prevent a skin
forming(UHT or sterilised milk can be used as each has been homogenised and sterilised; to produce a thicker yoghurt add 2
tblsp dried skimmed milk powder to the milk before boiling, blend natural unsweetened yoghurt (starter cultures) with a little
of the milk in a bowl, mix in remainder, cover and leave in vacuum flask for 6 -7 hours(may take 12 hours), if temperature too
high bacilli will be killed off, if too low bacilli will reproduce too slowly and yoghurt will take long time to thicken, when
thick cool quickly by standing bowl of yoghurt in another bowl containing ice cold water, whisk lightly, cover, place in
refrigerator for 4 hours until thick and cold, sweeten, flavour with fruit, put in jars, cover & label etc.
Yoghurt can also be made by placing in a bowl, cover with a plate/lid, wrap in a towel or blanket, stand in warm place
i.e. kitchen, hot press, near radiator for 6 -8 hours or overnight etc.
Yoghurt maker - sterilise glass jars, covers in yoghurt maker and a jug, bring milk to the boil, cool to 36°C, pour into
jug through sieve, stir in one glass jar full natural yoghurt, divide mixture between jars, place lids on securely, place
jars into yoghurt maker and place main lid on top, full fat milk will take approx. 4 hours, skimmed milk 6 hou rs, set
timer as yoghurt kept warm for too long will have a granular texture and acidy taste, when ready place jars in
refrigerator to cool, sweeten, flavour, put in jars, cover & label etc.
Each method of making yoghurt must include details of the underly ing principle
Suitable packaging and labelling for homemade yoghurt e.g. glass jars, glass kilner jars, plastic jars, recycled
yoghurt containers, plastic covers, cling film covers, stick -on labels etc.
If no packaging investigated – 3 marks
Dishes selected – Yoghurt type.
Evaluation (as specified in assignment) Practicability of making yoghurt in the home – resource issues – cost in
comparison to a similar commercial variety etc.
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Area of Practice D – Dishes illustrating the Properties of a Food
Assignment 5
The success of many dishes relies on the gelatinisation of starch.
Define gelatinisation. Identify dishes that illustrate this property.
Investigate and elaborate on the application of gelatinisation in the making of sweet
and savoury dishes explaining the principle involved.
Prepare, make and serve one of the dishes (either sweet or savoury) that you have
investigated. Evaluate the assignment in terms of (a) implementation and (b) success in
applying the property of gelatinisation when making the di sh.
Key requirements of the assignment
- define gelatinisation
-
application of the scientific principle of gelatinisation in the making of sweet and
savoury dishes
-
dishes illustrating the property of gelatinisation
chosen dish and reasons for choice.
Definition of gelatinisation: when mixed with a liquid and heated , starch grains swell and burst and absorb
moisture, resulting in thickening of the liquid etc.
Application of the property of Gelatinisation
Moist heat - starch grains(flour/cornflour) are mixed with a liquid and heated to an initial temperature of 55°C - 70°C
(differs for different starches), the granules (flour) swell, burst and absorb the liquid, as swelling continues the viscosity
of the solution increases the granules move together and form a paste like solution (thick and gluey), as the temperature
increases the mixture becomes more viscous, on cooling hydrogen bonds are formed and a gel like paste results, starch
molecules have many hydroxyl groups that attract and hold the water molecules, mixture does not separate upon
cooling instead a gel is formed, a temperature in excess of 85°C will create a sol(solution that contains particles that do
not dissolve but are evenly dispersed throughout the liquid), some starches h ave greater thickening powers e.g.
cornflour better than wheat flour as it is purely starch, a lot of sugar decreases starch’s ability to gelatinise as both
starch and water are competing for available water which leaves less water for the starch to attach itself to, acids also
affects starch’s ability to gelatinise, combination of acid and heat causes hydrolytic reaction, breaks down starch
molecules into smaller molecules, these can move unlike bigger molecules resulting in a thinner paste, add acid after
gelatinisation has taken place etc.
Dry heat – the starch grains burst and absorb any moisture (fat) present – used in the making of pastry and popcorn.
Range of dishes
Sweet dishes: dishes that include sauces thickened using a starchy substance – flour/cornflour/arrowroot rice
pudding, apple and rice meringue pudding, pastry dishes - lemon meringue pie, éclairs, apple puffs, vol -auvents etc
Savoury dishes: dishes that include sauces thickened using a starchy substance –
flour/cornflour/arrowroot/potatoes, pastry dishes – vol-au-vents, soups, stews, curry, lasagne etc
Dishes selected – must be a sweet or savoury dish where gelatinisation is
used. Evaluation (as specified in assignment)
How successful the property of gelatinisation was applied in the preparation/cooking of the selected dish.
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Area of Practice E: Comparative Analysis including Sensory Analysis
Assignment 6
The variety and quality of commercially prepared soups are constantly being extended
and improved.
Investigate the different types of commercially prepared soups available (i.e. brands,
flavours, methods of processing used).
Prepare three convenience soups. (Soups should be the same flavour, but different brands
or manufactured using a different method of processing).
Using a descriptive ranking test, compare the soups in terms of saltiness.
Evaluate the assignment in terms of (a) implementation and (b) the test results obtained (i.e.
an analysis of the factors that may have contributed to the test results obtained).
Key requirements of the assignment
- Investigation of foods appropriate to assignment - different types of commercially prepared soups
(i.e. brands, flavours, methods of processing used)
- Prepare three convenience soups, same flavour, but different brands or manufactured using a
different method of processing.
- Selected foods and selection criteria
- Investigation, description and possible outcomes of descriptive ranking test
- Conditions to be controlled during testing
Investigation
 Research / Investigation of products appropriate to the assignment
Investigate the different types of commercially prepared soups available (i.e. brands,
flavours, methods of processing used).
= 20
 Descriptive ranking Test
Description: tester is presented with a number (three) coded samples, tester ranks samples in order
of intensity of specified attribute i.e. saltiness etc.
Aim: to rank the perceived saltiness of three types of convenience soups etc
Possible outcomes: soups are ranked in order of saltiness i.e. can be compared in order of saltiness etc.
 Identification of the conditions to be controlled during the testing
Conditions specific to the assignment e.g., size, shape and colour of containers used for testing, simil ar quantities in
each sample, temperature of samples, hygiene, timing, dietary conditions, an understanding of the meaning
of the attribute - saltiness etc.
 Selected dish and selection criteria
Select three types of convenience soups, same flavour, but different brands or different methods
of processing. (3 types @ 1 mark, flavour @ 1 mark,)
=4
=4
State reasons for choice. - 2 reasons @ 2 marks each
=2
Sources – 2 x 1 mark ( 2 marks )
Preparation and Planning
=3
 Resources
 Main equipment needed to carry out assignment
Descriptive ranking test - trays, glasses of water, containers, soup samples A, B, C, score -cards,
record sheets, pen etc.
26
 Work sequence
=3
Brief outline of the main steps in sequence they intend to follow i.e.
Prepare self & testing area, prepare and cook/heat three types of soup
Descriptive ranking test: decide which symbol represents each soup sample, code containers with
symbols, label scorecards and record sheet, pour soup in coded containers, set up trays , place
coded samples on trays, follow instructions on score cards, carry out descriptive ranking test,
collect scorecards, transfer results onto record sheet, calculat e results, reveal codes, present
results, tidy and wash up, evaluate results etc.
= 16
Implementation
Procedure followed when carrying out this aspect of the assignment
The full sequence of implementation should be given and findings should
be presented for the test i.e. Descriptive Ranking Test
Prepare self & testing area, prepare and cook/heat three convenience soups,
Descriptive ranking test: decide which symbol represents each soup sample, code containers with different symbols ,
label scorecards and record sheet, pour prepared soups in containers, set up trays, place containers with different
symbols on each tray, label score cards and record sheet, follow tasting instructions on score card and taste
samples, collect scorecards and transfer results of each tester in group onto record sheet, calculate the score for
each soup by multiplying the number of ticks in each box by the value assigned to it, reveal codes, present results,
tidy and wash up, evaluate results etc.
 Key factors considered (any 2 @ 4 marks each)
=8
Key factors that may be considered in order to ensure success in this assignment include - conditions controlled
during testing … coding, choice of soups, degree of doneness, sufficient amounts, timing of test, glass of
water/or dry cracker included to cleanse the palate, importance of silence during testing etc..
(key factors must refer to the actual test carried out)
 Safety and hygiene (two safety / hygiene points x 2 marks each)
=4
Safety: testers with allergies e.g. special diets – coeliac, care in cooking soups and putting
hot soup into containers etc.
Good hygiene practice with regard to: preparation area and the testing area, handling
of samples – use of plastic gloves / disposable glasses etc.
Evaluation
 Implementation (2 points x 4 marks each)
=8
Testing procedures used
Key factors when conducting the test
Safety and hygiene issues considered
Problems encountered and suggested solutions
 Specific requirements of the assignment (1 point x 8 marks)
=8
The test results obtained (i.e. an analysis of the factors that may have contributed to the test results obtained)
Band A = 8 marks
Band B = 6 marks
Band C = 4 marks
27
Appendix 1
General Instructions for examiners in relation to the awarding of marks.
1.
Examination requirements:
Candidates are required to complete and present a record of five assignments for
examination. In respect of Areas of Practice, candidates must complete
Area A - One assignment
Area B - One assignment
Area C - One assignment
Area D - One assignment
One other assignment from either Area A or Area E
Where a candidate completes five assignments and does not meet the examination requireme nts as set out
above, the examiner will mark the five assignments as presented and disallow the marks awarded for the
assignment with the lowest mark from AOP A or E
2.
Each Food Studies assignment must include different practical activities.
Where a candidate repeats a practical activity for a second assignment , the examiner will mark the repeated
practical as presented and disallow the marks awarded for the repeated practical activity with the lowest mark.
3.
Where a candidate completes the investigation and / or the preparation and planning and / or the
evaluation aspects of an assignment and does not complete the implementation, the examiner will mark the
completed aspects of the assignment as presented. However, marks for evaluation of implementation, where
attempted, will be disallowed.
In relation to Assignments 3, 4, 5 and 6 evaluation of specific requirements will also be disallowed
4.
Where a candidate completes the preparation and planning and/or the implementation and /or the
evaluation aspects of an assignment, and does not complete the investigation, the examiner will mark the
completed aspects of the assignment as presented. However, marks for evaluation of specific requirements of
assignment, where attempted, will be disallowed.
5.
Where the dish / product prepared has not been identified in the investigation , but fulfils
the requirements of the assignment, deduct the relevant marks awarded ( -1/-2) under meals
/dishes/products in investigation.
6.
Teacher demonstration work is not acceptable, therefore no marks to be awarded
for implementation and evaluation of implementation.
7.
Dish selected not fully compliant with requirements e.g.
An uncooked dish selected where a cooked dish specified
Dish not rich in iron - Assignment 2
Dish selected shows few process skills e.g. Assignment 5 – porridge prepared.
Dish selected includes over use of convenience foods
Deduct – 8 marks from total mark awarded for assign ment and insert explanation as highlighted above.
8.
A dish that does not meet the requirements of the assignment e.g. a dessert dish prepared
instead of a main course no marks to be awarded.
9.
Where a teacher disallows a practical application, no marks are allowed for
Implementation and Evaluation of Implementation. All other areas may be credited.
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