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NEW NUTRITION
BUSINESS
www.new–nutrition.com
VOLUME 22 NUMBER 10
JUNE 2017 ISSN 1464-3308
Trends – and luck –
propel premium ready
meal brand to success
By Julian Mellentin and Mikaela Linden
Imagine that you decide to create a
range of meals that are “real food”,
using only natural ingredients, without
any preservatives or additives, produced
in small batches and sold in the chiller
section of the supermarket and with a
shelf-life of just five days. The products
cannot be microwaved – the consumer
has to heat them in an oven for around
30 minutes – and they sell at a price
premium of 100% to supermarket brands
in a category in which supermarket ownlabel products have a 90% share. Your
products all feature meat or fish – there
are no vegan or vegetarian options.
It may sound like attempting the
impossible. But that is just what the
Charlie Bigham’s brand has done in the
UK, achieving retail sales in 2016 of
£46 million ($60 million/€53 million)
– a 48% increase on the previous year,
according to Nielsen. To put that into
context, if you pro rata those sales to
a bigger market like the US, Bigham’s
is equivalent to a £200 million ($260
million/€232 million) brand.
Like many entrepreneurs, Charlie
Bigham, the founder of the brand that
carries his name, had no experience of
the food industry when he founded his
company back in 1996, aged 28. The
former management consultant wasn’t
a chef either, but that didn’t stop him
from setting up a small kitchen with one
employee and creating fresh meals – there
were just three products to begin with –
which he sold through delicatessens in the
London area.
Today Charlie Bigham’s offers a range
of 33 dishes, which includes traditional
dishes such as steak pie and macaroni &
cheese, but also dishes from Indonesian,
Moroccan, Indian, Thai, Vietnamese,
Italian and Spanish cuisine. Among
the best-sellers are fish pie, lasagne and
Moroccan chicken tagine.
The brand focuses on taste and quality,
using fresh, natural and high-quality
ingredients. No concessions are made to
people who want something fast from the
microwave – every dish must be cooked
by the consumer in the oven or on the
cook-top.
Bigham’s began – as so many
successful brands do – not in
Continued on page 3
Dairy giant places
bet on fast-growth
flax milk brand
Pages 18-19
Cautious approach
helps clean protein
bar to fill a gap
Pages 21-23
Premium-priced “real
food” achieves
mass-market
success
Pages 24-26
T H E J O U R N A L F O R H E A LT H Y E AT I N G , F U N C T I O N A L F O O D S & N U T R A C E U T I C A L S
CONTENT S & CONTACT S
2
JUNE 2017
LEAD STORY
1,3-5 Trends – and luck – propel premium
ready meal brand to success
EDITORIAL
6--9
The search for “natural energy”
18-19
PLANT-BASED:
20
DAIRY:
21-23
SNACKING:
24-26
WEIGHT MANAGEMENT:
10-11 Reinventing dairy to respond to rise of
plant milks
27-29
CASE STUDIES
12-14
STRATEGY:
Sweet stretch for cheese snack
Cautious approach helps
clean protein bar to fill a gap
Premiumpriced “real food” achieves mass-market
success
READY MEALS:
Solving dinner on the
side
E-commerce to power free-
from empire
15-17
Dairy giant places bet
on fast-growth flax milk brand
30-32
NEW PRODUCTS
33-37 Functional & healthy-eating new
product launches
IMPORTANT NOTICE
38
A polite reminder to our subscribers
HOW TO SUBSCRIBE
39
Report Order Form
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Subscription Order Form
From semi-retirement to
plant-based start-up
READY MEALS:
Unilever aiming to scale Sir
Kensington’s?
STRATEGY:
COMPANIES AND BRANDS IN THIS ISSUE
Amazon .................................................. 28
Annie’s Homegrown .............................. 14
Asda Walmart........................................... 3
Balanced Breaks ..................................... 20
Belvita................................................. 6,7,8
Beneo ....................................................... 6
Booths ...................................................... 3
Bounce Foods ........................................... 9
Cargill Health & Nutrition ....................... 8
Charlie Bigham’s ............................. 1,3,4,5
Clif Bar ................................................. 8,9
Costco .................................................... 28
CytoSport ............................................... 12
Danone................................................... 10
Dean Foods .................................. 10,18,19
Deliciously Ella......................................... 7
Elmhurst Dairy ................................. 10,11
Emmi...................................................... 11
Fabanaise................................................ 16
Facebook ................................................ 32
Fresh Direct ............................................ 28
Good Karma.................................. 5,18,19
All enquiries: Miranda Mills
Crown House, 72 Hammersmith Road
London W14 8TH, UK
Phone: +44 (0)20 7617 7032
Fax: +44(0)20 7900 1937
miranda.mills@new-nutrition.com
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Published 11 times a year by
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ISSN 1464-3308 All rights reserved, photocopying of any part strictly
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N E W
Harris Teeter .......................................... 30
Harvest Food Group ......................... 27,29
Health Focus International ...................... 6
Hellman’s ............................................... 15
Iceland............................................... 25,26
Kroger ............................................... 23,30
Mama Jess Organics.......................... 12,14
Meijer ..................................................... 28
Mondelez .............................................. 7,8
Muscle Milk ........................................... 12
Ocado....................................................... 3
Path of Life ............................ 4,5,27,28,29
PepsiCo ............................................. 12,30
Publix ................................................ 23,28
Quorn ...................................................... 5
Red Bull.................................................... 6
RXbar ....................................... 5,21,22,23
Safe + Fair Food Co ..................... 12,13,14
Safeway .................................................. 23
Sainsburys ................................................ 3
Sam’s Club ............................................. 28
Sambazon............................................... 12
Editor
Julian Mellentin
julian.mellentin@new-nutrition.com
Dale Buss, New Nutrition Business, 6390 Cherry Tree Ct,
Rochester Hills, MI 48306, USA.
Tel: 248-953-2701
DaleDBuss@aol.com
Crown House, 72 Hammersmith Road,
London, W14 8TH, UK.
Tel: +44 (0)20 7617 7032 Fax: +44 (0)20 7900 1937
PO Box 21675
Henderson
Auckland 0650
New Zealand
Sargento .............................................. 5,20
Shaw’s..................................................... 28
Shoreview Capital .................................. 14
Silk.......................................................... 11
Sir Kensington’s ........................... 15,16,17
Skeeter Snacks................................... 12,14
Slimming World ..................... 4,5,24,25,26
Soreen ................................................... 7,9
Spring Sheep .......................................... 11
Stonyfield Farm ...................................... 32
Sweet Earth ............................... 5,30,31,32
Symphony IRI ....................................... 20
Target ................................................ 23,30
Tesco ........................................................ 3
Trader Joe’s ............................................ 23
Unilever ............................................. 15,16
Waitrose.................................................... 3
Walmart............................................. 28,30
Wegman’s ............................................... 23
Weight Watchers ............................... 24,25
White Wave ....................................... 10,11
Whole Foods Market ......................... 16,23
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compiling, preparing and issuing the information
herein given but can accept no liability whatsoever in
connection with it.
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EDITORIAL
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supermarkets but in independent
channels, and to this day the brand is
still listed in only a few retailers. It is not
in mass retailers such as Tesco and Asda
Walmart.
Bigham’s retailed initially only in
delicatessens and the food-halls of major
department stores in the London area. In
the late 1990s the brand’s combination of
quality and all-natural was a differentiator
that made it interesting to retailers.
Following a path that’s now a wellestablished one for growing a new brand,
Bigham’s next approached Waitrose, a
smaller UK retailer that has a reputation
for quality and is favoured by upperincome consumers (you can find Waitrose
in Dubai and Singapore as well as
London and Edinburgh). Starting in just
40 stores, the brand was rolled out to
the rest of the chain’s 350 stores. Later
Bigham’s went into Booths, a privatelyowned chain in the north of England
with a similar profile to Waitrose, online
retailer Ocado and selected branches of
the Sainsbury chain.
The company’s founder, speaking in
a UK media interview, attributed part
of his company’s success to people’s
Bigham’s is both the
highest-priced and the
fastest-growing ready
meal brand in the UK,
where the category is
worth £2.7 billion ($3.5
billion/€3.1 billion) in
retail sales.
increasing interest in food and where it
comes from, a trend which has developed
steadily over the last 20 years, and a
growing willingness to pay more for
products that are high quality – because
that quality represents value.
The brand’s focus on quality meant
that when the “horse-meat scandal”
broke in the UK in 2013, Bigham’s
benefited. Ready meals in almost all
supermarket chains were found to
contain either horsemeat or mystery
meats not stated on the label. Most of
these were at the lower-price end of the
market. It resulted in an immediate spike
in sales for Bigham’s and the brand hasn’t
looked back. The scandal accelerated the
trend for people to choose “real food”.
Bigham’s is both the highest-priced and
the fastest-growing ready meal brand
in the UK, where the category is worth
£2.7 billion ($3.5 billion/€3.1 billion) in
retail sales.
Bigham’s customers are willing to
spend more on quality food and won’t
compromise taste for price. Interestingly,
younger consumers buy the brand as well
as older consumers.
The brand also has appeal for people
who worry about packaging and the
environment. Meals come not in
plastic but in bamboo trays in a simple
cardboard sleeve. Wisely Bigham’s
doesn’t play on this in its marketing – the
concerned consumer can quickly see that
it is different from other products.
Bigham’s founder, in an interview with
UK newspaper The Telegraph, was more
honest than many entrepreneurs when he
said that luck and good timing played a
major role in his company’s success.
“The only way you can ever set up a
successful business is to be lucky,” he was
quoted as saying. “It is the thing you need
CHART 1: CHARLIE BIGHAM’S PRICE COMPARISON
Charlie Bigham’s ready meals are premium priced compared to other options in the market. But this is not something the brand is
aiming to change – instead, it is targeting the increasing number of consumers who are willing to spend a bit more on proper quality
food, and who are not willing to compromise taste for price.
14
£12.68
($16.52/€14.94)
Price per serving
Price per kg
12
10
8
£
6
£4
($5.21/€4.66)
4
2
£5.11
($6.66/€6.02)
£2.30
($3/€2.71)
£2
($1.30/€2.33)
£5.58
($7.27/€6.49)
£4.5
($5.86/€5.3)
£2.4
($3.13/€2.79)
0
Quorn Classic Lasagne (500g) Tesco Italian Beef Lasagne
(450g)
N E W
Sainsbury's Beef Lasagne
(430g)
Charlie Bigham's Lasagne
(355g)
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EDITORIAL
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more than anything else. Anyone who
says otherwise is just lying.”
COMMENT
How do you grow a new or emerging
product? There are some answers to that
question in the Bigham’s story – and they
are the same answers that you will find
in many other stories of successful new
brands:
1. Taste first: It’s the success factor
that should be obvious but often isn’t.
The number one reason why some
products succeed is because of taste.
That doesn’t mean taste that appeals
to everyone, but taste that’s a hit with
your target customers. Taste is, after all,
subjective, not objective. Some people
love coconut water, others loathe it, but
enough like it for coconut water to be a
large and successful business. The massive
success of the Slimming World range
of frozen ready meals (see Case Study
on page 24) – achieving $70 million in
retail sales in one year, despite retailing
at a 100% price premium and in only
one supermarket chain – is in large part
due to the brand’s focus on giving people
products that are “full of the flavour of a
home-cooked meal”. In the US the Path
of Life brand (see Case Study on page 27)
has also made a success by putting a taste
space between itself and existing products
in the market, getting its chefs to “amp
up the flavour” and “offer the sorts of
flavour profiles that consumers crave but
don’t have time to prepare themselves”.
Brands succeed because they placed taste
first. No brand consultant’s expensive
strategizing is going to help you if you
don’t do that.
2. Real food: What’s gaining ground
is products that are fresh, with short shelf
life and natural ingredients, and seen as
similar to something that you would make
at home. A focus on simple recipes and
simple ingredients lies behind the success
in the UK of Charlie Bigham’s in the
premium lifestyle segment of the market,
and a similar focus has enabled Slimming
World to create a successful premium
brand even in the supposedly pricesensitive mass market. It’s a focus that
has also propelled rapid success in the
US for Path of Life. Many manufacturers
and most retailers are obsessed with
maximizing shelf-life and producing for
the least cost. But long shelf-life and least
cost also means low or no growth and thin
margins – not to mention lower quality.
The growth and margin is increasingly
in the “real” niches that conventional
wisdom said could not succeed.
PRODUCT PORTFOLIO
Charlie Bigham’s offers a range of 33 different dishes, which includes traditional
dishes such as steak pie and macaroni & cheese, as well as dishes from Indonesian,
Moroccan, Indian, Thai, Vietnamese, Italian and Spanish cuisine.
Source: bighams.com
N E W
3. Focus on low volume,
premium price: These words are seen
as madness in some companies. Which is
a pity, because in today’s market it’s what
most businesses have to do to succeed.
Bigham’s is not aiming for the mass, just
for a segment of people who care about
quality and taste and are loyal to products
that deliver on those expectations. These
people are willing to pay a premium for
such products – which is why a price
premium of 100% has been no barrier
to Bigham’s. Slimming World has shown
that for real food that tastes good, there’s
an eager “big niche” audience in the mass
market that’s willing to pay a premium –
suggesting that our industry’s assumption
that price is dominant in mass-market
customer decision-making might be
wrong. Perhaps they only want to pay a
low price because they are so accustomed
to being sold low-quality products? In
the US Path of Life has also had rapid
success – and been identified by IRI as
the brand driving the frozen category –
despite a lower-volume, premium-price
brand. The food and beverage market is
full of such opportunities.
4. Products on some shelves, not
all shelves: Tempting as it is to try to
grow as fast as possible and get into every
supermarket, that’s a high-risk strategy
that has killed many smaller brands.
Better to “launch to learn” – begin as
Bigham’s did with limited distribution
(Bigham’s started with delis) then just a
handful of supermarkets with the right
type of customer. You might choose
never to go into the big mass retailers –
after 20 years Bigham’s still hasn’t. The
same “some shelves, not all shelves”
strategy worked well for Slimming World,
a brand that has bucked the trend of
collapsing sales for “diet” and “weight
management” products. Slimming World
defied conventional marketing wisdom,
partnering with just one retailer that
has just 850 stores. And yet despite such
limited distribution – perhaps because of
it – it earned $70 million (€62 million) in
retail sales in 2016, its first full year on
the market, becoming the biggest frozen
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EDITORIAL
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JUNE 2017
ready-meal brand in the UK market, with
a 15% share.
5. You don’t need a big
advertising budget: Bigham’s didn’t
run its first advertisements until 2015.
And its first TV ad was in just one region.
Spending on advertising in your first five
years is not proven as a way of growing a
business. More effective are sampling and
good PR, backed up social media.
6. Power of trends: You have to
be connected to succeed – sometimes
that’s planning, and sometimes it is just
a question, as Bigham’s founder says, of
luck. Bigham’s benefited from the trend
to natural ingredients, coupled with the
growing demand for ultra-convenient
products. However, you don’t have to rely
on luck. You can design your product to
connect to the enduring long-term trends,
most of which are now well-defined. If
you take a look at all of the case studies in
this issue of New Nutrition Business where
there are clear signs of steady growth –
RX Bars in snacks, Good Karma in flax
milks, Slimming World, Path of Life and
Sweet Earth in meals, Sargento in cheese
snacking – they are all products with very
clear connections to the demonstrably
enduring, long-term trends. It’s usually
wiser and safer to recognise trends and
figure out how to ride them. Creating
trends is a noble ideal – but expensive,
slow and fraught with risk of failure.
7. Have patience: As Bigham’s did,
start small, grow slowly, take a long-term
view of success.
One final point: Although the plant
foods trend exists it’s still not as powerful
as is sometimes claimed, nor are people
“cutting back on meat” as much as is
often stated – as Bigham’s has proved. All
of Bigham’s 33 dishes feature red meat,
chicken or fish – there are no vegan or
vegetarian options.
In fact Bigham’s is catching up fast
with Quorn, Europe’s most successful
meat substitute brand, which has spent
30 years doing everything right in terms
of taste and product development. Yet
Quorn is only growing at 2.4% per
annum. Bigham’s meat-and fish-based
meals will likely outsell those of Quorn
within three years. We expect that to be
the case because although the plant foods
trend is real, people want vegetables that
are convenient, they don’t want meat
substitutes.
MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
Charlie Bigham’s is active on all social media channels. In 2015 it debuted its first
ever TV ad which was broadcast across the south west of England for the month of
March. The ad is humorous and features Em and Hugo, enjoying a Charlie Bigham’s
fish pie and talking about how it is real food made from real ingredients. The ad
reached an estimated 54 million viewers and resulted in a drastic sales increase in
the region – particularly for the featured fish pie which rose 36% in unit sales.
“This is the life Hugo!”
“Certainly is Em!”
“Great company, good food Just one
thing. How come the food is real, and
we’re not?”
”Well, they don’t want us distracting from
Charlie Bigham’s fish pie! Succulent
haddock and salmon with its velvety white
sauce and creamy mash.”
”They won’t. No, not after last time”
“What do you mean? Stop it!”
”Charlie Bigham’s fish pie. From our kitchen
to your oven, with love!”
Source: bighams.com
TABLE 1: NUTRITION SNAPSHOT, CHARLIE BIGHAM’S LASAGNE
Source: bighams.com
N E W
”No I wouldn’t mind They could have made
the wine real too!”
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EDITORIAL
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The search for “natural energy”
Energy is one of the largest, most
successful and most profitable markets.
But the energy market is dominated by
fast energy – caffeine-based stimulation
drinks, led by Red Bull, which created
the category – and the core consumers
are overwhelmingly males aged 15- to
25-years-old, served by brands whose
ingredients, packaging and marketing
messages are a turn-off for all other
consumer segments.
Most consumers want their energy
not from a caffeinated drink but from
something they perceive as more natural.
It’s an under-served market – yet energy
is a key consumer need.
According to respected consumer
researchers Health Focus International, in
the 32 countries in which it conducts its
research, “energy” is consistently among
consumers’ top-5 or top-6 needs.
Quantitative research conducted by
food and beverage ingredients giant
Beneo in the US, UK and Germany
found that a high percentage of women
in the three countries said they were
“lacking in energy”:
• US 47%
• UK 43%
• Germany 39%
Beneo found that in the US and UK
the age groups 20-29 and 30-39 are
feeling the most that they lack energy
(44% and 45%).
Most consumers want
their energy not from a
caffeinated drink but from
something they perceive
as more natural. It’s an
under-served market –
yet energy is a key
consumer need.
HOW TO SUCCEED IN NATURAL ENERGY
For product developers wanting to create
a natural energy product there are four
success factors. These are:
1. Ingredients with a natural health
halo
2. Snackification
3. Satisfying (fills you up)
4. Taste
BELVITA COMMUNICATES “NATURAL ENERGY”
N E W
The most successful products are the
ones that deliver against these criteria.
1. Ingredients with a health halo
Sources of “natural energy” that
consumers seem willing to accept
include fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole
grains and other ingredients that are
readily available in nature. Protein is also
beginning to show up more in products as
a credible source of natural energy.
Interestingly, although brands in most
categories are under pressure to reduce
their sugar content, consumers looking
for “natural energy” have proven to
be forgiving about the level of sugar if
the product delivers the natural energy
benefit.
For example, Belvita Breakfast biscuits
have become a worldwide success despite
the fact that they deliver 10g-12g of sugar
per 50g serving. That’s less than most
sweet biscuits, but when you compare
them with Oreo’s – a successful indulgent
cookie brand in many countries and
which have about 16g per 50g – then
Belvita isn’t too far behind.
It’s also worth noting that Mondelez
markets a “reduced sugar” version of
Belvita. Informed sources say this variant
accounts for just 5% of the brand’s sales.
In other words, just because people tell
you they want a lower-sugar product, that
doesn’t mean that they will buy it instead
of the sweeter version.
Other products have done well despite
a high sugar content when people
perceive the sugar as being in some
way “natural”. Dates, for example, are
increasingly popular with consumers,
bloggers and celebrity chefs as an
alternative to sugar.
Dates are 60% sugar – but the fact
that the sugar naturally present in the
fruit and dates is seen as a good source
of natural energy means that dates get a
free pass from consumers in the way that
yoghurt with a 12% sugar content does
not. The dates are seen as “natural” and
therefore acceptable, while the yoghurt
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EDITORIAL
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is seen as having added sugar which is
unacceptable. The logic is questionable,
but it is powerful and it is driving
increasing sales of dates and increasing
use of dates as an ingredient in many
countries (see Chart 1).
It is a particularly popular ingredient in
snacks. Some variants of the Delicously
Ella brand of energy balls, for example,
have a 60% date content (24g of dates
per 40g serve).
2. Make it a snack
Snacking is the most powerful trend
in food and beverage, affecting every
category and every eating occasion. It has
already created new habits and a blurring
of boundaries, as Belvita Breakfast
has shown by making sweet cookies
an acceptable breakfast food for the
first time in many countries. The word
“snacking” is really now just a shorthand
for describing single-serve convenient
consumption.
Snacking is a key part of the strategy
of many – perhaps most – companies.
Mondelez, the maker of Belvita, has
said it intends to be the global leader
in well-being snacks, with the category
representing 50% of its portfolio by 2020,
up from 35% today.
The optimum product formats for the
natural energy message are essentially
any type of on-the-go single-serve
snacking product. Almost every brand
that has made a success of natural energy
is a snack, or a product adapted to be
a snack. The Soreen cake brand in the
UK found success not just by offering the
benefit of natural energy but by focusing
on providing single-serve snack variants
of its cakes.
Energy products are driven by
individual consumption, not family or
shared consumption. Several bulk or
commodity products have adopted the
natural energy message but it’s hard to
find evidence that this has done anything
to boost sales.
3. Satisfying (fills you up)
What people want is energy that will
enable them to keep going through their
working day or fuel them through sport
N E W
CHART 1: DATES ARE AN INCREASINGLY POPULAR INGREDIENT
Being all-natural but 60% sugar, dates are an excellent source of natural energy
and the use of dates as an ingredient has increased in several markets.
Numbers of products launched using dates as an ingredient
FRANCE
72
France
80
60
40
20
0
37
4
6
2010
2011
14
20
22
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
AUSTRALIA
Australia
100
61
58
2015
2016
37
50
20
13
11
18
2010
2011
2012
2013
0
2014
USA
300
240
200
100
51
56
44
2010
2011
2012
113
120
2013
2014
151
0
2015
2016
Source: GNPD Mintel, 2017 [claim used: ‘date’ in the product ingredients].
SOREEN NATURAL ENERGY BRAND MESSAGES
Source: Soreen.com
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or other activity.
They want to feel full (but not
bloated). Grains and nuts are established
as “satisfying” in the minds of many
consumers. Protein also benefits from
consumer beliefs about its “satisfying”
qualities.
4. Taste
It shouldn’t need to be said but it is worth
repeating. A product must perform so
well on taste that people would be willing
to buy it even if it didn’t carry a natural
energy message.
Taste is subjective, however, and
consumer tastes are much more
fragmented than in the past. The days of
a consumer taste-test on a “representative
group of consumers” may be over – what
is good to one group of people is not
good to another.
Coconut water, for example, has a
very polarizing taste that is rejected by
about half the people who try it, but that
hasn’t stopped coconut water becoming a
success over the last 10 years.
What matters is that the taste is
considered great by the segment of
people you are aiming your product at.
HOW TO COMMUNICATE THE NATURAL
ENERGY MESSAGE
Steady energy: One of the challenges
companies face is figuring out how to
talk to consumers about energy in a
meaningful way. Consumer research
conducted by Cargill Health & Nutrition
found that the concept of “steady” or
“balanced” energy worked best and was
associated with enabling people to get
through their day and supporting their
stamina.
The “steady energy” message is used
by Mondelez’s Belvita Breakfast cookie
brand in markets as diverse as China,
Brazil, the US and France. Probably the
world’s most successful natural energy
brand, Belvita has over $900 million
(€800 million) in retail sales worldwide.
There are two steps to the Belvita
message:
1. Messaging on the pack and in
advertising which tells people that
biscuits can be part of a healthy
breakfast.
2. An emphasis on the product’s
slow energy-release carbohydrates,
reassuring people that they can eat
sweet biscuits for breakfast and they
will get the energy they need to keep
going all morning – and they can still
feel virtuous.
Connect to sport: Sport – or the image
of sport – is a selling tool in multiple
categories, from clothing (where “active
wear” is now a multi-billion dollar
market) to footwear. Food is no exception
and “sportification” has been a proven
route to success for many brands:
Clif Bar was launched in 1992 by cyclist
Gary Erickson, who wanted to create a
better tasting energy bar for people like
him. Clif Bar is a convenient snack that
is intended to “fuel my workout” or “feed
my adventure”.
Clif – whose products are all organic –
has become a major supermarket brand
by firmly tethering its identity to sports
and activity and the idea of “naturally
healthy”.
Sports people who want something
they recognize as a food, with familiar
ingredients in normal-food packaging,
and who don’t want the often chemicallooking sports brands loaded with
CLIF BAR NATURAL ENERGY MESSAGES
Clif Bar has a clear focus on motivation and on the consumer’s individual energy needs.
Source: clifbar.com
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unfamiliar ingredients, gravitate to Clif.
Athlete sponsorship is a big part of
Clif Bar’s marketing strategy. Sponsoring
70 athletes in eight sports, the brand
creates brand awareness and display at a
range of events while also hosting its own
sporting events on a regular basis.
The sports connection has helped
Clif Bar become a giant of the US bars
market, with $720 million (€650 million)
in sales in 2016, an 11.5% increase over
2015.
Soreen was once a regional cake brand
in the UK but it has remade itself into a
national, premium brand with consistent
annual growth by launching a range
of snack cakes and positioning them as
“deliciously squidgy energy” for sports
people – not professionals, but normal
people who do sport at the weekend.
This rebranding turned the falling sales
around, and Soreen’s sales increased 58%
between 2012-2015. What used to be a
cake has become the most recognised
snack brand by cyclists in the UK, and
the brand very clearly targets sports
people in much of its marketing.
Like Clif, Soreen uses sponsorship
and sampling as marketing tools. The
brand sponsors individual athletes as
well as races and events, conducts heavy
sampling at cycling and running events,
and communicates that “25% of athletes
said Soreen is a staple part of their diet”.
The brand has made good use of social
media to build widespread popularity
among weekend athletes as a source
of slow energy. As one fan puts it on a
cycling message board: “…it’s high in
complex carbs, with protein to promote
slower release of those carbs…” So
popular is Soreen among cyclists that it’s
even possible to buy a cycling shirt with
the Soreen brand.
Bounce Foods offers a product format
that is radically different – it’s a ball, not
a bar – and which is now being copied by
other snack brands. Founders Paula and
Andy Hannagan ”saw the need for a truly
healthy, super-nutritious and genuinely
tasty snack” and launched Bounce Balls
in 2004 in Australia. Today it can also be
found in the US, Canada and UK.
The high-protein balls are marketed
with a focus on fitness and health, with
workout-related videos on social media.
Bounce conducts sampling at sporting
events, fairs, festivals and shopping malls
and also organizes its own events, focused
on fitness.
COMMENT
If you want to succeed in snacking,
natural energy is something consumers
need and want. There are as yet few
brands competing with a natural
energy message, but those few provide
case studies of what you need to do to
succeed:
• Offer a single serve product that’s
easy to consume on-the-go
• Use natural ingredients with a health
halo
• Make sure the product tastes great
• Connect to fitness and activity in
your communications and marketing
they can enable the consumer to do.
BOUNCE BALLS: MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
With creative and interactive websites, Bounce Balls make the consumer want to
scroll further and read more. With hashtags such as #beyourbest and #grablife,
and concepts such as The Bounce Effect, marketing communications are
focused on the products and what they can enable the consumer to do.
Source: av.bouncelifestyle.com
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Reinventing dairy to respond
to rise of plant milks
In the US one small dairy has already
done it. In every other market, dairies
that want to stay in business will take the
same route – give up processing cows’
milk and become makers of plant milks.
New York-based Elmhurst Dairy shut
down its plant in late 2016 as milk sales
fell and it struggled to make money.
But rather than throw in the towel, the
90-year-old family-owned-and-operated
company decided to use its milk expertise
to succeed in the non-dairy segment.
It has transformed itself into Elmhurst
Milked, a non-dairy operation. The
company unveiled its “milked nuts” line at
Natural Products Expo West in California
earlier this year. The four varieties of
plant milks it produces are almond,
cashew, hazelnut and walnut. Elmhurst
Milked’s entire line is vegan, lactose-free,
kosher, and non-GMO certified.
If that degree of change sounds
unlikely, just remember that much of
what has happened to our industry
over the last 10 years would have been
dismissed as unlikely – or even plain
ridiculous – a decade ago.
And it’s not just small companies
that are responding to the changing
market – Danone, one of the world’s
10-biggest dairy companies, last year
acquired White Wave, the market-leader
in plant-based milks in both the US and
Europe (where it operates under the
Alpro brand), making Danone the world’s
biggest producer of plant-based milks and
yoghurts.
The previous owner of White Wave,
Dean Foods, America’s biggest processor
of liquid milk, might just have realized
the strategic mistake it made back in 2012
when it decided to spin off White Wave
in an IPO which valued the business at
$2.78 billion (€2.49 billion), in order to
reduce its debt pile.
Dean Foods exited what was already
very clearly at that stage one of the
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strongest growth opportunities in food
and beverage, selling off a high margin
growth business to focus instead on
a declining low margin business. As
strategies go it wasn’t a great decision.
Faced with a decline in liquid milk
volume which has pushed down its share
price, Dean Foods now seems to be
looking for a way back in and has made
an investment in flaxseed-based milk
producer Good Karma Foods (see Case
Study on page 18).
Dairy companies around the world
are increasingly anxious about the rise
of plant-based milks as a steady – and
sometimes rapid – increase in their sales
is happening in Asia, Australasia, South
America, North America and Europe.
With their promise of being “easier
to digest”, their lactose-free credentials
appeal to consumers who associate liquid
dairy milk with intestinal discomfort and
to a smaller group who are motivated by
the idea that “plant-based” is somehow
healthier.
The trend is most advanced in the US,
where sales of almond milk grew from
close to zero in 2007 to almost $1 billion
(€895 million) in 2016, according to IRI
data, and plant milks of all kinds have
a 12% value share of the liquid milk
market. Plant milks have also succeeded
despite selling at a 100%
premium to cows’ milk – which
means their volume share is a
more modest 6%.
The US – and many other
markets – is also experiencing a
long-term decline in demand for
liquid milk which pre-dates the
advent of plant milks by 30 years.
People have been giving up the
habit of drinking a glass of milk
– a change that was driven partly
by the switch to low-fat milk (as
a result of pressure from health
advocates and governments)
which took away milk’s taste advantage
and partly by the proliferation of
better-tasting, refreshing, convenient
and healthier-halo alternatives, from
fruit smoothies to fruit-plus-vegetable
smoothies, bottled water, coconut water
and many, many others.
Even in Asia, where per capita
consumption of liquid milk is a fraction
of that in the west, the high rate of
lactose intolerance in the general
population is causing many people to
limit their intake of liquid milk and
look afresh at plant milks, which are
traditional beverages in many countries
and whose sales are increasing as a result
of products being modernised with more
convenience, a better nutritional profile
and better-taste.
DESPERATION
The response of the US dairy industry
to the threat of plant milks has an air
of misguided desperation. A senator
– a Democrat from the dairy state of
Wisconsin – has introduced legislation
that would make the FDA enforce an
existing guideline that limits the use of the
word “milk” to products that come from
cows, goats and sheep. If the bill succeeds,
companies selling almond, soy, hemp, and
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other plant-based “milks” would have to
stop using the term.
But it’s a case of shutting the stable
door after the horse has bolted. Renaming
almond milk as “almond beverage” won’t
make any difference to its growth or that
of any other plant milk. Almond milk
looks like cow’s milk, many consumers
think it tastes better and people have
got used to seeing it in the dairy chiller
cabinet, where it will still be on sale, even
if it’s not using the word “milk” on the
label. A label change will do nothing to
stop the rise of a category that it is now
established in people’s minds.
Some dairy executives argue that
it’s necessary to reduce consumer
confusion around the nutrition that
dairy milk delivers, saying that the
producers of plant-based milks are using
dairy’s wholesome reputation to sell
their products, which contain different
nutrients, most of which are added and
not natural and intrinsic to the product.
That point of view shows a total
failure to understand why people buy
plant milks: it’s because they don’t want
the feeling of bloating or other digestive
discomfort that they believe they get when
they drink cows’ milk. Or they just prefer
the taste.
The fact that plant milks are industrial
products, often composed of 10 or more
ingredients compared to one in cows’
milk, illustrates how
consumers’ desire
for something that’s
“natural” and has as few
ingredients as possible
is something they are
willing to give a back
seat to when they are
looking for the tangible
benefit of “easier to
digest”. It’s a reminder
that there are few
absolutes in consumer
behaviour; beliefs are
complex and often
appear contradictory.
Telling them about how
industrial plant milks
are isn’t going to change
Source: silk.com
their minds.
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Nor will any amount of marketing
around the vague subject of “better
nutrition” address their digestive issue
or cause them to re-think plant milks.
Providing a good-tasting lactose-free milk
just might – for some – and it’s worth
noting that lactose-free milk is one of the
few growth stories in the US market, with
sales up 15% in 2016.
Trying to use the law to change a label
is more attractive to some senior dairy
executives than investing in product
innovation, offering better-tasting
products, more digestion-friendly or
lactose-free options or more convenience.
These steps would all require courage
and creativity – two characteristics
that American milk executives have
never been noted for. It’s a failure of
management that seems incredible from
the country that has brought the world
Apple, Amazon, Google, Facebook and
hundreds of other creative inventions.
Plant milks will eventually plateau as
they are not to everyone’s taste and the
premium price – usually 100% per litre
more than cows’ milk – also limits their
appeal to the mass-market consumer
who doesn’t have a strong health or taste
motivation.
Demand for low-fat cows milk will
continue to decline – volume fell by
5.6% in the US in 2016 as more people
woke up to the fact that not only does it
not taste good, but there are no health
benefits (as they discover when they trawl
the internet and find reputable sources
that tell them the good news about dairy
fat and health). Sales of whole milk will
rise (they were up 4.6% in 2016) as will
sales of organic milk.
Cows’ milk will become – like many
other markets – a fragmented place,
with many profitable low-volume
opportunities. Smart dairies will offer
flavoured milks, milks with coffee, singleserve milks, milks with digestive heath
benefits and even plant milk – because
some consumers are going to buy them
anyway, so why surrender space in the
chiller cabinet to a plant-milk brand
that someone else owns and let another
company capture the value of the sale?
It will be hardest for volume-oriented
farmer-owned dairies to adapt – after all,
farmer shareholders understand cows,
they don’t understand what it takes to
succeed in the store in a rapidly-evolving
consumer market, as they have amply
proven over the past 10 and more years.
Companies like Switzerland’s Emmi
and New Zealand’s Spring Sheep milk
(see Case Studies in April NNB) and
Elmhurst Dairy show the way ahead for
companies willing to be innovative. Faced
with unstoppable change, sometimes
innovation and risk-taking is the only path
that’s available.
Source: goodkarmafoods.com
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E-commerce to power
free-from empire
With $100-million (€92 million) to spend, The Safe + Fair Food Co plans to buy up small non-allergenic food
brands with the aim of building an empire to dominate this highly-fragmented but growing niche. And it intends
to market its products almost exclusively via e-commerce. By DALE BUSS.
Following the game plan of a CEO with
experience in startups as well as with
traditional industry leaders, Safe + Fair
– which already owns Skeeter Snacks, a
nut-free cookie brand, and Mama Jess
Organics, an allergen-free pasta brand –
plans to acquire handfuls of other brands
that are similarly devoted to the needs
of the 17 million Americans with food
allergies and their families. Its strategy
is to then streamline and improve the
brands and their product lines, and make
the foods widely accessible and fairly
priced by selling them almost exclusively
online.
“Our target is to spend $100 million
in the next 24 months to acquire $100
million of EBITDA-positive [Earnings
before Interest, Tax, Depreciation
and Amortization] companies,” Will
Holsworth, CEO of the Chicago-based
company, told New Nutrition Business. “We
have looked at 120 different companies
to consider, and are looking at another
40 companies, and currently we’re doing
due diligence on six.”
He looks at another set of numbers
to project success for Safe + Fair. “If
we get as customers just one million
of the food-allergic families and they
order just two boxes of cake mix, a box
of macaroni and cheese and two boxes
of cookies, that comes to just $15 in
products,” Holsworth says. “If they buy
that just once a month, that’s $15 million
in revenues a month.”
“But those families aren’t just going to
order one or two boxes of stuff; they’re
going to order 10. Because if your son
has a peanut allergy and you’re out of
cookies, he can’t eat anything else. So
these people really stock up and send
their kids with their own food everywhere
they go.”
Holsworth figures he’s got good odds
of success in this endeavor, in part
because of his vast experience working
“If your son has a
peanut allergy and
you’re out of cookies, he
can’t eat anything else.
So these people really
stock up and send their
kids with their own food
everywhere they go.”
– Will Holsworth, CEO of Safe+Fair
at a high level for PepsiCo as well as for
startups CytoSport, Muscle Milk and
Sambazon.
Another reason the odds favour Safe
+ Fair is that its deep-pocketed owners,
Dave Leyrer and Pete Najarian, are
dedicated personally to the success of
the company, like many entrepreneurs
behind better-for-you startups. They
have children who have serious food
allergies, and they were frustrated with
the state of allergy-safe food. That’s why
they founded Skeeter Snacks, which
became well known for its line of nut-free
products served in schools nationwide
and on all JetBlue flights.
A third reason Holsworth believes
Safe + Fair will succeed is that its time
has come. “The 17 million in America
now are growing by 20% a year,” he
said. “You can’t overstate how much it
changes people’s lives if their child has
Source: www.skeeternutfree.com N E W
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an anaphylactic reaction, so you can’t
overstate the lengths parents will go to
make sure that doesn’t happen to their
kids.
“There’s also the social factor of the
interactions between allergic and nonallergic families. Families have to create
wide barriers around their allergic kids,
or they have to ask friends to buy superweird food that their own kids don’t want
to eat.”
Initially, Leyrer and Najarian asked
Holsworth if he would be interested in
running Skeeters, and he said no; non-
allergenic cookies were too narrow a
play for him. But he told them he would
be interested in running and building
the type of company that became Safe
+ Fair because Holsworth saw a ripe
opportunity to build such an enterprise.
“There are many small companies
making non-allergenic products that have
single-digit sales-growth rates but doubledigit growth in EBITDA,” Holsworth
said. “If we buy a small company with a
small following, say it’s $5 million or even
$75 million in revenues, each of them
is not super-relevant to food-allergic
families.
“But if I buy three or four of these
sleepy companies, I can get the right
synergies and get EBITDA expanding
more than revenues and return three to
five times cash all day long. We can make
these companies way more attractive
financially with an executive team that
can scale. And right now, allergic families
can buy only 5% to 10% of the food in
a typical grocery store. So every time
we get into a new category, we’re giving
them an opportunity to buy. By building
even a modest connection to allergic
TABLE 1: NUTRITION SNAPSHOT, SKEETERS CHOCOLATE CHIP MINI COOKIES
Source: www.skeeternutfree.com TABLE 2: NUTRITION SNAPSHOT, MAMA JESS BIEN GOOD PASTA SAUCE
Source: www.mamajess.com
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families, we can generate eight-to-10
times cash.”
Safe + Fair is buying a majority stake
in each small outfit, sometimes up to
75%. “We want to be in a condition to
create synergies and [earnings],”he said.
“That means one CEO of the whole
company, one CFO and so on.”
A Minneapolis-based venture outfit,
Shoreview Capital, does most of the
research on potential acquisitions for Safe
+ Fair. “They create a deal flow for me,”
Holsworth explained. “About once a
month I see a list of 10 to 20 companies
that either are for sale or that I’ve said I
might be interested in buying.”
It’s important for Safe + Fair not
to over-pay to acquire companies
and brands to feed his rollup strategy,
Holsworth said. “You’ll get some big
brands out of Boulder [Colo.] that will
pay a price of many times revenue for
these companies,” he said. “That’s not a
business model that works.”
FOCUS ON INNOVATION AND
IMPROVEMENT
For Safe + Fair, Holsworth and a team
of similarly experienced food-industry
executives are focusing not only on
having a family of brands and a variety
of products but also on internallygenerated innovations in everything from
recipe improvements to more attractive
packaging. Also crucial is garnering
third-party certification of products as
allergen-free.
So, for instance, the company is
introducing a new brand of dry staples
called Good To Give, which will consist
of products such as macaroni and cheese,
cake mixes and granola – all certified
allergen-free and non-GMO. But to
accomplish an important part of his
mission, making Safe + Fair brands and
products affordable to average families,
Holsworth said that the company isn’t
relying on organic ingredients because
they’re too expensive.
“So our mac-and-cheese, for instance,
will compete with Annie’s, which
contains no nuts – but isn’t certified nut-
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free,” Holsworth said. “For parents, that
leaves too high a risk. Ours is a betterlooking package than Annie’s, too, and
because it’s certified allergen-free, friends
of allergic families can serve it proudly.
It’s also the same price as Annie’s.”
To market Safe + Fair, its brands and
products, the company has turned almost
entirely to e-commerce. One reason is
that the company quickly can tap into “a
really deep community of people who
already have coalesced. They’re always
online asking one another what their
kids can eat, or saying go to this camp or
this hotel, or this park or school is better
than others. The customer-acquisition
cost is substantially less than for almost
any other e-commerce business because
you’re not trying to convince anyone of
anything.”
With his vast experience in building
brands at retail, Holsworth also believes
that Safe + Fair would be harmed by
the distraction of building sales through
bricks-and-mortar stores. “It creates an
enormous body of work that you need to
focus on every day, and if your brand and
products don’t break through the clutter,
you’ve wasted everything,” he said.
However, the company does make an
exception to supply its products to Costco
warehouse stores. “Our products and
packaging lend themselves particularly
well to Costco, because they want to have
trusted brands on their shelves, and ones
that innovate,” Holsworth said.
“REASONABLE” PRICING
Far more important at this point is the
school market that already has been
penetrated by Skeeters (whose products
are being renamed by Safe + Fair). “If
one kid in a class is dealing with an
allergy, essentially every kid in the class
is,” he said.
Safe + Fair also is trying to achieve
reasonable price points that often elude
better-for-you new products and brands –
but which are important, Holsworth said,
to the founders’ goal of making allergenfree products available to the masses.
“We’re dedicated to a steadfast and
fair pricing scenario,” Holsworth said.
“These people go through enough.”
Source: www.mamajess.com
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Unilever aiming to
scale Sir Kensington’s?
Sir Kensington’s is a brand that lets Unilever play in the premium and vegan segments of the condiments category.
It offers a clean-label, millennial-friendly brand image and a chance to play in plant foods with a product made
from waste-water from processing chickpeas. By CAROLINE MACDONALD.
It’s a sign of how strategy is shifting that
Unilever has committed itself to a step
that only five years ago would have been
seen as high-risk and in fact unacceptable
for such a giant company. In buying
embryonic condiments brand Sir
Kensington’s, Unilever clearly believes it
can grow the brand far and fast.
After fending off the £115bn (€106bn)
Kraft Heinz offer, Unilever announced
its intention to sell its spreads business,
which includes brands like Flora and
Stork, fuelling rumours that it might
withdraw from the food business
altogether. Instead, the company is
doubling down on condiments – it
makes Hellman’s mayonnaise – and is
refocusing on ice-cream and tea.
Sir Kensington’s co-founders Mark
Ramadan and Scott Norton first noticed
that the ketchup market was in a rut
when they were studying together at the
Ivy League Brown University in Rhode
Island. They came up with the idea of a
gourmet ketchup in an entrepreneurship
class – and went on to host tasting parties
for the product in their dormitories.
The friends graduated and went off to
work: Ramadan for consulting company
McKinsey, and Norton for Lehman
Brothers in Tokyo, but they knew they
were still onto something with their
ketchup idea and decided to go into
business together to make it reality.
“They both had this itch they wanted
to scratch with Sir Kensington’s,” the
company’s vice president of marketing
Patrick Jammet told New Nutrition Business.
“They had seen that food was evolving,
but condiments were being left behind.”
The pair aimed to reinvent ketchup
as a natural product, cutting out
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high fructose corn syrup and tomato
concentrate, and using more flavourful
tomatoes and a small amount of organic
sugar instead.
“Food trends were changing. What
consumers wanted out of their food had
changed,” said Jammet. “They want a
deeper understanding of their foods and
where they come from. It is more than
just condiments. If I’m going out of
my way to get a higher quality piece of
meat, why would I put a lower quality
condiment next to it?”
The company started to look for
other categories that might have
been neglected in the same way, and
mayonnaise was the next obvious choice.
The mayonnaise market was also much
bigger, although Norton and Ramadan
didn’t know it at the time. Adding
mustard to the range opened them up to
hotel and food service outlets, which were
looking for a complete set of condiments.
UNDER PRESSURE
Although Hellman’s is America’s bestselling mayonnaise, the Sir Kensington’s
product gives Unilever an easy point
of entry to the premium condiments
market, which has put pressure on
dominant brands in recent years. A
study from investment bank Jefferies
found that big brands are under pressure
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across the board, with large packaged
food companies losing share in 42 of 54
categories.
All Sir Kensington’s condiments start
with home-style recipes and are made
without genetically modified ingredients
or high fructose corn syrup. The
mayonnaise includes certified humane
free range eggs, and the company also
makes a vegan eggless mayonnaise,
dubbed Fabanaise, which is made using
aquafaba, the liquid left over when
chickpeas are cooked.
“CONVINCED”
Vegan cooking websites have touted
aquafaba for years as an alternative to
egg whites in meringues – and an intern
at Sir Kensington’s suggested it could be
the answer for transforming the vegan
mayonnaise market.
“We didn’t want to make a ‘me too’
vegan mayonnaise. We are about going
against the grain,” Jammet said.
“Substitutes had been used for years
and years. We saw a huge opportunity
for innovation. Most people at the time
were using a yellow pea protein or a soy
protein,” he said. “…If people could
use aquafaba for meringues, why not
mayonnaise? So we went to Whole Foods
and drained a can of chickpeas to try it.”
Immediately, the team was convinced
that this was what they were looking for,
and Fabanaise was launched about a year
ago.
“One of the big challenges was
that there was no supply chain for
aquafaba. It would mean going to every
Whole Foods and buying every can of
chickpeas,” Jammet said.
Initially, the company used the
waste aquafaba from a local hummus
manufacturer before eventually striking
a deal with a major chickpea supplier.
Fabanaise, which is made with sunflower
oil, is now gaining traction on the food
service side as well as through grocery
stores.
“It’s one of the only vegan
mayonnaises that is soy-free and canolafree,” said Jammet. “Most importantly, it
N E W
tastes delicious.”
Until now, Sir Kensington’s sales have
centred on a few hundred popular New
York eateries and about 5,000 natural
and specialty grocers, including Whole
Foods. While Sir Kensington’s declined to
discuss its sales, industry sources estimate
them at over $3 million (€2.7 million) in
retail channels in 2016 – a 100% increase
over the previous year. The company also
has a large proportion of sales from the
restaurant and hospitality sectors, so the
total sales figure might be as high as $6
million (€5.5 million).
“Our core consumer is people who
care more about what they are eating.
It’s not about demographics – it’s more
about psychographics. We know that
making ourselves available in the natural
and specialty channel was where we were
going to find these consumers. Now we
are seeing natural shoppers are shopping
in conventional channels more than ever.
…Unilever can help open the doors up to
a lot of those retailers.”
For Norton and Ramadan, Unilever’s
Sustainable Living Plan – its strategy for
growth while reducing environmental
impact – was another draw. Unilever and
Sir Kensington’s claim to have similar
core values, placing sustainability and
social responsibility at the centre of their
business.
“Some of these larger companies can
have a stigma attached, but we don’t
have that with Unilever at all,” Jammet
TABLE 1: NUTRITION SNAPSHOT, CHIPOTLE FABANAISE
TABLE 2: NUTRITION SNAPSHOT, SPICY KETCHUP
Source: www.sirkensingtons.com
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JUNE 2017
said, adding that he thought those shared
values were likely a big attraction for
Unilever too. Financial details of the
deal have not been released, but the Sir
Kensington’s team will remain intact,
and will continue to be managed by its
founders in New York.
“They were buying a brand and team
of employees that has a culture that
stands for a lot,” Jammet said.
Sir Kensington’s prides itself on
the integrity and authenticity of its
ingredient list, meaning that customers
not only would recognise every item, but
also would be able to find the ingredients
themselves in the supermarket. Its
mission statement is “to bring integrity
and charm to ordinary and overlooked
food”.
While integrity is in its ingredients,
the charm comes in the form of Sir
Kensington himself.
The story of Sir Kensington, an
Oxford-educated traveller and food
enthusiast who once made ketchup for
Catherine the Great of Russia, is told in
detail on the company’s website – and
it is entirely fictional. Marketers often
say that the story behind a product is
increasingly important to consumers – so
does it matter if that story is made up, as
long as it is compelling?
Jammet describes Sir Kensington as
the “spirit animal” of the company.
“The character is one of the ways we
stand out. People are drawn more than
ever to brands that have a story. We
wanted to make sure it’s being positioned
as a premium alternative. “Fancy” is
one word that people use. …The fancy
aristocratic vibe, it’s about adding a bit
of humour and charm to the brand as
well.”
However, he insists that the story of
Sir Kensington doesn’t replace the actual
story of how the brand was born.
After finding its place among the
American condiment giants, can Sir
Kensington’s do the same elsewhere?
Jammet thinks so.
“We have been up against this
nostalgia that comes with classic brands,
especially with ketchup and mayonnaise.
When people start looking at the
ingredient panel they are craving a closer
connection to their brands,” he said.
“That puts us in a really strong position.”
CHART 1: SIR KENSINGTON’S PRICE COMPARISON
18
16
Price per pack
$15.18
(€4.66)
Price per liter
$12.66
(€11.4)
14
$15.62
(€14.06)
$13.38
(€12.04)
12
$9.28
(€8.35)
10
$
8
$6.15
(€5.54)
$4.55
(€4.10)
6
4
$7.39
(€6.65)
$5.99
(€5.39)
$2.46)
(€2.21)
$5.39
(€4.85)
$2.6
(€2.34)
2
0
Hellmann's Real
Mayonnaise (400ml)
Granovita Mayola
Vegan Mayo (280ml)
Sir Kensington's
Fabanaise (473ml)
Follow Your Heart
Veganaise (340ml)
Hampton Creek Just
Mayo Vegan
Mayonnaise (355ml)
Source: wwwsirkensingtons.com
N E W
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Sir Kensington's
Mayonnaise (473ml)
P L A N T- B A S E D CA S E S T U DY
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JUNE 2017
Dairy giant places bet on fastgrowth flax milk brand
With a nut-free product that sets it apart from its competitors – and with a recent injection of capital from food
giant Dean Foods – Good Karma looks set to make flax-based milk and yoghurts a much bigger niche in a plantbased yogurt segment that’s forecast to be worth $600 million (€530 million). By JULIAN MELLENTIN.
In May 2017 Dean Foods – America’s
biggest producer of liquid milk –
announced that it was making an
investment in tiny flax-milk start-up
Good Karma Foods, while also signing a
distribution deal with the brand to allow it
to expand yet further and faster.
Based in Boulder, Colorado – long
a centre of health-oriented start-ups
– Good Karma has been in existence
since the 1990s, formulating private label
plant-based products, launching flaxseedbased milks under its own brand in 2012
and since then expanding its range to
include probiotic drinkable yoghurts and
spoonables.
The company does not disclose sales,
but industry sources and SPINS data
suggest that the Good Karma brand’s
retail sales were around $6 million (€5.3
million) in 2016. CEO Doug Radi, who
joined the company in 2014 after a career
that included time at White Wave – the
maker of almond and soy milks which has
become the market leader in plant milks in
both the US and Europe – said in a media
report in late 2016 that he saw the underdeveloped plant-based yoghurts segment,
which he believed was worth less than $80
million (€72 million), as potentially having
a $600 million (€530 million) value.
Good Karma positions its range
as sustainable, vegan-friendly, kind to
animals and “free of all major allergens”
– specifically free-from dairy, lactose,
nuts, soy and gluten. As the majority of
plant milks are made with nuts – notably
almond, cashew and coconut – its nutfree status gives the small brand a point
of difference in an increasingly crowded
category. Compared to other plant-based
milks in the market, it is found on the
less expensive end of the pricing scale
N E W
(see Chart 1). Good Karma’s flaxseed
milk is in around 6,000 stores, including
Whole Foods Market, Sprouts, Target and
Safeway.
Good Karma promotes its milks as
delivering 1,200mg of omega-3s per
240ml serving from flaxseed and 5g of pea
protein.
The drinkable and spoonable yoghurts
are made with “live and active cultures”
although the product label does not
mention any specific strain. Each 170g
serve of the yoghurt delivers 800mg of
omega-3s, has 90 calories and only 7g of
sugars (the product is sweetened with cane
sugar) and provides 15% of the RDVs of
vitamins D and B12.
And as is common with most non-dairy
products, the yoghurt is made with many
more ingredients than a dairy-based
yoghurt – 14 in fact. Even the flax milk is
made with 10 ingredients. This puts these
products far from the “few ingredients
as possible” and “simple as possible”
position that many consumers claim to
prioritise in selecting their food. Clearly
the committed plant milk consumer is
willing to compromise on naturalness and
simplicity.
Good Karma uses a “feel the benefit”
message in its marketing communications,
notably for its yoghurt products, and
claims that they will “help to keep your
belly happy”, addressing the need for
digestive wellness and avoiding a feeling of
bloating which a small but growing group
of consumers associates with cows’ milk.
It’s a consumer need that has been a key
driver of the plant milk category.
Positivity and goodness is one of Good
Karma’s key messages. The company says
its mission is to “inspire goodness” and
that this is the basis for everything that
it does: “By providing allergen-friendly
GOOD KARMA INVITES CUSTOMERS TO CREATE GOODNESS AND “POUR IT
FORWARD”
Source: goodkarmafoods.com
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19
JUNE 2017
products that put a smile on your face,
we hope you’ll be inspired to pour some
goodness forward.”
The hashtag #pouritforward is
commonly used in the brand’s social
media communications, and there is a
Pinterest board by the brand dedicated
to “inspiring goodness”. Consumers are
encouraged to look out for – and spread –
positivity and goodness.
Good Karma is active on all main
social media platforms, where it shares
recipes, facts and ideas intended to make
an allergen-free life easier and more
interesting – and on how we can spread
goodness in life.
While Good Karma can not become
the next White Wave, it certainly has
the potential to make flax-based milk
and yoghurts a much bigger niche than
they are today, with its combination of
technical know-how and experience; a
proven ability to create products and
secure distribution; a competitive pricepoint; a CEO with insider experience in
the plant milks business; a clear allergenfree positioning and a nut-free point of
difference in a category dominated by nut
milks – and now coupled with capital from
Dean Foods and this giant company’s
distribution skills.
GOOD KARMA FOODS’ “FEEL THE BENEFIT” MESSAGE
Source: goodkarmafoods.com
CHART 1: GOOD KARMA FOODS PRICE COMPARISON
Compared to other plant-based milks in the market, Good Karma’s original flaxseed milk is
found on the cheaper end of the pricing scale.
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TABLE 1: NUTRITION SNAPSHOT, GOOD KARMA DAIRY FREE YOGHURT, FLAXMILK AND PROBIOTIC DRINKABLE YOGHURT
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Source: goodkarmafoods.com
N E W
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DA I RY CA S E S T U DY
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JUNE 2017
Sweet stretch for cheese snack
Sargento’s on-the-go protein-based snack, Balanced Breaks, remains a powerhouse not only for the traditional
cheese company, but also for the total refrigerated snacking segment in the US. Its latest innovation is pitched at
the consumer’s sweet tooth. By DALE BUSS.
Sargento has added a sweet variant
to its original and highly successful
Balanced Breaks line, a two-compartment
combination of cheese cubes in one and
a mix of dried fruit pieces and nuts in the
other.
Balanced Breaks was an important
factor in the impressive 12.6% sales
increase in 2016 in a category that
SymphonyIRI calls “refrigerated lunches.”
In 2016, Balanced Breaks sold $54
million (€49 million) in outlets where sales
are measured by SymphonyIRI. Trial was
11% and Balanced Breaks enjoyed 42%
repeat purchases.
Balanced Breaks remains designated a
“Pacesetter” by SymphonyIRI, a Chicagobased market research firm that tracks
mass market sales of products in the US.
“We’re thrilled with the Pacesetters
award,” Ryan Hemsing, director of
marketing for Sargento, told New Nutrition
Business. “Balanced Breaks has been one
of the most successful product launches
in Sargento history. And the snacking
category overall continues to grow and
gives us opportunity to tap into that
growth.”
Sargento has been one of America’s
biggest cheese producers and brands
for more than a half-century. But until
Balanced Breaks, its moves to add value
to a commodity product line mainly
consisted of figuring out new ways to cut
cheese: into slices, sticks, cubes and shreds.
When Sargento introduced Balanced
Breaks in 2015, it was at the forefront of
a new wave of similar on-the-go, singleserve cheese-plus-nuts snack packages
– for example, Kraft’s Oscar Mayer P3
snack pack that includes meat, cheese and
nuts.
Sargento tries to ensure that Balanced
Breaks are merchandised in the dairy case
near its cheeses. “Most often stores put it
with our core string cheeses,” Hemsing
said. “And because our focus has always
N E W
been on 100% natural cheese and on
innovation, we want Balanced Breaks to
be in that dairy case.”
Sargento pursues a “360-degree”
marketing plan to generate awareness
and trial. “As with any other new product,
creating product awareness remains our
biggest opportunity,” Hemsing said. The
company relies on TV advertising and
digital and increasingly social media.
“We make sure we get out the
message,” he said. “And that is what
creates trial. We’re trying to hit consumers
at various points in their journey, and
multiple different times, to get both
awareness and trial.”
The initial four SKUs of Balanced
Breaks each provided 7g of protein and
less than 200 calories, in three-count packs
that retailed for a suggested $3.69 (€3.36).
Sargento research later picked up a
growing consumer interest in “balance” in
their nutrition – in not relying too much
on any one component. “Their focus is
more of a balanced lifestyle,” Hemsing
said. This raised the question of whether
Balanced Breaks could also appeal to
consumers’ desire for sweetness without
undermining its basic nutritional message.
“While they know that cheese brings
them a great natural source of protein,
consumers also are looking for ways to
continue to satisfy their sweet tooth as they
look for real goodness,” he said. Moreover,
he said, consumers are looking for their
snacks to provide more and more of their
overall nutritional needs.”
There was an opening for sweet
elements in Balanced Breaks, Sargento
concluded, as long as each fit comfortably
under a healthful theme. Sargento has
debuted four Sweet Balanced Breaks
varieties:
• Cheddar Cheese with Raisins SeaSalted Roasted Almonds and Greek
Yogurt-Flavored Drops
• Monterey Jack Cheese with Dried
Cranberries, Banana Chips and
Dark Chocolate Chunks
• Cheddar Cheese with RaspberryFlavored Dried Cranberries,
Graham Crackers and Milk
Chocolate Chunks
• Monterey Jack Cheese with Dried
Cranberries and Dark ChocolateCoated Peanuts
Each provides 5g to 7g of protein – a
lower threshold of protein than regular
Balanced Breaks – and contains fewer
than 200 calories, in line with the standard
for regular Balanced Breaks. The Sweet
line also is priced at $3.69 (€3.36).
Hemsing conceded that Sargento needs
to be careful not to violate the simplicity
of the Balanced Breaks concept. “The
challenge is to find the right balance and
pace of innovation to satisfy consumers’
needs,” he said.
Sargento expects competitors to
proliferate as they see the success of
Balanced Breaks. “Category lines will
continue to blur as snacking trends
evolve,” Hemsing said. “And we’ll
continue to see lots of competition.”
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JUNE 2017
Cautious approach helps
clean protein bar to fill a gap
Searching for a natural-protein nutrition or energy bar to fuel his workouts and daily life, Peter Rahal and a friend
became business partners by creating their own bars based on egg whites and other whole-foods ingredients,
and built Rxbar into an eight-figure startup in just four years. By DALE BUSS.
Nutrition bar start-up Rxbar has
rocketed past $10 million (€8.9 million)
in annual sales to become the No. 3
nutrition-bar brand in the US natural
grocery channel in less than two years on
retail shelves, selling five of the top seven
SKUs, according to founder Peter Rahal.
“Now we’ve got people trying to copy
us, which is always a flattering thing,”
Rahal, who is chief executive officer, told
New Nutrition Business. Co-founder Jared
Smith is the chief financial officer. “But it
takes a lot of work and execution. It’s not
easy. The ideas and information may be
easy, but it’s another thing to do it, and
the way we built the business wasn’t easy.
We did it the traditional way.”
Rahal said that the two “weren’t alone
in recognizing” this void in the market.
“We were just able to identify it and
execute on it. And there’s a relationship
between the size of the problem you solve
and the business that results.”
At the moment, Rxbar’s stock-intrade is its long list of available bars that
couldn’t be simpler in their ingredients –
and which are listed on the front of each
package, in big, bold print. There are
more ingredients in each bar, but most of
the varieties and their “recipes” highlight
the base formula of Rxbars: “3 Egg
Whites, 6 Almonds, 4 Cashews, 2 Dates,
No B.S.” The 11 flavours typically retail
for a suggested $1.99 to $2.49 (€1.83 to
€2.29) per 52g bar and include:
• Chocolate Sea Salt
• Peanut Butter Chocolate
• Chocolate Chip
• Blueberry
• Peanut Butter
• Coconut Chocolate
• Maple Sea Salt
N E W
•
•
•
•
Mixed Berry
Mint Chocolate
Coffee Chocolate
Apple Cinnamon
“Everything had to
have value and drive
value – we didn’t want
any ingredients that cut
corners or just lowered
costs or were fillers.”
Peter Rahal, CEO, Rxbar
Smith and Rahal came to starting a
food company about as green as could
be. Rahal worked at a logistics startup
and Smith worked at a mutual fund.
They “couldn’t believe there wasn’t a
healthier protein bar out there,” Rahal
said, echoing what’s on Rxbar’s web site.
And their friends and family, seeing the
hundreds of bars available and the many
outlets for them, told them, “The world
doesn’t need another bar.”
But the pair insisted there was an
opening for another type of bar because
“there wasn’t a natural protein bar with
whole, quantifiable ingredients,” as Rahal
put it – “there wasn’t a clean protein
bar. We identified a huge gap in the
marketplace.”
Did they wonder why such a huge
and obvious hole existed, and maybe see
that as a reason for caution? “We figured
that a lot of people cut corners,” Rahal
said. “This type of bar isn’t easy to make.
Some raw materials are expensive. And
from an entrepreneur’s perspective, the
bar category is super-competitive – so
they don’t see the opportunity.”
In any event, the two began
experimenting with recipes in a kitchen
blender. For the bar base, egg whites
were a foundational ingredient upon
which they agreed. “We wanted a whole-
Source: www.rxbar.com
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food protein bar, one with high-value
ingredients, clean and natural,” Rahal
said. Egg whites had the disadvantage
of being more expensive than soy and
other protein forms, and also of being
allergenic to some people. “But we knew
that’s what we wanted. We were pretty
intentional about it from the beginning.”
“EVERYTHING MUST DRIVE VALUE”
As far as other ingredients were
concerned, they agreed that “everything
had to have value and drive value –
we didn’t want any ingredients that
cut corners or just lowered costs or
were fillers.” Dates, for example, were
important as a binding ingredient.
Originally, Rxbars relied on figs as an
ingredient second in importance only
to egg whites, and the bar sold well that
way. But Smith and Rahal didn’t like
some of the taste notes provided by figs.
So they switched to cashews even though
they’re about $4.50 (€4.14) a pound,
three times more expensive than figs.
“We realized that cashews drove
such better flavour and texture, so we
reformulated,” Rahal explained. “It
was a decision about quality. We totally
didn’t have to do that – the product was
selling well with figs. The concept had
been proven and the business already was
successful. But that was a quality move.”
experienced sales success right out of the
gate.
They chose health clubs “because
the primary purpose for people there
is to work out. Our interests are totally
aligned,” Rahal said. Despite the fact
that better-for-you food and beverage
brands continually target distribution
at fitness clubs, Rahal noted that most
chains haven’t done a very good job of
developing merchandising platforms
or even devoted spaces for retailing
packaged foods and beverages. “Their
core competency isn’t retailing, so we
have to partner with them and help them
in that respect,” he said.
For instance, sleeves of Rxbars “are
display-ready for their countertops”. The
brand also supplies countertop displays
and makes available large floor displays
“It’s a continuous
conversation. We never
want to just make a
product just for growth –
it has to solve a problem
or fit into a bigger goal.
– Peter Rahal, CEO
for merchandising, as well as banners
“and other kinds of paraphernalia to
bring attention and drive awareness”.
The partners were wary of bringing
Rxbars to conventional or even natural-
Source: www.rxbar.com
TWIST
TABLE 1: NUTRITION SNAPSHOT, RXBAR PEANUT BUTTER CHOCOLATE
It also was part of what Rahal called the
partners’ “kind of obsession with seeking
excellence – a mindset of continuous
improvement. Better ingredients, better
packaging, adjustments to the formula. A
lot of people wouldn’t touch any of it.”
Another important twist was Rxbar’s
go-to-market strategy: It focused, like
many brands, on the every-day fit
person and athlete. But to pursue that
concentrated market, the company
initially retailed only online and, in the
bricks-and-mortar realm, only through
gyms and fitness clubs. They stuck with
this approach for two-and-a-half years,
which is a long time for a brand that
N E W
Source: www.rxbar.com
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JUNE 2017
channel retail stores in part because they
feared the brand’s proposition – sound as
it was – would be drowned out. But after
30 months, they decided that online and
gym sales had raised awareness of the
brand and products enough that it was
worth taking a shot at stores.
Still, they proceeded cautiously; they
decided to target one retailer and build
from there. They selected Wegman’s, the
Northeast-US independent retailer with
a deserved reputation for welcoming and
showcasing innovative products in betterfor-you categories. “They’re best-inclass,” Rahal said. “We wanted to make
sure we were successful.”
Prior awareness has helped Rxbars
succeed in Wegman’s, which Rahal said
is one of America’s biggest nutrition-bar
retailers. Now the brand also is available
in Whole Foods Markets, Trader Joe’s,
Target, Publix, Kroger and SafewayAlbertson’s stores (and Rahal was
surprised to learn that Rxbars also are
being distributed, at least on a limited
basis, at Whole Foods Markets stores
near London and Glasgow.)
“CONTINUOUS CONVERSATION”
Not surprisingly, given the brand’s
success in growing from just eight
SKUs a year ago to 12 now, Smith and
Rahal are pondering new products and
even line extensions. “It’s a continuous
conversation,” Rahal said. “We never
want to just make a product just for
growth – it has to solve a problem or fit
into a bigger goal.
“And we don’t want to over-SKU. We
want to have the right mix. So we don’t
know for sure yet, but we’re very sensitive
that as we launch new flavours we retain
the right mix. We are only four years old,
so we know we’re not at the maximum
yet. But we see that as some companies
get older, they need growth, so they
look at flavour innovation. We want to
make sure that flavour innovation is
incremental, not cannibalisation.”
Also, Rahal said, Rxbar may work
as a brand in non-bar formats. “The
challenge is that we’re OK just being a
bar brand,” he said. “Another format
would have to be innovation that makes
a lot of sense, not just for the sake
of chasing growth. There has to be
value. The same principles we started
with. That may take a lot of discipline,
especially when growth tapers a bit.”
One other uncommon aspect of the
company is that it started in the Midwest
and hasn’t gotten any professionalinvestor backing. More and more
better-for-you startups these days are
popping up on both American coasts,
where cultural and lifestyle leadership –
including diet – long has found a home.
There’s also a lot more venture funding
available there.
OLD-FASHIONED GROWTH STRATEGY?
“I’m proud that we’re not venturebacked,” Rahal said. “It’s status quo to
go raise a bunch of money to build a
brand and to give a bunch of product
away. We’ve built our company the oldfashioned way – through profitable sales.
We actually have a business that’s standalone, that’s a great business and doesn’t
need others’ capital to keep it alive.”
CHART 1: RXBAR PRICE COMPARISON
60
Price per bar
$51.73
(€46.41)
Price per kg
50
$39.83
(€35.73)
$56.04
(€50.27)
$42.71
(€38.31)
40
$
30
$25
(€22.26)
$29.26
(€26.25)
20
10
$1
(€0.89)
$1.99
(€1.79)
$2.39
(€2.14)
$2.99
(€2.68)
$2.69
(€2.41)
$2.69
(€2.41)
0
Nature Valley Nut &
Dark Chocolate
Protein Bar (40g)
CLIF Builder's
Chocolate Protein
Bar (68g)
N E W
QuestBar Chocolate
Chunk Protein Bar
(60g)
ProBar Chocolate
Bliss Protein Bar
(70g)
RX Chocolate Chip SquareBar Chocolate
Protein Bar (52g)
Crunch Protein Bar
(48g)
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WEIGHT MANAGEMENT CASE S TUDY
24
JUNE 2017
Premium-priced “real food”
achieves mass-market success
Real food with simple ingredients, marketed as being just like something you could make at home, with few
concessions to vegetarians: Slimming World’s frozen ready meals have become a $70 million brand in less than
two years despite selling through just one supermarket chain, showing that you can make a premium-price
success even in the mass market. By JULIAN MELLENTIN AND MIKAELA LINDEN.
Consumers in most countries have been
turning away from old-style weight
management and dieting products
– resulting in a collapse in sales for
Slim-Fast, for Kellogg’s Special K and
products that carry the Weight Watchers
logo. At the same time consumers have
rejected old-style weight management
programmes, resulting in a big fall in
business for Weight Watchers and others.
Against this background, the success
of the Slimming World range of frozen
ready meals in the UK is all the more
astonishing. Launched in 2015, by the
end of 2016 the brand’s retail sales had
passed £54 million ($70 million/ €62
million) – despite being on sale in just one
supermarket chain.
Slimming World has become the
biggest frozen ready meal brand in the
UK, with a 15% market share, and is
the sole driver of growth in the frozen
meals category. Every other brand
saw sales fall – rival Weight Watchers
experienced a 12% sales decline – and
the total category would have declined
significantly were it not for the success of
Slimming World.
Not only has Slimming World defied
the trend, it has done so at a premium
price, with products typically selling at
an 80% premium to Weight Watchers
and a more-than-100% premium
to supermarket own-label products,
which have an almost 50% share of the
category.
Slimming World is the UK’s biggest
weight-loss organization. Formed back
in 1969, its founder, Margaret MilesBramwell, is still chair of the company,
almost 50 years later.
Slimming World has a nationwide
network of motivational groups for
people looking to lose weight, and
around 4,000 Slimming World trained
consultants help an estimated 900,000
members across the UK and Ireland.
”Love food, love Slimming World”
and “Lose weight without going hungry”
are messages used by Slimming World,
which encourages its members to enjoy
food. Slimming World also encourages
members to introduce physical activity
into their daily lives through its ‘Body
Magic’ programme. The emphasis is
on finding forms of activity that can be
integrated into everyday life. Members
achieve bronze, silver, gold and platinum
Source: slimmingworld.co.uk
N E W
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WEIGHT MANAGEMENT CASE S TUDY
25
JUNE 2017
‘Body Magic’ awards. Platinum is
achieved when members are routinely
active five times a week for 30 minutes at
a time. This is in line with government
activity guidelines.
The Slimming World programme
appears to be effective and – along
with Weight Watchers – it is listed as
an effective programme by the UK
government’s National Institute for
Health and Care Excellence (NICE).
Slimming World’s ‘Food Optimisation’
plan is based on energy dense food –
food which has a low number of calories
per gram. Such foods are labeled ‘Free
Foods’ and include products such as lean
meat, pasta, low fat dairy products, eggs
and pulses. The idea is that consumers
should be able to eat as much as they
want of these foods, meaning that they
should never have to feel hungry – while
continuing to lose weight.
The ready meals range is made with
these Free Food ingredients: ”You can
eat them in unlimited quantities – no
weighing, no counting, no measuring.
The only limit is your appetite!” Using
the “Love food, love Slimming World”
slogan, the range is promoted with the
message that there are no strict rules,
restrictions or calculations involved. As
such, the brand claims not to be a diet.
The range was developed jointly with
Iceland, a retail chain specialising in
frozen foods, is produced by a company
owned by Iceland and sold exclusively in
Iceland’s 850 stores.
The recipes represent a range of
both traditional and world cuisines with
the line-up including Spanish Paella,
Chicken Tikka and Thai Green Curry.
The ingredients are simple and easy
to recognise and the brand promotes the
meals as something just like you would
make at home – in fact Slimming World
supplies recipes for all of its meals and
encourages people to make them at
home themselves.
In a promotional video, founder
Margaret Miles-Bramwell claims that
“you can have the same trust and
confidence in these meals that you
could if you cooked them yourself ”
and the meals are said to be ”full of the
flavour of a home-cooked meal”. Simple
SLIMMING WORLD’S PRODUCT RANGE
Source: slimmingworld.co.uk
SLIMMING WORLD: BRAND MESSAGES
”Love food, love Slimming World” is a slogan used by the brand. It
encourages its consumers to enjoy food and promotes the fact that there
are no strict rules, restrictions or calculations involved. The ready meals
are promoted with the slogan and the brand is active in sharing recipes
and foods that are ”approved” in the program.
Source: slimmingworld.co.uk
N E W
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WEIGHT MANAGEMENT CASE S TUDY
26
JUNE 2017
ingredients are used and they are all
listed on the pack of the meals, enabling
the consumer to recreate the meal at
home.
The Slimming World range originally
included 10 different meals but this has
now been extended to 32 items, including
meat products, soups, sauces and salads.
The meals can be eaten as one hearty
portion or shared, and the consumer is
encouraged to add plenty of vegetables.
In terms of the various “free-froms”
that govern much of NPD, of the 32
products:
• All are egg-free
• Eleven are dairy-free
• Eight are gluten-free
• Eight are both dairy and gluten-free
In most western countries, weight
management and dieting have been
superseded by “weight wellness”. Making
healthy choices – including choices that
support a healthy weight – has become
an everyday part of most people’s dayto-day decision-making. At the same time
the food industry has made lower-calorie,
lower-sugar, healthier choices a standard
part of new product development.
The result is that specifically weight
management brands no longer have
much of a point of difference.
Slimming World has entered a
declining category and demonstrated
that by providing “real food” with simple
ingredients in familiar recipes a weight
management brand can remain relevant.
It has also shown that the mass-market
consumer is willing to pay a premium
for “real food” – contrary to a lot of
received wisdom. And while Slimming
World’s brand is powerful among its
900,000 followers, that alone would not
be enough to make a success, as so many
struggling weight management brands
have found. Brand recognition might get
the first sale to the consumer, but it’s the
quality of the product that gets the repeat
sales.
CHART 1: SLIMMING WORLD PRICE COMPARISON
16
£13.7
(€16.2)
Price per serving
And underscoring the relative
unimportance of the plant foods trend
in the mass market, only one is suitable
for vegans and just nine are suitable for
vegetarians.
The partnership of Slimming World
and Iceland has been an extraordinary
success. It is said to have been Iceland’s
most successful range ever launched.
Its success is all the more remarkable
as Iceland has long had a reputation
as a very price-competitive retailer,
yet Slimming World products sell at a
100%-plus price premium over own-label
competitors.
14
Price per kg
12
10
8
£7.1
(€8.4)
£6
(€7)
6
£2.5
(€2.95)
4
£1
(€1.2)
2
£3.9
(€4.6)
£3
(€3.5)
£2.5
(€2.95)
£1.25
(€1.5)
0
Tesco Chicken
Curry with rice
(400g)
Weight Watchers Slimming World
Chicken Curry
Chicken Tikka
with rice (320g)
Masala (500g)
Muscle Food
Cook Chicken
Chicken Tikka Tikka Masala with
Masala with rice
rice (310g)
(350g)
SLIMMING WORLD MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS
Slimming World claims to not invest a lot in marketing and promotions are mainly social media-based.
Source: slimmingworld.co.uk
N E W
£4.25
(€5)
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READY MEALS CASE STUDY
27
JUNE 2017
Solving dinner on the side
Harvest Food Group has been around for 17 years co-packing and freezing vegetables for private labels and
for brands. But the company has made its biggest mark over the last four years since launching its own brand of
frozen veggies, fruits and quinoa-based side dishes, Path of Life. By DALE BUSS.
Path of Life has helped re-energize the
entire category of frozen side dishes in
US supermarkets, one that faces ongoing
ambivalence by American shoppers who
harbour suspicions about the overall
health, nutrition and quality of frozen
foods compared with fresh ones.
Path of Life has positioned its sides as
high-quality, “all-natural,” non-GMO
and conveniently prepared alternatives
to fresh fare for the better-for-you
shopper.
“Our key marketing statement is,
‘Dinner Solved,’ Angie Neal, brand
manager for Path of Life, told New
Nutrition Business. “You take two Path of
Life products and put them with chicken
or fish, and you’re done. You can pick
it up from our retail partners and have
dinner on the table in 10 minutes.”
“The Path of Life line of frozen
vegetable side dishes supported 11%
growth for its category as a quick and
easy gourmet side dish that is sure to
elevate any meal,” reported Information
Resources Inc. in its newest annual
analysis of “pacesetters” in the US CPG
business. Harvest Food declines to reveal
its revenues overall or for Path of Life.
But Neal acknowledged IRI’s
assessment. “They’re saying we drove
growth for the category” in 2016, she
said. “That’s because our products have
become known for making eating better,
easy and flavourful.” And though IRI
assessed it as a “frozen vegetable” brand,
Path of Life’s biggest sellers actually are
its quinoa side dishes.
Path of Life evolved at Harvest Food
after owners Jason Eckert and Scott
Schmidt faced health crises in their
immediate families. Eckert’s wife was
battling breast cancer, and Schmidt was
one in his clan who was coping with a
history of rheumatoid arthritis. Both
families turned to a holistic treatment
N E W
approach based largely on foods, and
Schmidt’s new regimen included a
gluten-free diet.
With healthy outcomes, the Schmidt
and Eckert families attributed much of
their victory to their diets, and so they
embarked on a way to translate their
experience into a new approach for
Harvest Food Group. For the faith-based
company their gratitude also led to a
name for their new brand, which comes
“Path of Life has
helped re-energize
the entire category of
frozen side dishes in US
supermarkets”
from Psalms 16:11 in the Bible: “You
make known to me the path of life...”
The Path of Life brand has grown to
22 SKUs in six categories:
• Vegetable side dishes:
Include Hash Browns and
unusual products such as Kale &
Butternut Squash, Roasted Garlic
Cauliflower, Garbanzos & Lentils.
• Quinoa side dishes: All based
on quinoa, combined with different
ingredients, such as kale or brown
rice, or seasoned ethnically, such as
Mediterranean Quinoa and AsianStyle Quinoa.
• Veggies: Plain products including
asparagus spears and “rainbow”
cauliflower.
• Frozen fruit: Unadorned, such as
blueberries and mango.
• Dark chocolate-covered fruit
• Green smoothie
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READY MEALS CASE STUDY
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JUNE 2017
Path of Life launched in Costco club
stores in 2012, with an all-organic line
of frozen vegetables. By 2014, the brand
was offering the quinoa blends as well,
and the retail giant picked up that line.
Since then, the brand has gained
retail distribution much more broadly,
including adding Sam’s Clubs, owned
by Walmart, nationally; online outlets
including Amazon and Fresh Direct; and
a huge network of regional mainstream
supermarket chains including Publix in
the Southeast, Meijer in the Midwest,
and Shaw’s in the Northeast.
next to Birdseye or a similar product not
making the claims we are. So we get the
trust from consumers who might be a
little more discerning.”
Freshness though frozen: Schmidt
and Eckert had expertise in crop
sourcing before launching Path of Life.
To ensure capturing what Neal called
“the peak of freshness” for Path of Life
vegetables and fruits, Harvest quick
freezes them locally before shipping
them in a frozen state to its plants for
further processing.
Thus, for instance, broccoli grown
in Ecuador is “hand-picked and handsorted and individually frozen” in that
country before being “shipped to our
facility in frozen form, where it’s sorted
and packaged” in various Path of Life
products, Neal said.
TABLE 1: NUTRITION SNAPSHOT, CAULIFLOWER AND PEA CURRY
HEALTHY AND CONVENIENT
Throughout its expansion, Path of
Life has tried to ensure thorough
healthfulness as well as high quality and
convenience, in these ways:
“All-natural,” non-GMO – and
some organic: Organic sourcing has
become a hugely important factor to
many Americans in their purchases of
fresh produce. And Schmidt and Eckert
adopted organic sourcing for many Path
of Life frozen products as well; every
SKU it sells through Costco is organic.
But having determined from their
long experience in the vegetable
business that organic sourcing of every
ingredient in every SKU would be
cost-prohibitive, they didn’t put organic
positioning per se at the core of the Path
of Life brand.
However, Path of Life does
emphasize that its products don’t
contain genetically modified organisms,
a characteristic that is increasingly
important to better-for-you food
shoppers even though the nutritional
and safety benefits of non-GMO
ingredients are scientifically unproven.
And Path of Life says its products are
“all-natural,” also a vague and imprecise
attribute.
“These [claims] have helped to
separate us from the mainstream brands
when most of them don’t make the same
claims,” Neal explained. “In a Meijer or
Jewel or Publix, we may be positioned
N E W
Source: www.pathoflifebrand.com
TABLE 2: NUTRITION SNAPSHOT, CAULIFLOWER AND PEA CURRY
Source: www.pathoflifebrand.com
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READY MEALS CASE STUDY
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JUNE 2017
Uncommon tastiness: Recognizing
that Harvest Group’s commodity
vegetables for private-label and other
clients typically were bland and even
boring, Path of Life determined to come
up with some flavourful departures
in innovative seasonings and unique
ingredient blends that would help make
vegetables more appealing.
“We had chefs amp up the flavour
of what we were doing for private-label
customers, and we applied that same
approach to Path of Life,” Neal said.
“People want something healthy, fast
and easy, but also our flavour profiles
are unique. It’s not just plain brown
rice or the typical stuff you could find
anywhere. It’s all value-added, and that
entices consumers to try internationally
inspired flavours. And we offer the
sorts of flavour profiles that consumers
crave but don’t have time to prepare
themselves.”
What’s more, she said, the company
had figured out how to add seasonings to
frozen vegetables so that the quality and
freshness of the raw vegetables could be
retained.
The brand’s No. 1 SKU is Quinoa &
Kale, through club stores. Following are
Southwest Quinoa and Mediterranean
Quinoa.
Convenience of steaming: Many
frozen-veggie brands have gone to
microwaveable “steam” bags. Path
of Life’s take four minutes to cook.
“Convenience is one of our key selling
points,” Neal said. “Those few minutes
are what moms purchasing our products
don’t have to devote to cooking.”
She maintained that Path of Life’s
bags are differentiated from some other
brands’ because they don’t contain BPA,
a substance that can seep into foods or
“Kids love our products
right now, with the
strong flavour profiles
that mean even picky
eaters will eat them”.
Angie Neal, brand manager, Path of Life
beverages. And, Neal said, “while the
steam bag itself isn’t a revolutionary
format, a lot of other brands – especially
in the natural sector – tend not to
put vegetables in a steam bag for cost
reasons”.
Maintaining a price premium:
All of the above differentiation – even
without all-organic ingredients – involves
higher costs than for commodity veggies
and demands a price premium for Path
of Life as well. A typical suggested retail
price is $3.99 (€3.67) for a 10oz bag that
includes two servings of side dishes or
three servings of straight veggies.
“If we had to price it at $4.99 (€4.59),
it would be too high,” Neal said. “We’re
trying to make it affordable for the
families Path of Life was created for.”
The brand’s strength so far also
suggests its next move: into kids’ fare.
“They’re in development,” Neal said.
“Kids love our products right now, with
the strong flavour profiles that mean
even picky eaters will eat them. We’re
just trying to make things easier for
moms.”
CHART 1: PATH OF LIFE PRICE COMPARISON
25
$22.07
(€19.87)
Price per pack
Price per kg
20
$
$8.83
(€7.95)
10
5
$13.45
(€12.11)
$11.73
(€10.56)
15
$3.99
(€3.59)
$2.5
(€2.25)
$3.82
(€3.44)
$4.99
(€4.49)
0
BirdsEye Steamfresh Frozen
Brown Rice (283g)
N E W
365 Quinoa with Roasted
Vegetables (340g)
Path of Life Mediterranean
Quinoa (284g)
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Amy's Light & Lean Frozen
Quinoa with Black Beans (226g)
READY MEALS CASE STUDY
30
JUNE 2017
From semi-retirement to
plant-based start-up
Sweet Earth has leapt to more than $25 million (€23 million) in sales in just five years as a plant-based food
brand. Its 42 frozen and fresh SKUs are available in more than 10,000 retail outlets across the United States, and
the company is expecting double-digit sales growth in 2017. By DALE BUSS.
Sweet Earth CEO Kelly Swette, who
is 58 years old, had a background in
engineering and marketing at PepsiCo
and Calvin Klein and was a foodie with
1,500 cooking classes under her belt.
Co-founder Brian Swette, her 63-yearold husband, had senior-level jobs and
board seats at giant companies including
PepsiCo and Burger King, including as
PepsiCo’s chief marketing officer for a
time.
“Brian and I felt privileged to have had
wonderful training and background with
some wonderful CPGs as well as fashion
and other brands, and we felt – for what
we called the second stage of our lives –
that we wanted to do something that had
lasting meaning and value,” Kelly Swette
told New Nutrition Business. “It was and is
an extraordinary opportunity where we
can take the talent and experience that
we built over the course of a lifetime
and put it toward something that’s really
meaningful.”
Their start-up, Sweet Earth, has a
menu that consists of these categories
of foods, all of which are based on
nutrient-dense, plant-based recipes that
rely heavily on bold use of herbs and
spices for flavour and provide new takes
on several classic cuisines from around
the world. They’re distributed at major
retailers including Target, Kroger, some
Walmarts, and regional giants including
Harris Teeter on the East Coast, as well
as Whole Foods Markets and Sprouts,
and they include:
Artisan Bowls: Available only at Target
stores at this point, there are 12 SKUs
of frozen entrees that range from Lentils
Provencal (including 11g of plant-based
protein and 6g of fibre per serving) made
N E W
with organic lentils, mushrooms, carrots
and green beans to Chana Masala (13g
of protein and 4g of fibre) that includes
garbanzos, tomatoes and potatoes.
Breakfast Burritos: Sweet Earth
offers eight varieties of frozen
“international” burritos including The
Peruvian (black beans, red quinoa, sweet
potato, goat cheese, roasted corn and
spirulina, featuring 18g of protein, 6g
of fibre and ample vitamins A, B1 and
B2) and The Curry Tiger (lentils, curried
seitan, red peppers, potatoes, turmeric,
cinnamon and cardamom, for 19g of
protein and 7g of fibre).
Functional Burritos: Following a long
line of other brands that field products
based on the promise of enhancing
specific bodily functions, Sweet Earth
offers four SKUs in this frozen line,
including Get Focused! (for mental
clarity, featuring kale and flaxseed), Get
Cultured! (including probiotics), Lighten
Up (only 190 calories) and Protein
Lover’s.
Breakfast Sandwiches: Sweet Earth
diversified into refrigerated fare with
this line of four SKUs that includes an
egg-and-cheddar sandwich made with
“Benevolent Bacon” made from seitan.
Righteous Breakfast Meats: Two
kinds of meat analogues are made from
various plant-based proteins: Tuscan
Veggie Sausage and Benevolent Bacon.
Savory Grounds: They come in
three varieties which feature plantbased protein that mimic ground meat,
including Tuscan Savory Grounds,
described as a “porkless sausage handcrafted with beautifully rustic notes of
fresh rosemary garlic, fennel seed and
kale”.
Veggie Burgers in three varieties.
Seitan in six varieties.
And at Natural Products Expo West in
Anaheim, Calif., in March, Sweet Earth
was demonstrating some new products,
including a Korean Japchae Bowl that
features organic yam noodles and fresh
veggies in a savory stir fry, based on
dishes that are popular in the sizzling
Korean restaurant scene. It will also
Source: www.sweetearthfoods.com
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READY MEALS CASE STUDY
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JUNE 2017
introduce two more frozen Artisan Bowls,
more varieties of veggie burgers and
Righteous Meats.
“We believe in continuous
improvement,” Kelly Swette said. “We’re
constantly looking at how we can do
things better, not only in new products
but from an operational standpoint to
improve our margins and from a quality
standpoint.”
In semi-retirement, the Swettes
experienced an entrepreneurial itch.
“Beverages probably would have
been more in our wheelhouse,”
Swette observed. But they had been
contemplating healthful food for a
while, encouraged when their teenaged
daughter became a vegetarian.
“The better-for-you health movement
had started in California, but I still
couldn’t find any food that was healthy
and convenient that I could quickly make
for my kids as a snack before they went
to school,” Kelly Swette said. “And there
was nothing out there that I wanted to
eat, either. Big companies were only
working from a paradigm from the past,
and they hadn’t kept up. So it looked like
a big opportunity.
“We also knew how people were eating
when they went to restaurants and what
they were choosing,” Swette recalled.
“Those things weren’t available at retail.
The signs were there, and as a lifelong
marketer, I recognized there was an
opportunity to come up with something
better that would address a faction of the
market that was being underserved. And
it was one that was quickly becoming the
most important demographic group in
America: millennials.”
So for six figures, the Swettes bought
the Sweet Earth name from a local
store in Pacific Grove, California, that
sold salads and sandwiches and used
it as the vehicle for their food startup.
Sweet Earth also made pies. “We
didn’t feel they were in areas that were
big opportunities,” Kelly Swette said.
“Instead, we believed that convenience,
better-for-you and global flavours were
what was happening.”
At the same time, the Swettes
recognized that the five biggest food
N E W
companies in the US make up only 5%
of the market, leaving a big opening for
what they wanted to do. And because
they could invest $5 million of their own
nest egg in the venture right away, they
could buy a big building for product
development and manufacturing and
control both processes themselves. So
they purchased a 40,000-square-foot
facility that was empty at first with only
10 employees.
The Swettes made the decision to
enter the market with frozen burritos,
entrees and other products only after
serious assessments of market trends and
American consumers.
“When we did our initial assessment
in 2011, it was clear that things were
Source: www.sweetearthfoods.com
TABLE 1: NUTRITION SNAPSHOT, THE BAJA BREAKFAST
Source: www.sweetearthfoods.com
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READY MEALS CASE STUDY
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JUNE 2017
moving to fresh,” Kellly Swette said.
“But the alternative-meat category was
in frozen. And in American society, there
is an absolute need for convenience,
so frozen food that you can have at the
ready and that’s healthy and quickly
prepared and portable is a consumer
need. It crosses all ages and is particular
important with busy lifestyles and more
and more working couples.
“We believed that frozen could
maintain quality when it’s done right.
And there were a lot of frozen brands
not doing things right,
because frozen wasn’t being
optimized in terms of texture,
colour, flavour and recipe
development.”
Sweet Earth chose to enter
the market with burritos
because “they were portable,
and there is a handheldwrap culture in almost every
society,” she said. “Plus they’re
ready in three minutes. And
burritos have four day parts, so
we could enter with something
different and something
nutritionally on par with where
consumers were going. We also
were able to put a distinctive
flavour profile in there.”
Burritos also reflected the Swettes’
pricing philosophy. At natural-foods
markets, for example, typical frozen
burritos sell for around $2.99 (€2.75),
whereas Sweet Earth’s burritos sell for
suggested retail prices of $3.49 to $3.69
(€3.21 to €3.39). But while Kelly Swette
noted that Sweet Earth commands
premium prices, she also said that many
competitors sell only 5.5oz burritos while
her brand’s are 6oz or 7 oz.
“And we have a higher filling-to-wrap
ratio,” she said. “We make our tortillas
very thin because the nutrition is in the
filling.”
But while sticking with frozen for
most product lines, Sweet Earth decided
to offer fresh veggie burgers. Most
competitors are frozen, Kelly Swette said,
“but we’ve established a fresh customer
who likes the fact that our burgers are
veggie-centric, high-fibre, high-protein
and full-flavour.”
The Swettes had to do extensive
sampling to get retailers to bite on Sweet
Earth products. Now its marketing is
mainly via social media,
including contests and paid
campaigns on Facebook.
Sweet Earth also has
attracted $10 million
(€9.2 million) in outside
investments and managed
to land Gary Hirschberg,
founder of Stonyfield Farm,
for its board.
No wonder the Swettes
are talking bigger and
bigger. “Some of the
companies in our market
are at several hundred
million in revenue,” Brian
Swette told Forbes.com.
“We aspire to that.”
Source: www.sweetearthfoods.com
CHART 1: SWEET EARTH BURRITO PRICE COMPARISON
25
Price per pack
$19.94
(€17.95)
Price per kg
$21.08
(€18.98)
20
$14.64
(€13.18)
15
$9.94
(€8.95)
$
$7.87
(€7.08)
10
5
$1
(€0.9)
$1.69
(€1.52)
$2.49
(€2.24)
$3.39
(€3.05)
$3.29
(€2.96)
0
El Monterey Breakfast
Burrito (127g)
365 Bean & Rice Burrito
(170g)
N E W
Evol Egg & Green Chile
Burrito (170g)
Sweet Earth Protein
Lover's Breakfast Burrito
(170g)
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Amy's Tofu Scramble
Breakfast Wrap (156g)
NEW PRODUCTS
33
JUNE 2017
FUNCTIONAL & HEALTHY-EATING NEW PRODUCT LAUNCHES
Each month we summarise new product launches from around the world.
• Part 1: North America • Part 2: Rest of the World
All new product information is sourced exclusively from Mintel’s GNPD (Global New Products Database), which can be visited at
www.gnpd.com. Mintel can be contacted at 18-19 Long Lane, London EC1A 9PL, U.K.. Tel. +44-(0)20-7606-4533, Fax +44-(0)20-7600-3327
Country
Company
Brand & Product
Description
PART 1: NORTH AMERICA – FOODS & BEVERAGES
BAKERY
USA
Wholesome Treats
Breads from Anna Pie Crust Mix
USA
Mary’s Gone Crackers
USA
Wholesome Valley Foods
Mary’s Gone Crackers Super
Seed Seaweed & Black Sesame
Crackers
Barnana Toasted Coconut Organic
Crunchy Banana Brittle
USA
Edward & Sons Trading
Let’s Do...Organic Organic Green
Banana Flour
USA
Paleo Prime Foods
USA
United States Bakery
Paleo Prime Vanilla Blueberry
Natural Grain-Free Cookies
Franz Organic The Great Hemp
Seed Bread
USA
Prosupps
My Cookie Chocolate Chip Protein
Cookie
BREAKFAST CEREALS
Canada
Bob’s Red Mill Natural Foods
USA
Natural Direct
Bob’s Red Mill Paleo Style Muesli
Cold Cereal
Twofold Quinoa Granola
USA
Appetite For Healthy Living
Purely Elizabeth Pumpkin Fig
Ancient Grain Granola + Puffs
Cereal
CARBONATED SOFT DRINKS
USA
Santa Cruz Natural Incorporated
Organic product that comprises 6% juice and is free from GMOs and
gluten.
USA
Bai Brands
Santa Cruz Organic Rose Hip
Infused Earl Grey Tea Lemonade
Carbonated Beverage
Bai Black Simbu Citrus Sparkling
Antioxidant Infusion
USA
LIVE Soda
CHOCOLATE CONFECTIONERY
USA
Kroger
Organically grown, gluten-free, GMO-free and contains no preservatives.
USA
Vosges
USA
Vosges
Simple Truth Organic Maca Dark
Chocolate
Vosges Haut Chocolate Mo’s Milk
Bar
Vosges Haut Chocolat Black
Salt Coconut Nib Caramel
Marshmallows
DAIRY
USA
Dannon
USA
Califia Farms
USA
Pop and Bottle
Canada
Overwaitea Food
USA
USA
Misha
Sargento Foods
DESSERTS & ICE CREAM
Canada
Buono
Contains nuts and fruits, and is free from grain and gluten.
Granola made from quinoa, with no refined sugars or added oils.
Sweetened with maple syrup. Suitable for vegans and free from GMO,
gluten free, additives, preservatives and anything artificial.
A gluten-free and vegan product made with organic chia, quinoa and
millet puffs. Contains 4g protein, 4g sugar and 140 calories per 31g
serving. Lightly sweetened with coconut sugar.
With five calories per can and less than one carbohydrate per serving.
Free from sugar and artificial sweetener. 45mg natural caffeine per can,
like a cup of green tea. It is non-GMO, low glycemic, gluten free and soy
free.
Live Sparkling Drinking Vinegars
Contains 9% juice, two tablespoons of vinegar per bottle and only 3g of
Pomegranate & Elderberry Apple
sugar per serving. The USDA Organic and vegan certified handcrafted
Cider Vinegar with Coconut Vinegar product is free from gluten and GMO, and contributes to a balanced
happy gut.
Dannon Oikos Triple Zero Peanut
Butter Banana Flavor Blended
Greek Nonfat Yogurt
Califia Farms Go Coconuts
Coconut Milk & Coconut Water
Blend
Pop & Bottle Cold Brew Coffee
Almond Milk
Western Family Strawberry Kefir
Probiotic Fermented Milk
Misha Strawberry Rhubarb Quark
Sargento Snack Bites Smokehouse
Gouda Snack Bites
Buono Green Tea Mochi Ice
Dessert
N E W
A blend of three precooked bean flours and chia flour, which are said to
provide a good source of protein, fiber, vitamins, minerals, omega-3s and
antioxidants. The product is free from wheat, gluten, yeast, rice, dairy,
corn, soy, nuts, tree nuts, fish and shellfish.
The organic product is free from GMO and gluten and is said to provide
the protein and carbs plus the essential fats that can help maintain a
healthy heart.
Made from up-cycled bananas that do not qualify to leave the farm.
Free from GMO, gluten and soy. Contains potassium and is suitable for
vegetarians.
An alternative to grain flour. An organic product that can be used to
enhance nutritional profiles; for added iron, potassium and beneficial
starch. Free from gluten, GMO, artificial colors and preservatives.
Paleo certified and free from soy, grains, gluten and dairy. The product is
made with only four main ingredients.
Made with natural and organic ingredients free from GMO, preservatives,
trans fats and high fructose corn syrup. Contains hemp seeds that are
said to have a good 3:1 balance of omega 3 and omega 6. Also contains
5g whole grain and protein with all twenty amino acids.
Provides 18g of protein and contains no gluten, hydrogenated oils or
trans fat. An on-the-go product which retails in a pack, containing 12 x
1.94-oz. cookies.
Gluten free milk chocolate with uncured smoked bacon and smoked salt.
Made with Fair Trade certified ingredients and comprises black salt
marshmallows, burnt sugar caramel, Sri Lankan coconut, and cocoa
nibs. The product is free from GMO and gluten.
Free from added sugar, artificial sweeteners, fat and gluten. Contains
active cultures, vitamin D and 15g protein.
A blend of coconut water and coconut milk. The product contains 45
calories per serving, and 50% more calcium than milk. It is free from soy,
lactose, dairy and gluten.
Dairy free drink sweetened with organic dates. Contains no lactose,
cholesterol, gums, added sugar. thickeners or emulsifiers.
Contains two billion probiotics per 250ml that contribute to healthy gut
flora.
With 15g protein and 2% milk fat. Gluten free and 95% lactose free.
Snack product with gouda cheese with natural smoke flavor. The product
contains under 20 calories per stick.
Rice flour wrapped with non-dairy frozen dessert made with coconut
milk. The product is free of dairy, soy, gluten, trans fat, artificial flavors,
colors and preservatives. Contains high MCFA’s which help in the
process of excess calorie burning. It retails in a 208g pack containing
eight individually wrapped units.
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NEW PRODUCTS
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USA
JUNE 2017
Unilever
Breyers Non-Dairy Vanilla Peanut
Butter Frozen Almond Milk Dessert
Made with almond milk, peanut butter and other non-GMO sourced
ingredients.
Mann Packing
Ittella International
Mann’s Kale Beet Blend
Ittella Riced Cauliflower
Superfood blend of kale, golden beets, kohlrabi and red cabbage.
A low carb and gluten free substitute for any high carb item.
Numi
Numi Organic Tea Turmeric Cocoa
Golden Latte
A caffeine free loose blend made with coconut and cinnamon. Turmeric
is said to be the spice of life, an ancient root in the ginger family, used as
a potent ingredient in Ayurvedic diets.
JUICE DRINKS
USA
Naked Juice
USA
Kenover Marketing
Naked Sea Greens Veggies 100% A blend of seven juices with added dulse and spirulina. Free from added
Juice Smoothie
sugar, preservatives, gluten and GMO.
Beetology Beet + Veggie Juice
Cold pressed juice made from 100% fruits and vegetables not from
concentrate. Beets are great for the heart, blood pressure and brain.
OTHER BEVERAGES
Canada
Healthy Body Services
USA
Farmhouse Culture
USA
Bragg Live Foods
FRUIT & VEGETABLES
USA
USA
HOT BEVERAGES
USA
Femme Fit Goddess Greens
Prebiotic Probiotic Drink Mix
A blend of healthy fruits and green vegetables packed with nutritious
ingredients like kale, broccoli, pomegranate and goji berry. Gluten free
and contains prebiotics, probiotics, 2g fibre, 4g protein and 1g sugar.
Farmhouse Culture Classic Organic Sugar free and gluten free savoury drink with probiotic active culture.
Gut Shots
The bottle contains more than 10 shots.
Bragg Organic Apple Cider Vinegar Energising product that is free from GMOs. Ideal as a topping, as a
& Honey
marinade, for stir-fries, drinks and other recipes.
PROCESSED FISH, MEAT & EGG PRODUCTS
USA
Inland Market Premium Foods
USA
USA
Drink Eat Well
Tofurky
RTDs
USA
Caveman Coffee
USA
Bramo
SAUCES & SEASONINGS
USA
Drink Eat Well
USA
GLK Foods
PROCESSED FISH, MEAT & EGG PRODUCTS
SIDE DISHES
USA
De Matteis Agroalimentare
USA
Jovial Foods
USA
Hodgson Mill
SNACKS
Canada
The Whole Living Kitchen
USA
Mondelez Global
USA
Sattva Vida
USA
Co.Exist Nutrition
USA
Frito-Lay
USA
Duke’s Meats
SPORTS & ENERGY DRINKS
USA
Aspire Brands
PROCESSED FISH, MEAT & EGG PRODUCTS
Inland Market Premium Foods
Seasoned Mahi Burgers
Hilary’s Mediterranean Bites
Tofurky Chorizo Style
Free from gluten, corn, dairy, egg, soy, nut and GMOs.
A veggie-based take on the Mexican sausage. A vegan product that
is said to be a good source of protein, low in fat, free from cholesterol,
gluten and GMOs.
Caveman Coffee Co. Nitro Hibiscus
Cold Brew Herbal Tea
Bramo Original Black Organic Cold
Brew Coffee
Herbal tea infused with nitrogen. Free from caffeine and added sugar.
Paleo certified and said to possibly lower blood pressure.
A smooth iced coffee with very low acidity. It is free from sugar,
preservatives and dairy.
Hilary’s Beet Vinaigrette Dressing
& Marinade
Oh Snap! Pickling Co. Cool Beans
Pickled Green Beans
A vegan product that is free from gluten, soy, dairy, egg, corn, nuts and
GMOs.
Pickled green beans that are free from fat, gluten and GMO. The product
does not contain any added brine, making it a convenient on-the-go
snack.
Il Grano Integrale Bio di Armando
High Fibre Wholegrain Fusilli Pasta
Jovial Gluten Free Brown Rice
Lasagna Pasta
Hodgson Mill Chipotle Gluten Free
Sorghum Quinoa and Brown Rice
The organic product is high in fibre. It is made with durum wheat and oat
fibre.
Organic gluten free lasagna plates made from brown rice. 100% whole
grain.
A product made with ancient grains. Free from cholesterol, saturated fat,
trans fat and GMOs. It provides 21g or more whole grain per serving.
Healthy Crunch The Cool
Cucumber + Dill Kale Chips
Nabisco Good Thins The Wheat
One Ancient Grains Snacks
Paleo friendly and gluten free chips seasoned with lemon and dill, then
air dried slowly to maintain nutrients and crunch.
Made with 100% wholegrain wheat and ancient grains such as quinoa,
amaranth and millet. The product contains 23g of wholegrain per 30g
serving and is free from artificial colors, artificial flavors, cholesterol,
partially hydrogenated oils and high fructose corn syrup.
Raw product comprising dates, almonds, pecans, unsweetened coconut,
cocoa powder and vanilla extract. Free from added sugar and gluten.
An organic product that is free from gluten, soy and GMO. The product
provides 15g plant based protein per serving, 5g sugar per serving, 9g
fiber per serving, and 170 calories.
The product is made with real cheese and contains no gluten,
preservatives, flavors or colors.
Snack product made with pork and a peach BBQ relish. The product
provides 7g protein and only 2g sugar per serving. It is free from gluten,
MSG and added preservatives.
Sattva Vida Cocoa Craze Energy
Bites
22 Days Nutrition Peanut Butter
Chocolate Chip Plant Power
Protein Bar
Simply Cheetos Puffs White
Cheddar Snacks
Duke’s Hickory Peach BBQ
Smoked Shorty Sausages
Aspire Apple and Acai Natural
Energy Drink
Canada
GURU Beverages
Guru Organic Energy Drink
USA
Zevia
Zevia Mango and Ginger Zero
Calorie Energy Drink
SWEET SPREADS
USA
88 Acres Foods
USA
Healthy Concepts Food
88 Acres Vanilla Spice Sunflower
Seed Butter
Betsy’s Best Almond Butter with
Cinnamon and Chia Seeds
N E W
Burgers from wild caught mahi, free from gluten, and ready to cook.
A naturally sparkling and refreshing product said to be calorie burning
as it increases metabolism through thermogenics, burning calories and
increasing the energy needed to get things done. This product has no
calories, sugars or carbs, is vitamin and nutrient rich with natural caffeine
derived from green tea. It contains 80mg natural caffeine per serving.
The product contains 142 mg of naturally occurring caffeine, from
organic green tea and guarana, per can. Gluten free and non-GMO.
This product provides simple energy and is made with clean ingredients.
It contains 120mg caffeine per can and is free from calories, sugar,
artificial sweeteners, GMO, juice and gluten.
Free from nuts, gluten, GMO and the most common food allergens. The
vegan product contains 5g protein.
An all natural product that is free from gluten. It is made with almond
butter, chia seeds and cinnamon.
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NEW PRODUCTS
35
Country
JUNE 2016
Company
Brand & Product
Description
PART 2: REST OF THE WORLD – FOODS & BEVERAGES
BAKERY
Denmark
Germany
Rapunzel Naturkost
Tegut... Gute Lebensmittel
Italy
IPAFOOD
Italy
IPAFOOD
Peru
Industrias Alimenticias Cusco
Sweden
Bisca
BREAKFAST CEREALS
Australia
Bailey Beau
Brazil
Pure Sem Glúten Alimentos
Czech Republic
Artifex Instant
Germany
Allos Schwarzwald
India
Aurovika
Italy
Colussi
South Korea
Emart
CARBONATED SOFT DRINKS
Nigeria
Daveo Pharmaceuticals
La-Roux Health Drink
Poland
Aldi Group
Slovakia
Tranquini
Wellissa Cherry, Ginkgo and
Ginseng Flavoured Carbonated
Drink
TranQuini Positively Relaxed Mixed A refreshing, carbonated beverage with herbal extracts. It contains
Berries & Green Tea Carbonated
green tea extract, a source of natural theanine, and herb extracts
Drink
known to help relax and re-focus. Also contains vitamin B12 that helps
with proper brain functioning.
CHOCOLATE CONFECTIONERY
Germany
Vitafy
Vitafy Essentials Sport Coconut
Vanilla Protein Chocolate
Italy
Eatness
My Eatness Nutraceutica My
Cioccolato Organic Pomegranate,
Acerola and Carrot Chocolate
DAIRY
Germany
Alpro
Germany
Lidl
Puerto Rico
Lyrical Foods
South Korea
Lotte Foods
Provamel Soy Alternative to Quark
with Mango
Milbona Say Cheeezz Bear Shaped
Cheese Slices
Kite Hill Pineapple Flavored Artisan
Almond Milk Yogurt
Pasteur LB-9 Plain Yogurt
South Korea
Maeil Dairy
Spain
Sojade
Turkey
Altinkiliç Gida ve Süt San.Tic.
DESSERTS & ICE CREAM
Denmark
Kramers Is
N E W
Rapunzel Organic Hemp Flour
Tegut... Fitness Bread
Organic hemp flour that is rich in fibre.
Fitness bread made with rye, oats and wheat germ. A source of
wholegrain that is high in fibre.
Lo Conte Le Farine Magiche Broad Rich in fiber and protein, containing respectively 15% and 27%. Free
Bean Flour
from gluten, and has a low glycemic index of 58.
Lo Conte Le Farine Magiche
This product is rich in fibre and protein, free from gluten, and has a low
Organic Carrot Flour
glycemic index of 58.
IncaSur Quinoa Cookies and
Low sodium cookies that provide maximum energy. One portion of the
Grated Coconut
product gives 6% to 8% of the daily requirement of iron and vitamin C.
Karen Volf All in One Root Crops
Crunchy vegetable crackers baked with root vegetables. The crackers
Crispbread
are filling and have a root vegetable content of 36%, a wholegrain
content of 25%.
The Australian Superfood Co.
Cacao Coconut Crunch Paleo
Granola
Features wattleseed and Davidson plum, and contains no artificial
flavours, colours, sweeteners or preservatives. The 100% natural
product is suitable as part of a Paleo diet, and is said to be a good
source of fibre and a source of protein.
Pure Sem Glúten Multigrain Vegan Made with 12 whole grains including amaranth flakes, amaranth
Granola
grains, chia seeds, sesame, sunflower seeds, golden linseed, brown
linseed, white millet, red millet, quinoa flakes, red quinoa grains and
black quinoa grains. This granola is rich in fibers and free from gluten,
lactose, flavorings, preservatives and trans fat.
Prom-In Fitness Food Sweet Pear The mash is made from oat and barley, and is enriched with 5% free
Flavoured Low Carb Workout
L-glutamine. It is high in protein and supplies high quality nutrients
Mash Mix
throughout the day. Its digestible formula is based on proteins, peptides
and premium cereals. It is rich in beta-glucans that maintain normal
blood cholesterol level.
Tartex Bio Fit & Vital Amaranth
Breakfast porridge with 20% amaranth, which features a low glycemic
Breakfast Porridge with Aronia
index and increases blood sugar levels slower than muesli without
amaranth. Also contains iron, and magnesium that reduces tiredness
and supports the energy metabolism.
Aurovika Foxtail Millet Flakes
This vegetarian product is good for diabetics and is healthy for the
heart. It is easy to digest and contains no gluten.
Misura Natura Ricca Ancient Grains Made with quinoa, spelt and buckwheat. A natural source of
Breakfast Cereals
phosphorous, magnesium and fibre.
Peacock Soy Flour & Granola
Granola made with soybean, black bean, pumpkin seed, barley, oat,
rye, almond and acacia honey. It is high in fibre and protein.
Maeil Hey! Mr. Brown Black Bean
Milk
Sojade So Chanvre! Hemp Based
Natural Yogurt
Altinkiliç Apricot Flaxseed Yogurt
with Kefir
Kramers Chocolate Flavoured
Protein Ice Cream
This all natural product is said to regulate blood sugar, to control blood
pressure, to boost body immunity and to enhance blood circulation.
Provides concentration and refreshment.
This is a calorie reduced fitness confectionery with coconut flavour that
features increased protein content. It retails in an 80g pack containing
eight units.
A natural source of vitamin C, which is a powerful antioxidant
and provides a number of health benefits. In addition, it contains
manganese and helps to burn calories. The vegan and gluten-free
chocolate retails in a pack of four 7g units.
A quark that is high in protein, and contains no lactose or gluten.
Cheese snack with a high protein content.
Creamy vegan almond milk yogurt with live active cultures. The product
is said to contain five times the amount of protein of coconut yogurt.
Yogurt which contains one hundred million LB-9 lactobacillus – the
patented vegetable kimchi lactobacillus –which is claimed to reach the
intestines alive and helps to support healthy digestive system.
Milk alternative made of black bean, black sesame, quinoa, lentils and
oatmeal. It is low in fat and helps to boost energy.
A source of omega 3 that is naturally low in saturated fat, contributing to
the maintenance of normal cholesterol level.
The probiotic product supports the immune and digestive system,
contains 5.5% protein, minimum 2.5% milk fat and is free from
sweeteners, colorings and lard and its derivatives.
Italian ice cream with a high protein content (containing 40g of protein).
The product is made from organic milk.
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NEW PRODUCTS
36
JUNE 2017
Indonesia
Lion’s Head
Lion’s Head Atap Seed in Syrup
Norway
Ehrmann
UK
Clark’s
Ehrmann High Protein Chocolate
Pudding
Clark’s Dessert Topping Sweet
Strawberry Sauce
FRUIT & VEGETABLES
Australia
Woolworths
Brazil
Ecoaxial Alimentos
Brazil
M.W.A.
Indonesia
Bionic Natura
Bionic Farm Organic Sprouted
Beans
Italy
Orsini Gino - Damiani Filippo
Orsini & Damiani Mangia Tutto
Broccoli Spaghetti
HOT BEVERAGES
Colombia
Compañia Nacional de Chocolates
Nutresa Corona Enriched Hot
Chocolate with Sugar
India
FlorArôme
FlorArôme Green Coffee Instant
Premix
India
Teamonk Global Foods
Morocco
FlorArôme
Teamonk Global Ikusei Cardamom
Green Tea
FlorArôme Organic Digestion
Infusion
JUICE DRINKS
Australia
Natural Raw C
Czech Republic
Biotta
India
Miel Natura Foods
Miel Nàtura Honey and Aloe Drink
with Real Fruit Pulp
Sweden
Brämhults
Brämhults Smoothie Energy Mixed
Fruit Smoothie
Czech Republic
McCarter
Body & Future Chia Seeds Drink
with Lemon & Ginger
UK
Marks & Spencer
M&S Spirit of Summer Gazpacho
Juice Drink
Belgium
Mexpi Limited
Amazing Forest Birch Water
MEALS & MEAL CENTERS
India
Ashtral Biotech
Zero Calz Quinoa Multi Grain
Noodles
Made with 10 ancient grains including quinoa, hearth, chia, flax, foxtail,
barnyard, sorghum, finger millets, pearl and kodo. Provides omega-3,
fibre, selenium, lysine, 9 amino acids, energy and a boost to immunity.
OTHER BEVERAGES
UK
The Fuel Station
Fuel 10K Raspberry & Blueberry
High Protein Quark with Fruit
Berry Beats Kombucha
Japan
Meiji
High in protein and low in fat, with less carbs and no artificial colours or
sweeteners.
Kombucha with elderberries and hibiscus. A raw, organic and ancient
sparkling brew renowned for its immune and energy boosting
properties. The fermented product contains antioxidants, B vitamins,
is low in sugar, detoxifying, cold pressed, unpasteurized, and is antiinflammatory, revitalising and preservative free.
With soy protein, seven B vitamins and vitamin C.
Australia
Vesco Foods
France
Purasana
Meiji Savas Cocoa Flavour 100%
Soy Protein Drink
Super Green Smoothies Detox Un- A smoothie blend with pineapple, broccoli, beetroot, kale, celery, lemon,
beet-able Smoothie
and ginger. Recommended to blend with coconut water, almond milk
or soy milk.
Purasana Vegan Protein Organic
Blend of hemp, rice, pea, sunflower and pumpkin. 61% protein
Mix with Banana and Vanilla
from 5 vegetable-based sources. Also contains essential vitamins,
Flavour
minerals, healthy fatty acids, fibres and amino acids. Prevents muscle
breakdown, helps weight control and maintains mobility.
Australia
PROCESSED FISH, MEAT & EGG PRODUCTS
Italy
Coam Industrie Alimentari
N E W
Woolworths Simply Steam Zucchini
Spaghetti
Rio de Una Detox Orgânico
Cabbage, Spinach, Spearmint and
Ginger Detox Juice Blend
Kodilar Natural Life Green Banana
Biomass
Raw C Elderflower, Mint & Lime
Infused Sparkling Coconut Water
Biotta Vegetable Cocktail Juice
Scandia Yellowfin Tuna Bresaola
Slices
Free from artificial sweeteners and cholesterol and is high in fibre. Said
to be excellent as dessert on its own or can be served with cocktails,
ice cream and salads.
A protein dessert that is free from lactose, gluten and added sugar.
Made with sweeteners and provides 20g protein per 200g tub.
The product is high in fibre and contains 45% less sugar compared to
the UK’s number one strawberry dessert sauce brand.
A source of fibre for healthy digestion.
An antioxidant juice blend that is high in fiber and contains nine
vitamins and seven minerals. Helps with bone health, digestion,
disease-prevention and hydration.
A gluten free product made from green banana pulp, which is rich in
fibers. It can be added to recipes to provide a better texture, or as a
substitute for cooking cream in recipes. Contributes to the development
of microbiota and improvement of the intestinal tract.
Contains proteins, vitamins, and minerals with lower carbohydrate and
calorie content. The sprouted beans also contain enzymes that make
them easier to digest than regular beans. They are free from gluten,
preservatives and colourants and can help lower cholesterol, control
blood sugar level and improve digestion.
Broccoli spaghetti contains potassium, calcium, phosphorous, iron, folic
acid and vitamin C. It is detoxifying, re-mineralizing and supports tissue
regeneration.
This product is enriched with vitamins such as vitamin B1, B2, B3, B6,
B12 and vitamin D. It is a natural source of antioxidants and contains
no cholesterol or trans-fat. The vitamins contribute to healthy energy
metabolism.
A natural product with no artificial preservatives, colours or flavours.
Rich in chlorogenic acid, antioxidants and other nutrients. Modulates
glucose and fat metabolism and can help aid weight loss.
This refreshing and revitalising tea can stimulate metabolism and is
also claimed to be great for relaxation.
With peppermint, chamomile, verbena, thyme and fennel to help with
digestive disorders.
100% natural parkling Coconut Water which is described as nature’s
ultimate hydration with bubbles.
Contains pure juice from 640g of vegetables, obtained by direct
pressing. It is suitable for vegetarians and vegans and is recommended
for detoxifying the body.
Honey and aloe vera is blended in this drink. Honey is said to hydrate
the body and provide energy, while aloe vera repairs cells and
nourishes the skin. Contains no artificial ingredients, added sugar,
preservatives, artificial flavour or added colour.
A natural source of energy from green coffee beans and acerola, as
well as vitamin C, which helps to maintain a normal energy use while
minimising tiredness and fatigue.
A fruit drink made with lemon juice, chia seed, ginger, white tea and
sweetener. The product contains significant amounts of omega-3 fatty
acids, which are said to regulate blood cholesterol levels.
A blend of tomato, apple, cucumber, red pepper, lemon and sea salt.
The product is a source of vitamin C and provides one of five a day per
150ml serving.
This birch water is 100% organic, rich in minerals and in micronutrients.
Contains naturally occurring electrolytes to help consumers stay
hydrated.
High in protein, rich in omega-3 fatty acids, has a low fat content
and is free from gluten, colourings and preservatives. A good source
potassium, selenium and phosphorus and is said to be the ideal food
for sportsmen.
N U T R I T I O N B U S I N E S S
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NEW PRODUCTS
37
JUNE 2017
Italy
F.lli Sacla’
Saclà Organic Mopur Burgers with
Spinach and Peas
Germany
Culentro
Norway
Food for Progress
Netherlands
Schouten Europe
Vleisch Manufaktur Quinoa Köfte
Patties
Food for Progress Oumph! Grill
Soy Protein
Good Bite Vegetarian Nut Balls
RTDs
Japan
Poland
Yamazaki Baking
Dary Natury
Yamazaki Sencha Green Tea
Dary Natury Yerba Mate Strong
Energy Drink
Japan
Japan Sangaria Beverage
Sangaria My Sapo Tea with
Indigestible Dextrin
SAUCES & SEASONINGS
Venezuela
Bienestar Organico
Bienestar Orgánico Moringa
Germany
Neuseelandhaus
Neuseelandhaus Organic Virgin
Omega Oil
Nigeria
Helcinta
Helcinta Nig Ltd Dry Baobab Leaf
SIDE DISHES
UK
De Matteis Agroalimentare
Italy
Pedon
Germany
Molino Andriani
I Legumi di Armando High Protein
Red Lentil Penne Pasta
Pedon Happy Veggie Lupini Bean
Mix with Quinoa
Felicia Bio Linea Legumi Organic
Mung Bean Pasta
Norway
Orkla Foods
Toro Bare Bra Super Rice
Ireland
Marks & Spencer
Marks & Spencer Super Grains &
Beetroot
SNACKS
Hungary
Sante A. Kowalski
A protein bar with MPC 80, made with milk chocolate.
Singapore
Bhavani Foods
Go On! Protein High Protein
Cranberry Bar with Goji Berries
and Inulin
Uncle Saba’s Poppadoms Tomato
Flavoured Lentil Chips
India
Nutritatva Foods
India
Pi Cafes and Restaurants
India
Aurovika
Australia
Nourish Foods
This gluten-free product contains natural extracts of gentian, rhubarb
and boldo herbs which are known for their digestive properties.
This energy boosting product is said to be ideal while working late,
studying and after exercising. Contains 100mg of taurine per unit.
Formulated with indigestible dextrin as dietary fibre to promote healthy
digestion. The product is free from preservatives and colouring.
This is a functional food with green banana biomass. It is free from
gluten, sugar and lactose. Contributes to balance, cleansing and wellbeing.
SUGAR
& GUM CONFECTIONERYWedgewood Nougat
South
Africa
Italy
Noberasco
New Zealand
Ast Popcorn
SUGAR & GUM CONFECTIONERY
Italy
Giuliani
Made from six different types of nuts and free from meat. Contains
vitamin B12, iron and is rich in protein and fibres.
With indigestible dextrin to promote healthy digestion.
Pasteurised drink made from Brazilian yerba mate and organic honey.
It has a high caffeine content, and is recommended as an energising
drink.
Formulated with 5g indigestible dextrin as dietary fibre to help inhibit the
absorption of fats and reduce the blood sugar level rising after meal.
A 100% natural product made with leaves and stems of moringa.
Contains a high level of protein, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and
amino acids.
Extra virgin oils from avocado, olive and linseed. Contains 9% of
omega-6 and -3 in the ideal proportion of 2:1. Contributes to the
maintenance of a normal cholesterols level in the blood.
Baobab leaves are said to be excellent sources of vitamin A, calcium
mineral, iron, blood potassium, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum
and phosphorus.
A legume-based product that contains no gluten, and is rich in fibres
and protein.
The product is rich in protein and fibre.
Vegan pasta with a high content of iron, phosphor, zinc and
manganese. It is also gluten free and rich in protein and fibre.
suggestion.
Wholegrain rice with quinoa, buckwheat and black-eyed beans. A good
source of protein, and contains dietary fibre and potassium.
The product comprises beetroot, bulgur wheat, millet and buckwheat
with red onion and parsley in a sunflower oil and lemon juice dressing.
It is suitable for vegetarians and vegans, is a source of fibre and is low
in saturated fat, helping to maintain healthy cholesterol levels.
Chips with wholesome lentils. The product provides 11g complete
protein, three times more fiber, four times more protein, 40% less carbs
and 30% less saturated fat than the average chips. This vegan, low
GI and high fiber product contains no trans fat, preservatives, gluten,
cholesterol or harmful chemicals.
Nutritatva High Fibre Snack Sweet The all natural and vegetarian product is high in beta carotene and
Cinnamon Carrot Bits
contains no added colours or preservatives.
Thenibblebox.com Amaranth Aloha Amaranth helps in maintaining a healthy weight and is a great source
Granola Bars
of protein. Flax seeds are high in omega 3 fatty acids and have antiinflammatory properties. Oats and dates are rich in dietary fibre and
boost energy levels, help relieve constipation and reduce cholesterol.
Aurovika Lemon Flavoured
A gluten-free and diabetic friendly instant snack, which is said to
Roasted Chickpea Flakes
maintain bone health, and provides iron, vitamin B6 and magnesium.
Whole Kids Organic Manuka Honey Air-popped wholegrain corn that is naturally high in fibre and low in
Popcorn
fat. Does not contain artificial flavours, artificial colours, preservatives,
gluten, egg, GMO ingredients, added MSG or hydrogenated oil. The
product retails in a 35g pack.
Racefood Farbar Apple, Pear &
The product provides sustained energy release with simple and
Cinnamon Real Food Endurance
complex carbs and good fats to keep one fuelled for longer. Contains
Bar
cinnamon, which is known to be nature’s anti-inflammatory.
Noberasco Veg&Crock Dried
These chips contain no preservatives, are rich in fibre and are not fried.
Pepper Chips
Retails in a 15g pack.
Top of The Pop Microwave Popcorn The product is free from allergen, GMO and gluten while being high in
with Linseed
fibre. Linseed is an excellent source of dietary fibre, omega 3 fatty acids
and lignans. It is also rich in B group vitamins and minerals, and may
lower cholesterol.
South Korea
Orion
Giuliani Candies with Digestive
Herbs
Orion Power Bull Energy Jelly
SWEET SPREADS
Japan
Sonton
Sonton Peanut Cream
Brazil
CMP Alimentos
Celia Braga Chocolate Cream with
a Touch of Ayurveda
N E W
Vegan burgers made with spinach, peas, wheat gluten, legumes flour,
wheat, water and natural flavourings. A source of proteins and fibre
which is 100% vegetable based and contributes to a better metabolism.
Quinoa burgers with garlic, chia and lupine. Good source of fibre and
magnesium.
Rich in protein and fibre, and provides a source of iron.
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