Alabama Elderly Nutrition Program Manual

FY18
Alabama Elderly
Nutrition Program
Manual
This is a guide to understanding and managing the nutrition program at
senior centers in Alabama. It contains tools and instructions for
successful operation of the senior centers.
Revised and Developed by ADSS Nutrition Services
1
Todd M. Cotton, Acting Commissioner
10/1/2017
Table of Contents
Terms and Abbreviations
Chapter One
1-A
1-B
1-C
1-D
Administration for Community Living..................................................... 7
Administration on Aging Mission Statement ........................................... 7
ADSS Mission .......................................................................................... 8
History/Structure of the Aging Network .................................................. 8
Aging Network Organizational Chart....................................................... 10
Chapter Two
2-A
2-B
2-C
2-D
2-E
2-F
2-G
2-H
Senior Centers
Center Administration .............................................................................. 19
Senior Center Design ................................................................................ 20
Center Safety............................................................................................. 21
Maintenance and Upkeep ......................................................................... 23
Communication Procedures ...................................................................... 23
Food Service Equipment and Supplies ..................................................... 24
Dealing with Insect and Rodent Problems ............................................... 26
Chapter Four
4-A
4-B
4-C
4-D
4-E
Overview to Alabama Elderly Nutrition Program
Eligibility Criteria and Provisions of the Elderly Nutrition Program ...... 11
Congregate (C-1) Meals ........................................................................... 13
Home Delivered (C-2) Meals ................................................................... 13
Meal Counts and Attendance .................................................................... 14
Documentation of Meals........................................................................... 16
Low Attendance ........................................................................................ 16
Participant Contributions .......................................................................... 16
Meal Services Vendor............................................................................... 17
Chapter Three
3-A
3-B
3-C
3-D
3-E
3-F
3-G
Introduction
Center Operations
Operating Schedule ................................................................................... 29
Holiday and Statewide Closing Schedules ............................................... 30
Emergency Procedures for Meal Deliveries ............................................. 32
Vendor Emergencies ................................................................................. 32
Center Meal Orders................................................................................... 33
2
Chapter Five
5-A
5-B
5-C
5-D
5-E
5-F
5-G
5-H
5-I
5-J
5-K
5-L
5-M
5-N
5-O
5-P
5-Q
Preliminary Activities ............................................................................... 35
Food Thermometers .................................................................................. 38
Temperature Monitoring ........................................................................... 40
When a Food Item Fails to Meet Temperature Standards ........................ 41
Serving Order of Meals ............................................................................ 41
Food Sources for Meals ............................................................................ 42
Foods Taken Away from the Senior Center ............................................. 43
Serving the Home Delivered Meals.......................................................... 43
Delivery Instructions for Home Delivered Meal ...................................... 45
Serving the Congregate Meal ................................................................... 46
Clean-up Activities and Leftover Foods ................................................... 47
Equipment and Center: Care and Maintenance ........................................ 48
Managing Workers Assisting with Meal Service ..................................... 55
Management of Supplies .......................................................................... 55
Managing Food Quality Problems ............................................................ 56
Substitution Procedures ............................................................................ 57
Complete Meal Menu Substitution List.................................................... 59
Chapter Six
6-A
Volunteers
Volunteers ……………………………………………………………..60
(Table 6-1) Suggestions for Involving Volunteers in Center Activities...61
Chapter Seven
#1
#2
#3
#3A
#4
#5
#6
#7
#8
#8A
#9
#9A
#10
#11
Guide for Meal Services
Instruction Sheets
Proper Hand Washing ............................................................................... 66
Proper Glove Use ...................................................................................... 67
Operation of Metro Holding Cabinet ........................................................ 68
Operation of Cambro Electric Holding Carrier ........................................ 69
Preparing Sanitizing Solution .................................................................... 70
Checking the Food Thermometer for Accuracy ........................................ 71
Preparing Dish Washing Sink ................................................................... 72
Washing and Sanitizing Utensils............................................................... 73
How to Measure the Temperature of Food ............................................... 74
How to Measure the Temperature of Sour Cream Packets……………...75
Instructions for Iced Tea Preparation – Tea Maker .................................. 76
Instructions for Iced Tea Preparation – Stove Top .................................. 78
Cutting Diagram for Cornbread and Sheet Cakes ..................................... 81
Serving Temperature Policy ...................................................................... 81
3
#12
#13
#14
#15
#16
#17
#18
#19
Cleaning Insulated Carriers ....................................................................... 82
Wiping Cloths ............................................................................................ 83
Good Personal Hygiene Practices ............................................................. 84
Coffee Preparation Instructions ................................................................. 85
Juice Thawing Procedures ......................................................................... 86
Plate Diagram ............................................................................................ 87
Ice Machine – Basics…………………………….……………….…….. 88
Cleaning Instructions for Ice Bins…………………………………….... 89
Which Scoop Size.….……………………………………………………90
Which Spoodle Size...………………………………………………..….91
#20 Illness Plan and Clean-up Procedure
Chapter Eight
8-A
8-B
8-C
8-D
8-E
8-F
8-G
8-H
8-I
8-J
8-K
8-L
8-M
8-N
Instructions for Completing Item Delivery Ticket ................................... 92
General Information on Items Delivered………………………………. 93
Food Quality Rating ................................................................................. 95
Late Delivery, No Substitution Notice ..................................................... 95
Supplies Delivered .................................................................................... 96
Food Temperatures ................................................................................... 96
Shortages ................................................................................................... 97
Unacceptable Food Quality ...................................................................... 98
Delivery Problems .................................................................................... 98
Other Food Quality ................................................................................... 98
Replacement Foods ................................................................................... 99
Verification of Delivery ............................................................................ 99
Alternate Vendor Reimbursement Processing Procedures……….…….100
Instructions for Completing the Supply Order Form…………………...101
Chapter Nine
9-A
9-B
9-C
9-D
9-E
9-F
9-G
Form Instruction and Overview
Picnic and Cookout Meals
Picnic and Cookout Meals ........................................................................ 103
Picnic Menus............................................................................................. 104
Cookout Menu .......................................................................................... 106
Special Event Menus ................................................................................ 107
Picnic Serving Guide ................................................................................ 108
Donated Meals/Special Menu Approval Process ..................................... 111
Menu Approval for Special Events .......................................................... 112
4
Chapter Ten
10-A
10-B
10-C
10-D
Strategies for Improving Congregate
Nutrition Programs
Low Attendance ....................................................................................... 113
Contribution Options ................................................................................ 114
Senior Center Design ............................................................................... 114
Home Delivered Meals: Suggestions for Personalization ....................... 115
Chapter Eleven
Informational Items
11-A Informational Items to Post in the Senior Center…………………….. .. 116
Appendix A
Oliver Packaging System Reference Guide
Appendix B
Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
Clorox®
Appendix C
Area Agencies on Aging List
Appendix D
Participant Enrollment Form
Appendix E
Scale for How Nutrition Risk Score is Calculated
Appendix F
Form Instructions and Overview
Appendix G
Current Food Vendor Contract Information
5
Terms and Abbreviations
AAA - Area Agency on Aging
ACL – Administration for Community Living
ADSS - Alabama Department of Senior Services
AIMS - Aging Information Management System
AoA - Administration on Aging
C-1 - Congregate Meals
C-2 - Home Delivered Meals
ENP - Elderly Nutrition Program
MNT - Medical Nutrition Therapy
OAA - Older Americans Act
SUA - State Units on Aging
6
Chapter One
Introduction
The Alabama Elderly Nutrition Program Manual is an operational manual for
Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs) and Senior Centers. It contains guidelines for
carrying out responsibilities mandated by the Older Americans Act (OAA).
1-A
Administration for Community Living (ACL):
On April 18, 2012 the Administration for Community Living was officially
established and brought together The Administration on Aging, The Office of
Disability and the Administration on Developmental Disabilities.
This was done to achieve several important objectives including, but not limited to,
reducing the fragmentation that currently exists in Federal programs addressing the
community living service and support needs of both the aging and disability
populations; enhance access to quality health care and long-term services and
supports for all individuals; and promote consistency in community living policy
across other areas of the Federal government.
The ACL oversees a number of programs that supports older adults, persons with
disabilities and family caregivers.
x Administration on Aging
x Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
x Combined Aging and Disability Programs
Administration on Aging Programs, funded under the Older Americans Act,
provide assistance to older persons and their caregivers, as well as critical support
services, that help older adults remain independent and involved in their
communities.
1-B
Administration on Aging (AoA) Mission:
Help older adults retain their dignity and independence and remain in their own
homes and communities for as long as possible through comprehensive,
coordinated, and cost-effective systems of long term care and livable communities
across the US.
7
1-C
ADSS Mission
The mission of the Alabama Department of Senior Services is to promote the
independence and dignity of those we serve through a comprehensive and
coordinated system of quality services.
1-D
History/Structure of the Aging Network
The OAA forms the framework for a national aging network of people and
agencies that are committed to serving older persons. Across the nation, many
people strive to help senior citizens live their retirement years in health, honor, and
dignity. The Act established the AoA at the federal level to act as the advocate
agency for older citizens and their concerns. It also provided for the establishment
of State Units on Aging (SUAs) to play a similar role at the state level. The State
Units were also charged with the responsibility for developing and administering
state aging programs. On the community level, Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs)
were to serve as advocates for the older individuals within the communities for
which they are responsible.
As the system has evolved, federal and state agencies provide funds, guidance, and
technical support to local AAAs. The federal and state agencies are also charged
with the responsibility for monitoring program activities. The AoA disburses
federal funds to the State Units on Aging, basing the amount on the number of
people 60 and older in each state. The SUAs will in turn award grants to local
AAAs based on a funding formula. These grants will be a combination of federal
and state funds. AAAs are encouraged to acquire local support to administer and
expand the programs provided in their areas.
The AAA is responsible for the development and implementation of
comprehensive, coordinated area plans. These plans will have service systems
specifically designed to address the unique needs of older adults at the home and
community level. AAAs work with local officials and community members to
identify and help provide the various community needs; to plan programs/service
systems for meeting the identified needs; and to develop budgetary plans for
allocating funds so that services are targeted to those individuals with the greatest
need for services. These plans should also include the intent of local funding
support.
Typically, the AAA contracts with local community organizations to provide
specified home based and community based services for older adults. The
community organizations may be public entities such as city or county
8
governments (city council, county commission) or private non-profit entities
(Council on Aging, Meals on Wheels, etc). Oftentimes, the term “direct service
provider” or “local service provider” is used to refer to the local agency.
In Alabama, the state office responsible for aging services is the Alabama
Department of Senior Services (ADSS). The Commissioner is appointed by the
Governor and serves as a member of the Governor’s Cabinet. Senior citizens
throughout the state can call the 1-800-AGELINE number for assistance.
Those with Internet access can e-mail ageline@adss.alabama.gov or go to
http://www.alabamaageline.gov.
Alabama has thirteen AAAs with service areas ranging from one to ten counties.
The AAA population demographics, service needs, and budgets vary widely.
Because of the wide variations in income and need within the state, the types of
services offered and means for delivery differ significantly from one AAA to
another.
9
THE AGING NETWORK NUTRITION SERVICES
ORGANIZATIONAL CHART
Administration for
Community Living
(Washington, DC)
Regional Office
Administration on Aging
(Atlanta)
Administration on Aging
(Washington, DC)
Governor
State of Alabama
Alabama Department of Senior
Services
Food
Vendor
(Contract)
*Area Agency on
Aging/Regional Council of
Governments
Local Service Provider
Center Manager
Volunteers
Participants
*see Appendix C
10
Community
Staff
Chapter Two
Overview to Alabama Elderly Nutrition Program
2-A
Eligibility Criteria and Provisions of the Elderly Nutrition Program
The eligibility criteria for receiving nutrition services are established in the
OAA and any subsequent AoA published guidelines for implementation of
the law. The AAAs are responsible for establishing local policies in
accordance with the OAA provisions, any subsequent AoA technical
advisories, and ADSS guidelines. A sample Participant Enrollment Form is
shown in Appendix D. Enrollment forms will be completed initially and
updated annually in the Aging Information Management System (AIMS). A
copy should be kept on file at the senior center.
The Nutritional Health section of the Form (Nutrition Risk Assessment) (see
Appendix D and E) provides a Nutritional Score that shall be used to
identify needs. In addition to meals, all homebound and congregate
participants shall be provided with nutrition education, at least quarterly for
homebound and monthly for congregate participants. Nutrition counseling,
and other nutrition services shall be provided based on the needs of the
participant.
Eligibility Criteria: Under Title III C-1
a)
b)
c)
d)
Age 60 and over
Spouses of individuals age 60 and over
Person with Disability residing with eligible client
Person with Disability at Senior Centers located in Housing Facilities
primarily occupied by older individuals
e) Volunteer
Eligibility Criteria: Under Title III C-2
a) Age 60 and over
b) Client’s Spouse
c) Person with Disability residing with eligible client
d) Person with Disability at Senior Centers located in Housing Facilities
primarily occupied by older individuals.
11
According to federal guidelines, younger volunteers may consume a meal
only when it will not deprive an eligible older person of a meal.
Target Population
The target population is older individuals residing in rural areas with greatest
economic need, social need, severe disability, limited English proficiency,
Alzheimer’s disease, or at risk for institutional placement.
All meals served and paid for with state or federal funds (Title III Nutrition
Program funds) must be served to individuals eligible to receive a meal
under the ENP.
The meal may be a hot, picnic, breakfast, frozen, shelf-stable or Medical
Nutrition Therapy (MNT) meal replacement. Both congregate (C-1) and
home delivered (C-2) meals shall be provided at least 1 meal per day on 5 or
more days a week. The ADSS may grant a waiver to operate fewer days in a
rural area where such frequency is not feasible. However, all high risk
clients must be offered a meal 5 days a week.
Examples of meals that would not be eligible for payment with state or
federal funds include:
a) Meals served to under age 60 guests of older individuals who come to
the center such as other family members or grandchildren of older
individuals.
b) Meals served to staff of the nutrition service provider, the AAA, the
ADSS, and the AoA.
c) Meals served through programs in which the older adult is means
tested.
d) Meals served in residential facilities that charge for the cost of
services which includes meals.
e) Meals served in adult day care facilities that charge individuals for
service that includes meals.
f) Meals served in adult day care facilities through the USDA Child
and Adult Care Food Program.
g) Meals not served.
Individuals who do not meet eligibility under the OAA must pay the full cost
of the meal in order to receive a meal. The center manager shall record this
12
as an ineligible meal on the Item Delivery Ticket. The full cost of the meal
includes the cost of food, labor, and administration, direct and indirect costs.
Each AAA will determine this amount.
All meals must be planned so that the meals:
(a) comply with the most recent Dietary Guidelines for Americans;
(b) provide to each participating older individual a minimum of 33 1/3% of
the dietary reference intakes as established by the Food and Nutrition
Board of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences
if the project provides one meal per day; a minimum of 66 2/3% of the
allowances if the project provides two meals per day; and 100% of the
allowances if the project provides three meals per day.
2-B
Congregate (C-1) Meals : Any meal provided to an eligible participant at a
senior center, or other designated central location, should be reported as a
congregate meal.
Congregate meal participants may be given a shelf-stable or frozen meal at
the center to use during periods when the center is not operational (weather
emergencies, holidays, or over the week-end). In these examples, all meals
served at the center should be reported as congregate meals.
Every program participant will be either a congregate participant or a home
delivered participant but not both at the same time.
On occasion, a participant in the congregate meal program may become ill
and must have meals home delivered for a temporary period of time. The
AAA has the option to give approval for home delivery of meals to an ill
congregate client for a maximum of a three (3) calendar week period, fifteen
(15) consecutive serving days, without a client reclassification.
2-C
Home Delivered (C-2) Meals: Provision to an eligible client at the client’s
place of residence.
13
C-2 meals will be provided where necessary and feasible to meet the needs
of frail elderly whose location or condition prohibits participation in a
congregate center meal program. Special emphasis should be on low income
minority individuals and persons living in rural areas. Title III meals cannot
be served at Boarding Homes or Assisted Living Facilities.
Clients authorized to receive frozen C-2 meals must:
(a) have operational refrigerators with adequate space for storage of
refrigerated meal components,
(b) have operational freezers or refrigerator/freezers with adequate space for
frozen meal storage,
(c) have an operational microwave or oven for reheating meals, and
(d) be able to manage the simple tasks of storing and reheating of meals.
2-D
Meal Counts and Attendance
Being eligible to participate in either the congregate or home delivered meal
program does not ensure placement in the program. There must be an
available meal at the time service is requested. High risk clients will be
given priority.
Each center will be allotted a specific number of congregate meals by the
respective AAA. Most centers will also have an approved number of meals
that can be home delivered. If the request for meals exceeds the number of
allotted meals, people will be placed on a waiting list following AAA
waiting list procedures.
Every meal ordered should have an eligible participant to receive the meal.
No meal should be wasted because of low attendance. The waiting list
should be updated monthly and utilized when there is a meal available.
Food should never be stretched if the number of congregate participants
present is greater than the number of meals ordered. Serving improper
portions will result in counting the meal as ineligible.
14
Meal Count Adjustments: Center manager monitors attendance trends
carefully and requests adjustments in the meal counts as indicated. The
Nutrition Coordinator can vary center meal count orders from day to day and
from week to week as long as the 25 minimum order is met. (Refer to page
33-4E)
Sign-in Sheets: Participants sign the attendance log (first and last name)
and note time of arrival. Persons who have not registered by 10:30 a.m. risk
losing their meal for that day. Participants who receive meals must sign the
meal count attendance sheet to verify who is served.
In the event that a participant cannot sign his/her name, the participant may
make an “X”. The center manager/other staff will subsequently write “For”
and list the participant’s name followed by the initials or signature of the
person making this entry.
In the event that a participant fails to sign the attendance log on a given day,
the center manager/other staff may list the participant’s name on the log
followed by the initials or signature of the person making this entry. This
should be an exception rather than routine practice.
Waiting Lists/ Call List: Center manager maintains a list of people to call
to fill a meal slot on short notice. The list has the name, address, telephone
number, and available days to participate. These people are contacted
whenever there are cancellations and asked to “fill in”. Similarly, the C-2
meals will have a waiting list or alternate list available to the driver during
delivery in case a participant is not home.
Drop-in: Participants are allowed to drop in at the center without a
reservation. Drop-in participants receive a meal only if there is an available
slot that day. Drop-in participants are served last and cannot displace people
scheduled to attend.
Participants Relinquish Meals: Some options available when the number
of attendees exceeds the number of meals:
¾ kitchen volunteers will choose not to eat,
¾ the center manager informs center participants of the problem and
requests that some participants volunteer to give up the meal,
¾ the last persons signing in will be told that there are no meals available
on this day.
15
2-E
Documentation of Meals
State and AAA staffs are charged with the responsibility of monitoring
senior centers. One aspect of the monitoring process is to evaluate
attendance. Center managers must maintain daily records that accurately
reflect center attendance. Staff monitoring the center will review attendance
logs. These records will be considered legal documents and must be
maintained a minimum of three (3) years and/or longer if so directed by the
AAA.
The center manager will maintain daily records that accurately reflect the
distribution of all home delivered meals and the time the last meal was
delivered.
AAAs have the option to obtain signatures from participants for meals
delivered by staff on established delivery routes.
2-F
Low Attendance
The center manager must have strategies for improving low attendance.
These strategies must be developed in consultation with the Nutrition
Coordinator, local service provider, and the AAA.
2-G Participant Contributions
Voluntary contributions shall be allowed and may be solicited if the method
of solicitation is non-coercive. A fair voluntary contribution system, which
is clearly communicated, allows older adults to maintain their dignity and to
have ownership of their local program.
The AAA shall ensure that each local service provider will:
(a) provide each recipient with an opportunity to voluntarily contribute to the
cost of the meal;
(b) protect the privacy and confidentiality of each recipient with respect to
the recipient’s contribution or lack of contribution;
(c) establish appropriate procedures to safeguard and account for all
contributions; and
16
Through direction from the AAA, the center manager is responsible for
explaining the contribution program to all congregate and homebound
participants. Participants are to be periodically reminded of the important
role that contributions play in the ENP.
Ineligible meals (served to anyone who does not meet eligibility guidelines)
should receive at a minimum the food cost of $3.30 and up to twice this
amount as determined by the AAA.
Contributions and any other funds received for meals will be counted daily.
This will be done by two persons and the count verified by the center
manager. The amount will be recorded on the form supplied by the AAA.
Daily collection records shall reflect both the amount of funds collected
from contributions and amount of funds collected from individuals not
eligible to receive meals under the ENP guidelines.
At the end of each day, the center manager will secure all funds as directed
by the AAA. On a locally determined schedule, the center manager will be
responsible for taking the money to the designated collection point (may be
a local official or a bank account deposit).
2-H Meal Services Vendor
The ADSS, acting on behalf of the thirteen AAAs, administers a statewide
food service contract to provide meals for the ENP resulting in consistency
in menus and food products. The uniformity in the food delivery system
facilitates risk management and contributes to lower food costs.
Terms of the statewide contract are carefully outlined in bid specifications.
Food service companies are asked to submit bid proposals. The proposal
must include a price quote. The contract is awarded to the responsible
bidder submitting a bid proposal that conforms to the bid specifications and
has the lowest total bid price. (See Appendix G for current contract
information).
The AAA has several meal purchase options under the state contract. Hot
meals, picnic meals, frozen meals, breakfast meals, shelf-stable meals, and
MNT Meal Replacements are available. Door-to-door delivery by Valley,
Inc. is a purchase option for frozen meals, MNT Meal Replacements,
breakfast meals, and shelf-stable meals.
17
Frozen, breakfast, and shelf-stable meals are nutrition services available
under the C-2 Meals Service for Medicaid Waiver clients. Because these
meals are available under the Waiver Programs, the meals may not be
provided to Waiver clients and paid for with ENP funds (state or federal).
Hot meals and MNT Meal Replacements are not available service options
for Waiver clients under the Waiver. Therefore, the AAA has the option of
authorizing hot meals, and MNT Meal Replacements for Waiver clients and
paying for these meals with ENP (Title III) funds. However, all Waiver
clients provided meals by the ENP must meet ENP eligibility criteria.
MNT Meal Replacements: Meal consists of 2 cans of Ensure Plus or the
equivalent. These meals are only appropriate for individuals with a
physician’s documented medical need for the services. They are delivered
weekly to the center or the participant in 5 or 7 meal packs.
Per bid specifications, minimum order for a single senior center will be 5
meals per week. The AAA providing this service must request a minimum of
50 meals per week in their service area. MNT Meal Replacements are not a
covered service for Waiver clients. For those Waiver clients meeting the
eligibility requirements for ENP, these meals may be an authorized service
for Waiver clients at the discretion of the AAA.
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Chapter Three
Senior Centers
3-A
Center Administration
Senior centers are located in a variety of settings around the state. Some
groups have their own building. Others use the facilities of civic clubs,
churches, community buildings, or meeting rooms of other public buildings.
Successful senior centers attract older adults and provide a clean and
welcoming environment where they can enjoy a nutritious meal; have fun;
socialize with their friends and peers; participate in classes and wellness
activities; and have access to information and other services which help
them stay healthy, active and engaged in their community.
Staff and volunteers, who are trained in the operational policies and
procedures and who also have the people skills to help create such an
environment, are essential to the success of the program.
The senior center will be operated utilizing accepted management practices
as determined by the AAA.
The senior center shall be managed by a responsible, competent individual.
This designated individual will be responsible for the coordination of all
center activities and will encourage communication between the center, the
participants, the AAA and other community organizations which offer
services to older adults.
There shall be a sufficient number of competent paid and/or volunteer staff
to effectively carry out the programs and services provided at the senior
center. There should be a plan in place to manage the services if the center
manager is out.
Training
An ongoing program of training and development shall be provided for all
staff. This program should be consistent with procedures established by the
AAA.
19
Basic training should include:
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
3-B
Basic first aid and emergency procedures.
Food safety and sanitation.
Other AAA programs and resources.
Wellness and prevention.
Definitions and data collection.
Confidentiality and privacy of personal information.
Senior Center Design
Centers must be accessible to persons with disabilities in accordance with
the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Dignity and accessibility shall
be considered factors when constructing useable spaces and equipment.
Outside pathways and entrances must be accessible, in good repair and clear
of obstructions. Grass and plants will be kept trimmed. The exterior must be
well lighted. Adequate parking shall be provided for regular attendees.
Each center shall display outside the building a sign of a size that is clearly
visible and which clearly states its name or identifies it as a senior
community center. It is not required that the words “senior,” or
“community” be included on the sign. If a permanent fixed sign is not
possible because the building is shared, a portable or removable sign is
acceptable.
Temperatures should be maintained at levels to ensure the comfort and
health of participants throughout the year. This requirement should be
included as a part of the written agreement for the use of the building.
Lighting: All areas should be well lighted to ensure visibility for safe
walking and participation in center activities. Visual impairments are
increased in older adults. Check the lighting levels in hallways, bathrooms,
and congregate meeting areas.
Acoustics: Hearing impairments are increased in older adults. How well
one hears depends on the speaker, voice quality, and background noise level.
Center acoustics may be improved by:
20
¾ Installing an acoustical ceiling, adding rugs, carpeting, draperies, and
upholstered furniture to lower noise level.
¾ Installing a public address system.
¾ Encouraging speakers to speak slowly and to face the group.
¾ Locating the television viewing area away from the primary congregate
activity area.
Furnishings: Furniture and equipment for use by participants shall be
selected for comfort and safety and shall compensate for visual and mobility
limitations.
There should be a designated non-smoking area which may comprise all, or
part, of the senior center. The AAA has the authority to establish a center as
a non-smoking building. Smoking shall not be permitted if oxygen is
present. All local smoking codes shall be followed.
As possible, the senior centers should provide spaces for group activities
which are large enough to avoid crowding and rooms located and designated
so that meetings and other programs can be conducted without interruption.
The senior center should provide for sufficient office space to permit staff to
work effectively and without undue interruption.
3-C
Center Safety
The AAA will ensure that the senior center complies with all applicable
State and local health, fire, safety, building, zoning and sanitation laws,
ordinances or codes.
Ensure there are at least two exit doors that are clearly marked, unobstructed
and unlocked when the center is in operation.
Have a posted fire escape plan and schedule regular fire and bad weather
drills so the participants know what to do in emergencies.
Ensure that properly constructed ramps with handrails are available for use
by persons with disabilities.
21
Each center shall provide toilet facilities equipped for use by persons with
disabilities. Doors should be wide enough to accommodate people in
wheelchairs or walkers. Grab bars should be installed beside the toilets.
Ensure there is adequate space between tables and other furnishings so
people with wheelchairs and walkers can move about easily.
There should be no trip/fall hazards such as cords across walkways, uneven
or slippery floors, rolled edges of rugs or linoleum, etc. Area rugs should
have non-skid backing.
Ensure at least one ten-pound ABC fire extinguisher is mounted on the wall
in a visible, accessible location. Selected senior center staff or volunteers are
educated in proper evacuation and can demonstrate proper use of the fire
extinguisher. Staff should check the fire extinguisher monthly for the
following: (a) pin secure in handle, (b) dial is in the green zone, (c) hose is
properly attached, (d) extinguisher is mounted a minimum of 44 inches off
the floor. The AAA should give consideration to the number of fire
extinguishers as compared to the size and layout of the senior center area
and room divisions.
All fire extinguishers must be inspected and tagged annually by an
authorized agency of fire and safety equipment. The date of the inspection
shall be marked on the extinguisher. Extinguishers shall have hydrostatic
testing or be replaced every six years.
Center Staff will be trained in basic first aid and emergency procedures.
Basic first aid supplies must be available and stocked adequately.
All chemicals shall be labeled. Store chemicals or toxic items away from or
separated from food and food supply items. Position chemical or toxic items
so that they are not above food and food supply items. (Appendix B contains
a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for bleach which is common in all
senior centers).
22
3-D
Maintenance and Upkeep
Responsibility for maintenance and upkeep will be between the AAA and
local service provider through a written agreement. There shall be sufficient
maintenance and housekeeping to assure that the building is clean, sanitary
and safe.
Painting and redecorating shall be done as appropriate.
Provision shall be made for frequent, safe and sanitary disposal of trash and
garbage.
Provision should be made for equipment maintenance, repair and
replacement.
Senior centers must maintain a copy of the most current Alabama ENP
Manual. The ENP Manual is revised as needed to adhere to requirements
pertaining to all aspects of food service, e.g. receiving, storing, preparing,
serving, and cleaning/sanitizing in accordance with the policies established
by the Alabama Department of Public Health, Rules of Alabama State
Board of Health, Bureau of Environmental Services, Chapter 420-3-22,
For Food Establishment Sanitation 10/3/2016 and any revised editions.
These rules reference the Food Code, US Public Health Service, Food
and Drug Administration, 2013.
3-E
Communication Procedures
The first line of contact for the center managers and local service providers
is ALWAYS the AAA. The AAA must be kept in the information loop with
respect to center operations. Only the AAA can authorize contract
expenditures (order or cancel meals). Likewise, all information about
weather closings will be communicated by the AAA staff.
A telephone and published phone number is required in all senior centers.
Managers should not be required to use their personal cell phones for
business purposes.
Center managers should not contact the vendor directly. Center managers
should contact the Nutrition Coordinator or designated AAA representative.
23
Any meal errors, supply order problems, problem with a delivery, or
complaints will be reported to the Nutrition Coordinator. The Nutrition
Coordinator contacts the vendor and/or the ADSS.
The vendor staff cannot accept any center requests for changes in a meal
order; cannot accept phone requests from a center for supplies or equipment;
and cannot accommodate center requests for changes in delivery procedures.
Center manager must contact the Nutrition Coordinator with these type
concerns.
All communications to the commissary from the center should be as a
written message attached to the Item Delivery Ticket.
Problems with food items; short of servings, under or over cooked, dislikes,
too soupy, too lumpy, etc. should be described on the Item Delivery Ticket.
The comments/problems are reviewed by the vendor, the AAA, and the
ADSS.
3-F
Food Service Equipment and Supplies
The local service provider and the food service vendor share the
responsibility for providing and maintaining the equipment and supplies
required to serve meals at the senior centers.
Local Service Provider Responsibilities for Center Equipment and
Supplies:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
A refrigerator(s) capable of maintaining required temperatures of cold
items and with sufficient space to accommodate all cold menu items.
A freezer(s) capable of maintaining frozen food items and with
sufficient space to accommodate all frozen meals. Health Department
may require a freezer thermometer.
Refrigerator thermometer (freezer thermometer also if center is a
distribution point for frozen meals).
Adequate lockable storage areas for program and operating supplies.
Serving tables/counters adequate in length for serving and packing of
hot meals. Surfaces must be smooth and capable of being cleaned and
sanitized.
24
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
A 2-compartment sink equipped with hot and cold water for washing
utensils. Each new and remodeled center will be required to have a 3compartment sink. Additional pan for 2-compartment sinks, provided
by vendor, is required. (see vendor responsibility #7)
At least one sink equipped with hot and cold water, soap, paper towels
or air dryer that is designated for hand washing and convenient to the
food preparation area.
Adequate number of grounded electrical receptacles for coffee/tea
makers, Oliver packaging equipment and holding cabinets.
Kitchen lighting: Light bulbs shall be shielded, coated, or otherwise
shatter-resistant in areas where there is exposed food, clean equipment
or utensils.
Dining table and chairs adequate in numbers for number of congregate
participants. Table surfaces must be smooth and capable of being
cleaned and sanitized.
Insulated carriers as required for home delivered meals.
Dishwashing supplies, including detergent, bleach, and wiping cloths.
All cleaning supplies including mops, buckets, detergent, etc.
Garbage cans with lids and plastic liners in kitchen and restrooms.
Plastic gloves, plastic aprons, and hair nets/paper bonnets for food
servers.
Vendor Responsibilities for Center Equipment and Disposable Supplies:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Electric holding cabinet.
Oliver packaging equipment.
Coffee urn.
Tea maker.
Serving utensils:
1 ea
tablespoon
2 ea
solid spoon
2 ea
4-oz slotted spoodle
2 ea
4-oz solid spoodle
1 ea
6-oz solid spoodle
1 ea
#6 scoop
1 ea
tongs
1 ea
spatula server, 2” maximum width at tip
2 ea
#8 scoop
1 ea
spatula or spreader with serrated edge, suitable for cutting cakes
and cornbread
Digital thermometers, 2 each.
25
7.
Plastic pans, as required to supplement sink basin(s) so that a total of 3
basins is available for washing, rinsing, and sanitizing of utensils.
8. Chemical test strips.
9. Tea dispenser
10. Disposable supplies as required for serving congregate and home
delivered meals.
The vendor will retain title to all equipment and will make any and all
routine repairs or equipment replacements without additional charges to the
ADSS, the AAA, or the senior center. However, center personnel are
charged to make a reasonable effort to safeguard the equipment from abuse
or theft. If there is evidence of abuse or failure to properly secure the
equipment, the affected AAA and/or the local service provider will be
responsible for damages.
1. Casters should not be removed from the electric holding cabinet by the
local service provider. Casters may only be removed by Valley Food
Service. This should be requested through your Nutrition Coordinator.
2. Any electric holding cabinet returned to Valley Food Service for repair
shall be cleaned prior to pick up.
3. Any electric holding cabinet returned to the senior center shall be cleaned
prior to delivery.
Vendor Responsibilities for Delivery Equipment and Vehicles:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Hot and cold food carriers with thermo barrier shelves for delivery of
meals from the vendor to the senior center.
Cooler chests for delivery of meals from the vendor to the senior center.
Serving pans and lids.
Plastic bread boxes.
Delivery vehicles, including trucks equipped to maintain temperatures
of frozen meals.
Communication equipment (cell phones, radios, or beepers).
3-G Dealing with Insect and Rodent Problems (Local Service Provider’s
Responsibility)
Rodents, insects, birds, and other pests can damage food, supplies, and
facilities. The greatest danger comes from their ability to cause food borne
illness. There are three basic rules of pest control.
1.
2.
Deny pests entry into your facility.
Deny pests food, water, and a hiding or nesting place.
26
3.
Use a licensed pest control operator to prevent and eliminate pests.
The center will have adequate pest control.
Doors, Windows, and Vents (Local Service Provider’s Responsibility)
a)
Open windows and vents should be screened. Check screens regularly
and report problems to your local service provider and/or Nutrition
Coordinator.
b)
Keep exterior doors closed when not in use. Doors and windows should
fit tightly when closed.
Pipes, Floors and Walls (Local Service Provider’s Responsibility)
a)
Seal openings. Fill or close holes and other gaps along floors, walls,
and ceilings.
b)
Cover floor drains with a perforated cover and screen ventilation pipes.
Deliveries
a)
Insects can enter from boxes and containers brought in by vendor,
volunteer and participants.
b)
Insects can travel in Cambros, and a problem that started at one center
may soon be a problem shared with the vendor and other centers.
c)
Vendor drivers are trained to look for insects on and inside the insulated
containers they pick up from the senior center. Vendor staff should alert
the Nutrition Coordinator if they find a potential pest problem.
Denying pests food and shelter.
a)
Do not leave food and drink residue on floors, cabinets, or in the sink.
b)
Empty garbage daily. Clean containers as required.
c)
Do not store items directly on the floor. Hang mops and brooms--very
important as a wet mop is a great place for roaches to hide.
27
d)
Minimize clutter. Discarded boxes, old grocery bags, and leftover
aluminum cornbread pans attract roaches and ants. Quilt scraps provide
good bedding materials for mice.
e)
Clean up dead pests so they do not accumulate.
Notify your Nutrition Coordinator if you find insects being brought into
your center or if there are signs of an insect, mouse/rat, or other pest
problems at the senior center. If found in food delivery save the evidence
and return it to the vendor or Nutrition Coordinator as instructed.
Center managers should NOT try to treat the problem with chemicals. A
licensed pest control operator should be hired to deal with the problem.
There are many chemicals that cannot be used in food service areas. The
pest control companies know what is and is not permitted.
28
Chapter Four
Center Operations
4-A
OPERATING SCHEDULE FOR SENIOR CENTERS
Each senior center shall serve meals five (5) days per week (Monday
through Friday) except for designated holidays unless an alternative serving
schedule has been approved by the ADSS.
Approval to Serve Combination of Meal Types: The AAA may request
approval from the ADSS to serve hot meals combined with other meal types
to equal a serving mix of five (5) or more meals per week per participant.
Approval to Replace Hot Meals with Shelf-Stable Meals: The AAA may
request approval from ADSS to replace up to three (3) hot meal serving days
with shelf-stable meals or another alternative meal. The AAA exercising
this option will distribute shelf-stable meals to at-risk clients for use in
emergency situations. Distribution will occur in October unless otherwise
authorized by the ADSS. A distribution equal in number to the average
daily hot meal count for the AAA will be considered the equivalent of one
(1) serving day. In the event that the hot meal delivery is cancelled to all or
most centers in the AAA service area due to emergency situations or other
non-emergency closings, the shelf-stable meal distribution will replace the
hot meal serving day and the closing will not be counted as one of the
allotted five (5) non-serving days maximum.
Operating Hours: Standard operating hours for senior centers will be 9:00
a.m. to 1:00 p.m. local time. Some centers will open earlier and/or close
later. Official serving time at the centers is 11:30 a.m. local time.
Occasionally the AAA grants permission to serve at a different time.
29
4-B
HOLIDAY AND STATEWIDE CLOSING SCHEDULES
All senior centers will be closed on the following dates.
Fiscal Year 2017
November
December
January
April
May
July
September
Fiscal Year 2018
November
December
January
March
May
July
September
11
24-25
23-30
16
14
29
3-4
4
Veterans Day
Thanksgiving
Christmas break
Martin Luther King Day
Good Friday
Memorial Day
Independence Day (observed)
Labor Day
10
23-24
25
26-29
1
15
30
28
4-5
3
Veterans Day (Observed)
Thanksgiving
Christmas
Christmas break
New Year’s Day
Martin Luther King Day
Good Friday
Memorial Day
Independence Day
Labor Day
30
ADDITIONAL CENTER CLOSINGS
In addition to the scheduled holiday closings identified in 4-B, each AAA
served by the vendor will also have an option to include the equivalent of a
maximum of five (5) non-serving days in the operating schedule per AAA to
cover emergency situations and other events.
Any amendments to the schedule that is non-emergency and area wide
(additional closing day scheduled; deletion of a scheduled closing; change in
date of a scheduled closing) must be submitted to the vendor and the ADSS
a minimum of three (3) weeks in advance of the modification.
Emergency closings due to adverse weather conditions declared by the
ADSS, the AAA or the vendor will all be counted as non-serving day(s) for
the affected AAA(s). The AAA is to notify the ADSS and the vendor of any
unexpected closings.
On occasion centers will schedule an excursion or special event for
congregate program participants and request that picnic meals be sent the
preceding day for the home delivered program participants. Picnic meals
may not be ordered for Monday delivery or the day following a holiday.
The AAA may authorize an average of two events per center maximum per
fiscal year without counting these events as non-serving days.
31
4-C
Emergency Procedures for Meal Deliveries
The vendor, the ADSS, and the affected AAAs will work together to solve
problems that may arise in emergency situations. All involved parties must
be alerted to problems and kept informed of developing situations.
Current emergency contact information should be maintained at home and at
the office by the designated contact person for the vendor, the AAAs, and
the ADSS.
Each AAA will designate two (2) representatives (a primary contact and a
secondary contact) that the vendor shall call at home in emergency
situations.
Meal cancellations by the AAAs must occur no later than 12:01 a.m. the day
the food is to be served; otherwise, the AAA will pay for the cost of the
meals minus the cost of any foods or supplies that the vendor may use for
later meals.
Meal cancellation by the vendor must occur no later than 7:00 a.m. the day
the food is to be served; otherwise the vendor will reimburse the AAA or
centers for any food the AAA elects to purchase locally and replace any
supplies used from the center.
4-D
Vendor Emergencies
Emergencies Due to an Act of God: Should any meal prepared by the
vendor not be delivered to any senior center as a result of an Act of God or
any other reason not attributable to the ADSS or the AAAs, the vendor shall
bear the risk of loss and will not be reimbursed for loss nor invoice the
ADSS for said meals. It is the responsibility of the designated staff member
of the AAA and the production unit manager to notify each other and the
ADSS immediately if hazardous weather conditions exist in either the
contract delivery area or the production unit area.
32
Late Deliveries/Probable Non-deliveries
The vendor must notify the ADSS and the affected AAAs of projected
delays in deliveries or probable non-deliveries of meals to senior centers.
All center deliveries must be made prior to 10:30 a.m. Any agreement to
accept deliveries after this time will be a local decision made by center
personnel in consultation with the AAA staff.
Menu Substitutions. The vendor must limit menu changes and coordinate
changes with the ADSS dietitians.
The vendor must notify the ADSS and affected AAAs of all menu changes
no later than 9:00 a.m. of the serving day.
The vendor must staple a Menu Substitution Notice to the Item Delivery
Ticket for all centers affected by a menu change.
If a menu substitution is sent without a notice, the center manager should
NOT serve the item unless authorized by the Nutrition Coordinator.
Non-delivery of Meals or Meal Delivery Errors: Occasionally a center
must purchase replacement foods at the local level. (Refer to Chapter 8)
4-E
Center Meal Orders
Meals are ordered electronically by the Nutrition Coordinator on a weekly
basis. This information will include:
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
Changes in hot meal counts for senior centers for the next serving week.
Non-emergency meal cancellations of meal deliveries to centers.
Requests for picnic or cook-out meals for the next serving week.
Any special requests (low-sugar alternates).
Other meal requests such as frozen, breakfast, shelf-stable, or MNT
Meal Replacements.
The AAAs must submit meal orders by 12:00 noon Central Time on
Wednesday for the next serving week. In the event that the vendor does not
receive the weekly meal count by the 12:00 noon deadline, the vendor will
use the most recent meal count from the AAA unless otherwise agreed by
the vendor and the agency.
33
Center managers should send any requests for changes in the meal order to
the AAA by no later than 3:00 pm on Tuesday of each week (or as otherwise
instructed by the Nutrition Coordinator). The number of meals ordered by a
center may vary from week to week and from day to day.
The count between home delivered and congregate meals may vary from
week to week and day to day. However, the minimum number of hot meals
for an order is 25 meals.
Low Sugar Menu Alternates: For those individuals with a desire or need
to limit sugar intake, the AAA may request low sugar dessert items be
substituted for gelatin desserts, iced cakes, snack cakes, cobblers, fruit crisps
and fruit crunches.
The ADSS staff dietitian will develop a quarterly list of low sugar alternates
as appropriate. Low sugar desserts may be ordered for all participants at a
center or for selected participants. No medical documentation will be
required. The number of low sugar desserts ordered per center may vary on
a weekly basis but not on a daily basis. Center managers will be responsible
for determining serving procedures at the center level.
34
Chapter Five
Guide for Meal Service
This section provides a step-by-step outline of the desired flow of food service
activities. It is intended to be an overview of the meal serving and senior center
maintenance tasks.
5-A
Preliminary Activities
Put on hair net and apron.
Wash hands. (Instruction Sheet #1)
Hands should be washed at the designated hand washing sink convenient to
the kitchen. Hand washing cannot be done in the same sink used for cleaning
food utensils and equipment. Hand washing signs will be posted in the
kitchen and restrooms.
Check refrigerator temperature daily when you enter the kitchen and record
on the Item Delivery Ticket. All refrigerators must have a refrigerator
thermometer. Refrigerator temperature should be cold enough to hold food
at 41ºF (Fahrenheit) or below.
Centers that provide frozen meals will need a thermometer for the freezer.
Check the freezer temperature and keep a log. The reading should be no
higher than 10ºF and preferably 0ºF or less. Adjust temperature control knob
as needed to lower appliance readings to keep frozen food frozen.
Check the food thermometer(s) for accuracy. (Instruction Sheet # 5)
Record the thermometer temperatures on the Item Delivery Ticket.
Wash, rinse and sanitize the thermometer.
The metal stem of the thermometer should be washed, rinsed, and dipped in
sanitizing solution after each use. DO NOT immerse the thermometer in
water.
Plug in the Holding Cabinet. Preheat for approximately 30 minutes or until
it reaches at least 150 º F before placing hot food in the cabinet. (Instruction
Sheets #3 and 3A)
35
As soon as possible after the food arrives at the center, check temperatures
of hot foods and place in the holding cabinet. Record temperatures on the
Item Delivery Ticket. (Instruction Sheet #8)
Plug in the Oliver Heat Sealer. Turn on and preheat for approximately 15
minutes before beginning plating of home delivered meals. (See Appendix A
for Oliver Packaging System Reference Guide)
Check status of cold foods and room temperature items. Record cold
temperatures on the Item Delivery Ticket. Check milk dates. Place cold
foods in the refrigerator.
Check menu to determine if correct number of items was received (cold
pans; milk and/or juice; bread; condiments; and any cake or cookies).
Check to make certain that the items and amounts shown on the Item
Delivery Ticket accurately reflect any supplies received.
Prepare all sanitizing solution daily. Wipe countertops with a sanitizing
solution. (Instruction Sheet # 4)
All serving counters and tables must be washed and sanitized before use
each day. Allow to air dry. Surfaces can be sanitized by spraying with
sanitizing solution or wiped off with sanitizing solution. Spray bottles
should be clearly labeled “Chlorine Bleach Sanitizing Solution”.
Check the Serving Guide to see what serving utensils will be needed.
Pull out the needed serving utensils for the day’s menu.
Prepare the dish washing sink. (Instruction Sheet #6)
Public Health regulations require that all equipment and surfaces that come
in contact with food must be washed, rinsed, and sanitized appropriately.
Center managers are responsible for ensuring that correct procedures are
followed.
Wash, rinse, and sanitize the utensils. (Instruction Sheet #7)
Wash, rinse and sanitize the coffee maker and/or tea maker and dispenser.
Prepare coffee and/or tea.
The vendor will provide supplies (coffee, creamer, sugar, sugar substitute,
stirrers, and 8 oz. Styrofoam cups) for coffee.
36
The vendor will provide supplies (tea, lemon, sugar, sugar substitute,
stirrers, 8 oz. Styrofoam cups, and ice) for tea.
Check the Serving Guide and pull supplies needed for the home delivered
meals.
Count out the appropriate number of squat cups and lids; 3-compartment
trays; plastic/wax bags; and 1-compartment trays, when applicable. Put the
current date (month/day/year) on each of these containers. Set aside until
needed.
Check the Serving Guide and pull supplies needed for the congregate meals.
Count out the needed number of 5-compartment plates and any other
required paper goods.
Count out the cups for tea or coffee.
Set up the Beverage Table.
AAAs decide when and how to serve the beverages; whether self-serve or
served from the kitchen.
Ice should be served with a clean and sanitized spoon, tongs or scoop. Ice
should remain covered except during serving.
Beverage cups should be disposable. Re-useable cups should not be used
due to risk for spreading germs.
If desired, cornbread, biscuits, rolls and breadsticks can be placed into the
holding cabinet to warm (should not be more than 30 minutes).
Replace any food shortages and food items that did not meet temperature
standards. Refer to the Serving Guide for recommended replacements. Call
your Nutrition Coordinator if you have questions.
Refer to the cutting diagram (Instruction Sheet #10) and cut cornbread or
cake into portions according to the number of meals ordered.
Place items for home delivered meals in the appropriate container or plastic/
wax bag.
Serve and pack home delivered meals. (Refer to Section 5-H).
37
Check sign-in sheet by 10:30 for number of congregate participants present.
Call people from the waiting list to equal the number of meals ordered.
Serve congregate meals. (Refer to section 5-J)
5-B
Food Thermometers
Digital thermometers are more accurate and easier to read than dial
thermometers. Taylor model 9842N is the thermometer currently approved
for use in the senior centers and being provided by the vendor. Dial
thermometers should not be used. There should be two properly working
digital thermometers on hand.
Turn the thermometer ON by pushing the small gray rubber button marked
ON/OFF one time. When the thermometer is turned on, it will briefly show
the last reading. Numbers should then start changing until it registers the
current temperature of the air in the room.
Always check to make sure the Fahrenheit (F) setting of the thermometer is
being used. Do not use the Celsius (C) setting.
Insert sanitized thermometer stem into the food. Refer to (Instruction Sheet
#8).
Digital thermometers give readings in whole numbers and decimal fractions.
There is a small hard-to-see decimal point between the last two numbers. If
38
the numbers appear to be 676, the reading is 67.6 degrees. Likewise, if the
numbers appear to be 1479, the reading is 147.9
Digital thermometers are battery operated.
a.
To save battery life, always turn it off after use.
b.
Batteries should last about a year. Return the thermometer to vendor
for a replacement battery when needed.
c.
Keep the thermometer head out of water when washing and sanitizing
the thermometer. Thermometers will not work if moisture gets into the
head and corrodes the battery. These thermometers are water resistant
but not waterproof. Do not store thermometer in sanitizing solution.
d.
Do not store digital thermometers in the refrigerator for extended
periods as condensation may form inside the thermometer head.
e.
When taking hot food temperatures, stick the stem through the foil wrap
until it is at least ½ inch into the food. Do not cover the pan with the lid
while waiting for the thermometer to register the food temperature as
condensation may form inside the thermometer.
Do not use digital thermometers to check temperatures of holding cabinets
as the high heat may damage thermometers. Also make certain that a
thermometer is not left in the pan when foods are put into the holding
cabinet.
Check thermometers for accuracy in an ice water bath at least once a week
and preferably more often. Always check thermometers if temperature
problems occur or if the thermometer is dropped. (Refer to Instruction Sheet
# 5) Note: The boiling water or hot water method for checking
thermometers is not approved by ADSS due to safety risk.
Return malfunctioning thermometers to the vendor for repair or replacement.
Check the box provided on the Item Delivery Ticket whenever you return a
thermometer.
Let the Nutrition Coordinator know if a replacement thermometer is not
received within three days. Note this information on the Item Delivery
Ticket also.
39
5-C
Temperature Monitoring
Center managers are responsible for ensuring that food temperatures are
taken correctly. With Nutrition Coordinator approval, the task may be
delegated to a trained volunteer or staff member but the center manager
remains responsible for ensuring that approved procedures are followed.
Temperatures of both hot and cold foods delivered in Cambros MUST be
taken at the point of delivery (or as soon as the holding cabinet is preheated
if delivery is made prior to normal center operating hours) and again at
serving time. Foods that fail to meet temperature guidelines EITHER time
cannot be served.
The temperature of milk and juice must be taken upon delivery. Turn the
thermometer on and place the lower half of the thermometer probe between
two cartons of milk. Hold the cartons together around the thermometer probe
until the temperature stops. The same can be done between two cartons of
juice. Make sure that the tip of the thermometer is between the cartons and
is not visible. This will ensure a more accurate temperature reading. The
tested cartons of juice and milk may be served to a congregate participant if
temperature standards are met.
Record on the Item Delivery Ticket the reading of the thermometer exactly
as it appears without rounding. If an error is made in writing down a value,
mark through it one time; write the correct value beside it; and initial. Work
quickly when taking temperatures to prevent changes in the product
temperature.
All foods marked with an asterisk on the Serving Guide must be at or above
140°F if a hot food item and at or below 41°F if a cold food item. Products
that fail to meet minimum temperature standards cannot be served.
Hot foods that meet temperature guidelines shall be covered and placed in
the holding cabinet until serving time. Hot foods that do not meet
temperature guidelines when delivered shall be replaced according to the
Serving Guide.
Check the temperature of the hot foods again at serving time with a clean,
sanitized thermometer. Foods failing to meet temperature standards cannot
be served and shall be replaced according to the Serving Guide.
40
Cold foods that meet temperature guidelines should be covered and placed in
the refrigerator until serving time. Cold foods that do not meet temperature
guidelines when delivered shall be replaced according to the Serving Guide.
Check the temperature of the cold foods again at serving time with a clean,
sanitized thermometer. Foods failing to meet temperature standards cannot
be served and shall be replaced according to the Serving Guide.
5-D
When a Food Item Fails to Meet Minimum Temperature Standards:
Move the thermometer to a different area of the pan to see if the reading still
does not meet standards. This is particularly important if the initial reading
is slightly high or low.
Check the thermometer for calibration using the ice point method.
Have a second person verify that temperatures are being taken correctly and
that the reading does not meet standards.
Food that fails to meet standards should not be served or given to someone
else. Return the pan(s) of food to the commissary with documentation on
the Item Delivery Ticket explaining the problem.
Replace foods according to the Serving Guide or if you have questions call
your Nutrition Coordinator about a replacement.
Wash, rinse, and sanitize thermometer before it is used again.
5-E
Serving Order of Meals
The preferred serving order of meals is to serve the home delivered meals
first and then immediately begin serving the congregate meals.
This practice:
(a) affords the greatest temperature control because the time interval
required to serve a pan of food will be 15 minutes or less,
41
(b) reduces risk of cross contamination by serving utensils/people because
the same set of serving utensils/people is used without interruption, and
(c) best maintains product quality. Continuous serving should always be
the desired goal.
Centers that plan to serve early must recognize the vendor is not late if the
meals are delivered by 10:30 a.m. local time.
If the AAA authorizes a staggered serving schedule, the center should follow
these practices.
a)
b)
c)
d)
Temperature of the food must be checked when the first meals are
served.
Any product remaining in a pan must be returned to the holding cabinet
or refrigerator as appropriate.
When the remaining meals are served, food temperatures do not have to
be checked. However, the center manager must document the time that
the food temperature was checked and the time the last meal was
served. Time elapsed cannot exceed two hours and will preferably be
less than one hour.
Serving utensils must be washed, rinsed, and sanitized between the two
serving periods.
Meals for late participants should be dipped and placed in the holding
cabinet for not more than 30 minutes. If not picked up then discard. Never
leave food sitting out at room temperature. Late participation should be
discouraged. Holding cabinet must remain on when food is in it.
5-F
Food Sources for Meals
Only prepared foods obtained from commercial food sources shall be used in
C-1 and/or C-2 meals served at centers operating under the ENP in Alabama.
Purchased food cannot require additional preparation at the senior center.
No home-prepared products, home-grown produce, or home-preserved foods
may be served with meals. Specifically, no home-prepared items such as
pepper sauce, jams or jellies, baked goods, pickles, salads, homemade ice
cream, entrees, etc., can be served in conjunction with senior meals.
Likewise, no home-grown onions, tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, peaches,
watermelons, cantaloupe, etc., may be served.
42
In emergency situations, senior center personnel may purchase readyprepared food items and/or complete Meal Replacements. These products
shall be purchased from a grocery store, delicatessen, or other commercial
food service establishment.
As authorized by the Nutrition Coordinator, center personnel may purchase
commercially prepared condiments and/or supplies for tea or coffee to serve
in conjunction with meals. Condiments include pepper sauce, catsup,
mustard, mayonnaise, vinegar, soy sauce, and Mrs. Dash seasoning mixes.
Condiments provided for table service shall be in individual portions or in
original containers intended for table service. It is acceptable to serve sauces
(catsup, pepper sauce, vinegar, soy sauce) and Mrs. Dash seasoning mixes in
the original container.
As authorized by the Nutrition Coordinator, center personnel may purchase
baked goods (e.g. birthday cakes or birthday cupcakes) from a commercial
bakery or grocery store for use on special occasions.
5-G Foods Taken Away from the Senior Center
Participants receiving a congregate meal shall be allowed to take home fresh
fruit (apples, peaches, bananas, oranges, plums, pears); UNOPENED cartons
of fruit juice, milk, wrapped cakes, cookies, and snack cakes; and
individually wrapped portions of corn chips or potato chips. Breakfast
items; UNOPENED containers of yogurt, juice, milk, breads and cereals
may be taken out. Cold items must stay refrigerated until consumed or taken
out. No canned/ dipped fruit may be taken from the center. No other foods
should be taken away from the senior center by congregate participants. The
center cannot be responsible for foodborne illness which may develop from
foods/beverages that are taken from the center and are kept out of
time/temperatures guidelines. (Cold milk items should be in an insulated
container)
5-H Serving the Home Delivered Meals
Serving personnel should always put on a hairnet and apron when working
in the kitchen.
Wash hands. Put on clean gloves. (Instruction Sheet #1)
43
Take the temperature of milk and juice. (Instruction Sheet #8) Record on the
Item Delivery Ticket.
Cold food carriers should be pre-chilled at least 30 minutes prior to use with
either a block or bag of ice.
Remove cold foods from the refrigerator. Check temperature of cold foods.
(Instruction Sheet #8) Record on the Item Delivery Ticket.
Portion cold food items into appropriate containers and cover with lid.
Place cold food containers in cold food carriers if ready for delivery or back
in refrigerator if delivery will be later. Lid of food carrier must be closed.
No open carriers.
Place milk, juice, and margarine into the cold food carrier as close to
delivery time as possible. Lid must be closed. No open carriers.
Plug in and turn on the Oliver Heat Sealer at least 15 minutes prior to using.
Remove hot food from the holding cabinet. Check temperature of hot foods
(Instruction Sheet #8). Record on the Item Delivery Ticket.
Portion hot foods into the hot food trays. Cover and seal according to
directions. The Oliver Packaging System shall be used. Any changes from
this process must be approved by the Nutrition Coordinator.
Meal components shall be packaged in 3-compartment trays, wax bags,
plastic bags, 1-compartment trays, and squat cups as indicated on the
Serving Guide. Packaged foods should be placed in approved insulated
containers for delivery. In some situations, 3-compartment Styrofoam trays
are used for meals if delivery time is short. Likewise, meals with short
delivery times (15 minutes or less) may be wrapped in layers of newspaper
and placed in a paper bag/plastic bag in lieu of an insulated container.
Place hot food tray into the hot food carrier immediately after sealing. Close
carrier lids securely.
Always keep hot foods separate from cold foods when portioning and
packing home delivered meals. Hot foods and cold foods must be in
separate delivery carriers.
44
Deliver meals immediately after packing. Home delivered meals should be
delivered within two hours of the time that the food is dipped.
Turn off and unplug the Oliver Heat Sealer after all trays have been sealed.
Allow to cool completely before cleaning.
5-I
Delivery Instructions for Home Delivered Meals
Home delivered meals should be left in the carriers until arrival at the home
of the client.
The carriers should be kept closed except when a meal is being removed.
Carriers should be kept level at all times.
The delivery person should greet the client with a smile and call them by
name. Be friendly, assist the person if needed, but always remember other
people are waiting for a meal delivery.
The delivery person should ask the participant about the previous day’s meal
at the time of delivery. Problems and comments should be reported to the
center manager.
If possible, obtain the signature of the homebound client receiving the
meal. (Refer to chapter 2, section 2-E).
If no one answers the door, the delivery person should attempt to deliver to
another eligible homebound client. In the event no other eligible
homebound client is available to deliver a meal to, return the meal to the
center. Meals should NEVER be left on the doorstep, in a cooler or in the
mailbox. Meals should be physically handed to the intended recipient or an
approved alternate client. Follow AAA procedures regarding clients who do
not answer the door.
Encourage home delivered meal recipients to eat the meal immediately.
Some may need assistance with removing meal tray covers, opening utensil
packets, etc. If the client does not plan to eat the meal immediately, it should
be refrigerated.
45
Do not wait for hot foods to cool before refrigerating. Loosen one corner of
the film wrap on the hot meal tray to speed cooling but leave it on the top of
the tray.
Volunteer or meal delivery staff should report anything unusual such as
meals not being consumed, power outages, etc. to the center manager.
5-J
Serving the Congregate Meals
Wash hands.
Wipe dining tables with sanitizing solution. This should be done daily before
meal service.
Set up tables with utensil packets (napkin, salt, pepper, and flatware) and
condiments—sugar, sweetener, margarine.
Serving personnel should always put on hair nets and aprons when working
in the kitchen.
Wash hands. (Instruction Sheet #1) Put on clean plastic gloves. (Instruction
Sheet #2)
Refer to the Serving Guide and Plate Diagram (Instruction Sheet #17) to
determine recommended placement of the food items on plate.
Pass out milk, one per person.
Set up serving table with plates, room temperature foods, cold temperature
foods, and hot temperature foods.
Take food temperatures (Instruction Sheet #8) (Instruction Sheet #11).
Record on Item Delivery Ticket (unless done within the past hour).
Refer to the Serving Guide for instructions if any food is short or out of
temperature range. If you have questions call your Nutrition Coordinator.
Portion foods onto the plates as directed on the Serving Guide and Plate
Diagram.
Plates should be served to participants immediately.
46
5-K Clean-up Activities and Leftover Food
All leftover food should be discarded at the end of the serving day.
Keeping leftover food in the refrigerator or freezer to use another day is not
allowed.
Scrape out all food residues from the serving pans. Rinse pans out well or
wash and return to the Cambros. Cambros should not be stored outside the
building.
Leftover condiments (salad dressing, barbecue sauce, mayonnaise, mustard,
catsup, tartar sauce, cranberry sauce, etc.) in sealed, individual portions may
be retained at the senior center for use with future meals. Center personnel
shall develop a means for rotating stock so that items are used within six
months.
Leftover margarine in sealed, individual portions may be retained at the
senior center for use with future meals. Center personnel shall keep the
product refrigerated and rotate stock within one month.
Leftover UNOPENED milk or juice may be retained in the refrigerator and
sent as an extra component in home delivered meals on the next serving day.
Center personnel shall be responsible for verifying the product freshness
date for the leftover milk prior to serving it.
Any food that goes out of the center should follow the same guidelines as
the home delivered meals and be in separate insulated containers for the hot
and cold items.
All serving utensils must be washed, rinsed, and sanitized.
Discard any leftover tea and/or coffee. Clean coffee urn and/or tea urn.
Turn off the holding cabinet and unplug from the wall socket. Wipe up any
spills and remove any loose pieces of foil on cabinet floor.
Empty ice cooler. Wipe up any spills in ice cooler or Cambros.
Clean, sanitize and air dry home delivered meal containers (Instruction Sheet
#12).
Clean Oliver Heat Sealer (refer to page 52).
47
Return all supplies to the storage area.
Write comments on the Item Delivery Ticket.
5-L
Equipment and Center: Care and Maintenance
Cleaning and maintenance of the center and its furnishings is a local service
provider/center personnel responsibility. The responsibility for maintaining
and sanitizing food service equipment is shared between the vendor and
senior center personnel.
Refrigerator
Check refrigerator temperature daily when you enter the kitchen and record
on the Item Delivery Ticket.
The refrigerator temperature should be (less than) < 41ºF. All refrigerators
must have a refrigerator thermometer. Adjust temperature control knob as
needed to keep cold food at 41ºF or less.
Refrigerators should be cleaned and sanitized weekly.
1. Remove all food items from the area. Discard any out of date milk or
juice.
2. Brush out all loose food particles and soil.
3. Wash with a wiping cloth dipped into a detergent solution.
4. Rinse with hot clean water.
5. Sanitize with a wiping cloth dipped into sanitizing solution or spray with
a sanitizing solution.
6. Allow to air dry.
48
Freezer
Centers that provide frozen meals will need a thermometer for the freezer.
The reading should be no higher than 10ºF and preferably 0ºF or less. The
frozen food must remain frozen.
Notify your Nutrition Coordinator and the local service provider if
refrigerator or freezer fails to meet required temperatures.
Freezers should be cleaned and sanitized quarterly at a minimum or as
needed. Follow directions for refrigerator cleaning.
Refrigerator Thermometers
These should be checked for accuracy at least weekly and also if foods fail
to meet minimum temperature requirements after storage in the refrigerator.
Check the thermometer reading against that of a food thermometer that has
been left in the refrigerator for at least 20 minutes. A better check is to use
the food thermometer to take the temperature of a product (cup of water,
juice, etc.) that has been in the refrigerator for several hours. Compare this
temperature reading with that of the refrigerator thermometer. Readings
should be within three (3) degrees.
Food Thermometers
These should be checked for accuracy at least weekly using the ice point
method. (Instruction Sheet #5)
A quick check is to compare the readings of the two digital thermometers in
a cup of water. Readings should be within 2 degrees.
Hot Holding Cabinets (Instruction Sheet #3 and #3A)
Each center will be provided with one or more holding cabinets by the
vendor. Depending on meal count, the holding cabinet will be a Metro C190 or C-199 model or a Cambro Electric Hot Holding Ultra Pan Carrier HSeries. Centers will be responsible for operating and cleaning of the
cabinets. The vendor will be responsible for all repairs.
Notify your Nutrition Coordinator and write on the Item Delivery Ticket if
the holding cabinet will not heat above 150º F or if it routinely is above 220º
F when the dial is set on six.
49
To minimize risk of electrical shock, the holding cabinet should have a three
prong plug and the cord should not be frayed. The electrical outlet should be
grounded.
Casters on holding cabinets are not to be removed. Notify the Nutrition
Coordinator with this request.
Serving Utensils, Tea Urns and Coffee Urns.
The vendor is responsible for providing the equipment and any needed
replacement of broken items. The vendor may bill for replacement items if
the equipment has been abused, lost, or stolen. Center personnel should
return the broken or malfunctioning equipment to the vendor and request a
replacement. Attach a note to the item being returned with the center name,
date, and description of the problem. Also include a note on the Item
Delivery Ticket that the item was returned. If a replacement is not received
within one week (5 serving days), call your Nutrition Coordinator.
Equipment used to prepare tea and coffee should be washed, rinsed, and
sanitized in the same manner as the serving utensils.
Proper serving utensils (as listed on the Serving Guide) should be available
and used at each meal.
Serving Pans.
Center personnel must scrape and rinse excess food from the serving pans.
Wash and rinse the pans each day as best possible prior to returning them to
the vendor. The pans will be later washed, rinsed, and sanitized at the
vendor commissary.
Report any problems with dirty serving pans on the Item Delivery Ticket in
the comment section.
Ice Chests and Insulated Containers (Cambros).
Maintenance of ice chests and Cambros used to deliver food and beverage to
the center is the responsibility of the vendor. However, center managers
should wipe out the equipment each day and clean up any food spills.
50
Report any problems with food spillage, dirty or broken equipment in the
comment section of the Item Delivery Ticket.
Centers shall not use vendor equipment (ice chests and Cambros) for
delivering the C-2 meals.
Insulated Carriers Used for Home Delivered Meals
Clean home delivered carriers daily. (Refer to Instruction Sheet #12).
Tables/Counter Tops
All tables and counters must be cleaned and sanitized daily, immediately
prior to use. Surfaces must be in good repair and designed and constructed
to allow easy cleaning. Wiping cloths used for cleaning and sanitation
purposes must be clean and sanitary. Ready to use wipes are not
recommended. (Instruction Sheet #4, #13)
Between uses, wiping cloths MUST soak in a sanitizing solution to prevent
bacterial growth.
1. Wash surfaces with a detergent solution made from water and an allpurpose detergent such as Joy, Dawn, etc.
2. Rinse with hot clean water.
3. Sanitize with a wiping cloth dipped into sanitizing solution or spray with
a sanitizing solution.
4. Spray bottles containing a sanitizing solution must be clearly labeled
“Chlorine Bleach Sanitizing Solution”.
5. Allow to air dry.
Floors and Walls
Floors, walls, and ceilings of the kitchen shall be smooth and easily
cleanable. Floors at the center must be swept daily and mopped at least once
per week. Spills should be cleaned up immediately.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Sweep floor prior to mopping.
Wash floors with a mop dipped into a detergent solution.
Rinse with hot clean water to remove visible soil.
Allow to air dry.
51
5. After mopping is completed, mop heads must be sanitized. Soak mop
heads in a sanitizing solution for 5 minutes. Turn mop head upward
toward ceiling or hang to dry.
6. Brooms should be hung by the handles or stored in an inverted position.
7. Mop water should be disposed of in a janitorial sink or drain area. Toilets
and urinals may not be used as a service sink. Do not dispose of mop
water in the hand washing or dish washing sinks or on the ground.
Garbage Cans
When in use, all garbage cans must be lined with plastic liners.
At the end of each serving day, garbage bags should be tied up and taken to
an outside receptacle. Garbage should then be stored in a secured and
covered dumpster or in an elevated can to keep out scavenging animals.
Clean and sanitize garbage cans outside of the center as needed.
1. Transport empty garbage cans outside of the senior center.
2. Remove all loose food particles and soil from the garbage can.
3. Clean both the inside and outside of the garbage can with a detergent
solution.
4. Rinse with hot clean water.
5. Sanitize with a wiping cloth dipped into a sanitizing solution or spray
with a sanitizing solution.
6. Allow to air dry.
7. Re-line garbage cans with a plastic bag.
Bathrooms
Bathrooms must be cleaned and sanitized daily. Clean floors and fixtures.
Keep bathrooms stocked with soap, paper towels, and toilet tissue.
1. Clean toilet rims/handles and sink basins, handles, and faucets with a
detergent solution.
2. Rinse with hot clean water.
3. Sanitize using a wiping cloth dipped in sanitizing solution or spray with a
sanitizing solution. Use a separate cloth from those used in the kitchen.
4. Allow to air dry.
52
A commercial cleaner can be used as an alternative. For any chemical used,
a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) should be readily available. It is
recommended a copy be placed in the Appendix B section of this manual.
Model 1208 and 1208-N Heat Sealer
Daily Cleaning Procedures
1. Remove tray carrier by pushing the carrier in, lifting the tray
carrier straight up, and then pull out.
2. Wipe down tray carrier and gaskets with a standard cleaning
solution.
3. Tip the machine up on its side, and then wipe off the heated platen.
Use only a soft cloth, no scrubbers.
4. Wipe sides, top and handle of the machine.
5. Replace tray carrier.
Changing Cutter Blade
1. Remove tray carrier, as described above.
2. Use a flat head screw driver to remove one of the screws on either
end of the cutter rack.
3. Replace old cutter with new.
4. Replace and retighten screw.
(Refer to Appendix A)
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Automatic Ice Maker (Ice Machine)
Some senior center kitchens have and use commercial automatic ice makers.
These require regular service and maintenance (usually twice per year). Follow
instructions listed on the ice machine or in the owner’s manual. This is the
responsibility of the local service provider.
Equipment food-contact surfaces shall be clean to sight and touch. Ice is a food or
food ingredient and has been linked to a number of foodborne disease outbreaks.
The ice storage bin (under the ice maker) must be cleaned and sanitized regularly
and kept in good repair.
Over time mold can build up on the parts of the ice maker or storage bin. Mold is
not considered dangerous, but it can lead to allergies and visually contaminated
ice.
General cleaning instructions for ice storage bins
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Recommend cleaning every six months or more often as needed.
Turn the water supply off and disconnect the unit from electrical power.
Remove ice and throw away.
Wash any removable parts and the inside surfaces of the ice storage bin in
hot, soapy water.
Rinse all in clean water.
Sanitize the inside surfaces with unscented household chlorine bleach
(approximately ¾ to 1 tablespoon per gallon of lukewarm water).
Allow to air dry.
Clean outside surfaces of ice machine.
Refer to Instruction Sheet #18 and #19 at the end of Chapter 7.
54
5-M Managing Workers Assisting with Meal Service
All workers must be carefully trained and supervised by the center manager.
Workers should be trained in portioning, serving procedures, sanitizing
methods, and in using menu materials.
All workers must have good hygiene and wear clean clothes. (Instruction
Sheet #14)
All workers must follow hand washing procedures. (Instruction Sheet #1)
Clean gloves should always be worn whenever the hand will actually touch
the surface of unwrapped food. (Instruction Sheet #2)
No one should eat, drink, smoke, or chew gum in the serving area.
Never let people who are sick assist with the serving of food.
This is especially important if the problem may be a contagious disease
(diarrhea, vomiting, sore throat, cold, flu, tuberculosis, etc.). It is better to
be short of workers than to allow an ill person to assist in food service.
5-N
Management of Supplies
Supplies are delivered weekly by the vendor. The Valley driver will leave
you a blank 3-part supply order form. (See appendix F) Fill out the form
with the quantities of the items you need, not a check mark. Should you
need something not listed, note it on the “other” line provided. Place the
order from with your meal delivery ticket and the driver will pick it up the
next day. You will receive your order within three working days and your
driver will leave you another blank form for your next order.
x An order must be submitted to receive supplies.
x You should maintain one week’s supply in reserve.
x If you do not receive supplies that you ordered or receive a partial order,
make a notation on the form and notify your Nutrition Coordinator.
x Use this form only to order supplies. If you request supplies on your Item
Delivery Ticket you request may be delayed.
x Consult the Serving Guide to see what supply items are needed each day.
55
For example: To order utensil kits:
Order one for each congregate meal, times (x) the number of days meals are
served per week, plus amount needed in back up stock, equals (=) the number to
place on the order form.
The congregate (C1) meal order for each day is 25. Meals are served Monday
through Friday or 5 days per week.
Your inventory shows there are 100 utensil kits in the back up supply.
Keep one week of stock on backup utensil kits (125 kits). Anything under 125
should be added to the order. If more than 125, do not add to the order.
25 meals x 5 days to serve = 125 utensil kits. Add 25 kits for back up. Utensil
kits to order for this week are 150.
x Supplies should be stored orderly and in a clean, dry, and secured
location. Store like things together.
x Keep all items at least six (6) inches off the floor.
x Keep supplies covered at all times, where they are not exposed to
splash, dust, or other contamination.
x Store first aid supplies, cleaning supplies, and other toxic materials
away from the food service supplies (by spacing or partitioning).
x Toxic materials should not be stored above food service supplies.
5-O Managing Food Quality Problems
Occasionally, a food safety problem or food quality issue is discovered after
the food is served. The center manager and center staff should handle the
situation as directed below.
Remain calm and strive to handle the situation discreetly.
It is very important that center participants not be unduly alarmed.
If center participants are still eating when the problem is discovered, instruct
them to discontinue eating the product.
56
Keep the food in its original container with wrap and lid. Place the food in
the refrigerator. If the product had a foreign object in it, retain the object
(hair, bone, insect, etc.) for return to the vendor.
Call the Nutrition Coordinator who will alert other persons who may need to
be involved. The Nutrition Coordinator should notify the ADSS.
If you learn about a possible food borne illness after the center is closed for
the day, call the Nutrition Coordinator immediately even if it is at night or
on the weekend.
5-P
Substitution Procedures
Occasionally, a center will encounter problems and need to secure
replacement foods. Approved reasons for buying replacement foods include:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Product(s) did not make minimum temperature requirements.
Vendor failed to send adequate amount of food for number of meals.
Vendor failed to send a menu item.
Vendor could not make a meal delivery by 10:30 a.m.
The quality of the food sent was not acceptable to serve (badly burned;
undercooked; off-odor; contaminated). Never serve a food item if there
is any question about the safety of the food.
However, replacement foods CANNOT be bought just because the
participants do not like a particular menu or menu item. Likewise,
additional foods cannot be bought if the number of participants is greater
than the number of meals ordered for that day.
The AAA shall require the local service provider to have a procedure for
meal replacement that allows the center manager to acquire needed food
items without using contribution or personal funds.
Each center manager should have a plan of action for emergency
situations. Know where foods can be purchased on short notice and
the types of food that are likely to be available for purchase. Visit
the store owner in advance and discuss what is likely to be needed.
Paying for replacement foods can be handled in either of two
ways.
57
(1) The food can be purchased by the center manager and then submit a bill
to the vendor. The center manager will need to provide the vendor with
a receipt, center name, date items purchased, and the name and address
of person who should be reimbursed. Refer to (Appendix F).
(2) The center can request the vendor to set up an arrangement with 1-2
local businesses to serve as “Alternate Vendors”. In this case, the center
manager is authorized to purchase replacement foods and the bill is sent
directly to the vendor by the store or restaurant.
If a complete meal needs to be replaced, check the Complete Meal Menu
Substitution List in this section for menu combinations that will supply at
least 1/3 of the DRI for the indicator nutrients.
If a part of a meal is lacking due to temperature problems or shortages check
the Serving Guide to see if this food is a required food item. It will have a
check (√) in front of the recommended substitutions. Required foods must
always be replaced. However, centers are always encouraged to secure food
replacements whenever possible for each item.
Picnic and cookout meals are special situations. However, these meals must
meet the same temperature requirements as regular meals. If you encounter
problems with one of these meals, check the Picnic Serving Guide. (Refer to
chapter 9).
58
5-Q
COMPLETE MEAL MENU SUBSTITUTION LIST (FAST FOOD)
This list is provided to assist centers in making appropriate selections
when any or all meals require a full replacement. The menus listed
meet 1/3 of the DRI for the indicator nutrients. Nutrition Coordinators
must approve replacement of complete meals prior to purchase.
Option 1
Cheeseburger
French Fries (Small)
Side Salad
Salad Dressing (Any variety)
8 oz. Milk
8 oz. Orange Juice
Option 2
6” Sub Sandwich
(Made with wheat bread, any sandwich
meat, any cheese, lettuce and tomato)
6 oz. Yogurt OR 8 oz Milk
½ cup Apple Slices
8 oz. Orange Juice
Option 3
1 Chicken Breast (Fried, Baked or Grilled)
½ cup Mashed Potatoes / gravy
½ cup Coleslaw
½ cup Baked Beans (If baked beans are not
available, substitute with 1 order of fried
okra PLUS 1 order of corn on the cob)
8 oz. Milk
8 oz. Orange Juice
59
Chapter 6
Volunteers
Volunteers, within a senior center and in the larger community, are one of
the greatest resources of a senior center. Traditionally, the ENP has relied
on a large number of volunteers to supplement the efforts of a skeleton staff
in providing services at the local level. The program was founded on the
premise that enlisting older volunteers in meaningful service activities would
foster program ownership and provide a sense of self-worth and purpose.
Many retirees have both the skills and available time to aid with senior
center programs. Recruit their assistance, use them wisely, and reward them
well.
Suggestions for utilizing volunteers in senior center activities: Listed in
(Table 6-1) are several possible ways center managers may be able to use
volunteers in senior center activities. This list is by no means complete.
Center staff will be able to come up with many other ideas. Policies on the
appropriate activities of volunteers vary somewhat between the AAAs.
ALWAYS check with the Nutrition Coordinator to ensure conformance to
the AAA policies.
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Table 6-1:
Suggestions for Involving Volunteers in Center Activities
Congregate Meals Program
Greet/register participants
Send cards
Write thank you notes
Telephone absentee participants
Suggest potential participants
Accompany center manager on home
visits
Count contributions
Get out craft/game supplies for the day
Maintain bulletin board
Donate magazines and books
Home Delivered Meals Program
Deliver meals
Prepare tray favors for meals
Prepare daily meal tray messages
Do daily telephone participant checks
Run errands for participants
Assist participant with household tasks
Prepare holiday gift baskets
Assist participants with correspondence
Friendly visits
Maintenance and Decoration of
Facility
Take out trash
Sweep floor
Straighten chairs/room at end of day
Prepare table tents
Make table decorations
Decorate for special occasions
Make minor repairs to center facilities
Bring in flowers or plants
Paint/wallpaper area
Plant flowers outside area
Wash windows
Donate furnishings
Change lights
Programming Activities
Order program materials
Invite/suggest guest speakers
Present a short program
Lead craft workshop
Make daily announcements
Lead Pledge of Allegiance
Play piano, guitar, etc.
Lead singing
Duplicate handouts
Secure videos and DVDs
Become an exercise leader
Share computer skills
Meal Service Activities
Get out paper supplies
Date home delivered meal containers
Clean tables before and after meals
Set table
Serve plates
Prepare coffee/tea
Sanitize utensils
Wash serving pans/serving counter
Distribute milk/beverage
Distribute plates
Check food temperatures
Publicity/Outreach/Fundraising
Write article for newspaper
Maintain activity scrapbook
Suggest potential participants
Present programs about center
Participate in fund-raisers
Provide rides to others
Get goods and services donated
Help plan special events
Prepare posters and flyers
61
Inappropriate activities for volunteers: This will vary from one AAA to
another. If in doubt, always ask the Nutrition Coordinator. Volunteers are
to assist the center manager. The center manager is to supervise and give
direction. Center volunteers can assist with the senior center activities and
make suggestions in any way the center manager approves.
Managers successful at recruiting volunteers:
¾ Set a positive example of volunteerism.
¾ Welcome the assistance of others.
¾ Recognize and utilize a person’s strengths.
¾ Have an outgoing, enthusiastic manner.
¾ Show appreciation and respect for volunteers.
Suggestions for recruiting volunteers within the center: Know the center
needs and the skills of potential volunteers. Volunteering should be a
positive experience for all parties.
¾ Make a general request for assistance to the entire group. Be specific
in describing what is needed and when. (Example: I need three people to
help serve plates; I need one person to greet participants on Mondays; I
need 3 to 4 people to help me decorate the Christmas tree on Thursday
afternoon; etc.) By describing exactly what is needed and when,
participants are better able to judge the time commitment and level of
skill needed.
¾ Make individual or personal requests to specific people. Consider the
various talents and skills of center participants. Ask participants to assist
with specific tasks that they are likely to be good at and would enjoy
doing. For instance, a retired teacher might be a good person to lead a
discussion group or present a program; a person in a wheelchair might
enjoy doing secretarial tasks; a handyman might enjoy making wooden
ornaments.
¾ Have a "Volunteer Sign Up Sheet". The center manager should
attempt to use all volunteers listed.
¾ Use a Job Jar. Make a list of tasks. Write each task on a slip of paper
and put it in the jar. Participants draw for assignments. This can work
well in a center that has a history of participants never volunteering. If
62
the participant is unable to perform any task in the jar, allow one
“redraw" chance or the opportunity to swap tasks with someone else.
¾ Have a rotating assignment list. Make a rotating list of volunteers. The
center manager reads out the workers for the day and their assignments.
Suggestions for recruiting volunteers in the community:
¾ Community appeal for assistance in the newspaper or on the radio.
Local newspapers and radio stations will often run brief announcements.
¾ Ask the assistance of community leaders in recruiting volunteer help.
Ministers, civic club leaders, and church group officers may be able to
assist in recruitment. Oftentimes high school groups such as the National
Honor Society, Key Club, and Anchor Club require their members to do
service work. Scouts also have required service projects.
¾ Ask local businesses to encourage their workers to volunteer.
Managing a volunteer staff: The center manager must train volunteers in
job tasks (as specified in section 5-M), reward work efforts, and retrain as
necessary.
¾ Make certain that volunteers know what they are to do. Be sure all
volunteers are aware of the rules and are willing to conform. Post clear
instructions for serving food in the serving area. Whenever possible,
explain the reason for a rule or procedure.
¾ Try to place workers according to their abilities. If a volunteer
becomes unable to perform their usual job, find an alternative task if
possible.
Rewarding volunteer workers: Center managers should make certain that
workers feel needed and appreciated. This can be done in several ways:
¾ Routinely thank the entire group for their efforts and tell them they did a
nice job.
¾ Make a point to specifically tell an individual how much his/her efforts
were appreciated on a given day or for a particular task.
¾ Write thank you notes to community volunteers and speakers. A
participant could assume this responsibility.
63
¾ Have a "Volunteer Appreciation Day".
¾ Have a "Volunteer of the Day or Week" badge that the selected volunteer
wears for a day or week. Rotate it within the group.
64
Chapter Seven
Instruction Sheets
65
Wash hands often. This may be the most important thing you can do to keep germs
from contaminating food.
1. Wet your hands with running water.
2. Apply soap.
3. Rub and scrub hands together for 15-20 seconds. Clean under fingernails
and between fingers.
4. Rinse thoroughly under running water.
5. Dry hands and arms with a paper towel, heated air hand dryer or a fast
blowing air hand dryer. Use a paper towel to turn off the faucet and open
the door.
Kitchen workers must wash their hands
™ Before putting on gloves to work with food;
™ After touching your face, hair, clothes or apron;
™ After clearing tables or handling dirty dishes;
™ After using the bathroom or talking on the phone;
™ After smoking, drinking, chewing gum or eating;
™ After blowing nose, sneezing, or coughing;
™ After handling money or garbage;
™ After using chemicals that might affect the safety of the food;
™ After sweeping or other activity that can contaminate hands.
66
¾ Gloves are not a substitute for hand washing.
¾ Always wear plastic gloves when dipping food or
whenever the hand will be touching any
unwrapped food or the food contact surface of
plates and cups.
¾ Wash your hands before putting gloves on, and
after taking gloves off.
¾ Do not blow into the glove to open it. This
introduces bacteria.
¾ Whenever gloves are worn, they must be
changed, or replaced as often as hand washing is
required to reduce risk of contamination.
¾ Put on a fresh pair if gloves get damaged or
soiled during serving.
¾ Single-use gloves are meant to be used for a
single task.
¾
Gloves must never be re-used or washed.
¾
Gloves do not have to be used when passing
milk, juice or wrapped desserts.
67
Cabinet Instructions
1.
2.
3.
4.
Turn power switch off.
Plug in cabinet.
Set the thermostat dial to setting 10 = High.
Flip the power switch on. (red power light and yellow indicator light will
glow)
5. Preheat Cabinet for approximately 30 minutes.
6. Check food temperatures and put foods in warmer.
7. When the meals are served, turn off the warming cabinet and unplug.
After preheating, the thermostat dial can be lowered to a setting of 6 or 7. This
should provide a temperature of 150º – 170º F. Adjustments to the
temperature may be made as necessary to keep food within this range.
NOTE: The power (red) light will glow as soon as the power switch is
switched on and will continue to glow until switched off. The yellow indicator
light will go on and off as the thermostat cycles. If the yellow light is not
illuminated, this indicates that the cabinet has achieved the preset temperature
level, not that the unit has been switched off.
Do not put water in the pan in the base of the oven.
Daily Cleaning and Sanitizing Procedure for Holding Cabinets
CLEANER: Mild detergent (Joy, Dawn, etc.)
SANITIZER: ½ - 1 Tablespoon of bleach per gallon of water.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Remove all foods from the cabinet.
Turn cabinet off, unplug and let cool.
Remove all loose food particles and foil from inside the cabinet.
Lift out base cover and clean foil from under it.
Use a damp cloth and mild detergent to thoroughly wash entire
cabinet inside and out.
6. Use a damp cloth and rinse inside and out with clean tap water.
7. Sanitize inside of cabinet with Chlorine Bleach Solution and let air dry
before shutting cabinet door. Replace base cover.
68
Note: Units are designed to hold pre-heated hot food only. NEVER use to preheat or re-heat food.
Operating Instructions
1. Plug into main power supply.
2. Red light on front of heated door indicates power ON – there is no power
switch, unit turns on automatically when plugged into outlet.
3. Pre-heat compartment empty with door closed for 45 minutes prior to
loading hot food.
4. When door thermometer reads 150°F, insert pans of hot food into the carrier
and latch door to close tightly.
5. Unplug unit to turn off.
Daily Cleaning and Sanitizing Procedure
Cleaner: Mild detergent (Joy, Dawn, etc.)
Sanitizer: ½ Tablespoon of bleach per gallon of water.
Note: Do not submerge heater in water and never spray water on or near it.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Remove all foods from the cabinet.
Unplug, remove power cord from heater and allow to cool.
Remove all loose food particles and foil from inside the cabinet.
Remove white rubber gasket on door.
Use a damp cloth and mild detergent to thoroughly wash entire cabinet
inside and out. Do not use steel wool or abrasive scrub pads or brushes.
6. Use a damp cloth and rinse inside and out with clean tap water.
7. Sanitize inside of cabinet with mild chlorine bleach solution and let air dry
before shutting cabinet door.
8. Replace rubber gasket on door before shutting cabinet door.
69
Sanitizing with bleach – the final step needed to remove bacteria from food
contact surfaces that have just been cleaned.
1. Measure bleach with measuring spoon or cap from bleach container.
2. Bleach is an unstable chemical and will vary in strength so you must have chlorine
test strips to test the sanitizing solution.
3. Solution should be mixed fresh daily.
As a guide use: One tablespoon (1 capful) per 1-gallon water
4. Test the strength of the solution with the chlorine test strips.
5. Dip the end of the strip into the sanitizing solution for one second. Check the
color against the guide on the container.
6. The concentration should be 100 – 200 ppm.
™ If the solution is too strong, add a little water to dilute
™ If the solution is too weak, add a drop or two of bleach
™ Too weak of a concentration will not provide effective sanitizing.
™ Too strong of a concentration may leave a poisonous residue.
70
Thermometers should be checked for accuracy:
™ before first being used,
™ whenever they are dropped,
™ a minimum of once per week and
™ if foods do not meet temperature standards.
Ice Point Method
1. Fill a large container with ice.
Add clean tap water until the container is
full. Stir well so the mixture comes to a constant temperature.
2.
Place both thermometer stems in the ice water mixture so that the entire
sensing area is submerged. Do not let the stem of the thermometer touch the
sides or bottom of the container. Wait at least 30 seconds or until indicator
stops moving.
3.
With the stem of the thermometers still in the ice water mixture, the
readings should each be approximately 32ºF.
4.
If you get a reading in the range of 30ºF - 34ºF, continue to use the
thermometer. If a thermometer is not in this range return it to the vendor for
repair or replacement. Do not try to correct the readings.
5.
Record the actual readings on the Item Delivery Ticket.
71
Equipment Needed:
3-Compartment Sink *
Dishwashing Detergent
Chlorine Bleach, Regular
Test Strips (from vendor)
Cap from bleach for measuring.
Wiping Cloths
* Centers lacking 3-compartment sinks may supplement sink with plastic pan(s)
supplied by vendor.
Preparation of Sink
1. Clean sink. Make sure that it is free of all food particles and soil.
2. Fill the first compartment 2/3 full with hot, detergent solution made with
Dawn, Joy, etc. Water should be hot (110-120° F). Do NOT add bleach to
this water as it will interfere with the detergent.
3. Fill the second compartment 2/3 full with clear, hot water (at least 110° F).
4. Fill the third compartment 2/3 full with chlorine sanitizing solution measuring
100-200 ppm.
As a guide use: One tablespoon (1 capful) chlorine bleach per
1-gallon water
Water temperature should be lukewarm (75-100ºF).
Higher temperatures can destroy the bleach.
72
1. Pre-rinse and scrape all utensils and dishes to make the wash and
sanitation steps more effective.
2. Wash utensils in hot, sudsy water in first compartment of sink. Change
water often to keep it free of food particles.
3. Immerse utensils in hot water of second compartment to rinse or rinse
with running water. This step is very important as it removes surface
residue that can decrease the effectiveness of bleach. Again, change
water often to keep clean.
4. Immerse the utensils in sanitizing solution of third compartment for 1
minute. Check the concentration of the water with the test kit regularly.
Change water as needed to keep the degree of sanitizer correct.
5. Shake excess water off utensils and use immediately, or let air dry.
a. Utensils can air dry on paper towels or on a sanitized surface. Once
completely dry, store sanitized utensils in a clean, dry location; where
they are not exposed to splash, dust, or other contamination; and at
least 6 inches off the floor.
b. Utensils and other equipment CANNOT be dried with a cloth, rinsed
after sanitizing, nor can they be kept in the sanitizer.
Manual Dishwashing Procedure for use in
3-Compartment sinks at Senior Centers.
1. Wash with
hot detergent
solution.
2. Rinse in
warm water.
3. Sanitize in
chlorine bleach
solution.
73
4. Air Dry on
clean drying
rack or clean
paper towel.
To control the temperature of food, you must first know how to
check the temperature. A thermometer is the most important tool
for doing this.
1. Wash, rinse and sanitize. Do this before using it and
after checking each food item.
2. Check to see if it will measure temperatures correctly
(checking calibration). Use the ice point method for this.
3. Set on F (Fahrenheit) and not C (Celsius). Push button
on bottom right to change from C to F.
4. Place metal stem at least ½” deep into food or beverage.
Do not touch bottom or sides of container.
5. Wait until the thermometer reading stays steady before
writing down a temperature. Take another reading in a
different spot.
6. Keep the thermometer in its storage case when not in
use and keep them both clean.
7. For measuring milk temperature without puncturing
carton, place pointed metal stem between two cartons
and hold cartons together firmly.
74
To measure the temperature of sour cream packets, you will
use the same methods used for milk cartons. Please review
instructions below.
1. Wash, rinse and sanitize thermometer. Do this before
using it and after checking each food item.
2. Check to see if thermometer will measure temperatures
correctly (checking calibration). Use the ice point method
for this.
3. Set thermometer on F (Fahrenheit) and not C (Celsius).
Push button on bottom right to change from C to F.
4. For measuring sour cream temperatures without
puncturing the packet, use the same method used for milk
cartons. Place the pointed metal stem between two
packets or fold the bag of sour cream packets around the
thermometer stem and hold packets firmly together.
75
Tea leaves sometimes contain harmful bacteria that have the potential for
causing human illness. If tea is not brewed at a high enough water
temperature; if the equipment is not properly sanitized; or if prepared tea is
stored incorrectly, people might become ill from drinking tea.
Equipment: Iced Tea Maker (provided by the vendor)
Supplies: Tea bags, lemon juice, ice, sugar, sweetener, and cups will be
provided by the vendor. Each bag of ice will be sufficient for 20
servings. Vendor should send 1 bag of ice for up to 20 congregate
meals; 2 bags for 21-40 congregate meals; 3 bags for 41-60
congregate meals, etc.
Method:
™ Fill the brew tower with one-quart cold water to the Max Fill Line. Do
not use hot water. This level is indicated inside the reservoir and on
the pitcher. Do not use more or less water. This unit operates with
one quart of water.
™ Fill the pitcher with 1quart of water to the Max Fill Indicator Line.
™ Adjust the desired brew strength on the bottom of brew basket. Make
sure the mesh filter is securely placed in the brew basket.
™ Place 1 tea bag in the brew basket. Place the tea bag so that it is
between the mesh filter and the pouring spout of the pitcher when the
brew basket is in position.
™ Place lid on pitcher. Pull out the brew tray and place pitcher onto the
tray.
™ Plug in the tea maker. Press the On button to brew tea. The On light
will glow.
™ Let all tea drain completely from brew basket before removing pitcher.
76
(#9: page 2)
™
Pour brewed tea into tea dispenser. Add 2 quarts of
cold water to dispenser to make 1 gallon of tea.
™ Brew 1 tea bag for each gallon of tea desired.
o 1 tea bag for 25 servings or less
o 2 tea bags for 26-50 servings
o 3 tea bags for 51-75 servings
™ Serve tea over ice. (Use a sanitized utensil or glove to serve ice.)
™ Make tea fresh daily. Discard any leftover tea at the end of the day.
Cleaning:
™ Wash lid, mesh filter, brew basket and pitcher in hot, soapy water.
Rinse. Sanitize. Allow to air dry. Do not place in automatic dish
washer.
™ To clean the outside simply wipe with a damp cloth dipped in detergent
solution. Then wipe with a damp cloth dipped in bleach solution.
™ If you make tea daily, clean with vinegar monthly to prevent hard water
mineral deposits. Pour 2 cups of white vinegar into the reservoir.
™ Assemble pitcher with brew basket, mesh filter and lid. Place pitcher
on brew tray.
™ Plug in tea maker and press the On button. When the brew cycle is
completed discard the vinegar from the pitcher. Wash, pitcher, mesh
filter, brew basket and lid.
™ Repeat cleaning process with cold water.
77
Tea leaves sometimes contain harmful bacteria that have the potential for
causing human illness. If tea is not brewed at a high enough water
temperature; if the equipment is not properly sanitized; or if prepared tea is
stored incorrectly, people might become ill from drinking tea.
Equipment:
Plastic or metal urn (provided by the vendor)
Container for heating water (provided by the center). Container
should hold 3-4 quarts of water, be non-breakable, easily cleaned,
and heat resistant. A 4-quart aluminum or stainless steel
saucepan is recommended for heating water on the stove.
Supplies: Tea bags, lemon juice, ice, sugar, sweetener, and cups will be
provided by the vendor. Each bag of ice will be sufficient for 20
servings. Vendor should send 1 bag of ice for up to 20 congregate
meals; 2 bags for 21-40 congregate meals; 3 bags for 41-60
congregate meals, etc.
Method:
™ Wash, rinse, and sanitize the tea urn and saucepan each morning.
Be sure to take the tea nozzle apart when washing and sanitizing.
™ If the equipment is too large to immerse in the sanitizing solution
container, use a CLEAN cloth dipped in sanitizing solution to wipe all
surfaces.
™ Put approximately 2 quarts of cold water in the saucepan, or other
heat-resistant container. Bring the water to a boil. Remove the pan
from the heat.
™ Add tea bags (Use 1 tea bag for 25 servings or less; 2 bags for 26 to
50 servings; 3 bags for 51-75 servings, etc.).
78
(#9A: page 2)
™ Leave tea bags in the hot water for 3 to 5 minutes. Remove the bags
with a sanitized spoon. Let the prepared tea cool for 30 minutes in
the saucepan to minimize the risk of burns. (Do not boil the tea bags
or leave the bags in more than 5 minutes. This will cause the tea to
be bitter.)
™ Put cold water in the tea urn. Add the prepared tea and ice.
x Use 2 quarts of cold water if making 25 servings of tea; add tea
and enough ice to fill the container almost ½ full.
x Use 4 quarts of cold water if making 50 servings of tea and
enough ice to almost fill the container.
™ Serve tea over ice. (Use a sanitized utensil or glove to serve ice.)
™ Make tea fresh daily. Discard any leftover tea at the end of the day.
x Centers without a stove should use the tea maker provided by Valley.
Contact the nutrition coordinator to order a tea brewer.
x Microwaves are not recommended to heat water as they can be used
but care must be exercised to avoid a burn. Water heated in a
microwave often bubbles over due to superheating whenever the
container is moved.
79
Pan of cake or cornbread - 30 Servings
<----------------12"------------------>
<---------------------------------18"---------------------------------->
Each piece is about 2 1/4" x 2 3/4"
80
™ Temperature must be checked and recorded on each pan of food before
serving.
™ Do not serve any food that does not meet the serving temperature
requirements.
™ There are no temperature requirements for bread, cakes, cookies or fresh fruit.
™ If any food fails to meet the temperature guidelines or there is a shortage in
serving, check the Serving Guide to see if this food is a required food item.
™ If a food is a required item, it will have a check (√) in front of its name.
™ Items marked with a (√) MUST be replaced if you are short or if the product
fails to make temperature.
™ Replace with the same item whenever possible.
™ Condiments are an optional menu item. If you are short a condiment, you may
replace it with a similar item if desired, but replacement is not required. This
applies to: Margarine, Salad Dressing, Mustard, Ketchup, Mayonnaise,
Cranberry Sauce, Relish, and Onions.
™ Starred (*) items are those foods most susceptible to bacterial growth, which
may cause foodborne illness.
™ If either starred hot items are below 140 degrees or starred cold items are
above 41 degrees, they should not be served.
81
To reduce the incidence of food borne illness the senior center staff is
responsible for keeping home meal delivery carriers clean and
maintained.
This includes any soft sided carriers, Styrofoam or insulated coolers
or Cambro type carriers.
Instructions for Cleaning:
™ Wash inside with warm, soapy water.
™ Rinse with clean water.
(a) Spray with sanitizing solution or
(b) Use a clean wiping towel soaked in sanitizing solution, wring
out excess moisture and wipe inside of container.
™ Leave doors open and allow to air dry.
™ Carriers should be stored at least 6” off the floor.
™ Outside of carrier should be washed weekly or more often as
needed to maintain cleanliness.
82
Clean Towel
Container of Sanitizer
™ Sanitizing solution containers should be clearly labeled “Chlorine Bleach
Sanitizing Solution”. Solution should be mixed fresh daily.
™ Between uses, wiping cloths must soak in chlorine sanitizing solution of
100-200 ppm. Do not put soap or detergent in this.
™ Wiping cloths and chlorine sanitizing solution must be free of food or
visible dirt.
™ Wiping cloths should be held in containers that are stored off the floor.
™ Wiping cloths shall be laundered daily by
a) Washing machine and dried in a dryer or,
b) By washing cloth in clean detergent solution, rinsing thoroughly in
clean water, soak in sanitizing solution for 5 minutes, and hang to air
dry.
™ Commercially purchased chlorine bleach sanitizing wipes are not
recommended for use in the centers due to the risk for error in the
variety of products available.
™ Sponges are not to be used.
83
x Shower or bath daily.
x Trim and clean fingernails.
x Remove jewelry on hands and arms when working with
food.
x Wear clean clothes and a clean apron.
x Do not cough or sneeze over or around food.
x Do not pick or scratch nose.
x Do not taste food with fingers or an unwashed utensil.
x Do not blow into bags or plastic gloves to open them.
x Anyone sick or with skin infections cannot work around
food.
x Do not eat, drink or chew in the kitchen.
84
The vendor will send supplies for serving coffee with the supply order (coffee,
sugar, non-dairy creamer, stirrers, cups, and artificial sweetener). Amounts ordered
should be appropriate for one cup per congregate meal. Each center should have a
coffee urn to use for coffee preparation. If the center does not have urn, advise the
Nutrition Coordinator of the problem.
Instructions:
1. Wash, rinse, and sanitize the coffee urn each morning. Be sure to clean spout.
a. Do NOT immerse the urn in water, as this will destroy the electrical parts.
b. Sanitize with a chlorine bleach solution (1 Tablespoon bleach per gallon of
water). Wipe the urn with a CLEAN cloth dipped in a sanitizing solution.
2. Each package of coffee will make 15 servings.
3. Use the following proportions to provide adequate servings of coffee for
congregate participants:
# of Participants
Coffee
Water
15 or less
16-30
31-45
46-60
1 package
2 packages
3 packages
4 packages
3 quarts (3/4 gallon)
6 quarts (1 ½ gallons)
9 quarts (2 ¼ gallons)
12 quarts (3 gallons)
4. Fill urn with appropriate amount of cold water. Put coffee grounds into basket.
Turn on coffee maker. It takes 15-20 minutes for a pot of coffee to finish.
5. At the end of the day, wash coffee pot with hot sudsy water and rinse thoroughly.
6. If a white residue begins to accumulate inside coffee pot, fill coffee maker with
1-quart water and 1 ½ quarts (6 cups) white distilled vinegar. Place stem, empty
coffee basket, and lid in place; turn coffee maker on. Allow one complete
perking cycle. Let stand for 20 minutes. Pour out solution and rinse thoroughly.
85
The vendor thaws juice in the cooler for 2-3 days before it is delivered to the centers.
However, juice is still sometimes partially frozen at mealtime. The Alabama
Department of Public Health has approved the following procedure for thawing juice
at room temperature.
Approximately two (2) hours before the meal, the center manager should check to
make sure that the juice is thawed. If the juice is still frozen, staff may thaw it at
room temperature.
1. Thaw the juice at room temperature for no more than two (2) hours. Be
certain to spread the cartons out on the counter to speed the thawing.
2. Check juice frequently, and refrigerate the cartons as soon as they have
thawed. Juice temperature should never register above 41°F.
3. At the end of the serving period, any leftover juice may be returned to the
refrigerator and sent out as an extra with the home delivered meals the following
day.
4. If congregate participants wish to take their unopened juice home with them,
this is acceptable.
Caution:
x Juice is transported in coolers under ice. Always check cartons for damage.
If a seal/carton is broken, there is risk of cross contamination from melted ice.
Do not serve damaged product.
x Room temperature thawing can only be used for juices and fruit drinks. These
items contain enough acid and sugar to prevent bacterial growth. At the
present time, this method is approved for these juices:
Orange Juice
Blended Juice
Pineapple Juice
Grape Juice
Lemonade
Apple Juice
Cranberry Juice Cocktail
Orange/Pineapple Juice
Apple/Cherry Juice
86
Refer to the Serving Guide each day for the recommended
placement of foods on the tray.
The goal is to have an eye appealing plate and to safely serve the
correct portion of all food items to each participant.
87
To Keep Ice Free of Contamination:
x Wash hands frequently.
x Use a clean scoop or utensil with a handle.
x Store the scoop in a cleanable container or on a
clean surface.
x Do not store the scoop in the ice.
x Do not store food or drink directly in the ice.
x Keep the doors or lids of bins and machines
closed.
x Clean floor sinks and hub drains frequently to
prevent backflow.
x Clean the ice storage bin every 6 months.
x Most ice machines require servicing twice a year.
This is the responsibility of the contractor.
x Follow instructions listed on ice machine or in
owner’s manual.
88
x Recommend cleaning at least every six months.
x Turn the water supply off and disconnect the unit
from electrical power.
x Remove ice and throw away.
x Wash any removable parts and inside of ice bin in
hot, soapy water.
x Rinse all in clean water.
x Sanitize the inside surfaces
with unscented household chlorine bleach
(approximately ¾ to 1 tablespoon
per gallon of lukewarm water).
x Allow to air dry.
x Clean outside surfaces.
89
Applesauce
Rice
Potato Salad
Pudding
Taco Meat (Chicken or Beef)
What foods are
served with a
#8 Scoop?
Look for the SCOOP SIZE before using!!
Scoop Size
6 oz.
6
9
90
-Refer to the Serving Guide for suggested
utensils at each meal.
-Be sure to level scoops and spoodles.
4 oz.
8
Portion Control Tips:
Scoop Number
#6 & #8 are the only 2 scoop sizes we use.
Which Scoop?
LLook
o for the SCOOP SIZE before using!
#8 Scoop #6 Scoop
Chicken Pot Pie
Beef Tips/Rice
Casseroles like Italian Mac
Macaroni & Cheese
What foods are
served with a
#6 Scoop?
Peas
Stewed Tomatoess
Cobblers
Carrots and other Veggiess
Baked Beanss
What foods are
served
se
erved with a
e
4 oz Spoodle?
p
Size may be on the FRONT or BACK
of the handle.
-Refer to the Serving Guide for suggested utensils at each meal..
-Be sure to level scoops and spoodles.
Portion Control
Tips:
91
6 oz.
4 oz.
Spoodle Size
4 oz & 6 oz are the only
y 2 spoodle
p
sizes we use.
We use 4 oz solid and slotted spoodles.
Which Spoodle?
Look for the Spoodle SIZE before using!
4 oz
Spoodle
6oz
Spoodle
SSoups lik
like TTaco Soup
p
Ham & White Beans
Casseroles like Italian Macc
Macaroni & Cheese
What foods are
served
se
erved with a
e
6 oz Spoodle?
Chapter Eight
Form Instruction and Overview
8-A
Instructions for Completing Item Delivery Ticket (Appendix F)
The Item Delivery Ticket is the official and legal record of the foods that were
ordered and delivered to a senior center. It lets the Nutrition Coordinator and
the vendor know if all items ordered were received and the condition of the
delivered products. The Item Delivery Ticket is also the means for centers to
tell both the vendor and the Nutrition Coordinator about any problems
incurred and how those problems were handled. Be specific and factual in
reporting problems. It is very important that center managers fill out the ticket
completely and accurately.
PROCEDURES
There are three copies of the ticket. After completing the requested
information, return the original to vendor, send the second copy to the
Nutrition Coordinator, and keep the bottom copy for center records.
The driver will pick up the vendor copy when he returns to the center with the
next food delivery. Have a designated place where center personnel always
leave this ticket and any other forms that need to go to the vendor. Staple
everything to the Item Delivery Ticket (reimbursement requests, supply
requests, etc.).
Complete the ticket, preferably with a ballpoint pen. Write firmly so that all
copies will be clear and easy to read.
If an error is made in recording information on the ticket, draw a single line
through the part that is wrong and initial it. Put the correct information beside
it.
Always keep some blank Item Delivery Tickets on hand that the center can
use if the driver forgets to leave the ticket. These and all other forms (supply,
reimbursement) are supplied by the vendor. When the center needs new
forms, request them on your Item Delivery Ticket in the “Problems with
Supplies” section.
92
8-B
GENERAL INFORMATION ON ITEMS DELIVERED
Check to make certain the following information is listed correctly on the
Item Delivery Ticket. All of this will have been typed on the ticket when it is
delivered:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Date
Commissary Information: Unit Number.
Name of senior center. Route Number, Stop Number.
Type(s) of meals ordered. The Item Delivery Ticket will only list the
types of meals that were ordered for the center on this particular day. For
instance, Monday—meal listing might include hot meals, frozen meals,
and breakfast meals.
Tuesday—meal listing might include hot meals, assembled picnic meals,
and breakfast meals.
Number of items ordered.
Hot, Breakfast, Picnic, ShelfStable
Value will be number of meals
delivered.
Frozen (2 pk, 5 pk, or 7 pk)
Value will be the number of
packages delivered.
f.
Correct number of congregate and home delivered meals; correct number
of low sugar alternates.
g.
Driver’s initials should be signed at the bottom of the form with date and
time of delivery.
h.
When recording meal servings, shortages, unacceptable foods and
ineligible meals, refer to the following for clarification.
x An unacceptable required food item does not make the meal ineligible
for payment purposes for the AAA.
x Unacceptable food becomes an ineligible meal if not served or
replaced.
x An ineligible meal is processed at ADSS and a fine is issued to Valley.
x The collected fine is placed back into the AAAs meal budget at ADSS.
x Serving an eligible meal is our goal.
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x ADSS does expect the Senior Center Manager to replace the food item
when possible to make the meal eligible. (Refer to the serving guide for
allowed food substitution).
x If a food item is short or unacceptable, mark that on the Item Delivery
Ticket in the appropriate column.
i.
When a meal is served to an ineligible person:
x The AAA pays ADSS for ineligible people, not ineligible meals.
x The AAA pays for the meal via a check to ADSS using local funds.
x Mark on the item Delivery Ticket at the bottom in the “problem
section” so the AAA knows how many of the served people were
ineligible.
Example: 25 meals delivered. 23 meals served to eligible people.
2 meals served to guests.
j.
Record the number of items actually received of each meal type--hot,
breakfast, picnic, frozen, shelf-stable, MNT meal replacement under the
column “Delivered”.
k.
For Frozen Meal Packs, the number delivered will be the same as the
number ordered UNLESS the vendor failed to deliver an entire package of
meals.
x If the delivery is short a complete package of meal(s), the number
listed will be less than what appears in the column “Ordered.”
x If the delivery is missing only part of a meal package due to
shortages, temperature problems, or quality problems, this reduces
the number of meal packs delivered.
l.
For Hot, Picnic, and Breakfast Meals, the number delivered will be the
same as the number ordered UNLESS the vendor failed to deliver a
COMPLETE meal.
x If the delivery is missing only part of a meal due to shortages,
temperature problems, or quality problems, this does not reduce the
number of meals delivered.
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m. If the delivery was missing entire meals/meal packages and center
personnel replaced part or all of these meals, enter the number of
complete meals/meal packages that were purchased in the column
“Replaced”. Most days this column will be blank.
n.
In the column “Served”, list how many congregate and home delivered
meals were served on this date. If the meals were served differently from
what the AAA ordered, be sure to indicate this here.
x Occasionally a center will be short congregate participants and will
choose to send these meals out to home delivered meal participants.
x Likewise, sometimes less home delivered meals will be needed than
ordered and center staff will serve the meals to additional congregate
participants.
o.
8-C
It is the center manager’s responsibility to ensure that all meals received
are served to eligible persons. The total value listed in the “Served”
column should equal the sum of meals delivered plus meals replaced
less meals served to ineligible participants.
FOOD QUALITY RATING
Each day, rate the overall quality of the meal using the five-point scale on the
Item Delivery Ticket. The rating should reflect the participants’ opinion
rather than that of the center manager.
In determining a rating, consider how many complaints were received. Also
note how much food was left on the plates.
8-D
LATE DELIVERY, NO SUBSTITUTION NOTICE
The delivery ticket includes an easy way for documenting late deliveries,
supply deliveries, return of thermometer to commissary, and failure to receive
a menu substitution notice. Just check the boxes provided to document these
events.
Late delivery—meals should be delivered by 10:30 a.m. each day. By bid
specifications, a center may replace meals if they are not delivered by 10:30.
95
However, many centers elect to wait on the driver if the delivery is just a few
minutes late. This is the AAA’s choice. Any time the meal is delivered after
10:45 a.m., check the box to document the late delivery.
No substitution notice—whenever there is a menu change; the driver must
bring a notice of that change. If the item delivered is not what is listed on the
menu and no menu change notice was sent, call the Nutrition Coordinator
immediately and advise her/him of the problem. In addition, check the box to
document the problem. Do not serve foods delivered without a notice unless
the ADSS Nutrition Staff and/or Nutrition Coordinator authorize serving the
food.
8-E
SUPPLIES DELIVERED
Check the box to indicate receipt of an order.
Check the amount of supplies received against the Supply Order Form
(Appendix F). If an item listed was not sent or the amounts differ from the
listed values, note this information on both the Supply Order Form and the
Item Delivery Ticket. The Item Delivery Ticket has spaces for documenting
under “Problems with Supplies”.
Supplies should be ordered by the center manager using the Supply Order
Form (Appendix F) and will be delivered within 3-4 days after order form is
picked up by the Valley driver.
Always keep one week of back up supplies in stock.
If the center needs a new thermometer or serving utensils, request it in the
blanks in this area. Also check the box to indicate that the center is returning
a defective thermometer to the commissary.
8-F
FOOD TEMPERATURES
Check the temperatures of all starred foods (see Serving Guide) delivered in
insulated containers (Cambros) at the time of delivery. Record this
information in the appropriate column(s) in the “Temperatures” section of the
delivery ticket. If there are two similar types of items on the menu, write in
the initials of the items when recording the temperature.
96
Example: Black-eyed peas and whipped potatoes are both starches. Initial
which reading was listed as a starch and which was listed as a vegetable.
Example: Depending on the menu, sliced peaches might be the dessert or a
fruit. Initial where the temperature was recorded.
Recheck the temperatures of hot and cold foods when they are served. Check
the temperature of milk at this time. Record this information on the Item
Delivery Ticket in the appropriate columns.
If any foods fail to meet temperature guidelines at the time of delivery or at
serving time, do NOT serve them. Note on the Item Delivery Ticket that the
foods were not served and whether or not the food was replaced. Be certain to
describe exactly what food was purchased for replacement.
Example: Coleslaw 71° F when delivered. Replaced with tossed salad.
Example: Lemon Pepper chicken 134º F when delivered. Replaced with 2
chicken drumsticks.
x For juices, tell the flavor of product purchased. For salads, tell the type of
salad purchased (tossed salad; coleslaw with carrots). If a sandwich was
purchased, tell what was included (Hamburger with lettuce, tomato,
cheese, and bun).
x If an item is not required nutritionally and center staff does not buy
replacement food, note on the delivery “Did not replace as it was not a
required item.”
Check the food thermometer for accuracy (Instruction sheet #5). Record the
readings on the Item Delivery Ticket.
Check the temperature of the refrigerator thermometer. Record the
information on the Item Delivery Ticket.
8-G SHORTAGES
List all shortages of food items, condiments, and complete meals. Record
every item that was missing and exactly how many servings.
97
Indicate whether or not the center replaced the items that were short. Be
certain to describe exactly what foods were purchased. (See 8-F above)
Tea and coffee will be available year round. If tea is ordered ice should be
delivered. If no ice is delivered, note this in the “Problems” section and
indicate the number of meals affected (Count 20 servings/bag of ice).
8-H UNACCEPTABLE FOOD QUALITY
In the event that the quality of a food item is totally unacceptable and the food
cannot be served, note the number of servings that were affected in the
column “Unacceptable”. Describe what was wrong in the section “Problems”.
Never serve a food item if center staff thinks it may be spoiled or
contaminated.
Example:
Example:
Example:
Example:
Bug in the green beans affected 40 servings. Replaced with
tomatoes.
10 servings of ham were badly burned. Replaced with ham.
Gelatin was liquid, 40 servings. Did not replace.
Milk was out of date, 10 servings. Replaced with milk.
Indicate whether or not the center replaced the items that were short. Be
certain to describe exactly what foods were purchased. (See 8-F)
Return all of the food that was rejected for quality problems to vendor unless
otherwise directed. Store in the refrigerator for pick up by the driver on the
next delivery day.
8-I
DELIVERY PROBLEMS
Describe any food delivery problems or driver errors in the “Problems”
section.
Example:
Example:
8-J
Spillage in the hot food delivery box.
Driver did not lock the center door.
OTHER FOOD QUALITY
Describe all problems with food quality under the “Problems” section. Tell
exactly what the problem was. Try to be very specific. This is much more
98
helpful than general comments like “Food not good” or “Did not like the
food”.
Example:
Example:
Example:
Green beans had excess liquid.
Chicken was overcooked and tough.
Cornbread did not rise evenly.
Return products with quality problems to the vendor. By seeing the product
problem, the manager will have a better idea of how to prevent future
problems.
8-K REPLACEMENT FOODS
Whenever the center purchases replacement foods, note what was bought and
the amounts in the column “Food Purchased”.
On the line marked “Alternate Vendor”, tell where the foods were purchased
and the total “Cost” of the purchase. This provides additional documentation
for reimbursement purposes.
Also on the line marked “Alternate Vendor”, if a center replaces food with
products that are donated or in stock at the center describe the explanation
using these terms:
Donated—a store, individual, or other organization gave the center product to
use.
In stock—center used product leftover from another serving day to replace the
missing item (applicable to juice, milk, condiments).
AAA supply—center had product on hand to use as replacements when
problems arose. This product may have been purchased by AAA, center, or
the local service provider (city, county, or an agency).
Vendor supply—Same as above but vendor purchased.
8-L
VERIFICATION OF A DELIVERY
The person receiving the food should sign his/her name in the space at the
bottom marked “Accepted By”. Generally, it is the center manager who
completes and signs the ticket. Temperatures should be taken within 15
minutes of “Accepted By” time.
99
8-M ALTERNATE VENDOR REIMBURSEMENT PROCESSING
PROCEDURES
Center Manager must complete reimbursement request and send to the
commissary via the driver.
The Center Manager will complete the Valley “Request for Reimbursement
for Food Purchases” and “Mileage Reimbursement Form” (Appendix F)
whenever replacement foods are purchased. Use a separate form for each
store/restaurant and make certain all requested information is supplied.
The vendor must:
(a) mail reimbursement payments or otherwise deliver reimbursement
payments within 5 serving days of the time the reimbursement request
was received at the commissary and
(b) maintain a daily log of reimbursement requests.
Record the center’s name on the back of the store/restaurant receipt and staple
the receipt to the reimbursement form.
Leave the form and receipt with the meal ticket for pick up by the vendor’s
driver.
Send a copy of the reimbursement form to the Nutrition Coordinator with
meal tickets during the week it occurs.
Notify the Nutrition Coordinator if checks are not received within 10 working
days (2 weeks).
Commissary staff will:
x Review the submitted information. If there are errors, the commissary
staff will call and advise the Nutrition Coordinator of the problem. The
Nutrition Coordinator will follow up with center manager.
x Maintain a log of reimbursement requests. Information will include center
name, amount, date received, date check sent to center, and description of
any problems encountered.
x Enter reimbursement requests with weekly vendor invoices via STATZ
and forward original request forms to Valley corporate office with vendor
invoices.
100
Valley corporate staff will:
x Process reimbursement requests on a weekly basis, as received. Checks
will be generated by Wednesday of each week.
x Overnight all checks to the appropriate commissary on Wednesday
afternoon of each week.
Commissary staff will place the checks in envelopes and staple the checks to
the appropriate center’s Item Delivery Tickets. Drivers will deliver the checks
to the centers. Target day for delivering checks to the center will be Friday of
each week.
Center manager will distribute all checks to the appropriate parties.
8-N
Instructions for Completing the Supply Order Form (Appendix F)
x
x
x
x
x
x
The senior center manager must place an order to receive supplies.
Refer to the Serving Guide and order supplies at least one week in
advance of their need.
Supplies should be ordered according to items specified on the Serving
Guide.
Each center should always maintain one week’s supply needs in reserve.
Your driver will leave you a blank 3-part supply order form with each
supply delivery.
Fill out the form with the quantities of supplies you need.
Example: If you usually order 25 congregate meals daily x 5 days you
would order (125) 5-compartment foam trays for a 1 week’s supply.
You may need to order a few extra if you have to use your reserve supply
at any time.
x
x
x
x
x
Should you need something not listed, note it on the “other” line provided.
Place the order form with the meal delivery ticket and the driver will pick
it up the next day.
You will receive your order within the next three days with a copy of your
order attached.
If you do not receive supplies as ordered make a notation on the form and
notify your Nutrition Coordinator.
Do not use the Item Delivery Ticket to request supplies as there may be a
delay.
101
**Permanent items such as thermometers and serving utensils should be
ordered on your Item Delivery Ticket or as instructed by your Nutrition
Coordinator.
102
Chapter Nine
Picnic and Cookout Meals
9-A
Picnic and Cookout Meals
On occasion centers will schedule an excursion or special event for
congregate program participants and request picnic meals be sent the
preceding day for the home delivered program participants. The AAA may
authorize an average of two events per center maximum per fiscal year
without counting these events as non-serving days. Picnic meal orders must
be submitted with the weekly meal order. Picnics may not be ordered for
Monday delivery or the day following a holiday.
If the AAA plans to order picnic meals for an area wide event or submit an
order for 200 or more picnic meals within a single week, the Nutrition
Coordinator must notify the vendor, in writing at least three weeks in advance
and provide a tentative meal count.
There are two delivery options for picnic meals.
Picnic Meals – Delivered Unassembled: The vendor will portion all foods
into single serving amounts. Like foods will be packaged together. Cold food
items will be packed in insulated coolers for transport (juice, milk,
sandwiches, salads, egg, and canned fruit). The vendor will send plastic bags
(t-shirt bags). At serving time, center personnel will assemble foods and place
the food into bags.
For convenience, a production unit may elect to ship a small order of
unassembled picnic meals as assembled meals. This is a vendor choice but (a)
the meal cost will be that of a hot meal (b) meals must be shipped in Cambros
or coolers.
Picnic Meals – Delivered Assembled: Meals will be delivered already
assembled and packed in individual picnic boxes. Foods must be kept cold
until served and this often requires provision of extra refrigeration capabilities
at the serving center. The AAA will arrange for any required additional
refrigeration at the senior center and for other small events. For events with a
meal count of 200 or more, the vendor will provide, without added charge,
103
any required special arrangements to ensure meals remain at an appropriate
temperature until served.
Food items will be “in single serving amounts (individual bags of chips; snack
cakes; juice; pieces of fruit) or portioned into single serving containers
(individual sandwiches; individual cups of coleslaw, peaches, or tossed salad;
individual portions of carrot sticks, etc.)” This means that sandwiches should
be assembled at the production unit i.e., meat/cheese placed between two
slices of bread and wrapped or placed in a wax bag. Condiments should be
shipped separately in individual portions.
Pre-assembled picnic meals will be packed as individual meals in picnic boxes
at the production unit. The vendor will take necessary steps to ensure that all
potentially hazardous foods meet delivery temperature standards.
Cookout Meals will be available from October 1 to October 31 and April 1 to
September 30 of each contract year. The requesting AAA will discuss plans
and tentative meal counts for cookout meals with the vendor a minimum of
three (3) weeks or twenty-one (21) calendar days in advance.
Cookout Meals: The vendor will be responsible for food delivery and
preparation. Center staff will serve the meal. Oftentimes, AAAs will request
that these meals be served in picnic boxes. Prior to the event, vendor will
assemble the boxes and put all shelf-stable items in the boxes. On site, meat
and other potentially hazardous foods will be put in the boxes by center staff.
This is considered an assembled picnic meal. Any time the picnic boxes are
assembled by the vendor, the meal is billed as an assembled picnic meal.
Menu options for cookout and picnic meals are listed on the following pages.
Any deviations from these menus will require written approval from the
ADSS staff dietitian and consent of the vendor.
9-B
Picnic Menus
The following picnic meals may be ordered by Menu Number. Centers will
receive one (1) utensil kit per meal ordered. Only 1 menu may be selected per
event. When placing picnic meal order in MARS, specify the menu # and
choice selections in the special notes section. To order roast beef sandwiches,
a minimum order of 25 must be placed.
104
Picnic Menu #1
Meat: Choose One
Turkey/Cheese
Ham/Cheese
Roast Beef/Cheese
Picnic Menu #2
Meat: Choose One
2 oz/1.5 oz Turkey/Cheese
Ham/Cheese
2 oz/1 oz
2 oz/1 oz
Roast Beef/Cheese
Chips: Choose One
Potato Chips
Corn Chips
1(1 oz) bag
1(1 oz) bag
Corn Chips
Wheat Bread
Lettuce
Sliced Tomatoes
Fresh Orange
Oatmeal Cream Pie
Milk
Mayo and Mustard
2 oz/1 oz
2 oz/1 oz
2 oz/1 oz
1(1 oz) bag
2 slices
½ cup
3 slices
1 each
1 each
8 oz
1 each
Wheat Bread
Lettuce
Sliced Tomatoes
Fresh Orange
Oatmeal Cream Pie
Orange Juice
Mayo and Mustard
Picnic Menu #3
Meat: Choose One
Turkey/Cheese
Ham/Cheese
Roast Beef/Cheese
2 slices
½ cup
3 slices
1 each
1 each
8 oz
1 each
Picnic Menu #4
Meat: Choose One
2 oz/1.5 oz Turkey/Cheese
2 oz/1 oz
Ham/Cheese
Roast Beef /Cheese
2 oz/1 oz
2 oz/1 oz
2 oz/1 oz
2 oz/1 oz
Chips: Choose One
Potato Chips
Corn Chips
Chips: Choose One
1(1 oz) bag Potato Chips
1(1 oz) bag Corn Chips
1(1 oz) bag
1(1 oz) bag
Wheat Bread
Marinated Slaw
Fresh Apple
Oatmeal Cream Pie
Mayo and Mustard
Juice: Choose One
Orange Juice
Apple Juice
Grape Juice
2 slices
½ cup
1 each
1 each
1 each
Wheat Bread
Marinated Slaw
Fresh Apple
Oatmeal Cream Pie
Milk
Mayo and Mustard
8 oz
8 oz
8 oz
All Juices are Calcium Fortified.
Roast Beef requires 25 or more orders and will
be served with BBQ sauce in place of mustard
105
2 slices
½ cup
1 each
1 each
8 oz
1 each
9-C
Cookout Menus
The following cookout meals may be ordered by Menu Number. Centers will
receive one (1) utensil kit per meal ordered.
COMPONENT
SERVING SIZE
Cookout
Menu #1
Hamburger Patty
Hamburger Bun
Baked Beans
Corn Chips
Sliced Tomatoes
Lettuce, shredded
Onion
Mayonnaise
Mustard
Ketchup
Cookie or Snack Cake
Juice, calcium fortified
3 oz (EP weight)
1 each
½ cup
1 single serving pkg.
3 slices (1/4” thick)
½ cup
1 slice or 2 tbsp
1 single serving pkg.
1 single serving pkg.
1 single serving pkg.
1 cookie OR 1 snack cake
8 fl. oz
Cookout
Menu #2
Frankfurter
Hot Dog Bun
Baked Beans
Coleslaw/Carrots
Fresh Apple
Mustard
Ketchup
Onions, fresh, chopped
Cookie or Snack Cake
Juice, calcium fortified
3 oz (AP weight)
1 each
½ cup
½ cup
1 medium
1 single serving pkg.
1 single serving pkg.
2 Tbsp
1 cookie OR 1 snack cake
8 fl. oz
Cookout
Menu #3
Grilled Chicken Patty
American cheese
Hamburger Bun
Fresh Apple
Potato Salad
Lettuce, shredded
Tomato
Mustard
Mayonnaise
Cookie or Snack Cake
Juice, calcium fortified
3 oz (EP weight)
1 oz slice
1 each
1 medium
½ cup
½ cup
2 slices, ¼” thick
1 single serving pkg.
1 single serving pkg.
1 cookie or 1 snack cake
8 fl. oz
106
9-D Special Event Menus
These menus are available for special events (greater than 250 persons). Each
AAA will limit usage to no more than two (2) times per contract year.
Vendor will send one (1) utensil kit per meal ordered.
At special event meals, it is common practice for AAAs to provide “goodie”
bags containing fruit, chips, cookies, snack cakes, etc. Likewise, AAAs may
obtain ice cream or soft drinks to serve as meal adjuncts. There is no problem
with either of these practices if the products are obtained from commercial
sources and are appropriately packaged and handled.
Special
Event
Menu #1
Special
Event
Menu #2
COMPONENT
SERVING SIZE
Hoagie Sandwich:
Turkey
Ham
Sliced cheese
Lettuce, shredded
Tomato Slices
Hoagie Bun
Potato Chips
Fresh Apple
Oatmeal Crème Snack Cake
Mayonnaise
Calcium fortified Apple Juice
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz slice
½ cup
4 each (1/4” thick)
1 each
1 single serving pkg.
1 medium
1 each
1 single serving pkg.
8 fl. oz
Hoagie Sandwich:
Turkey
Ham
Sliced cheese
Lettuce, shredded
Tomato Slices
Hoagie Bun
Potato Chips
Fresh Apple
Ice Cream
Mayonnaise
Mustard
Calcium fortified Apple Juice
1 oz
1 oz
1 oz slice
½ cup
4 each (1/4” thick)
1 each
1 single serving pkg.
1 medium
½ cup or 1 individual cup
1 single serving pkg.
1 single serving pkg.
8 fl. oz
107
9-E
Picnic Serving Guide Instructions
The serving instructions needed for picnic menus are included below. Use as
a reference for all picnic meals.
SERVING TEMPERATURE POLICY
1. Starred * items are those foods most susceptible to bacterial growth, which
may cause food borne illness.
2. If either starred hot items are below 140ºF or starred cold items are above
41ºF, they should not be served.
3. Non-starred items do not have to meet the hot or cold temperature
guidelines.
√ REPLACEMENT POLICY
1. Items marked with a √ MUST always be replaced if you are short or if the
product fails to make temperature.
2. Condiments are an optional menu item. If you are short a condiment, you
may replace it with a similar item if desired, but replacement is not
required. This applies to: Margarine, Salad Dressing, Mustard, Ketchup,
Mayonnaise, Barbecue Sauce, Cranberry Sauce, Pickles, Relish, and
Onions.
3. Replace with the same item whenever possible.
108
Picnic
Menu #1
*
*
*
*
*
*
Picnic
Menu #2
*
*
*
*
*
*
Picnic Serving Guide
Menu
Recommended Substitution
Sliced Turkey, Ham or Roast
Any 2 oz beef, chicken, ham or turkey
Beef
Potato Chips OR Corn Chips
Any type chips (1 oz)
Wheat Bread (2 slices)
Any wheat or multigrain bun or 2 slices
wheat or multigrain bread
Sliced Cheese
Any Cheese (1.5 oz if turkey sandwich; 1
oz if ham or roast beef sandwich)
Lettuce
½ cup lettuce (any type) or ½ cup slaw
Sliced Tomatoes
½ cup slaw or 4 carrot sticks
Fresh Orange
8 oz orange juice, ½ cup mandarin
oranges, ½ cup peaches, or 8 oz tomato
juice
Oatmeal Crème Snack Cake
Any Little Debbie Snack Cake
Orange Juice
Fresh orange, ½ cup mandarin oranges,
½ cup peaches, or 8 oz tomato juice
Picnic Serving Guide
Menu
Recommended Substitution
Sliced Turkey, Ham or Roast
Any 2 oz beef, chicken, ham or turkey
Beef
Corn Chips
Corn Chips
Wheat Bread (2 slices)
Any wheat or multigrain bun or 2 slices
wheat or multigrain bread
Sliced Cheese
Any Cheese (1 oz)
Lettuce
½ cup lettuce (any type) or ½ cup slaw
Sliced Tomatoes
½ cup slaw or 4 carrot sticks
Fresh Orange
8 oz orange juice, ½ cup mandarin
oranges, ½ cup peaches, or 8 oz tomato
juice
Oatmeal Crème Snack Cake
Any Little Debbie Snack Cake
Milk
8 oz Chocolate Milk, 8 oz Yogurt
109
Picnic
Menu #3
*
*
*
*
*
Picnic
Menu #4
*
*
*
*
*
Picnic Serving Guide
Menu
Recommended Substitution
Sliced Turkey, Ham or Roast
Any 2 oz beef, chicken, ham or turkey
Beef
Potato Chips or Corn Chips
Any type chips (1 oz)
Wheat Bread (2 slices)
Any wheat or multigrain bun or 2 slices
wheat or multigrain bread
Sliced Cheese
Any Cheese (1.5 oz if turkey sandwich; 1
oz if ham or roast beef sandwich)
Marinated Slaw
½ cup slaw or 4 carrot sticks
Fresh Apple
Banana or 4 carrot sticks
Oatmeal Crème Snack Cake
Any Little Debbie Snack Cake
Juice
Any juice
Picnic Serving Guide
Menu
Recommended Substitution
Sliced Turkey, Ham or Roast
Any 2 oz beef, chicken, ham or turkey
Beef
Potato Chips or Corn Chips
Any type chips (1 oz)
Wheat Bread (2 slices)
Any wheat or multigrain bun or 2 slices
wheat or multigrain bread
Sliced Cheese
Any Cheese (1 oz)
Marinated Slaw
½ cup coleslaw or ½ cup mandarin
oranges
Fresh Apple
Banana or 4 carrot sticks
Oatmeal Crème Snack Cake
Any Little Debbie Snack Cake
Milk
8 oz Chocolate Milk, 8 oz Yogurt
110
9-F
Donated Meals/Special Menu Approval Process
Special menu approval requests will be done by the ADSS as time permits.
ADSS reserves the right to require the AAA to provide computer analyses of
the additional menus and signature of the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
(RDN) that analyzed the menu. In order for these meals to be eligible for the
Nutrition Services Incentive Program (NSIP), they must meet the following
requirements:
1. Each menu must comply with Dietary Guidelines and provide 1/3 of the
recommended daily allowances. The current ADSS planning standards for
the indicator nutrients must be used to determine compliance with nutrition
requirements.
2. All menus must be computer analyzed using a reputable nutrient analysis
software program such as Computrition, Food Processor, or ADSS
approved alternate.
3. An RDN with licensure to practice in Alabama must review all menu
analyses to ensure compliance with ADSS planning standards. Menus
complying with ADSS dietary planning standards will be signed and dated
by the RDN. If menus are analyzed at ADSS, the ADSS RDN will sign
them. If the analysis is done on the AAA level, the analysis will be signed
at the AAA level.
4. If analyzed at the AAA level, two copies of the signed menu and data
analyses for all meals must be submitted to the ADSS for review a
minimum of 30 days prior to use. No menus may be retroactively
submitted to the ADSS for review.
5. If analyzed at ADSS, the menu must be submitted on the special menu
form for review a minimum of 30 days prior to use. Once analyzed, a
signed copy will be returned to the AAA and should be submitted to ADSS
fiscal with meal certifications if NSIP will be considered.
5. The contractor must have a system for verifying the approved menus are
served as written, i.e., that both the food item and amount are served as
planned. If there is a menu change, the change must be documented and
menu computer analyzed to be certain nutrient levels were not
compromised.
6. The AAA must be notified of any and all menu changes by the provider of
meals and have documentation that nutrient levels were not compromised
and submit that prior to meal service for approval by ADSS.
7. The contractor must have a system for ensuring the meals conform to
delivery standards for meals and are served to eligible clients.
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8. The AAA should maintain copies of all menus, nutrient analyses, and
menu changes.
9- G Menu Approval for Special Events
Please complete the Special Events form (located in Appendix F) and submit
the information to ADSS as early in the planning process as possible,
preferably before any food orders are placed. This should be done any time:
a) you are preparing food for a special event, and your AAA plans to request
NSIP and/or
b) the menu differs from the picnic, theme, or cookout menus listed in the bid
specifications. ADSS will analyze up to five menus per AAA per year.
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Chapter 10
Strategies for Improving the Congregate Nutrition Program
10-A Low Attendance
Whenever a center has a continuing record of chronic low participation rates,
the service provider and AAA must jointly explore possible explanations for
the problem. Involve participants, center manager, and community leaders in
the discussions. Questions that should be considered include:
™ Does service area have sufficient population density of older individuals to
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support a center?
Is center conveniently located for the majority of older individuals residing
in the service area?
Are there any safety concerns with the present location?
Does the center provide adequate parking?
Are meeting facilities attractive and appropriate for older adults?
Is transportation an issue for community residents?
Are center hours a problem?
Any issues with center staff that may be affecting participation rates?
Does center offer programming that is appealing?
Is it geared to the needs and interests of older persons within the service
area?
How have center services been marketed in the community?
What outreach activities have occurred through the center in the last six
months?
Have there been recurring problems with meal quality?
What other programs are offered for seniors in the community that may
conflict with senior center hours?
Is there another means for providing nutrition services that would be more
appropriate for the needs of the community?
Occasional low attendance: For a variety of reasons, senior centers will
occasionally be short one or two participants. Possible approaches may include:
™ Utilize waiting lists of potential participants for both the home delivered
and congregate meals program.
™ Work with Alabama Cares staff to generate a list of caregivers and/or care
recipients that might benefit from an occasional ENP meal. Make certain
any meals placed with a client through Alabama Cares is eligible for a
meal under ENP guidelines. (See Chapter 2-A)
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™ Provide home delivered meal to an ill congregate participant (See Chapter
2).
™ Reduce attendance days for participants who are habitual no-shows.
™ Enforce an arrival time for participants to be guaranteed a meal.
10-B Contribution Options:
Provide participants with meal costs and ask them to decide their own
contribution.
To encourage donations, many centers post the amount of money collected at
the center each week and the average contribution per meal served. Others
use posters that explain how the money is used.
Sometimes a family member will volunteer to make donations for a
participant who cannot afford to contribute himself.
Possible Collection Methods:
™ Placing a locked contribution box in an easily accessible location but away
from the mainstream of center activities. The container should have a slot
in the lid so that donations can be deposited anonymously. Many centers
pad the bottom to dull the sound of coins.
™ Providing congregate participants with blank contribution envelopes and
having a central collection point at the center.
™ Sending self-addressed contribution envelopes to homebound participants
that are picked up weekly by volunteers who deliver meals. Alternatively,
clients may be asked to mail the contribution to the center/AAA on a
monthly basis. Steps should be taken to clarify that this is not provided as
a bill for payment, but as a means for making a voluntary contribution.
10-C Senior Center Design
Aim for a cheerful, warm atmosphere. A fresh coat of paint or new wallpaper
is a quick and fairly inexpensive way to give a facelift to an older building.
Centers that have their own buildings can achieve a homelike effect with
attractive window coverings, upholstered furniture, pictures, plants, bulletin
boards, etc. Be sure to display examples of craft activities, updated
photographs of special events, and the monthly activity calendar. A visitor to
a center should immediately recognize that fun and interesting activities occur
at that center.
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Furnishings should satisfy both the physical and social needs of participants.
They can also help to give the center a homelike atmosphere.
10-D Home delivered Meals: Suggestions for Personalization.
Aim to make the home delivered meal more than just a meal.
Try to make the recipient feel a part of senior center activities. Ideas used at
other centers are:
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
Send birthday cards from the center on each participant’s birthday.
Tape holiday greetings on meal tray—use cutouts from old cards.
Enclose pamphlets or handouts from senior center programs.
Tape a cartoon or joke to the tray.
Remember the participant with inexpensive gifts on special occasionsmake tray favors or gift baskets for homebound clients.
Establish a telephone calling system to check on participants living alone.
Provide volunteer assistance with household chores, errands, and
shopping.
Provide shelf-stable food items for emergency use.
Ask a local school to have classes, make cards, pictures, etc. for
homebound clients.
Work with church or community organizations.
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Chapter Eleven
Informational Items
11- A
Informational Items to post in the Senior Center.
This is a list of required information that should be available in the
senior center as part of participation in the Elderly Nutrition Program.
These are instructions for safety, procedural instructions and
educational information that would be beneficial to the participants of
this program.
This list includes but is not limited to the following:
Hours of Operation
Fire/Emergency Exit Plan and Drills
Emergency phone numbers
Current Menu
Current Activity Calendar
Contribution Sign
Sanitizing Procedures
Nutrition Educational Information
Foods that should not be taken from the center
Hand Washing Sign
Equal Employment Poster with Nondiscriminatory Clause
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