How to use
and care for your
PAGE
Parts Indentification
Principle Parts
Accessories
Installing Machine Head onto portable case
or cabinet and Connecting Machine
7
Selection of Needles and Threads
Needle-Th read-Fabric-Stitching Guide
Changing Needle
Changing Needle Plate
Selection of Presser Foot
Winding Bobbin
Upper Threading
Threading Bobbin Case
Placing Bobbin Case in Shuttle
8
9
10
10
11
12
13
14
14
Selection of Stitch
Stitch Length Control
Reverse Button
Stitch Width Control
Relating Stitch Length to Stitch Width
Stretch Stitch Control Ring
Stitch Pattern Selector
Automatic Reverse Stitch Tuner
Controls
Adjusting Thread Tensions
Adjusting Pressure on Fabric and Feed Dog Height
Sewing Light
4
6
15
15
16
16
17
17
18
18
19
20
I
Preparing to Sew
Guiding Fabric
Turning Corners
Curved Seams
Sewing Across Heavy Seams
Removing the Work
•
Straight Stitch
Seams
Basting/Topstitching
Darning
Cording/Sewing on Zipper
Quilting
Zigzag Stitch
Overcasting
2
21
21
21
22
22
22
23
23
23
24
24
25
Sewing Knits
Sewing on Buttons
With a Thread Shank
Satin Stitching
Built-in Embroidery and Utility Stitches
Twin Needle Sewing
Freehand Monogramming
Applique/Patching
Gathering Over a Cord
Lace Application
Flutter Hem
Sewing Tips
Shaping Dart in Interfacings
Multiple Zigzag Stitch
Buttonholes
Preparation
Built-In Buttonhole
Corded Buttonhole
Blind Hem Stitch
Straight Stretch Stitch
Topstitching
Ultra-Stretch Stitch
Rick-Rack Stretch
Pine-Leaf Stretch
Special Ultra-Stretches
Elastic Application
Overlock Application
PAGE
25
25
26
26
27
27
28
28
29
29
29
30
30
30
.
Oiling Machine
Cleaning and Oiling Shuttle Area
Adjusting Bobbin Winder
Adjusting and Changing Motor Belt
Problem and Remedies
31
32
33
34
35
35
35
35
36
37
38
39
40
40
41
3
IiG
)ENTI FICATION
,E PARTS
FRONT VIEW
7
8
V
-9
10
11
20
2!
i
is”
F
12
1,
BACK VIEW
24
22 23
a
•
I
1. Take-up
2.
3.
4.
5.
Pressure Control
Top Thread Guides
Stitch Pattern Selector
Stretch Stitch Control
6. Stitch Width Control
7. Stretch Stitch Pattern
Marking
8. Bobbin Winder
9. Hand Wheel
10. Stitch Length Control
11. Reverse Button
12. Feed Dog Height
Control
13. Needle Plate
14. Presser Foot
15. Feed Dog
16. Slide Plate
17. Check Spring
18. Light Switch
19. Face Plate
20.
21.
22.
23.
Tension Dial
Needle Clamp
Spool Pins
Automatic Reverse
Stitch Tuner
24. Bobbin Winder
Tension Disc
25, Presser Foot Lever
26. Thread Cutter
27. Thumb Screw
28. Head Hinge Holes
29. Clutch-nut
Allways at its highest position when beginning or end
ing sewing.
For regulating the pressure on fabric.
For leading thread to Tension Control for sewing.
For selecting the stitch pattern and buttonholing steps.
For changing ordinary stitch to triple back-and forth
stitch (stretch stitch).
For setting stitch width.
Cross-reference by number betweeR ordinary stitch
patterns and stretch stitch patterns performed with
stretch stitch control ring at “SS”.
For winding thread on bobbin.
For the control of the up and down movement of the
needle.
For selecting stitch length between no feeding and max
to about 6 stitches per inch.
For easy backtacking to lock thread ends by pushing the
button.
For regulating feed dog height for various materials and
types of sewing.
With guide lines for sewing accuracy.
For holding fabric when sewing.
Diamond point to move fabric accurately.
For opening an access to bobbin and bobbin case.
For automatic precise adjustment of flow of upper
thread.
For turning on or off the light inside face cover.
Hinge-open type for replacement of light bulb and
oiling.
For regulating the amount of tension on upper thread.
For holding needle in place in the slot of needle bar.
For holding spools, preventing over-spin of spools.
For adjustments for the buttonhole reverse stitch den
sity and the evenness óf the back-and-forth stitch lengths
of stretch stitch.
For providing proper tension on thread when bobbin
winding.
For lifting or lowering presser bar and presser foot.
For convenience to cut both upper and lower threads
after sewing.
For tightening presser foot in place on presser bar.
For installation of machine head onto portable case or
cabinet.
For the releasing movement of the needle bar in order
to wind bobbin.
5
It
ACCESSOR I ES
Your new sewing machine comes equipped
with the following set of accessori
es to
make your sewing easier
METAL BOBBINS
For straight stitch
ing on very sheer
soft or very light
weight stretchy ma
terials where extra
control is needed.
For your spare bob
bins wound with
various color threads.
-
A PACK OF NEEDLES
For spares Regular
assortment of sizes
#11, #14 and #16
regular needles and
size #11 ball point
needle.
SPOOL CUSHIONS
BUTTON FOOT
I
For holding buttons
in place for stitch
ing.
BUTTONHOLE FOOT
Place two felt Spool
Cushions on spool
pins
to
reduce
sound of spool spinfling.
0
SCREW DRIVERS
QUILTING GUIDE
Small one for use on
bobbin thread ten
sion
adjustment.
Large one for use on
screw, needle
I
I
Helps make parallel
rows of stitching.
OILER
CORDING AND ZIPPER FOOT
Containing machine
oil, use as oiler.
s.;
CLOTH GUIDE WITH SCREW
Aid
in
creating
straight seams.
6
Use for buttonhol
ing. Do not use
when normal sew
ing.
4
For stitching very
close to the edge
of a cord or zipper.
.I.
TWIN NEEDLE
For twin parallel
sewing.
INSTALLING MACHINE HEAD ONTO PORTABLE CASE
OR CABINET-AND CONNECTING MACHINE
Loosen both head hinge set screws
on the back of machine bed plate
until head hinge holes are clear.
Tilt head hinge pins up and back
as far as they will go.
Carefully slip machine head onto
hinges
making sure the head
hinge pins are inserted as far as
they can go into head hinge holes.
—
Allow machine head to rest in its
tilted back position.
Tighten both set screws securely
with screwdriver.
Plug electrical leads from machine
head into sockets located inside
cabinet or portable case. Cord
identified with “motor” tag must
be plugged into socket marked
“motor”. Untagged cord goes to
“light” socket.
Insert plug into a wall outlet of
110—115 Volts.
SELECTION OF NEEDLES AND THREADS
The needle nd thread you choose depends
upon the fabric you are stitching. The correct
selection of needle and thread is very important
to avoid damaging the fabrics of light weight,
or tightly woven fabrics, and to prevent skip
ped stitches when sewing on very sheer or
stretchy fabrics or needle breakage when stitch
ing heavy or stiff fabrics. For best results, sewing
machine needles should be replaced when they
become even slightly dull or bent or at the com
pletion of every other garment.
A regular needle is suggested for use with
woven fabrics. Needles, style 15 x 1, of the
range in size from 8 to 20 are used on this
machine. The lower number indicates the finer
needle. The most commonly used sizes are 11
and 14.
U
U
REGULAR
SHARP NEEDLE
A ball point needle is recommended for use
with tricots, jerseys, lingeries and power nets.
Unlike sharp pointed needles, which pierce
fibers of knit fabrics destroying elasticity,the
ball point needle slips between fibers without
damage to fabric and skipped stitches.
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I
A wedge point needle is recommended for use
with leather and leather-look vinyls. A wedge
cutting point pierces leather more easily than
ordinary sewing machine needles, resulting in
more satisfactory stitching.
a
Although it is recommended to use a ball point
needle for knit fabrics, when sewing on very
stretchy fabrics of knits,the placement of a thin
paper below the fabric and the use of a finer
needle are suggested to prevent skip stitches.
Always use the same type and size of thread
in both needle and bobbin.
Use good
quality thread without knots for best stitches.
8
WEDGE POINT
NEEDLE
J
BALL POINT
NEEDLE
NEEDLE
—
THREAD
FABRIC
—
Extremely heavy
tarpaulin, sacking,
canvas, duck, etc.
18
Heavy upholstery
fabric, ticking,
denim, leatherette.
—
STITCHING
GUIDE
6
to
8
Heavy Duty
18
8
to
10
Heavy Duty
Medium heavy drapery
fabric, velveteen,
suiting, felt, terry, etc.
16
10
to
12
Heavy Duty
Medium broadcloth,
percale, gingham, linen,
chintz, taffeta, sheer
wool, shantung, etc.
14
12
to
14
50
0
Sheer voile, lawn,
dimity, crepe,
handkerchief linen,
Plastic film, etc.
11
14
to
16
(plastic film)
8 to 10
50
0
Very sheer chiffon,
batiste, lace, organdy,
nylon net, marquisette, etc.
9
16
to
20
60
0
-
CHANGING NEEDLE
y
Always change the needle after ever
on
other garment especially when sewing
dull
polyester and nylon fabrics which
are
needles much faster. When needles
your
both
age
dam
,
they
bent
or
dull
fabric and the machine. A general rule
is
when placing sewing machine needles
d
place
is
le
need
the
of
that the flat side
to the back of the machine, when the
If the
bobbin is put in from the front.
hes
needle is inserted incorrectly, the stitc
.
will not form
To change the needle
1. Raise the needle bar to its highest
position by turning the hand wheel
toward you.
2. Loosen needle clamp to remove the
needle.
3. Place needle (flat side to the back and
long groove, to the front)in the needle
clamp and push it upward as far as it
will go, tighten needle clamp.
4. After changing the needle, make one
complete turn of the hand wheel by
hand to be sure the needle is clearing
the needle plate.
1
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TIGHTEN
NEEDLE
LOOSEN
F LAT
SIDE TO
THE 84CM
CHANGING NEEDLE PLATE
le
Although an all-purpose utility need
for
ine,
mach
your
on
fixed
is
plate
or
straight sewing on fine fabric or soft
very stretchy fabric, you may want to use
ther
the straight stitch needle plate toge
of
with the straight stitch foot, both
box.
ssory
acce
your
in
ded
which are inclu
To change the needle plate, simply slide
ible.
the slide plate as far forward as poss
the
Remove the two screws holding
and
plate
le
need
the
Lift
.
plate in place
replace.
ing
The needle plate is removed for clean
een
the lint which may pile up betw
needle plate and feed dogs.
l0
STRAIGHT STITCH
NEEDLE PLATE
UTILITY
NEEDLE PLATE
SELECTION OF PRESSER FOOT
For most ordinary sewing the origi
nal all-purpose foot can be used, How
ever, it
is recommended to use the following
special feet in your accessory box when
ever
you want a better stitching result.
Straight Stitch Foot
This has only a narrow hole
to accom
modate only straight stitching.
It may be
used on sheer or soft fabrics
for more
control. When using this foot,
the Stitch
Width should be ‘O” to avoid
hitting the
foot and breaking the needle,
Buttonhole Foot
This foot has a groove undernea
th, to
allow the narrow satin stitch or but
ton
hole to form evenly. However, if
skipstitch occurs on sheer fabrics with
this
foot, it may be necessary to use
thin
paper underneath.
Cording or Zipper Foot, and Butt
on Foot
Use for sewing very close to the edge of
a
cord or zipper and sewing on butto
ns
respectively.
CHANGING FOOT
Use the large screwdriver to loosen
thumb
screw. Turn the screw backward until
the
foot becomes loose. Then, lift
up on
presser foot lever until it is in its
highest
position in order to remove the
foot.
Replace with desired foot and
tighten
thumb screw securely.
II
WINDING BOBBIN
Disengage the hand wheel (1) from
the stitching mechanism by turning
the clutch nut (2) toward you or
counter-clockwise.
Place a spool of thread on one of
the spool pins and lead thread
through the rear Top Thread Guide
(3) after winding around Bobbin
Winder Tension Disc.
Run the end of thread through a
hole in the bobbin edge and place
bobbin on spindle of bobbin winder
(4) fitting the notch on bobbin over
small spring on spindle.
S
I
n}
•nt•
Push bobbin winder latch (4), and
hold the thread end loosely then
start machine slowly, and bobbin
winder latch will be released to
stop winding when bobbin is full.
Turn clutch nut away from you
until sewing mechanism is again
engaged so that needle moves when
you turn the hand wheel.
Break off loose thread end used to
start the winding and cut other
thread end. Then remove bobbin
from bobbin winder.
I
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.
4
2
UPPER THREADING
1. Turn the hand wheel toward
you to raise the take-up lever
to its highest position.
2. Place a spool of thread on the
spool pin.
3. Lead the thread through the
top thread guides.
4. Down and between the tension
discs, from right to left.
5. Draw the thread up through the
check-spring and with a slight
tug into the hook.
6. Up behind the front thread
guard and through the eye of
takeup lever from right to left.
7. Lead thread down through the
thread guide at the bottom of
the threading slot after drawing
thread behind the front thread
guard then, through the needle
bar thread guide.
8. Thread
the
needle
FROM
FRONT TO BACK, drawing it
through about 3 or 4 inches.
Hold the end of the upper
thread loosely and turn the hand
wheel toward you until the
needle goes all the way down
and comes back up. A thread
loop will form over the upper
thread which then can be pulled
out straight. Place both thread
ends under presser foot and
draw toward the back of the
machine, leaving both threads
three or four inches long.
In case of twin needle sewing, place
two spools of thread, matching or
contrasting in color, one on each
spool
pin, lead both threads
through top thread guides, bring
threads down and pass one thread
between the back discs and the
other between the front discs, then
treat both thread as one until
threading each thread through each
needle eye of twin needle.
THREADING BOBBIN CASE
1. Hold bobbin case be
tween thumb and fore
finger of left hand, so
that the slot in the edge
of the bobbin case is on
top. Take the bobbin
between thumb and fore
finger of right hand so
that the thread on top
leads from left to right.
2. Insert bobbin into bob
bin case, pull the thread
into the slot of the
bobbin case and draw it
under tension spring and
into
the
fork-shaped
opening of the spring.
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PLACING BOBBIN CASE IN SHUTTLE
Raise needle bar to its highest position, and slide plate
forward. Hold the bobbin case latch (D) between the
thumb and forefinger of the left hand, with at least three
inches of thread running from the top of the bobbin
case, Insert and center the bobbin case on the stud of
the shuttle body (C). Be sure the bobbin case finger (E),
is opposite the shuttle race notch (A). Press the bobbin
case (B) into the shuttle as far as possible until the latch
catches on the center post of the shuttle. Then release
the bobbin case latch (D). Press the bobbin case again
after the latch has been released to make sure the bobbin
case is locked securely in place. Close the slide plate.
14
SELECTION OF ST
ITCH:
STITCH LENGTH CONT
ROL
.
The stitch length co
ntrol controls the forwa
rd feeding of
the fabric in ordinary
sewing.
At 0, the fabric doe
s not feed at all. Wi
th the control
around the red
bar mark for butto
nhole, the shortest
stitch is available.
At 5 is the longest
about 6 stitches
per inch on ordina
ry fabrics
but the control ma
set at any desired
y be
spot between 0 and
5 for a variety of
length, except wh
en stretch stitching
(triple back-andforth stitching), the
control should be alw
ays at 5. Turn
the control to the
right to shorten and
to the left to
lengthen the stitch
.
—
—
The stitch length nu
mber you choose is ind
icated by the
pointer above the co
ntrol.
The stitch length in
stretch stitching (triple
back-andforth stitching> is fix
ed about 3/64 inch of
trouble-free
stretch stitch length
on most kinds of fab
rics with
stretch stitch contr
ol ring at “SS” and
the stitch length
control at “5”.
REVERSE BUTTON
When you wish to
sew backward to tie
the threads at the
in ordinary sewing,
beginning or end of
press the Reverse Bu
a seam
tton as far as it will
sews in reverse at ap
go, so that your ma
proximately the sam
chine
e stitch length as for
machine will sew ba
ward stitch length.
ckward as long as the
The
button is held in.
Cross reference table
between numeral on
the control and numb
per inch
er of actual stitch
es
Numeral on the contr
ol
Number of stitches per
inch (approx.)
0
No Feeding
1
2
3
4
5
30
25
15
8
6
‘5
STITCH WIDTH CONTROL
ihis control controls the side sewing of the needle for various width of stitches. At 0,
the straight stitch line results in ordinary sewing. Also, the widest special stitch
patterns as per those shown on the stitch pattern selector are made with this control at
5.
The narrow special stitch patterns including buttonhole are made with this control at
the less number, and with this control at 0, only straight sewing is made regardless the
selection of stitch patterns.
With the control at any other point than “0”, ordinary straight stitch varies to zigzag
stitches. At 1, the needle takes a narrow swing resulting in narrow column of stitching
and, at 5, the needle takes a large swing resulting in a wide column of stitches.
In case of twin needle sewing, this control
should be set less than Number 3, otherwise needle hits needle plate.
RELATING STITCH LENGTH TO
STITCH WIDTH
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When the stitch width control is set at
one particular width (such as 5), the
stitch length control will now control how
close those stitches come together. At
length 0, the fabric does not move,
resulting in a bar of stitches formed one
on top of the other, as is used in button
sewing. At red bar mark or near 0, the
feed pulls the fabric through slowly,
resulting in a dense column of stitches
called a satin stitch. At length 5, a very
long open zigzag results.
STRETCH STITCH CONTROL RING
Selection between ordinary stitching and triple auto
matic back-and-forth stitching called stretch stitch is
made by the stretch stitch control ring. With the
control ring to the left at mark “M”, ordinary sewing
is performed. With the control ring to the left at the
mark “SS”, your machine automatically performs the
stretch stitch with the repetition of two forward and
one backward stitch combination.
A reinforced seam of stretch stitch that will stretch
considerably more than the fabric used is the most
wanted feature in a sewing machine today.
Its uses are almost unlimited and the more you use
your machine the more it will become apparent to you.
When stretch stitching, the stitch length control should
be always set at 5.
STITCH PATTERN SELECTOR
In addition to ordinary straight and zigzag stitches, three consec
utive buttonholingstep stitches, 2 embroidery stitches, blind stitch and blind stretch
stitch, 8 different
kinds of utility forward stitches, 9 special stretch stitches and
straight and Rick-Rack
stretches as shown on the Stretch Stitch Patterns Markin
g can be selected by this
selector. This selector can be turned only to the right, except
for it’s buttonhole step
selection range where the selector can be turned to both directi
ons.
For regular stitch patterns, set the pattern selector at
the selected pattern position
and the stretch stitch control ring at “M”.
The regular stitch patterns selected by the selector are turned
to the stretch stitch
patterns shown on Stretch Stitch Pattern Marking under same
cross-reference number
of regular stitch patterns on the selector, simply by setting
stretch stitch control ring
at “SS”.
All regular stitches and blind stretch stitch are made by forwar
d sewing at an op
tional forward stitch length selected by
stitch length control. All stretch stitches
are made at the fixed stretch stitch length
with the stitch length control at 5 and the
stretch control ring at “55”. To balance
forward and reverse stitch length in stretch
stitching and buttonholding, adjust the
Automatic Reverse Stitch Tuner. With the
selector at buttonhole step (2—4), your
machine does not feed fabric for bartack
ing the buttonhole ends and, with it at
buttonhole step (3), it feeds fabric in
reverse to sew the right buttonhole edge
with the preset reverse satin stitch length
automatically, regardless the setting of
stitch length control.
17
______
AUTOMATIC REVERSE STITCH TUNER
Your buttonhole and stretch stitches are preset and tested to sew on most materials
certain fine materials may require a slight adjustment to balance forward and revers
stitch lengths of buttonhole and stretch stitches.
We have provided a special tuner for this purpose on the back of the arm. Shifting thi
tuner to the right (+) to increase the density of reverse stitch of buttonhole and shorter
reverse stitch of stretch and to the left (—) to expand the density of reverse stitch ol
buttonhole and stretch stitch.
CONTROLS:
ADJUSTING THREAD TENSIONS
Always adjust the upper thread
tension with the presser foot down,
as the tension is released when it is
raised. To increase the tension on
the upper thread, turn tension
control to the right. To decrease,
turn to the left. Before adjusting
the tension be sure that the
machine is,threaded properly.
It is seldom required to adjust
the
bobbin
thread
tension,
however, when necessary to change
bobbin thread tension, turn small
screw on side of the bobbin case
clockwise to tighten counterclock
wise to loosen.
When both tensions are properly
balanced, a perfect stitch will be
formed with both threads interlock
ing in fabric (A).
When the upper tension is too tight,
the bobbin thread is pulled up over
the upper thread which is lying flat
on the fabric (B).
When the upper tension is too
loose, the upper thread forms loops
over the bobbin thread lying flat on
the fabric (C).
When the upper and bobbin thread
tensions are balanced but fabric is
puckered in sewing direction on
sheer fabrics, both tensions are too
tight. Loosen both tensions evenly.
It is recommended to adjust the
tension balance under medium
stitch length. In case of satin
stitching for buttonholes and em
broidery slightly loosen the upper
thread tension.
,
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—
18
—
‘
0
ADJUSTING PRESSURE ON
FABRIC AND FEED DOG HEIG
HT
• GENERAL SEWING
Usually for normal sewing, except
for sewing on
very heavy and bulky fabrics and very
stretchy
knit fabrics, the center pin (B) of
the pressure
control be at its lowest position, also,
the feed
dog height control be turned to the
right, “High”
position, except for sewing on very
sheer fabrics.
For below exceptional fabrics, refer
to table.
To reduce half the pressure, press the
outer ring
(A> of the pressure control, then press
the center
pin (B) down again to halfway. To
reduce half
the feed dog height, turn the feed
dog height
control to “LOW” position.
Ordinary fabric of less elasticity:
Heavy and bulky fabrics
Medium weight fabrics
Light weight soft fabrics
Very stretchy fabrics and knits
:
Heavy and bulky ones
Medium weight ones
Light weight and sheer ones
Half
Full
Full
High
High
Low
Full
Half
Half
High
High
Low
• MENDING AND DARNING:
In order to move the fabric freely
in any direction for
the center pin (B) completely by
pressing down on the
dog height control to “DOWN”
position, which drops
needle plate. To return the feed dog
height to normal,
position.
darning and mending, release
outer ring (A). Turn the feed
the feed dog well below the
turn the control to “HIGH”
19
SEWING LIGHT
The sewing light is located in face cover directly over the
needle so as to better illuminate the stitching area.
Turn the light on and off by pushing the switch
on face cover.
To replace bulb, turn light off and open face cover to
the left. Unscrew bulb as you do a conventional light
bulb. Place new bulb in socket and screw in place.
I
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S
20
PREPARING TO SEW
Have take-up lever at highest position before starting
to sew. Pinning may be used
as a time saver instead of hand basting. It is possible to
sew over pins when placed at
right angles to the edge of fabric with the pin head
at the raw edge, but for best
results it is recommended that the pins be remov
ed as you approach the presser foot.
Sewing over pins can result in damaged needles.
Place material and threads under presser foot and lower
the presser foot. Lower the
needle by turning hand wheel by hand to check if the
needle will pierce the stitching
line you want to sew. You are now ready to begin
sewing. Press the speed control.
The speed of the machine running is regulated by
increasing ordecreasing the amount
of pressure exerted on the control. Never run machin
e without material under
presser foot.
GUIDING FABRIC
The scale is etched with every 1/8 inch distance measu
red from the center of needle
plate. Let the edge of fabric follow the line selected for
the seam, and let your eyes
follow the etched line you selected for the seam,
not the needle, during sewing. To
help you guide the fabric, place cloth guide attachm
ent securing it by the extra
thumb screw onto machine bedplate. Cloth guide
and extra thumb screw are
included in your accessory box.
Do not try to help the feeding by pulling the material
as this may deflect the needle
and cause it to break..
TURNING CORNERS
To pivot at a corner, leave the needle in the fabric.
Lift the presser toot, turn the
fabric, then lower the presser foot and continue sewing
.
21
CURVED SEAMS
Use slightly shorter stitch length
than that of the rest of the seams.
On the part where elasticity s
required on the seam, sew by
stretch stitch. The cloth guide may
be used on angle as shown.
SEWING
SEAMS
ACROSS HEAVY
When approaching heavy seam,
hold the fabric upward on an angle
so that the heavy seam falls under
the front curved sled of presser
foot.
REMOVING THE WORK
j
Be sure to stop the machine when
the thread take-up lever or needle
is at the highest position.
Now raise the presser foot and draw
the fabric back and to the left
and pass the threads over the
thread cutter.
Pull down slightly, holding thread
in both hands, so as not to bend the
needle
Leave the ends of threads under
the presser foot.
•
22
STRAIGHT STITCH;
SEAMS
Pattern: Ill
Length: 2—3
Width: 0
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: Straight Stitch or
All Purpose
Stretch Control: M
The normal stitch length
for most fabrics
is between 2—3 but the
length chosen
should depend on the fab
ric and area of
usage. Usually, heavier
fabrics require
lunger stitches, and ligh
ter weight fabrics
require shorter stitches
. For curved seams
and bias cut areas use
a shorter stitch
length. Be sure to set
the stitch width
control at 0.
BASTI NG/TOPSTITCHIN
Pattern:
Length: 4—5
Width: 0
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: Straight Stitch
Stretch Control: M
G
Sewing a seam wit
h
a longer stitch is
useful for temporary
seams prior to
fitting. Basting stitche
s also may be used
when gathering in fullnes
s.
Topstitching can be don
e very effectively
with the long straight stit
ch. For a bolder
stitch, two threads of the
same type can
be threaded through one
needle (size 14
or 16). A heavier thr
ead such as
buttonhole twist may
be used for
topstitching, but be sure
to use a larger
needle (size 16 or 18).
DARNING
Pattern: Ill
Length: 0
Width: 0
Feed Dog: Down
Pressure: 0
Foot: All Purpose, or
Stretch Control: M
Worn spots or small hol
es can be darned
very easily. Use of an em
broidery hoop is
optional depending on the
fabric. A fine
thread is recommende
d so that the fabric
and thread will blend tog
ether.
Trim the ragged edges from
the area to be
darned. Hold the threads
to start, then
move the fabric slow
ly backwards and
forwards while running
the machine very
fast to fill the area. Profess
ional results
will be attained by movin
g the fabric in
a figure eight pattern while
sewing. After
filling in the area lengthw
ise, reweave
with crosswise stitches
in the same
manner.
CORDING/SEWING IN ZIPPER
• INSERT CORDING
(A) Fold bias strip of fabric over
cord. Loosen the adjusting
screw on the back of cording!
zipper foot and set the foot to
the left of needle.
(B) Sandwich the welting between
two layers of fabric with right
sides together. Stitch a second
time with cording/zipper foot
to the right of needle so that
the needle stitches close to the
cord through all thicknesses.
• ZIPPERS
Swing the foot to left or right of
the needle as needed so that the
foot sews very close to zipper teeth.
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I
QUILTING
Parallel straight lines are easy to
sew with the quilting guide. To
attach the guide, loosen thumb
screw and slip the U-shaped holder
of the guide between presser foot
and thumb screw. Tighten the
thumb screw securely. Adjust the
curved bar to the desired distance
from the needle. Sew the first line
of stitching as desired, then, for the
succeeding rows let the guide
follow along the previous stitch
line. A straight stitch, zigzag, or any
other stitch may be used.
24
Pattern: (I)
Length: 1—3
Width: 5
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: All Purpose
Stretch Control: M
Pattern:
(I)
Length: 1—3
Width: I
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: All Purpose
Stretch Control: M
Pattern: (I)
Length: 0
Width: 2—5
Feed Dog: Down
Pressure: Full
Foot: Button Foot
Stretch Control: M
G
ZIGZAG STITCH:
OVERCASTING
Place the edge of the materia
l underneath
the opening of the sewing foo
t and guide
raw edge along the center slot
of the foot
allowing stitch to form half
on and half
off the fabric.
The multiple stitch zigzag
is a wiser
choice for most fabrics.
See page 30.
SEWING KNITS
The narrow zigzag can
be used in seams
of firm knits for added
strength. After
sewing, open seam and
press flat. Tiny
zigzag stitches can hardly
be seen and the
seam will give when stre
tched.
Generally on knits,
however, try the
straight stretch or ultra
stretch stitches. See
page 35.
SEWING ON BUTTON
Place the button so that
the holes of
button are positioned in
same distance
from the center straigh
t stitch needle
position respectively.
Turn hand wheel by han
d until needle
point lowers close to the
face of button.
Turn stitch width control unt
il the needle
comes just above a hol
e of button.
Turn hand wheel slowly by
hand to check
if the needle comes just
above another
hole of button after clea
ring the first
hole of button.
If necessary, readjust
the button position below
button foot
and repeat above checking
and adjust
ment of stitch width.
Note: Be sure the needle clea
rs the holes
of the button by moving the
hand wheel
by hand before running
the machine
fast.
Usual 6 to 8 stitches
are adequate for
securing a button in plac
e.
To lock the threads, set
the stitch width
at 0, readjust the button
position to that
a hole of button is just belo
w the needle,
and take a few stitches in
the hole.
25
SEWING ON BUTTON
WITH A THREAD SHANK
Buttons sewn on coats or jackets should
have a thread shank to make them stand
away from the fabric. To form a thread
shank, sew over a pin or rounded tooth
pick, as shown on page 25.
After stitching the button to the tabric,
remove work from under the presser foot
leaving threads about six inches from
fabric. Remove pin or toothpick. Pull the
threads to back of button and form a
shank between button and fabric by
winding threads tightly around the attach
ing stitches. Pull threads to back of the
fabric and tie thread ends securely.
SATIN STITCHING
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I
I
This is useful for decoration such as
tapering, manual designed embroidery,
monogramming and applique.
The satin stitch, which is really just a
very close zigzag stitch, is obtained by
setting the stitch length as near to “0”
as possible without stopping the feeding
action or at the red bar marked “button
hole”. The setting will vary for different
fabrics. It may be desirable to loosen the
upper tension slightly to cause the
threads to lock underneath in order to
make the top surface look especially
smooth. For lightweight fabrics, place a
paper underneath the fabric for best
results.
26
Pattern: (I)
Length: 4 or “Buttonhole”
Width: 1—5
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: All Purpose
Stretch Control: M
I
BUILT-IN EMBROIDERY
AND UTILITY STITCHES
The most popular two kinds of utility
embroidery stitch patterns can be made
by simply selecting with stitch pattern
selector, in addition to 10 kinds of utility
forward stitches and those complex stitch
patterns of back-and-forth feeding action
with stretch stitch control as “SS”.
TWIN NEEDLE SEWING
4
Attractive parallel straight stitch effects
and decorative zigzag patterns can be
easily made by sewing with the twinneedle, and they are very effective for
various kinds of garment finish sewing
such as top stitching, border sewing, etc.
Except buttonhole stitches, all built-in
special stitch patterns can be applied with
the twin needle sewing.
In case of twin needle sewing, the stitch
width control should be at less number
than “3” or white number.
The use of color-matched or contrasted
two threads will result in a more attrac
tive finish.
Pattern: Other than buttonhole stitches
Length: 1—5
Width: Less than 3
Foot: All-purpose
27
FREEHAND MONOGRAMMING
For giving garments and linens a per
sonalized touch, first transfer the design
to the right side of the fabric. An
embroidery hoop is recommended es
pecially for soft fabrics and toweling.
In order to monogram, you must move
the fabric slowly and run the machine
rapidly. Monogramming is like writing by
moving the paper under a stationary pen.
Guide the fabric slowly so that the zigzag
falls close together like a satin stitch, but
be careful that the stitches do no pile up.
When guiding from side to side, move
fabric slightly faster to avoid a heavy
pile up of thread.
Practice by forming loops. Once this is
accomplished any letter is easy.
Sometimes the use of paper or non-woven
interfacing under the fabric may make
guiding the fabric easier. The paper or
interfacing may be torn or cut away at
the completion of the monogram.When
monogramming towels, plastic film plac
ed on the top will help cover loops and
make the monogram smooth. Pull or cut
away remaining plastic film when finish
ed.
(I)
Pattern:
Length: 0
Width: 1—S
Feed Dog: Down
Pressure: 0
Foot; All Purpose or
Darning Spring of
White special
attachment
Stretch Control: M
APPLIQUE/PATCH ING
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a
Applying decorative shapes of fabric
scraps to household articles and clothing
is a very interesting way of trimming an
otherwise plain article. First, trace the
design on fabric to be appliqued or
patched, then pin or baste it securely in
place on garment. With a small straight
stitch or narrow zigzag, sew around the
transferred design or patch.
After excess fabric is trimmed away, sew
around the applique or patch with a satin
stitch or short length zigzag stitch. For a
smooth curve, stop frequently at the
inside edge of the curve to pivot the
fabric slightly. Corners look much better
when the point is stitched by pivoting
rather than just turned.
As with all decorative stitches, paper may
be used to give more body to the fabric
when stitching and can be torn away
when the applique is completed.
Stepi
(I)
Pattern:
Length: 1
Width: 0—2
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: All Purpose
Stretch Control: M
Step2
(I)
Pattern:
Length: %—%
Width: 2—5
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: All Purpose
Stretch Control: M
-
-
-
-
GATHERING OVER A CORD
Ordinary gathering with
a basting stitch
often breaks while pulling
in fullness. A
small zigzag across a cord
such as crochet
thread or carpet thread,
gives a much
stronger cord for gatherin
g fullness into
fabrics. Once the gathers
have been
stitched in place, the cord
can be pulled
out in order to eliminate bulk.
Pattern: (I)
Length: 2
Width: 2—3
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: Al! Purpose
Stretch Control: M
LACE APPLICATION
Attaching laces or trims
adds a special
touch to lingerie, dresses, or
linens. Pin or
baste lace in place easing
or mitering
corners where neccessary.
A straight edged lace or bra
id has a
convenient line to follow whe
n sewing.
When using a scalloped edged
lace follow
the design of the lace for an
almost
invisible application.
Pattern:! (II
Length: —1
Width: 1—3
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: All Purpose
Stretch Control: M
FLUTTER HEM
An unusual way of hem
ming or finishing
edges of tricot or soft kni
ts is by a flutter
edge. Hemming in this
manner is just like
overcasting an edge,
but the fabric is
stretched in back and
in front of the
needle as you sew. For
best results, pull
the fabric equally, making
sure the needle
goes over the edge. Wh
en you stop to
reposition your hands,
keep the needle in
the fabric.
Pattern:
Length: ‘4—Y
Width: 4—
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: All Purpose
Stretch Control: M
29
SEWING TIPS
When a dainty hair line finish is
particularly desirable for the inside seams
of sheer collars, facings, and yokes, seam
allowance that would ordinarily show
through is eliminated by following the
seam outline with a narrow zigzag stitch.
Trim seam allowance close to line of
stitchinq.
and press.
Turn
Pattern: (I)
Length: Y—1
Width:% 2
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: All Purpose
Stretch Control: M
SHAPING DARTS IN
INTERFACINGS
Cut interfacing down
lines.
Overlap cut
lines. Zigzag stitch
from point to wide
both raw edges close
Pattern:
ID
center between dart
edges, matching dart
along marking line
end of dart. Trim
to stitching.
Length: % 1
Width: %—1
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: All Purpose
Stretch Control: M
I
MULTIPLE ZIGZAG STITCH
The multiple zigzag stitch can be used for
hundreds of various kinds of sewing applications,
such as replacing worn blanket bindings for both
decorative and durable finish, overcasting an
edge to prevent fraying, applying elastic waist
bands to skirts and dresses, sewing a zigzag stitch
on soft or sheer material preventing puckering,
etc.
Just sew like ordinary zigzag stitching.
a
30
IC)
_>
Pattern:
Stitch Length: 4—5
Width: 3—5
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: All Puroose
Stretch Control: M
BUTTONHOLES
C C
\C C)
A
I
Various fabrics require
various methods of
sewing
buttonholes. Four diff
erent methods are given
below,
with suggested uses, If
you are in doubt as to
which
method is best for you
r fabric, test the method
s in
question and choose the
best according to the fini
shed
appearance.
PREPARATION
For the best results, a
good quality mercerized
cotton
thread should be used. Pol
yester threads often resu
lt in
puckered or heavy unattra
ctive buttonholes. The fine
r
your fabric is, the finer you
r cotton thread should be.
An interfacing should be
used under the buttonhol
es to
give body, to strengthen
, and to help them wit
hstand
wear.
To establish the correct leng
th of the buttonhole, add
the length of the button
(A), plus the thickness of the
button (B), plus 1/32 inch
for the bartacks. The leng
th
may be marked on the gar
ment with a basting stitch,
tailor’s chalk, or an invisib
le cellophane tape, as sho
wn.
Horizontal buttonholes sho
uld extend 1/8 inch beyond
the centerline of the garmen
t. Vertical buttonholes are
placed so that the cutting
space of the buttonhole
is
directly on the center line.
OF GARMENT
CENTER LINE
OF GARMENT
Always make a practice
buttonhole on a scrap of
the
garment fabric before mak
ing any buttonholes on you
r
garment. On your test sam
ple, duplicate the thicknesses
found in the garment and
be sure to include the
interfacing. The test sample
should help determine the
length needed for the but
ton to pass through the hol
e
easily, as well as the stitc
h length needed for the
particular fabric. As with
the satin stitch, the stitches
should be close together,
but not so close that they
pile
up. Be sure to use the
buttonhole foot.
BUILT-IN BUTTONHOLE
This buttonhole eliminates the needle for pivoting the
fabric. It is used most often on light and medium woven
fabric. The narrowest buttonhole is made with stitch
width control at 3 and the widest one is done with it
at 5. The stitch length control should be at BUTTON
HOLE” or near 0 not to without stop feeding action
With stitch width at your desired position between 3
and 5, a buttonhole can be made by simply turning
stitch pattern selector from buttonhole position 1 to
those 2, 3 and 4 in sequence on the stitch pattern
selector panel.
1. Set stitch pattern selector at buttonhole (1). Lower
needle into the mark at the top left end of button
hole. Lower buttonhole foot and sew on the left side
of buttonhole until you reach the bottom end of
buttonhole.
2. Turn pattern selector to buttonhole (2-4) and take
just a few stitch to bartack the bottom end of button
hole,
3. With needle up, turn the pattern selector to the
buttonhole (3) to sew on the right side of buttonhole.
Your machine is preset to balance both forward and
reverse stitches on most materials, but certain fine
materials may require a slight adjustment to balance
of them. If the stitch density in this step is rougher
than of the left side of buttonhole, shift automatic
reverse stitch tuner to the right (+) and if it is heavier
than left side one, shift it to the left (—).
I
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I
4. With the needle out of the cloth, turn again to the
buttonhole (4) position and complete the buttonhole
by bartacking just a few stitch on the top end of
buttonhole.
5. To lock the stitch, make sure the needle is out of the
fabric and set the pattern selector at ordinary sewing
position, the stitch width control at 0, and feed dog
height down. Then take a few stitches.
6. To prevent cutting through the bartack insert a
straight pin through the bartack and cut buttonhole
open.
32
EJ—--ti—
Pattern:
Length: Buttonhole
Width: 3—5
Feed Dog: High-Down
Pressure: Full
Foot: Buttonhole Foot
Stretch Stitch: M
For best buttonhole
finish, it is suggested
to test
buttonhoiings on scrap
of same fabric as that
you want
to buttonhole, for select
ion of buttonhole wid
th and
stitch density best suited
to your fabric.
CORDED BUTTONHO
LE
Cording gives a reinfo
rced raised buttonhole.
it is
excellent for use on bul
ky, woven fabric, or
k,nits
in which the stitchi
ng often gets buried
and
makes cutting diffic
ult. On knits, a
corded
buttonhole will help
keep the fabric fro
m
stretching out of sha
pe.
Pattern:
II)
Length Buttonhole
Width. 52 2-5-2 0
Feed Dog Down-High-Do
wn-High-Down
Pressure: Full
Foot: Buttonhole Foot
Stretch Control. M
Choose a heavy
cotton crochet thr
ead or
buttonhole twist to
use for the cording.
Proceed
as for the turn-arou
nd buttonhole having
cord
the under the presser
foot in such a way
that
the zigzag stitch cov
ers the cord.
At the completion
of the buttonhole
snip the
excess cord close
to the bartack on
woven
fabrics. For knitted
garments, always pul
l the
cords to the wrong
side by using a darnin
g needle
or needle threader,
and knot the cord
ends
before clipping.
33
BLIND HEM STITCH
STEP 1
The blind hem stitch provides a durable hem
finish that is almost invisible on garments,
drapes, and curtains. It is done easily with
straight or slightly curved hems. With a little
practice it will be a very quick and easy hem
application and the hem will never need
repairing.
Procedure:
(1 )Prepare raw edge of hem in desired manner,
such as overcast, 1/4 inch stitched under
pinked, hem tape, or just plain. (Step 1)
(2)Fold hem up desired length. Baste or pin 1/2
inch from upper edge. Press in place. (Step 2>
(3)Fold hem back toward right side of fabric
leaving about 1/4 inch extended. (Step 3)
(4) Guide the fold of the fabric into the center
cut of the presser foot so that the zigzag bite
of the stitch comes just slightly to the left of
the center cut of the presser foot. The straight
or narrow zigzag stitches should be formed on
the single thickness of fabric, and the zigzag
wide bite should catch just barely into the
fold of the fabric at the left.
(5>When stitching is completed, remove fabric
from machine and turn to right side. Press
completed hem.
When hemming an A-line skirt, place a machine
basting stitch along the raw edge of the hem. At
an ironing board, fold up the hem, matching the
seams. Ease in the excess fabric by pulling on
basting thread. Press with steam, then apply hem
tape. Baste or pin hem 1/2” from taped edge,
then continue into step 3.
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Pattern: ‘ (H) or
Length: 2-3
Width: 3-5
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: All Purpose
Stretch Control: M
STEP 2
STEP 3
STEP 5
t.
34
STRAIGHT STRETCH ST
ITCH:
This stitch may be used on
knits and wovens in area
s of
stress as a reinforcement
stitch. It is excellent for
curved
seams such as armholes and
crotch seams. For active
wear
such as ski pants and gird
le fabrics which endure a
lot
of
stress in bending and stre
tching, this stitch may
be used
for seaming throughout
the garment. With stretch
stitch
control ring at “SS” pos
ition, sew in same manner
as for
ordinary sewing.
If back and forth stitch
lengths in this stitching is
not same,
adjust by automatic reverse
stitch tuner. In case of lon
ger
back-stitch length and sho
rter forth-stitch length, mo
ve the
tuner to the right (---), and
, if shorter back-stitch leng
th and
longer forth-stitch length,
move the tuner to the left (+)
until both back and forth
stitch lengths become equ
ivelant.
CAU11ON — It is diff
icult to remove this stitc
h
from
fabric. Pre-fit garment bef
ore using this stitch.
Pattern:
(I)
Length: 5
Width: 0
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: All Purpose
Stretch Control: SS
• TOPSTITCHING
Because this stitch is hea
vier than an ordinary stra
ight
stitch, it is ideal for top-stitchi
ng, particularly on knits.
ULTRA-STRETCH STITC
H:
The Ultra-Stretch Stitche
s are excellent for stretch
fabrics such as lingerie, swe
bathing suit knits, and cot
ater knits,
ton knits. It has the greates
t strength and elasticity of
all.
• RICK-RACK STRETCH
This is most common util
ity ultrastretch of a trip
le
back-and-forth zigzag stitc
hes with more elasticity
than regular zigzag.
• PINE-LEAF STRETCH
This is the combined stitc
h of straight stretch and
single sideward stitches, use
ful for hemming on most
knits and stretchy fabrics.
• SPECIAL ULTRA-STRE
TCH STITCHE
S
These are very useful
ultra-stretch stitches call
ed
Smocking, and Feather,
etc, as shown on Stretch
Pattern Marking for variou
s purpose.
Pattern:
(I)
Length: 5
Width: 2—5
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: All purpose
Stretch Control: SS
Pattern:
lJ) or
Length: S
Width: 2-5
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full—Half
Foot: All purpose
Stretch Control: SS
Pattern:
Special stitches
Length: 5
Width :2—5
Feed Dog: High
Pressure: Full
Foot: All Purpose
Stretch Control: SS
35
(H)
APPLICATIONS:
On most knits, an about 3/16 inch finished
seam, such as pine-leaf or special ultrastretch stitches are more desirablethan a
5/8 inch opened seam allowance. These
stitches can create a neater, more
professional
finish,
eliminate bulky
seams, prevent curling, permit the gar
ment to “give” under stress, and at the
same time they cut down on the amount
of work involved in making a garment. If
ever in doubt as to which
of those
stitches to use, test them on the particular
fabric in question and choose according
to their performance.
Its use are almost unlimited and the
more you use your machine the more it
will become apparent to you
• ELASTIC APPLICATION
Fold fabric over the elastic and stitch
elastic and fabric at one time, using
smocking, pine-leaf, or other ultra-stretch
stitch. The double layer of fabric next to
the elastic should be stitched with the
one-side of ultra-stretch seam and the
elastic should be caught by another side.
I
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36
Note:
The stitch length control should
be always at number 5 when
stretch stitching, otherwise the
machine will be noisy and the
material may feed in reverse only
or with uneven forward and reverse
stitch length.
• OVERLOCK APPLICATION
(A)
Special ultra-stretch stitches are also
usable for overlock stitching
on
woven and knit fabrics.
(A> Place the raw edge of the
presser foot so that as the
the right, it comes down
This will result in an
allowance.
(B)
very
both
fabric under the
needle swings to
at the raw edge.
encloed seam
(B> The seam allowances may be trim
med to 1/4
inch either before or after
sewing. If
trimming before sewing, proceed
as above.
Otherwise, sew the seam with the
raw edge
of the fabric on the etched guide line
1/2”.
(Any time you use the full widt
h of a
particular stitch, you should readjust
the raw
edge of the fabric 1/8 inch to
the left.>
Afterward, trim the excess fabric near
the
stitching. This method is actually easie
r than
the overedge method for fabrics that
curl.
Note: On soft, loose knits, the fabri
c may
seem to wave or ripple. If this occurs,
reduce
the pressure on fabric.
37
OILING MACHINE
Use only a good sewing machine
oil, do not use any common
household oils.
Your machine should be oiled
occasionally to keep it operating
smoothly. How often depends on
the amount of sewing you do.
Once a year oil your machine
thoroughly as indicated by the
arrows on illustrations.
Avoid oier oiling.
—
•1
—I
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B
I
38
—
CLEANING AND OILING
THE SHUTTLE AREA
The stitch forming mechanism occasional
ly becomes clogged with loose threads
and lint. This will interfere with the
efficient operation of the machine.
Cleaning and removal of the lint will
safeguard the performance.
To remove the shuttle assembly, proceed
as follows:
1. Turn hand wheel until the needle
reaches its highest position. Tilt head
back on its hinges.
2. Remove bobbin case (A).
3. Turn the two shuttle race cover clamps
(f) outward and remove the shuttle
race cover (C) and the shuttle body
(E) and the lint cleaner (D).
4. Clean the shuttle race, the shuttle, and
shuttle race cover by removing all
threads, lint, etc.
When the cleaning has been completed, proceed as follow
s to replace the shut
tle assembly:
1. Turn hand wheel until the needle reaches its highest positio
n.
2. Place lint cleaner (D) to shuttle driver and shuttle
body (E) in race (F)
against shuttle driver and adjust into position.
3. Replace shuttle race cover (C), fitting pin at lower
edge into notch, and lock
into position with shuttle race cover clamps, (f), makin
g certain the clamps have
been snapped securely into position.
4. Put bobbin (B) into bobbin case (A).
5. Put the bobbin case into the shuttle, fitting tongue
(a) into notch (c) of race
cover (C).
(A)
(B)
(C)
(D)
(E)
(F)
(c)
(f)
39
ER
ADJUSTING BOBBIN WIND
Z1
to adjust
It may be sometime required
guide to
d
threa
top
rear
the level of
winder,
in
conform with the level of bobb
enly
unev
s
wind
d
threa
especially, when
in.
bobb
on
on bobbin
If the thread winds unevenly
of rear top
screw
set
en
loos
n
(A),
show
as
thread guide
thread guide and mjve the
s as shown
wind
up slightly. If the thread
n slightly.
dow
e
guid
d
threa
(B), move the
(B)
G
ADJUSTING AND CHANGIN
MOTOR BELT
I
I
I
adjust
Following are the instructions for
belt:
r
moto
ing and changing the
holding rear
(1) Remove four screws
the bottom
at
out
it
cover by tipping
wheel
and pivoting around the hand
ine,
mach
the
of
t
fron
away from the
ooseri screws
belt,
tor
mo
st
adju
To
(2)
en
(A)and move bracket (B)up to loos
belt and down to tighten.
(3) To remove motor belt:
• Removetopcover.
• Loosen clutch (C).
e
• Loosen screws (A) and mov
i
bracket (B) to its highest pos
a.
..t.
....
tion.
Slip belt off motor pulley and
then over hand wheel.
it
• Replace motor belt by slipping
over
then
and
l
whee
over hand
motor pulley.
• Adjust as noted under No. 2.
I
I
•
C
a
I
A-
40
B
PROBLEM AND REMEDIES
If Machine
Binds
Skipping
Stitches
Irregular
Stitches
Thread or lint in race
way.
Clean and ol) machine the shuttle
area. (See page 39.)
Bent needle.
Replace to new needle. (See page 10.)
Needle placed incor
rectly in clamp.
Place needle correctly. (See page 10.)
Too fine a needle for
thread being used.
Replace needle or thread to conform
each other. (See page 9.)
Too stretchy fabric.
Place a paper beneath fabric, or use
Ball Pjint needle.
Upper thread tension
too loose.
Tighten upper tension.
Improper threading.
Bobbin not wound
evenly.
Uneven
Stitches
Upper Thread
See threading instruction, page 13.
Adjust bobbin winder. (See page 40>
Pulling or holding
material.
Not enough tension
on upper thread.
Poor quality thread.
Try different thread.
Needle too fine for
thread being used.
See needle and thread chart, page 9.
Improperly threaded.
Too much tension.
Starting with take-up
in incorrect position.
Avoid pulling or holding material, just
guide it.
Increase tension.
Refer to threading instructions, see
page 13, and rethread machine.
Loosen upper thread tension.
(See page 18.)
Always start sewing with take-up lever
in highest position.
Improper setting of
needle.
Refer to needle setting instruction,
see
page 10.
Bent or eye of needle
too sharp.
Try a new needle.
Bent or blunt needle.
Discard all blunt or bent needles and
replace with new,
Tensions too tight.
Dull needle.
See tension adjustment, page 18.
Change needle.
Stitch length too long.
Reduce stitch length.
Machine noisy
& material will
not feed in
stretch stitching.
Stitch length control
is set at other than
Number 5.
Set stitch length control at Number 5
Improper
feeding
Lint in feed dog.
Remove needle plate and clean lint from
feed dog.
Material
Pu ckering
41