Untitled
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Fig. D4. Kickstart quadrant and spring. Arrow
indicates correct spring location
To reassemble the mechanism, first refit the chin
walled steel sleeve, spring, pinion and ratchet to
the gearbox mainshaft and assemble the tab washer,
then screw on the retaining nut to the torque
figure given in "General Data’. De not омег-
tighten the retaining nut as this may result
in failure of the thin walled inner steel sleeve.
Fit [the return spring to the kickstart quadrant as
shown in Fig. D4. Offer the spindle into the kick-
start bush and locate the return spring onto the
anchor peg at the rear of the cover. Fit the oil
seal over the spindle and assemble the kickstart
crank, locking it into position with the cotter pin
from the rear. Refit the outer cover as shown In
Section D1. Do not forget to refit the oil seal.
Refill the gearbox with the correct grade of lubri-
cant (Section Al).
SECTION D3 -
DISMANTLING AND REASSEMBLING THE GEARCHANGE MECHANISM
Slacken off the gear change pedal locking bolt and
withdraw the pedal from the serrated shaft. A little
leverage between the pedal and the cover may be
necessary. For this, choose a suitable tool to avoid
damage to the cover.
Remove the four nuts and locking washers securing
the guide plate. Withdraw the guide plate, plunger
quadrant and curved return springs. Thoroughly
clean the parts in paraffin (kerosene) and inspect
them for wear etc, as shown in Section D4.
To reassemble the mechanism, first fit a new rubber
0" ring to the spindle and offer it to the outer
cover bush using a smear of oil to assist assembly,
then refit the two quadrant return springs and
ensure that they locate correctly over the step in
the cover, Tofacilitate assembly of the springs, first
fit the gearchange pedal and clamp it in position,
‘thus enabling the quadrant to be turned and the
springs to be compressed (see Fig. D3).
Refit the retainer plate, not forgetting the locking
washers which fit one under each of the four nuts.
Finally, refit the springs and plungers, taking care
that they are not suddenly ejected from their seats
during assembly.
SECTION D4
INSPECTING THE GEARCHANGE AND KICKSTART COMPONENTS
GEARCHANGE:
(1) Inspect che gearchange plungers for wear and
ensure that they are a clearance fit in che
quadrant. Check the plunger springs by com-
paring their lengths with the figures given in
“General Data”.
(2) Examine the plunger guide plate for wear and
grooving on the taper guide surfaces. Renew
the plate if grooving has occurred.
106
(3) | Inspect the footchange pedal return springs for
fatigue and if they show signs of corrosion due -
to condensation, they should be renewed.
(4) | Examine the gearchange quadrant bush for
wear and possible ovality by inserting the
quadrant into the bush and feeling the amount
of play.
(5) | Check the tips of the plungers and the teeth of
the camplate operating quadrant for chipping
and wear, To remove the camplate quadrant,
first remove the inner cover as shown In
Section D7, then remove the two split pins and
withdraw the spindle.
DS
D - GEARBOX
KICKSTART: (3) Examine the kickstart ratchet mechanism for
wear, giving particular attention to the ratchet
teeth ensuring that they have not become
chipped or rounded. Check that the thin
walled steel bush is a clearance fit In the kick-
start pinion and that the spring Is not badly
(1) Examine the kickstart quadrant for chipped or
broken teeth or looseness on the spindle and
the kickstart return spring for fatigue cracks
and signs of wear, particularly at the centre
where it engages on the splines of the spindle.
- Warn.
(2) Examine the kickstart spindle bush for wear.
If the required measuring instruments are not (4) Finally, check that the kickstart stop peg is
avallable, use the spindle as a gauge and feel che firmly pressed into the inner cover and Is not
amount of play. distorted,
SECTION D5
RENEWING KICKSTART AND GEARCHANGE SPINDLE BUSHES
If it is found necessary to renew the kickstart removed (Section 07) and the camplate operating
spindle bush this should be done by completely quadrant disconnected.
stripping the outer cover of its assembly parts and |
heating it to 100°C., then driving the bush out using
a suitable shouldered drift. Press in the new bush
while the cover Is still hot.
Using a suitable tap|{e.g. # in. dia. x 10 Whit} cut
a thread in the bush to a depth of # in.; heat the
cover to 100°C., then reinsert the tap, or, prefer-
ably, a suitable bolt, Grip the belt (or tap) firmly
in a vice, then drive the cover away using a hide
Adopt a similar procedure for renewal of the outer
Р Р mallet until the bush is free.
cover gearchange spindle bush. The inner cover
bush does not usually wear much, even after great Á press or sultably shouldered drift is required to
mileage has been covered. However, ifitis required drive in the new bush, which should be done whilst
to renew the bush, the inner cover should be the cover is still hot.
SECTION D6
CLUTCH OPERATING MECHANISM
The clutch operating mechanism, which is situated
in the gearbox outer cover, consists of two spring
loaded plates held apart by three balls, which are
seated In conical indentations in the plates,
¥¥ear in this mechanism is negligible, even after
excessive mileage has been covered, so long as the
gearbox oil level is maintained at the recommended
level. The mechanism is removed as a unit by
unscrewing two slotted screws and is then easily
dismantled. The parts are arranged as shown in
Fig. D5, which should be referred to when re-
assembling the mechanism. Fig. D5. Exploded view of clutch operating mechanism
Dé
104
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СЕАВВОХ | _ D
SECTION D7
DISMANTLING THE GEARBOX
ed.
dan
5 TR, Tra
Fig. Dé. Gearbox inner cover retaining screws 08
Remove the gearbox outer cover as shown In
Section D1, leaving the gearbox with 4th (top) gear
selected:
Remove the two short bolts, two long bolts and a
centre nut which serves to retain the rear right
engine mounting plate, then withdraw the plate.
Bend back the tags on the lock washer and unscrew
the kickstart pinion ratchet retainer nut from the
end of the gearbox mainshaft. This should be easily
achieved with 4th (top) gear selected and the rear
brake applied. Unscrew the speedometer cable
union nut and disconnect the cable from the
speedometer drive shaft,
Remove the outer primary cover and dismantle the
transmission as shown in Section C, not forgetting,
finally, to remove the key from the gearbox main-
shaft,
108
Unscrew the large domed nut from underneath the
gearbox and withdraw the camplate indexing
plunger and spring. The gearbox inner cover is
rethined by a socket screw, a Phillips recessed screw
and a hexagonal bolt (see Fig. Dé}, When these are
removed the cover can be released by tapping it
outwards with a hide mallet, The gearbox malnshaft
can be withdrawn easily after the selector fork
spindle has been removed. The layshaft and
remaining gears can then be withdrawn. Remove
the camplate and spindle assembly, then remove
the two brass thrust washers which locate over the
needle roller bearings.
The mainshaft high gear, in which the gearbox
mainshaft runs, is locked through the main bearing
and gearbox sprocket. The oll is prevented from
leaving the gearbox through the main bearing by
an oil seal which runs on a ground boss on the gear-
box sprocket. To remove the mainshaft high gear
D7
D — GEARBOX
Fig. D7. Removing the gearbox sprocket with rear
brake applied
and renew the oll seal it will be necessary to remove
the sprocket. This can be done by removing the
circular plate from the primary inner cover at the
rear of the clutch and unscrewing the large
hexagonal gearbox |sprocket nur (1:66 in, across
flats). To facilitace removal of the nut, spanner
number Z&3 15 available.
When the nut is removed, drive the high gear
through into the gearbox using a hammer with a
soft metal drift.
To remove the sprocket, disconnect the rear chain
and remove it from around the sprocket, which can
then be easily withdrawn through the aperture.
Check the oil seal for cracking and wear. If there
has been any signs of excessive oil leakage, renew It.
SECTION D8 |
INSPECTION OF THE GEARBOX COMPONENTS
Thoroughly clean all parts in paraffin (kerosene) and
check them for wear and fatigue, as follows :—
(1) Inspect the gearbox housing and inner cover for
signs of cracking and damage to the joint faces.
Check that the location dowels are In position
correctly in the gearbox and inner cover
(2 dowels each). In preparation for reassembly,
clean the junction surfaces of the gearbox, inner
cover and cuter cover of any old deposits of
jointing compound.
(2) Examine both the mainshaft and layshaft for
signs of fatigue, damaged threads and badly
worn splines. Check the extent of wear to the
bearing diameters of both shafts by comparing
them with the figures given In General Data”.
Examine the shafts carefully for signs of seizure.
Excessive friction resistance and seizure will be
indicated by local colouring en the shaft,
(3) Check the layshaft needle roller bearing by
inserting the layshaft and feeling the amount of
play,
De
(4) Inspect the gearbox mainshaft ball bearing races
for roughness due to pitting or indentation of
the ball tracks] An estimate can be made of
ball wear by feeling the amount of side play of
the centre track. It should not be possible to
detect any movement by hand if the bearing is
in good condition. The mainshaft should be a
hand press fit in the inner cover bearing.
Similarly the mainshaft high gear should be a
good hand press fir in the opposite bearing.
(5) Examine the gears thoroughly, fer chipped,
fractured or worn teeth. Check the internal
splines and bushes. Make sure that the splines
are free on their respective shafts with no
tendency to bind, and the bushes in the
mainshaft high gear and layshaft low gear are
not loose or exgessively worn. Again, reference
should be made to the dimensions given In
“General Data”.
(6) Check that the selector fork rod is not grooved
and that it is a good fit in the gearbox casing
and the Inner cover. Inspect the selector fork
running faces for wear. This will only have
occurred if the gearbox is being continually
109
used with a badly worn mainshaft bearing. The
camplate rollers which fit on the selector fork
are of case hardened steel and consequently
wear should be negligible.
(7) The gear selector camplate should be Inspected
for signs of wear In the roller tracks. Excessive
wear will occur if the mainshaft main bearing
has worn badly. Check the fit of the camplate
spindle in its housing. Examine the camplate
gear wheel for excessive wear, Difficulty will
be encountered In gear selection, causing
subsequent damage to the gears, If this gear is
badly worn,
GEARBOX D
(8) Ensure that the camplate plunger works freely -
in the housing and that the moving parts are
free from corrosion. To check if the spring has
become inefficient, measure its length and
compare It with “General Data",
(7) Examine the mainshaft high gear bush for wear
by inserting the mainshaft into it and feeling
the amount of play. It Is advisable to take
micrometer readings of the mainshaft and
compare them with caliper readings of the bush.
If the clearance is excessively greater than the
figure given in “General Data" the bush should
be renewed as shown in Section D9,
SECTION D9
RENEWING MAINSHAFT AND LAYSHAFT BEARINGS
MAINSHAFT
The mainshaft ball bearings are a press fit into their
respective housings and are retained by spring
circlips to prevent sideways movement due co end
thrust. To remove the right bearing, first lever out
the circlip, then heat the cover to approximately
100°C. and drive out the bearing using a suitably
shouldered drift. The new bearing should be
pressed or drifted in whilst the cover is still hot
using a suitable tubular drift onto the outer race
(24 in. outside diameter x 6 in. long). Do not
forget to refit the circlip.
To remove the high gear bearing on the left of the
machine, first lever out the large oil seal (which
must be renewed), then remove the retainer
circlip. Carefully heat the casing locally to ap-
proximately 100°C. then drive out the bearing from
the inside by means of service tool Z15 or a suitably
shouldered drift. Whilst the casing is still hot, drive
in the new bearing, using a suitable tubular drift
onto the outer race, then refit the circlip and press
in the new oil seal.
MAINSHAFT HIGH GEAR BUSH
If it is required to renew this bush, this can be done
by pressing out the bush using a suitable drift, which
can be made from a 5 in. x § In. diameter piece
of bar by machining a + in. dia. x # in. long pllot
at one end. The bush must be pressed out by
Inserting the drift at the teeth end of the gear. The
new bush must be pressed in with the cil groove in
the bore of the bush at the teeth end.
110
55
Fig. Da. Section through gearbox mainshaft cil seal
Finally, ream the bush to size using service tool
reamer Z46. The pressed-in bore size is given in
“General Data’.
LAYSHAFT
The right needle roller bearing, which ls a press fit
Into the inner cover, should be removed by first
unscrewing the slotted screw which locates the
speedometer driven shaft, then driving out the
shaft, complete with bush, by means of a narrow
soft metal drift. Heat the cover to approximately
100°C. then press or drift out the bearing using a
tool similar to chat shown In Fig. D9, overleaf,
[9
D a — GEARBOX
-073/-078 ins.
NN
< N
NN
Min ОА:
Wins DIA.
65
Fig. D%. Sketch of needle roller and drift
The new bearing should be pressed in, plain end
first, whilst the cover is still hot, from the inside of
the cover, until -073/-078 In, of the bearing protrudes
above the cover face (see Fig. D9).
The left needle roller bearing is of the closed-end
type and is accessible from the left, through the
sprocket cover plate aperture. The casing should
be heated to approximately 100°C. and the bearing
driven through into the gearbox using a soft metal
drift. taking care not to damage the bore into which
the bearing fits. The new bearing must be carefully
pressed in whilst the casing is hot, until -073/-078 in.
protrudes above the spot face surface Inside the
gearbox. Do not use excessive force or the needle
roller outer case may become damaged, resulting in
the rollers seizing, jor breaking up.
Finally, the outer portion of the bare inta which the
bearing fits, should be sealed with a suitable
proprietary sealant,
SECTION DIO
REASSEMBLING THE GE
=
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HE |
ARBOX
Fig. D10. Reassembling the gearbox. Arrow indicates camplate in 4th (top) gear position
DIO
111
Drive the new oil seal up to the main bearing with
the lip and spring towards the bearing. Press the
high gear into the bearing. Lubricate the ground
tapered boss of the sprocket with oil and slide It
onto the high gear. Screw on the securing nut
finger tight.
Re-mesh the rear chaln with the sprockets and
replace the connecting link. Apply the rear brake
and tighten the sprocket securing nut as tight as
possible using service tool Z&3. (See Fig. D7.)
Smear the bronze bush protruding frem the main-
shaft high gear with oll and replace the circular
cover plate using a new paper gasket.
Lubricate the camplate spindle and offer it into the
spindle housing within the gearbox. Assemble the
camplate plunger and spring into the domed plunger
retaining nut and screw it into position underneath
GEARBOX
e =
==) a —_—
Te ae
D
Place the camplate rollers onto the selector farks
and hold them in position with grease. Position
the selector forks in their respective grooves in
the gears as shown in Fig. D11. The assembly is
now ready to be offered into the gearbox housing.
As the mainshaft and layshaft are being located in
their respective bearings, the gears should be slid
Into position and aligned so that the selector fork
rollers locate in che roller tracks in the camplate
and the bores for the selector forks are approxi-
mately aligned. Smear the selector fork spindle
É
Fig. D11. Reassembling the gearbox components. Arrows indicate camplate rollers in position and
thrust washer correctly located
the gearbox, but do not forget the fibre washer,
Set the camplate in fourth gear position.
Locate the brass thrust washer over the inner
needle roller bearing. The thrust washer can be
held in position by smearing its rear surface with
grease. Note that the grooved surface of the thrust
washer is towards the layshaft. {See Fig. D11).
Lubricate the mainshaft and layshaft captive gears,
then assemble the mainshaft and layshaft gear
clusters as shown in Fig. D711.
112
with oil and slide it through the selector forks,
shoulder end first, until it is fully engaged in the
gearbox housing,
Chee the camplate operating quadrant Is moving
freely in the inner cover and position the brass
layshaft thrust washer over the needle roller bearing
in the inner cover. Again, use grease to hold the
thrust washer in position during assembly.
D11
GEARBOX
"a:
E.
EE
Fig. D12. Refitting the gearbox inner cover. Note top of first tooth aligned with centres shown for correct
location of gearchange camplate and quadrant
Using a pressure oil can, lubricate all the moving
parts in the gearbox, then apply a fresh coat of
jointing compound to the gearbox junction surface.
=
Ensure that the two location dowels are in position
and offer the Inner cover assembly to the gearbox.
When the cover is approximately $ in. (6 mm.)
away from the gearbox junction face, lift the cam-
plate slightly so that it occupies the position shown
In Fig. D12, and then press the cover fully home.
Screw in the socket screw, recessed screw and the
bolt, then temporarily assemble the cuter cover and
gearchange lever and check that the gearchanging
sequence is correct by simultaneously operating the
gearchange pedal and turning the rear wheel. In the
event that either first or fourth gear only can be
selected and then the gearchange mechanism ceases
to operate, this will be due to the quadrant not
being correctly meshed with the camplate gear.
In effect the camplate has turned too far and the
D12
113
camplate plunger has over-sprung, thus stopping
the camplate from returning.
To rectify this, remove the inner cover again, set the
camplate In fourth gear position then re-locate the
inner cover with the "‘alignment tooth’ (see Fig.
D12) on the mainshaft centre line. The object being
to re-engage the quadrant accurately with the
camplate pinion in the correct camplate position.
When correct gearchanging is established, re-
assemble the kickstart pinion and ratchet, replace
the tab washer and screw on the securing nut to
the torque figure given in “General Data". To
facilitate this, the rear brake should be applied
with fourth gear selected.
Refit the gearbox outer cover as shown in section
C1 then reassemble the transmission, referring to
section A2 for the correct quantities and grades of
lubricant for the primary chaincase and gearbox.
GEARBOX | — D
SECTION DII
CHANGING THE GEARBOX SPROCKET
If it is required to change the gearbox sprocket for
one with a different number of teeth from that of
standard, then it will also be necessary to change
the speedometer-drive gear and driven gear. For
further details of this, see Section D12. To gain
access to the gearbox sprocket, first remove the left
footrest and exhaust pipe and then remove the outer
primary cover as shown in Section C3,
Remove the pressure plate, clutch plates and with-
draw the shock absorber unit and clutch sprocket
as shown in Section C9. Remove the key from the
gearbox mainshaft and unscrew the six screws which
serve to retain the circular cover.
Apply the rear brake, then unscrew the gearbox
sprocket securing nut using service tool number
Z63. The rear chain may now be disconnected and
the gearbox sprocket withdrawn through the
aperture,
Before fitting the new sprocket check that the
gearbox oil seal is in good condition and that the
rear chain is not excessively worn. Check the
extension as shown in Section A13. If the old chain
is td be retained for further use it should be
thorgughly cleaned in paraffin and lubricated in a
grease bath.
Lubricate the ground boss wich oil and slide the
sprocket over the gearbox mainshaft and high gear.
When the sprocket is located on the splines screw
on the securing nut finger tight, then re-connect the
chain. With the rear brake applied tighten the nut
until it ls as tight as possible.
When replacing the circular cover plate, Use a new
paper gasket. Ensure that the oil seal Is correctly
engaged over the protruding bronze bush. Re-
assembly then continues as a reversal of the above
Instructions.
SECTION DI2
SPEEDOMETER DRIVE GEAR COMBINATIONS
The speedometer drive Is taken from the right-hand
end of the gearbox layshaft. As any overall gear
ratio change Is achieved by changing the gearbox
sprocket and rear wheel sprocket, correction has to
be made to this speedometer drive ratio, to preserve
the correct speedometer drive cable speed.
The chart below gives the part numbers of the
speedometer drive gears required for a change-over
from the standard fitted gearbox sprocket to the
recommended sprocket for use when fitting a
sidecar,
For special purposes it may be necessary to
calculate the speedometer drive gear combination
requirement. If this is the case, reference should be
made to Technical Information Bulletin No. 11
which is available on request from the TRIUMPH
ENGINEERING CO. LTD., SERVICE DEPART-
MENT.
le а — A —
| Gearbox | Gears Required: | Cable :
Model | | — ——— —— Маг, %
Sprocket Drive Driven R.P. Mile
6T std, 20 T1744 (107) T1745 (157) 1590 —0:6
siCar 18 Т1747 (ЭТ) T1748 (157) 1600 | Zero
TRE Sed. 19 T1744 (10T) T1745 (15T) 1610 +06
| SiCar | 17 T1747 (3T) T1748 (15T) 1640 +25
T120 Std. 17 T1744 (107) T1745 (157) | 1670 +42
S (Car 17 T1747 (9T) T1748 (15T) 1695 | +57
O JU: IN: A: — —[—] — |
TABLE OF SPEEDOMETER DRIVE GEAR COMBINATIONS
Note: The above chart only applies If the gearbox ratios, the number of teeth on
the rear sprocket and the rear tyre size are as specified in "General Data” for the
particular model, and % variation is calculated on the standard 1600 drive cable
revolutions per mile.
114
D13
D _ GEARBOX
SECTION DI3
GEARBOX SPROCKET AND MAINSHAFT HIGH GEAR
The splines on the gearbox sprocket and the main-
shaft high gear have been altered on all models from
DU13375 onwards. The old and new conditions are
| not interchangeable, and should either of the items
Did
TE
require replacing ensure that the correct part
number for the particular machine is obtained from
the appropriate Replacement Parts Catalogue.
Femi.
ин
GEARBOX _ o D
SECTION Dil
CHANGING THE GEARBOX SPROCKET
If it is required to change the gearbox sprocket for
one with a different number of teeth from that of
standard, then it will also be necessary to change
the speedometer-drive gear and driven gear. For
further details of this, see Section D12. To gain
access to the gearbox sprocket, first remove the left
footrest and exhaust pipe and then remove the outer
primary cover as shown in Section C3.
Remove the pressure plate, clutch plates and with-
draw the shock absorber unit and clutch sprocket
as shown In Section C9. Remove the key from the
gearbox mainshaft and unscrew the six screws which
serve to recain the circular cover.
Apply the rear brake, then unscrew the gearbox
sprocket securing nut using service tool number
Zó3. The rear chain may now be disconnected and
the gearbox sprocket withdrawn through the
aperture,
Before fitting the new sprocket check that the
gearbox oil seal is in good condition and that the
rear chain is not excessively worn. Check the
extension as shown in Section A13. If the old chain
is to be retained for further use it should be
thoroughly cleaned in paraffin and lubricated in a
grease bath.
Lubricate the ground boss with oll and slide the
sprocket over the gearbox mainshaft and high gear.
When the sprocket is located on the splines-serew
on the securing nut finger tight, then re-connect the
chain. W¥ith the rear brake applied tighten the nut
until it is as tight as possible,
When replacing the circular cover plate, use a new
paper gasket. Ensure that the oil seal Is correctly
engaged over the protruding bronze bush. Re-
assembly then continues as a reversal of the above
Instructions.
SECTION DI2
SPEEDOMETER DRIVE GEAR COMBINATIONS
The speedometer drive is taken from the right-hand
end of the gearbox layshaft. As any overall gear
ratio change is achieved by changing the gearbox
sprocket and rear wheel sprocket, correction has to
be made to this speedometer drive ratio, to preserve
the correct speedometer drive cable speed.
The chart below gives the part numbers of the
speedometer drive gears required for a change-over
recommended sprocket for use when fitting a
sidecar.
For | special purposes it may be necessary to
calculate the speedometer drive gear combination
requirement. If this is the case, reference should be
made to Technical Information Bulletin No. 11
which is available on request from the TRIUMPH
ENGINEERING CO. LTD, SERVICE DEPART-
from the standard fitted gearbox sprocket to the MENT.
Gearbox | Gears Required: Cable |
Model | | —— Var. % |
sprocket | Drive Driven | RP. Mile |
6T Std. 20 | T1744 (10T) 11745 (15T) 1590 —0-6
S/Car 18 | T1747 (YT) 11748 (157) 1600 | Zero
TRé Std, 17 | T1744 (107) T1745 (15T) 1610 0-6 |
S/Car 17 | T1747 (97) T1748 (15T) | 1640 +25
T120 Std, 19 T1744 (107) T1745 (15T) | 1670 +42
$/Car 17 T1747 (9T) T1748 (15T) | 1695 +59 |
TABLE OF SPEEDOMETER DRIVE GEAR COMBINATIONS
Note: The above chart only applies if the gearbox ratios, the number of teeth on
the rear sprocket and the rear tyre size are as specified in "General Data" for the
particular model, and © variation is calculated оп the standard 1600 drive cable
revolutions per mile.
ee
£13
©
— — GEARBOX
SECTION DI3
GEARBOX SPROCKET AND MAINSHAFT HIGH GEAR
The splines on the gearbox sprocket and the main- require replacing ensure that the correct part
shaft high gear have been altered on all models from
number for the particular machine Is obtained from
DU13375 onwards. The old and new conditions are the appropriate Replacement Parts Catalogue.
not interchangeable, and should either of the items
D14
To
br
SECTION E
FRAME AND ATTACHMENT DETAILS
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE FUEL TANK
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE REAR PANELS |(6T)
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE SWITCH PANEL (TRé AND T120)
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE CIL TANK
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE BATTERY CARRIER ASSEMBLY
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE REAR MUDGUARD
ADJUSTING THE REAR SUSPENSION
REMOYING AND REFITTING THE REAR SUSPENSION UNITS
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE SUSPENSION UNITS
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE SWINGING FORK
RENEWING THE SWINGING FORK BUSHES
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE REAR FRAME
FRAME ALIGNMENT
REPAIRS
PAINTWORK REFINISHING
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE REAR SUSPENSION UNITS
118
Section
E1
E2
E3
E4
ES
E6
E?
ES
E9
E10
E11
E12
E13
E14
E15
E16
E1
Emam
78
Fig. El. General arrangement of front and rear frame assembly
El
Fer
FRAME — —E
SECTION El
REMOYING AND REPLACING THE FUEL TANK
Turn both fuel taps to the “OFF” position then
unscrew the union nuts and disconnect both feed
pipes. Raise the twin seat then unscrew the rear
fuel tank securing bolt. Detach the locking wire
from the front tank bolts and unscrew them. The
tank is then free to be removed. On machines
fitted with the nacelle type headlamp unit the tank
may foul the underside of the nacelle cover, in this
case the two rear nacelle securing screws should be
removed to give sufficient clearance.
Replacing the tank is the reversal of the above
instructions, but do not forget to fit the mounting
rubbers on the front and rear tank securing belts.
De not over-tighten the feed pipe union nuts as this
may result in failure of this part with subsequent
fuel leakage. Finally, rethread the locking wire
through the heads of the two front securing bolts
to prevent them unscrewing.
SECTION E2
REMOVYING AND REPLACING THE PANELS (6T)
Removal of the left and right rear enclosure panels is
achieved by unscrewing two domed nuts, a plain
nut, (just below the rear of the fuel tank) from
each panel and two front panel junction screws.
The panels are then free to be removed.
When replacing them, it is important that the
distance pieces which fit over each of the engine
mounting plate centre studs are in position other-
wise the panel will become distorted when the
domed nuts are tightened.
SECTION E3
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE SWITCH PANEL (TRé & T120)
The switch panel on che left of che machine is
secured by three point fixing on earlier models and
four point fixing, on later models. To remove the
panel, first disconnect the leads from the battery
terminals, then remove the two top mounting bolts
and front fixing bracket.
120
Life che panel clear and detach the ignition and
lighting switch socket plugs. On later models there
ls a rubber retaining band on each socket plug.
ES
When the panel |s free, the lighting switch can be
removed by unscrewing the central recessed
screw, withdrawing the knob and unscrewing the
switch retaining nut. To remove the ignition
switch, carefully lever off the rubber switch cover,
then unscrew the central retaining nut.
When replacing the panel, ensure that the sockets
are fully engaged. The pins in the sockets are so
arranged that they cannot be re-connected wrongly.
On models where the lower fixing pillar is fitted
check that the mating rubber grommet is correctly
replaced in the panel (see Fig. EZ).
Fig. EL. Switch panel lower fixing bracket
— SECTION E4
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE OIL TANK
Fig. El. Oil tank mounting bolt assembly
Ed
121
poe
"a
ны
On machines with rear enclosure panels, remove the
right panel, then unscrew the oil tank filler cap,
place a drip tray underneath the oil tank and remove
the drain plug, (where fitted) or, alternatively,
unscrew the union nut and disconnect the oil feed
pipe. Allow the oil to drain for approximately
fifteen minutes. Unscrew the large hexagon-headed
oil tank filter body from beneath the oil tank and
thoroughly clean it in paraffin (kerosene).
Disconnect the oil return pipe and rocker féed pipe
from beneath the oil tank and disconnect the oil
breather pipe from the froth-tower on top of the
70
Fig. Е4. Oil Junction pipe securing clips
co TAREE = E
oil tank. Remove the top mounting bolt complete
with suspension rubbers and disconnect the twin-
seat check wire. Unscrew the bottom mounting
bolt and remove the oil tank. This is best achieved
by allowing the bottom bracket to be lowered into
the space behind the gearbox, then tilting the top
of the oil tank outwards so that it can be lifted clear.
Thoroughly clean the tank in paraffin (kerosene) to
remove all traces of sludge, metallic particles
and debris, then allow it to drain,
Reassembly Is the reversal of the above instructions
but remember to fit the bottom mounting rubber
and also to connect the seat check wire to the rear
top mounting bolt. When connecting the oil feed
pipe union nur take care to avoid over-tighrening
as Chis may result in failure of che union nut. YYhen
connecting the oil lines ensure that chafing of the
rubber connections does not occur. Failure to
observe this may result in rubber fragments
entering-the oil system and subsequently causing
blockage.
On later models where screw clips are fitted to
prevent any possible oll leakage at the junction
between the connecting rubber and cil tank tube,
the clips should be carefully tightened. If oil leakage
is experienced from one of these junctions on
earligr models, it is advisable to purchase and fit
new (clips.
SECTION ES
REMOYING AND REPLACING THE BATTERY CARRIER ASSEMBLY
Disconnect the leads from the battery terminals
and remove the battery then unscrew the rectifier
securing nut as shown In Flg. ES. Remove the four
battery strap fixing bolts complete with mounting
rubbers then withdraw the battery carrier assembly
complete.
To refit the battery carrier, first place it in position
then align the switch panel bracket (if fitted) and
insert the mounting rubbers Into their correct
positions as shown in Fig. E3. Refit the pillar bolts
(not forgetting the plain washers) chen screw on the
securing nuts using a small amount of proprietary
thread sealant. The rectifier must be refitted to the
rear mounting strap with the red earthing lead
fixed underneath Its securing bolt,
71
Fig. ES. Removing the rectifier
ES
172
E — FRAME
SECTION E6
REMOYING AND REPLACING THE REAR MUDGUARD
Remove the split link and disconnect the rear chain
from the rear wheel sprocket. Unscrew the rear
brake operating rod adjuster nut and remove the
nut securing the torque stay to the anchor plate.
Unscrew the wheel spindle nuts and withdraw
the wheel.
Slacken the rear number plate securing bolts and
remove the two bolts securing the top clip, number
plate and left and right valances (if fitted). Remove
the left and right panels and remove the bottom
bolt which secures the mudguard to the frame.
Disconnect the rear light lead (two snap connectors
adjacent to the rear of the battery) and remove the
two bolts securing the mudguard to the bridge.
Carefully lower the mudguard at the same time
allowing the lifting handle to pass underneath the
number plate top bracket.
Replacement ls a reversal of the above instructions
but ensure that the electrical connections are
coupled correctly and when re-connecting che rear
chaln, check that the nose of the spring connection
link is facing In ché direction of rotation.
SECTION E7
ADJUSTING THE REAR SUSPENSION
The movement is controlled by Girling combined
coll spring and hydraulic damper units. The
hydraulic damping mechanism is completely sealed
but the static loading of the spring is adjustable.
There is a three position cam ring below the
chromium plated dust cover and a ""C'" spanner is
provided in the toolkit. To increase the static
loading of the spring place the machine on the stand
so that there is least load on the spring and use the
“C" spanner to turn the cam: both units must be
an the same notch whichever may be chosen.
Eó
The table below shows the spring rates and colour
codes for the purposes designated.
RE | Ele
Rate | e Colour
Ib. jin. E Code
(ins.)
| Standard
ET, T120 145 8-0 | Blue Yellow
Standard TRé| [100 84 — |Green/Green
Sidecar | [150 | 84 Blue Red
173
| ..
FRAME
The standard lowest position is for solo riding, the
second position Is for heavier solo riders or when
luggage is carried on che rear of the machine and the
third or highest position is for use when a pillion
passenger is being carried.
FIRST POSITION
LIGHT LOAD
SECOND POSITION
MEDIUM LOAD
72
THIRD POSITION
HEAYY LOAD
Fig. ES. Adjusting the rear suspension units
SECTION ES
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE REAR SUSPENSION UNITS
Removal of the suspension units on TRE and T120
models is achleved by removing the top and bottom
pivot bolts whilst the machine is suitably mounted
so that the rear wheel is off che ground.
On che 6T the top pivot bolts are fitted from the
Inside and che rear wheel and mudeuard require
removing so that the pivot bolts can be withdrawn
and ghe suspension units removed,
When refitting the units, ensure that the bridge
bracket fits in-between the lifting handle and the
frame prior to inserting the pivot boles. lt may
be necessary to use an allenment bar to assist in
bringing the holes into line.
124
EB
A ll see
Hydraulic damper unit
Rubber bump stop
Coiled spring
Qurer shield
Inner shield
Spring retainers
Bonded bush 73
Fig. E7. Exploded view of the rear suspension unit
125
FRAME
SECTION E?
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE SUSPENSION UNITS
The suspension unit consists of a sealed hydraulic
damper unit, outer coiled spring and dirt shields.
The static loading on the spring Is adjustable and
should be set according to the type of conditions
under which the machine is to be used [see
section E7).
To dismantle che suspension unit and remove the
spring, it is required to compress the spring whilst
the two semi-circular spring retainer plates are
removed. To do this first turn the cam until It is
in the “LIGHT-LOAD"" position, then carefully
grip the bottom lug in a vice. Take firm hold of
the outer dirt shield and pull it until the spring is
sufficiently compressed to allow the spring retainers
to be removed.
The damper unit should be checked for leakage,
bending of the plunger rod and damping action.
Check the bonded pivot bushes for wear and ensure
that the sleeve is not loose in the rubber bush.
The bushes can be easily renewed by driving out the
old ene and pressing in the new one using a smear
of sdapy water to assist assembly,
Squeaking coming from a suspension unit will
probably be due to the spring rubbing on the
bottom shield. To overcome thls, smear some
high-melting point grease on the inside of the
shield, Under no circumstances should the plunger
rod be lubricated,
The springs required for sidecar use are the 150
ibs./In. rate (Blue /Red). If a change-over is to be
made ensure that these springs are fitted.
Note.—For information concerning suspension
units or spare parts, the local Girling agent should
be consulted,
Reassembly Is a reversal of dismantling. Check that
the cam Is in the light load position before com-
pressing the spring.
SECTION EIO
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE SWINGING FORK
Disconnect the chain and remove the front anchor
stay securing bolt, then unscrew the brake operating
rod adjuster nut. Slacken the wheel spindle nuts
and withdraw the rear wheel.
On machines where rear enclosure panels are
ficred these must be removed. To do this unscrew
two domed nuts, two front panel junction screws
and a nut just below the rear of the petrol tank.
The panels are then free to be removed,
Remove two long and two short bolts which serve
to retain each of the left and right rear engine
mounting plates and withdraw the plates. On
panel-less models there is also a nut fitted centrally
which must be removed.
126
Slacken off che rear chainguard bolt and remove the
front chainguard securing bolt. Disconnect the
leads from the stop lamp switch and remove the
chaimguard.
Remove the two bolts which secure the suspension
unicg to the swinging fork.
On machines where the swinging fork pivot spindle
nut is on the right of the machine the oil scavenge
pipe should be disconnected from the cil tank to
give spanner clearance for removing the pivot
spindle. On earlier models the spindle was fitted
from the left of the machine. To remove the.
spindle, first unscrew the locking nut, then un-
screw the spindle until it is free to be withdrawn,
The swinging fork can then be removed and the end
plates, outer sleeves and distance tube withdrawn.
ED
JU
Fig. EB, Exploded view of swinging fork assembly
All parts should be thoroughly cleaned in paraffin
{(kerosine) and Inspected for wear giving particular
attention to the fit of the two outer sleeves in the
swinging fork bushes. The working clearance
between sleeve and bush should not be excessive,
If excessive wear is in evidence, the bushes will
require renewing, for details of this see Section E11.
The parts should be reassembled In the order shown
In Fig. EB with the addition of a sufficient quantity
of the recommended grade of grease to fill the
space surrounding the distance tube. Also, the
sleeves and bushes should be well greased. The
end places will require holding in position with their
flat edges forward whilst the swinging fork is
offered to the pivot lug and the spindle inserted.
The spindle should be tightened till the fork can
just be moved upwards and downwards with lltrle
effort. The lock nut and tab washer should then
be fitted and the nut tightened. Reassembly then
continues as the reversal of the above instructions.
E10
rent mL
«=
corp HAE pon A ri ar PIE nas.
14
Fig. EY. Swinging fork lubrication nipple
127
SECTION E
ERAME AND ATTACHMENT DETAILS
Section
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE FUEL TANK |... wo wo oo on Ef
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE REAR PANELS (67) .. o.oo... El
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE SWITCH PANEL (TR6 AND T120) ... .. … B
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE OIL TANK TEA
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE BATTERY CARRIER ASSEMBLY ~~ .. .. .. ES
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE REAR MUDGUARD ... o.oo... Eb
ADJUSTING THE REAR SUSPENSION ... ve. love oe 2 8
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE REAR SUSPENSION UNITS —... EB
STRIPPING AND REASSEMBLING THE SUSPENSION UNITS... ... .. #9
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE SWINGING FORK... mem E10
RENEWING THE SWINGING FORK BUSHES ... |... woo eo EM
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE REAR FRAME |. .. wo EN
FRAME ALIGNMENT oo ol ED
REES = № оч om owe om E = = = uw @ В
PAINTWORK REFINISHING o.oo oo bee i ES
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE REAR SUSPENSION UNITS .. .. .. H6
178 | E1
E a FRAME
Fig. El. General arrangement of front and rear frame assembly
El
129
Bo nyt
rai = "SE
FATE
SECTION El!
RENEWING THE SWINGING FORK BUSHES
If the swinging fork bushes require renewing they
should be removed by means of a suitable soft
metal drift inserted in the tubular housing at an
angle and located onto the far side bush. By
dexterous use of a hammer and a drift moving it
round the edge of the bush a little at a time the bush
should be easily removed with no resultant damage
to the bore of the housing (see Fig. E10),
New bushes are of the steel backed pre-sized type
and when carefully pressed in, using a smear of
grease to assist assembly, they will give the correct
diametral working clearance. If à press is not avail-
able the bush can be fitted by using a suitably
turned drift and hammer. Ensure that the bush
enters squarely and that no burr is set up due to
misalignment. Bore sizes and working clearances
are given in “General Data",
_—
Fig. E10. Removing a swinging fork bearing bush
74
SECTION El2
REMOVING AND REPLACING THE REAR FRAME
Disconnect the leads from the battery terminals
and remove the battery. Unscrew the four bolts
which serve to secure the twinseat hinges, then
disconnect the check wire and remove the twinseat.
Remove the panels (6T) or switch panel, (TRé and
T120) oil tank, and rear mudguard as described in
section EJ to Eó inclusive.
Slacken the finned clip bolts, silencer clip bolts and
two nuts which serve to secure the exhaust pipes
underneath the engine, then remove the exhaust
pipes by tapping them in a forward direction with
a hide or rubber mallet. Remove the left and right
silencers, .then remove two short bolts, two long
Bolts and a central nut which serve to retain
each of the left and right rear engine mounting plates.
Remove the plates complete with footrests.
130
On models where the footrests are secured under-
neath the engine they should be removed by
slackening their securing belts and giving each
footrest a sharp tap In a downward direction to
release it from its locking taper.
Remove all frame clips which connect the wiring
harness te the rear frame portion and unscrew the
botcem left and right bolts which serve to secure
the rear frame to the front frame, then remove
the top securing stud. The rear frame is now free
to be removed, this is best achieved by lifting it
vertically upwards over the swinging fork.
Replecement is the reversal of the above instruc-
tions, but refer to the relevant wiring diagram in
section H11 when reconnecting the electrical units
and wiring harness,
E11
E | | РАМЕ |
SECTION EI3
FRAME ALIGNMENT
B A
ON BAR
GOOD SLIDING FIT
PART A.— MILD STEEL— 2 OFF
PART B— MILD STEEL BAR
(Tin. DIAMETER MAX x 2ft. LONG)
Fig. Eli. Sketch of frame checking fixture
If the machine has been damaged in-an accident the
frame portions must be checked for correct align-
ment. In the following paragraph details are given
of alignment checking for all parts of the frame
(excepting the telescopic fork which is dealt with
in Section GQ).
Basic requirements for alignment checking are a
engineers checking table (surface area approxi-
mately 3 feet » 5 feet), adjustable height gauge
(Vernier type preferable) two suitable "'V"" blocks,
several adjustable heighc pillars, a set-square and
a suitable jig as shown in the sketch (Fig. E11).
FRONT FRAME
It is essential that after setting, or checking the
front frame lug centre [ine is in a plane perpendi-
cular to the plane of the swinging fork pivot lug
centre line. It is also essential, that the remaining
tubes and lugs are in their relative positions within
the stated limits of accuracy.
The method of checking the front frame is that of
securely fitting an adaptor spindle of the type shown
in Fig. E11 to the head lug. It is then required to
support the spindle and head lug on a plane parallel
to, and approx. 6 ins. (15 cm.) from, che checking
table surface. For this purpose two “Y” blocks,
packing pieces and two suitable “*G” clamps will
be required. At the other end of the frame (swing-
E12
SLIDING ar weon IN POSITION
de
ON BAR
ITs
3," т 16
4 я
ча
DIA.
75
ing fork and rear frame removed) an adjustable
pillar should be plated under the down tube adja-
cent to the swinging fork pivot lug (see Fig. E12).
The height of the pillar can be determined by
measuring the diameter of the tube which is to
rest on it, halving the diameter and then sub-
tracting it from the dimension between the head
lug centre line and table surface.
The frame centre line should now lie parallel to the
checking table surface if che frame alignment 15
correct,
To verify this take height readings on the front
down tube, top tube and rear down tube. See
Figs E12 and E13. Fermissible maximum variation
is 75 in. (0-75 mm.).
Fit the swinging fork pivot spindle with the two
outer sleeves and distance tube attached and check
the pivor lug for squareness using a set square at
the two location points as shown in Figs. E12 and
E13.
Then, using a set square, check that the bottom
tubes are aligned by bringing the set square to
bear on them at the front and rear.
Using a steel rule ar suitable instrument measure
the hole centres and compare the figures obtained
with those given In Fig. E14.
121
FRAME.
pe 1
front frame alignment
Fig. E11. Checking the
Fig. E12. Checking the front frame alignment
7 ma] e chers ed em —— il ii
E13
132
Fig. E14. Basic dimensions of the frame assembly
REAR FRAME
The rear frame basically serves to mount the rear
suspension units and twinseat etc, and ic is only
alignment between the top suspension unit support
brackets with those on the swinging fork that is of
most Importance. The best means of checking rear
frame alignment is that of fitting it to the front
frame and taking readings as indicated in the
following paragraph.
E14
FRAME ASSEMBLY
Securely bolt the rear frame to che front frame and
fit the swinging fork so that it can just be rotated
by slight hand pressure. Mount the complete
assembly horizontally on the checking table as
described above, then take height readings at the
swinging fork ends and top and bottom suspension
unit mounting brackets, referring to Fig. E14 for
dimensions. These brackets should not be more
133
|
3
ЕВАМЕ a Е
i 79
Fig. E15, Checking the swinging fork
than — in. (1-5 mm.), out of line otherwise the
suspension units will be working under excessive
stress.
If, when frame alignment Is completed, the amount
of discrepancy is excessive and rectification is
needed, then it is advisable to return the damaged
part to the Service Department of Triumph
Engineering Company. However, in the case of the
swinging fork where the misalignment is not more
than + in. (6 mm.), measured ar the tips of the fork
ends, it may be possible to rectify this by the
following means.
SWINGING FORK
It is required to check that the centre line of the
pivot spindle is in the same plane as the centre line
of the rear spindle. To do this, first place a tube or
bar of suitable diameter Into the swinging fork
bearing bushes, then mount the swinging fork on
two ''Y"' blocks, one either side, and clamp it
lightly to the edge of the checking table. Fit the
rear wheel spindle into the fork end slots or,
alternatively, use a straight bar of similar diameter,
then support a fork end so chat che swinging fork
is approximately horizontal. Height readings should
134
then be taken at both ends cf the wheel spindle to
establish any mis-alignment. (Fig. E15).
Mext, check that the distance between the fork
ends ls as given in “General Data",
lt is now necessary to lever the fork ends in the
correcting direccion until che wheel spindle can be
inserted and found co be parallel with the pivot bush
centre line. To do this, a bar of 4 ft. lengch by 14 ins.
diameter is required. It is now that great саге |5
required. Insert the bar at the end of the swinging
fork adjacent to the suspension unit mounting
brackets so that It is over che high" fork leg
and under the Clow * fork leg. Exert gentle pres-
sure at the end of the bar then insert che spindle
and re-check the alignment. Repeat this procedure
using increased loads until the spindle height
readings shows that the swinging arm is now mis-
aligned in the opposite sense. A small leverage
now applied from the other side will bring the
wheel back to parallel,
Note: Apply the leverage bar as near as possible
to the suspension unit brackets, otherwise the
tubes may become damaged. DO NOT USE THE
FORK ENDS.
E15.
| m
FRAME
SECTION El4
REPAIRS
Repairs covered In this section are simple operations
requiring only a minimum of special tools. The type
of repairs possible with these tools are those such
as small dents to mudguards, panels etc., caused by
flying stones or slight grooves which have not
affected a large area or torn the metal. The tools
required are shown below in Fig. E16.
Fig. E16. Tools used for panel repairs
REMOYAL OF DENTS
To remove small dents a spoon and suitably shaped
dolly block are required. A suitable spoon can be
made from a file by removing the teeth and polishing
the surface then cranking it as shown in Fig. E16.
Flace the dolly block underneath the panel then
hammer the dent(s) carefully with the spoon until
something like the original contour is achleved.
Lightly file the surface to show any high spots
there may be and use the dolly and spoon to remove
them.
Note.—Do not file more than is necessary to show
up the high spots. Care should be taken to keep
filing to a minimum otherwise serious thinning
of the metal will occur,
Where denting has occured without resultant
damage to the paint-work the dent{s) may be
removed whilst the paintwork Is preserved by
E16 -
careful use of a polished spoon and dolly block.
Dents which are comparatively larger may be
removed whilst the paintwork is preserved by
placing a “sandbag” against the outer surface and
hammering the inside of the panel with a suitably
shaped wooden mallet. A “'sandbag'’ can be made
from a piece of 18 in. square leather by folding it
and packing It tightly with sand. Finally, finish off
using a suitable dolly block and polished spoon as
required.
Fig. E17. Removing a/dent with dolly block and spoon
Mote.—lt is not advisable to use a hammer as
hammer-blows tend to stretch the surrounding
metal, giving rise tó further complicacions. Also,
unless the aim is true, damage of a more serious
nature may result.
Where a fuel tank has become damaged the repair
work should only be entrusted to a competent
panel beater, or preferably, return the tank te the
Service Department—Triumph Engineering Com-
pany Ltd.
135
эт сжат ro
PAINT STRIPPING
Except in cases where a ‘touch-up’ is to be
attempted, It is strongly recommended that the
old finish Is completely stripped and the refinish
is carried cut from the bare metal. A suitable
paint stripper can be obtained from most paint
stores and accessory dealers.
The stripper should be applied with a brush and
allowed approximately 10 minutes to react. A
suitable scraper should be used to remove the old
finish, then the surface cleaned with water using
a piece of wire wool. Ensure that all traces of paint
stripper are removed. If possible, blow cut crevices
with compressed air.
It is advisable to strip a small area ata cime to avoid
the stripper drying and also to enable easier
neutralizing of che stripper.
Finally, the surface should be rubbed with a grade
270 or 280 emery cloth to give a satisfactory finish
then washed off with white spirits or a suitable
cleaner solvent,
PRIMING
A thin coat of cellulose primer must be sprayed
onto the surface prior to application of an under-
coat or stopper, Undercoat and stopper will not
adhere satisfactorily to bare metal. It is advisable
to thin the primer by adding 1 part cellulose thinners
to 1 part primer. Ensure that the primer is dry
before advancing further.
APPLYING STOPPER
imperfections and slight dents in the surface may
be filled with stopper, but rubbing down with
“wet and dry” should not be attempted until
the undercoat or surfacer has been applied.
Apply the stopper with a glazing knife in chin layers,
allowing approximately 20 minutes for drying
between each layer. After the last layer, allow
the stopper about 6 hours (or over-night if possible)
to dry. Heavy layers or insufficient drying time will
result in risk of surface cracking.
FRAME E
SECTION EI5
PAINTWORK REFINISHING
136
UNDERCOAT (SURFACER)
Most cellulose undercoats also called surfacers, will
suffice for a base for TRIUMPH finishes, About two
or three coats are required and should be sprayed
on in a thinned condition using 1 part cellulose
thinners to 1 part undercoat. Allow approximately
10 minutes between each coat.
If stopper has been applied the final layer of under-
coat should be sprayed on after smoothing the
surface wich "wet and dry" abrasive as shown
below,
WET AND DRY SANDING
After application of the undercoat, the surface
should be rubbed down with 270 or 280 grade
abrasive paper used wet. An ideal method is to
have a rubber block approximately 3in. x2 in. x1 in.
around which to wrap the emery paper. However,
this is only recommendable for flat surfaces: where
rapid change of sections occur, 2 thin felt pad is
more useful.
The abrasive paper should be allowed to soak In
cold water for at least 15 minutes before use. A
useful tip is to smear the abrasive surface of the
paper with soap prior to rubbing down, This
will |prevent clogging and should at least treble
the useful life of the paper If It is washed choraughly
after each rub-down.
When the surface is smooth enough, wash it thor-
oughly with water and dry off with a clean sponge.
If smoother surface than this is required It can be
given another layer of undercoat and chen the
rubbing down procedure repeated using 320 or
400 grade of paper depending upon conditions.
FINISHING
Before spraying on the finishing coats the surface
must be quite smooth, dry and clean, It is important
that conditions are right when finish spraying is
to be carried out otherwise complications may
occur. Best conditions for outdoor spraying are
those on a dry sunny day without wind. Moisture
in the atmosphere is detrimental to paint spraying.
E17
SECTION FI
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE FRONT WHEEL
Place the machine with the front wheel approxi-
mately six Inches off the ground. First, unscrew
the handlebar front brake adjuster then disconnect
the cable at the actuating lever on the brake plate.
Unscrew the two wheel spindle cap bolts from the
base of each fork leg and remove the wheel.
Reficting the wheel is the reversal of the above
instructions but care should be taken to ensure
that the anchor plate locates correctly over the
peg on the inside of the right fork leg. Tighten the
spindle cap bolts evenly a turn at a time.
SECTION F2
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE REAR WHEEL
First unscrew the rear brake adjuster, then dis-
connect the rear chain. Slacken the bolt at the rear
of the chainguard so that the chainguard can be
swung upwards. Remove the nut securing the rear
brake torque stay to the anchor plate, then slacken
the left and right wheel spindle securing nuts. The
rear wheel is now free to be removed.
To refit the rear wheel first ensure that the spindle
nuts are sufficiently unscrewed then offer the wheel
to the swinging fork. Locate the adjuster caps over
the fork ends then lightly tighten the wheel spindle
nuts. Place the chain around the rear wheel
sprocket and connect up the brake anchor plate
torque stay, Refitting the chain may necessitate
slackening off both the left and right adjusters. It
Is now necessary ta ensure that the front and rear
wheels are aligned. This is shown in Section F4
below. Finally, lock up the two spindle nuts and
ensure the torque stay securing nut is tight.
SECTION F3
REMOYING AND REFITTING THE QUICKLY DETACHABLE REAR WHEEL
The Q.D. wheel Is mounted on three bearings, two
taper roller bearings being situated in the hub and
one ball journal bearing in the brake drum, The
wheel is quickly detachable by the simple method of
splining the hub into the brake drum thereby
eliminating the necessity of removing the rear chain
etc, when required to remove the wheel,
To remove the quickly detachable rear wheel first
unscrew the wheel spindle from the right side of the
machine and drop out the distance piece between
the wheel and the fork end. Pull the wheel clear
of the spline and the brake drum when the wheel can
then be removed.
When replacing the wheel slight variations may be
FZ
139
felt in che fit of the splines at various points. Select
the tightest position and mark with a small spot of
paint on the brake drum and corresponding spot on
the hub te facilitate replacement on future occasions.
In addition there is a rubber ring which is assembled
aver the splines on the wheel and Is in compression
when the spindle Is tight. This ring seals the spline
joint and prevents abrasive wear at the joint. If
it is perished or damaged fit a new ane.
Replacement of the wheel is a reversal of the above
instructions and if the chain adjuster is not altered
it will not be necessary to re-check the rear wheel
alignment. However if this Is necessary full details
are given in Section F4 opposite.
YYHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES _
|
SECTION F4
FRONT AND REAR WHEEL ALIGNMENT
When the rear wheel has bean fitted into the frame and parallel to both battens. Turn the front wheal
it should be aligned correctly by using two straight slightly until this can be seen. Any necessary
edges or “‘battens’’, about 7 feet long. With the adjustments must be made by first slackening the
machine off the stand the battens should be placed rear wheel spindle nuts, then turning the spindle
along-side the wheel, one either side of the machine adjuster nuts as required ensuring that rear chain
and each about four inches from the ground. When adjustment is maintained. Refer to Fig. Fl for
both are touching che rear tyre on both sides of the illustration of correct alignment. Note that the
wheel the front wheel should be midway between arrows indicate the adjustment required.
“wrong” “Correa” Wrong”
A | | 1
LI М IM — mu
| i | |! ‘
il В | 1
|; | | | IT [LE
| HH
il 1
Fig. Fi, Aligning the front and rear wheels
140
MEL
WHEELS, BRAKES' AND TYRES
SECTION F7
RENEWING THE BRAKE LININGS
The old linings can be removed by either drilling
through the rivets with a suitable sized drill (No. 23,
;154 in. dia.) or chiselling the lining off at the
same time shearing through the brass rivet
Drilling is of course preferred and is best undertaken
from the inside of the shoe to remove the peened
over portion of the rivet.
New linings are supplied ready drilled, counter
bared and the correct shape, If no Jig is available
for riveting, a simple method of spreading the
rivet is shown in Fig. F5.
Rivet the linings In the centre holes first, working
towards each end: great care must be taken to
ensure that the rivets are tight and that the linings
do not lift between the rivets. After fitting, all
sharp edges of the lining should be chamfered and
the leading and trailing edges tapered off to the
extent of y In. deep x + in, long.
Fig. F5. Riveting lining onto brake shoe
SECTION F8
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE WHEEL BEARINGS
Access to the wheel bearings differs in front and
rear wheels and therefore each wheel is dealt wich
separately in this section,
FRONT WHEEL
Remove the front wheel from the fork and withdraw
the brake anchor plate from the brake drum.
Unscrew the retainer ring (left hand thread) using
service tool Z76. '
The right bearing can be removed by using the
spindle and driving through from the left hand side.
Withdraw the backing ring and inner retaining
disc. To remove the left bearing, spring out the
circlip and insert the spindle from the right side
driving the bearing out complete with inner and
outer grease retainer plates.
Fully clean all parts in paraffin (kerosene). Clean
and dry the bearings thoroughly. Compressed afr
should be used for drying out the ball races. Test
for end float and inspect the balls and races for any
F&
signs of pitting, If there is any doubt about their
condition, the bearings should be renewed.
To refit the bearings, first insert the left inner
grease retainer, bearing, and outer dust cap using
a liberal amount of grease (see Section AZ). Refit
the spring circlip and insert the shouldered end of
the wheel spindle from the right, using it as a
drift to drive the bearing and grease retainer until
they come up to the circlip. Re-insert the spindle
the opposite way round and re-fir the right hand
grease retainer disc and backing ring. Drive the
right bearing into position well smeared with
grease, then screw in the retalner ring (left hand
thread) until tight.
Finally, tap the spindle from the left to bring the
spindle shoulder up against the right bearing.
Refer to Fig. F6 for correct layout. Reassembly
then continues as the reversal of the above in-
structions.
143
Fig. Fé. Exploded view of front whed!| bearing arrangement
REAR WHEEL (STANDARD)
Remove the rear wheel then unscrew the anchor
plate retainer nut and withdraw the brake anchor
plate assembly. Withdraw the wheel spindle then
Unscrew the slotted screw which serves to lock the
bearing retainer ring. The retainer ring can then
be unscrewed using service tool Z76. So that the
left bearing can, bé removed the central distance
pièce must be displaced to one side to allow a drift
to be located on the inner ring of the left bearing,
To do this, first insert a drift from the left and move
the distance piece to one side so that the grease
retainer shim collapses, as shown in Fig. FB. A
soft metal drift should then be inserted from the
right and the left bearing driven out. When this is
done, withdraw the backing ring, damaged grease
retainer and distance piece then drive out the right
bearing and dust cap using a drift of approximately
1% in. diameter.
Fully clean all parts in paraffin (kerosine) and clean
and dry the bearing thoroughly. Compressed air
should be used for drying out if possible. Test the
end float and inspect the ball races for any signs of
indentation or pitting. If the condition ef the
bearing is In doubt it should be renewed.
The damaged grease retainer shim usually can be
reclaimed for further service by carefully hammer-
ing It flat to restore lts original shape.
To nefit the bearings first drive In the right Inner
grease retainer disc, the bearing and then press on
the outer dust cap ensuring that the bearing and
both cavities are well filled with grease. From the
left, insert the distance piece, grease retainer shim,
backing ring and having packed the bearing with
grease, press it in the hub and bring the distance
plece into line with the spindle. Screw in the
retainer ring and tighten it with service too! Z76
Fig. F7. Exploded view of rear wheel bearing arrangement
144
F7
F WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES —
Finally, tighten the locking screw to ensure that
the bearing retainer ring Is locked in position.
Reassembly then continues as a reversal to the
above instructions, but do not forget to refit the
outer distance piece before assembling the anchor
plate and brake shoe assembly.
Fig. FB. Collapsing the left bearing grease retainer
shim
REAR WHEEL (QUICKLY DETACHABLE)
Remove the wheel from the swinging fork as
described in Section F3 and then unscrew the two
locknuts on the right side of the spindle sleeve and
push the sleeve out of the bearings from the right.
Extract the inner roller races and dust cover. The
outer races are a press fit and should be driven out
from the opposite side with a soft metal drift.
Care should be taken not to damage the bearing
backing rings, and inner grease retaining shims.
Thoroughly clean all parts in paraffin (kerosene)
and fully dry the bearings. Check the roller bearing
surfaces for pitting and pocketing. Renew the bear-
Ings if there is any indication of this.
To reassemble the wheel bearings, first press the
left and right backing rings and grease retainers
Into the wheel hub and then press.the left and right
outer races into the hub. Smear the rollers and
Inner races wich grease (see Section A2) and refic
them to their respective outer races, Offer the
threaded end of the spindle sleeve to the roller
bearings and then fit the right dust excluder cap
with felt washer and left dust excluder cap. (Refer
to Fig. F9).
Refit the right side distance piece and inner and
outer locknuts to the spindle sleeve, then tighten
the inner locknut, slacken it off one flat (1) turn and
lock it in position by tightening the outer locknut.
The sleeve and inner races should then rotate freely
without any *'play" in the rollers being In evidence.
Removal of the brake drum and sprocket assembly
from the swinging fork is achieved by first dis-
connecting the rear chain, torque stay and brake
operating rod, and then unscrewing the large
nut from the spindle sleeve. ,
Remove the brake shoes and anchor plate assembly
as described in Section Fé. To remove the ball
bearing from the brake drum, first press out the
spindle sleeve and then remove the circlip from the
brake drum. The retainer and felt washer can then
be levered out to enable the bearing to be driven
out. Care should be taken го avoid damage to the
inner grease retainer when removing the bearing.
Clean the bearing in paraffin (kerosene) and check
that there is not excessive play or that the race
tracks are not indented or pitted. If in doubt,
renew the bearing.
Reassembly is a reversal of the above procedure
referring to Fig. F9 for order of assembly and Sec-
tion F3 for refitting the wheel to the swinging fork,
Fig. F?. Exploded view of @.D, rear wheal
F8
145
E A,
WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES F
SECTION F9
WHEEL BUILDING
Wheel building, or adjustment to the spokes to
realign the wheel rim should only be undertaken by
a specialist and these notes are for the specialist,
to enable him to follow Triumph practice. The
main point to remember is that all Triumph wheels
are built with the inside spokes on the brake drum
side taking the braking strain. This means the inside
spokes on the drum side are In tension when the
brake is applied in the direction of forward motion.
Yoda 4 MS. STRIP
WITH TAPER AT ONE END
86
Fig. F10. Sketch of wheel building gauge
The front wheel has 40 straight 8/10 gauge butted
spokes and is single cross-laced, whilst the rear
wheel has 40 B10 gauge butted spokes, and is
double cross-laced.
A checking gauge suitable for Triumph wheels can
be made from two pieces of mild steel bar as shown
in Fig. F10 and this should be used to register from
the edge of the hub or brake drum onto the wheel
rim edge giving the relation indicated In the table.
This ensures the correct relation between the hub
and rim centre lines.
Т Е = 7 ESS 7 ee ner
| | Dimensions
Wheel Rim Loca-
PS Lan Inches | m.m.
(Front:
Standard | VWMZ | Drum — 57 — 0-4
Hear:
Standard | WM2 Hub 1% 47-6
WM3 | Hub 12 44-4
QD. | WM2 | Hub | 1% | 27
WM3 Hub $ 277
Table of “Dish Dimensional Settings for
Front and Rear Wheels
SECTION FIO
WHEEL BALANCING
¥Wheel balancing can be achieved by fitting standard
one ounce and half ounce weights which are readily
avallable, as required. All front wheels are balanced
complete with tyre and tube before leaving the
factory and If for any reason the tyre is removed it
should be replaced with the white balancing ‘spot’
level with the valve, If a new tyre is fitted. existing
weights should be removed and the wheel re-
146
balanced, adding weights as necessary until it will
remain in any position at rest. Make sure that the
brake is not binding while the balancing operation
is being carried out.
For normal road use it is not found necessary for the
rear wheel to be balanced in this way,
РУ
es
WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES
SECTION FI!
REMOVING AND REPAIRING TYRES
To remove the tyre first remove the valve cap and
valve core, using the valve cap itself to unscrew the
core. Unscrew the knurled valve securing nut and
then place all parts where they will be free from
dirt and grit. It Is recommended that the cover
beads are lubricated with a little soapy water before
attempting to remove the tyre. The tyre lever
should be dipped in this solution before each
application. First, insert a lever at the valve posi-
tion and whilst carefully pulling on this lever, press
the tyre bead into the well of the rim diametrally
opposite the valve position (see Fig. F11). Insert a
Ia
Fig. Fill. Removing the first bead of the tyre—Lever
inserted close to valve whilst bead is pressed into well
on opposite side of wheel
second lever close to the first and prise the bead
over the rim flange. Remove the first lever and
reinsert a little further round the rim from the
second lever, Continue round the bead in steps of
two to three inches until the bead is completely
away from the rim. Push the valve out of the rim
and then withdraw the inner tube. To completely
remove the tyre first stand the wheel upright and
then insert a lever between the remaining bead
and the rim. The tyre should be easily removed
from the rim as shown In Fig. F12.
F10
a
ML oa a gi E
EL LA Г ñ Г r
1 я 3
a Lh, JH TO TT I RT a on aan OE E (lé,
Fig. F1. Removing the first bead of the tyre, using
two tyre levers
REFITTING THE TYRE
First place the rubber rim band into the well of the
rim and make sure that the rough side of the rubber
band is fitted against the rim and that the band is
central in the well. Replace the valve core and
inflate the inner tube sufficiently to round it out
without stretch, dust it with french chalk and insert
it into the cover with the valve located at the white
“balancing spot’ leaving it protruding outside the
beads for about four inches eicher side of the valve.
At this stage it is advisable to lubricate the beads
and levers with soapy water (see Fig. F113).
Fig. F13. Cover and tube assembled ready for refitting
to the wheel
Squeeze the beads| together at the valve position
to prevent the cube from slipping back inside the
tyre and offer che cover to the rim, as shown in
Fig. F14, at the same time threading the valve
through the valve holes in the rim band and rim.
Allow the first bead to go into the well of the rim
and the other bead to lie above the level of the
rim flange.
147
br
Fig. F14. Refitting the tyre to the wheel. Noté valve
engaged in rim hole
Working from the valve, press the first bead over
the rim flange by hand, moving forward in small
steps and making sure that the part of the bead
already dealt wich, lies in the well of the rim. If
necessary use a tyre lever for the last few inches,
as shown in Fig. F15. During this operation con-
tinually check that the inner tube is not trapped by
the cover bead.
[ 79 A
Mio a TILL
E La hs al Ju
de +
МА LE
Fig. F15. Levering the first bead onto the rim
WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES be
Press the second bead into the well of the rim
diametrally opposite the valve. Insert a lever as
close as possible to the point where the bead passes
over the flange and lever the bead into the flange,
ac the same time pressing the fitted part of the bead
Into the well of the rim. Repeat until the bead is
completely over the flange, finishing at che valve
position (see Fig. F186).
Fig. Fló. Refitting the second bead over the wheel
rim. Care must be taken not to trap inner tube
Push the valve inwards to ensure that the tube
near the valve is not trapped under the bead.
Pull the valve back and inflate the tyre. Check that
the fitting line on the cover is concentric with the
top of the rim flange and that the valve protrudes
squarely through the valve hole. Fit the knurled
rim nut and valve cap. The tyre pressure should
then be set to the figure given In General Data,
SECTION FI2
SECURITY BOLTS
Security bolts are fitted to the rear wheel to prevent
the tyre “creeping on the rim when it is subjected
to excessive acceleration or braking. Such move-
ment would ultimately result in the valve being torn
from the inner tube. There are two security bolts
fitted to the rear wheel, which are equally spaced
148
either side of the valve and thereby do not affect
the balance of the wheel.
Note: The security bolt nuts must nat be aver-
tightened, otherwise excessive distortion may
ESF,
F11
F nn WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES |
Where a security bolt is fitted the basic procedure
for ficting and removing the type is the same, but che
following instruction should be followed :—
(1) Remove the valve cap and core as described.
(2) Unscrew the security bole nut and push the
bolt inside the cover.
(3) Remove the first bead as described.
(4) Remove the security bolt from che rim,
(5) Remove the Inner tube as described.
(6) Remove the second bead and tyre,
For refitting the tyre and Inner tube-—
(1) Fit che rim band.
Fig. F17. Placing the security bolt in position
(2) Fit the first bead to the rim without the inner
tube inside,
(3) Assemble the security bolt into the rim.
putting the nut onta the first few threads (see
Fig. F17).
(4) Partly inflate the inner tube and fit It into the
the tyre.
(3) Fit the second bead but keep the security bolt
pressed well into the tyre, as shown in Fig. F18,
and ensure that the inner tube does not
become trapped at the edges.
(6) Fit the valve stem nut and inflate the tyre,
(7) Bounce the wheel several times at the point
where the security bolt is fitted and then
tighten the security bolt nut.
ii.
Fig. F18. Refitting the second bead with the security
bolt in position
SECTION FI3
TYRE MAINTENANCE
To obtain optimum tyre mileage and to eliminate
Irregular wear on the tyres it is essential that the
recommendations governing tyre pressures and
general maintenance are followed. The following
points are [aid out with this in mind.
(1) Maintain the correct inflation pressure as
shown in ‘General Data‘. Use à pressure
gauge frequently. It is advisable to check
aNd restore tyre pressures at least once per
week. Pressures should always be checked when
tyres are cold and not when they have reached
hormal running temperatures.
(2) When a pillion Passenger or additional load is
carried, the rear tyre pressure should be
Increased appropriately to cater for the extra
load,
F12
(3) Unnecessary rapidaccelerationand fierce braking
should always be avoided. This treatment
invariably results in rapid tyre wear.
(4) Regular checks should be made for flints, nails,
small stones etc, which should be removed
from the tread or they may ultimately penetrate
and damage the casing and puncture the tube.
(3) Tyres and spokes should be kept free of oll,
grease and paraffin. Regular cleaning should be
carried out with a cloth and a little petrol
|gasaline).
(6) If tyres develope irregular wear, this may be
corrected by reversing the tyre to reverse ics
direction of rotation.
(7) If a sidecar is fitted then correct alignment
should be maintained. The method for testing
sidecar allgnment is given in Section Fi4
149
Ex: =
mm DZ FL Fr.
E
WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES
| "п
SECTION FI4
SIDECAR ALIGNMENT
In order that the tyres of a motorcycle and sidecar
combination are not subject to rapid tread wear and
to provide the best steering characteristics they
should be aligned as shown in the diagrams below.
First, align the front and rear wheels of the motor-
cycle as described in Section F4, and then, when it is
ascertained that this alignment is correct, the side-
car wheel should be set using two straight test bars
to the figure given In Fig. F19. Two battens about
6 feet long, 5 inches wide and 1 inch thick with one
edge on each of the boards planed perfectly MEE
and square, would be suitable.
Fig. F19. Aligning the sidecar wheel to the correct
amount of ‘‘toe-in”
With the combination standing on a flat, smooth
floor place one of the long boards about 4 inches
from the floor (i.e. using spacers), alongside the rear
tyre with its straight edge touching the sides of the
tyres. Straighten the front wheel until the board
the sides of the sidecar tyre. Front and rear
dimensions should then be measured, and che side-
car fixings adjusted until the front distance B is
between 3 inch (10 mm.) to 3 inch (20 mm.)
smaller than the rear distance A, This distance is
referred to as the amount of “‘toe-in"".
The motorcycle itself should also “lean out’ and the
method for making this adjustment is shown clearly
in Fig. F20. To do this, attach a plumb line to the
handlebar and measure the distances at the top
and bottom as shown. On the inner side of the
handlebar (i.e. nearer the sidecar) the plumb line
should be approximately 1 inch nearer the wheel
centre line at the bottom than at the top.
is parallel with the sides of the front tyre, an equal D ne)
distance from both sides of che front wheel centre 174
line. Place the other long board also about 4 inches Fig. F20. Setting the amount of “lean-out” by using a
from the floor level with its straight edge touching plumbline
150 F13
F WHEELS, BRAKES AND TYRES
SECTION FI5
WHEEL BEARINGS FOR QUICKLY DETACHABLE REAR WHEEL
All models from engine number DU13375 featuring
a quickly detachable rear wheel are fitted with two
ball races instead of the two.taper roller bearings
used on earlier models (see Fig. F21).
Having removed the wheel from the swinging fork
| as described In Section F3, the wheel hub can then
| be dismantled. Hold the bearing sleeve by the slot
at the tapered end and unscrew the nut on the
right side. Use service tool Z76 (left hand thread)
to unscrew the locking ring and then lift off the
distance piece, felt washer and locating disc, The
bearing sleeve Is a sliding fit and is easily wich-
drawn. In order to remove the right bearing the
central distance plece has to be displaced radially
to allow a drift to be located on the inner ring of
the right bearing. This is done by inserting à drift
| from the right and moving the centre distance piece
radially so that the grease retainer shim collapses.
Then insert a soft metal drift from the left and drive
out the right bearing. Withdraw the backing ring,
damaged grease retainer and distance plece; then
using a drift, drive out the left bearing and with-
draw the other grease retainer. Thoroughly clean
all parts in paraffin (kerosene) and fully dry the
bearings. Inspect the ball races for any signs of
Indentation or pitting and renew if necessary.
On reassembly of the hub, pack the bearings with
grease and fit a new grease retainer; also do not
forget to dip the felt washer in oil. Reassembly is
now carried out in the reverse manner described
above.
The removal of the bearing from the brake drum is:
carried out as described in Section FS.
Fig. Fi. Exploded view of G.D. rear wheel
F14
a
SECTION G
TELESCOPIC FORKS
DESCRIPTION
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE NACELLE TOP COVER (6T)
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE HEADLAMP (TRé AND T120)
REMOVING THE TELESCOPIC FORK UNIT ......
DISMANTLING THE TELESCOPIC FORK
INSPECTION AND REPAIR OF FORK COMPONENTS
RENEWING THE STEERING HEAD RACES
RENEWING THE FRONT FORK OIL SEALS
REASSEMBLING AND REFITTING THE FORK UNIT ...
TELESCOPIC FORK ALIGNMENT
ADJUSTING THE STEERING HEAD RACES
CHANGING THE FRONT FORK MAIN SPRINGS
THE HYDRAULIC DAMPER UNIT...
DISMANTLING AND REASSEMBLING THE TELESCOPIC FORK ...
152
Section
G1
G2
G3
G4
G5
Gé
G7
GB
GP
G10
G11
G12
G13 |
G1
O
DESCRIPTION
The Triumph telescopic hydraulically controlled
front forks requires little attention other than an
occasional check of the external nut and bolts etc.
and the routine oll changes given in Section A1.
Prior to frame number DU 5825 the type of front
fork fitted was that with inside main springs, but
subsequent to this engine number a re-designed
fork was introduced incorporating a modified
hydraulic damping system and having shorter main
springs fitted externally. The capacity differs
between the two types of fork, so that it is essential
that the appropriate quantity of oll is poured Into
each fork leg when an oll change is te be carried out.
TELESCOPIC FORKS
126
Fig. G1. Exploded view of telescopic fork
SECTION GI
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE NACELLE TOP COVER (61)
Disconnect the leads at the battery terminals,
Unscrew and remove the steering damper knob,
Slacken the headlamp securing screw adjacent to the
speedometer dial and lever off the headlamp.
Disconnect the lead from the main bulb, pilot
bulb and dip-switch (four snap connectors) and
disconnect the headlamp earthing lead.
Remove the two adaptor rim securing screws and
square nuts and withdraw the rims. Unscrew the
two front and two rear top cover securing bolts and
unscrew the left and right flash rear mounting
Screws,
Disconnect the front brake cable at the handlebar
and thread it through the nacelle cover. Slacken off
the clutch cable adjuster at the handlebar and lift
the rubber sleeve at the gearbox and remove the
slotted cable adaptor, then disconnect the clutch
cable at the handlebar and thread it through the
nacelle top cover. The nacelle cover can then be
G2
lifted to allow the drive cable and bulbholder to be
disconnected from the speedometer.
Disconnect the ammeter terminal leads and detach
the lighting switch and the ignition switch bakelite
connection plugs) The nacelle top cover is then free
ro be removed.
Refitting the cover is the reversal of the above
instructions but reference must be made to the
relevant wiring diagram in Section H11 to avoid
incorrect connections being made, The blue
brown lead from che battery —ve terminal should
be connected to the ammeter —ve terminal. To
check that the ammeter is correctly connected,
turn the ignition switch to "IGN". The ammeter
needle should deflect to disharge (—). Ifit does nor,
reverse the ammeter terminal connections.
Finally, when the headlamp adaptor rim and light
unit are refitted the head main beam should be set
as described in Section HB Part A,
TELESCOPIC FORKS a G
SECTION G2
REMOVING AND REFITTING THE HEADLAMP (TR6 AND T120)
Disconnect the leads from the battery terminals
then slacken the light unit securing screw at the top
of the headlamp until the light unit is released.
Disconnect the snap connector blocks from the
wiring harness and then thread the dip switch
leads and main harness leads through the grommet
at the rear of the headlamp shell.
To remove the headlamp shell unscrew the left
and right pivot bolts which secure the shell to the
fork covers,
Refitting is the reversal of the above instruction
but reference should be made to the wiring diagram
in Section H11. Finally, set the head lamp main
beam as shown In Section H8 Part À.
Do not tighten the headlamp pivot bolts aver the
torque setting given in “General Data'".
SECTION G3
REMOVING THE TELESCOPIC FORK UNIT
Removal of the front forks is best achieved by
detaching the fork as a unit, removing the top lug
only whilst the stanchions and middle lug assembly
is lowered from the frame,
First, unscrew the small drain plugs at the bottom
of the fork adjacent to the wheel spindle lug and
drain the oil out by pumping the fork up and down
a few times.
Flace a strong wooden box underneath the engine
so that the front wheel is about six inches clear of
the ground, then remove the wheel and mudguard
as shown in Section F1. Detach the nacelle top
unit (or headlamp unit if fitted) and then detach the
throttle cable and air control cable. The handlebar
can be removed by unscrewing the two self locking
nuts which secure the eye bolts underneath the top
lug.
Remove the steering damper plate pivot bolt and
then slacken the top lug pinch bolt and unscrew the
sleeve nut with a suitable tommy bar. Unscrew the
left and right stanchion cap nuts using spanner No,
D220 (14 in. (3-81 cm.) across flats) and withdraw
the two cap-nut-and-guide-tube assemblies.
154
Support the fork and then give the top lug a sharp
tap on the under-side until it is released from the
stanchion locking tapers, The stanchion and middle
lug assembly can then be lowered from the frame
headlug. If care is taken, the top ball race can be
left un-disturbed and the lower race balls collected
when the clearance is sufficient,
ALTERNATIVE METHOD
Alternatively the fork stanchions can be removed
whilst the middle lug, top lug and head races are
left un-disturbed. To facilitate extraction of the
stanchions from the top and middle lugs in this
case service tool Z19 will be required. Remove the
cap nuts, slacken the middle lug pinch bolts and
then unscrew the two small hexagonal headed oil
filler plugs (if fitted) from the stanchion. Screw in
the adaptor plug (219) and drive the stanchion until
it is free to be withdrawn from the middle lug, as
shown in Fig. G2. It should be noted that If the
stanchions are removed this way on the later
models (frame No. DU 5815 onwards) a special
service tool will be required to refit them (see
Section GB Part 2).
G3
| 6)
TELESCOPIC FORKS
SECTION G4
DISMANTLING THE TELESCOPIC FORK
There have been two types of forks fitted to unit
construction models, the earlier of the inside main
spring type and the more recent redesigned outer
main spring type. To avoid confusion between the
two basic types this section is divided into two parts,
with frame number DU 5825 as the change point.
FART 1. FRAME DU 101 TO DU 5824
Remove the front fork as shown in Section G3
then firmly grip the middle lug stem horizontally
in a vice and unscrew the hexagon headed oil
filler plugs and stanchion pinch bolts. Screw service
tool £19 into the stanchion and drive it out of the
middle lug assembly. Alternatively, refit the stan-
chion cap nuts and use a hide mallet. When the
stanchions are removed withdraw the nacelle
bottom covers and collect the two spring sealing
washers. On models fitted with gaiters slacken the
top and bottom gaiter securing clips and withdraw
them.
Removal of the dust excluder sleeve nuts is facili-
tated by spanner D 220 which should be used
when the stanchion and bottom member assembly
is firmly gripped in a vice by means of the wheel
spindle lug. The sleeve nut will be easily unscrewed
when It has been slackened initially by giving the
spanner a sharp knock with a hide or copper mallet,
Withdraw the stanchion, top bush and damping
sleeve from the bottom member, if necessary, by
giving che stanchlon a few sharp pulls to release the
bush. If the stanchion cannot be freed from the
bottom member due to some form of damage,
service tool No, Z127 will be required to extract
the stanchion. The tool should be attached to the
stanchion as shown In Fig. G3 ensuring that maxi-
mum thread engagement of the adapter cap nut is
achieved.
The oil restrictor rod assembly is secured within
the bottom member by means of a hexagonal headed
bolt counter-bored into the wheel spindle lug.
When this bolt is unscrewed the restrictor rod
assembly can be withdrawn.
The bolt is sealed by means of an aluminium washer
which should be removed from the counter bore
and placed in safe keeping.
The bottom fork bearing bush is secured to the
stanchion by means of a special slotted nut. Removal
of this nut is facilitated by spanner D 220.
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Fig. G1. Dismantling the telescopic fork using service
tool Z19. (Fork cavers not illustrated for clarity)
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TELESCOPIC FORKS — G
PART 2. FRAME NO. DU 5825 ONWARDS
Remove the front fork from the frame headlug by
the method shown in Section G3 and then grip the
middle lug stem firmly in a vice and unscrew the
two small hexagon headed oil filler plugs (if fitted)
from the stanchion. Unscrew the two middle lug
pinch bolts, withdraw the bottom nacelle covers,
and remove the top and bottom gaiter securing
clips if fitted.
Screw in service tool 219 or an old cap nut and drive
the stanchions out of the middle lug, When the
stanchions are removed, detach the spring covers,
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thread and should unscrew easily once the nut has
been initially loosened by giving the spanner z sharp
tap with a hide mallet.
Mote: If the hydraulic damping units shown in
Fig. G 14 are fitted, it will be necessary to remove
them before the stanchions can be withdrawn from
the bottom members. To do this, unscrew the
hexagon headed belt which can be seen counter
bored into the wheel spindle lugs.
When the dust excluder nut ls removed, a few
sharp pulls should release the stanchion, bush and
damper sleeve assembly from the bottom member.
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104
Fig. G3. Extracting the stanchion [rom the bottom member using service too! 2127
springs and top and bottom washers, It is advisable
co renew the felt sealing washer when reassembling
the forks.
Removal of the dust excluder sleeve nut is facilitated
by service tool D527 which should be attached to the
sleeve nut whilst the wheel spindle lug is held
firmly in a vice. The sleeve nut has a right hand
156
The restrictor rod securing bolt, the hexagon
headed restrictor securing bolt, seen counter-bored
into the wheel spindle lug, is sealed by means of an
aluminium washer which should be withdrawn
from the counter bore when the bolt is removed
and |placed in storage and refitted on assembly.
G5
G TELESCOPIC FORKS
SECTION G5
INSPECTION AND REPAIR OF FORK COMPONENTS
Telescopic fork components which have received
minor damage may possibly be repaired without
the need of new parts. The stanchions are the most
vulnerable part to damage and correction is often
possible if the damage is within the limits described
below. The top lug and middle lug are malleable
stampings and slight misalignment can be corrected
as described in the paragraphs below. The tools
required in order that a thorough check of the
various alignments can be made are an engineer's
checking table, set square, adjustable calipers and
a height gauge.
(1) Check the stanchions for truth by rolling them
slowly on a flat checking table. A bent stan-
chion may be realigned If the bow does not
exceed E in, maximum, To realign the stan-
chion, a hand press is required. Place the
stanchion on two swage **Y'' blocks at either
endand apply pressure to the raised portion of
the stanchion. By means of alternately pressing
in this way and checking the stanchion on a
flac table the amount of bow can be reduced
until it 1s finally removed,
(2) Inspect the top lug by fitting both stanchions
(if true) with the cap nuts tightened in position
as shown in Fig. G4. Check that the stanchions
are parallel to each other in both planes by
laying the assembly on a checking table and
taking caliper readings as shown. Using a set
square, check that the stanchions are at right
angles to the top lug,
Check the middle lug and stem for alignment
by inserting the stanchions until 64 in.
(16:5 cm.) of the top of the stanchion protrudes
above the top surface of the middle lug as
shown in Fig. G5. Fit and tighten the pinch
bolts in position and then lay the assembly on
the checking table and with calipers check that
the stanchions lie parallel in the middle lug.
G6
Ty
Fig. G4. Checking the top lug for alignment
The stanchions should also be checked for
being parallel in che ocher plane by sighting
along the checking table top. A set square
should be used to check that the stanchions
are at right angles to the middle lug.
The middle lug stamping is malleable and
provided that the lug is not excessively
disorted, it can be trued quite easily, Each
time a distortion correction is carried out
check that the assembly is true in both planes.
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TELESCOPIC FORKS G
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Fig. G5. Checking the stanchions and middle lug for alignment 105
(3) When the stanchions and middle lug assembly
has been trued, the top lug can be used to
check the position of the stem relative to the
middle lug. For this purpose, the distance
between the middle lug and top lug should be
the same on either side and to achieve this the
stanchions should be set in the middle lug ta
the figure given in Fig. Gé. When the top lug
is fitted the stem should be central in the top
lug hole. If it is not a long tube can be placed
over the stem and used to press the stem in the
correcting direction. YYhen this is achieved,
re-check the fork assembly to ensure that the
original alignment has not been adversely
effected.
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Fig. Gé. Showing the correct angle between stanchion and stem centre lines 95
158
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(4)
(6)
GE
Check that the bottom members are not
dented or damaged in any way by inserting
the stanchion and bottom bush assembly
and feeling the amount of clearance of the bush
within the bore of the bottom member. Any
restriction on movement indicates that the
bottom member is damaged and requires
renewing. The wheel spindle lug can be
checked for being at right angles to the bottom
member by machining a one À in, wide groove
in a ++ inch diameter bar and bolting it in
position in the wheel spindle lug. A square may
then be used to check chat the bar 15
perpendicular to the bottom member. If the
degree of error is excessive, no attempt should
be made to realign the wheel spindle lug, the
bottom member should be renewed.
Examine the top and bottom bushes for wear
by measuring the bore diameter of the top bush
and the outside diameter of the bottom bush
and comparing them with the figures given in
General Data. Also, the bushes can be checked
against their respective mating surfaces: put
the top bush over the stanchion and at about
eight inches from the bottom of the stanchion
check the diametral clearance at the bush.
An excessive clearance indicates that the bush
requires renewing, As described above, the
bottom bush can only be checked by fitting it
to the stanchion and Inserting the stanchion
into the bottom member te a depth of about
eight inches whilst the diametral clearance
is estimated from the amount of ‘play’.
Examine the main springs for fatigue and cracks
and check that both springs are of approximate
equal length and within 4 in. (1-3 em.) of the
original length on the earlier long type main
spring, and within + in. of the original length
In the case of the later short main spring. The
figures for the original length are given in
“General Data’,
TELESCOPIC FORKS
ra capsid THT
TA
101
Fig. GT. Checking the bottom member wheel spindle
lug for truth
(7) Inspect the cups and cones for wear in the form
159
of pitting or pocketing. This will appear as a
series of small indentations in the ball tracks
and indicates that both the races and the balls
require renewing.
Thecupsshould beatightinterferencefitintothe
frame headlug, Slackness chere usually Indicates
that the headlug cup seatings are distorted.
The bottom cone should be a tight fit onto the
middle lug stem and the top cone and dust cap
assembly should be a close sliding fit over the
stem. Slackness of the cone on the stem indi-
cates that the steering races have not been In
correct adjustment, In this case, if the new cone
ls not a tight fit over the stem, then either the
stem and middle lug assembly should be re-
newed or in certaín cases a proprietary sealant
may be used to secure the cone in position.
TELESCOPIC FORKS G
SECTION G6
RENEWING THE STEERING HEAD RACES
The cups can be driven cut of che headlug from the
inside by inserting a long narrow drift and locating
it on the inner edge of the cups. When the cups are
removed the bare of the headiug should be cleaned
thoroughly and the new cups driven In by using a
hammer and aluminium drift or a piece of hard wood
interposed to check the blow, Care should be
taken to ensure that the cup enters into the headlug
squarely and that no burrs are set up due to misalign-
ment.
The bottom cone can easily be removed from the
stern by inserting levers on either side and prising
the cone upwards. When it has been removed,
clean the stem and remove any burrs with a fine
grade file before fitting the new cones. To ensure
that the new cone is driven on squarely service
tool number Z24 should be used. To assist in the
assembly of the cone a small amount of grease may
be smeared on the middle lug stem. If the service
tool is not avallable a suitable drift can be made from
a piece of 14; in. (17 em.) inside diameter tube
? Inches long. Note chat when new cups and cones
are fitted, new balls must also be used. The correct
quantity is 40 off { in. diameter balls—20 top race
and 20 bottom race,
SECTION G7
RENEWING THE FRONT FORK OIL SEALS
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Fig. GB. Removing the oil seal from the dust excluder
sleeve assembly using service tool Z137
Removal of the oil seal from the dust excluder
sleeve assembly on the earlier type front fork is
achieved by means of service tool Z137. The dust
excluder nut should be fitted to the holder as shown
in Fig. GB and the drift inserted and used to drive
the sleeve our. This will enable the oil seal to be
driven out in the same direction.
When fitting the new oil seal, ensure chat it is
pressed in with the spring and lip side towards che
threaded end of the bore and press the sleeve in
until it is flush with the rear face of the oll seal.
On the later type front fork the oil seal is pressed
into the dust excluder sleeve nut and is freely
accessible from both sides. The oil seal can be driven
out by inserting a suitable drift and locating it on
the oil seal ar one of the peripheral slots.
The new oil seal should be pressed in with the lip
and spring side facing the threaded end of the sleeve
nut and a check should be made to ensure that ic is
fully and squarely engaged.
С?
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TELESCOPIC FORKS
SECTION G8
REASSEMBLING AND REFITTING THE TELESCOPIC FORK UNIT
To cater for the two basic types of telescopic forks
fitted to Triumph machines this section is divided
into two parts—part one deals with the earlier
type front fork and the second part deals with the
more recent type front fork, the assembly of which
requires service tool Z161,
PART 1. FRAME NO. DU 101 TO DU 5824
First, offer the stanchion and bottom bush assembly
into the bottom member and refit the damper
sleeve and top bush. Offer the dust excluder sleeve
nut and oil seal assembly over the stanchion using
a smear of oll to assist assembly, and then tighten
the sleeve nut in position using spanner D220. With
the stanchion in its lowest position offer the
restrictor rod assembly to the stanchion and refic
the hexagonal restrictor red securing bolt and
aluminium washer until all but a few threads are
engaged In the restrictor rod.
118
Fig. G9. Reassembling the telescopic fork
G10
161
Work the restrictor rod round until the location
slot in its base is level with the location plug hole
then refitting the plug, tighten the restrictor rod
securing bolts. Do not forget that a fibre washer
is fitted under each of the location plugs.
Thoroughly clean the head race cups and cones and
smear the ball tracks with the recommended grease
(see Section Al). Place the ball bearings in the cups
(20 top, 20 bottom) using grease to hold them in
position. Offer the middle lug and stem assembly
to the headlug and lower the top cone and dust
cover assembly into position. Refit the top lug and
sleeve nut, tighten the sleeve nut until all the slack
is taken up. Refit the sleeve nut pinch belt finger
tight and align the middle lug and top lug. Assemble
the left and right bottom nacelle covers to the
middie lug and insert the pinch bolts, but only
screw on the nuts finger tight.
Offer the right stanchion {with brake anchor plate
locating boss fitted) to the middle lug and rotate it
until the oil filler plug hole is accessible to the
headlamp aperture. Force the stanchion upwards
using the bottom member as an impulse driver (see
Fig. 9). When the taper is engaged in the top lug,
temporarily tighten the pinch bolt then repeat the
procedure for the left stanchion. Finally, pour
7 pint (150 c.c.)|of the recommended grade of oll
into each fork leg and then refit the main springs.
Screw in the left and right cap nuts and guide tube
assemblies until several threads are engaged, then
slacken the middle lug pinch bolts and then recurn
to fully tighten the cap nuts using spanner No.
D220. When this is achieved, adjust the steering
head races as described in Section G10 and retighten
the middle lug pinch bolts and sleeve nut pinch bolts
Refit the oil filler plugs (if fitted) not forgetting the
two sealing fibre washers. Reposition the handle-
bar but do not forget to refit the washers and
self-locking nuts where the handlebars are rubber
mounted.
Reassembly then carries on as a reversal of the
removal instructions but reference should be made
to the relevant wiring diagram in Section H11 when
refitting the nacelle unit,
PART 2. FRAME NO. DU 5815 ONWARDS
Assemble the stanchion to the bottom member
and fit the damper sleeve and top bush. Then
screw on the dust excluder sleeve nut and oll seal
assembly having used jointing compound on the
cuter member threads and hold the bottom member
In a vice by means of the wheel spindle lug whilst
the sleeve nut is tightened using service tool D517.
Te refit the oll restrictor rod first slide the rod
down inside the stanchion and then use a piece of
tubing about 2 feet long and 4 in. (1-3 em.) inside
diameter, to grip the restrictor rod whilst several
threads of the hexagon headed securing bolt are
engaged. Do not forget to replace the aluminium
sealing washer which fits over the securing bolt,
Screw in the small location plug and with the tubing
rotate the restrictor rod until the location slot is
aligned with the plug, then tighten the securing
bolt. Do not forget to fit new fibre washers under
each of the two location plugs. When both stan-
chions are assembled in this way, fit the plain thrust
washer, main spring, cover and felt washer over
each stanchion. On models fitted with nacelle type
headlamp there is also a plain steel washer fitted
underneath the felt washer to give additional
clearance. On models fitted with a headlamp unit
the gaiters should be fitted over the springs and
clamped up top and bottom on to the thrust washer
and sleeve nut respectively,
Align the middle lug and top lug and position the
left and right lower nacelle cover and then insert the
middle lug pinch bolt and fit the nuts finger tight.
Offer the right stanchion assembly (with welded
boss for front brake anchor plate location) and
engage as much of the stanchion as possible in the
middle lug. To pull the stanchion up to the top lug,
service tool Z161 is required which should be
inserted into the top lug and the plug adaptor
screwed into the stanchion top, The stanchion can
then be easily drawn up to the required level and
when this is achieved temporarily tighten the pinch
bolt, remove the tool and screw in the cap nut
until several threads are engaged. Repeat this
procedure for the left stanchion assembly and then
remove both cap nuts and pour § pint (190 c.c.) of
the recommended grade of oil (see Section AZ) Into
each fork leg.
TELESCOPIC FORKS
81
Fig. G10. Reassembling the telescopic fork, using
service tool Mo. Ziél
Refit the cap nuts until several threads are engaged
then slacken off the middle lug pinch bolt and fully
tighten the cap nuts. On models with nacelle type
front forks the stanchions will require turning
prior to tightening the cap nuts so that the oil
filler plug holes are accessible through the headlamp
aperture. Yhen this is achleved, adjust the steering
head races as described in Section G10 and then
tighten the sleeve nut pinch bolt and twa middle
lug pinch bolts, to the torque figures given in
“General Data”
Reassembly continues as the reversal of the dis-
mantling procedure, referring to section H11 for
the relevant wiring diagram and Section HE to
set the headlamp main beam,
G11
G TELESCOPIC FO RKS
SECTION G9
TELESCOPIC FORK ALIGNMENT
| To check the frant fork alignment, the front wheel
To facilitate checking the alignment of the tele- and mudguard must be removed and a spare wheel
spindle bolted in position. If a spare wheel spindle
Is not available a suitable bar for this purpose can be
the dimensions of which are shown in Fig. G11. made from mild steel to the dimensions given in
Fig. G12,
scopic fork legs there is available service tool Z103
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Fig. G11. Telescopic fork leg alignment gauge service tool Z103
G12 163
TELESCOPIC FORKS
Hold the alignment gauge firmly against the fork
legs as shown in Fig. G13 and check that the
gauge contacts at all four corners, If the gauge does
not make contact at point A then this indicates
that point B is too far forward. To remedy this,
slacken off the two middle lug pinch bolts and
the stem sleeve nut pinch bolt and give point C a
sharp blow using a hide mallet or a hammer used
in conjunction with a soft metal drift.
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147
Fig. G12. Sketch of wheel spindle tool for use with
service tool Z103
Check the alignment again with the gauge and again
give correcting blows in the above mentioned
manner until the amount of rock at any one corner
does not exceed 3% inch. When this is achieved,
tighten all three pinch bolts and then finally apply
the gauge to check that tightening has not caused
distortion.
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Fig. G13. Checking the telescopic fork leg alignment
with service tool 2103
SECTION GI0
ADJUSTING THE STEERING HEAD RACES
When a new machine has covered the 500 miles
(running-in period) it will be necessary to check
the steering head races for excessive play due to
the balls, cups and cones bedding down.
Also, after long periods, the head races may
require adjusting to compensate for any wear that
may have taken place. The working clearance of the
balls in the tracks of the cups and cones is controlled
by the fork stem sleeve nut which is locked in
position by means of a pinch bolt at the rear of the
top lug. When the pinch bolt is slackened the sleeve
nut can be turned to increase or decrease the head
race working clearance.
Mount the machine with the front wheel clear of the
ground and balance the front fork so that both the
164
front and rear wheels are aligned. When the fork
is tilted to either side of its central position it should
just fall to its full lock position. If the fork will do
this then the head races are not over tight and
conversely to check that they are not too loose,
hold the top lug with the left hand (with the
headlamp unit removed on models fitted with
nacelle type front forks) and held the top portion
of the front mudguard in the right hand and then
attempt to “rock” the fork. If there is any “roek"
in evidence, then tighten the stem sleeve nut
à turn and check again. Continuing this way
until the fork will not rock but will turn from lock
to lock easily. When this is achieved, re-tighten
the stem sleeve nut pinch bolt.
G13
TELESCOPIC FORKS
SECTION Gill
CHANGING THE FRONT FORK MAIN SPRINGS
Removing the main springs on models fitted with the
inside-spring type front fork i.e. frame No. DU101
to DUSB24) necessitates removal of the nacelle
top cover (if fitted) and handlebars. (To change the
mainsprings on the later type telescopic fork (Frame
No. DUS825 onwards) necessitates removal of the
complete fork unit, and for details of this see Section
G4).
First, place a strong box underneath the engine so
that the motorcycle is mounted with the front
wheel off the ground.
Removal of the cap nuts is facilitated by spanner
number 0220. When the cap nut-and-guide-tube
assemblies are removed the mainsprings can be
withdrawn and the new ones fitted.
YYhen the cap nuts are refitted, they must be
fully retightened. If necessary use a piece of tubing
which will increase the leverage to about 12 in. to
finally tighten the nuts. Reassembly then continues
as a reversal of the dismantling procedure.
| Solo | | 30 50 | Unpainted
| Sidecar 37 60 Yellaw
White
* With longer sidecar cuter members
J All models after DU13374
| Solo 264 27 Yellow/Blue
| Sidecar 324 16% Yellow
| Green
The table below shows the spring rates and colour
codes for the purposes designated.
ENGINE No. DUTO to DU5824
| LOAD at
SPRING | FITTED | COLOUR
| RATE |LENGTH| CODE
MODEL |b. fin. lbs,
| 61/1120 Solo 32 BS Black /Green
| 6T/T120
Sidecar* 37 98 | Red/White
TRé& Solo 30 46 | Black/White
TR& Sidecar 37 56 Black [Red
All models DU5825 to DU13374
SECTION GI2
THE HYDRAULIC DAMPING UNIT
Fig. G14 shows an exploded view of the damping
unit which may be fitted to certain types of tele-
scopic front forks. To fit these units, two alternative
stanchion cap nuts are required with a threaded
hole Inte which the top of the damper unit rod
screws. Locknuts are provided to secure the cap
nut to the rod. Note that on a machine fitted with
these damper units, if the rod should become
detached from the cap nut for any reason, it must
be remembered that it will fall back into the stan-
chien. Therefore when fitting the fork to the frame
a check should be made to ensure that the operation
of fitting the damper unit rod to the cap nur has
not been forgotten.
The bottom of the damper unit is secured In the
same way as the restrictor rod on standard machines
(Section GB), ie. by means of a hexagon headed
bolt countersunk into the wheel spindle recess.
G14
165
To dismantle the unit, first grip the body carefully
in a vice, then unscrew the adaptor nut (two flats)
and withdraw the rod assembly. The cap is removed
by unscrewing the locknut from the end of the rod
and withdrawing the sliding fit oil restrictor cup.
When reassembling the damper, ensure that the
pin is in position and when the locknut is tight, use
a centre punch to prevent the nut subsequently
unscrewing.
Ensure that the oll holes in the stem are free from
blockage and refit the rod assembly to the body.
After assembly, test the unit for damping efficiency
by immersing the lower end of the unit into oil and
pumping the centre rod a few times. There should
be little or no resistance on the down stroke anda
good resistance on the up stroke.
Es na
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Fig. G14. Exploded view of telescopic fork internal hydraulic damper unit assembly
SECTION GI3
DISMANTLING AND REASSEMBLING THE TELESCOPIC FORK
From engine No. DU13375 the damper sleeve is damper sleeve is pressed in with the thick end
stepped and when reassembling the fork unit the pointing downwards,
166 G15
167
SECTION H
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
INTRODUCTION
BATTERY INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE
DESCRIPTION ...
(a) DRY CHARGED BATTERIES
(b) ROUTINE MAINTENANCE
COIL IGNITION SYSTEM
DESCRIPTION |
(a) CHECKING THE LOW TENSION CIRCUIT FOR CONTINUITY |
(b) FAULT FINDING IN THE LOW TENSION CIRCUIT
(с) IGNITION COILS .. ZA ah
(9) CONTACT BREAKER ... . |.
(e) CHECKING THE HIGH TENSION CIRCUIT
(N CHECKING THE EMERGENCY STARTING CIRCUIT
SPARKING PLUGS
CHARGING SYSTEM
DESCRIPTION MET I
(a) CHECKING THE D.C. INFUT TO BATTERY
(b) CHECKING THE ALTERNATOR OUTPUT
(<) RECTIFIER MAINTENANCE AND TESTING .
(d) CHECKING THE CHARGING CIRCUIT FOR CONTINUITY
(e) MAKING A 1 OHM LOAD RESISTOR
ZENER DIODE CHARGE CONTROL
A.C. IGNITION (E.T.) AND A.C. LIGHTING SYSTEMS ...
DESCRIPTION e I
(a) A.C. IGNITION
(b) TESTING THE A.C. IGNITION SYSTEM
(c) CHECKING THE A.C. ALTERNATOR OUTPUT
(d) DIRECT LIGHTING SYSTEM A
ELECTRIC HORN
HEADLAMP . cn
DESCRIPTION
BEAM ADJUSTMENTS
TAIL AND STOPLAMP UNIT
FUSES …
WIRING DIAGRAMS .
COIL IGNITION MACHINES (6V)
POLICE 6Y WITH BOOSTER SWITCH
COIL IGNITION MACHINES (12Y)
A.C. IGNITION (E.T.) MACHINES
ALTERNATOR AND STATOR DETAILS (Specifications and Output Figures) ...
ZENER DIODE—CHARGING REGULATOR _. A
PROCEDURE FOR TESTING ON THE MACHINE
168
Hi
Hz
HI
H4
Hs
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H7
HB
H?
H10
Hi1
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H13
Ня
H ВЕ ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
INTRODUCTION
The electrical system is supplied from an alternating
current generator contained in the primary chain-
case and driven from the crankshaft. The generator
output Is selected by the respective positions of the
lighting and ignition switches and is then converted
into direct current by a silicon diode rectifier. The
direct current Is supplied to che 12 ampere/hour
battery equipment on 6 volt machines, or on 12 volt
machines to two 6 volt B ampere/hour batteries
connected in series, with a Zener diode in circuit to
regulate the battery current.
The current is then supplied to the ignition system
which is controlled by a double contact breaker
driven direct from the exhaust camshaft. The
contact breaker feeds two ignition coils, one for
each cylinder.
In case of a discharged battery the emergency
position of the ignition switch supplies output
direct from the generator through one pair of
contacts and one Ignition coil to enable the engine
to be started. As soon as the engine has been
started the ignition switch must be returned to the
normal pasition ar burning of the contact breaker
points will take place.
The routine maintenance needed by the various
components is set out in the following sections. All
electrical components and connections including
the earthing points to the frame of the machine
must be clean and tight.
SECTION HI
BATTERY INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE
DESCRIPTION
Battery models MLYE, MLZ9E and MEJE, MKZ9E
are six volt units and two of the latter type are con-
nected in séries on later 6T models, to give 12 volts.
The battery containers are moulded in translucent
polystyrene through which the acid can be seen.
The tops of the containers are so designed that en
when the covers are in position, the special anti- FMON
spill filler plugs are sealed in a common venting
chamber. Gas from the filler plugs leaves chis
chamber through an elbow-shaped vent pipe union
which can be inserted into one of four alternative
sealed outlets. Polythene tubing may be attached to
the vent pipe union to lead the corrosive fumes
away from any parts of the machine where they
might cause damage.
POSITIVE
PLATES
NEGATIVE _— 11 ,
FLATES jue
SEFARATORS - [7 =
Hi. PARTA. DRY CHARGED BATTERIES
Batrery models ML9YE and MK9E are supplied either
dry and uncharged or filled and charged, while
model MLZYE and MKZ9E are supplied dry-charged.
To prepare one of the above types of battery for orar |.
service, first discard the vent hole sealing tapes and |
then pour into each cell pure dilute sulphuric acid
of appropriate specific gravity to THE COLOURED
LINE. (See table a). Allow the battery to stand
for ac least one hour for the electrolyte to settle
down, thereafter maintain the acid level at the
coloured line by adding distilled water.
130
Fig. H1. Exploded view of battery
HZ 169
— _— E
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM a H
Hi. PART B. ROUTINE MAINTENANCE
Every week examine the level of the electrolyte in
each cell. Lift the battery out of the carrier so that
the coloured filling line can be seen. Add distilled
water until the electrolyte level reaches this line.
Note. On NO account should the MLSE or
MLZYE batteries be topped up to the separator
guard but only to the COLOURED LINE.
With this type of battery, the acid can only be
reached by a miniature hydrometer, which would
indicate the state of charge.
Great care should be taken when carrying out these
operations not to spill any acid or allow a naked
flame near the electrolyte. The mixture of oxygen
and hydrogen given off by a battery on charge, and
to a lesser extent when standing idle, can be
dangerously explosive.
The readings obtained from the battery electrolyte
should be compared with those given in table (a). If
a battery is suspected to be faulty it is advisable to
have it checked by a Lucas Depot or Agent.
(a) SPECIFIC GRAYITY OF ELECTROLYTE
FOR FILLING BATTERIES MLYE, MLZYE,
MKIE AND MKZ9E
U.K. and Climates Tropical Climates
normally below over
40°F (32-2°C) 90% (32-2°C)
| Filling | Fully charged | Filling | Fully charged
1-260 1-280/1-300 | 1:10 1-220/1-240
Every 1,000 miles (1,500 km.) or monthly, or more
regularly In hot climates the battery should be
cleaned as follows, Remove the battery cover and
clean the battery top. Examine the terminals: W
they are corroded scrape them clean and smear
them with a film of petroleum jelly, such as vaseline.
Remove the vent plugs and check that the vent
holes are clear and that the rubber washer fitted
under each plug is in good condition.
(b) MAXIMUM PERMISSABLE ELECTRO-
LYTE TEMPERATURE DURING CHARGE
| | | |
Climates | Climates | Climates
| normally between | frequently above
| Below BO"F | 30-100" F 100“F
(27°C) | (7.3%) | (38°C)
100°F | 110°F | 120°F
(38°C) (43°C) | (49°C)
Motes.
The specific gravity of the electrolyte varies with tne
temperature. For convenlence In comparing specific
gravities, they are always corrected to 60°F., which
is adopted as a reference temperature, The method
of correction is as follows:
For every 5°F. below 60°F. deduct -020 from the
observed reading to obtaln the true specific gravity
at 60°F. For every SF. above 60"%F., add -020 to the
observed reading to obtain the true specific gravity
at 60°F, |
The temperature must be indicated by a thermo-
meter having its bulb actually immersed in the
electrolyte and not the ambient temperature. To
take a temperature reading tilt the battery side-
ways and then insert into the electrolyte.
SECTION H2
COIL IGNITION SYSTEM
DESCRIPTION
The coil ignition system comprises two ignition
coils and a contact breaker fitted in the timing
cover and driven by the exhaust camshaft. The
ignition coils are mounted underneath the petrol
tank one either side of the main tank tube. Access
to the coils is achieved by removing the fuel tank
as shown In Section El. Apart from cleaning the
coils, in between the terminals and checking the
low tension and high tension connections, the coils
will not require any other attention. Testing the
ignition coils is amply covered in H2 Part C below
whilst testing the contact breaker Is described in
H2 Part D.
170
The best method of approach to a faulty ignition
system, Is that of first checking the low tension
circuit for continuity as shown in HZ Part A, and
then following the procedure laid out in H2 Part В
to locate the fault(s).
Fallure to locate a fault In the low tension circuit
Indicates that the high tension circuit or sparking
plugs are faulty, and the procedure detailed in
Н2 Part E must be followed. Before commencing
any of the following tests, however, the contact
breaker and sparking plugs must be cleaned and
adjusted to eliminate this possible source of fault.
H3
h
HZ PART A. CHECKING THE LOW
TENSION CIRCUIT FOR CONTINUITY
Te check whether there is a fault in the low tension
circuit and to locate its position, the following tests
should be carried out:—
Disconnect and remove the fuel tank (Section E1)
removing the white lead which connects the "SW"
terminals of the left and right ignition colls. Then,
with the wiring harness white lead connected to the
SW terminal of the left ignition coil only, turn the
ignition switch to the "IGN" position. Slowly
crank the engine and at the same time observe the
ammeter needle, which should fluctuate between
zero and a slight discharge, as the contacts open
and close respectively.
Disconnect the wiring harness white lead from the
left ignition coll and connect it to the 5.YW. terminal
of the right Ignition coll and then repeat the test.
If the ammeter needle does not fluctuate in the
described way then a fault in the low tension circuit
Is indicated.
First, examine the contact breaker contacts for
pitting, piling or presence of oxidation, oll or dirt
etc. Clean and ensure that the gap ls set correctly
со +014 in.—-016 In. (-35--40 m.m.) as described In
Section B31.
H2 PART B. FAULT FINDING IN THE
LOW TENSION CIRCUIT
To trace a fault in the low tension wiring, turn the
ignition switch to “IGN” positlon and then crank
the engine until both sets of contacts are opened,
or alternatively, place a piece of insulating material
between both sets of contacts whilst the following
test Is carried out.
For this test, it is assumed that the fuel tank is
removed and the wiring is fully connected as shown
in the appropriate wiring diagram, Section H11.
With the ald of a D.C. volt meter and 2 test-prods
(Voltmeter 0-10 volts for 6 volt machines, and 0-15
volts for 12 volt electrical systems), make a point
ta point check along the low tension circuit starting
at the battery and working right through to the
ignition coils, stage by stage, in the following
manner, referring to the relevant wiring diagram
in Section H11.
Note. On 17Y machines it will be necessary to
disconnect the Zener Diode before the test is
carried out. To do this remove the white lead from
the Diode centre terminal.
(1) First, establish that the battery is earthed
correctly by connecting the volt meter across
the battery negative terminal and the machine
frame earth. No voltage reading indicates that
H4
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(8)
171
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
the red earthing lead is faulty {or the fuse
blown, where fitted). Also, a low reading
would Indicate a poor battery earth connection.
Connect the volt meter between the left
ignition coil S,W. terminal and earth and then
the right ignition coil 5.W. terminal and earth.
Mo voltage reading indicates a breakdown
between the battery and the coil $.YY, terminal,
or that the switch connections or ammeter
connections are faulty.
Connect the volt meter between both of the
ammeter terminals in turn and earth. No
reading on the “feed” side Indicates that
either the ammeter is faulty or there is a bad
connection along the brown and blue lead
from the battery, and a reading on the
“battery” side only indicates a faulty ammeter.
Connect the volt meter between Ignition switch
terminal 12A and earth. No reading indicates
that the brown and white lead has faulty
connections. Check for voltage at the brown)
white lead connections at rectifier, ammeter
and lighting switch terminals No's 2 and 10:
Connect the volt meter across ignition switch
Mo. 13 terminal and earth. No reading indicates
that the ignition switch is faulty and should be
replaced. Battery voltage reading at this point
but not at the ignition coil 5.W. terminals
indicates that the white lead has become
“open circuit’’ or become disconnected.
Disconnect the black/white, and black [yellow
leads from the C.B. terminals of each ignition
coil. Connect the volt meter across the
C.B. terminal of the left coil and earth and then
the C.B. terminal of the right coil and earth.
No reading on the voit meter in either case
indicates that the coll primary winding is faulty
and a replacement ignition coil should be fitted.
With both sets of contacts open reconnect the
ignition coil leads and then connect the volt
meter across both sets of contacts in turn. Mo
reading in either case Indicates that there is a
faulty connection or the Internal insulation
has broken down in one of the condensers
(capacitors).
If a capacitor is suspected then a substitution
should be made and a re-test carried out.
Finally, on machines with 12V electrical
systems, reconnect the Zener Diode white
lead and then connect the volt meter between
the Zener Diode centre terminal and earth
(with ignition “ON'"). The volt meter should
read battery volts. Il it does not the Zener
Diode is faulty and a substitution should be made.
DEE
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM H
HI PART С, IGNITION COILS
The ignition coils consist of primary and secondary
windings wound concentrically about a laminated
soft iron core, the secondary winding being next to
the core. The primary winding usually consists of
some 300 turns of enamel covered wire and the
secondary some 17,000-26,000 turns of much finer
wire—also enamel covered. Each layer is paper
insulated from the next in both primary and secon-
dary windings.
To test the Ignition coll on the machine, first ensure
that the low tension circuit is in order as described
in HZ Part Á above then disconnect the high tension
leads from the left and right sparking plugs. Turn
the ignition switch to the “IGN” position and
crank the engine until the contacts (those with the
black [yellow lead from the ignition coil) for the
right cylinder are closed. Flick the contact breaker
lever open a number of times whilst the high tension
lead from the right ignition coil is held about % in.
away from the cylinder head. If the ignition coil is
in good condition astrong spark should be obtained.
if no spark occurs this indicates the Ignition coll to
be faulty.
Fig. HZ. Ignition colls in position on machine
Repeat this test for the left high tension lead and
coil by cranking the engine until che contacts with
the black white lead from the left ignition coil are
closed.
IT
= = a Ь
Before a fault can be attributed to an ignition coll ic
must be ascertained that the high tension cables
are not cracked or showing signs of deterioration,
as this may often be the cause of mis-firing etc. It
should also be checked that the ignition points are
actually making good electrical contact when closed
and that the moving contact is Insulated from earth
(ground) when open. lt is advisable to remove the
ignition coils and test them by the method described
below,
BENCH TESTING AN IGNITION COIL
Connect the ignition coil into the circuit shown in
Fig, H3 and set the adjustable gap to В mm. for
MAG coils and 9 mm. for MA12 types. With the
contact breaker running at 100 r.p.m. and the coli
in good condition, not more than 5% missing should
occur at the spark gap over a period of 15 seconds.
The primary winding can be checked for short-
circuit coils by connecting an chmeter across the
low tension terminals. The reading obtained should
be within the figures quoted below (at 20°C).
Primary Resistance |
Coil e |
Min, | Max,
MAS | 1-8 ohms. 2:4 ohms.
MA12 3-0 ohms. 3-4 ohms. |
| ADJUSTABLE GAP
a AUXILIARY ELECTRODE )
| cae FIBRE
CR BARELISED
FABRIC BLOCK
| IGNITION CONTACT BREAKER |
HT, COIL UNIT =
TERMIMALG 7 — |
| (00000000, || D
SW.OR-VE, | em Caoreve Y Y +}
TERMINAL | TERMINAL =r
d BATTERY
Fig. Hi, Ignition coll test rig
HS
H | ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
HZ PART D. CONTACT BREAKER
Faults occurring at the contact breaker are in the
main due to, incorrect adjustment of the contacts
or the efficiency being impaired by piling, pitting
or oxidation of the contacts due to oil ete. There-
fore, always ensure that the points are clean and
that the gap is adjusted to the correct working
clearance as described in Section B31.
To test for a faulty condenser, first turn the ignition
switch to IGN’ position and then take voltage
readings across each set of contacts with the contacts
open. No reading indicates that the condenser
internal insulation has broken down. Should the
fault be due to a condenser having a reduction in
capacity, indicated by excessive arcing when in use,
and overheating of the contact faces, a check should
be made by substitution.
Particular attention is called to the periodic
lubrication procedure for the contact breaker which
ls given in section A10. When lubricating the parts
ensure that no oil or grease gets onto the contacts,
BLACK & YELLO
39
Fig. H4. Contact breaker and condenser assembly
Ific Is felt that the contacts require surface grinding
then the complete contact breaker unit should
be removed as described In Section B25 and the
moving contacts disconnected by unscrewing the
securing nuts from the condenser terminals,
Grinding is best achieved by using a fine carborun-
dum stone or very fine emery cloth, afterwards
wiping away any trace of dirt or metal dust with a
clean petrol {gasoline} moistened cloth. The con-
tact faces should be slightly domed to ensure point
contact. There is no need to remove the pitting
from the fixed contact. When re-fitting the moving
contacts do not forget to refit the insulating shields
Hé
to the condenser terminals and apply à smear of
grease to the CB. cam and moving contact pivot
post. Lubricate the one felt pad.
H2 PART E. CHECKING THE HIGH
TENSION CIRCUIT
If ignition failure or mis-firing occurs, and the fault
is not in the low tension circuit, then check the
ignition coils as described in Part C. If the colls
prove satisfactory, ensure that the high tension
cables are not the cause of the fault.
If a good spark is avallable at the high tension cable,
then the sparking plug suppressor cap or the
sparking plug itself may be the cause of the fault.
Clean the sparking plug and adjust the électrodes to
the required setting as described in Section H3
below and then re-test the engine for running
performance. If the fault recurs then it is likely
the suppressor caps are faulty and these should be
renewed. |
H2 PART F. CHECKING THE
EMERGENCY STARTING CIRCUIT +
First, ensure that the contact breaker and sparking
plug gap settings are satisfactory and then remove
the contact breaker cover and place a small piece
of insulating card between each set of contacts.
Connect a D.C. voltmeter (0-15Y) with the positive
lead to earth and negative lead to the moving
contact spring of the front set of contacts. A resistor
is noc required for this test.
Turn the ignition [switch to “IGN” posicion. The
voltmeter should indicate battery voltage. Repeat
the test with the voltmeter negative lead connected
to the rear moving contact spring,
Disconnect the green /yellow (green black on 12V
models) lead from the alternator (underneath the
engine) and connect the voltmeter positive to
graen/vellow harness lead (green/black on 12V)
and negative lead to frame. Turn the ignition
switch to "EMG" position. The voltmeter should
indicate battery voltage. If it does not the green!
yellow lead (greenfblack on 12V) to No. 17 ignition
switch terminal, and black/white lead connecting
ignition coll C.B. (+) terminal to ignition switch
terminal Me. 15 should be checked. Reconnect
alternator lead.
Finally, disconnect the battery, and then connect an
A.C. voltmeter (0-15Y) berween the front moving
contact spring and frame. YYith ignition switch
In "EMG" position, {both contacts still insulated
with card) attempt to kickstart the engine. The
A.C. voltmeter should deflect to about 7 to 10 volts.
If it does not, the alternator should be checked as
shown in Section H4 Part B.
173
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM _
Tr
SECTION H3
SPARKING PLUGS
It is recommended that the sparking plugs be
inspected, cleaned and tested every 3,000 miles
(4.800 k.m.) and new ones fitted every 12,000
miles (20,000 k.m.).
То remove the sparking plugs a box spanner (+2 in.
(13-3 m.m.) across flats) should be used and if any
difficulty is encountered a small amount of pene-
trating oil (see lubrication chart Section Al)
should be placed at the base of the sparking plug
and time allowed for penetration. When removing
the sparking plugs identify each plug with the
cylinder from which it was removed so that any
faults revealed on examination can be traced back
to the cylinder concerned.
Due to certain features of engine design the sparking
plugs will probably shew slightly differing deposits
ind colouring characteristics. For this purpose it is
recommended that any adjustments to carburation
etc., which may be carried out to gain the required
colour characteristics should always be referred
to the left cylinder,
Examine both plugs for signs of cil fouling. This
will be indicated by a wer, shiny, black depesit on the
cencral insulator, This Is caused by excessive oil in
the combustion chamber during combustion and
indicates that the piston rings or cylinder bores are
Warn.
Next examine the plugs for signs of petrol (gaso-
line) fouling. This is indicated by a dry, sooty,
black deposit which is usually caused by over-rich
carburation, although ignition system defects such
as a discharged battery, faulty contact breaker, coil
or condenser defects, or a broken or worn out cable
may be additional causes. To rectify this type of
fault the above mentioned items should be checked
with special attention given to carburacion System,
Again, the left plug should be used as the indicator,
The right plug will almost always have a darker
characteristic,
Over-heating of the sparking plug electrodes is
indicated by severely eroded electrodes and a white,
burned or blistered insulator. This type of fault
is Usually caused by weak carburacion, although
plugs which have been operating whilst nor being
screwed down sufficienciy can easily become over-
heated due co hear that is narmally dissipated
through to the cylinder head not having an adequate
174
conducting pach. Over-heating is normally sympto-
"mised by pre-ignitian, shart plug life, and “pinking”
which can ultimately result In piston crown failure.
Unecessary damage can result from over-tightening
the plugs and to achieve a good seal berween the
plug and cylinder head a torque wrench should be
used ta tighten che plugs to the figure quoted in
“General Data”.
Fig. H4. Sparking plug diagnosis
A plug of the correct grade will bear a light flaky
depasit on the outer rim and earth electrode, and
these and the base of the insulator will be light
chocolate brown in colour. A correct choice of
plug is marked A. B shows a plug which appears
bleached, with a deposit Iike cigarette ash: this is
too hot-running” for che performance of che engine
and à cooler-running type should be substicuted.
A plug which has been running too ‘cold’ and has
not reached the self-cleaning temperature is shown
at C. This has oil on the base of the insulator and
electrodes, and should be replaced by a plug thar
will burn off deposits and remave the possibilicy of
à short-cireuit. The plug marked D is heavily
sooted, indicating that the mixture has been too
rich, and a further carburation check should be
made. Ac illustration E is seen a plug which is
complecely worn out and badly in need of raplace-
ment,
To clean the plugs it is preferable to make use of a
properly designed proprietary plug cleaner. The
maker's instructions for using the cleaner should
be followed carefully,
H7
H — me ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
When the plugs have been carefully cleaned,
examine the central Insulators for cracking and the
centre electrode for excessive wear. In such cases
the plugs have completed cheir useful life and new
ones should be ficted,
Finally, before re-fitting the sparking plugs the
electrodes should be adjusted to the correct gap
secting of -020 in. (-5 mm.). Before refitting spark-
ing plugs the threads should be cleaned by means
of a wire brush and à minute amount of graphite
grease smeared onto the threads. This will prevent
any possibility of thread seizure occurring.
If the ignition timing and carburation settings are
correct and the plugs have been correctly fitted,
but over-heating still accurs then it is possible that
carburation is being adversely affected by an air
leak between the arburetter, manifold and the
cylinder head. This possibility must be checked
thoroughly before taking any further accion. When
it Is certain chat none of che above mentioned faules
are che cause of over-heating then the plug type and
grade should be considered.
Normally the type of plugs quoted in ‘“Ganeral
Daca’ are satisfactory for general use of the machine,
but in special isolated cases, conditions may demand
a plug of a different heat range. Advice is readily
available to solve these problems from the plug
manufacturer who should be consulted.
Note —If che machine is of che type fitted with an
air filter or cleaner and this has been removed it
will affect the carburación of the machine and
hence may adversely affect the grade of sparking
plugs fitted,
SECTION H4
CHARGING SYSTEM :
G/W
С
=
| G/B
EMG O i
oFFro4 o— = _
B RW
en IGNITION SWITCH R/ AV
| RED
> OFF — I | | —
Rss vanter В a
“LIGHT SWITCH G/8 ard Ч
—— -
HEAD
__ SB
Fig. HS. Schematic Illustration of 6 volt charging circuit
AT up to engine No. DU.5824
TRé and T120 up to engine No. DU. 14874
175
HS
LL nn
DESCRIPTION
The charging current is supplied by the alcernatar,
but due to the characteristics of altarnacing currene
the battery cannot be charged direct from che
alternator. To convert the alternating current co
direct current a full wave bridge rectifier is con-
nected into the circuit, However, le is nat satis-
factory to have just this arrangement for battery
charging, due to the varying applied load an the
altérnator, 1e. lights, state-of-charge of battery, ecc.
Hence со overcame the problem of variations in
load, che output fram the alternator has to be
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
H
On models with a 12V electrical system and Leaner
Diode charge control, the alternator leads ara
connected differently in cha law JUT-pUL connectian
(ie [lighting switch In OFF" position). The
alternator giver “medium out-pur far cha lighting
switch) in both the ‘“OFF'' and PILOT pasitions,
the four coils B and C being permanently connected
across the rectifier. Switching to “HEAD pasition
connects che twa remaining coils, A. (See Fig. Hé).
Excessive charge is absorbed by che Zaener Diade
which is connected across che battery, To ensure
that back-leakage does not occur, the Zener Diode
is connected ta the bactery, through the ignition
governed to meet requirements. This is achieved by
interconnecting the generating coils and switch
terminals as shown in the diagram below in Fig. HS.
With che lighting switch In "OFF posicion che
coils A and B are shart circuited and flux induced
interacts wich the rotor flux [email protected] minimum
output. With the switch in PILOT position che
‚ 6915 А ап4 В are open circuited and the flux
interaction is thereby reduced causing coil C to give
increased ‘“medium'’ out-put. Vich che swicch in
HEAD position the coils A, 8 and C are connected
in parallel, giving maximum output.
i. ALTERNATOR GW
| A В C |
ЕМС © G/a | G/B
OFFO k — =
IGN IGNITION | ZENER DIODE
SWITCH (GY u —
= TE ё . PILOT | =
LIGHT |
SWITCH (HEAD НН |
BATTERY — |
==
— Fig. Há. Schematic illustration af 12 valt charging <ircuit (4T up to angine Na. DU 24674) - |
176
(2-6Y in series)
139
switch s0 that there is no possibility of the battery
discharging through che Diode. Always ensure
that the ignition switch is in the "OFF" position
whilst the machine is not in use.
To locate a fault in the charging circuit, first check
the charging rata in the three switch position as
shown in Part A. Proceed then to test che alter-
nacor 15 described in Part 8, If che alternator is
satisfactory, the fault must lle in the charging circuit,
hence the rectifier must be checked as given In
Part C and then the wiring and connections as
shown in Part D.
HY
H ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
H4 PART A. CHECKING THE D.C. INPUT
TO BATTERY
For this test the battery must be in good condition
and a good state of charge, therefore before
conducting the test ensure that the battery is up
to the required standard, or alternatively fic a
good replacement battery.
Connect D.C. ammeter (0-15 amp.) in series
between che battery main lead (brown blue) and
battery negative terminal and then start the engine
and run it ar approximately 3,000 r.p.m. (equivalent
to 45 m.p.h. in top gear).
Note.—Ensure chat che ammeter is well insulated
from the surrounding earth points otherwise a
short circuit may occur,
Operate the lighting switch and observe the
ammeter readings, for each position of the switch,
The observed figures should not be less than those
tabulated In Fig. H12 for the particular model. If
the readings are equal to or higher than those given,
then the alternator and charging circuit are sacis-
factory. Ifthe readings are lower than those quoted,
then the alternator must be tested as described in
Part B below.
H4 PART B. CHECKING THE
ALTERNATOR OUTPUT
Disconnect the three alternator output cables
underneath the engine and run the engine at 3,000
r.p.m. (equivalent to 45 m.p.h. in top gear).
Connect an A.C. voltmeter (0-15 volts) with
1 chm load resistor in parallel with each of the
alternator leads in turn as shown in che table,
Fig. Hil, and observe the voltmeter readings. A
suitable 1 ohm load resistor can be made from a
piece of nichrome wire as shown in Section H4
Part E,
From the results obtained, the following deductions
can be made ;—
(1) If the readings are all equal to or higher than
those quoted for the particular model then
the alternator is satisfactory.
(li) A low reading on any group of coils indicates
either that the leads concerned are chafed or
damaged due to rubbing on the chains or that
some turns of the coils are short circuited.
(iD Low readings for all parts of the test Indicates
either that the green/white lead has become
chafed or damaged due to rubbing on the
chains) or that the rotor has become partially
H10
demagnetised. If the latter case applies, check
that this has not been caused by a faulty
rectifier or that the battery is of correct
polarity, and only then fit a new rotor.
(iv) A zero reading for any group of coils indicates
that a coil has become disconnected, is open
circuit, or is earthed.
(v) A reading obtained between any one lead and
earth indicates that coll windings or con-
nections have become earthed.
If any of the above mentioned faules occur, always
check the stator leads for possible chain damage
before attempting repairs or renewing the stator.
It is beyond the scope of this manual to give Instruc-
tion for che repair of faulty stator windings. How-
ever, the winding specification is given in the table,
Fig. H22 for those abliged to attempt repair work.
H4 PART C. RECTIFIER MAINTENANCE
AND TESTING
The silicon bridge rectifier requires no maintenance
beyond checking char che connections are clean and
tight, and that the nut securing the rectifier to the
frame is tight. It should always be kept clean and
dry to ensure good cooling, and spilc oil washed
off immediately with hot water,
Note.—The nuts clamping the rectifier places
together must not be disturbed or slackened in
any way.
¥¥hen tightening the rectifier securing nut, hald
the spanners as shown in Fig. H7, for if the plates
are twisted, che Internal connections will be broken,
Mote that the circles marked on Lhe fixing belt and
nut indicate chat the thread form is § in. U.NL.F.
71
Fig. H7. Refitting the rectifier
177
r- a
TESTING THE RECTIFIER
To test the rectifier, first disconnect the brown/
white lead from the rectifier centre terminal and
insulate the end of the lead to prevent any possibility
of a short circuit occurring, and then connect a D.C.
voltmeter (with 1 ohm load resistor in parallel)
between the rectifier centre terminal and earth.
Disconnect the alternator green [yellow lead (green
black on 12V) and reconnect to rectifier green]
black terminal (green yellow on 12V) by means of
a jumper lead.
Note. Yoltmeter positive terminal to frame
earth (ground) and negative terminal to centre
terminal on rectifier.
Ensure that all the temporary connections are well
insulated to prevent a short circuit occurring then
turn the ignition switch to "IGN" position and
start the engine.
With the engine running at approximately 3,000
r.p.m. (approximately 45 m.p.h. in top gear)
observe the voltmeter readings. The reading ob-
tained should be at least 7-5Y minimum on 12V and
6Y machines.
(i) If the reading is equal to or slightly greater
than that quoted, then the rectifier elements
in the forward direction are satisfactory.
(Ii) If the reading is excessively higher than the
figures given, then check the rectifier earthing
bolt connection. If the connection is good
then a replacement rectifier should be fitted.
(iti) If the reading is lower than the figures
quoted or zero readings are obtained, then the
rectifier or the charging circuit wiring is
faulty and the rectifier should be disconnected
and bench tested so that the fault can be
located.
Note that all of the above conclusions assume that
that alternator A.C. output figures were satis-
factory. Any fault at the alternator will, of course,
reflect on the rectifier test results. Similarly any
fault in the charging circuit wiring may indicate
that the rectifier is faulty, The best method of
locating a fault is to disconnect the rectifier and
bench-test it as shown below:
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM H
Ter = =——
BENCH TESTING THE RECTIFIER
For this test the rectifier should be disconnected
and removed. Before removing the rectifier,
disconnect the leads from the battery terminals to
avoid the possibility of a short circuit occurring.
Connect the rectifier to a 12 volt battery and 1ohm
load resistor, and then connect the D.C. volt-
meter In the V2 position, as shown in Fig. HS.
Mote the battery voltage (should be 12V) and then
connect the voltmeter in V1 position whilst the
following tests are conducted,
= 3
ee al [=
; = | z
[REE] 4 < | | =
>
] = [ = |
E
E <
LAA NAA y
1 OHM RESISTOR
1 140
Fig, HA. Bench testing the rectifier
A [voltmeter in position Y) will measure the volt
drop across the rectifier plate. In position V2 it
will measure the supply voltage to check that it is
the recommended 12 volts on load.
ax 2
tu || 1
я
144.
Fig. H?. Rectifier—showing terminal connections for
bench tests 1 and 2
H11
E
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
TEST 1 CHECKING FORWARD RESISTANCE
— 1 +11 Ei 1
A A
К a” ne Су DAY,
“x Y бек E Чей,
2 у = ^^ 214 # LY 4 + SN 3 % 4
„= == == 4 =a =
2 , 5 у = “Уи к 2 Sly = с
= - = =
A RA “NL > rig ха
Y —|3
x 13 +13
TEST 2 CHECKING BACK LEAKAGE
+11 =I |1 ||
> of A # % avy
«еже E, E 1 E “E
Ш # Le A + 4 E Ne 4 _ A E
2 “vi, » и” a 2 1, % и 2 “el, + 2 % ”
“= чо = TI E A = RE
No’ w RC % #
13 13 = + 3 147
Fig. H10. Rectifier test sequence for checking forward resistance and back leakage
Test 1. With the test leads, make the following
connectings but keep the testing time as short as
possible to avold overheating the rectifier cell:
(a) 1 and ?, (b) 1 and 4, (с) 3 and 4, (d) 3 and 2. Each
reading should not be greater than 2-5 volts with the
battery polarity as shown.
Test 2. Reverse the leads or battery polarity and
repeat Test 1. The readings obtained should not be
more than 1-5 volts below battery voltage (Vy)
(i.e. 10-5 volts minimum.)
If the readings obtained are not within the figures
given, then the rectifier internal connections are
shorting or aged and the rectifier should be
renewed.
H4 PART D. CHECKING THE CHARGING
CIRCUIT FOR CONTINUITY
These three tests utilise the machines’ own battery
to test for continuity or breakdown in the A.C.
section of the charging system.
For this series of tests, the battery must be in a
good state of charge and the ALTERNATOR
LEADS MUST BE DISCONNECTED at the
snap connectors underneath the engine, so that
there Is no possibility of demagnetising the rotor.
(i) First, check that there is voltage at the rectifier
centre terminal by connecting a D.C, volt-
meter, with 1 ohm load resistor in parallel,
between the rectifier centre terminal and
earth (remember (—ve)positive earth
(ground). The voltmeter should read battery
volts. fit does not, there is a faulty connection
in the wiring and tests 1, 3 and 4 in H2 Part B
should be carried out to locate the fault.
H12
179
(il)
(ir)
This test does not apply to machines with 12 voit
systems. Connect the green (yellow lead from
the wiring harness (underneath the engine)
to the rectifier centre terminal lead [brown
white), by means of a jumper lead, and curn
the ignition switch to “IGN” position.
Connect a D.C. voltmeter with load resistor
In parallel between the green/white lead at
the rectifier and earth (frame). With the
lighting switch at “OFF” position, the
voltmeter should read battery volts. If it
does not the leads to ignition switch ter-
minals 16 and 18 should be checked and also
the leads to lighting switch terminals 4 and §
must be checked.
Connect the green/yellow lead (green black
lead for 12 volt system) from the wiring
harness (underneath the engine) to the
rectifier centre terminal, by means of a
jumper lead, as in test (il). Turn the ignition
switch to “IGN” position and che lighting
switch to HEAD position, and connect a D.C.
voltmeter (with 1 ohm resistor in parallel)
between green black lead [green/yellow lead
on 14 volt models) at rectifier and earth. The
voltmeter should read battery voltage. If ir
does not, the leads to ignition switch terminals
16 and 17 should be checked and the leads to
the lighting switch terminals 5 and 7 should
also be checked. With the lighting switch in
Pilot’ position no reading should be obtained
between green/black (green/yellow on 17
volt models) and earth or green/white and
earth at the rectifier.
TERMINAL
H4 PART E. CONSTRUCTING À ONE-
OHM LOAD RESISTOR
The resistor used in the following tests must be
accurate and constructed so that it will not over-
heat otherwise the correct values of current or
voltage will not be obtained.
A suitable resistor can be made from 4 yards
(33 metres) of 18 5.W.G. (-048 in, (i.e. 1-2 m.m.)
dia) NICHROME wire by bending it into two
equal parts and calibrating it as follows :—
(1) Fix a heavy gauge flexible lead to the folded
end of the wire and connect this lead to the
positive terminal of a 6 volt battery.
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM - H
(2) Connect a D.C. voltmeter (0-10Y) across the
battery terminals and an ammeter (0-10 amp)
between the battery negative terminal and
the free ends of the wire resistance, using a
crocodile clip to make the connection,
(3) Move the clip along the wires, making contact
with both wires until the ammeter reading is
numerically equal to the number of volts
shown in the voltmeter. The resistance is then
1 ohm. Cut the wire at this point, twist the
che two ends together and wind the wire on
an asbestos former approximately 2 inches
(5 em.) dia, so that each turn does not contact
che one next to it,
SECTION HS
ZENER DIODE CHARGE CONTROL (12 VOLT MACHINES ONLY)
DESCRIPTION
The Zener Diode output regulating system which
uses four coils of the é-coil alternator connected
permanently across the rectifier, provides auto-
matic control of the charging current. lt will only
operate successfully on a 12 volt system where it is
connected in parallel with the battery as shown in
the wiring diagram (Section H11 Fig. H1%). The
Diode is connected through the ignition switch to
prevent any leakage when the motor cycle is not
in use.
ESS
ae ———
NE
В
L E Y Y E
e e FL
|
||
UT
| [EZ
BLADE
| |
UN
lan
STUD
143
Fig. Hifi. Zener Diode
Assuming the battery is in a low state of charge its
terminal voltage (the same voltage is across the
Diode) will also be low, therefore the maximum
charging current will flow into the battery from the
alternator. At first none of the current is by-passed
by the Diode because of it being non-conducting
EARTHING
due to the low battery terminal volts, However,
as the battery is quickly restored to a full state of
charge, the system voltage rises until at 14 volts
the Zener Diode becomes partially conducting,
thereby providing an alternative path far a small
part of the charging current. Small increases in
battery voltage result in large increases in Zener
canductivity until, at approximately 15 volts about
5 amperes of the alternator output is by-passing the
battery. The battery will continue to receive only
à portion of the alternator output as long as the
system voltage is relatively high.
Depression of the system voltage, due to the use of
headlamp or other lighting equipment, causes the
Zener Diode current to decrease and the balance to
be diverted and consumed by the component in
use.
If the electrical loading Is sufficient to cause the
system voltage to fall to 14 volts, the Zener Diode
will revert to a high resistance state of non-
conductivity and the full generated output wlil go
to meet the demands of che battery,
The Zener Diode is however unable to absorb the
full output of the alternator. It is therefore
necessary co retain some form of charge control
through the lighting switch. This is achieved by
permanently connecting four charging coils across
the rectifier (green/white — green/yellow) and
bringing in the other two coils (green/black) in the
lighting switch head lamp position (Fig. Hé).
H13
H ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
MAINTENANCE
The Zener Diode is mounted on an aluminium heat
sink with an area of approximately 25 square inches.
Providing the Diode and the heat sink are kept
clean, and provided with an adequate airflow, to
ensure maximum efficiency, no maintenance will be
necessary,
SECTION
a
FIXING HOLES
TO SUIT
/
dey
О 1
| nn nt : i
4 DIA FIXING HOLE MATERIAL: 16 5.W.G.
FOR DIODE ALUMINILIAS
OR COPPER
144
Fig. H12. Zener Diode heat sink
H6 N
A.C. IGNITION (E.T.) AND A.C. LIGHTING SYSTEMS
BROWN
STOPLIGHT
250T 2507 BAT 88T
— 00005” TO
|8/W В/У |
Cd Ge
CONTACT
BREAKER
| COIL CONDENSER COIL CONDENSER
° 5 9 | | =p. ©
3ET COIL | = 3ET COIL
| HT.LEAD HT.LEAD
L.CYLINDER R.CYLINDER
| но ©
CUT OUT SWITCH
145
Fig. H13. Schematic illustration of A.C. ignition
(E.T.) system
H14
DESCRIPTION
The A.C. magneto {energy transfer) system con-
sists of two 3 E.T. Ignition coils, a contact breaker
and an alternator specially wound far A.C. ignition
and lighting. There are five leads from the alterna-
tor, two for ignition purposes and three for direct
lighting purposes. The circuit diagram, Fig. 20 in
Section H11 illustrates the stator oil connections.
The main features of the A.C. Ignition system for
twin cylinder machines is that the ignition coil and
contact breaker points are connected In parallel.
In practice this means that when the contacts are
closed the current can flow directly to earth.
When one set of contacts open, the current has to
pass through the ignition coil primary winding to
earth through the second set of contacts which are
arranged to be closed ar the same instant. From
this it can be seen that the availability of a spark ar
either cylinder Is dependent upon both contacts
being clean and adjusted correctly {see Fig, H13).
Another feature is that the ET. system operates on
a rising current in the ignition coil primary winding
and not falling primary current as in the con-
ventional coil ignition system.
18]
Hé PART A. A.C. IGNITION
The accurate and efficient working of the A.C.
ignition system is dependent not only upon the
piston (spark relationship that Is Involved but also
the rotor/stator relationship at the instant of
ignition. The stator is fixed to the left crankcase
and requires no maintenance other than to check
that the leads are not rubbing on either of the chains.
The rotor is located on the crankshaft by means of
a dowe| fitted to the engine sprocket. When the
rotor Is removed care should be taken to refit it
in the appropriate position with the rotor hole
located as shown in the tabel below, In accordance
with ignition timing requirements.
Dowel Ignition Timing Dowel
Location Full-Advanced Remarks
| HEM y BLE Standard
HR 41° B.T.C. Racing |
UM” 39° B.T.C, “Mid"' position
It is beyond the scope of this Manual to advise on
a deviation from the standard setting, as so many
factors are involved. If it is required to alter che
settings from standard, then advice should be
sought from a local Triumph Dealer or the Triumph
Engineering Co. Ltd., Service Department.
The 3 E.T. coil, condensers (capacitors), and high
tension leads must be kept clean and free from dirt
or water. Also, it is Important that the sparking
plug is maintained at the correct gap setting and
that the centre electrode is kept clean.
Fig. H14. A.C. ignition colls fitted on machine
Both sets of contact breaker contacts must be kept
clean and adjusted correctly to the gap setting
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM H
given in General Data, A fault at either set of
contacts will adversely affect the ignition spark at
BOTH cylinders.
Hé PART B. TESTING THE A.C.
IGNITION SYSTEM
First, ensure that the timing, contact breaker and
plug gaps are satisfactory, and then disconnect both
H.T. leads and check that a spark is available by
holding each of the cables about + inches (4 mm.)
from the cylinder head in turn and operate the
kickstarter, A good spark should be produced. If
it is not, then the 3 ET. coil and alternator ignition
supply are suspect,
As it is not possible to test the 3 E.T. colls acéurately
on the machine, the following test procedure
should be adopted,
Two 6 volt external batteries are used for che next
two tests, In conjunction with the A.C, ignition
colls on the machine,
A.C. Ignition coils are not designed to run under
such conditions, overheating occurring in the
primary windings.
Each test should be undertaken in as short a
time as possible, and the batteries connected
in circuit only when actually necessary to run
the test.
(1) Disconnect the five alternator leads under the
engine.
(2) Unplug the black/yellow lead from the con-
denser at the right hand side coil (under the
petrol {gasclene) tank.
(3) Connect the black/yellow lead to the positive
(+ ve) terminal of a (6V) test battery.
(4) Connect che negative (—ve) battery lead to
the condenser terminal.
(5) Unplug the black/white lead from the con-
denser at the left hand side coil (under the
petrol {gasolene) tank),
(6) Connect che black/white lead to the positive
{+ve) terminal of a second (6Y) test battery.
(7)| Connect the negative (—ve) terminal of the
second test battery to the left hand condenser
terminal.
(8) Remove the sparking plug wire from each plug
in turn and with battery wires connected, open
and close the contact breaker points. If the
coils and condensers are satisfactory, a good
spark will jump from the plug lead to earth
(ground).
(9) If a poor spark (or no spark) is noted, check
all wiring connections, and repeat (B) above.
If the system still does not spark, instal new
condensers and repeat (8). If still there is no
spark, check the ignition coils by substitution.
H15
182
H " ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
Hó PART C, CHECKING THE
ALTERNATOR OUTPUT (A.C. Ignition
Models)
To facilitate a check to be made on the alternator
output, a separate ignition circuit must be used as
given In Section H6 Part B above, so that the engine
can be run at 3,000 r.p.m. (approximately 45 m.p.h.
in top gear).
Pay careful regard to the warning given In che
previous section (Hé part B) concerning the possible
overheating of the AC. ignition coil primary
windings.
The preferred alternative method is to use two
MAS Ignition coils, bolted together, with the
machines С.В. leads, BLACK/WHITE, BLACK/
YELLOW connected to the appropriate C.B.
terminals on the test ignition coils. The test coil
5.W. terminals are linked together and fed to a test
battery (—ve) negative terminal and the battery
(+ ve) positive connected to the ignition coils cases.
À Jumper lead is also required between battery
(+ve) positive, and motorcycle frame earth
(ground. The H.T. leads are connected to the
appropriate sparking plugs.
With all five alternator leads disconnected under
the engine start up the engine and run at 3,000 r.p.m.
(equivalent to approximately 45 m.p.h. in top gear),
Connect an A.C. voltmeter (0-10V) with a 1 ohm
resistor in parallel between the pairs of alternator
leads given in table, Fig. H22 Section H12.
(i} If the readings are equal to or higher than the
figures quoted for the particular model, then
the alternator is satisfactory.
(il) A low reading on any group of coils indicates
either that the leads concerned are chafed
through or damaged due to rubbing on the
chains or that some of the coil turns are short
circuired,
(ill) Low readings from all parts of the test indi-
cates a partially demagnetized rotor. In this
case the rotor must be renewed.
Hié
(iv) A zero reading for any group of coils indicates
that a coil has become disconnected and Is
open circuit, In which case the stator should
be replaced.
(Y) A reading obtained between any one stator
lead and earth (ground) indicates that some
coil turns have become earthed (grounded)
to the engine. In this case, brush the stator
with paraffin (kerosene) or petrol (gasoline).
DO NOT LEAVE TO SOAK. Retest on the
machine. If still faulty, replace the stator,
If any fault does occur always check the stator leads
for possible chaln damage before attempting repair
or renewing the stator. It is beyond the scope of
this manual to give instruction for repair of faulty
stator windings. However the winding specification
is given in table, Fig. H22 to provide the required
information for local repair work, should a correct
replacement stator not be immediately available.
Hó PART D DIRECT LIGHTING SYSTEM
The electrical power for the direct lighting system
Is supplied by three of the five alternator leads,
namely the red, brown and brown blue. The leads
are connected as shown in the wiring diagram
(Fig. H20 in Section H11). In order that no one pair
of coils is overloaded, the electrical loads are
connected as shown and no deviation from the
standard arrangement shown should be made.
An apparant loss or reduction of power at any of the
lights may well be due to a high resistance caused
by a loose or faulty connection. In the event ofa
fault occuring, always check the wiring connections,
giving particular attention to the red earth (ground)
lead from che alternator and headlamp. Mote that a
short circuit in the brown stop lamp lead will
result in the ignition system falling, hence the stop
lamp switch connections should be always kept
clean and dry.
In the event of a fault occuring which cannot be
traced to the circuit connections the alternator
should be checked as described in Section Hé,
Part C above.
183
ды с ==, ==
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM H
SECTION H7
ELECTRIC HORN
DESCRIPTION
The horn is of a high frequency single note type and
is operated by direct current from the battery.
(On A.C. models a similar horn specifically designed
for A.C. current is fitted.) The method of operation
Is that of a magnetically operated armature, which
impacts on the cone face, and causes the tone disc
of the horn to vibrate. The magnetic circuit is
made self interupting by contacts which can be
adjusted externally.
If the horn fails to work, check the mounting bolts
etc, and horn connection wiring. Check the battery
for state of charge. A low supply voltage at the
horn will adversely effect horn performance, If
the above checks are made and the fault Is not
remedied, then adjust the horn as follows.
"HORN ADJUSTMENT
When adjusting and testing the horn, do not depress
the horn push for more than a fraction of a second
or the circuit wiring may be overloaded.
A small serrated adjustment screw situated near the
terminals (see Fig. H15), is provided to take up
wear in the internal moving parts of the horn. To
adjust, turn this screw anticlockwise until the
horn just fails to sound, and then turn it back
{clockwise) about one quarter to half a turn.
ADJUSTMENT SCREW
Ш == 147
Fig. H15. Horn adjustment screw
SECTION H8
HEADLAMP
DESCRIPTION
The headlamp is of the sealed beam unit type and
access is gained to the bulb and bulb holder by
withdrawing the rim and beam unit assembly. To
do this on the 6T Thunderbird model, slacken the
screw at the top of the nacelle cover adjacent to
the speedometer and prise off the rim and beam
unit assembly. Slacken the screw at the top of the
headlamp on the TR and T120 to remove the light
unit. The bulb can be removed by first pressing the
cylindrical cap inwards and turning it anticlockwise.
The cap can then be withdrawn and the bulb is free
to be removed.
When fitting a new bulb, note that it locates by
means of a cutaway and projection arrangement,
also note that the cap can only be replaced one way,
the tabs being staggered to prevent incorrect
reassembly. Check the replacement bulb voltage
and wattage specification and type before fitting.
Focusing with this type of beam unit is unnecessary
and there Is no provision for such.
184
BEAM ADJUSTMENTS
The beam must in all cases be adjusted as specified
by local lighting regulations, In the United Kingdom
the Transport Lighting Regulations reads as
follows: —
A lighting system must be arranged so that it can
give a light which is incapable of dazzling any person
standing on the same horizontal plane as the vehicle
at a greater distance than twenty five feet from the
lamp, whose eye level is not less than three feet—
six inches above that plane.
The headlamp must therefore be set so that the
main beam is directed straight ahead and parallel
with the road when the motorcycle is fully loaded.
To achieve this, place the machine on a level road
pointing towards a wall at a distance of 25 feet away,
with a rider and passenger, on the machine, slacken
the two small screws on the adaptor rim at either
side and tilt the beam unit until the beam 1s focused
at approximately twa feet six inches from the base
of the wall. Do not forget that the headlamp should
be on ** full beam" lighting during this operation.
H17
H ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
SECTION H9
TAIL AND STOP LAMP UNIT
Access to the bulbs in the tail and stop lamp unit Is
achleved by unscrewing the two slotted screws
which secure the lens. The bulb is of the double-
filament offset pin type and when a replacement is
carried out, ensure that the bulb is fitted correctly.
Check that the two supply leads are connected
correctly and check the earth (ground) lead to the
bulb holder is in satisfactory condition.
When refitting the lens, do not overtighten the
fixing screws or the lens may fracture as a result.
SECTION HIO
135
Fig. H16. Exploded view of fuseholder assembly
H18
FUSES
The fuse is to be found on the earth lead from the
battery positive terminal on later models. It is
housed in a quickly detachable shell and is of 25
amp fuse rating.
Before following any fault location procedure always
check that the fuse is not the source of the fault.
A new fuse-cartridge should be fitted if there is
any doubt about the old one. …_
A fuse can be fitted to any Triumph coil ignition
model and all that is required is a small proprietary
fuse holder obtainable from most Triumph Dealers.
In all cases the fuse rating must not under any cir-
cumstances be below 25 amp. rating and must be
fitted on the earth lead between earth (ground) and
the battery positive terminal.
185
SECTION HII
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
WIRING DIAGRAMS
STOP
LAMP nr
BROWN o
a+ = с о с
HORN =
PUSH HORM = =
=r —y BROWN/BLACK Ш e
Or /BLUE ]
- on —BROWN/BLUE | | BROWN, BLUE
| LIGHTING (A) ET
GREEN/ BLACK | — SWITCH D+— b VOUT | “|
RECTIFIER | A El AMMETER BATTERY [YT |
D— :
|
Sd | = |
PR ~~] MAIN =
o D 9% | FILAMENT USE
| | | I BLACK |
= * | =
| El | — BLUE HEADLAMP DIP FILAMENT
НЕ | | = — жа. IP SWITCH
E EE UEFA we $
5 |e E В Е | |
| = о E * z |
|= {= Π|=
x x IE a
uu | |g a SPEEDO LIGHT
3 E) | в
| | BROWN/GREEN — В So}
; - - | | | TAIL LAMP
| | BROWN/ GREEN —s—s——de ——
|
| PILOT LIGHT
RED/BLACK |
HQ = $
Burin
ALTERNATOR
I SWITCH 18)
(4)---- ! WHITE
| WHITE 5W- IGNITION
| | BLACK/WHITE cB + | COIL— LEFT
Ele es ee ст, | we] IGNITION |
GREEN, YELLOW wl COIL - RIGHT
== =
р ——- 5NAP CONNECTORS =
——|I' EARTH CONNECTIONS x CONTACT
— === SWITCH CONNECTIONS = BREAKER
149
Fig. H17. Wiring diagram—=Cail ignition 4¥ models
H19
186
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
GREEN, YELLOW
ГОР
mp STOP 5
LAMP LAMP
SWITCH st SWITCH
up +} Chalo OE Ор)
|
HORN =
PLUSH HORM x =
SE — BROWN/BLACK Mm =
Pe = BLUE . seve |]
= in BROWH WHITE |
8 EB (2% a | a. BROWN BLUE |
_ GREEN/ BLACK — 7) 7 AD ее o
2 AZ) wirch {| H— 6 ЧО i
EE | aii | A MME TER BATTERY | Y + |
L3 | 8) ; i |
| В 19 Н =] a
| == НЕ a À BROWN, WHITE To |
| | 11 | М FILAMENT FUSE
| | = | |
| | 1 = sack J ||
| | | BLUE ‚ © HEADL AMP |
= . A | _ С o DIR SWITCH (НР bi
E Q er BLACK 5
E nat us x с, . {I
1 E |= =
= = т
= = | Е
= |= £
i = | SPEECDO LIGHT
a ic | | _BROWH / GREEN о UU ||
- тт A a y TAIL LAME я
ROWN Mi
4 % - BROW] GREEN | —— = IN - il
| = PILOT LIGHT
ES 7 DE I RED/ BLACK | TO — au ШТ
L a —13) : |
LTERNATOR IGNITION
? 139 swirew (В)
- = = .
| | 14) : WHITE
| =} == - a Se
| Br IGNITION
. BLACK / WHITE " COIL — LEFT
= — - = IGNITION
= __GREEN/YELLOW | CON - RIGHT
жити НЕЕ SNAP CONNECTORS
— EARTH CONNECTIONS
—————]]— = SWITCH CONNECTIONS BREAKER
BLACK WHITE
—_) CONTACT
150
Y Police models with boost-switch
18
Fig. H1B. Wiring diagram—Coil ignition
H20
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
BROWN/ WHITE
-50 — BLUE
3
GREEN] YELLOW a per as | |
| Eo = |
—
Peer
o BROWN WHITE | |
_BROWN/WHITE
Lt T STOP
LIGHT
BROWN SWITCH
1} — o— 55 =
HORN HORN 2 |
5 BROWN/BLACK
858 — PRO + Sia
BROWN /BLUE _
BRCM] BLUE | e
1 & МОСТ =
AMMETER | BATTERY
но + >
Gl | +0
| | & VOLT. RE RE
МА! = | BAT TERY |
FILAMENT 5
GREEN/EL ACK .—)_GREEN/BL ACK
метр === === | ——— —" — Ew
BLAC
ONTACT
C
= EAKER
SE ОШИИЕ НЕ CONNECTORS
|| "EARTH CONNECTIONS
SWITCH CONNECTIONS
8
= = | BLUE/RED
£ =
ol du = TAIL) L LIGHT
q | BROWN/GREEN — — qu
= SPEEDO() LIGHT
[] >| BROWN [GREEN © = —
a = PILOT(|LIGHT
5 REY BLACK Fo 0 |
= ; Е _ ZENER DIODE |
Al
— |
z WHITE nn |
— WHITE IGNITION
E Sean | ul EE coi -RiGH
© sworn BF E COIL-RIGHT
@--. O I BLACK
| =| YELLOW
hl
151
Fig. 19. Wiring diagram—Coil ignition 121¥ models with Zener Diode charge control
H21
158
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
BLACK/YELLOW _
CONDENSER
BLACK/WHITE
CONDENSER
mi,
al
сон | =
= | 152
COIL =
STOP LAMP SOE TAC
SWITCH "AMP
m4 3 BROWN —_—r
BLUE
IDENT 1h
| BROWN
BROWN | GREEN
LIGHTING HEADLAMP
BROWN /BLUE pa
1 | “EE 9—e 7
| DIP _
PE | RED SWITCH 3
| HORN
_BROWN/BLUE «= BROWN/BLACK JF
rN
С |.
—— BLACK/YELLOW
CONTACT cor-outl
BUTTON |
BLACK/WHITE
Fig. H20. Wiring diagram—A.C,
ignition (ET. Ignition) models
Hii
PTE SEN
SECTION HI2
ALTERNATOR AND STATOR DETAILS—
SPECIFICATIONS AND OUTPUT FIGURES
—
| | | System . lgnition Alternator Stator
MODELS voltage type type No,
ET 12 Y.
us “wen E = Coil RM.19 47167
TR6SA, T120R, T120C, 6T.U.S.A ó Y,
6T, TRB, 1120 6 Y. Coil КМ.1 9 47164
6T (Police) 6 V. Coil RM19/20 47167
TRé65C, T12OTT Special 6 V. AC IGN RM,19 47188
Fig. H?1. Electrical system details
a "Alternator Qutput ||
D.C. input co battery minimum A.C, volts (@ |
amp. @ 3,000 r.p.m. 3,000 r.p.m. Stator coll details
Srator System a on + er || E (“ES
humber | voltage | og | poe | Head | A | в e pa Us ea
| (Main bear) | | coils | per coil
6 Y, 2-75 2-0 2-0
47162 | 20% | 24" | 15 || 40 | 65 | 85 {| 6 | 140 | m
| 12 W. — | |
| +81 | 3:84 | 18 |
47164 || 6V 27 | 09 | 16 || +5 70 | 95 | 6 122 | 21 |
— - “If eee
47167 6 V. 6:6} 66° | 13-6t 77 11-6 132 | 6 74 19
ЕЦ ee | КН
| | | 2 250 25
47188 6\. | Not applicable 50 | 15 35 | Z| BB 20
| | o
| 1 #8 20
E 3 Sa)
~~
Coil Ignition Machines
A=bGreen/White and Green/Black
B= Green White and Green Yellow
C=Green/White and {
A.C. Ignition Machines
A = Red and Brown Blue
Green/Black
Green! Yellow
B = Black Yellow and Black/White
С = Black/Yellow and Brown
> connected
* Zener in Circuit
+Zener disconnected
“With Boost
Fig. H27. Alternator—Minimum output and stator details
190
Switch in Circuit
H?3
IGN,
LG
H ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
SECTION HI3
ZENER DIODE—CHARGING REGULATOR
| REPRINT FROM JOSEPH LUCAS LTD.
SERVICE BULLETIN SB/RG/28
(Procedure for Testing on the Machine)
The test procedure given below can be used when
it Is required to check the performance of the
Zener Diode type £D/15 (supplied for 12-voit
originally equipped and 12-volt converted motor-
cycles), whilst Ir is in position on the machine,
Good quality moving coil meters should be used
when testing. The voltmeter should have a scale
0-18, and che ammeter 0-5 amps min. The test
procedure is as follows :-
(A) Disconnect the cable from the zener diode and
connect ammeter (in series) between the diode
Lucar terminal and cable previously discon-
nected, The ammeter red or positive lead
must connect to the diode Lucar terminal.
i
(B) Connect voltmeter across zener diode and
heat sink. The red or positive lead must con-
nect to the heat sink which Is earthed to the
frame of the machine by its fixing bolts and a
separate earth lead. The black lead connects
to the zener Lucar terminal.
(C) Start the engine, ensure that all lights are off,
and gradually increase engine speed while at
the same time ebserving both meters :—
(i) the series connected ammeter must indicate
zero amps, up to 13-0 volts, which will be
indicated on the shunt connected voltmeter
as engine speed is slowly Increased.
(il) Increase engine speed still further, until zener
current indicated on ammeter is 1-0 amp. At
this value the zener voltage should be 13-5
volts to 15-3) volts.
(Hi) disconnect the battery while the engine is run-
ning, and slowly increase engine speed until
zener current Indicated on the ammeter is 5:0
amps. At this value the voltmeter should
indicate a zener voltage of 12:0 to 15-0 volts.
Note.—Test (ii) should be carried out as quickly
as possible to avold overheating the zener diode.
TEST CONCLUSIONS :—
If the ammeter in test (i) registers any current at all
before the voltmeter indicates 13-0 volts, then a
replacement zener diode must be fitted.
If test (i) is satisfactory but in test (ii) a higher
voltage than that stated Is registered on the volt-
meter, before the ammeter indicates 1-0 amp, then
a replacement zener diode must be fitted,
If in test (ili) the zener diode does not pass 5-0 amps
within the stated voltage limits it should be re-
placed.
191
SECTION |
WORKSHOP SERVICE TOOLS
INTRODUCTION
This section of the Workshop Manual illustrates pictorially the workshop service tools that are available
for carrying out che major dismantling and re-assembly operations on the UNIT CONSTRUCTION 650 ce,
Triumph Motorcycle.
The section Is divided into sub-sections relating to the main section headings In this manual, illuscracing
those tools mentioned and used in the appropriate section text,
Section
ENGINE... m ... ... ... = ны. i» _ _ = Se in ... Ai
TRANSMISSION i” ui = E e. я E ДИ oa E in pe Ed
EEARBETN wr ae E A e” SO won Bass me me = WL mE MN
WHEELS La = ЕЕ = Ни = +. A e НА ... -.. Je
FRONT FORKS a i. _ "e e. e. . |. _ = НЕ 2. 4B
MOTORCYCLE TOOLKIT eae "e ... i. = Cree “ = а ... dE
197 Л
J 3 " SERVICE TOOLS
SECTION | |
ENGINE
223. Tappet guide block punch
103,2
Zié. Valve guide punch
103/3/4
I55. Left side reamer, camshaft bushes
L586, Arbor for left side reamer, camshaft bushes
L50. Spherical form blending cutter
Z54. Arbor and Pilot
2117. 45° valve seat cutter
Also illustrating a popular type valve holder Z6%. Die holder
12
193
SERVICE TOOLS _ i J
ENGINE (CONTINUED) J1
Fn
103,7 (m!
Mr
Z79. Crankshaft pinion punch and guide Ш
26/7
Z144. Replacer adaptor
{Used with Z8#)
L145. Extractor adaptor
{Used with Z89)
a
—
26/5
289. Camshaft pinion remever and replacer
13
194
16
Mem
— SERVICE TOOLS |
SECTION J4
WHEELS
SECTION 5
FRONT FORKS
г
4. Drift for fork crown and ste botte
=
Z103. Front fark alignment jauge
197
~~
лы
A
| Mm
| ED
<
IM
rm
|
O
O
Е
|
ms
158
Fork sleeve nut spanner (1964 models onwards)
153
D110. Fork sleeve nut and stanchion cap nut spanner
- — = - _ = = = =]
100
2127. Toal for extracting fork stanchion from bottom member
67)
L137. Punch and
holder for removing
earlier type oil seal
Z161. Impulse tool for assembling later type forks.
17
196
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
for
Workshop Use
SERVICE TIPS
- GEAR RATIO CHARTS
TECHNICAL DATA
TUNING INFORMATION
CAM TIMING
COMPETITION TIPS
_B' RANGE - TUNING PROCEDURES
CARBURETOR SETTINGS ET TR6 T120 T120C
Type (Amal Monobloc} 376 376 (2)376 (2)389
Venturi Size 1-1/14" 11/16" 1-1/16" 1-3/16"
Main Jet 300 300 270 310
Needle Jet .106 ‚ 106 . 106 „106
Needle | UE EE ME GN
Needle Position Center Center Center Center
Throttle Valve 376/4 376/3-1/2 376/3-1/2 389/3.1/?
Pilot Jet 25 25 25 30
NOTE: Increase Main Jet size when "Jomo Cams" are fitted to Engine!
TIMING 'B' RANGE ENGINES
REMOVING THE C/B ASSEMBLY AND OIL PUMP: The Ignition Contact Breaker
13 located in the Timing Cover and is driven by the Exhaust Camshaft. The Con-
tact Breaker Cam is attached to the Exhaust Camshaft by means of an Internal
Taper in the Exhaust Camshaft and secured by a Center Bolt. TO RELEASE THE
CONTACT BREAKER ASSEMBLY, remove the Cent er Bolt, and screw in the
Extractor Tool (D484). An Extractor Tool may be made in your shop by using
(5/16" x 24) Bolt (1-1/4" Long) and drillinga 7/32" hole in the center of the
Threaded End, 5/8" deep. Cuta piece of (3/16") Clutch Rod, 2.3/4" long and fit
into Center Hole.,. This completes your 'B' Range Extractor Tool.
TO REMOVE THE OIL PUMP: After the Contact Breaker is loose in the Taper,
the Timing Cover may be removed. Be careful not to disturb the two wires
attached to the C/B Assembly as the Oil Pump is being removed!
REMOVING THE CONTACT POINTS & CONDENSERS: Remove the two long
hex Sleeve Nuts which secure the Contact Breaker Plate. The Plate may now
be removed, complete with the Contact Points and Condensers for easy mainte-
nance.
IGNITION TIMING: Set C/B Base Plate at Center of Slots... Tighten the two
hex Sleeve Nuts...Rotate Crankshaft forward until the right hand Piston is
nearing top dead center and both Valves are closed. ..Set the Piston accurately
to the figure shown for the Model (@ Degrees or Inches B.T.C.)... Turn C/B
Cam in Clockwise Rotation, holding C/B Cam in full advance position, until
rear contacts just open. . Tighten Center Bolt,
BEFORE FINAL IGNITION TIMING, set rear contact gap at .,014"...Mark
the C/B Cam and rotate Engine forward till front Contacts are open and the
mark on the C/B Cam is in the same relative location. ..Set front Contacts
at -014"... This will insure the proper gap on each set of Contacts.
Page B-6
FINAL TIMING: Again rotate crankshaft forward until the right hand piston
ls at the proper location before tap dead center, ..loosen the two hex Sleeve
nuts...hold C/B cam in advance position and rotate C/B base plate for
desired timing... tighten hex sleeve nuts.
ON BATTERY IGNITION MODELS with ignition switch in on" position,
the opening of the C/B points will be shown by the ammeter needle return-
ing to zero.
WHEN TIMED ON THE RIGHT HAND CYLINDER and the Tear contact
breaker points with the black and yellow lead to the rear condenser. .
the black and yellow lead from the harness must be connected to the
right hand ignition coil,
TIMING THE CAMS FOR COMPETITION: This job is best accomplished
with the cylinder head removed. Attach degree wheel to drive sida crank-
shaft...locate top dead center and set pointer at 09 (tap) on degree wheel
- set dial indicator to take readings directly from right inlet tappet and
short push rod... zero indicator with cam rotated to heal position. .. YOU
ARE NOW READY TC TIME CAMS! -
ROTATE ENGINE TQ DESIRED DEGREE READING Before top dead center
...Rotate cam In clockwise direction until dial indicator reads . 020", ..select
proper keyway and install cam wheel on inlet cam, maintaining proper degree
reading for inlet opening @ . 020" on dial indicator... check inlet closing
@ .020" on dial indicator... set dial indicator on Tight exhaust tappet...
rotate engine until piston is in the proper location before bottom center...
repeat procedure in setting exhaust cam... NOTE: When cams are in proper
location with pistons on top dead center, camshaft keyways should both be
pointing towards the center of the pinion gear...if they do not, the cams are
not timed at the proper degree wheel reading, or they are 180“ out of time!
If high-lift cams have been installed, be sure that the top collar does not
strike the guide, and the valve clears the piston domes!
EXHAUST PIPES FOR COMPETITION
The diameter, length and shape of an exhaust pipe is very critical for maxi-
mum performance. These dimensions also go "hand-in-hand" with the
induction system, carburetors, valve size, bore and stroke, compression
ratio, R. P.M. s, torque and desired horsepower range. Therefore, it is
not possible to list an exhaust system for every type of application.
THE FOLLOWING EXHAUST SYSTEMS ARE RECOMMENDED to give the
‘best all around performance. A
Ist Choice: 1-1/2" diameter pipe... 32-1/2" to 33-1/2" long {measured
inside pipe at inside bend)... fitted with standard Triumph
inverted cone megaphones {open megaphone not recommended)
End Choice: 1-1/2" diameter pipe... 32-1/2" to 33-1/2" long... fitted with
1-3/4" diameter extensions, 14" in length.
3rd Choice: 1-3/4" diameter pipe... 27-1/2" long. .. no megaphone or
extension,
NOTE: Shorter or longer exhaust pipes will change torque range and
carburetor settings. A loss of R.P, M, s will also be noted,
Porra A 7
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