INSTRUCTION BOOK
CPFAFF)
72
INSTRUCTIONS
FOREWORD
Your dream has come true.
You are now the proud owner of a Pfaff 72, the sewing machine which will enable you to master all ordinary
sewing,
ornamental stitching and darning jobs that may come up in a home.
This instruction book will help you understand the machine and give you valuable tips to make sewing more fun
for you.
Even if you are an experienced seamstress, you will find this book a valuable guide to easy sewing.
Follow these simple instructions and familiarize yourself with the exclusive features of your machine. You will find sewing
exciting on your easy-to-operate Pfaff 72.
If you have any sewing problems, please contact your Plaff dealer. He will be glad to help you at any time.
G. M. PFAFF AG
Karlsruhe-Durlach Branch
DR 849
1 Face cover
2 Take-UP lever
3 Thread retainer
4 Spool pins
5 Stitch width dial (A)
6 Needle position lever (B)
7 Bobbin winder
8
9
10
ii
12
13
14
15
Balance wheel
Stop motion knob
Motor disengaging mechanism
Bobbin winder thread retainer
Reverse feed control
Stitch length control
Bed slide
Pt aft rotary sewing hook
2
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
Feed dog
Needle plate
Sewing foot thumb screw
Light switch
Needle thread tension
Presser bar lifter
Needle set screw
Sewing foot
DR 050
Fundamentals of Machine Operation
• Whenever you have to turn the balance wheel, turn it toward you (coun
ter- clockwise as shown by black arrow).
• Make sure stop motion knob on the balance wheel is tightened before
you begin sewing.
• Never run a threaded machine unless you have fabric under the sewing
foot.
• Place both threads back under the sewing foot before you put fabric
into the machine.
• The machine will feed the material under the sewing foot automatically.
All you have to do is guide the work.
• Always bring take-up lever to its highest position before you begin and
after you have completed a seam.
Failure to observe this rule may cause the thread to slip out of the
needle eye. Also, it is easier to remove the work with the take-up
lever up.
3
DRO51
DR 506
Operation of Your Sewing Machine
I Engaging the Sewing Mechanism
Hold balance wheel and turn stop motion knob clockwise.
Disengaging the Sewing Mechanism
Hold balance wheel and turn stop motion knob counter-clockwise (toward
you). The sewing mechanism is then disengaged for bobbin winding.
Electrical Information
IL
Power Drive and Sewlight
Push plug 1 into receptacle 2 on back of machine, and plug 3 at other end
of cord into the wall outlet. Cord 4 leads to the foot control.
Foot-driven machines
have merely a sewlight cord whose plug is pushed into the wall outlet. The
switch on the sewlight, push botton on face cover. Mount driving belt.
Before you drop the machine, remove the belt from the stand wheel, pulling
it to the right.
DR 561
4
DR 558
Motor Disengaging Mechanism
Powerdriven machines feature a lever underneath the balance wheel which
serves to swing the motor to its operative position. To do this, flick the lever
down. After you have completed sewing, flick the lever to its top position
in order to return the motor to the inoperative position.
With the motor swung out of engagement, all machines set up on treadle
stands can be driven by foot power.
Foot Control
4
Place the foot control under the cabinet within easy reach of your foot.
Rest the right foot on the control pedal and press. The harder you press,
the faster the machine will run.
On some sewing cabinets, the foot control cord can be passed through
the opening in the bedplate extension.
R 7132
5
DR 851
Straight Stitching
For straight-stitch sewing set:
Dial A
Lever B
=
=
0
Center
•
Control G regulates the stitch length. For detailed instructions please refer
to page 18. To backtack the end of a seam, simply depress the finger-tip
control.
DR 009A
6
DR 851
Zigzag Sewing
If you want to switch from straight (A on O”) to zigzag stitching, turn
dial A to desired stitch width (indicated by numbers 1 to 4).
Lever B changes the position of the needle in the needle plate slot. Thus
the stitching can be moved from the center to the left or right of the slot,
as desired.
The position of lever B (left, center, right)
indicates the position of the needle in
the needle plate slot.
Control G lengthens zig
zag stitches or packs them
more closely together (so
tin stitch).
4-
III—
-4
V 41
7
Removing the Bobbin Case
The needle has to clear the needle-plate. Lift front end of bed slide and
pull.
Lift latch k with the thumb of your left hand and pull out bobbin case with
bobbin. When you release the latch, the bobbin drops out.
8
1
DR 859
Winding the Bobbin
Disengage the sewing mechanism and raise the spool
pins to the vertical position.
Place a spool of thread on one of the spooi pins and
a bobbin on the bobbin winder spindle, making sure
that the key at its base enters the slot in the bobbin.
Pass the thread through the righthand thread guide,
down and around the thread retainer stud, and up to
the bobbin. Wind a few turns of thread on the bobbin
in clockwise direction. Push the bobbin to the right
and start the machine. The bobbin winder will stop
automatically when the bobbin is full. Press the bobbin to the left and
remove it from the spindle. Then tighten the stop motion knob again.
The amount of thread to be wound on the bobbin is regulated by turning
the adjusting button accordingly. Set the button at position A for the mim
mum amount of thread, or at position B for the maximum. The button can
be turned to the desired position after loosening its set screw with a
screwdriver.
9
A
B
Hercerize
Cotton
Silk
Fine Fabrics
80
0
such as georgette, chiffon,
batiste, voile, lawn, silk.
to
100
twist
Lightweight Fabrics
such as dress silks and cottons,
sheer woolens, shirting, draperies.
70
to
80
A&B
twist
80
50
to
70
&
twis
90
40
to
50
c&D
100
.
Types of Fabrics
Medium Fabrics
such as lightweight woolens,
madras, muslin, brocades,
heavy silks and rayon,
gabardine.
Heavy Fabrics
such as coating, denim, corduroy, slipcover fabrics, bed
tickings, lightweight canvas.
Very Heavy Fabrics
such as heavy tickings, canvas,
overcoating, sailcloth, upholstery
Synthetics, Rayon, Acetate
including nylon, orion, dacron,
plastics, etc.
24
to
40
.
Needle
Size
Recommended Needle
and Thread Sizes
60
or
70
The appearance of the finished seam is dependent
on the correct relationship between needle, thread
and fabric. Select the proper thread sizes and needles
from this chart.
The same size threads should be used in the needle
and on the bobbin. Some experienced seamstresses
prefer a somewhat thinner bobbin thread. However,
the bobbin thread never should be thicker than the
needle thread.
twist
E
twist
Determined by
weight of fabric
40 to 50
For embroidery and darning work, a No. 50 thread
should normally be used.
90
to
110
Determined
threal size
60 to 80
12
Important Facts about Needles
On Pfaff 72 sewing machines, System 130 R, flat-shank needles are used
for all ordinary sewing and embroidery work. The last column in the chart
on page 12 gives you the needle size required for the material in hand
Genuine Pfaff needles, System 130 Fl, are available from every Pfaff dealer.
Bent or blunt needles should not be used.
Changing the Needle
Bring needle bar to its highest point and lower sewing foot.
Loosen needle set screw a half a turn and pull old needle out of needle
clamp. Make sure that the flat side of the shank faces toward the back
and long groove toward you. Insert new needle into opening of needle
clamp and push it up as far as it will go. Tighten needle set screw a.
13
Upper Threading
Raise the presser bar lifter and swing the spool pins up to the vertical position. Place spool 1 on one of the spool pins and
lead the thread behind both scrolls of thread retainer 2 (see ill. at top of p. 15). Seize the thread on the right and left of
the thread retainer and pull it toward you until it snaps into the eyelets. It suffices to drew the thread into the left eyelet.
Pull the thread between any two of tension discs 3 (see ill, at bottom of p. 15) and jerk it far to the right so that it slips
properly into the slot and under the thread check spring. As you do this, press the thread against the casting between
spool and tension.
Bring take-up lever 4 as high as it will go and pass the thread from right to left through the hole at its end. Lead the
thread down and into slot S. Then thread the needle from front to back.
14
St
/
/
9c iQ
Correct Tension Regu’ation
Balanced tensions are essential far sewing. If your tensicn is correct, you
will have perfect seams as sketched below (Ill).
Sketch I
fabric.
Caus e :
—
The threads interlock on the underside of the
Upper tension too loose or lower tension too tight.
Sketch II —The threads interlock on the surface of the
fabric.
Cause
Upper tension too tight or lower tension too loose.
DR 046
A
Drawing Up the Bobbin
Thread
I
Hold needle thread lightly in your left
hand. Turn balance wheel toward you
until the needle moves once down and
up again. Lightly pull needle thread to
draw bobbin thread up through the
needle hole. Place both threads back
under the sewing foot.
II
III
16
Regulating the Thread Tension
DR 580
The bobbin thread tension has been set for a medium grade and need not
be adjusted for all ordinary sewing operations. If a special sewing operation
should require a looser or tighter tension, turn the small knurled screw on
the bobbin case with the tip of your thumb as follows:
Turn it left
Turn it right
W’\
for looser tension.
for tighter tension.
Determine whether the bobbin thread tension is set for a medium grade
by holding the thread end between thumb and forefinger and letting the
bobbin case hang freely. The tension should be strong enough to keep
the bobbin case from being pulled down by its own weight. However, as
you jerk your hand slightly, the bobbin case should gradually slide down.
Do not turn the knurled screw too far to the left to keep it from falling out.
Choose the lower tension slightly stronger when doing ornamental stitching
to be sure you always have a nead satin stitch on the right side of the
fabric.
V
A
The final stitch appearance can be regulated by the
upper tension dial, as follows:
Turn left
y
Turn right
for looser tension.
for tighter tension.
The upper tension is so designed that all grades of
tension
loose to tight
can be covered with one
complete turn of the tension dial. The numbers on the
tension dial indicate different degrees of tension. The
higher the number, the greater the tension. Oniy in
very rare cases will it be necessary to reset the ten
sion. For ordinary sewing, the upper tension should
be set between 3 and 5.
Your upper tension has a third tension disc for twoneedle work.
—
I
R8029
17
—
DR 008
Stitch Length Regulation
The stitch length control serves to regulate the stitch length and to limit
it in sewing backwards.
The numbers on the control indicate the stitch length (the higher the num
ber, the longer the stitch). When the control is set on “0” the machine
ceases feeding. The maximum stitch length is six stitches to the inch.
To regulate the stitch length, turn the control until the number indicating
the desired stitch length is opposite the mark on the left edge of the slot.
(The position of the mark is indicated by an arrow in the illustration).
I
Reverse Sewing
To sew in reverse, simply press the finger-tip control down. When the
control is released, the machine resumes forward sewing.
and
This feature is ideal for backtacking the beginning or end of a seam
for darning rips.
18
DR 009
DR 866
it T
Changing the Sewing Foot
Lift both needle and presser bar to their highest positions and turn sewing
foot thumb screw b to the left. Tilt the foot sideways and pull it down.
Ii
Reverse procedure to slip on new foot and tighten screw b securely.
DR 867
19
DR 855
Dropping the Machine Feed
Remove the bed cover and press the drop feed lever down slantwise, then
to the rear and up (as indicated by the white arrow). The lever will be
retained in this position and the fabric will cease feeding.
The machine feed is dropped for darning, hoop embroidery and button
sewing.
To raise the machine feed, press the lever down and let it return to its
original position.
Darning and Embroidery Foot
Remove the sewing foot. Attach darning foot No. 93-102 826-91 from the
rear. Hold spring clip c so that it is behind the needle set screw, and
tighten screw b.
20
DR854
DR 853
All-Purpose Sewing Foot
(with Clear-View Shoe)
All-purpose sewing foot No. 93-100 179-00 is attached as instructed
on
page 19.
The transparency of its shoe facilitates all sewing operation where
it is
important to watch the needle penetrate the fabric.
Special application possibilities are discussed in the second part
of this
book under the heading Using Sewing Feet and Attachments.
21
Care and Maintenance
Longevity and smooth machine performance are dependent on regular and proper cleaning
and oiling.
Use Pfaff sewing machine oil only, Never lubricate machine with animal or vegetable oils.
All moving and rotating parts require regular lubrication. Begin under the bedplate. If you
have a portable machine, tilt it back, loosen the large thumb screw on the underside cf the
machine base, and remove the base.
In replacing the machine base, tighten thumb screw
lightly.
DR 053
A
From time to time, lubricate the needle bar
frame bearings in the sewing head.
Removing the face cover see page 24.
The principal oiling points are marked by ar
rows in the illustrations on these pages.
DR 852
22
DR 886
4 There are two openings in the rim of the stitch
width dial, one on the left and the other at the
oil
back (see arrows). These openings are the
holes of the zigzag mechanism.
DR A 864
Do not lubricate the bobbin winder.
important oiling point. Put
The raceway in the sewing hook is the most
you sew (see picture at top
one drop of oil into the raceway each day
right).
and clean the machine feed
From time to time, remove the needle plate
accumulations of packed
with a soft brush. Take a toothpick and remove
clean the vicinity of the
and
bobbin
the
and
lint. Take out the bobbin case
sewing hook.
the bedplate and at the
Before you begin to oil the mechanism under
and lint which has accumu
needle-bar end of the machine, remove the dirt
lated on these parts.
23
DR 887
DR024
Changing the Light Bulb
The built-in 15-watt sewing light illuminates the area of stitchin perfect
g
ly.
To change the light bulb, remove the face cover, push the bulb
into its
socket, turn left, and pull out. When inserting new light bulb,
be sure to
slide bulb pins into socket slots. Press bulb in and turn right.
V
Removing the Face Cover
To change the light bulb or oil the parts
at the needle-bar end, remove the face
cover by pulling it upwards.
Replacing the Face Cover
Slip tip d into slot e and push face cover
4 up until it snaps into place.
DR
512
24
DR 5C5
Trouble Shooting
1. Machine Skips Stitches
Cause:
Remedy:
Needle incorrectly inserted.
Push needle up as far as it will go and be sure that the long groove
faces toward you, and flat side of shank away from you.
Wrong needle.
Choose the correct needle from chart on page 12. (For ordinary sewing,
use System 130 R needles.)
Needle bent,
Insert new needle.
Machine threaded improperly.
Check and correct threading as instructed on pages 14 and 15.
Needle too fine or too thick for the thread.
Use correct needle and thread (see chart an page 12.)
2. Needle Thread Breaks
Cause:
Remedy:
The above mentioned may cause thread
breakage.
See remedies listed under 1. above.
Thread tension too tight.
Adjust tensions as instructed.
Poor or knotty thread used.
Use good quality threads only.
Hook raceway is jammed with thread or
needs oiling.
Clean and oil hook raceway.
Burrs or sharp edges on needle plate slot.
Polish needle plate slot with fine emery cloth.
25
3. Needle Breaks
Cause
Remedy:
Bent needle strikes point of sewing hook.
Needle too thin or thread too heavy.
Replace needle at once to prevent further damage.
Use correct needle and thread sizes.
Fabric pulls needle so it bends and
strikes needle plate.
Don’t force the feeding motion. Guide the material lightly.
Bobbin case inserted incorrectly.
Push bobbin case until you hear it snap into place.
4. Faulty Stitch Formation
Cause:
Remedy:
Improper tension.
Adjust tensions as instructed.
Thread too heavy, knotty or hard.
Use only first-rate thread
Bobbin unevenly wound.
Pieces of thread between tension discs.
the correct size for the needle and fabric.
Don’t run thread over finger when winding the bobbin
(see page 9.)
Raise presser bar lifter and remove thread.
—
5. Machine Feeds Improperly
Cause:
Feed dog dropped.
Remedy:
Raise feed dog (see page 20).
Machine does not feed because stitch length
control set on “0”.
Regulate stitch length, as desired.
Accumulations of lint packed between
feed teeth.
Take off needle plate and remove lint with a stiff brush.
26
6. Machine Works Heavily
Cause:
Remedy:
Hook raceway lacks oil or is obstructed by
pieces of thread.
Clean and oil hook raceway.
Mechanism clogged by inferior oil.
Bobbin winder working while sewing.
Use only Pfaff sewing machine oil
Stop bobbin winder.
—
never salad oil or glycerine.
7. Motor idles
Cause:
Remedy:
Motor disengaging lever raised.
Flick lever down (see page 5).
Thread Jamming
The Pfaff rotary hook will not normally jam, even if the machine should be handled improperly. If thread should happen
to jam in the hook raceway, the power of the motor in most instances will be sufficient to overcome hard working of
the mechanism.
If this action should not free the jammed thread put a drop of kerosene into the hook raceway, jerk the balance wheel
back, then rock it back and forth.
27
Using Sewing Feet and Attachments
I
(setting see page 6)
DR 868
Edge Stitching
Zipper Insertion
8
Machine Setting: A
=
Machine Setting: A
0, B
Pin or baste closed zipper on wrong
side of fabric. Position of zipper depends
on whether or not you want the edge of
the fabric to overlap the zipper. Turn
fabric to right side. Run a straight seam
close to left edge of zipper, stitch across
end and up the other side in one conti
nuous operation. Use right edge of foot
as a guide.
0 to 4, B
=
Sew parallel rows of straight or zig
zag stitches at various distances from
the fabric edge by using adjustable
seam guide No. 847 300 and the edge
stitcher (without quilting gauge). The
seam guide is fastened to the machine
bed with the long thumb screw. For
wider marginal stitching, turn edge
guide half a turn and use low end as
a guide. (To sew narrow parallel
seams, guide fabric edge or prece
ding seam along right edge of sew
ing foot, using no edge guide.)
‘V
Quilting
Machine Setting: A
0, B
=
i
Edge stitcher No. 847 600 used with
the quilting gauge sews parallel rows
of stitching at any distance over the
entire surface of the fabric. Always
guide the gauge finger along the pre
ceding row of stitches.
Attractive tea cosies, slippers, seat
pads and covers can be quilted.
28
R 002
DR 033
47 561
Flat Felled Seams
Machine Setting: A
=
0, B
=
*
Flat felled seams are used to durably join two pieces of fabric. They are
made in two operations.
Flat felled seams usually are straight-stitched. Narrow zigzag stitches are
used for felling on elasticized fabrics only.
I First Seam
DR 869
Lay pieces together with the right sides facing and the bottom piece
protruding V8 inch. Feed both pieces into felling foot, as illustrated, so that
the bottom fabric is folded over edge of top piece and stitched down.
Make sure that protruding
seam allowance is not fol
ded twice,
Second Seam
Open the two pieces, place them under the needle right side up, insert seam
ridge into felling foot opening, and stitch down to the left. Make sure that
second seam is placed close to the edge but not beyond it. The felling foot
has a needle slot, rather than a needle hole, to permit zigzag felling.
29
DR 049
847 551
Hemming
40 or 2 to 3; B
Machine Setting: A
The hemmer foot is indispensable if you want to sew a uniform hem.
You can hem with straight or zigzag stitches, depending on the type of
fabric you are using.
/a” to facilitate insertion into the hemmer
Fold over edge of fabric about 1
foot. Place fabric under hemmer foot so that the needle stitches in the
material about 1/2” short of its rear edge and close to the folded edge.
Sew backwards as far as the rear fabric edge. Take the work out of the
machine by pulling it forward. Don’t trim the threads (sketch 1).
Draw the fabric into the scroll of the hemmer by pulling both threads back
wards. Inserting the fabric into the scroll like this will ensure a neat hem
right from the beginning. Feed fabric so that the hem edge is in line with
the left edge of the hemmer scroll. Don’t crowd fabric into the scroll, but
keep scroll well filled with fabric at all times (see ill, at top).
DR
870
Avoid ugly ends by slowing down feeding. To do this, press the fabric
against the needle plate on the left side of the foot before you come to
the end of the hem (see ill. at bottom).
If you want to hem several edges, hem first edge to within about 1/2” of
corner, cut away remaining portion of hem, as shown in sketch 2. Then
hem the second edge, as instructed above.
Before you hem the last edge, cut away about 1/3” of the hem sewn first,
as illustrated in sketch 3.
2fl
DR 509
30
u
838 954
Overcasting Edges
Machine Setting: A
=
2 to 4; B
=
4
4 Overcasting prevents frayed edges. Use a long wide zigzag stitch and sew edge
with the needle taking one stitch into the fabric and the other over its edge
(normal tension setting). You may overcas edges after fabric is cut and before
the pieces are joined.
DR 872
u
838 954
Butt Seaming
Machine Setting: A
=
3 or 4, B
=
Two similar pieces of fabric which do not ravel easily may be butted together
and joined with zigzag stitches. Worn bed sheets may be mended this way. Cut
out worn center strip. Place the selvaged edges of the remaining pieces of sheet
under the sewing foot so that the abutted edges are centered under the needle.
loin them with close, wide zigzag stitches to obtain a neat and flat seam. Hem
raw edges of sheet.
31
DR 046
DR 055
I
_e38954
R 7157
Inserting Patches
Machine Setting: A
=
4
B
Large holes can be patched quickly. The following method may particularly
be used for jersey fabrics. Cut patch square or rectangular so that the
grain will match the rest of the fabric. Place the patch over the damaged
I area. Sew it down with a wide zigzag stitch of medium length.
I For additional strength stitch over corners twice. Turn over and trim close
to seams.
V
u
838 954
Attaching Lace
Machine Setting: A
=
2
B
I You can attach lace edging in one simple operation. Fold the edge of the
fabric about /8” over to the wrong side, following the texture, and pre
ferably iron it down. Place the straight edge of the lace on the fold of the
fabric and sew it down with narrow zigzag stitches, taking one stitch into
lace and fabric and the other into lace only. Cut off excessive cloth on
the wrong side of the material close to the seam.
DR 871
32
DF 033
338 954
Applique Work
-
,—.
—
Machine Setting: A
=
Applique is very effective on buster suits,
pinafores, bibs, frocks, covers, wall hang
ings, or wherever a gay note is desired.
2, B
Applique is easy and modern.
Trace design on wrong side of fabric and baste
a piece of contrasting material o right side.
Outline design on wrong side with a narrow
zigzag stitch
and the motive will appear on
right side.
Fill out small, but essential sections of
design with granito stitches.
—
V
Trim excess material close to the seam and
sew over edges of applique with a mediumwide
satin stitch. If you want to give the design a
plastic effect, use buttonhole foot Nr. 847 616
or all-purpose sewing foot, flick lever B to the
left and setinstitch over a filler thread (see also
page 36).
R 7220
DR 001
838 954
Straight-Stitch Hemstitching
Machine Seing: A
=
0; B
=
+
Stitch length: Medium
4 Insert twin hemstitching needle, System 130 ZwiHo, as instructed on
page 13. Turn out needle set screw a little further than for ordinary
needles.
The thread size, threading procedure and thread tension are the same as
for cording work (see page 41).
Beautiful hemstitching effects on blouses, dresses, handkerchiefs, doilies
and so forth, can be obtained with Pfaffs System 130 twin needle. The
harder the fabric yarn, the more pronounced the hemstitching will be.
For this reason, batiste, organdy, georgette, etc. are best suited to hem
stitching, while woolly fabrics are not recommended.
::
Procedure
Fold fabric to mark seamline or trace seamline on fabric. Sew first row.
Guide fabric so that wing needle stitches along traced line. At the end of
the seam, turn fabric half a turn and sew second row. Guide fabric in
such a way that wing needle penetrates the needle holes it has made and
enlarged previously.
Imitation hemstitching thus requires at least two operations. If desired,
additional straight or curved ornamental seams may be stitched parallel to
the first one. Exciting decorative effects may be obtained by using vari
colored embroidery and darning threads.
Zigzag Hemstitching
Machine Setting: A
=
Up to
11/2;
B
=
4
Procedure
Same as above, except that the wing needle should penetrate the traced
line only when it is on the left of its throw.
R 8427
34
93-100179
DR 583
Button Sewing
Dont be afraid to sew on buttons, or rings with your Pfaff. The needle
won’t break and the threads will not get loose either. The latter may happen
only with ready-made clothing sewn with a chain stitch. It won’t be worthwile to take the machine out for sewing on a single button, but you will
appreciate this feature when sewing lines of buttons on pillow and bed
covers, on shirts or dresses, or when fastening rings on curtains etc. There
your machine will come in very handy. Attach all-purpose sewing foot
No. 93-100 179-00. Stitch length = 0.
Hooks and ayes are sewn on with the aid of a special button sewing foot,
No. 847 608, which can be obtained from your Pfaff dealer.
Machine Setting: A
0
B
,
feed dog dropped.
Place button under button sewing foot and align so that needle will enter left hole.
Let needle stitch through hole and make
one or two stitches. Raise needle. Turn dial A counter-clockwise, usually to 3, until
needle on the right of its throw is
centered over right hole. Start machine and sew as many zig zag stitches as you deem
necessary to fasten button securely.
Return dial A to 0 and make two or three tying stitches.
When sewing on four-hole buttons, reposition button and repeat the above process,
stitching through the second pair of
holes.
Hooks, eyes or rings are attached in the same manner.
35
I Sewing Buttonholes
Machine Setting: A = 1 ‘/2 (first notch) B =
Stitch Length: Almost 0 (for buttonhole seam)
Attach buttonhole foot No. 847 616 and set slide on buttonhole gauge, to
buttonhole length desired. The buttonhole is the right length when beginn
ing of first seam reaches red end of slide indicator (see arrow). When
you follow the procedure on the opposite page, the bartacks at each end
of your buttonhole will be twice as wide as a buttonhole seam.
If you prefer more prominent buttonholes, pull a filler cord in the guide
groove. To get the correct stitch length, sew on a piece of scrap material.
In making buttonholes in soft or loosely woven fabrics, it is advisable to
place a piece of tissue paper under the material, To strengthen button
holes in tricot and knit fabrics, insert a piece of firmly woven cotton ma
terial between the fabric layers.
Buttonholes may be made with the aid of the all-purpose
sewing foot. Place the filler cord in the left groove of the
clear-view shoe,
36
Instruction for Buttonholing
1 Sew first side over a filler cord. When beginning of
seam reaches red end of slide indicator on button
hole gauge, it is the right length. Leave needle in
fabric on right side of its throw.
2 Lift foot, turn fabric around clockwise, using needle
as a pivot. Pull filler cord around the needle to the
left and lay it parallel to completed line of stitching.
Lower foot and take one stitch to the left.
3 Turn dial A until it is caught in second notch. Make
4 to 6 bartack stitches, slightly holding the material
to reduce length of bar.
0
p
In
0
Np
©
I
©
Trim filler cord at end of first stitch row.
4 Change dial A to “1
Sew second row and stop about 4 to 6 stitches (h/io”) from end
of first row.
“.
5 Turn dial A to second notch position. Make second tack, as
instructed above (under 3).
6 Turn dial A to “0” and make 3 or 4 fastening stitches.
7 Trim both the sewing and filler threads. Open the buttonhole with
your seam ripper. Be careful not to injure the bartacks.
37
DROS6
DR 057
DR 559
Darrnng
Machine setting: A
0, B
Prepare your machine for darning as instructed on page 20. Place fabric into darning hoop, the damaged area being in the
center of the hoop. Hoops may be obtained from your Pfaff dealer.
Triangular Tears
Triangular tears are best darned by
placing the torn section between
hoops and making close stitches
across and lengthwise. Move work
under the needle with both hands.
Thin Spots
Remember that “a stitch in time sa
ves nine” and reinforce spots that
have worn thin with short stitches
made lengthwise and across worn
section. This job can be done with
out foot too.
Small Holes
Darn small and medium-size holes
by trimming ragged edges with the
fabric grain. First stitch back and forth
across the hole from one side to the
other with the machine running at
high speed. Then turn the fabric at
right angles and sew back and forth
over preceding work with short stit
38
ches. Make sure the stitches are ta
ken right into the good material.
Long Rips
may be darned with the normal sew
ing foot and without hoops. Raise feed
dog and use forward-reverse feed
control.
OR 038
Monogram Embroidery
Machine Setting; A
=
3 to 4, B
=
‘I
I Drop feed dog. Script letters are best for monogram embroidery without
a sewing foot. It requires a little practice. You will soon enjoy creative
embroidery once you have learned to move the material at a uniform rate.
The fabric should be held taut in the hoops and the presser bar lifter
lowered. Let the needle stitch into the fabric at the beginning of your
design and draw bobbin thread up through the fabric. Hold both thread
ends and sew over outline, moving hoops slowly and evenly. To give your
monogram dimensional quality, embroider outline twice. Be sure stitches
are closely spaced.
—
954
—
93-IaQIq
meA
2h,s
to 3, B
=‘
The procedure below is primarily used for block letters. Set needle plate
so that feed dog feeds the material. Attach all-purpose sewing foot and
set machine for satin stitch. Sew outlines of monogram, making sure that
seams do not overlap at joints of letters.
39
DR 031
Cording
Machine Setting: A
=
0
‘
B
To cord on your Pfaff 72, use a cording foot and a twin needle.
Twin needles are available for needle distances of 1.2 (3/64”), 1.6 (1/16”), 1.8, 2.0 (5/64”), 2.5 (3/32”), 3.0, and 4.0 (5/32”)
millimeters.
Cording feet are available in three varieties, as follows:
Pin tucks are made with cording foot No. 847 680 (7 grooves, 3/64” wide each) and a 1 .2-mm twin needle.
For narrow cording use cording foot No. 847 675 (5 grooves, 1/16” wide each; see ill.) and a 1.6-mm twin needle.
Wider cording is made with cording foot No. 847 671 (3 grooves, 5/64” wide each) and a twin needle with a needle distance
of 2.0 or 2,5 millimeters.
Cording feet and twin needles, System 13, are supplied on special request and at extra cost.
‘II
Changing the N ee dIe and the Sewing Foot
Bring take-up lever to highest point, loosen needle set screw a, and pull
ordinary needle out of needle clamp. Insert twin needle into opening of
needle clamp and push it up as far as it will go. Make sure that the flat
side of the shank faces toward the back. Tighten needle set screw a
securely.
DR 865
40
foot and tighten screw b securely.
Turn sewing foot thumb screw b to the left and take out the sewing foot. Slip on cording
with the guide attached.
It is best to turn out screw b completely if you want to slip on a cording foot
Thread Size
with sewing silk in the needle
Pin tucks and narrow cording are made with a No. 50 embroidery thread, wider cording
and on the bobbin.
Set the machine for a medium stitch length.
Upper Threading
through both thread retainer openings
Place a spool of thread on each of the two spool pins. Pass both thread ends
discs, and the other between the
tension
center
and
rear
the
between
thread
2, as illustrated on page 15. Lead one
position and pass both threads
highest
its
to
4
lever
Raise
takeup
center and front tension discs of upper tension 3.
back.
through the hole at its end, Pull threads into slot 5, and thread each needle from front to
threads in your left hand.
The bobbin thread is drawn up as instructed on page 16. To do this, hold both needle
Thread Tension
Slightly increase the bobbin thread tension, and increase or decrease the
needle thread tension depending on the type of fabric used. If the tension
has been set correctly, the bobbin thread should appear as a faint zigzag
line on the other side.
Filled Cording
If you want to make cording in filmy fabrics or render your cording more
prominent, Plaff recommends that you insert a filler cord. Its thickness
depends on the cording size you want.
Remove the bed slide and pass the filler cord from below through hole g
located in front of the oval needle hole f (see ill, on page 40). Lay the end
of the filler cord back under the cording foot (together with the needle
and bobbin thread ends). Pull a filler cord forward under the bed slide
and place the ball in your lap.
41
DR 521
DR 058
Spacing between Tucks
To ensure uniform spacing between parallel tucks, place the preceding
seam into one of the grooves of the foot and use it as a guide.
For a larger spacing between tucks, use the adjustable guide (see ill, on
page 41) which is part of every cording foot.
Various Cording Effects
Attractive cording effects may be obtained by combining horizontal, vertica’
and diagonal tucks or stitching curved tucks (see ill. below). If you want to
turn a corner, leave needle in fabric (up to needle eye only), lift foot, turn
fabric, lower foot, and continue sewing. To stitch an acute angle, turn
fabric halfway, let needle make one stitch, turn fabric all the way, and
resume stitching.
DR 473
OR 475
DR 474
42
OR 058 A
DR 059
L
-—
Ornamental Sewing
ting straight and
You can make exciting fashion stitch designs by alterna
position by
needle
or
width
stitch
length,
zigzag stitching, varying stitch
e. Some of the
practic
ent
suffici
had
have
you
after
easy
be
will
hand. This
designs you can make are illustrated below.
zigzag sewing foot
For ornamental sewing, use all-purpose sewing foot or
No. 838 954.
L
1.6-mm twin
Interesting two-needle effects can be obtained by using a
sewing,
eedle
twin-n
For
thread.
nt
color
differe
needle (see page 40) and
1/2”.
the stitch width dial should not be turned beyond “1
43
DR 858
-
OR 545
93-100179
Coarse Thread Embroidery
0 to 4; needle
Machine Setting: Stitch width lever A
small
to medium.
length:
stitch
optional;
=
B
lever
position
Buy coarse, four-ply embroidery thread in the desired co
lors from your Pfaff dealer. Embroidery designs made
with this thread are very attractive. They have dimensional
quality and closely resemble manual embroidery work
The adjoining designs were made with the zigzag stitch. To
make the design illustrated in the middle, alternate straight
and zigzag stitching.
Machine embroidery is made with the machine running at a
moderate speed.
44
38954
8H
Stitching Synthetic Materials
Curtains
Machine Setting: Stitch width lever A
1.
stitch length control
=
1 to 3, depending on material; needle position lever B
=
the upper
, use a matching synthetic thread. If necessary, ease
To finish the edge of synthetic curtain fabrics, such as Diolen
and lower tensions somewhat.
y. To butt
shrinking of both the thread and the fabric in the laundr
Both these hints should be adhered to in order to avoid
ted on p. 31.
seam the various sections of curtains, proceed as instruc
Plastic Sheets
Machine Setting: Stitch width lever A
=
0 to 2; needle position lever B
=
‘0 stitch length: medium.
needle. Place
are sewn with synthetic thread or cotton and a fine
Plastic curtains, as are used in kitchens and bathrooms,
sheets
plastic
t
preven
To
.
sewing
which can be easily removed after the
a piece of tissue paper under sticky plastic sheets
oily cloth.
from sticking to the sewing foot, wipe its sole with an
45
Contents
Foreword
Essential Parts
Fundamentals of Machine Operation
Operation of Your Sewing Machine
Engaging the Sewing Mechanism
Power and Foot Drive
Motor Disengaging Mechanism
Foot Control
Straight Stitching
Zigzag Sewing
Removing the Bobbin Case
Winding the Bobbin
Inserting a Full Bobbin into Bobbin Case
Inserting the Bobbin Case
Recommended Needle and Thread Sizes
Important Facts about Needles
Changing the Needle
Upper Threading
Correct Tension Regulation
Drawing Up the Bobbin Thread
Regulating the Thread Tension
Stitch Length Regulation
Reverse Sewing
Changing the Sewing Foot
Dropping the Machine Feed
Darning foot
All-purpose Sewing Foot
Page
Page
1
2
3
•
.
Care and Maintenance
Cleaning and Oiling
Removing and Replacing the Face Cover
Changing the Ligth Bulb
Trouble Shooting
4
4
5
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
•
.
•
•
•
•
•
.
•
.
.
22
24
24
25
Using Sewing Feet and Attachments
Zipper Insertion
Edge Stitching
Quilting
Flat Felled Seams
Hemming
Overcasting Edges
Butt Seaming
Inserting Patches
Attaching Lace
Applique Work
Straight-Stitch Hemstitching
Zigzag Hemstitching
Button Sewing
Sewing Buttonholes
Darning
Monogram Embroidery
Sewing Monograms
Cording
Ornamental Sewing
Course Thread Embroidery
Stitching Synthetic Materials
.
.
.
17
18
18
19
20
20
21
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28
28
29
30
31
31
32
32
33
34
34
35
36
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