Local standards for Houses in Multiple

Local standards for
Houses in Multiple
Occupation (HMO’s)
Telford and Wrekin Council
April 2015
Local standards for Houses in Multiple Occupation (HMO’s)
Telford and Wrekin Council
INDEX
SECTION
1
Introduction
2
Planning
approval
permission
and
building
regulations
3
Categories of houses in multiple occupation
4
Management of HMO’s
5
Occupancy and space standards in HMO’S
6
General amenity standards in HMO’s
7
Category A – bedsits. Space standards
8
Category A – bedsits. Amenity standards
9
Category B – Shared Houses. Space standards
10
Category B – Shared Houses. Amenity standards
11
Fire safety in HMO’s
12
Space heating
13
Housing, Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS)
1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 This booklet lays down the standards adopted by the Borough of Telford &
Wrekin for Houses in Multiple Occupation (HMOs). These standards apply to all
HMO’s whether or not they are subject to mandatory licensing.
1.2 A House in Multiple Occupation (HMO) means a building, or part of a building:• Which is occupied by more than one household sharing an amenity
such as bathroom, toilet or cooking facilities;
or
• Which is occupied by more than one household, which is a converted
building which does not entirely comprise self contained flats
(whether or not they are sharing amenities);
or
• Which comprises entirely of converted self contained flats and the
standard conversion does not meet that required by the 1991
Building Regulations and more than 1/3 of the flats are occupied
under short tenancies.
1.3 The Housing Act 2004 introduced mandatory licensing for HMO’s of 3 or more
storeys with five or more residents comprising of two or more households.
1.4 There are several categories of HMO which require different standards and
these are described in further detail in this document.
1.5 The Environmental Health team (housing standards) are the point of contact for
further information on HMO’s, licence applications and any other queries
regarding the conditions and amenities within the properties. The team can be
contacted at:Borough of Telford & Wrekin
Health, Well Being and Public Protection
Darby House
Lawn Central
Telford
TF3 4JA
Tel: 01952 381818
environmental.health@telford.gov.uk
2. PLANNING PERMISSION AND BUILDING REGULATIONS APPROVAL
Please note that even if you comply with the housing act 2004 this does not imply
that planning or building control requirements have been met.
In additional to certain types of building work and property alterations, planning
permission and building regulations approval are required for any change of use
where there are 7 or more households or for conversion of a dwelling. Further
advice on planning permission can be obtained from:-
Head of Planning & Environment
Telford & Wrekin Council
P O Box 457
Wellington Civic Offices
Telford TF2 2FH
Tel: 01952 380380
Fax: 01952 384110
Email: planning.control@telford.gov.uk
Head of Building Control
Telford & Wrekin Council
P O Box 457
Wellington Civic Offices
Telford
TF2 2FH
Tel: 01952 384555
Fax: 01952 384110
Email: building.control@telford.gov.uk
3. CATEGORIES OF HOUSES IN MULTIPLE OCCUPATION
There are seven main categories of Houses in Multiple Occupation. These are
based on the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health (CIEH) recommendations
and adopted by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister.
These categories are briefly detailed below, however the remainder of this
document will focus on the standards and requirements which apply to Category A
(bedsits) and Category B (shared houses). If you think your HMO falls outside of
these definitions, please contact Environmental Health on 01952 381818 or by
email on environmental.health@telford.gov.uk for more specific information
3.1
Category A
‘Bedsits’
Houses occupied as individual rooms, bedsits and flatlets
which are considered to have a number of rooms for
exclusive occupation, not necessarily behind one door, with
some sharing of amenities usually bathroom and/or toilet
and maybe a kitchen. In such a house, each occupancy
would be separately rented, i.e. each tenant has their own
tenancy agreement for exclusive occupation of their
bedroom.
Further information relating to the standards and amenities
for these HMO’s are contained in this document.
3.2
Category B
‘Houses in
Multiple’
Houses occupied on a shared basis. These would normally
be occupied by students where for certain activities the
shared occupiers might live as a single household unit, but
others do not. Usually the house will be let to a defined
group and occupation, not to individuals. The house is
most likely, but not exclusively, to be shared and although
most common amongst students it is increasingly found to
be occupied by groups of people coming together in the
house who share certain amenities as they wish but have
certain individual facilities such as a bedroom.
Further information relating to the standards and amenities
for these HMO’s are contained in this document.
3.3
Category C
‘Lodgers’
(small meals)
with meals
provided
Houses let in lodgings, i.e. catering for lodgers on a small
scale but not living as part of the main household, normally
with a resident owner/occupier. This is the traditional
houses let in lodgings where meals are provided in a dining
room and would be typified by a family or household who
might take in a small number of students or other
individuals away from their primary place of residence.
If you think that your HMO falls within this category, please
contact Environmental Health for further information
regarding standards and amenities.
3.4
Category D
‘Hostels’
Houses generally referred to as ‘hostels’ or guest houses.
Bed and Breakfast accommodation, which provide
accommodation for people with no other permanent place
of residence (as distinct from a hotel which provides
accommodation for visitors to the area for a short time).
The category includes hostels and bed and breakfast
establishments used by Local Authorities to house
homeless families, or similar establishments which provide
accommodation for single people whose only financial
support is state benefit and who would otherwise be
homeless. This category includes hostels, used for such
accommodation even on a casual basis where there is a
mixture of homeless households and short term visitors.
If you think that your HMO falls within this category, please
contact Environmental Health for further information
regarding standards and amenities.
2.5
Category E
Houses which are hostels and require registration under the
Registered Homes Act 1984. These residential homes
provide board and personal care for persons in need of
such care by reason of old age, disablement, past or
present dependence on alcohol or drugs, or past or present
mental disorder. These houses provide permanent
accommodation for people with nowhere else to go; and is
their only home and includes a level of support not normally
present within Category D accommodation which only
provides a home for the time-being.
If you think that your HMO falls within this category, please
contact Environmental Health for further information
regarding standards and amenities.
2.6
Category F
Most houses or buildings which by erection or conversion
contain dwellings which are self-contained, and all such
dwellings comprising accommodation which is behind one
access door off a common area. The dwellings would
normally contain all the standard amenities, although it
would be possible for some to be unimproved selfcontained flats lacking one or more standard amenities.
There would be no sharing of amenities with occupiers of
other dwellings.
If you think that your HMO falls within this category, please
contact Environmental Health for further information
regarding standards and amenities.
4. MANAGEMENT OF HMO’s
The Housing Act 2004 section 234 allows for the making of management
regulations.
The Management of Houses in Multiple Occupation (England) Regulations 2006
cover:
1. The duty of the manager to provider information to occupiers as to his name,
address and contact number to each household and those details must be
displayed in a prominent the house.
2. The duty of the manager to take safety measures relating to means of escape
in case of fire and to take measures to protect occupiers from injury having
regard to the design, structural condition and number of occupiers.
3. The duty of the manager to maintain the water supply and drainage in a good
clean and working condition.
4. The duty of the manager to supply and maintain gas and electrical supplies.
The manager if requested by the local authority, must supply within 7 days the
latest landlords gas safety record.
5. The duty of the manager to maintain common parts (including out-buildings,
gardens, yards, fences and walls), fixtures, fittings and appliances.
6. The duty of the manager to maintain living accommodation. This includes
ensuring any furniture supplied with it is in a clean and tidy condition at the
beginning of occupation.
7. The duty of the manager to provide waste disposal facilities and ensure that
refuse is disposed of correctly.
8. The duty of the occupiers to conduct themselves in a tenant like manner and
comply with any instructions which are required for the manager to carry out
their duties.
A person who fails to comply with these regulations commits an offence under
section 243(3) of the Housing Act 2004, punishable on summary conviction with a
fine not exceeding level 5 (£20 000) on the standard scale.
The Borough of Telford & Wrekin also has statutory powers to deal with:a) Disrepair to the property, including provision of services and automatic fire
detection
b) Poor management of the property, accumulation of refuse, dirty conditions,
uncleanliness & obstruction of common areas, defective amenities and
services etc
c) Overcrowding
d) Other miscellaneous and public health matters
HMO’s are therefore subject to the following considerations as a minimum:1. The Housing, Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS)
2. The Management of Houses in Multiple Occupation (England) Regulations
2006
3. The manager of the HMO must be “fit and proper”
4. The amenity and space standards contained within this document
5. Mandatory licensing (if applicable)
The landlord / owner / manager will be responsible for the provision, state and
proper working order of the following:1. the exterior and structural elements of the dwelling; and
2. the installations within and associated with the dwelling for :
(i)
the supply and use of water, gas and electricity;
(ii)
personal hygiene, sanitation and drainage;
(iii)
food safety;
(iv)
ventilation
(v)
space heating; and
(vi)
provision for heating water
The Council can enforce standards in HMO’s by serving a legal notice requiring the
works to be done or specific conditions can be attached to a mandatory licence to
ensure that the property is suitable for occupation.
Where the Council require works to be undertaken, or they are inspecting
standards, the works must be carried out in a professional and workman-like
manner.
All standards must comply with those set by the relevant authorities, such as
Building Control, and must comply with current Building Regulations.
All gas and electricity installations must comply with current safety standards. Any
works undertaken to a gas installation / gas appliance must be completed by a
GAS Safe Registered Contractor and works to the electrical installation must be
completed by a competent contractor in accordance with Part P of Building
Regulations. All appropriate certification must be obtained and copies provided to
the tenants and / or Local Authority where necessary.
Where there are no statutory standards, then relevant codes of practice apply and
professional guidance notes apply, e.g. LACoRS fire safety guidance, CIEH
enforcement guidance on excess cold.
If a statutory notice is not complied with, the Borough of Telford & Wrekin can
undertake work in default and recover costs plus administrative expenses. There is
also the provision to prosecute for non-compliance, which may result in a fine for a
criminal offence.
5. OCCUPANCY AND SPACE STANDARDS IN HMO’S
The space standards which have been adopted by the Borough of Telford and
Wrekin are based on recommended actions made by the Chartered Institute of
Environmental Health (CIEH) and adopted by the Office of the Deputy Prime
Minister. Regard is also had to the type and character of the property on a case by
case basis.
The standards give minimum sizes for rooms, recognising the particular types or
use to which individual rooms are put. For instance, the additional daytime use of a
‘study bedroom’, over and above its use for sleeping purposes.
In assessing the adequacy of any room, design and layout will be considered and,
in some cases, may not be accepted even where the specified minimum floor
areas are met.
For purposes of Mandatory Licensing ‘a person’ is any person residing at the
property and includes children of any age.
Two persons of the opposite sex and aged 10 years or older must not be
obliged to sleep in the same room unless they live together as a co-habiting
couple.
Sometimes, the requirements for Category A (bedsits) and Category B (shared
houses) HMO’s are considered side by side where a property is occupied on a
room by room basis with all tenants sharing the kitchen and bathroom. A site visit /
comprehensive property description with floor plan may be required to determine
the most appropriate standards to apply. Please contact Environmental Health
directly to clarify the acceptable standards in this regard.
6. GENERAL AMENITY STANDARDS IN HMO’s
This section outlines general information regarding provision of kitchens and
bathrooms. More specific information for each category of bedsit is contained in
Section 7 (bedsits) and Section 9 (shared houses) of this guide.
6.1 Kitchen facilities
There must be suitable facilities for the storage, preparation and cooking of food,
including an adequate number of sinks with a satisfactory supply of hot and cold
water.
One set of kitchen facilities includes:1. Standard / proper four ring hob, with oven and grill (gas or electric) installed
so that there is a minimum of 500mm worktop fixed to either side. This
should be suitably positioned within the kitchen to allow for safe circulation
and removal of hot items from the cooker. Mechanical extraction may be
required depending on the amount of natural ventilation in the kitchen.
2. One sink with a drainer, with a constant supply of hot and cold water and
connected to the mains drainage. Each sink should comprise a fixed
impervious bowl properly connected through an adequately sized trap to the
drains and should include at least one drainer or separate bowl, each of
reasonable size, fixed over a suitably constructed base unit.
3. Sufficient storage space for ambient, chilled and frozen food. As a guide this
would consist of at least one standard kitchen cupboard (excluding under
the sink) for food and one drawer / shelf in a fridge and freezer.
4. Sufficient storage space for cooking equipment and crockery etc
5. Sufficient fixed work surface to enable each tenant to prepare food safely
and hygienically. As a guide, a minimum of 500mm depth and length clear
run per person is required.
6. As a minimum each main appliance (fridge, freezer, microwave, washing
machine & kettle) should have its own dedicated power socket, with at least
a further two double electric sockets conveniently located for portable
appliance (toasters, food mixers etc).
Kitchens should not be located more than two floor distances away from any
intended user and facilities and appliances should be designed and installed so as
not to be prejudicial to health.
Sinks, worktops, immediately adjacent walls and floors should be non-porous and
reasonably smooth so as to facilitate cleaning.
Cooker rings and hot plates must be fixed within the worktop, a portable worktop
appliance is not acceptable in any circumstances.
A microwave is not a suitable cooking appliance, unless it is provided in addition to
a standard four / six ring hob, cooker and grill.
Each kitchen must only contain a maximum of two complete sets of cooking
facilities. If additional facilities are required, to cater for 11+ occupants, then a
second kitchen is required.
6.2 Water supply
Each separate kitchen / kitchenette shall be provided with a supply of cold running
water directly from the rising main and suitable for drinking purposes.
The water pressure to all fitments shall comply with the minimum requirements laid
down by the Severn Trent Water Authority at all times.
It is recommended that all water supplies shall, where necessary, be protected
from frost damage. To reduce the risk of organic contamination, it is also preferable
if the cold water supply pipe does not run fully and continuously adjacent to hot
water pipes or heating appliances.
6.3 Water Closets(WC’s)
All WC compartments must be provided with a wash hand basin which has a
constant supply of hot and cold water and connected to the mains drainage. The
floor covering must be capable of being readily cleansed, i.e. lino, tiles
No shared WC shall communicate directly with a room used for sleeping, living,
eating or preparing food.
6.4 Wash hand basins
All wash hand basins must have a constant supply of hot and cold running water
and connected to the mains drainage. A splash back will also be provided to the
wall immediately adjacent to the basin.
6.5 Bath / shower rooms
There must be sufficient fixed baths and / or showers with a constant & adequate
supply of hot and cold water & connected to the mains drainage. Baths should be a
minimum 1.67m in length; shower trays should be minimum 760mm x 760mm.
Bathrooms, shower rooms and WC compartments should be constructed so that
surfaces are readily cleansable and splash backs are provided behind sinks,
around baths and in shower compartments. Baths and showers shall not be
provided in kitchens. Mechanical extraction is required where there is an absence
of natural ventilation (windows). The floor covering must be capable of being
readily cleansed, i.e. lino, tiles
7. CATEGORY A – BEDSITS
SPACE STANDARDS
Houses occupied as individual bedrooms, with sharing of facilities such as kitchen
and / or bathroom. Tenants have their own tenancy agreement.
Type of Arrangement
Space Standard
(minimum)
One person occupying:
Bedsit with cooking facilities
13m2
Bedsit with separate kitchen
10m2 bedroom / living room
3m2 kitchen
Shared kitchens
3m2 per person using the accommodation
3-roomed bedsit with separate kitchen 4.5m2
kitchen, bedroom and living room bedroom 6.5m2
living room 9m2
2-roomed bedsit with separate bedroom 6.5m2
bedroom
living room/kitchen 11m2
Two persons occupying:
1-roomed bedsit including kitchen not suitable for 2 people
Bedsit with separate kitchen
kitchen 7m2
living room/bedroom 14m2
Bedsit with separate bedroom
living room/kitchen 15m2
bedroom 10m2
Separate kitchen, bedroom and kitchen 7m2
living room
bedroom 10m2
living room 12m2
8. CATEGORY A – BEDSITS
AMENITY STANDARDS
8.1 Kitchen Facilities
Kitchens for exclusive use
Where a bedsit is provided with its own kitchen*, it shall contain one complete set
of facilities which are detailed in Section 6.1.
There shall be a continuous length of work top provided of at least 2m in length.
*Planning and building control should be contacted to check compliance.
Shared kitchens
Where a shared kitchen is provided, there will be one complete set of kitchen
facilities, as detailed in Section 6.1, for every 5 occupants. This shall be not more
than two floor distance away from the intended users of that kitchen.
A suitable, securely fixed impervious food preparation surface shall be provided to
a minimum of ½m2 per person.
up to (and including) 5 people
1 complete set of kitchen facilities as
per Section 6.1
6 – 10 people*
2 complete sets of kitchen facilities as
per Section 6.1
For 11 people and over, the ratio of 1:5 will apply, however there should be no
more than 2 complete set of kitchen facilities in one room.
*Where there are 6 people in a HMO, the amenity standard will be relaxed IF IT IS
NOT REASONABLY PRACTICABLE to fit two complete sets of kitchen facilities in
the property which will be determined by the Local Authority.
Relaxed amenity standard for 6 people
A cooker with a minimum of 6 rings, oven and grill (gas or electric) and a
microwave oven and grill. The additional 2 cooker rings must be set within the
worktop, correctly installed by a competent contractor with a minimum of 500mm
work top either side (or to one side if it is located immediately adjacent the current
cooker).
8.2 Water Closets (WC’s)
Preferably, each separate occupancy shall be provided with its own water closet
compartment, but where this is not practicable, such facilities shall be provided in a
suitable location not more than one floor distant from each intended user, in the
following ratios:
up to (and including) 5 people
6 – 10 people*
11 – 15 people*
1 WC and WHB
2 WC’s & WHB
3 WC’s & WHB
16+ people*
1 WC & WHB for
every 5 occupants
*Where WC’s are shared, there should be at least one facility provided in a
separate room from the bathroom or shower room if this is practical. External WC’s
are not acceptable.
8.3 Bathrooms / shower rooms
Preferably, each separate occupancy shall have its own bathroom/shower room.
Where this is not possible or practical, a readily accessible bathroom or shower
room (not more than one floor distant away from each intended user) shall be
provided, in the following ratios:
up to (and including) 5 people
6 – 10 people
11 – 15 people
1 bathroom / shower room
2 bathrooms / shower rooms
3 bathrooms / shower rooms
16+ people
1 bathroom / shower room
for every 5 occupants
9. CATEGORY B – SHARED HOUSES
SPACE STANDARDS
Shared houses, such as students on a whole house tenancy. Exclusive
occupation of a bedroom with kitchen and bathroom shared.
Type of Arrangement
Space Standard
One person occupying:
Study/bedroom without separate living room
10m2
Study/bedroom with separate living room
6.5m2
Two persons occupying:
Study/bedroom without a separate living room
15m2
Study/bedroom with a separate living room
11m2
Shared rooms
Kitchen shared by:
1 – 5 people
7m2
6 – 10 people
10m2
11+ people two separate kitchens must be
provided
Dining/Kitchens shared by:
1 – 5 people
11.5m2
6 – 10 people
19.5m2
11+ people two separate kitchens must be
provided
Living Rooms + Dining Rooms shared by:
1 – 5 people
6 – 10 people
11 – 15 people
16 + people
11m2
16.5m2
21.5m2
25m2
10. CATEGORY B – SHARED HOUSES
AMENITY STANDARDS
10.1
Kitchen facilities
Each occupancy shall have use of a kitchen (containing one complete set of
kitchen facilities, as outlined in Section 6.1) separate from the sleeping room no
more than two floors distant from the intended users and adjacent to a dining room.
Up to and including 6 people in occupation
One cooking appliance with at least four rings / hot plates, together with a grill and
an oven, will be sufficient. To supplement this, a microwave oven and grill should
also be provided. One sink will be sufficient.
7 or more people
If the property is occupied by 7 people, then an additional set of kitchen facilities as
per Section 6.1, shall be provided. A dishwasher will be acceptable as a second
washing provision in addition to a sink. One set of facilities is required for every 5
occupants.
10.2
Water Closets (WC’s)
A readily accessible water closet compartment, being not more than one floor
distant from each user, shall be provided in a suitable location in the following
ratios:
up to (and including) 5 people
6 – 10 people*
11 – 15 people*
1 WC and WHB
2 WC’s & WHB
3 WC’s & WHB
16+ people*
1 WC & WHB per 5 occupants
*Where there are 6 or more occupants, at least one WC shall be in a room
separate from the bathroom or shower room.
10.3
Bathrooms
A readily accessible bathroom or shower room in a suitable location, being not
more than one floor distant from any user, shall be provided in the following ratios:
up to (and including) 5 people
6 – 10 people
11 – 15 people
1 bathroom / shower room
2 bathrooms / shower rooms
3 bathrooms / shower rooms
16+ people
1 bathroom / shower room per 5 occupants
11. FIRE SAFETY IN HMO’s
All HMO’s will be assessed using the HHSRS and the risk assessment will
determine the fire precautions specified by the Local Authority. Reference is also
had to LACoRS Housing – Fire Safety, Guidance on fire safety provisions for
certain types of existing housing. Where necessary, Shropshire Fire and Rescue
are also consulted to ensure adequate fire precautions are installed in properties.
The basic principles of “Means of Escape from Fire” are:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
The containment of the fire in the area where the ignition occurs
A protected route out of the property
That persons are made aware of the danger quickly, and are able to
reach a place of safety, unaided
The Council is required to consult with the Local Fire Authority in determining
“Means of Escape and Adequate other Fire Precautions”.
These standards are only sufficient if there are adequate arrangements to ensure
that the HMO is managed properly so that the fire safety standard is maintained.
Where the Council is not satisfied that the existing management will maintain the
equipment or escape routes, then they may require works which will need less
management, or they may consider closing all or part of the HMO.
Landlords of HMO’s are strongly requested to undertake fire drills and to inform
residents of good practice in case of fire.
Requirements and developments are changing continually, with new technology
and the Local Fire Authority can provide confirmation of the most recent advances.
The Authority will require an annual inspection and servicing of the fire precautions
measures, with an upgrade every five years.
Means of Escape
Any reference to fire resistance should be taken as meaning a standard of 30
minutes as defined in BS 476, unless otherwise stated.
Fire resisting doors are required to satisfy a performance standard of 30 minutes
integrity as determined in the relevant BS 476 – Part 20 and Part 22.
Fire doors which are required to control the movement of smoke should be fitted
with an efficient flexible edge smoke seal and combined intumescent strip, in
accordance with BS 476 – Part 31.
Self-closing doors shall be fitted with positive hydraulic lever arm type self-closing
devices, and shall be close fitting to frame and floor with rebate.
The doors of any doorway through which persons might have to pass so as to get
out of the premises shall not be locked or fastened that they cannot be easily and
immediately opened by them on their way out. This should conform with BS 5725.
Any locks must be capable of being operated without the use of a key – “thumb
turn” only.
Hinges used on fire resisting doors, when tested in accordance with BS476: Part 8,
should be made of non-combustible material, having a melting point of not less
than 800oC.
Fire resisting doors on storage cupboards or similar should be kept locked when
not in use.
The staircase, corridors and protected escape route should be free from
obstruction and articles which may create a risk of fire spread.
Any basements / cellars will also require provision of interlinked mains wired
smoke detection and the cellar ceiling and associated staircase will also need to
provide 30 minutes fire resistance.
Fire Fighting Equipment
A glass fibre blanket, to conform to BS 6575, mounted at a suitable height to
facilitate quick and easy removal from the container, should be provided in each
kitchen or room where cooking appliances are provided.
The provision of fire fighting equipment will be by specification of the local
authority. It is not a requirement to provide fire extinguishers to properties. This is
because they are often mis-used and tenants must be trained on how to use them
property.
Escape Routes
Conspicuous notices, ‘FIRE DOOR – KEEP SHUT’, to be fitted to all fire doors, to
conform with BS 5499.
Mirrors which may mislead occupants as to the direction of escape must not be
hung in escape routes.
Any glazed area adjacent to or forming part of the protected route should be of fire
resistant glass (for example, Georgian wired), and confirm to BS 6262. No glazing
must be sited below 1.1m.
The protected route should be clearly marked by means of signs, notices and
symbols, and in appropriate cases by illuminated fire safety signs.
Subject to a risk assessment, emergency lighting may be required on the escape
route.
Construction
In general, floor to ceiling partitions should be of thirty minutes fire resistance,
except where there is an area of high fire risk – such as a shared kitchen or
commercial kitchen – in which case, fire resistance should be for sixty minutes.
In buildings of three levels or more above ground, the fire resistance of the
structure of the building must be at least sixty minutes. This includes the fire
resistance of floors.
In buildings of not more than three levels above ground, there must be a fire
resistance of the structure and floors of thirty minutes (minimum).
Fire Alarm Systems/Fire Detection Systems
Will vary for each type of ‘house in multiple occupation’, but where automatic and
manual alarm systems are installed, they should comply with BS 5839 –6:2004
The protected route should be clearly marked by means of signs, notices and
symbols, and in appropriate cases by illuminated fire safety signs.
Emergency Lighting
Emergency lighting should be provided on escape route in accordance with BS
5266 Part 1 Code of Practice for the Emergency Lighting of Premises 1988.
The number and positioning of luminaries will be dependant on the layout of the
premises and the product chosen.
12. SPACE HEATING
Regard will be had to the CIEH guidance on enforcement of excess cold hazards in
England
Where there is a gas supply to the property, the preferred method of space heating
throughout the HMO will be gas central heating.
12.1
Gas central heating
Supply and install a whole house gas fired central heating system to the premises
to satisfy the design and installation requirements of British Standard 5449: 1990
and in accordance with Part L of the current Building Regulations. The system shall
be capable of maintaining
the following internal temperatures when the external temperature is –1˚C:Bed sitting rooms, communal living/dining room 21˚C
Bathrooms 22˚C
Elsewhere, including common landings/stairs 18˚C
Sizing of the boiler and radiators shall be determined using an approved Domestic
Central Heating Calculator and approved radiator manufacturer’s sizing tables.
Radiators shall be so sited as to ensure even distribution of heat whilst minimising
heat loss through walls and windows. All radiators shall be fitted with thermostatic
radiator valves. All controls, including the programmer and provision of boiler
interlock shall be in accordance with a recognised standard for a communal
heating system, and be compliant with Part L of the current Building Regulations.
The programmer and room thermostat should be accessible to the tenants, if this is
not possible, the heating should be programmed to be on all the time except for up
to [seven] hours at night. Installation and testing (including for soundness and
sizing of the gas carcassing under normal operating conditions) should be carried
out in strict accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions, the Gas Safety
(installation and Use) Regulations 1994 as amended and the relevant British
Standards/Codes of Practice applicable to domestic gas installations. A copy of the
Manufacturer’s instructions should be left with the occupier and the Benchmark
document competed by the installer, a copy of which should be provided to the
Council
Where it is not practical to provide a gas central heating system, then an electric
heating system shall be installed in accordance with 12.2 or 12.3.
12.2
Electric heating – storage heaters
Design and install a full electric heating system for the whole building using off
peak storage heaters. The system shall be capable of maintaining the following
internal temperatures when the external temperature is –1˚C:Bed sitting rooms 21˚C
Bathroom 22˚C
Elsewhere, including common landings 18˚C
The system shall include the following:
All bed sitting rooms shall be provided with a fan assisted combination storage
heater with thermostatically controlled top up convector heater. All bed sitting
rooms, except those between 8m2 and 11m2 in area with one external wall,
standard ceiling height, and with another heated space above and below, shall be
provided with wall mounted electric panel heaters with timers and electronic
thermostats.
Kitchens of sufficient size and bathrooms where practicable shall be provided with
storage heaters or with on peak down flow heaters otherwise. All storage heaters
shall have automatic charge control and a thermostatically controlled damper
outlet. For sizing and positioning of storage heaters regard shall be had to the
method set out in DOM 8: Guide to the Design of Electric Space Heating Systems,
The Electrical Heating and Ventilation Association, 2006. In particular the system
shall be designed so that 90% of the annual heat requirement is available at the off
peak rate. All works to comply with the latest edition of the IEE Regulations and
Part P of the current Building Regulations
12.3
Electric heating – wet central heating
Design and install a full electrical wet central heating system for the whole property
which can be thermostatically controlled and programmable. The system shall be
capable of maintaining the following internal temperatures when the external
temperature is –10C:
- Living room 21°C
- Bathroom 22°C
- Elsewhere 18°C
All works must comply with the latest edition of the IEE Regulations and Part P of
the current Building Regulations.
Regard shall be had to the method set out in DOM 8: Guide to the Design of
Electric Space Heating Systems, The Electrical Heating and Ventilation
Association, 2006 for the provision of this system.
13. HOUSING, HEALTH AND SAFETY RATING SYSTEM (HHSRS)
The (HHSRS) is used to assess standards in all properties. It is a risk based
assessment of hazards which evaluates the potential risks to health and safety to
occupiers and visitors from any deficiencies which are present.
The following are considered in all inspections:A. PHYSIOLOGICAL REQUIREMENTS
1. Damp and mould growth
2. Excess cold
3. Excess heat
4. Asbestos (and MMF)
5. Biocides
6. Carbon Monoxide and fuel combustion products
7. Lead
8. Radiation
9. Uncombusted fuel gas
10. Volatile Organic Compounds
B. PSYCHOLOGICAL REQUIREMENTS
11. Crowding and space
12. Entry by intruders
13. Lighting
14. Noise
C. PROTECTION FROM INFECTION
15. Domestic hygiene, pests & refuse
16. Food safety
17. Personal hygiene, sanitation and drainage
18. Water supply
D. PROTECTION AGAINST ACCIDENTS
19. Falls associated with baths etc
20. Falling on level surfaces
21. Falls associated with stairs and steps
22. Falls between levels
23. Electrical Hazards
24. Fire
25. Flames, hot surfaces etc
26. Collision and entrapment
27. Explosions
28. Position and operability of amenities etc
29. Structural collapse and falling elements
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