IBM Electronic Services: Support using automation

Front cover
IBM Electronic Services
Support using Automation and Web Tools
Simplify and enable faster support for
your IT environment
Electronic Service Agents run on
all IBM systems
Worldwide access and
utilization
Mary Kay Hyde-Bohn
ibm.com/redbooks
International Technical Support Organization
IBM Electronic Services: Support using
Automation and Web Tools
September 2007
SG24-6323-01
Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices” on
page vii.
Second Edition (September 2007)
This edition applies to products within or enabled by IBM Electronic Services.
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2007. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule
Contract with IBM Corp.
Contents
Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
The team that wrote this book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Become a published author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Comments welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .x
Summary of changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
September 2007, Second Edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Chapter 1. Welcome to IBM Electronic Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.1 Electronic Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2 Electronic Services are necessary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3 Privacy and security of Electronic Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.4 Electronic Service Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.5 Electronic Services Web site. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 2. Use of Service Agent information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.1 Where ESA information is at work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.2 Automatic hardware problem submission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.3 Viewing Service Agent information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.4 My Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.5 Performance Management reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.6 Capacity Upgrade on Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.7 Enhanced Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Chapter 3. IBM Electronic Services Web site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1 IBM Electronic Services Web site overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 Your IBM ID. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 About this site/Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4 My messages and My custom links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5 My systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.1 Select systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.2 Select reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.3 My Search using inventory data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6 Open service requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.7 Technical documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8 Access premium services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.9 Electronic Service Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.10 Services administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 4. IBM Electronic Service Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1 Electronic Service Agent overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2 Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3 Where to install and activate IBM Electronic Service Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3.1 Functions by operating system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3.2 Service information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4 Privacy and security of your information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4.1 Privacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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4.4.2 Transmission security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
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Chapter 5. IBM Electronic Service Agent and the Hardware Management Console
security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1 SA transmission security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2 SA connection options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.1 Modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.2 Internet HTTPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.3 Internet Virtual Private Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3 SA and HMC privacy of client information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4 Hardware Management Console (HMC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.1 HMC outbound configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.2 HMC inbound configurations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5 HMC protocols and encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.1 AT&T Global Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.2 SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.3 VPN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6 HMC data and information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6.1 Data sent to IBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7 HMC additional considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7.1 IBM server address list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7.2 VPN server address list. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7.3 Remote service HMC port list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7.4 Multiple HMCs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 6. IBM Electronic Service Agent: Connectivity for System i and System p .
6.1 Where to install and activate IBM Electronic Service Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2 Before you begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2.1 Determine your connectivity method. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.3 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4 Ensure that your physical network is set up correctly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5 Obtain or verify an IBM ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.6 Verify the HMC service settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 7. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.1 Where to install and activate IBM Electronic Service Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.2 IBM Electronic Service Agent V5R4 for System i platform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3 Stand-alone system compared to partitioned system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.4 Interaction with other components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.5 Activation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.6 Connectivity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.6.1 Service Agent in a network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.7 User Interface: Character-based compared to GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.8 Keeping Service Agent current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.8.1 Auto PTF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.8.2 Group PTF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.8.3 Subscription Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.8.4 Recommended Fixes Web page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.9 Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.9.1 Threshold table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.9.2 Delay problem reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.9.3 Service Agent activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.9.4 Automatic connection verification (Heartbeat) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.9.5 Line control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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7.10 Software problem reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.11 Batch activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.12 Authorizing users to view or use service information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.13 HMC Service Agent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.13.1 Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.13.2 Installation and activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.13.3 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 8. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System p . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
8.1 Electronic Service Agent on System p . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
8.1.1 Overview of Service Agent on System p. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
8.1.2 Key tasks and functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
8.1.3 Machine types and models that are eligible for Service Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
8.1.4 Service Agent Connection Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
8.2 Stand-alone environment: Planning and prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
8.2.1 Service Agent code installation and activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
8.2.2 Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
8.2.3 Activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
8.2.4 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
8.2.5 Stopping and restarting Service Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
8.3 HMC: Planning and prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
8.3.1 Installation and activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
8.3.2 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
8.3.3 Stopping and restarting a process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Chapter 9. IBM Electronic Service Agent for Linux on the System i, System p, and
System x platforms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.1 Electronic Service Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.1.1 Overview of Service Agent for Linux on System p . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.1.2 Machine types and models that are eligible for Service Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.1.3 Service Agent Connection Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2 Planning, installation, and activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.1 Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.2 Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.3 Activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.3 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.3.1 Basic menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.4 Mixed partition configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.5 Service Agent for Linux on System x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.5.1 Stand-alone environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.5.2 IBM Director Extension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 10. Service Agent for the Hardware Management Console . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.1 The Service Agent and HMC on System i and System p . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.1.1 Planning your HMC environment for Service Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.1.2 Installation and activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.1.3 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2 Electronic Service Agent for System z . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.3 HMC activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 11. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.1 IBM Electronic Service Agent for System x. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.1.1 The stand-alone environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.1.2 IBM Director Extension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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11.2 Stand-alone planning, installation, and activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.1 Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.2 Installation wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.3 Upgrade information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.4 Configuration and maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.2.5 Uninstall process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.3 Director Extension: Planning, installation, and activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.3.1 Planning for the Service Agent application setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.3.2 Installation, configuration, and activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.3.3 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.3.4 Uninstall process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
146
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Chapter 12. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System z . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.1 Electronic Service Agent for System z . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2 Features and functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.3 Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.4 Connection modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.4.1 Enhanced security for data transmissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.4.2 HMC connectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.4.3 Direct connectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.5 Applying the Service Agent code to all images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.5.1 Hardware configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.5.2 Hardware activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.5.3 Software collection configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.5.4 Collection and transmission activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.5.5 Activating Service Agent tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.6 Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.7 Uninstall process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.8 HMC activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
161
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Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Redbooks publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Online resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to get IBM Redbooks publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Help from IBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
185
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
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COPYRIGHT LICENSE:
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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
vii
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States,
other countries, or both:
Redbooks (logo)
eServer™
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xSeries®
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Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.
viii
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Preface
What is IBM® Electronic Services? Why do you need it? Where do you get it? When and how
do you use it? How will this help your electronic support relationship with IBM? Find the
answers to these questions and more details about IBM Electronic Services in this IBM
Redbooks® publication.
The goal of IBM Electronic Services is to simplify your support relationship to make it easier
and faster to do business with IBM. Through automation and Internet access, Electronic
Services integrates the IBM Support community with your company staff and your IT
environment. The two major components are IBM Electronic Service Agent™ (Service Agent)
and the IBM Electronic Services Web site.
IBM Electronic Services reaches across all IBM systems in all countries or regions where IBM
does business. Electronic Services can provide the electronic support relationship for a single
machine environment or a multinational complex of many servers.
This book is intended for IT management, system operators, and other individuals who work
for and with IBM clients. Prior to reading this book, you need a thorough understanding of
your computer system and networking environments.
The team that wrote this book
This IBM as produced by the IBM Electronic Services global organization. Assistance was
provided by the International Technical Support Organization (ITSO), Rochester Center.
Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project:
Electronic Services Executive team:
 R. Kent Holcomb, Electronic Services Director
 Bob A. Haataia, Electronic Services executive team
 John Speacht, Electronic Services executive team
ITSO: LindaMay Patterson, ITSO Project Leader
Content:








Linda Allen, Electronic Services Web strategist
Eve Berman: Hardware Management Console (HMC)
M. Lauren Bragg, Terry Ulmer, and Ivaylo N. Blajev: System x™
Eliot T. Burris, Mike A. Edwards, and Ivica Vardic: System z™
Kent Eastley, Craig Mull, and Eve Berman: System p™
Scott Fredericksen, Service Agent Strategist
Mary Kay Hyde-Bohn: IBM Redbooks publication coordinator
Mark McDonnell and Sandra Westling: System i™
Become a published author
Join us for a two- to six-week residency program! Help write a book dealing with specific
products or solutions, while getting hands-on experience with leading-edge technologies. You
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
ix
will have the opportunity to team with IBM technical professionals, Business Partners, and
Clients.
Your efforts will help increase product acceptance and customer satisfaction. As a bonus, you
will develop a network of contacts in IBM development labs and increase your productivity
and marketability.
Find out more about the residency program, browse the residency index, and apply online at:
ibm.com/redbooks/residencies.html
Comments welcome
Your comments are important to us!
We want our booksto be as helpful as possible. Send us your comments about this bookor
other IBM Redbooks publications in one of the following ways:
 Use the online Contact us review IBM Redbooks publication form found at:
ibm.com/redbooks
 Send your comments in an e-mail to:
redbooks@us.ibm.com
 Mail your comments to:
IBM Corporation, International Technical Support Organization
Dept. HYTD Mail Station P099
2455 South Road
Poughkeepsie, NY 12601-5400
x
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Summary of changes
This section describes the technical changes made in this edition of the IBM book. This
edition might also include minor corrections and editorial changes that are not identified.
Summary of Changes
for SG24-6323-01
for IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
as created or updated on September 13, 2007.
September 2007, Second Edition
This revision reflects the addition, deletion, or modification of new and changed information
described below.
New information
The new information includes:
 New tools on the Electronic Services Web site
 Electronic Service Agent (ESA) Connectivity
 ESA support for Linux®
Changed information
The changed information includes:





Expanded uses of ESA information on the Electronic Services Web site
Updated Web site tools
Security and privacy information
Updates to Service Agent new versions
Expanded information on Hardware Management Console (HMC) ESA
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
xi
xii
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
1
Chapter 1.
Welcome to IBM Electronic
Services
During the course of reading this book, you learn about IBM Electronic Services:




What IBM Electronic Services is
Where to get more information about IBM Electronic Services
When and how to use IBM Electronic Services
How IBM Electronic Services enables your electronic support relationship with IBM
The goal of IBM Electronic Services is to simplify your support relationship and make it easier
and faster to do business with IBM.
This chapter focuses on two key components of IBM Electronic Services:
 IBM Electronic Service Agent (ESA)
 IBM Electronic Services Web site
This chapter presents an overview of how these components interrelate, how they support
each other, and how they provide input to other IBM organizations.
Subsequent chapters give you information about the uses of ESA information within IBM
tools, specific categories on the Electronic Services Web site, and the reference information
for each Service Agent.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
1
1.1 Electronic Services
Electronic Services is an IBM support approach made up of Electronic Service Agent and the
Electronic Services Web site, as illustrated in Figure 1-1. Electronic Service Agent (ESA)
submits hardware problems and collects service information. Both submissions are
transmitted automatically within protected firewalls into the IBM structure. This information is
visible for your use and for those users you authorize on the Electronic Services Web site.
Organizations within IBM can use the same information or results to assist you with support
functions, solution delivery, and planning.
This structure works in any IBM system client environment: System i, System p, System x, or
System z platforms with their respective operating systems (OSs) and Linux.
ESA submits PMR automatically to IBM
PMR goes to IBM Support Center
Account
Firewall
Firewall
AT&T Gateway
Internet
IBM
IBM
Firewall
Firewall
Machine inventory collection and heartbeat
on a scheduled transmission
IBM
Problem
Management
IBM
Inventory
Database
Support reviews client machine
inventory vs. the PMR (starts
problem determination before
calling client). Sends SSR as
appropriate.
ESA clients
Electronic Services
Web site
Internet
Clients can view ESA inventory, perform
searches, manage all service requests/PMRs
submitted via ESA, voice or Web, view
Performance Management reports and other
offerings.
IBM will utilize ESA
information to assist Clients
with questions, deliver
offerings such as
Performance Management,
CUoD and future order
management.
Figure 1-1 eServices overview
1.2 Electronic Services are necessary
Electronic Services provides an electronic collaboration between you and IBM, so that IBM
can offer better support of your information technology (IT) environment. The goal of IBM
Electronic Services is to simplify your support relationship by making it easier and faster for
you to do business with IBM.
2
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Electronic Services brings the following benefits to your organization:
 Client systems might have higher availability due to shorter problem resolution time and
less downtime.
 All elements are easy to activate, easy to use, available on all IBM platforms, available
globally, and secure.
 Client problem information and service information are readily available to the IBM
Support Community through an internal Web site.
 Electronic Services enables personalized services, such as My Systems, My Search,
Performance Management, Electronic Technical Services (ETS) including Alert,
Maintenance Level Comparison Reports (MLCR), and Capacity Upgrade on Demand
(CUoD).
 ESA can submit hardware problems automatically with additional error data.
 ESA works with other IBM tools to identify a potential fix or create an action plan for the
IBM Support Center.
 IBM and Business Partners can provide the best, personalized support and guidance
using the ESA information.
 7x24 Web site enables your systems to potentially have higher availability due to shorter
problem resolution time and less downtime:
– View or print your ESA information for business or technical analysis.
– Search IBM technical databases using your ESA information to filter results.
– Review IBM technical resources or access IBM service offerings.
– Submit hardware or software service requests.
 Peace of mind knowing that IBM is there to ensure that your systems run smoothly.
Information about all the Electronic Services elements are available at the Electronic Services
Web site in flash tours, informational PDFs, or actual download files:
https://www.ibm.com/support/electronic
1.3 Privacy and security of Electronic Services
Here are several brief descriptions of the layers of security and privacy that are used by
Electronic Services, how IBM provides privacy for your information as viewed on the Web
site, and how IBM secures the transmission from your systems to IBM:
 The secure ESA transmission to IBM is described in Chapter 5, “IBM Electronic Service
Agent and the Hardware Management Console security” on page 51, with descriptions of
the communication methods available for each platform. The ESA transactions are subject
to IBM Security rigorous guidelines and updated frequently.
 The IBM ID entered during ESA activation is the account contact for any other IBM IDs
that will be associated with that system. (You use this same IBM ID in many of the IBM
Web sites.) You control who can view and use the ESA information, for example, your IT
department staff, extended staff, and Business Partners. On the Electronic Services Web
site in the Services Administration category, you can add more IBM IDs, select more
systems per IBM IDs, and remove IBM IDs from systems.
 The machine inventory information collected by ESA is typically collected by speaking with
clients during phone calls with the IBM Support Center, pre-sales specialists,
administrative clerks, and other groups within IBM. These IBM groups now have electronic
Chapter 1. Welcome to IBM Electronic Services
3
access to the information so that they can prepare and perform advance problem
determination and more efficiently serve IBM clients.
The ESA inventory information includes:
– Your support contact information, including names, phone numbers, and e-mail
addresses
– System utilization, performance, system failure logs, part feature codes, part number,
part serial number, part locations, software inventory, operating system applications,
program temporary fixes (PTFs), the maintenance level, and configuration values
Inventory information does not include:
– Collection or transmission of any of your company’s financial, statistical, or personnel
data
– Client information
– Your business plans
 ESA can provide a call home mechanism for other IBM offerings that you might select in
the future. The information collected by these offerings is covered by separate
agreements, for example, for Performance Management and Capacity Upgrade on
Demand offerings.
1.4 Electronic Service Agent
The Electronic Service Agent is a no charge software tool that resides on your system to
monitor events and transmit system inventory information to IBM. It ships with many IBM
systems without an additional charge. For other systems, it can be downloaded from the
Electronic Services Web site or ordered free of charge. The platform-specific chapters,
starting with Chapter 4, “IBM Electronic Service Agent” on page 41, give details about
installation and activation of ESA for each IBM system platform.
ESA’s two key functions, automatic hardware problem reporting and service inventory
information collection, enable proactive and predictive services, as well as faster problem
resolution and call avoidance. ESA tracks and captures machine inventory, hardware error
logs, and automatically reports hardware problems to IBM if the server is under a service
agreement or warranty. The information is available to you, your authorized users, and IBM
representatives.
You can add your IBM Business Partner representative to your authorized users by adding
their IBM ID to your list of authorized users.
Table 1-1 on page 5 outlines the features and benefits of ESA hardware reporting by IBM
hardware platforms.
4
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Table 1-1 ESA automatic hardware reporting
Feature
System i
System p
System x
System z
Report hardware problems and send
error data.
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Collect the extended error data.
Yes
Yes
No
No
Consult the knowledge base for
additional fix information.
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Collect the system logs.
Yes
No
No
No
Determine part numbers.
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Notify IBM service support
representative (SSR).
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
ESA hardware reporting enhances client satisfaction and has these benefits:








Confidence knowing your system is being monitored
Less time spent explaining problems to the IBM support community
Higher availability through faster problem resolution
Better call routing because more information is known up front
Getting the right part the first time saves time
Higher quality and effectiveness of support
Ability to view Service Agent information on the Web
Leveraging IBM resources
Table 1-2 outlines the features and benefits of the inventory collection function by IBM
hardware platforms.
Table 1-2 ESA machine inventory collection
Feature
System i
System p
System x
System z
Hardware inventory and system
Configuration
Yes
Yes
Yes
I/O only
Software inventory
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
PTFs (software fixes)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
The benefits of ESA machine inventory collection are:






Access current system configuration easily to assist in problem determination
Call out the accurate parts
Identify accurate hardware and software fixes
Enable marketing to assess needs and requirements
Enable customized solutions for marketing and sales
Ensure accurate billing
Chapter 1. Welcome to IBM Electronic Services
5
Table 1-3 outlines the features and benefits of transmission security. Electronic Service Agent
communicates with IBM through a secure connection using encryption and authentication,
with Internet or a dial-up connection using AT&T Global Network Services. You can ensure
your privacy and the security of your machine inventory information and problem submission
record, both in the transmission and usage of your information inside IBM. In Chapter 6, “IBM
Electronic Service Agent: Connectivity for System i and System p” on page 69, you see more
detailed information and graphics showing these connection styles.
Table 1-3 ESA transmission security
Feature
System i
System p
System x
System z
Connect to IBM using HTTPS
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Connect to IBM using the Internet
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Connect to IBM using Dial-up
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Proxy/Firewall support
Yes
Yes
Yes
Firewall
only
The benefits of ESA transmission security are:




There are a variety of connection options to satisfy most client configurations.
All connections are secure.
All communications are encrypted.
All communications are authenticated.
1.5 Electronic Services Web site
The Web component of IBM Electronic Services offers a single location for you to access
many IBM Internet service and support capabilities. You can also view and use the ESA
inventory information. This is a global site, which is tailored to 65 countries (regions) and
national languages, with visibility to the services offered by IBM in that country or region.
The Electronic Services Web site offers:
 A single portal for hardware and software information and reference materials
 My Systems to view and use ESA service information in customized reports, such as
hardware and software inventory, fixes, and system parameters
 My Search facility that uses Electronic Service Agent information to provide customized
results for your specific machines from the IBM reference databases
 A single place to submit a service request for either hardware or software, in any country
 My Messages to receive information for specific platforms or individual profile definition
 Access to Web-delivered premium services, such as Performance Management or
Enhanced Technical Support (ETS) contracted services
 My Links to customize the Web view by your selections of IBM system platforms
 Tutorials or demonstrations provided for all major areas of the Web site
6
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Table 1-4 shows the features available for each IBM system platforms.
Table 1-4 Electronic Services Web site: My Systems view of ESA inventory
Feature
System i
System p
System x
System z
Hardware
inventory and
system
configuration
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
System inventory
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
PTFs (software
fixes)
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
The benefits of the My Systems view of the Electronic Services Web site are:
 Easy Web access to current system configuration assists in problem determination even
when your system is unavailable.
 The My Systems view enables comparison of inventory across multiple systems.
 This view provides customized reports for printing and record keeping.
 You control the access so that you can add or remove users on the Web.
Table 1-5 shows the features available for each of the IBM systems when using ESA
information during a My Search query.
Table 1-5 Electronic Services Web site: My Search using Service Agent
Feature
System i
System p
System x
System z
Filter by installed fixes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Filter by operating system type
Yes
Yes
Yes
FMID
Filter by installed products
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
The benefits of My Search using Service Agent information are:
 Search based on what you have installed with the release level and fixes.
 Reduce irrelevant search results to help you focus on what applies to your system.
 Save searches so that you can quickly search for documents of interest and related to
your system inventory.
Table 1-6 shows the options available in the Service Request area of the Electronic Services
Web site.
Table 1-6 Electronic Services Web site Service Request
Feature
Americas
Asia
Europe
Hardware
Yes
Yes
Yes
Software
Yes
Yes
Yes
Unique country or region offering titles
Yes
Yes
Yes
Chapter 1. Welcome to IBM Electronic Services
7
The benefits of the Service Request area of the Electronic Services Web site are:
 You can access many Web tools from one location.
 You can use these tools for submitting or checking status on a service request instead of
calling IBM support.
 Tutorials are available for hardware or software submissions.
8
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
2
Chapter 2.
Use of Service Agent information
In this chapter, you explore many uses for your IBM Electronic Service Agent (ESA)
information. Be sure to consult with your account team for recent updates to existing
offerings, new offerings, or new solutions.
This chapter discusses the use of ESA information by IBM organizations, Web tools or
offerings, and processes. The value to your company is to have ESA information available
24x7 to support your operations, your staff, the IBM support community, and future planning.
The increased use or wider use of ESA information is continually updated based on client
suggestions of where this information can help you with self-assistance or help IBM provide
support with greater ease and efficiency.
The machine information you can see and use is based on your IBM ID. You can add your
IBM ID when activating the Service Agent code, request a specific machine serial to be
associated with your IBM ID on the Electronic Services Web site, or add an IBM ID to view
your machines using the Electronic Services Web site.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
9
2.1 Where ESA information is at work
Electronic Service Agent (ESA) information is found at many levels inside IBM, helping to
improve your support experience and provide the best support possible. The locations or
solutions listed are the current locations. However, solutions and locations are expanding
each month, so be sure to check with your account team.
2.2 Automatic hardware problem submission
The prompt resolution of Service Requests or Problem Management Reports (PMRs) is a
challenge to both you and to IBM. We both want to obtain the latest information to help find
the best solution to a problem in the most prompt manner.
When ESA detects a hardware problem and submits it to IBM, it brings along additional
information about the problem, the system operations at the time of the problem, and other
information, based on the type of system submitting the problem. The problem is routed to the
local support center for that system. Based on your contract coverage, the IBM Support
Center will contact you about your situation with a possible action plan.
The IBM Support community has access to your ESA inventory information, as well as the
information that came with the problem, so they have more information to use in problem
determination and resolution than in previous years.
2.3 Viewing Service Agent information
The My Systems category in the Electronic Services Web site is where you can view your
machine inventory that is collected and transmitted by ESA. The same information is visible
to the IBM Support community for use in problem determination. There are a wide variety of
uses for these reports, such as asset control, insurance documentation, disaster planning,
hardware consistency within your corporation, future planning, and software planning.
You select the machines that you want to include in the reports. The list displayed is of the
machines that are associated with your IBM ID. The selection table includes a column with
the date of the last inventory transmission to IBM so that you know how current the
information is that is provided in the reports.
The reports are available for sorting within columns and printing or downloading in several
formats, and they are based on each platform. Each report has header information that
includes the inventory and the heartbeat dates for reference. This information is available to
the IBM Support community on an internal site.
We describe these reports in detail in 3.5.2, “Select reports” on page 20.
2.4 My Search
The My Search tool that is available on the Electronic Services Web site uses the ESA
information to filter your search for an individual system. It enables you to search the IBM
technical support knowledge bases that provide informational APARs, FAQs, white papers,
and other document types.
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Note: A Demonstration Experience is provided on the Electronic Services Web site.
You will be able to assign two machine types to your IBM ID and be able to experience
the search capabilities yourself. See the Electronic Services Web site information in
3.1, “IBM Electronic Services Web site overview” on page 14 for details.
The basic steps of the My Search are:
1. You enter the search keyword or keywords.
2. Select the system that you want to use for filtering the results from the Select systems
table.
3. You can increase the filter for the search by specifying fixes that are on the system,
products that are installed, and operating system type and level. The filters vary by
platform.
2.5 Performance Management reports
Performance Management automates many of the functions that are associated with capacity
planning and performance analysis. You activate Service Agent and it automatically collects
and transmits system utilization information. This information can include CPU disk utilization,
response time, throughput, and application and user usage.
The result is the capacity planning and performance analysis reports and graphs that provide
a crisp picture of your current system operating efficiencies. Based on current trends, these
reports let you know when to consider rectifying an approaching capacity planning problem.
Performance Management puts you in control, as opposed to your system being in control of
you. The reports might be free or fee-based depending on your platform. The System i and
System p platforms offer Performance Management. More details about these reports are
available in A Systems Management Guide to Performance Management for i5 and p5
Systems, SG24-7122. View this book at:
http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/
2.6 Capacity Upgrade on Demand
Capacity Upgrade on Demand (CUoD) enables you to dynamically activate one or more
processors on your IBM system as your business peaks dictate. You can activate inactive
processors that are already installed on your server on a temporary or permanent basis.
Electronic Service Agent provides the vital product data (VPD) from your server helping to
create the activation code necessary to activate inactive processors on your server. It also
provides continuing VPD information:
 CUoD allows you to install inactive CUoD processors and memory at an extremely
attractive price and then bring new capacity online quickly and easily.
 On/Off CUoD allows self-managed temporary activation of CUoD processor and memory
resources. You can turn on and then turn off resources as needed. The system monitors
the amount and duration of the activations and generates a usage report. Billing for the
activations is based on the usage report.
Chapter 2. Use of Service Agent information
11
 Reserve CUoD allows you to have optimized, automatically managed temporary activation
of CUoD processors. You purchase a block of 30 Processor Days of usage time and then
assign inactive processors to the shared processor pool. The server then automatically
manages the workload and only charges against the Processor Day account when the
workload requires over 100% of the base (permanently activated) processing power.
 Trial Capacity Upgrade on Demand helps you meet an immediate need for additional
resources or to give inactive processor and memory resources a test run. To enable a trial,
the user must register the server at the CUoD Web site and request an activation code.
The user then uses the code to activate the trial on the registered server.
For more information about Capacity Upgrade on Demand, go to this Web site:
http://www.ibm.com/servers/eserver/about/cod/about/index.html
 Capacity BackUp provides emergency processing capacity for up to 30 days in the event
that you lose capacity in part of your operation. It helps you recover by adding reserved
capacity on a designated system. Capacity BackUp is intended for companies that require
an off-site disaster recovery machine at an extremely affordable price. Using On/Off
Capacity on Demand capabilities, Capacity BackUp offerings have a minimum set of
inactive processors that can be used for any workload. They also have a large number of
inactive processors that can be used at no charge in the event of a disaster.
2.7 Enhanced Technical Support
Enhanced Technical Support (ETS) is available in many countries as a single offering with
several components or in separate offerings using the ESA information as a reference for
customized support. The grouping of IBM tools and services varies by country. Check with
your local account team for availability.
In Europe for example, refer to this IBM Web site:
http://www.ibm.com/services/uk/index.wss/offering/its/a1007320
On this Web site, you can read about examples of what is available in the ETS relationship:
 Support for all common IT environments including IBM server and storage platforms, IBM
middleware and strategic other equipment manufacturer (OEM) products, for example,
Linux, Microsoft®, and Cisco
 Proactive advice by professional account advocates using state-of-the-art tools
 Access to the cross-European knowledge pool of support center engineers with direct
access to worldwide laboratories
 A coordinated support service to reduce cost by optimizing availability and preventing any
unplanned disruptions
 A consistent service level throughout Europe
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
3
Chapter 3.
IBM Electronic Services Web site
The Electronic Services Web site supports 65 countries (regions) in 23 languages, with more
countries added each year. This is your Web portal for all IBM Support activities with links for
planning purposes, self-assist using Electronic Service Agent (ESA) information to filter
results, technical document libraries, service request submission, viewing ESA information
reports, and access to offerings and tools that use ESA information.
This chapter explains the IBM Electronic Services Web site categories and features, including
PDFs, demonstration opportunities, and links to many IBM information sources. This chapter
gives you the opportunity to learn how to use and view the Service Agent information from
systems associated with your IBM IDs. You can customize the Web site and receive
personalized messages from IBM through this Web site.
You might find it helpful to open a Web browser and follow along viewing your country’s
Electronic Services Web page:
http://www.ibm.com/support/electronic
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
13
3.1 IBM Electronic Services Web site overview
The Electronic Services Web site evolved from a single platform, single country, single
language site in 1999 to a site that reaches many countries (in their national language) and
serves many platforms. Today you are able to view ESA inventory reports, use My Search to
get results from IBM databases filtered by your machines, open service requests, customize
the site to your preference, and receive support messages by platform or individual. You will
take a look at the major categories and the information or tools available.
Note: Several of the categories use the IBM registration ID (IBM ID) for authentication and
privacy to determine the relationship to systems (using machine serial numbers) and the
ESA information.
The Electronic Services Web site is located at:
http://www.ibm.com/support/electronic
When you are on the Web site and select your country, your first view is the IBM Electronic
Services welcome and news page. Figure 3-1 shows the Australian news page. This chapter
provides sample views in the English language. The left side of view is the list of major
categories; the middle section has animation that highlights Submit a service request, Service
Agent, and My Search activities and benefits. Just beneath the movie are two tabs: New
Links and New Offerings, which provide links that are new to your country’s site. On the right
side of the Web page are more links to information for you from your local IBM team.
Figure 3-1 Australian Web site
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
3.2 Your IBM ID
Your IBM Registration ID is your single sign-on or single point of access to IBM web
applications that use IBM Registration. You need just one IBM ID and one password to
access any IBM Registration-based application. Furthermore, your information is centralized
so you can update it in a convenient and secure location. The benefits of having an IBM
Registration ID will increase over time as more and more IBM applications migrate to IBM
Registration. Because IBM Electronic Services is a registration-based application, you need
an IBM ID for IBM Electronic Service Agent. Several categories on the Electronic Services
Web site, including My Systems and My Search, use this IBM ID for authentication. You also
need this IBM ID to view information that has been reported to IBM through the IBM
Electronic Service Agent. For your IBM ID, you can use the user ID for a profile that you
already have set up on other IBM Web sites, or you can use the user ID you already have
associated with your machine, for example, during Service Agent activation.
Several activities ensure that only authorized users can view and use the Service Agent
information:
 Service Agent code must be activated on a machine so that it can transmit inventory
information.
 A representative from your company must register their IBM ID during the activation
process.
The first person to register is the administrator who has the ability to add, remove, or
approve additional IBM IDs. Additional IBM IDs can be added using the ESA client fields
after activation. The ESA chapters show examples of the field.
 A new IBM ID user who requests access to a machine’s information completes a request
on the Electronic Services Web site under the Services Administration category. This
request goes to the administrator of the machine serial number. The administrator must
approve the request before any access is given.
For more information about the IBM ID or to create or update your IBM ID, go to this Web
page:
https://www.ibm.com/account/myibm/profile.do
Figure 3-2 shows an example of the IBM ID sign-on page on this Web site.
Figure 3-2 IBM ID sign-on page
Chapter 3. IBM Electronic Services Web site
15
3.3 About this site/Tours
The About this site/Tours category provides animated tours and documents describing
various elements of Electronic Services. All these documents are available for download and
use later.
Figure 3-3 shows the tours and PDFs available on the Australian Overview tab.
Figure 3-3 Australian About this site/Tours view
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
3.4 My messages and My custom links
My messages and My custom links are the areas where you can customize your view of the
Electronic Services Web site. You indicate which types of messages and notifications you
want to see delivered to a mailbox within this site or to your e-mail address. Figure 3-4 shows
you an example of this capability.
Figure 3-4 Create My messages profile
Chapter 3. IBM Electronic Services Web site
17
You can also customize your view of the Web site to show just those links that relate to your
system or systems. The average number of links per country (region) on this Web site is over
100. With your own profile, you limit the links to those that relate to the platform or platforms
that you have selected, as shown in Figure 3-5.
Figure 3-5 My custom links: Create the profile
3.5 My systems
My systems is the area of the Web site that provides your ESA information reports. As
mentioned before, your IBM ID is associated with the machine serial numbers that you are
able to view and use. This association is done during the activation of Service Agent or a
request made later in the Services Administration section of the Web site.
Note: The IBM Support community has visibility to similar reports through an internal site.
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
3.5.1 Select systems
To begin using My Systems, select the machines that you want to include in the reports by
checking those systems in the Identified Systems list. Figure 3-6 shows an example of the
“Select system” table. It displays the machine serial numbers that are authorized for the IBM
ID used in the session. The table includes a column with the date of the last inventory
transmission to IBM so that you know how current the information is that is provided in the
reports. The heartbeat time stamp is displayed when that is more current than the latest
inventory update.
Figure 3-6 Select a system view
After you have selected your system, the report selections reflect the unique system type.
Chapter 3. IBM Electronic Services Web site
19
3.5.2 Select reports
Based on the sample systems in Figure 3-6 on page 19, you see sample Select report views.
Figure 3-7 identifies the reports that are available for System i platforms.
Figure 3-7 Report selection for System i platforms
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Figure 3-8 identifies the reports for System p platforms. Note that these systems have reports
for stand-alone devices or for those devices in an Hardware Management Console (HMC)
environment. Certain reports are environment specific and do not include information if it is
inappropriate.
Figure 3-8 Report selection for System p platforms
Chapter 3. IBM Electronic Services Web site
21
Figure 3-9 is a sample of the reports. The Communications resources report for System i
platforms was selected. You can view this report on the window or select a resource and see
another layer of detail. If you prefer, you can download or print the report and get all the
detailed information.
Figure 3-9 Communications resources report
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Figure 3-10 shows the detail under the first resource: CMB08. You can also print or download
this report.
Figure 3-10 Hardware details report for Communications resource: CMB08
3.5.3 My Search using inventory data
My Search combines the function of search and the value of inventory data collected by the
Service Agent to provide advanced searching over the technical knowledge base of service
and support information. Using My Search and the inventory data, you are able to eliminate
search results that do not apply to your system and to include search terms that apply
specifically to your system.
The search can:
 Include or exclude certain keywords or phrases
 Specify the operating system release or a product
 Include or exclude installed fixes
The function to exclude all installed fixes eliminates search results that describe fixes that are
found on your system. If you are researching a problem that you believe might be a defect that
requires a code fix, enter search terms to describe your problem and choose the filter to
exclude all installed fixes. The search is designed to show only fixes that apply to your
system.
Chapter 3. IBM Electronic Services Web site
23
Figure 3-11 shows you the main view of the category. There are sections that you can select
to execute a search, go on a tour, experience a demonstration, and read testimonials. The
Execute a Search section takes you right into the search definition window.
Figure 3-11 My Search main view
IBM recommends that if you do not already have Service Agent activated and associated with
your IBM ID that you take advantage of the My Search demonstration experience.
My Search Demo experience
To view the My Search Demo experience:
1. Select either the Demo section or other links that point to the Demo experience.
2. You log in with your IBM ID if you have not already.
3. You see a window that explains that two systems (a System i and a System p) will be
associated with the IBM ID. The system information looks familiar, because we used the
same systems in the My systems section.
Try your own search keywords and include filters for those systems or select a saved search
provided under My saved searches. For each system, one saved search uses no filtering and
the other search filters with the inventory data. Notice the difference that it makes to filter the
search based on the inventory data. With filtering, the results are often reduced so that you
can quickly investigate the situation instead of seeing hundreds of irrelevant results.
Note: These systems are available for My systems, but they are not available for service
request submission. When the systems are no longer needed, you can delete them from
your profile using Services administration.
Now that you have machines associated to your IBM IDs, try searching.
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Figure 3-12 shows our search terms: java virtual machine.
Figure 3-12 Search terms
Next, you select the system, 9406 10-10006, to filter the results as shown in Figure 3-13.
Figure 3-13 Selecting the system to use for the filter
Chapter 3. IBM Electronic Services Web site
25
Next, you can select additional filters. The window prefills with the operating system on this
system, which is i5/OS® V5R3, as shown in Figure 3-14. You can filter the search by
specifying fixes that are on the system, products that are installed, and operating system (OS)
type and level. The filters vary by platform.
If you search for a fix to an IBM defect, you can exclude all the fixes that you already have
installed, greatly reducing the number of fixes. You can also include a product from the list of
products installed on the system. The search includes the component ID or FMID (of the
System z platform) for the product selected.
Figure 3-14 Selecting the filters
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Figure 3-15 shows how you can confirm all the search factors. You do have an opportunity to
adjust the filter selection. When you are ready, click Submit to begin the process.
Figure 3-15 Confirming filters
The search engine searches for all relevant results. Figure 3-16 on page 28 and Figure 3-17
on page 29 demonstrate the effectiveness of using Service Agent information in My Search
queries. The search text is java virtual machine on a 9406.
Chapter 3. IBM Electronic Services Web site
27
For comparison purposes, Figure 3-16 shows all the results (no filtering) for the search text
java virtual machine as 3,578 items.
Figure 3-16 Results without providing any filter for the search
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Using all the possible filters, system inventory, OS, and product filtering, Figure 3-17 shows
the results of the search, four items. Several of the result items are items that have been
translated into Japanese text.
Figure 3-17 Results using system information, products, and OS level: Four items
3.6 Open service requests
The Open a service request category enables you to submit a hardware or software service
request electronically. Each country (region) has a list of selections for both hardware and
software. You can submit problems to any of the countries on the drop-down list. The
self-guided tours in the About this site/Tours category have samples of each type of service
request.
Chapter 3. IBM Electronic Services Web site
29
Figure 3-18 shows the main page for submitting problems to Australia, from Australia. The
first field on this view is to determine which country receives the service request. After the
country is selected, the lists for hardware and software are presented for that country. The
hardware list is shown in this example.
You are taken to the product submission site or window for details about your request.
Figure 3-18 Australian view of hardware products
Figure 3-19 on page 31 shows the list of software products.
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Figure 3-19 Australian software products
3.7 Technical documents
Technical documents is the library of many links within the IBM vast collection of information.
Figure 3-20 on page 32 shows the topics that are available for Australia.
Chapter 3. IBM Electronic Services Web site
31
Figure 3-20 Technical documents category
3.8 Access premium services
The Access premium services category provides you with the information or links to the many
IBM Support and Services offerings in your country. Figure 3-21 shows the non-Web offerings
for Australia. Consult your country view of these categories and your account team, because
the availability and diversity of offerings vary by country.
Figure 3-21 Premium Services and information about services
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
3.9 Electronic Service Agent
The Electronic Service Agent category contains all the background information about each of
the Electronic Service Agents. There are informational brochures, connectivity guides,
security and privacy documents, success stories, actual code to download (if the ESA code is
not already shipped with the operating system), user guides, readme files, and tours.
Figure 3-22 is the main view of the category.
Figure 3-22 Service Agent category main view
Chapter 3. IBM Electronic Services Web site
33
The Learn about section has all the high level information that you might want to read about
each Service Agent. Figure 3-23 shows the results when you click Learn about → Security
Information.
Figure 3-23 Learn about → Security Information topic
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
See Success stories has short articles from a variety of industries and platforms. Figure 3-24
shows the General interest topic.
Figure 3-24 See Success stories → General interest
Chapter 3. IBM Electronic Services Web site
35
In the Use Service Agent Data topic, you see various tools and offerings that are enabled by
Service Agent. These include the Electronic Services Web site categories of My Systems and
My Search. The ESA inventory information gives this function customized results that are
used for improving your operations and system performance. Figure 3-25 shows the listings
under Use Service Agent Data → Performance Mgmt.
Figure 3-25 Use Service Agent Data → Performance Mgmt
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
The Download Service Agent topic shows you by platform where to find the ESA code, either
with the operating system package or available from download from the Web. In Figure 3-26,
the topic is open to the System x platform and Standalone - Linux. The download package zip
file contains the ESA code, user guide, readme file, and response file.
Figure 3-26 Download System x and Linux
Chapter 3. IBM Electronic Services Web site
37
The Reference Guides topic includes many ESA User Guides, as well as related ESA
documents. Drilling down into the System x for Linux download package, Figure 3-27 shows
the Reference Guides listed under that same platform and OS.
Figure 3-27 Reference guides for System x and Standalone - Linux
3.10 Services administration
The Services administration category enables you to do any administrative tasks related to
the Electronic Services Web site, as either a user or an administrator. You can link to this
area when in My Search or in My systems and:




Add new Customer numbers that relate to new contract coverage.
Request new systems that have activated ESA in order to add them to your IBM ID.
Remove systems from your IBM ID.
Perform administrator tasks if you are an ESA Administrator for a system.
Figure 3-28 on page 39 shows the main view if you are a user, not an administrator.
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Figure 3-28 Services administration: User view
In My service profile: Customer, the person who is the primary contact can add the
customer number to this section. You must be the person listed in the IBM contract as the
primary contact. This person can also authorize other users to be contacts for the customer
number.
In the My service profile: Systems portion of the view, you can add new IBM IDs to use and
view your list of systems. You can select one or several systems to add to an IBM ID.
Figure 3-29 shows the window after you have selected the machines to add to an IBM ID.
After you have added the IBM ID and click Submit, you get a success or fail message based
on a valid IBM ID.
Figure 3-29 Services administration: Add a contact
Chapter 3. IBM Electronic Services Web site
39
40
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
4
Chapter 4.
IBM Electronic Service Agent
IBM Electronic Service Agent supports several functions. This chapter highlights these
functions and describes the current environments in which you can use them. Detailed
information for each platform is described later in this book.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
41
4.1 Electronic Service Agent overview
The first product in the Service Agent family, Service Director™ SubSystem (Service Director
or SDSS), was introduced in 1987. It monitored direct access storage device (DASD)
input/output (I/O) attached to a S/390® platform. Over the years, the scope of platform
coverage now works with or is integrated into five operating systems. IBM clients in over 64
countries (regions) can activate Electronic Service Agent.
The following list outlines the current Electronic Service Agents. Because there are periodic
updates on each platform, refer to the Service Agent User Guide for the latest listing of
machine types and operating system coverage:






Electronic Service Agent for System i
Electronic Service Agent for System p
Electronic Service Agent for Linux on System p
Electronic Service Agent for System x
Electronic Service Agent for Linux on System x
Electronic Service Agent for System z
Figure 4-1 shows how the Service Director span of functions has evolved into the current
Service Agent functions.
Service Director
Service Agent
Function
Function
CE Tool
Site-Based
Dispatch CE
Alert Reporting to Retain
Capability Growth
Benefits
High Availability
Customer Satisfaction
Quicker Fix Time (DRA)
Parts Usage
Product Quality
Reduction in RAs
Benefit Growth
CE Tool
Customer Tool
Web-Based
Dispatch CE
Central Repository of
Collected Data
Alert Reporting to Retain
Problem Management
Vital Product Data
PTF Libraries
Customer Profiles
Capacity Planning
Benefits
Service Director Capabilities
PLUS
Expanded to Software
Services Offerings Enabler
Marketing
Support Center Enabler
Figure 4-1 Service Director growth into Service Agent
4.2 Environments
Service Agent is available on each IBM system product line for stand-alone and network
environments. The secure communication options range from modems to the Internet.
Figure 4-2 provides an example of a stand-alone environment.
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Client
Firewall
IBM
Firewall
Internet
AT&T
Gateway
SA Client
OR
IBM
Modem
Internet
SA Client
RETAIN
IBM Databases:
SA Inventory
VPD to MRPD
Call
Client
Client can view
on Web:
Inventory
Support
Center
Dispatch SSR
as appropriate
Figure 4-2 Generic stand-alone network
Figure 4-3 shows an example of a network environment. In this environment, Service Agent
flows inside complex networks and helps to manage the complexity with automatic hardware
problem submission and inventory collection.
Client
Firewall
Internet
AT&T
Gateway
IBM
Firewall
Firewall
IBM
SA Gateway
Modem
Internet
RETAIN
IBM Databases:
SA Inventory
VPD to MRPD
Call
Client
SA
Clients
Client can view
on Web:
Inventory
Support
Center
Dispatch SSR
as appropriate
Figure 4-3 Generic complex network
Chapter 4. IBM Electronic Service Agent
43
4.3 Where to install and activate IBM Electronic Service Agent
IBM Electronic Service Agent can run on a variety of operating systems and system
platforms:






i5/OS
AIX®
Linux on System p, System i, or System x
Windows® on System x
Hardware Management Console (HMC)
z/OS®
For any system platform, there can be one or more operating systems. No matter which
system platform you have, how many partitions are configured, or which operating systems
are running, IBM Electronic Service Agent must be installed and activated on each partition,
operating system, and HMC.
4.3.1 Functions by operating system
To have total coverage, IBM Electronic Service Agent needs to be running on every system,
every partition, and on every HMC. The functions provided by IBM Electronic Service Agent
vary based on the environment, including the network. For example, if your system is running
two partitions of AIX and two partitions of i5/OS, the HMC reports platform errors for the
system and partition errors for the AIX partitions. IBM Electronic Service Agent on each i5/OS
partition reports partition errors for the partition on which it is running. To have total coverage
(for this example), IBM Electronic Service Agent needs to be running on the HMC, each i5/OS
partition, and each AIX partition.
Table 4-1 shows the functions provided by the various Service Agents (SAs) based on
platform and system configuration.
Table 4-1 Service Agents by platform and OS
44
Operating
System
Report platform
errors
Report partition
errors
Report
service
information
Automatic
fix download
i5/OS
stand-alone
SA on i5/OS
N/A
Yes
Yes
i5/OS partition
with an HMC
SA on the HMC
SA on i5/OS
Yes
Yes
AIX stand-alone
SA on AIX
N/A
Yes
No
AIX partition with
an HMC
SA on the HMC
SA on the HMC
Yes
No
Linux
stand-alone
(Power)
SA on Linux
N/A
Yes
No
Linux partition
with an HMC
(Power)
SA on the HMC
SA on the HMC
Yes
No
HMC
Reports errors for itself
and reports all platform
errors
Reports partition
errors for AIX and
Linux platforms
Yes
No
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Operating
System
Report platform
errors
Report partition
errors
Report
service
information
Automatic
fix download
Windows
stand-alone
SA on Windows
N/A
Yes
No
Windows Director
Extension
SA on Windows
N/A
Yes
No
Linux
stand-alone
(X86)
SA on Linux
N/A
Yes
No
Linux Director
Extension (X86)
SA on Linux
N/A
Yes
No
z/OS
Handled by the z/OS
HMC
N/A
Yes
Yes
Storage:
DS8000™
SA on Storage
N/A
Yes
No
n series
Reported by n series
call home (Auto
support)
N/A
Yes
N/A
4.3.2 Service information
The following figures show the service information collected and sent to IBM by various
Service Agents based on the operating system or the system. These figures show that a
partition is controlled by an HMC, and the HMC is connected to it.
Table 4-2 shows the service information collected and sent to IBM by the various Service
Agents for the System i platforms.
Table 4-2 System i or i5/OS service information
Operating system
Hardware
information
Service Agent for
i5/OS (stand-alone or
partition)







Hardware
resources
IPL type
Disk details
ASP
Consolidated
hardware
information
System
configuration
Vital product
data (VPD)
Software information





Software
resources
Software license
Software license
usage information
Fixes
Fix groups
Other information









Service attributes
Network attributes
TCP/IP domain
information
TCP/IP status: IPv4
and IPv6
TCP/IP attributes:
IPv4 and IPv6
TCP/IP network
interface: IPv4 and
IPv6
TCP/IP network
routes: IPv4 and
IPv6
TCP/IP
Point-to-Point
Protocol (PPP)
setting
System register
Chapter 4. IBM Electronic Service Agent
45
Table 4-3 shows the service information collected and sent to IBM by the various Service
Agents based on the System p platform, AIX, or Linux operating system.
Table 4-3 Service information for System p platform, AIX, or Linux
Operating
System
Hardware
information
Service Agent for
AIX stand-alone



Hardware
information
Vital product data
(VPD)
Workload Manager
information (WLM)
Software
information


Installed
software
Fixes
Other information






Service Agent for
AIX partition
N/A


Service Agent for
Linux stand-alone
(Power)


Hardware
information
Vital product data
(VPD)


Installed
software
Fixes
N/A
Installed
software
Fixes






Service Agent for
Linux - partition
(Power)
N/A


PM AIX data
SNAP data
File system information
Printer information
System network
information
TCP/IP information
Installed
software
Fixes
PM AIX data
SNAP data
File system information
Printer information
System network
information
TCP/IP information
N/A
Table 4-4 shows the service information collected and sent to IBM by the various Service
Agents based on System i or System p platform’s use of HMC.
Table 4-4 Service information based on System i platform’s or System p platform’s use of HMC
Operating System
Hardware
information
HMC

Complete
information for
each partition,
including
unallocated
hardware

Hardware and
other information
for AIX and Linux
(Power) partitions
Software information
Other information
Information about
itself, AIX, and Linux
(Power) partitions
N/A
Table 4-5 shows the service information collected and sent to IBM by the various Service
Agents based on the System x platform and Windows or Linux operating system.
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Table 4-5 Service information for System x for Windows and Linux
Operating System
Hardware
information
Service Agent for
Windows (stand-alone
or Director Extension)







BIOS
Processor
Memory
Hard drives
ServeRaid drives
Power
Service processor
and PCI adapters









BIOS
Processor
Memory
Hard drives
ServeRaid drives
Power
Service processor
and PCI adapters


Service Agent for
Linux (stand-alone or
Director Extension
X86)
Software information
Device drivers
Installed programs
Other information



Installed packages
Patches



Machine location
Company
information
Contact details
Machine location
Company
information
Contact details
Table 4-6 shows the service information collected and sent to IBM by the various Service
Agents based on the System z platform or z/OS operating system.
Table 4-6 Service information for System z or z/OS
Operating System
Hardware
information
Service Agent for z/OS



Selected I/O
hardware failures
I/O statistical data
Tape media
maintenance
Software information


Installed software
Fixes
Other information


Contact
information
System
registration
4.4 Privacy and security of your information
For details about the privacy and security of your information, refer to the document,
Transmission Security Information Inventory Information Privacy, from the following Web site:
https://www.ibm.com/support/electronic
This document provides a high-level view of the security features during the Electronic
Service Agent inventory transmission between a client system and the IBM infrastructure. It
also provides a brief description of inventory information. The following sections highlight key
information from this document.
4.4.1 Privacy
The service information that is gathered from client systems is typically collected by speaking
with clients during phone calls with the IBM Support Center, pre-sales specialists,
administrative clerks, and other groups within IBM. These IBM groups have electronic access
to the information so that they can prepare, perform advance problem determination, and
more efficiently serve IBM clients.
Chapter 4. IBM Electronic Service Agent
47
Note: In certain IBM organizations, the representatives are not full-time IBM employees, or
they might be vendors who work under IBM direction and contract. These staff members
are subject to same privacy and security guidelines as any IBM employee.
The inventory information includes:
 Your support contact information, including names, phone numbers, and e-mail addresses
 System utilization, performance, system failure logs, part feature codes, part number, part
serial number, part locations, software inventory, operating system applications, program
temporary fixes (PTFs), the maintenance level, and configuration values
Using platform-specific commands, authorized IBM employees can view all inventory
information about the system.
Inventory information does not include:
 Collection or transmission of any of your company’s financial, statistical, or personnel data
 Client information
 Your business plans
In addition, Service Agent can provide a call home mechanism for other IBM offerings that
you might select in the future. The information collected by these offerings is covered in
separate agreements, for example, the Performance Management and Capacity Upgrade on
Demand offerings.
4.4.2 Transmission security
Electronic Service Agent has the ability to collect service information and transmit it to IBM on
a scheduled basis:
 All Service Agent transactions are outbound requests secured by encryption (Hypertext
Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) or POST).
 Service Agent has no inbound capability. Service Agent client code cannot accept
incoming connection attempts. For example, the Service Agent client initiates a
connection with IBM, similar to a Web browser, and then IBM replies. However, IBM never
initiates a connection to a client environment.
During the activation and setup of Electronic Service Agent, the client can select to transmit
this information either through the Internet or the AT&T Global Network Services (AGNS)
phone connection. The Service Agent code has the appropriate information to use for either
communication method. Both of these transmission paths use Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)
and TCP/IP protocols. Service Agent uses the client’s connectivity environment, including any
firewalls that the client has established.
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Figure 4-4 shows a summary of the connection into IBM. The nature of maintaining a
high-level security posture dictates that IBM and AGNS do not divulge in-depth details
regarding the management of security: tools, processes, and audits.
Client Environment
Public Network
DMZ
IBM
Problem
Management
AT&T
Global
Network
SA Client Code
• AGN Dial
• Internet Dial-up
• Internet Direct
Client Firewall (if provided)
AT&T
Public
Telephone
Network
ISP
System
Information
Internet
Internet
Gateway
Figure 4-4 Service Agent transaction environment
Internet
Note: The Internet provider relationship and connection are the responsibility of the client.
For the authentication of transmission, system IDs and passwords are generated for the client
system every six months by the server using an algorithm. The passwords are not visible to
the user. A user can request that a new password is generated, if deemed necessary.
If you select the Internet path to send your Service Agent service information, the following
process applies:
1. Service Agent collects the information to be transmitted and queues for transmission at
the scheduled time.
2. At the appropriate time, you establish an Internet connection using system IDs and
passwords that were created previously.
3. An SSL connection is established between your system and IBM.
4. Service Agent inventory information flows to the IBM destination (predetermined by the
Service Agent code).
5. Upon arrival at IBM, the inventory is transferred to the appropriate IBM database.
Chapter 4. IBM Electronic Service Agent
49
Telephone AT&T Global Network Service transmission
You can use the AGNS TCP/IP Remote Access Service (Secure IP) as a limited use network
service provider. This is a point-to-point dial connection, which has a specific IBM account
with AGNS. The information is encrypted prior to entering the AT&T network. No party on the
AT&T network can decrypt the information. The information is decrypted only inside IBM
firewalls by the appropriate application.
AT&T provides a document that describes their communication process with Service Agent.
Refer to the document, Transmission Security Information Inventory Information Privacy,
from the following Web site:
https://ibm.com/support/electronic
If you select the AGNS path for your Service Agent service information, the following process
applies:
1. You have a modem connected to your system.
2. Service Agent collects the information to be transmitted and queues for transmission at
the appropriate time.
3. The system dials the AGNS Local Interface Gateway (LIG) at the appropriate time and
establishes a connection using an AGNS ID and password.
4. An SSL connection is established with IBM through the AGNS LIG.
5. Service Agent inventory information flows to the IBM destination (predetermined by the
Service Agent code).
6. Upon arrival at IBM, Service Agent inventory is transferred to the appropriate IBM
database.
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5
Chapter 5.
IBM Electronic Service Agent
and the Hardware Management
Console security
The transmission of Service Agent (SA) or Hardware Management Console (HMC)
information is performed by a security-rich process. Depending on the connection options
available, the transaction is by modem or in many networks, through the Internet. Allowing
access between the Internet and the client’s network raises security and privacy concerns,
which we address in this chapter.
The following information and any updates are available on the Electronic Services Web site:
https://www.ibm.com/support/electronic
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
51
5.1 SA transmission security
The transmission of Service Agent information is performed by a security-rich process.
Depending on the connection options available, the transaction is by modem or in many
networks, through the Internet. Allowing access between the Internet and the client’s network
raises security and privacy concerns, which we address in this document.
IBM takes many actions to provide security-enhanced transmissions for Service Agent
transactions:
 Outbound transmission only: The client Service Agent initiates communications and does
not allow any inbound connection attempts. There are no applications “listening” to the
TCP/IP port to establish a session.
 Public key encryption: Service Agent uses a 128-bit public key encryption mechanism to
maintain the integrity and the authenticity of data exchanged between the Service Agent
and IBM. Service Agent uses Secure Socket Layer (SSL)-based encryption and
decryption.
 Enrollment: The first communication to IBM after activation is to request a unique ID and
password for each machine monitored. This ID is not visible; it is only between your
machine and IBM. The ID is generated by an algorithm using machine specific
information. IBM, using this ID and password to authenticate the client machine,
authenticates each subsequent communication.
 Machine information only: Machine or error information is sent. Service Agent does not
access or transmit any other information that is on the monitored machines. The client
license agreement clarifies the type of information that is transmitted.
5.2 SA connection options
This is a list of the connection options for Service Agent at this time. Each Service Agent User
Guide provides the latest connection options for that platform.
Note: Not all options described below are available for all platforms. Reference the
respective Service Agent User Guide.
5.2.1 Modem
Service Agent access through a modem:
 Service Agent uses the AT&T Global Network Services (AGNS) dialer for modem access.
 Service Agent provides the AGNS ID and password, which is supplied electronically in the
background. The client is not able to view this information. This is an exclusive account for
Service Agent.
 Service Agent uses these user IDs for point-to-point communications.
 A Dynamic IP address is assigned for each logon session.
 Service Agent does not accept incoming calls to the modem.
 The information is encrypted prior to entering the AGNS network. No party on the AGNS
network can decrypt the information. The information is decrypted only inside IBM
firewalls by the appropriate application.
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 AGNS has provided a document describing their communication process with Service
Agent. You can read this document on the Electronic Services Web site:
https://www.ibm.com/support/electronic
Modem transmission example
The details of a modem transmission example (as shown in Figure 5-1) are:
1. The client has a modem connected to the system.
2. Service Agent collects the information to be transmitted and queues for transmission at
the appropriate time.
3. System dials the AGNS Local Interface Gateway (LIG) at the appropriate time and
establishes a connection using AGNS ID and password.
4. SSL connection is established with IBM through the AGNS LIG.
5. Service Agent inventory information flows to the IBM destination (predetermined by
Service Agent code).
6. Upon arrival at IBM, Service Agent information is transferred to the appropriate IBM
database.
Client Environment
Public Network
AT&T
Global
Network
DMZ
IBM
Problem
Management
SA Client Code
• AGN Dial
Client Firewall (if provided)
AT&T
Public
Telephone
Network
ISP
Internet
System
Information
Figure 5-1 Modem connection example
Chapter 5. IBM Electronic Service Agent and the Hardware Management Console security
53
5.2.2 Internet HTTPS
Service Agent access using Internet HTTPS considerations are:
 Service Agent uses HTTPS, which utilizes SSL 128-bit encryption and TCP/IP protocols.
 You can configure Service Agent to work with firewalls and authentication proxies.
 Service Agent only initiates the HTTPS communications; it does not respond.
 The Internet provider relationship and connection are the responsibility of the client.
Internet transmission example
Service Agent collects the information that is transmitted and queues it for transmission at the
scheduled time. These steps show an example of Service Agent using an Internet
transmission (as shown in Figure 5-2):
1. At the appropriate time, client Service Agent code establishes the Internet connection
using System IDs and passwords that were created previously.
2. The SSL connection is established between the client system and IBM.
3. Service Agent information flows to the IBM destination (predetermined by Service Agent
code).
4. Upon arrival at IBM, Service Agent information is transferred to the appropriate IBM
database.
Client Environment
Public Network
AT&T
Global
Network
DMZ
IBM
Problem
Management
SA Client Code
• Internet Dial-up
• Internet Direct
Client Firewall (if provided)
AT&T
Public
Telephone
Network
ISP
Internet
Internet
Gateway
Figure 5-2 Internet connection
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
System
Information
5.2.3 Internet Virtual Private Network
A Virtual Private Network (VPN) gives users the privacy of a separate network over public
lines by substituting encryption and other security measures for the physically separate
network lines of traditional private networks. VPNs require the configuration of an access
device, either hardware-based or software-based, to set up a channel in a security-enhanced
environment. In the case of Service Agent, it is software-based:
 VPN access uses Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) safeguarded with IPSec.
 Internet Key Exchange (IKE) is used to perform the initial authentication and to establish
the security parameters to use when encrypting the information that will flow between the
client’s system and the IBM server.
 The Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP) is utilized as part of
establishing the L2TP tunnel. This is to perform a second level of authentication.
 There is a firewall, which filters traffic to allow access to specific IP addresses and ports,
behind the IBM VPN gateways to which the tunnels are established. When a tunnel is
established with the VPN gateway, Electronic Service Agent then establishes a socket
session to a specific port. When a socket is established, Electronic Service Agent sends
up a logon record.
VPN transmission example
These steps are an example of Service Agent using a VPN transmission (as shown in
Figure 5-3):
1. Service Agent collects the information and queues for transmission at the scheduled time.
2. At the appropriate time, client Service Agent code establishes an Internet connection
using System IDs and passwords created previously.
3. The VPN connection is established between the client system and IBM.
4. The Service Agent information flows to the IBM destination (predetermined by Service
Agent code).
5. Upon arrival at IBM, Service Agent information is transferred to the appropriate IBM
database.
Internet
Service Agent
on client machines
VPN
(tunnel connection)
Figure 5-3 VPN example
Firewall considerations
When the Service Agent uses a VPN connection for transmission with a firewall between the
client network and the Internet, you must configure the firewall to allow Service Agent to
connect to IBM.
Chapter 5. IBM Electronic Service Agent and the Hardware Management Console security
55
Service Agent establishes connections to these TCP/IP addresses:
 207.25.252.196: The IBM Boulder VPN server
 129.42.160.16: The IBM Rochester VPN server
You must enable the following ports and protocols:
 Protocol ESP
 Protocol UDP port 500
 Protocol UDP port 4500
5.3 SA and HMC privacy of client information
The inventory information that is gathered from client systems is information that is typically
collected verbally from clients during phone calls with the IBM Support Center, pre-Sales
specialists, administrative clerks, and other groups within IBM that work with the client to
provide the best possible service (technical or administrative). These IBM groups have
electronic access to the information so that they can prepare, do advance problem
determination, and more efficiently serve IBM clients.
Inventory information includes your contact information, including names, phone numbers,
and e-mail addresses; system utilization, performance, system failure logs, part feature
codes, part number, part serial number, part locations, software inventory, operating system
applications, PTFs, maintenance level, and configuration values. You can view all of the
inventory information on the system using platform-specific commands.
Inventory information does not include the collection or transmission of any of your
company’s financial, statistical, or personnel data, client information, or your business plans.
In addition, Service Agent might also provide a “call home” mechanism for other IBM offerings
that you might select in the future. The information collected by those offerings is covered in
separate agreements.
5.4 Hardware Management Console (HMC)
This section describes data that is exchanged between the Hardware Management Console
(HMC) and the IBM Service Delivery Center (SDC) and the methods and protocols for this
exchange. All the functionality that is described here refers to HMC Version 6.1.0 and higher.
The HMC uses various methods for communicating back to IBM to match different client
environments. This section outlines all the different ways in which you can configure an HMC
to communicate with IBM.
5.4.1 HMC outbound configurations
You use outbound configurations to configure the HMC to connect back to IBM. The HMC
uses its ability to connect to IBM for various situations, including reporting problems,
downloading system fixes, reporting inventory, and transmitting error data.
Modem connectivity
Figure 5-4 on page 57 shows a typical dial environment. This configuration allows the HMC to
use a modem to dial the AT&T global network and connect to the IBM POWER™
processor-based systems. The HMC automatically detects the modem when it boots up.
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
System p or System i
AT&T
Global
Network
Client LAN
Internet
AT&T
Firewall
HMC - A
IBM
Firewall
IBM Servers
HMC - B
Figure 5-4 HMC modem connection example
In this example, the HMC uses one of the configured phone numbers to dial the modem to
connect to the AT&T Global Network. After the modem connects, the HMC authenticates
itself and establishes a Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) session between the modems. Finally,
after the PPP session finishes, AT&T allows IP connections through a “Fenced Internet,”
which completes the network between the HMC and the IBM servers.
All the communications between the HMC and the IBM servers are handled through TCP
sockets. These sockets always originate from the HMC and use Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)
to encrypt the data that is sent back and forth.
The “Fenced Internet” connection uses a firewall to limit access between the HMC and the
Internet. Specifically, it allows communication only between the HMC and a list of IBM IP
addresses. All other access to and from the Internet is blocked.
Note: The client can also configure the HMC’s internal firewall, which also applies to IP
connections over the modem.
Internet connectivity
In Figure 5-5 on page 58, the HMC uses a client-provided Internet connection to connect to
the IBM servers. All the communications are handled through TCP sockets (which always
originate from the HMC) and use SSL to encrypt the data that is being sent back and forth.
For this type of configuration, the client can optionally use a second network card to
physically separate the local system network from the Internet-enabled network.
For the HMC to communicate successfully, the client’s external firewall must allow
established TCP packets to flow freely on port 443. The use of Source Network Address
Translation (SNAT) and masquerading rules to mask the HMC’s source IP address are both
acceptable. The firewall can also limit the specific IP addresses to which the HMC can
connect.
Chapter 5. IBM Electronic Service Agent and the Hardware Management Console security
57
System p or System i
Internet
Client LAN
Customer
Firewall
HMC - A
IBM
Firewall
VPN
Server
IBM Servers
HMC - B
Figure 5-5 HMC connecting to IBM without a proxy server
Optionally, you can also enable the HMC to connect to the Internet through a
client-configured proxy server, as shown in Figure 5-6.
To forward SSL sockets, the proxy server must support the basic proxy header functions (as
described in RFC #2616) and the CONNECT method. Optionally, you can configure basic
proxy authentication (RFC #2617) so that the HMC authenticates before attempting to
forward sockets through the proxy server.
For the HMC to communicate successfully, the client’s proxy server must allow connections
to port 443. The proxy server can also limit the specific IP addresses to which the HMC can
connect.
System p or System i
Internet
Client LAN
Proxy
Server
HMC - A
Customer
Firewall
HMC - B
Figure 5-6 HMC connecting to IBM using a client-provided proxy server
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IBM
Firewall
IBM Servers
Internet Virtual Private Network (VPN) connectivity
Figure 5-7 shows the HMC connecting to IBM using an Internet VPN. This is similar to the
Internet Connectivity in Figure 5-5 on page 58, except that the connections are tunneled
inside of another network layer.
In this example, the HMC connects through the client-provided Internet connection by the
default route. For this type of configuration, the client can optionally use a second network
card to physically separate the local system network from the Internet-enabled network.
Before the HMC tries to connect to the IBM servers, it first establishes an encrypted VPN
tunnel between the HMC and the IBM VPN server gateway. The HMC initiates this tunnel
using Encapsulated Security Payload (ESP, Protocol 50) and User Datagram Protocol (UDP).
After it is established, all further communications are handled through TCP sockets, which
always originate from the HMC.
For the HMC to communicate successfully, the client’s external firewall must allow traffic for
protocol ESP and port 500 UDP to flow freely in both directions. The use of SNAT and
masquerading rules to mask the HMC’s source IP address are both acceptable, but port 4500
UDP must be open in both directions instead of protocol ESP. The firewall can also limit the
specific IP addresses to which the HMC can connect.
Note: The client can also configure the HMC’s internal firewall, which applies to IP
connections that go through the VPN tunnel.
System p or System i
Internet
Client LAN
Customer
Firewall
HMC - A
IBM
Firewall
VPN
Server
IBM Servers
HMC - B
Figure 5-7 HMC connecting to IBM using Internet VPN
Pass-through server connectivity
Configuring pass-through server connectivity allows an HMC to borrow a shared VPN
connection or modem from a properly configured i5/OS partition.
Multi-hop VPN
Figure 5-8 on page 60 shows a configuration that allows the HMC to use the multi-hop VPN
capability of a client’s i5/OS partition.
Chapter 5. IBM Electronic Service Agent and the Hardware Management Console security
59
Before the HMC tries to connect to the IBM servers, it first establishes an unencrypted Layer
2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) tunnel to the i5/OS partition and requests the creation of an
encrypted VPN tunnel between the partition and the IBM VPN server. The HMC initiates this
tunnel using a UDP socket. After it is established, all further communications are handled
through TCP sockets, which always originate from the HMC.
For the HMC to communicate successfully, the HMC must be able to open a 2-way UDP
socket to the i5/OS partition on port 1701. Additionally, the client must configure the client’s
external firewall to allow the partition to properly establish the VPN tunnel to IBM.
Note: The client can also configure the HMC’s internal firewall, which also applies to IP
connections that go through the VPN tunnel.
System p or System i
Internet
Client LAN
Customer
Firewall
HMC - A
IBM
Firewall
VPN
Server
IBM Servers
HMC - B
Figure 5-8 HMC using the multi-hop VPN
Remote modem
Figure 5-9 on page 61 shows a configuration in which the modem that the HMC uses is
shared with a client’s i5/OS partition.
Before the HMC tries to connect to the IBM servers, it first establishes an unencrypted L2TP
tunnel to the i5/OS partition and requests the establishment of a modem connection to the
AT&T Global Network. The HMC initiates this tunnel using a UDP socket. After the modem
connection is established, the HMC authenticates itself and establishes a PPP session
between the dialed AT&T modem and itself. Finally, after the PPP session finishes, AT&T
allows IP connections through a “Fenced Internet,” which completes the network between the
HMC and the IBM servers.
All the communications between the HMC and the IBM servers are handled through TCP
sockets. These sockets always originate from the HMC and use SSL to encrypt the data that
is being sent back and forth.
The “Fenced Internet” connection uses a firewall to limit access between the HMC and the
Internet. Specifically, it allows communication only between the HMC and a list of IBM IP
addresses. All other access to and from the Internet is blocked.
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Note: The client can also configure the HMC’s internal firewall, which also applies to IP
connections over the modem.
System p or System i
Internet
Client LAN
AT&T
Global
Network
HMC - A
AT&T
Firewall
IBM
Firewall
IBM Servers
HMC - B
Figure 5-9 Shared modem example
5.4.2 HMC inbound configurations
Inbound connectivity configurations allow an IBM service support representative (SSR) to
connect from IBM directly to your HMC or the systems that the HMC manages. The following
sections describe two approaches to remote service. Both approaches only allow a one-time
use after enabling.
Modem
Figure 5-10 on page 62 shows an inbound configuration using a modem.
For remote service over a modem, the modem must be set up to accept incoming phone
calls. An IBM representative then logs in to a special server and uses that to dial directly into
the client’s modem. After the modem answers, a PPP session is initiated, and the IBM
representative must authenticate using credentials based on the value that the client entered
into the PPP address field on the Customize Inbound Connectivity panel.
After the PPP session is successfully initiated, the HMC creates an alternate IP address and
attaches it to the virtual PPP network device for each partition to which the client allows
access. Special routing rules are then put in place to route network packets to those IP
addresses and over to the intended partition.
Finally, if the client has disabled access to the HMC, firewall rules are put in place to block all
traffic that goes to the HMC. If the client has allowed access to the HMC, the firewall blocks
all traffic except for packets targeting the ports outlined in 5.3, “SA and HMC privacy of client
information” on page 56. Note that these rules override any rules that the client set through
the Customize Network Settings panel.
Chapter 5. IBM Electronic Service Agent and the Hardware Management Console security
61
System p or System i
IBM Support
Personnel
Client LAN
Global
Telephone
Network
HMC - A
IBM Service
Server
HMC - B
Figure 5-10 Inbound connectivity using a modem
VPN
Figure 5-11 on page 63 shows an inbound configuration using VPN.
A remote service VPN session can be initiated over a modem, Internet VPN, or a
pass-through i5/OS partition. At least one of these methods of connectivity must be
configured through the Outbound Connectivity panel.
To initiate the VPN session, the HMC connects into the IBM VPN server as described in 5.2.3,
“Internet Virtual Private Network” on page 55. A client who configures the Outbound Internet
VPN to use the existing Internet connection must ensure that the firewall has been properly
configured to allow connections to the servers listed in “Firewall considerations” on page 55.
After the VPN session has been initiated, the HMC initiates additional L2TP+PPP tunnels for
each partition to which the client allows access. Special routing rules are then put in place to
route network packets on those tunnels over to the intended partitions.
Finally, if the client has disabled access to the HMC, firewall rules are put in place to block all
traffic that goes to the HMC. If the client has allowed access to the HMC, the firewall blocks
all traffic except for packets targeting the ports outlined in “Firewall considerations” on
page 55. Note that these rules override any rules that the client set through the Customize
Network Settings panel.
After the VPN session has been fully established, an authorized IBM Service Representative
logs in to the IBM Service Server and connects to the HMC through the VPN session. The
IBM Service Server has a special firewall in place that keeps the client’s VPN session
completely separate from the IBM intranet. Access to the client’s VPN session through the
IBM Service Server is possible only through the use of special tools that require special
authorization and knowledge to use.
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System p or System i
IBM Support
Personnel
Internet
Client LAN
Customer
Firewall
HMC - A
IBM
Firewall
VPN
Server
IBM Service
Server
HMC - B
Figure 5-11 Inbound connectivity using VPN
5.5 HMC protocols and encryption
This section describes the protocols, encryption algorithms, and security that the various
communication methods use. It is intended to be a conceptual overview, not to provide
implementation details for particular technologies.
5.5.1 AT&T Global Network
When the HMC tries to connect to IBM using one of the phone numbers available from the
Outbound Connectivity Modem panel, it is dialing into the AT&T Global Network Fenced
Internet Remote Access Dial Service.
After the HMC’s modem successfully connects into one of AT&T’s Local Interface Gateways
(LIGs), it initiates a PPP session and authenticates with the server using a special account
and user ID that are sent using Password Authentication Protocol (PAP). Upon successful
authentication, the LIG assigns the HMC a dynamic IP address from a pool for the duration of
the connection.
All packets that flow through the LIG from the HMC are inspected to ensure that the source of
the packet is the assigned IP address and that the destination matches one of the authorized
IBM servers or to one of the utility services provided by AT&T (such as domain name
servers). Return packets that flow through the LIG back to the HMC must have destinations
that match the assigned IP addresses, and the source must match the IBM server with which
the IP addresses communicate. Any packets not matching these criteria are discarded.
5.5.2 SSL
The SSL sockets used by the HMC are actually Transport Layer Security (TLS) sockets
(sometimes referred to as SSLv4). The initial handshake uses a public/private asymmetric
1024-bit key. After the handshake, they negotiate the bulk encryption depending on the IBM
server to which a connection is being made. IBM systems in the SDC use a symmetric 128-bit
Rivest Cipher 4 (RC4) encryption or a symmetric 256-bit Advanced Encryption Standard
(AES) encryption.
Chapter 5. IBM Electronic Service Agent and the Hardware Management Console security
63
5.5.3 VPN
The VPN connection that is used by the HMC is an IP Security (IPSec) implementation in
tunnel mode over a UDP socket that uses L2TP+PPP encapsulation for the actual data
transmission. The VPN key exchange is done using Internet Key Exchange (IKE), which is
authenticated as part of the ESP encryption using a Pre-Shared Key (PSK). The ESP
encryption uses a 192-bit Triple DES (3DES) encryption key with a 160-bit Message Digest
Algorithm 5 (MD5) hash authentication key. The authentication and encryption keys are
renegotiated at a random time interval around every 30 minutes.
After the IPSec tunnel has been properly established, the HMC creates an L2TP tunnel
between the VPN server and itself. Within that tunnel, the HMC then establishes one or more
PPP sessions that the server authenticates using the Challenge Handshake Authentication
Protocol (CHAP). All further HMC data sockets are then opened over one of the established
PPP sessions.
5.6 HMC data and information
This section outlines what data is sent and the reasons for sending data when the HMC
connects to the IBM Service Delivery Center.
The reasons for connecting to IBM are:
 Reporting a problem with the HMC or one of the systems that it manages back to IBM
 Downloading fixes for systems that the HMC manages
 Reporting inventory and system configuration information back to IBM:
– The client’s problem and system inventory information are readily available to the IBM
Support Community, which helps reduce problem resolution time.
– The client can view the client’s inventory on the Electronic Services Web site. The
reports are unique by hardware platform.
– The Electronic Services Web site enables searching IBM technical databases using
your Electronic Service Agent information to filter results.
 Sending extended error data for analysis by IBM
 Repairing and verifying system parts and enclosures
 Reporting heartbeat and status of monitored systems
 Sending performance and utilization data for system I/O, network, memory, and
processors
5.6.1 Data sent to IBM
Table 5-1 on page 65 is a list of the files that can be sent to IBM, plus short descriptions of the
contents of those files. Along with the information contained in these files, the HMC also
sends back client contact information, machine model and serial numbers, and debug traces
for HMC software. None of the information or debug data that is sent to IBM contains client
data.
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Table 5-1 Files sent to IBM
File
Description
actzuict.dat
Tasks performed
hmc.eed
HMC code level obtained from lshm c -V and connection information
obtained from lssysconn -r all
iqyvpd.dat
Configuration information associated with the HMC
iqyvpdc.dat
Configuration information associated with the HMC
iqyycom0.log
HMC firmware log information backlog0
iqyycom1.log
HMC firmware log information backlog1
iqyycom2.log
HMC firmware log information backlog2
iqyylog.log
HMC firmware log information
PMap.eed
Partition map obtained from lshsc -w -c machine
problem s.xml
XML version of the problem opened on the HMC for the HMC and the
server
sys.eed
Output from the following commands:
 lssyscfg -r cage
 lssyscfg -r frame
 lsdump -e $machine -s a
 lsdump -e $machine -s b
 lshsc -i -a >> managedSystems
 lssyscfg -r lpar
 lshwres -r proc -- level lpar
 lshwres -r mem -m $machine --level lpar
 lshwres -r io -m $machine --rsub type slot
 lsdump -m $machine
 lssyscfg -r sys -m $machine
 lssyscfg -m $machine -r sys
 lssyscfg -m $machine -r lpar
 lssyscfg-m $machine -r sysprof
machType-Model_Seri
al.VPD.xml
Configuration information associated with the managed system
filetype.machineSerial.
dumpID yyyymmddhhmmss
Dump file type set to one of the following:
 SYSDUMP for a platform system dump
 FSPDUMP for a FipS Service Processor dump
 BMCDUMP for a BMC SP dump
 SMADUMP for a SMA dump
 PWRDUMP for a power subsystem dump
 LOGDUMP for a platform event log entry dump
 RSCDUMP for a platform resource dump
These dumps do not contain any client-related information.
5.7 HMC additional considerations
Next, we describe additional HMC information that is available to you.
Chapter 5. IBM Electronic Service Agent and the Hardware Management Console security
65
5.7.1 IBM server address list
An HMC uses the following internet protocol (IP) addresses when the client configures it to
use Internet connectivity. All connections to these IP addresses use port 443 TCP.
For the Americas, use:




129.42.160.48
129.42.160.49
207.25.252.200
207.25.252.204
For other than the Americas, use:




129.42.160.48
129.42.160.50
207.25.252.200
207.25.252.205
Note: When configuring a firewall to allow an HMC to connect to these servers, the client
only needs the IP addresses specific to the client’s region.
5.7.2 VPN server address list
The HMC uses these IP addresses when it is configured to use Internet VPN connectivity. All
connections use protocol ESP and port 500 UDP, or ports 500 and 4500 UDP when a
Network Address Translation (NAT) firewall is used.
VPN servers for all regions:
 129.42.160.16
 207.25.252.196
5.7.3 Remote service HMC port list
When an inbound remote service connection to the HMC is active, only the following ports
(shown in Table 5-2) are allowed through the firewall for TCP and UDP.
Table 5-2 Ports list
Port
Comments
22, 23, 2125, and 2300
These ports are used for access to the HMC.
9090, 9735, 9940, and 30000-30009
These ports are used for the Web-based System
Manager.
5.7.4 Multiple HMCs
This section describes an environment with multiple HMCs configured with outbound
connectivity.
Discovery and inter-console communication
Consoles have the ability to discover and communicate with each other. A console discovers
other consoles by using a UDP broadcast (port 9900) on the subnet of each configured
network card. A console also discovers any other console managing the systems that it
manages. A console establishes communication with any discovered console by using an
SSL socket (port 9920) with Diffie-Hellman key exchange.
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Call home servers
A console automatically forwards its call home requests to any discovered console that is
configured as a call home server. When more than one call home server console is available,
a brokering process involving inter-console communication selects a console to handle each
request. Failures are automatically retried at remaining call home server consoles.
Chapter 5. IBM Electronic Service Agent and the Hardware Management Console security
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
6
Chapter 6.
IBM Electronic Service Agent:
Connectivity for System i and
System p
This connectivity chapter contains the complete list of tasks needed to set up connectivity to
service and support. You might have already completed many of these tasks (during initial
server setup, for example). You can use this information to verify that the tasks were
completed correctly.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
69
6.1 Where to install and activate IBM Electronic Service Agent
IBM Electronic Service Agent can run on a variety of operating systems and system
platforms:






i5/OS
AIX
Linux
Windows
Hardware Management Console (HMC)
z/OS
For any system platform, there can be one or more operating systems. No matter which
system platform you have, how many partitions are configured, or which operating systems
are running, IBM Electronic Service Agent must be installed and activated on each partition,
operating system, and HMC.
The functions provided by IBM Electronic Service Agent vary based on the network
environment. For example, if your system platform is running two partitions of AIX and two
partitions of i5/OS, the HMC reports platform errors for the system and partition errors for the
AIX partitions. IBM Electronic Service Agent on each i5/OS partition reports partition errors
for the partition on which it runs. To have total coverage, IBM Electronic Service Agent needs
to run on the HMC, each i5/OS partition, and each AIX partition.
6.2 Before you begin
This chapter defines direct Internet connection as access to the Internet from a logical
partition, server, or HMC by direct or indirect access. Indirect means that you are behind a
Network Address Translation (NAT) firewall. Direct means that you have a globally routable
address without an intervening firewall (which blocks the ports that are needed for
communication to service and support).
6.2.1 Determine your connectivity method
In this section, we recommend options for your connectivity method.
If you have an HMC and have multiple logical partitions
In this case, we recommend:
 For the HMC, use either direct Internet or a dial-up connection to connect the HMC to
service and support.
 For logical partitions:
– For AIX or Linux logical partitions, hardware errors are reported through the HMC by
using the connection method provided for the HMC.
– For i5/OS logical partitions, use one of the following methods (listed in the
recommended order):
70
•
Direct Internet from each logical partition: This method allows larger fix files to pass
through the connection to the server. Each logical partition can receive the fixes
that it needs. It is also faster than modem dial-up connection.
•
Shared direct Internet through one of the i5/OS logical partitions: This method also
allows larger fix files to pass through the connection to the server. It allows
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
connectivity to be concentrated through one server or logical partition, which
simplifies firewall rules. It is also faster than modem dial-up connection.
•
Shared dial-up connection through one of the i5/OS logical partitions: If you do not
have direct or shared direct Internet, you might choose to use a shared dial-up
connection. It is slower and restricts the file size that can pass through the
connection.
If you do not have an HMC and logical partitions
Your options if you do not have an HMC and logical partitions are:
 For AIX or Linux, use direct Internet, Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), or direct dial-up
connection.
 For i5/OS, use direct or shared direct Internet, or a direct or shared dial-up connection.
6.3 Prerequisites
The following list describes various connection types.
Note: Work with the network administrator if necessary.
Internet connections:
 For HMC environments, and for i5 servers in a non-HMC environment, ensure the
following ports are open for communication:
– Protocol UDP ports 500 and 4500 with the following IP addresses:
•
Boulder: 207.25.252.196 and Rochester: 129.42.160.16
– ESP (protocol 50) with the following IP addresses:
•
Boulder: 207.25.252.196 and Rochester: 129.42.160.16
 For p5 servers in a non-HMC environment, ensure the following port is open for
communication:
– Protocol TCP port 443 with the following IP addresses:
•
Boulder: 207.25.252.200 and Rochester: 129.42.160.48
 If multiple logical partitions are sharing an Internet connection, you need the IP addresses
or host names created for TCP/IP and for virtual Ethernet.
Dial-up:
 For dial-up (modem) connection, determine the necessary configuration settings,
including:
– Local area code
– Pre-dial information, such as dialing “9” to dial outside the network
– Use of commas if delayed dialing is needed
TCP/IP:
 Ensure that TCP/IP is set up and configured correctly. If not, work with the network
administrator and your operating system documentation.
Chapter 6. IBM Electronic Service Agent: Connectivity for System i and System p
71
6.4 Ensure that your physical network is set up correctly
To ensure that your physical network is set up correctly, perform the following steps:
1. Verify the physical connection between the service processor and the HMC.
The service processor is part of your platform hardware and monitors hardware attributes
and conditions on your server. The service processor is controlled by server firmware
(Licensed Internal Code) and does not require an operating system to perform its tasks.
The connection to the service processor is recommended for all servers, whether or not
you have logical partitions. This connection is represented in Figure 6-1.
HMC
Figure 6-1 The Ethernet connection between your HMC and the service processor on your server
2. Verify the physical connection between the HMC and the operating systems.
Note: This step is optional for i5/OS.
This connection allows your operating systems to communicate with your HMC. How you
set up this connection depends on your configuration:
– If your server is in its manufacturing default configuration, you make this connection
when you set up your server.
– If your server has multiple logical partitions, you must ensure that your HMC can
communicate with each logical partition and that the logical partitions can
communicate with each other. You set up these connections as you create your logical
partitions.
Note: The manufacturing default configuration is the original configuration of the
managed system. All of the resources on the managed system are assigned to a
single logical partition. You can install an operating system on the single logical
partition and use the managed system in this non-partitioned state.
You can use either of the following methods. Both of the networking methods require
basic TCP/IP configuration on your logical partitions. For instructions to configure TCP/IP,
see your operating system documentation:
– Have an Ethernet adapter for one logical partition (this can be the service partition for
i5/OS) and then use virtual Ethernet to enable the logical partitions to communicate
with each other and with the HMC. This option is the preferred option, because it
requires that you have only one physical adapter in the system. Figure 6-2 on page 73
shows the Virtual Ethernet connection between your logical partitions and the physical
Ethernet connection between your service partition and the HMC.
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
HMC
Figure 6-2 Virtual Ethernet connection between logical partitions and the physical Ethernet connection
– Have a LAN adapter for each logical partition and then have a physical connection
between each logical partition and the HMC. This option requires that you have a
router and a physical LAN adapter for each logical partition. Figure 6-3 shows this
configuration.
Router
HMC
Figure 6-3 Physical Ethernet connections between logical partitions and your HMC through a router
3. Verify the physical connection from your site to service and support. This connection
enables you to report hardware problems and other server information to service and
support. It also enables you to receive fixes electronically from service and support as
shown in Figure 6-4.
Service
and
Support
HMC
Figure 6-4 The connection between service and support for a company with a server and an HMC
Chapter 6. IBM Electronic Service Agent: Connectivity for System i and System p
73
6.5 Obtain or verify an IBM ID
You need an IBM ID to register IBM Electronic Service Agent on the HMC and for IBM
Electronic Service Agent on the operating systems, including AIX, i5/OS, and Linux. You also
need this IBM ID to view information that has been reported to IBM through the IBM
Electronic Service Agent.
If you are a client, perform the following steps:
1. Using a Web browser, go to the My IBM Profile Web site at:
https://www.ibm.com/account/profile
2. Verify that you are registered:
– If you are registered, “Welcome back” appears on the Web site. Or, you can select
Sign in and see if your e-mail address is recognized.
– If you are not registered, select Register and fill out the registration form.
3. Record your IBM ID (the e-mail address that you registered). You will need the ID during
6.6, “Verify the HMC service settings”.
If you are a service provider, ask the client for their IBM ID. You will need the IBM ID during
6.6, “Verify the HMC service settings”. The simplest way to verify that the HMC service
settings are set up correctly is by using the Guided Setup wizard.
Note: If you have not set up your server, do that now. See the Initial server setup topic in
the eServer Hardware Information Center. For details, refer to Task 15. Access additional
resources.
6.6 Verify the HMC service settings
To verify the HMC serice settings, install the operating systems on your server or logical
partitions:
1. Access the Guided Setup wizard using the HMC interface:
a. In the navigation area, select the HMC with which you want to work.
b. Click Information Center and Setup Wizard.
c. In the contents pane, click Launch the Guided Setup Wizard. The Guided Setup
wizard steps you through the tasks that are required to set up your HMC, including the
tasks that are required to set up your service environment.
Note: You can ignore the tasks that are unrelated to service and support, such as
setting the date and time.
2. Ensure that the following service tasks are completed correctly:
– Configuration of the network settings
– Client contact information for service-related activities
– Configuration of connectivity for service-related activities. Choose one or more of the
following types of connectivity for this procedure:
•
74
VPN: When configuring the HMC’s network settings for connecting using direct or
indirect Internet, you must configure the HMC with a default gateway to access the
Internet. Select HMC Management → HMC Configuration → Customize
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Network Settings. Ensure that the Default Gateway Information field has a
Gateway address listed and that a selection is made in the Gateway device field (for
example, any).
•
HTTPS (HMC Release 5.2) Support for Proxy Servers
•
Dial-up
– Configuration of Service Focal Point settings
3. Test the connection from the HMC:
a. In the HMC navigation area, open Service Applications → Remote Support →
Customize Outbound Connectivity.
b. Select the tab for the type of outbound connectivity that you want for your HMC:
•
•
•
•
Local Modem
Internet VPN
HTTPS
Pass-Through Systems
c. Click Test and then click Start.
d. If the test fails, continue with the next step.
e. Ensure your country or region is listed. Select Service Applications → Remote
Support → Customize Customer Information. Ensure that your country (region) is
selected from the drop-down list.
Chapter 6. IBM Electronic Service Agent: Connectivity for System i and System p
75
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
7
Chapter 7.
IBM Electronic Service Agent for
System i
The IBM Electronic Service Agent for System i automatically ships with the System i platform
without an additional charge. It is designed to monitor events and transmit system inventory
information to IBM. Service Agent has been available on the System i platform since 1992
under the name Service Director and as Service Agent since 2000.
This chapter is written for system administrators who are familiar with or have a working
knowledge of IBM i5/OS system.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
77
7.1 Where to install and activate IBM Electronic Service Agent
IBM Electronic Service Agent can run on a variety of operating systems and system
platforms:






i5/OS
AIX
Linux
Windows
Hardware Management Console (HMC)
z/OS
For any system platform, there can be one or more operating systems. No matter which
system platform you have, how many partitions are configured, or which operating systems
are running, you must install and activate IBM Electronic Service Agent on each partition,
operating system, and HMC.
The functions provided by IBM Electronic Service Agent vary based on the network
environment. For example, if your system platform is running two partitions of AIX and two
partitions of i5/OS, the HMC reports platform errors for the system and partition errors for the
AIX partitions. IBM Electronic Service Agent on each i5/OS partition reports partition errors
for the partition on which it is running. To have total coverage, IBM Electronic Service Agent
needs to run on the HMC, on each i5/OS partition, and on each AIX partition.
7.2 IBM Electronic Service Agent V5R4 for System i platform
IBM Electronic Service Agent for System i platform is designed to reduce the downtime when
a hardware or software problem occurs or is predicted to occur. Detected hardware failures
are sent immediately to the IBM Support Center. The regular schedule of collecting machine
inventory information (also known as service information on this platform) enables support
representatives or representatives of your organization to quickly confirm the machine’s
configuration.
IBM Electronic Service Agent V5R4 is integrated into the base i5/OS V5R4 operating system
(5722-SS1). It includes the following features:




Secure Internet access to IBM through Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS)
Access to IBM through an authenticating proxy
Easy configuration using wizards
Reporting of certain software problems
For information about IBM Electronic Service Agent activation, use, connectivity, and
troubleshooting, see the IBM Electronic Service Agent topic in the i5/OS Version 5 Release 4
Information Center:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/iseries/v5r4/topic/rzaji/service_agent.htm
7.3 Stand-alone system compared to partitioned system
Hardware and software problems are reported through two paths, depending on your
hardware environment:
 Stand-alone (non-partitioned) system:
– Service Agent reports hardware problems and software problems to IBM.
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
 Partitioned system:
– Service Agent for System i detects partition errors for the i5/OS partition on which it is
running and reports the problems to IBM.
– Service Agent for System i detects software errors for the i5/OS partition on which it is
running and reports the problems to IBM.
– Service Agent on the HMC detects platform errors for the system and partition errors
for the AIX and Linux partitions and reports the problems to IBM.
The service information collected by Service Agent varies based on the configuration of the
system.
The machine inventory collection function of Service Agent for System i platform collects
system information about memory, hard disk drives or RAID drives, Peripheral Component
Interconnect (PCI) adapters, and communications information. You can view Service Agent
Inventory at the following Web site using your IBM ID as authentication:
https://www.ibm.com/support/electronic
Figure 7-1 shows a System i multi-partition environment reporting to the HMC.
Service Agent for System i
HMC
Service Agent
AT&T
Gateway
i5/OS
Service
Agent
Mgmt
Central
Internet
Client
Firewall
Firewall
Platform errors, AIX &
Linux partition errors
i5/OS
Service
Agent
Mgmt
Central
AIX
Linux
Service
Agent
Service
Agent
IBM
IBM
Firewall
Firewall
IBM
Modem
Note:
All AIX and Linux errors are
reported to IBM via the HMC. This
includes all partition and platform
types of errors
i5/OS platform errors are reported
via the HMC. i5/OS partition errors
are reported by the partition itself
via its own connectivity to IBM
RETAIN
Client can use on the Web:
Inventory on Electronic
Services web site
Performance Management
reports
Premium Search
IBM Databases:
SystemExpert
SA Service information
VPD to MRPD
Perf Mgmt
Test Case
Call
Client
Support
Center
Dispatch SSR
as appropriate
Figure 7-1 System i multi-partition environment
7.4 Interaction with other components
Service Agent for System i interacts with several system software components (as shown in
Figure 7-2 on page 80) in order to provide coverage for your system. These components
Chapter 7. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System i
79
include Electronic Customer Support (ECS), Connection Manager (Universal Connection),
Management Central, Problem Log Manager, Database, and Java™. Service Agent also
interfaces with components within the IBM back-end infrastructure, such as the Electronic
Services Problem Service Provider and the Profile Service Provider.
Is called by and calls
Reports problems using
Calls and is called by
System i
Service Agent
Problem Log
Manager
Electronic
Customer
Support (ECS)
Management
Central
Collects
Service
Information
Collects
Retrieves credentials from
Credential
Manager
Establishes a connection using
Connection
Manager
Exchanges information with
Exchanges
information with
IBM
IBM
Green: Problem reporting
Yellow: Inventory
Blue: IBM
Figure 7-2 How Service Agent works with other components
7.5 Activation
Service Agent must be activated before it can report problems or send service information to
IBM. For instructions about how to activate Service Agent, see the Information Center
articles: “Pre-Activation checklist” and “Activation steps and troubleshooting,” at this Web
page:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/iseries/v5r4/index.jsp?topic=/rzaji/servi
ce_agent.htm
With the inclusion of Service Agent into i5/OS, it is not possible to uninstall Service Agent;
however, you can disable Service Agent. To disable Service Agent, from the Service Agent
main menu, select Change Service Agent attributes (option 1) and set the Enable parameter
to *NO.
7.6 Connectivity
There are many ways to configure Service Agent and its connectivity in a network. The
recommended method is to use a direct Internet connection. A direct Internet connection
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
provides the largest bandwidth for improved performance in the transmission of information to
IBM. It is the most efficient connection type.
In the case where you use a modem, we recommend that you use the internal modem by
having it logically attached to each partition so that all partitions can share the modem as a
single connectivity point to IBM. You can configure Service Agent on i5/OS to use a modem
on any partition or the modem on the HMC.
For information and scenarios about connectivity options, see the i5/OS Information Center
topic on Universal Connection, which is located at:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/iseries/v5r4/index.jsp?topic=/rzatj/kicko
ff.htm
7.6.1 Service Agent in a network
Automatic hardware problem reporting and service information collection are started in
separate tasks. When using a centralized approach, we recommend that you activate
problem reporting first.
Problem reporting
In a network environment, Service Agent and System Manager/400 (SM/400) can work
together to report problems to IBM through a central system. It is important to note:
 On the central system (Service Provider):
– Service Agent must be activated.
– Service Agent must be configured to accept problems from remote systems (Service
Requesters).
This is controlled by a Service Agent attribute on the central system. To change this
attribute, from the Service Agent main menu, select Change Service Agent attributes
(option 1). The command parameter Report remote problems must be set to *YES.
– The Activation password (also entered using the Change Service Agent attributes
menu option) must be supplied. Contact your IBM Service Representative to obtain the
activation password.
 On each endpoint system (Service Requester):
– Service Agent must be activated.
– Service Agent must be configured to report problems to a central system (Service
Provider).
This is controlled by a Service Agent attribute on each endpoint system. To change
this attribute, from the Service Agent main menu, select Change Service Agent
attributes (option 1). The command parameter “Report problem to” must specify the
control point name and the network ID of the central system (Service Provider).
There are several Software Knowledge Base articles (as shown in Table 7-1 on page 82) that
are useful to configure Service Agent and System Management/400 to work together to
provide centralized problem reporting.
Chapter 7. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System i
81
Table 7-1 Software Knowledge Base articles for System Manager/400
Document title
Document number
“Installation, Configuration, and Start-Up for
System View System Manager/400”
14720929
“System View System Manager/400
Communication Requirements”
14425526
“Logging Remote Problems Using System
Manager and Service Agent”
20310946
For more information about configuring and using System Manager, refer to the document,
System Manager Use, SC41-5321, at this Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/iseries/v5r4/topic/books/sc415321.pdf
Service information
In a network environment, Service Agent and Management Central can work together to
collect and send service information to IBM through a central system.
Management Central on the central system provides an Extreme Support wizard to help you
configure the collection and transmission of service information to IBM. For instructions about
configuring Extreme Support to use Service Agent, see the i5/OS Information Center topic
entitled Configure Extreme Support.
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/iseries/v5r4/index.jsp?topic=/rzaji/rzaji
extsptcfg.htm
Figure 7-3 on page 83 shows iSeries® Navigator and Extreme Support on your system.
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Figure 7-3 Management Central, Extreme Support menus
For information about using Management Central, see the i5/OS Information Center topic
about Management Central:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/iseries/v5r4/index.jsp?topic=/rzaih/rzaih
1.htm
When Service Agent is activated, jobs are scheduled to handle the collection and
transmission of service information. If iSeries Navigator and Management Central are also
used to schedule the collection and transmission of service information, the result can be
duplicate processing. To avoid this duplication, after you have successfully scheduled the
collection and transmission of service information through iSeries Navigator, enter the
following command on each endpoint system:
RMVJOBSCDE JOB(QS9SA*) ENTRYNBR(*ALL)
This command removes the service information collection and transmission jobs that were
created during the initial activation of Service Agent. Each time that the Service Agent
attributes are changed, the service information and collection jobs are added.
Chapter 7. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System i
83
7.7 User Interface: Character-based compared to GUI
The user interface for Service Agent consists of a native user character-based interface
(“green screen” or 5250 application) and a graphical user interface (GUI). You can use the
native user interface to access all aspects of Service Agent: problem reporting and service
information collection. You can use the GUI to access service information collection, but not
problem reporting.
The GUI provides for centralized service information collection. Service Agent leverages
Management Central for this centralized service information collection. Centralized service
information collection allows service information to be collected from multiple endpoint
systems to a central system. The service information is then sent from the central system to
IBM.
The GUI is part of iSeries Navigator and is found as an agent under Extreme Support, as
shown in Figure 7-4.
Figure 7-4 iSeries Navigator, Extreme Support Agents
The Service Agent main menu (“green screen”), as shown in Figure 7-5 on page 85, is used
to update the configuration, authorize your IBM ID for the system, view reports or logs, send
test problems, and send service information manually. To access the Service Agent main
menu, enter:
GO SERVICE
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
1. Change Service Agent attributes
2. Run service information collection
3. Authorize users to access service infor mation
Information
4. Display problem reporting information
5. Display service information collection
6. Display service registration information
7. Reports
Jobs
8. End jobs
9. Start jobs
10. Work with jobs
Problem determination
11. Change Service Agent job logging
12. Change product activity log analysis
13. Work with Service Agent spooled files
14. Display audit log
15. Send test problem
16. Work with threshold table
17. Verify Service Agent connection
18. Service Configuration menu
Figure 7-5 Service Agent for System i main menu
7.8 Keeping Service Agent current
There are several ways to make it easy to ensure that you have the most recent Service
Agent code:




Auto PTF
Group PTF
Subscription Service
Recommended Fixes Web page
7.8.1 Auto PTF
Auto PTF checks the system or logical partition to determine if PTFs deemed critical by IBM
Service and PTFs needed to ensure Service Agent’s well-being are on the system or logical
partition. If PTFs are needed, fix request entries containing the PTF numbers to order are
created in the Problem Log, and the fix requests are sent to IBM. You can control whether
Auto PTF is enabled or not, and if enabled, the day on which it runs, and whether it
downloads PTFs, PTF cover letters only, or nothing. These controls are part of the Service
Agent attributes and can be changed by selecting from the Service Agent main menu,
Change Service Agent attributes. The command parameter is Auto PTF.
7.8.2 Group PTF
A group PTF is a collection of PTFs that are related to a single function, such as Service
Agent. This collection is identified by a single PTF number so that the entire collection is easy
to manage. You can order and install the entire collection of PTFs that are important for
Service Agent on V5R4 by ordering and applying PTF SF99316. Like cumulative PTF
packages, group PTFs are updated periodically as new fixes become available that affect the
Chapter 7. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System i
85
function. The IBM Electronic Service Agent group PTF helps you ensure that you have the
most recent PTFs for Service Agent and for components upon which Service Agent depends.
PTFs in the Service Agent group include those for ECS, Connection Manager (Universal
Connection), Management Central, and Java.
7.8.3 Subscription Service
Subscription Service for System i5™ provides technical bulletins on various support topics
including changes and updates to group PTFs. You can subscribe to the topics in which you
are interested, and when new or updated bulletins become available, an e-mail is sent with
the technical bulletins and links to more information.
The Service Agent group PTF is included in the IBM System i Subscription Service. You can
add the IBM Electronic Service Agent group to your current list of group PTF notifications to
receive when updates occur in the group. Register for the V5R4 (and V5R3) IBM Electronic
Service Agent notifications using the following steps:
1. Go to the Support for System i Web site, located at:
http://www.ibm.com/servers/eserver/support/iseries/index.html
2. Select System i5 Subscription Service under the Popular Links category.
3. Select the Subscribe/Setup tab.
4. Select Continue to sign in with your IBM ID.
5. If you do not have an IBM ID, use the IBM ID link to register for one.
6. After signing in, check the box next to the IBM Electronic Service Agent group.
7. Click Save preferences data to save your update.
7.8.4 Recommended Fixes Web page
You can get the latest fix information directly from the Rochester Support Center without a
telephone call. You can locate the fix for a specific problem or obtain the latest fixes for IBM
Electronic Service Agent.
The following link is for the IBM System i Recommended Fixes Web page. At this page,
select your release and then select a topic of IBM Electronic Service Agent:
http://www.ibm.com/eserver/iseries/support/s_dir/slkbase.nsf/recommendedfixes
7.9 Controls
There are several settings that control the way Service Agent reports problems, tests
connectivity to IBM, and notifies you of its activities. You can change these settings to fit your
environment.
7.9.1 Threshold table
Service Agent uses the threshold table to determine the action to take for problem log and
product activity log entries. Based on the origin of the error, the Active indicator or the
threshold value is used to determine if an error is reported to IBM.
When a problem surfaces in the problem log, the Active indicator in the threshold table is
used to determine whether the problem needs to be reported to IBM. Service Agent reports
errors for a device System Reference Code (SRC) that is active. If the SRC is not in the
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threshold table, whether the problem must be reported has been predetermined by Licensed
Internal Code processing.
When a problem surfaces in the product activity log, the threshold value in the threshold table
is used to determine whether the problem needs to be reported to IBM. Service Agent reports
errors for an active SRC that have occurred the specified number of times within a seven day
period. If the threshold value is 0, the error is not reported from the product activity log.
Service Agent analyzes the product activity log periodically throughout the day. The
frequency of the analysis is controlled by a Service Agent attribute. Analysis can be enabled
or disabled and the interval, including the time at which analysis is to begin, can be changed.
To change the product activity log analysis settings, do the following:
1. From the Service Agent main menu, select Change Service Agent attributes (option 1).
2. Press Enter to display additional settings.
3. For product activity log analysis, enter the desired values.
You can change the threshold table using the threshold table editor. You can add, remove, or
change devices and SRCs. This includes changing the active indicator and the threshold
value for a device SRC. To change the threshold table, from the Service Agent main menu,
select Work with threshold table (option 16).
7.9.2 Delay problem reporting
This new function helps avoid unnecessary interruptions to your operations. Every SRC
reported by the system does not require immediate action. One example of SRCs that do not
require immediate action are predictive (non-failure) SRCs, such as those which notify you
that the DASD cache batteries need replacement during the next 90 days. The battery
end-of-life SRCs reported and handled outside of normal business hours result in
unnecessary interruptions to your operations.
To avoid unnecessary interruptions and to avoid the concerns that these SRCs cause for
your off-shift personnel, it is preferable to report these SRCs the next business day and to
schedule replacement at a future date.
IBM Electronic Service Agent provides a way for you or your IBM Service Representative to
set parameters that allow SRCs to be reported only during normal business hours. If the SRC
occurs off-hours, reporting is delayed until the next business day.
To ensure that you have this functionality, install the latest Service Agent PTFs.
How the delay function works
To enable the delay function, a new command, Delay Service Agent Problem, is available. To
use it:
1. On the command line, enter the command DLYSRVAGTP.
2. Next, press F4 (prompt).
You see the parameters as shown in Table 7-2 on page 88.
Chapter 7. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System i
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Table 7-2 Delay Problem reporting parameters
Parameter name
Comments
Enable
*Yes enables the delay function. Group B SRCs are reported only on the
specified report days between the report start time and the report end time
(normal business hours). If the SRC occurs outside of the specified days and
times, the error is held until a reporting day and time is reached.
A parameter value of *NO disables the delay function. Errors are reported as
they occur.
The default is *YES.
Report day
The days during which Group B SRCs are reported. If an SRC occurs on a
day that has not been specified, the error is held until a reporting day is
reached.
A parameter value of *ALL means all days of the week.
The default is *MON *TUE *WED *THU *FRI.
Report start time
The time of day that defines the start of normal business hours. Group B
SRCs can be reported to IBM between the report start time and the report end
time.
Restriction: Start time and end time must both be either before midnight or
after midnight.
The default is 08:00.
Report end time
The time of day that defines the end of normal business hours. Group B SRCs
can be reported to IBM between the report start time and the report end time.
Restriction: Start time and end time must both be either before midnight or
after midnight.
The default is 17:00.
A new threshold table group value of “B” identifies SRCs that need to be reported to IBM only
during normal business hours. Figure 7-6 shows a Group B SRC in the Service Agent
threshold table. Installing the PTF that provides this function also updates the threshold table.
Work with Device SRCs
Device . . . . . . :
2748
Type options, press Enter.
1=Add 2=Change 4=Remove
Opt SRC
Changed
3400
8009
Active Threshold Group Description
Yes
Yes
0
0
B
STG I/O ADAP ERROR
CACHE BATT EXP 90 DAYS
Yes
Figure 7-6 Service Agent threshold table for Group B SRCs
7.9.3 Service Agent activity
You can receive notifications about Service Agent activity, or you can use the menu options
to display information about problem reporting activity and service information collection
activity.
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Notifications
You can receive notification of Service Agent activity through i5/OS messages. Notifications
are sent for activities, such as reporting a problem or analyzing the problem activity log.
Notifications are also sent when Service Agent is unable to complete a task, such as
reporting a problem to IBM.
To specify the user IDs to receive notifications:
1. From the Service Agent main menu, select Change Service Agent attributes (option 1).
2. Press Enter to display additional settings.
3. For Notify user ID, enter the user IDs to receive the notifications.
In addition to any user profiles you specify, the system operator (QSYSOPR) and QSRV user
profiles also receive messages. It is not possible to prevent notifications from being sent to
these user profiles.
Problem reporting
To display Service Agent problem reporting activity, select from the Service agent main
menu, Display problem reporting information. Figure 7-7 is a screen capture showing a
sample of this information.
Figure 7-7 SA main menu, Display Problem Reporting Information
In addition to these columns, the following information is provided by the Alternate views
(F11):




Last attempt date and time
Number of attempts
Last change date and time
Whether service information was sent or not
Chapter 7. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System i
89
Service information
You can display Service Agent service information collection activity by selecting from the
Service agent main menu, Display service information collection. Figure 7-8 is a screen
capture showing a sample of this information.
Figure 7-8 Service Agent main menu, Display Service Information Collection
In addition to these columns, the Last collect date and time is provided by the alternate view
(F11).
Audit log
The audit log contains information about Service Agent activity and errors that have been
encountered. Entries include starting the Service Agent monitoring jobs, detecting an error,
reporting or bypassing an error, and successful and unsuccessful attempts to connect to IBM.
This information is in English. Its purpose is to assist IBM support personnel in problem
determination. Figure 7-9 on page 91 is a sample from an audit log.
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
Figure 7-9 Service Agent audit log sample
7.9.4 Automatic connection verification (Heartbeat)
Service Agent provides a way to automatically periodically test the connection to IBM. At the
specified interval, Service Agent connects to IBM and sends a transaction to indicate that the
connection was successful.
The interval is controlled by a Service Agent attribute. To specify the interval for the automatic
connection verification test:
1. From the Service Agent main menu, select Change Service Agent attributes (option 1).
2. Press Enter to display additional settings.
3. For Connection verification timer, enter the specified interval in days.
7.9.5 Line control
It is possible for the service configuration to share a resource with other applications on the
system. When this is the case, for service configurations that use a line description, Service
Agent can vary off a line that is in connect pending status that shares the same resource as
the service line description. No other action is taken for any other line status. After Service
Agent has completed its use of the resource, the line is returned to the state in which Service
Agent found it prior to using it.
The service line varies based on the type of service configuration. If the Universal Connection
(TCP/IP) is used for the service connection, then line description QESPPLIN is used;
otherwise, it is an SDLC connection and line description QESLINE is used. In the case of the
Universal Connection, if it is configured to use a Virtual Private Network (VPN), then line
control is not used, and Service Agent does not attempt to vary off the line.
You can control whether line control is enabled or not, and if enabled, the configuration
objects associated with the resource that it is allowed to vary off. These controls are part of
the Service Agent attributes and can be changed by selecting from the Service Agent main
menu, Change Service Agent attributes. The command parameter is Line control.
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91
7.10 Software problem reporting
Service Agent reports software problems detected by the i5/OS Service Monitor, which is a
service function that is used to monitor the system for specific conditions. The Service
Monitor uses policy information to determine which problems to process. The policy
information defines the behavior for identifying and reporting software problems. When a
problem is reported, if no solution is found, Service Agent automatically sends the primary
problem documentation to IBM. Documentation consists of primary and secondary
information. The secondary documentation is not sent automatically.
If IBM Support requires the secondary documentation, it can be sent manually (as shown in
Figure 7-10):
1. From the Service Agent main menu, select Run service information collection (Option
2).
2. Change the following parameters to the specified values:
– Service information: *PRBID
This indicates that service information corresponding to a specific problem is to be
processed.
– Problem identifier: Specify the problem log ID for the problem
– Information for a problem: *SECONDARY
Figure 7-10 Command prompts for software problem reporting
7.11 Batch activation
You can activate IBM Electronic Service Agent in a batch environment. This is helpful for
environments with many systems. You can write a program to perform the activation steps
that otherwise occur manually.
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For details, including a sample program, see the i5/OS Information Center Service Agent
topic entitled Batch activation, at:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/iseries/v5r4/index.jsp?topic=/rzaji/batch
_activation.htm
7.12 Authorizing users to view or use service information
Authorized users can view or use service information for a system through the Electronic
Services Web site. To authorize users to view or use service information for a specific
system, from the Service Agent main menu on that system, select Authorize users to
access service information (option 3). Enter the IBM ID to authorize.
To obtain an IBM ID for use on many IBM Web sites, go to:
https://www.ibm.com/account/profile/us?page=reg
7.13 HMC Service Agent
Four major components make up the Service Agent environment on HMC machines:
 The Electronic Server System (ESS) process runs only on the gateway HMC. The ESS
handles all requests for data input and retrieval from the centralized database.
 The On Demand Server (ODS) process runs on all HMCs that are defined and handles all
Service Agent communication activities for that host. The ODS sends data to the ESS
process as necessary or makes a request to Service Agent Connection Manager (SACM)
to call IBM. Events from the Service Focal Point (SFP) are reported to IBM directly using
an Internet connection or a modem that is attached to the gateway server. Service Agent
calls IBM to report that it is healthy one time in every health-check interval.
 Service Agent Connection Manager is a stand-alone process. You can configure it to
communicate with IBM using an existing Internet connection or modem. It can exist on any
HMC or stand-alone System i5 machine and can support multiple Service Agent Gateway
connections.
 The User Interface allows you to set up and define HMCs that Service Agent monitors.
The graphical user interface (GUI) is invoked from Web-based System Manager (WSM) by:
a. Select Service Agent from the Service Applications.
b. From the WSM service menu, you select TASKS for the Service Agent User Interface.
c. You use the User Interface for advanced functions and customization of the system, as
well as to configure complex systems and multilevel networks.
7.13.1 Planning
Establish the overall HMC environment before you activate Service Agent. Do not start
Service Agent processes if the network is not configured on the gateway or your HMC.
Review and complete the following items:
1. On new installations, the HMC host name is a default name. Assign it a new name that
suits the client’s network environment.
2. On the HMC gateway, ensure that the modem and phone line are connected if they are
used. Check the physical connections to determine that they are connected.
3. If you use the Internet, make sure that the HMC has connectivity to the network.
Chapter 7. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System i
93
4. If HMC is a client, start Service Agent only after the network is set up properly.
5. After the host name is assigned, determine the type of Service Agent to apply: gateway or
client.
Figure 7-11 shows the HMC high-level activation flow.
g
Plan your HMC network
(gateway and clients)
WSM SA Menu
Customer information
Configure SACM
Configure gateway
Register
Transaction
Figure 7-11 HMC Service Agent activation flow
7.13.2 Installation and activation
HMC machines have Service Agent installed as part of the HMC code. Service Agent
appears on the HMC menu.
Complete the following steps to activate HMC Service Agents.
1. In the Navigation Area on the HMC menu, select Service Applications → Service
Agent, as shown in Figure 7-12 on page 95.
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Figure 7-12 HMC Service Agent menu
2. Service Agent detects whether it is activated. If it is not, you see the window shown in
Figure 7-13. Verify or update the information, and then click Continue.
Figure 7-13 HMC Service Agent activation wizard (Part 1 of 2)
Chapter 7. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System i
95
3. Now you see the window shown in Figure 7-14. Type the requested information and click
OK.
Figure 7-14 HMC Service Agent activation wizard (Part 2 of 2)
7.13.3 Maintenance
You update the HMC Service Agent with new releases of HMC code. Selecting Service
Applications → Service Agent invokes the HMC Service Agent GUI from the WSM.
The Service Agent menu has two major sections, TASKS and STATUS, as shown in
Figure 7-12 on page 95:
 In the TASKS section, you start and stop a process, change the function, update the host
name, and access the user interface.
 In the STATUS section, you see information about how this HMC is configured
(server/client) and the status of the Service Agent processes.
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8
Chapter 8.
IBM Electronic Service Agent for
System p
This chapter provides background and information about Service Agent on the System p
platform. This chapter is for users and system administrators who are familiar with or have a
working knowledge of AIX and RISC architecture as it pertains to basic operation of IBM
System p.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
97
8.1 Electronic Service Agent on System p
Service Agent on the System p platform began with Service Director on RS/6000® in 1994. It
served as a problem detection and submission tool on desktop Models 7011 through 7015 in
the United States. During the past decade, more models and function have been added,
hence the migration to the Service Agent title in 2001.
Electronic Service Agent for System p is now available on all models of the System p platform
in all countries (regions). Today, the Service Agent for System p submits problems
automatically and collects machine inventory information for both the stand-alone and the
Hardware Management Console (HMC) environments.
The following information is from the current Electronic Service Agent for System p User
Guide, SC38-7105, and Electronic Service Agent for System p Hardware Management
Console (HMC), SC38-7107. Refer to these user guides for comprehensive information about
these subjects. All the Service Agent graphical user interface (GUI) help text is directly from
the user guides.
8.1.1 Overview of Service Agent on System p
Figure 8-1 shows how your environment has the potential for a stand-alone configuration,
HMC machines in a configuration, or both types of configuration.
Internet
Client
Firewall
SP Node Client
IBM
IBM
Firewall
Firewall
AT&T
Gateway
IBM
Modem
SA Gateway
SACM
Internet
HMC
SA GW
RETAIN
IBM Databases:
EED to TESTCASE
SA Inventory
VPD to MRPD
PM/AIX
Call
Client
AIX
Clients
Support
Center
Dispatch SSR
as appropriate
Figure 8-1 Service Agent for System p network view
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Client can use on the Web:
Inventory on NavPage
PM/AIX reports
Service Agent is flexible, and you can configure it to your environment. Service Agent works
with clients by reporting through AIX gateways or the HMC client to the HMC gateway. All
Service Agent communication flows through the Service Agent Connection Manager (SACM)
on either AIX or the HMC host to IBM.
The choices of communication to IBM are either modem or Internet. The automatic problem
submission path and the inventory paths are through secure firewalls that go into the
appropriate IBM databases. You can use IBM Web sites to view the Service Agent inventory,
Performance Management reports, and other offerings. The HMC Web-based System
Manager (WSM) and System Management Interface Tool (SMIT) present Service Agent
menus or interfaces.
The HMC WSM menus allow control and setup of Service Agent. The Service Agent User
Interface (SAUI) is used for various functions, such as setting local user notification entries,
customizing the system, and displaying local Service Agent information. You start and stop
the application, as well as perform basic configuration, through the WSM menu.
The SMIT-derived menus in an AIX environment enable you to control management of the
application and select the user interface. They also display the application status.
8.1.2 Key tasks and functions
The Electronic Service Agent functions include:
 Use of Internet access or modem phone line connection to IBM
 Automatic problem analysis and submission based on defined thresholds
 Automatic client notification and view of hardware event logs of any automatic problems
 High-availability cluster multiprocessing (HACMP™) support for full fallback, including
high-availability cluster workstation (HACWS) for 9076
 Vital product data (VPD) or machine inventory information sent to IBM
 Software product information install and fix sent to IBM
 Capacity Upgrade on Demand (CUoD) enabled on non-HMC servers
 Using Performance Management, automatic reporting of PM/AIX data to IBM
8.1.3 Machine types and models that are eligible for Service Agent
Service Agent supports all System p machine types. This includes the 9076 (SP) or cluster
configurations. All machine types that have concurrent diagnostics installed and are under
IBM warranty or maintenance contracts (for problem submission) are eligible.
8.1.4 Service Agent Connection Manager
One of the major improvements or simplifications in Version 3.1 is the introduction of the
SACM. The SACM is a stand-alone process that can be configured to communicate with IBM
using an existing Internet connection or modem. This application installs with the Service
Agent AIX code on the Service Agent gateway, but it can be installed as stand-alone code on
any supported platform. It can exist on any HMC or stand-alone AIX machine and can support
multiple Service Agent gateway connections.
Chapter 8. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System p
99
The features that enable enhanced security, as shown in Figure 8-2, help to:
 Provide firewall support using either a proxy service or provide for traffic to pass through a
Network Address Translation (NAT) device, such as a Cisco PIX Firewall
 Provide a single point of exit from the client environment
 Ensure Inter-Enterprise Security (IES) compliance
Intranet
DMZ
Internet
Service Agent
Connection
Manager
Firewall 1
Gateway
Gateway
Gateway
Firewall 2
Master
Gateway
IBM
Figure 8-2 Sample configuration using firewalls and SACM
8.2 Stand-alone environment: Planning and prerequisites
Early planning can save you valuable time and prevent aggravation later. Understanding how
to set up the Service Agent application to best cover your information technology (IT)
environment makes the Service Agent experience much more enjoyable.
Consider the following items to assist in your decision making and placement of the Service
Agent components:
 Ensure that your System p is at AIX Version 4.2.1 or higher with concurrent diagnostics
installed. IBM diagnostics must be installed on every monitored machine. Error logging
and error log analysis must be enabled.
 Java is required on all monitored machines. Java for AIX V4.3.3 or higher is on the system
disk. You obtain Java from another source for machines with AIX versions earlier than
4.3.3.
 Note the correct memory needed for various components of Service Agent:
–
–
–
–
–
100
The minimum GUI is 10 MB. The maximum is 32 MB.
For a 50 system network, 20 MB are required.
For a 100 system network, 25 MB are required.
Electronic Server System (ESS) requires 64 MB.
On Demand Server (ODS) requires 64 MB.
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
 Ensure that the person who is installing Service Agent has root authority on the gateway
machine. This person must have access to a root-authorized window while installing
Service Agent.
 All communications between the Service Agent gateway and IBM are now encrypted and
secure using Java Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) regardless of the communication method
that is selected:
– Is an existing high-speed Internet access available to communicate with IBM? If no
Internet access is available, then you must meet all dialer prerequisites.
– Is a modem required? Only outbound calls are required by Service Agent, so you must
disable the auto answer capability of the modem. Refer to the local procedures in your
country (region) for asynchronous modem requirements for speed and error correction.
 Determine which host best supports the Connection Manager.
 Identify whether Service Agent needs to support any High Availability (HA) configurations.
 Verify whether an HMC host name and network are established and defined.
 Determine the number of Service Agent gateway machines that need to be set up to cover
the various client hosts:
– All client configurations must exist in their respective Service Agent gateway
databases.
– For multiple gateway configurations, build the first Service Agent gateway and then
export the database to a temp file. Import the temp file database to the second or third
gateway as needed.
– Set up only one Service Agent gateway as a master gateway for each Service Agent
Connection Manager (SACM).
 Service Agent needs to know the host name, machine type, model, serial number, and
processor ID (field is auto-filled) to monitor managed machines. Service Agent V3.1
attempts to automatically discover the machine type, model, and serial number after the
host name is given.
8.2.1 Service Agent code installation and activation
You can obtain the Service Agent code, user guides, and readme files from several sources:
 The AIX Expansion Pack is a collection of additional applications and tools. All
complement the AIX operating system with additional packaged software at no additional
charge. An Expansion Pack is included with every new order when media is selected.
 The IBM FTP site also provides information about this topic:
ftp://ftp.software.ibm.com/aix/service_agent_code/AIX
8.2.2 Installation
You install the Service Agent code on your system. Then you activate it to start the tasks.
Next you untar the svcagent.tar file into the directory from which you want to install it. The
restoration of the archive file creates a new sa subdirectory with svcagent modules.
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101
Note: You can install V3.1 over previous versions of Service Agent for System p. Your
machine list, communications files, and database remain the same. We recommend that if
you migrate from Service Agent V2.4 or earlier, you use the clean installation procedure:
1.
2.
3.
4.
To save the configuration, save the current Service Agent gateway database.
Remove the current version of Service Agent.
Install the new version of Service Agent.
To restore the configurations, import the saved Service Agent gateway database.
There are two methods to install Electronic Service Agent:
 Install from the SMIT:
a. Log on to the gateway server as root or sign on using a root-authorized user ID.
b. To activate the SMIT, type (in lowercase) smit
c. Select Software Installation and Maintenance → Install and Update Software →
Install and Update from Latest Available Software.
d. Type the INPUT device/directory (or select install media) and click OK.
e. From the SOFTWARE list, select svcagent to do a complete install. Click OK.
f. View the install Summary message result column to ensure that it indicates Success.
g. After the Service Agent program installs, select DONE. Depending on your version of
AIX, you do this either by clicking DONE, selecting DONE from a list of options, or
pressing a PF key shown at the bottom or your display.
h. Select CANCEL to return to the SMIT display.
You have successfully installed Service Agent.
 Install from a command line:
a. Log on to the gateway server as root or sign on using a root-authorized user ID.
b. Type the following command inutoc /tmp/sa and replace tmp with the directory where
you saved Service Agent.
c. If this is a new installation, type the command installp -YacXd /tmp/sa svcagent
d. Check the installation summary message result column to ensure that it indicates
Success. Figure 8-3 shows a sample view of the summary message.
Figure 8-3 SMIT menu summary results view
You have successfully installed Service Agent.
8.2.3 Activation
Figure 8-4 on page 103 shows the steps to activate Service Agent for System p in a
stand-alone environment.
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Plan your System p
network
Configure and
Activate SACW
Select and configure
SA gateway
Install and activate
SA client
Registration
Transaction
Figure 8-4 Service Agent for System p stand-alone activation flow
After the application is successfully installed, you must manually configure and start the
Service Agent processes. This occurs only after the initial or new installation. The upgrade
process does not require this step, because Service Agent is already running.
Determining what to configure and start depends on what is installed. Each step uses SMIT
Service Agent menus. Figure 8-5 on page 104 shows a sample SMIT main Service Agent
menu.
1. Create a new Service Agent gateway:
a. In the SMIT menu, select Service Agent to access the Service Agent menu.
b. In the SMIT main Service Agent menu, select Manage Service Agent Connection
Manager.
c. Then, select Configure Service Agent Connection Manager.
Note: The defaults are: localhost for host name, 1198 for socket, and secure setting. If
SACM points to a specific host, the fields must be updated with the correct information.
The SACM process must be started before using the Service Agent gateway.
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103
Figure 8-5 SMIT main Service Agent menu
d. Click OK.
e. Click Done.
f. Return to the SMIT main Service Agent menu.
g. Select Manage Service Agent Gateway → Select Configure Service Agent
Gateway to start the Service Agent gateway processes. Add the inittab entries for the
database and the ods script. The default host name of the Service Agent gateway
server is the default configured host name. Click OK.
h. Click Done.
2. Install the Service Agent client code:
Note: This step is required only if you manually installed the svcagent.client module on
another host after the Service Agent gateway host is activated. This step is not required
if code is applied to the client from the Service Agent gateway.
a. From the SMIT menu, select Manage SA Client.
b. Configure the client first. The host name is the default. Change it to match the host
name in the database if it is different. Enter the password for root to match the Service
Agent gateway password.
c. Define the primary (required), secondary, and tertiary server host names, as
appropriate.
d. Click OK.
e. Click Done.
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8.2.4 Maintenance
Electronic Service Agent has several operational user interface views (ASCII and GUI) that
you can access from the SMIT menu. These views include Select Problem Determination,
Service Agent, and Select Service Agent User Interface, which is shown in Figure 8-6.
Figure 8-6 SMIT menu: Select Service Agent User Interface
The basic menu
When you select the basic menu GUI (shown in Figure 8-7 on page 106), you see several
fields for customer contact information when you are using the GUI for the first time. Fields
with exclamation marks (!) are mandatory and must be completed for the machine location.
IBM communicates with your company and location based on the information in these fields.
Incomplete or inaccurate information delays responses from IBM.
The select list located on the left side contains fields that are completed as you proceed
through a guided process. Help for each of these selections is provided in the upper right side
of the view. The lower right side of the view contains the specific fields within each selection.
When you complete the eService Information field with your IBM ID, your ID is authorized to
view Service Agent information on the Electronic Services Web site and use the information
in the Premium Search queries.
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Figure 8-7 Service Agent for System p basic main menu
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The Call Log (shown in Figure 8-8) displays the results of connections and transmissions to
IBM. By viewing this log during the dialing or initial phase of a connection, you see real-time
updates being logged. When a connection is made and requests are transmitted, a summary
count of the request types and whether they were transmitted successfully are logged. The
summary counts overlay the description entries made during the connection phase.
Figure 8-8 Service Agent for System p basic menu Call Log view
The other selections, such as the various logs and connection view, that are in the left
navigation bar are used in activation or maintenance tasks.
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Advanced menu
The advanced menu (shown in Figure 8-9) provides selections that handle the complex
system configuration steps and maintenance tasks. Sample tasks include:





Adding SP nodes to 9076 cws
Setting thresholds, filters, and alerts
Using manual tools for testing and sending information to IBM
Purging information
Viewing real-time monitoring of code clients and alerts
Figure 8-9 pService Agent advanced menu
For more information under each properties folder, you use the four symbols on the upper left
side, as shown in Figure 8-10.
View/Edit
Properties
View Error
Events
View
Licensing Info
View
Internal Errors
Figure 8-10 System p Service Agent advanced menu: Property symbols
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For example, when you select Network properties, the View Licensing Info icon displays the
licensing, Heartbeat status (green flag or red X), and lock status (red X) on all monitored
machines as shown in Figure 8-11.
Figure 8-11 System p Service Agent advanced menu: Expanded sample
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You can configure e-mail alerts on the advanced menus shown in Figure 8-12 and
Figure 8-13 on page 111. You can customize various e-mail alerts for particular users. For
example, you might want to notify employee A about CAUTIONS and notify employee B of
INTERNAL ERRORS. Typically, only one e-mail alert is necessary for any of the events that
might happen on any of the systems that use this gateway.
Figure 8-12 Advanced menu: First view of e-mail setup
The advanced menu provides more configuration options, as shown in Figure 8-13 on
page 111.
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Figure 8-13 Advanced menu: Second panel of e-mail setup
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111
Selecting Performance Management on the advanced menu shown in Figure 8-14 informs
you of the status of the selected host. The same area displays the schedule for information
collection and transmission to IBM.
Figure 8-14 Advanced menu: Performance Management expanded
8.2.5 Stopping and restarting Service Agent
There might be times when you want to stop or restart the Service Agent daemon process.
There are multiple places and steps to perform the stop and restart. This section provides a
summary of the necessary tasks. For specific details, refer to Electronic Service Agent for
System p User Guide, SC38-7105.
Places to stop Service Agent
You can stop Service Agent in any of these areas:
 On the gateway server, ESS, ODS, and SACM (where the Service Agent database
resides)
 On the monitored machine, ODS only (clients that report to the gateway server)
 On the stand-alone AIX server, SACM (Connection Manager server) only
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Places to restart Service Agent
After you stop the Service Agent daemons, you restart them on both the gateway server and
the monitored machines:
 Restarting the Service Agent daemons on the gateway server creates new inittab entries
for the ESS, ODS, and SACM daemon processes. If Connection Manager is not on this
gateway, it is not started.
 Restarting the Service Agent daemon on the monitored machines creates a new inittab
entry for the ODS daemon.
 Restarting the Service Agent Connection Manager creates a new inittab entry for the
SACM daemon process that restarts the server’s Service Agent Connection Manager
process.
8.3 HMC: Planning and prerequisites
Four major components make up the Service Agent environment on HMC machines:
 The Electronic Server System process runs only on the gateway HMC. The ESS handles
all requests for data input and retrieval from the centralized database.
 The On Demand Server process runs on all HMCs that are defined and handles all
Service Agent communication activities for that host. The ODS sends data to the ESS
process as necessary or makes a request to SACM to call IBM. Events from the Service
Focal Point (SFP) are reported to IBM directly using an Internet connection or a modem
that is attached to the gateway server. Service Agent calls IBM to report that it is healthy,
one time in every health-check interval.
 The Service Agent Connection Manager is a stand-alone process that you can configure
to communicate with IBM by using an existing Internet connection or modem. It might exist
on any HMC or stand-alone AIX machine and can support multiple Service Agent gateway
connections.
 The User Interface allows the user to set up and define HMCs that Service Agent
monitors. The GUI is invoked from the WSM when you select Service Agent from the
Service Applications. Then in the WSM Service menu, you select TASKS for Service
Agent User Interface. It is used for advanced functions and customization of the system,
as well as configuration for complex systems and multilevel networks.
Important: You must establish the HMC environment prior to activating Service Agent.
Do not start the Service Agent processes if the network is not configured on the
gateway or client HMC.
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Here are several items to review:
 On new installations, the HMC host name is a default name. Be sure to assign a new
name to fit your network environment.
 On the HMC gateway, ensure that the modem and phone line are connected if you use
them. Check the physical connections to determine whether they are connected.
 If you use the Internet, make sure that HMC has connectivity to the network.
 If HMC is a client, start Service Agent only after the network is set up properly.
 After assigning a host name, determine whether to apply a gateway or client Service
Agent.
Figure 8-15 shows the high-level activation process.
Plan your System p HMC
network gateway and
clients
WSM SA Menu:
Customer
information
Configure SACM
Configure gateway
Registration
Transaction
Figure 8-15 System p HMC activation flow
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8.3.1 Installation and activation
HMC machines have Service Agent installed as part of the HMC code and on the HMC main
menu under Service Applications. You update Service Agent with new releases of HMC code.
1. In the Navigation Area on the HMC main menu, select Service Applications → Service
Agent (Figure 8-16).
Figure 8-16 HMC main menu: First visit
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2. Service Agent detects whether it has been activated. If not, you see the window shown in
Figure 8-17. Verify or update the information and select Continue.
Figure 8-17 HMC Service Agent activation wizard (Part 1 of 2)
3. In the next window (shown in Figure 8-18), enter the requested information and click OK.
Figure 8-18 HMC Service Agent activation wizard (Part 2 of 2)
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8.3.2 Maintenance
To invoke the Service Agent GUI in WSM, you select Service Applications → Service
Agent. The Service Agent menu (shown in Figure 8-19) shows the two main sections: TASKS
and STATUS:
 The TASKS section is where you start and stop the processes, change the function or
update the host name, and access the user interface.
 The STATUS section informs you about the configuration of this HMC (server/client) and
the status of the Service Agent processes.
Figure 8-19 HMC main menu with Service Agent expanded
8.3.3 Stopping and restarting a process
You have the flexibility to stop and restart Service Agent on the gateway server.
Stopping Service Agent
When you stop the Service Agent, you end the normal Service Agent daemon processes and
remove the inittab entries. If the SACM is running on this gateway server, it is not stopped
automatically. To stop it, complete these tasks:
1. On the HMC User Interface, select Service Agent Panel.
2. Select Stop Service Agent processes.
3. Select Stop SACM, if appropriate.
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Restart Service Agent
After you stop the Service Agent daemons, you restart them on both the gateway server and
the client machines. If the SACM is stopped on the gateway server, you can restart it from the
menu.
The Service Agent menu selections create new inittab entries for the ESS and ODS
daemons, which restart the gateway HMC Service Agent processes. The ODS daemon is
started on a client HMC and automatically starts a SACM process, if present. To restart
Service Agent, follow these steps:
1. On the HMC User Interface, select Service Agent Panel.
2. Select Start Service Agent processes.
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9
Chapter 9.
IBM Electronic Service Agent for
Linux on the System i, System p,
and System x platforms
This chapter provides background and information about the Electronic Service Agent for
Linux on several platforms. This chapter is intended for system administrators who are
familiar with or have a working knowledge of Linux on these platforms, Linux system
commands, and the System Resource Controller.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
119
9.1 Electronic Service Agent
Service Agent enhances your use of Linux in the System p environment by providing the
capability to submit automatic hardware problems and to monitor the system inventory.
The following information is from the Electronic Service Agent for Linux User Guide,
SC38-7109. Refer to this user guide for comprehensive text about the topics covered in this
chapter. All the Service Agent GUI help text is taken directly from that user guide.
9.1.1 Overview of Service Agent for Linux on System p
In the overview of the System p environment shown in Figure 9-1, you see the client Linux
environment has the potential for stand-alone and gateway configurations. All Service Agent
communication flows through the Service Agent Connection Manager (SACM).
The choices of communication to IBM are either modem or Internet. The automatic problem
submission path and the inventory paths are through secure firewalls into the appropriate IBM
databases. You can use the Electronic Services Web site to view the Service Agent
inventory.
g
Linux SA
gateway **
Linux
SACM *
p
Client
Client
Firewall
Firewall
Internet
IBM
IBM
Firewall
Firewall
AT&T
Gateway
IBM
Linux
SA
clients
Internet
Modem
Linux SA
gateway **
RETAIN
IBM Databases:
EED to TESTCASE
SA Inventory
VPD to MRPD
PM/AIX
Call
Client
Linux
SA
clients
Support
Center
Dispatch SSR
as appropriate
Notes:
* A Linux SACM can support an unlimited number of Linux Service Agent gateways.
** A Linux Service Agent gateway can support up to 256 Linux Service Agent clients.
Figure 9-1 Linux Service Agent overview
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Client can use on the Web:
Inventory on NavPage
9.1.2 Machine types and models that are eligible for Service Agent
Electronic Service Agent for Linux on System p supports SUSE Linux Enterprise Server
(SLES) Version 8 with Service Pack 3 and SLES Version 9. The machines must be under IBM
warranty or maintenance contracts.
9.1.3 Service Agent Connection Manager
The SACM is a stand-alone process that can be configured to communicate with IBM using
an existing Internet connection or modem. This application is installed with the Service Agent
code on the Service Agent gateway. However, it can be installed as stand-alone code on any
supported platform. It can exist in a stand-alone machine and can support multiple Service
Agent gateway connections.
Figure 9-2 shows a sample configuration using firewalls and SACM and the features that
enable enhanced security and offer the following advantages:
 Provide firewall support using either a proxy service or provide for traffic to pass through a
Network Address Translation (NAT) device, such as a Cisco PIX Firewall
 Provide a single point of exit from the client environment
 Ensure Inter-Enterprise Security (IES) compliance
Intranet
DMZ
Internet
Service Agent
Connection
Manager
Firewall 1
Gateway
Gateway
Gateway
Firewall 2
Master
Gateway
IBM
Figure 9-2 Sample configuration using firewalls and SACM
9.2 Planning, installation, and activation
Early planning can help save you valuable time and help minimize aggravation later.
Understanding your information technology (IT) environment and planning the activation of
the Service Agent application makes your time more efficient and effective.
Figure 9-3 on page 122 shows an overview of the activation steps.
Chapter 9. IBM Electronic Service Agent for Linux on the System i, System p, and System x platforms
121
Plan your pSeries network
Configure and
activate SACM
Select and
configure SA
gateway
Install and
activate SA client
Enrollment
Transaction
Figure 9-3 Linux Service Agent activation flowchart
9.2.1 Planning
Four major components or processes make up the Service Agent application:
 The Electronic Server System (ESS) process runs only on the Service Agent gateway
server or servers. It handles all requests for data input and retrieval from the centralized
database.
 The On Demand Server (ODS) process runs on both the gateway and monitored
machines. It handles all Service Agent monitoring and communication activities for that
host. The ODS retrieves and sends data to the ESS process as necessary.
 Service Agent Connection Manager is a stand-alone process that is configured to
communicate with IBM using an existing Internet connection or modem. It can exist on any
Linux on POWER in your environment and can support multiple Service Agent gateways
concurrently.
 The User Interface or interfaces is available for both basic or advanced users through text
or GUI. The Basic User Interface is designed to allow a first-time user to configure the
Service Agent system with as little user input as possible, using predefined defaults for a
single-level network environment. The Advanced User Interface provides advanced
functions and enables customization of the system as well as configuration for complex
systems and multilevel networks.
Use the following planning list to help you through the process:
1. Plan your Service Agent environment to determine the placement and the number of
Service Agent gateways and the location of monitored machines.
2. Plan your Service Agent Connection Manager:
– Determine which host is best.
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– SACM can be installed on any System p Linux host. It does not have to be a Service
Agent gateway.
– SACM can be controlled by a designated master Service Agent gateway.
– Communication to and from the SACM host can pass through secure firewalls.
– SACM can support an unlimited number of gateways.
– A gateway can support up to 256 clients.
3. Ensure that the administrator who is installing Service Agent has root authority on all
target machines.
4. If you are on a System p platform using POWER4+™ technology, ensure that your Linux
installation is SLES 8.1 SP3 or later.
5. If you are on a System p platform using POWER5™ technology, ensure that your Linux
installation is at SLES 9.0 or later.
6. Java is required on all Service Agent machines (SACM, gateway, and client). All
supported Linux on POWER distributions come with a version of Java installed by default.
Service Agent is equipped to use the default Java installation.
7. Install the appropriate IBM Linux Service Aids Toolkit. This toolkit provides the utilities
required to service System p systems running IBM-supported versions of the Linux
operating system. Service Agent requires you to download the packages from the Linux
Service Aids Toolkit Web site and install them in this order on all Service Agent machines:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
librtas
ppc64-utils
lsvpd
IBMinvscout
diagela
System Resource Controller (SRC)
You can obtain more information about the IBM Linux Service Aids Toolkit at:
http://techsupport.services.ibm.com/server/lopdiags
8. Install IBM diagnostics on every monitored machine.
9. Make sure that the System p machine type, model, and serial number are listed with an
IBM RETAIN® database.
10.Ensure that the gateway server has remote File Transfer Protocol (FTP), SSH, or both
types of capabilities for all monitored machines.
11.Determine whether you are using an existing Internet connection or modem.
12.Prepare for e-mail alerts. The host on which the e-mail alert is placed must have e-mail
service that is available either locally or through an attached network.
13.Obtain managed systems information. This includes the host name, machine type, model,
serial number, and processor ID. Service Agent attempts to discover the information after
the host name is provided. If the auto-discovery process is unsuccessful, manually start
the installation.
9.2.2 Installation
Service Agent consists of several RPM format packages. You must install each component in
the correct location. Table 9-1 on page 124 lists the items to install.
Chapter 9. IBM Electronic Service Agent for Linux on the System i, System p, and System x platforms
123
Table 9-1 Linux Service Agent components to install
Component
RPM name
Service Agent Connection Manager
svcagent.cm-1.0.0-x.ppc64.rpm
Service Agent Gateway
svcagent.server-1.0.0-x.ppc64.rpm
Service Agent Client
svcagent.client-1.0.0-x.ppc64.rpm
Service Agent Localized Messages
svcagent.msg.<locale>-1.0.0-x.ppc64.rpm
For example, svcagent.msg.en_US-1.0.0-x.ppc64.rpm
Service Agent Help
svcagent.help.<locale>-1.0.0-x.ppc64.rpm
For example, svcagent.help.en_US-1.0.0-x.ppc64.rpm
Download Service Agent code from the IBM FTP site to your machine using these steps:
1. Log in (or su) to root on a System p.
2. To access the tmp directory, type:
cd /tmp
3. Access the FTP site:
ftp ftp.software.ibm.com.
4. Log in to the server. For your login name (user ID), enter anonymous. For your login
password, enter your e-mail address.
5. Set the file transfer type to binary. Type:
bin
6. Access the path where the Service Agent code is stored. Type:
cd /linux/service_agent_code/LINUX
7. Retrieve the Service Agent code:
get svcagent_ppclinux.tar
8. Retrieve the Acrobat® format of the Service Agent User’s Guide:
get svcUG_ppclinux.pdf
9. End your FTP session:
quit
10.Transfer the file in binary if necessary to the machine that you want to be the Service
Agent gateway server.
11.Untar the svcagent_ppclinux.tar file into the directory from which you want to install it.
You have now created an SA directory that contains all of the installp modules.
Most clients install the Service Agent Connection Manager and Service Agent gateway on the
same machine. The following steps illustrate this type of configuration:
1. Install SACM:
a. Log in to your designated Service Agent Connection Manager as root or sign on using
a root-authorized user ID.
b. Change to the tmp directory or the location where you placed the Service Agent
Connection Manager package:
cd /tmp/sa
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c. Type the following command:
rpm –i svcagent.cm-1.0.0-x.ppc64.rpm
You have successfully installed Service Agent Connection Manager.
2. Install the Service Agent gateway:
a. Log in to your designated Service Agent gateway as root or sign on using a
root-authorized user ID.
b. Change to the tmp directory or the location where you placed the Service Agent
gateway (server) package.
cd /tmp/sa
c. Install the client package:
rpm –i svcagent.client.1.0.0-x.ppc64.rpm
d. Install the msg package:
rpm –i svcagent.msg.en_US-1.0.0-x.ppc64.rpm
e. Install the help package:
rpm –i svcagent.help.en_US-1.0.0-x.ppc64.rpm
f. Install the server package:
rpm –i svcagent.server.1.0.0-x.ppc64.rpm
The Service Agent processes are not active when the initial installation completes. You must
configure Service Agent manually after you install the code components.
9.2.3 Activation
Service Agent for Linux is under the control of the SRC. The following steps explain how to
configure your environment using the SRC.
Tip: The SRC master daemon (/sbin/srcmstr) must be running. Make sure that this line is
in /etc/inittab:src:2345:respawn:/sbin/srcmstr.
1. Start SACM.
startsrc -s sacm
2. Configure the gateway system.
/usr/svcagent/bin/sagatewayconfig
3. Accept the Customer License Agreement.
4. The gateway and client processes start on this machine.
5. To start Service Agent, type:
startsrc -g svcagent
Use the Advanced GUI for test and enrollment transactions.
9.3 Maintenance
Electronic Service Agent has two layers of operational menus: basic and advanced.
Chapter 9. IBM Electronic Service Agent for Linux on the System i, System p, and System x platforms
125
9.3.1 Basic menu
The basic menu (shown in Figure 9-4) displays several fields for customer contact information
when you use the graphical user interface (GUI) for the first time. Complete these fields
accurately, because IBM communicates with your company based on the information that is in
these fields. Incomplete or inaccurate information delays a response from IBM.
When you complete the eService Information field with an IBM ID, that ID is authorized to
view the Service Agent information on the Electronic Services Web site and to use Premium
Search queries.
Figure 9-4 Service Agent for Linux: Basic menu
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The Call Log shown in Figure 9-5 displays the results of connections and transmissions to
IBM. By viewing this log during the dialing or initial phase of a connection, you see real-time
updates being logged. After a connection is made and requests are transmitted, a summary
count of the request types and whether they were transmitted successfully are logged. The
summary counts overlay the description entries that were made during the connection phase.
Figure 9-5 Service Agent for Linux: Basic menu Call Log
Chapter 9. IBM Electronic Service Agent for Linux on the System i, System p, and System x platforms
127
Advanced menu
The advanced menu (shown in Figure 9-6) is used after you define the gateway server host
type and serial number fields. All functions available within the basic interface are a subset of
the functions that are available in the advanced interface.
Figure 9-6 Service Agent for Linux: Advanced menu
9.4 Mixed partition configurations
The System p server and Electronic Service Agent can operate with a variety of
configurations using AIX and Linux operating systems. The Service Agents do not
communicate directly to each other. However, they can share a gateway SACM. Figure 9-7 on
page 129 shows a sample configuration.
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p
g
Internet
Client
Client
Firewall
Firewall
SP Node Client
IBM
IBM
Firewall
Firewall
AT&T
Gateway
IBM
Modem
SA Gateway
SACM
Internet
HMC
SA GW
Linux SA
gateway
RETAIN
Linux SA
clients
IBM Databases:
EED to TESTCASE
SA Inventory
VPD to MRPD
PM/AIX
AIX
Clients
Client can use on the Web:
Inventory on NavPage
PM/AIX reports
Support
Center
Call Client
Dispatch SSR
as appropriate
Figure 9-7 System p network with Linux and AIX Service Agents
The following samples describe how Service Agents can operate in these configurations.
Linux operating system (OS) environments have the following characteristics:




Linux OS SACM
Linux OS gateways
Hardware problems automatically transmitted to IBM
Hardware inventory collected and transmitted to IBM
AIX OS environments have the following characteristics:





AIX OS SACM
AIX OS gateways
Hardware problems automatically transmitted to IBM
Hardware inventory collected and transmitted to IBM
Software inventory collected and transmitted to IBM
9.5 Service Agent for Linux on System x
The Electronic Service Agent for System x for Linux or Windows in a stand-alone
environment or Director Extension environment use the same user guides and readme file.
The following text is from the readme file of the most recent ESA for System x. You can
obtain the code, user guides, and readme file from the Electronic Services Web site:
http://www.ibm.com/support/electronic
Chapter 9. IBM Electronic Service Agent for Linux on the System i, System p, and System x platforms
129
9.5.1 Stand-alone environment
On Linux, installation and deinstallation of Electronic Service Agent is restricted to users with
root authority. Access to programs providing control over Electronic Service Agent requires
the use of a special user account esadmin.
Electronic Service Agent on Linux requires that IBM Director Agent Linux Version 5.10 or
later is installed and running. Before you install IBM Director Agent on Linux, make sure that
you have installed all of the necessary device drivers. This might require installing service
processor device drivers or the IBM LM78 and SMBus device drivers for Linux:
1. Ensure that all monitored servers have the correctly configured machine type, model, and
serial number.
2. Ensure that the person installing Electronic Service Agent has root authority.
3. Create the ServiceAgent group and user. Type the following commands as root:
#groupadd esa
#useradd -m esadmin -p welcome
4. Make sure that the cron daemon is running from a command prompt. Type the following
command as root:
# /etc/init.d/crond status
5. If the cron demon is running, this message appears:
crond (pid 1603) is running...
6. If the cron demon is not running, issue the following command to start it:
# /etc/init.d/crond start
7. Edit the sudoers file to allow the /opt/IBM/DSA/collectall (IBM inventory collector) to be
executed by esadmin without a password.
8. From a command prompt, type the following command as root:
#/usr/sbin/visudo
9. Append the following line to the end of the file:
esadmin
ALL=(ALL)
NOPASSWD: /opt/IBM/DSA/collectall
9.5.2 IBM Director Extension
The general requirements for the Director Extension are:
1. Ensure that all monitored servers have the correctly configured machine type, model, and
serial number.
2. Ensure that the person installing Electronic Service Agent has Administrative authority.
3. Ensure that all monitored servers are under warranty or under an IBM Service agreement.
4. Ensure that IBM Director has completed the initialization of the physical inventory for the
machines to be supported by Electronic Service Agent by checking the physical inventory
using the IBM Director console.
All supported systems must be initialized prior to Electronic Service Agent enrollment:
 Ensure that you have supplied accurate contact information when configuring Electronic
Service Agent.
 It is particularly important that you configure the location details of your managed systems
accurately. Recording location details incorrectly delays IBM service delivery. Similarly, if
you record your managed systems’ location details incorrectly, IBM service
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representatives will not be dispatched to the correct site location after a hardware problem
is reported.
Installing files on Linux
To install Electronic Service Agent on your IBM Director Server:
Remember: The installation requires Administrator privileges.
1. Log in as the user root.
2. Enter cd to the directory where you stored the installation program.
3. Execute the following command:
./5639-n89-de50.bin
4. At the Electronic Service Agent Setup panel, click Next to continue with the program
setup.
5. If you accept the terms and conditions of the License Agreement, click Yes to continue
with the setup program.
6. Click Finish to complete the installation.
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131
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10
Chapter 10.
Service Agent for the Hardware
Management Console
The Hardware Management Console (HMC) has a unique Service Agent (SA). You use the
HMC in the System i, System p, and System z environments. This chapter contains
information for each of these environments.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
133
10.1 The Service Agent and HMC on System i and System p
Four major components make up the Service Agent environment on HMC machines:
 The Electronic Server System (ESS) process runs only on the gateway HMC. The ESS
handles all requests for data input and retrieval from the centralized database.
 The On Demand Server (ODS) process runs on all of the defined HMCs and handles all
Service Agent communication activities for that host. The ODS sends data to the ESS
process as necessary or makes a request to Service Agent Connection Manager (SACM)
to call IBM. Events from the Service Focal Point (SFP) are reported to IBM directly using
an Internet connection or a modem that is attached to the gateway server. Service Agent
calls IBM to report that it is healthy, one time in every health-check interval.
 Service Agent Connection Manager is a stand-alone process. You can configure it to
communicate with IBM using an existing Internet connection or modem. It can exist on any
HMC or stand-alone System i5 machine and can support multiple Service Agent Gateway
connections.
 The User Interface allows you to set up and define the HMCs that Service Agent monitors.
The graphical user interface (GUI) is invoked from Web-based System Manager (WSM) by
selecting Service Agent from the Service Applications. Then from the WSM service menu,
you select TASKS for the Service Agent User Interface. Utilize the User Interface for
advanced functions and customization of the system, as well as to configure complex
systems and multilevel networks.
10.1.1 Planning your HMC environment for Service Agent
Establish the overall HMC environment before you activate Service Agent. Do not start
Service Agent processes if the network is not configured on the gateway or your HMC.
Review and complete the following items:
1. On new installations, the HMC host name is a default name. Assign it a new name that
suits the client’s network environment.
2. On the HMC gateway, ensure that the modem and the phone line are connected if you
use them. Check the physical connections to verify that the modem and the phone line are
connected.
3. If you use the Internet, make sure that the HMC has connectivity to the network.
4. If HMC is a client, start Service Agent only after you set up the network properly.
5. After you assign the host name, determine the type of Service Agent to apply: gateway or
client.
Figure 10-1 on page 135 shows the HMC high-level activation flow.
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Plan your HMC
network gateway
and clients
WSM SA Menu:
Customer
Information
Configure SACM
Configure gateway
Registration
Transaction
Figure 10-1 Service Agent HMC activation flow
10.1.2 Installation and activation
On HMC machines, Service Agent is installed as part of the HMC code. Service Agent
appears on the HMC menu.
Complete the following steps to activate HMC Service Agents:
1. In the Navigation Area of the HMC menu, select Service Applications → Service Agent,
as shown in Figure 10-2 on page 136.
Chapter 10. Service Agent for the Hardware Management Console
135
Figure 10-2 HMC main menu: Service Agent selected
2. When you select Service Agent under the Service Applications on the HMC Service Agent
menu (Figure 10-3), Service Agent detects whether it is activated. If it is not activated, you
see the window shown in Figure 10-3. Verify or update the information, and then click
Continue.
Figure 10-3 HMC SA information panel
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3. Next you see the window that is shown in Figure 10-4, the HMC Service Agent activation
wizard. Type the requested information and click OK.
Figure 10-4 HMC SA wizard
10.1.3 Maintenance
The HMC Service Agent is updated through new releases of HMC code. The HMC Service
Agent GUI is invoked from the WSM when you select Service Applications → Service
Agent.
The Service Agent menu consists of two major sections: TASKS and STATUS, as shown in
Figure 10-5 on page 138.
Chapter 10. Service Agent for the Hardware Management Console
137
Figure 10-5 HMC SA menu expanded
In the TASKS section, you start and stop a process, change the function, update the host
name, and access the user interface.
In the STATUS section, you see information about how this HMC is configured (server/client)
and the status of the Service Agent processes.
10.2 Electronic Service Agent for System z
Electronic Service Agent for System z has two functions: automatic hardware problem
reporting of connected I/O devices and system inventory collection for monitored systems.
With these functions, Electronic Service Agent for System z can monitor, track, and capture
system inventory and hardware errors.
Electronic Service Agent for System z (zSA) is designed to reduce the downtime of IBM
input/output (I/O) devices when a hardware problem occurs or is predicted to occur. Detected
I/O hardware failures are sent immediately to the IBM Support Center. When system problem
descriptions and inventory information are available to IBM Service or Support Center
representatives, they can better assist in diagnosing problems. With the early knowledge
about potential problems provided by the Electronic Service Agent, IBM can proactively
respond to clients and can assist in maintaining higher availability and performance.
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Service Agent is also designed to transmit, on a scheduled basis, performance and service
inventories to IBM. This information allows IBM support or authorized client representatives to
obtain and view necessary information. Service Agent for System z is designed to work with
z/OS Version 1.4 and higher.
Electronic Service Agent for System z has been enhanced with several new features,
including secure data transmission, direct communication mode with IBM, and additional data
collection capabilities.
Several of these features require Hardware Management Console (HMC) Version 2.9 and
higher, which is available with the IBM System z9™ Server.
Figure 10-6 shows a sample System z and Service Agent environment.
Customer & Support
remote services
interfaces
Tape
DASD
SSR
I/O errors and
statistical
collection
Software &
PTF data
collection
FTP
Sys1
Logrec
SMP/E
CSI
IBM
Problem
Management
Offerings:
CustomPac,
ServiceLink
Premium
Search
Hiper/PE
automatic
PUSH
HTTPS
IBM
eServices
Database
HMC
Figure 10-6 Service Agent for System z overview
Chapter 10. Service Agent for the Hardware Management Console
139
10.3 HMC activation
Clarification: The following steps are for Service Agent processes. These steps do not
have any relationship to the focal point HMC that reports errors on processors.
To activate the HMC Service Agent, follow these steps:
1. Log on as ASCADMIN.
2. The HMC menu (shown in Figure 10-7) opens. In the Views pane, select Console
Actions.
3. Now the HMC menu displays options in the Console Actions Work Area. The Console
Actions Work Area is shown in Figure 10-7. Select Hardware Management Console
Settings.
Figure 10-7 HMC Workplace™
4. A pop-up window opens on the HMC menu and displays an IP address. Record the
address. You need this address to complete a field in the Service Agent collection
attributes. Then click the upper left corner and select Close to close this pop-up window.
5. In the Console Actions Work Area in Figure 10-7, select Enable Electronic Service
Agent for zSeries®.
6. The Service Agent License Agreement window shows in Figure 10-8 on page 141. To
continue with the Service Agent activation process, page through the agreement and
select I AGREE.
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Figure 10-8 Service Agent for System z: License Agreement window
7. In the next window (shown in Figure 10-9), client contact information is used to register
this HMC with Service Agent and IBM. IBM uses this information to communicate
regarding service requests. Change or correct any of the client information as necessary.
Click Continue.
Figure 10-9 Service Agent for System z: Updating client information
Chapter 10. Service Agent for the Hardware Management Console
141
8. In the next window (shown in Figure 10-10), you enable or disable subsections of the
Service Agent, and you set the FTP password that is used by the OS/390® software to
send information to the HMC. Select the types of data that you want collected and
forwarded to IBM. Enter an FTP password, which you also must enter into the OS/390
software. Click Continue when you are finished.
Figure 10-10 Service Agent for System z: Enabling or disabling the types of data to send to IBM
9. In the next window, select the time of day for the daily transmission of the inventory
information that is sent to IBM. Click Finish to complete the configuration process and to
store the data within the HMC.
10.The HMC sends the automatic registration transaction to IBM. You must complete this
transaction before IBM can accept any problem data or inventory transactions.
11.Add a step in the EREP JCL job to run and capture Service Agent data.
12.Create started task IDs and started task entries in the STARTED RACF® class for
HESRDLOG using the supplied sample job.
13.Configure Service Agent by editing the dataset hlq.HESPARMS. Change the HMC IP
address and HMC FTP password to match that of your installation.
14.Start the hardware collection. Start the HESRDLOG procedure in the SYS1.PROCLIB
dataset.
15.Enable a scheduled collection for the data types of your choice.
16.Enable the collection and reporting for software data, performance data, or both.
Now, you have activated the HMC for Service Agent.
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11
Chapter 11.
IBM Electronic Service Agent for
System x
The IBM Electronic Service Agent (SA) for System x automatically ships with the System x
platform without an additional charge. SA monitors events and transmits system inventory
information to IBM. SA has been available since 2000 for the IBM Director environment and
available for the stand-alone environment since 2003.
This chapter is about the IBM Electronic Service Agent for System x.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
143
11.1 IBM Electronic Service Agent for System x
IBM Electronic Service Agent for System x is designed to reduce the downtime when a
hardware problem occurs or is predicted to occur. Detected hardware failures are sent
immediately to the IBM Support Center. The regular schedule of inventory checks enables
support representatives or client representatives to quickly check the machine’s
configuration.
Service Agent is designed to work an all models of the System x product line. Support for new
servers is available typically after General Availability of the new machines in order to allow
for proper testing. The System x Service Agent user guides and readme file show the current
listing for each release. The user guides and readme file are on the Electronic Services Web
site under Service Agent Reference Guides:
 For the stand-alone environment version of the user guide, go to:
http://www.ibm.com/support/electronic/serviceagent
 For the Director Extension version of the user guide, go to:
http://www.ibm.com/support/electronic/serviceagent
Automatic hardware problem detection
Service Agent both detects and generates hardware problem events. Service Agent is
pre-configured to detect specific hardware failure base events that are generated by managed
systems that are enabled and enrolled for Service Agent.
Service information collection
The inventory function of Service Agent for System x collects system information about
memory, hard disk drives or RAID drives, peripheral component interconnect (PCI) adapters,
communication information, and environments, such as power, fan, and temperature. You
can view service information for monitored systems at the following Web site, using your IBM
ID for authentication:
https://www.ibm.com/support/electronic
11.1.1 The stand-alone environment
The stand-alone environment on the System x platform (shown in Figure 11-1 on page 145)
has the ability to work with any system management tool. The Service Agent has all of the
modules that are needed to monitor, gather, and report events and inventory. Major features
are:
 Secure Internet access to IBM through the Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS)
 Restricted use of Service Agent to users with Windows Administrative rights
 Access through Service Agent to IBM through an authenticating proxy
 Easy installation and configuration by using wizards
 History panel with historical details of significant system events, including enrollment
history, inventory history, and Problem Management Record (PMR) history
 Installation can be done without a system reboot.
 Lightweight application uses minimum system resources.
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Gateway Server
IBM
• DC component is installed on each managed system
• Runs as a Windows service
• Can be remotely installed
• Does not require reboot
• Gateway server is designated to communicate to IBM
• Configured with customer information by user
• DCs inherit gateway configuration
• Does not require reboot
Service Agent
Gateway
Service Agent
DC
Managed System
Managed System
Managed System
Service Agent
Service Agent
Service Agent
DC
DC
DC
DC = Data Collectors
Figure 11-1 Stand-alone environment
11.1.2 IBM Director Extension
Service Agent is an extension to the IBM Director management application. Install Service
Agent on your IBM Director Server as shown in Figure 11-2 on page 146. You do not need to
install Service Agent on each of your managed systems.
This agent monitors your System x servers for hardware errors. Hardware errors that meet
certain criteria for criticality are reported to IBM. Service Agent also administers hardware and
software inventory collections and reports inventory changes to IBM. All information is
transmitted through a secure link and stored in a secure IBM database.
The information technology (IT) administrator must have a working knowledge of IBM
Director when working with Service Agent. If more in-depth knowledge of IBM Director is
required, refer to:
http://www.ibm.com/systems/management/director/
The features of Electronic Service Agent Director Extension are:
 The releases are concurrent with each version of Director
 It supports the Windows and Linux versions that are supported by Director.
 The Director Extension supports all System x machines that are supported by Director.
Chapter 11. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System x
145
IBM Director Server
IBM
Service Agent
• Director monitors systems on customer network
• Service Agent is installed as a Director Extension
• Service Agent mines Director database for machine
Director
Database
information and events
• Service Agent can transmit inventory data and error
events through Internet or modem
Director
Agent
Managed System
Managed System
Managed System
Service Agent
Service Agent
Service Agent
DC
DC
DC
DC = Data Collectors
Figure 11-2 IBM Director Extension view
11.2 Stand-alone planning, installation, and activation
The Service Agent code is available for download from the Electronic Services Web site
under Service Agent, Download ESA:
http://www.ibm.com/support/electronic/serviceagent
Important: Service Agent automatically detects if it is installed in a stand-alone
environment or in an IBM Director environment. If it is installed in an IBM Director
environment, you must ensure that Service Agent is installed on the IBM Director
Management Server.
Figure 11-3 on page 147 shows the flow of the Service Agent installation and activation
process.
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Plan your System x Network
SA Gateway
Installation
Wizard
Launch
ESAManager.exe
Test Message
to IBM
Install
Data Collectors
Figure 11-3 System x stand-alone activation flowchart
11.2.1 Planning
Early planning can save you valuable time and prevent confusion and delays later.
Understanding how to set up the Service Agent application to best cover your IT environment
makes the experience much more effective.
Consider these items assist you as you make Service Agent decisions:
 Ensure that the person who installs Service Agent has Windows Administrative authority.
 Ensure that the person who installs Service Agent has an IBM ID to enter on the
Advanced tab.
 Ensure that the gateway machine and all monitored servers are under warranty or an IBM
Service Agreement.
 Ensure that you supply accurate contact information when configuring Service Agent.
 Configure the location details of your gateway and managed systems accurately. IBM
Service Delivery depends on this information in order to deliver timely service, including
callbacks and the dispatch of the field personnel.
Important tip: Install the gateway before you install the Data Collectors.
Table 11-1 on page 148 lists the system requirements to consider for the stand-alone system.
Chapter 11. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System x
147
Table 11-1 System requirements for a stand-alone environment
Operating system
All versions of Windows and Linux supported by Director Agent
Microprocessor
x86 (Pentium® or higher)
Hard disk space
110 MB available: The gateway requires 100 MB, plus 10 MB per Data
Collector
Modem or Internet access
Required for gateway machine
Monitor
Super VGA monitor with the screen resolution set at 800 x 600
(minimum), small font setting, and 256 colors
11.2.2 Installation wizard
The installation wizard leads you through the installation process, beginning with the window
shown in Figure 11-4:
Requirement: You must install and configure the gateway before installing the Data
collectors. Electronic Service Agent stand-alone environment does not require a reboot of
either the gateway or the data collectors.
1. In the first wizard window that opens, select your installation type. In this example, we
select Gateway. Click Next.
Figure 11-4 Stand-alone installation wizard
2. In the next window, select the preferred language from the drop-down list to view the
Service Agent License Agreement. Click Next.
3. Select the option to accept the terms of the agreement. Click Next.
4. The next window prompts you to specify the directory placement of the Service Agent
code. Accept the default or select Browse for a new location. After you specify a location,
click Next.
5. The next window confirms your directory selection. If you agree, click Next.
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6. Installation Wizard begins to install Service Agent. The wizard shows a window with a
progress bar so you can see the progress of the installation.
7. After installation, launch the eSAManager.exe. Click the icon on the desktop or use Start
Programs.
Tip: You will be able to configure data collection systems after the gateway machine is
properly configured.
8. To continue installation on the rest of the machines in your enterprise, run the installation
wizard for each machine. This time, select Data Collection on the first wizard window
(shown in Figure 11-4 on page 148) for the installation type. No restart or reboot is needed
after installation.
9. After the installation is complete on the last (or only) machine, the System Status panel
(shown in Figure 11-5) of the configurator program appears. Select Automatically detect
Gateway System to have the Data Collector configure itself, if the Data Collector is on the
same network as the gateway. If the Data Collector is on a separate network, select the
Manually enter the port and network information option. Select Next.
Figure 11-5 Data collection configuration panel
10.When the task completes, there is a completion display (as shown in Figure 11-6 on
page 150) with the message that Electronic Service Agent has now been installed on
this system. To close the wizard, click Finish.
Chapter 11. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System x
149
Figure 11-6 Service Agent configuration completion window
11.2.3 Upgrade information
To upgrade an existing Service Agent, follow these steps:
1. Download the new Service Agent files.
2. Install Service Agent on your gateway. You must upgrade the gateway before you
upgrade the Data Collectors.
A downlevel gateway cannot handle transactions from Data Collectors that have a new
Electronic Service Agent release. A higher level gateway can handle downlevel Data
Collector transactions.
3. Invoke the installation wizard. It detects that you have an existing Service Agent and uses
existing configuration files. You do not need to launch eSAManager.exe unless your
configuration needs to be updated during this upgrade.
11.2.4 Configuration and maintenance
The Service Agent Configuration Manager provides the user-controlled functions of Service
Agent. These functions provide you with the ability to perform actions, such as naming the
callback contact and identifying the location of a monitored machine. If all monitored
machines are located in one subnet, have the same callback contact, and are in the same
physical location, you only need to configure the gateway, because all of the monitored
machines inherit the gateway configuration.
If any monitored machines have different Service Agent configurations, such as a monitored
machine that is located in a different location than the gateway, you must run the
Configuration Manager on the monitored machine.
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The Service Agent configuration contains the following information:
 System Status: Reports the current status of Service Agent and allows you to start and
stop it
 Company: Contains information about your company
 Contact: Contains information about the person responsible for this system
 Location: Describes where this system is located
 Communications: Contains information about the network setup
 Advanced: Helps you define who can view the data
 History: Provides historical details about significant system events
 General: Shows system details, “about” information, and legal notices
Figure 11-7 shows the Windows location of Service Agent Manager (esaManager).
Figure 11-7 Windows location of Service Agent Manager main menu
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151
Figure 11-8 shows the main menu view of Service Agent Manager. There are four major
sections with multiple tabs in each section.
Figure 11-8 Service Agent Manager main menu
On the Advanced tab (shown in Figure 11-9 on page 153), you can register two IBM IDs to
view the Service Agent inventory information and to use that information during Premium
Search queries.
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Figure 11-9 Electronic Service Agent for System x: Advanced tab
The History tab (shown in Figure 11-10) provides historical details about significant system
events, such as enrollment history, inventory history, and Problem Management Report
(PMR) history.
Figure 11-10 Service Agent menu: History tab
Chapter 11. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System x
153
The items on the History tab include:
 Enrollment:
– Last Sent to gateway is the locale-sensitive time stamp of when the enrollment status
was sent to the Service Data Receiver (SDR), the facility on the IBM server that
receives messages from Service Agent.
– Enrollment ID is the ID with which Service Agent is enrolled with IBM.
 Inventory:
– Last Sent to gateway is the locale-sensitive time stamp of when the inventory status
was last sent to IBM.
– Last Collected is the locale-sensitive time stamp of when the inventory was collected.
 PMR:
– Last Sent to IBM is the locale-sensitive time stamp of when a PMR was last sent to
IBM.
– PMR Number is an identifying number from IBM for the last submitted PMR. Give this
number to the IBM Support Representative when you call IBM about a problem.
– PMR Generated by Data Collector is the number of the system that generated the
PMR. In most cases, the number is the same as the number that appears in the
message System is enrolled as nnnnnnnn when you enroll a machine with the SDR.
However, if a system is generating PMRs on behalf of another system, this number
can differ from the number of the system you are using.
– Details of the last submitted PMR are only available on the gateway User Interface and
are not translated.
11.2.5 Uninstall process
Before you uninstall Service Agent, be sure that your machine is not a gateway that is used
by one or more Data Collectors. Uninstalling the program disables Service Agent on those
machines.
To uninstall Service Agent, use the Windows Add/Remove programs function:
1. From your Windows desktop, select Start → Control Panel.
2. In the Control Panel window, select Add/Remove Programs.
3. In the Add/Remove Programs window, select IBM Director Agent and click Remove.
You must remove this program first.
4. In the same window, select IBM Electronic Service Agent and click Remove.
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11.3 Director Extension: Planning, installation, and activation
Figure 11-11 shows the activation process for the Service Agent in the Director Extension
environment.
Plan your System x network
including IBM Director Environment
Install SA on the
Central Management
Server
Configuration
Wizard
Enroll and enable in
the Targeted Notebook
(for each managed system)
Enrollment
Transaction
Figure 11-11 System x Director Extension activation flow
11.3.1 Planning for the Service Agent application setup
Early planning can help save you valuable time and can help prevent errors later.
Understanding how to set up the Service Agent application to best cover your IT environment
helps make the use of Service Agent much more effective.
Consider these items when you make your decisions:
 You need to verify that your systems are supported.
 You must have a SupportLine contract (or similar contract) for IBM Director and Service
Agent support.
 You need to ensure that the latest drivers are installed on the hardware.
11.3.2 Installation, configuration, and activation
To install Service Agent on your IBM Director server, follow these steps:
1. Double-click your setup.exe file to run the setup program to begin the installation process.
2. In the Language Option window, select the language option that you want to use. Click
OK.
3. In the Electronic Service Agent Setup window, click Next to continue.
4. In the next window, if you accept the terms and conditions of the License Agreement, click
Yes.
Chapter 11. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System x
155
5. In the following window, if you accept the terms and conditions of the Communications
Charges Agreement, click Yes.
6. In the Question window, click Yes to view the readme file and then click Next.
7. In the Setup Complete window, select Yes to restart your system now.
8. Click Finish to complete the installation.
After you install Service Agent, you must configure several settings before you can use
Service Agent to monitor your managed systems and perform any other administrative tasks.
The Configuration Wizard leads you step-by-step through the configuration process.
To launch the Configuration Wizard, follow these steps:
1. Start IBM Director.
2. In the Tasks list (shown in Figure 11-12), double-click Electronic Service.
Figure 11-12 IBM Director Task menu
3. The Electronic Service Agent Setup Wizard opens as shown in Figure 11-13. Click Next.
Figure 11-13 Electronic Service Agent Setup Wizard for configuration
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4. Select the country (region) where the Director server is located. Click Next.
5. Select either Modem or Internet connection. Then, click Next.
6. Depending on your communication selection, the next windows configure the modem or
the Internet connections. Click Next when you are finished.
7. Complete your company information fields of name, phone, and e-mail. Click Next.
8. Complete the company contact information fields of name, phone, and e-mail. Click Next.
9. Complete the machine location information fields of building, floor, office, city, postal code,
state, or province. Click Next.
10. Automatic Upgrade selection configures Service Agent to download and apply program
updates automatically when they are available. This check box is enabled by default.
Clear the check box if you do not want this feature. Click Next.
11.When you complete the wizard, you see the window stating that you have completed the
required configuration for Electronic Service Agent (shown in Figure 11-14). Click Finish.
Figure 11-14 Wizard completion panel
The untargeted Service Agent Configuration Notebook automatically appears. Service Agent
is now ready for you to perform administrative tasks.
After you properly install and configure Service Agent, you must enable and enroll each of
your managed systems for Service Agent before Service Agent can perform
information-gathering operations and send Service Requests to IBM.
To enable one or more managed systems for Service Agent, follow these steps:
1. Open the targeted Electronic Service Agent Configuration Notebook. Launch the
Electronic Service Task that is targeted at an individual managed system, group of
managed systems, or multiple selected managed systems.
2. Open the System page.
3. Select Enable for Electronic Service. Click Apply or click OK to close the System page.
Chapter 11. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System x
157
To enroll a managed system for Service Agent and complete an enrollment transaction, follow
these steps:
1. Open the single targeted Electronic Service Agent Configuration Notebook. Launch the
Electronic Service Task that is targeted at a single managed system.
2. Open the Test page.
3. Click Enroll System.
4. Wait for the Enroll System Test window to confirm that the transaction has been successful
or follow the instructions on the window. Click OK to close the Test page.
11.3.3 Maintenance
You can access the Service Agent main menu under two possible locations, the untargeted
notebook or the targeted notebook, in the Director Extension environment. The untargeted
and targeted notebooks are launched from the IBM Director Console. Refer to your IBM
Director online help for more information about using the IBM Director Console.
The Untargeted Notebook Service Agent menu (shown in Figure 11-15) shows several tabs.
Figure 11-15 Untargeted Service Agent main menu
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For example, on the untargeted menu, under the Advanced tab (shown in Figure 11-16), you
can register IBM IDs to view the Service Agent information and use in Premium Search
queries.
Figure 11-16 Director Extension Service Agent menu: Advanced tab
You can display the targeted menu for these configurations:
 Single-targeted mode: Select a single managed system.
 Multi-targeted mode: Select two or more managed systems.
 Group-targeted mode: Select a group of managed systems.
Chapter 11. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System x
159
The Targeted Notebook menu (shown in Figure 11-17) has tabs for System, Services,
Contact/Location, History, and Test (for use in single-targeted mode only).
Figure 11-17 Targeted Service Agent main menu
11.3.4 Uninstall process
To permanently remove Service Agent from your server, use your administrator console:
1. From the Windows desktop, click Start → Control Panel.
2. In the Control Panel window, select Add/Remove Programs.
3. In the Add or Remove Programs window, select Electronic Service Agent for
xSeries®. Click Add/Remove.
4. In the Language Selection window, select the language of your choice from the pull-down
list, and click OK.
5. In the Add or Remove Programs window, select Electronic Service Agent for xSeries Director Extension. Click Add/Remove.
6. In the Language Selection window, select the language of your choice from the pull-down
list, and click OK.
7. In the Question window, click Yes to restart your computer now or No to restart your
computer later. Then, click OK.
8. On the Setup window, click Finish.
You have removed Service Agent from your server.
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12
Chapter 12.
IBM Electronic Service Agent for
System z
The IBM Electronic Service Agent for System z is a “no charge” System Modification Program
Extended (SMP/E) installable z/OS product. You can order the product number 5655-F17
through the normal z/OS product ordering channel. It is designed to monitor events and
transmit system inventory information to IBM.
This chapter is intended for System z software administrators and support staff who are
responsible for the installation, configuration, and activation of Electronic Service Agent for
System z.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
161
12.1 Electronic Service Agent for System z
Electronic Service Agent has two functions: automatic hardware problem reporting of
connected I/Os and system inventory collection for monitored systems. With these functions,
Electronic Service Agent for System z can monitor, track, and capture system inventory and
hardware errors.
Electronic Service Agent for System z (zSA) is designed to reduce the downtime of IBM
input/output (I/O) devices when a hardware problem occurs or is predicted to occur. Detected
I/O hardware failures are sent immediately to the IBM Support Center. When system problem
descriptions and inventory information are available to IBM Service or Support Center
representatives, the representatives can better assist you in diagnosing problems. With the
early knowledge about potential problems that is provided by the Electronic Service Agent,
IBM can proactively respond to clients and assist in maintaining higher availability and
performance.
Service Agent is also designed to transmit, on a scheduled basis, performance and service
inventories to IBM. This information allows IBM support or authorized client representatives to
obtain and view necessary information. Service Agent for System z is designed to work with
z/OS Version 1.4 and higher.
Electronic Service Agent for System z has been enhanced with several new features,
including secure data transmission, direct communication mode with IBM, and additional data
collection capabilities.
Several of these features require the Hardware Management Console (HMC) Version 2.9 or
higher, which is available with the IBM System z9.
Figure 12-1 shows a sample environment.
Customer & Support
remote services
interfaces
Tape
DASD
SSR
I/O errors and
statistical
collection
Software &
PTF data
collection
FTP
Sys1
Logrec
SMP/E
CSI
IBM
Problem
Management
IBM
eServices
Database
Figure 12-1 Service Agent for System z overview
162
Premium
Search
Hiper/PE
automatic
PUSH
HTTPS
HMC
Offerings:
CustomPac,
ServiceLink
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
12.2 Features and functions
The Service Agent for System z includes the following features:
 Secure Internet access to IBM through Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS)
 24x7 access to IBM technical support
 Two modes of communication to IBM:
– HMC communication mode
– Direct communication mode using an existing Internet connection
 zSA utilizes the enhanced security features of z9 HMC
 Electronic Service Agent access to IBM through an authenticating proxy
 Easy HMC configuration
 Hardware problems and direct access storage device (DASD) and tape error data
reported
 Problems routed to the correct IBM Support Center queue with the required information
 Required system information automatically gathered and reported, reducing data entry
errors or misreading of system information
You must include an IBM ID with the activation in order to view and use this information.
 Media Maintenance reports for the IBM Support community to review
 Ability to view Service Agent information by both IBM and the client
 Inventory collections:
–
–
–
–
Hardware I/O errors
Installed software and program temporary fixes (PTFs)
Automatic PUSH of HIPERs and PTFs fixing program errors reporting
Client configuration data using IBM Customer Configuration Collection (CCC) tool
 Periodic “heartbeat” to IBM
The hardware events that are captured include DASD errors, ESCON® Director errors, tape
errors, and tape volume errors. The automatic problem reporting helps prevent hard crashes
and extended downtime in the installation. Media maintenance recommendations are
produced when Service Agent examines tape media and tape drives to determine if the
media or drives are experiencing problems.
The Service Agent uses historical data and proprietary algorithms to determine if media need
to be replaced. Media that is recommended for replacement is highlighted on the Media
Maintenance display that is visible to the IBM Support community. Replacing this media can
prevent a hard failure and loss of device production time.
The service information collection function of Service Agent for System z uses your specified
System Modification Program Extended (SMP/E) Consolidated Software Inventory (CSI)
inventories to collect the information. IBM support staff can view your software inventory on
an internal site. Your authorized users can view it at the Electronic Services Web site, My
Systems selection, using the IBM ID as authentication:
https://www.ibm.com/support/electronic
The following System z documents provide more detailed information:
 SMP/E V3R4.0 Messages, Codes and Diagnosis, GA22-7770
 SMP/E V3R4.0 Reference, SA22-7772
Chapter 12. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System z
163
 SMP/E for z/OS and OS/390: User’s Guide, SA22-7773
 Electronic Service Agent for zSeries and S/390 V1R2 LPS, GA38-0956
 Electronic Service Agent for System z User Guide, SC38-7104
 Program Directory for Electronic Service Agent for zSeries and S/390 V1R2, GI11-2492
 IBM Electronic Service Agent for IBM zSeries and IBM S/390 Messages Guide,
SC38-7108
 Hardware Management Console Operations Guide, Version 2.9.0, IBM, SC28-6821
 The z/OS Internet Library at this Web site:
http://www.ibm.com/servers/eserver/zseries/zos/bkserv/
12.3 Planning
Early planning can help save you valuable time and prevent aggravation later. Understanding
your information technology (IT) environment and planning the installation and activation of
the Service Agent application is the best way to make your configuration and activation tasks
more efficient and effective.
The user guide recommends that you enable and activate Service Agent in a phased
approach. The user guide includes specific steps that enable a smooth transition. The
information in this section summarizes that information.
You must consider these data types for inventory collection:
 Hardware data needs to be collected for each instance of a LOGREC data set.
 Software inventory and service (PTFs) data can be collected from any system that has
addressability to the SMP/E CSI that contains information about the installed products and
service on the system.
HIPER/PE reporting can be requested for reporting the SMP/E CSI target zones.
 External data collection for sending configuration data is collected by the IBM CCC tool.
Personnel responsible for installing and configuring the Service Agent for hardware data
collection and reporting must be familiar with or have a working knowledge of:






System z architectures
MVS™ system commands
SMP/E installation skills
SMP/E CSI structure
UNIX® System Services environment
Program Directory and listed prerequisites
The System z environment is complex. Ensure that you consider all of the items in the
following list in the planning process for Service Agent activation:
 The systems programmer must have the correct authority to place Service Agent on the
images.
 Plan the Service Agent elements that you are going to activate: hardware and software.
 Plan the Service agent communication mode that you want to use:
– HMC communication mode:
•
164
Ensure that there is a local area network (LAN) connection between the HMC and
System z image. The focal point HMC needs to be LAN accessible from all z/OS
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
system images where Service Agent is installed to perform information collection
and transmission.
•
Ensure that the focal point HMC has the correct communications for contacting
IBM.
•
Ensure that the HMC is at the latest level.
– Direct communication mode using the existing Internet connection:
•
Ensure that there is a LAN connection between the system where zSA will be
installed and activated and your Internet Service Provider (ISP).
 Ensure that your System z platform is at least on z/OS V1.4 or higher with the current
maintenance installed.
 Ensure that the Java product level is IBM Developer Kit for z/OS, Java 2 Technology
Edition V1.3 or higher with the current maintenance installed: the 32-bit mode only at this
time. The 64-bit mode is expected in the future.
 Order the correct media for your operating system level. You order Service Agent for
System z code as a stand-alone program product or with one of the following package
offerings in one of four media (6250 tape, 3480 cartridge, 3590 cartridge, or 4mm
cartridge):
–
–
–
–
5751-CS3 MVS Custom-Built PDO (CBPDO)
5751-CS4 IBM SystemPac/MVS
5751-CS5 IBM ProductPac/MVS
5751-CS9 ServerPac
 Ensure that there is a minimum of 256 MB of memory for Service Agent on the z/OS
platform:
– HESEVEM Task: Requires 64 MB of memory
– HESSCAN Task: Requires a minimum of 256 MB of memory
– HESRDLOG or HESHWRDL Task: Requires 64 MB of memory
 DFSORT™ or other equipment manufacturer (OEM) equivalent is required only if you
enable performance data collection.
Table 12-1 on page 166 provides a comprehensive list of components that are related to the
Service Agent activation that is required for HMC communication mode.
Chapter 12. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System z
165
Table 12-1 Component list required for HMC connection mode
Various components related to Service Agent
Hardware
reporting
prerequisites
Software inventory
collection
prerequisites
OS: z/OS 1.4 or higher
X
X
LAN connection between HMC and host through
TCP/IP
X
X
Activation of xSA HMC component
X
X
HMC Console:
 HMC Driver 26+ MCL or >= Driver 38
 HMC 2.9.x level
X
X
Installation of Service Agent on host system using
SMP/E
X
X
TCP/IP with File Transfer Protocol (FTP) enabled;
Security Server or equivalent ISV product
X
X
IBM SDK for z/OS, Java 2 Technology Edition 1.3.x
or higher (31-bit only)
N/A
X
Unix System Services enabled and activated
X
ISPF/PDF: Invoke Service Agent Main Dialog to
customize and activate collections
N/A
X
Table 12-2 provides a comprehensive list of components that are related to the Service Agent
activation required for direct communication mode.
Table 12-2 Component list required for direct connection mode
166
Various components related to Service Agent
Hardware reporting
prerequisites
Software inventory
collection
prerequisites
OS: z/OS 1.4 or higher
X
X
LAN connection between HMC and host through
TCP/IP
X
X
Activation of zSA HMC component
X
X
HMC Console:
 HMC Driver 26+ MCL or >= Driver 38
 HMC 2.9.x level
X
X
Installation of Service Agent on host system
using SMP/E
X
X
TCP/IP with File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
enabled; Security Server or equivalent ISV
product
X
X
IBM SDK for z/OS, Java 2 Technology Edition
1.3.x or higher (31-bit only)
N/A
X
Unix System Services enabled and activated
N/A
X
ISPF/PDF: Invoke Service Agent Main Dialog to
customize and activate collections
N/A
X
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
12.4 Connection modes
Electronic Service Agent for System z now provides two connection modes for sending data
to IBM. Both connection modes (HMC and Direct) are designed to help provide a secure
means of transmitting data to IBM:
 HMC connection mode, which is the traditional connection mode. Data is forwarded by the
Service Agent client (using the FTP protocol) to the HMC Service Agent and then to IBM.
With zSA HMC Version 2.9, you also have the choice of Internet or modem connection to
IBM for inventory and automatic hardware problem reporting from your z/OS systems.
 Direct connection mode (APAR PK15210) is supported using an existing Internet
connection at your client site. Data is forwarded directly to IBM from the z/OS Service
Agent client using a secure connection, which is implemented using HTTPS. This
implementation removes the requirement for the HMC to have a separate LAN connection
for Service Agent use. All Service Agent’s components are enhanced to use this feature:
software, hardware, and external components.
12.4.1 Enhanced security for data transmissions
IBM takes ongoing steps to provide security-enhanced transmissions for Service Agent
transactions. HMC Version 2.9.x and PTF UK13197 (December 2005) have added a number
of functions to assist in the security of your data transmissions:
 Outbound transmission only: The Service Agent client initiates outbound communications
only; it does not accept inbound connections.
 Public key encryption: Service Agent uses Secure Socket Layer (SSL) and a 128-bit
public key encryption mechanism to help maintain the integrity and authenticity of the data
exchanged between your network and IBM.
 Enrollment: On activation, Service Agent’s first communication to IBM is to request a
unique ID and password for each System z9 it will monitor. IBM uses this ID and password
to authenticate each subsequent communication with your server.
 Processor information only: Service Agent sends only processor or error-related
information to IBM. It transmits no other information about the servers that it monitors.
Table 12-3 on page 168 summarizes the differences between the transmissions methods.
Chapter 12. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System z
167
Table 12-3 zSA communication mode differences
HMC connection mode
Direct connection mode
Service Agent uses the HMC modem to access
IBM Service. This telephone-based connection
allows communication only with IBM Remote
Support Facility (RSF) servers.
Service Agent uses HTTPS, which uses SSL
128-bit encryption, and TCP/IP protocols to
access IBM Service.
A security-rich service authenticates Service
Agent data transmission to IBM Service. Each
HMC has a unique account with IBM.
Authentication data is system-generated,
non-viewable, and non-modifiable.
A security-rich service authenticates Service
Agent data transmission to IBM Service. Each
Service Agent has a unique account with IBM.
After the HMC modem has dialed into the
phone-based connection, access is restricted
through a fenced Internet connection. Here, the
target addresses are limited to the small set
required to access IBM Service.
Service Agent initiates HTTPS communications
and sends collected data, but does not allow any
inbound connections.
Service Agent uses HTTPS, which uses SSL
128-bit encryption, and TCP/IP protocols to
access IBM Service.
You can configure Service Agent to work with
firewalls and proxies.
Service Agent does not accept incoming calls
from the modem.
The ISP relationship and connection is your
responsibility.
We describe the security and the privacy of all Electronic Service Agent transmissions in
detail in Chapter 5, “IBM Electronic Service Agent and the Hardware Management Console
security” on page 51.
12.4.2 HMC connectivity
If you have more than one Hardware Management Console, choose one that you want to use
for working with the Service Agent program. This HMC is called your focal point Hardware
Management Console.
The focal point Hardware Management Console needs to be attached to the the client local
area network (LAN). The focal point Hardware Management Console’s IP address needs to
be accessible to every operating system where the client wants to install and run Service
Agent, using one of these methods:
 Connect the Hardware Management Console to the client’s LAN through a bridge or
otherwise.
 Connect the Hardware Management Console to the client’s LAN using a second LAN
adapter. This method allows the host MVS systems to FTP the data to the HMC through
the client’s LAN but does not expose the HMC functions to the client’s LAN. The HMC
uses a private network on the other LAN adapter to communicate with its managed
systems.
 Install a separate Hardware Management Console on the client’s LAN. This Hardware
Management Console needs to have its own phone line and is not a part of the processor
complex.
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OS/2-based HMC
Verify or obtain the IP address of the focal point Hardware Management Console by
performing these steps:
1. Log on as ACSADMIN.
2. Select Console Actions.
3. Select Hardware Management Console settings.
4. The IP address is displayed in this panel. Record this IP address. You will need it to
configure the other Service Agent components.
To configure the other Service Agent components:
1. Under Console Actions, select Enable Hardware Management Console Services. We
recommend that you enable this focal point Hardware Maintenance Console as a Phone
Server if there is a phone line connected to it.
2. Under Console Actions, select Enable Electronic Agent for zSeries.
A multi-page legal agreement panel is displayed, which requires acceptance (I Agree) (for
best performance, use the page up and page down keys to view). Near the top of the first
page, the current status of Service Agent is displayed. If Service Agent is currently
enabled, it tells you the user ID and date that it was enabled. If you do not agree to the
terms in the panel, you can select Cancel or Discontinue and Service Agent is not
enabled.
3. Select I Agree. A second panel is displayed.
Verify that the information in the fields on the lower part of the window is complete and
accurate, especially the voice phone number. For automatic dispatching of an IBM service
support representative (SSR), this phone number must be the same as the phone number
registered with IBM Service. This information is used by IBM Service to contact you if you
have a failure on IBM maintained hardware.
4. Select Continue.
The next panel has two check boxes. You can allow Service Agent to process I/O error
data, or Software (Software and Service (PTFs) data as configured on the host), or both.
Check the applicable boxes.
The operating system sends the data to the focal point Hardware Management Console
using FTP. The user ID is set as esa390 and is not changeable. After supplying a
password for this user ID, select Continue. Record this password for later use. You will
need it during configuration of the Service Agent collection attributes.
5. Select a time when you want Service Agent to send accumulated I/O statistical data to
IBM. Service Agent must send data to IBM at least one time a day. When you are done,
select Finish.
If Service Agent was disabled prior to this action, a Service Agent call is sent to IBM to
confirm registration of this focal point Hardware Management Console. Service Agent is
disabled using this same icon.
6. At the bottom of the legal panels, select Discontinue to prevent the focal point Hardware
Management Console from sending Service Agent data to IBM. Be sure to deactivate the
corresponding Service Agent software on the z/OS images as well.
HMC 2.9 only
Enabling the Service Agent task allows the HMC Service Agent to send your data directly
over the Internet to the IBM Service Support System. The HMC Internet connection is new
with HMC 2.9.x. You can configure HMC 2.9.x to attempt connections through the Internet,
Chapter 12. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System z
169
through the local modem, or both. The other direct communication option is using the Service
Agent z/OS client to communicate over the Internet with IBM, therefore, bypassing the HMC.
The following list provides an overview of the Service Agent security features that are now
available with HMC 2.9.x:
 HMC Internal Firewall. Through its internal firewall, HMC Version 2.9.x limits TCP/IP
access to the HMC-related functions. HMC Version 2.9.x operates as a closed platform. It
does not allow other programs to access the underlying HMC operating environment or to
run under the HMC operating environment. All communication between the HMC and IBM
Service Support System is encrypted using HTTPS protocol.
 Optional high-speed Internet-based call home support. HMC Version 2.9.x can access the
IBM Service Support System over the Internet using SSL encryption. Only your HMC can
initiate this connection; the IBM Service Support System cannot initiate a connection to
your HMC. To use this call home support, your HMC requires a LAN adapter configured
with a default gateway for accessing the Internet.
 Other security enhancements in HMC Version 2.9.x include:
– Limiting FTP access to a particular directory; there is no root access through FTP.
– Providing you the option of limiting HMC FTP access to only those z/OS systems that
run Service Agent.
– Authenticating your data transmissions (performed by the IBM Service Support System
through an authentication service).
Verify or obtain the IP address of the focal point Hardware Management Console:
1. Log on as ACSADMIN
2. Select Console Actions → Hardware Management Console settings → Customize
Network Settings → LAN Adapters.
If there are two LAN adapters, two IP addresses display. You might need to verify with
your network support personnel which IP address is connected to the LAN. Record this IP
address.
Next, you need the IP address to configure the other Service Agent components:
1. Under Console Actions, select Enable System z Electronic Service Agent.
A multi-page legal agreement panel is displayed, which requires acceptance (I Agree) (for
best performance, use the page up and page down keys to view). Near the top of the first
page, the current status of Service Agent is displayed. If Service Agent is currently
enabled, it tells you the user ID and date that it was enabled. If you do not agree to the
terms in the panel, you can select Cancel or Discontinue and Service Agent is not
enabled.
2. Select I Agree. A second panel called the Data Selection Panel is displayed. The Data
Selection panel is comprised of four sections:
a. Data Types: This has two check boxes, which specify the data types that zSA HMC
Service Agent can process. Check the applicable boxes that you want:
•
IBM I/O Device Error data. This indicates that Service Agent is to process hardware
error data from LOGREC.
•
IBM Software Inventory and PTF levels. This indicates that Service Agent is to
process Software data: Software and Service (PTFs) data. Select this check box if
you plan to send Hiper/PE report requests or external transaction data.
b. FTP Password: Service Agent sends data to the HMC using FTP. Note that the user ID
is set as esa390 and is not changeable. Record this password for later use. You will
need it during configuration of the Service Agent collection attributes.
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c. Transfer Time: Select a time when you want Service Agent to send accumulated I/O
statistical data to IBM. Service Agent must send data to IBM at least one time a day.
d. FTP Access: You have an option to create an FTP access table to specify the IP
addresses of z/OS systems that will transfer data (FTP) to this HMC. This allows IP
access only from the listed client z/OS systems. When you are done, select OK. If
Service Agent was disabled prior to this action, a Service Agent call is sent to IBM to
confirm registration of this focal point Hardware Management Console.
Figure 12-2 shows the client panel for selecting FTP access.
Figure 12-2 SA client panel to select FTP access
Tip: Service Agent is disabled using this same icon. At the bottom of the legal panels,
select Discontinue to prevent the focal point Hardware Management Console from sending
Service Agent data to IBM. Be sure to deactivate the corresponding Service Agent
software on the z/OS images as well.
The z/OS systems running the Service Agent client need TCP/IP access to the HMC, if you
are running in HMC connection mode. Here, we recommend that you isolate the Service
Agent traffic from your network traffic. To do so, define and use the secondary HMC Ethernet
interface card to provide TCP/IP access to these systems.
For more information about these functions, refer to the Hardware Management Console
Operations Guide, Version 2.9.0, IBM, SC28-6821.
12.4.3 Direct connectivity
Service Agent (with PTF UK13197) can transmit your data (to IBM) either by using the HMC
or directly from the z/OS host by using your existing Internet connection. This Internet
connection uses a security-rich transmission mode that utilizes HTTP over SSL (HTTPS).
Certain clients might prefer the direct mode at their installations, because the direct mode
saves you from having to configure a separate LAN connection to the HMC for the Service
Agent’s use, as well as direct mode removes the dependency on the HMC. Proxy Server
authentication is also supported in Direct Connection mode with PTF UK20450 installed.
Using direct mode requires that your z/OS host system satisfies the following product
prerequisites. After the prerequisites have been satisfied, specify the enablement of Service
Agent to transmit data to IBM over the internet by using the Service Agent ISPF Dialog and
using one of these options:
 Operating system z/OS or z/OS.e V1R5 or higher
 TCP/IP
Chapter 12. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System z
171
 IBM Security Server or an equivalent product
 The z/OS UNIX System Services enabled and activated
 IBM Developer Kit for S/390, Java 2 Technology Edition (5655-D35) SDK1.3.1 with Java
JSSE, or higher.
To ensure successful communication between Service Agent and IBM, we recommend that
you apply the latest TCP/IP and Java service levels that are applicable to your systems.
Clarification: You do not need to install Java products if you only plan to use hardware
data collection and the HMC communication mode.
Figure 12-3 illustrates how direct mode is set for the Service Agent z/OS client. In
Figure 12-3, you use the Service Agent ISPF Dialog to set the Direct Connection option to Y.
If you set this field to N, the Service Agent z/OS client uses the HMC as the data transmission
vehicle to IBM. For the complete set of steps, refer to the Electronic Service Agent for System
z User Guide, SC38-7104.
Figure 12-3 Configure Service Agent Collection Attributes - Configuration panel
12.5 Applying the Service Agent code to all images
A system programmer from your organization or a similarly authorized representative applies
the Service Agent code to all images where Service Agent is to be activated. Refer to your
planning documentation for which image to activate for hardware problem submission or
software inventory collection.
12.5.1 Hardware configuration
You can set up hardware data to collect hardware I/O errors data by using one of the
following programs or tasks:
 HESRDLOG collects and sends data to the HMC on regular intervals. HESRDLOG does
not support direct connection to IBM over the Internet.
 HESHWRDL is a new module, which supports direct connection and requires you to install
APAR PK15210. HESHWRDL’s sole responsibility is collecting data. It notifies the
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HESEVEM and HESSCAN Service Agent tasks to format the data and send the data to
IBM.
The Hardware Data Collector started task first begins by reading a data set
(hlq.HESPARMS) for its operating parameters. LOGREC is then read on a five-minute cycle,
saving hardware records in a temporary dataset (hlq.HESTEMP). State information is written
to this dataset, hlq.HESSTATE. When critical data has been read, the HESTEMP file is
renamed to EREPDATA and a new HESTEMP file is allocated.
If you use the HESRDLOG task, all of the data in the EREPDATA dataset is sent to the focal
point Hardware Management Console for analysis and processing, and then sent from the
HMC to IBM Electronic Services.
If you use the HESHWRDL and Direct Connection, Service Agent bypasses the HMC step
and transmits the data directly to IBM using the HESSCAN task. With APAR PK15210
installed, HESHWRDL relies on the Service Agent sending components HESEVEM and
HESSCAN to transmit data to IBM either through the HMC or directly. As a result, no specific
sending parameters, such as HMC IP address, user ID, or password, are required. The
EREPDATA file is removed from the system after it has been successfully transmitted.
Write To Operator (WTO) messages are utilized to inform the operator of critical error
conditions. Job status information can be located in the spooled output ddname HESPRINT.
12.5.2 Hardware activation
We summarize the steps to configure and activate the Hardware Function of Service Agent
after the completion of the SMP/E installation of Service Agent:
1. Allocate data sets required by the Hardware Data Collection and Reporting function of
Service Agent by modifying and running the sample HESALCHW job provided in dataset
hlq.SHESJCL.
2. APF-authorize the Service Agent load library dataset (hlq.SHESLMOD).
3. Update and add Service Agent procedures to SYS1.PROCLIB.
4. Add a step in the EREP JCL job to run and capture Service Agent data.
5. Create started task IDs and started task entries in the STARTED RACF class for
HESRDLOG/HESHWRDL using the supplied sample job in dataset hlq.SHESSAMP.
6. Start the hardware collection by starting the HESRDLOG/HESHWRDL procedure in the
SYS1.PROCLIB dataset.
Where LOGREC is a LOGSTREAM: In a sysplex where the LOGREC is a
LOGSTREAM, only one instance of the HESRDLOG task must be running on any one
of the systems that is connected to the LOGREC logstream. Due to the nature of the
LOGSTREAM, data is reported from all of the images connected to the LOGSTREAM
in the sysplex.
No checking is done for multiple instances of HESRDLOG reading the LOGREC.
For LOGSTREAM in a sysplex, remember that the person who performs the installation is
responsible for ensuring that only one HESRDLOG task is attached to the LOGREC
LOGSTREAM in a sysplex.
Activating the HESRDLOG started task for hardware data collection and reporting on more
than one system results in duplicate data, duplicate service calls, and erroneous tape
statistical data presented to the IBM SSR.
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173
12.5.3 Software collection configuration
Software information is collected from the SMP/E CSI data on a daily basis based on
configuration values. Collected software information is compared with previously collected
information and if changed, is formatted and sent to IBM.
Hiper data is collected from either a subset of the SMP/E CSIs or the same SMP/E CSIs
specified for software information. The collection schedule is based on an interval (in weeks)
as outlined by the configuration values. External data is collected by systems that are outside
of Service Agent, and it is transmitted by Service Agent at the same time as software data is
collected and transmitted.
Collected data is formatted in XML and the file is sent using FTP to the focal point Hardware
Management Console or directly to IBM using HTTPS. The transaction file is sent by the zSA
HMC function, which regularly checks for any information to send to IBM. A response XML file
is generated that describes the status of the data sent to IBM. The response file is parsed,
analyzed, and logged by Service Agent.
Service Agent verifies the success of information received and stored by IBM. In case of an
error, Write To Operator (WTO) messages are utilized to inform the operator of critical error
conditions and the error is logged in ERRLOG inventory. You can locate job status
information in the spooled output ddname SYSPRINT.
Software data and Hiper data are collected and transmitted using configuration values
supplied by a user using the Service Agent Dialog. Externally collected data is transmitted
using the same values.
Here is a summary of the steps to configure and activate the Software and Hiper data
collection and reporting function of the Service Agent upon the completion of the SMP/E
installation of the Service Agent:
1. Allocate data sets required by the Software Data Collection and Reporting function of the
Service Agent by modifying and running the sample HESALCSW job provided in data set
hlq.SHESJCL.
2. APF-authorize the Service Agent load library using sample provided in data set
hlq.SHESSAMP(HESAPF).
3. Authorize Service Agent programs for Service Agent Dialog usage by modifying the
IKJTSOxx member in SYS1.PARMLIB. The sample is provided in the data set
hlq.SHESSAMP(HESTSO).
4. APF-authorize Java dynamic link libraries (DLLs) used by the Service Agent. The sample
job is provided in data set hlq.SHESSAMP(HESJAVA).
5. Create started task entries in the RACF STARTED class profile for HESEVEM and
HESSCAN. The sample job is provided in data set hlq.SHESSAMP(HESSTSW).
6. Update and add Service Agent procedures HESMAIN, HESEVEM, and HESSCAN to
SYS1.PROCLIB. The sample procedures HESMAIN, HESEVEM, and HESSCAN are
provided in data set hlq.SHESSAMP.
7. Verify that the 31-bit Java JDK™ level 1.3.x or higher is available to be used with the
Service Agent. The 64-bit JDK level is not currently supported.
8. Verify and update, if necessary, the environment variables in the
../usr/lpp/esa/esa1.2/envvars file:
– CLASSPATH and LIBPATH for the Java JDK level 1.3.x and higher
– Time zone
– Service Agent System call variables
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9. Customize the Service Agent Dialog ISPF interface.
10.Configure Service Agent using the Service Agent Dialog.
11.Start the Verify transaction to verify connection to IBM.
12.Enable scheduled collection for the data types of your choice:
– Software data collection and reporting
– Hiper/PE collection and reporting if you are eligible for this function
– Hardware collection if you activated the HESHWRDL hardware collection task
12.5.4 Collection and transmission activation
This section discusses:
 Enabling Service Agent to automatically collect and transmit data
 Enabling Hiper/PE Reporting
 Enabling external data collection
Enabling Service Agent to automatically collect and transmit data
You can enable Service Agent to perform data collection and to report automatically on a
predetermined schedule for the software data type. You also can enable Service Agent to
transmit the LOGREC data that is collected by the Hardware Data Collector to IBM. When
enabled for automatic data collection and reporting, the Service Agent initiates data collection
and reporting at a user-specified or default time each day for the software data type.
You need to set the Enable Service Agent scheduled collection parameter to Y (Yes) to
enable automatic data collection and reporting on a scheduled basis.
After you enable the Service Agent scheduled collection function, the software data type
automatic data collection and reporting is enabled by default. You can also individually
disable or enable data collection types.
Figure 12-4 on page 176 shows the SA panel for schedule selection.
Chapter 12. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System z
175
Figure 12-4 Configure Service Agent Collection Attributes - Schedule panel
To change the Enable Service Agent scheduled collection function to Y (Yes):
1. From the Service Agent Main Menu, select Option 3, Configure Service Agent
Collection Attributes.
2. Select Option 8, Schedule.
3. Change the Enable Service Agent scheduled collection field value to Y as shown in
Figure 12-4.
After you do this, Collect time, Send time, and Day of week are set to the default values.
Service Agent uses these values to determine when to initiate automatic daily data
collection and transmission. If you want to send hardware collected data to IBM, you must
set the collect hardware data field to Y, which indicates data that was previously collected
by the HESHWRDL task. The default assigned data collection and reporting time values
for the software data type are: current local time minus two hours for data collection and
current local time minus one hour for data reporting.
4. The Request Hiper/PE report field is set to N (No) by default. This parameter is visible only
if SMP/E target zones were previously selected for automatic hiper alerts (AHAs);
otherwise, this field is disabled. Change the Request Hiper/PE report to Y, allowing the
AHA frequency fields to display (under Schedule Hiper/PE report or PTF delivery
frequency):
a. Until date (after the frequency field has been populated) indicates the time at which
AHA reporting will stop. The date is limited to 2 years.
b. Frequency specifies the interval in weeks of the next scheduled report.
5. Here are several parameters that you might want to reset at this time:
– The Collect software data parameter is set to Y (Yes) by default. This parameter is
visible only if you previously enabled Enable Service Agent scheduled collection and
SMP/E zones are selected; otherwise, this option is disabled. If the parameter Collect
software data is set to N, the Service Agent will not automatically collect and transmit
software data.
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– The Collect External Data parameter is set to N (No) by default. Setting this parameter
to Y indicates that an external routine is collecting data that Service Agent will report at
the Schedule send time for software data. If this is the only collection-enabled
software, system enrollment is initiated.
6. Press Enter to save the data.
7. Press PF3 to return.
If Service Agent tasks have been activated and if the Hiper schedule has been specified,
then pressing PF3 automatically causes Service Agent to initiate a Hiper entitlement
transaction to verify if you are entitled to receive Hiper reports and PTF delivery. If a
positive response is received, Hiper reporting and PTF delivery will be scheduled
according to the frequency interval that you specified.
Enabling Hiper/PE Reporting
PTF UQ94890 introduced new functionality to Service Agent to support HIPER/PE reporting.
Service Agent can now electronically notify clients of critical software fixes (HIPER APARS)
and PTFs in Error (PEs). It also provides the ability to electronically download the fixes for
these problems.
This Automatic Hiper Alert report and PTF delivery feature is available to clients who have
purchased certain software contracts: ETS in Europe or Swxcel Enterprise Edition in the
United States. You use the Service Agent ISPF Dialog to enable Service Agent for HIPER/PE
reporting and electronic delivery of PTFs. The steps are:
1. Select the SMP/E zones for HIPER/PE reporting and delivery of PTFs as shown in
Figure 12-5.
Prerequisites: Software Inventory collection must be enabled and SMP/E target zones
must be selected for Inventory collection prior to enabling these zones for HIPER/PE
reporting.
Figure 12-5 Selecting target zones for HIPER/PE reporting
2. Enable HIPER/PE and its frequency interval. We recommend these settings:
– Collect software data: Y
– Request HIPER/PE report: Y
– Frequency: Specifies how often this should be done (defaults to every 2 weeks)
– Until Date: Specifies the last date to report on HIPER/PE fixes or delivery of fixes
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177
Enabling external data collection
Users of external applications, such as the IBM CCC tool, can use the software transmission
facilities of zSA to send their collected data to IBM on a regular basis.
The following actions are required to enable external reporting:
1. Ensure that the externally collected data file is written to shared DASD that is accessible
by both the external data collector and the HESSCAN sending component.
2. When started, the HESSCAN task looks for files that contain the name, hlq.C*.S*.D*.T*,
where hlq is the high level qualifier that is defined by the envvars environment variable
ibmhes.sysconf.dataset.prefix. HESSCAN transmits any of these files it locates. Be sure
that HESSCAN has authorization to rename and delete each file.
3. If you want HESSCAN to delete each file after the file’s successful transmission, set the
envvars environment variable ibmhes.sysconf.dataset.cleanup to Y. If you do not define
this environment variable or if you set it to N, HESSCAN renames the file hlq.C*.S*.D*.T*
to hlq.C*.S*.D*.X* after each successful transmission.
Where the envvars environment variable ibmhes.sysconf.dataset.cleanup is set to N,
HESSCAN deletes any file that has the same name as its rename target, which means that
you must avoid using duplicate .T* file names.
Optional advanced configuration option: Authorize Web Users
The Configure Service Agent Collection Attributes - Advanced panel (shown in Figure 12-6 on
page 179) allows you to authorize users to access the Electronic Services Web site to view or
use the Software Inventory data for the system that is enrolled by this Service Agent.
The User ID (s) field (on this panel) can accept two IBM IDs. After you enter the IBM IDs, IBM
remotely validates the IDs. If either of the fields is deemed invalid, a message is sent to your
TSO logon ID with a reason code:
 Code 9970: Length of given user ID is invalid.
 Code 9972L Illegal character within given user ID.
The entire process might take several minutes to complete. After a successful validation,
authorized IBM IDs and your user ID will be saved in the dialog activity log. The next time that
this panel is used, the Last Authorization text will show the date and time of the authorization
and the authorized IBM IDs that were submitted the previous time that this panel was used.
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Figure 12-6 Configure Service Agent Collection Attributes - Advanced: IBM ID field
12.5.5 Activating Service Agent tasks
After you configure Service Agent software collection, the next step is to activate the Service
Agent started tasks. If the Service Agent tasks are not activated, automatic data collection is
not initiated. The Service Agent tasks remain active only if you enabled Service Agent for
automatic collection and reporting of data.
You can start the Service Agent tasks in one of the following ways:
 On the Electronic Service Agent Main Menu, shown in Figure 12-7 on page 180, select
option 1 Start Service Agent to start the Service Agent tasks.
 Using the MVS console, enter the MVS command:
START HESMAIN,ESAPARM=START or S HESMAIN,ESAPARM=START
 From the command line on the Electronic Service Agent Main Menu, type the command:
STARTSA
Chapter 12. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System z
179
Figure 12-7 Electronic Service Agent Main Menu
12.6 Maintenance
The Electronic Service Agent Main Menu, shown in Figure 12-7, manages the software
actions, and in direct mode, hardware actions. The Electronic Service Agent Main Menu
displays a status of the running tasks at the bottom of the view.
Use option H History Service Agent History Logs to view history logs of all of the saved
Service Agent transactions.
For hardware problem submission, use the System z ISPF menu.
12.7 Uninstall process
Service Agent is installed under the SMP/E umbrella, and you use this same process to
uninstall it.
You can start and shut down Service Agent manually. Or, you can use an automatic
procedure for the Electronic Service Agent software component in an automated operations
environment. For more information about these steps, refer to the Electronic Service Agent
for System z User Guide, SC38-7104.
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12.8 HMC activation
Tip: The following steps are for Service Agent processes. They do not have any
relationship to the focal point HMC reporting errors on processors.
To activate the HMC Service Agent, follow these steps:
1. Log on as ASCADMIN.
2. The HMC menu (shown in Figure 12-8) opens. In the upper pane, select Console
Actions.
3. Now the HMC menu displays options in the Console Actions Work Area (bottom area in
Figure 12-8). Select Hardware Management Console Settings.
Figure 12-8 HMC menu
4. A pop-up window opens on the HMC menu and displays an IP address. Record the
address. You need this address to complete a field in the Service Agent collection
attributes. Then, click the icon in upper left corner and select Close to close this pop-up
window.
5. In the Console Actions Work Area (shown in the lower pane in Figure 12-8), select Enable
Electronic Service Agent for zSeries.
6. The Service Agent License Agreement window (shown in Figure 12-9 on page 182)
opens. To continue with the Service Agent activation process, page through the
agreement and select I AGREE.
Chapter 12. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System z
181
Figure 12-9 Service Agent for System z: License Agreement window
7. Next, client contact information (shown in Figure 12-10) is used to register this HMC with
Service Agent and IBM. IBM uses this information to communicate regarding service
requests. Change or correct any of the client information as necessary. Click Continue.
Figure 12-10 Service Agent for System z: Updating client information
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
8. The Electronic Service Agent License Agreement window (shown in Figure 12-11) allows
you to enable or disable subsections of the Service Agent and set the FTP password used
by the z/OS software to send information to the HMC. Select the boxes that you want to
enable. Enter an FTP password that must also be entered into the z/OS software. Click
Continue when you finish.
Figure 12-11 Service Agent for System z: Enabling or disabling the types of data to send to IBM
9. In the next window, select the time of day for the daily transmission of the inventory
information that is sent to IBM. Click Finish to complete the configuration process and
store the data within the HMC.
The HMC sends the automatic registration transaction to IBM. This transaction must be
completed before IBM can accept any problem or inventory transactions.
10.Add a step in the EREP JCL job to run and capture Service Agent data.
11.Create started task IDs and started task entries in the STARTED RACF class for
HESRDLOG using the supplied sample job.
12.Configure Service Agent by editing dataset hlq.HESPARMS. Change the HMC IP address
and HMC FTP password to match that of your installation.
13.Start the hardware collection. Start the HESRDLOG procedure in the SYS1.PROCLIB
dataset.
14.Enable a scheduled collection for the data types of your choice.
15.Enable collection and reporting for software data, performance data, or both.
You have activated Service Agent for System z.
Chapter 12. IBM Electronic Service Agent for System z
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Related publications
The publications listed in this section are considered particularly suitable for a more detailed
discussion of the topics covered in this bookbook.
IBM Redbooks publications
For information about ordering these publications, see “How to get IBM Redbooks
publications” on page 186. Note that some of the documents referenced here might be
available in softcopy only:
 A Systems Management Guide to Performance Management for i5 and p5 Systems,
SG24-7122
 IBM eServer iSeries Universal Connection for Electronic Support and Service, SC24-6224
 Effective System Management Using the IBM Hardware Management Console for
pSeries, SG24-7038
 Performance Management Services for AIX in a Partitioned Environment, REDP-0223
 Difference Between Two Backup Tasks: Backup Critical Console Data and Save Upgrade
Data (HMC for pSeries), TIPS0156
 What is a Hardware Management Console (HMC)?, TIPS0280
Other publications
These publications are also relevant as further information sources:
 Electronic Service Agent for System p User Guide, SC38-7105 at:
http://www.ibm.com/support/electronic
 Electronic Service Agent for System p Hardware Management Console (HMC),
SC38-7107 at:
http://www.ibm.com/support/electronic
 SMP/E V3R4.0 Messages, Codes and Diagnosis, GA22-7770
 SMP/E V3R4.0 Reference, SA22-7772
 SMP/E V3R4.0 for z/OS: User's Guide, SA22-7773
 Electronic Service Agent for zSeries and S/390 V1R2 LPS, GA38-0956
 Electronic Service Agent for System z User Guide, SC38-7104 at:
http://www.ibm.com/support/electronic
 Program Directory for Electronic Service Agent for zSeries and S/390 V1R2, GI11-2492
 IBM Electronic Service Agent for IBM zSeries and IBM S/390 Messages Guide,
SC38-7108
 Hardware Management Console Operations Guide, Version 2.9.0, IBM, SC28-6821
 Electronic Service Agent for System p - Linux User Guide, SC38-7109 at:
http://www.ibm.com/support/electronic
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2007. All rights reserved.
185
 System Manager Use, SC41-5321, at this Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/iseries/v5r4/topic/books/sc415321.pdf
Online resources
These Web sites are also relevant as further information sources:
 Electronic Services Web site
http://www.ibm.com/support/electronic
 z/OS Internet Library
http://www.ibm.com/servers/eserver/zseries/zos/bkserv/
 System i Information Center
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/iseries/v5r4/topic/rzaji/service_agent
.htm
 System p Information Center
http://publib16.boulder.ibm.com/pseries/index.htm
How to get IBM Redbooks publications
You can search for, view, or download IBM Redbooks publications, Redpapers, Technotes,
draft publications and Additional materials, as well as order hardcopy IBM Redbooks
publications, at this Web site:
ibm.com/redbooks
Help from IBM
IBM Support and downloads
ibm.com/support
IBM Global Services
ibm.com/services
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IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
IBM Electronic Services: Support
using Automation and Web Tools
IBM Electronic Services: Support
using Automation and Web Tools
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
IBM Electronic Services: Support using Automation and Web Tools
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IBM Electronic Services: Support
using Automation and Web Tools
IBM Electronic Services: Support
using Automation and Web Tools
Back cover
®
IBM Electronic Services
Support using Automation and Web Tools
Simplify and enable
faster support for
your IT environment
Electronic Service
Agents run on all IBM
systems
Worldwide access
and utilization
What is IBM Electronic Services? Why do I need it? Where do you get
it? When and how do you use it? How will this help your electronic
support relationship with IBM? Find the answers to these questions
and more details about IBM Electronic Services in this IBM Redbooks
publication.
The goal of IBM Electronic Services is to simplify your support
relationship to make it easier and faster to do business with IBM.
Through automation and Internet access, Electronic Services
integrates the IBM Support community with your company staff and
your IT environment. The two major components are IBM Electronic
Service Agent (Service Agent) and the IBM Electronic Services Web
site.
IBM Electronic Services reaches across all IBM systems in all countries
or regions where IBM does business. Electronic Services can provide
the electronic support relationship for a single machine environment or
a multinational complex of many servers.
This book is intended for IT management, system operators, and
others who work for and with IBM clients. Prior to reading this book,
you need to have a thorough understanding of your computer system
and networking environment.
INTERNATIONAL
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INFORMATION BASED ON
PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE
IBM Redbooks are developed
by the IBM International
Technical Support
Organization. Experts from
IBM, Customers and Partners
from around the world create
timely technical information
based on realistic scenarios.
Specific recommendations
are provided to help you
implement IT solutions more
effectively in your
environment.
For more information:
ibm.com/redbooks
SG24-6323-01
ISBN 0738488852
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