The
Answer
Book
Laundering
Refrigeration
Dishwashing
Cooking
$ 3.00
Table of Contents
Laundering . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pages 3-12
Dishwashing. . . . . . . . . . . Pages 13-22
Cooking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pages 23-30
Refrigeration . . . . . . . . . . Pages 31-39
Welcome to The Answer Book!
A large number of consumers’ questions and problems regarding
major appliances deal with the use of the appliance and related items,
rather than a mechanical malfunction. This reference book is
designed to help you solve these non-mechanical problems.
Although we have tried to include the most commonly encountered
situations, there will always be unusual or extraordinary situations.
However, in most cases we believe you will find The Answer Book
to be just that.
The Consumer Information Team
Maytag Appliances
403 West 4th Street North
P.O. Box 39
Newton, Iowa 50208
515-791-8402
Note: The photos used in the Laundering and Dishwashing sections are provided compliments of Procter and Gamble.
Laundering
Laundering Contents
Washer
Fabric Damage and Clothes Tearing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Lint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Tangling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Mineral Deposits in Washer (Lime, Rust) . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Wrinkling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Washer Stops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Poor Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Residue/Poor Rinsing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Spots and Stains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10
Fabric Softener Stains. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Greasy/Oily Stains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Brown or Reddish Stains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Dye Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Unknown Stains. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Dryer
Clothes Take Too Long To Dry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Staining on Dryer Tumbler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Resources
Resources available for consumers regarding washer and dryer usage, questions and problems include:
Questions & Answers
Other Resources
Tangling – 700CG
Clothes Washer Buying Guide – 803CG
Effects of Water Temperature
On Laundry Results – 701CG
Clothes Dryer Buying Guide – 212YG
Dryer Exhausting – 702CG
Soil Removal Chart – 397YG
Linting – 703CG
Poor Cleaning – 704CG
Residue/Poor Rinsing – 705CG
Wrinkling – 706CG
Pilling – 707CG
Unknown Staining – 708CG
Long Drying – 709CG
Fabric Damage – 710CG
Energy Conservation – Washers – 711CG
Energy Conservation – Dryers – 712CG
Maytag Washers – 600CM
Maytag Water-Saver Washers – 601CM
Maytag Dryers – 602CM
Maytag Neptune™ Washer – 604CM
Unique Sounds of a Maytag
Neptune™ Washer – 605CM
Water Temperature Chart – 396YG
3
4
Laundering
Fabric Damage & Clothes Tearing
Causes:
1. Age and normal wear.
• Inspect all clothing before placing in washer.
• Use a delicate or hand washable cycle with the item(s).
• Hand wash the item in a sink or wash tub.
2. Chemical damage. Contact with chlorine bleach, battery
acid, acne medication, solutions used by hairdressers or
household cleaners containing bleach, etc. can cause tears,
holes or yellow discoloration. Edges around the holes
will be very weak and tear easily.
Use an ultraviolet light to aid in identifying damage.
Damaged areas will appear blackened or dark under the
light. Hold light about 24 inches from item. (Terry cloth is
not suitable for testing.)
4. Fraying. Occurs from abrasion during normal wear
around the edges of towels, pillow cases and on collar tips
and cuffs, etc. For example, the collar tip rubbing against
the shirt while it is being worn.
• Do not overload. Clothes must circulate freely in the
tub. Permanent press loads should be smaller than regular loads.
• Sort carefully. Do not wash and dry heavy, abrasive
articles, such as towels, jeans, or sweatshirts with permanent press or delicate items.
• Avoid overdrying. This may cause abrasion of shirt collars and cuffs. Remove shirts from dryer as soon as
they are dry.
• Use the proper amount of chlorine bleach stated on the
back of the bottle.
5. Insects, mice or pets. Crickets, silverfish and moths
may eat fabric, causing holes of varying size. Pets may use
their claws to cause the damage.
• Use a bleach dispenser if available or dilute one cup
bleach in four cups water and add to the tub when agitation starts.
• Look for insects on the clothing. Customers may need
to use moth balls or an alternative storage area to protect clothing.
• Avoid wiping up bleach spills with laundry.
• Avoid contact of laundry items with skin medication
containing benzoyl peroxide. After using the product,
wash hands with soap and water and dry hands with
paper towels.
6. Poor construction.
• Look for seams which are not completely finished off or
for any loose threads.
• Some garments are made of lower quality fabrics.
• Check “second” or outlet store purchases carefully for
defects.
7. Snagging/tiny holes.
Cotton/Polyester knits snag very easily because they are a
series of loops. Sharp or rough objects can catch one or
more loops causing a snag. This may occur in the wash
tub if an item is washed with other items having zippers or
hooks. Some snags may be manufacturing defects unnoticed at the time of purchase. However most snagging
occurs during normal wear and use.
Terry cloth has small loops of thread on the surface, so it
snags easily during normal use by rough towel bars, laundry hampers, jewelry, hair brushes, etc.
3. Failure to mend rips and tears before laundering.
• Any rips or tears need to be mended before washing or
the laundering process may make them larger.
• Avoid washing any rough objects with items which may
snag. Close all zippers and fasten hooks and eyes.
• Do not overload. Match the water level to the size of
the load.
• Check washer tub, agitator or door for rough spots, etc.,
with a nylon hose. Any rough spots will snag the nylons
and identify a potential snag.
Laundering
3
5
Lint
Lint is small fibers of fabric that have broken off during wear or laundering. It
is easily brushed away from the fabric. Some lint will always be created by
any washer and flushed down the drain. Excessive linting is usually due to
reasons other than the washer design or mechanical malfunction.
Causes:
1. Improper sorting. Washing lint-givers (terry cloth, towels) with lint-catchers (corduroy, velveteen, most manufactured fibers).
• Separate lint-givers from lint-catchers.
2. Incorrect amount of detergent. A full capful or scoopful of detergent in the washer provides the most benefit in
holding lint and soil in suspension.
• The amount of detergent used is determined by:
a. The size of the load;
• Top-loading washers: Place dry, unfolded clothes
loosely in the tub to the top row of holes for a maximum load.
• Front-loading washers: The tub can be loaded completely full, but not packed tightly.
4. Using a water-saver washer. Colored permanent press
and knits may attract lint from water used in previous
loads.
• Start with a fresh fill for these loads and use a REGULAR cycle if saving the wash water.
b. Degree of soil;
c. Water hardness.
Water Hardness Chart
Rating
Soft
Average
Hard
Very Hard
3. Overloading.
Grains/Gallon
0-3 grains
4-9 grains
10-13 grains
14G grains
Parts/Million
0-59
60-119
120-179
180G
Mistaken for Lint
Residue:
A white substance left on the clothes at the end of the
wash cycle. It is NOT EASILY BRUSHED OFF and over
time, colors may dull. See page 7 for more details.
Pilling:
To determine water hardness, use a Water Hardness Test
Kit or contact the local water utility or county extension
office.
• Detergent manufacturer’s recommendations are for
washing a “normal” load. More detergent should be
used if:
a. The size of the load is extra large; or
b. The degree of soil is heavier than “average”; or
c. The water is harder than 10 grains per gallon.
• Similarly, less than the recommended amount of detergent may be used (1/2 capful or scoop) if:
a. A small load is being washed; or
b. The load is very lightly soiled; or
c. A partial fill is selected; or
d. The water is soft (0-5 grains).
• If a packaged water conditioner is needed, use the following recommendation.
Top loading – use 1/3 to 1/2 cup with detergent.
Front loading – use 2 tablespoons to 1/8 cup with
detergent.
* Brand names are trademarks of respective manufacturers.
Manufactured fibers such as polyester, acrylic, or blends of
these fibers have a natural tendency to “pill” due to abrasion from normal wear. When a fiber breaks, it simply
balls up on the fabric surface. This is characteristic of
these fibers, and is not the fault of the washer or dryer.
Lint can become enmeshed in the little balls of fiber making the pills appear more obvious.
6
Laundering
Poor Cleaning
Poor cleaning is usually the cumulative effect of any or all of the situations
listed below occurring over an extended period of time. Clothes often turn
gray and “dingy” looking.
Causes:
1. Not using hot enough water.
• The water heater should be set to deliver a minimum
120°F (49°C) hot water at the tap. (Water temperatures
up to 140°F (60°C) provide better results.) Take into
consideration how far the water has to travel from the
water heater.
• If the capacity of the hot water heater is not large
enough to provide adequate hot water, do not run the
washer when there are other household demands for
hot water.
2. Incorrect amount of detergent.
• See “Lint” page 5.
3. Cold water washing. Oily soils are harder to remove in
cold water. All detergents are ineffective in water 65°F or
lower.
• A cold water wash (65-85°F) is recommended only for
very lightly soiled or brightly colored garments.
• Use a liquid or pre-dissolved granular detergent.
4. Overloading.
5. Using an inexpensive detergent in hard water. These
products contain only sodium carbonate and will affect
laundering results no matter what brand or model washer
is used. Clothes may not get as clean and colored fabrics
may lose or change color. A lint-like residue may be
deposited on clothes from a reaction with hardness
minerals.
• Use a detergent containing both aluminosilicates and
sodium carbonate. This combination does a better job
of softening the water. The ingredients are listed on the
label.
• Install a water softener to eliminate hardness minerals
from the water supply.
• Use the hottest water possible for the fabric.
6. No soaking or pre-treating.
• If an item is heavily soiled or stained, soak for 30 minutes or less.
• Pre-treating soiled areas prior to washing with hand
soap, pretreat products such as Shout* or liquid detergent improves results.
Enzyme based pre-treats are best for removing
protein stains such as blood or grass.
• Clothes need to circulate freely.
• Top-loading washer: Load with dry, unfolded items up to
the top row of holes.
• Front-loading washer: The tub can be loaded completely
full, but not packed tightly.
• Load the washer with articles of different sizes to allow
free circulation in the water.
* Brand names are trademarks of respective manufacturers.
Laundering
7
3
Poor Rinsing/Residue
The rinse cycle is designed to flush water through fabric removing soil, suds
and detergent residue. The best indication of proper rinsing is the final result
after washing and drying. If residue is noticed on clothes, it will appear as
streaks and is more noticeable on dark colored loads. Residue is NOT EASILY
BRUSHED OFF and is many times mistaken for linting or poor rinsing. Dryer
drying usually removes residue from clothes.
Causes:
1. Using an inexpensive detergent in hard water. These
products contain only sodium carbonates and will affect
laundering results no matter what brand or model of
washer is used. A lint-like, white residue may be
deposited on clothes from a reaction with hardness
minerals, especially if the water is harder than 14 grains
per gallon.
• Purchase a detergent with a combination of sodium carbonate and aluminosilicates to act as water softeners.
The ingredients are listed on the label.
2. Incorrect amount of detergent.
• See “Lint” page 5.
3. Cold water washing. Water may be too cold to activate
detergent ingredients. A minimum of 65°F is required for
activating both liquid and granular detergent. Granular
detergent may not dissolve completely in cold water.
• A liquid detergent is recommended for better dissolving
in cold water.
• Pre-dissolve granular detergent in hot water before
adding it to the wash tub.
• If cold water setting is below 65°F, allow about a 1/4 of
the wash tub to fill with hot water and then switch back
to cold water.
4. Overloading.
• Top loading washers – Place dry, unfolded clothes
loosely in the wash tub up to the top row of holes.
• Front load washers – The tub can be loaded completely
full of items, but not packed tightly.
5. Use of rinse-added fabric softener. A chemical reaction between rinse-added fabric softeners and detergent
may create white deposits on clothes.
• Dilute rinse-added fabric softener with warm water in
the fabric softener dispenser.
• Clean any spilled detergent from the dispenser before
adding fabric softener.
• Change brands of fabric softener.
• Do not use fabric softener in every load.
6. Washer not draining fast enough.
• Check the pump-out time on a vertical washer:
a. Select maximum water level and allow washer to fill.
b. Manually advance the dial to the final spin on REGULAR or press “Spin” on touch models.
c. Time how long it takes from the start of spin until
you hear all of the water is out of the tub. The water
should all drain out within 90 seconds.
d. If there is water remaining in the tub, there may be a
drain restriction such as a kinked drain hose.
8
Laundering
Spots and Stains
Fabric Softener Stains
(Blue, Pink, Green, Yellow or Gray Stains)
Causes:
1. Improper use of liquid fabric softener. These stains
will vary in color depending on the color of the fabric softener. They may appear gray if they have attracted soil
from the load.
• Concentrated liquid fabric softener must be diluted
with water when used in the fabric softener dispenser.
• Do not pour undiluted fabric softener directly onto
fabric.
• Lifting the lid of top loading washers and interrupting
the first spin after the wash cycle will cause fabric softener to be dispensed improperly, which may cause
staining.
• To Remove Fabric Softener Stain – Dampen the
stained area and rub with a bar of soap (Ivory or Dove).
Then, relaunder the article in the hottest water possible.
Greasy/Oily Stains
Cause:
1. Dryer-added fabric softeners sheets. A greasy or oily
looking stain on fabric may be the result of:
• Overloading the dryer. A washer load is a dryer load.
• Adding dryer-added sheets after the dryer has been running for a period of time with heat temperature selected.
• Lightweight synthetic garments such as nylon or polyester
seem to have an affinity for stains from dryer-added softeners. If stains occur on these items frequently, use a
rinse-added softener.
These stains can attract soil and rust in subsequent washings and appear gray/black.
• To Remove – Dampen the stained area and rub with a
bar soap (Ivory or Dove). Then relaunder the item in
the hottest water possible.
Laundering
9
3
Brown or Reddish Stains
Cause:
1. Iron or manganese in the water supply.
• Front loading washers:
• Avoid using chlorine bleach on rust stains. It will
make them darker and more obvious.
a. Place 2 tablespoons of RoVer in the detergent dispenser area.
• When iron is dissolved in the water, use granular detergent plus a non-precipitating water conditioner, such as
Calgon or Spring Rain*. Better results may be obtained
by dissolving detergent and water conditioner in the
wash before adding the clothes. Be certain that all
clothes are down into the water before starting washer.
b. Place the items in the tub and close the door.
• If the iron is suspended in the water (it will settle out),
attach a rust filter to the faucet and inlet hoses or to the
water line.
• If iron or manganese stains are a recurring problem, the
customer may need a special filter or chemical feeder
installed in the home to remove these minerals from the
water supply.
To remove:
Launder with RoVer* Rust Remover Part No. 057961 using
the directions below:
• Top loading washers:
a. Fill the washer with water (no detergent), selecting a
temperature suitable for the fabric (hot or warm).
b. Add 1/3 cup RoVer and let it dissolve by agitation.
c. Add clothes and allow washer to complete the cycle.
d. Follow up with an additional wash with detergent.
Dye Transfer
Cause:
1. Color from one garment “bleeds” onto others
in the load.
• Dye transfer may be impossible to remove.
• Use caution when placing wet or damp clothes in a
clothes hamper or pile.
• Always sort brightly colored garments and wash separately.
• If the clothes are still wet, immediately spray with
Spray & Wash* and relaunder.
• Use chlorine bleach if safe for the fabric. If not safe,
use a commercial color remover according to package
directions.
* Brand names are trademarks of respective manufacturers.
c. Select a temperature suitable for the fabric (hot or
warm).
d. Start the washer.
e. Follow up with an additional wash with detergent.
• Colored fabrics:
a. Dissolve one teaspoon of RoVer in a cup of water.
b. Place one drop of this solution on a hidden area of
the item, making sure it penetrates the fabric.
c. Let dry.
d. If there is no change in color, RoVer should not damage the item. Follow the directions for the specific
washer.
• Stubborn stains:
These may be removed by soaking articles in a solution
of 1/3 cup RoVer and five gallons of water. Do not use a
galvanized tub for soaking as RoVer will damage galvanized iron.
10
Laundering
Unknown Stains
Many times it is difficult to exactly identify a stain. The stain may have occurred
while the item was being worn or used. Or, the stain may have been transferred
from other items in the wash load. The following patterns can offer some clues.
Causes:
1. Location of the stains.
• Stains appearing predominantly on the front, neckline,
seat, knees, cuffs, socks, etc. usually mean they
occurred while the garment was being worn or used.
For example, stains around the neckline and shoulders
are often due to hair care products. The pattern indicates the staining occurred prior to laundering.
2. Number of garments stained.
• If only one or two items in a load were stained, this generally means the garment was stained before laundering. In the rare event a washer or dryer was to stain
garments, the stain would appear throughout the load.
A washer or dryer cannot “select” one item to stain
while leaving other items unaffected.
3. Bunched stains. These are scattered throughout a small
area as if the item was wadded or bunched up when it
came in contact with a staining substance. They often
have a “tie-died” appearance to them. Bunched stains
occur when the item is lying in a pile on the floor, in a
hamper, laundry basket or in the wash tub before laundering.
• Avoid placing wet or stained garments in a pile or in the
laundry hamper. The dye can transfer to other pieces of
garment.
4. Pinched stains in the washer. These are often gray or
black in color and appear as though the garment was
caught or pinched. The garments may be getting caught
between the tub and tub cover or under the base of the
agitator. While it is unusual for this to happen, it is more
likely to occur in older models and if the washer is being
overloaded.
5. Pinched stains in the dryer. If these stains appear after
coming out of the dryer, they may be caused by a misaligned dryer tumbler. A garment may get caught between
the dryer tumbler and the front or rear bulkhead.
Pinch stains can be very difficult to remove.
• To remove pinch stains from the washer or dryer:
a. Soak stain in cold water for 20 minutes.
b. Pre-treat with pre-dissolved granular detergent, liquid
detergent or a special pre-treat product. Let the item
stand for 30 minutes.
c. Launder in the hottest water possible for the fabric.
Use chlorine bleach, if safe for the fabric.
d. Do not dryer dry until the stain has been
removed.
e. If the stain persists, repeat the procedure. In some
cases, the stain may only be lightened or may be
impossible to remove.
Tangling
Since part of the mechanical action of a washer is to circulate clothes for good
cleaning, some tangling can be expected. However, excessive tangling isn’t normal.
Causes:
1. Wrapping shirts and sheets around the agitator.
• Place the entire item in one portion of the wash tub.
2. Washing only one type of clothing (all shirts, sheets or
all delicates).
• Load the washer with articles of different sizes to allow
for free circulation in the washer. For example, wash
no more than one or two sheets or similar large articles
unless smaller articles are added to complete the load.
3. Not using a proper water fill.
• Match the amount of water to the volume of clothes.
Not enough water or overloading can cause severe tan-
gling. If excessive amounts of water are used for a
load, there is a chance tangling may occur.
4. Not fastening belts, hooks and buttons.
• Fastening hooks and eyes and closing all belts and buttons will reduce the likelihood of tangling to occur.
5. Choosing the right cycle.
• In a front load washer, the permanent press cycle
should be less prone to tangling.
Laundering
Hard Water Mineral Deposits
Causes:
1. Lime or chalk like substance. This is caused by calcium
build-up on the lint filter or tub.
• Cleaning a top load washer with RoVer* Rust Remover:
a. Fill washer with hot water and 1/3 cup RoVer, Part No.
057961.
b. Agitate 1 minute, soak 15 minutes, followed with a
regular wash.
c. If the manual clean lint filter has deposits, soak in
RoVer or a solution of vinegar & water.
• Cleaning a front load washer with RoVer Rust Remover:
a. Place 2 tablespoons RoVer in the detergent dispenser
and use a hot water wash.
b. Set for Cotton/Sturdy fabrics and a Regular/Normal
setting. Press Start.
c. Follow with a regular wash.
2. Rust. Iron in the water causes a reddish or brown stain.
• Refer to the cleaning steps for lime.
Washer Stops
Causes:
1. Unbalanced loads. This will occur most likely in the spin
cycle due to overloading or heavy garments ending up on
one side of the wash tub. It is possible for too much water
in the tub to trip the unbalanced switch when it goes into a
spin because of the small volume of clothing.
• Check that the washer is level from front to back and side
to side.
• When washing heavy items, distribute the load evenly
after the tub has come to a complete stop.
2. Using the “all-fabric” delicate cycle.
• A delicate wash action is created by alternating between
periods of agitation and soak.
• A washer pause may be the result of this special delicate
cycle.
3. Normal washer pauses.
• These naturally occur between segments of the wash
cycle (fill, agitate and spin).
• The washer is preparing to tumble in the opposite direction.
11
3
Wrinkling
Dryer drying is essential to remove wrinkles from most permanent press and other “no-iron” garments. However, some garments may require ironing.
Causes:
1. The washer.
• Avoid overloading. Permanent press loads should be
smaller than regular loads.
• Use the EASY CARE/PERMANENT PRESS cycle, especially if washing clothes in hot water. This cycle automatically provides a cool-down rinse to minimize wrinkles.
• Avoid using the Max Extract spin option. By not selecting the Max Extract spin option, items are less likely to
come out wrinkled.
• Avoid laundering heavy permanent press articles such as
work clothes and heavy pants or jackets with lighter permanent press articles such as shirts and blouses.
• Proper use of fabric softener will help minimize wrinkles.
2. The dryer.
• Use the EASY CARE/PERMANENT PRESS setting to get
the maximum cool down.
• Use the correct temperature and dryness setting. Avoid
overdrying.
• Remove clothes from the dryer immediately when the
tumble action stops.
• Do not dry more than a single wash load; do not combine loads for drying.
• If only one or two articles are being dried, add a few similar articles, even though they are dry, to insure proper
tumbling.
3. Heat-set wrinkles.
• The item should be ironed to restore the smooth surface.
• Proper laundering will help maintain a wrinkle-free
appearance.
4. Wrinkles in “no-iron” fibers like polyester, acrylic or
nylon.
• These fibers still require some touch-up ironing for a
smooth appearance. This is especially true if the fabric
is woven rather than knit.
4. Lid not closed.
• Close the lid to start the washer.
• For safety reasons, no washer will spin unless the lid is
closed.
• Select models will not agitate with the lid open.
5 None of the above solutions resolve wrinkling.
• When wrinkling still occurs, the permanent press finish
on the garments is not of good quality or wearing off and
ironing is necessary.
12
Laundering
Clothes Take Too Long To Dry
How long a load takes to dry depends on many variables, such as size of load, garment thickness, fiber content, etc. In general, we estimate 6 bath towels (weighing approximately 5
pounds) will dry in a dryer in about 40-50 minutes, including a brief cool-down. A 12 piece
permanent press load with slacks, shirts, shorts, dress, etc., (weighing approximately 5
pounds) will dry in 30-40 minutes including a cool-down. When the load comes out of a
Neptune™ washer using a max extract spin option, dry times may be 5 to 10 minutes shorter
than the above stated times. Keep in mind as the load size increases, so will the drying time.
Causes:
1. Obstruction in exhaust ducting, hinged hood cover,
extra long exhaust vent or use of flexible ducting.
• Check for extra lint or debris blocking the duct.
• The hinged hood cover should open freely with the
amount of air being exhausted from the dryer.
• Plastic flexible duct should be replaced with rigid
metal duct or flexible metal duct.
2. Overloading.
• A washer load is a dryer load
3. Failure to clean the lint filter.
• The lint filter should be cleaned after each use to promote shorter drying times and energy efficiency.
4. Mixing loads.
• Avoid drying heavy and lightweight clothes in the same
load.
• When washing one item like a rug, place a few small
items to balance the load. This will help spin more
water out of the load.
5. Washer not spinning properly. This results in excess
water remaining in the clothes.
• Check the pump-out time on a vertical washer:
a. Select maximum water level and allow washer to fill.
b. Manually advance the dial to the final spin on REGULAR or press “Spin” on touch models.
c. Time how long it takes from the start of the spin until
you hear all of the water is out of the tub. The water
should all drain out within 90 seconds.
d. If there is water remaining in the tub, there may be a
drain restriction such as a kinked drain hose.
6. Wrong temperature or degree of dryness.
• Check the temperature selected for drying and how
much moisture is left in the items.
7. Dryer may be in regular or extended cool-down
period.
• Check the control dial for where the setting presently
states.
Staining in The Dryer Tumbler
Cause:
1. A crayon, ink pen, felt tip marker or even excessive
dye from new towels or blue jeans can cause staining
of the dryer tumbler.
• It is important to remove excessive staining from the
tumbler using one of the following cleaning agents so
the dye is not transferred to other items.
a. A spray cleaner such as Fantastik or Formula 409*.
b. A laundry pre-treat product such as Spray n’ Wash or
Shout*. The aerosol types often work better for this
purpose.
• Wipe with a damp cloth.
• Tumble a load of old rags or towels on the REGULAR
cycle using either the REGULAR or DELICATE temperature for 20-25 minutes. This will make sure any excess
stain is removed.
After completing these steps, it may be possible to still see
the stain on the tumbler. However, as long as the above
steps are followed, there should not be any transfer of the
stain.
c. A mildly abrasive cleanser such as Soft Scrub or Bon
Ami*. Be sure to rub lightly.
* Brand names are trademarks of respective manufacturers.
Dishwashing
Dishwashing Contents
Unremoved Food Soils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Detergent Remains in the Dispenser Cup. . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Sand-Like Deposit in the Bottoms
of Cups and Glasses or on Dishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Unfamiliar Sounds/Noisy Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Cloudy Glassware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-17
Hard Water Filming and Water Spotting . . . . . . . . . . 16
Etching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Metal Marks on Dishes or Glassware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Poor Drying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Stainless Steel Discoloration or Rusting . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Discoloration of Dishes or the
Dishwasher Interior. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Pitting of Metals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Dishwasher Odor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Items Not to be Washed in the Dishwasher . . . . . . . . . . 22
Chipping of Dinnerware and Glassware . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Discoloration of Silverplate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Tarnishing (Sterling or Silverplate). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Suds or Foam in the Dishwasher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Resources
Resources available for consumers regarding dishwasher usage, questions and problems include:
Questions & Answers
Maytag Dishwashers – 626CM
Etching – 726CG
Energy Conservation – DW – 731CG
Hard Water Filming – 727CG
Maytag Intellisense Dishwashers – 627CM
Rust Staining – 788CG
Dishwasher Poor Cleaning – 728CG
Other Resources
Dishwasher Poor Drying – 729CG
Dishwasher Buying Guide – 825CG
Factors Affecting DW Results – 730CG
13
3
14
Dishwashing
Unremoved Food Soils
Causes:
1. Water temperature is too low.
• Water heating dishwashers require a minimum of 120° F
inlet water and regular use of the heating options. Nonwater heating dishwashers need 140° F inlet water for
optimum cleaning results.
• Run water from the hot water tap before starting the
dishwasher. This clears the line of cold water and is
especially helpful when using a short wash cycle.
• Avoid other activities needing hot water (such as laundry and showers) while running the dishwasher.
• For normal or longer cycles, place the prescribed
amount of detergent in each of the cups.
• When choosing a light wash or shorter cycle, place the
prescribed amount of detergent in the main wash cup
only.
3. Improper loading.
• All items should be loaded so they are separated and
facing the center.
• Large bowls or pans should not be placed over the center of the lower rack where they could block the wash
action of the center spray tower.
• Larger items should not be placed so that they shield
smaller items from the wash action.
• Bowls should not be nested together as water is then
unable to reach all of the surfaces.
• Spoons and other silverware should be loaded with
some handles up and some down to prevent nesting.
• Avoid loading items in a manner that would restrict the
rotation of the spray arms.
• Avoid loading large objects in a position that would
block the detergent dispenser from opening.
2. Inappropriate amount of dishwasher detergent for
the degree of water hardness or the amount of food
soil.
• The general recommendation is one teaspoon of detergent for each grain of water hardness (gpg), with a minimum of three teaspoons when water is soft.
4. Improper water fill. After filling, the water level should
be about even with the heating element in the bottom of
the dishwasher.
If the water level is low:
• Check to be sure that there are not other hot water
activities (such as laundering or showers) occurring at
the same time the dishwasher is running.
• Check that the dishwasher is level from front to back
and side to side.
Refer to the following chart:
Water Hardness
Detergent Use
Soft (0-3 grains)
Medium (4-9 grains)
Hard (10-13 grains)
Very Hard (14G grains)
3 tsp.
4-9 tsp.
10-12 tsp.
(see page 16)
To determine water hardness:
a. Use a Water Hardness Test Kit
(Maytag Part No.038184).
b. Contact the local water utility or state university
extension service.
• Check for an immobilized float.
• Check for low water pressure.
5. Use of old or caked dishwasher detergent.
• Detergent should be fresh and stored in a cool, dry
place.
• Detergents should NOT be stored under the kitchen
sink.
• Detergents should not be stored for extended periods of
time prior to use.
Dishwashing
15
3
Sand-Like Deposit in the Bottoms of Cups and Glasses or on Dishes
Causes:
1. Improper loading.
• Glasses should NOT be placed over the tines. The tines
interfere with the water flow and can inhibit proper
washing and rinsing.
• Large pots, pans, dishes and bowls should be carefully
loaded so as not to cover the center spray tower.
• Flatware or other items should not dangle down
through the rack where interference with the spray arm
rotation could occur.
2. The shape of some items.
• Narrow openings such as those found on baby bottles
and vases inhibit adequate wash and rinse action. If
changing the position of the item does not solve the
problem, the item should be washed by hand.
3. Water temperature is too low.
• For optimum results, water heating dishwashers require
a minimum of 120° F inlet water and regular use of the
heating options. Non-water heating dishwashers need
140° F inlet water for optimum results.
• Run the hot water before starting the dishwasher in
order to clear the line of cold water.
4. Use of granular dishwasher detergent which has been
stored inappropriately or for too long.
• Detergent should be fresh.
• Detergent should be stored in a cool, dry place. It
should not be stored under the kitchen sink. (Storage
in a damp environment can deactivate the cleaning
ingredients in the detergent.)
• Name brand dishwasher detergent should be used.
Poor quality detergents may not dissolve adequately.
5. Inappropriate amount of dishwasher detergent for
the degree of water hardness.
• Refer to the chart on page 14.
6. Low water level in the dishwasher.
• Avoid other hot water usage activities while using the
dishwasher.
• Check for an immobilized float.
• Check for low water pressure.
• Be sure the dishwasher is level.
7. Mechanical.
• Filter is cracked or dislodged.
• Lower spray arm is split or rotating too rapidly or too
slowly.
16
Dishwashing
Cloudy Glassware
To identify the cause of the cloudiness:
Soak the glassware in undiluted white vinegar for approximately 5 minutes,
rinse and dry. If the film is removed, it is due to hard water filming. If it is
not removed, the glassware is etched.
Hard Water Filming and Water Spotting
Causes:
1. Not using enough dishwasher detergent for the
degree of water hardness. Hard water minerals coat
the surface of the glassware, creating a film.
• The amount of detergent should be increased according
to the degree of water hardness (one teaspoon per
grain). Refer to the chart on page 14.
• For water hardness over 12 grains, add additional detergent (1 teaspoon for each grain over 12) at the beginning of the main wash portion of the cycle. (Open the
door, add detergent to bottom of the tub, close the
door). The dishwasher will continue through the cycle.
• When water has over 15 gpg of hardness, it is very difficult to achieve acceptable dishwashing results.
Extremely hard water can make it virtually impossible
to achieve acceptable results and a mechanical water
softener is recommended.
• Packaged water softeners such as Calgon* or Spring
Rain* are not recommended for use in an automatic
dishwasher as they create excessive suds.
4. Water spotting not due to hard water.
2. Water temperature is too low.
• The water heater should be set at a higher setting or the
water heating options on the dishwasher should be routinely used.
• Run the hot water before starting the dishwasher in
order to clear the line of cold water, especially when
using a shorter wash cycle.
3. Not using a rinse aid such as Jet Dry* or Cascade
Rinse Aid*.
• A rinse aid improves the sheeting action of the water,
allowing it to slide off of the dishes more easily. The
result is less water spotting.
When water temperature is too high, flash drying may
result. This is a situation where drying takes place before
the water droplets can sheet off.
• Lower the water temperature setting slightly.
To remove hard water filming, try one of the
following:
a. Wash glassware in the dishwasher using Glass Magic*
according to package directions. If filming is severe,
repeated washing may be required.
b. Soak items in undiluted vinegar.
* Brand names are trademarks of respective manufacturers.
Dishwashing
Etching
This is a permanent pitting or eroding of the glassware surface. Initially, etching appears as shades of blue, purple,
brown or pink when the glassware is held at an angle
towards the light. In more advanced stages, the glassware
appears cloudy, and in severe cases it appears frosted.
There is no way to restore the glassware once it has become
etched. There is also no way to predict what glassware may
be affected as it is not related to the cost or quality of the
glassware but rather how the glass was manufactured.
Poor Drying
Causes:
1. Not using a rinse aid such as Jet Dry* or Cascade
Rinse Aid*, or failing to refill the rinse aid dispenser.
• Rinse aid greatly improves drying by making the water
sheet off of the dishes more readily.
• For models without a dispenser, hang a rinse aid basket
or disc in the back right corner of the lower rack.
Causes:
• If the dishwasher has an automatic rinse aid dispenser
(located in the door), use liquid rinse aid. If the dispenser is adjustable, turn to the MORE setting.
1. Manually prerinsing dishes before loading.
• Refill the rinse aid dispenser monthly.
• Removing all food soils prior to loading increases the
alkaline concentration of the dishwasher detergent and
increases the possibility of etching.
17
3
2. Low water temperature.
• Adequate temperatures are required to heat the tub and
dishes. This heat is needed for proper drying.
2. Not adjusting the amount of detergent according to
the level of water hardness.
• Refer to the chart on page 14.
• If the water is mechanically softened, the hardness level
should be set at 3-4 grains per gallon rather than totally
softened at 0-1 grains per gallon.
3. Not using the heated dry cycle.
4. Improper loading.
• Dishes and flatware should be loaded so they drain freely.
• Face soiled surfaces to the center.
3. Water temperature is too high.
• Water entering the dishwasher should be between
120° F - 140° F.
• Do not use the water heating options.
• Do not use the heated dry option.
• Keep large items from shielding small items.
• Load only one item between each set of tines.
• Avoid placing glasses over tines. This interferes with
cleaning and drying results.
• Place silverware in the basket with some handles up and
some down.
5. Not using the proper amount of dishwashing detergent.
• Dishwasher detergents contain ingredients that improve
sheeting action of the water and aid in drying performance.
• Refer to the chart on page 14.
6. Unrealistic expectations.
• Cups and glasses with concave bottoms will hold water.
4. Using the Pots & Pans or Normal cycles when only
the Light/China cycle is needed.
• Exposing the dishes to longer cycles or more detergent
than necessary increases the possibility of etching.
• Plastic and Teflon® have porous surfaces that hold water.
Towel drying of these items may be necessary.
Drying results in either of these situations can improve
with the use of a rinse aid and the heated dry cycle, however some residual water or water droplets will remain.
18
Dishwashing
Discoloration of Dishes or the Dishwasher Interior
Causes:
1. Iron or manganese in the water supply can cause
brown, red or black stains on dishes or the dishwasher interior.
• To remove this type of discoloration on dishware and
the dishwasher tub, use a rust remover such as RoVer*
Rust Remover (Part No. 057961). Do Not use RoVer
with metal items.
To remove the discoloration, follow these steps:
a. Fill both detergent cups with a citric acid product
such as Tang*, Fruit Fresh*, or Glisten*.
b. Run a Normal cycle.
c. Follow with another Normal cycle and dishwasher
detergent.
To Use:
a. Fill both detergent cups with RoVer.
b. Set the controls and run a normal wash cycle.
c. Follow with an additional rinse cycle.
d. DO NOT use RoVer with dishwashing detergent.
3. A lime film or deposit may eventually build up on the
dishwasher interior if there is a high calcium level in
the water supply.
• Try ONE of the following procedures to remove this
type of deposit:
a. Use a damp cloth and a mild scouring powder.
2. Some foods (such as spaghetti sauce) can discolor
the tub interior.
• Assure that the inlet water is a minimum of 120° F and
that water heating options are being used. If the dishwasher is a non-water heating model, the inlet water
should be 140° F for optimum results.
• Increase the amount of detergent being used. More
detergent will help to keep food soils suspended. Less
contact with the dishwasher tub will help prevent transfer of color from the food soils onto the tub.
b. Initiate the Rinse & Hold portion of a cycle (with an
empty dishwasher). During the fill, open the door
and add 1/2 cup white vinegar to the water. Allow the
cycle to complete (without detergent). Follow with a
Normal cycle with detergent.
c. Fill both detergent cups with RoVer* Rust Remover
(Part No. 057961). Set the controls to complete the
Normal wash and rinse cycles. Follow with a shorter
wash cycle with detergent. Do not use RoVer in the
cycle with dishwasher detergent.
Dishwasher Odor
Causes:
1. Dishes washed too infrequently.
• Run a Rinse & Hold cycle, if dishes are being held until
there is a full load, to prevent food soils from causing
an odor.
2. Vinyl odor in a new dishwasher.
• The odor will go away with use.
To resolve the odor, follow one of these recommendations:
b. Fill both detergent cups with baking soda. Select a
short wash cycle. After the water has circulated for
about 5 minutes, unlatch the door to stop the dishwasher. Let it stand overnight. In the morning, latch
the door to restart the dishwasher and allow the
cycle to complete.
c. Select a short wash cycle and allow the dishwasher to
fill. When it is filled, open the door and add 1/4 cup
of liquid chlorine bleach to the water. Close the door
and allow the cycle to complete.
a. Use a lemon scented detergent and/or rinse aid.
* Brand names are trademarks of respective manufacturers.
Dishwashing
Suds or Foam in the Dishwasher
Detergent Remains in the Dispenser Cup
Causes:
Causes:
1. Use of a soap or detergent not designed for automatic dishwashers.
1. Adding the detergent to a wet cup.
• ONLY use automatic dishwasher detergents in a dishwasher.
• If sudsing occurs from improper use of detergent, open
the door slowly and sprinkle salt or vegetable oil on the
suds. Follow up with several cycles WITHOUT detergent to thoroughly rinse the tub.
2. Use of too much dishwasher detergent (especially
liquids and gels) for individual water conditions.
• For instructions regarding proper detergent amounts to
use, see page 14.
3. Use of too little dishwasher detergent to suppress
the suds and foaming that naturally occurs with
some foods such as egg whites, mayonnaise and milk.
19
3
• Always add fresh detergent to a dry cup.
2. Overfilling the detergent cup.
3. Leaving the detergent in the cup for prolonged periods of time.
• Add the detergent to the detergent cups immediately
before starting the dishwasher.
4. The detergent cup is malfunctioning or is being
blocked from opening.
• Be sure the dishwasher is not being loaded in a fashion
that is preventing the detergent cups from opening.
• See page 14 for recommended amounts.
4. Using detergent in both cups for shorter cycles.
• When the cycle selection is shorter than a normal cycle,
use the main wash detergent cup only.
5. Using generic or store brand dishwasher detergent.
• Value brand detergents may not contain adequate
amounts of suds suppressors. Switch to a major brand
of dishwasher detergent.
6. Prerinsing dishes.
• Detergents will suds more if there are not enough food
soils to act upon.
Unfamiliar Sounds/Noisy Operation
A new dishwasher may sound differently than the model it
replaced.
Causes:
1. Normal sounds include a hissing of the water valve during the fill, water circulation, or a humming during the
drain.
2. Improper loading can result in dishes hitting each other
during water circulation or wash arms hitting dishes as
they rotate.
3. Installation (location, flooring, cabinetry, etc.) can affect
noise production.
20
Dishwashing
Chipping of Dinnerware and Glassware
Metal Marks on Dishes or Glassware
Causes:
Cause:
1. Frequent breaking or chipping of dishware in an
older dishwasher may signal a cracked or split spray
arm.
1. The dish or glassware has been in contact with a
metal item (such as aluminum), leaving small black or
gray marks or streaks.
• Cracks and splits can cause erratic turning of the spray
arm and erratic water spraying.
2. Chipping occurred during normal use and was not
noticed until the dishes were removed from the dishwasher.
• Be sure the dishwasher is loaded carefully to prevent
metal items from touching other dishes. This is particularly important with disposable, foil-type pans.
• To remove: Use Zud* according to package directions.
• When dishes are loaded properly (according to manufacturer’s directions) there is nothing in the dishwasher
that will cause chipping. The dishes will only come into
contact with the cushioned racks.
• Follow manufacturer’s instructions for loading.
• Do not place more than one item between each set of
tines.
• Plates and saucers should lean back against the tines
rather than tilt forward.
• When placing crystal in the dishwasher, leave space
between each item to prevent contact.
Washing extremely fragile and lightweight crystal
and china in the dishwasher is not recommended.
* Brand names are trademarks of respective manufacturers.
Dishwashing
Discoloration of Silverplate
Pitting of Metals
Cause:
Cause:
1. The silverplate has worn thin and the base metal is
showing through.
1. When two different metals
(such as silver and stainless steel) touch in the
hot environment of the
dishwasher, electrolysis
can take place which can
cause pitting.
• The combination of dishwasher detergent and lack of
hand toweling may result in a copper or bronze discoloration of the base metal.
• To remove the discoloration, polish with a silver polish
or soak in vinegar for 10 minutes. This is a temporary
treatment.
• The only permanent solution is replating the item with
silver by a jeweler.
21
3
• Load silver and stainless
steel so they do not touch
in the silverware basket
(preferably at opposite
ends of the basket).
Stainless Steel Discoloration or Rusting
Causes:
1. Some stainless steel will take on a bluish cast when
washed in the dishwasher.
• This happens due to the heat and the alkalinity of automatic dishwasher detergent.
• To remove the discoloration, use a paste of baking soda
and water or a stainless steel cleaner.
Tarnishing (Sterling or Silverplate)
Causes:
2. Certain foods (such as table salt, vinegar, salad
dressings, milk and milk products, fruits and juices,
tomatoes, tomato products, and butter) can remove
the oxide film on stainless steel.
• When stainless steel is made, a passivation process
forms a protective oxide film on the surface of the
steel. It is this film of oxide which makes stainless
steel “stainless”. If it is removed, corrosion (rusting)
will occur.
• If the stainless steel is washed, rinsed and dried thoroughly, the oxygen in the air will heal the breaks in the
oxide film and return the stainless property to the steel.
• If food is not washed off promptly, the air cannot heal
the break and corrosion will take place.
1. Sulfur in the water supply.
• Tarnishing due to sulfur becomes accelerated with
automatic dishwashing because of the higher water
temperatures and because towel drying has been eliminated. Since sulfur cannot be readily removed from the
water supply, frequent polishing is the only answer.
2. Contact with sulfide-containing foods such as eggs,
mayonnaise, salty or acidic foods.
• Silver coming into contact with these foods should be
rinsed thoroughly as soon as possible after use, either
by hand or by using the Rinse & Hold cycle (if the dishwasher is not going to be run immediately after the
meal).
• To minimize rusting, rinse or wash as soon as possible.
• Polishing with a silver or stainless steel cleaner may
temporarily remove the corrosion.
Note: Silver (either sterling or plate) needs the
buffing effect of towel drying to retain its luster
(even when washed in an automatic dishwasher).
22
Dishwashing
Items not to be Washed in a Dishwasher
Most tableware, cookware, and silverware can be safely washed in the automatic dishwasher. If there are any doubts about a particular piece, the manufacturer of the item should be contacted. If the manufacturer cannot be reached, test wash a small item for
several weeks before attempting to wash an entire set.
The following chart provides general guidelines regarding what dishes to not wash in an automatic dishwasher.
Material
Dishwasher Safe
Special Information
Aluminum
Yes, except anodized aluminum and High water temperature and detergents may affect finish. Check
some cookware.
cleaning instructions.
Cast Iron
No
Seasoning will be removed and iron will rust.
China/Stoneware
Yes, except antique or hand painted
china.
ALWAYS check manufacturer’s recommendations before washing.
Antique, hand-painted or over-the-glaze patterns may fade. Gold leaf
may discolor. If in doubt, test wash a small item for several weeks
before washing an entire set.
Crystal
Yes, except antique or lightweight
delicate crystal.
ALWAYS check manufacturer’s recommendation before washing.
Some types of leaded crystal may etch with repeated washings. If in
doubt, test wash a small item for several weeks before washing an
entire set.
Glass
Yes, except milkglass.
Milkglass may yellow with repeated dishwasher washing.
Gold-plated flatware
No
Will discolor.
Hollow handle knives
No
Handles may be attached to the blade with adhesives which may
loosen if dishwasher washed.
Pewter
No
High water temperatures and detergent may discolor or pit finish.
Disposable Plastic
No
Cannot withstand high water temperatures and detergents.
Plastics
Yes, if labeled “dishwasher safe.”
ALWAYS check manufacturer’s recommendation before washing.
Plastics vary in their capacity to withstand high water temperatures
and detergents.
Stainless Steel
Yes
ALWAYS check manufacturer’s recommendation before washing.
Run a Rinse & Hold cycle (select models) if not washing immediately. Prolonged contact with food containing salt, vinegar, milk
products or fruit juice could damage finish.
Sterling Silver or
Silver Plate
Check with manufacturer. Styles
with commercial “darkening” are
NOT dishwasher safe.
ALWAYS check manufacturer’s recommendation before washing.
Since prolonged contact with food containing salt, acid or sulfide
(eggs, mayonnaise and seafood) could damage finish, running a
Rinse & Hold cycle is recommended if not washing immediately.
Commercial “darkening” may be removed by detergent.
Tin
No
May rust.
Wooden Items
No
Always check manufacturer’s recommendation before washing.
Wood may warp, crack or discolor.
Cooking
Cooking Contents
Poor Baking/Over or Under Browning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Damage to Glass-Ceramic Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Common Baking Problems and Causes Chart . . . . . . . . 25
Chrome Drip Bowl Discoloration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
What is Convection Cooking? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Porcelain Drip Bowl Stains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Poor Results When Convection Cooking. . . . . . . . . . 25-26
Problems Cleaning Sealed Gas Burners & Grates . . . . . 29
Surface Cooking Is Slower than Expected . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Discoloration of Porcelain in Oven After
Self-Clean Cycle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Cannot Maintain Boil on Glass-Ceramic
Surfaces When Canning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Difficulty Cleaning Standard Clean Oven . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Discoloration and Crazing to Porcelain
Cooktop and Drip Bowls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Continuous Clean Oven Does Not Clean . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Problems Cleaning Glass-Ceramic
Cooking Surfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Poor Performance Because of Cookware . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Problems Cleaning Specialty Finishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Resources
Resources available for consumers regarding cooking appliance usage, questions and problems include:
Questions & Answers
Other Resources
Cleaning Ceramic-Glass Cooktops – 751CG
Cooking Appliance Buying Guide – 876CG
Broiling – 752CG
Cooking Made Simple – 875CG
Cleaning Gas Cooking Surfaces – 753CG
Induction Cooking – 754CG
Drip Bowl Cleaning – 755CG
Poor Baking – 756CG
How A Microwave Oven Works – 757CG
Convection Cooking – 758CG
Ceramic-Glass Cooktops – 759CG
Electric Cooktop Choices – 760CG
Indoor Grilling with Downdraft
Vent System – 761CG
Cookware –
762CG
Kitchen Venting –
763CG
3
23
24
Cooking
Poor Baking/Over or Under Browning
Causes for both conventional and convection cooking:
1. Temperature shift in oven. As a cooking appliance gets
older, often the oven temperature gets hotter. Baking
times may vary from an old oven. THIS IS NORMAL.
• An easy way to confirm if the oven is calibrated correctly is to bake a white box cake mix or a tube of
refrigerated biscuits. Following the box or package
directions should result in a product that is done and
evenly browned. (Preheat oven and place rack in the
center of the oven.)
• Temperature settings on many cooking appliances with
electronic controls may be easily adjusted by the customer to fit their expectations. (See User’s Guide.)
2. Pan finish. Dark, dull pans absorb heat which results in
darker browning. Shiny pans reflect heat which results in
lighter browning. (Insulated cookie sheets, shiny or dull,
follow these guidelines as well.)
4. Incorrect pan placement on the rack.
• Allow 1-2 inches of space around each pan and between
pans and the oven walls.
• If baking on more than one rack, place the pans so that
one is not directly over another except when baking
cookies using convection bake (see page 26).
5. Oven not preheated. Preheating is necessary for good
results when baking breads, cookies, cakes, etc.
(Preheating is not necessary for casseroles and roasting.)
• To preheat, set the oven to the recommended temperature in the recipe or on the prepared mix directions.
Wait 10-15 minutes before placing the food in the oven.
Many ovens have an audible signal or light indicating
the oven is preheated.
6. Poor air circulation in oven.
• Do not put too may pans on a rack.
• Do not cover an entire oven rack or oven bottom with
aluminum foil. This affects air circulation and baking
results.
• A small piece of foil may be used to catch spillovers.
Place it on a lower rack several inches below the baking pan. (See illustration below.)
• Shiny pans are recommended for cakes and cookies.
• Dark pans are recommended for pies and breads. If
used for cakes and cookies, the oven temperature
should be decreased by 25° F.
• Glass pans require a 25° F. decrease.
3. Incorrect rack position in oven.
• For single rack baking, center the rack so the food is in
the middle of the oven. For multiple rack baking, check
the User’s Guide for recommendations.
• If food is placed on a rack toward the top of the oven,
top browning may be too dark.
• If food is placed on a rack located near the bottom of
the oven, the food may be too dark on the bottom.
NOTE: If the previous baking tips have been carefully followed and the results are not as expected,
refer to “Baking Problems” chart on page 25.
Cooking
Common Baking Problems and Causes
If you have carefully followed the basic instructions and still
experience poor results, these suggestions may be helpful.
Problem
Cause
Cakes are uneven.* Pans touching each other or oven walls.
Batter uneven in pans.
Uneven heat distribution in oven.
Oven not level.
Cakes high in middle Temperature too high.
or cracked.* Overmixing.
Too much flour.
Pans touching each other or oven walls.
Dark pans used.
Pan too small.
3
25
What Is Convection Cooking?
The definition of convection
is circulating air. In a convection oven, a fan circulates hot air over, under and
around the food. The moving air disturbs the layer of
cold air around the food,
allowing the heat to surround the food. As a result,
foods are evenly cooked and
browned – often in shorter
cooking times, at lower temperatures and with the flexibility
of using more racks.
Poor Results When Convection Cooking
Causes:
CO
N
V
E
C
BA
KI
N
IPS
T
*If similar problems occur when convection baking is done, make sure
the oven temperature has been decreased by 25°F.
C
TI
ON
ROA
ST
PS
TI
25%
less time
G
E
Pies don’t brown. Incorrect rack position.
Using shiny metal pans.
Temperature set too low.
V
Excessive shrinkage.* Too little leavening.
Overmixing.
Pan too large.
Oven temperature too high.
Baking time too long.
ON
TI
Roasting
N
Cakes, cookies, bis- Oven not preheated.
cuits too brown on Pans touching each other or oven walls.
bottom or top.* Using glass, darkened, warped or dull
finish metal pans.
Rack position too high or low.
Incorrect use of aluminum foil.
Oven temperature too high.
• When using recipes or
prepared mixes developed for a conventional bake oven, set
the oven temperature 25° F. lower than
the recipe or package
directions recommend.
(Baking times will be
the same or a few minutes less than the recommended times.)
CO
Cakes not done in Temperature too high.
center. Pan too small.
Baking time too short.
Pan not centered in oven.
1. Improper baking temperature. Not reducing the temperature will result in overbrowning and uneven results
when baking cookies, cakes, etc.
G
Cakes fall. Too much shortening or sugar.
Too much or too little liquid.
Temperature too low.
Old or too little baking powder.
Pan too small.
Oven door opened frequently.
Insufficient baking.
IN
2. Improper roasting time. Not reducing roasting time will
result in overdone meats.
• When convection roasting, roasting times should be
decreased by 25-30 percent (roasting temperatures will remain the same).
3. Using covers, lids and high-sided pans when roasting.
• The benefits of convection roasting are not achieved
when the food is covered or placed in a high-sided
roaster.
4. Dark pans. Will result in darker browning.
• Shiny, bright pans are recommended for convection
baking of cookies and cakes.
Continued on next page.
26
Cooking
Poor Results When Convection Cooking continued
5. Using cookie sheets with sides. Results in uneven
browning because the sides interfere with the flow of air.
6. Pans not placed in oven correctly.
• Center pans (stack) in front of the fan when baking
cookies on two or three racks (see illustration). This
will improve air circulation and browning.
• If baking items in pans with sides using two racks (i.e.
cakes and pies), stagger pans so one is not directly over
another.
7. Oven rack crowded.
• Allow at least 1-2 inches of space between the pans,
oven walls and oven door.
Pan placement for convection baked cookies.
Surface Cooking Is Slower than Expected
Causes:
1. Cookware that is oversized.
• Pans should not extend more than 1-inch beyond the
cooking area on a glass-ceramic cooking surface. (On
glass-ceramic surfaces a built-in temperature limiter will
sense uneven heating when an oversized pan is used
and lower the
heat resulting in
slow cooking.)
• Pans should not
extend more than
2-inches on a coil
or gas cooking
surface.
Cannot Maintain Boil on Glass-Ceramic
Surfaces When Canning
Cause:
1. Oversized canners or canners with ridges or grooved
bottoms.
• When using a glass-ceramic cooking surface, a small
canner (8-10 inches in diameter) will need to be used or
use a canner designed for glass-ceramic cooking surfaces. These canners are made with a flat base on the
bottom to fit the cooking area.
• Canners must be flat.
2. Cookware that is
not flat.
• To check for pan
bottom flatness:
Ruler Test: Place
a ruler across the
bottom of the pan.
Hold it up to the
light. Little or no
light should be visible under the ruler.
Bubble Test: Put an inch of water into the pan, place
on cooktop and turn control to HI. Watch the bubble
formation as the water heats – uniform bubble formation equals good performance; uneven bubbles indicates
uneven, slow cooking and hot spots.
Cooking
3
27
Discoloration and Crazing to Porcelain Cooktop and Drip Bowls
Causes:
1. Use of oversized canners and cookware.
• To help prevent damage when using a large canner or
pan on a coil surface, a special element accessory is
available. It elevates the canner or pan which reduces
trapped heat. This prevents damage to the porcelain
cooktop and drip bowls (see page 28).
2. Excessive use of the HI heat setting.
• Use the HI heat setting just until water comes to a boil
or food begins to cook, then reduce to the lowest heat
setting that maintains the boil or cooking action. Food
will not cook any faster at a fast boil than at a
slow boil.
(Order the element accessory from your parts distributor – model #CE1 for Maytag, Magic
Chef and Jenn-Air free-standing
models, and model #A145A
for other Jenn-Air products.)
8
2
4
6
Problems Cleaning Glass-Ceramic Cooking Surfaces
Causes:
1. Not cleaning surface before first use.
• Clean with Cooktop Cleaning Creme* (Part No.
20000001.) This will make future cleaning easier.
2. Pan bottoms not clean and dry before use.
3. Cleaning not done routinely. If spills are not removed
and burn on, they are more difficult to remove. Follow
these guidelines:
• General cleaning and light soil: Use a clean dishcloth with soap and water or with a nonabrasive cleaning powder such as Bon Ami*. Rinse and dry. OR,
apply a small amount of Cooktop Cleaning Creme (Part
No. 20000001) with a nonabrasive cloth. Buff with a dry
cloth.
• Moderate soil, metal marks from cookware or
hard water marks: Gently scrub with a nonabrasive
cleaning powder such as Bon Ami or Cooktop Cleaning
Creme (Part No. 20000001).
If the stain is not removed, reapply Cooktop Cleaning
Creme. Cover with damp paper towels and let stand 30
minutes. Scrub again. Rinse and dry.
* Brand names are trademarks of respective manufacturers.
• Crusty, burned on soils:
Use a single edge razor
blade, place at a 30°
angle and scrape off
spot. Clean remaining soil with Cooktop
Cleaning Creme. (Part
No. 20000001).
4. Using incorrect cleaning products.
• Do not use abrasive cleaners such as cleansing powders, scouring pads, etc. They can scratch the surface.
• Do not use chemical based cleaning products containing chlorine bleach, ammonia or caustic agents. They
can discolor the surface.
28
Cooking
Damage to Glass-Ceramic Surfaces
Causes:
1. Using glass cookware, sliding pans with rough bottoms across the surface, using the surface as a cutting board or cooking directly on surface without a
pan will cause scratches.
2. Sliding metal cookware, especially uncoated aluminum, across the surface or the use of trivets or
metal stands (i.e. wok rings, etc.) will cause metal
marks.
• Clean the surface as soon as it has cooled with Cooktop
Cleaning Creme* (Part No. 20000001) to remove the
metal marks or they will become permanent.
3. If plastic or substances with high sugar content melt
on the cooktop and are not removed immediately,
they will bond to the surface.
• Carefully, use a single edge razor blade held with a
potholder to scrape the melted material or sugary
boilover to a cooler area of the cooktop. Use several
layers of paper towels to wipe up the spillover being
careful not to burn yourself.
4. Allowing pans to boil dry, especially porcelain enamel
pans. The finish on pans may bond to the glass-ceramic
surface.
5. Not cleaning salt, sugar or other coarse particles off
of the surface before cooking will cause scratches.
Chrome Drip Bowl Discoloration
Causes:
1. Food spills cause brown stains, if not removed
promptly.
• Remove by washing the drip bowls frequently in warm
sudsy water. (It is not recommended to wash chrome
bowls in a dishwasher.)
• A mild abrasive cleaner such as
Soft Cleanser* or Soft Scrub*
and a plastic scrubber can
be used to remove stubborn stains.
• If heavily soiled, place an
ammonia soaked paper
towel on the stains, allow
to soak for a short time,
then gently scrub with a
plastic scrubber.
2. Overheating causes blue/gold stains.
• These stains generally cannot be removed unless a
metal polish is used such as Flitz* (available in automotive supply stores).
• To minimize discoloration:
a. use pans that are not
more than two inches
larger than the element. If an oversized
pan is used, heat may
be trapped under the
pan causing discoloration. (An element
accessory may also
help. See page 27.)
b. use flat bottom pans.
c. avoid excessive use of the high heat setting.
Porcelain Drip Bowl Stains
Cause:
1. Food spills cause brown stains and burned on stains
if not removed promptly.
• Remove by frequent washing in the dishwasher or in
soapy water. For difficult soils use a plastic pad and a
nonabrasive cleaner such as Bon Ami* or Cooktop
Cleaning Creme (Part No. 20000001). If soil is not
removed, reapply Cooktop Cleaning Creme. Cover with
damp paper towels and let stand 30 minutes. Scrub
again. Rinse and dry.
• To clean burned on soil:
a. remove bowls from the cooking surface and place on
newspapers.
b. spray with commercial oven cleaner. (Be careful not
to spray any other areas.)
c. place the bowls in a large plastic bag overnight or for
several hours.
d. wearing rubber gloves, remove the bowls, wipe clean,
rinse and dry.
Cooking
Problems Cleaning Sealed Gas Burners
and Grates
Discoloration of Porcelain in Oven After
Self-Clean Cycle
Causes:
Causes:
1. Burned on food soils or spatters on burner head.
1. Acid (tomato and milk based foods) and sugary
spills (sweet potatoes, etc.) not wiped up prior to a
self-clean cycle. Porcelain enamel is acid resistant, not
acid proof and the combination of high heat and the
acid/sugar causes discoloration and etching.
• Wipe the soiled area after it has cooled with a damp,
not wet, cloth. Use care around the ignitor. THE
BURNER WILL NOT LIGHT IF THE IGNITOR IS WET,
SOILED OR DAMAGED.
BURNER HEAD/
REMOVABLE CAP
(select models)
3
29
• It is best to wipe up as much of an acid spill as possible
before a self-clean process.
2. Use of commercial oven cleaner on a self-clean oven.
If oven cleaner is not thoroughly removed after use and a
subsequent self-clean cycle is used, the area where the
cleaner was used may discolor.
PORTS
• Never use commercial oven cleaner in a self-clean oven.
IGNITOR
PORT BELOW IGNITOR
• To remove stubborn stains, use a plastic scouring pad
and a nonabrasive cleaner such as Bon Ami* or
Cooktop Cleaning Creme* (Part No. 20000001).
• If gas ports become blocked, use a straight pin rather
than a toothpick to clean. Do not enlarge or distort the
ports. Be especially aware of the gas port beneath the
ignitor.
• If burner head has a removable burner cap, see following cleaning recommendations for burner grates.
2. Burned on food soils on burner grates.
Difficulty Cleaning Standard Clean Oven
Causes:
1. Spillovers and food soil not cleaned promptly.
• Wipe out the oven routinely to minimize the need for a
large scale cleaning.
2. Ineffective cleaning agent used.
• For stubborn soils a commercial oven cleaner is
needed. Follow the manufacturer’s directions.
• Clean grates frequently in hot, soapy water using a plastic pad.
• For stubborn soils, use a plastic pad and a nonabrasive
cleaner such as Bon Ami or Cooktop Cleaning Creme
(Part No. 20000001). If soil is not removed, reapply
Cooktop Cleaning Creme. Cover with damp paper towels and let stand 30 minutes. Scrub again. Rinse and
dry.
Continuous Clean Oven Does Not Clean
• To clean burned on soil:
1. Not enough use of the oven. The continuous clean finish works best with longer baking times.
a. remove grates from the cooking surface and place on
newspapers.
b. spray with commercial oven cleaner. (Be careful not
to spray any other areas.)
c. place grates in a large plastic bag overnight or for
several hours.
d. wearing rubber gloves, remove the grates, wash in
hot soapy water, rinse and dry.
* Brand names are trademarks of respective manufacturers.
Causes:
2. Improper cleaners used. Powdered cleaners and
commercial oven cleaners should not be used on the
continuous clean finish. The chemicals in the cleaners
will clog the porous finish eliminating the cleaning action.
• Cleaners such as Fantastik* or 409* may be used if area
is rinsed with water.
30
Cooking
Problems Cleaning Specialty Finishes
1. Stainless Steel
2. Colored Stainless Steel (Blue Creek)
• DO NOT use any cleaning product containing chlorine bleach.
Follow the first three bullet points under stainless
steel cleaning.
• Always wipe with the grain when cleaning.
General Cleaning – using a very soft cloth wipe with
soapy water or a window cleaner. (Do not use paper
towels, or other spray cleaners or abrasive cleaners, as
they may scratch or mar the finish.)
• To remove fingerprints and restore luster after
cleaning, use Stainless Steel Magic Spray* (Part
No. 20000008).
Daily Cleaning/Light Soil – using a soft cloth, wipe with
one of the following: soapy water, white vinegar/water
solution or a multi-surface cleaner. Rinse and dry.
Moderate/Heavy Soil – using a soft cloth, wipe with one
of the following: Bon Ami*, Soft Scrub* (without
bleach) or a similar nonabrasive cleaner. Rinse and dry.
Stubborn soils may be removed with a damp ScotchBrite* pad rubbed evenly with the grain.
Discoloration – using a damp sponge or soft cloth, wipe
with Cameo Stainless Steel Cleaner*. Rinse immediately and dry.
3. Molded Colored Materials (Blue Creek)
General Cleaning – soap and water. For difficult stains
– gently scour using a mild-abrasive cleaner such as
Soft Scrub and a green Scotch-Brite* pad. Rinse and
dry. Follow with HOPE’S Countertop Polish.*
* Brand names are trademarks of respective manufacturers.
Poor Performance Because of Cookware
Causes:
• Stainless steel, if used alone, is a slow
heat conductor. Copper or aluminum is
often used as a bottom coating or as an
inner core between two layers of stainless to improve heat conductivity.
• Copper and aluminum are excellent
heat conductors. They are often used
as a bottom coating or core to improve
the heating of other pan materials.
• Porcelain-enamel is a glass-like substance fused to metal. Heating characteristics depend on the base metal.
• Cast iron is a good heat conductor, but
slow to heat. It cooks evenly once temperature is reached.
• Glass is a slow conductor of heat and
not recommended.
3. Oversized pans.
• Pans should not extend more than 1-inch beyond the
cooking area on glass-ceramic surfaces.
1. Poor conductivity of pan material. The pan material
directly affects how evenly and quickly heat is transferred
from the heat source to the pan.
• On coil element and gas surfaces pans should not
extend more than two-inches beyond the element or
grate.
2. Uneven, warped or grooved pan bottoms. Pans must
be flat to work effectively, especially on glass-ceramic
cooking surfaces.
4. Balance and gauge. A light weight pan with a heavy handle could tip and fail to make good contact with the cooktop. Very thin gauge metal will produce hot spots.
Refrigeration
Refrigeration Contents
Refrigerator
Outside of the Refrigerator Feels
Warm to the Touch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Beads of Moisture Appear on the Cabinet Exterior. . . . 37
Fresh Food Compartment is
Too Warm or Too Cold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Frost or Ice Crystals Forming
in or on Frozen Food Packages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Meat/Cheese Drawer is Too Warm or Too Cold . . . . . . . 32
Ice Cubes or Water From the Dispenser
have an Odor or Off-Taste. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Freezer Compartment is Too Warm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Freezer Burn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Noisy Operation/Unfamiliar Sounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Refrigerator Runs Too Long or
Too Infrequently . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Food is Dried Out or Dehydrated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Fresh Produce is Dried Out,
Wilted, Soft or Moldy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Odor in Refrigerator or Food
has an Off-Taste or Odor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Icemaker
Icemaker Does Not Make Enough Ice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Ice Cubes are Too Small . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Icemaker Does Not Make Ice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Food Storage Chart
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Meat in the Fresh Food Compartment
has Dark Spots or has Turned Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Resources
Resources available for consumers regarding refrigerator usage, questions, and problems include:
Questions & Answers
Other Resources
Refrigerators – 651CM
Refrigerator Buying Guide – 851CG
Food Storage – 741CG
The Freshness Files – 850CG
Energy Conservation – 742CG
31
32
Refrigeration
Outside of the Refrigerator Feels Warm to the Touch
Causes:
1. Normal operation.
2. Improper clearance around the refrigerator.
• Heat helps prevent moisture from condensing on the
cabinet exterior
• A space of at least 1/2 inch should be left between the
refrigerator and adjacent walls or cabinets.
Fresh Food Compartment is Too Warm or Too Cold
Causes:
1. Fresh food (or refrigerator) control set incorrectly.
• Adjust control to the next setting (the next higher number will make the refrigerator colder; the next lower
number will make it warmer). Do not change the control more than one setting at a time.
• Allow 24 hours for the temperature to stabilize before
making further changes.
2. Freezer control set at coldest position.
• In refrigerator models with a manual damper temperature control system, an unnecessarily cold freezer setting can result in a warmer temperature in the fresh
food compartment. In these models, the coldest freezer
setting is recommended for short term use only.
3. Prolonged or frequent door openings.
• Food items should be removed from the unit as quickly
as possible. Retrieve several items at one time, rather
than opening the door several times.
To check the temperature of the fresh food compartment: Place an appliance thermometer in a glass of
water in the center of the refrigerator. Read after 24
hours. If needed, adjust the control one setting and
check the temperature after another 24 hours.
Meat/Cheese Drawer is Too Warm or Too Cold
Causes:
1. The control slide on the drawer is incorrectly positioned.
• The slide regulates the amount of cold air that is channeled into the drawer. When the slide is positioned to
the “meat” or “cold” position, the temperature inside the
drawer will be at it’s coldest (approximately 32° F - 34°
F). Moving the slide towards the “cheese” or the “cool”
position produces a more moderate (warmer) temperature within the drawer (approximately 36° - 38° F).
CHEESE
MEAT
2. The drawer does not have an adjustable temperature
option.
• Without this capability, the drawer will not provide a
temperature that is colder than the surrounding fresh
food compartment. The temperature will be the same
as the main refrigerator cabinet, however the food will
be protected from any drying effect from the circulating
air.
Refrigeration
Freezer Compartment is Too Warm
Causes:
1. The freezer control is set too warm.
• Adjust the freezer control to the next colder setting. Do
not change the control more than one setting at a time.
• Allow 24 hours for the temperature to stabilize before
making further adjustments.
2. Prolonged door openings or the door has not been
closed securely.
3. Condenser needs cleaning.
• The No Clean™ commercial-duty condenser design does
not need cleaning for efficient operation in normal
home usage situations. It may, however, need to be
cleaned if the operating environment is dirty, greasy or
there is significant pet traffic in the area. In these kind
of situations, the No Clean™ Condenser can be cleaned
using a cleaning brush (part no. 20001017).
4. Adding too much warm or room temperature food at
one time.
• This can slow the rate of freezing and can raise the temperature of frozen foods already in the freezer, lowering
the quality of the food being stored.
• As a general rule, no more than three pounds of food
per cubic foot of freezer space should be added to the
freezer within a 24 hour period.
To check the temperature of the freezer compartment: Place an appliance thermometer between
packages and read after 24 hours. If needed, adjust
the control one setting and check the temperature
after another 24 hours.
Noisy Operation/Unfamiliar Sounds
Causes:
1. Today’s refrigerators are built with smaller, more
efficient compressors. These are not louder but do produce a higher pitch which can be mistaken as louder in
some operating environments.
2. Fan operation required for normal air flow in and around
the fresh and frozen food compartments.
3. Cabinet vibration can occur if the refrigerator is not
level or if the refrigerator is installed on a weak floor.
6. Bubbling or gurgling sounds (like water boiling) result
when the refrigerant boils off as it circulates.
7. A dripping sound can occur as water drips into the
defrost pan beneath the refrigerator during the defrost
cycle. This sound only occurs during the defrost cycle.
8. A clicking noise can sometimes be heard as the defrost
timer begins and ends the defrost cycle.
9. The automatic icemaker may produce several sounds.
4. A sizzling sound can occur in the freezer compartment
by defrost water dripping on the defrost mechanism.
5. Popping or cracking sounds may be heard as metal
parts expand and contract.
• Buzzing of the water valve,
• Water running as the ice tray fills,
• Rattling of the ice cubes as they fall into the ice bin.
33
34
Refrigeration
Refrigerator Runs Too Long or Too Infrequently
Causes:
1. Normal operation when comparing the run time of a
new refrigerator to that of an older model.
• Today’s refrigerators use smaller compressors that run
more frequently, but use less energy. This provides
more stable temperatures within the refrigerator.
2. Temperature control set too cold.
• Check the temperature of the fresh and frozen food
compartments (see pages 32 and 33).
• The fresh food compartment of the refrigerator should
be kept between 34° and 40° F, with an optimum temperature of 37° F. If the fresh food compartment is too
cold, adjust the control to the next lower number.
Allow 24 hours for the temperature to stabilize before
making further adjustments.
• The freezer compartment of a refrigerator should be
kept at 0° F or slightly lower.
3. Prolonged or frequent door openings.
• Food items should be removed from the unit as quickly
as possible. Remove all foods needed at one time,
rather than opening the door several times.
4. If the room temperature is excessively high, it is normal for a refrigerator to run longer or more often.
• Lower the room temperature, if possible.
5. Fresh food or freezer compartment is overloaded or
underloaded.
• Shelves should not be overloaded. Overloading prevents proper air flow and interferes with the refrigerator’s ability to cool or freeze evenly.
Food is Dried Out or Dehydrated
Causes:
1. Food was stored uncovered or poorly covered.
2. Crisper or Meat/Cheese Drawer not tightly closed.
3. Food stored too long.
• Refer to the food storage chart (page 39) for suggested
storage times.
• The freezer compartment should be at least 2/3 full.
The frozen bulk provided by the foods within the
freezer compartment helps to keep more of the cold air
within the unit when a door is opened. If this compartment is less than 2/3 full (as in the above example), it is
helpful to fill milk cartons half full of water and store
them in the freezer to provide more frozen bulk.
6. It is normal for the unit to run more if a quantity of
warm food has been recently added.
7. Condenser needs cleaning or there is poor air circulation around the condenser.
• The No Clean™ commercial-duty condenser design generally does not need cleaning for efficient operation in
normal home usage situations. It may, however, need to
be cleaned if the operating environment is dirty, greasy
or if there is significant pet traffic in the area. In these
kind of situations, the No Clean™ Condenser can be
cleaned using a cleaning brush (part no. 20001017).
Refrigeration
3
35
Fresh Produce is Dried Out, Wilted, Soft or Moldy
Causes:
1. Fresh produce not stored in the crispers.
• Fruit and vegetables will dry out and deteriorate prematurely if stored on an open refrigerator shelf (see example on page 34).
2. Fruit or vegetables not stored at the proper humidity level.
• Generally, vegetables require higher humidity conditions
while fruits need lower humidity.
• The control should be set at “high” or “vegetables” for
storing vegetables and “low” or “fruit” for storing fruits
(in refrigerators with humidity controlled crispers).
FRUIT
VEGETABLES
6. Fruits and vegetables not stored in separate
crispers.
• Fruits and vegetables have different humidity requirements and should be stored separately.
• Certain fruits emit ethylene gas which hastens spoiling
of some vegetables.
7. Temperature too low.
• This can cause fresh produce to freeze, destroying the
cell structure and resulting in “chill injury” (browning,
pitting, watery breakdown, decay). Food quality is
unacceptable when this happens.
• The fresh food compartment of a refrigerator should be
kept between 34° F - 40° F, with an optimum temperature of 37° F. Refrigerator temperatures can be checked
by using an appliance thermometer (see page 32).
3. Certain vegetables not wrapped.
• Leafy vegetables, such as lettuce and spinach should be
stored in the crispers in plastic bags or air-tight containers to further reduce moisture loss.
4. Too much moisture can shorten the storage time of vegetables, especially leafy vegetables.
• Drain these vegetables well before storing.
• Store vegetables unwashed. Washing strips away the
natural protection, so wait until just prior to use to
wash.
5. Crisper drawer not closed tightly.
8. The quality of the produce when it was purchased.
Quality can vary from item to item, variety to variety, and
season to season.
• Sort fresh produce before storing and use bruised or
soft pieces first.
• Discard any pieces showing signs of decay.
9. Fresh produce is stored too long.
• Refer to the food storage chart on page 39 for suggested
storage times.
36
Refrigeration
Odor in Refrigerator or Food has
an Off-Taste or Odor
Causes:
1. Foods not wrapped and tightly sealed in foil, selfsealing bags or plastic wrap.
• Odorous vegetables such as onions and cabbage should
be wrapped before they are placed in the crisper.
Meat in the Fresh Food Compartment
has Dark Spots or has Turned Brown;
Cheese has White or Green Spots
Causes:
1. Oxidation. It is natural for meat to darken with time.
• If fresh meat is not going to be used within 1-2 days, it
should be stored in the freezer.
2. Interior of the refrigerator may need cleaning.
• Follow the cleaning steps listed below.
2. Fresh or cured meat has been stored too long.
• Brown, green or yellow discoloration can be due to bacterial growth and should be disposed of.
3. Defrost pan needs cleaning.
• Check the User’s Guide for instructions on removal and
replacement of the defrost pan.
Note: In some units, the defrost pan is not readily
accessible to the consumer and instructions for
the removal of the defrost pan are not included in
the User’s Guide.
4. A food may be spoiled from being stored too long or
forgotten.
• Throw out any food that is suspected unsafe for consumption.
• Refer to the Food Storage Chart on page 39 for approximate recommended storage times.
To remove an odor, follow these steps:
• Unplug the refrigerator and thoroughly wash the inside
of the unit, including all shelves, drawers, accessories
and gaskets with a mixture of 2 tablespoons of baking
soda dissolved in 1 quart of warm water. Pay special
attention to any corners, crevices or grooves into which
odor-causing liquid may have settled. Dry thoroughly.
• Place open boxes of baking soda on the refrigerator
and freezer shelves.
• If odor persists, spread activated charcoal on a pan and
place on a refrigerator shelf or
• Lightly crumple sheets of newspaper and loosely pack a
refrigerator shelf which has been emptied of food.
Sprinkle the newspaper with water and close the doors.
Replace the newspaper every 1-2 days. In 5-6 days the
odor should be gone.
3. Cheese has become moldy.
• It is normal for mold to occasionally develop on the surface of hard cheese (Swiss, Cheddar, Parmesan). Cut
off at least an inch around and below the moldy area,
keeping the knife out of the mold itself. The remaining
cheese is safe to eat. DO NOT try to save individual
cheese slices, cottage cheese or other soft cheese that
has molded.
Refrigeration
Beads of Moisture Appear
on the Cabinet Exterior
Causes:
37
Freezer Burn
Freezer burn is a gray/white area on food which is dry, tough
and may be off-flavored.
1. Hot, humid weather.
2. Installing a refrigerator in a hot, humid location such
as near a heater, clothes dryer, range or sunny window.
3. Older model refrigerator.
Top-mount refrigerators have historically had an “Energy
Saver” Switch. In models with this switch, adjust the control to the “Reduces Moisture” setting to turn on a heater.
This heater helps prevent moisture from forming on the
cabinet exterior.
New design top-mount refrigerators are engineered to
automatically prevent moisture formation on the cabinet
exterior and do not require the “Energy Saver” Switch.
Frost or Ice Crystals Forming in
or on Frozen Food Packages
Causes:
1. Failure to use air-, moisture- or vapor-proof packaging (ie: heavy duty aluminum foil, freezer bags, or
polyethylene-coated freezer wrap) to properly wrap
frozen foods for longer term storage.
• Protruding bones and other sharp edges should be
padded with extra wrap to avoid puncturing the wrap,
which would introduce unwanted air into the package.
2. The freezer control may not be set cold enough.
• Adjust the control to the next higher number. Allow the
temperature to stabilize for 24 hours before making further adjustments.
Causes:
1. Air space in the package.
• Moisture evaporates from the food and it then condenses as ice crystals. To prevent this, remove as much
air as possible from packages before sealing and freezing.
2. Prolonged door openings or a door that is not closed
securely.
• Remove freezer items quickly.
• Remove several items at one time rather than opening
the door several times.
• Be sure there are no items blocking the door open.
3. Refreezing of partially thawed food.
• Avoid adding too much warm food to the freezer at
once.
• Do not place warm packages directly against the surface of already frozen food.
4. Food has been frozen too long.
• Refer to the Food Storage Chart on page 39 for approximate recommended storage times.
38
Refrigeration
Ice Cubes or Water From the Dispenser
Have an Odor or Off-Taste
Icemaker Problems
Causes:
Icemaker Does Not Make Enough Ice
1. Ice has absorbed odors from other foods.
Cause:
• If ice is not used up rapidly, store it in a covered container to help prevent odor absorption.
• Foods within the refrigerator or freezer should be covered to prevent odor transfer.
1. The freezer temperature is not cold enough.
• Set the freezer control to a colder setting. Change only
by 1 setting at a time. Allow 24 hours for the temperature to restabilize before making further adjustments.
2. The ice bin or freezer needs cleaning.
• Follow the cleaning guidelines in the User’s Guide.
3. There may be strong tasting or strong smelling minerals in the water source.
• Use a filter (Part No.18001009) to remove minerals such
as sulfur from the water supply.
Ice Cubes are Too Small
Cause:
1. Inadequate water supply to the icemaker.
• Low water pressure.
4. The ice is old.
• Clogged water line.
• Dispose of the ice and make a fresh supply.
5. The refrigerator is connected to an infrequently
used water pipe, causing a metallic taste in the
water and or ice.
• Try a filter (Part No.18001009) designed to remove
tastes and odors.
6. The icemaker is new.
• It is normal for the first few loads of ice to have an offtaste. Dispose of this ice.
7. The water has become stale.
• Draw several glasses of
water and discard the
stale water. This freshens the water supply
within the reservoir.
8. The filter in the water
line is old.
• Replace the filter
(Part No.18001001 or
18001009 for tastes
and odors, or
18001010 for tastes,
odors, and scaling).
• Replenish the water dispenser with fresh water.
Icemaker Does Not Make Any Ice
Causes:
1. New freezer is still warm.
• It may take up to 24 hours for the freezer to reach a
temperature to freeze ice cubes.
2. The control lever is positioned in the OFF position.
3. The control lever is blocked into the OFF position
by lodged ice cubes.
• Remove the lodged cubes and reposition the wire lever
to the ON or the down position.
Refrigeration
Food Storage Chart
(Storage times are approximate and may vary depending on type of packaging, storage temperature and quality
of food when purchased.)
Foods
Refrigerator
Freezer
Storage Tips
DAIRY PRODUCTS
Butter
1 month
6-9 months
Wrap tightly or cover.
Milk & cream
1 week
Not recommended
Check carton date. Close tightly. Don’t return unused portions to
original container. Don’t freeze cream unless whipped.
Cream cheese, cheese spread
& cheese food
1-2 weeks
Not recommended
Wrap tightly.
Cottage cheese
Sour cream
3-5 days
10 days
Not recommended
Store in original carton. Check carton date.
Hard cheese (Swiss, Cheddar
& Parmesan)
1-2 months
4-6 months
May become crumbly
Wrap tightly. Cut off any mold.
Eggs in the shell,
3 weeks
Not recommended
Refrigerate small ends down.
Leftover yolks or whites
2-4 days
9-12 months
For each cup of yolks to be frozen, add 1 tsp. sugar for use in
sweet, or 1 tsp. salt for non-sweet dishes.
Apples
1 month
8 months (cooked)
May also store unripe or hard apples at 60-70°F.
Bananas
2-4 days
6 months (whole/peeled)
Pears, plums, avocados
3-4 days
Not recommended
Berries, cherries, apricots
2-3 days
6 months
Ripen at room temperature before refrigerating. Bananas & avocados darken when
refrigerated.
Grapes
3-5 days
1 month (whole)
Citrus fruits
1-2 weeks
Not recommended
May also store at 60-70°F. If refrigerated, store uncovered.
Pineapples, cut
2-3 days
6-12 months
Will not ripen after purchase. Use quickly.
Asparagus
1-2 days
8-10 months
Brussels sprouts, broccoli,
cauliflower, green peas, lima
beans, green onions, peppers
3-5 days
8-10 months
Don’t wash before refrigerating. Store in crisper.
Wrap odorous foods. Leave peas in pods.
Cabbage, celery
1-2 weeks
10-12 months
Wrap odorous foods & refrigerate in crisper.
Carrots, parsnips, beets, &
turnips
7-10 days
8-10 months
Remove tops. Wrap odorous foods & refrigerate in the crisper.
Lettuce
7-10 days
Not recommended
Chicken and Turkey, whole
1-2 days
12 months
Chicken and Turkey, pieces
1-2 days
9 months
Fish
1-2 days
2-6 months
Bacon
7 days
1 month
Beef or lamb, ground
Beef or lamb, roast & steak
1-2 days
3-5 days
3-4 months
6-9 months
Ham, fully cooked, whole
half
slices
7 days
5 days
3 days
1-2 months
1-2 months
1-2 months
Luncheon meat
3-5 days
1-2 months
Pork, roast
3-5 days
4-6 months
Pork, chops
3-5 days
4 months
Sausage, ground
1-2 days
1-2 months
Sausage, smoked
7 days
1-2 months
Veal
3-5 days
4-6 months
Frankfurters
7 days
1 month
EGGS
FRUITS
VEGETABLES
POULTRY & FISH
Keep in original packaging for refrigeration. Place
in the Meat and Cheese Drawer. When freezing
longer than 2 weeks, overwrap with freezer wrap.
MEATS
Fresh meats can be kept in original packaging for refrigeration.
Place in the Meat and Cheese Drawer. When freezing longer
than 2 weeks, overwrap with freezer wrap.
Unopened, vacuum-packed luncheon meat may be kept up to
2 weeks in the Meat and Cheese Drawer.
Processed meats should be tightly wrapped and stored in the
Meat and Cheese Drawer.
Sources: United States Department of Agriculture; Food Marketing Institute; Cooperative Extension Service, Iowa State University
3
39
Maytag Appliances • 403 West 4th Street North • P.O. Box 39 • Newton, Iowa 50208
Form No. 804CG 08/97
Litho U.S.A.