Cessna Grand Caravan EX

CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
AIRPLANE HANDLING,
SERVICE AND MAINTENANCE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Identification Plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Cessna Owner Advisories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
United States Airplane Owners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
International Airplane Owners. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
Airplane File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
Airplane Inspection Periods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
FAA Required Inspections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
Inspection Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
Cessna Customer Care Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8
CESCOM System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8
Pilot Conducted Preventive Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9
Alterations or Repairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9
Ground Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10
Towing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10
Parking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11
Tiedown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12
Jacking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-13
Leveling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-15
Servicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-16
Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17
Oil Specification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17
Oil System Servicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-18
Oil Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19
Oil Quantity Operating Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19
(Continued Next Page)
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-1
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
Page
Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Grade (Specification) and Fuel Additives. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Additives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Capacity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Contamination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Landing Gear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oxygen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ground Deice/Anti-Ice Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Holdover Timetable
(Type I, Type II, Type III, and Type IV Fluids) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Essential Areas to be Deiced. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Essential Areas to Apply Anti-Ice Fluid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deice and Anti-Ice Fluid
Direct Spray Avoidance Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deicing and Anti-Icing Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cleaning and Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Painted Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windshield and Windows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stabilizer Abrasion Boot Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Propeller Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interior Care. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Avionics Care. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prolonged Out of Service Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-2
U.S.
8-20
8-20
8-21
8-26
8-27
8-29
8-30
8-31
8-35
8-42
8-43
8-44
8-45
8-46
8-46
8-47
8-51
8-51
8-52
8-55
8-56
8-57
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
INTRODUCTION
This section contains factory recommended procedures for proper
ground handling and routine care and servicing of your airplane. It also
identifies certain inspection and maintenance requirements which must
be followed if your airplane is to retain that new airplane performance
and dependability. It is important to follow a planned schedule of
lubrication and preventive maintenance based on climatic and flying
conditions encountered in your local area.
Keep in touch with your local Cessna Authorized Service Facility and
take advantage of their knowledge and experience. Your Cessna
Authorized Service Facility knows your airplane and how to maintain it,
and will remind you when lubrications and oil changes are necessary,
as well as other seasonal and periodic services.
The airplane should be regularly inspected and maintained in
accordance with information found in the airplane maintenance manual
and in any company issued service bulletins and service letters. All
service bulletins pertaining to the airplane by serial number should be
accomplished and the airplane should receive repetitive and required
inspections. Cessna does not condone modifications, whether by
Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) or otherwise, unless these
certificates are held and/or approved by Cessna. Other modifications
may void warranties on the airplane since Cessna has no way of
knowing the full effect on the overall airplane. Operation of an airplane
that has been modified may be a risk to the occupants, and operating
procedures and performance data set forth in the POH may no longer
be considered accurate for the modified airplane.
IDENTIFICATION PLATE
All correspondence regarding your airplane should include the Serial
Number. The Serial Number, Model Number, Production Certificate
Number (PC) and Type Certificate Number (TC) can be found on the
Identification Plate, located on the aft left tailcone. The Finish and Trim
Plate, which is installed on the lower part of the left forward doorpost,
contains a code describing the exterior paint combination of the
airplane. The code may be used in conjunction with an applicable
Illustrated Parts Catalog if finish and trim information is needed.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-3
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
CESSNA OWNER ADVISORIES
Cessna Owner Advisories are sent to Cessna Aircraft FAA Registered
owners of record at no charge to inform them about mandatory and/or
beneficial airplane service requirements and product changes. Copies
of the actual bulletins are available from Cessna Authorized Service
Facilities and Cessna Customer Care.
As a convenience, service documents are now available online to all
our customers through a simple, free-of-charge registration process. If
you would like to sign up, please visit the “Customer Access” link at
www.cessnasupport.com to register.
UNITED STATES AIRPLANE OWNERS
If your airplane is registered in the U.S., appropriate Cessna Owner
Advisories will be mailed to you automatically according to the latest
airplane registration name and address which you have provided to the
FAA. Therefore, it is important that you provide correct and up to date
mailing information to the FAA.
If you require a duplicate Owner Advisory to be sent to an address
different from the FAA aircraft registration address, please complete
and return an Owner Advisory Application (otherwise no action is
required on your part).
INTERNATIONAL AIRPLANE OWNERS
To receive Cessna Owner Advisories, please complete and return an
Owner Advisory Application.
Receipt of a valid Owner Advisory Application will establish your
Cessna Owner Advisory service for one year, after which you will be
sent a renewal notice. It is important that you respond promptly to
update your address for this critical service.
8-4
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
PUBLICATIONS
Various publications and flight operation aids are furnished in the
airplane when delivered from the factory. These items are listed below.
•
•
Customer Care Program Handbook
•
•
•
Pilot’s Checklist
Pilot’s Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual
Passenger Briefing Card
Cessna Authorized Service Facility Directory
To obtain additional publications or owner advisory information, you
may contact Cessna Customer Care at (316) 517-5800. Fax (316) 5177271 or write to Cessna Aircraft Company, P.O. Box 7706, Attn. Dept.
569, Wichita, KS 67277.
The following additional publications, plus many other supplies that are
applicable to your airplane, are available from a Cessna Authorized
Service Facility.
•
Information Manual (contains
Handbook Information)
•
Maintenance Manual, Wiring Diagram Manual and
Illustrated Parts Catalog
Pilot’s
Operating
Cessna Authorized Service Facilities have access to a Customer Care
Supplies and Publications Catalog covering all available items, many of
which the Authorized Service Facility keeps on hand. The Authorized
Service Facility can place an order for any item which is not in stock.
NOTE
A Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual which is lost or destroyed may be replaced by
contacting Cessna Customer Care.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-5
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
AIRPLANE FILE
There are miscellaneous data, information and licenses that are a part
of the airplane file. The following is a checklist for that file. In addition, a
periodic check should be made of the latest Federal Aviation
Regulations to ensure that all data requirements are met.
To be displayed in the airplane at all times:
1. Aircraft Airworthiness Certificate (FAA Form 8100-2).
2. Aircraft Registration Certificate (FAA Form 8050-3).
3. Aircraft Radio Station License, (if applicable).
To be carried in the airplane at all times:
1. Current Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual.
2. Garmin G1000 Cockpit Reference Guide (190-00384-00 Rev. B
or subsequent).
3. Weight and Balance, and associated papers (latest copy of the
Repair and Alteration Form, FAA Form 337, if applicable).
4. Equipment List.
To be made available upon request:
1. Airplane Logbook.
2. Engine Logbook.
3. Propeller Logbook.
Most of the items listed are required by the United States Federal
Aviation Regulations. Since the Regulations of other nations may
require other documents and data, owners of airplanes not registered in
the United States should check with their own aviation officials to
determine their individual requirements.
Cessna recommends that these items, plus the Pilot's Checklists,
CESCOM/Customer Care Program Handbook and Customer Care
Card, be carried in the airplane at all times.
8-6
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
AIRPLANE INSPECTION PERIODS
FAA REQUIRED INSPECTIONS
As required by U.S. Federal Aviation Regulations, all civil aircraft of
U.S. registry must undergo a complete inspection (annual) each twelve
calendar months. In addition to the required annual inspection, aircraft
operated commercially (for hire) must have a complete inspection
every 100 hours of operation.
The FAA may require other inspections by the issuance of
Airworthiness Directives (ADs) applicable to the airplane, engine,
propeller and components. It is the responsibility of the owner/operator
to ensure compliance with all applicable airworthiness directives, and
when the inspections are repetitive, to take appropriate steps to prevent
inadvertent noncompliance.
If an airplane is being operated under a CFR Part 135 Certificate, the
operator can choose to use an Approved Aircraft Inspection Program.
INSPECTION PROGRAMS
Refer to the 208 Maintenance Manual, Chapter 4-00-00, Airworthiness
Limitations, for FAA approved mandatory replacement times and
inspection intervals for components and structures that are life-limited.
The section also gives the scheduled inspection requirements for
structural and fatigue components that are considered a part of the
certification process. Refer to Chapter 5-00-00 for approved time limits
and maintenance checks for the Model 208B airplanes.
Regardless of the inspection method selected, the owner should keep
in mind that 14 CFR 43 and 14 CFR 91 establishes the requirement
that properly certified agencies or personnel accomplish all required
FAA inspections and most of the manufacturer recommended
inspections.
NOTE
Airplanes operating in other than U.S. registry should refer
to the regulations of the country of certification for
information on approved maintenance inspection programs.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-7
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
AIRPLANE INSPECTION PERIODS
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
(Continued)
CESSNA CUSTOMER CARE PROGRAM
Specific benefits and provisions of the Cessna Warranty plus other
important benefits are contained in the CESCOM/Customer Care
Program Handbook supplied with the airplane. The CESCOM/
Customer Care Program Handbook should be thoroughly reviewed and
kept in the airplane at all times.
Contact a Cessna Authorized Service Facility for the first 100-hour or
annual inspection depending on the program chosen for the airplane.
These inspections can be performed by any Cessna Authorized
Service Facility.
CESCOM SYSTEM
CESCOM is Cessna’s Computerized Maintenance Records System.
This comprehensive system provides an accurate and simple method
of monitoring and scheduling inspections, Service Bulletins, Service
Kits, Airworthiness Directives as well as scheduled and unscheduled
maintenance activities. For detail information about CESCOM, refer to
the CESCOM Instruction Manual supplied with the airplane.
8-8
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
PILOT CONDUCTED PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
A certified pilot who owns or operates an airplane not used as an air
carrier is authorized by 14 CFR 43 to perform limited maintenance on
his airplane. Refer to 14 CFR 43 for a list of the specific maintenance
operations which are allowed.
NOTE
Pilots operating airplanes of other than U.S. registry should
refer to the regulations of the country of certification for
information on preventive maintenance that may be
performed by pilots.
A Maintenance Manual must be obtained prior to performing any
preventive maintenance to ensure that proper procedures are followed.
A Cessna Authorized Service Facility should be contacted for further
information or for required maintenance which must be accomplished
by appropriately licensed personnel.
ALTERATIONS OR REPAIRS
It is essential that the FAA be contacted prior to any alterations on the
airplane to ensure that airworthiness of the airplane is not violated.
Alterations or repairs to the airplane must be accomplished by licensed
personnel, utilizing only FAA Approved components and FAA Approved
data, such as Cessna Service Bulletins.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-9
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
GROUND HANDLING
TOWING
The airplane is most easily and safely maneuvered by hand with the
towbar attached to the nosewheel. The towbar may be stowed in Zone
6. Moving the airplane by hand will require that the individual steering
with the towbar be assisted by personnel pushing at the wing struts.
CAUTION
Do not push or pull the airplane using the propeller
blades or control surfaces.
Use extreme caution during towing operations, especially when towing
with a vehicle. Do not exceed the nose gear turning angle limit of 51.5°
either side of center as shown by the steering limit marks.
If excess force is exerted beyond the turning limit, a red over-travel
indicator block (frangible stop) will fracture and the block, attached to a
cable, will fall into view alongside the nose strut. This should be
checked routinely during preflight inspection to prevent operation with a
damaged nose gear.
CAUTION
UNLOCK the rudder lock and remove any external
rudder locks before towing.
If the airplane is towed or pushed over a rough surface during
hangaring, watch that the normal cushioning action of the nose gear
does not cause excessive vertical movement of the tail and the
resulting contact with low hangar doors or structure. A flat nose tire will
also increase tail height.
8-10
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
GROUND HANDLING
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
(Continued)
PARKING
When parking the airplane, head into the wind and set the parking
brakes. Do not set the parking brakes during cold weather when
accumulated moisture may freeze the brakes, or when the brakes are
overheated. Install the control wheel lock, engage the rudder lock, and
chock the wheels (if the brakes are not utilized) to prevent airplane
movement. In severe weather and high wind conditions, tie the airplane
down as outlined in the tiedown section.
CAUTION
Any time the airplane is loaded heavily, the footprint
pressure (pressure of the airplane wheels upon the
contact surface of the parking area or runway) will be
extremely high, and surfaces such as hot asphalt or
sod may not adequately support the weight of the
airplane. Precautions should be taken to avoid airplane
parking or movement on such surfaces.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-11
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
GROUND HANDLING
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
(Continued)
TIEDOWN
Proper tiedown procedure is the best precaution against damage to the
parked airplane by gusty or strong winds. To tiedown the airplane
securely, proceed as follows:
1. Head the airplane into the wind, if possible.
2. Set the parking brake.
CAUTION
Do not set the parking brake during cold weather when
accumulated moisture may freeze the brakes or when
the brakes are overheated. If the brakes are not
utilized, chock the nose and main wheels to prevent
airplane movement.
3. Install the control wheel lock and engage the rudder lock.
4. Set aileron and elevator trim tabs to neutral position so that tabs
fair with control surfaces.
5. Install pitot tube cover(s), if available.
6. Secure ropes or chains of sufficiently strong tensile strength to
the wing tiedown fittings and secure to ground anchors.
7. Attach a rope or chain to the tail tiedown, and secure to a ground
anchor.
8. If additional security is desired, attach a rope (no chains or
cables) to the nose gear torque link and secure to a ground
anchor.
9. If dusty conditions exist, or the last flight of the day has been
completed, install the two engine inlet covers to protect the
engine from debris. The covers may be installed after the engine
has cooled down (ITT indicator showing “off scale”
temperature).
10. To prevent the propeller from windmilling, install the propeller
anchor over a blade of the propeller and secure its anchor strap
around the nose gear or to the bracket located on the lower right
hand cowl.
8-12
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
GROUND HANDLING
(Continued)
JACKING
When a requirement exists to jack the entire airplane off the ground, or
when wing jack points are used in the jacking operation, refer to the
208 Maintenance Manual, Chapter 7-10-0, Jacking - Maintenance
Practices, for specific procedures and equipment required.
Several jack points or jacking locations are available depending on
whether a cargo pod is installed. The nose wheel jack point is located
directly below the firewall at FS 100.0 and housed within the nose gear
strut fairing. This jack point is accessible for nose gear jacking
regardless of the installation of a cargo pod. The two fuselage jack
points are located at the main gear supports, but are not accessible
with the cargo pod installed. Their use is generally reserved for
maintenance such as main gear removal or raising the entire airplane
whenever the cargo pod is not installed.
Anytime the cargo pod is installed, if the main gear to fuselage fairings
are removed, jacks can be positioned adjacent to the sides of the cargo
pod and raised to engage the receptacle on the end of the jacks over
the head of the outboard bolt which secures the main gear attach
trunnion bearing cap (aft) on the left and right gear. These jacking
locations serve essentially the same purpose as the fuselage jack
points at the main gear supports. An additional jack point on each main
gear axle fitting is used primarily when the cargo pod is installed and it
is desired to jack a single main gear for tire replacement, etc. If desired,
jack stands with wing jack pads may be fabricated so that the front wing
spar at WS 141.2 or 155.9 on each wing may be used as jacking
locations. A tail jack must be used in conjunction with wing jacking.
(Continued Next Page)
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-13
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
GROUND HANDLING
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
(Continued)
JACKING (Continued)
CAUTION
•
A tail jack stand must be used when conducting
maintenance inside the tail section, and should be
installed in most jacking operations. Be sure the
stand is suitably heavy enough to keep the tail stable
under all conditions and is strong enough to support
the airplane. Placing a jack stand under the nose
jack point (if not used for jacking) will provide
additional stability.
•
Do not use cargo pod structure for jacking or as a
blocking surface.
•
Raise the airplane no more than required for the
maintenance being performed.
•
Jack base must be level and jack cylinder vertical at
start of jacking operations.
In some instances (i.e. off-runway landing, collapsed gear, etc.) it may
be necessary to use overhead means to lift (hoist) the airplane, to be
followed with jacking at the jack points. Refer to the 208 Maintenance
Manual, Chapter 7-10-01, Emergency Lifting - Maintenance Practices,
and Chapter 7-10-0, Jacking - Maintenance Practices for specific
procedures and equipment required.
8-14
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
GROUND HANDLING
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
(Continued)
LEVELING
Longitudinal leveling of the airplane for weighing will require that the
main landing gear be supported by stands, blocks, etc., on the main
gear scales to a position at least four inches higher than the nose gear
as it rests on an appropriate scale. This initial elevated position will
compensate for the difference in waterline station between the main
and nose gear so that final leveling can be accomplished solely by
deflating the nose gear tire.
NOTE
Since the nose gear strut on this airplane contains an oil
snubber for shock absorption rather than an air/oil shock
strut, it cannot be deflated to aid in airplane leveling.
The airplane can also be leveled longitudinally by raising or lowering
the airplane at the jack points. Longitudinal leveling points are provided
at FS 239.05, WL 97.50 and FS 272.13, WL 97.50. Remove screws
located at leveling screw location on the left side of the fuselage just
forward of the cargo doors. Install two screws of sufficient length at
longitudinal leveling points on fuselage to provide resting points for
level. Place a spirit level on the screws, then deflate the nose gear tire
(if placed on scales) or adjust the jacks to center the bubble in the level.
The pilot’s seat rails can also be used for longitudinal leveling by
moving the pilot’s seat to the most forward position and placing the
level on top of (and parallel to) seat rail, just aft of pilot’s seat. Observe
level indication and deflate nose gear tire (if placed on scales) or adjust
jacks to center bubble in level.
To level airplane laterally, center a spirit level across the seat rails just
aft of crew doors, removing carpet if necessary. Observe level
indication and deflate main gear tire to properly center bubble in level.
Refer to the 208 Maintenance Manual, Chapter 8-20-00, Leveling Maintenance Practices, for specific procedures and equipment
required.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-15
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SERVICING
In addition to the Preflight Inspection covered in Section 4 of the POH,
complete servicing, inspection, and test requirements for your airplane
are detailed in the 208 Series Maintenance Manual. The Maintenance
Manual outlines items that require attention at regular intervals, plus
those items that require servicing, inspection, and/or testing at special
intervals.
Since Cessna Authorized Service Facilities have the training and
equipment necessary to conduct all service, inspection, and test
procedures in accordance with applicable maintenance manuals, it is
recommended that owner/operators contact the Cessna Authorized
Service Facility concerning these requirements and begin scheduling
the airplane for service at the recommended intervals.
Depending on various flight operations, your local Government Aviation
Agency may require additional service, inspections, or tests. For these
regulatory requirements, owners/operators should check with local
aviation officials where the airplane is being operated.
For quick and ready reference, quantities, materials, and specifications
for frequently used service items are as follows:
8-16
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
OIL
OIL SPECIFICATION
APPROVED OILS
REFER TO PRATT & WHITNEY CANADA SERVICE BULLETIN
NO. 1001, REVISION 28, OR SUBSEQUENT REVISON FOR A
COMPLETE
LISTING
OF
APPROVED
SYNTHETIC
LUBRICATING OILS.
Figure 8-1
(Continued Next Page)
208BPHCUS-01
U.S.
8-17
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
OIL (Continued)
OIL SPECIFICATION (Continued)
OIL SYSTEM SERVICING
Pratt & Whitney Canada has determined that regular oil changes are no
longer required and engine oil is to be changed on condition. Refer to
Pratt & Whitney Engine Service Bulletin No. 1001 for information on oil
system servicing.
8-18
U.S.
208BPHCUS-01
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
OIL (Continued)
OIL CAPACITY
Total: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 U.S. QUARTS (13.2 I)
(including filter, cooler, and hoses)
Drain and Refill Quantity: . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.5 U.S. QUARTS (9.0 l)
(approximately)
OIL QUANTITY OPERATING RANGE
Fill to within 1.5 quarts of MAX HOT or MAX COLD (as appropriate)
on dipstick. Quart marking indicate U.S. quarts low if oil is hot. For
example, a dipstick reading of 3 indicates the system is within 2
quarts of MAX if the oil is cold and within 3 quarts of MAX if the oil is
hot.
WARNING
Make sure oil dipstick cap is securely latched
down. Operating the engine with less than the
recommended oil level and with the dipstick cap
unlatched will result in excessive oil loss and
eventual engine stoppage.
NOTE
To obtain an accurate oil level reading, it is recommended
the oil level be checked within 10 minutes after engine
shutdown while the oil is hot (MAX HOT marking) or prior to
the first flight of the day while the oil is cold (MAX COLD
marking). If more than 10 minutes has elapsed since
engine shutdown and engine oil is still warm, perform an
engine dry motoring run before checking oil level.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-19
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
FUEL
FUEL GRADE (SPECIFICATION) AND FUEL ADDITIVES
* It is assumed that fuel temperature is the same as Outside Air
Temperature (OAT).
** AN8 is JP-8 fuel with a reduced freeze point specified for
Antarctic operations.
Figure 8-2
8-20
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
FUEL (Continued)
FUEL ADDITIVES
One of the following fuel system anti-ice additives must be added to the
fuel as noted at the following concentrations. Use of fuel anti-ice
additives is required if freezing temperatures are expected during any
part of the flight. Use of an approved Static Dissipator or Biocide is
recommended but not required.
1. MIL-DTL-27686 (EGME) or MIL-DTL-85470 (DiEGME), Type:
Anti-Ice Additive, in a concentration of 0.10 to 0.15 percent by
volume.
2. MIL-DTL-27686 (EGME) or MIL-DTL-85470 (DiEGME), Type:
Anti-Ice Additive, in a concentration of 0.10 to 0.20 percent by
volume.
3. GOST 8313 (Fluid I), Type: Anti-Ice Additive, in a concentration
of 0.10 to 0.30 percent by volume.
4. CIS TU6-10-1458 (Fluid I-M), Type: Anti-Ice Additive, in a
concentration of 0.10 to 0.30 percent by volume.
5. T1301 (SH0396-92), Type: Anti-Ice Additive, in a concentration
of 0.10 to 0.15 percent by volume.
6. DuPont Stadis 450, Type: Static Dissipator, in a concentration as
required to bring fuel up to 300 conductive units, not to exceed 1
Parts Per Million (PPM).
7. SOHIO Biobor JF, Type: Biocide, at a concentration not to
exceed 20 PPM of elemental boron (270 PPM of total additive).
8. Kathon FP, Type: Biocide, at a concentration not to exceed 100
PPM of total additive.
(Continued Next Page)
208BPHCUS-01
U.S.
8-21
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
FUEL (Continued)
FUEL ADDITIVES (Continued)
A variety of fuels may be used in the airplane. When operating in
outside air temperatures of 5°C or colder, each fuel must have an
approved anti-icing additive, incorporated or added to the fuel during
refueling.
Make sure the correct concentration of anti-icing additive is present in
the fuel if freezing temperatures are expected during any part of the
flight.
Anti-icing additive or biocide can be used to control bacteria and fungi.
The anti-ice additives EGME/DIEGME have shown, through service
experience, that they provide acceptable protection from
microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi that can rapidly multiply
and cause serious corrosion in tanks and may block filters, screens and
fuel metering equipment.
CAUTION
•
JP-5 fuels per MIL-T-5624 and JP-8 fuel per MIL-T83133A contain the correct premixed quantity of an
approved type of anti-icing fuel additive and no
additional anti-ice compounds should be added.
•
Proper mixing of EGME or DIEGME compound with
the fuel is extremely important. A concentration in
excess of that recommended (0.15% by volume
maximum) will result in detrimental effects to the fuel
tanks, such as deterioration of protective primer and
sealants and damage to o-rings and seals in the fuel
system and engine components.
•
Use only blending equipment that is recommended
by the manufacturer to obtain proper proportioning.
(Continued Next Page)
8-22
U.S.
208BPHCUS-01
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
FUEL (Continued)
FUEL ADDITIVES (Continued)
PROCEDURE FOR ADDING FUEL ANTI-ICING ADDITIVE
When the airplane is being refueled, use the following procedure to
blend anti-icing additive to nontreated fuel:
1. Attach additive to refuel nozzle, making sure blender tube
discharges in the refueling stream.
2. Start refueling while simultaneously fully depressing and slipping
ring over trigger of blender.
WARNING
Anti-icing additives containing Ethylene Glycol
Monomethyl Ether (EGME) are harmful if inhaled,
swallowed, or absorbed through the skin, and will
cause eye irritation. It is also combustible. Before
using this material, refer to all safety information on
the container.
CAUTION
•
Diethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether (DIEGME) is
slightly toxic if swallowed and may cause eye
redness, swelling and irritation. It is also
combustible. Before using this material, refer to all
safety information on the container.
•
Make sure the additive is directed into the flowing
fuel stream with the additive flow started after the
fuel flow starts and stopped before fuel flow stops.
Do not allow concentrated additive to contact coated
interior of fuel tank or airplane painted surface.
•
Use a minimum of 20 fluid ounces of additive per
156 gallons of fuel and a maximum of 20 fluid
ounces of additive per 104 gallons of fuel.
(Continued Next Page)
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-23
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
FUEL (Continued)
FUEL ADDITIVES (Continued)
PROCEDURE FOR CHECKING FUEL ADDITIVES
Prolonged storage of the airplane will result in a water buildup in the
fuel which “leaches out” the additive. An indication of this is when an
excessive amount of water accumulates in the fuel tank sumps. The
concentration of additive can be checked using an anti-icing additive
concentration test kit. Refer to 208 Maintenance Manual, Chapter 1211-01, Fuel - Servicing, for additional information on the anti-icing
additive concentration test kit. It is imperative that the instructions for
the test kit be followed explicitly when checking the additive
concentration. The additive concentrations by volume for EGME/
DIEGME shall be 0.10% minimum and 0.15% maximum, either
individually or mixed in a common tank. Fuel, when added to the tank,
should have a minimum concentration of 0.10% by volume.
CAUTION
If the fuel additive concentration has fallen below
0.035% by volume, the airplane should be defueled and
refueled.
(Continued Next Page)
8-24
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
FUEL (Continued)
FUEL ADDITIVES (Continued)
ANTI-STATIC PROTECTION
If additional anti-static protection is desired, the following additive is
approved for use:
Dupont Stadis 450 - in a concentration as required to bring fuel up
to 300 conductive units, not to exceed 1 PPM of total additive).
BIOCIDAL PROTECTION
If additional biocidal protection is desired, an additive is permitted for
use in certain conditions. Fuel tank maintenance practices are of prime
importance in controlling microbial growth. However, other factors such
as climate, airplane design, route structure, and utilization also affect
microbial growth; therefore, occasional use of a biocide may be
required.
Biocide additive may be used on a limited basis, defined as intermittent
or non-continuous use in a single application, to sterilize airplane fuel
systems suspected or found to be contaminated by microbial
organisms. For those operators, where the need for biocide use is
dictated, Pratt & Whitney Canada recommends, as a guide, a dosage
interval of once a month. This interval can then be adjusted, either
greater or lesser as an operator’s own experience dictates. An engine
operated in private and corporate airplanes, where utilization rates are
relatively low, may use the additive continuously. The following
additives are permitted for use:
• Sohio Biobor JF - at a concentration not to exceed 20
PPM of elemental boron (270 PPM of total additive).
• Kathon FP - at a concentration not to exceed 100
PPM of total additive.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-25
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
FUEL (Continued)
FUEL CAPACITY
TOTAL FUEL
Both Tanks and Reservoir: . . . . . . . . . . 339.1 U.S. Gallons (1283 l)
Both Tanks: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335.6 U.S. Gallons (1270 l)
Each Tank: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167.8 U.S. Gallons (635 l)
TOTAL USABLE FUEL
Both Tanks ON and Reservoir: . . . . . . . 335.3 U.S. Gallons (1268 l)
Both Tanks ON: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332.0 U.S. Gallons (1256 l)
Single Tank ON: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165.0 U.S. Gallons (624 l)
TOTAL UNUSABLE FUEL
Both Tanks ON: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.6 U.S. Gallons (13 l)
Single Tank ON: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8 U.S. Gallons (10 l)
Maximum Fuel Imbalance: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Pounds (90 kg)
NOTE
To achieve full fuel capacity, fill fuel tank to the top of the
filler neck. Filling fuel tanks to the bottom of the fuel filler
collar (level with flapper valve) allows space for thermal
expansion and results in a decrease in fuel capacity of 4.0
U.S. gallons (15 l) per side (8.0 U.S. gallons (30 l) total).
CAUTION
To obtain accurate fuel quantity indicator readings,
verify the airplane is parked in a laterally level condition,
or, if in flight, make sure the airplane is in a coordinated
and stabilized condition.
8-26
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
FUEL (Continued)
FUEL CONTAMINATION
Fuel contamination is usually the result of foreign material present in
the fuel system and may consist of water, rust, sand, dirt, microbes, or
bacterial growth. In addition, additives that are not compatible with fuel
or fuel system components can cause the fuel to become
contaminated.
Before each flight and after each refueling, use a clear sampler cup and
drain at least a cupful of fuel from each inboard fuel tank sump quick
drain valve, fuel tank external sump quick drain valve, the fuel reservoir
quick drain valve (actuated by a push-pull drain control on cargo pod),
and fuel filter quick-drain valve to determine if contaminants are present
and ensure the airplane has been fueled with the proper fuel. If the
airplane is parked with one wing low on a sloping ramp, draining of the
outboard fuel tank sump quick-drain valves (if installed) is also
recommended.
If contamination is detected, drain all fuel drain points again. Take
repeated samples from all fuel drain points until all contamination has
been removed. If, after repeated sampling, evidence of contamination
still exists, the airplane should not be flown. Tanks should be drained
and system purged by qualified maintenance personnel. All evidence of
contamination must be removed before further flight. If the airplane has
been serviced with the improper fuel grade, defuel completely and
refuel with the correct grade. Do not fly the airplane with contaminated
or unapproved fuel.
In addition, Owners/Operators who are not acquainted with a particular
fixed base operator should be assured that the fuel supply has been
checked for contamination and is properly filtered before allowing the
airplane to be serviced. Fuel tanks should be kept full between flights,
provided weight and balance considerations will permit, to reduce the
possibility of water condensing on the walls of partially filled tanks.
(Continued Next Page)
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-27
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
FUEL (Continued)
FUEL CONTAMINATION (Continued)
To further reduce the possibility of contaminated fuel, routine
maintenance of the fuel system must be performed in accordance with
the Airplane Maintenance Manual. Only the proper fuel, as
recommended in this POH/AFM, should be used, and fuel additives
must not be used unless approved by Cessna and the Federal Aviation
Administration.
WARNING
8-28
•
It is the pilot’s responsibility to make sure that
the airplane’s fuel supply is clean before flight.
•
Do not fly the airplane with contaminated or
unapproved fuel.
•
Any traces of solid contaminants such as rust,
sand, pebbles, dirt, microbes and bacterial
growth or liquid contamination resulting from
water, improper fuel type, or additives that are
not compatible with the fuel or fuel system
components must be considered hazardous.
•
Carefully sample fuel from all fuel drain locations
during each preflight inspection and after every
refueling.
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
LANDING GEAR
Consult the following table for servicing information on the landing gear.
SERVICING
CRITERIA
COMPONENT
Nosewheel (22 x 8.00-8, 6-Ply Rated Tire)
30.0 - 42.0 PSI
Main Wheel (8.50-10, 8-Ply Rated Tire)
53.0 - 57.0 PSI
Main Wheel (29 x 11.00-10, 10-Ply Rated Tire)
35.0 - 45.0 PSI
Brakes
MIL-H-5606 (Note 1)
Nose Gear Shock Strut
MIL-H-5606 (Note 2)
NOTE
1. Service brake fluid reservoir with MIL-H-5606 hydraulic fluid as
placarded on reservoir. Maintain fluid level between MIN and
MAX markings.
2. Keep strut filled with MIL-H-5606 hydraulic fluid per filling
instructions placard. No air pressure is required in strut.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-29
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
OXYGEN
The oxygen cylinder, when fully charged, contains either 51 cubic feet
for the 2-port oxygen system or 117 cubic foot for the 10-port or 17-port
system, of MIL-O-27210 aviator's breathing oxygen under a pressure of
1850 PSI at 21°C (70°F). Filling pressures will vary, however, due to
ambient temperature in the filling area, and the temperature rise
resulting from compression of the oxygen. Because of this, merely
filling to 1850 PSI will not result in a properly filled cylinder. Fill to
pressures indicated on the table below for ambient temperature.
OXYGEN FILLING PRESSURES
Figure 8-3
NOTE
Refer to Section 9, Supplement 6 for additional information
on the oxygen system installed on your airplane.
8-30
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
GROUND DEICE/ANTI-ICE OPERATIONS
During cold weather operations, flight crews are responsible for making
sure that the airplane is free of ice contamination. Type I deice, and
Type II, Type III, or Type IV anti-ice fluids may be used to ensure
compliance with FAA regulations, which require that all critical
components (wings, control surfaces and engine inlets as an example)
be free of snow, ice, or frost before takeoff. The deicing process is
intended to restore the airplane to a clean configuration so that neither
aerodynamic characteristics nor mechanical interference from
contaminants will occur.
WARNING
Type II, Type III, and Type IV anti-ice fluid is
designed for use on airplanes with a VR speed of 85
knots or greater. Whenever Type II, Type III, or Type
IV anti-ice fluid is applied to the airplane, the takeoff
flap setting is limited to UP and the VR is 88 KCAS
(83 KIAS). Refer to Section 2, Limitations, Type II,
Type III, and Type IV Anti-Ice Fluid Takeoff
Limitations and Section 5, Performance, Figure 5-11
and Figure 5-27, for Flaps Up Takeoff Distances and
liftoff speeds in KIAS. Figures 5-11 and 5-27, Flaps
Up Takeoff Distance charts start with the airplane’s
maximum weight for normal operations.
NOTE
It is recommended that flight crews refamiliarize
themselves seasonally with the following publications for
expanded deice and anti-ice procedures:
• Cessna 208 Series Maintenance Manual, Chapter 12.
• FAA Advisory Circular AC135-17, dated 14 December
1994 or later.
• FAA Advisory Circular AC20-117, dated 17 December
1982 or later.
• Cessna Aircraft Company SNL 08-1 and FAA Notice
8900.196: Revised FAA-Approved Deicing Program
Updates, Winter 2012-2013.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-31
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
GROUND DEICE/ANTI-ICE OPERATIONS (Continued)
Deicing and anti-icing fluids are aqueous solutions which work by
lowering the freezing point of water in either the liquid or crystal phase,
thus delaying the onset of freezing. For this reason, they are referred to
as Freezing Point Depressant (FPD) fluids. Deicing fluid is classified as
Type I. Anti-icing fluid is classified as Type II, Type III, or Type IV.
Deicing and anti-icing with fluids may be performed as a one-step or
two-step process. The one-step deicing procedure involves using Type
I deice fluid to remove ice and slush from the airplane prior to departure
and to provide minimal anti-icing protection as provided in the Type I
holdover timetable (refer to FAA notice 8900.196, dated 8-16-12 or
later).
The procedure involves applying Type II, Type III, or Type IV anti-ice
fluid to make sure the airplane remains clean after deicing. Type II,
Type III, or Type IV fluid is used to provide longer-term anti-icing
protection. Type I, Type II, Type III, and Type IV fluids have time
limitation before refreezing begins, at which time additional deicing is
required. This time limitation is referred to as “holdover time”. Because
holdover time depends highly on a number of factors, charts can
provide only approximate estimates. It remains the responsibility of the
pilot-in-command to determine the effectiveness of any deicing or antiicing procedure. Refer to FAA notice 8900.196, dated 8-16-12 or later
for Type I, Type II, Type III or Type IV fluids.
CAUTION
Type I, Type II, Type III, and Type IV fluids are not
compatible and may not be mixed. Additionally, most
manufacturers prohibit the mixing of brands within a
type. However, the same spray equipment may apply
Type I and Type III fluids. Line personnel should be
supervised by the pilot in command to ensure proper
application of Type I deice, and Type II, Type III, or
Type IV anti-ice fluids.
(Continued Next Page)
8-32
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
GROUND DEICE/ANTI-ICE OPERATIONS (Continued)
NOTE
Deicing fluids are not intended for use in removing snow
deposits. Snow is best removed by mechanically sweeping
or brushing it from the airplane structure. Use caution not to
damage any airplane structure or antennas when removing
snow.
Deicing may be accomplished using the ambient temperature available
from a heated hangar or by mechanical means using a glycol-based
Freezing Point Depressant (FPD) Type I fluid. A heated hangar is an
excellent option to deice airplanes and must be utilized whenever
possible. However, care must be exercised to make sure that all melted
precipitation is removed from the airplane to prevent refreezing once
the airplane is moved from the hangar to the flight line. Type I deicing
fluids should be sprayed on the airplane (with engine shutdown) in a
manner that minimizes heat loss of fluid to the air. The fluid should be
applied in a temperature range from 160°F to 180°F (71°C to 82°C)
using a solid cone pattern of large coarse droplets. Fluid should be
sprayed as close as possible to the airplane surfaces, but not closer
than approximately 10 feet if a high-pressure nozzle is used.
Application techniques for Type II, Type III, and Type IV fluids are the
same as Type I, except that since the airplane is already clean, the
application should last only long enough to properly coat the airplane
surfaces. However, Type II, Type III, or Type IV fluid is sometimes
heated and sprayed as a deicing fluid. For this case, it should be
considered a Type I fluid as the heat may change the characteristics of
the thickening agents in the fluid. Therefore, Type II, Type III, or Type IV
fluid applied in this manner will not be as effective as it would be if it
were applied at ambient temperature.
(Continued Next Page)
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-33
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
GROUND DEICE/ANTI-ICE OPERATIONS (Continued)
Refer to Figure 8-4, Essential Areas To Be Deiced, for areas to spray
Type I deicing fluid, Figure 8-5, Essential Areas To Apply Anti-ice Fluid,
for areas to spray Type II, Type III and Type IV anti-icing fluid, Figure 86, Deice And Anti-ice Fluid Direct Spray Avoidance Areas, for areas to
avoid spraying directly, and Figure 8-7, Deicing And Anti-icing
Application, for sequence of application.
Heated solutions of Freezing Point Depressant (FPD) are more
effective than unheated solutions because thermal energy is used to
melt the ice, snow, or frost formations. Type I deicing fluids are used in
the diluted state, with specific ratios of fluid-to-water dependent on
ambient temperature. Type I deicing fluids have a very limited holdover
time. Refer to FAA Notice 8900.196, dated 8-16-12 or later.
CAUTION
Type I fluids should never be used full strength
(undiluted). Undiluted glycol fluid is quite viscous below
14°F (-10°C) and can actually produce lift reductions of
about 20 percent. Additionally, undiluted glycol has a
higher freezing point than a glycol/water mixture.
NOTE
•
Deicing and anti-icing procedures must be closely
coordinated between the pilot in command and ground
crews, and carried out in a timely manner. Ultimate
responsibility for safety of flight rests with the pilot in
command, and any decisions to deice or anti-ice an
airplane must be accomplished under his or her direct
supervision.
•
The first area to be deiced and anti-iced must be visible
from the cockpit and must be used to provide a
conservative estimate for subsequent ice accumulations
on unseen areas of the airplane before initiating takeoff.
•
Due to the weight and C.G. changes that occur while
deicing the airplane, a tail stand must be placed under
the tail to prevent the airplane from tipping on its tail.
(Continued Next Page)
8-34
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
GROUND DEICE/ANTI-ICE OPERATIONS (Continued)
HOLDOVER TIMETABLE (TYPE I, TYPE II, TYPE III, AND
TYPE IV FLUIDS)
NOTE
Refer to FAA Notice 8900.196, dated 8-16-12 or later for
holdover timetables.
The length of time that deicing and anti-icing fluids remain effective is
known as “holdover time”. The holdover timetables for Type I deicing,
and Type II, Type III, or Type IV anti-icing fluids are only an estimation
and vary depending on many factors (temperature, precipitation type,
wind, and airplane skin temperature). The holdover times are based on
the mixture ratio appropriate for the OAT. Holdover times start when the
last application has begun.
Guidelines for maximum holdover times anticipated by the FAA, in
coordination with Transport Canada (TC) and the SAE G-12 Aircraft
Ground Deicing Holdover Time Subcommittee generated the HOT
guidelines published in FAA Notice 8900.196 for Type I, Type II, Type III
or Type IV, and ISO Type I, Type II, Type III, or Type IV fluid mixtures.
Type I HOTs are a function of weather conditions and outside air
temperature (OAT) while the HOTs for Type II, Type III, and Type IV
fluids are primarily a function of the OAT, precipitation type and
intensity, and percent Freezing Point Depressant (FPD) fluid
concentration applied.
NOTE
The SAE no longer publishes HOT guidelines.
(Continued Next Page)
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-35
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
GROUND DEICE/ANTI-ICE OPERATIONS (Continued)
HOLDOVER TIMETABLE (TYPE I, TYPE II, TYPE III, AND
TYPE IV FLUIDS) (Continued)
CAUTION
•
Aircraft operators are solely responsible for ensuring
that holdover timetables contain current data.
•
The tables are for use in departure planning only and
should be used in conjunction with pretakeoff
contamination check procedures.
•
The time of protection will be shortened in heavy
weather conditions. High wind velocity and jet blast
may cause a degradation of the protective film. If
these conditions occur, the time of protection may be
shortened considerably. This is also the case when
fuel temperature is significantly lower than OAT.
NOTE
•
Holdover timetables in FAA Notice 8900.196, dated
11-25-09 or later do not apply to other than SAE or ISO
Type I, Type II, Type III or Type IV fluids.
•
The responsibility for the application of this data remains
with the user.
WARNING
When ground icing conditions are present, a
pretakeoff contamination check must be conducted
by the pilot in command within 5 minutes of takeoff,
preferably just prior to taxiing onto the active
runway. Critical areas of the airplane such as
empennage, wings, windshield, control surfaces,
and engine inlets must be checked to make sure
they are free of ice, slush, and snow and that the
anti-ice fluid is still protecting the airplane.
(Continued Next Page)
8-36
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
GROUND DEICE/ANTI-ICE OPERATIONS (Continued)
HOLDOVER TIMETABLE (TYPE I, TYPE II, TYPE III, AND
TYPE IV FLUIDS) (Continued)
TYPE I DEICE FLUID
NOTE
•
Freezing point of Type I fluid mixture must be at least
10°C (18°F) below OAT.
•
•
Holdover time starts when last application has begun.
Type I fluid should be sprayed on the airplane (with
engine off) in a manner which minimizes heat loss to the
air. If possible, fluid should be sprayed in a solid cone
pattern of large coarse droplets at a temperature of
160°F to 180°F. The fluid should be sprayed as close as
possible to the airplane surfaces, but not closer than 10
feet if a high pressure nozzle is used.
WARNING
When ground icing conditions are present, a
pretakeoff contamination check should be
conducted by the pilot in command within 5
minutes of takeoff, preferably just prior to taxiing
onto the active runway. Critical areas of the
airplane such as empennage, wings, windshield,
control surfaces, and engine inlets should be
checked to make sure they are free of ice, slush,
and snow, and that the anti-ice fluid is still
protecting the airplane.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-37
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
GROUND DEICE/ANTI-ICE OPERATIONS (Continued)
HOLDOVER TIMETABLE (TYPE I, TYPE II, TYPE III, AND
TYPE IV FLUIDS) (Continued)
TYPE II ANTI-ICE FLUID
NOTE
•
Freezing point of Type II fluid mixture must be at least
7°C (13°F) below OAT.
•
•
Holdover time starts when last application has begun.
•
Type II fluid can be applied undiluted at ambient
temperature to a “clean” airplane within three minutes
after deicing is completed, due to the limited holdover
times of Type I deice fluid. Type II fluid is however,
sometimes heated and sprayed as a deicing fluid. For
this case, it should be considered a Type I fluid, as the
heat may change the characteristics of the thickening
agents in the fluid. Type II fluid therefore, applied in this
manner, will not be as effective as it would be if it were
applied at ambient temperature.
Application techniques for Type II fluid are the same as
for Type I, except that since the airplane is already
clean, the application should last only long enough to
properly coat the airplane surfaces.
CAUTION
Some Type II fluids could form a thick or high strength
gel during “dry-out” and when rehydrated can freeze
restricting movement of flight control surfaces, while in
flight.
WARNING
When ground icing conditions are present, a
pretakeoff contamination check must be conducted
by the pilot in command within 5 minutes of takeoff,
preferably just prior to taxiing onto the active
runway. Critical areas of the airplane such as
empennage, wings, windshield, control surfaces,
and engine inlets must be checked to make sure
they are free of ice, slush, and snow and that the
anti-ice fluid is still protecting the airplane.
8-38
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
GROUND DEICE/ANTI-ICE OPERATIONS (Continued)
HOLDOVER TIMETABLE (TYPE I, TYPE II, TYPE III, AND
TYPE IV FLUIDS) (Continued)
TYPE III ANTI-ICE FLUID
NOTE
•
Freezing point of Type III fluid mixture must be at least
7°C (13°F) below OAT.
•
•
Holdover time starts when last application has begun.
•
Type III fluid must be applied undiluted at ambient
temperature to a “clean” airplane within 3 minutes after
deicing is completed due to the limited holdover times of
Type I deice fluid. However, Type III fluid is sometimes
heated and sprayed as a deicing fluid. For this case, it
should be considered a Type I fluid, as the heat may
change the characteristics of the thickening agents in the
fluid. Therefore, Type II fluid applied in this manner will
not be as effective as it would be if it were applied at
ambient temperature.
Application techniques for Type III fluid are the same as
for Type I, except that since the airplane is already
clean, the application should last only long enough to
properly coat the airplane surfaces.
WARNING
When ground icing conditions are present, a pretakeoff contamination check must be conducted by
the pilot in command within 5 minutes of takeoff,
preferably just prior to taxiing onto the active
runway. Critical areas of the airplane such as
empennage, wings, windshield, control surfaces,
and engine inlets must be checked to make sure
they are free of ice, slush, and snow and that the
anti-ice fluid is still protecting the airplane.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-39
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
GROUND DEICE/ANTI-ICE OPERATIONS (Continued)
HOLDOVER TIMETABLE (TYPE I, TYPE II, TYPE III, AND
TYPE IV FLUIDS) (Continued)
TYPE IV ANTI-ICE FLUID
CAUTION
The time of protection will be shortened in heavy
weather conditions. Heavy precipitation rates, high
moisture content, high wind velocity, or jet blast may
reduce holdover time below the lowest time stated in
the range. Holdover time may be reduced when
airplane skin temperature is lower than OAT.
NOTE
•
Freezing point of Type IV fluid mixture must be at least
7°C (13°F) below OAT.
•
•
Holdover time starts when last application has begun.
•
Type IV fluid can be applied undiluted at ambient
temperature to a “clean” airplane within three minutes
after deicing is completed, due to the limited holdover
times of Type I deice fluid. Type IV fluid is however,
sometimes heated and sprayed as a deicing fluid. For
this case, it should be considered a Type I fluid, as the
heat may change the characteristics of the thickening
agents in the fluid. Type IV fluid therefore, applied in this
manner, will not be as effective as it would be if it were
applied at ambient temperature.
Application techniques for Type IV fluid are the same as
for Type I, except that since the airplane is already
clean, the application should last only long enough to
properly coat the airplane surfaces.
(Continued Next Page)
8-40
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
GROUND DEICE/ANTI-ICE OPERATIONS (Continued)
HOLDOVER TIMETABLE (TYPE I, TYPE II, TYPE III, AND
TYPE IV FLUIDS) (Continued)
TYPE IV ANTI-ICE FLUID (Continued)
CAUTION
•
Some Type IV fluids could form a thick or high
strength gel during “dry-out” and when rehydrated
can freeze restricting movement of flight control
surfaces, while in flight.
•
Some Type IV fluids exhibit poor aerodynamic
elimination
(flow-off)
qualities
at
colder
temperatures.
•
Heated areas of airplane (i.e., heated pitot tubes and
stall warning vanes) should be avoided due to the
fact that fluid may “dry-out” into hard globular
nodules.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-41
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
ESSENTIAL AREAS TO BE DEICED
SHADED AREAS INDICATE ESSENTIAL AREAS TO BE DEICED.
NOTE
1. Give special attention to the gaps between the flight controls.
All snow, ice, and slush must be removed from these gaps.
2. Remove snow, ice and slush from pitot tubes by hand only.
DIRECT SPRAY AVOIDANCE AREAS:
Engine Inlets and Exhaust, Brakes, Pitot-Static Tubes, Windshields,
Cabin Windows, and Stall Warning Vane.
Figure 8-4
8-42
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
ESSENTIAL AREAS TO APPLY ANTI-ICE FLUID
SHADED AREAS INDICATE ESSENTIAL AREAS WHERE ANTI-ICE
FLUID IS APPLIED.
NOTE
Anti-ice fluid must be applied at low pressure to form a thin
film on surfaces. Fluid must just cover airplane without
runoff.
DIRECT SPRAY AVOIDANCE AREAS:
Pitot-Static Tubes, Windshields, Cabin Windows, and Stall Warning
Vane.
Figure 8-5
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-43
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
DEICE AND ANTI-ICE FLUID
DIRECT SPRAY AVOIDANCE AREAS
DIRECT SPRAY AVOIDANCE AREAS:
Engine Inlets and Exhaust, Brakes, Pitot-static Tubes, Windshields,
Cabin Windows, and Stall Warning Vane.
Figure 8-6
8-44
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
DEICING AND ANTI-ICING APPLICATION
NOTE
By starting the deice and anti-ice application at the left front
area of the airplane, the pilot can then get a conservative
estimate of how quickly ice forms by observation from
inside the cockpit. Because the cockpit is the first area
deiced or anti-iced, it will be the first area where ice will
form again.
Figure 8-7
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-45
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
CLEANING AND CARE
PAINTED SURFACES
The painted exterior surfaces of the Cessna 208B have a durable, longlasting finish. Approximately 10 days are required for the paint to cure
completely; in most cases, the curing period will have been completed
prior to delivery of the airplane. In the event that polishing or buffing is
required within the curing period, it is recommended that the work be
done by someone experienced in handling uncured paint. Any Cessna
Authorized Service Facility can accomplish this work.
Generally, the painted surfaces can be kept bright by washing with
water and mild soap, followed by a rinse with water and drying with
cloths or a chamois. Harsh or abrasive soaps or detergents that cause
corrosion or scratches must never be used. Remove stubborn oil and
grease with a cloth moistened with Stoddard solvent.
To seal any minor surface chips or scratches and protect against
corrosion, the airplane must be waxed regularly with a good automotive
wax applied in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. If the
airplane is operated in a sea coast or other salt water environment, it
must be washed and waxed more frequently to assure adequate
protection. Special care must be taken to seal around rivet heads and
skin laps, which are the areas most susceptible to corrosion. A heavier
coating of wax on the leading edges of the wings and tail and on the
cowl nose cap and propeller spinner will help reduce the abrasion
encountered in these areas. Reapplication of wax will generally be
necessary after cleaning with soap solutions or after chemical deicing
operations.
When the airplane is parked outside in cold climates and it is necessary
to remove ice before flight, care must be taken to protect the painted
surfaces during ice removal with chemical liquids. Isopropyl alcohol will
satisfactorily remove ice accumulations without damaging the paint.
However, keep the isopropyl alcohol away from the windshield and
cabin windows since it will attack the plastic and may cause it to craze.
8-46
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CLEANING AND CARE (Continued)
WINDSHIELD AND WINDOWS
The windshield and windows are constructed of cast acrylic. The
surface hardness of acrylic is approximately equal to that of copper or
brass. Do not use a canvas cover on the windshield unless freezing
rain or sleet is anticipated. Canvas covers may scratch the plastic
surface. When cleaning and waxing the windshield and windows, use
only the following prescribed methods and materials.
MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES
The following procedures provide the most current information
regarding cleaning and servicing windshields and windows. Improper
cleaning or use of unapproved cleaning agents can cause damage to
these surfaces.
CLEANING INSTRUCTIONS
CAUTION
•
Windshields and windows (acrylic-faced) are easily
easily damaged by improper handling and cleaning
techniques.
•
Do not use methanol, denatured alcohol, gasoline,
benzene, xylene, methyl n-propyl ketone, acetone,
carbon tetrachloride, lacquer thinners, commercial or
household window cleaning sprays on windshields
or windows.
1. Place airplane inside hangar or in shaded area and allow to cool
from heat of sun’s direct rays.
2. Using clean (preferably running) water, flood the surface. Use
bare hands with no jewelry to feel and dislodge any dirt or
abrasive materials.
(Continued Next Page)
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-47
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
CLEANING AND CARE (Continued)
WINDSHIELD AND WINDOWS (Continued)
CLEANING INSTRUCTIONS (Continued)
3. Using a mild soap or detergent, such as a dishwashing liquid, and
water to wash the windshield surfaces. Again, use only the bare
hand to provide rubbing force. A clean cloth may be used to
transfer the soap solution to the surface, but extreme care must
be exercised to prevent scratching the surface.
4. When contaminants on acrylic windshields and windows cannot
be removed by a mild detergent, Type Il aliphatic naphtha,
applied with a soft clean cloth, may be used as a cleaning
solvent. Be sure to frequently refold cloth to avoid redepositing
contaminants and/or scratching windshield with any abrasive
particles.
5. Rinse surface thoroughly with clean fresh water and dry with a
clean cloth.
6. Hard polishing wax should be applied to acrylic surfaces. (The
wax has an index of refraction nearly the same as transparent
acrylic and will tend to mask any shallow scratches on the
windshield surface).
7. Acrylic surfaces may be polished using a polish meeting Federal
Specification P-P-560 applied per the manufacturer’s
instructions.
CAUTION
When applying and removing wax and polish, use a
clean, soft cloth, such as cotton or cotton flannel.
8. A Cessna approved rain repellent and surface conditioner may
be used to increase the natural cleaning of the windshield during
rain. Apply in accordance with manufacturers instructions.
Caution must be used not to get rain repellent on painted
surfaces surrounding the windshield.
CAUTION
REPCON is the only rain repellent conforming to
Federal Specification MIL-W-6862 that is approved to
use on Cessna Model 208 series airplanes.
8-48
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CLEANING AND CARE (Continued)
WINDSHIELD AND WINDOWS (Continued)
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
CAUTION
Utilization of the following techniques will help minimize
windshield and window crazing.
1. Keep all surfaces of windshields and windows clean.
2. If desired, wax acrylic surfaces.
3. Carefully cover all surfaces during any painting, powerplant
cleaning or other procedure that calls for the use of any type of
solvents or chemicals.
4. The following coatings are approved for use in protecting
surfaces from solvent attack:
a. White Spray Lab, MIL-C-6799, Type I, Class II.
b. WPL-3 Masking Paper - St. Regis, Newton, MA.
c. 5 X N - Poly-Spotstick - St. Regis, Newton, MA.
d. Protex 40 - Mask Off Company, Monrovia, CA and
Southwest Paper Co., Wichita, KS.
e. Protex 10VS - Mask Off Company, Monrovia, CA and
Southwest Paper Co., Wichita, KS
f. Scotch 344 Black Tape - 3M Company
5. Do not park or store the airplane where it might be subjected to
direct contact with or vapors from: methanol, denatured alcohol,
gasoline, benzene, xylene, MEK, acetone, carbon tetrachloride,
lacquer thinners, commercial or household window cleaning
sprays, paint strippers, or other types of solvents.
6. Do not use solar screens or shields installed on inside of airplane
or leave sunvisors up against windshield. The reflected heat from
these items causes elevated temperatures which accelerate
crazing.
7. Do not use power drill motor or powered device to clean, polish,
or wax surfaces.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-49
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
CLEANING AND CARE (Continued)
MATERIALS REQUIRED FOR ACRYLIC WINDSHIELDS
AND WINDOWS
MATERIAL
MANUFACTURER
USE
Mild soap or detergent (hand Commercially available
dishwashing
type
without
abrasives)
Cleaning
windows.
Aliphatic
naphtha
Type
II Commercially available
conforming
to
Federal
Specification TT-N-95
Removing deposits that cannot
be removed with mild soap
solution on acrylic windshields
and windows.
Polishing wax: (Refer to Note 1)
Waxing acrylic windshields and
windows.
Turtle Wax (paste)
Turtle Wax, Inc.
windshields
and
Chicago, IL 60638
Great Reflections Paste Wax
E.I. duPont de Nemours and
Co., (Inc.)
Wilmington, DE 19898
Slip-Stream Wax (paste)
Classic Chemical
Grand Prairie, TX 75050
Cleaning and polishing acrylic
windshields and windows.
Acrylic polish conforming to
Federal Specification P-P-560
such as:
Permatex plastic cleaner
Number 403D
Permatex
Company,
Kansas City, KS 66115
Mirror Glaze MGH-17
Mirror Bright Polish Co.
Inc.
Pasadena, CA
Soft cloth, such as: Cotton Commercially available
flannel or cotton terry cloth
material
Applying and removing wax
and polish.
Rain repellent conforming to
Federal Specification MIL-W6882, such as:
UNELKO Corp.
REPCON
7428 E. Karen Dr.
(Refer to Note 2)
Scottsdale, AZ 85260
Rain shedding
windshields.
on
acrylic
NOTE
1. These are the only polishing waxes tested and approved for
use by Cessna Aircraft Company.
2. This is the only rain repellent approved for use by Cessna
Aircraft Company for use on Cessna Model 208B series
airplanes.
Figure 8-8
8-50
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CLEANING AND CARE (Continued)
STABILIZER ABRASION BOOT CARE
If the airplane is equipped with stabilizer abrasion boots, keep them
clean and free from oil and grease, which can swell the rubber. Wash
them with mild soap and water, using Form Tech AC cleaner or naphtha
to remove stubborn grease. Do not scrub the boots and be sure to wipe
off all solvent before it dries. Boots with loosened edges or small tears
must be repaired. Your Cessna Authorized Service Facility has the
proper material and knowledge how to do this correctly.
PROPELLER CARE
Always conduct a preflight inspection and occasionally wipe the blades
with a cloth dampened with oil to clean off grass and bug stains,
minimize corrosion, and assure a longer blade life. Waxing the blades
with an automotive type paste wax on a regular basis will further
minimize corrosion. Damaged or blistered paint must be repainted.
During the preflight inspection, check the blades for nicks, gouges,
scratches, corrosion pits, etc., the propeller hub for evidence of grease
and oil leaks, and the propeller spinner for condition and security.
Repair of small nicks and scratches may be performed by qualified
mechanics in accordance with procedures specified in FAA Advisory
Circular 43.13-1A. However, whenever a significant amount of metal is
removed, or in the case of previously reworked blades that may be at or
near minimum width and thickness limits, the appropriate Hartzell
Service Manual must be consulted to determine if minimum allowable
blade width and thickness limits have been exceeded. If these limits are
exceeded, blade replacement is required. After filing and polishing, the
damaged area must be inspected by the dye penetrant method to verify
that all damage has been removed and the blade is not cracked. The
area should then be reprotected by localized application of chemical
film per MIL-C-5541 (e.g., Alodine) and repainted as necessary. Large
nicks or scratches or other damage involving such things as bent
blades, balance, diameter reduction, etc. must be corrected by an FAA
approved propeller repair station.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-51
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
CLEANING AND CARE (Continued)
ENGINE
ENGINE EXTERIOR/COMPARTMENT CLEANING
The engine exterior and compartment may be cleaned, using a suitable
solvent, in accordance with instructions in the airplane Maintenance
Manual. Most efficient cleaning is done using a spray type cleaner.
Before spray cleaning, ensure that protection is afforded for
components which might be adversely affected by the solvent. Refer to
the 208 Maintenance Manual, Chapter 12-22-01, External - Cleaning/
Painting for approved cleaning procedures and Chapter 12-21-05,
Engine Control Rod Ends - Servicing, for information on proper
lubrication of controls and components after engine cleaning.
ENGINE COMPRESSOR WASH
The benefits of performance improvements and increased service life
of hot section parts accruing from instituting a regular compressor wash
program cannot be overemphasized. Compressor blade wash is
accomplished to remove deposit buildup accumulated on compressor
blades during normal operation. A compressor wash ring is installed on
the top of the engine adjacent to the induction air inlet screen to
facilitate this maintenance program. Refer to 208 Maintenance Manual,
Chapter 71-42-00, Compressor Blade Wash - Maintenance Practices,
for approved washing procedures.
Compressor washes can be performed by either motoring the engine
with the starter or running the engine. Depending on the nature of the
operating environment and the type of deposits in the engine gas path,
either of the two wash methods can be used to remove salt or dirt and
other baked-on deposits that accumulate over a period of time and
cause engine performance deterioration. When the wash is performed
solely to remove salt deposits, it is known as a “desalination” wash. A
wash performed to remove baked on deposits to improve engine
performance is known as a performance recovery wash. A motoring
wash is conducted at a gas generator RPM of 14-25%; the running
wash is carried out at an Ng of approximately 60% (23,000 RPM). The
water or cleaning mixture and rinsing solution, dependent on ambient
temperature, is injected at different pressure, depending on the wash
method being conducted.
(Continued Next Page)
8-52
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CLEANING AND CARE (Continued)
ENGINE (Continued)
ENGINE COMPRESSOR WASH (Continued)
Operating environment determines the nature of the wash, the
frequency, and wash method recommended. If operating in a
continuously salt-laden environment, a desalination wash is
recommended following the last flight of the day by means of the
motoring method. Occasionally, salt-laden environments may
necessitate a desalination wash each week using the motoring method.
Less severe and more general operating environments are not as
conducive to rapid deposit buildup but eventually can contribute to
performance deterioration and necessitate a performance recovery
wash at intervals of 100-200 hours. In these general environments, a
motoring wash is recommended for light soil and multiple motoring or a
running wash is suggested for heavy soil.
CAUTION
Observe engine starting cycle limits when conducting
motoring wash procedures. Refer to Section 2,
Limitations, Powerplant Limitations, for details on
Engine Starting Cycle limits.
A number of cleaning agents are recommended for addition to water to
form the cleaning solution used for compressor wash. However, the
mixture proportion of all the cleaning agents is not identical. Depending
on the prevalent ambient temperature, aviation kerosene and methanol
must be added to the cleaning solution in various proportions. The
quality of the water used is also important; any drinking quality water is
permissible for a motoring wash, but demineralized water only is
recommended for a running wash. Detailed information concerning the
cleaning mixture components, mixture formulation, recommended
quantity and application equipment can be found in Pratt & Whitney
Aircraft Gas Turbine Operation Information Letter No. 7.
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-53
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
CLEANING AND CARE (Continued)
ENGINE (Continued)
COMPRESSOR TURBINE BLADE WASH
Pratt & Whitney Canada has developed a procedure for performing a
compressor turbine blade motoring wash. This technique will facilitate
the removal of contaminants from the compressor turbine blade airfoil
surfaces, thereby minimizing sulphidation attack of these surfaces. This
serves as an aid for obtaining optimum blade service life. With this
method, a water or water/methanol solution is injected directly into the
combustion chamber by way of a special spray tube which is installed
in one of the igniter plug ports. This method of engine wash does not
replace the need for a normal engine compressor wash for
performance recovery or desalination purposes.
Compressor turbine blade washing is accomplished using water of
drinking quality (potable) only at ambient temperatures of +2°C (36°F)
and above. Use a water/methanol solution at ambient temperatures
below +2°C (36°F). Refer to 208 Maintenance Manual, Chapter 71-4300, Turbine Blade Wash - Maintenance Practices, for approved
washing procedures and the Pratt & Whitney, PT6A-140 Engine
Maintenance Manual, for solution strength according to ambient
temperature.
8-54
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CLEANING AND CARE (Continued)
INTERIOR CARE
The instrument panel, control wheel, and control knobs need only be
wiped off with a damp cloth. Oil and grease on the control wheel and
control knobs can be removed with a cloth moistened with Stoddard
solvent. Volatile solvents must never be used since they soften and
craze the plastic.
CAUTION
Do not use any of the following solvents for cleaning of
the interior or interior components: methanol,
denatured alcohol, gasoline, benzene, xylene, MEK,
acetone, carbon tetrachloride, lacquer thinners,
commercial or household window cleaning sprays.
When in doubt about any product, do not use it.
The plastic trim, headliner, door panels, and floor covering in the crew
area of both versions and the rear cabin headliner and sidewalls of the
Passenger Version need only be wiped off with a damp cloth. In Cargo
Versions, the sidewalls, cargo doors, and overhead in the cargo area
are not easily soiled or stained. Dust and loose dirt must be picked up
with a vacuum cleaner. Stubborn dirt can be wiped off with a cloth
moistened in clean water. Mild soap suds, used sparingly, will remove
grease. The soap must be removed with a clean damp cloth.
To remove dust and loose dirt from the upholstery and carpet, clean the
interior regularly with a vacuum cleaner.
Blot up any spilled liquid promptly with cleansing tissue or rags. Don't
pat the spot; press the blotting material firmly and hold it for several
seconds. Continue blotting until no more liquid is taken up. Scrape off
sticky materials with a dull knife, then spot clean the area.
(Continued Next Page)
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-55
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
CLEANING AND CARE (Continued)
INTERIOR CARE (Continued)
Oily spots may be cleaned with household spot removers, used
sparingly. Before using any solvent, read the instructions on the
container and test it on an obscure place on the fabric to be cleaned.
Never saturate the fabric with a volatile solvent; it may damage the
padding and backing materials.
Soiled upholstery and carpet may be cleaned with foam type detergent,
used according to the manufacturer's instructions. To minimize wetting
the fabric, keep the foam as dry as possible and remove it with a
vacuum cleaner.
The protective plywood floor panels (if installed) and aft bulkhead
covering in the cargo area must be vacuum cleaned to remove dust
and dirt. A cloth moistened with water will aid in removing heavy soil.
Do not use excessive amounts of water, which would deteriorate the
protective floor panels.
For complete information related to interior cleaning, refer to the 208
Maintenance Manual, Chapter 12-23-01, Interior - Cleaning/Painting.
AVIONICS CARE
The Garmin GDU displays have an anti-reflective coating that is very
sensitive to skin oils, waxes, ammonia, and abrasive cleaners. Clean
the displays as described in the Garmin G1000 Cockpit Reference
Guide.
8-56
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
PROLONGED OUT OF SERVICE CARE
Prolonged out of service care applies to all airplanes that will not be
flown for an indefinite period (less than 60 days) but which are to be
kept ready to fly with the least possible preparation. If the airplane is to
be stored temporarily or indefinitely, refer to the 208 Maintenance
Manual, Chapter 10-11-00, Storage - Maintenance Practices, for proper
storage procedures. The Maintenance Manual provides amplification
for the following procedures:
1. The procedure to be followed for preservation of an engine in
service depends on the period of inactivity and whether or not
the engine may be rotated during the inactive period. The
expected period of inactivity must be established and reference
made to the Engine Preservation Schedule. The preservation
carried out must be recorded in the engine maintenance record
and on tags secured to the engine. The following preservation
schedule lists procedures to be followed:
CAUTION
Under no circumstances should preservative oil be
sprayed into the compressor or exhaust ports of the
engine. Dirt particles deposited on blades and vanes
during engine operation will adhere and alter the airfoil
shape, adversely affecting compressor efficiency.
a. 0 to 7 Days - The engine may be left in an inactive state,
with no preservation protection, provided the engine is
sheltered, humidity is not excessively high, and the engine
is not subjected to extreme temperature changes that would
produce condensation.
b. 8 to 28 Days - An engine inactive for up to 28 days requires
no preservation, provided all engine openings are sealed off
and relative humidity in the engine is maintained at less than
40%. Humidity control is maintained by placing desiccant
bags and a humidity indicator on wooden racks in engine
primary exhaust duct. Suitable windows must be provided in
the exhaust closure to facilitate observation of the humidity
indicators.
(Continued Next Page)
208BPHCUS-00
U.S.
8-57
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
AND MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL 208B 867 SHP
GARMIN G1000
PROLONGED OUT OF SERVICE CARE (Continued)
c.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8-58
29 to 90 Days - An engine inactive for a period exceeding 28
days, but less than 91 days, need only have the fuel system
preserved, engine openings covered, and desiccant bags
and humidity indicators installed.
d. 91 Days and Over - An engine inactive over 90 days in the
airframe or removed for long-term storage in a container,
must, in addition to the 29 to 90 day procedure, have the
engine oil drained and unused accessory drive pads
sprayed.
Place a cover over the pitot tube and install the two engine inlet
covers. To prevent the propeller from windmilling, install the
propeller anchor over a blade of the propeller and secure the
strap around the nose gear or to the bracket located on the
lower right hand cowl. Cover all other openings to prevent entry
of foreign objects.
Keep the fuel tanks full to minimize condensation in the tanks.
If the airplane will be out of service for 5 days or more,
disconnect the battery. If the battery is left in the airplane, it must
be removed and serviced regularly to prevent discharge. If the
battery is removed from the airplane, check it regularly for state
of charge.
If the airplane is stored outside, tiedown the airplane in
accordance with the procedure in this section. Chock the nose
and main wheels; do not set the parking brake if a long period of
inactivity is anticipated as brake seizing can result.
Either block up fuselage to relieve pressure on tires or rotate
wheels every two weeks to prevent flat areas on tires. Mark tires
with tape to ensure tire is placed approximately 90 degrees from
previous position.
Drain all fuel drain points every 30 days and check for water
accumulation. Prolonged storage of the airplane will result in a
water buildup in the fuel which “leaches out” the fuel additive. An
indication of this is when an excessive amount of water
accumulates at the fuel drain points. Refer to Fuel Additive in
this section for minimum allowable additive concentrations.
U.S.
208BPHCUS-00