2017 Holiday Gift Guide

FOR THE PILOTS OF OWNER-FLOWN, CABIN-CLASS AIRCRAFT
VOLUME 21 NUMBER 11
NOVEMBER 2017 $3.95 US
2017 Holiday
Gift Guide
Featuring this one-of-a-kind Paris Jet
Jet Journal: Avoiding the Gotcha’s
Hydroplaning: Landing on Liquid Ice
Pilot Report: Flying the B-29 Flying Fortress
Miller: Buying Your Next Airplane
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2 • TWIN & TURBINE
November 2017
Contents
November 2017 • VOL. 21, NO. 11
2 Editor’s Briefing
by Dianne White
4 2017 Holiday Gift Guide
4
Jet Journal
12 Safeguarding the “Gotcha’s”
Every aircraft has its
unique characteristics.
by Kevin Ware
18 Landing on Liquid Ice
12
No aircraft is immune
to hydroplaning.
by Thomas P. Turner
22 Five on the Fly
Meet Piper Aircraft’s Bart Jones
by Rebecca Groom Jacobs
18
26 Pilot Report:
Flying the Fortress
by Doug Rozendaal
From the Flight Deck
32 Deferred Maintenance
“Pay me now, or pay me later.”
by Kevin R. Dingman
22
37 NBAA Focus
En Route
44 Honeywell’s New iPad App
26
44
45
Optimizes Routes
Raisbeck Certifies Five-Blade
Prop for King Air 350
Certification Imminent for
Pilatus PC-24
On Final
48 So You Want to Buy
an Airplane
44
by David Miller
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COVER PHOTO
The Paris Jet, photo by Dustin Breau
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November 2017
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TWIN & TURBINE • 1
editor’sbybriefing
Dianne White
NBAA 2017:
A Show of Strength
A
s I write this, the 2017 NBAA Convention is drawing to a
close. This year’s show was held in Las Vegas, which was still
reeling from the horrific shooting at an outdoor music festival
that left 58 dead and 500 injured just one week before. There
was a subdued, but determined feeling among the Las Vegans
I encountered, including several who worked at the primary
FBO at McCarran International Airport. As you may have heard,
the shooter targeted the GA fuel farm at the airport, but was
obviously unsuccessful. The locals I spoke with felt profound
sadness, some anger but, most importantly, solidarity that this
tragedy cannot and would not break the city’s spirit. For a town’s
economy that depends upon tourism and convention business,
I heard time and time again: “Please come back – Vegas is
standing strong, we’re not going anywhere.” Across the city,
normally glitzy billboards carried somber messages of sympathy
along with “#VegasStrong.”
The events of the prior week were on the minds of everyone
who walked through the doors of the Las Vegas Convention Center.
During the Opening General Session, NBAA CEO welcomed
Clark County Commissioner Lawrence Weekly, who spearheaded
the creation of the Las Vegas Victims Fund. During his emotional
address, Weekly said, “This city looked evil in its face, and the
world saw that Las Vegas is a community, a family. To the 30,000
delegates attending NBAA-BACE, I want to say thank you from
our community. You don’t know what it means to all of us to have
you here.”
Bolen announced that NBAA Charities made a $10,000
contribution to the Las Vegas Victim’s Fund and encouraged
show participants to contribute as well.
This year’s convention took place as debate continued in
Washington over the future of the nation’s ATC system. At the
media breakfast held just before the show’s opening, leaders
from various alphabet organizations – EAA, AOPA, NATA, HAI
and NBAA – held a discussion about the proposed legislation
that would strip ATC oversight from Congress and hand that
authority over to a private, airline-centric board, unaccountable
to the public. Out on the convention floor, volunteers wearing
bright red shirts emblazoned with “ATC Not for Sale” held
iPads, allowing attendees to send an on-the-spot email to their
congressmen. Signage, lapel stickers and other promotional
items were visible throughout the exhibit hall and the static
display of aircraft promoting the www.atcnotforsale.com website.
If you haven’t done so, I’d encourage you to visit the site and
take advantage of communication resources there.
2 • TWIN & TURBINE
Overall, NBAA reported that this year’s convention,
which marked the 70th anniversary of the association, was
one of the largest yet: 1,100 exhibitors with more than 100
new ones; approximately 100 aircraft on static display at
Henderson (HND) and the convention center; and three days of
well-attended educational sessions, including a single-pilot
safety standdown. From my perspective, the convention floor
seemed very busy, with lines forming to climb into mockups
or talk to subject experts at various avionics, components and
engine manufacturers.
This year’s show was less about blockbuster announcements,
although several new jets made their NBAA debut, including
the Pilatus PC-24 (which should certify by yearend),
Gulfstream G600 and the Bombardier Global 7000. Rather,
the news from this year’s show centered on enhancing the
value of your asset (i.e. your aircraft), whether that be through
safety, technology, connectivity, or creature comforts. Garmin
announced its TXi series of touchscreen flight displays that
replace the G500/G600. They also showcased their HUD (GHD
2100), which will debut on the Citation Longitude. Engine
maker Pratt & Whitney Canada launched a new PT6A certified
pre-owned engine program that gives in-service engines a oneyear/500-hour first run warranty and other benefits. Embraer
debuted the Phenom 300E featuring a beautiful new interior
design, as well as inflight entertainment and cabin management
system. Tamarack Aerospace announced that the Citation
560XL is the next airframe to undergo certification for the
company’s ATLAS active winglets. Gogo Business Aviation
demoed its AVANCE L5 that operates on the Gogo 4G network.
It that allows voice, data and streaming capability on board a
variety of airframes from light to large cabin jets. Jeppesen is
collaborating with Universal Avionics, Honeywell and ForeFlight
to make its databases available for their products. Finally, a small
company called Polaris Aero showcased its unique flight risk
program that integrates crowd-sourced information to provide
pilots real-time risk alerts (such as runway conditions, ATC
quirks, and other gotcha’s) based on each phase of flight.
In spite of the shadow of the Las Vegas tragedy and the
continued fight to preserve a fair ATC system, the NBAA
convention felt upbeat and energized. Both the city and our
industry have a lot in common: we are resilient, resourceful,
forward-looking and most of all, a community that pulls together
at the most important moments. Just as the
city is #VegasStrong, we are #GAstrong.
November 2017
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November 2017
TWIN & TURBINE • 3
2017 Holiday Gift G
by Dianne White
W
hether you are looking to drop a hint, buy a gift for your favorite pilot or simply treat
yourself, Twin & Turbine is here to help. There are plenty of pilot-oriented gadgets and
gizmos out there, so we narrowed the field down to 12 unique gifts for the owner-pilot
(and those who travel along) at a variety of price points. As we approach the holidays and the
season of giving, we hope these selections inspire you...or at least get you dreaming of what you
might find under the tree this year.
The Paris Jet: Own the World’s First Business Jet and Rare Piece of History
Aviation’s short history is filled with many airplanes that were fantastic performers and
enjoyable to fly, but didn’t find commercial success or wide market appeal. The Paris Jet is one such
Owned and offered for sale by “Mr. Paris Jet” Dave Bennett, this Paris Jet is one of only 15 remaining
in the United States, and one of three that is still flown regularly.
DUSTIN BREAU PHOTO
DUSTIN BREAU PHOTO
4 • TWIN & TURBINE
This 1959 Paris Jet was initially sold in Europe before
being purchased by Santa Monica Aviation. In 1987, it was
converted to a MS.760B-II, which added more fuel and the
two Turbomeca Marbore VI engines producing a combined
2,116 pounds of thrust. In 2012, the panel was updated to
feature Garmin G600 with synthetic vision and a touchscreen
Garmin GTN 750, which is fully coupled to an STEC 55X
autopilot. The beautiful leather interior with sheepskin seats
were completed in 2015.
This rare bird is currently owned and offered for sale by “Mr.
Paris Jet” Dave Bennett. For more information and pricing,
contact Dave at parisjet@me.com.
Best Tugs: The Last Tug You’ll Ever Need
Why move your expensive aircraft with a low-tech tug?
Finally, a company has developed a digital tug that is engineered
with every feature on an owner-pilot’s wish list: digital speed
modulation, prop protection, auto-throttle for changing grade
conditions, quiet operation and even an optional air compressor.
Plus, the Best Tug can easily configured to move every aircraft
in your hangar, from piston to jets.
aircraft that but never found its legs in the business aviation.
Nevertheless, it a pilot’s airplane. Whether you fly it for your
next weekend getaway or simply make it the centerpiece of
your aviation collection, this low-time Paris Jet – immaculately
restored and with state-of-the-art avionics – is a gem waiting
to be scooped up. For our 2017 Gift Guide, Twin and Turbine
is proud to announce the availability for sale of this one-ofa-kind aircraft.
If you thought the Learjet was the first business jet, you’d be
wrong. That honor belongs to the Morane-Saulnier MS.760 Paris,
a four-place, French-built jet designed and built in the early
1950s, and marketed to business travelers in the United States
by Beechcraft. This year’s marque gift guide item is a beautifully
restored and extremely well-equipped and appointed Paris Jet.
Privately owned and maintained, this rare aircraft was once
owned by the King of Morocco and pilot/actor John Travolta,
who featured this bird in his movie “Look Who’s Talking.”
DUSTIN BREAU PHOTO
t Guide
The Echo is a workhorse with a tow rating of 9,000 pounds,
while the Echo XLP can move aircraft up to 12,500 pounds, but
also is perfectly suited to move a Cirrus or Bonanza. The Echo
features a “Prop Safe” design that guarantees that even the large
props found on a TBM or Meridian will never come in contact
with the tug. Every tug comes installed with a computer software
optimized for the torque limitations specific of your plane to help
prevent nose gear damage. The tug measures speed and torque
while moving your aircraft, and the Auto Throttle can make up
to 30 changes a second to maintain a constant speed, even on
slopes. It also has programmed codes that will trip to prevent you
from damaging your aircraft. Plus – new for 2017 – the hybrid
system allows the tug’s motor to act as a generator and recharge
its batteries when the tug is slowing or stopping your plane.
All Best Tugs can be personalized with one of several paint
schemes and can be outfitted with several options, including an
LED light, underglow lighting, a fire extinguisher, USB charging
ports, jump-start GPU and an air compressor.
For more information and pricing, go to besttugs.com or
call (800) 914-2003.
The Best Tugs Echo XLP
The Paris Jet was originally built as an ab initio jet trainer to
compete for a French government contract. The revolutionary
(at the time) side-by-side seating doomed the aircraft from
winning the competition, so Morane-Saulnier came up with
an idea that was way ahead of its time: Market the MS.760 as
a business jet. In 1955, Beech Aircraft Corporation imported
and FAA-certified two aircraft, intent on bringing business
aviation into the jet age.
November 2017
TWIN & TURBINE • 5
Flight Outfitters’
stylish new Bush
Pilot Folio.
Get an exact replica of your aircraft in desktop size.
Factory Direct Models:
A Custom Model of Your Plane
What’s almost as good as the real airplane? A highly detailed,
scale model of it. From a photo you provide, Factory Direct
Models will create an exact replica of your plane in desktop size
down to the stripe detail, registration number and personalized,
engraved plaque attached to the stand. Your personalized
interior can be included upon request. Each meticulously
detailed scale model is custom manufactured and precisely
engineered to your exact specifications. To learn more, go to
www.factorydirectmodels or call (866)-580-8727.
Flight Outfitters Bush Pilot Folio
Why can’t a flight bag be utilitarian yet look good?
Flight Outfitters says you can have both. The company’s new
Bush Pilot Folio has plenty of style, it’s also a very practical bag,
storing a surprising amount of gear without looking bulky or
weighing you down. It has separate pockets for your tablet and
laptop, plus a large center compartment and plenty of exterior
pockets. For further utility, the Folio Bag has a rear strap to
securely attach it to your roller-board.
The Bush Pilot Folio retails for $139.95 and can be found at
leading online aviation retailers. For more information, go to
flightoutfitters.com.
Special Edition Abingdon
Watch for Your Favorite Aviatrix
Watchmaker Abingdon Company is celebrating its 10th
anniversary by unveiling a new version of its most popular
timepiece. Limited to 100 pieces only, the 24-carat gold Amelia,
features a custom designed 10th anniversary case-back.
The Amelia timepiece is the company’s most popular watch
that helped launch the company into the spotlight as the first
aviation watch for women back in 2007.
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Specifications include a Ronda Swiss Made
505.24H GMT movement, 40mm case size and
5 ATM water resistance. This limited watch
is delivered in a collector’s box with two
straps: a gold metal strap and a genuine
white leather strap. Both straps have the
EZ release pins on the back for a simple
swap out. Authenticity paperwork
with the watch’s serial number and
signed by the company founder,
Abingdon, is also included. Sapphire
crystal, date box, dual time function,
and a rotating aviator’s bezel controlled
by a gold crown at the 6 o’clock position
makes this watch not only stunning, but
functional as well.
The 10th anniversary
The watch is priced at $499 and will
special edition
begin deliveries Nov. 3, 2017.
“Amelia” watch.
November 2017
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TWIN & TURBINE • 7
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November 2017
Track it All on Your Garmin
D2 Charlie Watch
With a rich array of
color mapping, weather,
waypoint reference and
f light logging features,
the D2 Charlie sets the standard
for on-wrist situational reference
and backup navigation. You can
pan and zoom the watch’s moving
map to quickly expand your
The Garmin D2 Charlie
view of airports, waypoints,
combines aviation functions
terrain, obstacles or weather
with sports watch features.
activity along your route
of flight.
Wherever you travel, smart notifications (emails, text
messages, alerts and more) can display on the watch to help
you stay in the know while on the go. And between flights,
you can use the latest sport watch features – including wristbased heart rate monitoring, daily activity tracking, training
metrics and more – to keep up with your
personal fitness goals.
Priced starting at $799, you can find
the D2 Charlie at many online pilot shops.
Flight Outfitters’ Pilot Knife:
An Emergency Essential
Garmin VIRB:
Capture and Create Videos Flying Flights
Garmin’s line of VIRB cameras
was designed especially for
pilots, and their latest model
doesn’t disappoint. The
powerful, easy-to-use,
and compact VIRB Ultra
30 shoots ultra HD video
(4K/30fps) with builtin image stabilization
and GPS logging. Plus,
the complete kit includes
an audio cable for recording
cockpit communications, a prop
filter to remove distortion and mounts. It’s
everything you need to create amazing flying videos.
The MSRP for the VIRB 360 is $799 and can be found at many
online pilot shops or purchased directly from Garmin. Go to
Garmin.com for more information.
Base Turn: Aviation-Inspired Apparel for Your Yogi
The work of talented photographer Jessica Ambats has graced
the covers of many aviation magazines. Now she has turned her
creativity to a new venture: Base Turn apparel and accessories.
Using images from her extensive photography catalog, Ambats
Inspired from Jessica Ambats’ extensive photography
portfolio, Base Turn features aviation-themed yoga apparel
and accessories.
This knife is much more than just a
blade. Designed to be the perfect emergency
accessory for pilots, this knife could even
save your life when in a pinch. The locking
serrated blade is constructed with 440
stainless steel to cut through tough material,
even through jammed harnesses. It also features
a removable LED flashlight that activates with a
twist of the head. A magnetic back makes it easy
to mount to something when you need both handsfree. It also has a magnesium alloy fire starter,
which is key to prolonged survival out in the bush.
Spring assisted for easy, one-hand operations, this
knife will quickly become your go-to when in the
bush. Priced at $29.95, it’s available at most online
pilot stores, or by going to flightoutfitters.com.
This multi-functional knife is an essential survival
tool that should be in every pilot’s aircraft.
November 2017
TWIN & TURBINE • 9
has created a fun line of yoga leggings, capris, tank tops, and
accessories such as headbands and mini pouches. Other fun
collections include yoga wear featuring sectional charts (you
pick from several regions) and captain’s stripes. She also has a
line of matching toddler leggings as well.
These handmaid leggings and tops are medium weight
and made of sturdy, yet breathable material. Reasonably priced, the items are available
at baseturn.com.
Make a Great Cup of
Coffee On the Road
Created by a Stanford University
engineering instructor, the AeroPress is
a great option for pilots because it’s small,
sturdy and lightweight, and it comes with
a tote bag making it easy for travel. One
minute with the AeroPress makes a
delicious cup of coffee and a quick, light
rinse cleans it up. As long as you’ve got a
source of hot water you’ve got a smooth,
rich cup of coffee. Also, the quick brewing
process helps keep the acid level in the
coffee low, meaning it’s gentler on your
stomach than drip or French press brew.
In fact, AeroPress brewed coffee is so
smooth and flavorful that many
people find they love the taste even
without cream or sugar.
The AeroPress is priced at $29.99
and available at amazon.com or
go to www.aeropressinc.com to
see more retailers near you.
Traveling doesn’t mean you can’t
enjoy good coffee. The AeroPress
produces a perfect cup every time.
10 • TWIN & TURBINE
The Bibo Barmaid makes a variety of cocktails and eliminates
the hassle of leftover mixers.
Bibo Barmaid is a Mix-Saving Drinkmaker
If you often travel to a vacation or second home, you know the
frustration of leaving behind perishable food and drink. Now you
can enjoy your favorite cocktails without the worry of leaving
partially used bottles of mixers and juices behind. Named
the top kitchen gadget of the future by Architectural Digest,
the Bibo Barmaid is cocktail self-serve machine that allows
consumers to create expertly crafted mixed drinks at home
with the touch of a button. If you can use a Keurig, you can
make a Bibo cocktail. Simply fill it with cold water, insert a
cocktail mix pouch, pull down the handle and press the “mix”
button. Add your choice of alcohol, ice and a garnish.
The Bibo Barmaid and cocktail mix packets are available at
Bed, Bath & Beyond, Amazon, Best Buy and others. Retail price
for the system is $199.
Custom-engraved Seatbelts for
Your Favorite Sleigh
Your aircraft deserves a holiday gift, too! If your seat
belts are looking a bit worn, why not replace them with
custom engraved lift lever lids featuring your aircraft’s
head-on or profile view, your company logo or even your N
number. Aircraft Belts, a sister company Twin Commander
Aircraft, can create customized belts for both crew and
passenger seats. Call Brian Harbaugh of Twin Commander
November 2017
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Available for many airframe types, personalized seat belts
make a great gift for your aircraft.
Aircraft at (919) 956-4385, or email him at bharbaugh@twin
commander.com. He will be happy to help you with a quote
on a stylish and distinctive set of new restraints. For more
information see www.aircraftbelts.com.
T&T
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November 2017
TWIN & TURBINE • 11
Jet Journal
Safeguarding
the “Gotcha’s”
Every aircraft has its unique characteristics,
which begs the question: how can this
airplane hurt us?
by Kevin Ware
Photos by Paul Bowen and Kevin Ware
12 • TWIN & TURBINE
November 2017
November 2017
TWIN & TURBINE • 13
PHOTO CREDIT: PAUL BOWEN PHOTOGRAPHY
I
t is a short trip today: Seattle’s Boeing Field (KBFI) to Boise, Idaho KBOI) in a vintage
1983 Lear 35. Less than 30 seconds after our wheels leave the pavement of runway 13R
we are doing 250 knots and climbing at 4,000 feet per minute. With the power rapidly
being reduced to 65 percent, we come whipping up to the Kent Seven departure procedure’s
climb limit of 2,000 feet. The airplane really wants to keep going up, but Seattle Departure
Control has their frequency clogged with airline traffic leaving from SEATAC, which is just
off to our right, and we can’t get in a word edgewise. So, we roar along at 2,000 feet doing
250 knots, burning $8 worth of fuel every 15 seconds, and heading 90 degrees away from
where we really want to go, with the little airplane champing at the bit like a racehorse
held back at the track.
up, and is normally done before landing
or as the airplane taxis in.
The Learjet 35 contains its fuel in two tip tanks, two wing tanks and an aft fuselage
tank. The fueling process requires special care that one tip tank is not filled while the
other remains empty.
Despite all this fuel-thirsty,
thoroughbred performance, and contrary
to what you may have heard, Learjets
are quite easy to fly. They have nicely
balanced controls, go exactly where
you point them, and have fighter-like
acceleration and climb rates. It is hard
to believe they were originally designed
back in the early 1960s when most of us
were still in high school or college. And
yet, although the older models will do just
about everything newer versions of the
airplane will do, they have a reputation
among pilots for some peculiar, mostly
“age of design”-related operational issues,
many of which can be fatal if you do not
pay careful attention. In the vernacular of
pilots, these become known as “gotcha’s.”
Avoiding the Gas Gaffe
Well before you board the aircraft,
the Lear 35 “gotchas” start with the
fuel system. The big TFE731 fanjets
on these little airplanes each put out
3,500 pounds of thrust and use so much
fuel that the engineers had trouble
finding places to put it all. Just over
900 gallons can be boarded, and it is
stashed all over the place. There is the
equivalent of seven 50-gallon drums
(1,175 pounds or 172 gallons on each
side) in the wing tip tanks.
14 • TWIN & TURBINE
Inboard of each tip tank, squeezed
into each of the small thin wings, there
is another 1,254 pounds (a bit over 180
gallons a side). Finally, behind the
baggage area aft of the rear passenger
seat, there is a tank the size of a cattle
watering trough called “the trunk,” which
holds another 1,340 pounds or just under
200 gallons. The little jet, which has a
basic operating weight of 10,700 pounds,
takes off with just under 7,000 pounds of
fuel on board.
With tanks scattered all over the
airplane, filling them safely becomes
a procedure that the pilots pay careful
attention to. Unlike newer business
jets, which nearly all have single-point
refueling, the only way to fuel a Lear 35
is via the fuel ports in each tip tank where
it flows by gravity into the wing tank on
the same side. You must watch that the
line guys do not fill up one tip tank while
the other is empty, as that will cause a
fuel imbalance of over half ton. Given the
relatively narrowly spaced landing gear,
this will tip the airplane literally up on its
side. In addition, there is no way to place
fuel into the fuselage or “trunk” tank from
outside the aircraft. That tank can only be
filled by transferring fuel from the wing
and tip tanks via on board electric fuel
pumps. It’s a time-consuming activity that
usually requires the aircraft be powered
After the line guys are done filling the
tip and wing tanks, you absolutely must
check each of the fuel caps for security.
There is just one on each side, they look
almost identical to those on a Cessna
310, lie on the outboard side of the tip
tank and so cannot be seen from inside
the airplane. If the left is less than fully
fastened, they can depart the aircraft in
flight, which will cause all the fuel on
that side (literally a ton), to be completely
siphoned out into the slipstream within a
period of minutes. This in turn will cause
the engine on that side to fail, and creates
a lateral 2,400-pound fuel imbalance
that makes the aircraft non-controllable
around the horizontal axis. This “gotcha” is
this reason you will find at least one of the
pilots of a good Lear crew to be physically
present during any fueling, and even after
that, at least one of them will walk around
the airplane and literally touch each of the
two fuel caps before boarding. Personally,
I check them twice.
Close the Door Already!
While still on the ground, the
next “gotcha” with potentially fatal
consequences is the cabin door closing
mechanism. The complex process
required to close the door has more steps
than that needed to start the engines.
Screw it up and a loss of pressurization
could occur, which at the altitudes at
which the airplane is capable of operating
could easily prove fatal.
The process begins with pulling the
lower half door up to a temporary lock
November 2017
position using a T handle attached to a
cable, while the upper half is still open.
The lower door is then locked in place
with a rotary handle, then the upper half
pulled down. One then activates a hook
driven by an electric motor contained
within the lower door itself, to cinch down
the upper door. The motor is controlled
by a small, very hard-to-find toggle
switch lost in the upholstery, located
on the forward side of the lower entry
door. Looking lost and muttering under
your breath while you are groping for the
switch, does not enhance the image of
your piloting skills to the two pax sitting
less than 4 feet away.
Once the doors are cinched together
by the electrically powered hook, the
upper door handle can be thrown over
into the fully locked position. The
electric motorized hook, however, is still
holding the door fast, which would make
exit during an emergency evacuation
impossible. Thus, the next step is to
reverse the hook’s motor, in the process
disconnecting the hook entirely. The final
step is to call out “door closed,” while
your buddy sitting in the cockpit with the
master switch on checks to make sure the
“door” annunciator panel light has gone
out, at which time he says, “light out.” Miss
a single step and the light remains on,
which causes the passengers to wonder
just how good of a crew you are, if you
can’t even figure out how to close the door.
Luckily, we know the drill, so with the
door now closed, the engines are started,
which is a relatively simple task.
Stay Out of the Grass
Now it is time to taxi the aircraft
and another potentially embarrassing
“gotcha” presents itself: the nose-wheel
steering. This system is operated
through the rudder pedals, but is
electrically driven by a motor that has
variable authority depending upon
aircraft speed. From a practical point
of view, this means that the pilot (at least
until very familiar with the airplane),
can never quite tell how much the nose
wheel will turn for a given amount of
rudder pedal movement. In addition,
small inputs to the rudder pedals result
in the system making a squealing sound
similar to that of a pig being castrated,
which in all its unpleasantness is clearly
audible to the passengers.
November 2017
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TWIN & TURBINE • 15
The partially-hidden toggle switch (pictured at right) operates an electrically operated
hook that latches the clamshell door together (above). Not following proper doorclosing procedure will lead to a potentially dangerous “gotcha.”
All this has many new Lear 35 pilots
lurching down the taxiway, with the
repeated odd noise clearly announcing to
the passengers that the pilot must be new
to this aircraft. This continues through
the initial part of the takeoff run, when at
45 knots the nose-wheel steering becomes
dangerously sensitive so it is turned off
via a red button on the control wheel.
The CRM drill to prevent an offrunway excursion “gotcha,” goes like this:
Pilot flying (PF) advances the throttles
PNF calls “power set,” then at about 45
knots “airspeed alive,” at which time PF
presses the red button on the control
wheel and calls out, “nose wheel steering
off.” On landing, serious accidents have
occurred if the nose-wheel steering is
“ON” at touch down because even a small
amount of rudder input (say, a slight slip
for crosswind purposes) will move the
nose wheel well off center. Thus, when
it meets the pavement, the nose wheel
immediately points the airplane toward
the grass. For this reason, the nose
wheel steering is left OFF on landing,
and kept that way until the airplane is
well slowed down, something that is not
at all intuitive.
to use TOLD (takeoff and landing data)
cards. In newer jets, this information is
automatically calculated by the onboard
computer, and moved to the PFD (primary
flight display), but this convenience is not
available on the older Lear 35s. Pilots
must look up the required speeds (V1,
Vr, and V2), runway length, and power
settings for each takeoff. The numbers
are dependent upon temperature, weight,
runway condition and elevation.
Most of us have made up charts for
the common numbers, and pasted them
to the checklist, but it still can be tricky.
For example, for Boise today, (elevation
2,871 feet), the readily available chart
is not valid because it is for sea level
operations only, so a larger book is
consulted for the numbers applicable to
that elevation. Usually the charts in the
larger book never show the exact altitude
and temperature you are at, and so some
extrapolation is required.
Once the takeoff or landing
information has been extracted from
the charts, to make it readily apparent
to the crew it is hand printed on a TOLD
card and stuck somewhere obvious for
both pilots to see.
Old School TOLD Calculations
A Gotcha-Free Landing
Nearing the runway and ready to fly,
the next potential “gotcha” is the need
We have been blasting along at
2,000 feet and 250 knots on our BFI
16 • TWIN & TURBINE
While the flight decks in newer jets can
perform the takeoff data calculations, the
Learjet 35 requires the pilot to acquire
and display the data the old-school way.
departure for several minutes when
we finally get a word in edgewise with
Seattle Departure and are given a left
turn and climb to 12,000 feet. We arrive
there in less than three minutes and
meet with our next “gotcha.” Most of
these older Lears do not have altitude
preselect on either the flight director
or the autopilot. As a result, both pilots
need to be fully alert during the climb,
November 2017
because when doing 4,000 feet per
minute, with the usual “1,000 feet to
go” CRM call out, you have less than
15 seconds to get the climb rate under
control or an altitude bust is almost
a certainty.
Luckily, on our flight to Boise today,
we nail the altitude, and with fuel caps
staying in place and the cabin door
remaining closed, we do just fine as
we climb to FL390 to happily discover
a 100-knot tail wind. Twenty minutes
later we are at the TOD (top of descent)
for our approach into Boise. During
the decent we dial up the local ATIS,
then look up the TOLD numbers for
the airplanes weight, plus temperature
and altitude of the airport. We make a
good landing being sure the nose wheel
steering remains turned off. We turn
the nose wheel steering on as we exit the
high-speed turnoff, and while taxiing to
the FBO have the foresight to transfer
fuel from the wing to the “trunk” tank
in the aft fuselage.
Forty-eight minutes after leaving
BFI, and having luckily avoided all
the “gotcha’s,” we park the airplane
on the ramp at BOI, borrow a crew
car and head out for breakfast
thinking, “What great airplanes
those Lear 35s.”
T&T
•
Hillaero
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and is typed in several different business jets. He has
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and currently works as a contract pilot for various
corporate operations in the Seattle area. When not
working as a pilot he is employed part time as an
emergency and urgent care physician. He can be
reached at kevin.ware2@aol.com
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November 2017
TWIN & TURBINE • 17
Jet Journal
The Pilatus PC-24, which is the first
business jet designed to take off and
land on unpaved runways, undergoes
water pond testing. Although turbine
aircraft undergo testing under
extreme conditions, no aircraft is
immune to hydroplaning, especially
if not flown at the proper speed.
No aircraft is immune to hydroplaning. Know
your hydroplane speed, plan ahead and use
good technique when landing on wet surfaces.
by Thomas P. Turner
A
light jet overran the runway at Chicago Midway Airport in mid-July. Perhaps because the
new-model jet was the first of its type delivered to a customer, images of the aftermath
received widespread distribution in aviation-oriented media. Preliminary reports state:
“Information from video footage and ADS-B data suggest that the aircraft landed on Runway
31C and steered off the left side of the runway just before reaching the Engineered Material
Arrestor System (EMAS) pad at the end of the runway.”
Light rain was reported at the time of the overrun, and the pavement in the photo appears quite
wet. Witnesses state it had rained heavily before the jet, arriving from Philadelphia, attempted
landing on the 5,141- by 150-foot (1567 by 45.7 meter) Runway 31C. The FAA’s Airplane Flying
Handbook tells us:
Dynamic hydroplaning occurs when there is a film of water on the runway that is at least
one-tenth inch deep. As the speed of the airplane and the depth of the water increases, the
water layer builds up an increasing resistance to displacement, resulting in the formation of
a wedge of water beneath the tire. At some speed, termed the hydroplaning speed (VP), the
water pressure equals the weight of the airplane and the tire is lifted off the runway surface.
In this condition, the tires no longer contribute to directional control and braking action is nil.
Dynamic hydroplaning is related to tire inflation pressure. Data obtained during hydroplaning
tests have shown the minimum dynamic hydroplaning speed (VP) of a tire to be 8.6 times
the square root of the tire pressure in pounds per square inch (PSI). For an airplane with a
18 • TWIN & TURBINE
November 2017
PILATUS AIRCRAFT PHOTO
Landing on Liquid Ice
main tire pressure of 24 pounds, the
calculated hydroplaning speed would
be approximately 42 knots.
It is important to note that the
calculated speed referred to above is for
the start of dynamic hydroplaning. Once
hydroplaning has started, it may persist
to a significantly slower speed depending
on the type being experienced.
PILATUS AIRCRAFT PHOTO
R e v e r t e d r u b b e r (s t e a m)
hydroplaning occurs during heavy
braking that results in a prolonged
locked-wheel skid. Only a thin film
of water on the runway is required to
facilitate this type of hydroplaning. The
tire skidding generates enough heat to
cause the rubber in contact with the
runway to revert to its original uncured
state. The reverted rubber acts as a seal
between the tire and the runway, and
delays water exit from the tire footprint
area. The water heats and is converted
to steam which supports the tire off
the runway.
Reverted rubber hydroplaning
frequently follows an encounter
with dynamic hydroplaning, during
which time the pilot may have the
brakes locked in an attempt to slow
the airplane. Eventually the airplane
slows enough to where the tires make
contact with the runway surface and
the airplane begins to skid.
The remedy for this type of
hydroplane is to release the brakes and
allow the wheels to spin up, then apply
moderate braking. Reverted rubber
hydroplaning is insidious in that the
pilot may not know when it begins,
and it can persist to very slow ground
speeds (20 knots or less).
Viscous hydroplaning is due to the
viscous properties of water. A thin film
of fluid no more than one-thousandth
of an inch in depth is all that is needed.
The tire cannot penetrate the fluid and
the tire rolls on top of the film. This
can occur at a much lower speed than
dynamic hydroplane, but requires a
smooth or smooth acting surface such
as asphalt or a touchdown area coated
with the accumulated rubber of past
landings. Such a surface can have the
same friction coefficient as wet ice.
When confronted with the possibility
of hydroplaning, it is best to land
on a grooved runway (if available).
Touchdown speed should be as slow
as possible consistent with safety. After
the nosewheel is lowered to the runway,
apply moderate braking. If deceleration
is not detected and hydroplaning is
suspected, the nose should be raised
and aerodynamic drag utilized to
decelerate to a point where the brakes
do become effective.
Apply brakes firmly until reaching
a point just short of a skid. At the first
sign of a skid, release brake pressure
and allow the wheels to spin up.
Maintain directional control as possible
with the rudder.
In a crosswind, if hydroplaning
should occur, the crosswind will
cause the airplane to simultaneously
weathervane into the wind as well as
slide downwind.
Performance Aircraft
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November 2017
TWIN & TURBINE • 19
Under Pressure
NASA has tested the hydroplaning
phenomenon extensively. It publishes a
table that correlates tire pressure to the
speed at which dynamic hydroplaning
will occur. Note the main wheel tire
pressure for the airplane you’re flying,
and compare that pressure to the actual
touchdown speed, which should be very
close to the stalling speed as adjusted
for airplane weight. You may find that
your normal landing puts you close to
a hydroplaning speed.
There is extremely little margin
between the full-stall, essentially shortfield landing touchdown speed and the
NASA hydroplaning speed. You need
to be very careful and land much slower
than many pilots routinely land to avoid
hydroplaning on a wet runway in an
airplane like that!
Note that these are groundspeeds, the
speed the airplane’s tires are traveling
across the wet surface. This becomes
important as we return to the case of
the Midway light jet.
Wet Runway
Tire Pressure
(psi)
Hydroplaning
Speed (kts)
30
49
40
57
50
64
60
70
70
75
80
81
METARs around 1836Z, the time of the
mishap, are listed below. I’ve highlighted
some important information.
KMDW 121853Z 18009G17KT 10SM
-RA FEW060 BKN110 BKN130 OVC200
23/21 A2991 RMK AO2 LTG DSNT NE
SLP120 P0007 T02280211 $
(above) Tire Pressure versus Hydroplaning Speed (NASA)
KMDW 121753Z 21011KT 10SM
-RA FEW040 SCT090 BKN120 OVC200
23/21 A2996 RMK AO2 LTG DSNT ALQDS
RAB37 SLP135 P0001 60060 T02280206
10256 20206 51006 $
KMDW 121653Z 20011KT 10SM
FEW045 SCT060 BKN110 OVC150 23/21
A2995 RMK AO2 LTG DSNT W AND NW
RAE41 TSE09 SLP133 P0001 T02280211
The light jet, landing on Midway’s
Runway 31C, touched down with a
variable and at times gusty wind. 100
degrees to as much as 130 degrees off
the runway heading, a crosswind-to-tail
wind landing. The trend established
by the NASA Tire Pressure versus
Hydroplaning Speed table, suggests this
to be a potential contributing factor, and
certainly enough to remind us to think
about dynamic hydroplaning in any
airplane we fly.
Mitigation
To minimize the hazard of hydroplaning when landing on a wet runway:
• Fly the proper touchdown speed as
slowly as possible to just above the
stall speed at the moment of
touchdown to preserve a hydroplaning
speed margin.
• Land aligned with the runway
centerline with zero sideslip using
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20 • TWIN & TURBINE
November 2017
Fly the proper touchdown speed and aligned with the runway centerline with zero
sideslip using appropriate crosswind control inputs. Plan a “firm” but smooth arrival,
to put the tires solidly against the pavement.
One-tenth inch of water on a runway
is all that is needed to induce dynamic
hydroplaning.
appropriate crosswind control inputs.
This is a basic requirement for
passing the Private, Recreational and
even Light Sport Pilot check ride, so
it should be your routine for all
landings, and then all your landings
become good practice for landing on
a wet runway.
• Touch down as close to the approach
end of the runway as possible to
maximize available landing distance.
We normally aim for the touchdown
zone markers, which are usually 1,000
feet from the runway threshold. But
that reduces available stopping distance
by 1,000 feet. In the case of Midway’s
31C that make it effectively a 4,141-foot
runway, about 20 percent less stopping
distance when hydroplaning is a risk.
• Plan a “firm” but smooth arrival, to put
the tires solidly against the pavement.
Don’t try to “grease it on” if the runway
is wet.
• Hold the elevator after touchdown to
maximize aerodynamic braking. But
when the nose does come down, don’t
push the wheel down and cause the
airplane to wheelbarrow, or induce a
pilot-induced oscillation.
November 2017
• Avoid applying brakes at or above the
NASA-critical speed for your airplane.
Land at a speed and with remaining
runway distance that permits coming
to a stop with little or no braking. Once
below hydroplaning speed for your
airplane, brake firmly without causing
the tires to skid. Treat a wet runway
like you’d treat one with a film of ice.
• Execute an immediate go-around
if you detect hydroplaning upon
touchdown, unless you have a
runway much longer than your
computed landing distance with a
very healthy margin.
• Divert to a more suitable airport if
a wet runway is combined with a
significant crosswind or component.
You might hydroplane off the side or
end of the runway.
• Some pilots advocate retracting flaps
to put more weight on the wheels,
increasing braking and directional
control. Attempting to retract flaps
during the landing roll is a common
cause of inadvertent landing gear
retraction in retractable gear airplanes.
I recommend against this practice in
retractable gear airplanes.
Hydroplaning is one of those
things we read about but we really
can’t practice unless we’re doing
it for real. Any time the runway is
wet, think about the possibility of
dynamic hydroplaning and adjust your
technique to avoid the threat.
T&T
•
Thomas P. Turner is an ATP
CFII/MEI, holds a master's
Degree in Aviation Safety, and
was the 2010 National FAA Safety
Team Representative of the Year.
Subscribe to Tom’s free FLYING
LESSONS Weekly e-newsletter at
www.mastery-flight-training.com.
National Flight Simulator
Sixth Page
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TWIN & TURBINE • 21
by Rebecca Groom Jacobs
WHO:
1. You’ve been at Piper more than 28 years. Can you describe your start at the company?
Bart Jones
I was hired into the training department in 1989, back when Piper used to perform all piston
training in-house, with both new and old aircraft. Stuart Millar, Piper’s owner at that time, held the
belief that we needed to train in all airplanes because of the intangible benefits – can’t put a dollar
figure on accidents you don’t have. So, during my first five years I provided type-specific training
to pilots in Senecas, Aerostars, Saratogas, Cherokees, Seminoles, Super Cubs, Malibus and others. It
was a really fun time, and I met a lot of great people I am still friends with today.
WHERE:
Vero Beach, FL
POSITION:
Piper Aircraft Chief Pilot,
Senior Manager of
Production Flight Test
CAREER HIGHLIGHTS:
Ratings: Seaplane,
Tailwheel, Single-Engine
Commercial and
Multi-Engine ATP
Hours: 10,000+
22 • TWIN & TURBINE
2. What are your current responsibilities within the company?
I am the chief pilot, as well as senior manager of production flight test. I am essentially responsible
for anyone who flies within the company with the exception of engineering test flight. I also act as
the corporate pilot, check out sales pilots, perform demo flights, transport aircraft to trade shows,
etc. But I spend the bulk of my time flying production test flights across the whole product line. Each
aircraft has its own extensive flight test procedure designated by the FAA prior to certification. We
are the ones who verify it meets those operational standards.
3. In your career, what have been some of the biggest shifts in the industry?
I’d say the growth in avionics and cockpit automation has been the biggest shift. Airplanes have not
changed all that much otherwise. But the automation has made both airplanes and pilots different.
The whole attitude of flying is different. Back when I started, you didn’t expect the autopilot to work
and now it’s a shock if it doesn’t. With GPS, flight planning has dramatically changed as well – it
takes a lot less pilot input. Cost is another shift, but I have my own theory on that topic.
November 2017
4. Can you elaborate on your cost theory?
There is this feeling now that flying costs more than it should
since it was a lot cheaper back in the 1950’s, 60’s, and 70’s. That’s
the time a lot of us grew up in. But if you go back farther than
that and look at private flying in the 1930’s and 40’s, relatively
speaking it was as expensive, if not more, than it even is now.
I honestly think the era between the end of WWII through the
early 1980’s was the anomaly and what we are experiencing
now is the norm. It’s an interesting way to look at it.
Piper’s most recently debuted model is the M600. What sets
it apart from other M-Class models?
The range and payload. With 260 gallons of fuel, you have
six hours of range plus the ability to offload a significant
amount of fuel and still have more range than you need on
an average-length trip. It’s a clean-sheet wing, making it a
completely different performing airplane. Usually, with smaller
turbine-engine aircraft, you are compromised with range/
payload, but Piper has cracked the code with this one. T&T
•
Jacobs is a private pilot and general aviation enthusiast.
In 2012, she earned her business degree in marketing
from Oklahoma State University. Since then, she
has specialized in aviation-specific marketing,
working first for Piper Aircraft, and then as an
aviation marketing specialist at Sullivan Higdon & Sink.
Jacobs is now serving as the Director of Communications
at the consulting firm Groom Aviation.You can contact
Rebecca at rebecca@groomaviation.com.
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TWIN & TURBINE • 23
The Worldwide General Aviation
owner/operators and chief pilots of these aircra
TOTAL MARKET COVERAGE
Jets – 15,630
Chief Pilots & Owners
Count
61
27
30
53
42
244
126
373
53
41
112
52
295
9
183
298
269
155
84
206
169
360
63
222
146
46
299
19
249
463
60
163
44
140
377
126
256
61
238
238
Aircraft
AIRBUS ACJ319
ASTRA 1125
ASTRA 1125SP
ASTRA 1125SPX
BEECHJET 400
BEECHJET 400A
BOEING BBJ
CHALLENGER 300
CHALLENGER 600
CHALLENGER 601-1A
CHALLENGER 601-3A
CHALLENGER 601-3R
CHALLENGER 604
CHALLENGER 800
CITATION 500
CITATION 525
CITATION BRAVO
CITATION CJ1
CITATION CJ1+
CITATION CJ2
CITATION CJ2+
CITATION CJ3
CITATION CJ3+
CITATION CJ4
CITATION ENCORE
CITATION ENCORE+
CITATION EXCEL
CITATION I
CITATION I/SP
CITATION II
CITATION II/SP
CITATION III
CITATION LATITUDE
CITATION M2
CITATION MUSTANG
CITATION S/II
CITATION SOVEREIGN
CITATION SOVEREIGN+
CITATION ULTRA
CITATION V
24 • TWIN & TURBINE
29
94
254
24
210
205
1
46
3
230
41
133
60
235
239
84
22
21
174
21
68
16
24
2
30
9
71
68
206
7
92
150
23
103
180
128
19
207
9
21
285
9
462
70
24
CITATION VI
CITATION VII
CITATION X
CITATION X+
CITATION XLS
CITATION XLS+
DIAMOND I
DIAMOND IA
DORNIER ENVOY 3
ECLIPSE EA500
EMBRAER LEGACY 500
EMBRAER LEGACY 600
EMBRAER LEGACY 650
EMBRAER PHENOM 100
EMBRAER PHENOM 300
FALCON 10
FALCON 100
FALCON 200
FALCON 2000
FALCON 2000EX
FALCON 20C
FALCON 20C-5
FALCON 20D
FALCON 20D-5
FALCON 20E
FALCON 20E-5
FALCON 20F
FALCON 20F-5
FALCON 50
FALCON 50-40
FALCON 50EX
FALCON 900
FALCON 900C
FALCON 900EX
GLOBAL 5000
GLOBAL EXPRESS
GULFSTREAM G-100
GULFSTREAM G-200
GULFSTREAM G-300
GULFSTREAM G-400
GULFSTREAM G-450
GULFSTREAM G-500
GULFSTREAM G-550
GULFSTREAM G-II
GULFSTREAM G-IIB
140
169
282
172
36
10
5
6
11
22
12
12
6
107
56
193
33
191
34
352
35
80
148
7
4
1
6
12
10
17
2
14
39
10
7
16
39
10
100
4
29
167
33
380
13
GULFSTREAM G-III
GULFSTREAM G-IV
GULFSTREAM G-IVSP
GULFSTREAM G-V
HAWKER 1000A
HAWKER 125-1A
HAWKER 125-1AS
HAWKER 125-3A/RA
HAWKER 125-400A
HAWKER 125-400AS
HAWKER 125-400B
HAWKER 125-600A
HAWKER 125-600AS
HAWKER 125-700A
HAWKER 4000
HAWKER 400XP
HAWKER 750
HAWKER 800A
HAWKER 800B
HAWKER 800XP
HAWKER 800XPI
HAWKER 850XP
HAWKER 900XP
JET COMMANDER 1121
JET COMMANDER 1121B
JETSTAR 6
JETSTAR 731
JETSTAR II
LEARJET 23
LEARJET 24
LEARJET 24A
LEARJET 24B
LEARJET 24D
LEARJET 24E
LEARJET 24F
LEARJET 25
LEARJET 25B
LEARJET 25C
LEARJET 25D
LEARJET 28
LEARJET 31
LEARJET 31A
LEARJET 35
LEARJET 35A
LEARJET 36
33
29
194
174
99
4
12
261
478
111
7
19
2
1
24
1
19
3
68
15
6
75
5
32
65
LEARJET 36A
LEARJET 40
LEARJET 45
LEARJET 45XR
LEARJET 55
LEARJET 55B
LEARJET 55C
LEARJET 60
PILATUS PC-12/45
PREMIER I
SABRELINER 40
SABRELINER 40A
SABRELINER 40EL
SABRELINER 40R
SABRELINER 60
SABRELINER 60AELXM
SABRELINER 60ELXM
SABRELINER 60EX
SABRELINER 65
SABRELINER 80
SABRELINER 80SC
WESTWIND 1
WESTWIND 1123
WESTWIND 1124
WESTWIND 2
House Ad
Full Page
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Turboprops – 10,774
Chief Pilots & Owners
Count
Aircraft
7
356
1,202
2
32
132
13
264
58
38
57
21
178
ADAM A500
CARAVAN 208
CARAVAN 208B
CARAVAN II
CHEYENNE 400
CHEYENNE I
CHEYENNE IA
CHEYENNE II
CHEYENNE III
CHEYENNE IIIA
CHEYENNE IIXL
CHEYENNE IV
CONQUEST I
November 2017
ion & Business Aviation Markets
aircraft ALL RECEIVE Twin &Turbine every month
Do you want your marketing message
to reach these key decision makers?
It will when you advertise in Twin & Turbine
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252
46
68
61
34
510
20
19
146
181
11
564
57
286
19
11
70
214
58
106
94
885
95
8
95
4
22
81
347
34
194
358
82
96
125
14
245
156
25
CONQUEST II
JETSTREAM 31
JETSTREAM 32
JETSTREAM 41
KING AIR 100
KING AIR 200
KING AIR 200C
KING AIR 200T
KING AIR 250
KING AIR 300
KING AIR 300LW
KING AIR 350
KING AIR 350C
KING AIR 350I
KING AIR 90
KING AIR A/B90
KING AIR A100
KING AIR A200
KING AIR A90
KING AIR A90-1
KING AIR B100
KING AIR B200
KING AIR B200C
KING AIR B200CT
KING AIR B200GT
KING AIR B200SE
KING AIR B200T
KING AIR B90
KING AIR C90
KING AIR C90-1
KING AIR C90A
KING AIR C90B
KING AIR C90GT
KING AIR C90GTI
KING AIR C90GTX
KING AIR C90SE
KING AIR E90
KING AIR F90
KING AIR F90-1
7
25
21
28
45
18
5
9
9
66
1
26
18
33
11
18
18
25
39
519
149
483
3
5
5
6
101
70
293
101
5
73
37
141
144
83
26
55
MERLIN 300
MERLIN IIB
MERLIN III
MERLIN IIIA
MERLIN IIIB
MERLIN IIIC
MERLIN IV
MERLIN IV-A
MERLIN IV-C
MITSUBISHI MARQUISE
MITSUBISHI MU-2D
MITSUBISHI MU-2F
MITSUBISHI MU-2J
MITSUBISHI MU-2K
MITSUBISHI MU-2L
MITSUBISHI MU-2M
MITSUBISHI MU-2N
MITSUBISHI MU-2P
MITSUBISHI SOLITAIRE
PILATUS PC-12 NG
PILATUS PC-12/47
PIPER MERIDIAN
ROCKWELL 680T TURBO
ROCKWELL 680V TURBO II
ROCKWELL 680W TURBO II
ROCKWELL 681 HAWK
SOCATA TBM-700A
SOCATA TBM-700B
SOCATA TBM-850
SOCATA TBM-900
STARSHIP 2000A
TURBO COMMANDER 1000
TURBO COMMANDER 690
TURBO COMMANDER 690A
TURBO COMMANDER 690B
TURBO COMMANDER 840
TURBO COMMANDER 900
TURBO COMMANDER 980
Twin Piston – 6,961
Owners
Count
Aircraft
39
1,459
3
351
112
3
301
197
176
531
90
BARON 56 TC
BARON 58
BARON 58 PA
BARON 58P
BARON 58TC
BARON A56TC
BARON G58
BEECH DUKE B60
CESSNA 340
CESSNA 340A
CESSNA 402B
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CESSNA 402C
CESSNA 404 TITAN
CESSNA 414
CESSNA 414A
CHANCELLOR
CESSNA 421
CESSNA 421A
CESSNA 421B
CESSNA 421C
CESSNA T303
PIPER 601P AEROSTAR
PIPER 602P AEROSTAR
PIPER CHIEFTAIN
PIPER MOJAVE
PIPER NAVAJO
ROCKWELL 500 SHRIKE
ROCKWELL 500A SHRIKE
ROCKWELL 500B SHRIKE
ROCKWELL 500S SHRIKE
ROCKWELL 500U SHRIKE
ROCKWELL 520
COMMANDER
ROCKWELL 560
140
29
266
363
49
41
362
610
53
116
25
488
24
835
16
27
82
47
5
16
7
15
13
8
17
7
13
17
8
COMMANDER
ROCKWELL 560A
COMMANDER
ROCKWELL 560E
COMMANDER
ROCKWELL 560F
COMMANDER
ROCKWELL 680 SUPER
ROCKWELL 680E
ROCKWELL 680F
COMMANDER
ROCKWELL 680FL
GRAND COMMANDER
ROCKWELL 680FLP
GRAND LINER
High Performance
Move-Up Singles –
5,602
Owners
Count
Aircraft
228
462
59
412
21
54
1
751
2,905
241
468
BEECH BONANZA
CESSNA 182
CESSNA 206
CESSNA P210N
CESSNA P210R
CESSNA T182
CESSNA T206
CIRRUS SR20
CIRRUS SR22
PIPER MALIBU
PIPER MIRAGE
38,967
TOTAL AIRCRAFT
John Shoemaker, Advertising Director
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(800) 773-7798 • (231) 946-3712 • Fax: (231) 946-9588
E-mail: johns@villagepress.com • www.twinandturbine.com
November 2017
TWIN & TURBINE • 25
Flying the Fortress
by Doug Rozendaal
Editor’s Note: One of the highlights of EAA AirVenture 2017 was witnessing two B-29s flying together
for the first time since they were in military service more than 50 years ago. Longtime Twin & Turbine
readers may remember writer Doug Rozendaal, who through his prolific flying career, contributed a
number of articles to this magazine. As Chief of Staff of the Commemorative Air Force and a longtime
warbird pilot and enthusiast, he is a regular on the air show circuit, flying any number of warbirds.
Earlier this year, he began flying the Boeing B-29 Superfortress, so we brought him back to find out
what it is like to fly one of the biggest warbirds in the fleet.
M
y first job in aviation was over 30 years ago flying right
seat in a DC-3 hauling overnight express packages.
The co-pilot’s primary responsibility was humping
7,000 pounds of overnight letters and packages up the 12-degree
incline created when the airplane was sitting on its tailwheel.
That ignited a passion for old airplanes and that led me to
warbirds. There, I came to appreciate the stories these airplanes
can tell and the excitement they can create for young people,
of all ages. (Yes, airplanes can make people feel young again.)
PHOTO CREDIT: ADAM GLOWASKI
26 • TWIN & TURBINE
I have been richly blessed to fly many of the significant
airplanes of WWII. Museums and private collectors need
someone to fly an airplane and that provides an opportunity
to fly a new type. For the last several years the leader of
the Commemorative Air Force B-29/B-24 Squadron had
been pushing me to come to their spring ground school and
November 2017
responsibility is to manage that checklist. That, plus learning
the flight manual and the limitations. There is quite a bit of
head work to do before arriving at the airplane to fly.
PHOTO CREDIT: ADAM GLOWASKI
“FIFI” is a big airplane. With a 141-foot wingspan and
110,000-pound gross weight, it is three times bigger than
anything I had flown previously. Patience is not only a virtue
in big piston airplanes, it is mandatory. From the time the crew
assembles at the nose for a briefing until the airplane leaves
the ground is at minimum 30 minutes. The flight engineer
has already been at the airplane for a couple of hours fueling,
oiling and pre-flighting the airplane. Each engine has up to
90 gallons of oil, and it might require 15 minutes of idle time
on a cool morning to reach 40-degree Celsius oil temp before
brake release.
start the process of checking out in the CAF B-29, “FIFI.” This
spring I agreed, and so I went to Texas for the annual spring
ground school.
WWII aircraft are remarkably simple and share very
common systems. The U.S. military recognized the benefits of
standardization and many of the components are interchangeable
between various models and even manufacturers. The
voltage regulators are almost universal from a trainer built by
North American to a bomber built by Boeing.
If the appliances are the same then the systems will almost
certainly be similar. So often learning a new aircraft type is
about learning the differences. The B-29 is a Boeing product
and Boeing airplanes are almost entirely electric. Since I had
not flown the B-17, I had some extra learning to accomplish.
But with some home study prior to arrival, it all made sense,
and I passed the written test at the end.
The next thing was to get scheduled for initial flight training.
Back to the books again. One of the squadron members is a
gifted technical writer and he has crafted expanded checklist
procedures and flight profiles that make the transition easier.
There are six pages of a challenge-and-response checklist that
must be accomplished before the airplane leaves the ground,
and five more before it is landed and parked. The co-pilot’s main
November 2017
Crew is a key word in flying the B-29. The normal crew in
wartime was 11 and “FIFI” flies with 6. A pilot, co-pilot and
flight engineer up front, plus left and right scanners, and a rear
scanner/APU operator in the tailcone. These crew members have
key roles in normal flight, and critical roles in emergencies.
Getting the airplane in the air is a ceremony and requires clear
and concise communication from everyone.
None of the WWII bombers had nose wheel steering and all
of them have marginal brakes. Learning to taxi them is often
harder than flying them. Fortunately, my B-25 experience
was a huge help in taxiing the airplane. The brake chambers
on these airplanes are large and the brake valves are basically
pressure regulators. There is no feedback in the pedal other
than a spring and a mild application of brake results in the fluid
filling the brake chamber very slowly. Holding the appropriate
pedal pressure, and waiting until the chamber fills will yield
a nice brake application, but pushing the pedal until you feel,
or hear, the brake engage, will result in a brake pressure far
in excess of what’s desired. The brake barks, the tire squeals,
the airplane lurches, in one direction and the pilot releases
the brake quickly, only to have to restart the procedure on the
other side to stop the excursion.
The CAF Airpower History Tour takes “FIFI” to airports
unaccustomed to aircraft having a wingspan 23 feet longer
than a 737. This often requires shutting down the No. 1 and 4
engines and “X-ing” the propellers to clear taxiway lights and
signs. The outboard propellers clear the ground by a measly
28 inches, and the inboards only 14 inches. Obstructions and
FOD are a major concern while taxiing.
The flight engineer (FE) is the hardest-working person on
the airplane. The FE operates everything but the flight controls,
gear and the flaps, including providing the hydraulic pressure to
the brakes. The pilots have throttles, but other than for taxi and
initial takeoff roll we never touch them. Power settings are called
to the FE as needed. To eliminate confusion, power settings are
called as individual numbers. So, lined up on the runway before
brake release the pilot flying might call, “Engineer’s throttles,
set manifold three-zero.” Flap settings are called as “Flaps 15.”
Lined up on the runway with the engines spooled up to 30
inches of manifold pressure, the pilot flying takes the throttles
and releases the brakes. The 16-foot, 7-inch propellers provide a
TWIN & TURBINE • 27
The real work is done by the flight engineer who controls nearly every
aspect of the airplane, including the throttles. The pilot controls the
throttles during taxi and the initial part of the takeoff roll. After that
the FE has everything.
The airplane accelerates quickly, the gear comes up and
the airplane climbs away nicely. This was not always the case.
The B-29 was fitted with the first version of the Curtis-Wright
R-3350-57. It was an engine before its time, and it suffered from
numerous problems. Engine failures, engine fires and serious
overheating problems were all just a way of life in the B-29. Large
power reductions immediately after takeoff were mandatory
and flying her was a struggle between cooling and climbing.
Many lives were lost when B-29s ditched in the Pacific Ocean
after engine problems.
very strong left turning tendency. Using the brakes on takeoff roll
is verboten, so the hot tip is to have the rudder fully deflected and
lead with some power on the left side as the brakes are released.
Early in the takeoff roll before the rudder is fully effective,
full rudder deflection left and right may be required. The first
decision speed is 80 miles per hour. Any problem prior to 80
is an abort. The next decision speed is 125. Directional control
cannot be maintained with an engine out below this speed.
Winner Aviation
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www.winner-aviation.com
mailto:mx@winner-aviation.com
The CAF flew “FIFI” until 2005 with the original engines
and they were so unreliable the decision was made to ground
the airplane. She sat sadly in our hangar in Midland, Texas for
five years. It seemed she might never fly again, but that’s not
how the CAF works. The entrepreneurial spirit of our members
rose to the occasion and it was decided that maybe she could
be refit with better engines. The problem was that the engine
mounts were specific to the -57 engines and the nose case gear
reduction needed to turn the huge propellers was a ridiculously
low 0.35 to 1 reduction.
The solution was to build engines using the nose and accessory
case from the -57 engine and the power section from a much
more advanced 3350 used in the Douglas AD-1 Skyraider.
The combination was tested on a test stand and it worked.
This power section was significantly different and it required
extensive modifications to the cowlings and an entirely new
exhaust system, and it had to be done for all four engines. It was
a massive undertaking made possible by a major donation from
Jim Cavanaugh of the Cavanaugh Flight Museum in Addison,
Texas. The new hybrid engines have performed very well and
normal climb power settings can be maintained.
Once the airplane is up and flying at a cruise power, she
indicates 190-200 mph. Add a 2 percent increase for every 1,000
feet of altitude, 200 KTAS is a good flight plan speed at 6,500
ft. This while gobbling up 500 gallons in the first hour and 400
per hour subsequent. But topped off with 5,460 gallons of avgas,
she could go a very long way.
The flight controls are fly by wire, wire cables. There is no
hydraulic boost on anything. The best way to fly is with one
hand on the yoke and the other on the trim wheel. Push or
pull to achieve the desired pitch and relieve that pressure by
following with trim. The ailerons are fairly light by comparison,
but the response is slow. She is very stable in pitch and roll and
relatively stable in yaw at cruise speeds. Frankly delightful to
fly in smooth air.
Large radial engines do not like abrupt power changes so
the secret to an arrival is planning ahead. Initial flap speed in
220, but in order for the scanners to inspect the landing gear,
it is lowered at 180 mph before initial flap extension. “Manifold
26” in level flight will get the airplane below that speed easily
and the fun begins.
28 • TWIN & TURBINE
November 2017
Every pane of glass in the nose seems to have a different index of refraction. Items appear to move around when viewed through
different windows.
As the airplane slows, the f light controls become
considerably less responsive. And the airplane becomes less
stable, especially in yaw. Downwind at 170, base and 160,
and decelerating to stable approach at 125. Stall speed in the
landing configuration is 95 and the airplane is now a bit of a
handful. The secret, as in any airplane is small corrections
made early. Aileron inputs will result in adverse yaw that,
uncorrected, will drag the nose several feet in the opposite
direction of aileron application. Manifold 22 or 24 seems to
be the power setting for the final. Getting slow in the landing
Covington
Half Page
4/C Ad
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November 2017
TWIN & TURBINE • 29
configuration is a bad idea. It takes a big power increase to
get the speed back.
the tailskid is 5 degrees above level. This means that if the nose
rises more the 5 degrees on landing, the tail will strike the skid.
The sight picture is unlike anything else. The entire nose of
the airplane is covered in small windows with hefty frames to
accommodate cabin pressurization. Every window seems to
have a different index of refraction causing landmarks outside
to appear in different places depending on which pane of glass
they are observed through. Not having a nose in the traditional
sense on the airplane also is a new experience. But if the airplane
is stable on glideslope and on speed at about 50 feet, the call
is “Ease ‘em off.”
Airplanes are intended to be flown and not driven. This
means that for the most part, they should leave and return to
the earth at the slowest possible speed. If the pilot happens to
make the “ease ‘em off” call slightly early, or late and the airplane
starts to settle, or bounces, any aviator knows that pulling back
will soften the impending arrival. Wrong! The CAF paints the
tailskid bright red and it bears the signature of the most recent
remover of the paint. (At this writing that would be the author
whose signature is augmented with two hash marks.)
This is the FE’s que to begin a gradual power reduction and
the pilot flares in concert with the power reduction. If all goes
according to plan, the airplane can be rolled on the runway in
a most pleasing fashion, the nose is lowered and the residual
thrust from the gigantic propellers continue to pull the airplane
down the runway until the brakes are applied, CAREFULLY.
Nothing to it. Right?
A 5-degree landing pitch window from nosewheel first to
tail strike is pretty narrow. With both hands on the yoke and
the engineer on the throttles, calling for some power and
getting the engines spun up before the arrival just isn’t going
to happen. The solution is to swallow your pride, and ride out
the firm arrival. The airplane takes it in stride, but it is not very
rewarding to the pilot flying.
There are some other idiosyncrasies. On the rear of the
fuselage below the horizontal stabilizer there is an electrically
controlled tail skid that raises and lowers with the gear. One
of the responsibilities of the Aft scanner/APU operator is to
ensure that it extends. A line drawn from the main wheel to
The reward in flying warbirds is not a “roll-on landing.”
Flying these historic airplanes is about using them as a hook
to bring young Americans to the airport. Our hope is they
might come to know and understand the price that was paid
for their freedom. The old CAF cliché “Lest We Forget” is more
With no hydaulic boost on anything, the best way to fly is with one hand on the yoke and the other on the trim wheel.
30 • TWIN & TURBINE
November 2017
FiFi’s TOLD card for a lightly loaded short flight at 86,000 pounds,
nearly 25,000 pounds below gross weight. She was loaded at just
over half tanks, with 2,900 gallons of 100LL on board.
important today than ever. It’s so a granddad or grandmother
will bring the current generation to the airport to see and touch
an old airplane. Share stories about a time when we were losing
the war in the Pacific. About a brother on a ship in the Pacific
who never came home. Or a neighbor who walked on to the
beach at Normandy and survived but brought home the scars
left by walking among the bodies on the blood-stained sand of
Omaha Beach.
Preserving and flying these airplanes to preserve those
stories, good landing or bad landing, is rewarding work. And
occasionally, a “roll-on landing” is nice too, especially nice
because you know you earned it. T&T
•
On any given day, you might find Doug Rozendaal f lying aerobatics in a P-51 at an air show, flying a twin or
turbine doing pilot service or charter, or flying his B-55
Baron or F-1 Rocket working in his lubricant, packaging
and real estate businesses. He holds an ATP, CFII, MEI,
SES, and several type ratings in World War II aircraft.
Email Doug at dougr@petroblend.com.
Pacific Coast Avionics
Half Page
4/C Ad
www.pca.aero
The pitch window for landing is very narrow. In accordance
with CAF custom, after scraping the tail-skid, the author takes
ownership of the infraction by signing the new paint.
November 2017
TWIN & TURBINE • 31
From the Flight Deck
by Kevin R. Dingman
Deferred
Maintenance
“Pay me now, or pay me later.”
(Fram oil filter slogan, Circa 1971)
DMI (Deferred Maintenance Item) – postponing
maintenance activities in order to save costs,
maintain a schedule or to meet budget
constraints. The failure to perform such repairs
could lead to higher long-term costs, component
deterioration and ultimately, component failure.
L
ately, the Duke has been enjoying some fixes and upgrades: new boots, overhauls on the mags
and props, avionics upgrades including a nav/comm, WAAS GPS and an ADS-B. But the air
conditioning compressor blew a gasket (literally), the 48-year-old KWX-50 black-and-white
weather radar only receives The Dick Van Dyke Show and the engines are nearing TBO. With just
300 hours to go, I’m staring at $160,000 for two overhauled TIO-541’s and $25,000 for a new color
radar. Everything is relative and we have readers who regularly spend much more than this; I get
that. But to carry four people and luggage, at 20,000 feet and 220 kts, on an airline pilot’s salary, the
Duke suits me.
A Budget Far, Far Away
Long past its useful life, Kevin Dingman’s 48-year-old KWX-50 black-and-white
weather radar is only good for watching The Dick Van Dyke Show.
32 • TWIN & TURBINE
Many readers have written describing their
experiences and difficulties maintaining,
upgrading and even sustaining, their airplanes.
When our receivables under-fly the payables,
difficult decisions must be made. We often
purchase a little bit more airplane than we can
afford, forgetting that component issues, new
technologies, regulations, insurance, training
and other owner-pilot needs and whims will
prompt unforeseen spending. I’m not immune
to this forgetfulness and whimsical spending
because the Duke and I are sometimes far apart
on a budget. As described above, my $250,000
airplane currently “needs” yet another $185,000
worth of stuff in addition to the regular items
that break. But asking your shop to defer
maintenance items to massage the budget
can put your AMT (Aviation Maintenance
November 2017
Give Me A Break
Outside of the above conditions,
section 91.213 addresses inoperative
equipment and provides relief from
section 91.205 through the use of an FAA
approved MEL. The MEL allows flight
with components either inoperative or
degraded. It’s aircraft-specific and spells
out which equipment may be inoperative
along with procedures required to
operate under very specific conditions
while maintaining airworthiness. If a
component is not listed in the MEL, the
item should be considered as required:
the wings, landing gear and motors
are obvious examples. The MEL will
list actions and procedures that must
be accomplished by the Operator “(O),”
Maintenance “(M)” and Dispatch “(D)” to
use the relief provided by the MEL.
Because maintaining an aircraft is an expensive proposition, aircraft owners often ask
their aircraft maintenance providers to defer noncritical maintenance items. However,
putting off minor issues can sometimes lead to bigger (and perhaps dangerous)
problems down the road.
Another avenue in which we may continue to fly with missing
Technician) in an uncomfortable position of not only liability,
pieces-parts is the CDL (Configuration Deviation List). Examples
but morality. The maintenance shop I use has encountered
of CDL items are missing vortex generators, static discharge
many owners experiencing this conundrum and asked me to
wicks or fairings and panels. For large aircraft, a separate NEF
write an article emphasizing the importance and long-term
list (Nonessential Equipment Furnishings) may include things
value in keeping up with both large and small maintenance
like window shades or galley equipment. However, when multiple
needs. Maybe they were trying to tell me something.
operators discover an operational issue or defect with a critical
You Can’t Make Me
While some shops may require that service bulletins (SB’s)
are met and recommended overhaul times for components
are not exceeded, only AD’s (Airworthiness Directives) and
mandatory inspections, whether accomplished every 100 hours,
on a progressive schedule, or as an annual inspection, are
required by the FAR’s. Company flight departments or insurance
companies may impose additional compliance conditions.
However, even if found during a mandatory inspection,
the FAA allows us to defer some of the non-airworthy items
our shop may uncover. Title 14 CFR section 91.205 lists the
aircraft equipment and instruments that must be installed and
requires the instruments and equipment to be in an operable
condition. For example, if you don’t have an MEL and CDL
(Minimum Equipment List and Configuration Deviation List,
discussed shortly), you may only fly with certain instruments
inoperative, provided that:
• The inoperative instruments are not basic VFR-day
instruments that were required to get the aircraft certified
in the first place;
Arizona Type Ratings
Quarter Page
4/C Ad
www.arizonatyperatings.com
• The inoperative instruments are not listed in the aircraft’s
equipment list, such as stall warning horns or other items
listed in the type certificate or items required for the type
of flying you’re about to do (such as lighting for night flying);
• The required instruments are not required by an AD;
• The inoperative instruments are deactivated, clearly marked
as inop and are recorded in the maintenance records.
November 2017
TWIN & TURBINE • 33
component, a notice may come to you
in the mail.
A Letter from the IRS
Receiving a SB (Service Bulletin)
or AD (Airworthiness Directive) in
the mail is right up there with a letter
from the IRS. An SB is a notice from
a manufacturer informing operators
of a product improvement or problem.
Having realized that there are distinct
levels of seriousness, manufacturers
may categorize them as informational,
optional, recommended, alert or
mandatory. It may be something minor
like replacing the original metal chains
on the fuel caps with plastic retaining
lanyards, or something severe like a
crankshaft inspection. The first thing
to do is read the section that describes
to whom the AD or SB applies. Affected
users are normally identified by the
component manufacturers name and
serial numbers or part numbers for the
affected component. Although a service
bulletin may be listed as mandatory,
compliance isn’t necessarily required
unless accompanied by an AD. I’ll add
a caveat here: a recent “mandatory” SB
(that is not yet an AD) for a piston-engine
component or described failure to comply
with the SB as possibly resulting in “a
sudden and catastrophic failure of the
engine.” Try justifying non-compliance
with that one when someone prosecutes
you for crashing into their pre-school.
An Airworthiness Directive (AD) is
issued when the FAA believes that a
perilous condition exists in a product
(engine, airframe, appliance or propeller)
and the potentially unsafe condition
needs special inspection, alteration or
repair. An AD will often reference a
service bulletin as a method of complying
with the AD. An example of an AD is the
wing attach bolts on many Beechcraft
and the pressure decay test on many
combustion heaters for the cabin. AD’s
are legally enforceable regulations, and
if you own or operate the listed item,
compliance is mandatory.
Don’t put off until tomorrow,
what you can do today.
– Benjamin Franklin
(and your AMT)
AOPA Product
Half Page
4/C Ad
Jet Journal Section
www.aopa.org
34 • TWIN & TURBINE
We can agree that the following
are critical components for keeping
the airplane in the air: The wings,
empennage, fuselage and flight controls.
If any of these are missing or severely
damaged, we will have an aircraft control,
weight and balance or life support
issue. Those components are followed
very closely by the propulsion system
that may include propellers or turbine
components and a fuel storage and
delivery system. We won’t necessarily
die without a propulsion system, but an
off-airport landing in a twin-and-turbine
style airplane would be interesting. A
landing gear system is next on our list
of priorities so that we may land on a
nice surface of our choosing. Again, this
system isn’t needed for survival, but it
should increase our odds during the
landing. With the above axioms in mind,
consider the following list of squawks that
owners (myself included) most often ask
AMT’s to defer, and my experience with
some of them:
November 2017
Simcom
Full Page
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www.simulator.com
November 2017
TWIN & TURBINE • 35
Fuel Leaks
I once had a slow drip from a wingtank. The fuel bladder quick-drain
eventually gave way and the entire
right system leaked out. Only the
crossfeed kept the motor running.
focus
Metal in an Oil Filter
We found three bad lifters and cam
lobes on the right motor. Repairs
were made.
Brake Discs and Pads
A fellow Duke owner’s brakes failed
and he went off the end of the runway.
Flight Controls with Corrosion
Haven’t seen this one yet, but I did
have an autopilot trim issue because
the tension on the elevator cable
was wrong.
Worn Fluid Hoses
A very small engine-oil leak eventually
(two years) exposed itself when the
fitting became loose enough to cause
a large drop in oil pressure. I shut it
down and landed single engine to LPV
minimums.
What started as a deferred maintenance issue – a small oil leak – on Kevin Dingman’s
Beechcraft Duke led to a drop in oil pressure. This required an inflight engine shutdown and
landing to LPV minimums in rain.
Overhaul of Old or HighTime Props
My left prop once went into feather
on landing roll.
Overhaul of Prop Governors
No experience with this one yet but we
don’t want the prop to run away on us.
Low Compression on Cylinders
(can’t we go another year?)
Guilty as charged. I pushed my last
set of motors 300 hours past TBO
by replacing cylinders as necessary.
But this technique could allow a
catastrophic failure of one cylinder
to trash the rest of the motor.
It’s Not Whimsical Spending
Janitrol Aero
1/3 Page Square
4/C Ad
www.janitrol.aero/SouthWind
36 • TWIN & TURBINE
Like me, you may have asked your
shop to defer some items. Let’s do
our AMT’s and ourselves a favor by
limiting DMI’s and by keeping up with
AD’s, SB’s and recommended TBO’s.
Don’t blow a gasket over the expense or
downtime. It’s not whimsical spending;
we can pay now, or pay more later.
Besides, no one wants an anxious AMT,
an unresolved AD/SB or to watch “I
Dream Of Jeannie” on a black-andwhite display.
T&T
•
Kevin Dingman has been f lying
for more than 40 years. He’s an
ATP typed in the B737 and DC9
with 23,000 hours in his logbook.
A retired Air Force major, he flew
the F-16 and later performed as
an USAF Civil Air Patrol Liaison
Officer. He flies volunteer missions for
the Christian organization Wings of
Mercy, is employed by a major airline,
and owns and operates a Beechcraft
Duke. Contact Kevin at dinger10d@
gmail.com.
November 2017
NATIONAL BUSINESS AVIATION ASSOCIATION
focus
The Fight Against
ATC Privatization Continues
by Ed Bolen NBAA President and CEO
A
s Twin & Turbine
readers are certainly
aware, NBAA and its
members have been hard at
work this year as part of an
historic coalition of voices
opposing privatization of air
traffic control (ATC) services in the United States.
The recent passage of a funding extension for the
FAA did not end this fight; to the contrary, we can
expect backers of this controversial plan – backed
by powerful airline interests – to continue pushing
their agenda in Congress, and it is imperative that our
shared aviation community remain steadfast in our
opposition to them.
Privatization raises a host of troubling questions,
most notably the very real possibility that once the
ATC system is governed by what will essentially be
an airline cartel, the private entity could assume
authority for taxation, investment and access to the
nation’s airports and airspace.
This scheme also raises concerns from a financial
standpoint. Contrary to proponents’ claims that a
privatized ATC will save costs and improve efficiency, a
recent study by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget
Office estimates that privatizing ATC in the U.S.
could increase the nation’s budget deficit by nearly
$100 billion.
Despite these and other red flags, proponents for
ATC privatization are pulling out all the stops to rally
support for their cause. As part of their efforts, they
and their third-party surrogates are carrying a proprivatization message that vilifies business aviation
in print, broadcast and online placements.
November 2017
Fortunately, these efforts have been met by a
large, diverse and growing coalition of more than 150
aviation organizations, over 100 business leaders who
are also pilots, more than 100 U.S. mayors, consumer
and agricultural groups, congressional leaders from
both political parties, and a majority of American
citizens – all with concerns or outright opposition to
ATC privatization.
They have been joined by industry legends, with
career-spanning expertise about the nation’s aviation
system, have raised concerns. In a recently produced
TV ad, Miracle on the Hudson pilot Capt. Chesley B.
“Sully” Sullenberger asks: “Why in the world would we
give the keys to the kingdom to the largest airlines?
Because they definitely have their own agenda – to
lower their costs.”
Apollo 13 Commander Jim Lovell said ATC
privatization “would put the traveling public at
unnecessary risk,” adding “it could even endanger
our national security,” and concluding that ATC
privatization “is a solution in search of a problem.”
Most recently, Lovell and Sully were joined by six
legendary military heroes, former team commanders
with the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds and the U.S.
Navy Blue Angels aerial demonstration teams, in also
expressing their fierce opposition to ATC privatization.
With the last-minute passage of an FAA funding
extension, privatization supporters will now look to
other opportunities later this year to get the bill to
the House floor for a vote. Although we have a large,
diverse and growing chorus of opposition to ATC
privatization, we will need to continue to make our
voices heard, and we have the tools to do so.
Continued on page 38
TWIN & TURBINE • 37
NATIONAL BUSINESS AVIATION ASSOCIATION • focus
Continued from page 37
NBAA’s Contact Congress resource provides a means
for using email and social media to alert lawmakers to
the industry’s opposition to privatization. In addition, a
toll-free action line – 1-833-GA-VOICE (1-833-428-6423)
– connects constituents with elected representatives,
along with a brief list of suggested talking points.
The general aviation community is also supporting
a dedicated website – www.ATCNotforSale.com – where
citizens can learn more about the threat from ATC
privatization, and contact their elected officials. A
Facebook page – Air Traffic Control – ATC Not for
Sale – provides regular updates about the concerns
over ATC privatization.
We are at a critical point, one that could determine
the very future of our industry. We have fought hard,
but we know we must do more. Now is the time for
our industry’s resounding voice to be heard.
Business Aviation Responds to Calls for Hurricane Relief
O
ver the past two months, the business aviation
community has mobilized in response to
devastating storms impacting Florida, Texas, and
Puerto Rico. They were aided by a resource established
by NBAA to connect relief organizations to operators
and personnel able to help at a moment’s notice.
NBAA’s Humanitarian Emergency Response
Operator (HERO) database is a list of people in the
business aviation community who are part of disasterresponse mobilization efforts. In the aftermath of
major crises, basic information from the database
is made available to organizations coordinating
relief efforts.
In the days prior to Hurricane Harvey making
landfall along the Texas Gulf Coast, dozens of business
aviation pilots had already volunteered to transport
specialists and supplies into disaster-stricken areas.
Two Texas aircraft brokers – Janine Iannarelli,
president of Par Avion Ltd. and Robin Eissler, COO
of jetAVIVA - worked together to get needed supplies
to victims in the Corpus Christi and Houston regions.
allows us to get what is needed most, to exactly where
it’s needed most.”
Even as Harvey subsided, there was no time to
rest as the next powerful storm, Hurricane Irma,
moved through the Caribbean and Florida. Efforts
initially stood up in response to the earlier storm
quickly transitioned to assisting victims in those areas,
including Operation Airdrop, a volunteer group of GA
pilots organized through social media to coordinate
relief flights.
At this writing, these and other relief organizations
within the aviation community are mobilizing to assist
with recovery efforts following the devastation wrought
by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico. In such times of
crisis, business aviation has always rallied to help
those in need, contributing to relief efforts in profound
and meaningful ways.
To assist with these and other relief efforts,
Conroe-North Houston Regional Airport (CXO) made
a hangar available as a distribution center for general
aviation aircraft to drop off supplies for delivery to
storm victims, while Dassault Aviation called upon one
of its Falcon 900 large-cabin business jets to transport
badly-needed supplies for a Texas community ravaged
by the storm.
“We must be dedicated to helping each other
wherever we can, because we have the perfect tool
available to do so,” said Andrew Ponzoni, the company’s
senior communications manager. “Business aviation
38 • TWIN & TURBINE
November 2017
NATIONAL BUSINESS AVIATION ASSOCIATION • focus
BAI - Promoting Ethics and Integrity in Business Aviation
A
re professional ethics and integrity cornerstones
of your organization? How can you encourage
ethical behavior throughout your aviation
department, charter operation, maintenance facility
or other aviation-related business?
Employees of large flight departments are often
required by their parent company to complete ethics
training annually, but such training is less common
in smaller firms. Once you establish ethics policies,
be sure to train your employees on those policies.
Simply put, ethics are standards that govern the
conduct of members of a society or group, while
integrity is adherence to those standards. Those
are broad, abstract concepts, sometimes difficult to
specifically define and apply to real-life challenges.
“Company ethics training with annual recurrent
requirements is so important,” said Chris Broyhill,
CAM, who is with business aviation consultancy
Mente Group and is a member of NBAA’s
Business Aviation Management Committee. “It
reminds employees about conflicts of interest, travel
policies, confidentiality, social media, discretion and
other ethics-related topics.”
Whether dealing with a human resources issue,
choosing a maintenance vendor, negotiating the
purchase of an aircraft or even just determining
appropriate travel expenses, it is important to
establish and follow guidelines to help employees
act with integrity.
Set expectations for your organization’s employees,
consultants and vendors regarding ethics. These
policies should include a general code of conduct,
as well as policies for travel, conflict of interest,
confidentiality and social media practices.
Broyhill also advised that conducting ethics
training annually, and documenting that training,
can help the company enforce ethics policies
and better manage personnel matters related
to ethics violations. Leaders should consider
offering employees professional training and
certification programs that teach ethics and
promote integrity.
Conflict of interest – or even the appearance of
conflict – can be particularly challenging to define.
Managers and leaders must explain that “income”
does not just mean cash; it may also be in the form
of gifts or other considerations.
Of course, ethics must be demonstrated from the
top down. Setting expectations for ethical behavior,
and training employees on those expectations, is
critically important. Top management’s actions must
be beyond reproach and serve as an example to all.
Likewise, “employment” – typically meaning
receiving a W-2 from an organization – is not the only
way to “work for” an entity, while several common
industry practices – from pilots disclosing alternate
sources of income, to aircraft brokers working on behalf
of both buyers and sellers – may represent potential
conflicts of interest, even if there is no ill intention.
“As leaders, we need to demonstrate and reinforce
this every day,” said Chris Adams, regional sales
manager at FlightSafety International and chairman
of NBAA’s Business Aviation Management Committee.
“Ethical behavior is an overlying governing principle in
my organization. We are held to the highest standards
and are expected to be trustworthy, reliable and
honest. We are respectful of confidentiality and aim
for constant self-improvement and self-development.
Ethics and integrity aren’t just buzzwords – they are
an integral part of our culture.”
Once you have established standards or norms
for your organization, be sure to review and update
them often to help your employees act with integrity.
“Integrity goes hand-in-hand with ethics,” said
Tim Peace, CAM, aviation department manager for
PB Air, LLC, and a member of NBAA’s Business Aviation
Management Committee. “Ethics evolve over time, and
technology can blur lines of integrity,” partly because
identities and relationships can be veiled or unclear.
November 2017
An expanded version of this article originally
appeared in the September/October 2017 issue of
NBAA’s Member Publication, Business Aviation
Insider. Download the magazine app for iOS and
Android tablets and smartphones.
TWIN & TURBINE • 39
NATIONAL BUSINESS AVIATION ASSOCIATION • focus
Graphical Forecast for Aviation Replaces
Text-Based Area Forecasts
O
n Oct. 10, the transition to graphical forecasts for
aviation (GFAs) for the continental U.S. is set to
be complete as traditional textual area forecasts
(FAs) will be discontinued.
The move, in a transition phase since July,
will enable National Weather Service Aviation
Weather Center forecasters to focus their efforts on
maximizing operational benefit to airspace users,
resulting in improved weather information to decisionmakers, FAA officials explained in a notice highlighting
the change.
“The majority of the weather elements contained
in the FA are already available through other NWS
products,” the agency noted. “To maintain continuity
of service, the GFA will ensure the availability of
equivalent information, in addition to adding graphical
displays of the predominant weather, sky cover, and
wind speed and direction.”
GFAs are web-based displays that provide
observations and forecasts of weather phenomena
critical for aviation safety. GFAs cover the continental
U.S., from the surface up to 42,000 feet mean sea
level (MSL). Wind, icing, and turbulence forecasts are
available in 3,000-foot increments from the surface
up to 18,000 feet MSL, and in 6,000-foot increments
from 18,000 feet MSL to 42,000 feet MSL. Turbulence
forecasts are also broken into low (below 18,000 feet
MSL) and high (above 18,000 feet MSL) graphics.
Maximum icing and maximum wind velocity
graphics are also available. Data is time-synchronized
and is available in hourly increments for up to 14 hours
in the past and 15 hours into the future.
“This is a huge step
forward,” says John Kosak,
NBAA Air Traffic Services
project manager for
weather. “The graphical
forecasts provide much
finer resolution than
any text-based forecast
ever c ou ld.” Kosa k
has been representing
business aviation as a
member of the FAA’s
Collaborative DecisionMaking Weather Evaluation Team.
The GFAs will replace
the textual FAs only for the
continental U.S. The FA for
Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico,
Hawaii and the Caribbean
will not change.
40 • TWIN & TURBINE
November 2017
NBAA
Full Page
4/C Ad
www.nbaa.org/join
November 2017
TWIN & TURBINE • 41
NATIONAL BUSINESS AVIATION ASSOCIATION • focus
New Study Reaffirms Industry’s
Contributions to Successful Companies
A
head of NBAA’s Business Aviation Convention &
Exhibition (NBAA-BACE), the largest and most
significant event focused on the global impact
of business aviation to companies and communities
across the nation and around the world, the Association
welcomed a new study of S&P 500 companies
demonstrating that by a host of measures, the use
of business aviation is the sign of a well-managed
enterprise among America’s most highly valued and
well-respected companies.
“This report reaffirms what study after study,
from one decade to the next, have repeatedly found:
smart entrepreneurs and companies understand
the value of business aviation in making them more
efficient, productive, nimble and competitive,” said
NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen. “As this report
makes clear, these are America’s most innovative
companies, most admired companies, best brands,
best corporate citizens, and best places to work.”
The study, “Business Aviation and Top Performing
Companies, 2017,” is the sixth completed by
NEXA Advisors, LLC and focuses on the ways S&P
500 companies utilize business aircraft to create
enterprise value. Analysts examined the financial
performance of the S&P 500 between 2012 and 2017,
and found that, over that period, S&P 500 companies
42 • TWIN & TURBINE
utilizing business aviation to support their missions
outperformed those not using business aviation, as
demonstrated by several key metrics, including drivers
of shareholder value.
The latest NEXA study highlights three additional
financial drivers positively impacted by using business
aviation: Revenue or market share growth, profit
growth and asset efficiency. Non-financial indicators
positively influenced by using business aviation
include customer and employee satisfaction.
The study also indicates that companies that closed
their flight departments experienced less financial
success, compared to those that continued to utilize
business aviation, even during economic downturns.
The study also shows that, using a “best of the best”
analysis, leading of the S&P 500 overwhelmingly use
business aircraft. These include 98 percent of the top
50 among the “World’s Most Admired Companies,”
a list of the global top companies by reputation,
compiled by Fortune magazine, as well as 100
percent of the 100 companies in Forbes magazine’s
listing of “100 Most-Trustworthy Companies
in America.”
This comprehensive report, commissioned for the
No Plane No Gain advocacy initiative, which is
cosponsored by NBAA and the General Aviation
Manufacturers Association (GAMA), may be
downloaded at www.nbaa.org/business-aviation/
nexa-business - aviat ion- and- top -per for mingcompanies-2017.pdf.
November 2017
NBAA
Full Page
4/C Ad
www.nbaa.org/join
November 2017
TWIN & TURBINE • 43
En Route
H
Honeywell’s New iPad App Optimizes Routes
oneywell has released its latest flight planning
application GoDirect Flight Bag Pro. Pilots can create
and file flight plans for easy reference, calculate and
compare aircraft cruise modes to increase performance, and
access real-time weather updates to ensure the aircraft arrives at
the destination on time. GoDirect Flight Bag Pro is available via
an iPad app, and versions for other tablets are in development.
GoDirect Flight Bag Pro’s simple, intuitive interface works
on both domestic and international flights. For access to the
app, pilots only need an annual subscription to GoDirect Flight
Services and an active Honeywell account.
Features of GoDirect Flight Bag Pro:
Flight Plan Overview: To view an upcoming flight route,
pilots can type in or paste a route from a website, email or text
message into the app. Pilots can also view frequently cleared and
optimized routes for best aircraft performance. With in-flight
connectivity, pilots can even make adjustments while in the air.
Flight Bag Pro Performance Calculator: Calculate
multiple cruise modes and determine the most efficient
flight by comparing speed, flight level, time, fuel, cost of the
trip and more.
Trip Kit: Package all of the trip documents into a Trip Kit
to view during flight. Access the latest weather information for
your destination such as icing, winds and temperature, even
prior to takeoff.
Flight Schedule Updates: Pilots can receive real-time
updates to flight schedules when information is released from
air traffic control with a pre-departure clearance, when filing
status changes, or when weather conditions change.
•
To learn more about Honeywell’s GoDirect Flight Services,
visit Honeywell’s website aerospace.honeywell.com.
T&T
Raisbeck Certifies Five-Blade
Prop for King Air 350
R
aisbeck Engineering has received Supple mental Type Certificate (STC) approval from the FAA
for its new Composite five-blade swept propeller for the
Beechcraft King Air 350.
The composite propeller, designed to improve
King Air comfort, performance and efficiency, was developed in
collaboration with Hartzell Propeller. At 106 inches in diameter,
Raisbeck’s propeller reduces weight and contributes to improved
short field and climb performance, while providing strength
and durability expected from modern composites. The new
composite propellers have an extended 3,000-hour, three-year
warranty and unlimited blade life.
“This is a significant milestone in our journey to market
entry for a composite five-blade swept propeller,” said
company CEO and Chief Financial Officer Tony Armstrong.
“We couldn’t be happier and our new propeller will further
enhance the King Air 350 performance. We believe King Air
operators will truly enjoy flying with these new propellers”
Specialized Aero
Quarter Page
4/C Ad
•
The propeller, which are available for immediate delivery,
provides a total weight savings of 47 pounds compared to the
current OEM propeller for the King Air 350.
T&T
www.specializedaero.com
44 • TWIN & TURBINE
November 2017
En Route
P
Certification Imminent for Pilatus PC-24
i lat us ex pect s to obt a i n
certification for its PC-24 light
jet from the European Aviation
Safety Agency (EASA) and the FAA in
December 2017. First customer aircraft
is scheduled by yearend.
The Pilatus PC-24 development
project has now entered its final
certification phase, with the three
PC-24 prototypes having f lown
1,250 f lights and 2,000 hours thus
far. Function reliability tests are
currently underway with P03, which
is a production conforming aircraft.
In preparation for the PC-24’s entry
into service, Pilatus has launched
a 24/7 customer service facility to
provide technical support and spare
parts. The company has also worked
with FlightSafety International to
develop a full-motion simulator
and maintenance training prior
to certification.
Oscar J. Schwenk, chairman of
Pilatus, commented, “I’m very pleased
with the progress of the development
program and am looking forward to
the moment when we are awarded
the type certificate and can hand over
the PC-24 to our first customer. I have
no doubt whatsoever that the future
operators will be more than delighted
with the outstanding performance of
the super versatile jet and the countless
possibilities it offers.”
November 2017
The PC-24 is the first business jet
worldwide designed to take off and land
on very short or unpaved runways,
and to come with a cargo door as
standard. It also boasts a spacious
cabin whose interior can easily be
adapted to personal requirements.
The outstanding flexibility of the PC-24
opens the door on an enviable spectrum
of possibilities, whether as a business
jet, ambulance aircraft or for other
special missions. T& T
•
Statement of Ownership, Management and Monthly Circulation of Twin & Turbine
OWNER: Village Press, Inc. PUBLISHER: Village Press, Inc EDITOR: Dianne White
HEADQUARTERS OF PUBLISHER & PUBLICATION: 2779 Aero Park Dr., Traverse City Michigan 49686
STOCKHOLDERS: Village Press, Inc., David B. Moore, J. Scott Lizenby
BONDHOLDERS, MORTGAGEES,OTHER SECURITY HOLDERS: Fifth/Third Bank – Grand Traverse
CIRCULATION: Average No. Copies each issue during preceding 12 months: A. Total Copies Printed (Net
press run), 16,748; B. Paid and/or Requested Circulation: 1. Mail subscriptions, 8,300; 2. Paid in-county subscriptions, 0; 3. Single copy sales, 0; 4. Other classes mailed through the USPS, 2; C. Total Paid Circulation, 8,302;
D. Free Distribution by Mail,1. Outside County, 7,938; 2. In County, 0; 3. Other Classes, 0; 4. Outside the
mail, 250; E. Total Free Distribution (Sum of D 1-4), 8,188; F. Total Distribution (Sum of C and E), 16,490; G.
Copies Not Distributed, 258; H. Total (Sum of F and G), 16,748; I.Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation,
50; CIRCULATION: Single Issue nearest filing date: A. Total Copies Printed (Net press run), 15,800; B. Paid
and/or Requested Circulation: 1. Mail subscriptions, 7,976; 2. Paid in-county subscriptions, 0; 3. Single copy
sales, 0; 4. Other classes mailed through the USPS, 5; C. Total Paid Circulation, 7,981; D. Free Distribution
by Mail, 1. Outside County, 7,570; 2. In County, 0; 3. Other Classes, 0; 4. Outside the mail, 0; E. Total Free
Distribution (Sum of D 1-4), 7,570; F. Total Distribution (Sum of C and E), 15,551; G. Copies Not Distributed,
249; H. Total (Sum of F and G), 15,800; I.Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation, 51;
J. Scott Lizenby, Financial Officer
Rocky Mountain Propellers Inc.
Sixth Page
B/W Ad
www.rockyprop.com
mailto:rockyprop@rockyprop.com
TWIN & TURBINE • 45
Ad Index
Preferred Airparts, LLC
Quarter Page
BW Ad
www.preferredairparts.com
mailto:sales2@preferredairparts.com
1st Source ........Inside Back Cover
National Flight Simulator ........... 21
Advent Aircraft Systems Inc. ....... 3
NBAA ... Inside Front Cover 41, 43
American Aviation ..................... 7
Pacific Coast Avionics .............. 31
AOPA Insurance ......................34
Partners in Aviation......Back Cover
Arizona Type Ratings ............... 33
Performance Aircraft ............... 19
Aviation Insurance Resources ... 11
Preferred Airparts, LLC ............46
Banyan .................................. 11
Rocky Mountain Propellers Inc. . 45
B/E Aerospace, Inc.................. 20
Select Airparts .......................... 6
Covington............................... 29
Simcom ................................. 35
Genesys Aerosystems.............. 15
Specialized Aero .....................44
Gulf Coast Avionics.................. 17
SRS Aviation........................... 23
Hillaero .................................. 17
Turbines Inc. ...........................46
Janitrol Aero ........................... 36
Winner Aviation ....................... 28
MMOPA ................................... 8
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR JOHN SHOEMAKER
2779 Aero Park Drive, Traverse City, MI 49686
Phone: 1-800-773-7798 • Fax: (231) 946-9588
E-mail: johns@villagepress.com
Turbines Inc.
Half Page
4/C Ad
www.turbinesinc.com
mailto:turbines@turbinesinc.com
facebook.com/turbinesinc
46 • TWIN & TURBINE
November 2017
is now ONLINE!
View the entire magazine on the updated site!
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any device!
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www.twinandturbine.com
On Final
by David Miller
So You Want to
Buy an Airplane
E
ach time I buy an airplane (now on number 10) I get a little
more organized. Perhaps you can learn from my successes
and failures. Here’s some things you should consider.
Who Are You Buying From?
My experience with purchasing from the manufacturer
(Textron in my case) on both new and used Citations has been
excellent. Although you are unlikely to get a “distressed price”
from the OEM, they have some flexibility in offering extended
warranty or service agreements that others don’t. There are also
many reputable brokers who specialize in your specific aircraft
and can do market analysis and locate the best deal. Their fees
are often negotiable but I find you often “get what you pay for.”
I have dealt with the best and the worst brokers. The best is
better. A quality broker can make the entire process enjoyable
while saving you money in the long run.
Learning From Others
Do you have friends who have recently purchased? Ask
them for advice. The best info can be found from accessing
the owners group for your airplane and search for experience
of others. Most groups also have executive directors who can
refer you to key players in the industry.
THE PRE-BUY INSPECTION
Hire someone who specializes in the specific model to lead
the process. You can find names and recommendations on the
various owner group websites. Once you engage their services,
listen to them. I once almost purchased a Falcon 10 that was
represented as “no damage” only to find out after translating
the logs from French to English that it had been run into by a
catering truck in Italy!
I have saved tens of thousands of dollars on purchase costs
using a qualified pre-buy inspector.
If a major inspection is part of the pre-buy, you may want
to schedule avionics upgrades like ADS-B or paint and interior
right after closing and before the airplane is “buttoned up.”
SETTING UP YOUR HANGAR
If you are moving to a new hangar, will your new airplane fit?
Is there available space at the airport? Find out in advance as
there may be a waiting list for your favorite FBO. Is power (110
or 220) available? If you will be in a multiple aircraft hangar,
who are the tenants? Can you store the various items (power
cart, nitrogen bottle, cleaning supplies) near your airplane?
TRAINING
Simulator availability can be challenging for some models.
Get on their schedule as soon as you can. Do a full recurrent
or initial course very near your closing date. If you are
using a mentor (and you should) call them early and book
48 • TWIN & TURBINE
them. I always have one meet me at delivery and off we go
for training.
PAPERWORK
I have used an aviation attorney in some deals but not all.
But in every case, I engaged someone who had experience in
airplane transactions.
PROGRAMS
Often, an airplane enrolled on engine overhaul and parts
programs will sell for hundreds of thousands more than one
not on programs. Each program has a current “balance.” Some
accounts may be negative or in arrears. Find out if the dollars
in each account will be transferred to you after purchase.
Make sure your purchase contract specifies what happens to
these monies.
DATABASES
Before closing , contact data providers such as Garmin,
Rockwell Collins and Serious XM Weather to set up an account.
Make sure you update your flight planning vendor to reflect the
avionics status of your new airplane. If you are waiting on RVSM
approval post closing, make sure your airplane’s limitation is
noted in the proper “box.”
STOCKING THE AIRPLANE
If you are replacing a prior airplane, take the opportunity to
throw away about half the “junk” you had on the old one. This
will lighten the weight you have been carrying around for years.
INSURANCE
Call your broker and get coverage approval early. Have
them review your hangar lease for coverages. Many insurance
carriers offer rebates on insurance premiums to members who
participate in annual operators conferences.
THE FAA
If you are changing your N number you will need a new
certificate of airworthiness. Failure to do so can be painful.
Get your RVSM application (if flying above FL280) prepared in
advance. I have seen the approval time reduced from 3 months
or more to less than four weeks for my latest Mustang purchase.
Proper planning when purchasing a new aircraft should allow
you to depart from delivery with RVSM approval.
Enjoy your new ride.
Fly Safe.
With 6,000-plus hours in his logbook, David Miller
has been f lying for business and pleasure for more than
40 years. Having owned and f lown a variety of aircraft
types, from turboprops to midsize jets, Patty and David
currently own and f ly a Citation Mustang. You can contact
David at davidmiller1@sbcglobal.net.
November 2017
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