Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle

Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle
Skills Proficiency awards
in Basic Motor Vehicle
Repair and Servicing
Skills Foundation Certificate 3528
Skills Proficiency Certificate 3529
Syllabus
Assessments
Programme guidance notes
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Skills Proficiency awards
in Basic Motor Vehicle
Repair and Servicing
Skills Foundation Certificate 3528
Skills Proficiency Certificate 3529
Syllabus
Assessments
Programme guidance notes
03.05/F00045143/ST87177
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Contents
05
About City & Guilds
05
Introduction to this programme
05
About this booklet
06
How to offer this programme
06
Qualification approval
06
Examination centre approval
06
Numbering system
07
Making entries for assessments
07
Internal candidates
07
External candidates
07
Submitting results to City & Guilds
08
Roles and responsibilities
08
Programme coordinator
08
Assessor
09
Candidate
09
External verifier
10
Quality inspector/auditor
10
Designing courses of study
11
Resources
11
Presentation format of syllabus
11
Carrying out assessments
12
Practical assessments
13
Preparation, supervision and marking
13
Assessment of underpinning knowledge
14
Records, results and certification
14
Health and safety
15
Equal opportunities
15
Progression routes and recognition
17
Syllabus
17
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
19
Skills Foundation Certificate 3528
27
Skills Proficiency Certificate 3529
Contents
continued
33
Candidate assessment record sheets
34
Skills Foundation Certificate
38
Skills Proficiency Certificate
43
Guide to the assessment of practical skills
43
Assessor skills
44
Preparing assessment plans
45
Conducting practical assessments by observation
46
Appraisal of products
46
Supplementary questions
47
Oral questioning
47
Distractions and disruptions
48
Giving feedback on performance
50
Skills to help with employment
52
Safety for workers
Skills Proficiency awards in
Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
About City & Guilds
We provide assessment and certification services for schools and colleges, business
and industry, trade associations and government agencies in nearly 100 countries.
We have over 125 years of experience in identifying training needs, developing
assessment materials, carrying out assessments and training assessment staff. We
award certificates to people who have shown they have mastered skills that are based
on world-class standards set by industry. City & Guilds International provides a service
to customers around the world who need quality assessments and certification.
Introduction to this programme
We have designed the Skills Proficiency awards to provide a broad introduction
to essential practical skills for those undergoing training or employed in these
areas of work.
There are two related levels:
Skills Foundation Certificate
Skills Proficiency Certificate
We do not say the amount of time a candidate would need to carry out the programme.
We award certificates and diplomas for gaining and showing skills by whatever mode of
study, and not for periods of time spent in study.
We recommend that candidates achieve the Skills Foundation Certificate before
attempting the Skills Proficiency Certificate.
About this booklet
This booklet is designed to be used by:
• Candidates
• Instructors
• Assessors
• Verifiers
• Centre co-ordinators
• Employers
It provides all the information required to understand and take part in the Skills
Proficiency awards, and conduct suitable training and assessment in accordance with
City & Guilds’ regulations, policy and practice.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
05
How to offer this programme
To offer these awards you must get approval from us.
There are two categories of approval.
Qualification approval
We give approval to offer a training and assessment course based on this syllabus.
Examination centre approval
We give approval to enter candidates for practical assessments.
To be approved by us to offer a training and assessment course you must send a
completed application to your local City & Guilds office.
To enter candidates for assessment you must be approved by us.
Approved centres must provide suitable facilities for taking practical assessments,
secure places to keep assessment materials, and will have an appointed external
verifier to review practical work.
After we have received and accepted an application, we will send an approval letter
confirming this.
Please note that in this section we have provided an overview of centre
approval procedures. Please refer to the current issue of ‘Delivering
International Qualifications – Centre Guide’ for full details of these procedures.
City & Guilds reserves the right to suspend an approved centre, or withdraw its
approval to conduct City & Guilds programmes, for reasons of debt, malpractice or for
any reason that may be detrimental to the maintenance of authentic, reliable and valid
qualifications or that may prejudice the name of City & Guilds.
Numbering system
We use a numbering system to allow entries to be made for our awards.
To carry out what is needed for the Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor
Vehicle Repair and Servicing, candidates must be successful in one of the
following assessments:
3528-07-007 Skills Foundation Certificate
3529-07-007 Skills Proficiency Certificate
We use these numbers throughout this booklet. You must use these numbers
correctly if you send forms to us.
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Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
Making entries for assessments
Candidates must enter through an assessment centre we have approved to carry out
the assessments for Skills Proficiency awards.
There are two ways of entering candidates for assessments.
Internal candidates
Candidates can enter for assessments if they are taking or have already finished a
course at a school, college or similar training institution that has directed their
preparation, whether by going to a training centre, working with another institution,
or by open-learning methods.
External candidates
These are candidates who have not finished a programme as described above. To be
eligible for assessment external candidates must be able to provide suitable
evidence of previous training or work experience through which the required
competencies have been demonstrated on more than one occasion in the past. The
assessment centres must receive their application for assessment well before the
date of the assessment concerned. This allows them to act on any advice you give
about assessment arrangements or any further preparation needed.
External candidates must meet all the requirements for the assessment.
In this publication we use the term ‘centre’ to mean a school, college, place of work
or other institution.
Submitting results to City & Guilds
Successful candidates entering for the Skills Proficiency awards will receive a
‘Notification of Candidate Results’ giving details of how they performed.
We grade practical assessments as pass (P) or not yet competent (X).
If candidates successfully finish all the requirements for the Skills Proficiency award
at a specific level, they will receive the appropriate certificate.
We will send the ‘Notification of Candidate Results’, and certificates to the
assessment centre to be awarded to successful candidates. It is your responsibility
to give the candidates the certificates. If candidates have a question about the
results and certificates, they must contact you. You may then contact us if necessary.
We will also send you a results list showing how all candidates performed.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
07
Roles and responsibilities
This section gives details of the requirements and responsibilities of each role
involved in the assessment, verification and examinations processes. Centres should
identify members of staff to fulfill these roles.
Please refer to ‘Delivering International Qualifications – Centre Guide’ for
more information.
Programme coordinator
The person in the training centre responsible for ensuring that:
• printouts sent by City & Guilds are correct
• results are sent to City & Guilds in accordance with specified procedures
• all interested parties are notified of assessment dates well in advance
• candidates and centre staff fully understand their role and responsibilities
• facilities and equipment are available so that assessments can be conducted in
accordance with City & Guilds requirements
• documents received from City & Guilds are securely stored
• results and/or certificates are properly issued to candidates at the centre
• monitoring the work of assessors.
Assessor
The primary role of an assessor is to assess candidates’ performance and related
knowledge in a range of tasks and to ensure that the competence/knowledge
demonstrated meets the requirements of the programme. Assessors will therefore
need to have occupational experience in the vocational area to be assessed.
They will also need to be familiar with the candidates whom they are assessing; so
assessors are likely to be the candidates’ own instructors, who are best able to
decide when individuals are able to perform competently, and therefore are ready to
be formally assessed for the award.
Assessors are responsible for:
• agreeing an assessment plan with each candidate
• briefing candidates on the assessment process
• following assessment guidance provided
• observing candidates’ performance and/or conducting other forms of assessment
• recording all questions used and answers given for the purposes of meeting the
evidence requirements
• justifying the evidence and making assessment decisions against the standards
• providing candidates with prompt, accurate and constructive feedback
• maintaining records of candidates’ achievement
• confirming that candidates have demonstrated competence/knowledge and
completing the required documentation
• keeping themselves up to date with City & Guilds publications relating to
quality assurance
• agreeing new assessment plans with candidates where further evidence is required
• making themselves available for discussion with the external verifier.
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Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
Candidate
Candidates are those individuals who are working towards a qualification at a centre
approved by City & Guilds.
Candidates are responsible for:
• confirming to assessors that they understand the requirements of the programme
• confirming to assessors that they understand the relationship between the
requirements and the tasks they need to perform to demonstrate competence
and/or related knowledge
• discussing and agreeing assessment plans with their assessors
• identifying possible sources of evidence
• maintaining and presenting evidence in a well organised way
• ensuring that the evidence is adequate to present for assessment
• making themselves available for assessment and to discuss their evidence.
External verifier
External verifiers are appointed by City & Guilds for specific programmes to ensure
that all assessments undertaken within City & Guilds centres are fair, valid,
consistent and meet the requirements of the programme.
External verifiers are responsible for:
• making approval visits/recommendations (where necessary) to confirm that
organisations can satisfy the approval criteria
• helping centres to develop internal assessment and evidence evaluation systems
that are fair, reliable, accessible and non-discriminatory
• monitoring internal quality assurance systems and sampling, including by direct
observation, assessment activities, methods and records
• checking claims for certification to ensure they are authentic, valid and supported
by auditable records
• acting as a source of advice and support, including help with the interpretation
of standards
• promoting best practice
• providing prompt, accurate and constructive feedback to all relevant parties on
the operation of centres’ assessment systems
• confirming that centres have implemented any corrective actions required
• reporting back to City & Guilds
• maintaining records of centre visits and making these available for auditing purposes.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
09
Quality inspector/auditor
Quality inspectors or auditors are appointed by City & Guilds to ensure that centres
comply with our centre approval criteria. Their responsibilities relate to systems and
quality assurance rather than specific assessment requirements.
Quality inspectors or auditors are responsible for:
• conducting inspection or audit trails to ensure centres comply with City & Guilds
centre approval criteria
• making approval visits/recommendations (where appropriate) to confirm that
potential centres satisfy/will be able to satisfy the centre approval criteria
• providing prompt, accurate and constructive feedback to all relevant parties
• providing advice to centres on internal quality arrangements
• reporting back to City & Guilds
• maintaining records of centre visits and making these available for auditing purposes.
Designing courses of study
Candidates for the Skills Proficiency awards will have come from different
backgrounds and will have different employment and training experiences.
We recommend the following:
• carry out an assessment of the candidates’ achievements so you can see what
learning they already have; and
• consider what learning methods and places will best suit them.
When you assess a candidate’s needs, you should design training programmes
that consider:
• has the candidate completed any previous education, training or qualifications?
• does the candidate have any previous practical experience which is relevant to the
aims of the programme and from which they may have learned the relevant skills
and knowledge?
As long as the candidates meet the aims of this learning programme the structure
of the course of training is up to you. So, it is possible to include extra topics that
meet local needs.
Practical work must be carefully planned both to illustrate the application of theory
and to provide exercises of skill. The maximum opportunity must be provided for
workshop practice and demonstrations. As far as possible, candidates must be able
to apply their theoretical knowledge to practical work within a realistic work
environment. Candidates should keep records of the practical work they do so they
can refer to it at a later date.
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Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
Resources
If you want to use these qualifications as the basis for a course, you must read this
booklet and make sure that you have the staff and equipment to meet all the
requirements. If there are no facilities for realistic practical work, we strongly
recommend that you develop links with local industry to provide opportunities for
hands-on experience.
Presentation format of syllabus
Practical competences
Each unit starts with a section on practical competences which shows the practical
skills candidates must have.
At times we give more detail about important words in each ‘competence statement’.
For example:
1.2 Apply good housekeeping practices at all times.
Practices: clean/tidy work areas, removal/disposal of waste products,
protect surfaces
In the above statement the word ‘practices’ is given as a range which the candidate
should be familiar with. If a range starts with the abbreviation ‘eg’ the candidates
only need to cover some of the ranged areas or you can use suitable alternatives.
The end of each unit contains practical assessments which deal with the practical
competences. Candidates must carry out the practical assessments either in a real
or a simulated work environment.
Carrying out assessments
The practical assessments for these awards may be carried out during the learning
programme, but they may also take place during a special assessment period once
training has been completed.
We describe these assessments as ‘free date’ because they are carried out at a college
or other training establishment on a date or over a period which the college chooses.
Assessments must be carried out in accordance with the requirements described in
‘Delivering International Qualifications – Centre Guide’. Assessors/instructors should
familiarise themselves with the Guide to the assessment of practical skills contained
in this booklet.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
11
Practical assessments
The practical assessments for the Skills Proficiency awards are derived from the
practical competences.
The competence checklist given at the end of the list of practical competences and
knowledge requirements, serves as the marking criteria for
these assessments and should be used by the assessor/instructor to record the
outcome of each candidate’s performance.
The competence checklist is a list of activities or performance outcomes that a
candidate must be seen to be able to do in order to be considered competent in the
tasks being assessed for these awards. The checklists are written in the same way, so
that for each competence statement it is possible to say either:
‘Yes, the candidate successfully carried out this activity’ or
‘No, the candidate has not yet achieved this standard.’
The use of local legislation, tools, equipment and practices is allowed within the
specifications of the ‘range’ supporting each practical competence statement.
The results of the assessment must be documented and available for audit by the
external verifier.
All assessments must be successfully completed.
All assessments must be completed in the context of one specific job role in which
the candidate is working, or for which the candidate is being trained. The context
must be stated on each candidate’s assessment record.
The competence checklists in this publication must be photocopied and must be
completed for every candidate.
The practical assessments for these awards are not suitable for entirely classroombased teaching. Candidates must demonstrate competence in
a realistic work environment.
This may be:
• the workplace in which the candidate is undertaking training
• a simulated work environment.
A simulated work environment is an area such as a training room specifically
designed to replicate the work place as closely as possible. A classroom is unsuitable
as a simulated work environment.
A candidate transferring from a realistic work environment to a real workplace
should perceive no difference.
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Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
Candidates may demonstrate competence in a combination of real and
simulated situations.
Candidates must be able to show that they can perform the required tasks to the
standards that would be expected if they were actually working in industry. This is
likely to include factors such as the time taken to complete the tasks and the quality
of any products produced. In addition to demonstrating practical skills, candidates
will have to show that they can cope with psychological and environmental
conditions of real work, eg pressures and consequences of producing products for
customers, working with other people, planning and organising work, following
procedures, and dealing with variations and problems that may occur in performing
the specified tasks.
Candidates undertaking practical activities for the purposes of assessment must, at
all times, be under the supervision of a competent and qualified supervisor.
Preparation, supervision and marking
It is essential that the instructor/assessor ensures all necessary preparations are
carried out. This will involve ensuring:
• the candidate is ready to demonstrate his or her practical skills
• every candidate understands what is involved
• any necessary materials, tools or equipment are available for the assessment.
Assessment of the practical performance is determined on outcomes as defined by
the practical competences. The candidate must be successful in all competences
included in the checklist before it can be ‘signed off’ and its results transferred to
the summative record.
All practical assessments should be supervised and assessors should make sure that
the results reflect the candidate’s own performance. Separate records must be kept
of the dates of all attempts by each candidate.
The candidate should be informed of the result as soon as possible. If he / she does
not meet the standard of ‘competent’ in any of the practical requirements, the
decision of either immediate resit or further practice must be taken.
Assessment of underpinning knowledge
The knowledge requirements in this programme are tested by asking questions at
the end of the practical assessment to verify that the candidate understands the
reasons why a particular activity has been performed.
The programme coordinator must arrange in advance with their local City & Guilds
office to obtain the underpinning knowledge questions and candidate record sheets
required for conducting the oral assessment. He/she is responsible for ensuring that
all oral questioning materials are kept securely and the assessments conducted in
accordance with City & Guilds requirements.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
13
Oral questioning must not be conducted during an activity. The person carrying out
the assessment of practical competences is responsible for asking questions about
underpinning knowledge and recording the candidate’s responses on the relevant
form. The candidate response record forms must be available for review by the
external verifier.
The underpinning knowledge questions may be asked in any language that is
understood by both candidate and assessor. The centre must ensure that the external
verifier is provided with translations of questions asked, as well as candidate responses,
if he / she does not speak the language in which questioning was conducted.
Please refer to the section Oral questioning in the Guide to the assessment of
practical skills contained in this booklet.
Records, results and certification
When all the required assessments have been achieved, the result must be
entered onto Form S which must be countersigned by the external verifier and
sent to City &Guilds.
You must keep all assessment documentation and material in a file for each candidate
until the results have been agreed by the external verifier and until confirmation of the
result has been received from City & Guilds. You must hold all the evidence for eight
weeks after the application for a certificate.
After results have been confirmed, copies of assessment documentation other than
Form S may be returned to candidates.
The operation of this programme requires the appointment of an external verifier.
The external verifier must countersign the results of the practical
assessments on Form S.
The external verifier should also be able to inspect records and candidates’ work to
verify the results before submission.
Health and safety
Instructors must emphasise the dangers associated with vehicle systems, fuels, and
materials at all times, in particular FLUOROLASTOMEC (VETON) used in the manufacture
of some brake seals, fuel pipes and possibly other rubber or plastic substitutes.
Fluorolastomec (Veton – trade name) becomes dangerous after it has been burnt.
The material melts into a highly-corrosive acid, which if touched by bare skin cannot
be removed – the only treatment is amputation. In this melted state, Fluorolastomec
will stay dangerous for at least two years, only professional de-contamination will
make it safe. Safety precautions must be taken when working on burnt-out vehicles
and their parts.
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Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
All work must be carried out in a safe and efficient manner, and safety must be
inherent in the candidate’s approach to the practical assessments.
Centres must ensure that due attention is paid to safety and safe working practices
during all practical assessments.
It is expected that the assessor will intervene if a candidate is acting in a dangerous
manner, explaining to the candidate the reason for stopping the assessment.
Candidates should not be allowed to continue with the test if acting in an unsafe manner.
Equal opportunities
We are committed to giving everyone who wants to gain one of our awards an equal
opportunity of achieving it. We support equal opportunities in education, training
and employment, and will take positive action to:
• promote practice and procedures in our centres that give equal opportunities to
everybody, regardless of their culture, sex, ability, disability, age, ethnic
background, nationality, religion, sexual orientation (sexuality), marital status,
employment status or social class
• work towards removing all practice and procedures that discriminate unfairly
(directly or indirectly)
• widen access to our awards to include people who are under-represented
• set the awards standards according to equal opportunities best practice.
We will make sure that our centres use an equal opportunities policy that works
together with ours, and that they maintain an effective appeals procedure.
We will expect centres to tell candidates how to find and use their own equal
opportunities policy and appeals procedure.
Progression routes and recognition
A related qualification for onward progression is 3905 IVQ in Motor Vehicle
Engineering, which is described in the City & Guilds International Handbook.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
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Syllabus
Skills Proficiency awards in
Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
19
Skills Foundation Certificate
27
Skills Proficiency Certificate
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
17
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Skills Foundation Certificate
Introduction
The aim of this module is to introduce the candidate to:
a safe working within their own area of work
b the prevention of hazards
c basic tool skills
d types of layout and construction used in motor vehicles
e operating principles of motor vehicle systems
f basic vehicle maintenance, replacement of minor assemblies and stripping of
vehicle components.
The use of national/local regulations and working practices must be included in all
practical competences.
Practical competences
The candidate must be able to do the following:
Health and Safety
1.1 Select and use protective clothing and equipment as applicable to the task.
1.2 Apply good housekeeping practices at all times.
Practices: clean/tidy work areas, removal/disposal of waste products, protect
surfaces, follow statutory regulations
1.3 Carry out risk assessments as applicable to the task and identify potential hazards.
1.4 Use all equipment safely.
1.5 Correctly wire appliance plugs.
1.6 Carry out manual handling operations safely.
Handling: eg lifting techniques, mechanical lifting devices, vehicle jacks,
hoists, crane/lifting tackle
1.7 Use and store materials in a safe manner.
Use: eg manufacturers’ instructions, toxic effect, loading, unloading
Materials: eg adhesives, lubricants, oils, acids, alkalis
Tool Skills
1.8 Select, use, clean and store basic hand tools.
Tools: eg hammer, spanner, chisel, file, hacksaw, hand drill, taps and dies,
screwdrivers, pry bars and levers, reamers, punches and drifts, wrenches,
feeler gauges, cutters, pliers, thread restoration tool, marking out instruments
1.9 Select, use, clean and store portable power tools.
Tools: eg hand drill, angle grinder
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
19
1.10 Sharpen tools using a bench grinder.
Tools: eg chisel, screwdriver, drill bits
1.11 Select, use, clean and maintain workshop equipment.
Workshop equipment: eg vehicle jacks, axle stands, vehicle hoist, bench
grinder, bench drill, hydraulic press, cleansing tank, washing plant, steam
cleaning machines, lubrication equipment, pneumatic equipment
1.12 Produce paper and cork gaskets.
1.13 Identify components from assembly drawings and diagrams.
1.14 Manufacture, anneal, soften and shape pipes for routing on vehicles.
Pipes: eg steel, copper, plastic
Manufacture: eg single flare ends, double flare ends, olive and union,
cone nipples
1.15 Solder materials and produce effective joints.
Materials: eg electrical wire, light gauge steel, copper, brass
1.16 Braze materials, inspect and rectify defective joints.
Joints: eg tack, lap
1.17 Remove and replace different types of securing, locking, locating and
sealing devices.
Devices: eg nuts (wing, thumb, wheel, self locking, castellated), bolts (pinch),
set screws (Allen, grub, Phillip), studs, pins (clevis, split), rivets, washers (spring,
shake proof, tab), locking plates, circlips, locking wire, self curing materials,
gaskets, joints, plugs, compounds, pipes (metal, copper, flexible, plastic,
formed nipple, olive), unions (straight coupling, elbow, banjo), swaged end pipe
fixing, high pressure pipes, hoses, hose clips
Engine Systems
1.18 Drain and replenish engine lubrication systems.
1.19 Remove and maintain oil filters.
Maintain: dismantle container filters, change element, reassemble, replace
canister filters
1.20 Remove and replace exhaust systems.
Petrol Fuel Systems
1.21 Remove, clean and replace air filter elements.
1.22 Remove, clean and replace petrol filters.
1.23 Remove and replace pipes.
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Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
Diesel Fuel Systems
1.24 Remove, clean and replace air filter elements.
1.25 Remove and replace injectors.
Ignition Systems
1.26 Remove and replace spark plugs.
Cooling Systems
1.27 Remove and replace radiators.
1.28 Remove and replace hoses.
1.29 Inspect, remove, replace and adjust fan belts.
1.30 Drain, flush and replenish coolant mixture and inspect for leaks.
1.31 Pressure test cooling systems.
1.32 Pressure test radiator caps.
Braking, Steering and Suspension Systems
1.33 Check and top up fluid levels.
1.34 Check and top up steering gear box oil.
1.35 Remove and replace shock absorbers.
1.36 Inflate vehicle tyres and check and adjust tyre pressures.
1.37 Measure tyre tread depths.
Transmission Systems
1.38 Change gear box oil.
1.39 Change final drive oil.
1.40 Remove and replace clutch operating cables/linkage.
1.41 Check and adjust clutch clearance.
Electrical Systems
1.42 Correctly top up vehicle batteries.
1.43 Remove and replace vehicle batteries.
1.44 Neutralise battery corrosion.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
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1.45 Correctly connect battery to charger.
1.46 Remove and replace windscreen wiper arms and blades.
1.47 Remove and replace light bulbs.
Bulbs: eg side light, tail light, indicator, light, headlight
Vehicle Body
1.48 Remove and replace vehicle bonnets.
1.49 Remove and replace vehicle bumpers.
Underpinning knowledge
Oral questioning should be used to provide evidence of the candidate’s knowledge of:
Health and Safety
1.1 Emergency procedures.
Procedures: raising alarms, alarm types, safe/efficient evacuation, means of
escape, assembly points
Emergencies: fire drill
1.2 Use of protective clothing/equipment.
Protective clothing: overalls, ear defenders/plugs, safety boots, knee pads,
gloves/gauntlets, safety helmet (hard hat), particle masks,
glasses/goggles/visors, barrier cream
Equipment: machine guards, residual current devices
1.3 Reasons for carrying out good housekeeping practices.
Practices: clean/tidy work areas, removal/disposal of waste products
Reasons: safety, efficiency, security
1.4 Reasons for carrying out a risk assessment for all working practices.
Reasons: hazard identification, dangerous substances (adhesives, oils,
greases, acids, alkalis, solvents, gases), site machinery, noise
1.5 Sources of electrical danger and methods of protection.
Sources: damaged (sockets, cables, plugs, equipment), incorrectly wired
appliance plugs, water
Methods of protection: transformers, fuses, plugs, circuit breakers, double
insulation, safe working practices
1.6 Method of correctly wiring appliance plugs.
Method: colour coding, fuse rating
1.7 Principles of fire and different types of fire.
Principles of fire: heat, fuel, oxygen
Types: wood/paper, oil/spirit, electrical
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Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
1.8 Types of fire fighting equipment and their uses.
Equipment: fire extinguishers (water, CO2, foam, powder), sand/water bucket,
blanket, fire hose
1.9 Hazards associated with pneumatic equipment.
Hazards: directing the air jet at body/clothing
1.10 Procedures for safe storage of materials.
Procedures: loading, unloading, storage
1.11 Toxic effect of materials used in motor vehicle engineering.
Effect: eyes, skin, breathing.
1.12 Preventative and remedial actions to be taken in the case of exposure to
toxic materials.
Exposure: ingested, contact with skin, inhaled
Preventative action: ventilation, masks, protective clothing/equipment
Remedial action: immediate first aid, report to supervisor
Tool Skills
1.13 Use of basic hand and power tools.
Tools: eg hammer, spanner, chisel, file, hacksaw, hand drill, taps and dies,
screwdrivers, pry bars and levers, reamers, punches and drifts, wrenches,
feeler gauges, cutters, pliers, thread restoration tool, marking out instruments,
sander, drill
1.14 Method of cleaning and storing basic tools.
Method: wipe clean/dry, lubricated, cable care, secure storage
1.15 Use of workshop equipment.
Workshop equipment: eg vehicle jacks, stands, vehicle hoist, bench grinder,
lubrication equipment, bench drill, hydraulic press, cleansing tank, washing
plant, steam cleaning machines
1.16 Method of cleaning and maintaining workshop equipment.
1.17 Equipment and consumables used for soldering.
Soldering: surface cleaning materials, soldering irons (electric, gas), fluxes
1.18 Basic principles of soldering sheet metal and wire joints.
Principles: joint types, joint structure, capillary action, process, applications,
safety precautions
1.19 Equipment and consumables used for brazing.
Equipment for brazing: surface cleaning materials, blowpipe/torch, fluxes,
filler metal
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
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1.20 Basic principles of brazing.
Principles of brazing: joint types, joint structure, capillary action, process,
applications, safety precautions and equipment
Engines and Fuel Systems
1.21 Types and location of motor vehicle engines.
Engines: petrol, diesel
Types: front engine front wheel drive, front engine rear wheel drive, rear
engine rear wheel drive
1.22 Basic layout and identification of components of vehicle fuel systems.
Petrol: carburettor systems, single/multi point petrol injection systems
Diesel: in-line fuel injection pump, rotary fuel injection pump
Ignition Systems
1.23 Function of the spark plug.
Cooling Systems
1.24 Specific safety measures associated with cooling stems.
1.25 Basic operating principles of cooling systems.
1.26 Main cooling system components and their function.
Braking, Steering and Suspension Systems
1.27 Types of braking systems.
Systems: drum brakes, disc brakes, parking brakes, hydraulic, pneumatic
1.28 Main components of braking systems and their functions.
1.29 Health hazards associated with braking systems.
1.30 Main components of steering systems.
1.31 Main components of suspension systems, wheels and tyres.
Suspension systems: beam axle, live axle, Macpherson strut, wishbone
1.32 Purpose and function of shock absorbers.
Transmission Systems
1.33 Types of gearbox systems.
Types: manual/automatic transmission
Locations: front engine front wheel drive, front engine rear wheel drive
1.34 Types of clutch operating mechanisms.
Clutch operating mechanisms: cable, hydraulic
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Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
1.35 Location of clutch assembly.
1.36 Types of vehicle drives, drive shafts and hubs.
Types: front engine front wheel drive, front engine rear wheel drive, rear
engine rear wheel drive
1.37 Propeller shafts, drive shafts and hubs.
Electrical Systems
1.38 Electrical systems and components.
Systems: Generation, storage, starting, motor/drive assemblies, lights, heating
elements, switches
1.39 Functions of main electrical system components.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
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Skills Proficiency Certificate
Introduction
The aim of this module is to enable the candidate to:
a maintain safe working conditions
b adopt safe procedures for themselves and others
c replace vehicle components and assemblies
d strip and repair vehicle components
e determine serviceability of wear components
f understand the operating principles of motor vehicle systems.
The use of national / local regulations and working practices must be included in all
practical competences.
Practical competences
The candidate must be able to do the following:
Health and Safety
2.1 Select, use, clean and store personal protective equipment.
2.2 Carry out safe working practices to prevent hazards and to ensure the safety of
working personnel and members of the public.
2.3 Use and store materials in a safe manner.
2.4 Apply good housekeeping practices at all times.
Practices: eg clean tidy work areas, removal/disposal of waste products,
gangways free from obstruction
2.5 Demonstrate the correct procedure for jacking up and placing a vehicle
securely on axle stands.
Procedure: identification of jacking point, positioning of axle stands, raising
and lowering jack, checking vehicle position
2.6 Demonstrate the correct procedure for wiring appliance plugs.
Procedure: preparing, connecting and securing wires, colour coding
2.7 Demonstrate the correct procedure for soldering a terminal end to electrical
wire.
Procedure: preparation of wire, safe use of soldering iron, selecting correct
flux, tinning, soldering, testing solder joint
Engine Systems
2.8 Inspect, remove and replace tension engine cambelt.
2.9 Set valve timing.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
27
2.10 Remove and replace manifold gaskets.
Gaskets: exhaust, inlet
2.11 Carry out compression tests.
2.12 Remove and refit engine assemblies.
Petrol Fuel System
2.13 Remove and replace mechanical petrol pump.
2.14 Remove and replace petrol tank.
Diesel Fuel System
2.15 Remove and replace diesel fuel filter element.
2.16 Bleed fuel system.
Ignition Systems
2.17 Remove and replace ignition distributor.
2.18 Remove and replace contact breaker points.
2.19 Set and adjust ignition timing.
2.20 Remove and replace high tension leads.
Cooling Systems
2.21 Demonstrate the correct procedure for pressure testing a cooling system.
Procedure: system and component preparation, visual inspection, use of
pressure tester, interpretation of data, action to be taken
2.22 Remove and replace water pump.
2.23 Remove and replace thermostats.
2.24 Remove and replace thermal transmitters.
Braking, Steering and Suspension Systems
2.25 Demonstrate the correct procedure for checking tyre condition and
inflating tyres.
Procedure: inspecting damage to wheel rim and tyre walls, inspecting tyre
tread, depth of tread, valves, correct tyre pressure
2.26 Remove, inspect and replace brake shoes.
2.27 Remove, inspect and replace brake pads.
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Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
2.28 Remove and replace discs.
2.29 Remove and replace handbrake cables.
2.30 Dismantle, inspect, clean and assemble wheel cylinders .
2.31 Bleed hydraulic brake system.
2.32 Inspect, remove and replace track rod ends.
2.33 Check and adjust wheel alignment.
2.34 Remove and replace springs.
Springs: leaf, coil.
2.35 Remove and replace suspension arms.
Transmission Systems
2.36 Remove, inspect and replace hub bearings.
2.37 Remove and replace propeller shafts.
2.38 Remove and replace drive shafts.
Drive shafts: front wheel, rear wheel drive.
2.39 Inspect, remove and replace drive shaft gaiters.
2.40 Remove and replace constant velocity joints.
2.41 Remove and replace clutch assembly.
Electrical Systems
2.42 Remove and replace generator/alternator.
2.43 Remove and replace starter motor.
2.44 Remove and replace lamp assemblies.
2.45 Demonstrate the correct procedure for removing and replacing a
vehicle battery.
Procedure: order for disconnecting and attaching earth and power leads,
lifting battery safely, fitting and connecting new battery
2.46 Correctly connect slave battery.
Vehicle Body
2.47 Adjust door striker plates.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
29
Knowledge requirements
Oral questioning should be used to provide evidence of the candidate’s knowledge of:
Health and Safety
2.1 Types and use of protection equipment.
2.2 Principles of workshop layout.
Layout: non-slip flooring, cleanliness, provision of adequate gangways, safe
movement of materials, exits
2.3 Human and environmental conditions leading to accidents in the workplace and
the means of controlling them.
Conditions: human causes of accidents (ie carelessness, improper behaviour
and dress, lack of training, supervision and experience, fatigue, drug taking
and drinking), environmental causes of accidents (ie unguarded or faulty
machinery and tools, inadequate ventilation, untidy, dirty, overcrowded or
badly-lit work places)
2.4 Dangers associated with using faulty/misusing workshop tools and equipment.
2.5 Correct procedures for safely performing workshop tasks.
2.6 Dangers associated with substances used for cleaning brake and clutch parts.
2.7 Dangers associated with working with running engines and moving parts.
2.8 Dangers associated with working with flammable liquids.
Dangers: eyes, skin, breathing, fire
2.9 Hazards associated with braking systems.
Hazards: lining materials (asbestos dust), brake cleaning fluids
Tool Skills
2.10 Use of special hand and power tools.
Tools: eg pullers, press, measuring equipment
2.11 Use of workshop manuals and vehicle data.
2.12 Use, cleaning and maintenance of workshop equipment.
Workshop equipment eg wheel balancer, tyre removing equipment, engine
lifting equipment, wheel alignment gauges
Engines and Fuel Systems
2.13 Basic operating principles of motor vehicle engines.
Engines: petrol four stroke, diesel four stroke, two stroke
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Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
2.14 Function of components.
Components: Crankshaft, camshaft, pistons, connecting rods and valves
2.15 Basic operating principles of vehicle fuel systems.
Petrol systems: carburettor systems, single/multi point petrol injection systems
Diesel systems: in-line fuel injection pump, rotary fuel injection pump
2.16 Basic operating principles of engine lubrication systems.
Systems: wet sump, dry sump
Ignition Systems
2.17 Types of spark ignition systems.
Systems: contact breaker, contact breakerless
2.18 Basic operating principles of spark ignition systems.
Cooling System
2.19 Components and functions of cooling systems.
Braking, Steering and Suspension Systems
2.20 Basic operating principles of braking systems.
Systems: drum brakes, disc brakes, parking brakes, servo assistance.
2.21 Basic operating principles of hydraulic braking systems.
Hydraulic braking systems: master cylinder, caliper, wheel cylinder and servo.
2.22 Basic operating principles of steering systems.
Steering systems: true rolling motion, wheel alignment, toe-in/toe out
2.23 Basic operation of suspension systems, wheels and tyres.
Suspension systems: independent, beam axle, live axle, Macpherson
strut, wishbone
2.24 Tyre defects.
2.25 Procedures for assessing tyre condition, safely inflating vehicle tyres and
checking tyre pressure.
2.26 Purpose of wheel balancing.
Balance: static, dynamic
Transmission Systems
2.27 Basic operating principles of gearboxes.
2.28 Basic operation principles of the clutch assembly.
Clutch assembly: single plate, diaphragm, multi-plate
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
31
2.29 Basic operating principles of the final drive assembly.
Final drive assembly: front engine front wheel drive, front engine rear wheel
drive, differential unit
Electrical Systems
2.30 Electrical systems and components.
Systems: eg relays, conductors, circuit protection devices, driver
information circuits
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Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
Candidate assessment record sheets
Instructions
One complete set of competence achievement records must be provided for
each candidate being assessed. The following section contains competence
achievement records for both the Skills Foundation Certificate and the Skills
Proficiency Certificate programmes.
The assessor should confirm achievement of each requirement with a tick in the
appropriate box and note the date of achievement. The candidate should also initial
and date each requirement to confirm the successful completion of the assessment.
Unsuccessful attempts should not be recorded on these sheets but
recorded separately.
Upon completion of all requirements for the award the competence assessment
record must be dated and signed by the candidate, assessor and external verifier
before results can be submitted and certification requested.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
33
Skills Foundation Certificate in
Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
Competence achievement record (3528-07-007)
Candidate name (please print)
Practical competences
Standard achieved
Date
Health and Safety
1.1
Select and use protective clothing
and equipment as applicable to
the task.
1.2
Apply good housekeeping
practices at all times.
1.3
Carry out risk assessments as
applicable to the task and identify
potential hazards.
1.4
Use all equipment safely.
1.5
Correctly wire appliance plugs.
1.6
Carry out manual handling
operations.
1.7
Use and store materials in a safe
manner.
Basic Skills
1.8
Select, use, clean and store basic
hand tools.
1.9
Select, use, clean and store
portable power tools.
1.10
Sharpen tools using a bench
grinder.
1.11
Select, use, clean and maintain
workshop equipment.
1.12
Produce paper and cork gaskets.
1.13
Identify components from
assembly drawings and diagrams.
1.14
Manufacture, anneal, soften and
shape pipes for routing on vehicles.
1.15
Solder materials and produce
effective joints.
1.16
Braze materials, inspect and
rectify defective joints.
34
(✓)
Assessor
initial
Date
(✓)
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
Candidate
initial
1.17
Remove and replace different
types of securing, locking, locating
and sealing devices.
Engine Systems
1.18
Drain and replenish engine
lubrication systems.
1.19
Remove and maintain oil filters.
1.20
Remove and replace exhaust
systems.
Petrol Fuel Systems
1.21
Remove, clean and replace air
filter elements.
1.22
Remove, clean and replace petrol
filters.
1.23
Remove and replace pipes.
Diesel Fuel Systems
1.24
Remove, clean and replace air
filter elements.
1.25
Remove and replace injectors.
Ignition Systems
1.26
(✓)
(✓)
(✓)
(✓)
Remove and replace spark plugs.
Cooling Systems
1.27
Remove and replace radiators.
1.28
Remove and replace hoses.
1.29
Inspect, remove, replace and
adjust fan belts.
1.30
Drain, flush and replenish coolant
mixture and inspect for leaks.
1.31
Pressure test cooling systems.
1.32
Pressure test radiator caps.
(✓)
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
35
Braking, Steering and
Suspension Systems
1.33
Check and top up fluid levels.
1.34
Check and top up steering gear
box oil.
1.35
Remove and replace shock
absorbers.
1.36
Inflate vehicle tyres and check and
adjust tyre pressures.
1.37
Measure tyre tread depths.
Transmission Systems
1.38
Change gear box oil.
1.39
Change final drive oil.
1.40
Remove and replace clutch
operating cables/linkage.
1.41
Check and adjust clutch clearance.
Electrical Systems
1.42
Correctly top up vehicle batteries.
1.43
Remove and replace vehicle
batteries.
1.44
Neutralise battery corrosion.
1.45
Correctly connect battery to
charger.
1.46
Remove and replace windscreen
wiper arms and blades.
1.47
Remove and replace light bulbs.
Vehicle Body
1.48
Remove and replace vehicle
bonnets.
1.49
Remove and replace vehicle
bumpers.
36
(✓)
(✓)
(✓)
(✓)
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
Context:
Comments:
This is to confirm that the candidate has successfully completed the required tasks:
Candidate name (please print) and signature
Assessor name (please print) and signature
Verifier name (please print) and signature
Completion date
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
37
Skills Proficiency Certificate in
Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
Competence achievement record (3529-07-007)
Candidate name (please print)
Practical competences
Standard achieved
Date
Health and Safety
2.1
Select, use, clean and store
personal protective equipment.
2.2
Carry out safe working practices to
prevent hazards and to ensure the
safety of working personnel and
members of the public.
2.3
Use and store materials in a safe
manner.
2.4
Apply good housekeeping
practices at all times.
2.5
Demonstrate the correct
procedure for jacking up and
placing a vehicle securely on axle
stands.
2.6
Demonstrate the correct
procedure for wiring appliance
plugs.
2.7
Demonstrate the correct
procedure for soldering a terminal
end to electrical wire.
Engine Systems
2.8
Inspect, remove and replace
tension engine cambelt.
2.9
Set valve timing.
2.10
Remove and replace manifold
gaskets.
2.11
Carry out compression tests.
2.12
Remove and refit engine
assemblies.
38
(✓)
Assessor
initial
Date
(✓)
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
Candidate
initial
Petrol Fuel System
2.13
Remove and replace mechanical
petrol pump.
2.14
Remove and replace petrol tank.
Diesel Fuel System
2.15
Remove and replace diesel fuel
filter element.
2.16
Bleed fuel system.
Ignition Systems
2.17
Remove and replace ignition
distributor.
2.18
Remove and replace contact
breaker points.
2.19
Set and adjust ignition timing.
2.20
Remove and replace high tension
leads.
Cooling Systems
2.21
Demonstrate the correct
procedure for pressure testing a
cooling system.
2.22
Remove and replace water pump.
2.23
Remove and replace thermostats.
2.24
Remove and replace thermal
transmitters.
Braking, Steering and
Suspension Systems
2.25
Demonstrate the correct
procedures for checking tyre
condition and inflating tyres.
2.26
Remove, inspect and replace
brake shoes.
(✓)
(✓)
(✓)
(✓)
(✓)
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
39
2.27
Remove, inspect and replace
brake pads.
2.28
Remove and replace discs.
2.29
Remove and replace handbrake
cables.
2.30
Dismantle, inspect, clean and
assemble wheel cylinders.
2.31
Bleed hydraulic brake system.
2.32
Inspect, remove and replace track
rod ends.
2.33
Check and adjust wheel alignment.
2.34
Remove and replace springs.
2.35
Remove and replace suspension
arms.
Transmission Systems
2.36
Remove, inspect and replace hub
bearings.
2.37
Remove and replace propeller
shafts.
2.38
Remove and replace drive shafts.
2.39
Inspect, remove and replace drive
shaft gaiters.
2.40
Remove and replace constant
velocity joints.
2.41
Remove and replace clutch
assembly.
Electrical Systems
2.42
Remove and replace
generator/alternator.
2.43
Remove and replace starter motor.
2.44
Remove and replace lamp
assemblies.
40
(✓)
(✓)
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
2.45
Demonstrate the correct
procedure for removing and
replacing a vehicle battery.
2.46
Correctly connect slave battery.
Vehicle Body
2.47
(✓)
Adjust door striker plates.
Context:
Comments:
This is to confirm that the candidate has successfully completed the required tasks:
Candidate name (please print) and signature
Assessor name (please print) and signature
Verifier name (please print) and signature
Completion date
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
41
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Guide to the assessment of practical skills
The performance outcomes in the competence checklist are often stated as activities
performed to a particular standard, that can be observed by the assessor. The
outcomes may also require assessment of practical skills through appraisal of
products, objects made by the candidate in the course of the activity being assessed.
The checklist ensures that everyone involved in observation of practical performance
the Skills Proficiency awards is working to the same checklist and standards.
Assessor skills
We do not require assessors to have a formal qualification in assessment, although
we do ask centres to confirm that all staff involved in teaching programmes are
appropriately qualified, as part of the centre approval process. We reserve the right
to check this, and we moderate the quality of assessor performance through the
external verifier.
Observation of performance requires personal skills and judgment skills to make
assessment decisions based on the evidence and criteria available.
Personal skills are related to the assessor’s behaviour towards candidates during the
observation. Although assessors need to be objective, they must also be supportive.
Assessors with good personal skills will:
✓ Plan a realistic environment – normal workplace, normal workshop activity
✓ Be friendly towards the candidate, and using first name
✓ Check that the candidate understands everything and is not nervous
✓ Be attentive
✓ Not stand so close to the candidate that the candidate is distracted or made to
feel nervous
✓ Offer words of encouragement –provided these do not distract
✓ Ask questions that offer encouragement
✓ End the observation with a final word of encouragement.
Assessors with poor personal skills:
✗ Dress inappropriately (for example wearing unusually formal clothes)
✗ Use threatening expressions, eg ‘I hope you understand this, because it’s too late
if you don’t!’
✗ Be inattentive, not watching, talking to people not involved in the assessment
✗ Stand very close to the candidate so that candidate feels nervous
✗ Show disapproval, eg by shaking the head
✗ End the assessment with an expression of disapproval
During the assessment the assessor should focus on one activity at a time. The
candidate may be performing activities in a sequential order. The assessor must
watch for each activity as it happens, in sequence, and make a judgment quickly and
decisively, in order to be prepared to move to the next observable activity. If assessing
one candidate at a time, the assessor can follow the activities in a sequence.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
43
Candidates may also be assessed in groups, although we suggest not more that 10 15. The assessor will need to move from candidate to candidate to collect evidence
for all the outcomes being observed. More than one assessor may be required.
The assessor should consider:
• Has the candidate normally performed this task successfully up to the time of the
assessment?
• Is it likely that the candidate will continue to perform this task to the standard
required in the future?
If the answer to these questions is ‘yes’, then the assessor should be confident about
recording successful achievement.
Preparing assessment plans
Unplanned assessment of practical skills is ineffective and wastes time.
In best practice, the assessment process is a natural part of the learning programme,
is cost-effective and fair, and is held in respect by all involved.
The first stage is to be clear about what has to be assessed. What is the candidate
being asked to do, show, know, produce – to what standard and under what
conditions? This information can also come from lesson plans. A good lesson plan
will have specific achievements as the outcome of the lesson or series of lessons.
The meaning of the outcome must be understood and agreed as part of the planning
process. Some outcomes are intentionally written to allow for local interpretation
according to particular circumstances. The training programme should provide
opportunities to discuss all the possible interpretations and to consider why
different companies have different policies and why practices can vary from country
to country. It will also focus on what is most appropriate for the particular situation in
which the candidates are working.
The assessment plan must involve the selection of assessment methods that are
valid and reliable, cost-effective, achievable in terms of time and resources and
which cover the competences to be assessed.
City & Guilds has a policy that all of its assessments should be fair and accessible. The
practical assessments are not a test of English, or indeed any other language, unless
knowledge and use of specific terminology is an essential part of the job in question.
The assessor must explain any instructions or performance objectives that a
candidate does not understand before the assessment takes place.
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Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
The following tips may be useful in making an assessment plan:
• Make plans clearly legible with good handwriting or typed
• Write plans in clear language which avoids jargon
• Order stages logically
• Identify the aim of assessment
• Identify suitable venue for assessment to take place
• List resources to be used
• Explain the aim of assessment to candidate and how information gained by the
assessment will be used
• Establish candidate’s current and prior achievements and preferred learning style.
• Select assessment methods best suited for the learning objectives
• Select assessment methods which cause minimum disruption and are cost effective
• Select assessment methods which take account of any special factors
• Select assessment methods which occur during normal work activities
• Complete the assessment plan and state where records are stored
The external verifier will want to know what plan was used to arrive at the practical
assessment results.
Please refer to section 9.6 in ‘Delivering International Qualifications – Centre Guide’
for a sample assessment plan (Form 7).
Conducting practical assessments by observation
Assessment by observation of performance takes place whilst the activity is being
done. This method of assessment, especially in the workplace, is popular with
candidates and employers because there is a high degree of realism and it is a good
indicator of the ability to perform particular tasks.
Before the assessment takes place, it is essential to brief the candidates. This can
be done as a group, or individually. Observing performance is not intended to be an
examination, or cause candidates undue stress. It should never be a surprise,
unannounced activity.
The briefing should:
• describe what the assessor plans to do
• show candidates the performance outcomes to be assessed
• explain what candidates will be asked to do in order to demonstrate the skills
• clarify what will be looked for in the demonstration of skill
• confirm when the assessment will take place, where and how long it will last
• explain what will happen to information collected during the assessment
• provide opportunities for candidates to ask questions on any aspect of
the assessment.
Each candidate needs to know what will happen if the decision is ‘not yet achieved
the standard required’. Candidates should be able to attempt the activity again,
after the assessor has explained what evidence is still needed.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
45
Appraisal of products
Where observation of performance is not used, our policy is to include appraisal of
products as a means of assessing practical skills.
Example:
Practical competences
The candidate must be able to do the following:
1.3 Assemble and finish components to form basic products
This method of assessment is sometimes used because a practical task brings
together the mental, physical and social skills needed to carry out the planning,
undertaking and checking of a specified task. In this case the product required is a
product made up of components. A product could also be a plan, a design, or a piece
of processed information.
Here the instructor uses the competence checklist to plan a set of activities that will
allow the candidate to demonstrate competence in the required practical skills. Often
this will involve using equipment in a workshop. It may involve working outside.
Workshop activities are particularly useful in the early stages of assessing practical
skills and can be used in combination with work placement. To reduce the risk of
candidates making mistakes that have a real value, workshop activities can be used to
practice highly technical skills until both the trainer and the candidate are confident
that the task can be performed safely and competently in a real work situation.
Workshop practice, combined with work experience, is also useful where there is a
high element of risk or where the relationship between customer and customer
satisfaction is immediate and critical.
Although it can contribute to the demonstration of practical skills and has its
advantages in certain situations, to rely on workshop activities alone for the
assessment of practical skills has several disadvantages. It does not give the candidate
the opportunity to experience a work environment and therefore it is only possible to
infer that if the candidate were in a workplace, then probably the candidate
would perform the task competently based on successful performance under
observed conditions in the workshop, or while carrying out practical tasks.
Supplementary questions
An additional technique for supporting formative assessment is to use
supplementary questions. The instructor may observe a candidate performing
correctly, but want to know whether the candidate is likely to always perform in such a
way. Supplementary questions can be used to probe specific areas of a candidate’s
knowledge, about which there may be some doubt, or where the possession of
knowledge is critical.
46
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
They are asked as a natural part of an activity –asking about what the instructor is
seeing – so they are less likely to intimidate the candidate.
However, on their own, supplementary questions are not sufficient
evidence for confirming that a candidate has the practical skills to
carry out tasks to the standard required.
Supplementary questions must be relevant to the task, and must have been
covered in the training. It is unfair to ask about things that have not been taught. A
variety of supplementary questions may be used and different questions can be
used with different candidates, although questions should be similar in construction
and degree of dificulty.
Supplementary questions should be planned to ensure they are relevant and fair.
Open questions should be used, which require the candidate to supply the answer.
Closed questions, which require only ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ answers, should be avoided.
Oral questioning
By asking every candidate the same set of questions, requiring a spoken response,
the assessor obtains evidence of underpinning knowledge to support assessment of
each candidate’s practical skills. By using the same set of questions for each
candidate the same demand is made of each candidate. This is important if more
than one person is involved in the training and assessment of candidates.
The set of questions asked to every candidate is useful evidence to give to the
external verifier to support the completed competence checklists. The external
verifier may use the same questions to randomly check candidates’ knowledge.
It is important not to confuse oral questioning that requires candidates
to give answers to specific questions, from observation of performance
that involves speaking.
In oral questioning the assessor is looking for the ability of the person to give the
required knowledge, using speech. The ability to speak well (clearly, varied pitch and
pace, well constructed sentences) should not be the purpose of the assessment. If
candidates struggle to speak well, assessors should consider alternative, more
appropriate assessment methods.
Distractions and disruptions
Internal distractions come from the candidate. The most likely candidate
distractions are sudden loss of confidence, either immediately before or during the
observation and resistance to assessment – where the candidate argues against or
actually refuses to carry out the task.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
47
The assessor must be alert to candidate signals and respond appropriately. If the
task can be completed, the candidate should be encourage to do so, but if necessary
the candidate may take a break to regain their composure, and re-start the
observation. The assessor must explain that the reason for the break is to allow the
candidate to demonstrate best performance, and that it is not a signal of failure.
Resistance to assessment is more serious. The candidate may resist for a number of
reasons, ranging from nerves (encouragement should be offered), to not
understanding what is required or not being able to perform the tasks (they should
be explained again, and review the learning programme to identify gaps).
Resistance may occur because the candidate does not have confidence in the
assessor’s ability to make a fair judgment. This may be because the assessor:
• has not briefed the candidate properly
• is untrained and/or does not demonstrate an understanding of the process
• has consistently criticised the candidate’s performance and has not offered
constructive training and support.
External distractions during an observation of performance should be minimised
during the planning process. The assessor must minimise disturbance to the
candidate. If it is necessary to interrupt an assessment in order to deal with a
disruption, the assessor should reassure the candidate first and explain what is
happening, stop the assessment and then deal with the problem. When resuming
the assessment, the candidate should be reassured once more. In an extreme
situation, the assessor should agree with the candidate arrangements for repeating
or rescheduling the assessment.
Giving feedback on performance
Feedback on the demonstration of practical skills is essential to explain to the
candidate how the result has been decided.
Feedback should always be a one to one conversation between the candidate and
the assessor. The assessor should have a completed record sheet available to show
to the candidate.
The approach to feedback should be open and constructive and avoid unfriendliness
or intimidation. The purpose of assessment is to find out what a person can do; it
should not be a means to find fault or catch the candidate out through unexpected
tasks and deliberately difficult questions.
A good way of beginning feedback would be to start by saying ‘well done’ and
then asking for the candidate’s evaluation on their own performance. This
approach immediately involves the candidate in the feedback process, showing
value and respect.
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Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
The assessor should explain those activities or products completed well, and
congratulate the candidate on what has been achieved. At this stage it is also useful
to explain why it was achieved. By maintaining a positive approach throughout, a
good relationship should have been developed with the candidate, and the
candidate is prepared to accept any feedback on performance as fair and valid.
Giving feedback on unsuccessful performance is always more difficult, but
equally important.
At no time should the assessor feel under pressure to say that something
has been successfully achieved when it has not.
The assessor should explain what parts of an activity were done well, even if overall
performance did not meet the required outcome. It is necessary to explain
objectively which specific outcomes were not achieved, and why, and to be able to
give examples of what could be done to achieve a successful outcome. During the
assessment notes should be taken so that there is a written record of objective
observations to give to the candidate during the feedback session.
A candidate is most likely to become upset or aggressive if the result is not
understood, or considered to be unfair. Remain calm, objective and supportive.
Keep talking to the candidate until agreement to listen has been reached. Subjective
expressions like ‘I think that…..’ or ‘In my opinion you should have…’ should be
avoided.
It is essential to agree with the candidate what the future action will be. If the
outcome of the assessment activity is the successful completion of all competence
requirements, the next stage is to inform the candidate that the successful
performance will be recorded and registered with City & Guilds. If the outcome is
that some of the tasks have not yet been achieved, discuss what still needs to be
practiced, and when an opportunity can be given to repeat the assessment.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
49
Skills to help with employment
Introduction
It is recommended that candidates who are thinking about employment in this
sector should prepare themselves for employment by following a course of study or
other form of preparation based on the following activities.
Tips and hints
Employability
1
Find out about employment opportunities in the industry.
Opportunities: within city, state, nationally and internationally
50
2
Complete a job search and identify training opportunities.
Training opportunities: eg full time and part time courses, apprenticeship
programmes, on-the-job training, government funded programmes
3
Obtain information about a job.
4
Find out about documents that may be required for a job application and
reasons for including them.
Documents: eg curriculum vitae, education certificates, identification
5
Practice completing job application forms.
6
Practice job-interview techniques.
7
Understand and demonstrate productive work habits and positive attitudes.
Work habits and positive attitudes: general (eg timekeeping, health and
safety, consideration for others) and job specific
8
Identify ethical and responsible work practices.
9
Follow acceptable hygiene practices and adopt a professional appearance.
10
Demonstrate the principles of time management, work simplification, and
teamwork when performing assigned tasks.
11
Understand the importance of taking pride in the quality of work performed.
12
Understand the importance of a drug-free workplace and industry policies
toward drug and alcohol use.
13
Explain to a supervisor the importance of confidentiality in the workplace.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
Customer relations skills
14 Demonstrate positive customer relations skills.
Customer relations skills: self-control, appropriate responses to criticism,
courtesy
15
Demonstrate appropriate responses to criticism.
16
Respond to customer complaints in a positive, professional manner.
17
Demonstrate respect for people and property.
Problem-solving skills
18 Practice organising and planning multiple tasks, using various resources such
as time, personnel and materials.
19
Analyse problems, identify the causes and devise plans of action.
20
Identify obstacles and choose the best alternatives.
21
Create new and better ways to perform tasks.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
51
Safety for workers
Introduction
Going to work for the first time can be exciting and a bit strange. It can sometimes be
dangerous. This is true whether you work in a factory or an office or on a farm or
building site. Fortunately most dangers are recognisable and can be avoided.
Your own workplace will also have its own safety rules – perhaps in a booklet or on a
notice board. Some you will be told. Make sure you know and obey them.
Remember these four important rules:
✓ Learn how to work safely
✓ Obey safety rules
✓ Ask your supervisor if you don’t understand any instruction
✓ Report to your supervisor anything that seems dangerous, damaged or faulty
Games and practical jokes
Work is not the place for practical jokes or silly tricks. Serious injuries and even
deaths have been caused this way.
Tidiness
Keep work areas and walk ways tidy and clear. Do not leave things lying around which
people can trip over or bump into. Wet patches on the floor should be mopped up
straight away or some one might slip and fall.
Hygiene
Always wash your hands, using soap and water or a suitable cleanser, before meals
and before and after using the toilet.
It is recommended that you use barrier cream to protect your skin when you are
doing dirty jobs.
Dry your hands carefully on the towels and driers provided. Do not wipe them on old
rags or on your clothes.
Protective equipment and clothing
Use all protective equipment and clothing provided, such as ear and eye protectors,
dust masks, overalls and safety shoes, helmets or boots. It may feel strange at first.
Keep using it and you will get used to it. Ask your supervisor to replace any item that
gets damaged or worn.
Moving about the workplace
Walk, do not run or rush about.
Use the walk ways provided and never take short cuts.
Look out for and obey warning notices and safety signs.
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Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
Only drive a works vehicle if you have been trained to use it and your supervisor
allows you to use it.
Never hitch a ride on a vehicle not made to carry passengers. Do not stand on a fork
lift truck or on a tractor trailer drawbar.
Lifting and carrying
You must learn how to lift correctly. Only lift or carry what you can easily manage.
When lifting, get a good grip, lift smoothly and close to your body.
Get help if you are not sure you can lift or carry something safely and easily by
yourself. Use trolleys or wheelbarrows where these are provided.
Ladders
Do not use ladders with split, missing or loose rungs. Use proper ladders.
Always make sure that the ladder is placed in the right position, at the right angle and
cannot slip.
If working from a ladder, do not lean too far to the side, come down and move the
ladder to a more convenient place.
Always use ladders, scaffolding or lifts to reach high places. Never hitch a lift in a
crane bucket or on the forks of a lift truck.
Roofs
Roofs may be fragile or the tiles loose. Never go on to a roof unless you are told to do
so by your supervisor and have been shown the precautions you should take.
Compressed air
Only use compressed air when your supervisor tells you to.
Do not use it for cleaning machines, benches or clothing.
Electricity
Remember electricity can kill or cause severe burns. Treat it with care.
Make sure you understand your supervisor’s instructions before using any electrical
equipment. It you do not understand, ask your supervisor to show you again.
Always switch off before connecting or disconnecting any electrical appliance.
Machinery
Operate only machines you have been trained to use and told to use.
Make sure you can reach the controls easily and know how to stop any machine
you use.
Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
53
Safety guards are fitted to machines to protect you and must be used.
Wait until a machine has stopped and has been switched off before you clean or
clear it. Dangling chains or loose clothing could get caught up in the moving parts.
Keep long hair tucked under a cap or tied back.
Do not distract other people who are using machines.
Tell your supervisor at once if you think a machine is not working properly.
Harmful substances
Learn to recognise the hazard warning signs or labels which tell you about the type
of danger. They should tell you if a substance is poisonous, easily set on fire, or can
cause burns.
Follow all instructions given on the container or by your supervisor.
Before you use a substance, find out what to do if it spills onto your skin or clothes.
If you are splashed with a chemical wash it off at once in the way your have been
shown. Then report to your supervisor or whoever is responsible for first aid.
Overalls or protective clothing that get soaked or badly stained by harmful
substances must not be taken home from work.
Do not put liquids and substances into unlabelled or wrongly labelled bottles and
containers such as lemonade bottles or empty tins. This can be dangerous to
everyone you work with.
Fire
Take care when handling petrol or other flammable substances. Keep them away
from naked flames or sparks. Do not smoke.
Do not throw rubbish or cigarette ends and matches in corners, or under benches.
Obey ‘No Smoking’ rules.
First aid
Make sure you know the first aid arrangements for your workplace.
Report any injury, however slight, to your supervisor.
Always be careful.
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Skills Proficiency awards in Basic Motor Vehicle Repair and Servicing
Published by City & Guilds
1 Giltspur Street
London
EC1A 9DD
T +44 (0)20 7294 3505
F +44 (0)20 7294 2425
[email protected]
www.cityandguilds.com
City & Guilds is a registered charity
established to promote education
and training
WP-97-0007
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