Stage 6 Syllabus Hospitality Curriculum Framework

Stage 6 Syllabus
Hospitality
Curriculum Framework
based on the SIT Tourism, Travel and Hospitality
Training Package (version 1.1)
for implementation from 2017
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September 2016
DSSP–27336
Contents
1
Introduction to the Hospitality Curriculum Framework ............................................. 5
1.1
AQF VET qualifications available in the Hospitality Curriculum Framework ........... 5
1.2
Industry context – hospitality ................................................................................. 5
1.3
HSC VET course and AQF VET qualification completion requirements ................. 6
1.3.1 HSC VET course requirements .................................................................. 6
1.3.2 AQF VET qualification requirements .......................................................... 6
2
1.4
HSC VET course delivery ...................................................................................... 7
1.5
Outcomes and content .......................................................................................... 7
1.6
Assessment requirements and advice ................................................................... 7
Course structures and requirements .......................................................................... 8
2.1
Hospitality HSC VET courses ................................................................................ 8
2.1.1 Unit credit for the Higher School Certificate ................................................ 8
Table 1
HSC credit units for Hospitality HSC courses .............................. 8
2.1.2 BOSTES course numbers .......................................................................... 9
2.1.3 HSC examination numbers ........................................................................ 9
2.1.4 Allocation of HSC indicative hours of credit ...............................................10
2.1.5 Work placement requirements ..................................................................10
Table 2
3
Minimum work placement hours for Hospitality HSC courses .... 11
2.2
Hospitality (120 indicative hours) ..........................................................................12
2.3
Hospitality (240 indicative hours) ..........................................................................13
2.4
Hospitality Specialisation Study (60 or 120 indicative hours) ................................15
2.5
Hospitality units of competency ............................................................................17
Table 3
Associated mandatory units of competency for the 240-hour
course ....................................................................................... 17
Table 4
Associated units of competency – Food and Beverage
stream ....................................................................................... 18
Table 5
Associated units of competency – Kitchen Operations and
Cookery stream ......................................................................... 18
Table 6
HSC elective pool...................................................................... 19
Table 7
Additional HSC elective pool for school-based apprentices
and specialisation study courses ............................................... 21
HSC Content ................................................................................................................22
Table 8
3.1
Focus areas and associated units of competency ..................... 23
Hygiene – mandatory focus area ..........................................................................24
3.1.1 Outcomes .................................................................................................24
3.1.2 Associated unit of competency ..................................................................24
3.1.3 Scope of learning for the HSC ...................................................................25
3
3.2
Safety – mandatory focus area .............................................................................28
3.2.1 Outcomes .................................................................................................28
3.2.2 Associated unit of competency ..................................................................28
3.2.3 Scope of learning for the HSC ...................................................................29
3.3
Working in the hospitality industry and workplace – mandatory focus area...........34
3.3.1 Outcomes .................................................................................................34
3.3.2 Associated units of competency ................................................................34
3.3.3 Scope of learning for the HSC ...................................................................35
3.4
Food and Beverage – stream focus area ..............................................................43
3.4.1 Outcomes .................................................................................................43
3.4.2 Associated units of competency ................................................................43
3.4.3 Scope of learning for the HSC ...................................................................45
3.5
Kitchen Operations and Cookery – stream focus area ..........................................57
3.5.1 Outcomes .................................................................................................57
3.5.2 Associated units of competency ................................................................57
3.5.3 Scope of learning for the HSC ...................................................................59
4
5
6
HSC examination .........................................................................................................70
4.1
Examinable outcomes and content .......................................................................70
4.2
Relationship of the Hospitality (240 indicative hours) course structure to the
HSC examination .................................................................................................70
Other important information .......................................................................................71
5.1
Exclusions ............................................................................................................71
5.2
Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) and credit transfer within VET courses ........71
5.3
School-based apprentices and trainees ................................................................71
5.4
Students with special education needs .................................................................71
5.5
Access by students in Years 9 and 10 (Stage 5) ..................................................72
Glossary .......................................................................................................................73
4
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
1
Introduction to the Hospitality Curriculum Framework
Industry curriculum frameworks provide students with the opportunity to gain industryrecognised national vocational qualifications under the Australian Qualifications Framework
(AQF) as part of their NSW Higher School Certificate (HSC).
HSC courses within industry curriculum frameworks count as Board Developed unit credit for
the HSC. Frameworks include an HSC examination which provides the opportunity for
students to have this HSC examination mark contribute to the calculation of their Australian
Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR).
1.1
AQF VET qualifications available in the Hospitality Curriculum
Framework
The Hospitality Curriculum Framework is based on qualifications and units of competency
contained in the nationally endorsed SIT Tourism, Travel and Hospitality Training Package.
The AQF VET qualifications available in the Hospitality Curriculum Framework are:
 SIT20316 Certificate II in Hospitality
 SIT20416 Certificate II in Kitchen Operations
 SIT30816 Certificate III in Commercial Cookery – Statement of Attainment only
 SIT30916 Certificate III in Catering Operations – Statement of Attainment only.
1.2
Industry context – hospitality
The hospitality industry is one of the largest in Australia, predominately made up of small to
medium businesses that provide a range of accommodation, food and beverage services.
The inter-related nature of hospitality means that many businesses operate across sectors
within the industry and across complementary industries such as tourism, travel and events.
Services industries are characterised by a high casual workforce. They are a major
employer, supporting the skill development of younger workers who are central to Australia’s
economic and social development. For businesses in the service industries, employees are
the most important asset. Recruiting and retaining skilled staff is fundamental for businesses.
Occupations within the hospitality industry are diverse and include barista, chef, cook, front
office clerk, housekeeping attendant, kitchen hand, manager, marketing and promotion
officer and waiter.
Training needs to keep up with current practice, responding to changing technologies,
emerging new markets and different business models. While there will always be a demand
for specialised skills for particular job roles, customer service, cultural awareness, problemsolving and decision-making are key industry skills. Currency of skills and knowledge
provided to students is crucial to the success of the hospitality industry. Individuals need
skills that are transferable across industry sectors, business models and product styles 1
1
http://skillsiq.com.au
5
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
1.3
HSC VET course and AQF VET qualification completion requirements
The requirements for the completion of an HSC VET course are different to the requirements
for AQF VET qualification completion. Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) need to
ensure that delivery of courses meets HSC course requirements and complies with Training
Package rules.
1.3.1
HSC VET course requirements
HSC VET courses in the Hospitality Curriculum Framework are made up of:
 units of competency
 associated HSC mandatory units of competency
 associated HSC stream units of competency
 HSC elective units of competency
 HSC outcomes and content
 mandatory HSC work placement requirements.
For a student to be considered to have satisfactorily completed a course within the
Hospitality Curriculum Framework they must meet the:
 HSC VET course requirements (refer to Sections 2.2–2.5 of this Syllabus)
 requirements for satisfactory course completion (refer to the Board of Studies, Teaching
and Educational Standards NSW (BOSTES) Assessment Certification Examination
(ACE) website). There must be sufficient evidence that the student has:
 followed the course developed by BOSTES
 applied themselves with diligence and sustained effort to the set tasks and
experiences provided in the course
 achieved some or all of the course outcomes
 undertaken the mandatory work placement.
1.3.2
AQF VET qualification requirements
To receive AQF VET qualifications, students must meet the assessment requirements of the
SIT Tourism, Travel and Hospitality Training Package (http://training.gov.au).
AQF VET qualifications are determined by the qualification rules for each Training Package,
referred to as qualification packaging rules. The qualification packaging rules describe the
number and range of core and elective units of competency required for eligibility for an
AQF VET qualification.
Units of competency should be selected to meet qualification packaging rules for the
intended qualification pathway. Selection of units of competency should also be guided by
the job outcome sought and local industry requirements.
Qualification packaging rules for each AQF VET qualification available through the
Hospitality Curriculum Framework are contained in the SIT Tourism, Travel and Hospitality
Training Package. Associated documents have been developed to describe how
qualifications can be achieved through the Framework. These are available on the BOSTES
website at www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/syllabus_hsc/hospitality.html.
6
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
1.4
HSC VET course delivery
HSC VET courses can only be delivered by an RTO with the relevant qualification and units
of competency on their scope of registration. Scope of registration can be checked at
http://training.gov.au.
RTOs offering training programs for the delivery and assessment of the Hospitality HSC VET
courses must meet the requirements of the VET Quality Framework, the SIT Tourism, Travel
and Hospitality Training Package and the HSC course.
Information about the delivery of HSC VET courses by RTOs other than school system RTOs
or TAFE NSW institutes is contained on the BOSTES Assessment Certification Examination
(ACE) website.
Non-government schools outsourcing delivery of HSC VET courses to external providers
also need to refer to the Registered and Accredited Individual Non-government Schools
(NSW) Manual or Registration Systems and Member Non-government Schools (NSW)
Manual which are available on the BOSTES website at http://rego.bostes.nsw.edu.au.
1.5
Outcomes and content
The HSC outcomes and content for this industry curriculum framework are defined in:
 the units of competency (refer to Section 2.5 of this Syllabus)
 HSC Content focus areas (refer to Section 3 of this Syllabus).
1.6
Assessment requirements and advice
HSC VET courses are competency-based. BOSTES and the VET Quality Framework require
that a competency-based approach to assessment is used. Advice on appropriate
assessment practice in relation to the Hospitality Curriculum Framework is contained in the
Assessment and Reporting in Hospitality Stage 6 document.
An integrated or holistic approach to course delivery and assessment should be
adopted.
7
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
2
Course structures and requirements
2.1
Hospitality HSC VET courses
This Framework specifies the range of industry-developed units of competency from the
SIT Tourism, Travel and Hospitality Training Package for inclusion in the HSC. It describes
how these units of competency are arranged in HSC VET courses to gain unit credit for the
HSC.
The Hospitality Curriculum Framework contains the following courses:
 Hospitality (120 indicative hours) – see Section 2.2 of this Syllabus
 Hospitality (240 indicative hours) – see Section 2.3 of this Syllabus
 Hospitality Specialisation Study (60 or 120 indicative hours)
– see Section 2.4 of this Syllabus.
2.1.1
Unit credit for the Higher School Certificate
To facilitate flexibility of VET in the HSC, courses within the Hospitality Curriculum
Framework may be delivered as Preliminary, as HSC or as a combination of Preliminary
and HSC units.
The HSC credit units will be allocated to students’ Preliminary and/or HSC patterns of study
as required.
The pattern of study (BOSTES course number) entered on Schools Online (Administration)
should reflect the delivery of the HSC VET course over successive years. For example,
delivery of the 240 HSC indicative hour course over two years should be entered as
2 units x 2 years. Students will be credentialled for the HSC credit units entered each
calendar year, provided they have satisfactorily completed the course requirements for that
calendar year as determined by the school, college or RTO.
Table 1
HSC credit units for Hospitality HSC courses
HSC VET course
HSC credit units
Hospitality (120 indicative hours)
2
Hospitality (240 indicative hours)
4
Hospitality Specialisation Study (60 indicative hours)
1
Hospitality Specialisation Study (120 indicative hours)
2
8
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
2.1.2
BOSTES course numbers
Pattern of
study
BOSTES
course
number
Schools Online
(Administration) entry advice
2 units x 1 year
26510
Enter this course number for
either Preliminary (Year 11) or
HSC (Year 12)
2 units x 2 years
26511
Enter this course number for
both Preliminary (Year 11) and
HSC (Year 12)
4 units x 1 year
26512
Enter this course number for
either Preliminary (Year 11) or
HSC (Year 12)
Hospitality
Specialisation Study
(60 hours)
1 unit x 1 year
26513
Enter this course number for
HSC (Year 12)
Hospitality
Specialisation Study
(120 hours)
2 units x 1 year
26514
Enter this course number for
HSC (Year 12)
BOSTES course name
Hospitality
(120 hours)
Hospitality
(240 hours)
2.1.3
or
HSC examination numbers
HSC examination
HSC stream
HSC
Schools Online
examination
(Administration) entry advice
number
Food and Beverage
Hospitality
26589
Enter this course number as an
HSC (Year 12) entry in the
year the examination is
undertaken
26587
Enter this course number as an
HSC (Year 12) entry in the
year the examination is
undertaken
or
Kitchen Operations
and Cookery
9
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
2.1.4
Allocation of HSC indicative hours of credit
Units of competency drawn from Training Packages are not defined in terms of duration. The
amount of time required by individual students to achieve competency will vary according to
their aptitude and experience. Where a training program is designed for delivery by an RTO,
the RTO will specify the length of the training program according to the delivery strategies
and/or curriculum resources chosen.
However, for the purposes of the HSC, VET courses must be described in terms of their
indicative hours. For this reason, indicative hours for unit credit towards the HSC have been
assigned to each unit of competency within the Framework. It is emphasised that the
assignment of indicative hours does not imply that all students will fulfil all requirements of a
unit of competency within these hours. RTOs may determine that additional or fewer hours
are required for the achievement of particular competencies. However, this does not alter the
HSC indicative hours allocated, only the delivery hours.
Students may need to spend additional time practising skills in a work environment and
completing projects and assignments, in order to fulfil Training Package assessment
requirements.
The HSC indicative hours assigned to each unit of competency are listed in Section 2.5 of
this Syllabus.
2.1.5
Work placement requirements
Work placement is a mandatory HSC requirement within this Framework and minimum
hours have been assigned to each HSC VET course.
Work placement is to be undertaken in an appropriate hospitality work environment.
Students undertaking courses as part of a school-based apprenticeship or traineeship will
meet the mandatory work placement hour requirements through the on-the-job training
component of the apprenticeship or traineeship.
For units of competency that must be assessed in a hospitality work environment, work
placement provides an opportunity to collect evidence required for a student to be deemed
competent. Work placement also provides an opportunity for students to undertake ‘service
periods’ for the collection of evidence of work performance required by the holistic units of
competency.
Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) may be granted for mandatory work placement
requirements. Students’ outside employment (ie not under the auspices of the school) may
be recognised towards the requirement for work placement in a VET course (ACE 8051 –
Assessment Certification Examination (ACE) website).
Non-completion of work placement is grounds for withholding the HSC course. Schools and
colleges are advised to follow the procedure for issuing ‘N’ determinations as outlined on the
BOSTES Assessment Certification Examination (ACE) website.
10
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
Students must complete the following work placement for Hospitality Curriculum Framework
courses.
Table 2
Minimum work placement hours for Hospitality HSC courses
Hospitality Framework course
Minimum work placement requirement
Hospitality (120 indicative hours)
35 hours
Hospitality (240 indicative hours)
70 hours *
Hospitality Specialisation Study
(60 indicative hours)
additional 14 hours
Hospitality Specialisation Study
(120 indicative hours)
additional 35 hours
* For the 240-hour course only, it is permissible for up to 50% of work placement to include
school and community functions where students cater for and/or service customers.
The ‘work environment’ of the functions should be authentic and as far as possible
reproduce and replicate a hospitality workplace or work environment. Tasks, activities and
conditions need to be as close as possible to real-life situations. There should be industryrealistic ratios of staff to customers, as well as sufficient customer traffic that allows
students to deal with a range of customers with varying needs and multiple hospitality
service or operational tasks simultaneously. The speed, timing and productivity for tasks
should be typical of a commercial operation.
Refer to the Work Placement in Hospitality document for further information.
11
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
2.2
Hospitality (120 indicative hours)
AQF VET qualifications
The Hospitality (120 indicative hours) course provides a pathway to the following
qualifications:
Statement of Attainment towards:
 SIT20316 Certificate II in Hospitality
 SIT20416 Certificate II in Kitchen Operations
Course structure
This course consists of a selection of units of competency from the HSC mandatory, streams
and/or elective pool to a minimum of 120 HSC indicative hours.
(See Section 2.5, Tables 3–6 of this Syllabus.)
Course requirements – Hospitality (120 indicative hours)
Students must attempt:
a selection of units of competency from the HSC mandatory, streams
and/or elective pool to a minimum of 120 HSC indicative hours
(Section 2.5, Tables 3–6)
a minimum of 35 hours of work placement
(Section 2.1.5)
12
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
2.3
Hospitality (240 indicative hours)
AQF VET qualifications
The Hospitality (240 indicative hours) course provides a pathway to the following
qualifications2:
 SIT20316 Certificate II in Hospitality
 SIT20416 Certificate II in Kitchen Operations
Statement of Attainment towards:
 SIT30816 Certificate III in Commercial Cookery – school-based apprentices only.
Course structure
This course consists of:
 three mandatory focus areas (containing four associated units of competency)
 two stream focus areas:
 Food and Beverage (containing four associated units of competency)
 Kitchen Operations and Cookery (containing four associated units of competency)
 a range of elective units of competency which can be selected from the stream not
already undertaken and/or the HSC elective pool
 HSC Content – for the mandatory and stream focus areas.
(See Section 2.5, Tables 3–6 and Section 3 of this Syllabus.)
For students undertaking a school-based apprenticeship in Commercial Cookery, additional
elective units of competency are available. These are listed in Section 2.5, Table 7 of this
Syllabus.
Hospitality HSC examination
An external written Higher School Certificate examination will be conducted for the
240 indicative hour course (refer to Section 4 of this Syllabus).
The HSC Content (focus areas) for the HSC examination is detailed in Section 3 of this
Syllabus.
2
A Statement of Attainment will be issued if a student successfully completes one or more units of competency
but does not meet the requirements for a qualification (as specified in the Training Package). The Statement
of Attainment will list all of the units of competency achieved.
13
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
Course requirements – Hospitality (240 indicative hours) – students attempt ONE of the following:
Pathway to
SIT30816
Certificate III in Commercial Cookery
Pathway to
SIT20316
Certificate II in Hospitality
Pathway to
SIT20416
Certificate II in Kitchen Operations
FOUR associated mandatory units of competency
FOUR associated mandatory units of competency
(Section 2.5, Table 3)
(Section 2.5, Table 3)
FOUR associated mandatory units of competency
(Section 2.5, Table 3)
with the following focus areas
with the following focus areas
with the following focus areas
Hygiene
Safety
Working in the hospitality industry and workplace
Hygiene
Safety
Working in the hospitality industry and workplace
Hygiene
Safety
Working in the hospitality industry and workplace
(Section 3)
(Section 3)
(Section 3)
FOUR associated stream units of competency
(for school-based apprentices only)
FOUR associated stream units of competency
FOUR associated stream units of competency
(Section 2.5, Table 4)
(Section 2.5, Table 5)
(Section 2.5, Table 5)
with the
Food and Beverage focus area
with the
Kitchen Operations and Cookery focus area
with the
Kitchen Operations and Cookery focus area
(Section 3)
(Section 3)
(Section 3)
HSC elective units of competency to a minimum of
95 HSC indicative hours from the stream not already
undertaken and/or the HSC elective pool
HSC elective units of competency to a minimum of
95 HSC indicative hours from the stream not already
undertaken and/or the elective pool
HSC elective units of competency to a minimum of
95 HSC indicative hours from the stream not already
undertaken and/or the elective pools
(Section 2.5, Tables 5 & 6)
(Section 2.5, Tables 4 & 6)
(Section 2.5, Tables 4, 6 & 7)
a minimum of 70 hours of work placement
a minimum of 70 hours of work placement
(Section 2.1.5)
(Section 2.1.5)
work placement requirement met through the
on-the-job training component of the SBA
14
(Section 2.1.5)
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
2.4
Hospitality Specialisation Study (60 or 120 indicative hours)
Course eligibility
The Hospitality Specialisation Study is for students with particular interest in, and aptitude
for, the industry. Students need to be currently entered in, or have completed, the Hospitality
(240 indicative hours) course to undertake a Hospitality Specialisation Study course.
The Hospitality Specialisation Study:
 provides students who have achieved one Certificate II qualification through the 240-hour
course with the opportunity to gain the other Certificate II qualification
(120-hour Specialisation Study course only)
or
 provides students who have achieved a Certificate II qualification through the 240-hour
course to commence study towards Certificate III in Catering Operations
(60 or 120-hour Specialisation Study course)
or
 provides school-based apprentices (SBAs) with the opportunity to gain further credit
towards their Certificate III in Commercial Cookery qualification3
(60-hour Specialisation Study course only).
AQF VET qualifications
The Hospitality Specialisation Study (60 indicative hours) course provides a pathway to the
following qualifications:
Statement of Attainment towards:
 SIT30816 Certificate III in Commercial Cookery – school-based apprentices only
 SIT30916 Certificate III in Catering Operations
The Hospitality Specialisation Study (120 indicative hours) course provides a pathway to the
following qualifications:
 SIT20316 Certificate II in Hospitality
 SIT20416 Certificate II in Kitchen Operations
 Statement of Attainment towards SIT30916 Certificate III in Catering Operations
Course structure
The Hospitality Specialisation Study consists of units of competency (not previously
undertaken) drawn from the streams and/or HSC elective pool and/or additional pool of HSC
electives.
(See Section 2.5, Tables 4–7 of this Syllabus.)
3
Note, for Commercial Cookery school-based apprentices, a Specialisation Study course would be required
only if Stage 1/Year 1 of the apprenticeship could not be completed within the 240-hour Hospitality course.
15
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
Course requirements – Hospitality Specialisation Study (60 or 120 indicative hours)
Students must attempt:
a minimum of 60 or 120 HSC indicative hours of units of competency
not previously undertaken from the HSC streams and/or elective pools
(Section 2.5, Tables 4–7)
a minimum of 14 hours of work placement for the 60-hour course
a minimum of 35 hours of work placement for the 120-hour course
(Section 2.1.5)
16
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
2.5
Hospitality units of competency
Details of units of competency listed in Tables 3–7 are available in the SIT Tourism, Travel
and Hospitality Training Package at http://training.gov.au.
Table 3
Associated mandatory units of competency for the 240-hour course
Attempt the following units of competency:
HSC indicative
hours of credit
Unit code and title
Hygiene
SITXFSA001
Use hygienic practices for food safety
10
Participate in safe work practices
15
Safety
SITXWHS001
Working in the hospitality industry and workplace
BSBWOR203
Work effectively with others
15
SITHIND002
Source and use information on the hospitality industry
20
Total HSC indicative hours for mandatory:
60
17
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
For the 240-hour course, attempt all units of competency from ONE of the following
two streams:
Table 4
Associated units of competency – Food and Beverage stream
HSC indicative
hours of credit
Unit code and title
SITHFAB004
Prepare and serve non-alcoholic beverages
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
SITHFAB005
Prepare and serve espresso coffee
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
SITHFAB007
Serve food and beverage
15
40
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
SITXCCS003
15
Interact with customers
15
Total HSC indicative hours for Food and Beverage:
85
OR
Table 5
Associated units of competency – Kitchen Operations and Cookery stream
HSC indicative
hours of credit
Unit code and title
SITHCCC001 Use food preparation equipment
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
SITHCCC005 Prepare dishes using basic methods of cookery
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
SITHKOP001 Clean kitchen premises and equipment
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
SITXFSA002
20
40
10
Participate in safe food handling practices
15
Total HSC indicative hours for Kitchen Operations and Cookery:
85
18
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
PLUS a selection of unit/s of competency from the stream not already undertaken by
students AND/OR the HSC elective pool to a minimum of 95 HSC indicative hours:
Table 6
HSC elective pool
HSC indicative
hours of credit
Unit code and title
Accommodation Services
SITHACS001
Clean premises and equipment
10
SITHACS002
Provide housekeeping services to guests
5
SITHACS003
Prepare rooms for guests
20
SITHACS005
Provide porter services
10
Client and Customer Service
SITXCCS002
Provide visitor information
20
Commercial Cookery and Catering
SITHCCC002
Prepare and present simple dishes
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
20
SITHCCC003
Prepare and present sandwiches
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
10
SITHCCC004
Package prepared foodstuffs
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
5
SITHCCC006
Prepare appetisers and salads
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
25
SITHCCC007
Prepare stocks, sauces and soups
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
25
SITHCCC008
Prepare vegetable, fruit, eggs and farinaceous
dishes
35
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
SITHCCC011
Use cookery skills effectively 4
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
20
Communication and Teamwork
4
BSBCMM201
Communicate in the workplace
15
SITXCOM001
Source and present information
10
SITXCOM002
Show social and cultural sensitivity
10
This is a holistic unit of competency and is core for SIT20416 Certificate II in Kitchen Operations.
19
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
Table 6 cont/d
HSC indicative
hours of credit
Unit code and title
Environmental Sustainability
BSBSUS201
Participate in environmentally sustainable work
practices
15
Process financial transactions
15
Provide first aid
20
Receive and store stock
10
Finance
SITXFIN001
First Aid
HLTAID003
Inventory
SITXINV001
SITXINV002
Maintain the quality of perishable items
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
5
Sales
SIRXSLS001
Sell to the retail customer ♯
15
Working in Industry
SITHIND001
Use hygienic practice for hospitality service
5
SITHIND003
Use hospitality skills effectively 5
20
Follow point-of-sale procedures ♯
20
Imported
SIRXSLS002
♯
For students undertaking courses from both this Framework and the Retail Services Curriculum Framework or
Stage 6 Retail Board Endorsed VET course, these SIR units of competency cannot contribute to meeting HSC
indicative hour requirements of the Hospitality HSC course(s).
5
This is a holistic unit of competency and is core for SIT20316 Certificate II in Hospitality.
20
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
Table 7
Additional HSC elective pool for school-based apprentices and
specialisation study courses
HSC indicative
hours of credit
Unit code and title
Commercial Cookery and Catering
SITHCCC012
Prepare poultry dishes
35
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
SITHCCC013
Prepare seafood dishes
35
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
SITHCCC014
Prepare meat dishes
50
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
SITHCCC017
Handle and serve cheese
10
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
SITHCCC018
Prepare food to meet special dietary requirements
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
SITHCCC019
Produce cakes, pastries and breads
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
25
35
Client and Customer Service
SITXCCS006
Provide service to customers
20
Kitchen Operations
SITHKOP002
Plan and cost basic menus
25
Patisserie
SITHPAT006
Produce desserts
35
Prerequisite: SITXFSA001
21
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
3
HSC Content
The HSC Content for this industry curriculum framework is organised into focus areas. Each
focus area prescribes the scope of learning for the HSC. This is drawn from the associated
units of competency.
Students undertaking the 240 indicative hour course from the Hospitality Curriculum
Framework must address all of the mandatory focus areas plus one stream focus area.
The Hospitality Curriculum Framework mandatory focus areas are:
 Hygiene
 Safety
 Working in the hospitality industry and workplace.
The Hospitality Curriculum Framework stream focus areas are:
 Food and Beverage
 Kitchen Operations and Cookery.
The HSC examination in Hospitality is based on the HSC Content in this Framework (refer to
Section 4 of this Syllabus).
The following table outlines the associated units of competency for each focus area.
22
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
Table 8
Focus areas and associated units of competency
Mandatory
Focus area
Unit code
Unit title
Hygiene
SITXFSA001
Use hygienic practices for food safety
Safety
SITXWHS001
Participate in safe work practices
Working in the
hospitality industry
and workplace
BSBWOR203
SITHIND002
Work effectively with others
Source and use information on the hospitality
industry
Stream
Focus area
Unit code
Unit title
Food and Beverage
SITHFAB004
SITHFAB005
SITHFAB007
SITXCCS003
Prepare and serve non-alcoholic beverages
Prepare and serve espresso coffee
Serve food and beverage
Interact with customers
Kitchen Operations
and Cookery
SITHCCC001
SITHCCC005
SITHKOP001
SITXFSA002
Use food preparation equipment
Prepare dishes using basic methods of cookery
Clean kitchen premises and equipment
Participate in safe food handling practices
23
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
3.1
Hygiene – mandatory focus area
3.1.1
Outcomes
The student:
 considers the importance of hygiene in the hospitality industry
 demonstrates an understanding of compliance with laws, standards and codes relevant
to hygienic work practices and food safety for the hospitality workplace
 explains how to prevent food contamination that might cause food-borne illnesses
 proposes hygienic work procedures and practices for food safety in a hospitality work
environment.
3.1.2
Associated unit of competency
The scope of learning for the HSC must be read and delivered in conjunction with the
following associated unit of competency:
 SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety
The application and elements for this unit of competency are provided below.
SITXFSA001
Use hygienic practices for food safety
Application
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required
to use personal hygiene practices to prevent contamination of food that might
cause food-borne illnesses. It requires the ability to follow predetermined
organisational procedures and to identify and control food hazards.
Elements
1.
2.
3.
4.
Follow hygiene procedures and identify food hazards
Report any personal health issues
Prevent food contamination
Prevent cross-contamination by washing hands.
Assessment requirements for SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety are
detailed in the Training Package.
24
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
3.1.3
Scope of learning for the HSC
hygienic work practices

importance of hygienic work practices

consequences of poor hygienic work practices for the customer, worker, colleagues
and workplace

hygienic work practices and their purposes related to:
– personal hygiene
– food preparation and storage
– ‘ready to eat’ food items
– service of food and beverages
– linen
– cleaning and sanitising
– waste disposal
– pest control

hand washing, including when it needs to occur (frequency), the facilities needed and
procedure

hygienic work practices for various job roles and responsibilities within the hospitality
industry
hazards impacting food safety

food hazards that may affect the health and safety of customers, colleagues and the
worker:
– related to:
 handling food and beverages
 food contact surfaces
– including:
 personal hygiene
 personal health issues
 environmental hygiene
 work practices
and associated hygiene risk(s)

appropriate control measures to eliminate or minimise the hazards and their associated
risk(s)

Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP):
– as a method of controlling food safety
– work practices associated with the HACCP approach to hygiene and food safety
compliance

difference between an act, regulation, code of practice and standard (Australian,
industry and workplace)

purpose and intent of national and state/territory food safety laws, standards and codes
relevant to hygienic work practices and food safety:
25
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
compliance cont/d
– Food Act 2003 (NSW) (as amended)
– Food Regulation 2015 (NSW) (as amended)
– Australia New Zealand Food Standards (ANZFS) Code (‘the Code’)
and consequences of failure to observe

role of the NSW Food Authority and local government regulator in food safety

overview of food safety program for the hospitality workplace including reasons for,
essential components and basic content

workplace policy and procedures related to hygiene, food safety and cleaning and the
consequences of failure to observe

responsibilities of the food safety supervisor and food handler according to food safety
laws, standards and codes

application of workplace policy and procedures and regulatory requirements for food
safety to a workplace and job role in the hospitality industry and integrate into daily
work activities
food contamination and food-borne illnesses

signs of damaged, deteriorated, spoiled or out-of-date food

meaning of contaminant, contamination, cross-contamination and potentially hazardous
food

causes of contamination:
– common types of contaminants:
 physical
 chemical
 microbiological
– common food allergens
– conditions conducive to food spoilage and contamination

food allergies:
– common symptoms of food allergies
– emergency response to allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis
– important consideration in the selection of foods to be handled and consumed

meaning of food-borne illness (‘food poisoning’)

causes of food-borne illness (‘food poisoning’):
– bacterial, bacterial toxins and viral contamination of food through:
 cross-contamination
 incorrect storage and food handling
– naturally poisonous foods

bacterial, bacterial toxins and viral contaminants of food:
– bacterial:
 camphylobacter
26
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
food contamination and food-borne illnesses cont/d
 escherichia coli (E. coli)
 listeria
 salmonella
–
toxins:
 bacillus cereus
 clostridium botulinum
 clostridium perfringens
 staphylococcus aureus
– viral:
 hepatitis A
 rotavirus
and the associated food-borne illness(es) and its symptoms and examples of high-risk
foods

hygienic work practices to minimise and/or prevent contamination and illness:
– food handler
– workplace procedures
reporting

purpose and importance of reporting hygiene and food safety-related issues

describe what, how, when and to whom to report:
– what to report:
 food hazards and associated hygiene risks
 poor hygiene work practices
 unsafe work practices when working with food
 personal health issues
 incidents of food contamination
– types of reports:
 formal and informal
 written
 verbal
– reporting to appropriate persons
27
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
3.2
Safety – mandatory focus area
3.2.1
Outcomes
The student:
 demonstrates an understanding of work health and safety (WHS) compliance,
participation and consultation in the hospitality industry
 explains workplace policy, procedures and practices that ensure the safety of the
hospitality worker and their colleagues and customers
 describes security policy and procedures for a hospitality work environment
 applies risk management in a hospitality workplace
 proposes appropriate responses to emergency situations.
3.2.2
Associated unit of competency
The scope of learning for the HSC must be read and delivered in conjunction with the
following associated unit of competency:
 SITXWHS001 Participate in safe work practices
The application and elements for this unit of competency are provided below.
SITXWHS001
Participate in safe work practices
Application
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required
to incorporate safe work practices into own workplace activities. It requires the
ability to follow predetermined health, safety and security procedures and to
participate in organisational work health and safety (WHS) management
practices.
Elements
1. Work safely
2. Follow procedures for emergency situations
3. Participate in organisational WHS practices.
Assessment requirements for SITXWHS001 Participate in safe work practices are detailed in
the Training Package.
28
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
3.2.3
Scope of learning for the HSC
work health and safety (WHS)

meaning of health, safety and security

implications of the cost of workplace injury:
– human
– social
– economic
– organisational

acknowledge that WHS is everyone’s responsibility in the workplace and the
implications of this responsibility

concept of ‘participation’ and ‘consultation’ in relation to WHS

primary role/function of key bodies involved in WHS:
– SafeWork NSW
– Safe Work Australia
– local councils
– unions
– professional associations

internal and external sources of workplace WHS information

importance of acting within scope of responsibility/level of authority in relation to WHS
in the workplace:
– taking initiative
– problem-solving
– decision-making
WHS compliance

difference between an act, regulation, code of practice and standard (Australian,
industry and workplace)

purpose and intent of WHS legislation and codes of practice and their application to the
hospitality industry and a hospitality workplace and job role:
– WHS legislation:
 Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (NSW) (as amended)
 Work Health and Safety Regulation 2011 (NSW) (as amended)
– codes of practice related to:
 hazardous substances and dangerous goods
 manual handling
 risk management
 WHS consultation

WHS rights, duties and responsibilities of the person conducting a business or
undertaking (PCBU), officer and worker (as defined in the legislation)

consequences of failure to observe (non-compliance) WHS workplace policy and
procedures and legislative requirements
29
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
WHS compliance cont/d

safety signs, symbols and barricades used in the hospitality industry and their use in
the workplace:
– legislative requirements
– meaning of colour and shape
– placement and positioning

hospitality industry and workplace requirements for monitoring and reporting in relation
to workplace safety

describe how, when and to whom to report:
– types of reports:
 formal and informal
 written
 verbal
– reporting to appropriate persons

purpose and importance of monitoring and reporting

application of workplace policy and protocols and regulatory requirements when
recording and reporting in relation to WHS
WHS consultation and participation

opportunities for workers to provide input into WHS consultation and participation
processes:
– formal and informal discussion
– meeting
– survey
– training
– WHS audit
– WHS inspection

requirements (including election/formation) of a health and safety committee or health
and safety representative (HSR) and their role and responsibilities in the workplace

role and responsibilities of relevant personnel in WHS consultation and participation:
– PCBU
– manager/supervisor/team leader
– self
– other workers
– union

importance of identifying and reporting:
– WHS issues and concerns
– workplace hazards
– unsafe work practices
– breaches of health, safety and security
and examples of each for the hospitality industry and workplace
30
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
risk management

difference between a hazard and a risk

risk management and its application in the hospitality workplace:
– hazard identification:
 potential hazards to self, colleagues, customers and others typical to the industry
 range of hazards:
o biological
o human factors (self and others)
o manual handling
o materials
o tools and equipment
o work environment
o work processes and practices
o working with electricity and gas
– risk assessment
– risk control (hierarchy):
 eliminate the risk
 minimise the risk:
o substitution
o modification
o isolation
o engineering control
 other controls:
o administration
o safe work practices
o personal protective equipment (PPE)
 monitor and review
safe work procedures and practices

safe work procedures and practices and their purposes, including:
– WHS induction training
– adherence to:
 standard operating procedures (SOPs)
 work documentation
 work instructions
 workplace policy
– selection, use and maintenance of PPE
– manual handling techniques:
 when working individually, in pairs and with a team:
o bending and twisting
o moving, lifting, carrying and placing items down
o working with tools and equipment
o loading and unloading
o using mechanical aids/lifting equipment
o undertaking repetitious tasks
 recommended weight limits
– ergonomics and posture:
 correct placement of equipment
 sitting and standing positions
 task rotation
 use of adjustable furniture
31
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
safe work procedures and practices cont/d
–
–
–
–
hazardous substances and dangerous goods:
 correct handling, application, labelling, transport and storage
 safety data sheet (SDS)
tools and equipment:
 selection appropriate to task/work activity
 pre-operational checks and correct use
 regular maintenance and correct storage
 electrical tagging
working with:
 electricity
 liquid petroleum gas (LPG)
 inert gases
housekeeping:
 clean-up procedures
 storage and disposal of waste
 consideration of WHS and the environment

importance of safe work procedures and practices

propose safe work procedures and practices for a hospitality workplace and job role
security

potential breaches in security in a hospitality workplace

workplace security policy and procedures in relation to:
– cash
– documents
– equipment
– keys/access pass
– people:
 staff
 customers
 others
– records
– stock/supplies
– workplace/building:
 secure areas
 general access areas

strategies to deal with breaches in security

reporting breaches in security to appropriate personnel
incidents, accidents and emergencies

meaning of incident, accident and emergency

a range of incidents, accidents and emergencies common to the hospitality industry

distinguish between a manageable first aid situation and an emergency situation
32
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
incidents, accidents and emergencies cont/d

range of potential injuries common to the hospitality workplace, their cause(s) and basic
first aid for these injuries

strategies to reduce workplace accidents, injury and impairment

responding to incidents, accidents and emergencies:
– emergency situations
– seeking assistance
– emergency contact numbers
– emergency signals, alarms and exits:
 location
 use
– procedures to follow:
 notification
 workplace policy and procedures:
o evacuation
o security
 reporting
– basic process of fighting a fire and use of firefighting equipment:
 fire blanket
 fire extinguishers
 fire hose and reel
– role of personnel in an emergency
– first aid:
 basic principles
 personnel responsible

application of workplace policy and protocols and regulatory requirements when
recording and reporting in relation to incidents, accidents and emergencies
33
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
3.3
Working in the hospitality industry and workplace – mandatory focus
area
3.3.1
Outcomes
The student:
 examines the nature of the hospitality industry
 demonstrates an understanding of working in the hospitality industry
 explains how to communicate and work effectively with others in a hospitality workplace
 applies hospitality industry and workplace standards to ensure quality work outcomes
 explores how misunderstandings and conflict may be avoided or effectively managed in a
range of situations common to hospitality work environments.
3.3.2
Associated units of competency
The scope of learning for the HSC must be read and delivered in conjunction with the
following associated units of competency:
 BSBWOR203 Work effectively with others
 SITHIND002
Source and use information on the hospitality industry
The application and elements for these units of competency are provided below.
BSBWOR203
Work effectively with others
Application
This unit describes the skills and knowledge required to work cooperatively
with others and deal effectively with issues, problems and conflict.
Elements
1. Develop effective workplace relationships
2. Contribute to workgroup activities
3. Deal effectively with issues, problems and conflict.
Assessment requirements for BSBWOR203 Work effectively with others are detailed in the
Training Package.
SITHIND002
Source and use information on the hospitality industry
Application
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required
to source and use current and emerging information on the hospitality
industry. This includes industry structure, technology, laws and ethical issues
specifically relevant to the hospitality industry. Hospitality personnel integrate
this essential knowledge on a daily basis to work effectively in the industry.
Elements
1.
2.
3.
4.
Source and use industry information
Source and use compliance information
Source and use information on hospitality technology
Update personal and organisational knowledge of the hospitality industry.
Assessment requirements for SITHIND002 Source and use information on the hospitality
industry are detailed in the Training Package.
34
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
3.3.3 Scope of learning for the HSC
information on the industry

basic research skills in order to obtain and use information:
– identifying and accessing relevant information
– questioning techniques to obtain information
– validating information
– interpreting and using information
– sorting, summarising and presenting information

sources of information that can be used when gathering current and emerging
information on the hospitality industry:
– colleagues and manager/supervisor/team leader
– experienced industry personnel
– industry bodies and professional associations
– internet
– journals
– libraries
– networks
– personal observations and experience
– suppliers
– training courses
– unions
– workplace documents and manuals

opportunities to source and use a range of current and emerging information on the
hospitality industry:
– utilise online information systems and other information and communications
technologies
– integrate into daily work activities and operational duties
– share researched information with colleagues
nature of the industry

general features of the hospitality industry

general nature of allied and related industries and their relationship to the hospitality
industry:
– entertainment
– food manufacture/production
– meetings, incentives, conferences and events (MICE)
– recreation
– retail
– tourism and travel
– wine production

sectors within the hospitality industry, including:
– accommodation
– casinos
– clubs
– hotels
– restaurants, cafes and catering
– holiday parks and resorts
35
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
nature of the industry cont/d

for sectors within the hospitality industry:
– primary role/function(s)
– service(s) provided
– examples of businesses
– interrelationship between sectors

departments/sections/work areas in a hospitality establishment:
– accounts and finance
– food and beverage
– food production/kitchen
– front office
– housekeeping
– human resources
– gaming
– maintenance
– sales and marketing
– security

for departments/sections/work areas in a hospitality establishment:
– primary role/function(s)
– product(s) and/or service(s) provided
– occupational areas

interrelationship between departments/sections/work areas and effect on an individual’s
work and customer outcomes

primary role and duties performed by key personnel across hospitality departments/
sections/work areas

customer service:
– characteristics
– industry approaches to service delivery:
 underpinning principles
 how work is organised and undertaken
 strategies for establishing quality service

features of current and in-trend products and services relevant to a range of hospitality
job roles

current issues and trends affecting the hospitality industry and implications for a
hospitality workplace, own work practices and delivery of service

economic and social significance of the hospitality industry
working in the industry

the difference between legal and ethical

legal and ethical issues affecting the hospitality industry

legal and ethical obligations of the hospitality worker
36
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
working in the industry cont/d

purpose and intent of legislative requirements relevant to the hospitality industry and a
particular sector/department, including:
– Food Act 2003 (NSW) (as amended)
– Food Regulation 2015 (NSW) (as amended)
– Food Safety Standards (Australia only) – Australia New Zealand Food Standards
Code
– Responsible Service of Alcohol
– Responsible Conduct of Gaming/Gambling
– local council regulations
– local community protection including land ownership and access requirements
– Australian Consumer Law
– Fair Work system
– Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) (as amended)

application of legislative requirements to a hospitality workplace and job role

meaning of quality assurance and an overview of the role of employees

industry accreditation schemes:
– purpose
– examples
– requirements
– responsibilities of the participant
– business benefits of participation

purpose of occupational licensing and examples of licensing for the hospitality industry
and their requirements

workplace policy, guidelines and procedures related to compliance when working in the
hospitality industry

consequences of failure to observe (non-compliance) legislative requirements, quality
assurance processes and workplace policy, guidelines and procedures

connection between quality assurance, work practices and customer service
employment

career pathways across the hospitality industry and the knowledge and skills required
for different job roles

types of employment in the hospitality industry:
– full-time
– part-time
– casual
– contract

the difference between an award, agreement and contract and how they apply to
workers in the hospitality industry

investigate the employment terms and conditions for a hospitality job role
37
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
employment cont/d

working knowledge of employer and employee rights and responsibilities in relation to
employment

purpose and value of a code of conduct for the hospitality industry and worker

equal employment opportunity (EEO):
– principles
– intent of EEO legislation
– reciprocal rights and responsibilities of employers and employees
– workplace policy and procedures relating to EEO

primary role/function(s) of a range of key cross-industry and sector-specific industry
bodies for both employers and employees:
– employer groups
– professional associations
– employee groups
– unions
anti-discrimination

bullying and harassment in the workplace:
– indirect
– direct
– types:
 verbal
 physical
 psychological
 sexual

principles of anti-discrimination

intent of anti-discrimination legislation

rights and responsibilities of employers and employees in relation to anti-discrimination

workplace policy and procedures relating to anti-discrimination

strategies to eliminate bias and harassment in the workplace

consequences, including legal ramifications, of discriminatory workplace behaviour

recourse available to individuals in the event of inappropriate workplace behaviour
hospitality worker

hospitality worker:
– personal attributes and work ethic valued by the hospitality industry
– interpersonal skills beneficial to an individual working in a hospitality workplace
– importance of personal presentation and standards for a hospitality workplace and
job role
– behaviour to support a safe and sustainable hospitality work environment
38
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
hospitality worker cont/d

how personal values, opinions and ethics can affect everyday work

duties and responsibilities:
– for a job role within the hospitality industry
– relationship between an individual worker and the team/work group
– differences between individual and workplace goals and plans

industry currency:
– importance of maintaining currency
– individual and workplace strategies to maintain currency, including training and
professional development

feedback:
– value of feedback to an individual worker, the workplace and the industry
– types of feedback:
 personal reflection
 formal and informal
 direct and indirect
– strategies for obtaining and interpreting feedback from supervisor(s), colleagues
and customers
– dealing with positive feedback and negative feedback
– responsibility of a worker to use personal reflection, seek and provide feedback and
improve
work practices

an understanding that work practices and experiences differ between workplaces

how work practices are implemented and maintained in accordance with industry
standards and workplace policy and procedures

the value of work standards

work standards for the hospitality industry, and specific to a hospitality workplace and
job role

implications of non-adherence to work standards

effect of poor work practices on colleagues, customers, the workplace and the industry

tasks typical to a hospitality workplace (routine, rostered and non-routine)

access and use a range of sources containing information relating to work
responsibilities (work instructions)

strategies for understanding and clarifying work instructions

a range of opportunities to read, interpret and follow instructions for a range of work
tasks of varying degrees of difficulty
39
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
work practices cont/d

time and task management:
– principles
– techniques
– prioritising
– constraints

planning, organising and preparation for a range of tasks/activities applicable to daily
work routines in a hospitality workplace

application of time-management techniques to work tasks/activities in a hospitality
workplace

concept of sustainability in the workplace and environmentally sustainable work
practice

current environmental issues affecting the hospitality industry

strategies to work in an environmentally sustainable manner in a hospitality workplace

quality improvement in hospitality:
– role of employees in improving skills and productivity
– connection between evaluating work performance and improving work practices
– strategies to improve work practices and customer outcomes

recording and reporting in the hospitality industry:
– workplace policy and procedures applying to record-keeping and reporting
– legislative requirements for confidentiality and privacy
– lines of communication and reporting typical of a hospitality workplace
technology

current and emerging technologies in the hospitality industry and workplace

effect of current and emerging technology on operational duties and service delivery

role of current and emerging technology in development of new and improved work
practices

selection and use of technology appropriate to day-to-day work activities and work
tasks in the hospitality industry
working with others

importance of developing collegial work relationships

communication in the workplace with colleagues and customers:
– communication process/cycle
– workplace examples of types of communication:
 verbal
 non-verbal
 written
40
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
working with others cont/d
–
–
–
a range of effective verbal, non-verbal and written communication
effective questioning and listening techniques
barriers to effective communication and strategies to overcome them
communication methods/equipment used in the hospitality industry:
 general features
 benefits
 selection
 use

workplace protocols in relation to working with others

importance of teamwork when working in the hospitality workplace:
– meaning of ‘team’ and ‘teamwork’
– characteristics of effective teamwork
– benefits of teamwork to the hospitality workplace
– examples of teams or work groups in a hospitality workplace and their area(s) of
responsibility

supporting others to achieve team/work group goals and tasks

delivering quality work outcomes through teamwork and work groups
cultural diversity

concepts of cultural diversity, cultural awareness and inclusiveness

workplace diversity:
– benefits
– need for tolerance in the workplace
– importance of respect and sensitivity
– proactive strategies for promoting workplace diversity and accommodating
individual differences
– culturally appropriate work practices
– effective cross-cultural communication skills
misunderstandings and conflict

the difference between being passive, aggressive and assertive

causes of misunderstandings and conflict when working with others and in the delivery
of service

the extent to which conflict can be a positive or negative experience

conflict management:
– conflict-resolution techniques
– different approaches to conflict management, including problem-solving, negotiation
and mediation
– workplace policy and procedures regarding management of conflict
41
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
misunderstandings and conflict cont/d

identify own response to misunderstandings and conflict and evaluate personal
approach to management and resolution of conflict

identify when it is appropriate to seek assistance when misunderstandings or conflict
arise and whose assistance should be sought when conflict escalates
42
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
3.4
Food and Beverage – stream focus area
3.4.1
Outcomes
The student:
 explains the fundamental principles of quality customer service
 applies knowledge of workplace policy and procedures and industry standards to ensure
quality customer service
 demonstrates an understanding of food and beverage service including preparation for
service, provision of service and closing down after service
 proposes appropriate responses to customer inquiries, dissatisfaction, problems and
complaints
 demonstrates knowledge of non-alcoholic beverages and espresso coffee, their
preparation and service.
3.4.2
Associated units of competency
The scope of learning for the HSC must be read and delivered in conjunction with the
following associated units of competency:
 SITHFAB004 Prepare and serve non-alcoholic beverages
 SITHFAB005 Prepare and serve espresso coffee
 SITHFAB007 Serve food and beverage
 SITXCCS003 Interact with customers
The application and elements for each of these units of competency are provided below.
SITHFAB004
Prepare and serve non-alcoholic beverages
Application
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required
to prepare and serve a range of teas, non-espresso coffees and other nonalcoholic beverages. It requires the ability to select ingredients and equipment
and to use a range of methods to make and present drinks.
Elements
1.
2.
3.
4.
Select ingredients
Select, prepare and use equipment
Prepare non-alcoholic drinks
Serve non-alcoholic beverages.
Assessment requirements for SITHFAB004 Prepare and serve non-alcoholic beverages are
detailed in the Training Package.
SITHFAB005
Prepare and serve espresso coffee
Application
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required
to extract and serve espresso coffee beverages using commercial espresso
machines and grinders. It requires the ability to advise customers on coffee
beverages, select and grind coffee beans, prepare and assess espresso
coffee beverages and to use, maintain and clean espresso machines and
grinders. Complex repairs of equipment would be referred to specialist service
technicians.
Elements
1. Organise coffee workstation
2. Select and grind coffee beans
3. Advise customers and take espresso coffee orders
43
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
4.
5.
6.
7.
Extract and monitor quality of espresso
Undertake milk texturing process
Serve espresso coffee beverages
Clean espresso equipment.
Assessment requirements for SITHFAB005 Prepare and serve espresso coffee are detailed
in the Training Package.
SITHFAB007
Serve food and beverage
Application
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required
to serve food and beverage to customers in a casual dining setting. It covers
the fundamental technical skills required to prepare the outlet for the service
period, interact with customers to take orders, serve and clear food and
beverage, and complete end of service tasks.
Elements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Prepare for food and beverage service
Welcome and advise customers
Take and process orders
Serve food and drinks
Clear food and drinks
Complete end of shift duties.
Assessment requirements for SITHFAB007 Serve food and beverage are detailed in the
Training Package.
SITXCCS003
Interact with customers
Application
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required
to deliver fundamental customer service to both internal and external
customers. It requires the ability to greet and serve customers, and respond to
a range of basic customer service enquiries, including routine customer
problems.
Elements
1. Greet and serve customers
2. Work with others to deliver service
3. Provide feedback on customer service.
Assessment requirements for SITXCCS003 Interact with customers are detailed in the
Training Package.
44
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
3.4.3
Scope of learning for the HSC
customers

types of customers:
– internal
– external
– new
– repeat or regular

customers with special needs and implications for customer service

a range of customers with different service requirements

difference between customer needs, preferences and expectations

establishing customer needs, preferences and expectations through:
– active listening
– open, closed and reflective questions
– observation and recognition of non-verbal cues

communicating effectively with customers:
– verbal, written and non-verbal communication
– face-to-face, over the telephone and electronically
– importance of being accurate, clear, concise and courteous
quality customer service

industry approaches to service delivery:
– standards of customer service for industry personnel
– how work is organised and undertaken
– timing and designated response times for service to workplace and industry
standards

the relationship between customer service and business success

concept of a ‘customer focused’ workplace

characteristics and benefits of quality customer service

role of communication in provision of quality customer service

establishing quality customer service:
– detailed knowledge of a range of products and services offered at a hospitality
workplace
– matching customer needs, preferences and expectations to appropriate product(s)
and/or service(s):
 meet customer need, preference and/or expectation
 seek assistance from others as necessary in order to meet the customer need,
preference and/or expectation
 refer to appropriate person where unable to meet the customer need, preference
and/or expectation
45
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
quality customer service cont/d
–
–
–
–
–
seeking opportunities to deliver additional level of service beyond customer’s
immediate request or expectation
developing collegial working relationships with others involved in the provision of
customer service
using/adopting a teamwork approach
dealing with problems and/or delays in the delivery of products and/or services
seeking feedback on customer service practices:
 the value of feedback from staff and customers
 its use in improving and enhancing service delivery
workplace policy and procedures for customer interaction

workplace policy and procedures for establishing contact with customers:
– techniques for approaching a customer
– developing rapport

workplace policy and procedures for dealing with:
– customers from diverse backgrounds
– customers with special needs
– difficult and abusive customers

workplace policy and procedures for directing customers to relevant personnel and/or
more experienced staff
customer inquiries

a range of customer inquiries common to the hospitality workplace

establishing the details of the inquiry by questioning, summarising and clarifying

paper-based and electronic methods for recording customer inquiries:

sources of information that can be used when handling customer inquiries

effective response(s) to a range of customer inquiries common to hospitality within
appropriate timeframes
customer complaints and feedback

reasons for customer dissatisfaction, problems and complaints

examples of customer dissatisfaction, problems and complaints common to hospitality

complaints-handling policy and procedures

skills required for handling complaints, including:
– problem-solving
– conflict resolution
– negotiating
– decision-making
46
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
customer complaints and feedback cont/d

using conflict-resolution techniques when handling customer dissatisfaction, problems
and complaints

effective responses to a range of instances of customer dissatisfaction, problems and
complaints

the importance of:
– hospitality staff offering a range of viable solutions in accordance with workplace
policy and procedures
– hospitality staff and the customer agreeing on what is to be done in regard to the
problem or complaint
– implementing solution(s) within acceptable timeframes
– acting within level of authority/scope of responsibility when handling customer
dissatisfaction, problems and complaints

identify when it is appropriate to seek assistance and/or refer customer to other
appropriate personnel for issues that cannot be resolved effectively

the importance of recording and/or reporting instances of customer dissatisfaction,
problems and complaints

workplace practices for recording and reporting customer complaints and feedback:
– formal and informal
– verbal and written

recognition of the value of customer complaints and feedback
casual dining

meaning of casual dining, cover, service period and style of service

food and beverage outlets offering casual dining, including:
– cafes
– cafeterias
– catering operations
– clubs
– coffee shops
– hotels or pubs
– restaurants

styles of service and their characteristics, including:
– bar
– bistro
– cafeteria
– counter
– family
– plate
– smorgasbord/buffet
– table

service requirements for service periods including breakfast, lunch, dinner and morning
and afternoon teas
47
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
casual dining cont/d

key features of a range of menu types, including:
– à la carte
– blackboard
– cyclic
– function
– set
– table d’hôte

commercial food and beverage menus typical to a range of food and beverage outlets

role and responsibilities of a range of food and beverage personnel
policy, procedures and standards for food and beverage service

industry and workplace standards and workplace policy and procedures for:
– preparing for food and beverage service
– providing food and beverage service to customers
– closing down after food and beverage service:
 end of service
 end of shift
preparation for food and beverage service

check reservations

furniture and fittings:
– checks for cleanliness, stability and condition
– placement for optimum service efficiency

for a range of food and beverage outlets, service styles and service periods:
– set up of dining area, tables and waiter/service station(s)
– selection, check and preparation of equipment:
 crockery
 cutlery
 glassware
 linen
 service utensils
 service-ware
 table items
 tableware
– ensure an environment that will provide comfort and ambience for the customer:
 background noise
 decor
 lighting
 music
 privacy
 room temperature

essential components of a pre-service briefing
48
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
customer

customer interaction:
– greeting and seating
– during service
– thanking and farewelling

establishing customer needs, preferences and expectations through probe questioning
and active listening

dealing with diverse demands and requests of multiple customers during food and
beverage service
providing food and beverage service to customers

safe and hygienic work practices for service of food and beverages

food and beverage service:
– sequence
– timing
– procedures
– teamwork

work flow:
– typical to food and beverage service
– between kitchen and front-of-house areas

information provided at various stages of food and beverage service:
– menu choices, options, specials and availability
– key features of food and beverage menu items:
 describing and recommending menu items
 details of ingredients and preparation techniques
 recommendations for complementary selections
– location of customer facilities
– local/surrounding area

importance of accuracy and legibility when taking customer food and beverage orders

consequences for the customer and business if food and beverage orders are not
correct or are mismanaged

taking and processing food and beverage orders:
– equipment and technology
– systems:
 manual
 electronic
– workplace procedures:
 general
 special requests:
o allergies and intolerances
o religious or cultural beliefs
o special occasions
o individual preferences
49
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
providing food and beverage service to customers cont/d
–
industry and workplace acceptable abbreviations for:
 menu items
 special requests
 variations

selection/adjustment of glassware, service-ware and cutlery appropriate to customer
menu choices

tailoring food and beverage service to a range of customers and their requirements

techniques for serving and clearing:
– beverage service
– collection of food and beverage from kitchen and/or bar
– carrying and placing plates containing meals
– clearing and carrying multiple used plates and service-ware
– clearing tables

dealing with:
– numerous service tasks simultaneously
– delays and deficiencies in service:
 reasons for
 problem-solving
 follow-up
 rectify to customer satisfaction

environmentally friendly work practices:
– efficient use of resources, water and energy
– management of food and beverage waste:
 sorting of recyclables
 disposal of waste

customer accounts:
– calculations
– timing and presentation
– processing:
 equipment:
o point-of-sale (POS)
o electronic funds transfer at point-of-sale (EFTPOS)
 cash transactions and giving change
 credit cards
closing down after food and beverage service

difference between end of service and end of shift

workplace tasks and procedures for:
– end of service
– preparation for next service period
– end of shift

service review:
– debriefing session
– customer feedback
50
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
closing down after food and beverage service cont/d

handover to colleagues for next shift
non-alcoholic beverages

range of non-alcoholic beverages typically found in commercial beverage menus

major types/styles of non-alcoholic beverages and their characteristics:
– carbonated
– coffees (non-espresso)
– fruit-based
– milk-based
– mocktails
– teas
– waters

standard recipes for a range of non-alcoholic beverages

for a range of non-alcoholic beverages, industry standards for:
– strength
– taste
– temperature
– appearance
espresso coffee

culinary terms associated with espresso coffee:
– barista
– espresso:
 coffee-making equipment and method
 type of roast
 a drink
– extraction
– group head
– tamping

different types of coffee beans, blends and roasts and their characteristics

major styles of espresso coffee typically found in commercial beverage menus and their
characteristics:
– caffè latte
– cappuccino
– espresso (short black)
– flat white
– long black
– macchiato:
 short
 long
– mocha
– piccolo latte
– ristretto

different types of milk and their characteristics
51
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
espresso coffee cont/d

milk in different coffee styles:
– steamed milk
– textured milk
– cold milk

characteristics of textured milk, including:
– silken
– reflective
– smooth
– pliable

standard recipes for a range of espresso coffee styles

criteria used to evaluate the quality of coffee:
– aroma
– body
– flavour:
 acidity
 bitterness
 sweetness
– quality of the crema
– volume of the espresso

to produce quality coffee, importance of correct:
– grind
– dose
– tamp
– extraction

for a range of espresso coffee styles, industry standards for:
– strength
– taste
– temperature
– appearance
equipment – non-alcoholic beverages

industry-standard equipment used to prepare different types/styles of non-alcoholic
beverages

for a range of equipment:
– name and general features
– purpose and limitations
– selection for task (functions)
– assembly (if appropriate)
– safe and hygienic use/operation:
 pre-operational and safety checks
 according to manufacturer’s instructions
– cleaning and sanitising
– maintenance
– storage
52
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
equipment – non-alcoholic beverages cont/d

when working with post-mix dispensing systems:
– dangers associated with inert gases
– appropriate measures to ensure safety of the hospitality worker and customer
equipment – espresso coffee

industry-standard equipment used to prepare different styles of espresso coffee:
– name and general features
– selection for task (functions)
– safe and hygienic use
– cleaning and storage

range of different commercial espresso machines and grinders:
– features, parts and functions
– assembly (if appropriate)
– safe and hygienic use/operation:
 pre-operational and safety checks
 according to manufacturer’s instructions
 preparation for service
– cleaning and maintenance:
 during service
 post service
– problems with equipment:
 indicators of unsafe and/or faulty equipment
 solution(s) to common problems
 respond within scope of responsibility:
o rectify (minor adjustments)
o refer to manager/supervisor, trained service technician, licensed electrician
and/or plumber

function of filter baskets and tampers, including size and types

when working with steam:
– potential dangers
– safe operational practices
customer service of non-alcoholic beverages and espresso coffee

establishing customer needs, preferences and expectations through probe questioning
and active listening

matching needs, preferences and expectations with the most suitable non-alcoholic
beverage and espresso coffee

workplace procedures for non-alcoholic beverage and espresso coffee service:
– taking order (manual and electronic)
– calling of order
– delivery to table
– presentation to customer

standard turnaround times for non-alcoholic beverage and espresso coffee service

dealing with numerous service and operational tasks simultaneously during preparation
of non-alcoholic beverages and espresso coffee
53
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
preparation of non-alcoholic beverages and espresso coffee

safe and hygienic work practices for preparation and service of non-alcoholic beverages
and espresso coffee

time and task management:
– efficiently sequence beverage order and preparation
– prepare and serve within commercially realistic timeframes
preparation specific to non-alcoholic beverages

environmentally friendly work practices:
– efficient use of resources, water and energy
– management of waste:
 sorting of recyclables
 disposal of waste

mise en place for non-alcoholic beverages:
– workstation
– preparation of beverage
– service of beverage

ingredients for a range of non-alcoholic beverages:
– associated culinary terms
– characteristics
– handling and storage

range of preparation methods for non-alcoholic beverages:
– blending
– brewing
– juicing
– mixing
– plunging
– shaking

measuring ingredients and calculating quantities

deficiencies in beverage quality:
– evaluation:
 causes
 indicators
– adjustments
preparation specific to espresso coffee

mise en place for espresso coffee:
– work station
– preparation of coffee beverage
– service of coffee beverage
– test extractions

ingredients:
– including:
54
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
preparation specific to espresso coffee cont/d
–
 coffee beans
 ground coffee
 milks
 flavourings and toppings
storage:
 environmental conditions to ensure food safety
 methods to optimise shelf life

methods and techniques for:
– grinding coffee beans
– dosing:
 manual
 electronic
 mechanical
– tamping
– extraction of espresso:
 flushing the group head
 appropriate pour rate for espresso coffee beverages
– texturising milk:
 milk selection and temperature
 purging the steam wand
 swirling
 sound

sensory analysis of quality:
– olfactory
– tactile
– tasting
– visual

monitoring quality of espresso during the service period

deficiencies in espresso extraction:
– evaluation:
 causes
 indicators
– adjustment(s)
service of non-alcoholic beverages and espresso coffee

traditional and workplace-specific standards for presentation of quality non-alcoholic
beverages and espresso coffee

service-ware for non-alcoholic beverages and espresso coffee:
– glassware
– crockery
– takeaway cups and lids

garnishes and accompaniments for non-alcoholic beverages

sugar, sweeteners and accompaniments for espresso coffee
55
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
service of non-alcoholic beverages and espresso coffee cont/d

techniques for coffee art and use in the service of espresso coffee

importance of consistency in quality, volume and appearance
56
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
3.5
Kitchen Operations and Cookery – stream focus area
3.5.1
Outcomes
The student:
 justifies the selection of appropriate utensils, equipment and ingredients for food
preparation and cookery tasks in a commercial kitchen
 explains a range of cookery methods and their application
 understands the importance and application of legislative requirements, industry
standards and workplace policy and procedures for preparation, cooking, presentation
and service of food
 describes a food safety program and applies it in a hospitality workplace
 proposes cleaning procedures for a commercial kitchen to ensure the safety of food
 proposes improvements for resource efficiency and sustainability in a commercial kitchen
work environment.
3.5.2
Associated units of competency
The scope of learning for the HSC must be read and delivered in conjunction with the
following associated units of competency:
 SITHCCC001 Use food preparation equipment
 SITHCCC005 Prepare dishes using basic methods of cookery
 SITHKOP001 Clean kitchen premises and equipment
 SITXFSA002 Participate in safe food handling practices
The application and elements for each of these units of competency are provided below.
SITHCCC001
Use food preparation equipment
Application
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required
to safely use commercial kitchen equipment to prepare a range of different
food types.
Elements
1. Select food preparation equipment
2. Use equipment to prepare food
3. Clean and maintain food preparation equipment.
Assessment requirements for SITHCCC001 Use food preparation equipment are detailed in
the Training Package.
SITHCCC005
Prepare dishes using basic methods of cookery
Application
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required
to use a range of basic cookery methods to prepare dishes.
Elements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5
Select ingredients
Select, prepare and use equipment
Portion and prepare ingredients
Cook dishes
Present and store dishes.
Assessment requirements for SITHCCC005 Prepare dishes using basic methods of cookery
are detailed in the Training Package.
57
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
SITHKOP001
Clean kitchen premises and equipment
Application
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required
to clean food preparation, storage areas and equipment in commercial
kitchens to ensure the safety of food. It requires the ability to work safely and
to use resources efficiently to reduce negative environmental impacts.
Elements
1.
2.
3.
4.
Clean and sanitise kitchen equipment
Clean service-ware and utensils
Clean and sanitise kitchen premises
Work safely and reduce negative environmental impacts.
Assessment requirements for SITHKOP001 Clean kitchen premises and equipment are
detailed in the Training Package.
SITXFSA002
Participate in safe food handling practices
Application
This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required
to handle food safely during the storage, preparation, display, service and
disposal of food. It requires the ability to follow predetermined procedures as
outlined in a food safety program.
Elements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Follow food safety program
Store food safely
Prepare food safely
Provide safe single use items
Maintain a clean environment
Dispose of food safely.
Assessment requirements for SITXFSA002 Participate in safe food handling practices are
detailed in the Training Package.
58
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
3.5.3
Scope of learning for the HSC
knives

parts of a knife

knife-handling techniques

types of knives, their characteristics and use in preparation of a range of food types

techniques to sharpen knives using a steel and a stone

suitable cutting surfaces:
– yielding
– unyielding

safe work practices when handling, using, cleaning and storing knives
equipment for food preparation and cookery

examples of equipment classified as utensils, mechanical and fixed

equipment found in commercial kitchen work environments:
– used to prepare different food types
– used for different cookery methods

for a range of equipment:
– name and general features
– purpose and limitations
– selection for task (functions)
– assembly (if appropriate)
– safe and hygienic use/operation:
 hazard(s) and risk(s) control
 pre-operational and safety checks
 according to manufacturer’s instructions
– cleaning and sanitising
– maintenance
– storage

problems with equipment:
– indicators of unsafe and/or faulty equipment
– solution(s) to common problems
– respond within scope of responsibility:
 rectify (minor adjustments)
 refer to supervisor/manager
– recording and reporting
food

types:
– dairy products
– dough
– dry goods
– fruit
– meat
59
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
food cont/d
–
–
–
–
–
pastry
poultry
seafood
vegetables
general food items:
 batters
 coatings
 condiments and flavourings
 garnishes
 oils
 sauces

for each food type:
– examples
– characteristics
– indicators of freshness and quality
– use in different recipes
– preparation requirements
– use in different dishes
– effects of different cookery methods
– handling and storage

stock selection from stores:
– data codes
– stock rotation:
 FIFO (first in, first out)
 rotation labels
preparation

safe and hygienic practices for food preparation in commercial kitchen work
environments

mise en place:
– meaning
– role in:
 preparing food
 cooking food
 presenting food
– for dishes:
 incorporating a range of food types
 produced by a range of cookery methods

work instructions:
– standard recipes:
 dishes incorporating a range of food types
 dishes produced by a range of cookery methods
– task sheets
– food preparation lists

time and task management:
– effect of poor work flow on:
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Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
preparation cont/d
–
–
 colleagues
 customers
 business
features of effective work flow:
 planning and organisation
 logical sequencing of food preparation and cookery tasks
 time efficiency
 dealing with pressure and time constraints
 clear communication
 cooperation and teamwork
preparation, cooking and service within commercially realistic timeframes

preparation of a range of ingredients:
– incorporating a range of food types
– for a range of standard recipes
– with consideration to portion control

weighing and measuring dry and wet ingredients

calculating and determining quantities and portions required

washing, peeling and trimming of a range of foods

precision cuts:
– brunoise
– chiffonnade
– concasse
– jardinière
– julienne
– macedoine
– mirepoix
– paysanne

portioning and standard cuts of meat, poultry and seafood

storage of food items to prevent spoilage

waste-minimisation techniques for use during food preparation, cooking, presentation
and service

environmentally friendly work practices during food preparation:
– efficient use of resources, water and energy
– management of kitchen waste:
 storage of re-useable by-products
 sorting of recyclables
 disposal of waste
menu

key features of a range of menu types and their application, including:
– à la carte
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Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
menu cont/d
–
–
–
–

cyclic
function
set
table d’hôte
dealing with customer special requests and special dietary requirements
cookery methods

transference of heat through convection, conduction and radiation

category of cookery:
– dry heat method
– moist heat method

range of cookery methods:
– baking
– blanching
– boiling
– braising
– deep-frying
– grilling
– poaching
– roasting
– shallow-frying:
 pan-frying
 sauté
 stir-frying
– steaming
– stewing
– microwaving

for each cookery method:
– definition
– associated culinary terms
– suitable foods and recipes
– utensils and equipment required
– potential safety and/or hygiene issues
– principles and practices
– characteristics of food/dishes prepared using this method
– effect(s) on the nutritional value of food
– cooking time and temperature
cooking process

safe and hygienic work practices for cooking in commercial kitchen work environments

problem(s) in the cooking process:
– causes
– indicators
– corrective action(s)
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Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
cooking process cont/d

environmentally friendly work practices in the cooking process:
– efficient use of resources, water and energy
– management of kitchen waste
presentation of food

importance of food presentation to the customer’s dining experience

considerations when plating food:
– appropriate crockery, service-ware and utensils
– temperature of crockery and food
– portion size
– placement of food
– presentation according to recipe
– avoiding/removing grease marks, spills and drips
– use of appropriate sauces and garnishes or decorations

industry and workplace standards for food presentation

current trends in the preparation, presentation and service of food
commercial kitchen work environment

potential variations in commercial kitchen work environments:
– commercial kitchens within hospitality or catering organisations
– permanent or temporary kitchens
– food preparation areas

hygiene and cross-contamination issues for commercial kitchens

importance of cleaning services to food safety and hygiene and the overall quality of
service provided

industry and workplace standards for the presentation of kitchen premises
cleaning regimes

importance and purpose of cleaning regimes

cleaning of kitchen premises and equipment as a component of food safety

time and task management:
– planning and organising
– efficiently sequencing stages of cleaning kitchen premises and equipment
– cleaning within commercially realistic timeframes

cleaning schedules:
– frequency:
 daily
 weekly
 monthly
 other
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Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
cleaning regimes cont/d
–
–
timing:
 during service period
 end of service period
 end of shift
tasks to be completed
kitchen premises and equipment

areas of a commercial kitchen work environment to be included in the cleaning regime
and schedule:
– utensils
– equipment (small, large and fixed)
– service-ware
– linen
– premises:
 surfaces:
o floor
o walls
o windows
o shelves
 food preparation areas:
o benches
o work area/surfaces
 fittings and appliances:
o stove
o oven
o microwave
o dishwasher
o extraction fan
 storage areas:
o food storage areas (cupboards, freezer, fridge/cool room, storeroom)
o garbage/waste area
clean and sanitise

safe and hygienic work practices when cleaning kitchen premises and equipment

difference between cleaning, sanitising and disinfecting and the importance and
purpose of each

for a range of cleaning and sanitising agents and chemicals (products) for kitchen
premises and equipment:
– interpretation of instructions on the product label, safety data sheet (SDS) and
associated workplace documents
– safe preparation and use:
 directions and precautions
 recommended dosage and dilution
 calculating quantity required
 first aid
 storage
 disposal
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Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
clean and sanitise cont/d

safe work practices for the use and storage of hazardous substances

dealing with chemical-related accidents:
– first aid:
 chemicals absorbed through the skin
 chemical burns
 chemicals ingested
 inhaled chemical fumes
 chemical splashes in the eye
– workplace policy and procedures

for a range of cleaning equipment required to clean kitchen premises and equipment:
– name and general features
– purpose and limitations
– selection for task (functions)
– assembly (if appropriate)
– safe use/operation according to manufacturer's instructions
– maintenance
– storage

disassembling kitchen equipment for cleaning and reassembling once complete

cleaning, sanitising and disinfecting methods/techniques for cleaning commercial
kitchen work environments:
– utensils
– equipment
– service-ware
– linen
– premises

workplace policy and procedures and industry and workplace standards for cleaning
commercial kitchen premises and equipment

pest control procedures for flies, cockroaches, rats and mice

recording and reporting:
– infestations
– losses from damaged utensils, equipment and service-ware
environmentally sustainable work practices when cleaning

environmental impacts of cleaning commercial kitchen premises and equipment

workplace strategies to reduce negative environmental impact

environmentally responsible products and practices in relation to cleaning

efficient use of resources, water and energy

workplace systems to manage kitchen waste:
– storage of re-usable by-products
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Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
environmentally sustainable work practices when cleaning cont/d
–
–
sorting of recyclables
disposal of waste:
 food waste
 general waste
 damaged service-ware
 hazardous substances
safe food handling work practices

the importance of safe work practices when handling food

an understanding that food safety needs to be considered from ‘paddock to plate’

safe work practices and their purposes when handling food during:
– storage
– preparation
– display
– service
– disposal

vulnerable customer groups with a high risk of harm from food contamination
compliance for food businesses and food handlers

businesses involved in the preparation and service of food are required to:
– provide notification of the operation of a food business
– nominate a food safety supervisor
– implement a food safety program
– allow inspections of food and premises

intent and purpose of national and state/territory food safety laws, standards and codes
relevant to food safety for workplaces and workers within the hospitality industry:
– Food Act 2003 (NSW) (as amended)
– Food Regulation 2015 (NSW) (as amended)
– Food Amendment (Food Safety Supervisors) Act 2009 (NSW) (as amended)
– Australia New Zealand Food Standards (ANZFS) Code (‘the Code’)

role of the NSW Food Authority in food safety

local government food safety regulations and inspection regimes

legislative and regulatory requirements:
– impact on workers at operational level
– responsibilities of the owner, manager/supervisor/team leader, kitchen staff and
other staff
and consequences of failure to observe
food safety program

reasons for a food safety program in the hospitality workplace
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Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
food safety program cont/d

essential elements of a food safety program:
– identify potential food safety hazards
– determine where each hazard can be controlled and the means of control
– monitor the means of control
– provide for corrective action when the hazard identified is not under control
– regularly review the program
– keep appropriate records

main components of a food safety program common to the hospitality industry and
workplaces:
– Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) plan
– support programs

documentation associated with food safety programs:
– workplace policy, procedures and flowcharts
– monitoring food safety
– product specifications
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP)

definition of HACCP

key principles of HACCP:
– hazard analysis
– determine critical control points (CCPs)
– establish critical limits of CCPs
– monitoring
– taking corrective actions
– verification
– documentation/keeping records

high-risk and potentially hazardous foods

food hazards that may affect the health and safety of customers, colleagues and the
worker:
– actual and potential
– types:
 biological
 chemical
 physical
– causes of contamination

critical control points where there is a high risk to food spoilage and contamination (food
safety):
– purchasing and taking delivery of food stock
– food storage and stock control
– food and beverage preparation
– cooking or processing of food
– cooling and reheating of food
– holding or displaying food
– packaging food
– transporting food
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Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) cont/d
–
–
service of food and beverages
disposal of food

implementing HACCP through operational policy and procedures

application of HACCP practices for food safety to a workplace in the hospitality industry
and integrate into daily work activities
preparation, storage and service

environmental conditions for preparation, storage and service of food:
– to protect against contamination
– to maximise freshness, quality and appearance
– for a range of food types:
 fresh, frozen, preserved and cooked
 dry, cold and frozen storage

optimum storage times for a range of food types

stock rotation as it relates to food safety

time and temperature controls:
– to ensure microbiological safety
– temperature danger zone
– 'two-hour' and 'four-hour' rule
– appropriate temperatures at various stages:
 storage
 production
 heating and cooling
 display
 service
– temperature probe:
 calibration
 use
 cleaning
 identifying faults
– monitoring

storage and display of single-use items to protect from damage and contamination
workplace policy and procedures for food safety

based on workplace food safety program

workplace policy and procedures related to food safety:
– purchasing, delivery and storage of food
– preparation of food and beverages
– cooking, cooling and heating food
– displaying or holding food
– service of food and beverages
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Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
workplace policy and procedures for food safety cont/d

consequences of failure to observe workplace food safety policy and procedures

monitoring, reporting and recording related to food safety
support programs

support programs for a hospitality workplace that contribute to food safety:
– approved suppliers
– calibration of equipment
– kitchen premises and equipment:
 cleaning and sanitising schedules
 pest control
 maintenance
– personal presentation, health and hygiene of workers
– staff training
– waste management:
 general waste
 food waste
 food identified for disposal
 recyclables
 damaged service-ware
– workplace records and documents
69
Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
4
HSC examination
The Hospitality Curriculum Framework includes an HSC examination which provides the
opportunity for students to have this HSC examination mark contribute to the calculation of
their Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR).
The Hospitality HSC examination can contribute up to two units towards the calculation of a
student’s ATAR.
Students who have completed the Hospitality (240 indicative hours) course are eligible to sit
for the Hospitality HSC examination.
Students who want to sit for the Hospitality HSC examination must be entered for both the
Hospitality (240 indicative hours) course and the Hospitality examination on Schools Online
(Administration).
The HSC examination specifications, which describe the format of the external HSC
examination, are contained in the Assessment and Reporting in Hospitality Stage 6
document.
The HSC examination is independent of the competency-based assessment
undertaken during the course and has no impact on student eligibility for AQF VET
qualifications.
4.1
Examinable outcomes and content
The HSC examination in Hospitality is based on the HSC Content (focus areas) in this
Framework.
The HSC Content is detailed in Section 3 of this Syllabus.
4.2
Relationship of the Hospitality (240 indicative hours) course structure to
the HSC examination
The relationship between the Hospitality (240 indicative hours) course structure, the HSC
Content and the HSC examination is described in the Assessment and Reporting in
Hospitality Stage 6 document.
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Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
5
Other important information
5.1
Exclusions
Where there is significant overlap between an HSC VET course and other HSC VET or
general education courses, BOSTES has an exclusion between the courses. Exclusions are
applied at a course level rather than at the unit of competency level.
In this Framework, students can only undertake the Hospitality (120 indicative hours) course
or the Hospitality (240 indicative hours) course.
Schools should check all course exclusions when determining an appropriate pattern of
study for their students.
VET course exclusions can be checked on the BOSTES website at
www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/voc_ed/exclusions.html.
5.2
Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) and credit transfer within VET
courses
Students who have current knowledge, skills or experience relevant to a VET course may be
granted credit towards the course requirements.
Arrangements for RPL and credit transfer within VET courses, including processes,
application form and examples of possible scenarios, are detailed on the BOSTES website at
www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/voc_ed/rpl.html.
5.3
School-based apprentices and trainees
Information regarding provision for school-based apprentices and trainees within the HSC is
available on the BOSTES website at
www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/voc_ed/apprenticeships-traineeships.html.
Information on requirements and arrangements for NSW school-based apprenticeships and
traineeships is available at
www.training.nsw.gov.au/individuals/apprenticeships_traineeships/school_based/index.html.
5.4
Students with special education needs
Students with special education needs may access a VET course in one of two ways:
 by undertaking the course under regular course arrangements, or
 by undertaking selected units of competency within the course that have been identified
through the collaborative curriculum planning process.
For more information, see the VET Courses and Students with Special Education Needs fact
sheet, as well as Collaborative Curriculum Planning advice, on the BOSTES website.
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Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
5.5
Access by students in Years 9 and 10 (Stage 5)
In certain circumstances students in Years 9 and 10 (Stage 5) may access Stage 6 VET
courses. Further information is available on the BOSTES website at
www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/voc_ed/stage-5.html.
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Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
6
Glossary
AQF
Australian Qualifications Framework
The AQF is the policy framework that defines all qualifications recognised
nationally in post-compulsory education and training in Australia. The AQF
comprises titles and guidelines that define each qualification, as well as the
principles and protocols covering cross-sectoral qualification links and the
issuing of qualifications and statements of attainment.
Australian
Apprenticeships
Australian Apprenticeships encompass all apprenticeships and
traineeships. They combine time at work with training and can be full-time,
part-time or school-based (www.australianapprenticeships.gov.au).
competency
The broad concept of industry competency concerns the ability to perform
particular tasks and duties to the standard of performance expected in the
workplace. Competency requires the application of specified skills,
knowledge and attitudes relevant to effective participation in an industry,
industry sector or enterprise.
core units of
competency
Units of competency required by the Training Package to be eligible for an
AQF VET qualification.
elements of
competency
The basic building blocks of a unit of competency which describe the key
activities or elements of the work covered by the unit.
focus areas
HSC Content is organised into focus areas. HSC Content prescribes the
scope of learning for the HSC.
mandatory units
of competency
Units of competency that must be studied for an HSC VET course.
recognition of
prior learning
(RPL)
The result of an assessment of an individual’s non-formal and informal
learning to determine the extent to which that individual has achieved the
required learning outcomes, competency outcomes, or standards for entry
to, and/or partial or total completion of, a qualification.
RTO
Registered Training Organisation
A training organisation registered by a registering body in accordance with
the VET Quality Framework, within a defined scope of registration (include
TAFE NSW institutes, private providers and school system RTOs).
scope of
registration
The particular services and products an RTO is registered to provide. The
RTO’s scope defines the specific AQF VET qualifications, units of
competency and accredited courses it is registered to provide, and
whether it is registered to provide:
 both training delivery and assessment services, and to issue the relevant
AQF VET qualifications and statements of attainment, or
 only assessment services, and to issue the relevant AQF VET
qualifications and statements of attainment.
Stage 5
In NSW, Stage 5 relates to Years 9 and 10 of schooling.
Stage 6
In NSW, Stage 6 relates to Years 11 and 12 of schooling.
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Hospitality Curriculum Framework Stage 6 Syllabus
Statement of
Attainment
May be issued in the vocational education and training sector by an RTO
when an individual has completed one or more units of competency from
nationally recognised qualification(s)/course(s).
training.gov.au
http://training.gov.au
The national register for recording information about RTOs, Training
Packages and accredited courses.
Training
Package
A nationally endorsed, integrated set of competency standards,
assessment guidelines and AQF VET qualifications for a specific industry,
industry sector or enterprise.
training plan
A documented program of training and assessment required for an
apprenticeship/traineeship training contract. It is developed by an RTO in
consultation with the parties to the contract as the basis for training and
assessing a person undertaking an apprenticeship or traineeship.
unit of
competency
Specification of industry knowledge and skill and the application of that
knowledge and skill to the standard of performance expected in the
workplace.
VET
Vocational Education and Training
VET
qualification
Formal certification in the VET sector by an RTO that a person has
satisfied all requirements of the units of competency or modules that
comprise an AQF VET qualification, as specified by:
 a nationally endorsed Training Package, or
 an accredited course that provides training for the qualification.
VET Quality
Framework
The VET Quality Framework comprises:
 the Standards for Registered Training Organisations
 the Fit and Proper Person Requirements
 the Financial Viability Risk Assessment Requirements
 the Data Provision Requirements, and
 the Australian Qualifications Framework.
74
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