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
SLOW-COOKER
Leave It
Then Eat It
Slow Cooked Island Recipes
Cooperative Extension Service
University of Hawaii at Manoa
College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources
Department of Family and Consumer Sciences
Department of Human Nutrition, Food & Animal Science
Food Stamps Nutrition Education Program
Hawaii Child Care Nutrition Program
Hawaii Foods for Wellness
Nutrition Service for Older Adults
V.2
2014
The Nutrition Education for Wellness Program staff and student assistants
have developed and compiled the “Leave It Then Eat It” recipes for use in
an electric slow cooker. Each recipe has been tested and retested by NEW
staff a minimum of four times by four different people and then field tested
amongst family, friends, and colleagues. Assorted brands of slow cookers
were utilized in recipe development and also varied in capacity from four to
five quarts. Each recipe notates a recommended slow cooker size. Recipe
analyses were conducted by three NEW Program staff to ensure accuracy
of the nutrition label.
Although such scrupulous measures were taken in the development of the
“Leave It Then Eat It” recipes, there are still existing variations between
each slow cooker in its cooking time and temperature. Recipes may need
to be adjusted based on your slow cooker size.
Table of Contents
PAGE
Table of Contents
i-iii
Acknowledgments
1
Introduction
2
Important Safety Precautions
3
Hints and Tips
7
Recipes
Soups and Stews
Chicken Long Rice
11
Cream of Mushroom Stew
12
Curry
13
Jook
14
Kim Chee Soup
15
Lau Lau Stew
16
Local Stew
17
Portuguese Bean Soup
18
Vegetable Beef Soup
19
Pulled Meats
Kalua Pig and Cabbage
21
Pulled Kalbi Beef
22
Pulled Oyster Chicken
23
Pulled Pork Adobo
24
i
PAGE
Miscellaneous
Confetti Rice
26
Poultry Stuffing
27
Taro
28
Healthy Eating for Wellness – Food and Nutrition
Information Resources
A Food Guide
Build A Healthy Plate
30
Whole Foods, Water, Moderation, Variety, Physical Activity
31
Be a Food Detective; Fruits & Veggies – More Matters
32
Food Groups
33
Produce a Plate with Fruits and Veggies
34
Dressing Recipes
35
Safe Food Handling
Keep Food Safe
37
Clean; Separate
38
Cook; Internal Temperatures for Safe Cooking
39
Chill
40
Meal Planning
Daily Planner
42
Save Time; Aim for a Healthy Lifestyle
43
Make Meals Appealing; Variety in Meals
44
Food Groups
45
Recipes
46
Recipe Lists
47
ii
PAGE
Spending Less, Eating Better
A Shopper’s Guide
49
Meal Planning
50
How to Read Food Labels
51
A Shopper’s Guide continued
52
Shopping List
53
Shopping List; Grocery Store Layout
54
Winning Ways in the Kitchen
Cooking Terms and Methods
56
Master Measuring
57
Basic Kitchen Tools
58
Temperatures for Safe Cooking
59
Alphabetical Recipe Index
60
Evaluation
61
iii
Acknowledgments
The University of Hawaii Cooperative Extension Service (UH-CES)
endeavors to “put knowledge to work.” One of UH-CES’ cornerstone
programs is Nutrition Education for Wellness (NEW).
The NEW Program and its staff would like to convey a very special thanks
to those who contributed their valued time and efforts to the “Leave It Then
Eat It” recipe development, testing, tasting, and artwork.
NEW is a statewide program that facilitates consumer foods and nutrition
education in support of Hawaii’s communities, thereby improving their
health and well being. The NEW Program staff and student assistants
have developed, cooked, and taste tested these recipes, conducted
multiple recipe analyses, and collaborated in the compilation of this booklet.
To find out more about NEW, its projects and its resources, please visit the
program web site at: www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/NEW.
1
Introduction
For over thirty years, electric slow cooking has addressed our need for
convenience, taste, and budget consciousness. “Leave It Then Eat It” is
dedicated to those who yearn to relax and enjoy good tasting, homecooked meals with family and friends. Even though we may lead busy
lives, slow cooking allows us to enjoy simmered-in flavors without the need
for constant attention to traditional cooking in the pot. Slow cooked dishes
also benefits to our budgets by allowing us to use less expensive meats
that simmer to tenderness.
Eating delicious meals and foods that are good for our health is important
for all of us. The “Leave It Then Eat It” recipes promotes: (1) lower fat
eating, and with applied menu suggestions, (2) incorporates vegetables
and fruits into each dish. Topics such as safe food handling, budgeting,
menu planning, shopping and cooking skills, as well as other food and
nutrition information, and resources are included for your reference.
Slow cooking is a type of cooking method that involves recipe adaptations.
The recipes contained in this cookbook, which include local favorites, have
been tested several times each and conveniently include their nutrition
facts. For simple, easy to make, slow and simmered flavors with tasty
home-style meals, try these sixteen recipes as a basic starting point. As
you become more familiar with the method of slow cooking, feel free to add
your own creativity to the pot, and adjust the recipes as you see fit.
Sit down to a delicious slow cooked meal with family and friends at least
once a week. Sharing a home-cooked meal is one way of showing that you
care. Sharing is caring!
2
Important Safety Precautions
When using electrical appliances such as your slow cooker, safety
precautions should always be followed to reduce the risk of fire, electric
shock, burns, food poisoning and other dangers. These safety precautions
include the following:
I.
READ INSTRUCTIONS
a. Read all instructions that come with your slow cooker before using
it. The slow cooker is for household use only. Use only for its
intended use and follow its basic directions. Save instructions for
future reference.
b. Follow recipe instructions. Familiarize yourself with the basics of
slow cooking before becoming creative with slow cooker recipes.
II.
BE FOOD SAFE
a. Follow all recommended safe food handling guidelines
(information included on pages 37-40).
b. Cooking Temperatures and Food Safety: Food cooked in a slow
cooker needs to reach and maintain an internal temperature of
165 ºF.
1) Cook with the lid on for the recommended total time. Taking
the lid off causes a loss of heat and temperature of the food
to decrease.
2) Do not use the “warm” setting for more than two hours.
3) If your slow cooker has an automatic timer, do not delay the
starting time for more than two hours. Well-chilled foods can
be held at room temperature for no more than two hours.
c. Frozen foods: Do not use frozen foods unless they are
recommended in the recipe, as they may increase the food safety
risk by increasing the time needed to reach 165ºF. Be aware that
some foods, especially meats that may be in the “danger zone”
(between 40-140ºF) longer than recommended, can become a
food safety hazard.
3
d. Thaw frozen roasts before slow cooking. Another alternative is to
cook the roast on high for the first hour, then reduce to low and
cook as usual. Ingredients need to quickly rise to a safe
temperature so that there is less chance of food contamination.
e. If the ingredients are prepared the night before cooking, place
them in a covered container in the refrigerator. Do not refrigerate
the food directly in the slow cooker. A cold slow cooker with cold
food takes too long to heat and begin cooking. The food may be
in the “danger zone” (between 40-140ºF) longer than is
recommended and can become a food safety risk.
f. Before you use your slow cooker, check if it heats properly. Fill it
two-thirds full with water, cover and cook on high setting for four
hours. Check the temperature with an instant-read thermometer.
It should read 180ºF.
III.
BE CAUTIOUS
a. Close supervision is a must when a slow cooker is used by, with or
near children.
b. Place your slow cooker on a flat, non-flammable surface. Ensure
that the area around your slow cooker is clear and free from clutter
to help prevent accidents from occurring. Do not put the slow
cooker in a place that is unstable, humid, near a fire or any heat
source. A heat resistant pad or trivet is recommended for
countertops not designed to withstand the prolonged heat
generated by a slow cooker.
c. Always turn the switch to OFF before unplugging. Keep your slow
cooker unplugged when: the slow cooker is not in use, before
cleaning, the inner pot is removed, or when the inner pot is empty.
When the food is cooked and ready to serve, turn off the slow
cooker and unplug it from the electrical outlet.
d. Do not touch the hot surfaces of your slow cooker; use its handles
and knobs. When removing the cover or when handling the hot
inner pot, use potholders. Keep in mind that the outer appliance
may also be hot during use.
4
e. To protect against electric shock, do not immerse the outer
cooking appliance in water or any liquid. Do not put any type of
food or liquid into the outer cooking appliance of the slow cooker
without the inner pot in it.
f. Do not use the slow cooker if: the power cord is damaged, after
the appliance malfunctions, or it has been damaged in any way.
To avoid hazards: the slow cooker must be replaced or repaired by
the manufacturer, its service agent, or a similarly qualified person.
Do not alter, tamper, or repair the slow cooker yourself.
g. Use only the attachments and accessories recommended by the
manufacturer.
h. The purpose of the short power cord reduces the risk of becoming
tangled as well as to avoid tripping over a longer cord. Do not let
the cord hang over the edge of the table or counter, or be near any
heated surfaces. Longer detachable power cords or extension
cords are available, but use them with care. The marked electrical
rating of the cord or extension cord should be at least as great as
the electrical rating of the slow cooker cord. The extension cord
should be arranged so that it cannot be pulled, tangled, or tripped
over.
i. Avoid sudden temperature changes: adding cold foods into a
heated inner pot, putting the pot on a cold surface, or adding cold
water to a heated pot. The inner stoneware cooking pot cannot
withstand the shock of sudden temperature changes and may
crack if proper precautions are not taken.
j. After cooking is complete, and the slow cooker is turned off, place
a heat resistant pad on the counter or table before placing the
inner pot on top.
k. Are you concerned about leaving your slow cooker on while you
are away from home? Cook the dish overnight. Then, in the
morning, refrigerate the food in a refrigerator-safe container. At
suppertime, reheat the food by microwave or stovetop. For proper
5
refrigerating techniques, refer to the safe food handling information
on pages 37-40.
IV.
CLEAN PROPERLY
a. Clean all parts of your slow cooker before and after use to avoid
hazards. Make sure that the outer cooking appliance and the
inner pot are clean, both on the inside and outside, as spills and
bits of food may burn during long cooking times.
b. Avoid sudden temperature changes such as pouring cold water
into the hot pot to soak and wash. The stoneware inner cooking
pot cannot withstand the shock of sudden temperature changes
and may crack.
c. Do not use abrasive cleaners or cleaning pads.
6
Hints and Tips
1.
Trim all outer-layer or visible fats: Too much fat can cause overcooking.
2.
Ground Meats
a. Most ground meats (except the very lean) should be browned and
thoroughly drained of fat before cooking in your slow cooker. This
helps the meat maintain a better texture and prevents overcooking.
b. To maintain firmness, meat loaves should be placed on top of
sliced vegetables or on the accessory meat rack.
3.
For even cooking of meat, be sure there is some space between the
pieces to allow the heat to circulate.
4.
Some sturdier vegetables such as carrots and potatoes, may cook
slower than meats so they should be placed at the bottom or along
the sides of the slow cooker. Tender vegetables such as leafy
greens, green onions, etc., could be added for the last 30-60 minutes
of the total cooking time. Recipes may suggest layering the
vegetables in a specific order with the tougher ingredients on the
bottom.
5.
Herbs and spices: Be aware that whole dried herbs and spices may
give out more flavor than their ground forms.
6.
Rice and pasta have variable results in slow cookers: It is often
recommended that rice and pasta be cooked separately from your
slow cooker. Another option is to add the rice or pasta to the slow
cooker towards the end of the total cooking time.
Use whole grain brown rice as an alternative to instant or white rice.
It does not become as mushy as instant or white rice.
7.
Coating meats with flour assists in thickening recipes with broth as it
cooks. You can also thicken your broth by removing the lid and
cooking on high for the last 15-20 minutes to evaporate some of the
liquid.
7
8.
For best results, the slow cooker should be one-half to two-thirds full
when cooking. The duration of cooking indicated on each recipe is
specific to the size of the slow cooker listed. Therefore, recipe
cooking times may need to be adjusted depending on the size of your
slow cooker.
9.
Cooking times: Cooking for 1 hour on high is approximately the same
as 2-2½ hours on low.
10.
Be aware that slow cookers can tip over or the covers may come off
during transportation. Place it in a newspaper or towel-lined
container slightly larger than your slow cooker so it will fit snugly.
This will also aid in insulation. Rubber bands can be used to fasten
the lid to the handles by wrapping them around the knob on the lid
and stretching them over the handles on the side of the slow cooker.
Some models of slow cookers may have lid fasteners built in to avoid
spills.
11.
Certain ingredients should be added toward the end of the cooking
time. These include: milk products, seafood, tender vegetables,
cooked rice and pasta.
12.
For even cooking, cut meats and veggies into equal sizes.
13.
When a slow cooker roast recipe gives a range of cooking times such
as 8-10 hours, roasts will be tender after 8 hours, and will shred after
10 hours.
14.
To make gravy after a slow-cooked roast is done, remove the roast,
and leave the juices in the slow cooker. Make a smooth paste of ¼
cup water at room temperature, and ¼ cup flour. Mix and pour slowly
into the slow cooker while stirring and set on high for about 15
minutes.
15.
Do not peek into your slow cooker by opening the lid. The
temperature will be significantly reduced and the cooking time may
increase by 15-20 minutes each time the lid is opened.
8
16.
When food comes up to cooking temperature in the slow cooker, the
low setting is approximately 200º F and the high setting is
approximately 300º F.
17.
Slow cookers are not meant to be used for reheating cooked foods:
Slow cookers do not warm up fast enough. Reheat foods on the
stovetop or microwave.
18.
Be aware that high humidity and/or high altitude can cause food to
take longer to finish cooking.
9
Soups and
Stews
10
CHICKEN LONG RICE
Slow Cooker Size: 5 quarts
Cooking Time: 7-9 hours on low & 20-25 minutes on high
Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
makes
12 medium green onions, chopped into half-inch
pieces
6-inch piece ginger, peeled and cut into half-inch
pieces
3 medium carrots, peeled and cut into one-inch
pieces
1 small onion, cut into one-inch pieces
2 pounds chicken thighs, bone in, skin removed
3 (14 ½-ounce) cans fat-free chicken broth
8-10 ounces long rice noodles, dehydrated
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon oyster flavored sauce
13
one-cup servings
Variations:
Lean ground meat or
chicken breast may be
used in place of chicken
thighs.
Optional Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
Chinese parsley, chopped
garlic, peeled and crushed
salt and pepper to taste
sesame oil
Directions:
1. Refrigerate chopped green onions and Chinese
parsley (optional) until ready to use.
2. In slow cooker, combine ginger, garlic (optional),
carrots, onion, and chicken; cover with chicken
broth.
3. Cover slow cooker and cook on low for 7-9 hours.
4. During the last 30 minutes of cooking, soak long
rice in warm water for 5 minutes. Remove chicken
bones from slow cooker.
5. Add softened long rice and green onions to slow
cooker and cook on high for 25-30 minutes.
6. Before serving, stir in soy and oyster sauces.
7. Optional: Stir in salt, pepper, sesame oil, and top
with Chinese parsley.
11
Menu Suggestions:
Chicken Long Rice
Brown rice
Fresh, frozen, canned or
dried fruit
CREAM OF MUSHROOM STEW
Slow Cooker Size: 4 quarts
Cooking time: 7-9 hours on low
makes
Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and cut into
two-inch pieces
2 large carrots, peeled and cut into two-inch
pieces
3 celery ribs, chopped into two-inch pieces
1 medium onion, chopped into two-inch pieces
2 pounds boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut
into one-inch cubes
¼ cup water
2 (10 ¾-ounce) cans cream of mushroom soup
Optional Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
garlic, peeled and crushed
frozen or canned chopped green beans, defrosted or drained
canned mushrooms, drained
salt and pepper to taste
Directions:
1. In slow cooker, add potatoes, carrots, celery, onion, chicken, and water. Optional: Add garlic.
2. Optional: Add green beans, canned mushrooms,
salt and pepper to taste.
3. Cover mixture with cream of mushroom soup.
4. Cover slow cooker and cook on low for 7-9 hours.
5. Mix well before serving.
Menu Suggestions:
Cream of Mushroom Stew
Brown Rice
Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
12
10
one-cup servings
Variations:
Chicken breasts or lean pork
may be used in place of
chicken thighs.
Chicken broth may be used
in place of water.
For a thicker stew: Combine
3 tablespoons flour and ¼
cup water. Mix well and stir
into the slow cooker during
the last 30 minutes of cooking.
CURRY
Slow Cooker Size: 5 quarts
Cooking Time: 7-9 hours on low
makes
Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and chopped
into two-inch pieces
3 medium carrots, peeled and chopped into twoinch pieces
3 celery ribs, chopped into two-inch pieces
1 medium onion, chopped into two-inch pieces
2 pounds boneless stew meat, cut into one-inch
cubes
3-4 tablespoons curry powder
2 (14 ½-ounce) cans fat-free chicken broth
Optional Ingredients:
•
•
•
garlic, peeled and crushed
bananas or apples, peeled and chopped
salt and pepper to taste
Directions:
1. In slow cooker, layer potatoes, carrots, celery, onion, and stew meat. Optional: Add garlic, banana or
apple.
2. Sprinkle curry powder over meat.
3. Cover mixture with chicken broth.
4. Cover slow cooker and cook on low for 7-9 hours.
5. Optional: During the last 30 minutes of cooking add
flour-water mixture to curry and stir well. Cover and
cook on low for 30 minutes.
6. Optional: Add salt and pepper to taste.
7. Mix well before serving.
Menu Suggestions:
Curry
Brown rice
Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
13
15
one-cup servings
Variations:
Lean ground meat or
chicken cubes may be
used in place of beef
cubes.
Beef or vegetable broth
may be used in place of
chicken broth.
For a thicker curry: Combine 3 tablespoons flour
with ¼ cup water; mix well.
Stir into the curry during the
last 30 minutes of cooking.
JOOK
Slow Cooker Size: 5 quarts
Cooking Time: 7-9 hours on low
Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1 medium won bok cabbage, chopped into bitesized pieces
12 medium green onions, chopped into one-inch
pieces
6-inch piece ginger, chopped into one-inch pieces
2 medium carrots, chopped into half-inch pieces
1 cup uncooked white rice, rinsed (standard cup
measure)
1 cup uncooked brown rice, rinsed (standard cup
measure)
1 pound boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut
into one-inch cubes
4 (14 ½-ounce) cans fat-free chicken broth
1 tablespoon oyster flavored sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
Optional Ingredients:
•
•
Chinese parsley, chopped
sesame oil
Directions:
1. Refrigerate chopped won bok cabbage, green onions, and Chinese parsley (optional) until ready to
use.
2. In slow cooker, combine ginger, carrots, white and
brown rice, chicken, and cover with chicken broth.
3. Cover slow cooker and cook on low for 7-9 hours.
4. During the last 1 hour of cooking, open slow cooker
and mix in won bok cabbage and green onions.
Cover and cook for 1 hour.
5. Add oyster sauce, soy sauce, Chinese parsley
(optional) and sesame oil (optional) before serving.
Menu Suggestions:
Jook
Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
14
makes
11
one-cup servings
Variations:
Lean ground meat, chicken
breast, ham, or leftover
meats may be used in place
of chicken thighs.
KIM CHEE SOUP
Slow Cooker Size: 5 quarts
Cooking Time: 7-9 hours on low
Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
makes
½ small head cabbage, chopped into one-inch
pieces
5 medium green onions, chopped into half-inch
pieces
1 (10-ounce) bag bean sprouts, rinsed
12 ounces hot kim chee
1 (14-ounce) block firm tofu, drained and cut into
one-inch cubes
2 (6 ½-ounce) cans mushroom pieces, drained
1 pound lean boneless pork, cut into one-inch
cubes
3 (14 ½-ounce) cans fat-free chicken broth
Optional Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
garlic, peeled and crushed
ginger, peeled and crushed
chili pepper flakes
ko cho jung sauce
Directions:
1. Refrigerate chopped cabbage, green onions, and
bean sprouts until ready to use.
2. In slow cooker, combine kim chee (cabbage and
liquid), tofu, mushrooms, pork, and chicken broth.
Optional: Add chili pepper flakes, garlic, and ginger.
3. Cover slow cooker and cook on low for 7-9 hours.
4. During the last 15 minutes, open slow cooker and
mix in cabbage, green onions, and bean sprouts.
Cover and cook for 15 minutes.
5. Optional: Stir in ko cho jung or Asian hot sauce
sauce before serving.
Menu Suggestions:
Kim Chee Soup
Brown rice
Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
15
13
one-cup servings
Variations:
Lean ground pork or chicken
may be used in place of
lean boneless pork.
LAU LAU STEW
Slow Cooker Size: 4 quarts
Cooking Time: 7-9 hours on low
Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
•
makes
5-6 large ti leaves, washed and ribs removed
2 (24-ounce) packages cooked, frozen luau
leaves
2 large sweet potatoes or yams, cleaned and
cut into two-inch pieces
1 pound lean pork roast, trimmed and cut into
two-inch pieces
2 teaspoons rock salt
Optional Ingredients:
•
coconut extract to taste.
Directions:
1. Line the bottom and sides of the slow cooker
using 3 ti leaves.
2. In slow cooker, layer 1 package of luau leaves,
sweet potatoes or yams, pork, and remaining
package of luau leaves.
3. Cover ingredients with remaining ti leaves.
4. Cover slow cooker and cook on low for 7-9
hours.
5. When ready to serve, sprinkle with rock salt and
mix lightly.
6. Optional: Stir in the coconut extract.
Menu Suggestions:
Lau Lau Stew
Brown rice
Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
16
10
one-cup servings
LOCAL STEW
Slow Cooker Size: 5 quarts
Cooking Time: 7-9 hours on low
Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
makes
2 medium russet potatoes, peeled and cut into
two-inch pieces
2 large carrots, peeled and cut into two-inch
pieces
3 celery ribs, cut into two-inch pieces
1 medium onion, cut into two-inch pieces
2 pounds stew meat, cut into one-inch cubes
1 (14 ½-ounce) can fat-free chicken broth
1 (14 ½-ounce) can stewed tomatoes
Optional Ingredients:
•
•
•
bay leaf
garlic, peeled and crushed
salt and pepper to taste
Directions:
1. In slow cooker, add potatoes, carrots, celery, onion, stew meat, and chicken broth. Optional: Add
bay leaf and garlic.
2. Cover mixture with stewed tomatoes.
3. Cover slow cooker and cook on low for 7-9 hours.
4. Optional: During the last 30 minutes of cooking,
add flour-water mixture to local stew and stir well.
Cover and cook for remaining 30 minutes.
5. Optional: Add salt and pepper to taste.
6. Mix well before serving.
Menu Suggestions:
Local Stew
Whole wheat bread or brown rice
Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
17
12
one-cup servings
Variations:
Chicken, pork, or lean
ground meat may also be
used in place of stew meat.
Beef or vegetable broth may
be used in place of chicken
broth.
Tomato soup or tomato
paste may be used in place
of stewed tomatoes.
PORTUGUESE BEAN SOUP
Slow Cooker Size: 5 quarts
Cooking Time: 7-9 hours on low
Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
makes
1 small cabbage, chopped into two-inch pieces
1 (10-ounce) Portuguese sausage, sliced into
quarter-inch rounds
1 pound lean ham steak, bone-in, cut into one-inch
cubes
1 large carrot, peeled and cut into one-inch pieces
1 medium russet potato, peeled and cut into oneinch pieces
1 medium onion, cut into one-inch pieces
1 (15 ¼-ounce) can kidney beans, drained and
rinsed
1 (28-ounce) can diced tomatoes
4 cups water
Optional Ingredients:
•
•
•
garlic, peeled and crushed
cooked pasta
salt and pepper to taste
Directions:
1. Refrigerate chopped cabbage until ready to use.
2. In slow cooker, combine Portuguese sausage, ham,
carrot, potato, onion, garlic (optional), kidney beans,
tomatoes, and water.
3. Cover slow cooker and cook on low for 7-9 hours.
4. One hour before soup is ready to be served, stir
chopped cabbage into soup. Cover, and continue
cooking for 1 hour.
5. Before serving, remove and discard ham bone and
stir.
6. Optional: Add pasta, salt and pepper to taste.
Menu Suggestions:
Portuguese Bean Soup
Whole wheat bread or rolls or brown rice
Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
18
16
one-cup servings
Variations:
Ham shank may be used in
place of ham steak.
VEGETABLE BEEF SOUP
Slow Cooker Size: 4 quarts
Cooking Time: 6-8 hours on low
Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
•
•
makes
1 pound package frozen mixed vegetables
1 (14 ½-ounce) can diced tomatoes
1 (14 ½-ounce) can tomato sauce
½ pound lean stew meat, cut into one-inch
cubes
2 (14 ½-ounce) cans fat-free chicken broth
3 cups cooked pasta (1 ½ cups dry)
Optional Ingredients:
•
•
•
Bay leaf
dried basil or mixed Italian seasoning
salt and pepper to taste
Directions:
1. In slow cooker, combine frozen mixed vegetables, diced tomatoes, tomato sauce, stew meat,
and chicken broth. Optional: Add bay leaf, dried
basil or mixed Italian seasoning.
2. Cover slow cooker and cook on low for 6-8 hours.
3. Add cooked pasta and mix well just before serving.
4. Optional: Add salt and pepper to taste.
Menu Suggestions:
Vegetable Beef Soup
Whole grain bread
Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
19
10
one-cup servings
Variations:
Lean ground meat may be
used in place of stew meat.
Canned tomato soup may be
used in place of canned tomato sauce.
Pulled
Meats
20
KALUA PIG AND CABBAGE
Slow Cooker Size: 5 quarts
Cooking Time: 8-10 hours on low and 1 hour on high
Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
•
makes
5-6 large ti leaves, washed and ribs removed
1 small round onion, chopped into half-inch
pieces
1 small head cabbage, chopped into oneinch pieces
2 pound top loin boneless pork roast, visible fat removed
1 teaspoon rock salt
Optional Ingredients:
•
Pepper to taste
Directions:
1. Line bottom and sides of slow cooker using 23 ti leaves.
2. Refrigerate chopped onion and cabbage until
ready to use.
3. Place pork in slow cooker and cover top of
pork with remaining ti leaves.
4. Cover and slow cook on low for 8-10 hours.
5. One hour before serving, remove pork from
slow cooker and place in a medium bowl.
Discard ti leaves.
6. Shred pork with a fork and add rock salt. Optional: Add pepper. Mix well.
7. Add chopped onion and cabbage to slow
cooker, and place shredded pork on top of the
vegetables.
8. Cover slow cooker and cook on high for approximately 1 hour or until onions and cabbage are cooked.
9. Mix well before serving.
Menu Suggestions:
Kalua Pig and Cabbage
Brown rice
Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
21
9
one-cup servings
PULLED KALBI BEEF
Slow Cooker Size: 4 quarts
Cooking Time: 6-8 hours on low
Ingredients:
•
•
makes
8
2 pounds lean beef, trimmed
Water to cover
one-cup servings
Kalbi Sauce: Combine in a medium jar, shake well
and refrigerate.
• ¼ cup soy sauce
• 1 tablespoon honey*
• 1 tablespoon sugar
• 1 teaspoon sesame seeds, roasted and
ground
• 1 teaspoon sesame oil
• 1 clove garlic, minced
• 1 tablespoon green onions, minced
Directions:
1. Place beef in slow cooker and add water.
2. Cover slow cooker and cook on low for approximately 6-8 hours.
3. When beef is done, drain liquid out of slow
cooker.
4. Shake kalbi sauce well and stir into beef.
*Kalbi sauce should not consumed by persons under 2 years of age because of the presence of
honey.
Menu Suggestions:
Pulled Kalbi Beef
Brown rice
Steamed broccoli or other vegetables
Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
Use in a sandwich with whole wheat rolls or buns.
22
Variations:
Marinate slow cooked beef in
kalbi sauce and refrigerate
overnight.
PULLED OYSTER CHICKEN
Slow Cooker Size: 4 quarts
Cooking Time: 6-8 hours on low
Ingredients:
•
•
makes
8
2 pounds lean chicken, trimmed
Water to cover
one-cup servings
Optional Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Variations:
1 clove garlic, minced
2 tablespoons green onions, minced
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon soy sauce
¼ cup oyster flavored sauce
Chicken breast or thighs may
be used.
Marinate slow cooked chicken
in oyster sauce and refrigerate
overnight.
Directions:
1. Place chicken in slow cooker and add water.
2. Cover slow cooker and cook on low for approximately 6-8 hours.
3. When chicken is done, drain liquid out of slow
cooker.
4. Shake oyster sauce well and stir into chicken.
Menu Suggestions:
Pulled Oyster Chicken
Brown rice
Chinese parsley
Bean sprouts
Steamed choi sum or other leafy green vegetables
Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
23
PULLED PORK ADOBO
Slow Cooker Size: 4 quarts
Cooking Time: 6-8 hours on low
Ingredients:
•
•
makes
8
2 pounds lean pork, trimmed
Water to cover
one-cup servings
Adobo Sauce: Combine in a medium jar, shake well
and refrigerate.
• 1 clove garlic, minced
• ¼ cup white vinegar
• ¼ teaspoon black peppercorns, cracked or
freshly ground
• 2 tablespoons soy sauce
• ¼ teaspoon salt
• 1 bay leaf, torn into 3 pieces
Directions:
1. Place pork in slow cooker and add water.
2. Cover slow cooker and cook on low for approximately 6-8 hours.
3. When pork is done, drain liquid out of slow
cooker.
4. Shake adobo sauce well and stir into pork.
Menu Suggestions:
Pulled Pork Adobo
Brown rice
Bell peppers, steamed eggplant, tomatoes, onions
Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
Use in a sandwich with whole wheat rolls or buns.
24
Variations:
Marinate slow cooked pork in
adobo sauce and refrigerate
overnight.
Apple cider vinegar can be
used in place of white vinegar.
Miscellaneous
25
CONFETTI RICE
Slow Cooker Size: 4 quarts
Cooking Time: 6-8 hours on low
Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1 pound lean ground beef
1 (24-ounce) jar salsa
1 (14-ounce) can diced tomatoes
2 cups uncooked brown rice, rinsed
(standard cup measure)
1 cup water
1 (10-ounce) package frozen mixed vegetables
1 tablespoon taco seasoning or chili powder
Optional Ingredients:
•
•
•
garlic (peeled and minced)
bay leaf
salt and pepper to taste
Directions:
1. In slow cooker, combine ground beef, salsa,
diced tomatoes, brown rice, water, frozen mixed
vegetables, and taco seasoning or chili powder;
mix thoroughly.
2. Optional: Add the garlic, bay leaf.
3. Cover slow cooker and cook on low for 6-8
hours.
4. Optional: Add salt and pepper to taste.
5. Mix well before serving.
Menu Suggestions:
Confetti Rice
Tossed green salad
Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
26
makes
10
one-cup servings
Variations:
Ground turkey or ground
chicken may be used in place
of ground beef.
POULTRY STUFFING
Slow Cooker Size: 5 quarts
Cooking Time: 5-6 hours on low
Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1 ½ pounds day-old whole grain bread, cut into
one-inch cubes
1 large onion, diced
5 large celery ribs, diced
2 (6 ½-ounce) cans mushroom pieces & stems,
drained
2 tablespoons poultry seasoning
1 teaspoon pepper
1 cup water
1 (14 ½-ounce) cans chicken broth
Non-stick cooking spray
Optional Ingredients:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
sausage or leftover meats (chopped)
butter
salt-free seasoning
salt to taste
water chestnuts, drained
carrots, peeled and diced
spinach, fresh or frozen
Directions:
1. In a large bowl, add bread, onion, celery, and
canned mushrooms.
Optional: Add chopped sau-
sage or leftover meats, butter, salt-free seasoning,
salt, water chestnuts, diced carrots, and spinach.
2. Add poultry seasoning, pepper, water and chicken
broth and mix well.
3. Lightly grease slow cooker with non-stick cooking
spray, and place stuffing mix inside.
4. Cover slow cooker and cook on low for 5-6 hours.
Menu Suggestions:
Poultry Stuffing
Turkey or ham or chicken
Corn or green beans
Tossed green salad
Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
27
makes
12
one-cup servings
Variations:
If cubes of bread are soft
before used in recipe,
bake at 350º F in the oven
for approximately 20 minutes until firm before adding to slow cooker.
TARO
Slow Cooker Size: 4 quarts
Cooking Time: 10-12 hours on low
Ingredients:
•
•
makes
2 pounds taro, thoroughly scrubbed and
rinsed
8 cups water
Directions:
1. Put taro and water into slow cooker. Add
more water to cover taro if needed.
2. Cover slow cooker and cook on low for 1012 hours.
3. Thoroughly remove skin and eyes.
4. Rinse well before serving.
Menu Suggestions:
Taro
Pulled meat
Lomi lomi salmon
Fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit
Lau Lau Stew or Kalua Pig and Cabbage
28
8
one-cup servings
A Food
Guide
29
University of Hawai’i at Manoa, College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources,
Department of Family & Consumer Sciences,
Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Science,
Cooperative Extension Service, Nutrition Education For Wellness
www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/NEW
A Food Guide
Drink water
often, with
and between
your meals.
Build A Healthy Plate
Vegetables and fruits fill half the plate.
Choose
fat-free or
low-fat
(1%) milk.
A starch/grain fills a fourth of the
plate not more than 1/2 inch high.
Pile them as high as you want. If you
are still hungry, go for more fruit and
veggies.
Make half your grains whole grains.
A meat/protein fills a fourth of the
plate, not more than 1/2 inch high.
Choose a variety of colors and forms:
fresh, frozen, canned or dried, and
100% juice.
Keep meat and poultry portions lean
and small.
Eat beans, a natural source of fiber
and protein.
30
Revised 2/13
WHOLE FOODS:
• Choose foods in their natural, unprocessed form when possible.
For example, fresh apples are in the “whole” form nature gave us.
Applesauce and apple juice are more processed. Apple flavored
products may not contain real apples.
Water:
• Drink more water, the liquid your body needs.
MODERATION:
• Reduce your risk of chronic diseases by limiting the amounts of foods you eat
that are high in fats, sugars, and salt, such as fatty meats, desserts and frozen
meals.
• Avoid oversized portions.
VARIETY:
• Get the nutrients your body needs to be healthy by eating many different kinds
of foods.
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY:
• Be physically active in your own way.
• Pick activities that you like and start by doing
what you can, at least 10 minutes at a time.
• Adults should aim for 30 minutes each day.
• Children should aim for 60 minutes each day.
ENJOY:
• Enjoy your food.
• Cook together, eat together, talk together. Make mealtime a family time!
31
Be A Food Detective
Guess how many teaspoons of fat and salt are in the food below.
Chocolate
Banana
Candy Bar v.s.
1 medium
1 ounce
Tuna in water
Luncheon Meat
2.5 ounces v.s.
canned
1
( /2 can)
3 ounces (1/4 can)
FAT
Brown Rice
v.s.
1 cup
Brown Rice with
1 tablespoon
Regular Shoyu
Potato Chips
Potato
small bag
1 medium v.s.
(1 oz.)
SALT
Answers on bottom of page 4
Fruits & Veggies ― More Matters ®
Choose all different forms: Fresh, Frozen, Canned, Dried and 100% Juice.
Select fruit for dessert.
Example:
apple
List or draw
the fruits and
vegetables you
ate, or will eat
today.
FRUITS
Example:
List or draw
the fruits and
vegetables you
plan to eat _____
_________________
32
VEGETABLES
FRUITS AND VEGGIES: Make half your plate fruits and vegetables.
Choose a variety of colors. Choose different forms.
Acerola
Apple
Apricot
Banana
Bean Sprout
Bittermelon
Blueberry
Broccoli
Cabbage
Cantaloupe
Carrot
Cauliflower
Celery
Chayote
Cherimoya
Choi sum
Cucumber
Eggplant
Fresh herbs
Grapefruit
Lychee
Mango
Marungay
Mushroom
Okra
Orange
Papaya
Peach
Peas
Persimmon
Grape
Green bean
Green pepper
Guava
Jicama
Kiwi
Kumquat
Lettuce
Lilikoi
Luau Leaf
Pineapple
Pomegranate
Prickly Pear
Pommelo
Pumpkin
Seaweed
Spinach
Squash
Starfruit
Strawberry
Sugar Snap Peas
Surinam Cherry
Tamarind
Tangerine
Tomato
Turnips
Watercress
Watermelon
Winged Bean
Zucchini
PROTEINS: Keep meat and poultry portions lean and small.
Eat beans, a natural source of fiber and protein.
Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs, and Nuts Group & Milk, Yogurt, Cheese and Calcium Foods Group
Fish
Seafood
Tuna
Eggs
Beef
Pork
Chicken
Turkey
Beans/Soybeans
Lentils
Nuts
Tofu
Sardines
Salmon
Dried Fish
Bones
Milk
Cheese
Yogurt
Cottage Cheese
GRAINS: Make at least half your grains whole grains.
Bread, Cereal, Rice and Pasta Group
Bagels
Barley
Breads
Bulgur
Buns
Cereals
Corn/Cornmeal
Crackers
English Muffins
Look fun
Long rice
Millet
Macaroni
Oats
Pita bread
Rice
Pancit
Saimin
Soba
Somen
Spaghetti
Tortillas
Udon
Whole grains
Starchy Vegetables:
Breadfruit
Potato
Green banana
Sweet potato
Poi
Taro
CUT BACK ON FOODS HIGH IN FATS, SUGARS, AND SALTS
Limit foods high in fats, oils, sugar and salt. Limit sweets and sugary desserts.
WATER: Drink the liquid your body needs.
BE PHYSICALLY ACTIVE IN YOUR OWN WAY.
Answers
FAT: chocolate candy bar = 2 tsp, banana=v. little, tuna in water=1/6 tsp, luncheon meat = 4 1/2 tsp
SALT: brown rice = v. little, brown rice & 1 tbsp. shoyu = 1/2 tsp, potato = v. little, potato chips= 1/10 tsp
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII ATMANOA COLLEGE OF TROPICAL AGRICULTURE AND HUMAN
RESOURCES 1955 EAST-WEST ROAD, AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE 306, HONOLULU, HAWAII 96822 The UH-CTAHR Cooperative
Extension Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperate in presenting to the people of Hawaii programs and
services without regard to race, sex, age, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, disability, marital status, arrest and court
record, sexual orientation, or veteran status. The University is an equal opportunity, affirmative action institution.
33
Produce a Plate
with Fruits and Veggies
INSERT
Choose fat-free
or lowfat (1%)
milk.
Drink water often,
with and between
your meals.
FRUITS AND
VEGETABLES
GRAINS AND
STARCHES
MEATS AND
PROTEINS
34
Revised 2/13
INSERT
Dressings
Sauces, dips and dressings can add taste and flavor to vegetables and fruits. Store bought
products may be high in fat, salt, and calories.
Homemade sauces, dips and dressings are quick and easy to prepare. These recipes are low in fat,
rich in flavor, a good source of nutrients, and taste great.
Salsa
Thousand Island Dressing
Yields: about 4 cups
Yields: about 1 1/2 cups
Ingredients:
Ingredients:
• 1/2 - 3/4 pounds tomatoes OR
1 (28-ounce) can whole tomatoes
• 1/2 small round onion
• 2 tablespoons Chinese parsley
• 1 piece chili pepper
• 1 teaspoon lemon OR lime juice
• 1 (6-ounce) container lowfat
vanilla yogurt
• 1/4 cup ketchup
• 1/4 cup pickle relish
• 1/4 teaspoon pepper
Directions:
Directions:
1. In a small bowl, MIX yogurt, ketchup, pickle
relish, and pepper.
2. CHILL for 1-2 hours before serving.
1. Finely CHOP tomatoes, onion, and parsley.
2. MINCE chili pepper.
3. In a medium bowl, COMBINE tomatoes, onion,
Chinese parsley, chili pepper, and lemon OR
lime juice.
4. COVER and REFRIGERATE. SERVE with salad or
whole grain tortilla chips.
Variations:
Use as a dressing or dip for vegetables and salads in
place of mayonnaise.
Pina Colada Sauce
Ranch Style Dip
Yields: about 2 cups
Yields: about 3 cups
Ingredients:
Ingredients:
• 3 (6-ounce) containers lowfat
vanilla yogurt
• 1 (12-ounce) can frozen 100%
pineapple juice concentrate
• Coconut extract flavoring to
taste
• 2-4 tablespoons water OR
nonfat milk OR lowfat milk
• 1 (16-ounce) container lowfat cottage cheese
• 1 ounce package Ranch-style dressing mix
Directions:
1. In a blender, PLACE water OR milk, cottage cheese,
and Ranch-style dressing mix and BLEND at
medium to high speed.
2. For thinner consistency, ADD more water OR milk.
3. POUR mixture into a medium jar, COVER and
REFRIGERATE. SERVE with vegetable sticks.
Directions:
1. In a small bowl, MIX ingredients well.
2. COVER and REFRIGERATE. SERVE with sliced
fruit OR vegetable sticks.
35
Revised 2/13
Safe Food
Handling
36
University of Hawai’i at Manoa, College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources,
Department of Family & Consumer Sciences,
Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Science,
Cooperative Extension Service, Nutrition Education For Wellness
www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/NEW
Safe Food Handling
Proper food handling and cooking are the best ways to keep us from becoming sick
from bacteria in foods.
KEEP FOOD SAFE
• Wash your hands with soap and water
• When in doubt, throw it out
• Keep hot foods hot, and cold foods cold
Germs, such as bacteria, fungi, yeast, and molds, are a natural part of our environment.
Where there is food, there are bacteria. Generally, young children, older adults, and
those who are often sick are the most at risk of getting ill from germs in food.
BACTERIAL
MULTIPLICATION
ACTIVITY:
165°
140°
Hawaii’s usual
temperature
A
ZO NG
N ER
E!
40°
32°
Boiling Point
D
How would this
affect your family?
212°
0°
Safe temperatures
for cooking foods
Rapid growth of bacteria
Some will produce poison
Refrigerator
temperature
Freezer
Temperature
Revised 4/13
1. CLEAN
WASH YOUR HANDS
CLEAN SURFACES
Wash your hands with warm water and
soap for at least 20 seconds:
• before and after handling or eating food
• after using the bathroom
• after changing diapers
• after handling pets
• after sneezing, coughing,
or blowing your nose
• Wash surfaces that come into
contact with food in hot soapy water
• Wash your cutting boards, dishes,
and utensils with hot soapy water
after preparing each food item.
• Use clean towels, pot holders, cloths
and sponges. Wash them often.
• Sanitizing Solution
one tablespoon of bleach
1 Mix
with a gallon of water.
FRUIT & VEGGIE HANDLING
•Rinse all fruits and vegetables
under running tap water.
•Never use detergent or bleach
to clean fresh fruits
or vegetables.
2
Sanitize non-porous
countertops and cutting boards
for 2 minutes.
3
Store solution, tightly covered
for up to one week.
2. SEPARATE
SHOP: Keep raw meat,
poultry, seafood and
eggs away from other
foods
in your
shopping
cart and
grocery
bags.
MARINATE: Sauce
that is used to marinate
raw meat, poultry or
seafood should NOT be
re-used or poured over
cooked food.
STORE: To prevent
CUT: Use one cutting board
for fresh produce and a
different one for raw meat,
poultry and seafood.
Or prepare your fresh and
ready-to-eat foods before
you cut your raw meat,
poultry or seafood.
juices from raw meat,
poultry or seafood from
dripping onto other foods
in the refrigerator, place
these raw foods in sealed
containers or in plastic
bags on the bottom shelf
of the fridge.
COOKED: Never place
cooked food on a plate
that previously held raw
meat, poultry, seafood
or eggs.
3. COOK
TEMPERATURE
Thoroughly cooking food
kills the harmful bacteria
that cause illness.
Use a food thermometer
and follow the “Internal
Temperatures for Safe Cooking”
chart below.
MICROWAVE
• For best results, cover food before
microwaving.
• Stir and rotate during microwaving for
even cooking. If there is no turntable,
rotate the dish by
hand once or twice
during cooking.
• Make sure there
are no cold spots
in food.
KEEP HOT FOODS HOT
LEFTOVERS
• Hot foods should be kept at 140°F
or higher.
• Keep food hot with chafing dishes,
slow cookers, warming trays or on
low heat on a stove.
• Heat leftovers thoroughly to
165°F.
• Bring sauces, soups and
gravies to a boil for at least
one minute before serving.
INTERNAL TEMPERATURES FOR SAFE COOKING
Use a food thermometer to measure the internal temperatures of food.
Meat Product
Temperature
All cooked leftovers (reheated)
Poultry (whole bird)
Poultry (breast, thigh, wing)
Ground poultry
Ground meat (beef, pork, veal, lamb)
Egg dishes
Fish
*Beef, Veal, or Lamb
*Pork or Ham
165°F
165°F
165°F
165°F
160°F
160°F
145°F
145°F
145°F
*Cook whole cuts of meat (beef, veal, lamb, pork, ham) to an internal temperature of 145°F, then allow
the meat to rest for 3 minutes before carving or consuming.
4. CHILL
BUYING
• When shopping, buy frozen, cold or
perishable foods last.
• When traveling store perishable food
with ice or cold packs in a cooler.
• Take food straight home.
REFRIGERATOR
• Always marinate food in the
refrigerator.
• Divide large amounts of leftovers
into shallow containers for quicker
cooling in the refrigerator.
• Use most cooked leftovers within
3-4 days.
• Unsafe food does NOT always smell,
taste or look bad.
DON’T WAIT, REFRIGERATE
• Refrigerate or freeze meat,
poultry, eggs and other
perishables as soon as you get
them home from the store.
• Never let leftovers sit at room
temperature more than 2 hours
or one hour when temperature
is above 90°F.
DEFROSTING
• Never defrost food at room temperature (on the kitchen counter).
• Defrost food in the refrigerator. This is the safest method for all foods.
• For defrosting in microwave, use the defrost or low setting.
• Thaw meat and poultry in airtight packaging in cold water if it will be used
immediately. Change the water every 30 minutes, so the food continues to thaw in
cool water.
• Food thawed in cold water or in the microwave should be cooked immediately.
KEEP COLD FOODS COLD
Cold foods should be kept at 40°F or below
Keep all perishable foods chilled right up until serving time.
Place containers of cold food on ice for serving to make sure they stay cold.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII ATMANOA COLLEGE OF TROPICAL AGRICULTURE AND HUMAN
RESOURCES 1955 EAST-WEST ROAD, AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE 306, HONOLULU, HAWAII 96822 The UH-CTAHR Cooperative
Extension Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperate in presenting to the people of Hawaii programs and
services without regard to race, sex, age, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, disability, marital status, arrest and court
record, sexual orientation, or veteran status. The University is an equal opportunity, affirmative action institution.
4
Meal
Planning
41
University of Hawai'i at Manoa, College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources,
Department of Family & Consumer Sciences,
Department of Human Nutrition Food and Animal Science,
Cooperative Extension Service, Nutrition Education For Wellness Program
www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/NEW
Meal Planning
Daily Planner
•
•
•
•
•
Plan meals and snacks for your family for one day.
Be sure to include each of the food groups on your plate.
Fill half your plate with vegetables and fruits.
Go easy on the sugars, fats, and salt!
Think of a snack as a mini-meal.
MEAL PATTERNS
MENU
Morning:
Grains or starches
Fruit/100% Fruit juice
Milk or water
(Egg or lowfat meat may be included)
Healthy mid-morning snack low in sugars, fats, and salt.
Lunch:
Grains or starches
Meat, bean, fish, or poultry
Vegetable
Fruit
Milk or water
Healthy afternoon snack low in sugars, fats, and salt.
Evening:
Grains or starches
Meat, bean, fish, or poultry
Vegetable
Fruit
Milk or water
Healthy evening snack low in sugars, fats, and salt.
How well did you
fill your plate?
42
Revised: 7/11
Save Time
Plan quick-fix meals from foods cooked a day or two earlier!
SUNDAY
B
R
E
A
K
F
A
S
T
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
Fried eggs
& rice
Rice &
Baked
Chicken
Creamed
Chicken
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Fruit Salad
Chicken
Salad
L
U
N
C
H
D
I
N
N
E
R
MONDAY
Fish burger
Fruit salad Rice & Pot
roast
& Fish
Fried rice
Portuguese
bean soup
Chop Suey Portuguese
bean soup
AIM FOR FITNESS...

Aim
for a healthy weight.

Be physically active each day.
Aim for a
Healthy Lifestyle
BUILD A HEALTHY BASE...
Focus
on fruits.
Vary your veggies.

Get your calcium-rich foods.
Make 1/2 your grains whole.
Go lean with protein.
Keep food safe to eat.
CHOOSE SENSIBLY...
 Choose
a diet that is low in
saturated fat and cholesterol and
moderate in total fat.
 Choose beverages and foods to
moderate your intake of sugars.
 Choose and prepare foods with
less salt.
 If you drink alcoholic beverages,
do so in moderation.
43
Make Meals
Appealing
Plan meals with foods of different...
...c
olo
rs
ors
v
la
...f
...sh
ap
es
res
u
t
x
...te
...temperatures
Variety in Meals
Consider each of the following tips as you plan meals:
Nutrition
Use MyPlate to help ensure good nutrition.
Color
Include foods of different colors in meals. Look for sales on the
following, for good contrast at low cost: carrots, oranges, bell peppers,
tomatoes, lettuce, spinach, apples, broccoli, red cabbage,
sweet potatoes, and papayas.
Shape
Vary the shape and size of food pieces: Include chunks, slices, strips,
and wedges.
Taste or flavor Use a variety of flavors such as sweet, sour, salty, bland, spicy, or tart.
Temperature
Serve foods at the appropriate temperature. Serve foods of various
temperatures at each meal.
Texture
Serve foods of different textures such as hard, soft, moist, dry, crisp,
smooth, or chewy.
44
Meal Planning: Use these food lists to help you and your family follow a balanced meal
pattern.
PROTECTIVE FOODS
FRUITS AND VEGGIES
CHOOSE A VARIETY OF COLORS
Vegetable Group and Fruit Group
Acerola
Apple
Apricot
Banana
Bean sprout
Bittermelon
Broccoli
Cabbage
Cantaloupe
Carrot
Cauliflower
Celery
Chayote
Cherimoya
Choi sum
Cucumber
Eggplant
Fresh herbs
Grapefruit
Grape
Green bean
Green pepper
Guava
Jicama
Kiwi
Kumquat
Lettuce
Luau Leaf
Lychee
Mango
Marungay
Okra
Orange
Papaya
Peach
Peas
Persimmon
Pineapple
Pomegranate
Prickly pear
Tangerine
Pommelo
Tomato
Pumpkin
Turnips
Seaweed
Watercress
Spinach
Watermelon
Squash
Starfruit
—Winged bean
Zucchini
Strawberry
Sugar snap peas
Surinam cherry
Tamarind
BODY BUILDING FOODS - WATCH THE FAT
Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs, and Nuts Group and
Fish
Seafood
Tuna
Beans
Lentils
Nuts
Beef
Pork
Chicken
Sardines
Salmon
Dried fish
Milk
Cheese
Yogurt
ENERGY FOODS - CHOOSE WHOLE GRAINS
Bread, Cereal, Rice and Pasta Group
Bagels
Barley
Breads
Bulgur
Buns
Cereals
Cornmeal
Crackers
English muffins
Look funn
Long rice
Millet
Macaroni
Oats
Pita bread
Rice
Pancit
Saimin
Soba
Somen
Spaghetti
Tortillas
Udon
Whole grains
Starchy Vegetables:
Potato
Breadfruit
Green banana Sweet potato
Taro
Poi
CAUTION FOODS
Foods high in fats, oils, sweets, sugar, and salt
WATER - A BASIC NUTRIENT
PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA COLLEGE OF TROPICAL AGRICULTURE AND HUMAN RESOURCES 1955
EAST-WEST ROAD, AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE 306, HONOLULU, HAWAII 96822 The UH-CTAHR Cooperative Extension Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperate in presenting to the people of Hawaii programs and services without regard to race, sex, age, religion, color, national
origin, ancestory, disability, marital status, arrest and court record, sexual orientation, or veteran status. The University is an equal opportunity,
affirmative action institution.
45
(insert)
Meal Planning
Recipes
Knowing the recipes you can prepare along with your family's favorite dishes can help you with
meal planning. You can be a smart shopper by planning meals according to the food ads and
preparing recipes with ingredients that are on sale. Using ingredients that you have at home
will also help you save on your food bill.
Using slips of paper or index cards, write a heading on each card like the samples below.
On each card, list all of the recipes and dishes you can prepare with these major ingredients.
Pork
Pork Tofu
Chow Funn
Pinacbet
Recipe Lists
Chicken
Vegetables
Parmesan Chicken
Roast Chicken
PROTECTIVE FOODS
Shoyu Chicken Vegetable na
Spinach and
Chicken Long Rice
Canned Tuna/Salmon
Stir Fry Vegetables
Cream Tuna
Ground Beef/Ground Turkey
Tuna Salad
Tofu Salad
Chili
Tuna Vegetable Casserole
Spaghetti
Beef Bean Casserole
Meat Loaf
Other Categories:
•
•
•
•
•
Salads
•
Fruits
•
Soups
•
Beans
•
Canned Foods
Eggs
Fish
Tofu
Snacks
Now you're ready!
WATER - A BASIC NUTRIENT
• Keep your lists handy.
• While looking at the sale ads, refer to your lists to help you decide what dishes you can
prepare with the foods that are on sale.
• Ask your family what dishes on your lists they would enjoy this week.
WATER - A BAS
• Write down the dishes you are planning to prepare.
• Make a shopping list for the items you need to purchase.
• Add to your recipe lists as you learn to make new dishes.
Revised: 7/11
46
(insert)
Vegetables
Fruits
Salads
Snacks
Soups
Beans
47
Spending
Less, Eating
Better
48
University of Hawai’i at Manoa, College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources,
Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Science &Department of Family & Consumer Sciences,
Cooperative Extension Service, Nutrition Education For Wellness
www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/NEW
Spending Less, Eating Better
A Shopper’s Guide
PLAN MEALS
AROUND SPECIALS
4
• If ground beef and chicken
are on sale, how about chili
and roast chicken for two
dinners?
EAT BEFORE
YOU SHOP
10
Shop at a Farmer’s Market
USE UNIT PRICING
Unit Price
$.20 per oz.
• meal plan
• inventory
17
28
TRY STORE
BRANDS
23
Total
Price
• Park further away from the
store - get more
physical activity!
KEEP REUSEABLE
BAGS CLEAN
Regularly wash or
wipe thoroughly
with sanitizing wipes.
12 oz.
PHYSICAL
ACTIVITY
COMPARE
PRICES
Compare prices of fresh, frozen
and canned vegetables and
fruits. The net weight includes
liquid in a can.
$2.40
Snappy Rice Cereal
• specials
• food budget
• Check the value.
• Often have lower prices.
• No national advertising.
BUY FRESH
VEGETABLES AND
FRUITS IN SEASON
22
Make your shopping list
based on your:
11
Resist
buying
extras.
16
MAKE A
SHOPPING LIST
5
29
START A
HOME GARDEN
• Buy some seeds
and grow your
own vegetables
49
6
USE COUPONS
OR CLUB CARDS
• Use coupons for foods you
need when the price is right.
• Take coupons or club cards
when shopping.
12
BE AWARE OF
MARKETING TECHNIQUES
• End of aisle displays.
• Items at checkout counter.
• Sweet cereals at children’s
eye-level.
18 BEST BUYS IN MILK
• Choose fat-free or low fat
(1%) milk.
• Skim milk, skim dry milk, and
evaporated skim milk are
especially good in cooking.
24
DATES
30
BEFORE
COOKING
Check packaging for:
• Sell by (pull date)
• Use by
• Expiration date
so you know the time limit to
buy or use product at its best.
• Rinse lids of cans
• Wash fresh fruits
and vegetables
Revised 4/13
Spending Less, Eating Better
Plan quick-fix meals from foods cooked a day or two earlier!
SUNDAY
B
R
E
A
K
F
A
S
T
L
U
N
C
H
D
I
N
N
E
R
Rice, Baked
Chicken
& Veggies
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
Fried Eggs
& Rice
Fruit Salad
Oriental
Chicken Salad
Fish Burger
& Salad
Vegetable
Stir Fry
Rice, Pork Pot
Roast &
Green Beans
Chop
Suey
Skillet
Lasagna
Fruit Salad
& Fish
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Bean Soup
Bean Soup
• Plan your meals around sales/specials, your inventory, and MyPlate.
• Plan meals for at least one full day based on the shopping list.
Day
Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner
day
Grains/Starches
Meat, beans, fish, poultry
Vegetables
Fruits
Milk or Water
day
day
• Determine the cost of your food list and planned menu for the day. It needs to be
within your food allowance for that week.
• Make adjustments where needed.
Answer Key: (1) 5 (2) 300kcal (3) No (4) No
50
How to Read Food Labels
Barbeque Sweet Potato Chips
START HERE
Check calories
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 oz. (28g/About 14 chips)
Servings Per Container about 5
Amount Per Serving
Calories 150
Calories from Fat 70
Look at serving size
and number of
servings.
There may be more
than one serving per
container.
% Daily Value*
Limit These
Nutrients
Get enough of
these
nutrients
Total Fat 8g
Saturated Fat 0.5g
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 6g
Cholesterol 0mg
Sodium 140mg
Potassium 400mg
Total Carbohydrate 15g
Dietary Fiber 3g
Sugars 4g
Protein 1g
Vitamin A 150%
Calcium 4%
12%
3%
% Daily Value: is the
amount of a nutrient
in one serving
compared to
recommendations for
a 2000 calorie diet.
0%
6%
11%
6% Quick Guide to %DV
5% or less is “low”
12%
20% or more is “high”
Vitamin C 4%
Iron 2%
Label Reading Activity
(use the label above or other labels)
1) If I ate the whole box/bag, how many servings would I have eaten?
2) If I ate 2 servings, how many calories would I have eaten?
Using the % Daily Value information from the label:
3) Is the food ‘low’ in fat?
4) Is the food ‘low’ in sodium (salt)?
51
University of Hawai’i at Manoa, College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources,
Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Science &Department of Family & Consumer Sciences,
Cooperative Extension Service, Nutrition Education For Wellness
www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/NEW
Spending Less, Eating Better
A Shopper’s Guide
1
WEEKLY
SHOPPING PLAN
• Divide grocery money into
weekly amounts.
• Take only the amount of
food money you plan to
spend.
7
KNOW YOUR PRICES
• Choose one or two stores
with the best prices.
• Check open markets and
wholesale outlets.
• Buy bread at thrift stores.
13
CHOOSE WHOLE
GRAINS
• Brown rice contains more
nutrients and fiber.
• Try whole grain cereal, pasta
or bread.
19 LIMIT CONVENIENCE
FOODS
• Prices are higher
• Prepared/ready-to-eat meals
have added sugar, salt and fat.
25 DO NOT BUY OR USE
• Bulging or swollen cans
• Cans or jars which spurt when
opened or have milky liquid
• Rusty or severely dented
cans
2
CHECK YOUR
INVENTORY
• Check your refrigerator,
freezer and cupboards for
foods and supplies you have
before you go shopping.
8
KNOW
STORE LAYOUT
• Basic foods are
around the outside
of the store.
• Buy frozen foods last.
14
VARY YOUR
PROTEIN
• Meats can be expensive and
high in fat.
• Try beans, lentils or tofu
more often for family meals.
20
READ THE LABELS
Look for:
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
Servings Per Container
Amount Per Serving
26
BE SURE
TO CHECK:
• Scanner for price errors
• Receipt for accuracy
• Your change before leaving
the store
3
CHECK
NEWSPAPER ADS
• Watch for sale items.
• Buy extra staple goods when
the price is low and if your
stock is low.
9
HINTS
ABOUT KIDS
• Shop when rested.
• Shop when less crowded.
• Allow children to add one
item to your shopping list.
15
BE MEAT
SMART
• Use cheaper cuts of meat in
stews, soups and stir fries.
• Remember to choose less
fatty meats.
21
SEE THE LIST
OF INGREDIENTS
• Ingredients are listed in
order, from the most to the
least amount found in the
product.
27
GETTING HOME
• Refrigerate perishable foods
immediately.
• Put new canned foods at the
back of shelves. Use older
cans first.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII ATMANOA COLLEGE OF TROPICAL AGRICULTURE AND HUMAN RESOURCES 1955 EAST-WEST
ROAD, AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE 306, HONOLULU, HAWAII 96822 The UH-CTAHR Cooperative Extension Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture
cooperate in presenting to the people of Hawaii programs and services without regard to race, sex, age, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, disability,
marital status, arrest and court record, sexual orientation, or veteran status. The University is an equal opportunity, affirmative action institution.
52
Other Protein
Meats
Supplies
Veggies
Fruits
Shopping List
Dairy
Grains/Starches
INSERT
Supplies
Meats
Fruits
Other Protein
Veggies
Shopping List
Dairy
Grains/Starches
INSERT
Dairy
Supplies
Other Protein
Meats
Veggies
Fruits
Shopping List
Grains/Starches
INSERT
Think about the foods
stocked around the outer edge of your local grocery store.
Write in the types of food on this store ‘map’.
What items are at
the ends of the aisles?
What items are at the
checkout counter?
54
Revised 4/13
Winning Ways
in the Kitchen
55
University of Hawai'i at Manoa, College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources,
Department of Human Nutrition Food and Animal Science & Department of Family and Consumer Sciences
Cooperative Extension Service, Nutrition Education for Wellness
www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/NEW
Winning Ways In the Kitchen
Cooking Terms and Methods
BAKE/ROAST. Cook food uncovered in an oven or oven-type appliance.
BEAT ................. Make mixture smooth with a rapid, regular motion using a wire whisk, spoon, hand
beater, or mixer. When using a spoon, lift the mixture up and over with each stroke.
BLEND ............. Mix two or more ingredients thoroughly.
BOIL .................. Cook food over high heat in liquid in which bubbles rise constantly to the surface and
break.
BRAISE ............. Cook meat or poultry slowly in a small amount of liquid in a covered pot.
BROIL ............... Cook food by direct heat, usually on a rack.
BROWN ........... Cook food quickly until surface of food is brown.
CHOP ................ Cut food into small pieces.
CREAM ............ Make soft, smooth, and creamy with a spoon or mixer.
CRUSH ............. Use a garlic press or a blunt object to smash foods until the fibers separate (such as
garlic).
CUBE ................ Cut food into small cubes (½-inch).
DICE ................. Cut food into very small pieces (about ¼-inch).
DRAIN .............. Draw off (a liquid) gradually; to empty by drawing off liquid.
FOLD ................ Combine ingredients by using a gentle circular motion to cut down into mixture; slide
across the bottom of the bowl to bring some of the mixture up and over the surface.
FRY .................... Pan Fry - Cook in frying pan over medium heat with a small amount of fat.
Deep Fry - Cook in hot fat deep enough for food to float in.
GRATE ............. Rub food on a grater (or chop in blender or food processor) to produce fine, medium or
coarse particles.
GREASE ........... Cover or lubricate with oil or fat, to keep food from sticking.
KNEAD ............. Work a food mixture (usually dough) with a fold and press motion.
MARINATE ..... Allow food to soak in a seasoned liquid mixture.
MINCE ............. Cut into tiny pieces; smaller than diced.
PEEL .................. Remove outer covering of foods by trimming away with knife or vegetable peeler.
PREHEAT ........ Heat oven to desired temperature before putting food in to bake.
POACH ............. Cook food over low heat in small amount of hot, simmering liquid.
SAUTE .............. Cook foods rapidly in a small amount of oil in an open pan and stir constantly.
SHRED ............. Cut food into slivers or slender pieces using a knife or shredder.
SIFT ................... Remove lumps or to lighten the dry ingredients by putting them through a strainer or a
sifter.
SIMMER .......... Cook food over low heat in a liquid just below the boiling point in which tiny bubbles
form slowly.
SKIM ................. Remove fat or scum from surface of food.
SLICE ................ Cut food into thin pieces.
STEAM ............. Cook food on a rack or in a colander in a covered pan over steaming hot water.
STEW ................ Cook food over low heat in a large amount of simmering liquid.
STIR FRY ......... Cook sliced food quickly in a skillet or wok and toss occasionally.
THAW ............... Change from frozen to a liquid state slowly.
TOSS ................. Mix foods lightly with a lifting motion, using forks or spoons.
56
Revised: 6/11
Master Measuring
RECIPE SUCCESS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Read over recipe.
Clear work area.
Set out ingredients and supplies.
Prepare and measure ingredients.
Make recipe!
Check at eye level
to make sure the correct amount
is measured. Liquid should just
touch the measurement line.
Use the dry measuring cups
pictured below to measure dry
ingredients.
1 Cup
1/2 Cup
Use clear measuring cups
to measure liquid ingredients.
Use these measuring spoons to
measure small amounts of
ingredients.
1/3 Cup 1/4 Cup
1/4
teaspoon
1/2
1/2teaspoon
tsp.
1
Tablespoon 1t1sp.
teaspoon
Dry ingredients should be spooned
into measuring cup and leveled using
the straight edge of a knife.
57
BASIC KITCHEN TOOLS
Draw a line to match the kitchen tools
Liquid Measuring Cup
Dry Measuring Cups
Measuring Spoons
Cutting Board
Knife
Spatula
Spoon
Mixing Bowls
Can Opener
Grater
Peeler
Hot Pad
Pot
Pan
Scrubber
Baking Pan
Pot Holder
58
Temperatures for Safe Cooking
Roasting Meats
Thermometer Readings for Meats
All cooked leftovers (reheated)........................... 165°F
Poultry (whole bird)..................................................165°F
Poultry (breast, thigh, wing)...................................165°F
Ground poultry........................................................ 165°F
Ground meat (beef, pork, veal, lamb)....................160°F
Egg dishes..................................................................160°F
Fish............................................................................. 145°F
* Beef, Veal, or Lamb................................................145°F
* Pork or Ham....................................................... 145°F
* Cook whole cuts of meat (beef, veal, lamb, pork, ham) to an
internal temperature of 145°F, then allow the meat to rest for 3
minutes before carving or consuming.
Proper food handling and cooking are “winning ways” to keep
from becoming sick from bacteria in foods. Place a food
thermometer in the thickest part of the meat and follow these
temperatures as a guide to help prevent foodborne illnesses.
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA COLLEGE OF TROPICAL AGRICULTURE AND HUMAN RESOURCES 1955
EAST-WEST ROAD, AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES 306, HONOLULU, HAWAII 96822 The UH-CTAHR Cooperative Extension Service and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperate in presenting to the people of Hawaii programs and services without regard to race, sex, age, religion, color, national
origin, ancestory, disability, marital status, arrest and court record, sexual orientation, or veteran status. The University is an equal opportunity,
affirmative action institution.
59
Alphabetical Listing of Recipes
RECIPE
PAGE
Chicken Long Rice……………………………………………………………...11
Confetti Rice…………………………………………………………................26
Cream of Mushroom Stew………………………………………..……………12
Curry ……………………………………………………………………………..13
Jook………………………………………………………………………………14
Kalua Pig and Cabbage………………………………………………………..21
Kim Chee Soup………………………………………………………………....15
Lau Lau Stew………………………………………………………..................16
Local Stew…..…………………………………………………………………...17
Portuguese Bean Soup………………………………………………………...18
Poultry Stuffing………………………………………………………................27
Pulled Kalbi Beef……………………………………………………................22
Pulled Oyster Chicken………………………………………………...............23
Pulled Pork Adobo………………………………………………………………24
Taro……………………………………………………………………...............28
Vegetable Beef Soup……………………………………………….................19
60
Leave It Then Eat It Evaluation Form
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Nutrition Information
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Evaluation can be submitted to NEW via fax at 808-956-6457 or mailed to ATTN: Leave It Then Eat It, 1955 EastWest Road, AgSci 306, Honolulu, HI 96822.
61