Getting Started With Parallels® Virtual Automation

Getting Started With
®
Parallels Virtual
Automation
Copyright © 1999-2009 Parallels, Inc.
ISBN: N/A
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c/o Parallels Software, Inc.
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Copyright © 1999-2009 Parallels Holdings, Ltd. and its affiliates. All rights reserved.
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are registered trademarks of Parallels Software International, Inc. Virtuozzo, Plesk, HSPcomplete, and
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This product is based on a technology that is the subject matter of a number of patent pending applications.
Virtuozzo is a patented virtualization technology protected by U.S. patents 7,099,948; 7,076,633; 6,961,868 and
having patents pending in the U.S.
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3
Contents
Introduction
5
About Parallels Virtual Automation .............................................................................................................5
Getting Help .................................................................................................................................................6
Feedback.......................................................................................................................................................6
Installing Parallels Virtual Automation
7
System Requirements ...................................................................................................................................7
Software Requirements......................................................................................................................8
Hardware Requirements ....................................................................................................................9
Installing on Bare Metal ...............................................................................................................................9
Installing on Windows ................................................................................................................................10
Installing on Linux......................................................................................................................................11
Parallels Virtual Automation Basics
13
Parallels Virtual Automation Infrastructure................................................................................................14
Getting Started ............................................................................................................................................15
Interface Overview .....................................................................................................................................17
Managing Physical Servers
19
Registering Physical Servers ......................................................................................................................20
Logging in to Physical Servers ...................................................................................................................21
Monitoring Physical Server Resources .......................................................................................................22
Rebooting Physical Server..........................................................................................................................23
Managing Parallels Licenses ......................................................................................................................24
Managing Virtual Environments
25
Creating Virtual Environments ...................................................................................................................25
Creating Virtual Machines...............................................................................................................26
Creating Containers .........................................................................................................................29
Starting and Stopping Virtual Environments ..............................................................................................32
Logging In to Virtual Environments...........................................................................................................32
Logging in to Virtual Machines.......................................................................................................33
Logging in to Containers .................................................................................................................33
Deleting Virtual Environments ...................................................................................................................34
Glossary
35
Index
37
4
Table of Figures
Figure 1: Interface Overview - Viewing Interface Summary Tab.........................................18
Figure 2: Creating Parallels Virtual Machines - Adding Devices..........................................27
Figure 3: Creating Parallels Virtual Machines - Viewing Details .........................................28
Figure 4: Creating Containers - Selecting Applications .........................................................30
Figure 5: Creating Containers - Viewing Details ....................................................................31
5
CHAPTER 1
Introduction
Parallels Virtual Automation is a flexible and easy-to-use administration tool, designed for
managing groups of Physical Servers hosting Parallels Virtuozzo Containers and/or Parallels
Server software. With Parallels Virtual Automation, you can manage both the available Physical
Servers and the virtual environments residing on them, using a standard Web browser running
on any platform.
This guide is aimed at a wide range of users who are new to Parallels Virtual Automation or just
want to make sure they are doing everything right.
The present document is just as easy to use, as the product itself. However, we also provide
complete information about the structure and peculiarities of the guide in the following topics.
In This Chapter
About Parallels Virtual Automation...................................................................................... 5
Getting Help.......................................................................................................................... 6
Feedback ............................................................................................................................... 6
About Parallels Virtual Automation
Parallels Virtual Automation is an advanced administration tool designed for managing groups
of Physical Servers and the virtual environments residing on them, using a standard Web
browser running on any platform.
With Parallels Virtual Automation, you can create groups of Physical Servers and perform both
collective and individual administration operations on these server groups. Moreover, you can
also manage the virtual environments residing on the registered Physical Servers: their
productivity and resources, system tasks and processes, configuration, and much more.
You can read more about Parallels Virtual Automation and its functionality in Parallels® Virtual
Automation Administrator's Guide.
Introduction
6
Getting Help
Parallels Virtual Automation offers several options for accessing necessary information:
Parallels Virtual Automation documentation
ƒ
Parallels Virtual Automation Administrator's Guide.This document contains extensive
information about the product, its usage and troubleshooting. To access the PDF version
of the document, go to the Support link in the left pane and then click the Downloads
pane. You can download any document of the Parallels Virtual Automation
documentation bundle from the Parallels website.
ƒ
Parallels Virtual Automation Installation Guide. This document contains extensive
information on system requirements for physical computers and instructions how to
install Parallels Virtual Automation components on them.
ƒ
Getting Started With Parallels Virtual Automation. This document contains the basic
information how to install, launch and manage Parallels Virtual Automation.
Context-sensitive help
You can open a help page for the present screen by clicking the Help link in the right upper
corner.
Parallels Web Site
Parallels web site http://www.parallels.com. Explore the Support web page that includes product
help files and the FAQ section.
Parallels Knowledge Base
Parallels Knowledge Base http://www.kb.parallels.com. This online-resource comprizes
valuable articles about using Parallels Virtual Automation 4.5, Parallels Virtuozzo
Containers and Parallels Server.
Feedback
If you spot a typo in this guide, or if you have thought of a way to make this guide better, we
would love to hear from you!
The ideal place for your comments and suggestions is the Parallels documentation feedback
page (http://www.parallels.com/en/support/usersdoc/).
7
CHAPTER 2
Installing Parallels Virtual Automation
Installing PVA components is a quick and easy procedure, that comprises basic steps: starting
PVA installer, configuring installation options, selecting the PVA components to be installed.
PVA components can be installed either via the PVA autoinstaller or from the PVA installation
archives that you should download onto your physicals servers. This guide contains instructions
on how to install PVA via the Autoinstaller. If you choose to install from the archives, please,
turn to the Parallels Virtuozzo Automation Installation Guide.
To have a clear structure of the PVA components and to understand where to install every
component, you can refer to the Parallels Virtual Automation Infrastructure (p. 14) section.
In This Chapter
System Requirements............................................................................................................ 7
Installing on Bare Metal........................................................................................................ 9
Installing on Windows .......................................................................................................... 10
Installing on Linux ................................................................................................................ 11
System Requirements
In most cases, there are no special requirements for the physical servers on which you want to
install Parallels Virtual Automation components. However, we strongly recommend you to read
the following information carefully, so that you can ensure a successful installation of the
product.
Installing Parallels Virtual Automation
8
Software Requirements
If a Windows- or Linux-based computer serves as a Client Server (p. 14), it should have a
supported Web-browser client:
ƒ
Internet Explorer 6.x and 7.x for Windows
ƒ
Mozilla Firefox 2.x and 3.x for all platforms
ƒ
Safari 3.x for Mac
Although other browsers will most likely work, only those listed above have been extensively
tested for compatibility with Parallels Virtual Automation.
If a Windows- or Linux-based computer serves as a Slave Server (p. 14) where virtual
environments will be stored and managed, then Parallels Virtual Automation will call for more
complex requirements, as the creation and management of Containers demand more complex
software resources. So, in choosing an appropriate Windows- and Linux-based computer, you
should be guided by the Parallels Virtuozzo Containers system requirements. For the detailed
and more concrete information on the requirements, see Parallels® Virtuozzo Containers for Linux
and Parallels® Virtuozzo Containers for Windows user guides.
Note: You can install PVA Power Panel only together with PVA Agent.
If a Windows-based computer serves as a Master Server, it should meet the following
requirements:
dedicated server running a 32-bit or x86-64-bit version of Microsoft Windows Server 2003
(with Service Pack 2).
If a Linux-based computer serves as a Master Server, it should meet the following
requirements:
ƒ
a physical server without virtualization technology running 32-bit, x86-64-bit versions of
RHEL 3, RHEL 4, RHEL 5.0, RHEL 5.1, RHEL 5.2, SLES 10.1, CentOS 3.4.
A Linux-based computer may also serve as a Master Server even if it has a virtualization
technology - Parallels Virtuozzo Containers software. In this case, you should create a
Container and start the PVA component installation there. The Container should be created on
the basis of the ve-slm.2048MB.conf-sample template.
Note: At the moment, Parallels Virtual Automation doesn't support Security Enhanced (SE)
Linux, so make sure its working mode is set to Permissive before trying to install the product.
To set the SE Linux mode to Permissive, enter the following command:
/usr/bin/setenforce Permissive.
Any physical server that will be managed via PVA should have a virtualization technology
installed: Parallels Virtuozzo Containers software for Linux- and Windows-based computers
and Parallels Serve Bare Metal software for a bare metal computer.
Installing Parallels Virtual Automation
9
Hardware Requirements
If a Windows-based, Linux-based, or bare metal computer serves as a Master Server, there are
no special requirements for it. However, below is the list of the basic hardware requirements
you can use as a checklist:
ƒ
Intel Celeron, Pentium III, Pentium 4, Xeon, or AMD Athlon CPU;
ƒ
at least 128 MB of RAM;
ƒ
hard drive with at least 15 GB of free disk space;
ƒ
network card.
If a Windows-based, Linux-based, or bare metal computer serves as a Slave Server where
virtual environments will be stored and managed, then Parallels Virtual Automation will call for
more complex hardware. The general considerations regarding the configuration of your
physical servers could be as follows:
ƒ
CPUs. The more virtual environments you plan to run simultaneously, the more CPUs you
need.
ƒ
Memory. The more memory you have, the more virtual environments you can run. The
exact figure depends on the number and nature of applications you are planning to run in
your virtual environments.
ƒ
Disk space. Each virtual environment occupies 40–150 MB of hard disk space for system
files in addition to the user data inside the virtual environment (for example, web site
content). You should consider it when planning disk partitioning and the number of virtual
environments to run.
ƒ
Intel VT-x or AMD-V hardware virtualization technology support (for Parallels Server Bare
Metal virtual machines management).
For the detailed and more concrete information on the requirements for the computer, see
Parallels® Server Administration Guide, Parallels® Virtuozzo Containers for Linux and Parallels®
Virtuozzo Containers for Windows user guides.
Installing on Bare Metal
You can install Parallels Virtual Automation on your bare metal physical server using the
autoinstaller. The autoinstaller scans the physical server and offers to download and to install
only those PVA components that can be installed on this server. Thus, the autoinstaller saves the
downloading time and the disk space.
This procedure consists of the following steps:
1 Download the necessary autoinstaller to the physical server where you are going to install
Parallels Virtual Automation.
2 Go down to the directory, where the autoinstaller is stored.
3 Start the autoinstaller by executing the following command:
# ./autoinstaller_file_name
In the aforementioned command, autoinstaller_file_name stands for the name of
the autoinstaller file.
Installing Parallels Virtual Automation
10
4 In the Welcome to pva-setup window, click Configure to specify the Internet repository
information and the local download directory to which you want to upload the files. After
you have specified the necessary information, click OK and then Next to proceed with the
installation.
5 In the Choose installation type window, choose the installation type. By default, you are
offered to install PVA Agent for Virtuozzo and Parallels Server and the Power Panel
component.
Click Next to start the installation. Keep in mind that, by default, the wizard will install both
the PVA Agents and PVA Power Panel components. If you want to deselect PVA Power
Panel, select Custom installation and click Next. Pass on to the next step.
6 After you have selected Custom installation and clicked Next, you will see the Choose
components to install window displayed. To install PVA Agents only, deselect the PVA
Power Panel component.
7 Click Next to start the installation.
For the instructions on how to install Parallels Virtual Automation from the installation archive,
refer to the Parallels Virtual Automation Installation Guide.
Installing on Windows
You can install Parallels Virtual Automation components on your Windows-based physical
server using the autoinstaller. The autoinstaller scans the physical server and offers to download
and to install only those Parallels Virtual Automation components that can be installed on this
server. Thus, the autoinstaller saves the downloading time and the disk space.
This procedure consists of the following steps:
1
Download the pva-setup-deploy-gui.exe file to the physical server where you are
going to install Parallels Virtual Automation components.
2 Start the autoinstaller by double-clicking pva-setup-deploy-gui.exe.
3 In the Welcome window, click Configure Settings to specify the Internet repository
information and the local download directory to which you want to upload the Parallels
Virtual Automation installation files.
When the necessary information is specified, click Next to proceed with the installation.
4 In the Choose Setup Type window, choose the installation type. The component for the
default installation may differ. This depends on whether the physical server is clean or
already has any virtualization technology installed on it.
ƒ
if the physical server is clean (i.e. has no virtualization technology installed), you will be
offered to install the PVA Management Server component by default. Click Next to start
the installation. If you want to change the destination folder for the Management Server
component, choose Custom installation and click Next.
ƒ
If the physical server has Parallels Virtuozzo Containers installed, you will be offered to
install the PVA Agent for Virtuozzo component by default.
Installing Parallels Virtual Automation
11
In this case, if you want to install only PVA Agent, click Next to start the installation. Keep
in mind that, by default, the wizard will install both the PVA Agent for Virtuozzo and PVA
Power Panel components. If you want to deselect PVA Power Panel, select Custom
installation and click Next to specify the components which will be installed. Pass on to the
next step.
5 After you have selected Custom installation, you will see the Choose components to install
window displayed. To install PVA Agent for Virtuozzo only, deselect the PVA Power Panel
component.
You can manually select where the program files will be placed by typing the path in the
Choose destination folder field.
6 Click Next to start the installation.
For the instructions on how to install Parallels Virtual Automation from the installation archive,
refer to the Parallels Virtual Automation Installation Guide.
Installing on Linux
You can install Parallels Virtual Automation on your Linux-based physical server using the
autoinstaller. The autoinstaller scans the physical server and offers to download and to install
only those Parallels Virtual Automation components that can be installed on this server. Thus,
the autoinstaller saves the downloading time and the disk space.
This procedure consists of the following steps:
1
Download the necessary autoinstaller to the physical server where you are going to install
Parallels Virtual Automation.
2 Go down to the directory, where the autoinstaller is stored.
3 Start the autoinstaller by executing the following command:
# ./autoinstaller_file_name
In the aforementioned command, autoinstaller_file_name stands for the name of
the autoinstaller file.
4 In the Welcome to pva-setup window, click Configure to specify the Internet repository
information and the local download directory to which you want to upload the files. After
you have specified the necessary information, click OK and then Next to proceed with the
installation.
5 In the Choose installation Type window, choose the installation type. The component for the
default installation may differ. This depends on whether the physical server is clean or
already has any virtualization technology installed on it.
ƒ
If the physical server is clean (i.e. has no virtualization technology installed), you will
be offered to install the PVA Management Server component by default. Click Next to
start the installation. If you want to change the destination folder for the Management
Server component, choose Custom installation and click Next.
ƒ
If the physical server has Parallels Virtuozzo Containers installed, you will be offered to
install the PVA Agent for Virtuozzo component by default.
Installing Parallels Virtual Automation
12
Click Next to start the installation. Keep in mind that, by default, the wizard will install both
the PVA Agent for Virtuozzo and PVA Power Panel component. If you want to deselect
PVA Power Panel, select Custom installation and click Next. Pass on to the next step.
6 After you have selected Custom installation, you will see the Choose components to install
window displayed. To install PVA Agent for Virtuozzo only, deselect the PVA Power Panel
component. If necessary, change the default destination folder for the components installed.
7 Click Next to start the installation.
For the instructions on how to install Parallels Virtual Automation from the installation archive,
refer to the Parallels Virtual Automation Installation Guide.
13
CHAPTER 3
Parallels Virtual Automation Basics
The main thing about Parallels Virtual Automation you should know before starting to use it, is
that Parallels Virtual Automation is a Web service that ensures machine-to-machine interaction
over a network. This means that Parallels Virtual Automation is not a conventional application
you can launch by opening an EXE or RPM file, but rather a low-level software that enables
you to remotely access physical Servers and the virtual environments they host via LAN or
Internet.
Parallels Virtual Automation is an advanced, yet an easy-to-use tool, that couples intuitive
interface with extensive functionality. With Parallels Virtual Automation, you can manage
separate physical servers and each of their virtual environments, organize servers into server
groups and administer the resulting units; supervise user accounts and privileges, and much
more. For more information about the Parallels Virtual Automation features, see Parallels®
Virtual Automation Administrator's Guide.
This chapter provides basic information about the Parallels Virtual Automation concept and
usage.
In This Chapter
Parallels Virtual Automation Infrastructure.......................................................................... 14
Getting Started ...................................................................................................................... 15
Interface Overview................................................................................................................ 17
Parallels Virtual Automation Basics
14
Parallels Virtual Automation
Infrastructure
With Parallels Virtual Automation, you can easily deploy an effectively functioning virtual
infrastructure that will enable you to significantly reduce your costs in terms of time and
resources. While Parallels virtualization products enable you to create complex formations of
virtual environments, you may find it hard to manage these formations using different
management tools. However, with Parallels Virtual Automation you can handle this challenging
task with ease. Since Parallels Virtual Automation supports the whole set of the Parallels
products, you can use it with any of its virtualization solutions, be it Parallels Virtuozzo
Containers or Parallels Server virtual machines.
Of course, if you work with only one virtualization product, you can just as well use the native
management tool – Parallels Management Console (PMC) – designed to manage either Parallels
Virtuozzo Containers or Parallels Server Virtual Machines. However, if you build up your
infrastructure with both software- and hardware-based virtualization, you need a more
sophisticated tool for managing such infrastructure.
Before you start installing Parallels Virtual Automation, you should know about its components
and their role in the management process. Parallels Virtual Automation consists of several
components and an auxiliary tool. The main Parallels Virtual Automation components are:
Component
PVA
Server
Where to install
Description
Management On any clean physical server This component ensures the communication
without
any
virtualization between the slave physical servers and their
technology, or on a Container.
virtual environments.
The physical server with PVA PVA Control Center
Management Server component It is a part of the PVA Management Server
installed is called Master Server. component and is always installed together
with it. Thus, you are able to interact with the
remote Physical Servers and have means to
observe your virtual infrastructure.
It is the PVA front-end that you see in the
browser window after logging in to
Parallels Virtual Automation. When
talking about the Parallels Virtual
Automation interface, we are actually
talking about the Control Center interface.
PVA Agent for Parallels On a dedicated physical server
Server Bare Metal
that has Parallels Server or
Parallels Server Bare Metal
software installed. Such server
is also called a Slave server.
The component ensures the interaction
between this physical server, the Master
Server and your client computer. Without
this component a physical server cannot
be registered in the system.
Parallels Virtual Automation Basics
PVA
Agent
Virtuozzo
15
for On a dedicated physical server
that has Parallels Virtuozzo
Containers or Parallels Server
Bare Metal software installed.
Such server is also called a Slave
server.
This component ensures the interaction
between this physical server, the Master
Server and your client physical computer.
Without this component a physical server
cannot be registered in the system.
On a dedicated physical server
together with PVA Agent
component (for Virtuozzo or for
Parallels Server).
An auxiliary tool designed for managing a
single virtual machine or a single
Container. It can be installed only
together with the PVA Agent component.
PVA Power Panel
Getting Started
To start managing your virtual infrastructure with Parallels Virtual Automation, do the
following:
1
Install PVA Management Server component on the Master Server (p. 14) from which you
are going to access the virtual infrastructure.
We strongly recommend you to install PVA Management Server on a stationary physical
server that is maintained, powered on, and connected to the network for long periods. Thus
you will secure access to the PVA infrastructure at any time and for any administrator.
Note: Management Server component is always installed together with Control Center.
2 Install the PVA Agent for Parallels Server or PVA Agent for Virtuozzo on the physical
servers you want to manage. After you have installed these components, you can register the
physical server in the Master Server.
Note: Power Panel is installed together with PVA Agents by default.
3 On the Master Server or any other computer, open the available Web browser and log in to
Parallels Virtual Automation by typing the Management Server IP address( or hostname)
and the open TCP port (default port is 4646) in the address bar. The resulting line may look
like as follows: https://10.50.120.70:4646.
When logging in from the Management Server, replace the IP address with localhost.
Note: You can access the Management Server and, therefore, all Parallels Virtual
Automation functionality from any computer on the network, irrespective of whether it has
any Parallels Virtual Automation components installed or not. The point is that as soon as
you connect to the Management Server, you automatically connect to its Control Center and
thus can use it remotely.
Parallels Virtual Automation Basics
16
4 When the browser displays the login window, type your user name and password and click
the Login button. To log in as an administrator, provide the administrative credentials for the
operating system installed on the Master Server.
5 Now that you have successfully logged in to Parallels Virtual Automation, you can deploy
your virtual infrastructure by registering the required physical servers and creating virtual
environments. The following section - Interface Overview (p. 17) - will help you to get
accustomed to the Parallels Virtual Automation interface, while the Managing Virtual
Environments (p. 25) and the Managing Hardware Nodes (p. 19) chapters will introduce the
basic management operations.
Parallels Virtual Automation Basics
17
Interface Overview
The Parallels Virtual Automation interface has been designed to let the physical server
administrator quickly perform all possible tasks through an intuitive navigation system.
The main components of the Parallels Virtual Automation interface are:
ƒ
The left menu frame listing and allowing to access all your physical servers and virtual
environment(s). The left menu also allows to access the main types of operations to be
performed on them with the help of Parallels Virtual Automation.
ƒ
The toolbar on top of the right frame enabling you to perform the basic actions on your
physical servers and virtual environments. The set of the toolbar buttons varies depending
on the type of the object you explore, for example, Infrastructure, Resource Library, or Setup
menu items.
ƒ
The content part on the right frame displays a summary for the object you select, be it a
physical server, a virtual environment, or a template. The content part may consist of several
tabs, each containing more detailed object information and links to advanced actions.
ƒ
The Tasks pane at the bottom of the right frame allowing you to view all the operations
recently finished and running at the moment, their start times, the objects they are applied
to, their statuses, progress information and other details. The pane is minimized by default.
To expand it, click Tasks at the bottom of the screen.
The picture below illustrates the interface layout:
Parallels Virtual Automation Basics
18
Figure 1: Interface Overview - Viewing Interface Summary Tab
As you can see from the picture, the left menu frame contains several menus:
Infrastructure
Displays the physical structure of your registered physical servers (Parallels Virtual
Automation infrastructure) in the form of a hierarchical tree with physical servers
as its upper levels and the virtual environments hosted on them as lower levels.
Using the Infrastructure context menu or toolbar, you can arrange the physical
servers into groups, thus making the servers management more convenient.
Note: Although you can create and rearrange Server Groups in the
Infrastructure menu, each physical server can be located in only one group
at a time. If the Server Group arrangement requires adding the same server
to two or more different groups, use the Logical View for viewing and
managing your servers.
Each of the physical servers and virtual environments that make up your Parallels
Virtual Automation infrastructure displays its name on the Infrastructure-oriented
left menu which, if clicked on, leads to its dashboard.
Logical View
Displays the custom structure of the registered physical servers. The Logical View
provides a flexible solution for Server Groups arrangement, as it enables you to add
one and the same physical server to several groups or place virtual environments
hosted on different servers in one folder.
ResourceLibrary
Provides quick access to the auxiliary information, such as IP Pools, available
virtual environment templates, etc.
Management
Provides access to the Parallels Virtual Automation management tools, such as the
Scheduler or the Support error report tool.
Setup
Provides access to the general configuration information, such as Licensing or
Security settings.
By default, the left menu frame displays all available menu items from Infrastructure to Setup.
However, you can change the menu layout by clicking any of the buttons placed on the bottom.
While the actual appearance of the Parallels Virtual Automation interface content part on the
right frame is dictated by the tag opened at the moment, there are always two main operational
levels: the virtual environments level and the physical servers level that determine its overall
appearance and the available options. Both levels afford to perform operations on a single
virtual environment or physical server, as well as multiple operations. Each time you click on a
Datacenter, or on a Room, a Cage, a Rack on the left Parallels Virtual Automation menu, - the
right pane loads a screen with the Summary, Physical Servers, Virtual Environments, Templates,
Backups, and Security tabs; the Summary tab is opened by default.
19
CHAPTER 4
Managing Physical Servers
As soon as you register a physical server in Parallels Virtual Automation, you can manage it.
To be registered, the physical server should have Parallels Virtuozzo Containers or Parallels
Server software, used for hosting virtual environments (Containers and/or Virtual Machines),
and PVA Agent for Virtuozzo or Parallels Server accordingly. The Parallels Virtual Automation
functionality enables you to register and manage a number of Physical Servers via PVA Control
Center, group them under logical units and consolidate their IP addresses into an IP addresses
pool.
The servers collectively registered in Parallels Virtual Automation are easier to manage because
all of them are accessible from any computer when you log to the PVA Control Center. For
information on registering Physical Servers, refer to the Registering Physical Servers section (p.
20).
Note: PVA Control Center is always installed together with PVA Management server
Component.
When you find out that the number of registered servers (and, consequently, of virtual
environments run on them) has grown, you may consider dividing them into a number of logical
units representing certain classes - the servers based on a certain architecture, hosted virtual
environments of a particular type or purposes, etc. The IP addresses of the physical servers
group united into an IP addresses pool present a more convenient distribution because, when
assigning IP addresses to virtual environments, there will be no IP conflicts and no manually
entering IP addresses - they will be selected from the pool.
On the Physical Servers screen, you can review the list of physical servers currently registered
in Parallels Virtual Automation and see the servers details, such as the current operating system,
its CPU and memory usage, etc.
Note: If this screen is loaded in the Logical View, the servers displayed in this table are those
which have been added to the Logical View, otherwise the servers list is empty. To add a
physical server to the Logical View, click Add on the Parallels Virtual Automation toolbar, select
Physical Server from the menu and choose the server(s) on the screen it opens.
Below are several how-to's for basic management operations:
ƒ
To manage any of the servers registered in PVA, click its name in the leftmost column of
the table.
ƒ
To display a certain server from a long list of servers, click the Show Search link on top of
the table, enter the name of the server and click the Search link; to have the list of the
servers back, click Reset Results.
ƒ
To stop managing a physical server via PVA, select its checkbox and click Unregister.
ƒ
To add a new server to the list of the physical servers registered in PVA, click the Add
button on the main toolbar.
Managing Physical Servers
20
In This Chapter
Registering Physical Servers................................................................................................. 20
Logging in to Physical Servers ............................................................................................. 21
Monitoring Physical Server Resources ................................................................................. 22
Rebooting Physical Server .................................................................................................... 23
Managing Parallels Licenses................................................................................................. 24
Registering Physical Servers
You can register in Parallels Virtual Automation any Windows, Linux or bare metal computer
providing there is a Parallels Virtuozzo Containers or Parallels Server Bare Metal installation on
it. The newly registered physical servers will be displayed in the servers list on the Physical
Servers screen and accessible for all the usual managing and monitoring operations Parallels
Virtual Automation provides you with.
Besides this, the servers registered in Parallels Virtual Automation form a joint physical servers
pool which provides for the following collective actions:
ƒ
creating a logical structure of physical servers and the virtual environments residing on
them
ƒ
migrating virtual environments between physical servers
ƒ
copying OS and application templates from one physical server to another
ƒ
making Container templates stored on the Management Server available to other registered
physical servers
ƒ
consolidating server IP addresses into a network address range
Registering a new physical server for management via Parallels Virtual Automation is simple,
and all it takes is entering the following information on the new server:
1
The server's valid IP address that will be used by Parallels Virtual Automation components
to connect to this server. Enter this IP address to the Server Address field in the Connection
to Physical Server section.
In case you do not remember the IP address of the required physical server running Parallels
Autosearch button to see a list
Server or Parallels Server Bare Metal, you can click the
of all physical servers, running Parallels Server or Parallels Server Bare Metal, connected to
your network. To add a particular server, select its name from the list.
2 The administrative login and password to connect to the physical server as the administrator.
Specify the credentials in the Administrative Login to Physical Server section.
3 Selecting the Force Registration checkbox in the Registration Options section is the option to
choose when the physical server you are registering has already been and still is registered
in another Server Group and you need it to be registered in your Server Group. If you
forcibly register the server, it will be removed from the Server Group it currently belongs to.
Pressing the Register button initiates the registering procedure.
Managing Physical Servers
21
Logging in to Physical Servers
If you are managing a physical server with the Windows operating system installed, you can
use Remote Desktop Connection - a standard Windows application - to connect to the physical
server by means of the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP).
Note. The feature is available only for Internet Explorer 5.0 or above.
To connect to a physical server via RDP, do the following:
1
Open the Remote Desktop window by clicking the Remote Desktop button on the Server's
toolbar.
2 In the Remote Desktop window, click the Login button to open a Remote Desktop session.
If you are doing this for the first time, your browser may display a security warning asking
you to install additional components. Click Yes and wait for the Remote Desktop terminal
window to appear.
3 In this window, specify your user name and password you created for this Physical Server
and click Enter to get connected to the and start sending commands to the Server via Remote
Desktop.
If you are managing a Physical Server with the Linux operating system installed, you can use
the Secure Shell (ssh) application to remotely connect to the Server and work inside its directory
tree using standard Linux command line tools.
Note. The feature is available only for Internet Explorer 5.0 or above.
To connect to a Physical Server by ssh, do the following:
1
Open the SSH Connection window by clicking the Terminal Login button on the Server's
toolbar.
2 In the SSH Connection window, specify your user name and password you created for this
Physical Server and click Login to get connected.
If you are doing this for the first time, your browser may display a security warning asking
you to install additional components. Click Yes and wait for the ssh terminal window to
appear, whereupon you get connected to the Server and may start sending commands to it
via ssh.
Managing Physical Servers
22
Monitoring Physical Server
Resources
Parallels Virtual Automation enables you to monitor and manage not only the virtual
environments operation, but also the physical servers resources. In Parallels Virtual Automation,
you can view the current resource usage statistics and adjust the values to improve the
performance of the physical server, as well as that of the virtual environments it hosts.
The overall CPU, disk and memory-related resources usage of the physical server registered in
Parallels Virtual Automation are displayed on the physical server Dashboard.
The Disk Partitions and Memory sections inform you about the respective resources
consumption on the physical server.
The information on the Disk Partitions size usage in all the Linux partitions or Windows logical
disks existing on your physical server is presented in the following tables (corresponding to the
number of partitions/logical disks):
Column Name
Description
Mount Point
The name of the partition/logical disk using the resource.
Used
Used amount of disk size in the partition/logical disk
Free
Free amount of disk size in the partition/logical disk.
Total
The total amount of disk size allocated for the partition/logical disk.
The information on the Memory usage is displayed in the following way:
Field
Description
Physical memory
The percentage of the current physical server utilization in terms of allocated
memory.
Swap Space
The percentage of the current physical server utilization in terms of allocated
swap space. The bar is not displayed if swapping is not configured on the
physical server.
RAM+Swap
The simple average of the resources above.
If you need to free some of the resources, click the Resources tab. You will see which of the
virtual environments hosted on the physical server snatch the biggest piece of a corresponding
resource. Then, depending on how important the operations run on these virtual environments
are, you can suspend some of them. A suspended virtual environments stays put, and so its
processes and services do, to be later resumed from the checkpoint. Suspending virtual
environments is a good method to disengage the physical server recourses for a certain period of
time or saving the state of current operations which can be quickly launched again afterwards.
Note: Remember, that repairing, restarting and reinstalling a suspended virtual environment can
change the saved state of the virtual environments, so these actions are not recommended.
Managing Physical Servers
23
Rebooting Physical Server
Sometimes you may need to reboot your Physical Server, for example, if you have installed a
new Linux kernel want to start using it.
Before rebooting the server, keep in mind that usually this process takes about 3-5 minutes.
During this time, the physical server and all virtual environments residing on it will be
unavailable.
To reboot the physical server, you can do one of the following:
ƒ
Go to the Physical Servers page of the Infrastructure window, right-click the server name
and select Reboot from the context menu.
ƒ
Click the server name in the infrastructure tree to open the Physical Server page and select
Reboot from the Tasks list.
Managing Physical Servers
24
Managing Parallels Licenses
Physical servers running Parallels Virtuozzo Containers technology demand Parallels
Containers licenses to create and work with Containers. Physical servers running Parallels
Server Bare Metal technology demand Parallels Server Bare Metal license to create and work
with virtual machines and Containers. You do not need to additionally install Parallels
Containers license n PSBM physical servers to run Containers on them.
Any of the licenses can be installed either as a key string or as a text file with the help of the
Install License Key or Install License File links, correspondingly. Whereas a license key can be
installed directly on the physical server under consideration, the license file first should be
uploaded to Parallels Virtual Automation and only then it can be installed on the physical
server.
A license includes a set of parameters, the full list of which (such as, the number of CPUs,
virtual environments, or users your license allows you to have on the physical server) is
available on the screen which opens if you click the key number of the license or the license
serial number. If any of these parameters has been or will be changed (say, you upgraded your
physical server with more CPUs, or want to extend the limit of the virtual environments that the
physical server may host), you will need to update your physical server license as well.
You may also want to update the license if the data in the Status or Expiration columns suggest
that you do. For example, if the Status column tells you that the license is invalid, or expired, or
the expiration date displayed in the Expiration column is close, this is a good reason to update it.
Finally, you can update your trial license. To update your license, select its checkbox on the list
and click Refresh on the Parallels Virtual Automation toolbar.
The Licensing screen contains all the necessary information on the Parallels Virtuozzo
Containers and Parallels Server Bare Metal product keys installed on physical servers that
registered in Parallels Virtual Automation.
The Licenses table on shows the information on all your licenses:
Column Name
Description
Serial Number
The string of symbols that serves for both activating the license and as an identifier
of the license on the physical server.
Key Number
The key number of the license, which identifies the license on the Parallels Key
Authentication (KA) server.
Hardware Node
The physical server on which the license is installed.
Status
The status of the license.
Expiration
The expiration date and time of the license.
25
CHAPTER 5
Managing Virtual Environments
In This Chapter
Creating Virtual Environments ............................................................................................. 25
Starting and Stopping Virtual Environments ........................................................................ 32
Logging In to Virtual Environments ..................................................................................... 32
Deleting Virtual Environments ............................................................................................. 34
Creating Virtual Environments
This section provides basic instructions for creating a virtual environment using Parallels
Virtual Automation.
You can create either a virtual machine or a Container. The two types belong to different
virtualization technologies and have a number of differences in their configuration settings.
When deciding on the new virtual environment type, you may consider the following points:
ƒ
Containers are less resource consuming than virtual machines, as they do not emulate the
physical server hardware;
ƒ
Virtual machines require a guest OS to be installed after creation, while Containers are
created with a guest OS and can be started right away;
ƒ
Virtual machines allow to install a wide range of OSs different from the physical server OS.
Each virtual environment configuration you make up during the creation process contains a
number of advanced settings that you may skip when learning the basics of Parallels Virtual
Automation. In case you would want to learn more about the advanced options, you can click
Help button in the upper right-hand corner of the window, or see Parallels® Virtual
the
Automation Administrator's Guide.
Managing Virtual Environments
26
Creating Virtual Machines
Creation of a Parallels Server virtual machine is quite an easy process, during which you define
basic virtual machine operation settings and create initial configuration that you can edit later
from the virtual machine dashboard or with the help of Parallels Server.
To create a new Virtual Machine
1
Click the
New button and select Virtual Environment from the drop-down list.
2 In the Begin window, select the type of virtual environment you want to create: in this case,
it will be Parallels Server Virtual Machine.
As you make the selection, you are prompted to define on which physical server the virtual
machine will reside in the Physical Server Selection section. You can either let Parallels
Virtual Automation select the Server for you, or specify one yourself.
In the Virtual Environment Configuration section, specify the number of virtual machines to
be created and the virtual environment template to be applied to them.
As you finish with the initial settings, click Next to proceed to the next window.
3 In the General Settings window, specify the new virtual machine name and the guest
operating system type and version. At this point, you can also create a list of users who will
be able to manage the new virtual machine and define their administration privileges in the
Permissions section.
Besides the general settings, you can also adjust the virtual machine working mode and
appearance:
ƒ
Expand the Host System Integration section to set the virtual machine dependencies on
the physical server operation, such as the start method (automatic on the server
load/reload or manual) or the foreground and background processes relation.
When finished, click Next to define the hardware settings, or click Create to apply the
default hardware settings and create the virtual machine.
Managing Virtual Environments
27
4 In the Hardware Settings window, specify the characteristics of the new virtual machine
hardware, such as the number of virtual CPUs, the amount of the Physical Server RAM to
be used by the Virtual Machine, and various virtual devices settings. To view and edit the
default settings, click the device name in the device panel to the left.
By default, the virtual devices you can set up in this step are the virtual machine hard disk,
network adapter and CD/DVD-ROM. However, you can add more devices to the virtual
machine configuration by clicking the Add Device button at the bottom of the devices panel.
From the pop-up list that appears, select the required virtual hardware and click Add, as it is
shown in the picture below:
Figure 2: Creating Parallels Virtual Machines - Adding Devices
When you are done with the hardware settings, click Next to proceed.
Managing Virtual Environments
28
5 In the Review window, look up the virtual machine configuration settings you have specified
and either click Back to go back to the previous steps and change them, or click Create to
schedule the new virtual machine for creation.
At this point, you will be redirected to the Virtual Environments tab of the Infrastructure
window. The information bar at the top of the window informs you about the scheduled task
and provides the Details link to the task progress information:
Figure 3: Creating Parallels Virtual Machines - Viewing Details
After the virtual machine is created, you can find it in the list of available virtual
environments. If it doesn't appear, click the
Refresh button and check again.
Managing Virtual Environments
29
Creating Containers
The procedure of a Parallels Virtuozzo Container creation is somewhat more complicated than
that of a Parallels virtual machine, since almost every window contains not only the basic
configuration options, but also a number of advanced settings. The good thing about it is that
you can easily skip the advanced options or simply use the default parameters that the Parallels
Virtual Automation team has developed for your convenience. Or you may learn more about
these options by clicking the
Help button and reading the corresponding help page.
In any case, you can always edit the Container configuration later from the Container dashboard
or with the help of Parallel Virtuozzo Container software.
To create a new Container, do the following:
1
Click the
New button and select Virtual Environment from the drop-down list.
2 In the Begin window, select the type of virtual environment you want to create: in this case,
it will be Parallels Virtuozzo Container.
As you make the selection, you are prompted for the destination Physical Server information
in the Physical Server Selection section. You can either let Parallels Virtual Automation
select the server for you, or specify one yourself. When creating a new Container on an
automatically selected server, you should also specify the desired operating system for the
target physical server.
In the Virtual Environment Configuration section, specify the number of Containers to be
created and the virtual environment template to be applied to them.
As you finish with the initial settings, click Next to proceed to the following window.
3 In the Setup window, specify the new Container name and the Virtuozzo OS template to be
applied to the newly created Container.
It is also recommended to specify the administrative password at this point, so that you
won't have to do this later. The default username for the administrator of the Containers with
the Windows and Linux operating system will be Administrator and root respectively.
Besides setting up the administrator credentials, you can make up a list of users who will be
able to manage the Container and define their administration privileges in the Permissions
section.
In this window, you can also configure a number of advanced settings found in the
following sections:
ƒ
Advanced Configuration section lists several customization options and advanced
functions you can enable.
ƒ
Terminal Services section enables you to define in which Windows TS mode (Remote
Desktop for Administration and Terminal Server) the Container will operate and which
licenses it will use.
ƒ
Offline Management section enables you to define the services that will be available even
when the Physical Server hosting your Container is down.
When finished, click Next to define the network settings, or click Create to apply the default
settings and create the Container.
Managing Virtual Environments
30
4 In the Network Configuration window, provide the connection information that will be used
for connecting to the new Container, such as the Container hostname and its IP address.
Click Next.
5 In the Resources Customization window, adjust the advanced settings concerning the
Container CPU, memory and operating system parameters. Since setting up these values is
quite a challenging task, you can use the default settings.
If you'd like to learn more about the advanced options, you can click the
Help button in the
upper right-hand corner of the window, or see Parallels® Virtual Automation Administrator's
Guide.
1
In the Application Selection window, specify the applications you want to automatically
install in the Container upon its creation. To select an application, select it in the Available
Applications list and click
below:
to move it to the Scheduled for Installation list, as shown
Figure 4: Creating Containers - Selecting Applications
2 In the Review window, look up the Container configuration settings you have specified and
either click Back to go back to the previous steps and change them, or click Create to
schedule the new Container for creation.
At this point, you will be redirected to the Virtual Environments tab of the Infrastructure
window. The information bar at the top of the window informs you about the scheduled task
and provides the Details link to the task progress information:
Managing Virtual Environments
31
Figure 5: Creating Containers - Viewing Details
After the Container is created, you can find it in the list of available virtual environments. If
it doesn't appear, click the
Refresh button and check again.
Managing Virtual Environments
32
Starting and Stopping Virtual
Environments
A virtual environment may be started up, restarted, paused, and shut down like an ordinary
computer. Depending on the virtual environment state, only those operations are accessible that
comply with its current state. For example, a running virtual environment cannot be started for
obvious reasons, and so on. The following states can be characterized as stable:
Status
Description
Running
The virtual environment is running; therefore, it may only be restarted or stopped.
Down
The virtual environment is stopped; therefore, it may only be started.
Repairing
The virtual environment is being repaired. You cannot perform any action on the virtual
environment until you click the Finish Repair button.
Besides these states, a virtual environment may be in one of the transitional states: mounting,
starting, stopping, etc. When a virtual environment is in a transitional state, you cannot perform
any action on it until the operation is finished.
To change the virtual environment state, go the Virtual Environments tab of the Infrastructure
page and click the Start, Stop, Pause or Restart button to perform the corresponding action. On
clicking one of these buttons, this action is logged.
The current status of the virtual environment is available in the Status table of the virtual
environment dashboard. The history of the status changes can be viewed from the Logs -> Tasks
page of the virtual environment.
Note: Some operations are available either for virtual machines or Containers. For example, you
can pause virtual machines only.
Logging In to Virtual Environments
Sometimes you may find it necessary to log in to a virtual environment to monitor or manage it
from the inside. The topics in this section explain how you can do this using PVA Control
Center.
Managing Virtual Environments
33
Logging in to Virtual Machines
You can connect to the virtual machine via Virtual Network Computing (VNC) - a graphical
desktop sharing system.
To connect to a virtual machine via VNC, do the following:
1
Make sure that the required virtual machine is running. If it is not, start it via PVA.
2 Open the virtual machine Console tab by selecting the corresponding option from the virtual
machine context menu (right-click the virtual machine name and select Open Console), or
by clicking Open Console in the Tasks section of the virtual machine Summary tab.
On the Console tab, the virtual machine remote display will open automatically.
If you are doing this for the first time, your browser may display a security warning asking
you to install additional components. Click Yes and wait for the remote desktop window to
appear.
In this window, specify your user name and password you created for this virtual machine and
click Enter to get connected to the virtual machine and start sending commands to it via VNC.
Logging in to Containers
You can use Remote Desktop Connection - a standard Windows application - to connect to
a Windows Container by means of the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP).
Note: The feature is available only for Internet Explorer 6.x and 7.x for Windows.
To connect to a Container via RDP, do the following:
1
Make sure that the required Container is running. If it is not, start it.
2 Open the Remote Desktop window by selecting the corresponding option either from the
Container's context menu (right-click the Container's name and select Log In -> Remote
Desktop), or from the Container's toolbar (click the Log In button and select Remote
Desktop).
3 In the Remote Desktop window, click the Login button to open a Remote Desktop session.
If you are doing this for the first time, your browser may display a security warning asking
you to install additional components. Click Yes and wait for the Remote Desktop terminal
window to appear.
Managing Virtual Environments
34
4 In this window, specify your user name and password you created for this Container and
click Enter to get connected to the Container and start sending commands to it via Remote
Desktop.
You can use the Secure Shell (ssh) application to remotely connect to a Linux Container and
work inside its directory tree using standard Linux command line tools.
Note: The feature is available for all the browsers supported by Parallels Virtual Automation.
To connect to a Container by ssh, do the following:
1
Make sure that the required Container is running. If it is not, start it.
2 Open the SSH Connection window by selecting the corresponding option either from the
Container's context menu (right-click the Container's name and select Log In -> Terminal
Login), or from the Container's toolbar (click the Log In button and select Terminal Login).
3 In the SSH Connection window, specify your user name and password you created for this
Container and click Login to get connected to the Container.
If you are doing this for the first time, your browser may display a security warning asking
you to install additional components. Click Yes and wait for the ssh terminal window to
appear, whereupon you get connected to the Container and may start sending commands to
it via ssh.
Deleting Virtual Environments
The Delete screen allows you to remove those virtual environments from your physical servers
that you do not need anymore.
To delete a virtual environment, do the following:
1
Go to the Virtual Environments tab of the Infrastructure window, choose the virtual
environment and click the Delete icon.
All the virtual environments scheduled for removing are listed in the Delete Virtual
Environment section of the Delete screen.
2 To delete the listed virtual environments, select the Yes, I want to delete the Virtual
Environment(s) check box and click the Delete button; otherwise, click Cancel.
When removing virtual environment, please keep in mind the following:
ƒ
Removing a virtual environment means that the private area of the virtual environment is
completely deleted from the Host OS and all the virtual environment private files are
irrevocably erased from the physical server.
ƒ
Deleting a considerable number of virtual environments may take a rather long run.
Glossary
35
Glossary
Application template is a template used to install a set of applications in virtual environments.
See also Template.
Container (or regular Container) is a virtual private server, which is functionally identical to an
isolated standalone server, with its own IP addresses, processes, files, its own users database, its
own configuration files, its own applications, system libraries, and so on. Containers share one
physical server (or Hardware node) and one OS kernel. However, they are isolated from each
other. A Container is a kind of ‘sandbox’ for processes and users.
Hardware Node is a physical server where the Parallels virtual environment software is
installed for hosting virtual environments. Sometimes, it is marked as Container 0. in the
interface, the Hardware Node term is used, while in the help physical server is being used.
Host Operating System (or Host OS) is an operating system installed on the physical server.
Master Server. A physical server where the Parallels Virtual Automation Management Server
component is installed.
OS template (or Operating System template) is used to create new virtual environments with a
preinstalled operating system. See also Template.
Parallels Virtual Automation is a tool designed for managing physical server and all virtual
environments residing on them with the help of a standard Web browser on any platform.
Parallels Management Console (or Management Console) is a Parallels virtual environments
management and monitoring tool with graphical user interface. It is used to control individual
physical server and their virtual environments. Management Console is cross-platform and runs
on Microsoft Windows, Linux, and Mac OS workstations.
Parallels Power Panel is a means for administering personal virtual environment with the help
of a standard Web browser (Internet Explorer, Mozilla, etc.) on any platform.
Parallels Virtuozzo Containers (or Parallels Containers) is a complete server automation and
virtualization solution allowing you to create multiple isolated Containers on a single physical
server to share hardware, licenses, and management effort with maximum efficiency.
SSH stands for Secure Shell. It is a protocol for logging on to a remote machine and executing
commands on that machine. It provides secure encrypted communications between two
untrusted hosts over an insecure network.
Standard template is a template file that has inside itself all the re-usable files of all the
packages comprising the template. If newer versions of any of these packages appear, a standard
template can be correspondingly updated. Compare EZ template.
TCP (TCP/IP) stands for Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. This suite of
communications protocols is used to connect hosts on the Internet.
Glossary
36
Template (or package set) is a set of original application files (packages) repackaged for
mounting over Parallels File System. There are two types of templates. OS Templates are used
to create new virtual environments with a preinstalled operating system. Application templates
are used to install an application or a set of applications in virtual environments. See also
Standard template and EZ template.
Parallels Containers and Parallels Server license is a special license that you should load to the
Hardware Node to be able to start using the virtual environments software. Every Hardware
Node shall have its own Server license.
Virtual Machine. The computer emulated using Parallels Server, it is functionally identical to an
isolated standalone server. A virtual machine has its own virtual hardware and requires an
operating system to control its hardware. The installed operating system and its applications are
isolated inside the virtual machine and share physical hardware resources of the physical server
where the virtual machine resides..
Virtual Environment. Is a generic name for virtual machines and Containers.
37
Index
A
About
Parallels Virtual Automation • 5
About Parallels Virtual Automation • 5
C
Containers
creating • 29
deleting • 34
logging into • 33
starting • 32
stopping • 32
Creating
Container • 29
Virtual Environment • 25
Virtual Machine • 26
Creating Containers • 29
Creating Virtual Environments • 25
Creating Virtual Machines • 26
D
Deleting
Containers • 34
Virtual Environment • 34
Virtual Machines • 34
Deleting Virtual Environments • 34
F
Feedback • 6
G
Getting Help • 6
Getting Started • 15
Glossary • 35
H
Hardware Requirements • 9
I
Installing on Bare Metal • 9
Installing on Linux • 11
Installing on Windows • 10
Installing Parallels Virtual Automation • 7
on Linux • 11
on Windows • 10
Interface Overview • 17
Introduction • 5
L
Logging in to Containers • 33
Logging in to Physical Servers • 21
Logging In to Virtual Environments • 32
Logging in to Virtual Machines • 33
Logging Into
Containers • 33
Physical Servers • 21
Virtual Environment • 32
Virtual Machines • 33
M
Managing
Containers • 25
Physical Servers • 19
Virtual Environment • 25
Virtual Machines • 25
Managing Parallels Licenses • 24
Managing Physical Servers • 19
Managing Virtual Environments • 25
Monitoring Physical Server Resources • 22
P
Parallels Virtual Automation
basics • 13
components • 14
getting started with • 15
infrastructure • 14
interface • 17
Parallels Virtual Automation Basics • 13
Parallels Virtual Automation Infrastructure •
14
Physical Servers
logging into • 21
managing • 19
rebooting • 23
registering • 20
resources • 22
R
Rebooting Physical Server • 23
Index
Registering Physical Servers • 20
S
Software Requirements • 8
Starting
Containers • 32
Virtual Environment • 32
Virtual Machines • 32
Starting and Stopping Virtual Environments •
32
Stopping
Containers • 32
Virtual Environment • 32
Virtual Machines • 32
System Requirements • 7
hardware requirements • 9
software requirements • 8
V
Virtual Environment
creating • 25
deleting • 34
logging into • 32
managing • 25
starting • 32
stopping • 32
Virtual Machines
creating • 26
deleting • 34
logging into • 33
starting • 32
stopping • 32
38
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