Commission Working Document on possible Ecodesign and EU

INTRODUCTION
Commission Working Document
on possible Ecodesign and EU Energy Label measures for
Domestic Coffee Machines
Brussels, 18.11.2011
Table of Contents
Subject matter ................................................................................................................. 4
Market structure and trends of the products covered by this working document ............... 6
Measurement standard..................................................................................................... 6
Worldwide standards and labelling activities ................................................................... 6
Impact on other EU legislation ........................................................................................ 7
Impact from other EU legislation..................................................................................... 7
Voluntary agreements ..................................................................................................... 7
Alternative proposals....................................................................................................... 7
PROPOSAL 1 ......................................................................................................................... 8
Definitions ...................................................................................................................... 9
Eco-design requirements ............................................................................................... 10
Energy labelling requirements ....................................................................................... 10
Measurement method .................................................................................................... 10
Information requirements for domestic coffee machines ................................................ 11
Conformity Assessment ................................................................................................ 12
Market surveillance ....................................................................................................... 12
Benchmarks .................................................................................................................. 12
Review .......................................................................................................................... 12
Annex I: Ecodesign requirements .......................................................................................... 13
Annex II: Energy labelling requirements ............................................................................... 14
1. Label 1 for domestic coffee machines.............................................................................. 14
2. Label 2 for domestic coffee machines.............................................................................. 16
3. Label 3 for domestic coffee machines.............................................................................. 16
3. Label 3 for domestic coffee machines.............................................................................. 17
4. Label 4 for domestic coffee machines.............................................................................. 18
Annex III: Product fiche........................................................................................................ 19
Annex IV: Technical documentation ..................................................................................... 20
Annex V: Information to be provided in the cases where end-users cannot be expected to see
the product displayed ............................................................................................................ 21
Annex VI: Verification procedure for market surveillance purposes ...................................... 22
Annex VII: Energy efficiency classes.................................................................................... 24
Energy efficiency classes ...................................................................................................... 24
Annex VIII: Method for calculating the Energy Efficiency Index, Weighted Standard Energy
consumption and Weighted Annual Energy Consumption ..................................................... 25
Calculation of the Energy Efficiency Index ........................................................................... 25
Calculation of the Weighted Standard Annual Energy Consumption ..................................... 25
Calculation of the Weighted Annual Energy Consumption .................................................... 28
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INTRODUCTION
ANNEX IX ........................................................................................................................... 29
Benchmarks .......................................................................................................................... 29
ANNEX X ............................................................................................................................ 29
List of energy-using products covered by Annex I, point 1 to Regulation (EC) No 1275/2008
............................................................................................................................................. 29
Transitional Measurement Method ........................................................................................ 30
Method for filter coffee machines (from latest draft IEC 60661, Nov. 2011) .......................... 33
PROPOSAL 2 ....................................................................................................................... 37
Note on Proposal 2 ........................................................................................................ 38
Definitions .................................................................................................................... 38
Eco-design requirements ............................................................................................... 39
Energy labelling requirements ....................................................................................... 39
Measurement method .................................................................................................... 39
Information requirements for domestic coffee machines ................................................ 39
Conformity Assessment ................................................................................................ 40
Market surveillance ....................................................................................................... 40
Benchmarks .................................................................................................................. 41
Review .......................................................................................................................... 41
Annex I: Energy Analysis of Coffee...................................................................................... 42
Introduction................................................................................................................... 42
Energy analysis of coffee production ............................................................................. 42
Annex II: Ecodesign requirements ........................................................................................ 44
a) Minimum energy efficiency requirement ................................................................... 44
b) Minimum energy efficiency requirement ................................................................... 44
c) Minimum energy efficiency requirement ................................................................... 44
d) Product information requirement ............................................................................... 44
e) Appropriate power down time ................................................................................... 44
Annex III: Energy labelling requirements.............................................................................. 45
1. Label for domestic coffee machines .............................................................................. 45
Annex IV: Product fiche ....................................................................................................... 48
Annex V: Technical documentation ...................................................................................... 49
Annex VI: Information to be provided in the cases where end-users cannot be expected to see
the product displayed ............................................................................................................ 51
Annex VII: Verification procedure for market surveillance purposes..................................... 53
Annex VIII: Energy efficiency classes .................................................................................. 54
Energy efficiency classes ...................................................................................................... 54
Annex IX: Testing and calculation methods .......................................................................... 55
TECHNICAL DEFINITIONS ........................................................................................................ 55
TESTING METHOD .................................................................................................................. 56
CALCULATION OF THE ENERGY EFFICIENCY ........................................................................... 58
CALCULATION OF THE ANNUAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION......................................................... 59
PROPOSAL 3 ....................................................................................................................... 60
Summary and explanatory Notes ........................................................................................... 61
Form of the implementing measure ............................................................................... 61
Scope ............................................................................................................................ 61
Exclusions ..................................................................................................................... 61
Summary....................................................................................................................... 62
Proposal 1 ..................................................................................................................... 62
Proposal 2 ..................................................................................................................... 62
Proposal 3 ..................................................................................................................... 63
Comparison table proposals 1, 2 and 3 for domestic coffee machines .................................... 64
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INTRODUCTION
3
INTRODUCTION
Subject matter
This working document pursuant to Directive 2009/125/EC and Directive 2010/30/EU
esxamines possible ecodesign and labelling requirements related to domestic coffee machines.
The Lot 25 preparatory study shows that energy, coffee and filter/pad, capsule consumption in
the use phase are the significant environmental aspects.
Coffee makers are about coffee. Europeans are large coffee drinkers, consuming 2,4 Mt of
coffee beans and representing over 31% of world coffee consumption. On average, 2,2 daily
cups per capita (1 cup = 125ml, 6 g of coffee) are consumed, totalling 400 billion cups per
year. Per average household this comes to 2000 cups per year and a daily consumption of 5,2
cups.
Regional differences in coffee drinking behaviour are large. Coffee consumption is high in
Northern and Western Europe, except UK and Ireland, at on average 3-4 cups per capita (8 per
hh) of which a significant part is consumed at work, in bars and restaurants. In Southern
Europe (2 cups/capita) and Eastern Europe (1,5 cups/capita) coffe consumption is significantly
lower, but rising. Whereas in Western and Northern Europe coffee consumption is stable or
even in a slight decline, Italian coffee consumption, although rarely involving filter coffeemakers in the scope of this possible measure, has been rising by 6%. For Eastern Europe there
is anecdotal evidence that high-end coffee makers are becoming a status symbol. The UK
reports almost doubling of coffee maker unit sales between 2001 and 2007, with a 2007 sales
volume of 1 million units.
Figure . Daily coffee consumption per capita in the EU-27
According to the preparatory study1, the expenditure related to domestic coffee machine usage
is estimated around € 62 billion/year, costs related to the machine (3%), energy use (6%) and
maintenance (1%) are negligible compared to coffee (including filters) which makes up 90%
of the expenditure. Per household the annual costs are on average € 310.
1
Bio Intelligence Service in association with ARTS, Preparatory Study Lot 25 Non-tertiary Coffee Machines. July, 2011.
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INTRODUCTION
Expenditure: € 62 billion/yr
( € 310/household.yr)
‘beans’
drip filter
coffee
(incl. filter)
90%
machine
3%
ground
maintenance
1%
pads
portioned filter
energy
6%
capsules
espresso
Figure . Annual consumer expenditure domestic electric coffee makers in EU-27
Coffee machines, although their expense is negligible compared to the coffee, are still
economically significant constituting a market of € 2 billion in consumer prices. Market data
in general is very poor for this sector, but it can be estimated that the market in msp
(manufacturer selling prices) is around € 800 million. Employment in the trade, physical
distribution and production is estimated to be significant and at the common ratios for wages
against turnover will be in the order of 15-20 000 jobs, of which at least two-thirds will be in
the EU.
In terms of energy, coffee makers are not just about electricity use but probably more about
the (indirect) energy of waste streams caused by the machine. Reportedly, up to one-third of
the drip filter coffee is thrown away after evaporating and deteriorating for more than half an
hour on a keep-warm plate and also the filters/pads/capsules contribute to the impact.
An energy analysis of the production and procurement of roasted coffee beans is added as a
separate document, providing background information on how the indirect energy values for
coffee and auxiliaries used in the draft measure for proposal 2 are calculated. This analysis
shows that coffee beans contribute more to energy use than the electricity consumption of the
coffee maker.
Around 70% of installed domestic coffee machines are drip filter machines, 20% are portioned
filter machines and 10% are espresso machines. Unit sales are estimated around 20-22 million
machines per year at a value in consumer prices of € 2 billion per year. On average the price of
a drip filter machine is € 35, portioned filter machines cost about € 81 and espresso machines
can be acquired at the expense of € 225 (weighted average over all types).
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INTRODUCTION
Market structure and trends of the products covered by this working document
Over the last decade there has been a strong trend away from drip filter machines and towards
portioned filter coffee machines and espresso machines with hard capsules. The latter two are
now believed to constitute more than 50% of the market values.
Within drip filter machines, standard machines with a glass jug make up 70% of the market (€
15-100), standard machines with a thermos account for 20% of the market (€ 25-100), finally
electronic drip filter machines have a market share of 10% (€ 100-200).
Portioned filter machines were introduced in 2002 and now they have a 20% market share.
These machines can be bought for on average € 81 according to the preparatory study.
The market for espresso machines is divided between hard cap machines with 51% market
share (€ 156), semi-automatic machines with 30% market share (€ 103) and fully automatic
machines with 19% market share (€ 595).
Measurement standard
For espresso machines there is standard IEC 60661: 1999, which was amended in 2005 but is
now being redesigned to fit the policy measures and e.g. include also drip filter coffee
machines. Unfortunately, a final version is not expected for some time but it has been a source
of inspiration for the test and calculation method presented in this draft Working Document,
albeit the drip filter section is still quite immature.
Other test and measurement methods for domestic coffee makers have been developed by the
Swiss Topten and largely followed by the German Blue Angel. But again the scope is on
espresso machines, taking into account also extra functionality such as the energy for frothing
the milk.
In the US there is an AHAM standard AHAM CM-1-2007 for coffee machines, which has a
focus on certain quality features but no focus on energy. The legacy voluntary minimum
requirement in Russia, discussed hereafter, also features a measurement standard. The same
goes for the Korean eco-label, which contains a prescription on how to establish efficiency.
Worldwide standards and labelling activities
Energy policy measures for coffee makers are scarce. In the EU there is a Blue Angel label
RAL-UZ 136 for espresso machines and apparently a Nordic Swan label. In Switzerland
Topten is very active in the field of espresso machines.
In Russia there appears to have been (or perhaps still is) a voluntary minimum energy
performance for coffee pots GOST 20888-81, introduced in 1981 and updated last in 1991.
There is a Korean Eco-label EL408. for Electric Kettles and Electric Coffee Makers,
introduced in 2005, which requires amongst others that the efficiency for brewing 1 litre of
coffee should be at least 72% and the keep-warm consumption should be lower than on
average 45 W.
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INTRODUCTION
Impact on other EU legislation
No impact on other EU legislation has been identified.
Impact from other EU legislation
Currently, domestic coffee machines are subject to Commission Regulation (EC) No.
1275/2008 on standby as well as directives on WEEE, RoHS, Packaging Directive, ELV and
possibly, if they contain electronics, the EMC directive. Espresso machines will be subject,
depending on type and pressure, the Pressure Equipment Directive ("PED"). Various healthrelated EU and national legislation on materials that come into contact with foodstuffs will
apply.
Voluntary agreements
No voluntary agreements have been identified. The European Committee of Domestic
Equipment Manufacturers (CECED) uses only the energy efficiency class of the Swiss
Association of Manufacturers (FEA) voluntary energy label on product on the EU market
based upon a voluntary agreement.
Alternative proposals
This Working Documents contains 3 proposals for measures, to be discussed at the
Consultation Forum:
1.
2.
3.
Label A-G rating based on test cycle and calculated annual electricity consumption.
Minimum requirements for stand-by and off-mode power, maximum auto power down
time (‘electricity only proposal’);
Label and minimum requirement single A-G rating based on test cycle and calculated
annual energy consumption for electricity consumption and indirect energy requirement
for production of coffee and filters/pads/capsules (‘electricity and consumables
proposal’);
No action
Proposal 1 is based on the latest proposition by industry and the draft industry standard IEC
60661. Proposal 2 is developed using the findings of the preparatory study as a possible
response to some stakeholders' request for a holistic approach reflecting on consumables
usage, but still in the realm of energy. Proposal 3 is an option for non-action.
The proposals are elaborated hereafter. Finally, the differences are compared.
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PROPOSAL 1
PROPOSAL 1
'Electricity only' proposal: Energy label A-G rating based on test cycle and calculated annual
electricity consumption. Ecodesign requirements for stand-by and off-mode power, maximum
auto power down time.
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PROPOSAL 1
PROPOSAL 1
Following the finalisation of the preparatory study, the industry made the following proposal.
Definitions
Domestic coffee machines are considered as energy-related products ("ErPs") within the
meaning of Article 2.1 of Directive 2009/125/EC. Definitions remain as suggested by industry
but the term "non-tertiary coffee machines" is changed to "domestic coffee machine" for a
better understanding.
For the purposes of this working document the following definitions shall apply:
(1)
“Domestic coffee machine” means a non-commercial appliance to be used to brew
coffee when connected to the mains. Commercial Coffee machines are excluded.
(2)
“Drip filter domestic coffee machine” means a domestic coffee machine with separate
containers for water and for brewed coffee and with a filter to be placed on top of the
brewed coffee container. Coffee is brewed by heated water passing once through the
ground coffee and the filter into the brewed coffee container.
(3)
“Low pressure portioned coffee machine” means a domestic coffee machine where
coffee is brewed by heated water, forced through ground coffee contained in a capsule
or pad by a mechanical pump with a pressure lower than 19 bar.
(4)
“High pressure portioned espresso machine” means a domestic coffee machine where
coffee is brewed by heated water, forced through ground coffee contained in a capsule
or pad by a mechanical pump with a pressure equal or higher than 19 bar.
(5)
“Manual espresso coffee machine” means a domestic coffee machine where coffee is
brewed by heated water, forced through manually pressed ground coffee and a filter by
steam pressure, manual piston drive or mechanical pump. The mechanical pump
pressure is equal or higher than 9 bar.
(6)
“Semi-automatic espresso machine” means a domestic coffee machine where coffee is
brewed by heated water, forced through automatically pressed ground coffee and a
filter by steam pressure, automatic piston drive or mechanical pump.
(7)
“Standby mode” means a condition where the equipment is connected to the mains
power source, depends on energy input from the mains power source to work as
intended and provides only the following functions, which may persist for an indefinite
time:
-
(8)
reactivation function, or reactivation function and only an indication of enabled
reactivation function, and/or
information or status display;
“off mode” means a condition in which the equipment is connected to the mains power
source and is not providing any function; the following shall also be considered as off
mode:
-
conditions providing only an indication of off-mode condition;
9
PROPOSAL 1
-
conditions providing only functionalities intended to ensure electromagnetic
compatibility pursuant to Directive 2004/108/EC of the European Parliament and
of the Council
(9)
‘reactivation function’ means a function facilitating the activation of other modes,
including on-mode, by remote switch including remote control, internal sensor, timer
to a condition providing additional functions, including on-mode;
(10)
‘information or status display’ means a continuous function providing information or
indicating the status of the equipment on a display, including clocks;
(11)
“Beverage production mode” means a condition where the domestic coffee machine is
brewing the coffee beverage.
(12)
“Ready-to-use mode” means a mode were the heating element of the domestic coffee
machine is kept hot.
(13)
“Cup preheating function” means a mode by which the surface dedicated for the
storage of cups in the domestic coffee machine is kept warm in order to maintain the
temperature of the stored cups at the appropriate temperature for a better coffee taste.
(14)
“Steam function” means a function where the domestic coffee machine produces water
steam and delivers it through a pipe in order to heat up milk or drinking water.
(15)
“Grinding function” means a function where the domestic coffee machine
mechanically grinds coffee beans into ground coffee.
(16)
“Rinsing function” means a function where the domestic coffee machine produces
water steam and delivers it through the conducts by which the brewed coffee is
delivered, in order to rinse these conducts.
(17)
“Coffee brewing period” means a modelled pattern of use of the domestic coffee
machine (excepting drip filter coffee machines) lasting 100 minutes and including the
brewing of 4 coffees.
Eco-design requirements
Products falling under the definition domestic coffee machines of paragraph "Definitions"
above in this document shall meet the ecodesign requirements set out in Annex I.
Energy labelling requirements
Products falling under the definitions of paragraph "Definitions" above in this document shall
meet the labelling requirements set out in Annex II.
Measurement method
10
PROPOSAL 1
In the absence of an appropriate test standard, the Commission proposes to publish a
Communication on a transitory measurement method in the Official Journal, as described at
the end of this section.
Information requirements for domestic coffee machines
Suppliers shall ensure that:
(1)
each domestic coffee machine is supplied with a label, stating, as applicable:
(a)
Supplier's name or trade mark;
(b)
Supplier's model identifier which means the code, usually alphanumeric,
which distinguishes a domestic coffee machine model from other models
with the same trade mark or supplier’s name;
(d)
the Energy Efficiency Class, as defined in Annex VI, Table 1;
(e)
the weighted Annual Energy Consumption (AEC), in kWh/year, as
indicated in Annex VII.1(i);
(2) the format of the labels for the domestic coffee machine is set out in Annex I
and shall be applied according to the following timetable:
(a) for the domestic coffee machine placed on the market from [date to be
inserted: 12 months after entry into force of the delegated Regulation],
labels for the domestic coffee machine with energy efficiency classes A, B,
C, D, E, F, G shall be in accordance with Annex II;
(b) for domestic coffee machine placed on the market from [date to be inserted:
2 years after entry into force of the delegated Regulation] with energy
efficiency classes A+, A, B, C, D, E, F, labels shall be in accordance with
Annex II.
(3) a product fiche, is made available; as set out in Annex III;
(4)
the technical documentation as set out in Annex IV is made available on request
to the authorities of the Member States and to the Commission;
(5)
from [date to be inserted: 12 months after entry into force of the delegated
Regulation]:
(a)
any advertisement for a specific model of domestic coffee machine
contains the energy efficiency class, if the advertisement discloses
energy-related or price information;
(b)
any technical promotional material concerning a specific model of
domestic coffee machine which describes its specific technical parameters
includes the energy efficiency class of that model.
2.
The energy efficiency classes shall be based on the Energy Efficiency value in
accordance with Annex VIII.
3.
The format of the label shall be as set out in Annex II.
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PROPOSAL 1
Dealers shall ensure that:
(1)
each domestic coffee machine, at the point of sale, bears the label provided by
suppliers on the outside of the front of the domestic coffee machine, in such a way as
to be clearly visible;
(2)
from [date to be inserted: 16 months after entry into force of the delegated
Regulation]:
(a)
domestic coffee machine offered for sale, hire or hire-purchase where the
end-user cannot be expected to see the product displayed, are marketed with
the information provided by suppliers in the format specified in Annex VI;
(b)
any advertisement for a specific model of domestic coffee machine contains
a reference to the energy efficiency class, if the advertisement discloses
energy-related or price information, and;
(c)
any technical promotional material concerning a specific model of domestic
coffee machine which describes its specific technical parameters includes a
reference to the energy efficiency class of the model.
Conformity Assessment
A conformity assessment shall be carried out according to Article 8(2), and Annex IV (Internal
design control) or Annex V (Management system for assessing conformity) of Directive
2009/125/EC. Member States shall apply the procedure laid down in Annex VI of Directive
2009/125/EC when assessing the conformity of the declared energy efficiency class, the
weighted annual energy consumption, the power consumption in “off-mode”, “standby
model” and “ready-to-use” mode.
Market surveillance
When performing the market surveillance checks referred to in Directive 2009/125/EC, Article
3 (2), Member State authorities shall apply the verification procedure set out in Annex II of
this working document.
Benchmarks
Industry's preliminary assessment of where most of the products on the market are being
estimated to be class "C". The benchmark for best product is not yet known as measurements
will still have to be carried out.
Review
A review of the proposed requirements shall be presented to the Consultation Forum
depending on technological progress and not later than 5 years after its entry into force.
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PROPOSAL 1
Annex I: Ecodesign requirements
1.
Specific ecodesign requirements
From January 1, 2014 onwards, domestic machines shall comply with the following
requirements.
(a) Power consumption in ‘off-mode’:
Power consumption of televisions in any off-mode condition shall not exceed 1,00 Watt.
(b) Power consumption in ‘standby-mode(s)’:
The power consumption of coffee machines in any condition providing only a reactivation
function, or providing only a reactivation function and a mere indication of enabled
reactivation function, shall not exceed 1,00 Watt.
The power consumption of coffee machines in any condition providing only information or
status display, or providing only a combination of reactivation function and information or
status display, shall not exceed 2,00 Watts.
(c) Availability of off-mode and/or standby-mode:
Coffee Machines shall have an off-mode and/or standby-mode, and/or another condition
which does not exceed the applicable power consumption requirements for off-mode and/or
standby-mode when the Coffee Machine is connected to the mains power source.
From January 1, 2015 onwards, domestic coffee machines shall comply with the following
requirements.
(d) Power management:
Filter coffee machines storing the coffee in an insulated jug shall turn, not later than 15
minutes after the completion of the brewing cycle, into:
standby-mode, or,
off-mode, or,
another condition which does not exceed the applicable power consumption requirements
for off-mode
Coffe machines other than filter coffee machines shall turn into:
standby-mode, or,
off-mode, or,
another condition which does not exceed the applicable power consumption requirements
for off-mode
no later than 60 minutes after the activation of the machines
no later than 60 minutes after last beverage preparation
no later than 60 minutes after the activation of the ready-to-use mode
no later than 60 minutes after the activation of the cup preheating function
These should be the default time settings for placing the coffee machine on the market.
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PROPOSAL 1
Annex II: Energy labelling requirements
Label
1. LABEL 1 FOR DOMESTIC COFFEE MACHINES
I, II
III
IV
2011/….
[* Numbering of the Regulation to be added on the label before publication in the OJ]
(a)
The following information shall be included in the label:
I.
II.
III.
IV.
supplier's name or trade mark;
supplier's model identifier, meaning the code, usually alphanumeric, which
distinguishes a specific domestic coffee machines model from other models
with the same trade mark or supplier’s name;
the energy efficiency class as defined in point 1 of Annex VI; the head of the
arrow containing the energy efficiency class of the domestic coffee machines
shall be placed at the same height as the head of the arrow of the relevant
energy efficiency class;
weighted annual energy consumption (AEC) in kWh/year, rounded up to the
nearest integer and calculated in accordance with Annex VII.
14
PROPOSAL 1
(b)
The design of the label shall be in accordance with point 5 of this Annex.
15
PROPOSAL 1
2. LABEL 2 FOR DOMESTIC COFFEE MACHINES
III
IV
16
PROPOSAL 1
3. LABEL 3 FOR DOMESTIC COFFEE MACHINES
III
IV
2011/….
17
PROPOSAL 1
4. LABEL 4 FOR DOMESTIC COFFEE MACHINES
III
IV
2011/….
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PROPOSAL 1
Annex III: Product fiche
1.
The information in the product fiche of the domestic coffee machines shall be given
in the following order and shall be included in the product brochure or other literature
provided with the product:
(a) supplier's name or trade mark;
(b) supplier's model identifier which means the code, usually alphanumeric, which
distinguishes a specific domestic coffee machines model from other models with
the same trade mark or supplier’s name;
(c) whether the domestic coffee machines is an “automatic coffe machine” or “manual
coffe machine”;
(d) energy efficiency class in accordance with point 1 of Annex VI;
(e) the weighted Annual Energy Consumption (AEC), in kWh/year rounded up the first
decimal place; it shall be described as: “energy consumption 'X' kWh per year”;
(f) the power consumption of the off-mode (Poff) and of the standby mode (Pstandby) in
Watt and rounded to the first integer;
(g) information on the type of coffee preparation used by the machine (for example
filter, capsule, pad, etc.).
2.
One fiche may cover a number of domestic coffee machines models supplied by the
same supplier.
3.
The information contained in the fiche may be given in the form of a copy of the
label, either in colour or in black and white. Where this is the case, the information
listed in point 1 not already displayed on the label shall also be provided.
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PROPOSAL 1
Annex IV: Technical documentation
1.
The technical documentation shall include:
(a) the name and address of the supplier;
(b) a general description of the coffee machine model, sufficient for it to be
unequivocally and easily identified;
(c) where appropriate, the references of the harmonised standards applied;
(d) where appropriate, the other technical standards and specifications used;
(e) identification and signature of the person empowered to bind the supplier;
(f) technical parameters for measurements as follows:
i.
the weighted Annual Energy Consumption ( AE ) rounded up to the first
decimal place; it shall be described as: “energy consumption 'X' kWh per
year”;
ii.
the power consumption of the off-mode (Pof) and of the standby mode
(Pstandby)
iii.
the average energy consumption of the following three functions, if
available, the steam function (Esteam), the rinsing function (Erin) and the
grinding function (Egri), in Wh and rounded to the first decimal place
iv.
the average difference of the temperatures of the coffees brewed during the
coffe period (
), of the variation of tenperature of thewater in the tank
and the steam water during the steam function ( ∆Tsteam ),measured
temperature of the water in the tank (Ttank) and the weight of the coffee
during the coffee period (Mcoffee);
(g) the results of calculations performed in accordance with Annex VIII
information on the type of coffee preparation used by the machine (for example filter, capsule,
pad, etc.)
2.
Where the information included in the technical documentation file for a particular
domestic coffee machines model has been obtained by calculation on the basis of design, or
extrapolation from other equivalent domestic coffee machines or both, the documentation shall
include details of such calculations or extrapolations, or both, and of tests undertaken by
suppliers to verify the accuracy of the calculations undertaken. The information shall also
include a list of all other equivalent domestic coffee machines models where the information
was obtained on the same basis.
20
PROPOSAL 1
Annex V: Information to be provided in the cases where
end-users cannot be expected to see the product displayed
1.
The information shall be provided in the following order:
(a) the energy efficiency class as defined in point 1 of Annex VI;
(b)
whether the domestic coffee machines is an “automatic coffe machine” or
“manual coffe machine”;
i.
the weighted Annual Energy Consumption (AEC) rounded up to the first
decimal place; it shall be described as: “energy consumption 'X' kWh
per year”;
ii.
the power consumption of the off-mode (Poff) and of the standby mode
(Pstandby)
iii.
the average energy consumption of the three following function, if
available: steam functions (Esteam), rinsing function (Erin) and grinding
function (Egri)
iv.
the average difference of the temperatures of the coffees brewed during
the coffe brewing period (Tactual), average difference of the water
temperature in the tank and the steam water during the steam function
( ∆Tsteam ), the measured temperature of the water in the tank (Ttank) and
the weight of the coffee during the coffee brewing period (Mcoffee);
(c) if the domestic coffee machines is intended to be built-in, an indication to this
effect.
(d)
information on the type of coffee preparation used by the machine (for example
filter, capsule, pad, etc.).
2.
Where other information contained in the product fiche is also provided, it shall be in
the form and order specified in Annex III.
3.
The size and font in which all the information referred in this Annex is printed or
shown shall be legible.
21
PROPOSAL 1
Annex VI: Verification procedure for market surveillance
purposes
For the purposes of checking conformity with the requirements laid down in Annex I, Member
State authorities shall test a single domestic coffee machines. If the measured parameters do
not meet the values declared by the supplier within the ranges set out in Table 1, the
measurements shall be carried out on three more domestic coffee machines. The arithmetic
mean of the measured values of these three domestic coffee machines shall meet the values
declared by the supplier within the range defined in Table 1 (Ecodesign requirements) and –
when appropriate—Table 2 (Labelling of non drip filter machines).
Otherwise, the model and all other equivalent domestic coffe machine models shall be
considered not to comply with the requirements laid down in Annex I (Ecodesign
requirements) and –where appropriate—Annex II (Labelling requirements).
Member States authorities shall use reliable, accurate and reproducible measurement
procedures, which take into account the generally recognised state-of-the-art measurement
methods, including methods set out in documents the reference numbers of which have been
published for that purpose in the Official Journal of the European Union.
Table 1. (Ecodesign requirements)
Measured parameter
Verification tolerances
The time for the activation of the power
The measured value shall not be greater than
management system
the rated value of Tpms by more than X %.
Power consumption in off-mode and standby The measured value of power consumption in
mode
in off-mode and standby Poff and Pstandby shall
not exceed the limit values by more than 10
%,
Table 1 (Labelling of non drip filter machines)
Measured parameter
Verification tolerances
Weighted Annual energy consumption
The measured value shall not be greater than
the rated value* of AEC by more than X %.
Weighted coffe brewing period energy
The measured value shall not be greater than
consumption
the rated value of Et by more than X %.
Power consumption in off-mode and standby The measured value of power consumption in
mode
in off-mode and standby Poff and Pstandby shall
not exceed the rated values by more than 10
%,
Average mass of the brewed coffees during
The measured value shall not be greater than
the coffee periods
the rated value of M coffee by more than X %.
Average temperature of the two first brewed
coffees
Temperature of the water in the tank
Average of the temperature difference
between the temperature of the water in the
The measured value shall not be greater than
the rated value of Tactual by more than X %.
The measured value shall not be greater than
the rated value of Ttank by more than X %.
The measured value shall not be greater than
22
PROPOSAL 1
tank and the steamed water
the rated value of ∆Tsteam by more than X %.
Measured energy consumption for the coffee The measured value shall not be greater than
brewing period
the rated value of Ecbp by more than X %.
Average measured energy consumption for
The measured value shall not be greater than
the steam function
the rated value of Ecbp by more than X %.
Average measured energy consumption for
The measured value shall not be greater than
the steam function
the rated value of Esteam by more than X %.
Measured energy consumption for the rinsing The measured value shall not be greater than
function
the rated value of Erin by more than X %.
Measured energy consumption for the coffee The measured value shall not be greater than
grinding function
the rated value of Egri by more than X %.
* “rated value” means a value that is declared by the supplier
23
PROPOSAL 1
Annex VII: Energy efficiency classes
ENERGY EFFICIENCY CLASSES
The energy efficiency class of a domestic coffee machines shall be determined in accordance
with its Energy Efficiency Index (EEI) as set out in Table 1.
The Energy Efficiency Index (EEI) of a domestic coffee machines shall be determined in
accordance with point 1(a) of Annex VII.
Table 1: Energy efficiency classes
Energy efficiency class
A+++
A++
A+
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
Energy Efficiency Index
EEI < 48
48 ≤ EEI < 56
56 ≤ EEI < 68
68 ≤ EEI < 81
81 ≤ EEI < 97
97 ≤ EEI < 117
117≤ EEI < 140
140 ≤ EEI < 168
168 ≤ EEI < 202
202 ≤ EEI
24
PROPOSAL 1
Annex VIII: Method for calculating the Energy Efficiency
Index, Weighted Standard Energy consumption and
Weighted Annual Energy Consumption
CALCULATION OF THE ENERGY EFFICIENCY INDEX
For the calculation of the Energy Efficiency Index (EEI) of a non tertiary coffee machine, the
weighted Annual Energy Consumption of a domestic coffee machine is compared to its
weighted Standard Annual Energy Consumption.
(a)
The Energy Efficiency Index (EEI) is calculated as follows and rounded to one
decimal place:
EEI =
AEC
× 100
SAEC
where
− AEC = weighted Annual Energy Consumption of the domestic coffee machine, in
kWh/year and rounded to one decimal place
− SAEC= weighted Standard Annual Energy Consumption of the domestic coffee
machine, in kWh/year and rounded to one decimal place.
CALCULATION OF THE WEIGHTED STANDARD ANNUAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION
(a) The weighted Standard Annual Energy Consumption (SAEC) is calculated as a weighted
benchmark, in kWh/year and rounded to one decimal place, as follows:
SAEC = (WBE cbp + WBE steam + WBE s tan dby + WBEoff + WBE rin + WBE gri ) × 365
where
WBEcbp = weighted benchmark of the energy consumption for the coffee brewing
period (in Wh and rounded to the first decimal place)
WBEsteam = weighted benchmark of the energy consumption for the steam function
(in Wh and rounded to the first decimal place)
WBEstandby = weighted benchmark of the energy consumption for the standby mode
(in Wh and rounded to the first decimal place)
WBEoff = weighted benchmark of the energy consumption for the off mode (in Wh
and rounded to the first decimal place)
WBErin = weighted benchmark of the energy consumption for the rinsing function
(in Wh and rounded to the first decimal place)
WBEgri = weighted benchmark of the energy consumption for the grinding function
(in Wh and rounded to the first decimal place)
25
PROPOSAL 1
(b) The weighted benchmark for the energy consumption for the coffee brewing periods
(WBEcbp) shall be calculated, in Wh and rounded to the first decimal place, as follows:
− If Tactual < 76°C
 M
 T
− Ttan k
WBEcbp = 3 ×  coffee  ×  actual
  80   76 − 23

 × BEbrew + BEHU + BERTU

− If Tactual ≥ 76°C
 M
  76 − Ttan k 
WBEcbp = 3 ×  coffee  × 
 × BEbrew + BEHU + BERTU
80
76
−
23





and
3
∑M
M coffee =
Tactual
c ,n
n =1
3
T +T
= 1 2
2
where
BEbrew = benchmark energy consumption for the coffee brewing (in Wh, rounded to
the first decimal places)
BEHU = benchmark energy consumption for the heating up mode (in Wh, rounded
to the first decimal place)
BERTU = benchmark energy consumption for the ready to use mode (in Wh,
rounded to the first decimal place)
Mcoffee = average weight of the coffees brewed in the three coffees brewing periods
(in grams, rounded to the first decimal place)
Mc,n = mass of one brewed coffee during each coffee brewing period (in grams,
rounded to the first decimal place)
Tactual = average temperature of the two first brewed coffees in the coffee brewing
period (in K, rounded to the first decimal place)
T1 = temperature of the first brewed coffee in each coffee brewing period (in K,
rounded to the first decimal place)
T2 = temperature of the second brewed coffee in each coffee brewing period (in K,
rounded to the first decimal place)
Ttank = measured temperature of the water in the tank (in ºC, rounded to the first
decimal place)
3 = number of coffee brewing periods per day
80 = benchmark average weight of the three brewed coffees
76 = benchmark average temperature of the brewed coffee
23 = benchmark temperature of the water in the tank
(c) The weighted benchmark for the energy consumption for the steam function (WBEsteam)
shall be calculated in Wh and rounded to the first decimal place, as follows:
26
PROPOSAL 1
WBE steam= BEsteam ×
∆Tsteam
40
and
3
3
∑T
∆Tsteam =
F ,n − ∑ TS ,n
n =1
n =1
3
where
BEsteam = benchmark energy consumption for the steam function (in Wh, rounded to
the first decimal place)
∆Tsteam = temperature difference between the temperature of the water in the tank
and the steamed water (in K, rounded to the first decimal place)
TF , n = temperature of the water in the tank (in °C, rounded to the first decimal
place)
TS ,n = temperature of the steamed water (in °C, rounded to the first decimal place)
40 = benchmark temperature variation between the temperature of the water in the
tank and the steamed water.
(d) The weighted benchmark for the energy consumption for the standby mode (WBEstandby)
shall be calculated, in Wh and rounded to the first decimal place, as follows:
WBE s tan dby = BPs tan dby × 11
where
BPstandby = benchmark energy consumption for standby mode (in W and rounded to
the first decimal place)
11 = number of hours in standby mode per day
(e) The weighted benchmark for the energy consumption for the off mode (WBEoff) shall be
calculated in Wh and rounded to the first decimal place, as follows:
WBE off = BPoff × 8
where
BPoff = benchmark power for off mode (in W and rounded to the first decimal
place)
8 = number of hours in off mode per day.
(f) The weighted benchmark for the energy consumption for the rinsing function (WBErin) has
the same value as the benchmark energy (BErin) consumption for the rinsing function as
reported in Table 1.
27
PROPOSAL 1
(g) The weighted benchmark for the energy consumption for the grinding function (WBEgrin)
has the same value as the benchmark energy consumption for the grinding function (BEgrin)
as reported in Table 1.
Table 1: Benchmark energy consumption values
Function
Symbol
Coffee brewing
Heating up mode
Ready to use mode
Steam function
Rinsing function
Grinding function
Mode
Standby mode
Off mode
BEcbp
BEHU
BERTU
BEsteam
BErin
BEgrin
Symbol
BPstandby
BPoff
Benchmark energy consumption
values (Wh)
27,9
20,0
23,5
15,0
3,0
2,0
Benchmark power (W)
2,0
1,0
CALCULATION OF THE WEIGHTED ANNUAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION
(a) The weighted Annual Energy Consumption (AEC) is calculated, in kWh/year and rounded
to one decimal place, as follows:
[
]
AEC = (3 × Ecbp ) + (3 × E steam ) + (11× Ps tan dby ) + (8 × Poff ) + E rin + E gri × 365
and
3
∑E
E steam =
S ,n
n =1
3
where
Ecbp = measured energy consumption for the coffee brewing period (in Wh and
rounded to the first decimal place)
Esteam = average measured energy consumption for the steam function (in Wh and
rounded to the first decimal place)
ES,n = measured energy consumption for the steam function for each of the three
coffee brewing periods (in Wh and rounded to the first decimal place)
Pstandby = measured power consumption for the standby mode (in W and rounded to
the first decimal place)
Poff = measured power consumption for the off mode (in W and rounded to the first
decimal place)
Erin = measured energy consumption for the rinsing function (in Wh and rounded to
the first decimal place)
28
PROPOSAL 1
Egri = measured energy consumption for the coffee grinding function (in Wh and
rounded to the first decimal place)
3 = number of coffee brewing periods and number of steam function use per day
11 = number of hours in “standby mode” per day
8 = number of hours in ”off mode” per day.
ANNEX IX
Benchmarks
Industry has not yet proposed any benchmarks.
ANNEX X
List of energy-using products covered by Annex I, point 1
to Regulation (EC) No 1275/2008
1. Household appliances
Washing machines
Clothes dryers
Dish washing machines
Cooking:
Electric ovens
Electric hot plates
Microwave ovens
Toasters
Fryers
Grinders and equipment for opening or sealing containers or packages
Electric knives
Other appliances for cooking and other processing of food, cleaning, and maintenance of
clothes
Appliances for hair cutting, hair drying, tooth brushing, shaving, massage and other body care
appliances
Scales
Note: This proposal by industry eliminates coffee makers from the list of the Standby
Regulation.
29
PROPOSAL 1
Transitional Measurement Method
[For publication as Communication in the OJ, based on the industry proposal and IEC
60661 Draft Nov. 2011]
Note: this method applies only to energy labelling of espresso machines.
Magnitudes
Power Consumption used to measure the of off-mode and standby consumption of Poff and
Pstandby is measured over a moment in time and is expressed in Watt
Energy Consumption Is measured over a variable period of time and is expressed in Watt/hour
Measurements
Coffee Period: Measurements of Energy Consumption, Temperature and Coffee Mass
1. The appliance is switched on and the energy consumption measurement starts and
continues for 100 minutes.
2. The first brewing cycle starts. A 40 g single coffee is brewed, this brewing cycle starts
60 seconds after the coffee maker is ready for brewing, and temperature (TC1) and mass
of coffee (MC1) are measured and recorded.
3. The second brewing cycle is done 60 seconds after the coffee maker has finished the
first brewing cycle. If needed the coffee maker is to be re-activated (in case the power
management has turned the coffee machine to standby mode). This is a 120 g single
coffee, and temperature (TC2) and mass of the coffee produced (MC2) are measured and
denoted. After that, the energy measurement shall continue without any further
interaction until minute 30 after the initial switch on of the machine.
4. The third brewing is made 30 minutes from start. A double coffee is made (2 x 40 g). If
needed, the maker is to be re-activated (in case the power management has turned the
coffee machine to standby mode). Mass of coffee (MC3) is measured and denoted.
After that, the energy measurement shall continue without any further interaction until
minute 100.
5. 40 minutes from start, the accumulated energy consumption is measured, and denoted
(E40).
6. 100 minutes from start, the accumulated energy consumption is measured, and denoted
(E100).
30
PROPOSAL 1
7.
Figure1 – Schematic representation of the coffee period
Heat up
from cold
Brew
40 gr
Reactivate Brew
if necessary 120 gr
Reactivate Brew
if necessary 2x40 gr
Measure
energy used
RTU
Measure total
energy used
RTU and/or standby depending on PMS
1 minute
30 minutes
40 min.
100 minutes measuring period
Steam Function: Measurements Energy Consumption, and Temperature
•
100 grams of water are heated up with the steam deployed though the dedicated pipe of
the machine until a difference of temperature between the start and the end of the
process of 40 K is reached.
•
The water temperature at the start in the beaker (TS) has to be recorded for each cycle.
•
The steam function is started 60 ±seconds after a coffee brewing cycle has ended and
the coffee maker is ready to be used. The energy is measured from the moment the
steam function is activated by pre-selection of steaming, opening the steam valve or
pushing the steam button, until the moment the required water temperature in the
beaker has been obtained.
•
This cycle is repeated two additional times and the energy is measured (ES1, ES2, ES2)
for each cycle.
•
The temperature in the beaker shall be monitored continuously until the difference of
temperature between the initial and the final temperatures is 40 K temperature is
reached. When the required temperature is reached, steaming is stopped and
immediately the final temperature (TF) is measured in the middle of the beaker, after a
short stirring, and denoted.
31
PROPOSAL 1
Figure 2 – Schematic representation of the steam function measurements
Reactivate
if
necessary
Brew
40 gr
Reactivate
if
necessary
Steam measurement
cycle
Wait 60±2sec after coffee
brewing cycle ends
Brew
40 gr
Reactivate
if
necessary
Steam measurement
cycle
Wait 60±2sec after coffee
brewing cycle ends
Brew
40 gr
Reactivate
if
necessary
Steam measurement
cycle
Wait 60±2sec after coffee
brewing cycle ends
Standby and Off modes: Measurements of Power Consumption
The power consumption in the standby and off modes is measured according to EN
50564/2011.
Grinding and Rinsing: Energy Consumption
The energy consumption of one Rinsing Cycle and one Grinding Cycle is measured
32
PROPOSAL 1
Method for filter coffee machines (from latest draft IEC
60661, Nov. 2011)
Note: The industry's proposal at this stage does not foresee labelling of coffee machines.
However, the draft IEC 60661, although in early stages, considers filter coffee machines as the
example shows below.
26.3
Filter coffee makers
All features Note 1 are to be set in factory default mode.
Accessories, e.g. (thermos) jugs are to be used according to user manual.
Note 1
Features such as auto-power-down, heating systems, etc.
26.3.1 Coffee Period
26.3.1.1
Preparations
Measurements are performed without coffee powder and paper filter. In case of filter coffee
makers with integrated coffee grinder, the grinder function shall not be part of the energy
measurement procedure.
If the maker provides a plastic or metal filter, this filter shall not be used unless necessary for
the function of the appliance.
The rated amount of water (check mark, "max", etc.) is filled into the reservoir Note x1.
Water temperature (Tw) shall be 15 ± 1°C.
The mass of the jug is weighed and denoted.
Water temperature (Tw) is measured before start and denoted.
Note 1
Energy consumption will be corrected to a nominal amount of brewed coffee as
described in clause 26.3.4.
26.3.1.2
Procedure
Start
(switch on)
Brewing
Brewing ended: denote
time, energy Ebrew meas,
temperature and weight
of output. Drain 50%.
30 min since
brewing ended:
denote temperature
30 min
100 minutes measuring period
Figure 3
Coffee period, filter makers
33
100 min from start:
denote energy E100
PROPOSAL 1
The appliance is switched on and the energy consumption measurement starts and continues
for 100 minutes ± 2 seconds.
Brewing ends when the power measurement show a drastic drop in used power. Ending time
and energy consumption Ebrew-meas is denoted. The temperature of the processed (brewed)
water TB1 is measured within 10 seconds, after stirring with a rod of negligible heat capacity,
in the middle of the jug at approximately 1 cm from the bottom. Temperature TB1 is denoted.
The amount of brewed (processed) water Mbrew is determined by weighing the jug and
subtracting its empty weight. Mbrew is denoted.
50% ± 1% of the processed water Mbrew is drained. If there is a lid supplied with the appliance
to replace the filter with the coffee residues, it is now placed. The jug is placed back into the
appliance within 30 seconds since brewing ended.
30 minutes ± 10 seconds since brewing ended, temperature of the water in the jug (TB2) is
measured, after a short stirring with a rod of negligible heat capacity, in the middle of the jug
and is denoted.
Ambient temperature (TA) is measured and denoted.
Note 2
Benchmark temperature values of brewed coffee and after 30 minutes are 80°C and
76°C, respectively. If measured values (referred to TW = 15°C) are below, a
correction is made as described in clause 26.3.4.
Energy measurement is continued until 100 minutes ± 2 seconds from start and total energy
consumption of the coffee period E100 is denoted.
26.3.2 Standby mode
The power or energy measurement is started immediately after the coffee period has ended,
and according to EN 62301. The value of Pstandby over 1 hour is to be recorded as Estandby.
Note 3
If a maker does not have a power management system including automatically
switching to standby mode or off mode, the average of the power consumption
during keeping hot shall be used as standby mode energy consumption for 1 hour.
Note 4
If the maker has a power management system that switches the maker to off mode,
the off mode power consumption will be taken as standby power.
26.3.3 Off mode
The power or energy consumption in the off mode is measured according to EN 62301. The
value of Poff over 1 hour is to be recorded as Eoff.
Note 5
If the maker does not have any off mode, the standby mode value will be used for
this value.
26.3.4 Calculation of energy rating
The energy rating is calculated as a relation between the weighted sum of the measured values
for functions as given in table 2 and the weighted sum of the benchmark energy values based
on the current available technology. Weighting factors are set to represent the energy
consumption during 24 hours.
34
PROPOSAL 1
26.3.4.1
Temperature correction of brewing energy
If after brewing the temperature difference (TB1 – TW) is below 65°C, the brewing energy is
corrected:
Ebrew = Ebrew-meas * (80 – 15) / (TB1 – TW)
Note 6, 7
Note 6
80°C is judged to be the minimal coffee temperature of filter coffee to allow an
optimal filtering process. The relevant temperature increase by brewing is 80°C –
15°C = 65°C. If the temperature difference after brewing (TB1 – TW) is 65°C or
higher, no correction is made, i.e. Ebrew = Ebrew-meas.
Note 7
Real filter coffee preparation (with coffee powder) will yield about 11% higher
brewing energy consumption, according to the amount of hot moist coffee powder
remaining in the filter.
26.3.4.2
Temperature correction of keeping hot energy
The measured energy consumption Ekhot meas to keep 50% of the brewed coffee (for test: of the
processed water) hot is:
Ekhot-meas = E100 – Ebrew-meas
Note 8
Filter coffee makers with thermos jug do not need active heating energy for keeping
hot. Ekhot meas , will in that case represent the standby or off mode energy consumption
of the rest of the coffee period after brewing. Penalization of too low keeping hot
temperature of thermos jugs is based on brewing energy, see Note x10.
If the temperature difference of coffee (water) to ambient (TB2 – TA) after 30 minutes is below
53°C, the keeping hot energy is corrected:
a) For makers with active heating to keep hot
Ekhot = Ekhot −meas ⋅
76 − 23
TB 2 − TA
Note 9
b) For makers with thermos jug
 76 − 23

Ekhot = Ebrew ⋅ 
−1 Note 9, 10
 TB 2 − TA

Note 9
76°C is the minimal coffee temperature value, the same as used for the correction of
pressure coffee makers. At 23°C nominal ambient temperature the difference is
53°C. If (TB2 – TA) is 53°C or higher, no correction is made, i.e. Ekhot = Ekhot-meas.
Note 10 Thermos jug makers: Penalization by the relative temperature loss times the brewing
energy instead of the actual energy content presumes a keeping hot efficiency below
100%. The energy necessary to cover the losses of common jugs by common heating
elements is much greater.
If no correction is made for thermos jug makers, Ekhot will be equal to the standby or
off mode energy consumption since brewing ended.
26.3.4.3
Temperature corrected energy for coffee period
35
PROPOSAL 1
Ecp (Wh) = Ebrew + Ekhot
26.3.4.4
Benchmark energy for coffee period
Benchmark energy for the coffee period (Bcoffee) is calculated from the basic value Ecp900
which is the value for nominal capacity of 900 g of processed water and comprises also the
energy consumption for active keeping hot.
NOTE
The basic benchmark energy (Wh) for coffee period represents the state of
technology.
Ecp900 = 125 Wh
Benchmark energy (Wh) for coffee period:
26.3.4.4
Bcoffee = Ecp 900 ⋅
M brew
900
Relative energy consumption value
Wi = Weighting factor based on use frequency for function i
Bi = Benchmark energy value for function i
Pi = Function i available (yes=1, no=0)
Ei = Measured energy for function i
index
Function
clause
Wi
Bi (Wh)
Ei
1
Coffee period
26.3.1
2
Bcoffee
Ecp
2
Standby mode
26.3.2
12.67
0,5
Estandby
3
Off mode
26.3.3
8
1
Eoff
Table 2
Energy rating values for functions of filter coffee makers
Note 11 Is measured as a part of the Coffee period
3
∑W ⋅ E
i
The energy rating value is given by: Erating =
i
i =1
3
∑ Pi ⋅Wi ⋅ Bi
i =1
36
⋅100 (%)
PROPOSAL 2
PROPOSAL 2
'Electricity and consumables' proposal: Ecodesign requirement and energy label, single A-G
rating based on test cycle and calculated annual energy consumption for electricity
consumption and indirect energy requirement for production of coffee and
filters/pads/capsules
37
PROPOSAL 2
PROPOSAL 2
Following the finalisation of the preparatory study and building on the views of some
stakeholders on the necessity to consider consumables such as coffee, filters, pads and
capsules, this proposal considers the impact of consumables.
Note on Proposal 2
The inclusion of other significant environmental impacts besides energy in the EU energy
label is foreseen in the labelling directive and has occurred in the past for e.g. the water
consumption of washing machines and dishwashers. For other candidate products like imaging
devices, there is no energy label, but options like double-sided printing (saving paper) and
others would certainly be considered. Annex 1 contains an energy analysis of coffee
production and procurement.
The guiding principles here are:
a) that the impact is significant, and
b) that the manufacturer can do something about it through the design of the machine.
The latter is important for manufacturers. For instance in the SAVE studies in the 1990s for
washing machines the subject of automatic detergent dosage, to contain the overdosing by
consumers, was considered but not implemented because there was proof from experience of
low market-acceptance[1]. This is not the case for domestic coffee machines, where a
significant part of machines on the market work with automatic water dosage and show
various solutions to optimize coffee dosage (portioned solutions, automatic dosage).
What would be new in proposal 2 is the fact that coffee and filter efficiencies would not be
given a separate A-G rating, but instead would be integrated in an overall A-G energy
efficiency rating, taking into account direct and indirect energy requirement. It emphasizes,
unlike with water usage in washing machines that investing in coffee machines that are coffee
efficient is
−
good for the household budget (coffee constitutes 90% of the LCC of a coffee maker and
a part of that cost is in energy),
−
is good for taste (overdose is detrimental for taste)
−
and would constitute more than half of the energy use of the total energy considered.
Considering the significant impact of the consumables on energy consumption and consumer
expenditure, this proposal would be based on the view that taking into account only electricity
consumption on the label would not provide consumers with the full picture.
Definitions
Domestic coffee machines are considered as Energy-related products ErPs within the meaning
of Article 2.1 of Directive 2009/125/EC.
For the purposes of this working document the following definitions shall apply:
[1]
Compare e.g. the market failure of the Bosch ADS (Automatic Dosage System) for washing machines.
38
PROPOSAL 2
“Domestic coffee machine”: any coffee machine that fits the definition of a drip filter
machine, a portioned pad coffee machine or an espresso coffee machine as defined in Annex
IX.
Eco-design requirements
Products falling under the definitions of paragraph "Definitions" above in this document shall
meet the ecodesign requirements set out in Annex II.
Energy labelling requirements
Products falling under the definitions of paragraph "Definitions" above in this document shall
meet the labelling requirements set out in Annex III.
Measurement method
In the absence of an appropriate test standard, the Commission proposes either (i) to publish a
Communication on a transitory measurement method in the Official Journal or (ii) incorporate
a test and calculation method in the legislation, as described in Annex IX.
Information requirements for domestic coffee machines
Suppliers shall ensure that:
(1)
each domestic coffee machine is supplied with a label, stating, as applicable:
(a)
Supplier's name or trade mark;
(b)
Supplier's model identifier which means the code, usually alphanumeric,
which distinguishes a domestic coffee machine model from other models
with the same trade mark or supplier’s name;
(d)
the Energy Efficiency Class, as defined in Annex VIII, Table 1;
(e)
the weighted Annual Energy Consumption (AEC), in kWh/year, as
indicated in Annex IX;
(2) the format of the labels for the domestic coffee machine is set out in Annex II
and shall be applied according to the following timetable:
(a) for the domestic coffee machine placed on the market from [date to be
inserted: 12 months after entry into force of the delegated Regulation],
labels for the domestic coffee machine with energy efficiency classes A, B,
C, D, E, F, G shall be in accordance with Annex III;
(b) for domestic coffee machine placed on the market from [date to be inserted:
2 years after entry into force of the delegated Regulation] with energy
efficiency classes A+, A, B, C, D, E, F, labels shall be in accordance with
Annex III.
(3) a product fiche, is made available; as set out in Annex IV;
39
PROPOSAL 2
(4)
the technical documentation as set out in Annex V is made available on request
to the authorities of the Member States and to the Commission;
(5)
from [date to be inserted: 12 months after entry into force of the delegated
Regulation]:
(a)
any advertisement for a specific model of domestic coffee machine
contains the energy efficiency class, if the advertisement discloses
energy-related or price information;
(b)
any technical promotional material concerning a specific model of
domestic coffee machine which describes its specific technical parameters
includes the energy efficiency class of that model.
2.
The energy efficiency classes shall be based on the Energy Efficiency value in
accordance with Annex IX.
3.
The format of the label shall be as set out in Annex III.
Dealers shall ensure that:
(1)
each domestic coffee machine, at the point of sale, bears the label provided by
suppliers on the outside of the front of the domestic coffee machine, in such a way as
to be clearly visible;
(2)
from [date to be inserted: 16 months after entry into force of the delegated
Regulation]:
(a)
domestic coffee machine offered for sale, hire or hire-purchase where the
end-user cannot be expected to see the product displayed, are marketed with
the information provided by suppliers in the format specified in Annex VI;
(b)
any advertisement for a specific model of domestic coffee machine contains
a reference to the energy efficiency class, if the advertisement discloses
energy-related or price information, and;
(c)
any technical promotional material concerning a specific model of domestic
coffee machine which describes its specific technical parameters includes a
reference to the energy efficiency class of the model.
Conformity Assessment
A conformity assessment shall be carried out according to Article 8(2), and Annex IV (Internal
design control) or Annex V (Management system for assessing conformity) of Directive
2009/125/EC. Member States shall apply the procedure laid down in Annex VI of Directive
2009/125/EC when assessing the conformity of the declared energy efficiency class, the
weighted annual energy consumption, the power consumption in “off-mode”, “standby
model” and “ready-to-use” mode.
Market surveillance
40
PROPOSAL 2
When performing the market surveillance checks referred to in Directive 2009/125/EC, Article
3 (2), Member State authorities shall apply the verification procedure set out in Annex VII of
this working document.
Benchmarks
The benchmark for best product is an energy efficiency EE of 83%, defined as set out in
Annex IX.
Review
A review of the proposed requirements shall be presented to the Consultation Forum
depending on technological progress and not later than 10 years after its entry into force.
41
PROPOSAL 2
Annex I: Energy Analysis of Coffee
Introduction
The preparatory study found that consumables have a significant cost and environmental
impact. Below is an exploration of one of these impacts, coffee, in more detail for the purposes
of this proposal of the working document.
Energy analysis of coffee production
Coffee has been subject to several LCA studies, looking at energy, water, carbon emissions,
pesticides, fertilizers, land use, etc. This document is only about energy consumption, i.e. the
energy analysis of roasted coffee beans, from cultivation of the crop up to the point where they
enter the household. End-of-life credits for the energy displacement by the use of composted
coffee bean peelings as fertilizer and the energy credits of (a fraction of) coffee beans in
municipal waste composting and heat recovery incineration have been considered.
Publications by Jungbluth (ESU-Services/ EcoInvent data) and Humbert (ecointhesis)
identified as being most reliable, known to follow proven energy analysis principles
IFIAS (later incorporated in ISO 14044-series). Also the industry viewpoint on
(Nespresso) and some LCA cases at the extremes (best case: organic farming; worst
irrigation from pumped water at sea-level plantations) were taken in to account.
were
from
LCA
case:
Generally speaking, several sources show a wide spread in GER values (Gross Energy
Requirement) for the individual parts of the analysis, amongst others this reflects not only the
difference in data quality but also the spread in climatic conditions and agricultural practices
on which the LCAs are based. But, independent of the source there is a wide consensus that
the non-renewable energy involved in production and procurement of the roasted coffee beans
exceeds the energy for brewing in a domestic coffee maker. This has been, independently from
the outcomes of individual LCA studies, a guiding principle in establishing the energy value of
6 kWh electricity equivalent per kg of roasted coffee (GER 65-70 MJ/kg). This value
represents the lowest estimate from all sources and in the rest of this background document
values will be found that are more than twice as high. This reflects the cautious approach in
trying to avoid an overstatement of the importance.
Note that in the draft measures for coffee machines a primary energy factor (pef) for electricity
generation and distribution from MEEuP was assumed at 10,5 MJ/kWh (pef=2.9). This could
be in the future replaced by a MEErP pef based on 9 MJ/kWh (pef=2.5). However, it was
taken into account that most LCA studies use pef values for the average EU mix that are 2030% higher.
As a case in point, the following figure 1 was calculated from the analysis by Humbert 20072,
which shows an overall GER value of 148 MJ/kg roasted and ground (R&G) coffee beans. As
this study uses EcoInvent (UCTE) average EU mix the pef is 20-30% higher. However, taking
that into account, the GER value is still twice the assumed 65-70 MJ/kg.
2
S. Humbert et al., Life cycle assessment of spray dried soluble coffee and comparison with alternatives (drip filter and
capsule espresso), Journal of Cleaner Production 17 (2009) 1351–1358.
42
PROPOSAL 2
At the other side of the spectrum, Jungbluth et al., although the study shows a lower level of
detail in the publication than Humbert, generally assume values that are much lower (closer to
65-70 MJ/kg).3 Both Jungbluth and Humbert studies result in a GER of coffee production
higher than the GER for electricity of the coffee machine in brewing the coffee.
Energy Analysis R&G Coffee Beans
Total 148 MJ/kg
from filler to retail: 420 km from filler to
distribution center, 300 km from there to retailer
lighting and heating industry/distributor offices,
storage space and shop, handling and logistics
equipment (forklifts etc.)
Distribution 9
Overheads 14
roasting (oven), grinding and filling/packaging
(machinery)
Processing 11
per 100 g R&G beans: 9.4 g composite
(PET12/alu8/LDPE60) pouch for R&G beans;
16.3 g cardboard packaging, 0.5 g LDPE film,
pallet (filter 3 g/pad 1,3 g /capsule 0,55-1,1 g
included elsewhere)
Packaging 6
Delivery 6
Treatment 22
delivery from plantation to (EU) roasting plant:
410 km by local truck, 15.000 km by boat and
133 km by EU truck (LCI transportation data in
MJ/tkm from Ecoinvent)
electricity and fuel for machinery that
(contributes) to collect, wash, peel, dry, bag the
beans
Cultivation 42
N-, K,- P-fertilizers requiring gas/oil for
production and feedstock (includes credits for
composted coffee peelings used as fertilizer).
Energy for the production of pesticides. Diesel
for agricultural machinery
diesel/electricity for irrigation-pumps for
additional irrigation (80-90% comes from rain
water) at 4000 m3/ha.yr. Total water use (incl.
rain) 21 m3/kg R&G beans [Hoekstra 2009]
Irrigation 47
glass, paper, cardboard recycled and all other
materials incinerated. Gross electric and thermal
efficiency for municipal waste incineration 10
and 20% respectively (EU average). Recovered
electricity and heat to displace EU mix.
End-of-Life -9
Figure 1. Energy analysis of roasted and ground coffee beans (source: calculated from
Humbert et al., 2007)
3
Busser, S., Steiner, R., Jungbluth, N., LCA of Packed Food Products , the function of flexible packaging , ESU-services Ltd.
(CH) for Flexible Packaging Europe. (LCA of coffee therein)
43
PROPOSAL 2
Annex II: Ecodesign requirements
Domestic coffee machines shall meet the ecodesign requirements set out in this Annex.
a) Minimum energy efficiency requirement
From January 1, 2014 onwards, the minimum allowable energy efficiency of domestic coffee
machines must meet or exceed an energy efficiency EE of 60% as defined in Annex IX.
In case of combination machines every type of domestic coffee maker that is in the same
product (casing) shall meet this requirement.
b) Minimum energy efficiency requirement
From January 1, 2016 onwards, the minimum allowable energy efficiency of domestic coffee
machines must meet or exceed an energy efficiency EE of 70% as defined in Annex IX.
In case of combination machines every type of domestic coffee maker that is in the same
product (casing) shall meet this requirement.
c) Minimum energy efficiency requirement
Instead of a revision like in the past, it is proposed that a third minimum energy efficiency
requirement is set at the level of BAT (rounded to the class limit 80%). This would provide a
stable regulatory framework for industry over a longer period of time and avoid unnecessary
administration work in form of frequent revisions. The following text is proposed:
From January 1, 2018 onwards, the minimum allowable energy efficiency of domestic coffee
machines must meet or exceed an energy efficiency EE of 80% as defined in Annex IX.
In case of combination machines every type of domestic coffee maker that is in the same
product (casing) shall meet this requirement.
d) Product information requirement
From January 1, 2014 onwards, the suppliers of domestic coffee machines shall provide the
information in a product fiche, following Annex IV, and make available technical
documentation, following Annex V.
e) Appropriate power down time
For the purpose of the second tier of Commission Regulation (EC) No. 1275/2008 of 17
December 2008, the appropriate power down time is defined as 100 minutes after the end of
the brewing cycle as defined in Annex IX.
44
PROPOSAL 2
Annex III: Energy labelling requirements
1. LABEL FOR DOMESTIC COFFEE MACHINES
[illustration drip filter coffee machine]
I
I, II
II
A
B
C
C
III
221
IV
D
E
F
G
ENERGIA ∙EНЕРГИЯ∙ΕΝΕΡΓΕΙΑ
ENERGIJA∙ENERGY∙ENERGIE∙ENERGI
kWh/annum
kWh/a
127
87
7
V, VI
125
ml
max. 0,8 L
17.6 kg
2200
2.2 kg
2011/XYZ
[XYZ: Numbering of the Regulation to be added on the label before publication in the OJ;
Note that figures are fictituous and will be replaced with xx,x denominations in the final
regulation]
(a)
The following information shall be included in the label:
I.
II.
III.
supplier's name or trade mark;
supplier's model identifier, meaning the code, usually alphanumeric, which
distinguishes a specific domestic coffee machines model from other models
with the same trade mark or supplier’s name;
the energy efficiency class as defined in point 1 of Annex VIII; the head of the
arrow containing the energy efficiency class of the domestic coffee machines
shall be placed at the same height as the head of the arrow of the relevant
energy efficiency class;
45
PROPOSAL 2
IV.
V.
VI.
calculated annual energy consumption AE in kWh per year, rounded up to the
nearest integer and calculated in accordance with Annex IX.
a pictogram of the type of domestic coffee maker: drip filter coffee machine (as
in label 1), portioned filter coffee machine (as in label 2) and espresso coffee
machine (as in label 3) with –for drip filter coffee machines—the option to
indicate the maximum capacity.
a diagram with graphics (in cyan) as indicated, showing the split of the
calculated annual energy consumption AE in kWh electricity equivalent per
year in a rounded rectangle as follows
a)
calculated annual electricity consumption AEL in kWh per year,
rounded to the nearest integer and calculated in accordance with Annex
VII, positioned in the center of a grey bar. The grey bar is placed in the
rounded rectangle and has a width proportionate to the relative
contribution to the total AE as indicated by the width of the rounded
rectangle, a height fitting the inside frame of the rounded rectangle and
is left-aligned to a position that is proportionate to the relative
contribution of the indirect energy requirement for the ground coffee
beans;
b)
the calculated indirect energy requirement of the ground coffee beans
AEC in kWh electricity equivalent per year, rounded up to the nearest
integer and calculated in accordance with Annex IX positioned in the
center of the space in the rounded rectangle to the left of the grey bar
mentioned under a);
c)
the calculated indirect energy requirement of the possible filter material
AEF in kWh electricity equivalent per year, rounded up to the nearest
integer and calculated in accordance with Annex IX positioned in the
center of the space in the rounded rectangle to the right of the grey bar
mentioned under a);
also showing pictograms (in cyan) with indications, in black and from left to
right in the picture of:
d)
the calculated annual coffee consumption in kg
e)
the number of annually consumed coffee cups used in the calculation,
with an indication in the pictogram of the cup size in g
f)
the calculated annual consumption of possible filter material.
46
PROPOSAL 2
(b)
The design of the label shall be in accordance with the following specifications
[detailled design drawing and description to follow; examples below are for
illustration of icons for icons of portioned filter coffee machines (left) and espresso
machines (right)]
I
II
I
A
II
A
B
B
C
C
D
D
E
E
F
G
F
G
ENERGIA ∙EНЕРГИЯ∙ΕΝΕΡΓΕΙΑ
ENERGIJA∙ENERGY∙ENERGIE∙ENERGI
241
ENERGIA ∙EНЕРГИЯ∙ΕΝΕΡΓΕΙΑ
ENERGIJA∙ENERGY∙ENERGIE∙ENERGI
kWh/annum
kWh/a
111
C
C
kWh/a
121
9
111
125
ml
15.4 kg
2200
80
42
40
ml
2.9 kg
15.4 kg
2011/XYZ
(c)
233
kWh/annum
2200
2.2 kg
2011/XYZ
Combination coffee machines shall have a separate label for each type of domestic
coffee machine.
47
PROPOSAL 2
Annex IV: Product fiche
1.
The information in the product fiche of the domestic coffee machines shall be given
in the following order and shall be included in the product brochure or other literature
provided with the product:
(h) supplier's name or trade mark;
(i) supplier's model identifier which means the code, usually alphanumeric, which
distinguishes a specific domestic coffee machines model from other models with
the same trade mark or supplier’s name;
(j) whether the domestic coffee machines is an “automatic coffee machine” or
“manual coffee machine”;
(k) energy efficiency class in accordance with point 1 of Annex VIII;
(l) the calculated Annual Energy Consumption (AE), in kWh/year rounded up the first
decimal place; it shall be described as: “energy consumption 'X' kWh per year for
brewing on average 6 cups per day in 2 shifts”;
(m) the calculated Annual Electricity Consumption (AEL), in kWh/year rounded up the
first decimal place; it shall be described as: “electricity consumption 'X' kWh per
year”;
(n) the calculated Annual Equivalent Electricity Consumption for Coffee Beans (AEC),
in kWh/year rounded up the first decimal place and the calculated Annual Mass of
Coffee Beans in kg/year rounded up the first decimal place ; it shall be described
as: “calculated equivalent electricity consumption 'X' kWh for production and
procurement of ‘Y’ kg of roasted and ground coffee beans per year”;
(o) the calculated Annual Equivalent Electricity Consumption for Filter Material
(AEF), in kWh/year rounded up the first decimal place and the calculated Annual
Mass of Filter Material in kg/year rounded up the first decimal place; it shall be
described as: “calculated equivalent electricity consumption 'X' kWh per year for
production and procurement of ‘Y’ kg of filter material per year”;
(p) information on the type of coffee preparation used by the machine (for example
filter, capsule, pad, etc.).
2.
One fiche may cover a number of domestic coffee machines models supplied by the
same supplier.
3.
The information contained in the fiche may be given in the form of a copy of the
label, either in colour or in black and white. Where this is the case, the information
listed in point 1 not already displayed on the label shall also be provided.
48
PROPOSAL 2
Annex V: Technical documentation
1.
The technical documentation shall include:
(h) the name and address of the supplier;
(i) a general description of the coffee machine model, sufficient for it to be
unequivocally and easily identified;
(j) where appropriate, the references of the harmonised standards applied;
(k) where appropriate, the other technical standards and specifications used;
(l) identification and signature of the person empowered to bind the supplier;
(m) technical parameters for measurements as follows:
(1)
whether the domestic coffee machine is drip filter coffee machine, a
portioned filter coffee machine or an espresso machine, whereby –if it is a
drp filter coffee machine—it shall be reported if the product has a thermos
jug, automatic water dosage, automatic coffee dosage or is fully automatic
as defined in Annex IX;
(2)
the accumulative electricity consumption for the test cycle until 100
minutes after finishing the brewing cycle Etst is calculated, expressed in
Wh with 1 decimal precision, as appropriate increased with the corrections
under points 3), 4) and 5) to be reported separately;
(3)
the average power consumption between 100 minutes after finishing the
brewing cycle until the end of the test cycle PDtst is calculated, expressed
in W with 1 decimal precision;
(4)
average temperature of the water leaving the filter before entering the cup
or jug, expressed in degree Celsius with a 1 decimal precision;
(5)
temperature of the coffee in the cup is measured immediately after the cup
is filled by the machine or after filling from the jug, measured with a
temperature sensor positioned in the center and middle of the cup,
expressed in degrees Celsius with a 1 decimal precision;
(6)
average mass of the coffee in the cups brewed per cycle, expressed in g
rounded to the nearest integer;
(7)
the dry mass of the ground coffee beans consumed during the test cycle
expressed in g with 1 decimal precision;
(8)
the dry mass of pads without ground coffee beans or the dry mass of the
capsules used, expressed in g with a 1 decimal precision ;
(9)
average ambient air temperature during the test, expressed in degrees
Celsius with a 1 decimal precision;
(10) temperature, expressed in degrees Celsius with a 1 decimal precision, and
water hardness of the cold water used in the test;
(11) for machines not equipped with automatic water dosage the mass of cold
water supplied to the reservoir in g, rounded to the nearest integer;
49
PROPOSAL 2
(12) for machines not equipped with automatic coffee dosage or portioned
coffee pads or –filters, the mass of coffee used during the test in g, with an
accuracy of ±0,1 g;
(13) for drip filter coffee machines with a thermos jug, the temperature drop in
of the water in the jug after 30 minutes when filled to half of its volumecapacity with water of a temperature between 77 °C and 97 °C and placed
in an ambient with 20±1 °C air temperature not exposed to direct sunlight
or other radiative heat sources, measured in the middle of the jug with an
accuracy of ±0,1 K;
(14) for portioned domestic coffee machines: the material used for the pad or
capsule;
(15) for machines with an automatic dosage device, the settings used for the
coffee taste and/or composition.
(n) the results of calculations performed in accordance with Annex IX to arrive at the
-
Annual Energy consumption AE in kWh/a
-
the Annual Mass of Coffee AMC in kg/a,
-
the Annual Energy requirement for Coffee AEC in kWh/a,
-
the Annual Mass of Filter or capsule material AMF in kg/a,
-
the Annual Energy requirement for Filter or capsule material AEF in
kWh/a and
-
the Energy Efficiency EE in %;
(o) information on the type of coffee preparation used by the machine (for example
filter, capsule, pad, etc.)
2.
Where the information included in the technical documentation file for a particular
domestic coffee machines model has been obtained by calculation on the basis of
design, or extrapolation from other equivalent domestic coffee machines or both, the
documentation shall include details of such calculations or extrapolations, or both,
and of tests undertaken by suppliers to verify the accuracy of the calculations
undertaken. The information shall also include a list of all other equivalent domestic
coffee machines models where the information was obtained on the same basis.
50
PROPOSAL 2
Annex VI: Information to be provided in the cases where
end-users cannot be expected to see the product displayed
1.
The information shall be provided in the following order:
(e)
whether the domestic coffee machine is drip filter coffee machine, a portioned
filter coffee machine or an espresso machine, whereby –if it is a drip filter
coffee machine—it shall be reported if the product has a thermos jug, automatic
water dosage, automatic coffee dosage or is fully automatic as defined in Annex
VII;
(f)
information on the type of coffee preparation used by the machine (for example
filter, capsule, pad, etc.) and in case of a portioned preparation the material of
the pad or capsule material;
(g)
the energy efficiency class as defined in point 1 of Annex VIII;
(h)
the following quantitative information:
v.
the weighted Annual Energy Consumption (AE) rounded up to the first
decimal place; it shall be described as: “energy consumption 'X' kWh
per year, at 6 cups brewed per day”;
vi.
the calculated Annual Electricity Consumption (AEL), in kWh/year
rounded up the first decimal place; it shall be described as: “electricity
consumption 'X' kWh per year”;
vii.
the calculated Annual Equivalent Electricity Consumption for Coffee
Beans (AEC), in kWh/year rounded up the first decimal place and the
calculated Annual Mass of Coffee Beans in kg/year rounded up the first
decimal place ; it shall be described as: “calculated equivalent
electricity consumption 'X' kWh for production and procurement of ‘Y’
kg of roasted and ground coffee beans per year”;
viii.
the calculated Annual Equivalent Electricity Consumption for Filter
Material (AEF), in kWh/year rounded up the first decimal place and the
calculated Annual Mass of Filter Material in kg/year rounded up the
first decimal place; it shall be described as: “calculated equivalent
electricity consumption 'X' kWh per year for production and
procurement of ‘Y’ kg of filter material per year”;
(i) if the domestic coffee machines is intended to be built-in, an indication to this
effect.
(j) information on the type of coffee preparation used by the machine (for example
filter, capsule, pad, etc.).
2.
Where other information contained in the product fiche is also provided, it shall be in
the form and order specified in Annex III.
51
PROPOSAL 2
3.
The size and font in which all the information referred in this Annex is printed or
shown shall be legible.
52
PROPOSAL 2
Annex VII: Verification procedure for market surveillance
purposes
For the purposes of checking conformity with the requirements laid down in Annexes II and
III, Member State authorities shall test a single domestic coffee machine. If the aggregated
value of Energy Efficiency is lower than the value declared by the supplier, the measurements
shall be carried out on three more domestic coffee machines. The arithmetic mean of the
Energy Efficiency value of these three domestic coffee machines shall meet or exceed the
Energy Efficiency value declared by the supplier. Otherwise, the model and all other
equivalent domestic coffee machine models shall be considered not to comply with the
requirements in this Regulation.
Member States authorities shall use the measurement procedure as defined in Annex IX.
53
PROPOSAL 2
Annex VIII: Energy efficiency classes
ENERGY EFFICIENCY CLASSES
The energy efficiency class of a domestic coffee machines shall be determined in accordance
with its Energy Efficiency Index (EEI) as set out in Table 1.
The Energy Efficiency Index (EEI) of a domestic coffee machines shall be determined in
accordance with point 1(a) of Annex IX.
Table 1: Energy efficiency classes
Energy efficiency class
A+
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
Energy Efficiency
EEI ≥ 90%
80%≤ EE < 90%
70% ≤ EE < 80%
60% ≤ EE < 70%
50%≤ EE < 60%
40%≤ EE < 50%
30% ≤ EE < 40%
EE<30%
54
PROPOSAL 2
Annex IX: Testing and calculation methods
TECHNICAL DEFINITIONS
For the purpose of this Regulation the following technical definitions applies:
(18)
“domestic coffee machine” means any machine for brewing coffee that fits the
definition of a drip filter coffee machine, a portioned filter coffee machine or an
espresso coffee machine hereafter;
(19)
“drip filter coffee machine” means an appliance for producing and storing coffee,
using a production method where heated water is dripping once through ground coffee
beans in a filter at the force of gravity, equipped with provisions for heating the water
and automatically dosing the heated water on the grinded coffee beans, with a coffee
brewing capacity between 0,6 and 1,8 litres within 10 minutes after being activated,
with a storage capacity of the recipient between 0,6 and 1,8 litres capable of storing the
coffee at a temperature of 67°C or higher for at least 30 minutes after brewing.
(20)
“portioned filter coffee machine” means an appliance for producing coffee from one or
two portions of ground coffee beans contained in a filter envelope using heated water,
at a pressure lower than 1 MPa (10 bar), equipped with means for heating the water and
automatically administering the heated water on the ground coffee beans, with a
minimum brewing capacity of 125 g of coffee in a recipient within 2 minutes after
being activated and a maximum capacity of simultaneously producing 2 coffee portions
of 125 g in two different recipients within 2 minutes after being activated;
(21)
“espresso machine” means an appliance for producing coffee by supplying heated
water at a pressure of 1 MPa (10 bar) or more to ground coffee beans in a filter, with a
minimum brewing capacity of 40±1 g of coffee in a recipient within 2 minutes after
being activated and a maximum capacity of simultaneously producing 2 coffee portions
of 120±5 g in two different recipients within 2 minutes after being activated;
(22)
“activated” means connected to a power supply and operated to brew the desired
volume of coffee according to manufacturer’s instructions, after a preceding period of
being disconnected for 6 h in an ambient with 20±1 °C air temperature, after being
prepared –immediately prior to the connection to a power supply-- according to
manufacturer’s instructions with an appropriately filled reservoir of cold water of 10±1
°C and medium hardness, roasted and possibly ground coffee beans as well as possibly
other auxiliary materials required;
(23)
“coffee beans” means the bean-like seeds of a tropical shrub Genus Coffea (family
Rubiaceae: several species);
(24)
“ground coffee beans” means roasted and ground non-decaffeinated coffee beans;
(25)
“coffee” means a hot drink made from roasted and ground coffee beans;
55
PROPOSAL 2
(26)
“filter” means a container or part of a container that holds ground coffee beans ready
for extraction of coffee in a domestic coffee maker that prevents ground coffee beans
from entering the coffee, for single or multiple use;
(27)
“pad” means a closed filter envelope for single use, permeable to oxygen, containing a
specific weight-portion of grinded coffee beans;
(28)
“capsule” means a closed filter envelope for single use, non-permeable to oxygen,
containing a specific weight-portion of grinded coffee beans;
(29)
“cup” is the coffee recipient in a portioned filter coffee machine or an espresso
machine as well as an accounting unit for domestic coffee makers indicating a volume
of 40±1 g for espresso machines and 125±1 g for other types of domestic coffee
machines;
(30)
“coffee jug” means recipient of coffee in a drip filter coffee machine;
(31)
“thermos coffee jug” means a coffee jug with the characteristic that, when filled to half
of its volume-capacity with water of a temperature between 77 °C and 97 °C and
placed in an ambient with 20±1 °C air temperature not exposed to direct sunlight or
other radiative heat sources, the water temperature, measured in the middle of the jug,
between the moment immediately after filling and 30 minutes after filling does not
exceed 10 K;
(32)
“water dosage device” means a device that is capable of administering ground coffee
beans with an accuracy of ±0,1 g to the filter of a domestic coffee maker;
(33)
“coffee dosage device” means a device that is capable of supplying heated water to the
ground coffee beans in the filter with an accuracy of ±1 g, following user settings
controlling the desired composition of the coffee;
(34)
“automatic dosage device” means a device that is capable of preparing a desired
volume of coffee, with an accuracy of ±1 g and with a user-set fixed portion size of at
the most 40±5 g, at a desired user settings controlling the desired composition of the
coffee;
(35)
“hard off switch” means a switch on the domestic coffee machine that fully cuts off the
machine from the external power supply;
(36)
“end of brewing cycle” means the moment the flow of coffee in the recipient stops and
more specifically for filter types means the moment at which the period between two
drops falling consecutively into the coffee container is approximately 2 s.
TESTING METHOD
The following test cycle, using the definitions in Art. 2 of this Regulation, applies:
(a)
The domestic coffee maker is activated, whereby the cold water reservoir of drip filter
coffee machines without automatic water dosage shall be filled with
− 540±1 g of water if the machine has no thermos jug and no semi-automatic or
fully automatic dosage device;
56
PROPOSAL 2
− 472±1 g of water if the machine is equipped with a thermos jug or automatic
coffee dosage device;
− 405±1 g of water if the machine is equipped with a thermos jug and an automatic
coffee dosage device
and the filter of drip filter coffee machines without automatic coffee dosage shall be
filled with
− 24±0,1 g of ground coffee beans if the machine has no thermos jug and no semiautomatic or fully automatic dosage device;
− 21±0,1 g of coffee beans if the machine is equipped with a thermos jug or
automatic coffee dosage device;
− 18±0,1 g of ground coffee beans if the machine is equipped with a thermos jug
and an automatic coffee dosage device.
(b)
Within 60 s after the end of the brewing period 2 cups are poured from the jug (drip
filter coffee machine) or the machine is operated to brew a second cup (other types).
(c)
30 minutes after the end of the brewing period 1 cup is poured from the jug (drip
filter coffee machine) or the machine is operated to brew another cup (other types).
(d)
45 minutes after the end of the brewing period machines with a hard on-off switch,
i.e. that fully disconnect the machine from the power supply, are switched off.
(e)
100 minutes after finishing the brewing cycle machines without a hard on-off switch
are unplugged from the power supply.
During the test the following parameters are determined:
(i)
electric power consumption with an accuracy of 0,1 W at a sample rate of 1 s;
(ii)
temperature of the water leaving the filter before entering the cup or jug with an
accuracy of ±0,1 K;
(iii)
temperature of the coffee in the cup (from the machine or jug) is measured
immediately after the cup is filled with an accuracy of ±0,1 K ;
(iv)
mass of the coffee in the cup with an accuracy of ±1 g;
(v)
the mass of the ground coffee beans consumed during the test sequence with an
accuracy of ±0,1mg;
(vi)
the mass of the pad and capsule without ground coffee beans consumed during the
test sequence with an accuracy of ±0,1 mg;
From the above parameters the following intermediate calculations are made:
(1)
from measurements (i), the accumulative electricity consumption for the test cycle
until 100 minutes after finishing the brewing cycle Etst is calculated, expressed in
kWh with 4 decimal precision, possibly increased with the corrections under points
3), 4) and 5);
57
PROPOSAL 2
(2)
from measurements (i), the average power consumption between 100 minutes after
finishing the brewing cycle until the end of the test cycle PDtst is calculated,
expressed in kW with 4 decimal precision of 4 decimals;
(3)
from measurements (ii), if the temperature is lower than 75 °C the accumulative
electricity consumption Etst shall be increased with 2% for every degree that the
lowest measured temperature measured in point (ii) is below 80 °C;
(4)
from measurements (iii), if the temperature of the last cup in the test cycle is below
67 oC and the drip filter coffee machine was tested as an appliance with a thermos
jug the test shall be repeated at conditions for a drip filter coffee machine without
thermos jug and there shall be a correction of 0,1 kWh added to the accumulative
electricity consumption Etst;
(5)
from measurements (iv), the accumulative electricity consumption Etst shall be
corrected by the ratio of the mass per cup and the applicable standard cup size if the
difference between the two latter parameters is more than 2 g;
(6)
from measurement (v), the dry mass of the ground coffee beans consumed during the
test sequence MCtst , expressed in g with 1 decimal precision should be in the range of
6±0,2 g/cup for drip filter machines with automatic coffee dosage or 7±0,2 g/cup for
other coffee machine types or otherwise the user-setting for the coffee dosage shall be
adjusted or another commercially available portioned pad or capsule shall be selected;
(7)
from measurement (vi) the dry mass of pads without ground coffee beans consumed
during the test shall be in the range of 1,3±0,2 g/cup in order to assume a default
value of 1,3 g, otherwise a more suitable commercially available pad shall be used,
whereas for capsules the actual capsule mass MFtst is recorded and for drip filter
coffee machines a default mass of 3 g is assumed;
CALCULATION OF THE ENERGY EFFICIENCY
For the calculation of the Energy Efficiency Index (EE) of a domestic coffee machine, the
Annual Energy Consumption of a domestic coffee machine is compared to its Standard
Annual Energy Consumption.
(a)
The Energy Efficiency (EE) is calculated as follows and rounded to one decimal
place:
where
− SAE= calculated Standard Annual Energy Consumption of the domestic coffee
machine, in kWh/year with SAEC is 110 kWh/a for drip filter coffee machines,
137 kWh for portioned filter coffee machines and 110 kWh/a for espresso
machines;
58
PROPOSAL 2
− AE = calculated Annual Energy Consumption of the domestic coffee machine, in
kWh/year and rounded to one decimal place
CALCULATION OF THE ANNUAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION
(b) The Annual Energy Consumption (AE) is calculated, in kWh/year and rounded to one
decimal place, for 730 coffee making cycles as follows:
AE = AEL + AEC + AEF
where
AEL is Annual Electricity consumption in kWh/a,
with
AEL= ( Etst + PDtst x 22 ) x 730 ;
AEC is electricity equivalent of indirect energy requirement for production and
procurement of ground coffee beans in kWh/a
with
AEC= AMCtst x 730 x GERC
where
AMCtst is calculated dry mass of ground coffee beans consumed in a
year, expressed in kg/yr with 1 decimal precision,
with
AMCtst = MCtst x 730,
where
MCtst is the dry mass of ground coffee beans consumed in the
test in kg/cycle with 4 decimal precision;
GERC is the Gross Energy Requirement for the production and
procurement of ground coffee beans, expressed in kWh electricity
equivalent with default value of 6,5 kWh/kg
AEF is electricity equivalent of indirect energy requirement for production and
procurement of filter material in kWh/a,
with
AEF= AMFtst x 730 x GERF
where
AMFtst is the calculated dry mass of filter material consumed in a year,
expressed in kg/yr with 1 decimal precision;
with
AMFtst = MFtst x 730,
where
MFtst is the dry mass of filter material consumed in the
test in kg/cycle with 4 decimal precision, with a default
value of 0,0030 kg/cycle for drip filter coffee machines
using a paper filter, 0,0052 kg/cycle for portioned filter
coffee machines, a measured mass MFtst for capsules and
for machines with only mechanical filters the default
value is 0;
GERF is the Gross Energy Requirement for the production and
procurement of the filter material with default 3 kWh/kg for paper
filters or pads and 18 kWh/kg for aluminium capsule material.
59
PROPOSAL 3
PROPOSAL 3
No action
This proposal does not deliver any savings directly but the Standby Regulation will bring ca.
2 TWh annual savings and probably further savings could be expected from the general trend
that more efficient machine are making it eventually to the market. This option would free
resources to focus on other priority product groups.
60
SUMMARY AND EXPLANATORY NOTES
Summary and explanatory Notes
This working document is meant to contribute to achieving the aims of Directive
2009/125/EC and Directive 2010/30/EU in relation to domestic coffee machines. The
proposed ecodesing requirements are set out based on the recommendations of the preparatory
study and calculations made by the Commission services.
Form of the implementing measure
The intention is to give to the Ecodesign implementing measure the form of a directly
applicable regulation and the Energy Labelling measures the form of a directly applicable
delegated regulation.
Scope
Unless indicated differently, the first two proposals in this working document cover domestic
coffee machines including:
•
•
•
•
drip filter coffee machines;
portioned filter coffee machines;
espresso machines and
combination machines.
Note that for labelling measures Proposal 1 only include espresso machines.
Only electric machines are in scope. The capacity and performance range as indicated is
typically fitting for a household environment.
Exclusions
Excluded from the scope of the first two proposals of the working document are:
•
•
•
non-electric coffee makers (e.g. ‘cafet(i)era’);
non-domestic coffee machines;
niche markets in the EU, such as electric percolators, drip filter machines with
capacity smaller than 0,5 litre, coffee makers using soluble coffee, etc..
61
SUMMARY AND EXPLANATORY NOTES
Summary
Proposal 1
Data from the preparatory study identify an electricity consumption for domestic coffee
machines of 17 TWh/a.
Under the current legislation, i.e. the Standby Regulation, the off-mode and standby-mode
power of coffee makers should be reduced to maximum 0,5 and 1 W respectively by
1.1.2013. Furthermore, an appropriate auto power down time should be implemented. The
preparatory study calculates that this existing piece of legislation, with an auto power down
time of 100 minutes, will lead to a 2 TWh per year saving by 2020-2025.
Instead, the industry proposes to exclude domestic coffee machines from the scope of the
standby regulation and implement a maximum off-mode and standby-mode power
requirement of 1 and 2 W respectively. This reduces the autonomous saving by some 20-30%,
i.e. there is a negative saving of 0,5 TWh per year.
As auto power down, the industry is proposing 60 minutes. This will lead to some saving with
respect of the autonomous (100 minutes) power down; probably in the order of magnitude to
compensate the negative saving.
The industry proposes labelling only for espresso machines, representing ca. 10% of installed
stock and electricity use. This would save 0,5 TWh by 2020. If portioned filter and drip filter
coffee machines would be included then the savings would be higher, ca. 3-4 TWh.
In terms of consumer expenditure, labelling espresso machines only result in savings of
between € 0 and 90 million per year, or € 0-0,45 per EU household per year. If all types of
machines are labelled, savings could go up to 3-4 TWh per year, or € 2,70 - € 3,60 per EU
household per year4.
Proposal 2
The Lot 25 preparatory study and additional analysis by the Commission services show that
direct electricity consumption and indirect energy consumption for the production of coffee
and filter/pad/capsules in the use-phase dominate the life-cycle impact of domestic coffee
machines. Direct electricity consumption is estimated at 12-15 TWh per year, coffee
consumes the equivalent of 15 TWh electricity per year and filter/pad/capsule materials
account for the equivalent of 1,6 TWh electricity annually. In total, the direct and indirect
energy consumption amounts to around 30 TWh electricity equivalent per year, most of which
is in the European Union.
4
The saving from the industry proposal if they only tackle the labelling of espresso-machine = 0 – 0,5 TWh/a = 0 -90 million
Eur = € 0 - € 0,45 per EU household
The saving from the industry proposal if they only tackle the labelling of all machines (incl. drip filter) = 3-4 TWh/a = 540720 mln euro = € 2.70 - € 3.60 per household.
62
SUMMARY AND EXPLANATORY NOTES
Accordingly, this proposal entails minimum energy efficiency requirements and labelling
measures that take into account all three energy impacts and benchmarks in relation to direct
and indirect energy consumption in the use phase.
For this particular product, as for most domestic appliances, energy labelling is expected to be
as least as effective as setting minimum requirements. But it is the combination of both that
supports EU and Member State action and will hopefully add a ‘consumer and retailer pull’ to
the ‘market push’ of eliminating the worst on the market.
In total, a direct and indirect energy saving in 2020-2025 is expected to be of 25%, half of
which is to be realised in making coffee machines that will help people to make a good cup of
coffee with precision dosage of the ingredients, using thermos jugs instead of a keep-warm
plate that ruins leftover coffee, and smart heating element insulation. Thus electricity use can
be reduced by 30-40%, coffee, by not being wasted, saves the electricity equivalent of 20%.
Filter/pads/capsules, which make up a relatively small share of the total, except with certain
espresso machine, can still contribute their part: comparing highest and lowest aluminium
espresso capsule weight on the market there could still be a 40-50% gain. Overall, the savings
would amount to 7.5 TWh per year, or € 68.70 - € 69.60 per EU household taking into
account the cost of coffee, filters, pads and capsules5.
EU-27 domestic coffee
machines
Electricity
Coffee
Filters & caps
TOTAL (approx.)
Consumption
TWhe eq./a
12-15
15
1.6
30
Saving potential
TWhe eq./a
3-4
3.6
0.3
7.5
Saving potential
billion EURO
0.54 - 0.72
13.2
pm
13.8
Note that the above excludes the saving from the standby regulation, which particularly
impacts on espresso and portioned filter machines.
Proposal 3
This proposal does not deliver any savings directly but the Standby Regulation will bring ca.
2 TWh annual savings and probably further savings could be expected from the general trend
that more efficient machine are making it eventually to the market.
5
The saving is 3-4 TWh/a electricity (= 540-720 mln euro = € 2.70 - € 3.60 per household) + € 13.2 billion/a in coffee = €
13.74 to € 13.92 billion/a = € 68.70 - € 69.60 per household.
63
SUMMARY AND EXPLANATORY NOTES
Comparison table proposals 1, 2 and 3 for domestic coffee
machines
Target
Scope,
savings
Consumer
savings
Standby
Benchmark
Proposal 1 ('electricity
only')
Targets only specific
electricity consumption in
the use phase, e.g. power in
off- and standby-mode
Proposal 2 ('electricity
and consumables')
Targets electricity, coffee
and filter/pad/capsule
consumption in a holistic
approach integrating direct
and indirect energy use in
as much as they can be
influenced by the product
design. In other words the
manufacturer can choose
how to reach targets
Labelling Scope and savings: Scope: all three common
only domestic espresso
household types: drip filter,
machines (ca. 10% of stock
portioned filter and
of the most common types).
espresso coffee.
Represents ca. 2 TWh/a
Representing ca. 30 TWh
electricity use with saving
of direct (40-50%) and
potential 30% = 0,6 TWh/a
indirect (50-60%) energy
consumption and an overall
25 % saving of 7,5 TWh/a.
Consumer savings EU
Consumer savings EU
household/year € 0-0.45, if household/year € 68.70all machines labeled € 2.7069.60 (including energy
3.60 (including energy cost + cost + purchase cost +
purchase cost of machines)
purchase cost of coffee,
filters, pads, capsules)
Makes off- and standby
Maintains existing
mode limits more lenient
regulation, 2nd tier effective
per 1.1.2013 (0,5 and 1 W).
than existing standbyregulation (1 and 2 W
Adds specifically that the
instead of 0,5 and 1 W):
appropriate power down
time is 100 minutes after
negative savings
the end of the brewing
cycle.
Benchmarks are based on
Benchmarks are based on
commercial BAT, not further theoretical (technical)
elaborated
minimum energy use,
calculated transparently
Measurement Uses energy use
measurements (parts of AE)
method
and benchmarks (parts of
SAE) specifically subdivided
for Brewing, Rinsing,
Standby, Off, etc.
64
Uses integrated energy
measurement of full cycle
in kWh + last part used for
powered down power (in
W)
Proposal 3 (no
action)
Frees resources for
the finalisation of
other priority
product groups
Saving 2 TWh/a
n/a
Standby Regulation
applies
n/a
n/a
SUMMARY AND EXPLANATORY NOTES
Calculation
method
Calculated 3 cycles of 3
cups/day à 9 cups/day (IEC:
first 1 x 120 ml + 2 x 40 ml)
Calculated 2 cycles of 3
cups/day à 6 cups/day
n/a
Calculation
method
Includes separate test for
milk frothing, keep-warm
function for cups
n/a
Calculation
method
Prescribes 76 oC as
minimum storage
temperature
Calculation
method
Calculation of AE for
electro-mechanical dripfilter
machines (=90% of market)
with 20h/day keep-warm
plate action.
Calculation
method
Corrections if brewing
temperature is too low (<80
oC), but the penalty is
calculated immediately and
in a direct way that will
dissuade suppliers from
following this strategy.
Corrections if store
temperature is too low (<67
oC), but the penalty is
calculated immediately and
in a direct way that will
dissuade suppliers from e.g.
using faulty thermos jugs.
[note that thermos jugs are
also tested independently to
guarantee minimum
performance.
Measures just coffee
making (and store);
inclusion of extra functions
and unnecessarily
complicates rating
Differentiates between
temperature leaving filter
(>80 or 76 oC) and storage
temperature: 67 oC as
minimum stored coffee
temperature (note: ideal
serving temperature is 5560 oC)
Machines with hard offswitch (as electromechanical dripfilter
machines and others) are
switched off 45 minutes
after the end of the brewing
cycle. The calculation is
based on 2 shifts (2 x 45
min. keep-warm
action/day).
Corrections if brewing
temperature is too low
(<80 oC), but the penalty is
calculated in a more
complex formula that takes
into account the energy use
measured.
Corrections if brewing
temperature is too low of
the second cup of espresso
after 30 minutes(<76 oC).
The same temperature is
taken for drip filter stored
coffee. Penalty is
calculated as a fraction of
the overall energy use of
the cycle.
Calculation
method
65
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
SUMMARY AND EXPLANATORY NOTES
Calculation
method
Calculation
method
Corrections if brewing
temperature is too low of the
second cup of espresso after
30 minutes(<76 oC) is
acceptable (not yet in
proposal). A store
temperature of 67 oC is
taken for drip filter stored
coffee. Penalty is calculated
as a fraction of the overall
energy use of the cycle for
the espresso machine. For
store temperatures that are
too low a worst-case hot
plate action is assumed.
Correction for mass of coffee
66
Correction for mass of
coffee is identical in both
proposals
n/a
Correction for mass of
coffee
n/a
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