DIS FNG
Simplex Fire Products Fault & Assistance Guide
1.0
Identifying Simplex® 4100 Series Faults .......................................................................................... 3
1.1
1.2
1.3
4100 SERIES - OVERVIEW ................................................................................................................... 4
4100U BASIC OPERATIONS ................................................................................................................ 5
OPERATOR INTERFACE COMMANDS ..................................................................................................... 6
1.1.1
1.4
Resetting 4100 Latched Faults & Rebooting CPU .................................................. 7
INDEX – QUICK VIEW ........................................................................................................................... 8
1.1.2
Loop Card Faults ..................................................................................................... 9
1.1.2.1
1.1.2.2
1.1.2.3
1.1.2.3.1
1.1.2.3.2
1.1.2.3.3
1.1.2.3.4
1.1.2.3.5
Card Missing/Failed ............................................................................................... 10
Correct Card Abnormal .......................................................................................... 10
Short Circuit Abnormal........................................................................................... 10
Class „A‟ Abnormal ................................................................................................ 11
Channel Failure Abnormal ..................................................................................... 11
Channel Initialization Abnormal ............................................................................. 11
Extra Device........................................................................................................... 12
IDNet Dipswitch Settings ....................................................................................... 12
1.1.3
Addressable Device Faults .................................................................................... 13
1.1.3.1.1
1.1.3.1.2
1.1.3.1.3
1.1.3.1.4
1.1.3.1.5
1.1.3.1.6
1.1.3.1.7
1.1.3.1.8
1.1.3.1.9
1.1.3.1.10
No Answer ............................................................................................................. 13
Head Missing ......................................................................................................... 14
Wrong Device ........................................................................................................ 15
Bad Answer............................................................................................................ 16
Extra Device........................................................................................................... 17
Output Abnormal .................................................................................................... 18
Alarm Verification Tally Exceeded ......................................................................... 18
Detector LED Operation ........................................................................................ 18
Device DIP Switch Settings ................................................................................... 18
End of Line Resistors ............................................................................................. 19
1.1.5
4100-0157A Battery Charger Faults ...................................................................... 21
1.1.6
Positive/Negative Earth Ground Faults ................................................................. 23
1.1.6.1
Earth Ground Fault Detecting and Locating .......................................................... 23
2.0
4100 Crash Codes – General Information....................................................................................... 25
2.1
2.2
2.3
4100 CRASH CODES – GENERAL INFORMATION ................................................................................. 26
4100-FAMILY GENERAL CRASH CODES TABLE .................................................................................. 27
4100-FAMILY GENERAL CRASH CODES TABLE (CONTINUED) ............................................................. 28
3.0
Identifying Faults on the GCC, IMS & TrueSite Graphics & Network .......................................... 29
3.1
IDENTIFYING FAULTS ON THE GRAPHICS – GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS ................................................... 30
3.1.1
GCC, IMS & TrueSite Workstation Graphical Control Centre ............................... 30
3.2
DISPLAYED FAULT FORMAT............................................................................................................... 31
3.2.1
Fault Type .............................................................................................................. 32
3.3
NETWORK FAULTS ............................................................................................................................ 33
3.3.1
Common Trouble Point for Node ........................................................................... 33
3.3.2
Card Trouble for Node ........................................................................................... 33
3.3.3
Network Operating in Degraded Style 7 ................................................................ 33
3.3.4
Network Initialization Incomplete ........................................................................... 33
3.3.5
Node Missing/Failed .............................................................................................. 33
3.3.6
System Pseudo Status for Node ........................................................................... 33
3.3.7
Version Mismatch .................................................................................................. 33
4.0
Identifying F3200 Faults ................................................................................................................... 34
4.1
RECALL SYSTEM FAULTS .................................................................................................................. 35
4.1.1
Function ................................................................................................................. 35
4.1.2
Operating Sequence .............................................................................................. 35
4.2
4.3
LIST OF SYSTEM FAULTS – NON-NETWORKED ................................................................................... 36
GLOSSARY OF ABBREVIATIONS ......................................................................................................... 39
5.0
Identifying faults on a QE90 ............................................................................................................. 41
5.1
5.2
5.3
QE90 SERVICE ISOLATION MODE – FAULT DISPLAY .......................................................................... 42
ECP VERSIONS 2.XX/4.XX/6.XX – SYSTEM FAULT DISPLAY................................................................. 43
AUDIO LINE FAULT............................................................................................................................ 45
5.3.1
Speaker Line Fault/Amp Fault ............................................................................... 45
5.4
5.3.2
Amplifier LED Configurations................................................................................. 45
5.3.3
Speaker Tapping Adjustments............................................................................... 46
STROBE LINE FAULT ......................................................................................................................... 47
5.4.1
Strobe Output Considerations ............................................................................... 47
STROBE RELAY DRIVER MODULE AND STROBE LIGHT CONNECTION......................................................... 48
5.4.2
Cable Sizing ........................................................................................................... 48
TABLE 1: CABLE GAUGES ..................................................................................................................... 48
5.4.3
Links and DIP Switches ......................................................................................... 49
TABLE 2: LINK SETTINGS AND THEIR CORRESPONDING OUTPUTS ............................................................. 49
TABLE 3: DIP SWITCHES 1 – 4 – SELECT CARD ADDRESS ....................................................................... 49
TABLE 4: DIP SWITCHES 5 – 8 – SELECT MODE FOR POWERED OUTPUTS .............................................. 50
5.4.4
STBM9008 Board Installation ................................................................................ 50
5.5
BGA OR FIP FAULT .......................................................................................................................... 51
5.6
5.7
5.8
WIP LINE FAULT............................................................................................................................... 52
PA SPEECH, SPARE SPEECH, WIP SPEECH, COMMS AND SPARE COMMS CABLE FAULTS .................. 53
ECP FAILURES ................................................................................................................................. 54
5.8.1
MECP and SECP Failure ....................................................................................... 54
TABLE 5: DIP SWITCH SETTINGS ........................................................................................................... 51
5.9
5.10
5.11
5.8.2
WIP MECP and SECP Failure ............................................................................... 54
5.8.3
Paging Console Failure ......................................................................................... 54
ECM NETWORKED SYSTEMS............................................................................................................. 54
ECM NETWORKED SYSTEM – SYSTEM FAULT DISPLAY ...................................................................... 55
QE90 FAULT REGISTER .................................................................................................................... 56
6.0
National Contact Directory ............................................................................................................... 59
6.1
CONTACT US .................................................................................................................................... 60
Page 2 of 60
1.0 Identifying Simplex® 4100
Series Faults
1.1 4100 Series - Overview
The 4100 Series was released onto the Australian Market in 1990.The first version supported 512 devices or
points. It was replaced with the 4100+ in 1993, which supported 1000 points & the networking of up to 99
panels. The 4100A was a localized version of the 4100+ & has the FireFighter Interface as per AS4428.1.
All versions use the same metalwork & expansion cards.
In 2004, the 4100U was released. This is the new generation of 4100 series panels & has many new
software features & new, smaller expansion cards. It is still fully compatible with the old 4100 expansion
cards. The visible difference is the 4100U has raised rubber keys on the Operator Interface.
What is it? It is a fully modular Fire Detection & Control System. From 8 conventional circuits through to
2,000 conventional, addressable or a mix input & output of circuits, you simply add cards & cabinets to house
them – up to 119 cards per CPU. Connection between cabinets (that are part of the same unit) is a multiconductor harness, containing power & communications.
The 4100 series supports up to 31 remote units via an RUI (Remote Unit Interface). A unit can be 4100
cabinets full of cards, a mimic panel - up to 2000 LEDs & switches (2 or 3 position switches), a remote LCD,
flatpack 24Point I/O modules (multiple flatpack I/O modules located together count as 1 unit). A system can
have up to 4 RUI loops per CPU.
For larger or multi-building sites, multiple 4100 series panels can be networked together, up to 99 panels or
PC based graphic stations (each panel or station is called a Node)
The 4100 series has comprehensive built in diagnostics & the ability to display all details of each card &
addressable device. While the diagnostic & detail display details are beyond this guide‟s intent, a full range of
technical information is available on the Simplex website: www.simplexfire.com.au
Each 4100 consists of a CPU Card & up to 119 addressable expansion cards:
5004 - 8 conventional monitor zones [ZN].
3003 - 8 SPDT relays [AUX] & 8 feedback inputs [FB].
4321 - 6 supervised relay outputs [SIG].
3024 - 24 input or output relays [I/O].
0157 - Power supplies.
0110 - MAPnet addressable loop [M].
0113 - Dual RS232/2120 interface [PORT].
0304 - Remote sub-panel/LCD/mimic panel interface [RUI].
0154 – VESDA High Level Interface.
0301 - 64 LED/64 switch controller.
1288 - 64/64 Led Switch Controller
3101AU - 250 Point IDNET Addressable Loop PDI [ID}
0160 - Fire Panel Internet Interface Module
0620 - 4100U Basic Transponder Interface Card
0302A - 6 EWIS amplifier interface.
0205A - Master WIP phone.
Note: The cards listed above are the most commonly used types.
The 4 digit number is the card type & the identifier in square brackets is the physical point type.
Examples:
The first 5004 card contains points ZN1 to ZN8, the second 5004, ZN9 to ZN16.
The first 3024 card contains points I/O1 to I/O24, the second 3024, I/O25 to I/O48.
The first 0110 card contains points M1-1 to M1-127, the second 0110, M2-1 to M2-127.
Page 4 of 60
1.2 4100U Basic Operations
The Fire Panel display consists of two sections – the Operator
Interface (upper section) and the Zone Isolate pushbutton switches &
indicators (lower section). Fire detectors are grouped into zones
(searchable grouped areas). Zones can be Isolated by pressing the
zone‟s isolate pushbutton on the panel – this prevents an alarm in
that group from activating the panel outputs. When a non-isolated
detector detects an alarm, the fire panel rings the bell, calls the fire
brigade, and activates the Warning or Evacuation System along with
any other programmed functions (site specific).
The Operator Interface indicates common Alarm, Fault & Isolation
Status on LEDs, and point (detector) status on the LCD. When an
Alarm, Fault or Isolation occurs, the buzzer will operate until the
corresponding „Acknowledge‟ (e.g. Fire Alarm Ack) key is pressed.
The panel is reset by pressing „System Reset.‟ If the alarm won‟t
reset the point may still be activated (i.e. detector is still in alarm).
Press „Fire Alarm Ack‟ when the point alarm is displayed, then press
„Disable,‟ „Enter.‟ Press „Fault Ack‟ (to acknowledge the fault caused
by disabling a point), then press SYSTEM RESET again. The
disabled detector must be re-enabled when the condition is cleared.
Page 5 of 60
1.3 Operator Interface Commands
The table shown below includes some general front panel commands for quickly navigating through system
components. In addition output points can be controlled by following the below steps then commanding the
point via the On/Off/Auto keys. Manually controlling output points will create a fault on the LCD display, and
to clear these faults each manually altered output will need to be set back to its AUTO state.
Press
These Keys to Select Points
Enter
Point Data
ZONEᅠ+ Number + Enter
(4100A Only)
Enter the number of a zone. After pressing enter, use
the Previous/Next keys to scroll through the zone
points.
SIGᅠ+ Number + Enter
Enter the number of a signal circuit
AUXᅠ+ Number + Enter
Enter the number of an auxiliary relay point
FBᅠ+ Number + Enter
Enter the number of a feedback point
IOᅠ+ Number + Enter
Enter the number of a 24-Point I/O point
IDNet (4100U) / Mapnet (earlier 4100) + ChannelDevice + Enter
For Channel (loop), enter the number of the IDNet,
MAPNET, or VESDA channel. Insert a dash using the
NET key. Enter the number of the addressable
device.
P + Number + Enter
Enter the number of a digital pseudo point
A + Number + Enter
Enter the number of an analog pseudo point
L + Number + Enter
Enter the number of a list pseudo point
NET + Number + Enter
Enter the number of the network node. When the
screen prompts you to select the type of point (Zone,
Signal, etc.), press the Entry Keypad key
corresponding to that type of point, enter the number
of the point, and press Enter.
ADDR + Card-Point-Subpoint + Enter
Enter the number of the card, insert a dash (using the
NET key), and enter the number of the subpoint.
Page 6 of 60
1.1.1 Resetting 4100 Latched Faults & Rebooting CPU
When fault finding the Simplex® 4100U Fire Detection Panel some IDNet/MAPNet & RUI faults will „latch‟
and not clear without the use of the „System Reset‟ button (described on a previous page). If all else fails, to
clear latched faults or some networking issues it may be warranted to use a CPU Reboot otherwise known
as a Warm-Start.
To perform a Warm-Start, gain access to the CPU card. The CPU card is generally the only legacy card
(vertically mounted) with its components side facing in a different direction (relative to other cards mounted in
a similar fashion) – otherwise it will be the only card in the panel with a small, flat and round ram battery
located on it. Once located, find the small push-button switch located on the bottom edge of the card (4100U
CPU card shown below). Push this button and the panel will then reinitialize. Allow 2-5mins for the panel to
become fully active and re-establish communications with all its associated devices.
NOTE: Starting the panel from a powered-down state is referred to as a cold-start.
Page 7 of 60
1.4 Index – Quick view
Loop Card Faults








Card Missing Failed (Card Inserted)
Correct Card
Short Circuit
Class A
Channel Failure
Channel Initialization
Extra Device
Card DIP Switch
!
NOTE - It is vital that the Loop card is in
NORMAL status before addressable
device fault finding is started.
Addressable Device Faults











No Answer
Head Missing
Wrong Device
Bad Answer
Extra Device
Output Abnormal
Detector LED Operation
Device LED Operation
DIP Switch Table
End of Line Resistor Values.
Hints & Tips
Page 8 of 60
1.1.2 Loop Card Faults
Description:
If the Loop card (MAPNET or IDNET) is in an ABNORMAL (FAULT) state, all devices on that loop will be
displayed as NORMAL.
This NORMAL indication is used to reduce the number of faults when a Loop is not working as all devices
would be displayed as NO ANSWER.
!
NOTE - It is vital that the Loop card is in
NORMAL status before addressable
device fault finding is started.
To confirm a Loop card is in NORMAL status:








Press the MENU button.
Scroll through the options until CARD STATUS is reached.
Press the ENTER button
Scroll through the cards in the panel. Confirm that each loop card is NORMAL.
If CARD MISSING FAILED ABNORMAL then press ENTER and Scroll through card faults.
Refer to the relevant section for fault descriptions.
IDNet Loop Voltage = approx24vDC normally & 30vDC when the panel is in alarm
MAPNet Loop Voltage = approx 36vDC at all times.
Note: IDNet & MAPNet Loop Voltages are fluctuating DC because the Loop Voltage is modulated
to transmit the data.
Page 9 of 60
1.1.2.1
Card Missing/Failed
Description:
The circuit card is not communicating correctly with the panel controller.
Possible causes:






Card has not been fitted
Card is not seated correctly on connector
- Power down panel, clean connectors and reinsert
Card has not been addressed correctly
Card DIP Switch incorrectly set (Dipswitch 1 always in ON position)
Another card has been addressed the same as this card
Card has failed
1.1.2.2
Correct Card Abnormal
Description:
The wrong type of card has been addressed at this location.
Possible causes:


Incorrect card fitted in the panel.
Two cards have the same address.
1.1.2.3
Short Circuit Abnormal
Description:
The addressable loop has a short circuit or the + and – wires are crossed over.
Possible causes:



NOTE:
If there are no isolators fitted or the short is between the panel and the isolator then the loop will stop
operating. This may also display a channel fail
Find the short circuit and fix – disconnect the loop totally, check each pair for a short circuit with a
Multimeter. If fault evident continue these checks at half way points around loop until short is
narrowed down
If short circuit cannot be detected with a Multimeter, disconnect one side of the loop only and
disconnect devices at half way points until the short circuit fault clears, to narrow down the fault
location.
Panel will need to be reset between each disconnection as this fault will latch
Page 10 of 60
1.1.2.3.1
Class ‘A’ Abnormal
Description:
The addressable loop or RUI Bus has an open circuit.
Possible causes:




Open circuit in the wiring loop
Bad connection at addressable point (on addressable loop faults).
Bad connection at remote transponder or LCD Annunciator (for RUI Bus faults)
Faulty addressable loop or RUI card
- Check this fault by „looping out‟ the A and B terminals on the RUI/Mapnet/IDNet card to clear
the fault. If fault does not clear then card may be faulty
1.1.2.3.2
Channel Failure Abnormal
Description:
The Loop card cannot communicate with any device on the loop. Be aware all devices associated with this
loop will indicate a „Normal‟ state to prevent multiple faults per display.
Possible causes:



The Loop has a Short circuit
The Loop has an Earth fault
The Loop is not connected or incorrectly connected
1.1.2.3.3
Channel Initialization Abnormal
Description:
This fault typically occurs at startup with IDNet loops and will normally clear after a couple of minutes if a lot
of Isolators are fitted.
Possible causes:


If the fault continually re-appears the loop length maybe too long or too noisy – Contact your local
Simplex® branch for assistance
Possible bad device causing communication errors
- Disconnect devices at half way points until the fault clears to locate the faulty device
Page 11 of 60
1.1.2.3.4
Extra Device
Description:
A device is located on the addressable loop that is addressed at a location that is not programmed.
Possible causes:
The panel has identified a device/card at an address that is not in the panel programming. Refer to the Extra
Device section of Device Faults (Page 20).
A card/device may be incorrectly addressed bringing up an Extra Device fault and the programmed device‟s
address will display “Points defined but not inserted.”
1.1.2.3.5
IDNet Dipswitch Settings
1. Devices are supplied with DIPSWITCH switch ALL ON (set to 0)
2. DIPSWITCHES are labeled 1 to 8
 Switch 1 = MUST BE ON (OFF disables card communications)
 Switch 2 = 64
 Switch 3 = 32
 Switch 4 = 16
 Switch 5 = 8
 Switch 6 = 4
 Switch 7 = 2
 Switch 8 = 1
3. Turn Switch OFF to add the above number to the address.
Examples:
 Address 5 = Switch 6 & 8 OFF all others ON.
 Address 23 = Switch 4, 6, 7 & 8 OFF others ON.
NOTE - This is reverse of how the addressable devices addresses’ are set.
[Refer to section 1.1.3.9 – page 19]
Page 12 of 60
1.1.3 Addressable Device Faults
!
NOTE - It is vital that the Loop card is in
NORMAL status before addressable
device fault finding is started.
To confirm a Loop card is in NORMAL status:







1.1.3.1.1
Press the MENU button.
Scroll through the options until CARD STATUS is reached.
Press the ENTER button
Scroll through the cards in the panel. Confirm that each loop card is NORMAL.
If CARD MISSING FAILED ABNORMAL then press ENTER and Scroll through card faults.
Refer to the relevant section for fault descriptions.
No Answer
Description:
The panel has a device programmed at the address displayed that is not responding.
Possible causes:
1. Device is not fitted or wiring not correctly terminated.
2. Addressable loop is not working correctly (loop is broken)
3. Faulty base or device
Suggested solutions:
Is device LED
flashing?
NO
YES
Check Loop is
powered at device
(30V)
Check
device
Address
Page 13 of 60
1.1.3.1.2
Head Missing
Description:
The panel is seeing the base at the displayed address but is not seeing the head (Sensor).
Possible causes:





Head is not installed.
Head is not fully twisted onto the base
Detector terminals on the base are loose
Faulty Head
Faulty Base
Suggested solutions:
Is base LED
flashing?
YES
NO
Adjust terminals to
make better contact
with head
Replace Head
NO
Replace Base
Page 14 of 60
1.1.3.1.3
Wrong Device
Description:
The panel is getting a response from the displayed address that does not match the device programmed to
that address.
Possible causes:



Incorrect device installed (Relay with T-Sense fitted instead of standard Relay)
Incorrect head installed (Photo instead of Heat)
Detector head not making good contact with base
Suggested solutions:
Retrieve the part number from the
device (409x-xxxx)
Contact the Programmer
to confirm device
matches Program
YES
Replace Device /
Sensor
NO
Device or Program
change will be required
Replace Base
Page 15 of 60
1.1.3.1.4
Bad Answer
Description:
The panel is getting a response from the displayed address that sometimes does not match the device
programmed to that address.
Possible causes:




Two devices are programmed with the same address.
These devices will most likely be two different device types.
Water damaged device, or wiring.
Electrical Interference
Suggested solutions:
Remove the device/base at
the known address
Bad Answer Fault clears
and no fault present at
device address
Yes
No
Fault changed to
„WRONG DEVICE‟
No
Fault changed to „no
answer‟
Yes
Find other device on
Loop with same
address.
Find other device on
Loop with same
address.
Device will probably
be in „NO ANSWER‟
fault
Replace device or
Sensor
Page 16 of 60
1.1.3.1.5
Extra Device
Description:
The panel has identified a device at an address that is not in the panel programming.
NOTES:
Only one extra device per loop is ever displayed. Fixing one extra device may display a new
extra device fault (if present)
Extra Device Faults take a longer time to appear and clear than other faults.
Possible causes:



Device not added to the program
Device addressed incorrectly
Device not programmed at all (IDNet address 255, MAPNet address 0)
Suggested solutions:
Scroll through the Historical
Fault Log for the following
message
“MAPNET EXTRA DEVICE”
Scroll to the NEXT event.
Channel = Loop Number
DEVICE = Address
Device = 255 or 0
1< Device > 255
Check Program has a
device at that address
The device has
not been
addressed.
Check and fix “NO ANSWER” Device
faults as this may clear extra device
faults
Page 17 of 60
1.1.3.1.6
Output Abnormal
Description:
Observed when the output of a Relay, Sounder or Isolator base is not responding correctly.
Possible causes:


ISOLATOR Base
A Short circuit has occurred on the addressable loop and the Isolator Base has not been able to
reset correctly


SOUNDER or RELAY Base
24 Volt supply to Sounder base is not present
Suggested solutions:

ISOLATOR Base – If short circuit fault has been corrected press „CPU RESET‟ (Warm Start) to
reinitialize the isolator base

SOUNDER or RELAY Base - Check wiring and 24V fused distribution board in panel
1.1.3.1.7
Alarm Verification Tally Exceeded
NOTE:
This fault indicates a dirty detector in the field or conventional zone circuit that is
programmed for Alarm Verification. Check for previous faults and note in the Log book the
time and date this fault occurred.
1.
2.
3.
4.
1.1.3.1.8
Log in at Level 4
Select P214
Force Point ON
Reset CPU (use button on CPU – refer to Page 7) to clear Simplex® Service Fault
Detector LED Operation
Off



Detector is not communicating with the Panel
Two Detectors on the same address
The Head is not fitted correctly


Detector is communicating with the panel
Flash speed does not provide any information



Detector is in ALARM or FAULT
If no Head fitted then EXTRA DEVICE fault.
Detector LED may become latched on if multiple faults occur to the same detector. To Reset
the LED, move the Loop Card DIP Switch 1 to OFF for 10 seconds & back ON.
If all else fails, warm boot the fire panel (CPU Reset).
Flash
On

1.1.3.1.9
Device DIP Switch Settings
Page 18 of 60

Devices are supplied with DIPSWITCH set to 255

DIPSWITCHES are labeled 1 to 8 (left to right)
 Switch 1 = 1
 Switch 2 = 2
 Switch 3 = 4
 Switch 5 = 8
 Switch 6 = 16
 Switch 7 = 32
 Switch 8 = 128

Turn Switch ON to add the above number to the address. Examples:
 Address 10 = Switch 2 & 5 ON all others OFF
 Address 105 = Switch 1, 4, 6 & 7 ON others OFF



The highest IDNet device address is 250.
The highest MAPNet device address is 127.
1.1.3.1.10 End of Line Resistors
For a comprehensive pocket reference guide contact your local Simplex® branch
4090-9001
4090-9101
4090-9118
4090-9120AU
2190-9156
2190-9164
4100 EWIS
4100 8pt Monitor Card
4100 6 Signal Card
4100 24-pt IO Card
Supervised IAM
Current Limited
Monitor ZAM
Relay IAM with T-Sense
Current Limited
6 Pt I/O Module
Current Limited
Mapnet Monitor ZAM
Mapnet Signal ZAM
WIPs
Conventional Zone Card
Signal Card
Pluggable Resistors on card
6.8kΩ
4.7kΩ & 1.8kΩ
3.3kΩ
6.8kΩ
4.7kΩ & 1.8kΩ
6.8kΩ
4.7kΩ & 1.8kΩ
3.3kΩ
10kΩ
10kΩ
3.3kΩ
10kΩ
2.2kΩ Input
20Ω Output
Page 19 of 60
1.1.4 Address Settings for Simplex® Addressable Bases & Devices
DIP Switches 1 - 4
DIP Switches 5-8
0000 1000 0100 1100 0010
0000 0
16
32
48
64
1000 1
17
33
49
65
0100 2
18
34
50
66
1100 3
19
35
51
67
0010 4
20
36
52
68
1010 5
21
37
53
69
0110 6
22
38
54
70
1110 7
23
39
55
71
0001 8
24
40
56
72
1001 9
25
41
57
73
0101 10
26
42
58
74
1101 11
27
43
59
75
0011 12
28
44
60
76
1011 13
29
45
61
77
0111 14
30
46
62
78
1111 15
31
47
63
79
Detectors preset at address 255
1010
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
0110
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
1110
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
0001
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
1001 0101 1101
144 160 176
145 161 177
146 162 178
147 163 179
148 164 180
149 165 181
150 166 182
151 167 183
152 168 184
153 169 185
154 170 186
155 171 187
156 172 188
157 173 189
158 174 190
159 175 191
UP = 1 (ON)
0011
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
1011 0111 1111
208 224 240
209 225 241
210 226 242
211 227 243
212 228 244
213 229 245
214 230 246
215 231 247
216 232 248
217 233 249
218 234 250
219 235 251
220 236 252
221 237 253
222 238 254
223 239 255
DOWN = 0 (OFF)
Note: MAPnet devices highest address is 127.
Page 24 of 60
1.1.5 4100-0157A Battery Charger Faults
There are a number of Battery Charger Faults that can arise during the operational lifetime of a panel. You may
observe one of the following Faults;
Charger 2% out of range
Battery Charger Supply incorrect
The most common cause is one or possibly both batteries are faulty. Before proceeding to adjust the power
supply as described below, measure the voltage of each battery while it is under load. Both batteries should
measure within 0.1v of the other
To correctly measure the output voltage you will need to follow the steps below.
1. To prevent damage to the system, disconnect the batteries & power down the system, disconnect
the power & comms harnesses from the Power Supply.
2. Connect the Multimeter to the battery leads (with batteries disconnected), power up & measure
the voltage. Calculate the difference between the measured voltage & 27.6v.
NOTE: After 90 seconds, the voltage will drop to <24v. If this happens, power down & start
again.
3. Connect the Multimeter to the A or B tap on TB2. Measure the voltage. Adjust the trim-pot (refer
to the Trimpot Location diagram found on Page 22) so the voltage increases (or decreases) by
the difference calculated in step 1.
Page 21 of 60
4. Measure the voltage on the battery leads. You may have to power down & up again to reset the
power supply. If the voltage is correct, power down, re-connect
the power & comms harnesses & return the system to normal.
5. If the voltage is not correct, repeat steps 1 & 2.
Depending on the site implementation of the Power Supply (vertical orientation shown below), it may be difficult to
locate or view the Trim pot. You may be able to work on it in-situ by using a small inspection mirror. If not, it is
recommended that the panel be powered down and the power supply dismounted from the panel and
reconnected (and made live) on a non conductive surface as you will need to monitor the voltage across the
Terminal Strip B connections.
There is an older version of the Power Supply – the adjustment procedure is the same, only the trimpot location is
different. This Power Supply can be identified by the IEC Socket for the mains connection on the end.
An IEC Socket is the same style as found on PCs, Computer monitors etc.
Page 22 of 60
1.1.6 Positive/Negative Earth Ground Faults
Simplex 4100 Series Fire Panels have the ability to detect positive or negative Earth Ground Faults. An Earth
Ground Fault occurs when an electrical circuit has a low resistance path to ground. It is imperative that Earth
Ground Faults are located and repaired as multiple earth faults can disable communications meaning small or
large components of the Fire Detection System may not function correctly (i.e. multiple earth faults on a Mapnet
loop can disable the entire loop communications channel rendering it inoperative).
Possible Causes (Examples)
 Water Damage – creates electrical pathways
 Terminations touching metal contacts or metal structures
 Mounting screws piercing cabling
 Damaged Card in a Fire Panel
 Incorrect wiring to modules
1.1.6.1
Earth Ground Fault Detecting and Locating
There are various ways to test and locate an earth ground fault. The methods utilised can vary between the
different 4100 Series Fire Panels.
Simplex 4100U – The Simplex 4100U series fire panel has the most advanced earth fault monitoring available to
the Simplex Fire Panel Range. The 4100U has the ability to self diagnose and locate the general locale of an
earth fault, enabling the saving of much time and effort during diagnosis. There are two main Earth Fault
Detection options available for selection in the menu options (accessed via the 4100U fascia), a „Location Search‟
and an „IDNet channel Search.‟
To run an Earth Fault Diagnostic, you will firstly need to login to the panel with a sufficient access level as shown
below;
Access Level:
3
Passcode:
333
(Or contact your local Simplex Branch)
This will then enable the „Diagnostics‟ menu option available for selection. Choose a „Location Search‟ or an
„IDNet channel Search‟ and the panel will begin automatically searching different circuits trying to locate the fault.
Once the diagnostic has completed its search, you should then have a finite area to focus your repairs. The IDNet
channel search can even tell you which section of the loop (i.e. between which isolators) the fault is located.
NOTE – It is possible for Earth Ground Faults to switch from Positive to Negative Earth Ground Faults (or ViceVersa), so when disconnecting circuits it is highly recommended that you remove BOTH the positive and negative
connections for efficient diagnosis.
If you find that all the bays have been checked, and the earth fault appears to be in the main CPU Bay, the Earth
fault will most likely be in either the integrated IDNet Loop card found on the power supply, OR more likely, on the
Auxiliary fuse distribution card. The loop card can be tested as per any other loop card. The Auxiliary fuse card
should be unmounted (remove 4 screws) & insulate the Fuse Card from the mounting studs with paper or cloth. If
the Earth fault disappears, then the fault lies in the fuse card, otherwise you will need to individually disconnect
each of the 24V power supplies from the Fuse Distribution Board in turn, narrowing the circuit with the Earth Fault.
If the Earth Fault still remains, the fault is in the PSU
For more information on the specifics of 4100U Earth Fault Diagnostics, please refer to the 4100U Installation
Manual (LT0350) that was supplied with the panel.
PLEASE NOTE – Intermittent Earth Faults can only be diagnosed whilst the fault is active.
Page 23 of 60
Pre-4100U Series Fire Panels (4100+, 4100A) – The older Simplex 4100 Series Fire panels have the ability to
detect Positive/Negative Earth Ground Faults. Unlike the 4100U Series Fire panels, their Power Supplies do not
have the option to automatically diagnose on which circuit the fault is located. There are, however, methods which
can narrow down the circuits in question.
To begin, when the Earth fault is currently active on the fire panel:
 Disconnect the power & comms to the different bays – power down the panel first (sequentially, and one
at a time) until the Earth Fault clears from the system
 After locating which bay of cards holds the problem, you will need to disconnect individual cards using the
same methodology.
 Once the card in question is located, you will need to test the circuits but keep in mind the fault may be
with the card, but is more likely is out in the field.
 The motherboard that the card plugs into can be the source of the Earth Fault – the protection devices on
the motherboard can fail after repeated discharges through them.
 When the earth fault is located on a Mapnet or IDNet loop, disconnect one end of the loop from the Loop
card (both + and - terminals), and break the loop in different areas (i.e. line isolators for example) until the
Earth Fault disappears.
NOTE – It is possible for Earth Ground Faults to switch from Positive to Negative Earth Ground Faults (or ViceVersa), so when disconnecting circuits it is highly recommended that you remove BOTH the positive and negative
connections for efficient diagnosis.
If you find that all the bays have been checked, and the earth fault appears to be in the main CPU Bay, the Earth
fault will most likely be on the Auxiliary Fuse Distribution Board. The Auxiliary fuse card should be unmounted
(remove 4 screws) & insulate the Fuse Card from the mounting studs with paper or cloth. If the Earth fault
disappears, then the fault lies in the fuse card, otherwise you will need to individually disconnect each of the 24V
power supplies from the Fuse Distribution Board in turn, narrowing the circuit with the Earth Fault. If the Earth
Fault still remains, the fault is in the PSU
PLEASE NOTE – Intermittent Earth Faults can only be diagnosed whilst the fault is active.
Page 24 of 60
2.0 4100 Crash Codes – General
Information
Page 25 of 60
2.1 4100 Crash Codes – General Information
The 4100 family associated with the crash codes in this section are listed below;




4100 Classic
4100+
4100A
4100U
Crash codes can be defined by a class designation as listed below;
CLASS E Crash: Indicates a possible defect in system hardware or incompatible firmware revisions.
CLASS S Crash: Indicates a possible error/bug in executive software. Check the system revision (via MENU >
Software Revision Level) and contact your local Simplex® branch.
CLASS P Crash: Indicates a possible problem in the job software programming. Incompatible job hardware and
software can be corrected by reprogramming of the job information. This can occur during installation of new
software on a network (Crash Code 78). If it persists, contact your local Simplex® branch.
Page 26 of 60
2.2 4100-Family General Crash Codes Table
Crash Code
LCD Display
Error
Information
00
CRASH_UNEXPECTED
<CRASH UNEXPECTED>
CLASS S CRASH
Unexpected crash due to possible
bug in executive software (System
PROM)
– Call Headquarters Technical Support at once!
Internal RAM error
-
External RAM bad
-
- Bad System RAM Chip
- RAM chip defective, improperly inserted, or missing
- Not enough memory for Job or bad RAM chip
- CFIG chip is blank
14
15
30
CRASH_INTERNAL_RAM_BAD
<INTERNAL RAM ERROR>
CLASS S CRASH
CRASH_EXTERNAL_RAM_BAD
<EXTERNAL RAM ERROR>
CLASS S CRASH
CRASH_BAD_RAM
<Bad or missing RAM chip>
CLASS E CRASH
31
CRASH_BAD_CODE
<CODE Checksum Error>
CLASS E CRASH
Code checksum error
System PROM is defective, NOT
programmed or inserted improperly
32
CRASH_BAD_CONST
<K_SEG checksum error>
CLASS E CRASH
K_SEG CHECKSUM ERROR
Code checksum error
33
CRASH_BAD_CFIG
<CFIG checksum error>
CLASS E CRASH
CFIG checksum error – CFIG PROM
is defective, not programmed, or
inserted improperly
34
CRASH_CFIG_FMT
<Invalid CFIG Format>
CLASS E CRASH
Invalid CFIG format
- Will occur with Rev 4.02 and earlier when used with 8096BH
th
microprocessor change indicator „E.‟ Check 9 character of FPO
number on U9. If „E‟ then Rev 4.03, or higher system executive is
required. Also see FSB-386R
- The CFIG format (Panel Programmer) used is incompatible with
the panel EXEC installed
- System PROM U34 is defective, NOT programmed, NOT
properly inserted, or missing.
- Error 32 can be caused by a defective, un-programmed or
improperly inserted flash chip
- Can be caused by CFIG RAM selected by dipswitch SW1-2, but
CFIG RAM is not installed in the U45 socket
- There has been a large number of AMD AM28F010 and
AM28F020 Flash chip failures
Indicates that the CFIG format number is incompatible with the
version of executive software (System PROM). Check
programmer disk Rev number against Rev number on the label
of the System PROM.
Update System PROM to Rev of current software by burning a
new system executive PROM
Page 27 of 60
2.3 4100-Family General Crash Codes Table (continued)
LCD Display
Error
39
CRASH_SMPL_CODE_OPCODE
<Invalid CODE Operation>
CLASS P CRASH
Invalid operation
program
62
CRASH_RAM_OVERLAP
<Overlapping CFIG RAM>
CLASS E CRASH
Overlapping CFIG RAM
66
CRASH_MSGLIB_FMT
<MSGLIB Format Error>
CLASS E CRASH
MSGLIB Format error
67
CRASH_SMALL_RAM
<System RAM chip too small>
CLASS E CRASH
System RAM chip is too small
73
CRASH_INVALID_MSGLIB_NUMBER
<INVALID Msglib Number>
CLASS S CRASH
INVALID Message Library Number
Crash Code
Information
code
exists
in
Invalid operation code exists in program
This indicates that the system RAM and the CFIG RAM
addresses overlap. This can be caused by an improper version of
the GEN_INFO.DAT file being on the CC/Build and/or Runtime
Disk.
- Message library format number is incorrect for system software
revision
- Wrong MSGLIB on programmer disk.
Use same programmer version to burn upper and lower EXEC
chips
- The amount of RAM installed in the Master Controller is too
small for the job configuration. Replace the 256K RAM with
1MEG RAM chip on 4100 and 4020, or add an additional RAM
Bank on 4100+ and UT.
- The panel did not have a RAM chip installed into U35. Remove
the chip that had been placed into the CFIG RAM socket U45
and install in the system RAM socket U35
INVALID Message Library Number
Page 28 of 60
29 of 60
of 60
of
5 of 1
60
3.0 Identifying Faults on the
GCC, IMS & TrueSite Graphics
& Network
Page 29 of 60
3.1 Identifying Faults on the Graphics – General
Instructions
The GCC, IMS & TrueSite are all different generations of PC based graphics stations.
GCC was for Windows 9.x, IMS for Win2000 & XP, TrueSite is for XP & Vista.
All are similar in appearance, functionality & features – the newer versions have extra features
Fault buzzer
sounds on
IMS.
Acknowledge fault condition
by clicking the yellow button,
highlight flashing fault and
press acknowledge.
Check
30 of 60
60
description of
of
fault and compare
5 of 1
of
it to the fault60list sheet.
Follow the instructions specified for that
specific fault.
Finished
3.1.1
GCC, IMS & TrueSite Workstation Graphical Control Centre
All current faults on a network can be viewed from the Graphical Control Centre (setup is site specific). It is
possible to access a panel directly from the Graphical Control Centre using the Set Host function on a GCC or
IMS System or by opening a session in Terminal Mode on the Network tab on a TrueSite Workstation.
For assistance on utilising these features please refer to the corresponding User Manual that is supplied with each
system.
Page 30 of 60
3.2 Displayed Fault Format
The faults will appear in the below format,
23
10:59:47
Wed 13-Dec-06
Common Trouble
Point
Node Missing
Entry number
for the Fault
Fault description
Trouble
Type of entry
Latest Date and time
fault occurred.
When an active fault is displayed on the LCD more information about the location of a network fault can be
determined by pressing either the „MORE INFO‟ key (4100U) or „FUNCTION‟ (earlier 4100 series panels).
On an IMS System, view network information with a „double-click‟ on the current fault to bring up a more detailed
information window.
Example:
31 of 60
of 60
2:M1-45
5 of 1
OfficeofDetector
1
Node at Fault (i.e.
Node 2)
Loop Card and Device
Address
60
Head Missing
Device Name
Fault Description
Card faults can be viewed in the same manner, whereby the node at fault can be viewed in the same way (as
above).
On an IMS (graphics terminal) identifying which node number corresponds to which panel is achieved by
accessing „Set Host‟ and then clicking on „About Node.‟
To view similar information via the 4100 display, click on „MENU‟ followed by „Display Network Node Identification’
via the main keypad.
Page 31 of 60
3.2.1
Fault Type
Fault
Description of most likely cause
Head missing
Output Abnormal
Bad Answer (Static)
Bad Answer (Intermittent)
No Answer
Open Circuit
Short Circuit
Node Missing
Degraded Style 7
Earth Fault
Battery Fault
Card Fault
Pseudo status fault
Miscellaneous fault
Detector Head has been removed from base
Detector output e.g. sounder is faulty
Detector head or base is faulty
Two detectors reporting at the same address
Detector / device missing (Complete head/base)
Monitored circuit broken
Monitored circuit or 24 volt supply shorted
Communication lost with specified panel
The specified network loop is broken
The specified panel has an earth fault
The specified panel has a battery fault
Specified panel has a card in fault
Specified panel needs to be checked
Specified panel has a fault not include above
Pg 14
Pg 18
Pg 16
Pg 16
Pg 13
Pg 10
Pg 11
32 of 60
of 60
of
5 of 1
60
Network Diagnositcs showing Topology.
By clicking on each Icon, the panel details will be displayed
Page 32 of 60
3.3 Network Faults
3.3.1
Common Trouble Point for Node
A fault has occurred within a device, or card (etc) that is flagging the Common Trouble Point for that
Node around the network. Only by accessing the Node encompassing the fault (or Graphics Control
Centre), will more specific fault information be available.
3.3.2
Card Trouble for Node
This fault indicates that there are one or more faults associated with a card in the listed Network
Node. For further diagnosis of the fault, you will need to access the Node encompassing the fault.
3.3.3
Network Operating in Degraded Style 7
Style 7 networks are a continuous ring topology. If the network ring has a break or incorrectly
terminated cable pair, then the network cards see this as an open circuit and will display a „Degraded
Style-7‟ fault
3.3.4
Network Initialization Incomplete
During the network boot-up sequence, there are panel/s that have not successfully initialized. May
require a full network reboot (global warm restart which can be done remotely on some networked
systems by access the MFIP)
3.3.5
3.3.6
3.3.7
Node Missing/Failed
The node from which you are viewing the fault cannot communicate successfully to the node/s listed
33 of 60
System Pseudo Status for Node of 60
5 of 1
of
This fault is similar to the Common Trouble Point
60 for Node as there is a System Pseudo (or virtual
point) that is in an abnormal state on the listed Node. Accessing the Node encompassing the fault
may provide more specific information.
Version Mismatch
The configurations do not match between at least two nodes. This is due to different revisions of
software in the panels & is caused by not programming & downloading to the network correctly.
Please Contact your local Simplex Fire Service Provider for Assistance
Page 33 of 60
34 of 60
of 60
of
5 of 1
60
4.0 Identifying F3200 Faults
Page 34 of 60
4.1 Recall System Faults
4.1.1
Function
The Recall System Faults function allows viewing on the LCD the current causes of a "SYSTEM
FAULT" indication. It also displays the status of any RZDU (Remote Zone Display Unit) that has an
off-normal condition, including those which do not cause System Fault
4.1.2
Operating Sequence
For both networked and non-networked systems, from the base display, press:
OR
If there are no system faults, a brief message is displayed saying so, and the LCD reverts to the base
display.
If a system fault exists, the LCD will display
35it.ofTo60view the next fault, press:
of 60
5 of 1
To view the previous fault, press:
of
60
Page 35 of 60
4.2 List of System Faults – Non-Networked
The complete list of faults which can be displayed by a system fault recall is as follows:
1.
Mains fail
When mains fail appears in a system fault recall it indicates that mains is currently failed. When mains
have failed continuously for 8 hours a system fault may be generated depending on programming.
2.
EEPROM database checksum error
The panel is in-operational if this fault is present.
3.
EEPROM database version error
This fault condition means that the EEPROM database checksum is correct but the database is an
old version with a format which cannot be used. All circuit processing is disabled when this fault is
present and the panel is in-operational.
4.
Module configuration mismatch
This fault occurs when the number of Zone or Relay Modules installed does not match the
programmed number of modules required to be present. The bottom line states processing is enabled
or disabled. On detection of a module mismatch processing is disabled and the panel is not
operational. A technician can temporarily assign a new configuration so that processing can be reenabled and use only those modules that are present. This System fault will remain until the correct
number of modules is installed and verified as operating correctly.
5.
Keypad disconnected
Processing of circuit inputs and alarms continues.
6.
LED display board fault
36 of 60
There is a fault with a zone or relay LED display
board. This can occur if the wrong number of display
of 60
boards is installed.
5 of 1
of
LCD display fault
60
A fault has occurred with the 80 character LCD. This can occur at startup or during an LCD test.
7.
8.
EPROM CRC error
A checksum calculation of EPROM memory has failed. This can occur during System and Auto Test.
9.
RAM write read fault
A write read test of main RAM has failed. This can occur during System and Auto Test.
10.
Charger high/low/normal Raw value = high/low/normal
This message indicates the battery charger voltage is high or low. When this fault is viewed in the
system fault recall, the display will show the current state of the charger as high, low, or normal, which
may be useful for adjusting the charger potentiometer. A charger low condition will not produce a
system fault until 30 minutes after any battery test, but will still appear in a system fault recall during
this time. During a battery test a charger low condition (for the raw value) will be displayed in a
system fault recall as the charger is inhibited, but this is not a system fault.
11.
Fuse blown
Check for a blown fuse, and replace with a fuse of the same amperage rating
12.
Clock chip RAM fault
Clock chip RAM is used to store all the isolate data (zone and relay isolate status, etc) plus temporary
"board present" assignments. The isolate data and board present data is read from clock chip RAM at
startup and this fault means the clock chip RAM has not saved the data correctly and will probably not
Page 36 of 60
be read correctly at startup. Try isolating and de-isolating something (e.g. bells) to get the controller to
retry writing/reading this RAM.
13.
EEPROM write fail
This fault will occur if a failure occurs when writing to EEPROM database memory during program
mode.
14.
All MAF zones isolated
This fault will occur if all zones (mapped to MAF) are isolated. This can be inhibited with an option in
programming, but doing so contravenes AS1603.4.
15.
Supply failed
This fault means that both mains have failed and the battery voltage has fallen to 21 volts or below.
The standby relay is de-energised and all processing of circuit inputs stops.
16.
Output logic exec error nn
An error has occurred with output logic execution. The error number nn has the following meaning:
NOTE:
The software produces the following error messages from a series of built-in checks which are
performed during the operating of the FIP outputs. It is highly unlikely that such errors will occur. If
one does, the operator should inform the service company and have them check it.
“No equations have been found but some were expected”. This indicates a
conflict in the information stored in the EEPROM database.
Invalid Opcode - An invalid token has been encountered in an equation.
Range error - This occurs when an out of range value is found such as a
timer number greater than 64 or an ancillary relay number greater than 3.
Stack error - The execution stack in the RAM has overflowed or underflowed.
37been
of 60found in a link field in an equation.
Link error - An invalid value has
of 60a conflict in information stored in the
Invalid MAF output - This indicates
5 of
1
EEPROM database. An equation
has
been found to control an ancillary or
of
MAF relay but was not expected. 60
NA (New Alarm) function RAM limit exceeded - This indicates too many NA
functions have been used in the programming of Output Logic functions.
Netvar SID not present - This error occurs if a network variable in the output
logic specifies a SID which is not present in the SID list of this panel. Every
SID for which Netvars are to be accessed must be entered into the SID list
of this panel.
Zone command range error - An equation to isolate/de-isolate or reset a
zone or range of zones had an invalid zone number.
17.
System/Auto Test circuit test fail
A circuit test failed during system or Auto Test or an unexpected fault or alarm occurred during the
test. The Brigade fault relay is turned on when this fault is present. The fault will be cleared by a
successful system or Auto Test. Isolating the faulty circuit & performing a system test should allow the
test to pass & clear the fault.
18.
Shift register bus fault
This error indicates a fault with the bus connecting the Controller with the MAF/PSU, zone modules
and relay modules. It may be caused by a break or short in the flat ribbon cable (e.g. bd unplugged),
by temporary noise, or by a circuit board fault.
NOTE:
When this fault occurs all processing of inputs stops until the fault clears. If the fault does
clear, processing of inputs resumes automatically.
Page 37 of 60
19.
RZDU x
This displays the current status of any RZDU which has an off-normal condition.
20.
Net msg discard
This occurs only with network systems. The local system discarded a message that was repeatedly
sent to another device on the network that did not acknowledge it. To allow other messages to be
sent on the network, the unacknowledged msg was discarded. This should occur only in cases of
extreme network loading, if the system addressed does not exist or is off line, or if network cables are
broken.
21.
Net port hw fault
This indicates a hardware fault with the serial port interfacing to the network. Call the service
company.
22.
Clock crystal Timebase check fail
This error message occurs only at startup and indicates the frequency of the clock chip on the
Controller is out of tolerance to the microprocessor. The Controller will restart and try the test again.
23.
Clock register write read fail
A test of the Controller time/date clock registers has failed. The Controller will restart and try the test
again.
24.
Clock chip RAM write read fail
A test of the Controller‟s clock RAM has failed. The Controller will re-start and try the test again.
25.
Shift reg clocking fault
This is the same fault as “Shift register bus fault” above. However, this fault occurs only at startup or
on exit from programming mode when the panel is trying to determine what modules are present.
26.
38 of 60
Battery is low
of 60
This message indicates the battery voltage is5 oflow.
When PSU faults are inhibited for 24 hours, this
1
of
message will still appear in a system fault recall if the voltage is low even though it is not creating a
60
system fault.
27.
Battery connection fail
This message indicates the battery is not connected, but may occur with the battery connected if the
battery is faulty or has a low charge. When PSU faults are inhibited for 24 hours, this message will
still appear in a system fault recall if the battery appears to be not connected even though it is not
creating a system fault.
28.
Battery capacity low
This message indicates an automatic battery test failed, i.e. the battery has a low charge.
Page 38 of 60
4.3
Glossary of Abbreviations
A/C :
ac :
AEOL :
AHr :
ANC 1 :
ASE :
AZC :
AZF :
AVF :
Bd :
CIE :
Char :
Cct :
COM :
dc :
EB :
EEPROM :
ELV :
EOL :
EOLR :
Expn :
E2 :
FF :
FIP :
FRC :
I/O :
LCD :
LED :
MAF :
Max :
Min :
MCP :
MOV :
msec :
NC :
NDU :
NO :
No :
Nom :
PC :
PCB :
PSU :
PTC :
R1 :
RL1 :
RAD :
RDU :
RMS :
Reqd :
RTC :
SAD :
SID :
sq mm :
Air Conditioning
Alternating Current
Active End of Line
Ampere Hour
Ancillary Relay 1
Alarm Signaling Equipment
Alarm Zone Circuit, or Detection Zone
Alarm Zone Facility, or Group (AS1603.4 terminology)
Alarm Verification Facility, or Check Alarm
Board
Control & Indicating Equipment
Character
Circuit
COMMON relay contact
Direct current
External Bell
Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory
Extra Low Voltage
End Of Line (device)
End of Line Resistor
Expansion
Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory
Firefighter Facility (part of Display/Keyboard)
Fire Indicator Panel
Flat Ribbon Cable
Input/Output
Liquid Crystal Display
39 of 60
Light Emitting Diode
of 60
Master Alarm Facility
5 of 1
of
Maximum
60
Minimum
Manual Call Point (Break Glass Switch)
Metal Oxide Varistor (Used for electrical Surge Protection)
Millisecond
Normally Closed
Network Display Unit
Normally Open
Number
Nominal
Personal Computer (small computer)
Printed Circuit Board
Power Supply Unit
Positive Temperature Co-efficient (Thermistor)
Module Relay Number 1 (program abbreviation)
Module Relay Number 1 (text abbreviation)
Return Air Duct (Air Conditioning Plant)
Remote Display Unit
Root Mean Square
Required
Real Time Clock
Supply Air Duct (Air Conditioning Plant)
System Identification Number (Network device)
square millimeter
Page 39 of 60
T1 :
Programmable Timer Number 1 (program abbreviation)
Tmnl : Terminal
V1 :
Programmable Variable Number 1
VA :
Volts Amperes
VB :
Battery Backed Voltage
VNB :
Non Battery Backed Voltage
+VBF : Fused Battery-Backed Voltage
+VNBF :
Fused Non-Battery-Backed Voltage
WS :
Warning System
Z1 :
Zone Number 1 (program abbreviation)
Zn1 :
Zone Number 1 (text abbreviation)
8RM :
8 Relay Module
8ZM :
8 Zone Module
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5.0 Identifying faults on a QE90
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5.1 QE90 Service Isolation Mode – Fault Display
To access the fault memory and communications errors facility of a QE90 panel follow these steps;
1. Put the panel into „Isolate‟ [I.e. move key-switch to Isolate position]
2. Press and hold the BGM/PAGING key for 2 seconds until PROGRAM LED (only) is on.
3. Press BGM/PAGING key successfully until LAMP TEST is flashing
The Fault memory will be displayed
ALERT LEDs will display the binary equivalent of the COMMS ERROR COUNT:
Zone 3
Zone 4
Zone 5
=
=
=
1
2
4
etc
When the LAMP TEST button is flashing refer to the following pages for some descriptions of the faults
indications displayed
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5.2 ECP versions 2.xx/4.xx/6.xx – System Fault Display
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Page 43 of 60
5.3 Audio Line Fault
5.3.1
Speaker Line Fault/Amp Fault
Check EOL resistor (56k)
If ok, swap speaker lines to a different Zone (on amp)
Test to see if the fault has followed
IF YES – the fault could be in the field (wiring, devices)
IF NO – the fault is likely to be in the transformers/amplifiers
NOTE:
A good way to test where a fault is located within the panel is swapping identical components over
and testing to see if the fault follows the device. This allows you to eliminate if the fault is located on a
device/card within the panel or out in the field wiring/devices.
5.3.2
Amplifier LED Configurations
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The red LEDs on the HAMP9308 and AMP 200 indicate that the speaker load is greater than the amplifier‟s rating,
or the output is short circuited, and the amplifier has briefly switched off to prevent damage. Both LEDs of the
HAMP9308 will operate in unison in 1 * 100W mode and the LEDs on both amplifier modules will operate in
unison on the AMP200.
Page 45 of 60
5.3.3
Speaker Tapping Adjustments
Both amplifier types have controls to adjust the power output.
NOTE:
However in terms of efficiency and battery capacity that it is preferable to reduce the volume by
adjusting the speaker taps to a lower setting and leaving the controls turned right up (fully
clockwise), rather than by using the volume controls. Listed below are the Card Tap
configurations.
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Page 46 of 60
5.4 Strobe Line Fault
Check EOL resistor (56k)
If ok, swap speaker lines to a different Zone (on amp)
Test to see if the fault has followed
IF YES – the fault could be in the field (wiring, devices)
IF NO – the fault is likely to be in the transformers/amplifiers
NOTE:
A good way to test where a fault is located within the panel is swapping identical components
over and testing to see if the fault follows the device. This allows you to eliminate if the fault is
located on a device/card within the panel or out in the field wiring/devices.
If a fault was present but all strobe outputs are now normal, the Red LED will be steady. This feature is designed
to assist in determining if an "Audio fault” indication on the ECP is/was an amplifier fault/speaker line fault or a
strobe line fault. To extinguish the steady red LED, switch the ECP to Isolate and back to Manual or Auto (all
software versions) or press and hold SILENCE for 2 seconds (ECP Version 2.0 and later).
5.4.1
Strobe Output Considerations
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Having eliminated the strobe card as the Audio Line Fault 5there
are some other considerations to keep in mind.
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Strobe lights must be wired to the A and B terminals as shown in the diagram below (Strobe Relay Driver Module
and Strobe Light Connection).
The 2k7 resistor connected to each terminal pair when the system is shipped must be removed and connected to
the end of the strobe line. Keep in mind that the maximum load on each output is 2Amps. Loads higher then this
can blow fuses
Page 47 of 60
5.4.2
Cable
Strobe Relay Driver Module and Strobe Light Connection
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Sizing
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It is inadvisable to use a wire gauge appreciably heavier than the gauges in the table(below) – there may be
problems with high inrush currents (which are required to charge the large electrolytic capacitors in some strobe
lights) which can weld the relay contacts. It is also recommended that you don't use cables shorter than 100m, or
if you do then add resistor(s) to make enough total resistance to give about a 10% voltage drop at the intended
load current.
It is recommended that cables are no longer than 1000m.
NOTE:
The above paragraph does not apply if all strobes connected to a cable pair are Multi-Candela
strobes – as they do not suffer from the inrush current problem.
Table 1: Cable Gauges
Page 48 of 60
5.4.3
Links and DIP Switches
Each STBM9008 module contains a DIP switch that must be set to the correct address to define the function of
the module. Switches SW5-8 set the function of the module and must be set as indicated (a more detailed
description of settings included in Table 4). Switches SW1-4 determine the address, 0 - 15, of the module and
thus the output line numbers (as seen in Table 3). The mapping of the evacuation zones to the strobe output line
numbers is controlled by the software in the ECP module.
The Link settings for each output are shown in the table, below.
Table 2: Link Settings and their corresponding Outputs
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Table 3: DIP Switches 1 – 4 – Select Card Address
Page 49 of 60
Table 4: DIP Switches 5 – 8 – Select MODE for Powered Outputs
NOTES:
Voltage-free General Purpose relay contacts are unaffected by these DIP switches.
Strobe Module outputs (Non-GP) use terminal C as REFERENCE.
„A‟ terminals are +ve (active positive signal) for ALERT.
„B‟ terminals are +ve (active positive signal) for EVACUATE.
5.4.4
STBM9008 Board Installation
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To install the STBM9008 Module, perform the following steps:
STEP 1:
Install the STBM9008 board into the DIN rail housing and install the unit on the DIN rail.
STEP 2:
Isolate power to the SYSTEM by Switching OFF ALL the DC circuit breakers on the power supply
unit.
STEP 3:
Install all the cable connections to the STBM9008 module and ensure that the DIP switch has
been set to the correct settings.
STEP 4:
Switch on the DC circuit breakers and check that the system functions correctly.
Page 50 of 60
5.5
BGA or FIP Fault
A 10V Zener Diode type BZT03-C10 (Normally open input type only) is required as Input End-of-Line. The Zener
diode is required to maintain Line Monitoring. The diode must be connected with the cathode (i.e. the end marked
with a band) to the positive input (Please see „Termination Points and Example Wiring‟ figure shown below).
Inputs that are programmed as General Purpose (GP) inputs do not need the zener diode end of line.
2
Cables should have a wire gauge of at least 0.75mm and should not be longer than 1000m .
Table 5: DIP Switch Settings
The FIB8910 Fire Indicator Panel/Break Glass Alarm Master Module has only a single Status Indicator LED which
indicates 24V Power Supply to the card.
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FIB8910 Termination Points and Example Wiring
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5.6 WIP Line Fault
The WIPS2000 must connect to a WTRM2000 termination module. The WIPS9004 must connect to a WTRM9007
termination module. Do not swap them over.
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NOTE: WIP Line fault LEDs will flash (whilst un-acknowledged) when a WIP Line fault is detected in its
corresponding Zone. For example, a flashing WIP Line Fault LED on Zone 2 will indicate a WIP Line fault
associated with that Zone.
A WIPS Module Fault may be present if one or more WIP Line Fault LEDs are active. The zones in fault will
indicate will indicate which WIP Module may be having issues/problems, as the lines in fault will be connected to
this module.
If a WIP Line Fault is detected, you will need to check the wiring configuration (as above) and ensure the correct
EOL (end of line) resistor has been installed. A WIP Line fault indicator LED will be located on the ECP in its
corresponding Zone, depicting which WIP connection to focus on.
Page 52 of 60
5.7 PA Speech, Spare Speech, WIP Speech, Comms
and Spare Comms Cable Faults
PA Speech Cable Faults, Spare Speech Cable Faults, and WIP Speech Cable Faults refer to the connections
between SPIF cards and Secondary ECPs and equipment racks (remote units). As can be seen in the Figure
below, the PA Speech, Speech Backup, and WIP Speech terminals will correspond to the respective Fault on the
ECP System Fault Display.
NOTE:
Any WIPS Module Failure or WIP Speech cable fault will activate ‘WIP SYSTEM FAULT’ LED on
the ECP System Fault Display. The LED will flash while unacknowledged and be steady for a
latched or acknowledged fault.
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SPIF9506/SPIF9709 Wiring Diagrams
Comms Cable Faults and Spare Comms Cable Faults on the ECP System Fault Display are related to the loss of
communications between SPIF interfaces. The COMMS BUS and COMMS BACKUP terminals on a SPIF card
(shown above) are relating to Comms Cable Faults and Spare Comms Cable Faults, respectively.
Page 53 of 60
5.8 ECP Failures
5.8.1
MECP and SECP Failure
A MECP failure will be present on any SECP when communications is lost and/or the panel has failed to activate
correctly. In a similar fashion, an SECP failure will be present when communications is lost and/or the panel has
failed to activate correctly.
5.8.2
WIP MECP and SECP Failure
A WIP MECP failure will be present on any SECP when a WIP Line fault or WIPS Module failure is detected on
the MECP. In a similar fashion, any WIP SECP failure will be present on any SECP when a WIP Line fault or
WIPS Module failure is present on the SECP/s.
5.8.3
Paging Console Failure
A paging console failure will be observed when a loss of communication to the Paging console/s is discovered.
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5.9 ECM Networked Systems
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If you are having issues with an ECM Network and are unable
60to diagnose a fault/trouble – please contact your
local Simplex® Personnel who will be able to assist.
Page 54 of 60
5.10 ECM Networked System – System Fault Display
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5.11 QE90 Fault Register
TROUBLE
QUESTIONS
POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS
REFERENCE
Programming
I don't get an alert phase in Auto mode, but I can
select it and it works OK in Manual mode.
Several possibilities: Alert has been turned off; cascade has been
turned off; cascade delays are not set up correctly; system has been
specifically programmed that way.
LT0088 sections 24.3 (front
panel programming) and
24.4 (serial port
programming) or 20.7 (ECM
network systems).
Tones
My alert (or other tone/signal) is too loud
compared to the other tones/signals.
The levels of the following signals can be separately adjusted for each
amplifier rack on that rack's EMUX card: PABX bus, PA Speech,
Background Music, AUX bus, Digitised Speech, Alert Tone.
LT0088 section 15.8
A QE90 is indicating an Audio Fault on some
zones. I disconnected the speaker wiring and
shifted the speaker line end of line resistors to
directly across the transformer module terminals,
but the faults are still present and will not reset.
What else can cause this fault indication?
(a) Amplifier supervision faults. To check whether this is the case turn off
the power, and remove the amplifier card that is generating the fault.
Remove links 10 and 11 (on any amplifier type) to disable amplifier
monitoring. If the faults can be reset when the amplifier is replaced, then
the source of the fault is the amplifier supervision. Replace the amplifier
card.
(b) A Strobe module circuit fault can also cause this indication. To check
whether the source of the fault is the Strobe Module (if present), look at
red LED, LD4. Flashing = current line fault, Steady = latched line fault.
(c) The Audio Fault LEDs will also be on for affected zones if the EMUX
card controlling those amplifiers is faulty. In this case the Evacuation
System Fault LED on the left had side of the ECP Module will also be
on.
LT0088 Sections 5.2.4, 8.6
The voice messages are too quiet and are
muffled by the reverberation of the evacuation
tone.
This can be improved with hand mods to the EMUX board. You can
increase the level of the digitised speech keywords "emergency" and
"evacuate now" by decreasing the value of the tacked on R125 (over
XT1 position). Suggest connect a 56k resistor in parallel. Also decrease
the evacuation tone level by increasing the value of R45, currently 22K,
to 47K or even 56k. The alert tone pot will need to be backed off.
Blank
Servicing
Messages
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If a zone is large and require two amplifier
circuits, but they happen to be in separate racks
with their own EMUX card, will the signal in the
zone get out of sync?
Yes they will get out of sync. Emux cards cannot be synchronised. You
should try to rearrange the amplifier for the same zone to be in the same
rack. However if not possible you can use one rack amplifier as "master"
for a zone and feed its 100V o/p though a voltage divider into the local
input of amps of another rack (these amps being programmed to always
select the local input), but to report faults to the zone.
Bulletin
required.
Refer LM0372 PA0646
ALIM9706 Audio Isolator
User Instructions
Paging
Console
Where can I find a master for the zone button
naming label?
On the Fireplace under downloads/QE90. It is LB0367 and is available
as a PDF or Excel Spreadsheet.
Fireplace
Front Panel
Where can I find a master for the QE90 fascia
zone naming label?
On the Fireplace under downloads/QE90. It is LT0216 and is an MS
Word Document.
Fireplace
Installation
A QE90 ECP system consist of and AMP rack
and a remote MECP and SECP every now and
again an All Amp fault LED comes up. I can be
cleared soon after. What is the problem and how
can it be fixed?
The ECP based system requires that the comms circuits are earthed at
all ends. If there is electrical earth noise between these points,
communications can fail temporarily. The all Amp fault indicates a
communications fault. The most successful solution will be to upgrade
the system to an ECM base configuration. The lack of earthing that
should be earthed can contribute see PBQ0080
LT0088 Fig 16.4 PBQ0080
Servicing
When powered up, the Alert, Evac and PA
Indicators for Zone 2 were found to be flashing
together. What does this mean?
Zone 2 has been isolated with the service isolate facility accessible via
the On-Site Programming facility. This shouldn't normally happen by
itself, but has been noted to happen occasionally, presumably because
the ECP software hasn't cleared the applicable memory location for
some reason. To clear, enter the service fault table display as outlined in
LT0088 Ch24.3 Step 6, and press the hidden key under the "LINE
FAULT" text.
LT0088 section 24.3
Programming
A QE90 non-ECM needs to be programmed with
changes, but when connecting the PC terminal to
the SPIF and pressing enter, it returns with
unrecognisable characters. The QE90 connects
to an FIP RZDU port. How can I get it into
programming mode?
The ECP only has one serial port to connect via the SPIF or SE9004
issue C, and when set up for 1200 baud RZDU interfacing to the FIP, the
port cannot be used for programming, normally at 9600 baud. You have
to
program
it
via
the
front
panel
in
this
case.
The manual issue 4 does not make this clear but will be corrected in
future manuals.
LT0088 section 24.3
Servicing
Building occupants are complaining that they can
hear a hissing noise from the speakers when the
room is quiet.
Ensure that the Local Input Links on the Amplifier are in the "Silence"
position unless they are terminated into a low impedance equipment
output. If the amplifier inputs are programmed for BGM or PABX, ensure
that these inputs are either shorted out if not used, or terminated into low
impedance outputs from the BGM or PABX equipment.
LT0088 Section 5.2.3
Design
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Messages
In a large zone with multiple amplifiers across
several card cages, how can I get tone and
message synchronisation?
Use one amplifier in the zone as a "master" and configure all the
amplifiers for the same zone in other card racks as "slaves" - use an
ALIM modified per fig 3 of LT0372 to monitor the "master" amplifier's
100V line and feed it to the local audio input of the "slaves". "Slaves"
supervise their speaker line, but don't ever select anything but the local
input.
Simplex® T3 strobes only work on EVAC.
1) The Positive should be wired to Terminal B and the Negative should
be wired to Terminal A.
2) Dip switch setting (5, 6, 7, 8) have to be (OFF, ON, ON, ON)
Installation
Simplex® T3 Strobes not functioning
Servicing
Comms light (yellow) is not flashing. One LED
(green) is flashing; 8-10V between comms. Panel
displays zones 3, 4 & 5 in Audio Fault.
The panel has Faulty Strobe Card. After swapping two strobe cards
over, the fault cleared from the panel and followed the faulty strobe card
(when tested in another panel).
Servicing
An Audio line fault is observed on Zones 2 & 3
After replacing the amps and transformers the fault still did not clear.
The ribbon cable may be at fault or damaged. The red ribbon should
point to pin number 1.
Page 58 of 60
LT0372 (also PBQ0072 for
general ideas like this)
PBQ0095
6.0 National Contact Directory
Page 59 of 60
6.1 Contact Us
To contact Simplex® Fire Products in Australia please call our National Support Number
National Support Phone Number:
131 491
Branch
Office
Sydney
Unit 4, 2-8 South Street
RYDALMERE
NSW 2116
Phone:
Fax:
Melbourne
Brisbane
47 Gilby Road
NOTTING HILL
VIC 3149
Phone:
Fax:
(03) 9538 7250
(03) 9538 7200
Freecall:
1300 552 559
34 Corporate Drive,
CANNON HILL
QLD. 4170
Phone:
Fax:
Perth
(02) 9638 8280
(02) 9638 8285
(07) 3318 6900
(07) 3318 6992
1 Eyre St.,
RIVERVALE
W.A. 6103
Phone:
Fax:
(08) 9479 2999
(08) 9479 2883
www.simplex.com.au
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