GUNS Magazine August 1956

AvGUST 1956 ~ O C
WHAT'S WRONG.
WITH
PIGEON SHOOTING?
-
?,
CONVERTING A PISTOL
INTO A RIFLE
1 WHAT AMMO
FOR MATCH SHOOTING ?
THE BRITISH FIRED JUST ONE ROUND FROM THESE PREWAR
SPRINGFIELDS!
NOW J U S T
sion. They were test fired by the Royal British proof house (British proof marks on receivers). They were neverfired again.
They are AMERICAN 30106 CALIBER 6-SHOT BOLT ACTION. BORES PERFECT. Guaranteed excellent by National Rifle
Association Standard. The Springfield i s the favorite North American big game hunting rifle for DEER, BEAR, ELK, MOOSE, MT.
LION, ANTELOPE, you name it. It i s the most accurate military rifle ever made. These are high number models originally made by
ington for the U. S. with all milled parts and four groove barrels (not %groove), same as used by Marine snipers in Korea. Softnose hunting amdays in this excellent condition. 10-day-money-back guarantee. For C.O.D. send $10 deposit. A l l shipments F.O.B. Pasadena,
nist revolutionaries and placed on the free world market. They are of the type used by Red Chinese i n Korea. The sale of
Â
m
$23.50 Postpaid. Includes official gleaming chrome steel sheath. May Also B e Purchased B y C i v i l i a n Collectors.
The sabre is again authorized for dress uniform of U.S Army Commissioned Officers. These are brand new, handmade and hand-forged dress sabres. Few people know that in-between wars Solinaen. Germany, supplied most of the
official swords and sabresforthe U.S. (and manyather cotmtnes). We haverece ved a small shi6ment which we believe
were made for our European occupation forces. This weapion i s appr.35" overall. lavishly engraved both sides and along
the Un led States. Total design is basically unchanged since
1 or retired officer, and a legendary focal point of any collecice. 10-day money-back guarantee. For C.O.D. send $7.50 ea.
IMPORTED GERMAN
NAZI TRENCH KNIFE
$4.75
POSTPAID
s were imported
tale Dept. permis-
complete with sheath. A n excellent
souvenir, collector's item and hunting
knife. Holds a razor edge. Add 80c for
U.S.. A.P.O. or F.P.O.Air Mail.
Sorry, no C.O.D.
I
m
I!+300.00U.S. NAVAL TELESCOPES
(
<
0. S. Navy Bureau of ShipsorSurplus, Serially
Numbered
of
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"Ship's
K . S . F i g h t i n g Ships it1
Glass"
W W 11. T h e largest h a n d - h e l d scope. These telescopes were "bed on t h e b r i d g e and
a
e v e famous n a v a l engaxement f r o m Pearl Harbor to T o k y o Bay. T h e y are t h e
finest i n m c r y detail. co.sting the eovt. over $300.00. Coated optics, absolute preciston
n
g
. shipped i n o r i g i n a l heavy hardwood f i t t e d and felted ca1,inei-j w i t h Navy i d i n t .
plate. A useful and w o n d e ~ f u llifetnme ~ ~ ~ ~ s s c COT
ss~
use
o na5 a s p o t t i n g sCol>e, fop S h o O t e T s .
hunters, boat owners. I.er.ses are a s t r o n o m i c a l çiuality Space ~atell~tes
soon t o 1,e
I n c h e d m a y l i e seen with t h i s glass. SEND check, cash or m o n e y order. 10.day money
a h a
. S p e d F.O.B. Pasadena, C a l i f . Calif. resid. add 4% state t a x . No e x c i s e
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N E W .45 CAL. BRASS BRUSHES 87% OFF
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Normally I5C 91. 500 for $10
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Here are the famous lever-action rifles with the exclusive
Savage rotary magazine . . . available in 3 models
. . . each drilled and tapped for popular receiver
and 'scope sights. You'll find one of these 99's
made to order for your shooting requirements.
THE FAMOUS FEATHERWEIGHT 99-F: the lightest big
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pounds. Speedy, accurate and extremely
light to carry, the 99-Fis perfect for
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MODEL 99-R:
You can actually shoot the famous Savage 99 as fast as you take aim. It never
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More dope on a fine lever action
Here are the two exclusive indicators on
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.250-300 SAVAGE
,300 SAVAGE The 150 grain
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medium game. In 180 grain this cartridge
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and is highly effective for brush shooting.
The 99 is just as light and perfect1 balanced as it looks. Quick to point a n d i i m ,
it's comfortable to hold, easy to carry. T h e
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Side ejection and lever action leave the
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.243 WINCHESTER This new 99 caliber in 80
and 100 grain bullet weights gives fine accuracy and energy at extreme ranges. Excellent for varmints, deer, antelope and
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As the saying goes, "no one ever dropped
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game . . . 150 grain for medium
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,358 WINCHESTER For a hefty brush cutter,
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will stop any American game in its tracks.
All Savage 99's include custom details at
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The article in the June issue of GUNS
Magazine, "Why Bullets Kill," is one of the
best articles on this subject appearing in
popular guns and sporting magazines. I think
the article has appeal to a wide range of
shooters from the casual once-a-year hunter
to the hard-bitten gun nut.
From my own personal standpoint I was
very pleased that the author left out the
usual hocus-pocus about "nerve shock" which
the pseudoscientific writer frequently inserts
with no understanding of what he is talking
about.
My only criticism, and this is with tongue
in cheek, is that the title does not describe
the contents of the article. Actually the
article is on the physical aspect of wound
ballistics rather than the physiologic effects.
One, of course, accounts for the other, but
to put it simply, bullets do not kill because
they make a hole through something but
because the effect of this hole is the disruption of vital processes. I realize this sounds
like saying that "a bullet kills because it
stops you from living," but in a sense this
is the case.
A bullet that enters vital regions of the
brain, for example, produces death by paralysis of respiration and subscqucntly of
heart action, or both rather close together.
A high spinal cord injury initially produces
only paralysis of respiration with death due
to lack of oxygen to the brain and subsequently to the heart.
These are rather crudely described wounds
that are immediately or rapidly fatal. Less
rapidly fatal wounds are generally related to
blood loss with the later development of
impairment of brain and heart function by
loss of oxygen, carrying capacity of the decreased blood volume.
GUNSMagazine is to be complimented for
a wound ballistics article t^at sticks to the
facts in a most lucid and readable manner.
Dr. Alexander C. Johnson
Great Falls, Mont.
Hollywood Stories
-
.
"Why Bullets Kill"
-. . --.. ..-
..s.
",
,m.w.
1220 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles, Calif..
Reading through the June issue, I found
your selection of the articles excellent; with
ones on handloading, hunting, and target
shooting you had very good variety. But I
think what pleased me the most was the
lack of the Hollywood type story. I can't
understand whom you are trying to appeal
to by putting in the stories such as "The
Guns of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .", or using such
idiotic photographs as the ones at the bottom
of page 40. Most gun owners take their
shooting and hunting quite seriously and
don't give two cents for the opinion of an
entertainer or someone in politics.
You have a large reading audience in the
.
shooters of America. but with only one thing
in common: an interest in guns. Along with
the pleasure of reading about guns, one
usually likes to acquire some useful information. I am happy that most of the material in
GUNSis of this nature, but why waste your
paper on something that isn't? Even including this fault though, you have a very fine
magazine, and I hope to be a subscriber for
many years to come.
West Frazier
Lafayette. Indiana
Buffalo Hunters
Enjoyed your article on the buffalo hunt.
My sentiments though are with Charles
Russel's last paragraph about the buffalo.
I t is too bad that some of those guns didn't
blow back and blow the heads off some of
those who hunted, the buffalo to practical
extinction and wasted meat by the millions
of tons, leaving nothing for those people
following who could have used the meat.
We could have had some buffalo now to hunt
and use and enjoy. Curses on the stupid
fools.
Erwin H. Slavens
Aurora, Colo.
Target Rifle Shooting
This letter is in reference to the article
written by Colonel Charles Askins in the
March Issue of GUNS on "What's Wrong
With Target Rifle Shooting?" Col. Askins
singed the hair of my tail when he said:
"The target shooting game among civilians
is about as moribund as a Sunday afternoon
in Topeka." Sure, but why? I'll tell you why.
Name one public large bore rifle range in
New York City. Why if we want to shoot
large bore do we have to go to Middlefield,
Conn., 100 miles or so away? Thanks to the
Lyman Gun Sight Corp., there are facilities
available including immaculate rest rooms,
shower stall and a snack bar. That's Connecticut. What about New York City? New
"York State? If you belong to the National
Guard, there are facilities and some of these
facilities are available to certain clubs, only
certain clubs. What about the individual
shooter? Where does he stand?
Then the colonel goes on to say: "We
used to be a nation of riflemen." I got news
for him. We still are if given a place to
shoot within traveling distance. Let me give
you an example of what takes place when
we go to a match in Middlefield, Conn. It
usually starts at 9:00 AM, so we get up
about 5:30 AM, leave the club or meeting
place at 6:00 AM and arrive in plenty of
time. We are ju5t a bit weary after a threehour drive and the prone position feels
pretty good after that.
Harry F. Corradi
Brooklyn, N. Y.
Dallas, Texas. Site of skeetdom's traditional Pan-American classic was the
plush Dallas Gun Club, where 120 top gunners including a visiting 8-man Puerto
Rican police team battled for silver trophys in all gauges and classes. High
gun in the pop-gun .410 event --which is a tricky thing at best with the-light
shotload of the ,410 shell was Mississippian Fred LaRug. Charley Boardman of
Philadelphia chalked up the 28 gauge win and Bob Rath of Winnetka, Illinois,
took honors in the 20 gauge shoot. The gruelling 200 bird 12 gauge event was
tied by Jaime Loyola of Puarto Rico, w o l a Mandel of Chicago, Fred LaRue and
Titus Harris, Jr. of Galveston, all deadlocked at 199. In the shoot-off, Titus
Harris blazed to win...The
efficient layout of the Dallas clubhouse contributed
much to the success of the match. When shoots are in progress, the squad
hustler and announcers can comfortably direct activities by loudspeaker from
the second floor.
-
Akron,Ohio. The blond gal who is building a top name for herself in the smallbore world, Mrs. Viola Pollum of Brookville, Pa., won the coveted Litchfield
Trophy at the Goodyear Zeppelin Rifle C l w -22match. First woman to win tht
Litchfield bronze plaque, she fired 3194 x 3200 with 239 X-ring bullseyes to
lead a field of 96 top competitors from the east. Charles C. Whipple of Somerseau,
Pa., was runner-up scoring 3193 with 249X's. Whipple's near miss had a
rough edge to it
he had won the Litchfield in 1954. Viola will have a chance
to defend another of her titles at the July 21st Zeppelin open smallbore
+, ourney...Midwestern
Regionals which are important in the annual .22 competition
set-up are scheduled for August 4 and 5 at the Zeppelin range. The club plans
to expand soon to 80-position firing line with pistol, skeet and trap added.
-
-
Montreal, Canada* RCAF Sgt. Barney H a r t ~ nof Ottawa knocked the birdies out '
of the wild blue yonder for a clean sweep of four titles in the first Canadian
Skeet Shoot championships at Montreal's skeet club. Hartman led the way in both
Canadian open and closed championships in .410 and 20 gauge classes...American
invaders from New Jersey kept their Remington 11-48's smoking with John Oldenof Paterson, and Mrs. Victoria Wood and F. C. Wood, Jr. of Fort Lee scoring
high.
Chicago, Ill. One of skeet shooting's biggest events, the Great Western
regional.^, was fired at the beautiful lake-shore Lincoln Park Gun Club. About
170 gunners turned out for the 12 gauge event with the hot competition lasting
almost 12 hours. A little confusion during the three-day shoot was brought on
by a hail storm with stones 3/4" in diameter battering down for a few minutes.
They say none of the stones were scored as "birdsW...Fred LaRue repeated his
regional victory in Dallas by winning the .410 event. Bob Rath from Winnetka
took the 28 gauge event and Carola Nandel set a new rectord by becoming the first
woman ever to win an event in this shoot, not only taking the 20 gauge but winning the 12 gauge as well and the all-around championship in four guns. Just
shows that little girls can shoot big guns if they try...Both
Chet Crites from
Detroit and Marion Shields of Grand Rapids went straight to knock down 100
without a miss. Marion won the shoot-off...In the 20 gauge event the gunners
were so uniformly matched that the shoot-off took as long as the event itself!
W.
- G. Tomlinson of Royal Oak, Michigan, tied with Carola, both cracking 98 over
the wind-swept field. First round ended and both fired 25; next two rounds ran
24 apiece and not only shooters but the spectators were tensing up. In the
fourth and final round "Tothnyn dropped one bird while Carola went straight to
win the crown...Bob Rath won the 28 gauge after a close run by Harry Altice, one
if the Middle West's outstanding guns for many years.
Core
-----da. On the Police Pistol C l u ~ran
turned in. Lew Frederick kept his handgun battery how,
open, centerfire expert and .45 expert classes with reme
of 197, 196 and 193 in timed fire course...Grand aggy winners ir
were Frederick with a high 1695* Harvey
scoring 1684, and
nudged into third place with 1664 over Ken Cowan's fourth, a close
class high pistoleer was Lassae Alexander, 1627; Jesse Francis, Jr
three guns for a-sharpshooterhigh of 1578: and Ira C. Merick score
marksman with 1438.
Middlefield, Conn. The 12th annual Shoulder-to-Shouldex mior .22 1
conducted by the Connecticut State Rifle& Revolver Association attrat
100 juniors to the Winchester Clubhouse range
The 79 eager, excitei
and nervous marksmen cooled down with a l l Kerr of New London High Scho
scoring 190 for first place
Barbara Winton of Stratford, Conn.'~, I
Athletic League earned double honors, second place and high girl scorer.
...
...
. ..
La Grange, Illinois. At the Electromotive Division (Gex~~~.al
Motors) ROU a GUI~
club range, nine top trap gunners fired to wins in all three classes
Class A winner was Walt Stenzl of Westmont, 111.: second place to G. Nation, retired from active employment at EMD but an honorary life member of the club
third to Vern Gunsallus who blasted through to uphold the honor of the Engin
Division
Industrial engineer Syl Bezjak busted the birdies for first
in class B; second was F. Smiar; third to Dave Johnson of Winchester, I1
Class C saw hot shooting between C . Morris, Roy Mickow of Hinsdale, and
Elsey for 1-2-3 in that order.
Ken Skibbe won a handsome gold finished
travelling trophy as high gun of the season. This is a new thing with the EMD
club-three wins and it is permanent with Skibbe but there should be some interest in getting it away from him during the next shooting season. A "travel-
...
..
Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Fifty-three Marine Corps sharpshooters kept
steady barrage of .30M2's barreling down-range to win medals and honors in the
Eastern Division individual rifle competition attended by some 400 shooters
from east coast posts and the Mediterranean area
Six
were headed by sgt. D. S. Wagner. The youthful leatherneck topped all other
shooters for a grand aggregate win of 570 x 600. Wagner fired his Ml for 28
the first day, 287 the second. Course of fire was 20 shots off-hand 200 yards,
20 minutes; then 10 rounds rapid fire from sitting in 50 seconds; third is 10
rounds rapid fire from prone at 300 yards, and last 20 shots prone at 600 yard
Same course is shot the following day. Wagner tightened up a little and shot
four points better the second time around
m g t . W. A. Herring=
of
Camp Lejeune took a firm grip on his .45, stuck his feet as far apart as he
could reach for a rock-solid shooting stance, jammed his
pocket and triggered off his shots for a silver medal in t
and 527 x 600
PFCs showed they could shoot and well.
J. E. Schneider, 2nd Marine Division, placed 25th in a fie1
Marine shooters for a score of 525 x 600 and a bronze medal.
.. .
...
...
Libertyville, 111. The day dawned hot and clear but a little rain later did n*.'7
dampen the spirits and aim of 78 registered shooters at the Libertyville Gun
Club smallbore shoot....The
100 yard dual course was fi-redover, first two
matches "any sightsn with the usual line-up of 20X Feckers, Unertls and Lyma
a-top .22 M52's and Remington 37's. One of A1 Freeland's BSA single shots
turned up in the hands of one shooter... John Moscakau of Waterloo, Iowa, f0Un
the grassy meadow of Libertyville's 100 yard range was anything but his "Water
loo," for he drilled the bullseye neatly for a "possiblen 400 x 400 and 30 X's
O KV
D E
SERIES 60
-
MEAVEWCOPE
3X or 5X
H
among shotgunners
is live pigeon shooting. It is so
hot that shooters do not openly discuss
it, except under the euphemism of
"flyer shooting." For the first time
anywhere, one of the world's leading
flyer shooters, Bob Allen, who is a
author and expert and twice
Champion of the World, frankly discusses the facts and the problems of
shotgunning's most fascinating and
difficult target game. His article asking "What's Wrong with Pigeon Shooti n g is an eye-opener on a very controversial sport.
The nation's leading h a n d g u n
shooter for some eight or ten years
past also makes his debut in this issue
of GUNS.We are proud to welcome Sgt.
Joe Benner to our pages. America's
foremost Olympic hope, Joe writes of
his methods in training for handgun
matches~information worthwhile to
everyone in the gun game from beginner to expert. Benner is currently stationed at the Military Academy at Wesi
Point as shooting instructor.
Colonel Ward 0. Betz brings up from
the old dope bag a wildcat story which
at first "
glance seems ordinary-until
you read on and learn the implications
By working up special loads for a
unique handgun cartridge, Colonel
Betz has just about brought the pisto'
up into the rifle class for long range
varmint shooting. His remodeling of
a New Service Colt into a high-pow
ered .30 bottle-neck wildcat will start
a lot of case resizing in basement work
shops, we predict. The colonel is ir
~ewfoundlandon a bear hunt now ani
we expect to have a story from hirr
soon on "Hunting the biggest var
mints," which he shoots with, natur
ally, a .240 wildcat of his own devising
"What Ammo for Match Shooting'
by ordnance technician Larry Moon
will make some shooters wake up an(
read the statistics again. The tab11
showing accuracy of various lots an(
brands of . 2 2 s in three different rifle
reveals the great importance of team
ing your ammo with your gun througl
testing to determine which :22's givi
top results in your particular rifle
Moore is employed in one of the na
tion's largest research and testing lab
oratories and writes with full know1
edge of his subject.
OTTEST TOPIC
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Honeymooning in India, Lady
Amabel Linday, 20-year-old British
noblewoman, killed a crocodile with
the first shot she ever fired in her life.
0
0
0
Yugoslavia's Marshal Tito has a
weakness for practical jokes. On a
recent hunting trip, he tied a pair of
deer antlers on a cow and turned it
loose in the brush. Then he excitedly
pointed out the animal to a companion
and courteously allowed him to take
the first shot. For days after the incident, Tito would phone his hunting
friend and when the latter answered,
Tito would just say "Moooo."
Q
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and "How To Make Your First Shot Count."
Enclosed is $2.00 for all-new 1956 (8th edition)
of "Tomorrow's Rifles Today."
Over 100 Pages
~rofusely illustrated! Valuable information and
ballistical data!
WEATHERBY
The Greatest Name in Big ~ a m eRifles and
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to fit any low
comb stock.
DAYTON TRAISTER CO.
DEALERSAND
7912 S. E. POWELL BLVD.
PORTLAND 6, OREGON
JOBBERS INQUIRIES
INVITED
0
0
0
0
Ed Lindsay of Knoxville, Tennessee,
hunted two years to catch one particular squirrel. He sighted an albino
squirrel one day and stalked the same
animal 24 months before getting a shot
at him while walking the banks of
Little River hunting for ducks.
0 0
A western stage-coach holdup, modern style, was foiled in Los Angeles by
gas station operator Milton Gerber. He
had drawn $7,000 from the bank and
was getting into his car when a man
approached with drawn gun. "This is
a holdup," the robber said, "You're
covered." Drawing his own gun, Gerber
said to the bandit, "You're covered,
too." The gunman looked at Gerber's
pistol, muttered "Let's call it quits,"
and fled.
13
For Mauser, Springfield,
and Enfield. Also speedlock kit for all three.
0
Maine deer hunters who drop a buck
weighing 200 pounds or more become
eligible to the Biggest Bucks In Maine
Club. Last year some 1000 hunters
shot a buck over the 200-pound mark.
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
0
A wild duck that somehow had managed to escape hunters' guns for 1 3
years finally had his luck run out at
the Munuscong marshes in Michigan.
The bagged bird had a federal leg band
that had been attached in the same
marshes in 1943.
EI
aluminum
COVEY
H A N D TRAP
d
/
w
e
*
-
Throws 1, 2 or 3
standard Clay Targlets
Next Best Thing To Real Field Shooting
iL
<
IDEAL AT G U N CLUB, I N CAMP, I N THE FIELD, I N A N Y LARGE, SAFE, O P E N AREA.
Now, for the first time, the sportsman can shoot a "covey" of double or triple targets, the closest posI
sible simulation of actual field conditions.
The COVEY Hand Trap is simple to operate, light, portable, strong, with no moving parts - nothing to
go wrong. Long rubber lined tracks give the clay birds on effective stabilizing spin which sustains their
flight. Retaining spring along track holds clay birds in trap so that they don't fall out accidentally.
Rubber bumper at end of trap cushions shock to targets while loading, thus minimizes chances of
accidental breakage.
Targets can easily be thrown at any angle, in any direction, at various speeds and will carry up to a
distance of 60 yards. Excellent and unusual practice for the experienced shooter as well as the beginner.
The COVEY Trap i s made of aluminum, weighs only about 1 '/; Ibs. and is 37" long when fully set up.
Can be operated either right or left handed. Handle is removable and locks inside frame for compact
carrying.
Complete instructions
for use on the box
Loading is simple a n d
quick. Trap works perfectly
with either 1,2 or 3 targets.
For easy, compact carrying, trap handle
can be removed and lacked inside frame.
,
I couldn't have made
this shot without the
MV FAVORITE GUN
BOONE!"
says George E. Parshley of Bath, Maine of his
2 i X Boone gunscope, bought last October.
u
There's no strain on your
eyes and it brings your
have made the
shot."
the fabulous
BOONE j y i s c o p
2iX.
. . . $38
1
. . . $+?
4X.
Interchangeable Receiver Sight
$5.31
Free-Send for
Bulletin #56
and mount list
CHILFORD ARMS
24 California St, San Francisco, Calif.
By KING FAISAL II OF IRAQ
Of all my guns, I believe my favorite is a Holland & Holland .375 Magnum double rifle, deluxe model, with 24-inch barrels. I like this rifle for
its perfect balance, which makes it very easy to shoulder when a quick
shot is needed. The bullet also has enough power to bring down most game
in a charge or otherwise.
ing equipment in
and at home with La
custom-styled saddle leather
shooting accessories.. .favor- '
ites with four generations of
sportsmen.
No. 8. RIFLE SCABBARD
For rifle with telescope sight.
ah" carrying strap. Rich mahogany oil finish. Send tracing of rifle with the scope
$16.00
mounted.
No. 18. SHELL CARRIER
4
Holds four boxes of shotgun shells
and their original containers. Inside weather protection flaps. Rich
mahogany finish with reinforced
carrying handle. Specify gauge of
$16.00
shell. Basket weave.,
>
a
Â
Write fnr
SEE
.- - .
- -.-
DEALER
postpaid
7
By RUDY ETCHEN
Champion Shotgunner
My favorite gun is the
Browning Grade V over-andunder shotgun with speciallybuilt stock. This gun has the
single sighting plane of a singlebarrel gun, yet has all of the
fine qualities of a side-by-side
double gun. For tournament
shooting such as I do, this becomes an all-purpose gun that
is beautifully balanced and always dependable.
ORDER BY MAIL-WE PAY THE POSTAGE
KRASNE'S OF CALIFORNIA
E C H O R E - L O A D I N G PRESSES
"The t o o l that uses i t s heady Exceptionally strong "C' type casting
with a new type shell holder that may be changed b y just unscrewing the
head a n d replacing it. ( A ) MODEL 8iZeS o n the up-stroke
(B)
M O D E L sizes o n the down-Stroke.
...
(A)
A rugged, economipositive alignment
and accuracy.
C-H PRESS o n l y
Primer Arm,
PRESS only
........
laroe
Or
..........
.............
T O T A L COST
...... .$55.50 1
T O T A L COST
One of
LYMAN 310 TOOL ,,COMPLETE,$15.76
t h e most accurate! Will
hold to one-tenth of a grain1
Rifle-drum
~ i f l e or Pistol.
holds 15 grains 2400 to 75
Saeco Measure, for
Extra
rifle orDrum,
pistol drum
rifle or
i
t
c
Will d o a l l operat i o n s t o r a n y single
caliber.
~:22?;emE
I%=%iii,;
1 9 grains 2400.
8-50
EXTRA
. . . . . . . . . . 5-50
n
.
4.00
-
SAECO ELECTRIC FURNACE
L a m capacity.
Thermostatic control from 450 to
850 degrees. Complete with
Per Set
.......$I5
.......$10
Complete Set ......$25
......$38.50
Gun
n
Lachmiller Primer Pocket Swager for
removing crimped-in GI primers $8
PRESS only
Dies, per set
.......
..............
.........
..............
..............
........
..............
........
..
BOX OF 100
2 2 C a l i b e r ~ . 2 2 3Diameter
2.80
40-Grain Hornet
45-Grain Hornet
2.80
22 C a l i b e r ~ . 2 2 4 D i a m e t e r
..............
..............
.22 C a l i b e r ~ . 2 2 4 D i a m e t e r
..............
..............
40-Grain Hornet
45-Grain Hornet
45-Grain Semi-pointed
45-Grain Spitzer
50-Grain Semi-pointed
50-Grain Spitzer
55-Gr. Semi-Ptd. or Spitzer
63-Grain Semi-pointed
.......
..............
........
..............
...
........
.25 Caliber-257
..............
..............
6MM.-2.43
Diameter
75-Grain Spitzer H.P.
4.15
80.Grain Spitzer
4.15
100-Gr. Spitzer or Semi-pointed. 4.40
..............
..............
6.5MM.-264
Diameter ,
120-Grain Spitzer
4.65
140.Grain Spitzer B T
5.00
.........
........
................
....
......
..............
...........
...........
.........
..............
........
.........
........
..........
..........
..............
..............
....
........
..............
..............
..........
2 7 0 C a l i b e r ~ . 2 7 7 Diameter
110-Grain Spitzer
4.66
5.00
130-Grain Spitzer B T or F B .
150-Grain Spitzer B T
5.25
..............
...
..........
7MM.-284
Diameter
120-Grain Spitzer
4.65
140-Grain Spitzer
5.00
160.Grain Spitzer B T
5.25
..............
..............
..........
.............. 2.80
................
3.05
................
3.05
................3.05
22 C a l i b e r - 2 2 2 5 D i a m e t e r
45-Grain Hornet ..............2.80
50-Grain Spire ................3.05
45.Graln
50-Grain
55.Grain
60-Grain
Hornet
Spire
Soire
Spire
............$24.50
Change Unit.
one gauge t o
another..
Laohmiller Metallic Loading
Dies, per l e t .
....... $12.50
..........
Lachmilier Priming
only
6.5MM.-263
Diameter
100.Grain Spire
4.40
4.80
129-Gr Rnd Nose can)
160-~; ~ n d :Nose (can)
5.25
TOOI
...............
.......
.......
RED DIN^
............... 4.66
................
...... 5.00
5.25
...............
..........
......
......
303 Caliber-,312
Diameter
150-Grain Rnd. Nose (can).
5.10
Diameter
..............
..............5.10
5.35
8MM.-.323
Diameter
150.Grain Spitzer ..............5.10
175-Grain Spitzer .............. 5.36
1
....
32 Special-.321
Diameter
170-Gr. F l a t Pt. (can)
5.25
........
8 M M . caliber--.323
Diameter
150-Gr. Rnd. Nose (can)
5.00
5.25
170-Gr. Rnd. N w e (can)
......
......
200-Gr. F l a t Point (can) ...... 5.75
35 Caliber-.358
Diameter
200-Gr. Rnd. Nose (can) ...... 5.75
250-Gr. Rnd. Nose (can) ...... 6.30
348 C a U b e r ~ . 3 4 8 D i a m e t e r
Rnd. Nose (can)
...... 6.80
375 C a l i b e b . 3 7 5 D i a m e t e r
300-Gr. Rnd. Nose (can)
531 Market St.
......7.35
$14.00
REDDING POWDER MEASURE
Easy-to-set c h r o m e
d i a l , with e x c l u s i v e
f l e x ring that e l i m i nates powder
cutting.
..........
.................
......
275.Gr.
I
..
0 H y d r a u l i c Dampener!
0 Weighs t o 2 5 Grains!
0 T e n t h - G r a i n Graduations!
.....
.....
$8.80
POWDER
& BULLET
SCALE ,
100.Grain Soire
130-Grain Spire
150.Br. Rnd. Nose (can)
7MM.-284
Diameter
4.65
120-Grain Spire
5.00
139-Grain Spire (can)
5.25
154-Gr. Rnd. Nose (can)
175-Gr. Rnd. Nose (can)
5.75
t o change from
........... $18.00
...............
................
................
......
3 0 3 Caliber-.311
150-Grain Spitzer
180-Grain Spitzer
..............
...
...........
INC.
..................$60
Shotsiieli loading
dies onty
2 5 C a l i b e r ~ . 2 5 7Diameter
3.85
0 - G r a i n Spire
87-Grain Spire
4.18
4.40
100-Grain Spire
4.65
117-Gr. Rnd. Nose (can)
30 Caliber-.308
Diameter
110-Gr. Rnd. N o w or Spire.
4.55
5.00
150-Gr. Rnd. Nose or Spire
170-Grain F l a t p o i n t
5.25
180-Grain Round N o w or
Spire (Can)
5.25
220.Gr. Rnd. Nose (can)
5.75
..............
Fiber, $4.25 &I 1000
Felt. $4.95 per 1000
'A" Felt, $6.00 per 1000
I,$"
Felt, $7.95 per 1000
135" Over powder. $1.95 per M
Overshot, $1.75 per 1000.
..............$48.50
Loading Tool w i t h S n a r a t t
Priming Tool Complete, for any
one gauge shot
shell..
................ 4.15
3.95
................
......... 4.40
.30 Caliber-.308
Diameter
125-Grain Spitzer
4.65
150-Grain Spitzer
5.00
5.25
8 0 - G r a i n Spitzer B T o r FB.
5.50
180-Grain Matchking
LACHMILLER LUBRICATED
SHOTGUN WADS
Rugged, strong tool; one o f the most
versatile o n the market.
Loading Tool w i t h Priming Tool
Complete, for any
one caliber
270 C a l i b e r ~ 2 7 7D i a m e t e r
1/20
I KRASNE'S,
I
&
LACHMILLER METALLIC
SHOT
SHELL
RELOADER
6MM.-243
Diameter
70-Grain Spire
87-Grain Spire
100-Grain Round Nose
.........
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
..............
(both funnels fit a l l calibers)
nny n c inn
Diameter
85-Grain Spitzer
4.15
100-Grain Spitzer
4.40
4.65
117-Gr. Spitzer. B T or F B
7MM.-284
Diameter
5.00
130-Grain Spitzer
145-Grain Spitzer
5.10
5.25
Ifill-Grain
.
.. -. -....Snitzer
-.....
3 0 Caliber-.308
Diameter
110-Grain Ogival Spire
4.50
4.90
130-Grain Hollow Point
150-Grain Fiat. Spitzer or
Round Nose
5.00
180-Gr. Sptz. or Rnd. Nose
5.25
200-Gr. Rnd. Nose or Sptz
5.40
3 0 3 Caliber-.3
1 1 Diameter
150-Grain Spitzer
5.00
180-Grain Rnd. Nose
5.25
3 2 Caliber-.321
Diameter
170-Grain Flat Point
5.25
8MM.-.323
Diameter
125.Grain Ooival Soire
4.65
150-s rain spitzer
5.00
170-Grain Semi-Spitzer
5.25
225-Grain Round Nose
5.75
3 3 3 Caliber-.333
Diameter
275-Grain Semi-Spitzer
7.00
.348 Caliber-.349
Diameter
180-Grain F l a t Point
5.50
220-Grain Flat Point
5.85
.. .S1.25
Powder Funnel.. ............$1.00
Inertia Bullet Puller. ....... .S8.60
HORNADY BULLETS
SIERRA BULLETS
DIES
. .$10.75
LYMAN TRULINE JR. TURRET
RELOADING PRESS
1 ingot mold.
Extra Ingot Molds.
iliber-223
Diameter
40-Grain Ogival Spire
..$2.80
45-Grain Spitzer
2.80
2 2 Caliber-224
Diameter
2.80
40-Grain Ogivai Spire
2.80
45-Grain Spitzer
50.Grain Soitzer
3.05
52-Grain Hollow Point
3.70
55-Grain Spitzer
3.05
6 M M 2 4 3 Diameter
75-Grain Hollow Point
90-Grain Spitzer ..............
105-Gr. Spitz. or Rnd. Nose..
2 5 Caliber-257
Diamete
60-Grain Ogival Spire
87-Grain Spitzer
100-Grain Spitzer
120-Grain Spitzer
6.5MM.-263
Diameter
87.Grain Spitzer
120-Grain Spitzer
140-Grain Spitzer
270 Caliber~.277 Shank
1OO.Grain Spitzer
4.60
5.00
130.Grain Snitzer
...........$33.00
...
SAECO TRU-SPEED POWDER
MEASURE
nnv nr 1nn
2.75
3.25
13.50
THALSON SHOTSHELL RELOADING SET
LYMAN SIZER &
LUBRICATOR 4 4 5
SPEER BULLETS
..
Complete with a l l dies a n d funnel and shot measure,
$22.50
E x t r a D i e Sets for 12. 16 a n d 20 gauge.
... .$33.00
T O T A L COST
.......$1350
only.
Tool
C-H Precision Chrome-Plate Dies
...-
.....
(B)
-
..........$12.W
...... 3.00
........
4.50
small
Shell Holder
C-H Precision
Chrome-Plate Dies
or
L a r g e or S m a l l P r i m e r A r m . .
S h e l l - H o l d e r Head, with W r e n c h
cal press f o r a l l
l e a d i n g operations.
$16
fl
LACHMILLER POWDER
$16.75
MEASURE
$16.15
Accurate, easy-to-set1 P o r celanized inside t o perm i t powder t o slide evenIT
Complete
.
w i t h 2 drop
tubes. Range 2.5 grains
hullseye to 93 grains
4350.
I
L Y M A N 55
POWDER
MEASURE
(left) $14.50
SAN DIEGO 1, CALIF.
;It- S- 'Scat. SwiptuA. '.
¥¥*¥¥¥¥**¥**********
NEW SPRINGFIELD !
.30-06 BARRELS
WILL FIT ANY 30-06
:
Guns
AUGUST
1956
Vol. 2
NO. 8-20
SPRINGFIELD
Regularly $9.95-worth
up t o $25.00
Â
Model 1903A3 Springfield barrels manu, factured t o rigid government specifications"
, standard G.I. 24". Completely finished:
, chambered and rifled, with front sight band
, and sporter t y p e ~ w i t h o u tspline cut.
, DEALERS: Write for special Discounts on
, Springfield barrels only.
MAG'AZINE
:
SUPER SPECIAL BUY
;
'
CHROME-LINED BARRELS .30-06 & 2 7 0
CALIBERS. Will f i t .98 & FN actions.
BRAND NEW. Threaded chambered blued
chrome-lined, ready f o r fitting with mini:
mum effort. While they last. SPORTER Wt.,
22" ONLY $14.95ÑO
FITTED TO YOUR
ACTION $24.95.
ENFIELD PARTS-
:
:
:
:
}
:
:
-
rn
NEW:
Ea.
Per Doz.
Extractors
$1.50
$13.00
Bolts with Collar
I.oo
10 00
Handguards, rear
.50
4.00
Ejectors
1.oo
8.00
Strikers (Firing Pins
.50
4.00
Magazine Box
1.oo
10.00
Cocking Piece
1.oo
10.00
Bolt Stop Spring
.25
2.00 0
Floor Plate
1.oo
8.00
Trigger Guards
1.oo
8.00
(One each of above 10 scarce parts $6.95)
Enfield Trigger Guards completely straightened (the hump taken out of the front)
polished and blued with floor plate and
screws-while they last $3.95.
:
:
:
:
$26195 !
:
-
'
:
-
-
:
:
:
:
:
Â:
:
:
Â
:GUNS HAND GUNS ...
:BERETTA. . ASTRA . .
:
.
CHASSEUR
:
.
J
BULLETS
HORNADY
NORMA
Â
MISCELLANEOUS
Gun Coses; Grips, Powder, Holsters, Hoppe's
Cleaning Accessories, Swivels Factory, Instollers o f POLY CHOKES, ~ u h Cornpensos
tors.
 HI-STANDARD
LLAMA
LE
a
w
Â
Â
Â
IVER JOHNSON
WALTHER
STAR-GREAT WESTERN
THE OLDEST N A M E
...
9
N. F. S T R E B E G U N WORK5404-A Mnrlboro P i k e Wnthirtnton 17. D.
c.1
Allen
16
IN GUNS COMES BACK.. . . . . . . . . W i l l i a m B. Edwards 2 4
THE M A N W H O C A N OUTSHOOT THE RUSSIANS. .....Col. Charles Askins 2 8
H O W I A M T R A I N I N G FOR T H E OLYMPICS.. . . . . . .M/Sgt. Huelet Benner 33
DREAM TARGET RANGE..
..................
W H A T A M M O FOR M A T C H SHOOTING?.
...
military . . .
hunting . . .
departments . . .
.
...
.
.Clement C. Theed
40
.Larry F. Moore
44
workshop
CONVERTING A PISTOL I N T O A RIFLE..
....
Col. Ward.
THE M A C H I N E GUN'S BAPTISM OF FIRE. . . .
RABBITS C A N SHARPEN UP YOUR SHOOTING..
SHOOTING
....
NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TRIGGER T A L K
GUNS
........
IN THE NEWS.. . .
M Y FAVORITE G U N . .
0.
Betz
21
.Evarts Erickson
34
. . . . . . . .Robert J. Kindley 38
....
.
...............................
...............................
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .King
Faisal of Iraq and Rudy Etchen
6
7
9
10
12
. . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Stuart M i l l e r 47
SHOPPING W I T H GUNS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . 76
PARTING SHOTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
CARTRIDGES, quips, quotes and queries.
COVER
Shoulder stocks f i t t e d to regular caliber revolvers, such as M I 8 6 1 Navy Colt .36 and
special long range sights on "Buntline Special" Frontier .45 have been tried t o adapt a
handgun t o rifle use. Modern trend is typified by re-barreled New Service Colt which
uses wildcat cartridge o f rifle type w i t h long range and power, yet is fired w i t h one hand.
George E. von Rosen
PUBLISHER
Ben Burns
William B. Edwards
EDITOR
TECHNICAL EDITOR
,
Col. Charles Askins
Herbert 0. Brayer
SHOOTING EDITOR
WESTERN EDITOR
Sydney Barker
Ben Rosen
Louis Satz
ART DIRECTOR
ART EDITOR
CIRCULATION MANAGER
M. Magnusson
Marvin Ginn
ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER
Jack Provol
Tom Youngblood
ADVERTISING MANAGER
.
MIDWEST REPRESENTATIVE
Â
RIFLES
SHOTGUNS
IVER JOHNSON..
MARLIN O/U. IVER
MARLIN. MANNJOHNSON. BERETTA.:
LICHER-SCHOENAUER SAUER. FRANCHI.
STEYR
SAKO.
ZEPHYR.
Â
TERMS: Cash with order only-Plus
parcel Â
post 6 insurance.
Â
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..Bob
WHAT'S W R O N G W I T H PIGEON SHOOTING..
Â
:
:
RELOADING TOOLS
LYMAN C-H DIES
RCBS PACIFIC
Â
THALSON -WILSON
REDDING SCALES AND
POWDER MEASURES
SCOPES
MOUNTS
LYMAN
BUEHLER
NORMAN-FORD PACHMAYR
LEUPOLD
GRIFFINPECAR
HOWE
KAHLES
LEUPOLD
.
-
Â
JOBBERS FOR
SIGHTS
LYMAN
MARBLE
KING
MICRO
MERIT
WILLIAMS
...
shooting
CROSSFIRE, letters to the editor.
'
Prewar quality but
best of $1 PREWAR PRICES!
Perfect i n and out-as
new.
Patridge sights b e a u t i f u l l y
blued, checkered grips, positive safety. Deep rifling for
GRADE
extreme accuracy. Also a few
GRADE 1. (sliahtlv worn. bore
perfect) @ $24.95. ~ x t r a m ~ g a z i n e new
s
@ $1.50 with gun. New holsters' with
Qun, $3.95. 41A"
. - BBL onlv.
A WHEN ORDERING, close signed ktatemenl- "I Â
:;nota;,a;in,
have never been convicted of
am not under indictment or rn
fugitive. I am 2 1 or over".
o
I N THIS ISSUE..
ADVERTISING PRODUCTION
Eugene L. Pollock
EASTERN ADVERTISING MANAGER
Editorial Advisory Board
H.
J A Y ERFURTH
CAROLA M A N D E L
STUART MILLER
JAC WELLER
ROGER MARSH
ROY C. DUNLAP
V A L FORGETT
magazine i s published monthly at 8150 H. Central Park Avenue, Skokie, Illinois. Second class
Privileges authorized at Skokie, lllinois. SUBSCRIPTION: One year, $5.00' single copy 50c.
CHANGE OF ADDRESS: Four weeks' notice required on a l l changes send old add&s as w e l l as new.
CONTRIBUTORS submitting manuscripts, Photographs or drawings do so at their own risk. Material cannot
be returned unless accompanied by sufficient postage. PAYMENT will be made a t rates current at time
of acceptance and w i l l cover reproduction i n any, or a l l of GUNS magazine's domestic or foreign additions.
ADVERTISING RATES w i l l be furnished upon request.
GUNS
mall
PIST OLS
REVOLVERS
SHOTGUNS
^
*
NEVER BE FOR^ -T
AT SUCH LOW
Hi HUNTER
b
B
U
R
7
AMERICAN WEAPONS CORP.
3 0 3 1 WEST B U R B A N K BLVD.
B
A
N
K 14-Q, C A L I F O R N I A
CONSIDERED MOST COMPETITIVE SPORT,
PIGEON MATCHES ARE FADING I N U.S.
BECAUSE
SHOTGUNNING IN EUROPE
Well-known Iowa shotgunner Bob Allen has won
world's pigeon shooting
championship several times,
uses M12 pump for "flyers."
By BOB ALLEN
call it, a nonFcommittal name they
which live pigeon
LYER SHOOTING
shooters have applied to their game.
Their sport is a bigger public controversy and has been more loudly
damned than even bullfighting. Yet
throughout the rest of the world this
sport is accepted as nothing out of the
ordinary and is the most popular form
of shooting in European countries.
During this summer live pigeon shoots
will be held in all the civilized capitals
of Europe, including Grace Kelly's
new home of Monte Carlo. On a strand
jutting into the blue waters of the
Mediterranean, live pigeons will be the
target at one of the season's important
international shoots.
But here in the U.S., humane societies and do-good-for-animals groups
have raised such a howl that you'd
think it was pedigreed dogs and cats
that were being destroyed instead of a
known pest, the pigeon.
What's so wrong with live pigeon
shooting? Why the outcry anyway?
Most cities and many building owners
spend thousands of dollars tring to get
rid of pigeons by having pest control
firms trap them, but when shooters
make a sport out of it, there is always
a big howl.
Certainly pigeon shooting on a
wholesale scale would provide a good
way to control the birds that mark up
our buildings, carry contagious livestock diseases, and make themselves
generally disliked~especially as they
make their customary deposit on your
new coat or hat as you walk down the
street. Most people consider pigeons
nuisances and pests, but there are
enough pigeon fanciers and those who
oppose the killing of anything (this includes hunting in the field as well,
though the objectors usually eat meat
with a clear conscience) to make
wholesale pigeon shooting by gun clubs
a fading sport.
About the turn of the century pigeons were the favorite targets at gun
clubs but gradually disappeared in fawr of the clay target which is so corn-
A t Grand Prix de Monte Carlo, gunner gets set to call "Pull" and swing
when pigeon is released in popular international shoot at Riviera spa.
Famous locale of international pigeon shooting sport is ring at Monte Carlo on
the water below gambling casino. Sport started in Monte Carlo back in 1872.
mon now in trapshooting and skeet.
For many years previously experimenters attempted to design a target with
flying characteristics like a pigeon.
Metal targets were made with sections
that would collapse when struck by
shot; glass and clay balls as well as
ceramic targets in various other shapes
were tried. Finally our modern clay
targets and standardized traps to throw
them were developed.
Shooters all admit that the clay pigeon is no substitute for the live bird
when it comes to shooting thrills. The
live pigeon with its darting, twisting,
turning, unpredictable fashion of flight
is unexcelled as a target and has long
been the delight of all those who love
guns and shooting.
But currently there is no organized
pigeon shooting in the US., although
no laws are on the books to prevent it.
17
I
At the "Carabine de Monte Carlo" live pigeon ring, concrete walk is marked off for handicap distances by paint stripes.
Fence extends around shooting area and the bird must be brought down inside this fence in order to score points.
Kenosha top gun Bill Isetts (right) won Champion of the
v o r l d cup presented by Egypt at Cairo meet in 1955-
in most states. A few individuals operate pigeon rings for
training in preparation for overseas shooting matches and
thus, many Americans have become very proficient in this
type
.- of shooting.
Birds are readily available to these club operators as
pest control firms, which operate in just about every major
city, trap pigeons on public buildings. The pigeon ring
operators buy their birds from such firms and I'm sure
that the end awaiting the birds is far more humane than
that which they receive at the hands of those who trap
them.
In Europe and South America, where such shooting
flourishes, a special type of pigeon has been developed by
cross breeding wild mountain pigeons with domestic birds.
This breeding has been going on over a long period of
years and the end result is a bird with longer wings and
smaller body. Much greater speed and mobility result.
These birds twist and dive in flight much as do the doves
we are so familiar with here. They are the most difficult
target imaginable to the gun pointer-I speak from experience when I say this for I have shot many of them in
Cuba, Monte Carlo, Italy and France.
While clay target shooting is intensely interesting, I'm
sure it will never have the fascination for shooters and
spectators that the old live bird matches held. The surw
Double guns are used at flyer
shooting. Most competitors use
over-under guns in 12-gauge.
Metal pigeon traps
are set by putting
live birds inside and
closing the halves.
Some traps are filled
from pit beneath.
Famous pitcher Paul Derringer of Cincinnati Reds has
good eye which makes him top gun at many flyer shoots.
prise element in shooting live targets makes it a form of
gunning that is always intriguing and exciting. Curiously,
one of the traditional championship pigeon shooting places
seems likely soon to stop the sport. Prince Ranier of
Monaco has asked that the sport, introduced by his gunenthusiast ancestor, Prince Charles 111, be halted as a
"wedding present" from Greek financier Aristoteles Socrates Onassis who controls the casino of Monte Carlo.
Prince Charles began live-bird shooting at Monte Carlo
in 1872, noting that it was a "privileged pastime" and
would attract wealthy sportsmen to the Monaco Riviera.
Today the sport upholds the ideas of Prince Charles. In a
recent small match the entry fee was more than $500. Sixty
guns were present, all shooters of more than average wealth.
But the prize was typical-a new Cadillac ElDorado. In
the shoot-off, the results hinged on one bird which brought
breathless anxiety to even those who were no longer in the
running. Touched by shot, the bird settled on the fence
ridging the arena, and gently swayed back and forth for a
minute. He finally fell inside the ring, and the winning
shooter was one Cadillac richer!
Money has been one of the appeals to flyer shooting for
The gentle Annie Oakley was an active live bird
enthusiast. Firing at the Lyons, France, gun club in 1889,
die shot from the 31-yard mark-and scored high. although
v.
Traps are opened by
pulling wires which
release halves. Hose
carries air blast
that scares pigeon
into flying away.
Elaborate flyer ring
at some clubs have
concrete t u n n e 1s
with traps in roof.
Pit boys keep traps
filled with birds.
not in the money. One week later at
Marseilles she brought down 96 out of
100, winning $1100 in gold and the
championship medal. From the 1880's
to today, live bird shooting is definitely
the greatest challenge in the shooting
world, and yearly groups of 15 to 50
Americans journey overseas to particishooting events, such as
pate in
the championship of the world.
Some folks wonder why other birds
in this same pest category as pigeons
are not used for this shooting, such
birds as starlings and crows. The answer is that no other bird makes as
challenging a target as a pigeon. Crows
have been tried and good shots rarely
missed one. Starlings are hard to raise
or keep in captivity and are also easily
killed. A pigeon is one of the few birds
that makes an initial start that is almost as fast as its cruising speed. This,
plus the fact that a pigeon customarily
flies in a darting, twisting fashion,
makes it supreme as a gunner's target.
Just as clay target shooting gained
in popularity with the decline of our
game population, so did pigeon shooting get its start in England in the early
19th century when game became less
plentiful. Sportsmen there accidentally
found that pigeons placed under a top
hat and released when the hat was
jerked away with a cord made difficult
flying targets. The sport was then developed further and various types of
mechanical traps were designed to release the birds.
To the beginner, pigeon shooting
doesn't look too difficult. But once he
-
Young Skip Williams of Chicago, an up-and-coming pigeon shooter, gets a
few points on flyers from Homer Clark (right), who was twice world champion.
4
Dave Willey of
C i ncinnati,
' where live
pigeon shooting
was popular
shotgun target
sport years ago
in days of Annie Oakley, is
still p i g e o n
shooter at 82.
has picked up his gun and gone to work
on them, he soon finds that it is considerably harder than any other form
of shooting he has tried including
shooting game in the field.
The average pigeon ring is a semicircular arena with five traps arranged
in a line and spaced five yards apart.
The shooter stands on a walk, graduated in yards so that handicaps can
be assigned. Distances range from 28
to 35 yards from the line of traps. Back
of the traps is a fence about 30 inches
high and completely surrounding the
arena but never put up closer to the
traps than 16 yards.
To score a kill, the shooter is allowed two shots to drop his bird inside the fence. A clean kill is not nec(Continued on page 62)
essary-any
CONVERTING
Colonel Ward Betz fitted piece of .30-30 rifle barrel to his old New Service Colt in wildcat revolver cartridge
experiment which resulted in .30/357 bottleneck handgun pill having many shooting qualities of a rifle load.
WILDCAT .30/357 HANDGUN CARTRIDGE WITH MODERATE RECOIL AND FLAT
TRAJECTORY PROVES ADAPTABLE FOR LONG RANGE SHOOTING OF VARMINTS
By COLONEL WARD 0. BETZ
like a rifle is good
even
M though it soundsshoot
far-fetched. The trick lies not with
AKING A PISTOL
sense,
modifying the gun, such as was done years ago with Civil
War Colts which had rifle butts stuck on their hind ends,
but in cartridge development.
Giving a pistol power like a rifle can be done by wildcatting a new cartridge. And it really takes a new cartridge,
not just a new load for an old case, to step up handgun
power to more nearly equal the rifle.
While varmint rifles have been pretty well worked over
and "improved" or "magnum" wildcats are so common
that some have even been made as factory standards, the
field of long-range handgun shooting is wide open for the
experimenter.
I got my first taste of trying to use a pistol like a rifle in
the gang I used to shoot with out around Lincoln, Nebraska,
a few years ago. Our favorite calibre was .30 in our riflesKrags, Springfields and Enfield-and it was natural enough
i
Custom grips, special frame peep sight
and long barrel were obvious changes
in rebuilding Colt .45 into experimental .30/357 from regular model (left).
that when we turned to pistols for hunting, we turned to a
.30 calibre load.
We shot up hundreds of all sorts of .30 caliber bullets,
from salvaged 150 grain military slugs hollow-pointed on a
lathe to .32/20 gas checks cast hard and pushed out at
scandalous velocities from our rifles. But when several of
the group tried shooting in the field with revolvers, they
used .38 Specials for prairie dogs and jack rabbits. But
the .38's did not have the power nor the flat-shooting trajectories needed to reached out a hundred yards away.
Talking over the faults of the .38 for long-range shooting
one night while we were cleaning guns, somebody popped
up with the idea that what we really needed was a long
range handgun, more powerful and faster than anything on
the market. The .357 Magnum was powerful enough at
close range, but mighty uncomfortable to shoot all day.
While the conversation went on, I idly picked up an
empty .357 case and inverting a .30-'06 neck die in the
loading tool, put a short 30-caliber neck on it. The shouldered case looked right pretty, sort of like an enlarged
Mauser pistol shell with a rim. Now if we could cook up a
safe, fast load for it, and had a gun to shoot it in, we might
have the answer for those long shots we'd been missing
with the .38's.
The next Saturday I took my old 1917 Army Colt .45,
Serial No. 49, and the sample cartridge case up to Les
Lindahl, who operated a combined sales store and gunsmithy in Central City, Nebraska. Les was a crackerjack
machinist and a real gun bug who did all the work on his
own designs, from tool making to chambering barrels and
assembling complete rifles. As usual there was a crowd in
his place that day, buying powder and caps and shooting
the breeze, an art at which all shooters are adept. It took
me several visits to Central City before Les found the time
to sit down with me and get to work on the Colt.
He ground a reamer to cut a chamber with the same
base and body dimensions as the .357 S&W, but with a VA,"
neck, .330" in diameter. Using self-tempering tool steel, he
then made up the bushings to reduce the .45 ACP cylinder
to the new cartridge size. The steel had a bad habit of
hardening itself from the heat of turning in the lathe,
making it necessary to practically hone each bushing to a
press fit. The new chambers were rough drilled, and then
carefully hand reamed to finish. Les made a bullet-seating
die for me with the reamer before grinding it down a trifle
to cut a case-sizing die.
The next step was to rebarrel the pistol to .30 caliber.
I hadn't budgeted much 'cash for the project, but fortunately Les had an old .30/30 barrel standing in the
corner which proved to be useable. It was badly pitted at
the muzzle and breech, but the midsection was still in fair
to stay within the law,
shape. Sawing it down to 81%'
we soon had it threaded and pinned into the frame. I
shrank a Springfield front sight band on the barrel and
fitted a King red bead reflector sight into the dovetail. A
Marble folding leaf rear sight was then inlet into the frame
and she was ready to check out. With that chunk of .30/30
Zippy little .30 bottleneck load showed good accuracy and long-range performance, worthy of building a Winfield Martini into unique wildcatter.
u
!
Springfield barrel on small Martini action did not stabilize longer bullets at moderate velocities obtained, but 150
grain M2 slug did fairly well, 3" at 100 yards. Unertl 12X scope was employed during testing from sand bag rest.
barrel on it, I guess I've got the only Colt marked "Winchester" in existence.
Over the next several weeks I experimented with light,
medium and heavy charges of a number of powders, using
93 grain Luger SP and 86 grain Mauser HP bullets, but
without producing any noticeable improvements over the
range or accuracy of the .38 Special. Dupont Pistol No. 6
powder got pretty noisy at 4.5 grains, and cases were hard
to extract. Sporting Rifle No. 80 was a favorite squib load
in the big .30 caliber rifles. Used in the Colt, it burned
clean in the .30/357 case and was comfortable to shoot,
but even 13 grains didn't give much velocity. I checked out
No. 2400 and 4227 powders, also. Unfortunately, with 13
grains of "either one I was getting lots of blast and unburned powder at the muzzle, indicating a rifle powder
that was not fast-burning enough for use in short-barreled
pistols.
Many reloaders were trying at the time to achieve high
velocities safely, started probably by the magic 4100 feet
per second attained by the Swift. A number of experimenters had turned to multiple charge loading. This is
not a new idea at all, to boost speed without raising pressures. The idea is to start combustion at the primer with a
small charge of fast burning powder, and finish pushing
the bullet down the bore with a heavier charge of a powder
with a slower rate of burning, but (Continued on page 53)
THE OLDEST NAME
First model of the streamlined .22 sport automatic pistol which evolved into the current Whitney gun had
slight styling differences in frame curves but same alloy aluminum construction and low-lying grip for fast pointing.
of the brownstone ruins of Eli Whitney's
1factory
old mill near New Haven, Conn., is rising today a gun
dedicated to the highest principles of modern deN THE SHADOW
sign, translating into the field of firearms the swept-back,
streamlined styling of the newest jet planes. The Whitney
company, organized this year to manufacture a series of
lightweight handguns, has no corporate relationship with
the old, long-defunct Whitney company, but they both are
related in terms of visionary outlook and common location.
The new Whitney company is out to make a name for itself.
starting with its .22 automatic pistol, and the firm is well
aware of the rich tradition it is carrying forward in the
oldest name in guns.
The Whitney pistol's monobloc cast-aluminum frame is
a startling departure from conventional gun-making ideas
and would have gladdened the heart of Eli Whitney, who
stirred up some talk almost two centuries ago with his
cotton gin. All the parts of the new Whitney gun are assembled into it. The high-strength dural precision cast
frame allows design never before possible at a reasonable
cost. The shape and weight result in a very handy, fastshooting pistol.
I have triggered the new gun so rapidly it fired like a
.22 machine gun, so fast in fact that other shooters thought
it had malfunctioned.
Yet the recoil was light and by squeezing them off a little
lighter, excellent groups were made. No one shot a "possible," but by superimposing the 50-foot indoor bull over
the various groups shot by three different marksmen, one
of them in the "expert" class, the inherent accuracy of the
pistol was obvious. Since barrel and sights are i n a fixed
relationship to one another when assembled, the new
Whitney has an advantage in accuracy over some other
designs.
The rear sight on the Whitney is a thin piece of sheet
metal, adjustable for windage zeroing only, and sprung in
a curve into two cuts across the top of the frame. The sight
base is heavy enough to be milled for a target sight. The
long, deep curve to the grip allows easy recovery in shooting. With ordinary .22 regular velocity cartridges, the
muzzle did not rise out of the black from kick, and getting
the sight picture again quickly was easy. The gun lies low
in the hand.
Muzzle rise is minimized because of the extremely natural
pointing and the long spur which lies over the back of the
hand like a "free pistol" grip. The grooved trigger has
some slack but let-off is very good for a "sport" pistol. It is
adjusted at the factory between 294 and 4 pounds. Three
sample guns handled had good trigger pulls, crisp and
regular.
I
NEW WHITNEY FIREARMS
FIRM ADOPTS
HISTORIC NAME TO
IN GUN BUSINESS WITH STREAMLINED, INEXPENSIVE ONE-PIECE ,22 PISTOL
BY WILLIAM B. EDWARDS
First pistol with name of "Whitneyyywas percussion revolver made in factory of Eli Whitney (right), whose son continued
gun business until 1880's. Weapon coincidently had cast metal frame for low-cost construction, like modern Whitney.
Section view of Whitney reveals parallel .22
cartridges which feed
in straighpline manner
with minimum friction
and freedom from jams.
Futuristic styling of production Whitney automatic is
enhanced by two-tone black anodizing finish. Thumb
safety is fast, snaps off by thumb pressure upwards.
The "expert" at the range trying out
the Whitney persistently astonished
himself by his good shooting, although
the gun was not zeroed for him to
strike the black. All shots on several
10-shot groups he fired would have
been within the 9-ring and some inside
the 10-ring at 50 feet. The Whitney
finish is black-gray anodizing with a
' ,
sand-blast and polished surface contrast. Length over-all is 9" with 4%''
barrel. Price is $39.95.
This light, 23-ounce contender for a
place in the front rank of American
handguns is having its way shoulderecl
open by the husky frame of burly, embarrassingly-modest Bob Hillberg, the
Whitney's designer. Son of a Minneapolis banker who used to spend much
time hunting and fishing, Iowa-born
Hillberg is a novice manufacturer, yet
anything but a novice about guns. He
With racy appeal of Buck Rogers ray gun, artist's study of target model is quietly humble about the role his
styling incorporated muzzle brake for rapid fire with front take-down bushing. friends have played in his career, but
behind the strikingly radical shape of
the Whitney automatic lies quite a
story. Part of it is the story of Bob
Hillberg.
To one of Hillberg's friends some
years ago is due his introduction to
guns and gun design. The friend,
middle-western marksman Bill Schutte,
had a gun collection. Young Bob
studied the ideas and mechanical principles of the many pistols. The ideas,
good and bad, stuck with him. Bob
still collects unusual automatic pistols,
rifles and submachine guns as a hobby.
Bob studied several years of engiName first applied to Whitney
neering
at the University of Minnesota,
was "Trimatic," taken from
and
his
first job in the gun field with
3-in-1 pocket pistol with hinged
Colt's
polished
off a few of the rough
barrel deskned by Hillberg
edges. He had designed a -38 Super
several years ago. Chamber
caliber tommy gun, and sent it in to
could be loaded without pulling
back slide, and gun could be
Colt in 1937. They weren't interested
used in -22, -32 and .380 by
in the tommy gun, but they were inchanging the barrels and clips.
terested in the would-be gun designer
. and he went east to work. In various
department at Colt's, engineering, inspection, assembly, he became familiar
with gun design and manufacture. As
Oddly tapered Whitney clip is easy to insert
and uses .22 cartridge stuck through magazine
follower hole to depress it for easy loading.
Locked-breech blow forward military carbine (with barrel in "unlocked" position) was made by Hillberg when ordnance
engineer with aircraft firm in World War 11, used style curves which were later dominant in Whitney pistol.
.380. The substitution from one caliber to another could
an assembler he learned the fine points of putting a gun
together. From Colt's in 1938 he went to the development
be made in 30 seconds.
section of Pratt & Whitney Aircraft in East Hartford.
Bob's choice of the .380 reflects one idea he had and may
During the war his firearms experience came in useful when
yet get a chance to put over. "All the companies underload
he was project engineer in Bell Aircraft's ordnance division.
the .380 miserably," he argues. "The .380 with a 90-grain
He then moved on to Republic Aviation in charge of
bullet could, considering improved powders we have detheir armament group. Each move was a step upward. At
veloped since John Browning designed the little pill fifty
Republic he coordinated the efforts of several designers in
years ago, be boosted along to give darn near the muzzle
preparing guns for planes, adapting .50 caliber machine
energy of a .45."
guns and 20 mm cannon to combat aircraft.
Tri-Matic never got off the ground, but the name was
"Working at Republic was one of the most important
borrowed later. Applied to the more conservative sportjobs I have ever held," says Hillberg. "We learned that
target .22 that has evolved into the Whitney, it served to
gound weapons don't necessarily work when carried up
keep competitors guessing or at (Continued on page 66)
into the air. Feed problems had to be
corrected. In one project the muzzle
blast ripped off the cowling and we had
to do some extensive redesigning."
Work at Republic seems to have been
0
something like going back to school for
Hillberg. It prevented his ideas from
getting solid and set and, like a prize
fighter, he learned to think on his feet.
Airplane companies during the war
were interested in small arms. At Bell,
Hillberg made a blow-forward semiand full-automatic .30 caliber shoulder
rifle with the barrel as the only moving
part. Bob is very positive in his slow,
methodical way, that the gun was not a
"blow forward," so much as a lockbreech type with a gas-operated forward moving barrel.
At Republic, Hillberg designed a
series of automatic pistols, at once
revolutionary and yet traditional. With
the flair for streamlining and shape
which characterizes Hillberg's work,
one of the pistols was a successful solution for a design problem which has
been studied since at least 1908. The
132-3
White-Merrill experimental pistols, patented in that year, had one feature of
lasting importance. They were designed to have interchangeable barrels
for several calibers on the same frame.
Hillberg's double action pistol, the
.+
-- - -.
,L,
"Tri-Matic? had interchangeable bar- By assembling tubular and lathe-turned parts into precision die-cast frame unit,
rels, clips and ejectors for .22, .32 and New Haven-built Whitney pistol is inexpensive yet sturdy and accurate.
& - -
%
a
7
s
- T
--Â¥mi
Sergeant Joe Benner, whose solid grip on Model 1911 .45 keeps bullets in the black during instruction session at
West Point where he teaches cadets fundamentals of marksmanship, is main hope of U. S. pistol team in Olympics.
For rapid fire .38 matches, Benner uses completely rebuilt Super Colt changed by Berdon to shoot wadcutters.
Custom grip shaped to put Joe's trigger finger tip in
right place on trigger shoe is factor in his many wins.
OUTSHOOT THE RUSSIANS
PUDGY WEST POINT POWERHOUSE JOE BENNER MAY BE
WORLD'S GREATEST PISTOL SHOT AND HE'LL GET CHANCE
TO PROVE I T WHEN HE FACES SOVIETS IN OLYMPICS
By COLONEL CHARLES ASKINS
Joe Benner is the greatest pistol shot in
ITtheMAYworld.BE that
This is his year of decision. He is our national champ and has been over and over again but world's
best is something else again. Joe is journeying to the
Olympics in Australia this Fall and down under will be
our best hope to stop the Russians. In some ways he is
our last hope since our handgunners are the strongest section of our shooting team for the Olympiad.
In 1952, he came away from the Helsinki Olympicsand short weeks before the world's championships at Oslo
-with more than the lion's share of the loot. But in another little jousting, staged around Thanksgiving, 1954.
he bumped up against a new breed of Commie gun pointer.
This was at Caracas, Venezuela, and he didn't look so hot.
As a matter of cold, unadorned fact, he had a rough time
to garner anything at all.
This is to be the crucial year. Benner has improved.
That is evident from his king-size take at the important
Florida spring matches at the Coral Gables shootfest, where
single-handed he copped 12 firsts from a 23-match program
and set a new world record with a perfect 300.
But how much better are the little Ivanovitches?
A regal-dimension advantage held by Bulganin's boys
is that they practice all the time on the target they will
face in the big games. Benner doesn't do this. He shoots
ai the standard American target, a mark peculiar only to
Yankees. This is considerably larger, easier, and closer
than the International. This puts our hero behind the
eight ball as it were.
It is Joe Benner who must carry our colors. The shooting fate of the nation, so to speak. Olympics-wise, depends
on this Ozark hillbilly. Neither from the ranks of the rifle
clan nor yet from his own fraternity, the pistoleers, can we
muster anyone of his formidable stature. We have a
baker's dozen of smoking hot handgunners in these our
48 states but none who can touch the Arkansas traveler.
We have had a full two score and ten of championship
pistol marksmen over the past half-century. Benner so
brilliantly surpasses all the others a s to relegate them,
verily, to the ignominy of water boys.
There was Chevalier Ira Payne as a beginning, and of
the same vintage, practically, Walter Winans and A. L. A.
Himmelwright, and Chase, Doats, T. K. Lee and Karl Fredrick. And there was E. E. Patridge, who wasn't much
shakes as a shooter but did develop the sights that bear his
name.
Later there was Doc Calkins, from up Springfield way,
a sterling gunner and a stalwart in the U. S. Revolver
Association. And after Doc Calkins there was Doc Snook,
a pistol swinger of champion-like proportions who banged
his lady friend with a ballpeen hammer and was duly
hanged.
More recently there has been a modern crop
like A1 Hemming, the Detroit copper; Jake Engbrecht, the
City of Los Angeles hot rock; and Bill Tony, the Texas
border guard; and last but best, Harry Reeves. Harry, a
sometimes policeman from Detroit and a sometimes Marine
reserve officer, is the fly in Joe Benner's soup.
This pair-the
Benner-Reeves duo-have
since World
War 11, completely dominated the American handgunning
scene.
Reeves, veritably a patriarch beside the youthful Joe
(49 as against 38), has this year bowed gracefully out of
the shooting picture. Benner poured on the coal so unmercifully this past brace of seasons that the pudgy Harry
has tossed in the sponge. Before that, however. Reeves
managed to garner more national championships than did
Benner.
Friendly rivals and nation's top handgunners Joe Benner
and Harry Reeves of Detroit talk over shooting techniques.
29
Faced at a tender age withgoing to
How does a man get so good? What
makes a champion of the proportions work or going to the Army, he chose
of Reeves and Benner? What makes . the latter. He has never regretted his
them so outstanding as to dominate a choice. He can retire this year but
highly competitive game for.more than the military has made things so IUIa decade. Reeves I know only casually; deniably pleasant our hero will probJoe I know very well indeed. And since ably remain another decade at West
our ridge-runner must carry on alone Point where he teaches fledgling generhereafter and is in fact our white hope als the fine points of pistol pointing.
Before that, our hillbilly had put in
against our mortal enemy, the
munists, I propose to explain what all his time on precisely two Army
posts: Fort Benning, deep in Georgia,
makes him click.
Some believe that Huelet Benner, and at Fort Knox. hard bv the Kenmaster sergeant of the U.S. Army, tucky derby grounds. During the two
country boy from Arkansas, may prove recent blood-lettings, the champion
to be the greatest pistol shot the world taught small arms marksmanship to
has ever known and may before the countless thousands of tankers whipped
year is done prove to the world that we through the ' accelerated Armored
are not decadent in the face of the School, and thence to distant battleCommunist threat but possess in fact fields.
Joe has never fired his sixguns in
the gunning skill to trounce the best
that Bulganin and Kruschev can throw anger.
" , has never seen a battle. He has
never killed a head of game, not even
against us.
Benner stands 5' 7" with his shoes so much as an Ozark fox squirrel. He
off-a
general condition-and
is 40 has -never done anything more lethal
pounds overweight. He likes nothing with his spectacular skill than punch
quite so much as two pounds of KC holes in paper.
Benner developed slowly as a pistol
tenderloin washed down with a couple
of bottles of Blue Ribbon. This is stand- man. I remember him as a fledgling
ard fare for supper but if available is member of the Infantry pistol team bealso cheerfully appreciated for lunch. fore. World War 11. He was anything
For breakfast Joe sticks to light, dainty save a threat, but rather a veritable
things like a double order of ham and tyro who labored mightily and someeggs, grits and gravy, hot biscuits and times took a dobie or G o down around
10th money. The Infantry squad in
hash brown potatoes.
'
om-
Wearing enlisted men's dress blues,
Army Sergeant Joe Benner smiles as
he receives trophy plaque in recent
Tampa mid-winter pistol tournament.
1
1
I
JOE BENNER'S RECORDS
All U.S. National Records:
893 x 900 in .22 caliber
885 x 900 in centerfire .38
882 x 900 in .45 caliber
All-gun aggregate 2644 x 2700
I
I
Benner's wife and son have good reason to be proud of his shooting trophies, look forward to his Olympic shooting.
those days had Sgt. James Tumlin, a
clown who could consume a case of
beer before the noonday whistle and
two afterward, and might not only
make a clean sweep of all the 45 events
but tell off all the match officials and
Captain Charley Rau, team pilot and
coach, in the doing.
And they had, too, Garfield Huddieston who was so hot the Kansas City
police brought him out of the Army
and thought that teamed with their
Francis O'Connor, they would see their
outfit sweep the country. At last reports Huddleston was herding a street
car in the city of his choice, he having
had a slight disagreement with the flatfeet.
Of Benner there was little to indicate his latent greatness.
The war came as a blessing in disguise for our Arkansaw ridge-hopper.
It gave him opportunity to shoot, study,
experiment and perfect a winning gunning style. While his contemporaries
strode off to distant battlefields, and
the pistol-shot game fell into the doldrums, Joe worked in the shooting
gallery. It is claimed he pitched his
pup tent hard by the h t t s and like
Dr. Pepper had a shot at 10, 2 and 4
but this ain't so. Joe wears his underwear inside out so the seams won't
scratch him. Anyone so mindful of hi:
comfort as that sure isn't going to d(
anything as disagreeable as live in I
tent.
He did burn up a full 100,000 hull
-22,38 and 4 5 ~ e v e r ytwelfthmonth
beginning in 1942. When Nagasaki disintegrated atomically speaking, the
pride of the Ozarks was ready, ready
to clobber any and all oppositionand did! Well, almost everyone. There
still was Harry Reeves, the Marine, who
remained an exceedingly durable nut
to crack. And it has been, so ever
since.
Benner is a perfectionist. He demands shooting irons that are inher
ently super accurate and once speciall;
selected from the manufacturer, hi
turns them over to Berdon, his Florid,
pistolsmith, and sees them modifiet
and adjusted, tuned and' readied, unti
each produces the maximum of points
He laboriously tests his ammunitio~
until he is completely satisfied it is thi
best loaded. Thereafter he remains
eternally suspicious of every new lot
though it be from the same company.
Should a new batch throw a single
flier, the bellyaching in that plaintive
Arkansas treble is clearly audible from
Bridgeport to East Alton.
,
As an instructor at West Point. Benner is called on to explain fine points of
all kinds of weapons to cadets, using training aids like lucite Browning rifle.
~enner'scareful coaching of West Point team since he took over in 1952
has improved team's standing. They have lost but one match since then.
.
-
A'*
.?1
"
$
.d
O n the trigger-finger skill of Benner's hand clamped snugly in custom-fitted Hammerli free pistol grip rests
American hopes for victory in 1956 Olympics. Free pistol shooting, uncommon in U.S., is one of Benner's strong points.
It is the same with physical conditioning Benner is a rolypoly. He willed in that way. A wide-eyed country recruit
at Camp Perry, 20 years ago, he saw the winners were
shaped like beer barrels and tipped the beam at two hundred and above. A bit shy himself, he scaled 126 bedside.
Our little man immediately commenced to gorge himself.
He has been at it ever since. Now he looks like a Jap
wrestler just before the annual Nipponese bonebending.
He believes that is what it takes to win pistol tourneys.
Benner has shoulders like a King ranch breed bull, no
neck at all, and arms so unbelievably short it is a wonder
he can reach anything that itches. He wears a shirt size
16 neck but the tailor must whack the sleeves down to 2930 inch length. If you don't believe this is an advantage,
you have never shot in the wind, buster! The less lengthy
the shooting arm, the less havoc the wind works on hand
and gun. If we could just somehow shoot from the hip
accurately, the weapon pressed against the body, we'd all
be champs!
The Benner hand is notable for a palm that is gigantic.
Not only is it wide but it is long and bulges with sheath
upon sheath of muscle. The fingers are stubby but this is
no disadvantage because of the extraordinary dimensions
of that palm. The 45 auto, ordnance notable for a grip
over-fatted for two ordinary hands, is swallowed in the
Benner fist. Therein lies one of the secrets of his control
32
of
this belting, hard-kicking, contrary self-loader.
The wrist behind the over-beefed paw is as large as the
forearm. The entire arm is muscular but with a sheathing
that is smooth and deceptive. The biceps is not bulging
and knotty but the point of the shoulder is extraordinarily
over-developed. The Benner shooting arm looks more properly the property of a European peasant girl accustomed to
handling a No. 7 manure fork.
When Joe levels on the target, there is less perceptible
movement in arm and gun than any shooter the game has
ever known. This is very probably a result of the extreme
shortness of the arm, the strength inherent in hand and
wrist, and the fact that he has lifted and pointed the shooting hardware not less than ten million times during a rather
intensive shooting lifetime.
The ability to stand motionless goes a bit deeper than
the hand and arm. It reaches the feet. These are a mite
unusual. While only size 8, the width spreads to a mere
triple E! A proper foundation to keep the stocky body in
plumb. Benner, when taking up a shooting position, spreads
his legs very widely, facing west while firing north, a full
90-degree turn. This stance provides the best possible recovery from recoil although ordinarily it tends to set up
a swaying motion from front to rear. The EEE underpinning of our barefoot boy from Arkansaw most effectively
dampens that !
(Continued o n page 57)
HOW I A M T R A I N I N G
FOR THE OLYMPICS
By MASTER SERGEANT HUELET BENNER
THE
shooting competition during the coming Olympic
Games will, I think, be the most spirited of all the
modern Olympiads. This will be true not only for the
various "spectator sports" but for free pistol shooting as
well. None of us are going to be able to settle for the
scores we made in Helsinki in 1952, and we will all be
out to better them. In my opinion, the toughest nations to
beat will be Sweden and Russia, and to best them I am starting the most intensive training program I have ever tried.
There are several factors that play big roles in free pistol
shooting that a lot of people are not aware of. To me one
of the most important is weather and climate. For example,
my score in Oslo, Norway, was about the same as in Helsinki-but in Caracas, Venezuela, it was only fair. Caracas
is more than a mile above sea level and the air is much
thinner-something to which I wasn't accustomed. I think
this might be a reason why the Russians tied Thorsten
Ullman of Sweden, who, in my opinion is the best free
pistol shooter in the world today. After Caracas, I've
decided to try and duplicate what I expect to find climate(Continued on page 60)
wise, in Melbourne.
Benner and Army coach Col. Perry Swindler study Joe's 98
score shot with Hammerli .22 on Olympic 50-meter card.
'
- .. .
Solid stance with feet well apart is adopted by Benner
while aiming free pistol he will use in Australian Olympics.
33
At.
-__->
.-^-
Lt. John Henry Parker, selfstyled as an "artist with the machine gun," used Gatlings at San
Juan first time in modern war.
34
BIGGEST CHANGE I N FIELD TACTICS I N THIS CENTURY WAS WROUGHT BY THE
MACHINE GUN, FIRST USED BY U.S. OFFICER I N THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR
By EVARTS ERICKSON
Spanish-American War were as
G closely watchedin bytheforeign
military observers as Stuka
ATLING GUNS
dive bombers and fast tanks in the Spanish Civil War of
1936. The Cuban fighting was a proving ground for World
War I just as the Spanish hassle served to test Axis and
Soviet arms for the conflict of 1939. And it was in Cuba
that the machine gun as a basic weapon of war got its first
real baptism of fire although rapid-fire guns had been
issued nearly 50 years before San Juan Hill became a
familiar name in history.
Out of the Cuban fighting came the doctrine of mobile
machine gun fire as infantry support, covering fire for
troops on the move.
Even in World War 11, military tactics owed a debt to
the American boys in blue who, sick with malaria, learned
to use machine guns in the hot, stinking jungles of Cuba.
It was here that the secret of infantry's role in the blitzkreig was first formulated.
It was a mule driver fresh out of West Point and as
stubborn as his animals who showed the experts something
about how machine guns could be used in the field. He was
John Henry Parker, whose ideas were ridiculed in the
Spanish-American War but who later proved in World War
I to be the boy wonder of machine gun fighting. It was
Parker who wrote the official machine gun manual and
became General John J. Pershing's rapid fire expert.
Up until Parker came up with a new concept for the
machine gun's use, the weapon was employed chiefly for
indirect fire. Parker had tremendous opposition from high
officers in getting his ideas across and his mule-drawn
Gatlings were jokingly called the "jackass battery" when
he first tried to use them in the Cuban war.
Earlier the primitive Gatlings had been considered of
little use in the Civil War when first tested in the field by
General Benjamin Butler. U.S. officers later read that tbe
French machine gun, the "Montigny Mitrailleuse," was
used only to shoot at extreme ranges like artillery. Even
sales promotion brochures for the Gatling spoke of the
guns only in terms of opposing grape shot at 800 or 1,000
yards.
Indirect fire from fixed positions was the principle with
no attempt to take advantage of the mobility of the Gatlings and keep up with movement of troops. Conservative
officers would not fool with the Gatling because of its
Colt-Browning gas-operated machine guns were bought by Teddy Roosevelt and used in attack on San Juan and Kettle
Hills by Rough Riders during battle which saw first use of machine guns against "modern" army, Spanish forces in Cuba.
Model 1895 Gatling guns on steel field carriages with double-row Bruce feeds were unloaded at Daiquiri in Cuba ready
to follow troops in combat under command of Lt. Parker who foresaw the value of machine gun tactics in combat.
association with General Butler, who was looked upon as
an impractical visionary.
But Parker was not a conservative.
Parker realized in 1898 that military knowledge of the
uses of machine guns had lagged far behind their technical
development. Convinced that machine guns could not
profitably be used against a "civilized" enemy armed with
artillery, most armies issued the weapons to troops fighting
savages. General Custer had four Gatlings available for
his command, but didn't think they would be useful and
did not have them for his famous "last stand."
One clear-cut example of what a machine gun could do
against a European army was needed. Each nation awaited
field proof that the things were worth fooling with before
going ahead on full-scale rearmament.
The man who showed them that proof was from Missouri. Obstinate, argumentative J. H. Parker was graduated from West Point in 1892 at 25. Six years later when
William Randolph Hearsfs war began with Spain, he was
still a second lieutenant. Working on machine guns did
nothing to help his career. His sketches of a lightweight
Gatling carriage were sent to the ordnance office in Washington but the bureau did not even bother to reply. It had
resisted such innovation as percussion caps, revolvers,
rifles, breech loaders, and there was no reason to get all
steamed up over Gatlings.
When the battleship "Maine" blew up and Congress
36
declared war on Spain in April, 1898, Parker got ready for
the fight. The U.S. Fifth Corps, which was practically all
there was of the regular- army, gathered on the sun-baked
flats around Tampa, Florida, to embark for Cuba.
Against his commanding officer's wishes, Parker planned
a machine gun battery. In his prospectus he forecast most
of the tactical functions of the machine gun as an infantry
support weapon. Passed around among officers at Tampa,
Parker's plan got action when he showed it to Lt. John T.
Thompson, head of the Tampa ordnance district. Thompson, 20 years later to become known as "Tommy Gun"
Thompson, took Parker to the commanding general. As a
result, Lt. Parker, two sergeants, and ten privates were
detached from the 13th Infantry for duty with the "Gatling
Gun Battery."
Parker had a leg up-nothing could stop him now.
When sailing orders for the Fifth Corps omitted mention
of Parker and the Gatlings, he bluffed his whole outfit on
board a Cuba-bound transport. When a couple of senior
officers tried to buck him, he went straight to the Corps
Commander, Major General Wm. R. Shafter.
'Bull" Shatter-he weighed 320 pounds-gave the fanatical Parker 15 minutes of his time. It was enough.
Parker came out of his office with carte blanche to tote
his Gatlings on. Across the water at Daiquiri, Shafter
personally supervised their landing.
Instead of four horses for each (Continued on page 73)
In battle at Santiago, Cuba, guns
covered advance of U.S. troops. Pile
of white ammo boxes illustrates great
firepower of the gun. Gatlings have
been used in movies such as "Siege at
Red River" starring Van Johnson.
Basic 10-barrel Gatling was made in
.45 caliber with single row feed clip
and had sliding elevation handle.
Rifles for jackrabbits range from .22 at left through
urn powers to heavy .30 Enfield and .270 Model 70 (rig
'
Jacksare hunted in prairie country which affords many long
shots (left), good training for bigger game like antelope. :
38
,
I
CAN SHARPEN UP YOUR SHOOTING
FOR BIG-GAME HUNTER WHO WANTS TO TEST HIS RIFLE
AT ALL RANGES, JACKRABBIT MAKES EXCELLENT TARGET
By ROBERT KINDLEY
jackass-rabbit is one of
Tthe best targets inlong-legged
the world for the big-game hunter
HE LONG-EARED,
who wants to sharpen up his shooting eye prior to the big
game season. Using his hunting rifle on these running
jacks will teach any hunter the proper lead and swing for
his particular weapon. When a rifleman gets to the stage
where he can knock running blacktails kicking at 100 yards,
and do it consistently, he need not worrv about accurately
pin-pointing his shots on running big-game. And when
he can bowl this relatively small summer target over at 150
yards while in full flight, he's almost sure come winter of
venison in the freezer.
The big, Western black-tailed jack rabbit is a customtailored target for the rifleman. He'll sit as still as a woodchuck or prairie dog. He'll lope along like a lazy, ground
feeding squirrel, or burst from cover like a hot-rod. Miss
him as he streaks across the open prairie and the crack
when the shot passes will shift him into a high gear that
would do credit to a scared antelope. Kick him out of the
(Continued on page 70)
sagebrush and he'll dart and
.
,
Because meat spoilage is incidental to destruction of rabbit pests, any caliber from .22 up is okay for hunting.
i
Author's son proudly holds up blacktail popped in long
shot with 222 Remington 722 using Weaver scope.
'
Concrete firing line at Trail Glade
range is often scene of major smallbore shoots attended by out-of-staters.
DREAM
TARGET
RANGE
BY LONG, CAREFUL PLANNING AND
P O L I T I C A L ALERTNESS, SHOOTER1
I N M I A M I W O N I D E A L FACILITIES
THAT DRAW 60,000 PEOPLE I N YEAR
Plan of dream layout affords range facilities for all
shooters-shotgunners,
riflemen and handgunners-and
at the same time has water sport lagoons and archery.
40
BY CLEMENT L. THEED
is a dream come true-the
I?dream and ambition range
of dozens of shooters and just
ORIDA'S TRAIL GLADE
plain civic-minded people who created the beautiful Miami
target range out of the Everglades swampland. The range
is symbolic of the new spirit in the shooting game these
days, a positive feeling that clubs can no longer limp along
with half-way measures, settling for abandoned dumps to
use as ranges. Miami shooters determined to do better
and followed it up double-quick by forming the Dade
County Sports Park Association with a dividend: the Trail
Glade Ranges.
While most shooting ranges are usually dreary placessand pits, abandoned quarries, the ends of the earth that
nobody else could successfully use-Trail Glade is different. Landscaping began with draining the area and is still
going on. Soft breezes sway the palms gently against the
bright blue sky, and from the top of the range observation
tower the visitor can see out over 30 miles of Everglades.
The tower is made of huge boulders. Even in the swamp
land there were stones to be moved in grading and draining, and there was no place to dump them. So the work
crew built them into a tower.
The shooting spread is among the country's finest.
Seventy firing positions for small bore rifle and pistol
Informal plinkers trying out new rifles are large part of Trail
Glade's use where youngsters outnumber adults two to one.
Staggered target holders allow several pistol ranges to be fired on at once so matches do not take too much time.
Cool cloth awning over firing points shades shooters from sun's glare which often interferes with good aiming
in pistol match. Convenient tables hold ammo, shooting kits and scopes for spotting shots on target in slow fire.
From control box on the firing line range, superintendent
Maurice LaLonde conducts match through loudspeaker.
shooting make a line beneath the gaily canopied sun roof.,
Racks to hold competitors' rifles vertically stand conveniently behind the line, with beach chairs for the comfort
of spectators nearby. Electric target holders stretch away .
to 100 yards, ready to flip the bullseye on "Commence
firing." Whenever any new equipment appears on the
market, the Dade County Park Department is eager to
try it, and if suitable for the Trail Glade ranges, the devices
are installed. A row of electric temporary carriers can be
set up in two hours to extend Trail Glade facilities for the
largest shooting meets, and can quickly be shifted from the
25 yard butt to the 50 yard butt as needed.
The rifle and pistol range is backed by a high earth
wall, part of the dike project. On each side of the range
extending to near the firing line are other earth ridges
which prevent anyone from straying into the shooting
zone. These ridges can catch bullets as a backstop.
Shotgunners are catered to with four combination 'skeet
and trap rings. Hydraulic autoloading skeet traps in high
and low towers keep the air buzzing with birds. The traps
are the latest on the market. Manning the ranges are
skilled instructors, each an expert in one of the sports:
skeet, rifle, pistol. All of them are well known in the
sports world, and all are registered as Class A instructors.
Maurice LaLonde, formerly a Detroit police officer and an
expert shooter, is the superintendent and lives' at the range.
He has a staff of park tenders to help with maintenance
and range operation. As business demands it, during the
tourist season or for important matches, extra help is hired.
Use of the range has exceeded all reasonable hopes.
Nine separate new clubs register the range as "home
plate." Many who use the park are plinkers, people who
want to try out new guns, but Trail Glade plays host.to a
good schedule of matches and tournaments. There is
regular pistol competition every Thursday evening. On
weekends there may be waiting lines for positions on the
-
Solid shooting benches for super-accurate shooting or sighting-in were part of equipment on well-thought
out range. Picnic lunch benches and beach chairs are used by visitors while matches are in progress.
several ranges because of the heavy attendance.
The new park is the site of the Flamingo Open Pistol
Tournament, now considered No. 3 in the nation after the
Mid-Winter matches and the Perry Nationals. The Annual
Sawgrass Smallbore Rifle Championships is fired on the
balmy Trail Glade range. Shooters come from all over
the nation for this match, out-of-staters outnumbering the
local riflemen. The Florida state rifle and pistol championships and Southeastern Regional smallbore rifle championships will be fired at Trail Glade.
Any range should pay its own way. Trail Glade does
just this. Within three years after it was opened, the range
became self-supporting. While the county does not operate
its parks for profit, each park is managed to be as much
self-supporting as possible. Trail Glade reflected how important the citizens of Miami thought the range was, for it
has become self-supporting more quickly than any other
known park establishment.
From October 1954 to October 1955, more than 22,000
range fees of 25 cents per shooter tinkled into the cash
register. Exact count of attendance was difficult but expert
estimates based on two spectators (Continued on page 81)
New, permanent skeet houses and trap pits on shotgun ranges have modem electric and hydraulic target throwing
machines installed. Entire range not used by buildings or concrete walks is heavily sodded, free from dust.
.-.- ,
1
I
Fifteen different brands and lots of ammunition including Western, Winchester, Monark, Remington an
Peters regular,' match, shorts, longs and long rifle cartridges were studied in scientific accuracy tests.
PRECISE TESTS OF DIFFERENT .22 LOADS REVEAL ACCURACY OFTEN DEPENDS ON
MATCHING CARTRIDGE BRANDS AND LOTS CAREFULLY WITH PARTICULAR RIFLE
By LARRY F. MOORE
3
=
every smallbore shooter is asked sooner
T o r later is a tough one, "What brand, Mister?" Too
many match shooters answer it hastily. They shouldn't,
for there is a lot more to choosing the right .22 ammo
for your rifle than taking the prettiest package or the
most-advertised brand. Not only brand, but the particular
lot of ammunition has much to do with the kind of groups
your rifle will shoot. And too many shooters are not
hitting as well as they should, because they are careless
in this important detail, their choice of the ammunition
that shoots best in their rifle.
One novice shooter asked for "match ammunition," and
the clerk in a big Philadelphia sports store saw he was a
novice. He took advantage of the shooter's ignorance to
HE QUESTION
sell him several boxes of an obsolete, discontinued .22
long rifle cartridge placed on the market a few years before especially for 200-yard competition. T h e novice not
only placed last in the competition but he was pretty
embarrassed, for the round was loaded with Lesmok powder which gave a bright muzzle flash, a .cloud of smoke,
and a foul odor. The poor accuracy was not as objectionable as the flash, smoke and smell, since these were very
annoying to other competitors. The novice who didn't
know how to answer "what brand?" rightly was a very
unpopular guy.
Another young shooter who didn't know the answer
bought ammo from a dealer in Commercial Row at the
Camp Perry national matches before 1940. Fortnnatelv
Mossberg Model 35A costing less than $15 new pre-war and similar to cur
rent M144-LS at $39.95 grouped equal to Winchester 52 with some
-. -
Remington's newest 40X .22 match rifle listing at $119.95 with heavy U ~ L L C J
less sights gave accuracy from excellent to poor according to ..cartridges
:
A
Brand new Winchester Model 52C Bull gun costing $144.70 less sights was
used by author Larry Moore. in evaluating performances of cartridges tested.
Because basic design of Mossberg .22 single shot was not adapted to reliable machine rest testing, accuracy firing
was done with 20X scope fitted, and under careful range conditions to insure maximum, reliable performance of gun.
T o prevent human error from entering into accuracy tests and invalidating results, machine rest was used to rigidly hold
Winchester (above) and Remington rifles during thorough study of .22 cartridges on windless indoor 100-yard range.
the results were different. The novice shooter, Harm Shelmatch-winning scores in that particular rifle. His success
don, had been persuaded to enter his first national comwas sheer accident. There was no deliberate planning in the
ammo he bought: he just took what was available.
petition with his M2 Springfield
.22 rifle. The M2 is a
good training rifle but even in the hey-day of the big
An experienced shooter may choose one type or brand
.30 caliber Springfield, its .22 little brother was not conrecommended by another shooter, by an advertisement,
sidered a first-class match rifle.
or may have found from experience that a certain type
Arriving at Camp Perry, Harm learned that there was
or brand gives satisfactory results. Associating with other
such a thing as a .22 long rifle match-grade cartridge.
shooters, he is likely to get suggestions on the choice of
Since he wanted the adammunition. He hears,
vantage of the more accu"Use only greased bulrate match load, he walked
lets if you want good acTEST DATA
into a shop on Commercuracv." or "Don't use
The average extreme spread at 100 yards of four ten-shot groups from
cial Row and asked for
high
speeds because they
each lot of ammunition (unless otherwise noted) is given in inches.
"match ammunition." The
give flyers."
AMMUNITION
RIFLE
dealer took advantage of
The old-time c o m ~ e t i WINCHESTER REMINGTON
MOSSBERG
M52C
M40-X
M35A
his inability to specify
tor, now probably retired
LONG RIFLE MATCH CARTRIDGES
which brand, and peddled
from active shooting, will
1.07
1.12
Western Super Match Mark III
him an obsolete lot that
talk about the Lesmok
Remington Match
1.12
1.40
Remington Palma Match LESMOK
1.94
had been kicking around
vowder brands of match
LONG RIFLE REGULAR GRADE STANDARD VELOCITY
ammunition w h i c h he
the dealer's shelves for
Remington Kleanbore
1.67
2.10
2.34
,
three years.
used in the old days to
Western Xpert
1.87
2.17
1.90
Winchester Leader
1.64
3.32
2.32
Harm used the outwin matches. and which.
Federal Monark
1.72
1.39
2.68
moded ammo and turned
in his opinion, were the
LONG RIFLE HIGH SPEED
Western Super-X
1.80
2.20
2.46
in e x c e 1 1 e n t scores
best cartridges ever made.
Winchester Super Speed
,
2.03
. 2.01
throughout the match. He
Although
these cartridges
Winchester Super Speed Hollow Point ,
2.52
2.25
made a record score of
have not been manufacLONG HIGH SPEED
Winchester Super Speed
4.48*
8.82*
400 with 34 X's in a 50tured for 17 or 18 years,
SHORT STANDARD VELOCITY
yard restricted e v e n t .
some who do a limited
Winchester Leader
Later Harm learned that
amount of shooting, still
SHORT HIGH SPEED
have a supply of them.
Lady Luck had been sitWinchester Super Speed
Remington Rocket
Many individuals who
ting on his ammo chest.
*Two ten-shot groups were fired.
The particular brand he
have had success with a
**One ten-shot group was fired.
certain brand are reluc- '
unwittingly bought was
A 20X Lyman Super Targetspot telescopic sight was used on the Mossberg
tant to change brands, althe o n 1 y one available
rifle for sighting.
(Continued on page 48)
which would give him
A
WHAT AMMO FOR MATCH SHOOTING
IMPROVE SCORING
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Ray
Riling
 6844-M
of "old"
Gorsten
Â
Philadelphia 19.
Pa.
I
though the ballistics of any brand vary
with the lot and may change greatly over a
period of years. Several manufacturers take
advantage of this and, market the same cartridge under several brand names. The ammunition is made on the same machines using
the same components. The only difference
is the head stamp on the case, and the
package label. One may buy a certain brand
of cartridges with a distinctive brand head
stamp and find in the box a cartridge case
having the head stamp of a different brand.
This occurs because both brands are loaded
on the same machine and a case from the
previous loading gets into the next run by
accident. No difference in the performance
UNBERTH* r- CKETS
JUST W H A T YOU WANTED!
For Displaying Your Guns.. .
*
In Cabinets, on Walls or Panels
These N E W specially designed Gunberth Brackets are made
of rubber covered steel and are easy to use, screw-in type.
Note how easily and securely the guns cradle in the
brackets! W i l l fit all sizes and types of guns.
o better serve your needs
new Gunberth Brackets
lable in two sizes: for
s and for Rifles or Shot-
FOR HANDGUNS:
3 pr. $1.65 ppd.
. . . .$5.50 ppd.
FOR RIFLES or SHOTGUNS:
3 pr. $1.95 ppd.
1 dozen pair. . . . . . . ..$6.50 ppd.
1 dozen pair..
...
ORDER
YOURS
NOW!
The Sportsman's Club of
America has awarded its
special 1955 citation to the
Gunberth line as outstanding and the best in Gun
Cabinets.
BUILD I T YOURSELF!
PISTOL-BERTH! MODEL NO. HM-14DD-IZ-fc.
Overall Dimensions: 50" w, 26" h, 4" d
Easv to follow working wlans are now available to you. Plans forPistol-~erth with twin
doors are complete for the 1 2 gun size illustrated and also include details with complete
bills of material for 20 and 28 eun sizes. -The
plans for the single door modeT are complete
for 6, 10 and 14 gun sizes. The extra space in
the larger sizes is gained by adding to the
heights only, the widths and depths remain the
same.
DETAILED WORKING PLANS FOR:
PISTOL-BERTH with Twin Doors
Complete for 12, 20 and 28 gun sizes $2.95 ppd.
PISTOL-BERTH with Single Door
Complete for 6, 10 and 14 gun sizes. .$1.95 ppd.
New! EXCLUSIVE "HANDBOOK
Just published! This NEW "Handbook" is a
comprehensive study of all types of Gun Cabinets. It selects the type best for you. Then
tells you, shows you HOW TO BUILD and
FINISH your own Gun Cabinet. Details on
Kits, Plans and Hardware for 22 different models are all listed in NEW HANDBOOK.
(Finished cabinets also available.) Yes, it even
contains scaled patterns and drawings for you
to work from. Don't buy or build your cabinet
until you consult this authoritative Handbook
. . giving you the complete details on what
to buy or how to build for the very finest In
Gun Cabinets. Send for yours NOW! Only
$1.00 ppd.
*Copyright
Dealers' Inquiries Invited
.
COLADONATO BROS., Dept. G I 2L, Hazelton, Pa.
48
of this round would probably be observed.
While manufacturers have advertised the
merits of their respective brands, there has
been little unbiased test information available to the shooter to make a really intelligent choice of type or brand to find out more
about proper choice of ammo. I conducted
some tests to investigate the characteristics
of some of the many brands of .22 rimfire
cartridge.
Three rifles were used in the test: the
model 52C Winchester with a bull weight
barrel, the model 40-X Remington, which
both represent the latest factory models of
expensive target rifles made in the U. S., and
a model 35A Mossberg, which is a low-cost
bolt-action class of rifle. A 20-power Lyman
Super Targetspot telescopic sight was used
on the Mossberg rifle for sighting. All firing
was conducted on a 100-yard indoor range.
The match rifles were fired from a machine
rest and the Mossberg rifle was fired from a
bench rest because the insecure method of
attaching the stock on this model does not
permit normal performance in a machine
rest.
A total of 14 different brands and types
of cartridges were tested. These included
long rifle, long, and short cartridges as well
as the high speed and regular velocity, and
greased and waxed bullets, which are being
manufactured currently. A box of obsolete
Remington Palma Match rounds loaded with
Lesmok powder was also included, in the
test. The center to center distance of the two
extreme shots in each ten-shot group was
recorded. Four ten-shot groups were fired
with all but the Winchester Super Speed
longs, Winchester Super Speed and Leader
shorts, and the Remington Rocket shorts.
With the first three, two ten-shot groups were
made; with the Remington Rockets, only one.
The average of the extreme spreads were
noted for each lot and type of ammunition.
The test results show that for accuracy,
selecting the ammunition is fully as important as selecting the rifle. Certainly few
shooters would select the Mossberg rifle,
which sold for $11.25 about 1937, for competition against rifles in the class of the $140
Remington Model 40-X, yet the Mossberg
gave better average accuracy than the 40-X
with six of 13 lots of ammunition.
The importance of ammunition selection
is best demonstrated with the lot of Winchester Leader .22 cartridges. This lot gave
the best accuracy of the regular priced lots
in the M52 Winchester rifle, with an average
extreme spread of 1.64 inches. On the contrary, this lot gave the poorest accuracy in
the M40-X Remington rifle, an average extreme spread of 3.32 inches. The Winchester
Leader gave average accuracy in the Mossberg.
The Federal Monark gave similar results
with best accuracy in the M40-X Remington
rifle, an average extreme spread of 1.39
inches. This is a better average than that
obtained with the Remington Match cartridge in this rifle. However, in the M52 Winchester rifle the accuracy with Monark was
average and in the Mossberg it was below
average.
There is a difference in the average accuracy of the various types of cartridges.
For example, the match cartridges gave
superior accuracy when compared with that
of the other types. The standard priced long
rifle rounds were in another group, and the
longs and shorts were-inferior to the others.
Considerable variation in point of impact
of the various lots, when fired in a single
rifle, was observed. The two lots of match
ammunition of recent manufacture struck at
approximately the same point in each rifle.
However, the point of impact of each regular
brand, with relation to that of the match
cartridges, varied considerably with the individual rifle. Generally, the standard brands
of long rifle cartridge struck higher than the
match brands. The Monark ammunition gave
the highest impact of the regular brands.
The average impact with Monark was 2.1
inches above that of the match lots. The
average impact of the high speed cartridges
was 2.8 inches above that of the match lots.
The long cartridge (not the long rifle) impacted an average of 0.6 inch above the match
cartridges, and the shorts, excluding the
Remington Rocket cartridge, impacted an
average of 3.2 inches below. The average
impact of the Rocket cartridges was 3.3
inches above that of the match lots.
Only one split case occurred during firing
the Remington Kleanbore ammunition in the
Mossberg rifle. There was no damage to the
~ i f l eor shooter. This type of casualty could
be serious in some rifles since the case fails
to obturate-seal
the breech-in
a normal
manner and the gas may escape into the gun
mechanism. On some rifles the gas may blow
hack into the shooter's face. This type of
casualty indicates a low quality case.
Since there is a wide variation in performance of the various types and brands of
cartridge, it would be best in selecting the
type to consider the purpose for which it will
be used.
For accuracy in top-level rifle competitions
the match cartridge is a must. The X-ring
on the 100-yard smallbore rifle target has a
diameter of one inch and the ten ring has
a diameter of two inches. Only two groups
obtained with the regular-priced brands were
small enough to make 10-X possibles. Yet
each of the four groups made with the more
expensive Super Match ammunition in the
M52 Winchester rifle would make a 10-X
possible if properly placed. Accuracy of the
Remington Palma Match loaded with Lesmok
powder was comparable with that obtained
from the regular brands sold today.
Ammunition selection is especially important to the target shdoter since the game is
highly competitive and "400 possible" scores
are common when wind conditions are good.
In large matches the winning score generally
has close to 40 Xs for the 40 record..-shots.
If the target practice is informal, or indoors at close range, investigate the regularpriced brands if cost must be considered.
The match grade cartridges sell at $1.10 per
box, compared with 75c for the regular grade.
While there is little difference in the accuracy between the regular velocity and high
speed rounds, the noise level of the high
speeds may be objectionable on indoor
ranges. The slightly shorter bore time with
high speed rounds might be an advantage,
especially when firing from the standing position. Although bore wear might be greater
with the high speed rounds, caliber .22 rim
fire barrel life is measured in the tens of
The beautiful 1956 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz
The lucky man who drives a new Cadillac
experiences a quiet inner pride of ownership
that no other car can evoke.
Similarly in
/^\
when you raise one of the new Colt
Python Revolvers to the target. sense the velvet
smoothness of the action as you cock the hammer. .
and feel the clean crispness of the trigger. . . you'll
know why no other gun can quite compare with a Colt.
..
.
- ,. .*". "
5
3
,-Smvi:
* * *
^$
^'2
.
L
* 'Â¥Tr
1: ,**
is just the first in a projected series of exciting new Colt
revolvers and automatic pistols that will give America's shooters
need models, the superior quality and the
,.
supreme accuracy they want.
.357Magnum and all .38 Special loads.
ventilated rib.
Weight: 44 ounces. Sights: Accro micrometer rear,
ramp type front. Hammer: Fast-cocking wide spur.
Stocks: Target type, full-checkered walnut.
Finish: Colt's beautiful Royal Blue.
Ammunition:
Barrel: 6 inches, with integral
. . KEEP Y O U R E Y E O N COLT
Revolvers and Automatic pistols
FOR THE F I N E S T .
COLT'S PATENT FIRE ARMS MANUFACTURING COMPANY, INC.
150 Huyshope Avenue, Hartford 15, Connecticut
A Distinguished Member of the
PENN-TEXAS CORPORATION Family of Progressive Companies
,.
49
u.,,
I
FOR YOUR CAST BUllET
N O SPECIAL MOULDS
Velodtiu of 2700 fl/f
s a n d s of rounds, and it would be i i $
portant only to the individual who shootpz
,i. r:i
several thousand rounds a year.
Genuine Tooled Leather
HOLSTERS
. ^i
The long rifle high yelocity cartridges a r 4ts- .
probably the best choice for hunting, because4
)f their slightly flatter trajectory and greate
snergy. The wax-coated bullets are to b
preferred to the greased bullets when th
rounds are carried loose in the pockets be
cause the greased bullets pick up dirt. $,; ;<
have been readied with
cream your cast bullel
performance. Available In
es 22, .25, .308
$500WI
'
cLADALOY BULLET CO.
Manufacturer! of the wvular new machine o u t
c e p w clad allay ballets which c a m be driven i t
hlohert wlooltlm. Available for hand gun8 and
rifles. A t VOT dmlnr or udnr dlrmt- Write lor
BOX 643
NORTH HOLLYWOOD.
CALIF.
Vnvenfors
Send today for our instructive booklet, "Patent
Protection for Inventors" outlining preliminary
steps to take toward patent protection, also for
convenient "Evidence of Invention" form.
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
255-J MERLIN BUILDING, WASHINGTON 6, D.C.
TO GUNSMITHS 6 DEALERS
Most Complete In East Rifles *Shotguns
*Pistols *Revolvers *Scopes *Mounts *Sights
*Gun Accessories *Reload Tools *Components
*Leather *Sporting Goods *Fishing *Archery
Tackle
AURANDIS
The cause of poor accuracy with long and
short cartridges is largely because the guns
used were rifled and chambered for the long
rifle cartridge, which uses a bullet weighing
40 grains. The twist is too fast for the short
bullet which weighs only 29 grains. Also,
when a short is fired in a long rifle chamber,
it has to jump through the forward portion
of the chamber to reach the rifling and the
bullet is probably mutilated to some extent.
For using shorts exclusively, it would probably be worth while to obtain a barrel rifled
and chambered especially for the short cartridge. This would give an improvement in
accuracy.
FLINTROP
220-233E.3l'd
Lewiatown, PÇ
4034 W. National Ave.
EV. 3-2626
MILWAUKEE 15, WISCONSIN
Canada Sportsman's Catalogue No.
The remainder of our 1955 fl4 cataloaues
reduced to 5 0 ~ ' .
FREE BULLETIN ON REQUEST
ELLWOOD EPPS
Holsters for a l l model guns.
Made of best saddle leather,
flower c a r v e d , a t
$5.45
the low price o f . . .
SPECIFY MAKE,
CALIBER AND
BARREL LENGTH
Fast Service J 0 B B E R S
<
For plinking and snap shooting at fcottiparatively large targets at close range the ;
short cartridges have an advantage in co~t,.,
The standard short lists at 50c per box. The,,'
longs, which list at 68c, are only sliglitl$,;
cheaper than the long rifle cartridges. While
the accuracy obtained with the long and
short cartridges was definitely inferior to that
obtained with the long rifle rounds, it compares with large caliber slide, lever and
semiautomatic hunting rifles at 100 yards or
less.
The shooter may easily determine the type
Clinton, Ontari
We. pACACttL... SAFE, LIGHTWEIGHT
AND POWERFUL-
1
SCHULTZ & LARSEN
MODEL 54-J HUNTING RIFLE
Chambered for the Amazingly Efficient
7MM (7 x 61 ) SHARPE & HART CARTRIDGE - *
- , ,'it t^
(Other Calibers Available: .30-06 - .270 - 6 . 5 M M L . wse-ça &
fcS
Made by the world-famous Schultz & Larsen Rifle Company of Denmark, this
new MODEL 54-1 SPORTER offersthe extra features you want most in a superb
hunting rifle:
. , . ,
=IT.p.
-
-4
Lower bolt lift
Over 70% more bolt locking surface, &&ring extra strong and
safe action-proof-tested at 80,000 16s.
French walnut Monte Carlo stock, designed for scope use-no recoil on cheek or jaw.
Crisp, clean trigger pull-~adjustablefrom 3 to 6 pounua.
3-Cartridge single column magazine-easy, t&d
singly or as
-shot repeater.
\
F
- ,A<*,^
2All these unique EXTRA features at no appreciable EXTRA cost!
-
- a
The Sharpe & Hart Associates, Inc.
EMMITSBURG 1, MD.
Bolt Action of them all!
.
?,
i
ABOUT THE NEW 7 x 61
SHARPE & HART CALIBER
,
r~
With the 'slickest1
4435-G Piedmont Ave., Oakland 11, Calif.
Designed and developed over a 7-yea1
period by Phil Sharpe and Dick Hari
asthe ultimate cartridge for maxirnun
accuracy and efficiency. Praised b j
gun experts and shooters alike, because of its high velocity and SAFE
oressures. Successfully field-tested or1
most American big game. Steadily
growing in popularity, as evidenced by
more and more shooters buying the
new SCHULTZ & LARSEN SPORTER, chambered for the amazingly efficient 7mm (7 x 61) S & H cartridge.
Ask your dealer about the safe but
sensational 7 x 61 Sharpe & Hart
caliber SCHULTZ & LARSEN M-54J
SPORTER. Norma factory-loaded ammunition available. If your dealei
can't accommodate you, please write
our nearest office for particulars on
both rifle and ammunition.
Oddities or FEW IN STOCK ITEMS
CUSTOM SPORTER
Now as easy as 1 - 2 - 3 !
All that's needed i s a vise and wrench t o re-barrel
your Mauser. Springfield or Enfield military rifle into
either of t h e most popular American calibers , 2 7 0 or
30.06. Fully illustrated s t e p b y - s t e p instructions ineluded w i t h each kit.
\
MAKE THESE GUNS YOURSELF!
Id l . 1 1 Remington 1 2 ga. barrels, old model w/exten-1
sion, 20" cyl. bore, new, $9.95; German K & G-43
mags., 2 0 shot, our make, $9.95. Colt .32 Pocket
IPositive cylinders, w/eJector, new, $4.50. Fair sized
lot of Hanei a i r rifle and pistol parts & Hubertus a i r
IPistol Parts just received. Stocks for Win. '73. Winchester make. require extension of inletting for tang
and new hole drilled, shotgun type b u t t as used o n
sporting models, new $4.95.
COMPLETE KIT OF PARTS SUPPLIED.
KIT £1-9-shot . 2 2
caliber revolver. 2"
barrel, a l l parts, unfitted
and
unassembled, completed
g.u.n ,would
specialb e.kit£29.5
price
__
Quackenbush .22 rifle breech blocks, new, $2.00, firing
..
..
Ipins, $1.25, triggers, 7 5 e , air rifle mainsprings, $1.75
(state dia. & length), New Remington Mdl. 5 1 slides,
state if .32 or .380, $4.90 (less t h a n 1 1 3 of old
Iprice). Young America .22 hammers, $1.25, S&W t i p
up (underbreak) .32 bolts & springs, blue or nickel,
$1.95. Reising . 4 5 cal. model 50, 5 5 , 6 0 mass., 2 0
shot. $4.95. .22 cal. Sav. 1 9 0 3 , 0 6 pump mags. $2.85,
.22 Lightning rifle extractors. $2.25. Savage .22
IHornet 23D mags, $1.50, Colt Lightning pistol hand,
$2.00.
-------._
$13.25.
KIT £2-9-sho
.22 caliber
target revolver, 6" barrel.
adjustable sights, a l l parts,
unfitted and unassernbled
c o m p l e t e d gun would b e
$50.00
special k i t Price
_____-------------$18.90.
,Colt
-
*
m
LYMAN Â £ 3 front sight, obsolete style,
fits any standard slot. especially handsome on oct. barrels, $1.25.
SIGHT
for
m
IL U G E R
DRUM
LYMAN Â £ gold bead. unavailable f o r al-
REAR
Quackenbush,
Little
--------- _ ------- _-__$1.25.
rA
''
u g e r d r u m m a g a z i n e s , r a r e item,
Scout, etc. etc. . 2 2 rifles. Elevator h a s V
and peep
M A R L I N BARRELS
---------_____.
------_--_
-_-____.___
----------_-_-_____
___
MAUSER military pistol rear
sights, also fits many small
Mauser .22 rifles, excellent,
is issued, $2.85.
.*,
t
shot,
"snail"
to
disturb
i s offset so as
gun's
TYPE front
sight,
balance.
M A U S E R M I L I T A R Y pistol holster
as isstock-HARNESS
ONLY.
sued, very rare, good used condition, Grade £1 $4.50. Grade
 £ 2 $3.50.
LUGER HOLSTERS
zte;;;
$4.00, 6" bhl., $3.50 4" bbl,, $2.00.
take down tools, $1.06 ea.
ge;?::::
Luger issue
ppd.
g h t l y used, $8.95
iCHUETZEH
BE SURE TO READ BELOW
We supply entire kit of parts f o r assembly-parts
are
new and "in t h e white" (unhlued) ready for polishing.
Machine marks, nicks and scratches aplenty which
come out in polishing of course. We have fitted t h e
Super RareÑJus Discovered a f t e r many, many
extractors with each cylinder, you d o t h e assembly &
years of Storage-AH Absolutely NEW only
final fitting & polishing. You can polish as nicely a s
occasional slight outside blemish f r o m years
you like or even leave as i s for plinking or knock
of shifting and storage. Can be converted for
around gun. All parts American made. A bottle of o u r
use on many other makes.
instant gun blue. Formula 4 4 - 4 0 is supplied w i t h
FOR MODEL
9 3 -~
36 - .
-- 1 8
each kit. We euarantee t h a t parts shipped CAN be
.38-55 Caliber
fitted and assembled but do not guarantee t h a t YOU
26" full octagonal ----_____-,_
$12.50
can do it. If you know nothing of gun assembly DO
26" full oct. (Takedown)
16.50
NOT ORDER. you are on your own, none are re26" round Takedown
12.50
turnable. Assembly instiiictions included w i t h each
0
n
d Carbine
. 8.95
3 2 - 4 0 Caliber:
kitÑonl tools required-screwdriver,
vise, file, ham26" full octagonal
12.50
m e and emery paper. Spare parts for each style al26" half octagonal
12.50
ways available. Each kit tax paid, each .pistol serial
20" round Carbine
8.95
ff'ed-permits
from permit states, each order m u s t
FOR MODEL '92:
contain Federal Firearms statement stating age, you
are not a fugitive etc. etc.
LUGER rear sights, adjustable,
a s used on long barrel and
sporting models, issue. excel.
lent, $3.50.
!
*
1
fine
c r e w windage adjustment, i n white,
io apertures a t present
.----$3.50.
SILVER BLADE wide slot front site,
suitable for muzzle loaders old s t y l e
sporting rifles etc. ~ e a u t i f u l l ymilled,
$1.50.
1. S. CARBINE HEAVY DUTY CANVAS CARRYING
ASE, water repellent, strong rust resistant zipper
eather re-inforced
double stitched, adjustable
'Brand New" carrying sling, 351/sr, long _-..$2.95
-
LYMAN RAMP SIGHT
YTt&
;:!p&r;:
Colt rifles and
$kvEf3,
9 2 , 9 3 . 94, 95's.
many others. $1.50.
ight ia deSid$dF$?%'?
~
ir ivory and model of gun).
Universal magazine springs, usable
f
Springfield, Enfield, etc. convertible t o Japs, Mausers. Bolt
Action shotgun magazines etc.
New, Packet of
1 0 , SPECIAL
ONLY $1.95.
ADJUSTABLE CHOKE
RECOIL REDUCER
Shooters1 Gunsmiths! Dealer! A terrific value! Choke
attachment worth $17.95, complete and ready to silversolder or braze i n your own shop. 5 in. long I n
white, complete-12.
16 or 20 l a . ------- $4.95 P'PD.
(Write wants f o r other Garand parts,.
d
$
~
-
~
g
~
~
-..
new,
$14.95
. . . . .. . . . $ 9 . 9 5
ppd.
each.
,
-.-.
.- .
.22CAL. (0.d. ,415)
INNER 6 OUTER
-MAGAZINE
TUBES
193/1" easy conversion t o most any tubular . 2 2
by s i m p ~ ysawing t o length. New, set-$l.oo
ppd.
Dozen sets, $7.95.
ARBINE REAR SIGHTS
adjustable for
windaxe
&
elevation, fits a i l U. 8. Carbines, slides into receiver
dovetail-2
minutes t o install, as issued. $1.85 ppd.
A N T E D : G U N PARTS
ALSO WANT
to,
breaking
into
parts.
SATISFACTION ALWAYS GUARANTEED!
PISTOL BARRELS
IUMRICH ARMS CO.
WEST HURLEY 1, NEW YORK
Finest 4 1 3 0 steel, 4-groove, 1 1/ 16" a t shoulder,
%d
;
o~e;~;~;~;er;iy~u~edlob;;;~da~f
;iii:Kiha$
l/s ploduction cost! Only $4.95 plus 5 5 $ postage.
Will not fit receivers with over 1 1/16,, thread.
N E W ! 2 2 CALIBER RIFLE BARREL
..
J U N K RIFLES
PISTOLS
SHOTGUNS
It HAVE OVER 15,000.000 GUN PARTS
31.75 ea.)
f
-
o ? r z ~ g ~ sn%$
off for offer2ck airmailed day reved-if
not 0.k. shipi t returned prepaid imdiately.
2 ".m. K. e$3.95
~*E~
i
-
..
, ship
?
? d e&
P d & t % O ~ -i
<
fox shot ctgs.,
~
. 3 0 C A L . BARREL-24"
BRAND N E W !
C H A M B E R E D FOR 30-06
d%h 1%
E E d a S 2 r Z:$hk%~Th2uXeZ
.45 auto or unchambered, s t a t e which
~
G A R A N D BARRELS-Brand
Used, v. g. t h r o u g h o u t . . .
G A R A N D RIFLE
CONVERSION KIT
kinds, new or used
i t a r y or commercial:
U. S. C A R B I N E STOCKS
~
NEW. 15 shot, N O T rejects, Quaranteed to feed-in
original wrappings.
our special 5 shot
$1.00 ea., 2-$1.75,
bottom comes flush with
I streamlined appearance
r hunting i n most states:
$2.45. F R E E with
zine issue rubber w
==-z=zs
pieces $6.95
HOLDERS
Brand new t e using taper in
rather than solder. Sight i s , 6 0 5
i.d. and can therefore be reamed
t o any size o v e ~desired. Less
SUPER BUY 95c
2
::2=!2%2"1?"';;fE
.
Note design that permits use
rifle by turning end of barrel
assuring
smooth
appearance.
Also
makes fine pistol sight.
Eacn SSt-Extra Special$9.00 perdoz. $65.00 per 1 0 0
1 of cartridge.
- , whether short., lone,
-. long
- rifle
0
 41
Â
-
REMINGTON
RI.MFIRE SHORTS
$T50
p e r BOX
( 5 0 Rds.)
M.I. Carbine
Per 1 0 0 ...............
'06 Military Late Issue
Per 1 0 0 ...............
7 0 Smokeless Low Pressure
Per 1 0 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remington Rifle Cartridges
Per 1 0 0 (Value $17.50) .
Winchester Self-Loading
Per 1 0 0 (Value $14.00,
Winchester SrIf-Loading
Per 1 0 0 (Value $14.00)
l i n g t o n Silvertip
.
Per 100 (Value $17.00)
R e l i n g t o n Soft Point
Per 100 (Value $15.00)
Long R F Cartridges
Per 1 0 0
Short R F
Per 1 0 0
Rim-Fire Shorts
Per 1 0 0
.
..
..
.
..
.............
.............
...............
0
........................
Rifle Slings, w e b New
O v . Surplus 11," inch'. .....
3 for $1.50.
Ã
The tests demonstrated that one lot of
ammunition cannot be expected to give the
same level of performance in all rifles. An
ammunition "lot" means all the ammunition
which comes from one factory loading machine continuously with the same set-up. A
lot may be from a special set-up of only a
day's running or less, or it may be hundreds
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of thousands of cartridges turned out in several days of production. The lot is assigned
a number in factory records and that number
is found stamped on each package of 50
rounds. The most suitable lot of ammunition
for one rifle can be found by only one method, by testing.
The best method is to fire several ten-shot
groups with samples of various lots under
good light conditions when there is little or
no wind. A bench rest or other support for
the rifle should be used to minimize holding
error. The level of the accuracy between
cartridge lots can be determined most easily
in scope-sighted rifles equipped with good
sights.. When a lot of ammunition gives top
performance, the shooter should purchase
enough to last through at least one season.
It is wise to use a single ammunition lot since
this permits the shooter to become thoroughly
familiar with his rifle-ammunition combination.
If rifle and ammunition are to be used for
hunting, the sight settings for various ranges
can be determined, or the rifle can be sighted
in at one range and the required hold-off for
other ranges can be determined.
Ammunition selection will be most important to the individual demanding the greatest
accuracy-the
match shooter. It can also
mean meat in the pot for the hunter since the
the caliber .22 rim fire bullet generally must
be placed in a vital area of the game in order
to obtain a kill. For the plinker, selecting
the proper ammunition can mean twice as
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finding a lot or brand of cartridge which will
give maximum performance with a particular
rifle may be more complicated.
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additional. A l l PPK Models (except lightweight)
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WALTHER, traditional leader i n basic design,
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The PPK i s very much in demand by Law Enforce::$
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'
PISTOL INTO RIFLE
Start Reloading Shotgun Shells
,m
fContinu,ed from Page 23)
which would develop dangerous pressures
if used alone. The trick is to prevent mixing them and to balance the amount of
fast-burning powder with the slow-burning
stuff properly. It is almost impossible to
do this correctly without the extensive
facilities of a well-equipped ballistic laboratory. Lighting the wrong kind of fire in
a cartridge can result i n detonation, when
the charge explodes like a hand grenade
instead of burning progressively as it I
should.
Knowing the dangers of mixed powders.
1 started my attempts to find a fast load
for the .30/357 with a cautious prime
charge of 2 grains of Pistol No. 6 topped
with 5 grains of SR No. 80, packed down
tightly with Kleenex to prevent mixing.
From this very light load I worked up to !
3 grains of Pistol No. 6 and 5.5 grains of
SR No. 80, which was still a mild charge. ;
Then I tried topping this duplex load with '
No. 2400, ending up with a multiple charge
consisting of 3 grs Pistol No. 6. 3.4 grs
SR No. 80 and 6 grs No. 2400. This load
didn't show any signs of excessive pressure
and gave practically no recoil, but it did 1
go off with an awful boom and shot the 93
grain Lnger bullet faster than any handgun
we knew of. As near as we could determine,
using rather primitive means, muzzle velocity 1
was i n the neighborhood of 1700-1800 feet '
per second.
Just for the hell of it, Ken Stohl and I 1
took the hybrid Colt out on the Platte
River to a spot where we had often potted ;I
at a stump with our .38's. We knew the
stump to he right at 700 yards away, and
had never been able to do any damage to
it with our hunting loads. After a couple
of bracket rounds with the .30/357 we
found we could whack the target consistently
without holding very far over.
I never did get a chance to try the new
.30/357 Magnum out on game as I was
called into active service with my regiment
that fall, hut while I was off learning to
dig foxholes,, Ken took it out on the plains
and clobbered some iackralibits. He. reported that his longest shot was 220 paces,
and even at that range the jack froze and
keeled over like he'd been hit with a varmint rifle.
The .30/357 looked so good that I made
up a set of detailed drawings of the cartridge and submitted them to the chief of
ordnance "through channels." By this time
the war was on, and the M l carbine had
been developed to the point where there
was no apparent need in the service for a
high speed handgun cartridge, and I never
even got a rejection slip for my trouble.
Many years passed before I ran across
old No. 49 among the stuff I'd left in storage during the war. A flood of memories
came out into the sun with the long-barreled
revolver, but there weren't any jackrabbits
or coyotes in Ohio, so back she went into
the bottom drawer of the gun cabinet.
One day I dropped in to see Paul Rennick at the showrooms of Winfield Arms in
Los Angeles, and found him all steamed up
about some Australian Martini rifles that
had j u ~ t come in. He'd had one of the
actions rebarreled to take the .357 S&W
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case, and had prooftested it with a 90,000
pound charge. This action was used for
a number of small rifle cartridges, but I was
surprised to learn that it would handle successfully anything as stout as the .357.
I picked up a couple of the actions with
the notion t h a t they'd make fine platforms
for a lightweight K-Hornet for my growing
boy. Before I got around to doing anything
with them I happened to find Les Lindahl's
.30/357 reamer in my toolbox one day and
the bug bit again.
I t has been pretty conclusively proven
that there's no such thing as a good dualpurpose rifle and pistol cartridge (except,
of course the .22 rimfire), and there is very
little real need for one today, as the small
sales of .32/20 and .44/40 ammunition
demonstrate. We'd had a real objective in
the development of the .30/357 for the handgun. There wasn't a single reason I could
think of to justify putting a rifle together
for it except dumb curiosity, but that was
enough.
I knew the action would handle the case
without any mechanical difficulties, and I
thought I knew where I could find the other
necessary pieces and help to make a gun
of it. Sure enough, Charley Johnson, the
Lawrenceville, Ohio gunsmith, had the answer for me. He cut the back end off an
old Springfield barrel, chambered it for the
.30/357 and fitted it to the Martini action.
The chamber was a bit too tight, of course,
as the reamer had been reduced in size for
use to cut a case-sizing die, so it was necessary to polish it out by hand. This produced a somewhat abrupt shoulder of the
double radius shape characteristic of the
Weartherby line of magnums, and a glasssmooth wall, tapered just enough to prevent
sticking cases.
I t didn't take me long to whittle out a
stock and forearm and after Charley had
mounted scope blocks and a Lyman 57 rear
sight Iwas ready to start shooting.
From late March through July 1955 I shot
a number of different loads in the .30/357
Martini, with bullets ranging from the 86
grain fullpatch Mauser pistol slugs to 150
grain jacketed service bullets. Powder charges
varied from 2.5 grains of Bullseye to 15
grains of No. 2400. Several loads were
made up using salvaged ball powder from
M l carbine shells, and I also shot up a lot
of No. 4759, DuPont's replacement for the
old bulky SR No. 80. However, I'd got
over my fondness for multiple charges, and
shot 'em straight this time.
Naturally the Springfield barrel with its
1-in-10 twist didn't stabilize the shorter
bullets at the low velocities obtained. Some
groups fired with M l carbine bullets and 9
grains of No. 2400 spread out to 10" at 100
yards. But the longer bullets fired with
heavier charges did fairly well. The 150
grain army slug shot into 3", using 10 grains
of No. 2400. The cast .32/20 Lyman bullet,
No. 311316, did just as well with 12 grains
of No. 4759. None of them justified the
use of the Unertl 12x Ultra Varmint scope,
as this was certainly no woodchuck gun.
Cases began to stick when I had worked
up to 15 grains of No. 2400 with 110 grain
and heavier bullets, but the extractorejector system on the little Martini handled lighter charges without trouble, snapping the empties out like a high-class scattergun.
I still haven't finished all the work I
want to do with the .30/357. In a barrel
with a 12" or even 14" twist, I'm sure its
accuracy as a rifle cartridge would be greatly
improved with the lighter bullets such as
Joyce Hornady's 110 grain spire point. The
little Martini shows considerable promise
as an inexpensive, lightweight rifle for the
cartridge.
But the .30/357 was designed specifically
for use in handguns, and even the limited
experience I've had. with i t has convinced
me that it's worth working on. There is a
definite trend today toward high performance short guns, started by the .357 Atomic
and the new .4'4 S&W Magnum. The J.
Kimball Arms Company is producing an
MULTI-TARGET HOLDER
automatic pistol to shoot GI carbine amV. S. Patent No. 2.722.420
For all SHOOTERS, including ARCHERS.
munition, and it is logical to assume that
Proof against sudden winds, and made to
they'll be looking at other potent cartridges
last a lifetime. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR YOUR MONEY BACK.
to add to their line. After further refine. . ..... .. .... .$10.00
Postpaid
ment, particularly with the new ball powders,
Write far free brochure TODAY
the .30/357 wildcat may be a natural for
T. H. ADAMSON Dept. GI, Buffalo, Wyo.
such a handgun as the Kimball.
The search goes on by independent ex"OSIER" SHOOTING ACCESSORIES perimenters for the flatter, hotter, more
A complete line of all types of shooting equipment,
efficient cartridges demanded by target
including surplus shooting mats that retail at half
the price of other mats on the market. Mail orders
shooter, varmint bug and big game hunter
filled D. ~ O-~ D. ~ Y .
alike. In thousands of basement workshops
Write for free literature and wines.
Dealer Inquiries Invited
~ e p t .S.R.
all over the country, handloaders who are
Llanerch Gun Shop 2 ~ ~ ~ ~ doctors,
;
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p
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spending their evenings reshaping brass,
weighing and recording powder charges
NEW ILLUSTRATED BOOK live* m~-to.date WMS
and putting together new wildcats.
nf over 2 060 Amerloan ~lçtolÃ
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m m m&. modal tram Illntlaek thruih mtamntla.
The odds are that none of them will come
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Free catalogue of gun boots.
Weatherby's new .378 Magnum, more acP I O N E E R PRESS, Harriman, ~ennessee
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from brass easier to get than .30-'06, but
R.W.S. P R I M E R A N D B R A S S don't be too darned sure of it. Many of
yesterday's wild ideas are today's standards.
6.5 Jap. 6.5 Carcano. 6.5 M. S. Brass. $9.75
Per 100. Primers. Large Rifle, Small Rifle,
The "pocket rifles" and "pistol carbines"
Small Pistol $2.24 per 250. Loaded 6.5 Jap.
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J. DEWEY GUN CO.
East Hampton
Connecticut
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Extended by popular request until August 1st.
Any .25 or 6.5m/m to 7m/m $12.50
Rebarreling and Custom Specialists
Send gun to: PACIFIC FIREARMS
1517 N. Gardner, Hollywood 46, Calif.
Send 25c, refundable, for price lists and brochures
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G. T. SMILEY COMPANY
158 Kellie Lane
54
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CARTRIDGES
(Continued from Page 47)
and rifle combinations, or some sort of an
early .410 gauge, the dealer could not tell me.
The most common caliber headstamp of
these was either "44-40" or "44 WCF" for
Winchester Center Fire. One early English
cartridge company merely marked them
"N.A. Winchester" showing the popular identification of the makes with the caliber. The
middle headstamp is interesting for two reasons. It was the type employed by other
companies who apparently thought they were
giving Winchester too much advertising by
calling it "W.C.F.," so reversed the procedure to put Winchester last. Also this cartridge is by a little known. company, the
FOR YOUR HANDGUNS
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MORE KILLING POWER
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PROT-X-BORE BULLETS combine a lead
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DIES AVAILABLE.
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This "C.F.W." is often thought to be a
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hut it was employed by several different companies. The headstamp at the right, while
not a .44-4'0, is my most interesting example
of a misprint. This cartridge was made by
Dominion Cartridge Co. of Canada, and
should read "D.C.Co 44 Colt." Such mistakes
sometimes happen in the factories, but it is
seldom that any slip by the inspectors and
appear on the market.
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1
OUTSHOOT THE RUSSIANS
'
(Continued front Page 32)
Joe is a critter of moderate habits. Besides a penchant for 32-ounce steaks and
French fries washed down hy a schooner or
two of suds, he is gken to the early-to-bed
and late-to-rise routine. And not forgetting a
two-hour siesta in mid-day. The night life
is not for our boy and although he is an
old Army gambler and can d.0 things with
coin or card that would baffle a working
sleight-of-hand sharpie, he cannot be inveigled to poker or other lightsome pursuits
when there is powder to be burned.
He is the most popular gunner on the
field when tournament play commences. This
is attributable to a philosophy of good will
and cheerful enthusiasm for his fellow man.
"You've got to have a happy heart to win,"
says our Arkansan. Joe gives with a hearty
interest of his time and advice if it is asked.
Probably no one knows more about pistol
pointing than he. I have yet to see him
register impatience over the dumb questions
and requests fired hy the hordes of recruit
gunners who engulf him at every bigtime
bangfest.
Benner practices a lot. He says he does
not but that's for the birds. He shoots four
or five times weekly and maintains this pace
yearlong. He goes to the range and it matters not whether he is with fellow team
members or is alone. He commences with
the 22 pistol and works through this pipsqueak to the 38 revolver, winding up with
his No. 1 love, the 45 Auto.
He first bangs out his 50-yard slow fire
with the 22. Ordinarily his 50-yard work
is topnotch so he fires no more than 20
shots. Then he goes forward and wrings
out 20 rounds timed fire, 25 yards. This is
followed by some 30-40 shots rapid fire.
The 22 is then put aside and pretty much the
k
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ACCESSORXES
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FRANK MITTERMEIER
111
[
T h e d e m a n d for these world f a m o u s h a n d m a d e
knives h a s become so g r e a t t h a t a t present I'm
several m o n t h s behind in deliveries. However I
refuse t o lessen t h e i r q u a l i t y b y mass p r o d u c t i i n .
Y o u r patience w i l l n o t g o unrewarded.
Send 2W f o r descriptions, prices a n d instructive
manual. 5 W for f i g h t i n g k n i f e booklet.
W. D. RANDALL, JR., B o x 1988-G, Orlando, Fla,
Hz&e;rs
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same routine follows with the center-fire 38.
Again 20 shots are slowly and carefully
squeezed off at 50 yards. Maybe a third
10 shots will be added. Then he comes UD
to 25 and the timed and rapid get about
the same treatment as did the 22. This
done he trudges back for the third time
to 50 and goes over the course as many as
three times with the big 45.
After that-Joe keeps no written scoreshe ponders his weak ranges and offbeat
totals. Maybe his 22 is down a point or two
at 50 yards. This means a repeat of 10
or 20 shots. Or possibly the 38 was not as
hot as he thinks it should be. More shooting is in order.
But more than any of his guns, Benner
scrutinizes his across-the-board ~erformance
with the Model of 1911. If the
45 show;
any sourness anywhere along the route,
whether at 50 yards slow, or at 25 yards
timed, or rapid, he immediately retraces his
steps and works on that particular stage
until it shows improvement.
Benner is the soul of deliberation on the
match range. He cannot be hurried; neither
is he ever tardy. A firing line is yet t?
await on him. He fires every shot at 50
yards with extreme care, using up all his
allowable time without fail. It is common
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to see him aim for a very long period, take
the gun down, resting it on the bench before him without ever changing the grip,
and after what seem to be minutes again
lift the piece and recommence 'his aim.
He fires his 20-second timed fire in the
same manner. It is easy to pop off the
string in 15 seconds but Joe doesn't do ,that.
He accepts the rule book literally; it says
the gunner has a full 20 seconds so Joe uses
it all.
The 10-second rapid fire puts ants in the
pant? of every coach who endeavors to follow little Roll0 through this bang'em-out
stage. He does not finish in 8% or even
9% seconds; he uses 'em all. With the fate
of a national championship depending on
wringing every last point out of anchor-man
Benner-and black failure riding his muzzle
should he get a hair's breath too slow and
thus not get his 10th round out-he will loop
in the final bullseye just as the target is
disappearing.
Our champ suffers from buck ague on
rare occasions. When he does, he may take
a single bottle of beer although it has been
my feeling he does this more to fill the
vast recesses of that puncheon that passes
for his upper gut. When the butterflies
commence to flutter, Benner simply works
a sort of self-hypnosis on himself. He looks
down at the target and is mesmerized. He
glances at that blob of black so neatly centered on the square of white and his onetrack mind is shunted, onto the shooting
mainline. It doesn't swerve or miss a curve
until the tenth and last shot has been pitched.
He never lets the final score enter his
head, never calculates what the other champions are doing to either flank, never works
on anything save the immediate shot. He
has a self-concentration that permits him
to put everything out of his brain save the
mechanics of how to pour each bullet into
the center ring. Working his way, as he
does, shot by shot, the final total takes care
of itself.
Of course, the fact that he has vanquished
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every leading handgunner in the country
literally scores of time doesn't do his confidence any harm either.
The Benner battery is notable of inspection. The 22 is a venerahle Colt Match
Target of the vintage of 1938. It was company property, not Colt Company, don't misunderstand, but the equipment of a company of soldiers of whom Joe was a member.
Just how he acquired the weapon is lost
in antiquity but probably some friendly supply sergeant made him a present of it. The
pistol went out to the late D. W. King, when
he was jefe of the King Gunsight Co. (now
the Rickey' Co.), and the old man affixed
a tubular barrel weight and implaced a Kingraised ventilated rib and click-adjusting rear
sight. The front patridge is %-inch and
undercut. Joe equipped this Woodsman as
he does all his shooting irons with a Lew
Sanderson stock.
A year or so ago he wrote Col. Milt Hicks,
then sales manager for Colt, and complained
that after a couple of hundred thousand shots
he thought the venerahle Match Target was
beginning to slip and would Colt put on a
new barrel. Milt got the Benner prize and
had the chamber and barrel very painstakingly miked. It was found to be perfect as
to standard dimensions. He sent the weapon
back to Joe with a full account of the micrometer reading and other tests done by Colt
to be sure the pistol had lost none of its
wizardy. I t hasn't heen back since.
Joe yearly wins a dozen or more new
handguns. These he never fires. He has
a spare 22 auto hut he packs it along solely
as an emergency number should old Bacon-
Gitter fold up. It never has. Annually the
gun makes a trek to Berdon, the Florida
pistol-whiz, and is completely tuned.
The Benner 38 is a far-from-new Colt
Officers Model. It has a King raised ventilated rib but a Micro sight instead of the
King adjustable. The front sight is %-inch,
undercut. It has a short action installed
by Berdon and a set of Sanderson grips.
There is a wide trigger shoe and a rather
heavy trigger pull. Joe keeps his triggers
on the hard side. He runs no risk of a
trigger going soft and failing to stand during the weighing-in ceremonies. There is
always a second 38 OM in the baggage
just in case the old favorite might throw
a rod.
The 45 is a straight Berdon work-over.
It has the so-called "Berdon mouse trap"
in it. This is a device which is spring
actuated and forces the barrel into the top
of the slide, thus very firmly seating barrel
lugs into slide grooves. This rather simple
device assures a most superior degree of
accuracy. The 45 has a set of Micro sights:
%-inch, and the inevitable Sanderson-grips.
So amazing is the skill of our boy wonder,
he shoots this Model 1911 just like the 22
Woodsman. During the Coral Gables championships, he averaged 293 out of 300 some
nine times over the National course, this
with 22, 38 and 45.
Benner shoots Western Super Match in
the 22, the same brand in the 38. With
the 45 Auto he may either fire reloads across
the board or a combination of reload at 50
yards and Remington wadcutters at the timed
and rapid fire, 25 yards.
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HOW I'M TRAINING FOR THE OLYMPICS
(Continued from Page 33)
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N e w Y o r k 16
I used to think that age was one of the
most important things in shooting and, after
I reached my "prime," I could see myself
in my mind's eye slowly declining in scores
the older I got. But after I saw UUman,
who is about 60, I realized that training,
fitness, and self-control are just as important,
if not mom so than the age factor alone.
Because of this, my training will be as
rigorous as a boxer who is getting ready
for a championship bout, and I intend to
be as physically fit as possible.
To allow every individual the greatest
possible margin in the meet, each man will
be allowed to fire 60 rounds in three hours
-plenty of time to make your best showing
in precision firing. If you have ever held
your hand outstretched for a few minutes,
you can realize some of the muscular strain
a shooter goes through. You must accustom yourself to it and it is necessary to
train to do this.
Another point that I find important is my
mental attitude. I know, for instance, that
since I have won before, I will actually
add another hurdle for me to cross, for more
will be expected, of me. I don't mean this
to sound like bragging, but it is a cold fact.
I am aware that it is humanly impossible
to shoot a perfect score on the range (fifty
meters-that is, 54 yards and one foot-at
a bullseye a bit larger than a half dollar)
but I've still got to better my previous scores.
One thing in my favor is the wonderful
cooperation from the spectators at the Olym-
pics. They, like the competitors, are the
best in the world. For example, when the ,
going gets really tight and a shooter needs
nothing to distract him, you can hear a pin a
drop-until the shot is fired. Then you've :
got to shout to make yourself heard. With .
that sort of sportsmanship a man can do '
nothing hut shoot his best.
I think too, that a man must he aware of
his capabilities and have confidence in him- . ,
self. At the free pistol meets, the' best score
will probably range about 560-565. At times
some people can do better than they are
really capable, but in the Olympics, you
can't count on this kind of thing. I musttrain myself to maintain a consistently good
average every time I go out, and the only
way I can accomplish this is through training.
This match will not he between teams but
individuals-two from each of the 32 nations
participating. It is hard on the nerves and
demands great self-control. Every shot is
going to count. I will use a -22 caliber
Hammerli pistol-a gun I have great confidence in and one with which I am very
familiar. If I don't make top shuwing, it
won't be the gun's fault.
All service contestants are scheduled to
go down to Fort Benning for eliminations this
summer. Here, at West Point, where I am
stationed, I am going to work up on the
outdoor range out of a little booth I am
building to shut off the wind. At first, I
will maintain a three-day schedule and try
and duplicate what I expect to find in
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WHAT'S WRONG WITH PIGEON SHOOTING
^
(Continued from Page 20)
PATTERN
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bird which can be retrieved is considered
i "dead" bird on the score sheet. The averige contest on live pigeons is a 25 bird "race"
ind a typical winning score is 23 or 24 out of
25. Twenty-five "straights" are rare under
nodern handicapping systems and an averige of 90 percent is considered very good.
Sometimes "miss-and-out" races are held
and in this type of a match, contestants are
eliminated as they miss. The winner is the
last one still shooting without a lost bird.
From a pressure standpoint, this type of
contest is the most difficult. To give you an
idea of how difficult it sometimes becomes,
ince I won such a "miss-and-out" race in San
Remo, Italy, over a field of about 150 shootsrs by killing only five birds. It was a terrifically windy day and almost half of the
entry lost their first bird. By the end of the
second bird, the entry list had shrunk down
to about 35, was down to 11 on the fourth
bird and I was the only one able to kill the
fifth and thus was the winner.
Luck plays a big part in winning a pigeon
match. I'd guess that luck in the draw is
about 10 to 20 per cent of it to the topflight
shooters, and the balance is shooting ability.
There are some birds which any shooter can
kill consistently but there are others that no
shooter can kill. The bird that twists and,
dives, outguessing both barrels of the shooter,
is an impossible bird to kill unless the
shooter were to mis-point or lose his timing.
This is what makes a live pigeon shoot such
an exciting form of shooting. This, plus the
fact that the pigeon has a natural will to
live, and will exert every effort to make it
o'ver the boundary fence, even while dying,
makes it even more difficult.
To score a "dead bird" in skeet or trap,
all you have to do is knock a chip off a
target-not" so in the pigeon ring, as here
you have to literally load and break the
pigeon down with a concentration of shot
heavy enough to either kill it or break its
wings so that it cannot fly out. A pigeon
can carry a lot of lead and still fly.
I'll cite as an example one which cost me a
lot of money in a Cuban tournament many
years ago. I drew a "driver" (fast-flying
bird, low to the ground, and heading straight
away from the shooter) from the center trap.
Although I centered him in both patterns
shot from my super full-choke 12 gauge, this
bird, hit so hard that both loads tumbled
him on the ground, was able to fly up and
over the fence to fall dead, on the outside.
I had the bird retrieved and picked it of
all feathers to see where it was hit and how
many pieces of shot had struck it. Examination revealed that 18 pieces of #7% shot
had found their way into the bird, most of
them striking it around the tail, while one
piece had cut a groove in the top of the
head almost to the skull. Despite all of this,
the bird was able to make it over the fence.
Had even one piece of shot broken a wing
bone, it would have been a score on the
score sheet and would have saved me several
hundred dollars in prize money. Shoot your
shotgun at a piece of paper at 40 yards and
you'll see why such "drivers" can escape.
The wing bone of a pigeon is pretty small,
and shooting at a bird flying straight away
from you is like trying to hit a flying razor
blade.
Normal procedure in pigeon shooting is
for the shooter to take his place at his assigned yardage on the walk facing the traps.
Then he loads his gun with two shells
(usually 1% oz. of shot is used and in size
7% or 8), asks the puller if he is ready,
places gun at shoulder and calls "pull"
when the bird is wanted. The puller springs
one of five traps to release the bird. The
articular trap is selected by rolling dice, by
an electrical selector, or sometimes by a
mechanical wheel-the shooter never knows
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KOLPIN BROS. C O . INC., DEPT. G, BERLIN, W I S C O N S I N
which trap is going to open.
To make sure birds fly immediately, modern gun clubs have compressed air jets installed in the traps directly below where
the bird stands. When the trap opens, the
blast of air is released simultaneously so
that if the bird has not flown, the air will
literally blast it into flight. In addition, a
rubber hose about 18 inches long and attached to the compressed air line, is mounted
in front of the trap. When the air pressure
hits this hose, it writhes like a snake and
scares the bird into immediate flight.
The shooter then attempts to kill the bird
as swiftly as he can, before the bird can
achieve full speed or get so high in the air
that even if killed stone dead, it will fall
outside the boundary fence. Double-barreled
guns are most popular, with superposed guns
being the most common type.
Several factors make live pigeon shooting
difficult. One is the unknown trap factor.
Another is the spacing of the traps. They
are so far apart that they defy the average
person's spread of vision to encompass them
all at one time. The two end traps are almost
always slightly out of focus so that birds
starting from them are always a blur. Toughest and most feared birds are "drivers" from
any trap or birds from the two end traps
that cut in towards the center of the ring
and then turn out away from the shooter.
The latter type feints the shooter out oi
position for both shots. The first shot is
usually wild because the shooter is swinging
his gun in the opposite direction from the
flight of the bird and when he attempts tc
move his gun back to the proper direction oi
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swing, the bird changes course just in time
to louse up the point again. I've seen more
birds of this type lost than any other kind
and it affects the champion as well as the
beginner.
I've watched many fine field shots and
top tournament trap and skeet shots make
their first attempt a t live pigeon shooting.
I t is always a shock to them that they are
not shooting so hot on the first round.
I can remember my own first experience
at this type of shooting. I was sure I'd murder them all but when I called "Pull" for
the first time, all I saw was a blur of thrashing wings zig-zagging away from the ivory
bead on my gun barrel. I never once was
able to put the bead where I wanted to or
set up any kind of a smooth swing. I had a
lot of trouble learning how much lead they
took, too. The lead used on trap and skeet
targets was far too short. The longer I shot,
the more confused I became until I suddenly
realized that there was no particular pattern
to follow in shooting pigeons. Shooting had
to be instinctive. From then on my scores
got better. Now I find that the best way to
go at pigeon shooting is to walk out on the
yardage mark, shoulder my gtin, make sure
my vision is spread as wide as it will go and
my concentration is on the first moving object. Then I call "Pull" without giving any
consideration to what I might draw. My
shooting then becomes instinctive and I let
my reflexes do the swinging and trigger
pulling.
Any time I try to kill a bird in any set
way, I get into trouble. You cannot arbitrarily say you'll point out the next bird; it
may be a driver that you have to snap two
shots at. Worse yet, you can't say you'll
snap at the next bird for it may be a sitter
or an "incomer" that floats lazily in towards
you and requires accurate pointing. It is a
nerve-wracking sport and no cinch to be
sure.
Many consider live pigeon shooting the
toughest competitive sport in the world.
.-
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When you consider that one slight mistake
takes you out of the competition in most big
events, this becomes understandable. Pressure grows and grows as the matches progress and the pigeon doesn't help you. He is
always a variable that you cannot predict.
I n a golf tournament the golfer has only to
make his reflexes and coordination work
properly and he can drive the ball wherever
he wishes. In pigeon shooting, his reflexes
and coordination must be perfect, too, but in
addition, he has wind and an unpredictable
live thing to shoot at-a thing which, even
if shot perfectly, may carry the load outside
the ring to ruin a score.
Nothing but years of practice will season
a pigeon shooter. Practice outside of competition does not help for there is no pressure. Pigeon shooters who consistently .do
well are those who follow the tournaments
and do their practicing under pressure in
matches. What makes it toughest is that
there is no way for the shooter to correct
himself as he goes along, just as there is no
way to practice a shot over again-no two
pigeons fly alike.
There is a certain kind of shot I have
drawn at live pigeon shoots which I have
never been able to kill. Even drawing this
same type of shot several times, I have almost always missed it. This one is the-bird
that cuts in towards the center of the ring
from an end trap, flying just above the
ground, but turning up and out just a few
feet from the trap.
My first barrel usually misses because I'm
swinging too fast to stop when I get to this
bird moving towards my gun. My second
barrel is wasted usually because the bird
climbs out of my pattern. All the thinking
and practice in the world cannot prepare
me for this particular bird. I t is rather
like practicing for a parachute jump. The
chute has to open the first time or all is
lost.
We faced the same unpredictable probler
in the Air Force gunnery schools where
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instructed, during the war. Our gunners
were filled with theory and practice on
everything but an attacking enemy airplane.
We had nothing to show our students that
would give them this experience. Some experimentation was done near the end of the
war using frangible plastic bullets shot
against armored attacking planes but even
with armor and destructible bullets, we shot
down some of our target planes and the
plan never became too feasible.
The pigeon shooter, too, just has to develop a shooting style out of experience, developing confidence in his own reflexes, leading to an ability to cope with any bird. he
draws.
If you think a pitcher on the mound at a
World series game is under pressure, you
ought to shoot in a match like the championship of the world where every shot can
mean elimination. There is nobody around
to help you and you are facing a pigeon that
wants to live and will do everything in its
power to elude your shot string. Couple all
this with the prize money at stake, the esprit
de corps of your team mates, and the pressure placed on your shoulders by the betting
spectators, and you have a sport unexcelled
for thrills.
The bigtime championship of the world
competition goes something like this. You
pick up your gun in the armory, located in
the basement of the club and walk up and out
into the arena. The clubhouse is several
stories high and is curved to surround the
back of the pigeon ring. Hundreds of spectators line the railing around the ring and
watch through the windows above.
boundary fence edging the arena is stark
white staring you in the face with the five
small traps mid-distance between. The
handicap walk you stand upon is carpeted.
As you wait for the traps to be loaded, the
clubhouse is buzzing with the chatter of the
bettors and spectators. When the traps are
loaded and the pigeon boys run back, you
slip two shells into your gun and call out
"trapper ready?" Instantly, just as though
a huge switch had been pulled, all sound
ceases in the clubhouse. You raise your gun
to your shoulder and call "pull."
The metal trap explodes open with a
"clang" that can be heard for blocks and
out of t h e corner of your eye, you see a
blurred, feathery object streaking downwind
towards the fence. You literally throw the
gun after it, jerk the trigger once, and then
again through the smoke of the first shot. I t
is not until then that you know for sure if
you have put the gun in the right place. If
you did, your bird. will be lying up against
the fence and the crowd will be applauding.
If you didn't, don't be downhearted as maybe i t wasn't your shooting that caused you
to miss. You'll never know for sure though
- t h a t ' s pigeon shooting.
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PRODUCTS
COMPANY
I E W I S I O N , IDAHO
I
THE OLDEST NAME I N GUNS COMES BACK
(Continued from Page 27)
The Ideal Gift for
the Hunter in Your Family
Unsightly notches on your gunstock tell
on1 part of the story. The hunter who is
r e a h proud of his skill uses solid gold or
silver "STUDS" that show the head and
name of the actual game killed. "STUDS"
are beautifully embossed game heads that
are permanent, easy to use and enrich the
appearance of your gunstock.
Ask for "STUDS" at yvur dealer. I f he
can't supply you, order direct and include
your dealers name and address.
"STUDS" are available I n these 18 popular game head designs i n either 10-k
gold a t $3.00 each, or Sterling silver
a t $1.25 each. Federal T a x included.
ELK
DEER
BROWN BEAR
BEAR
WOLF GRIZZLY BEAR
MOOSE TURKEY MOUNTAIN COAT
CARIBOU COYOTE MOUNTAIN SHEEP
ANTELOPE
CAT (Panther)
JAVALINA
BLACK TAIL DEER
MULE DEER SKUNK (a good gag)
DEALERS WANTED -Cash
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national advertisin that's creating
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STUDS:.
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Other Low Cost Phones and Wire Available.
LORIS SALES P. 0. BOX
least confused. But during the war there
was no chance to prepare more than models
and drawings of new pistols.
When Hillberg went to High Standard at
the end of the war, he plunged into the thick
of small arms designing. As head of research
and development, he had much to do coordinating the ideas of the engineers, Sears
representatives and High Standard sales
people. Along with the regular High Standard pistols which came out in the post-war
years were many new designs especially for
the J. C. Higgins line of Sears, Roebuck
guns. Leaving H-S for the Bellmore Johnson
Tool Co. was the next step for Bob, who
eventually arrived at a point which any idea
man reaches sooner or later-sink or swim
he was pretty much on his own.
Bellmore Johnson is a name unknown outside the gun industry. Within the business,
B-J makes tools for production and builds
experimental firearms from pocket pistols to
aircraft cannon for private firms, inventors
and government agencies. At Bellmore Johnson, Bob finally had a chance to work on
some of his pet ideas. The sleek, racy, modernly-styled Whitney emerged at Bellmore
Johnson, of which Whitney is a subsidiary.
The Whitney is a truly new design, developed in the late spring of 1954 at Bellmore Johnson, but behind it are principles
as old as the original guns of Eli Whitney.
"Low tooling and. manufacturing costs aimed
at a greatly reduced urice sales potential. . ."
proclaimed a ~ e l l m u r e~ o h n s i npromotion
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booklet on the gun. Whitney would ha
paraphrased it, "I find I must get up m
tools to make all the gun locks alike. else
cannot complete my contract." ,
There is a surprising kinship between the
latest pistol to bear the name, and the first
Whitney handgun. Constructed about 1849,
the first Whitney revolver was designed f o r
low manufacturing cost, yet for serviceability.
Casting the frame of the first Whitney permitted the graceful handle shape of the
"pepperbox" style of gun, instead of the
angular, expensive methods of fabricating the
regular Colt pistol handle.
Casting has proved good, for today's needs,
too. "This type of (cast aluminum frame)
construction," explains the Bellmore Johnson booklet, "enabled the Trimatic-Whitney
to have the bulk and solidness of a gun so
absent with the sheet metal construction and
at a considerable cost saving. It also enabled
many noteworthy style variances hitherto impossible with practical machining methods
on solid forgings, thus enhancing the graceful contour lines." The Trimatic-Whitney is
"modern as tomorrow," but it reflects Hillber's studies of yesterday.
Like other imaginative firms, Whitney feels
that American pistols have been built to
obsolescent patterns. "Progress in pistol design and styling has just about stood still.
We have new dishwashers, refrigerators, cars,
even railroads, but many guns built today
are
30 years behind the times," explains
-- -berg.
There is nothing original in this idea, but
Hillberg is in the enviable position of finally
being able to do something about it. Starting
from scratch, without factory, machines, sales
or work force or materials, their high standing in the industry enabled Bellmore Johnson
to raise the capital necessary. This was the
start of Whitney Firearms Co., makers of a
pistol which is at once serviceable in its
category of sport .22, competitively priced,
and eye-catching. In fact, it looks like nothing else in this world,.
"I know of designs which have been turned
down by gun companies today solely on the
basis of their appearance," said Hillberg.
This is understandable, for the firearms industry is so traditional that many have accused it of stagnation. Whitney is out to see
if something new can be done about conservatism in firearms styling.
The Whitney's graceful moulded contours
make it seem to fly while standing still. By
using a die-cast receiver, tricky shapes can
be made without costly machining.
One leading handgun maker used. to widely
publicize the fact that their guns were literally "carved from solid steel." The frame
forging weighed 40 ounces; after drilling,
turning and milling, the frame weighed 13.
The Whitney's new design avoids such a fundamental absurdity. Except for slight trimming the Whitney receiver is almost as it
comes from the mould. I t encloses barrel,
bolt, moving slide, and all firing parts.
Most automatic pistols have straight magazine wells. In the Whitney the side walls are
tapered. This makes the clip very easy to
insert without fumbling. Its magazine is the
best designed clip in a handgun today.
Magazine feed is the heart of successful
automatic pistol operation.
The tiny .22 rimfire is one of the worst
offenders as far as feed goes, jamming on
the rims and battering the soft bullets. Yet
a jamproof .22 clip is well-nigh impossible,
but the Whitney approaches the impossible.
On chambering the first shot the slick breech
operation of the Whitney is so free from any
resistance that I opened the bolt to see if it
had picked up a cartridge. I t had, but the
feed seems frictionless. The case bodies rest
parallel, with the clip wider at the back than
front and the rims staggered, making the
feed as easy as with a rimless round. Since
1908 designers have tried to solve the problem of a rimmed case in an automatic; the
new Whitney is the solution.
There is no bullet guide ramp, source of
much .22 difficulty, on the barrel. Instead,
the barrel is faced off and the bullet guide
is built into the clip. Proving the "reliability
with economy" idea, this design is cheaper
yet better than usual designs. Unlike most
other .22's, the Whitney clip can easily be
disassembled for cleaning.
Aluminum frame pistols like the Whitney
have an inherent problem of battering. The
harder steel parts slamming against the
softer alloy will hammer and damage it. But
the Whitney is a little different. When the
shell is fired, the bolt throws back. Crosswise through the bolt is a large pin, which
fastens i t to the tubular slide. The slide surrounds the barrel and is narrowed at the
front end. Between slide construction and a
flange around the rear of the barrel is the
recoil spring. All these parts assemble from
the back inside the tubular-topped receiver,
and the barrel muzzle is fastened to the receiver by a plunger-locked sleeve or bushing.
The stresses of firing are carried through the
recoil spring to the barrel flange, up the
flange to the muzzle bushing, and from the
muzzle bushing to the entire frame structure.
What started out as a slam-bang battering
ends up as a force applied to the aluminum
frame in compression.
The practical strength of the Whitney
frame with the artistic ribs and curves is
enormous, more than enough for higherpowered cartridges. The early TrimaticWhitney fired 200 proof loads and 40,000
regular shots without any damage or significant wear.
Asked if the Whitney would be made in
larger calibers, Hillberg replied: '!No comment." Expanding on his inability to sav
yes or no, Bob acknowledged that there were
Whitney experimental models in other calibers, some of them locked breech types. A
target model .22 "will definitely be available." Although there is no model yet established, Hillberg's first thoughts on target
pistols were set forth in the Trimatic promotional booklet. The basic pistol was shown
with target sights, and a zoot-suit muzzle
brake which did double duty as a muzzle
bushing.
The basic Whitney model has a wide rear
sight pad and Micro or other conventional.
target sights could easily be mounted. But
"conventional" is a four-letter word around
the Whitney shop. "A brand new target gun,
and many new ideas" are in the works at
Whitney. Hillberg has always liked the
double action system, especially for pocket
defense autos and large military pistols. As
for a bigger caliber on the Whitney, it is
easy to see a .38 Special, maybe a wad-
Complete color brochure sent free on
request. Contains all information and.
ordering instructions.
HERRETT'S
FIELD MODELS OR
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STOCKS
Custom fitted to the exact needs of your
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DETECTIVE
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BOX 741-G, TWIN FALLS. IDAHO
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8
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itter, on that frame. The peculiar Whitney
ssign would allow a rotating barrel lock to
i built into the sleek, overall styling.
The innovations introduced by Hillberg
ay make later generations of arms designers
id sportsmen look back on this year as of
[ual significance to the day so long ago in
'98 when Eli Whitney, founder of the origa1 Whitney Arms company, pioneered
terchangeable assemblies in firearms proiction. Whitney had invented and built
any cotton cleaning engines as well as his
mow cotton gin, but patent infringers had
imaged his business. Owning a factory with
.illed workmen, but no product, Whitney
Fered his services to the government. He
cured a contract for U. S. muskets after
e French Charleville pattern and set up
s shop to make guns.
In those days of laborious hand filing and
dividual fitting of parts into a whole gun,
hitney found himself up against a deadie of delivery to the ordnance department.
e could not meet it by old-fashioned ways
manufacturing and still make a profit.
nder these conditions, begging delay and
:ferment from the ordnance officers, Whit:y hit upon the interchangeable parts idea.
In those days basic cause of disabling a
usket in the field was failure of the lock to
~ r k . A spring might break, the cock face
ack against the battery, or some damage
:cur to the sear inside. Repair was imissible in the field. Parts were so indidual that they required hand fitting with
file and only a skilled armorer could restore
e gun to service. In 1717 and again in 1765
xnch ordnance officers had experimented
ith interchangeable parts, but with little
.ccess because they did not have the malines to turn them out uniformly.
When Eli Whitney came upon the scene,
s solution to the problem was so fundaental that it changed the whole course of
e industrial revolution. Whitney's use of
terchangeable p a r t s a n d assemblies
amounted in his day to a philosophical principle, a way of thinking which no one before
him had ever followed successfully. Whitney
not only designed interchangeable parts for
his gun locks and, made the lock plates interchangeable from musket to musket, but
he designed and built the machines to produce these parts to close tolerances.
Whitney's invention of the milling machine
and other tools basic to modern manufacturing production have earned him a permanent
place in America's hall of fame. Small wonder, then, that when several enterprising
young men of New Haven decided to make
guns in 1956, they took as the name of their
firm the oldest name in guns. By assuming
the name "Whitney Firearms, Inc.," the
newest gunmaker is out to lay claim to the
most significant industrial trademark which
has ever appeared on a gun.
The old Whitney firm was a prime supplier
of contract muskets and rifles to the government from its beginning to the Civil War.
In the post-Civil War era, Whitney introduced lever-action repeating rifles and single
shot target rifles of fine quality. Lever action
rifles were the downfall of the firm, because
Winchester bought the company in 1887 and
the mark of Whitney disappeared from guns
for 70 years. Today the new Whitney company is out to make a name for itself with a
basic philosophy which is as radical now as
Whitney's interchangeable parts was in 1798.
Behind Whitney are some good ideas, but
Bob Hillburg disclaims the credit. "Remember this," he points out. "We are a new
company, but Whitney is right in the heart
of the gunmaking industry. We wanted to
build the factory on the exact site of the old
Whitney works, but the water company which
owns the property wouldn't sell what we
needed. So we contented ourselves by setting
up along the road not far away.
"Our employees have all been working in
the gun business for many years, and have
experience in all forms of gun manufactur-
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KRIECHOFF
MAUSERS
A Rifleman's Rifle-soon
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540 14 Broadway, Winnipeg
to 7MM and . 3 d
Other calibers on request. Many extra features as Standard Equipment.
AGENTS AND DEALERS WANTED
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That seems to be a good formula for success~progressiveideas; quality product in
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the ideas of Hillberg, guns made by Whitney
Firearms, the manufacturing know-how of
Bellmore Johnson, and the sales outlet of
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row," but Whitney is here today.
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HOLLYWOOD "TURRET"
RELOADING TOOLS. Shown
HOLLYWOOD "MICROMETER" SHOT MEASURE. Required for f a s t accurate
shotshell reloading -
$24.50
HOLLYWOOD "SENIOR"
RELOADING TOOL. Reloads
rifle. ~ i s t o l . shotshells
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$49.00
stripped
HOLLYWOOD "TURRET"
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for all caliber of rifle pistol and
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SWAGING DIES. From 22 to 375
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Per set
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I
Something New
IAe-
RABBITS CAN SHARPEN UP YOUR SHOOTING
-
(Continued from Page 39)
odge like a cottontail in a briar patch. In
hort, he's the rifleman's target par excelMice, a target with enough variety to interst the most discriminating shooter.
For the big-game hunter who wants to
now exactly what his favorite rifle will do
t all ranges, the jackrabbit affords an exellent target. Since the jack's usual balirick is open country, uninhabited sand and
age, the hunter can use his heavy rifle withut danger to livestock or humans. Here he
an pick off jackrabbits with his favorite
ig-game load, selecting his targets to simlate shots he might get while hunting.
On bunnies at long range he can shoot
rone from a knoll or a haystack to learn
i e trajectory of his rifle with any particular
lad. This type of shooting affords excellent
ractice in estimating both range and holdver. The normal sitting position can be
sed to take jacks at medium ranges. And
icking jackrabbits out of the sage will give
ie hunter the practice he needs on runing targets, teaching him to lead and swing
i t h them to score consistently.
Hunting woodchucks, prairie dogs, and
round squirrels makes a shooter a dead
hot on still game, but it takes the lanky,
)ng-legged jack rabbit to develop a good
11-around shot. In my opinion the jack
eads the long list of our varmints when it
omes to offering the biggest variety of in?resting targets.
Jackrabbits can be hunted successfully
pith any rifle from the .22 rimfire to the big
lagnums. Rifle choice is a matter of perma1 preference. Whether a shooter plinks
Â¥ita .22, hunts with an iron-sighted .30-30,
r uses a scope-sighted .300 Weatherby
lagnum, each will be found adequate within
s own range when hunting jacks. Rememer, however, that the .22 long rifle and the
igger calibers with heavy bullets are more
pt to richochet and these rifles should be
sed in the more sparsely settled districts.
For the hunter who wants an economical
fle for jackrabbits, an accurate, scopeghted .22 will fill the bill. The 37 grain
igh speed hollow point is a potent load. up
)
125-150 yards. Placed in the head or
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Goods to.
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,:
-
Brownsville,
Texas
f
chest cavity it will anchor jacks in their
tracks. And only head or chest shots should
be taken with the .22, for a gut-shot jackrabbit will run out of sight. Using a .22
in this manner will teach any big-game hunter enough about anatomy so that he will be
able to pin-point his shots accurately in vital
areas on any big-game he may b e after.
The .22 should be sighted-in to hit point
of aim at 75 yards. With this particular
sight setting the bullet will be 5" high at
25 yards, 1" high at 50 yards, 3" below point
of aim at 100 yards, 7" low at 125 yards, and
about 14" below point of aim at 150 yards.
The vital area of a sitting jackrabbit from
head to rib cage offers a target about 7"
high by 2%" wide. This means that a hunter .
armed with a .22 sighted-in as above could -4
hold dead-on at ranges up to 75 yards. At
100 yards a hold on the head would drop
the hollow point into the chest cavity. At
150 yards, the extreme accurate range of the c:
.22, it would be necessary to hold over about '
8".
On a recent hunt using a .22, my 11 yearold son and I were ~ e r c h e don the bank
of a ranch water tank overlooking a 75 acre
stand of alfalfa. On hunts like this we
have a practice of taking turns as the targets
present themselves, hit or miss. I happened
to be in the shooter's spot with the scopesighted .22 Model 75 Winchester.
"There's one, Dad!" Jimmie whispered,
pointing excitedly.
A big black-tailed jack was sitting upright on the edge of the alfalfa perhaps 150
yards away. I looked him over through the
scope and even at that distance he looked
big. From a solid sitting position I put the
crosshairs a good 8" above his head and
squeezed off the shot. The big jack took a
long, loose-legged jump and piled up, kicking. Upon examination we found that the
hollow point had taken him right between
the front legs as he sat facing us.
That jack rabbit "training" shot compares with a long shot at a big mule deer
across a canyon or high up in a mountain
meadow. Using a scope-sighted .30-06 and
150 grain handloads at about 2950 feet per
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N E W M E T H O D MFG. CO.
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I
EASILY INSTALLED A N D COMPLETELY INTERCHANGEABLE W I T H THE STOCK COLT SLIDE
For the first time in history K I N G offers a slide replacement for all Colt 22 automatics with smooth bolt action
leaving the rear sight in a permanent stationary position.
Precision:tooled AUTO-ACTION* equipped with K I N G
semi-rib sight, postage paid .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$45.00
State model or gun when ordering.
RICKY
GUNSIGHT
CO.
1017 California Drive, Dept. 64, Burlingame, Calif.
Manufacturers of King Gun Sights
'Pat.
Pending
-
INVITED
second. sighted to put the bullet on point
of aim at 200 yards. the bullet will be 1.8"
high at 100 yards. 2" low at 300 yards, and
about 14" low at 333 yards. A mule deer's
chest area is a target about 16" deep. To
put a 150 grain '06 bullet where it would
do the most good would require the crosshairs to be level with a deer's back at 300
yards and about 8" above that point at 333.
So my long shot with the 2 2 compares
favora])ly will1 many situations- one Can
expect while hunting big-game.
For areas where a ricochet would endanger people or livestock, and where the
heavy report of a .30-06 or a .270 might be
objectionable, one of the popular varmint
calibers is a better choice. A light flat
trajectory, high-velocity bullet that will
go to pieces on contact with the ground is
hard to beat for such shooting. The .22
Hornet, ,218 Bee. 2 2 2 Remington, .219
Zipper or Improved Zipper, .22-250, and
,220 Swift are among the more popular
loads. Any one of these calibers driving
a .22 soft point a t velocities from 2800 to
4000 feet per second will flatten a jackrabbit like a bomb. And the flat trajectory
of these calibers makes it possible to score
at longer ranges with minimum hold-over
to compensate for bullet drop.
Take the .222 Remington for example.
With a handload of 20.5 grains of 4198 and
50 grain l~ullet. my particular rifle will
group inside an inch at 100 yards and
around 2" at 200. Sighted in to put the
bullet an inch high at 100 yards. I find
that I can hold dead on a jackrabbit up
to 200 yards and not worry about bullet
drop. Out at 300 yards the 50 grain slug
is about 3" hclow point of aim. At this
range I put the crosshairs on the head of
a bunny facing me. knowing that the bullet
will drop into the chest cavity. On broad.
side shots a hold about an inch over the
rabbit's shoulders will put tlu' slug right
tl~roiigh the boiler room.
The jackrabbit is a mangy caricature of
a kangaroo wearing a pair of full-fledged
mule cars. His scrawny neck supports a long,
unattractive head that s ~ ~ o r t as pair of
large hug eyes which can see all around
him at once. Hi? wariness is one thing
that makes him a prime rifle target, and
unlike the lova1)le cottontail, lie hasn't a
friend in the world.
Extremely destructive to alfalfa, other
grains, and vegetables. the jackrabbit is a
pest. A couple of l11ingrY jacks in a dav
will consume as much forage as a good beel
sterr. Ranchers and farmers welcome care.
fill, well-behaved riflemen bent on redur.
ing the jackrabbit population.
"Hell. yes," said one irrigation farmer
when 1 first asked pern~ission to hunt
"shoot all the damn things. Right now
they're knocking the daylights out of mi
alfalfa. I figure those jacks cost me abou
10 tons a year. And with the price of bale<
alfalfa as high as it is right now that7:
more than a prime steer would bring."
The best times to hunt jackrabbits ari
during the last two hours of daylight an1
the first two after dawn. Being a nigh
forager, the jack leaves his scooped-out hol
low beneath some sage brush late in th.
afternoon and heads for his feeding grounds
This is the time of day when a good posi
tion near a handy alfalfa patch really pay
off.
L A N D CAROW SUPPORT
B.S.A. ,222 Short Action Field Rifle, with the
high comb, which has now completely proven
its ability in accuracy. Complete with Factory Sights . . .
$147.00
Parker-Hale Mounts for above
gun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
REELAND CAR-WINDOW
UPPORT, only . . . . . . . .$7.50
WELAND POPULAR BENCH
ZEST STAND, with
I sand b a g s . . . . . . . ..$20.00
Stith Mounts for above gun
........................
$20.00
B.S.A. 7MM and 257R Medium Action rifle with
continental stock, is a very fine rifle, complete
with f a c t o r y s i g h t s . Same
mounts as above applicable. .
$1 51.50
B.S.A. .22 Caliber Martini Target Rifle, either
in the light or heavy weight rifle, and made for
either right hand or left hand
shooters, with sights.. . . . . . .
$1 51.oo
FREELAND 3-Point Electronic Bedder.. . . . . . . . . . .$15.00
.50
Freeland Sling Keeper $1.25 Gun wiper.. ........
FREELAND ALL ANGLE TRIPOD,
mention scope . . . . . . . $14.95
COLT 357 Magnum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$89.50
S M I T H A N D WESSON H I G H W A Y PATROLMAN $85.00
H I G H STANDARD .22 Cal Sport King. . . . . . . . . . . . $43.75
RUGER SINGLE SIX, Light or Reg. W t . . . . . . . . . . . .$63.25
PACHMAYR PISTOL KITS, 4 gun model.. . . . . . .$29.50
L Y M A N ALL AMERICAN 4 X Scope. . . . . . . . . . . . .$49.50
UNERTL 20x54 Spotting Scope. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$64.00
FREELAND
Swiss Type
Palm Rest
$1 8.50
FREELAND
Regular
Palm Rest
$12.50
Complete outfitter to the shooter, reloader and hunter.
Send $7.00 for Catalogue, which is refunded on order of
$3.50 or more.
Wholesale to established dealers
3737 Fourteenth Avenue
Rock Island, Illinois
SENT YOU FREE!
1
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GUNS Magazine brings you the whole wide
and wonderful world of hunting and shooting. Contains superb illustrations of guns,
closeups of special shooting techniques,
gun care and handling.
1 GUNS MAGAZINE
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Otherwise YOU may
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I N A M E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
With daylight, jackrabbits migrate back
to the sage-brush where they rest during
the heat of the day. A good vantage point
overlooking a spot where the cultivated
fields meet the sage will produce some of
1
the best rifle shooting to be had. A haystack or the bank of a ranch water tank
within range of the feeding grounds will
Built to your own specifications in all standSINCE 1933
allow a rifleman to pick his targets.
ard fir most of the better wildcat calibers.
After the migration from the feeding
Enjoy the t h r i l l o f owning and shooting a 7MM Express 'AMERIgrounds has ceased, the next best bet is
CA'S GREATEST H U N T I N G RIFLE'. It is the original American
to stroll through the sage brush and kick
made Hi-Velocity 7 M M - a n d it packs a wallop and penetration
'em out. Some jacks will burst from cover
at the rifleman's feet offering excellent snap
t h a t will stop the toughest game in its tracks. Yet its recoil is so
shooting as they dodge through the scatmoderate t h a t women enjoy shooting this 7MM.
tered clumps of sage.
4 0 years experience in rifle buildins
2 3 years in our present shop
One of the fastest-running jacks is the
"antelope jackrabbit." This particular bunny
2 0 5 - G WEST I S L A Y STREET
gets his name from the smooth, fast gait
SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA
he employes, a run similiar to the floating
run of the pronghorn with whom he shares
the same range.
When this jackrabbit breaks from cover,
he gets up on his legs and really runs. His
fast gait, unlike the bounding run of other
bunnies, is level and smooth. This makes
the blacktail an excellent running target.
I
While the jackrabbit hasn't a friend in
the world, one is credited with saving a
man's life, in a round about way. Here
in the Southwest the story is told about
a young man with a full load of bar whiskey
The BEST 1 0 Go. M A G N U M We've ever offere
under his belt, who was doing his best
32" SOLID Chopper Lump barrels, full choke an
wrangle an inoffensive little cowpoke lean
Nitro Proved. Double purdey bolt and greener cross-bolt locking system. Engraved
ing up against a post in front of a stagi
action. French Walnut stocks. Finest Craftsmanshio bv Uaarteburu of Eibar. Wt.
stop. The cowboy was noticeably nettle(
opp. 1 1 Ibs. Limited supply only available during 1956. "ONLY $1 89.50.
but didn't want any trouble. Just about t h t
Prices subject to change without notice. (Discounts t o Dealers)
time the situation was due to get out of
hand, a mangy-looking jackrabbit left the
FRANK CLARK, JR.
shade of a cactus and headed for parts
(Life NRAÃ
Cheyenne, Wyo.
Box 2 9 7
unknown.
The cowboy's hand flicked down and came
up with his longbarreled Colt .45. I t bellowed once and the jackrabbit rolled end
over end. The young man gulped, turned
about three shades lighter, and was last
seen entering the afternoon stage cold sober.
Hunt the most exciting game animal in North America! There's
So that's the lanky, longlegged Western
{ no trophy like a giant Kodiak and no thrill equal to stalking one
jackrabbit-a reprobate that survives all efI
of these huge beasts
I
forts to eliminate him from his spot in
I
We are now reserving our fall hunts and '57 spring trips.
nature. Above all he's a target supreme for
Finest cruisers, camps, personnel and equipment. 25 years of
the rifleman. A target that offers more
guiding sportsmen assures you the utmost compentence and
variety for sharpening up the shooting eye
RESULTS!
I
than any of our other varmints. Take any
good rifle, find a good stand that overlooks
Air mail or wire for further details.
I
a handy alfalfa patch, get there during the
Â
first two hours of daylight and you'll be
BOX G-848
Kodiak, Alaska
@
~ e e e ~ a e e a m a ~ a m o o a a ~ ~ e m o o a o a e a a m a m @ @ ~ ~ ~ o o e ~ a a e e e e assured
o e e e of
e esport
e ~ aplenty.
CUSTOMBILT RIFLES
ROY CRADLE
FOR DUCKS & GEESE AT LONG RANGE
10 Go.
MAGNUMS!
I
1
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KODIAK
;
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. . . ::
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ALF MADSEN
:
EW UNIVERSAL
SCOPE MOUNT BASE
MADE TO FIT ALL
BUEHLER RINGS
...
windage
50 Minutes of Angle
Amazingly simple
gives a
positive elevation of 25 minutes of
angle as well as the usual windage.
FOR FULL IMFORMATION SEND TODAY
FOB NEW F'REE CATALOG No. 10-G
(OUR TENTH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE)
,
A
THE MACHINE GUN'S BAPTISM OF FIRE
(Continued from Page 36)
of his four guns, Missourian Parker used a
pair of mules. "Parker's Jackass Battery"
most of the troops called them as Parker's
men hacked a way for two days through
guerilla-infested Cuban jungles. They hoped
to lure the Spaniards into a Gatling ambush.
But no Spaniards appeared. Parker and his
men fretted with forced inactivity, and the
Gatlings stood abreast in a gun park, silent,
waiting.
Parker's Gatlings were Model 1895 weapons. With ten exposed, barrels, they were
mounted on high thin artillery wheels and
fairly heavy riveted iron carriages. Chambered for the rimmed .30-40 Krag cartridge,
the new Bruce feed was used. In rapid firing-and that was close to 1200 rounds per
minute, though 600 to 900 was most practical
-the older single column feed clips did not
supply cartridges fast enough to the barrels.
The new feed, permitted continuous firing if
enough ammunition was packed in the arsenal issue 20-shot boxes. With the tops torn
off and the rims exposed, the cartridges
could be stripped in a single motion into the
Bruce feed. Farther down the gravity-moved
column of cartridges became a single row,
on into the gun. Almost jamproof, the Bruce
feed made Parker's Gatlings fast-firing and
sure.
The gunners had good weapons, and cour-
age to match. And it sure took guts to
stand up with these high-silhouette baby
artillery pieces against the swift smokeless
fire of hidden 7mm Mauser-armed Spanish
snipers.
General "Fighting Joe" Wheeler had not
permitted Parker to mount his Gatlings to
cover Santiago, although the American army
held the town under siege. Scouts reported
that Spanish General Pando was marching
on Santiago with additional troops to reinforce 15,000 Spanish regulars already in the
city. General Shafter's corps had only 15,000
men and he decid,ed to strike while the odds
were even.
From the American artillery position on
El Pozo, observers had a clear view of the
town roughly 3,000 yards distant. A mile
from the city, San Juan Heights commanded
the approach, the steep grassy slopes slashed
with the cuts of Spanish trenches. A big
red-and-yellow Spanish flag flapped lazily
from the roof of the pagoda-like blockhouse
on San Juan Hill.
At 6:30 on a hot July 1st morning in 1898,
the 2nd Infantry, right wing of Shatter's
army, attacked Spanish outposts at El Caney.
The division had, orders to capture the town
by mid-morning, drive the "garlics" down
the road toward Santiago, and join the 1st
Infantry and 1st Cavalry (dismounted) di-
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VALLEY GUN SHOP. Dept. G
7784 Foothill
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Everything for the Hunter, Shooter, & Handloader. $1.50 Prepaid. Refunded with first order.)
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Burns regular (auto) gasoline or white gasoline.
Burns 10 hours on one filling.
Can be used as
spot or flood light.
Write for colorful literature
WISLER WESTERN A RM S
$1 8.95
207 SECOND STREET
SAM FRANCISCO 5, CALIF.
H & W Powder Measure. . . .$1 1.85
H & W Powder Measure,
with micro .............$1325
Model 28 Improved Tool. ..$19.50
Model 56 Upright Tool. . . . .$18.00
Stainless Steel Rods from $2.40
t o . . ................... $4.50
Loading Blocks, Primer Pocket reamers,
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Dealer Inquiries invited
0
FREEFolder
HARPSTER & WILLIAMS
Philipsburg, Penna.
visions. All would then advance to the foot
of San Juan Heights. Confidently Shatter at
8 am wired Washington: "Will keep you
continually advised, of progress." From that
New 1956 Edition
moment everything seemed to go wrong.
,
of the famous
I
Our artillery, shrouded in clouds af blackpowder smoke, was quickly spotted and siI lenced by the invisible smokeless-powder
II
Spanish guns. Parker's Gatlings, instead of
!
'WINGSHOOTER'S HANDBOOK 1 going forward, were ordered to withdraw
28 fact-filled pages written by experts. All 1
half a mile. Parked along the road, Parker's
about choking, bore diameters, shotgun 1
patterning and how to improve your wing- 1 crew took plenty of guff from passing infantrymen. "What are you going to do back
shooting. Send for your copy TODAY!
I here, grow bananas?" disgusted soldiers
Write to The
814 Tunxis St.
asked.
Hartford 1, Conn.
Suddenly the smiles were wiped from their
faces. Entering the narrow jungle trail which
led from El Pozo to the foot of San Juan
Heights, they were raked by an artillery
barrage. Then small-arms fire cut them from
their flanks and rear. Concealed in trees
Made i n 1916 a t
overlooking their line of march, Spanish
Rock Island Arsenal.
Cost U.S. Govt. $12.50
sharpshooters picked them off at leisure.
When the sweating, cursing columns reached
SPECIAL
the edge of the jungle, they were fish in a
barrel to the Spanish infantry on the ridge
POSTPAID
above. Volley after volley of Mauser fire
Gold plated over solid bronze.
poured down on them. It was a Roman holiRaised letten
Limited quantity.
day for the Spaniards.
As regulars and volunteers reached San
Juan river, they deployed along it right and
left. Commanding the volunteer regiment of
his old cowboy buddies was Colonel Theodore Roosevelt. Sweating it out with his
Rough Riders, Roosevelt was grimly satisfied; all he wanted, was permission to attack.
Yet he was held back. Finally came word to
call up the Gatlings.
At the foot of the hill, the desperate attack
which has lived in history as the "charge at
San Juan Hill" got under way at a quarter
past one. Parker kicked up his mules and
the four guns raced from the jungle out into
the open meadowland at the base of the
Trip.
.
Write for illustrated literature
Heights. Hardly had the mules been unClubsÑUs this trap on your auall & grouse walks!
hooked and the trails dropped than the gunWRITE TRIUS PRODUCTS c^J,-%0.
ners were astride the guns cranking. The
Reasonably Priced. Order direct If not handled
by your dealer. Dealer inquiries Invited.
Gatlings opened fire on the blockhouse,
strong-point of Spanish defenses at the crest
of the hill.
Parker's guns were in the center, the iron
-- - - Good gunsmith8 are In great demand. You can have
fist.
At the left white-haired General Hawkins
your own business as a gunsmith, or work as a gunformed his troops to storm the ridge, and
smith in other shona. Graduates located in 48 states
apd three foreign countries. Veterans & non-veteran
ordered his bugler to sound the "Charge."
-Veterans Adrnlnhtration approved for P. L. 16.
246, 550 & 894.
Roosevelt on the right, bucking up and down
For Free literature writel
the line on "Little Texas," shouted to his
COLORADO SCHOOL of TRADES INC.
dismounted troops, "Follow me!" and turned
8797 W. Colfax Ave.. G. Denver 15, Colorado
to attack the Spaniards on adjoining Kettle
FINE HANDMADE
Hill. Rebel yells, shouts of "Remember the
Maine!" and Indian war whoops mingled
with the ominous, steady drumming of the
The finest made in Texas
Gatlings.
WRITE FOR CATALOG
Six hundred yards from the Spanish blockALSO: BELTS, BILLFOLDS,
SADDLEBY GOODS. ETC.
house Parker's guns covered our troops with
JONES BOOT & SADDLERY
a singing apron of cupro-nickel bullets.
Box 215
Lampasas, Texas
When the first Spanish fusillade killed the
feeder and wounded another crew member
of Gun No. 3, Gunner Corporal Doyle stradPROTECTS SCOPE
ASSURES ACCURACY
dled the trail and fired the Gatling himself.
Write for FREE Folder
He worked the elevating lever with his left
CASSELL CASES, Box 168. Grand Rapids, Mkh.
hand and cranked with his right till help
came. From the panting, laboring infantry
who had climbed up the hill, hardly a shot
Want shooting dogs for training right now. was fired except in haste, more for the noise
Training all year In the field under natural
conditions on wild quail. Have your dog and, encouragement than for killing.
trained right by a man with over 86 years
But from the little plain below the bark of
know how as credit Hates m
.
0
0per month
with board. W i r e or write.
the Gatlings continued as the guns automatically traversed the crest of the slope, the
IDLEWILD ACRES
Iron City, Team. .30/40 slugs driving the opposition under
Route #1
1
%-&,&!
4'
$125
I
...
-
-
--
-
-
SOLID R I-F L E CASES
BIRD DOG TRAINING
cover. Eight minutes after Parker opened
fire, the regulars were almost to the crest of
San Juan Hill. Demoralized by the hail of
bullets, the Spaniards were jumping from
their trenches and falling hack. By 1:30 pm
the blockhouse, cornerstone to Spanish resistance, had fallen. Fifteen minutes had
passed.
A mile and a half safely at the rear, the
foreign military attaches stared incredulously
through high powered field glasses as the
first blue-shirted, regulars reached the crest
of San Juan Hill. They were reduced to a
pitiful handful, far too few to have stormed
such a strong position under ordinary circumstances. But the circumstances had not
been ordinary. The charge had every reason
to fail, except for the concentrated firepower
of the Gatlings.
As Spanish organization at the top of the
hill ceased, Parker's men got their mules
hitched up and drove the battery for the
hilltop at a dead run. Reaching the top, they
saw the Spaniards counter-attacking. The
drivers swung the Gatlings about in a left
turn and, still moving, the gunners began
their fire at point blank range.
The wild-eyed Spaniards concentrated their
shots on the Gatlings. Riflemen could at
least lie prone. Parker's crews did not even
have the protection of a shield. They had
to serve their guns erect. For the rest of the
afternoon, Parker's Gatlings ranged the line.
beating the Spaniards back when they
showed themselves. The raucous mule-bray
and the drumming fire from the white-hot
Gatlings was some of the sweetest music the
troops had ever heard.
"It was the only sound I ever heard my
men cheer in battle," said Colonel Roosevelt.
Toward sundown a Spanish 6-incher threw
a couple of shells at the Gatlings. Picking
up the flash in the dusk, the Gatlings returned the fire a t an estimated 2,000 yards.
No more shells came their way. Later Parker
found the 6-incher, still loaded. A Spanish
officer told him that the Gatlings had made
things so hot they had not been able to fire
it again.
Roosevelt strolled over to meet Parker in
the lull after the battle. One Gatling was
out of action. It had become overheated.
In a momentary cease-fire several cartridges
were cooked-off, one with the breech partly
open. Parker pulled out the damaged breech
bolt and it fired thereafter with nine of its
ten barrels. Of the gun crews, one third
were casualties, many killed. Yet the troops
hung on at San Juan. When some junior
officers of the Cavalry Division came down
off the hill to urge a "strategic withdrawal"
of several miles, the general sent them back
up with entrenching tools. All the available
troops were in the line. The Gatlings were
the only reserve.
On Sunday Admiral Sampson engaged the
Spaniards in a brisk sea battle. Soon he was
able to telegraph to President McKinley;
"The fleet under my command offers the
nation as a Fourth of July present the whole
of Cervera's fleet. I t attempted to escape at
9:30 this morning . . ." Meanwhile, Parker
took the wheels off his Gatlings and bedded
them in-sandbags, to the extreme front of the
line. Added to the Gatlings were the Rough
Riders' two Colt "potato digger" atuomatic
Browning guns, Model 1895, and one dynamite gun.
With the dynamite gun, Parker evolved a
novel machine gun tactic. The dynamite gun
sent an 11% pound Whitehead torpedo filled
with blasting gelatin a maximum distance of
about 3,600 yards. Compressed air was the
"charge," compressed in a secondary tube by
motion of a piston driven by a gunpowder
charge. The Rough Riders fired the gun by
striking the firing mechanism with a hatchet:
they then ran like hell. As often as not, the
shell dropped a short distance in front of the
piece. Parker thought the dynamite gun
might be good for a scare.
He would aim the dynamite gun in the
general direction of a Spanish trench or
battery. If the projectile ever got that tar,
the terrified enemy soldiers would run from
their trenches and Parker's guns would cut
them down, like flushed quail.
On July 1 7 the Spaniards decided they had
enough. Santiago surrenderel. Shortly afterwards, the malaria-ridden Fifth Corps was
sent home. Home, too. went the many foreign military attaches, to report on what they
had s e e n
Imagination made their reports enthusiastic, but there was no imagination about the
direct result. Germany in 1899 organized he1
first regular machine-gun detachment, the
10th Battalion, Hanoverian Chasseurs. Japan
and Russia worked out machine gun tactics
in their war of 1905. Most of the major pow.
ers, revising their military textbooks, fol.
lowed Germany on the hand wagon. The
published writings of Parker were liberally
plagiarized in the years that followed b j
machine gun "experts" of every army.
Friendship with Teddy Roosevelt servec
Parker well. When Colonel Roosevelt sue
ceeded to t h e White House after McKinley':
death, he sent Gatling Gun Parker to For,
Leavenworth. The battle before Santiago hac
made Colonel Roosevelt a firm convert to tht
idea that American infantry should havt
adequate machine gun support. Parker':
task was to organize the first model machint
gun detachment in the U.S. Army, appointee
under General Order No. 16, January 22
1902. That date marks the start of moderr
American tactical firepower.
When World War I came, the gradua
introduction of the German Heavy Maxin
guns changed battle tactics of the Britisl
and French from charges with bayonet
across open land, to hiding in holes. Thi
machine gun dominated the scene in Worli
War I and created a stalemate in t h ~
trenches which lasted four long years.
Pershing had Parker as his personal ad
viser on machine gun warfare. Right in lin
with Parker's philosophy was the "Pedersei
device," an automatic breech for convertin
the Springfield rifle into a submachine gur
Pershing ordered 500,000 of them for use i
the great Spring offensive of 1919, firepowe
such as Parker would have wanted had h e
dared dream of it. But the British tanks,
movable machine-gun platforms protected by
armor, capable of crossing the trenches and
attacking machine gun posts up close, broke
the back of German might. Armistice came
too soon for Pershing's scheme to be tested.
Yet the tanks themselves were like old
friends to Parker. Gun crews completely
protected from enemy fire: what his boys in
blue couldn't have done with Gatlings like
that at San Juan! Even so. he still had his
claim to fame, as the man who made Teddy
Roosevelt's charge at San Juan hill pos@
sible.
8
FOR C U R R E N T
I T H T H I S COMPLETE
E D I T I O N OF
k
FIREARMS
Dl
RECTORY
by S H E L L E Y B R A V E R M A N
I
UP-TO-DATE
This is the only-of-its-kind Gun Encyclopedia which, since 1951, has been serving those whose
vocation or avocation includes Firearms .Collectors, Dealers, Gunsmiths. Libraries, Manufacturers,
etc., throughout the world, ore finding the Firearms Directory more ond more valuable.
Police Laboratories f r o m Scotland to Singapore use t h e Firearms Directory!
Since its inception, The Firearms Directory hos grown each year by means of additions and
revisions, to the extent that i t now weighs more than six f6J pounds!
PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED-THOUSANDS
OF ILLUSTRATIONS!
The unique maintenance service, consisting of additional new moterial and revisions, solves the
"obsolete book" problem-The FIREARMS DIRECTORY IS ALWAYS UP TO DATE, AND THE MAINTENANCE SERVICE KEEPS IT THAT WAY; there is nothing else like it in the Fireorms field.
THE FIREARMS DIRECTORY IS DIVIDED INTO SIXTEEN SEPARATE SECTIONS:
ÇOON a i d nniicxno~s
CLUBS O ~ RANGES
J
COOFS and n O O f MAWS
Of ALFRS
FIWAÈMS M I S C f L L A N f O U l
Mrfms
nsroti
RlfLfS
WOlGWa
LA80ÇArORlf
I f C N N K A l mitt
LEGAL
MANUfACrUKRS wH IMKXlfM
Appropriate material, contained in the above classifications, is continually added tofor example, the "PISTOL ATLAS" (pp. 34-35, FIREARMS IDENTIFICATION, J. S. Hatcher)
long unavailable, will be at YOUR hand as a Firearms Directory owner.. .Also, each
patent in the Firearms field is extracted with illustrations and and included in the annual
supplement
And, of course, our world famous Isometric Drawings-of which we now
have sixty-seven-all to be included in the Firearms Directory! These range from the
Collier Flintlock Revolver and Patterson Colt through the modern automatics-Truly 0
wealth of material nowhere else available.
GLOSSARV
GUNSMITHS
lOfN~lflCAlION
EACH FID COMES TO YOU IN A SPECIALLY DESIGNED. CUSTOM BUILT. TENGWALL BINDER!
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T H E FIREARMS DIRECTORY
2 0 7 EAST 31st STREET
NEW Y O R K 16, N. Y.
* byPRODUCTION
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Record holding Bench Resters.
Excellent delivery.
Barrel fitting service (retail only).
Stainless steel.
Ask for free data on all services..
R. DOUGLAS, Life Member N. R. A.
Route 3, Box 435
Charleston, West Va..
GERMAN ARMY KNIFE
çfrw1 à § f i i i m ^
pounds. Four 1 o c k i n g lugs give added
strength and permit only half of the normal
bolt lift, assuring ample scope clearance in
handling. Stock hand-in-letted in final stages. Comes without sight-d e s i g n e d and
stocked for scope sights. Available in popular sporter calibers. The Sharpe & Hart Associates, Dept. G-8, Emmitsburg, Md.
a
COMBINATION
FRANZITE GRIPS are now available in
PACIFIC "SUPER" RELOADING TOOL
is especially designed for the "tough jobs"
in reloading. Said to be the ultimate in reloading tools, the model illustrated above
includes the Automatic Primer Feed in place
at top of the tool; this is an "in-line" device
for feedine of the nrimers into the nrimer
arm, making the handling of the primers
easier and permitting speedier operation of
the tool. The Automatic Primer Feed is an
optional accessory. Complete information including prices available. Write to Pacific
Gun Sight Co., Dept. G-8, 2901 El Camino
Real, Palo Alto, Calif.
1000 yds. Spot .22 cal.
bullet holes at 200 yds.
Threaded m e t a l d u s t
cover screws on over
objective lens. Features
lll/s" tripod and adjustable mount. Weighs only
ll/a Ibs. including tripod. Complete w i t h leather
carrying case, mount and tripod.
over 200 different sizes and styles. Shooters
also have a choice of six luxurious colors
to choose from as well as the famous Franzite
Staghorn. Models are also offered in oversize target type and conversion styles, which
convert round butt frames to square butt for
more comfortable shooting. In addition,
Franzite features grips for obsolete and antique models as well as over 50 foreign guns.
Free catalog with complete listings, drawings,
prices sent free upon request. Write manufacturer: Sports Inc., Dept. G-8, 5501 Broadway, Chicago (40) 111.
-
FULLT CUARAMTCCO #OM b MOI. AGAINST
MECMANfCAL AND OPTICAL DCFKCTS
MARLIN'S MODEL 55-HUNTER SHOTGUN is a bolt repeater, 12 gauge bored full
I
Include postage w i t h order
NEW 54J S C H U L T Z & LARSEN
I
B
I
THE
I
NEW
I
PATENT PENDING
Complete job as shown now
reduced to $20
I
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MUZZLE
BRAKE [
i
Tiny b u t POTENT! Custom-fitted t o look like,
I and actually be, part of your r i f l e barrel. Write
for literature.
PENDLETON OUNSHOP
Ed~^oy&&'.'.;
bolt action. Using a lap-fitted bolt similar
to world famous International Match Free
Rifle, it is the strongest and safest action
made; each rifle proof-tested at 80,000
I
Replace that Crosshair w i t h a
PEEP RETICULE
FOR MOST RIFLE SCOPES
l e that does not hide the exact center
get. Field of v i e w unchanged. A n excellent range finder. Promptly installed. Pat. Pend.
Dealers Invited-Free
Literature
¥.----¥¥¥¥--¥--¥-----
FASTEST SERVICETIMNEY
SPORTSMAN TRIGGERS
for
MAUSER
ENFIELD SPRINGFIELD
A t o p quolitv mechanism completely ad'ustable for weight o f
trigger pull, sear engagement and
b o c ~ ~ a s l iPUB
.
is single stoge
short, clean and crisp.
-
/RETAIL
ALLEN T I M N E Y CO.
13609 LEIBACHER
NORWALK, C A L I F
choke with a 28" barrel. clip holds two 2%"
shells only. Tapped for the new Lyman 40
SM receiver peep sight. Safety sear locks.
Patented Marlin double extractors for nositive extraction and ejection. ~ a k e - d o w n
screw for quick and easy d i s a s s e m b 1 y.
Streamlined seasoned walnut stnck
- - -- measnrea
- -- -- - 14" x 1%" x 2%". Action taken down 35%", overall length 49". Price, $33.95; with
new choke as illustrated, $37.95. Order fiom
Marlin Firearms Co., Dept. G-8, 11 W. 42nd
1
St., New York (36) N. Y.
W e ship p r e p a i d f r o m our stock Pacific
Tools a n d Dies, C. H. Tools a n d Dies,
Williams Sights, Lyman Sights a n d Loadi n g Tools. Harnady, Sierra, Speer Bullets.
Lawrence Leather. Bear C u b Scopes, Texan
Scopes.
Redding Measures a n d Scales.
Guns, Archery, Clothing. M a n y other items.
Authorized Remington, Winchester G u n smiths N. Y. State Paly Choke installers.
Send f o r free catalog.
Wholesale
Retail
BENNETT GUN
WORKS
Since 1928
D e l m a r (near A l b a n y ) N e w Y o r k
Mauser (Pistol & rifle) P38 Luger G48 Japanese
(pistol & rifle), Italian Browning, ~rtgies,some Springfield. Enfleld, 45 Auto.. Others. Stamped. addressed
envetone for list. Mauser H8c Firing Pins, Sprinns
4.00 set. Ortnles Firing Pins 2.50 ea. Japanese 7.7
Guard Screws 25c each $2 50 Dozen Mauser Military
Bolt (recoil) Springs ' ~ 4 3 Recoil
'
springs Luger Coil
Mainspringe. ~apanes; Mainsprings (rifle) 7'5c ea.. $5.00
dozen. S5.50 dozen assorted.
BOB LOVELLI BOX 4811 ELMHURSTl ILL.
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U. S. MARTIAL
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Attention, men! I f you've been searching f o r
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PONY EXPRESS SPORT SHOP
17460 V e n t u r a Blvd., E n c i n o 2. Calif.
Phone: STate 9-6031
WITH &,JM
STREAMLINE MUZZLE BRAKE is an
MERCURY DOUBLE BARREL MAGNUM SHOTGUNS provide power for killing
power at extreme ranges-distances
commanding the best in both shooter and gun. 12
and 20 gauge models have 3" chambers; 10
gauge 3%'' chamber. Will also handle regular loads. Permit upland bird shooting-extra reaching power with full magnum loads
for ducks and geese. Handcrafted by skilled
gunsmiths to exacting specifications. Made
of finest, select high-grade steel, each Mercury Magnum Shotgun is accuracy and proof
tested. Write Tradewinds Inc., Dept. G-8,
P.O. Box 1191, Tacoma (1) Wash.
0. F. MOSSBERG & SONS INC. announces two new light weight, 3 shot, bolt
action, repeating shotguns. Available in 12
and 16 gauges with interchangeable choke
tubes. Both models have cushion rubber recoil pads, stocks of Monte Carlo design in
genuine walnut and detachable clips holding
two shells with one in the chamber. Model
195D (12 gauge) priced at $29.95, Model
190D (16 gauge) at $28.95. Both are chambered for all 2%" or shorter factory loaded
shells including the new 2%" Magnum
loads. Write 0. F. Mossberg & Sons, Inc.,
Dept. G-8, New Haven, Conn.
anti-recoil device that takes the sting out of
heavy recoil guns. Available in two models,
it is custom tailored to individual barrels and
calibers, with tolerances held to much closer
limits. Designed for higher efficiency in a
small package, it outperforms much bulkier
brakes. Muzzle jump with this brake is negligible; permits perfect follow-through for
full enjoyment of target and varmint shooting. For full details including illustrated
literature, prices, write Pendleton Gun Shop,
Dept. G-8, 223 SE Court Ave., Pendleton,
Oregon.
BECKELHYMER'S EXCLUSIVE CUSTOM MADE GRIPS are designed to take
the drudgery out of aiming and holding. Assures a perfect hand fit. Available in Plain.
Checkered or Carved Adjustable Grip. Plain
Grip retails for $24.50; Checkered Grip
$28.50; Carved Grip $32.50. Handsome De.
luxe Grip, $5.00 more. In addition, these
new grips are available in a wide assortment
of Deluxe, choice woods-both domestic and
imported-at $5.00 more. Complete details
about entire line sent free upon request.
Write Beckelhymer's Sporting Supplies, Dept,
G-8, 513 Salinas Ave., Laredo, Texas.
1 NEwlnHOsT G"
MUSKET CAPS
Guaranteed Accuracy. Will not snag on
Nnute.
brush
Send ~escription'of Your Gun and Only $1.00 To:
BROWN & BROWN MFG. CO.
Hot Springs, Ark.
Coopen Mills, 10
Maine
...........................
Gun Care
Try this effective, easy-on-your-gun-
FRANK A. HOPPE, INC.
2313 No. 8th St., Phila. 33, Pa.
SOUTHWEST CUTLERY & MFG. CO.
Montebello. California
M-1 RIFLES
Quan.-$125
M - 1 CARBINES 2 c
a
0
,
Excellent-Legal-Limited
:THE M O U N T THAT WILL:
: ALWAYS ZERO BACK :
and-you solvent for removing primer,
powder, lead and metal fouling and thorough rust protection. Ask your gun dealer for
Hoppe's No. 9 or send us 15c
for sample. "Gun Cleaning
Guide" FREE upon post card
request.
or left $9.00.
CLEAR SIGHT LENS CAPS for all
scopes. $2.95 pr.
GREAT WESTERN Single Action Guns-most
cal. in stock.
Send for FREE CATALOG. Address Box
360-G.
Lim. Quan.-$87.50
COLT FRONTIERSÑBISLE REVOLVERS
$75.00 up
ED HOWE
Dept. 20
721 Rector Ave.
"TOP ~ a t s "
Eley Bros. English Fresh pack $6.00 per M.
Minimum 500 $3.00.
Express, not mailable
POINTER STOCKS
The o r i g i n a l
thumb rest
stocks $ 6 . 5 0
and $7.00 pair.
POINTER PUPS
stag, no thumb res
Largest complete
1" Uroupa at IW yards. BaaÂ
0 w
wrench needed to adjust.
Open rear sight. Fixed reticule scopes only. W d
when locked no bouncing around to damage scope.
Discount to dealers. For free Information write:
0 0
0 No
0
0
$19.75 P.P.
GEORGE M. FISCHER
Box 22R
Billings, Mont.
¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥Â
-
:
S. SLOPER, 907 Nearmont, Tucson, Arii.
1 KRIEGHOFF MAUSERS 1
Soon to be available for delivery in 7MM
and .30-06. Other calibers later a n d
an order. Standard equipment wifl include horn 'trigger guard, cartridge
magazine in stock and safety in qtock.
Competitive Prices.
Literature Available $oc
1
DEALERS A N D AGENTS W A N 1
CHARLES W. LEAWELL, Sumter,
1
S.C.
I
77
the FORSTER PRECISION
1
CASE T R I M M E R
secutive one shot kills on all sizes of game
take pleasure in recommending the
7MM Express to anyone who wants a real
Big Game stopping rifle." Roy Gradle, Dept.
G-8, 205-G West Islay St., Santa Barbara,
Calif.
. . . I'd
w i l l trim cartridge cases easier, faster a n d
f a r more accurately, regardless of variations
i n head diameter. SEE IT,-TRY
IT,-BUY
IT!
NO OTHER CASE TRIMMER EQUALS IT
IN QUALITY, PERFORMANCE NOR PRICE!
ONLY $1 1.75
Unit
(IT s*"
i W BUEHLER UNIVERSAL MOUNT
LSE incorporates simple elevation adjust-
A C C U R A T E AND R E L I A B L E
HEADSPACE GAUGES
B U L L E T PULLERS
G U A R D SCREWS
LOADING D I E BLANKS
I me*nt in the base; may be installed without
us< of elevation feature as it is the correct
he ight for standard actions. Elevation may
be set permanently for use of scopes not
ha ving internal adjustment. The reticule will
allways be placed in the exact center of the
fie Id. With the new universal base on several
i ifiles. one scope in one set of rings may be
mewed from rifle to rifle without rezeroing.
Ca nnot work lose or get out of adjustment.
Miaynard P. Buehler, Dept. G-8, 110 Orinda
Highway, Orinda, Calif.
LOWEST FACTORY PRICES
write for free literature
Gunsmith a n d Dealer Inquiries Invited.
94 E. Lanark Ave.
9 Lanark, Illinois
FORSTER BROTHERS
-
O u r illustrated
c a t a l o g and
lists f o r t h e
c u r r e n t year
mailed upon
receipt o f 25c
coin. Same-day
service! A l l
shipments
made prepaid.
i
1;
!
D E A L E R S : W r i t e o n your
letterhead f o r o u r prepaid
wholesale catalog.
ROBERT S. FRIELICH
611 Broadway
N.
N E W Y O R K 12
1
I!
1
Y.
PROTECT the TIPS
WITH A
Parker
Cartridge Clip
30-06, 8mm., 270, 7mm.
C a r t r i d g e s at y o u r F I N G E R T I P S
for F A S T R E L O A D I N G
IWERFUL, 7MM EXPRESS RIFLE,
stom-built by Roy Gradle, is rated "tops"
stopping power by big game hunters and
gu n experts alike. Dr. W. A. Delaney of
MIitchell, S. D., endorses i t with this commtmt: "The Gradle 7MM Express rifle I used
on my African trip was outstanding in every
waly . . . A vast majority of my shots were
on e shot kills and I had a string of 36 con-
SILVER DOLLAR BOLO TIE features
authentic Navajo craftsmanship. With a sterling silver setting, it makes the ideal companion for a sport shirt. Contains a genuine
U.S. silver dollar set i n an engraved sterling
silver frame and hung on a black hand-braided leather thong. No two ties are exactly
alike since each tie is completely and individually hand made. Adds a touch of the
"Old West" with sport or western shirtladies wear it with a blouse. Available for
$10.00 postpaid, including Federal Tax. Order
from Norm Thompson, Dept. G-8, 1311 N.W.
21st, Portland (9) Oregon.
-
CUSTOM RELOADED
AMMUNITION
30-M-l Carbine H u n t i n g Reloads
$5.00 p e r b o x (50)
220 Swift $1.75 p e r b o x (20) (your cases only)
270 Win. $2.90 p e r b o x (20)
30-06 $3.00 per b o x (20)
8 M M Mauser Rifle $3.00 per b o x (20)
38 Special $2.50 per b o x (50)
45 Auto $4.00 p e r b o x (50)
Sized a n d Lubricated cast bullets
38 cal. 150 or. semi WC a n d 158 gr.
r o u n d nose $1.50 p e r 100; $1.40 per 100
in 50'0 lots postpaid
Stock of a l l popular smokeless a n d b l a c k
powders, primers a n d bullets, also shotg u n reloading supplies.
Dealer Discounts o n RWS primer, cast
bullets, a n d reloads.
H i g h I m p a c t Plastic (Guaranteed)
If n o t a t your dealer, Price $3.00 ppd.
HOLIDAY
M F G . CO., D e p t .
Grand Island, Nebr.
Jobbers
&
STODDARD'S
G,
Dealers Inquiries I n v i t e d
374 Washington Street, Boston 8, Mass.
Box 2062
Fort Pierce, Fla.
Sertinft New England for over 100 yeur,
,
^
ger and sight carries low on the hip: places
gun butt near palm of hand for a firm, quick
draw. Rawhide leg thong holds holster secure. Belt has 12 cartridge loops. Made of
durable saddle leather in rich mahogany finish, fittted with polished nickel hardware.
Holster is removable by unfastening snaps
on holster loop. For full details write George
Lawrence Co., Dept. G-8, 306 S.W. First
Ave., Portland, Oregon.
1
U
BRITISH ENFIELD DELUXE SPORTERS
0
,
.30.06
Caliber
Action Repeatersweight approx. 8
1SWISS ARMY RIFLES '89 11
HARPSTER & WILLIAMS TURRET
R E L 0 A D I N G TOOL easily loads 100
rounds per hour. Performs all operations
accurately and quickly. I t decaps old primer,
resizes cartridge cases-full length, seats new
primer, measures powder charge, crimps bullet. Shell holder and all pins made of quality tool steel. Precision made throughout.
this all purpose tool is ideal for most reloading needs. Price, $27.00 including one primer rod and one shell holder-less dies and
powder measure. Write for additional information or order from Harpster & Williams,
Dept. G-8, Philipsburg, Pa.
SHIPPED DUTY FREE
1 WHEN ORDERING, enclose signed statement: "I
11 am not an alien have n$ver been convicted of a
, ;;imeof
STERLING SILVER GRIP CAP fits a n
HOLSTER & CARTRIDGE BELT for
quick draw shooting has been revived by the
George Lawrence Company for their Centennial anniversary. Holster with exposed trig-
indictment or a
violence, ;mn$;under
rifle or shotgun-many hand guns too. Fea
tures a handsomely embossed personalize(
initial as desired. Handsome in appearanc
and available at a practical price, Grip Ca]
may be easily applied in only 15 minutes
(Some models may require a slight amoun
of edge-filing.) Actual size of this jeweler'
piece is approximately 1%" x 1%". Retail
for $5.00 including postage, screws and Fec
era1 Excise Tax. Write for additional info]
mation or order from Engineered Model
Corp., Dept. G-8, 3145 N. Martindale Ave
Indianapolis ( 5 ) Ind.
R
E A MHI-SPEED
ERS$8.00
$1 0.00
R..o u a h e r
Finisher
30.06
300 Sav. 2 0 8 Win.. 7mm. 2 7 0 Win., ,257
~oberts2
, 5 0 - 3 0 0 6 Sav., 2 2 0 Swift, 22-250, .222 Rem.
$1 0.00
Rougher
HI-SPEED
243 Win.,
2 4 4 Rem.
$1 2.50
Finisher
,219 Wasp. .22 Hornet. .22K Hornet, 2 1 8 Bee. ,300
H & H. .30-40 Krag, .30-06 Ackley Imp., .35 Whelen.
CAGES
8 MM
2 5 7 Roberts
.308 Win.
BRAND NEW
O N L Y $1.50 E A C H
Set of three $4.00. One piece ordnance type. Ground
head and angle, held t o .001 limit, hardened, 58 Rockwell. GO-NO-GO and F I E L D .
F U L L Y GUARANTEED
ORDER T O D A Y
30-06
-
REDFORD REAMER CO.9 BOX 4863-G
R e d f o r d S t a t i o n , D e t r o i t 19, M i c h i g a n
THE LEWIS LEAD REMOVER
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
Get those high-flying, 7 to 11 pound Canadian honkers
with the NEUMANN 10-gauge Magnum-finest shotgun of
its type made i n the world today! Specially desianed for
long-range pass shooting, this great goose gun will give
vou clean k i l l s a t t w i c e the effective r a n a e of other
guns! Immediate delivery on 4 models.
b
I
II
Quality Gunstocks
Experience the thrill of having sour
mgfg;;;;p0?;;;;:
F I N I ~ H Estocks,
~
me are offering the
flnest most complete 1'ne In the industry,
R E I NH A RT
' I c e Cop
report -r
I
"DEAD DUCKS AT 100 YARDS"
32" FULL & FULL CHOKE.
3IAwCHAÈIBER.AtlTOMATI
O R NON-EJECTORS. ANSt)N
OEELY ACTION. FOUR WAY
CLOSING
- - - - . DEVICE.
.. - 11 LBS.
---
'-9
Send 106 today for our big
new 36 page catalog No. 55.
i:EE:fz
I 2%'3
Write t
s l L v E R ~D
~ ~~ ~ :
I
Mission B+
J!rancisc;"3f^l$gsO1e 1mporterA
and Canada
"-"
-
s
~
k
p
~
~
~new , checkering and
carving designs for custom stocks, also the latest
in semi-finished rifle and shotgun stocks.
FA J E N,
Box
1150,
1 POSTPAID
~ e v o l v e r Cleaning
it. Removes
Leading from Forcing Cone, Cylinder, and Barrel. Available In 38-44.45 cal. Kit for two
calibers $5.35. Patches IPkg. 10) $.SO. Dealer Inquiries
COD'S.
Invited. Check or Money Order-No
Warsaw,
Missouri
Gun Specialties, '
P. 0 . Box 31.
college Park, Georgia
Never be-'
f O % I, a s a r
achromatic t e i c scope sold :or an
where near this amazin
low l l r ~ c e ! 1.011 get cl
sharper picfires at all power
because of :he super compou
Achro Lens. No color, no fuzz. Vari
b e eyepiece adjustable to 20, 40, or 60
o
r Lower powers excellent .or targ'e
ShooLing and wide angle viewing. Higher p
for long range and Astronomy. Guaranteed to sp
2 2 holes in the black at 200 yds. Guaranteed to bring
distant objects, peoi>le, planets, etc. 60 'rimes closer.
hakelite sections, trimmed in gleaming Iwass-5 i>recisio
n A
made ins'.rument. uncor
l
n A i
ditionally giaranteed. Carrying case included. Send on1
$ 7 . 9 8 . Cash, check or money order. W e pay postage.
Criterion Co., 31 Church St., Hartford, Conn., Dept. TSA8
-
T H E GUN MARKET
Classified ads l 5 c per word per insertion including name and address. Payable
in advance. Minimum ad 10 words. Closing date for the October, 1956 issue
--
COLLECTORS
TONS RARE Antique Gun Supplies. Illust r a t e d catalog 256. Dixie Gun Works, Dept.
G, Union City, Tennessee.
MANY MODERN. Antique guns. List lo$.
Modern. Obsolete Cartridge list 104. Ed. Howe,
Cooners Mill 10. Maine.
(on sale September 11 is July 16. Print your ad carefully and mail to: GUNS
Magazine, 8150 North Central Park Blvd., Skokie, Illinois.
B.S.A. Martini T a r e e t Rifles (Over $100.00
value) $39.50 each. "Shipped Duty F r e e . s e n d
remittance f o r immediate shipment. International. 1011 Bleurv, Montreal. Que.
HUNDREDS BARGAINS-Guns,
Swords,
Knives, Relics, Documents. Illustrated Catalog-25<.
Brotcke, 14402 Oxnard, Van Nuys,
California.
SWISS ARMY Rifles '89. Famous ScbmidtRubin Rifles. Hi-power 7.5mm (.30 cal.) 1 2
shot repeater, f a s t loading detachable magazine. T h e speed of a n automatic, excellent condition. while thev l a s t $16.95 12 of these flne
rifles $29.50). Ammunition$2.65 per box 20
( 2 boxes $5.00). Send remittance immediate
shipment. International Firearms, 22 Kingman St.. Albans. Vermont.
DRAGOON-1ST
Model-#2928.
Overall
Good Condition. $395.00. Ralph 11. Timpanaro, R F D Box 450, Deer Park, L. I.
AMMUNITION: .45 A.C.P. $4.25 P E R 100.
ANTIQUE ARMS f o r Collector o r Shooter, a t
Bargain Prices. 10< for List. Ladd, Catskill,
N. Y.
GUNS OLD a n d new Curios, Relics, Antiques, Rare, Unusual, Oddities list postpaid
25c. B'arish's, Vicksburg, Miss.
ARROWHEADS ASSORTED : T h i r t y $5.00,
hundred $15.00.' Catalog 50c. Tilton Relics,
Topeka 25, Kansas.
treal.. Que.
R I F L E S : FAMOUS .303 Short Lee Enfield
(S.M.L.E.) No. 1 Mark 111 British Service
Model, ten-shot repeater with detachable magazine-only
$29.50. Shipped duty free. Send
remittance f o r immediate shipment. International Firearms Co., 1011 Bleury, Montreal,
Que.
-
GUNS & AMMUNITION
PISTOLMEN, F R E E I l l u s t r a t e d C a t a l o g .
Clark accurized guns hundreds items f o r Pistolmen only. Gil Hebard, Knoxville 2, Illinois.
30 CALIBER 12-SHOT high-power precision
Swiss Rifle. silk-smooth action. fine accuracy,
low recoil, excellent shooting condition,
$14.93 : 48 Military cartridges $5.00 ; Hunting
cartridges $3.25 per 20. Free Brochure.******
52-wase s u n cataloe A15. Modern & Obsolete
l'iCto&, Rifles aml Shotguns, IIard-to-get Foreign & American Ammunition, Lending Tools,
d i n s , Maeazinea. Aci-'essorics. price 25d. Martin'B. Retting, Inc., Culver City ( 2 3 ) , California.
YOUR J A P rifles altered t o 30-06. $6.00. J a p
shells $3.75. Bolts altered for scope $4.50
engine turned $4.00, both $8.00. Catalog .05.
T P Shop, West Branch 16, Mich.
INDIAN RELICS
2 F I N E INDIAN W a r Arrowheads $1.00.
Flint Scalping Knife $1.00. F l i n t Thunderbird $2.00. List Free. Arrowhead, Box 1249.
H o t Springs, Arkansas.
H I Bleurv. Montreal. Oue.
GUNS, BAYONETS, Misc. military items. lo<
for list #42. Mention interests. Sam Holmers.
13503 Lakewood. Paramount, Calif.
GUN BARGAINS ! Antique and Modern. Send
254 f o r 1 0 page list of hundreds of g u n s and
edges weapons. Firearms Unlimited. 1 1 9 Shadv
Ave., Pghy 6, Pa.
NEW S&W ,357 MAGNUM Revolvers Nickel
3%". Blue 8 % $96.00 each. .44 'special
Military 5" $65.00. Ray Thompson, G r a r d
Marais 4, Minnesota.
FAMOUS U. S. .38 SMITH & Wesson (Milit a r y & Police) revolvers only $27.50 with new
holster. Shipped duty free. Send remittance for
immediate shipment. International Firearms
Co., 1 0 1 1 Bleury, Montreal, Que.
MUZZLE LOADING rifle & pistol barrel
blanks. 30 t o 50 cal. octagon o r round, lengths
P. 0.
to 48 in. I ~ e sBanska-Barrellmnker,
Box 511, Kalispell, Mout.
1 5 TO 20% DISCOUNT New Guns, Pistols,
Lyman Reloading Supplies. A. C. Ficke, Bide.
3006, Apt. D. Farnsworth. Great Lakes, Illinois.
ENGRAVING
F I N E ENGRAVING. Folder, 50c. E. C. Prudbomme, 305 Ward Bldg., Sbreveport, La.
ENGRAVING-SCROLL-gold
animals-Individual designs. Doubles restocked. Gunreblu, Biltmore 15, N. C.
CUSTOM GUN Engraving. Free Folder. L. C.
Hoyt, 321 E. Minnesota St., Indianapolis, Ind.
PARTS & SPECIALTIES
GRIPS-IVORY,
pearl, stag, wood. Your design inlaid-gold,
platinum, ivory f o r discriminating. Grunreblu, Biltmore 15, N. C.
,
GUNSMITHING
-
.
. $"
CUSTOM GUNSMITHING. Catering t o match
& varmint shooters. Greenwich Firearms, T"A
169 Chambers St.. New York 7, N. Y.
used; 1 2 shot, good coudition,$39.50 each.
44-40 Cartridges, $12.00 per hundred. Public
Sport Shops, 11 S. 1 6 t h Street, Philadelphia
z. r a .
AMMUNITION L E S S T h a n Cost. Factory
25-35 Win. $12 0 5 P e r 100 3 3 Win. $14 00
J U S T PURCHASED Several Collections P e r 1 0 0 348 $ i 6 50 P e r 100 Blanks' 30-06
7mm 8mm 30-40, 44-40 $3 00 P e r 100, ~ e - s t a m p brings listing of any of t h e following:
Kentuckies, Civil W a r carbines, Colts. Lugers,
loads, 3 8 Spec, $32.50 'per' 1.000. 45 Auto
Winchesters. Swords. Bayonets. double rifles.
$45.00 P e r -1.000. Bullets. S i h d i n-d T.nhrlcombination'
guns, automatic pistols - Super
cated 3 8 Spec. $16.00 P e r 1 0 0 0 45 Auto
eatalog 5W. 1.000,000 items. E d Agramonte,
$18.00 P e r 1,000. NO c.o.D.';. she11 shop,
Yonkers
2K,
N. Y.
3705 Sunset Blvd.. Los Anseles
- 26., Calif
FOR
SALE
:
German double rifle. H. Kessel,
BUY, SELL. t r a d e guns. Following f o r imSuhl, 9.3x74R. highly relief engraved, blue
mediate delivery: Ruger Single Six
thin,
otherwise
excellent i n a n d out, $495.00.
$63.25. Colt Single Action Army, n e d
Jeff. Trader, Pocomoke City, Maryland.
hbl., .38 spl. cal. only, $125. Ruger Blackhawk, new, $87.50. Win. Mod 8 8 308, new
COLT SINGLE Actions, calibers .22, 32-20,
$129.90. Cherry's, Geneseo 50.1llii1ois.
3 8 Special. .38-40, .44 Special. .44-40. and .45
Colt
with 4 w , 5 % o r 7%" barrels, blue o r
ITHACA 4 SINGLE T r a p a s n e w $260.00.
nickel finish, guaranteed good condition,
S.A. Colt 3 8 Spccial Frontier-looks
new
$85.00.
Greer Firearms Company, Box 201,
$97.00. Fl Rifle Shootable & decorative $55.00.
Griffin. Georsia.
Want Rem 32TC & Win 2 1 Shotguns. Gun
Exchange, Wells, Minn.
3
tG!
GOLD-SILVER-Nickel
Plating. Bright prew a r bluing. Antiques, Frontiers restored. Gunr ~ h l i i .Biltmore 15. N. C.
SPECIALIZING. CHROME moly barrels. 4570 a n d 3 3 WCF. and remodeling 1886 Winc h e s t e r ~ . Convert model 92 and 5 3 Winchesters t o .357 magnum. Hughel's Gun Shop.
Route 1. Box 354. Monroe, Wash.
SHOOTERS : I F you a r e interested i n learning Gunsmithing and a r e willing t o spend a
few hours i n your home shop f o r a handsome accurate .22 target pistol, send 3 cent
s t a m p f o r complete information. P. 0. Bn362, Terre Haute, Indiana.
-- -
FAMOUS SWISS 7.5 mm Maunlicher Type
Carbines and Schmidt-Rubin Rifles. Individiially selected in Switzerland. Excellent, no
seconds. Carbines $75. Rifles $50. Genuine
leather hand laced Carbine Cases $20. Ammunition : Military $2.50 box 24 : $ 6 . 0 0 carton 60. Sporting $4.00 box 24 ; shipping prepaid five boxes west Mississippi : eight boxes
east. Randau Arms, 911 Pico Avenue, Frenso
4. California.
CARTRIDGE COLLECTORS-List
#14 with
new additions listing 1000 different U. S. a n d
Foreign Collectors cartridges. Many rarities
never before offered. 204. M a r t i n B. Retting,
Inc., Culver City 23, Calif.
.22 CALIBRE SHORT Lee Enfield (S.M.L.E.)
Service Model Rifles (similar t o ,303 S h o r t
Service Rifle No. 1 ) . Best training rifle ever
made. Only a small quantity originally manufactured. $24.50 each. .22 Calibre famous
nois.
CARTRIDGE BOXES with partitions auu
d a t a labels prepaid: 3 8 spec. -44 spec.-45
ACP etc. $1.50 dozen. 30-06-30-30
etc. $1.40
dozen. Sample 20c. Labels 50c hundred. J. E.
Bridgman, P 0. Box 2502, Kansas City 42, Mo.
HANDGUN RELOADERS. T h e "Perfection"
~ ' i i i b o l oResizing
~
Die, prevents scratch o r gall
on your cases, and cleaning o r lubricating is
never reauired before resizing. Unconditionally
f o r 250,000 cases, a n d Police departments have reported r u n n i n g 1,500,000
NEW AND Used Rifles, Pistols, Snotguns a n d
with n o wear o n shells o r die. P o s t paid
Revolvers. We buy, sell and trade. Bargain
$21.50. S t a r reloaders a n d Lubricators i n
list f o r dime. Midwest A r m s Exchange, Dept.
stock, no waiting 1 5 0 days f o r factory delivG . 28 N. Hazel St.. Danville. 111.
ery. Reloading a l l t h e popular rifle a n d handgun calibers, a n d c a r r y a full line of cast,
U S. 30-40 CAL KRAG rifles Very good
Cladaloy (Kirksite) a n d jacketed bullets. C-H$37.50. U.S. 30-06 cal Enfield rifles Excellent
Pacific, Lyman a n d Norma products carried
$39.50. German Mod: 88.8mm ~ a u s e rrifles
Very good $37.50; Excellent $42.50. ~ e r m a n in stock. Mail 504 f o r f o r t y page illustrated
catalog. Buey's Custom Reloading Service,
G-438mm Mauser semi-automatic rifles Ex5325 Arlington Street, Phila. 31. Penna.
cellent $60.00. Russian 7.62mm Moisiu rifles.
Very good $19.95. J a p 7.7mm Arisaka rifles
Excellent $18.00. Money Back Guarantee. ~ r e e RELOADERS-WHY
buy 40 reloading dies
List. Freedlaud Arms, 34 P a r k Row, New
when one die will do t h e work $15.00. C - A .
York, 3'.Y.
Pattison, Box 1701, Anchorage, Alaska.
SPRINGFIELDS, MAUSERS, Japs, etc. a t big
bargain prices. Free Gun List. Al's Gunroom, 1 Beekman St., New York. N. Y.
--
DREAM TARGET RANGE
BINOCULARS & TELESCOPES
BINOCULAR SPECIALISTS. all makes repairrd. Authorized Bausch & I.omb KeissHensoidt, and Bushnell dealer. Tele-Optics,
5314 Lawrence, Chicago 30, 111.
'WHICH MODEL?" "How to Check Alignment" - Free leaflets by Binocular Experts
since 192.1. Free list: 3 grades with quality
comparison. 30 days' trial. Free repair estimates. Mirakel Optical Co. Mount Vernon 8,
New York.
BISOCTTLARS REPAIRED by expert craftsman. Hard coating. Eye cups replaced, all
makes. We have optics to repair any make.
Collimator alimment to Gov't snecification.
Free rherk-nn a n d patimatea. nromnt service.
special rate; t o c l n b s - . A l l work
Binocular cases, any size $3.00. I. Miller, 703
South Third Street. Philadelnhia 47. Penna.
AMERICA'S ONLY Direct Mail Binocular Factory. 40th year-better binocular values. Repair Specialists. Eyepieces for Balscope Sr.lox to 75x-$9.95 to $15. Write. DuMaurier
Mfgrs. Elmira 4, N. Y.
WANTED
WANTED : GOOD 98 Mauser actions made before 1942, Koenigs Guns, Box 241, Newman,
Calif.
COLLECTOR WILL pay fair prices for fine
condition American Civil War and Revolutionary guns. .T. Floberg, 2720 W. Devon Ave.,
Phirag0 45. 111.
W A N T E D : REMINGTON hand guns in fine
condition. also Remington catalogs prior to
1012. W. E. Florence, 60 Mt. Vernon St.,
Reading. Mass.
FOR SALE
-
10% OFF-ALL New Guns & Scopes in Stock.
Vinnedge Gun Shop, Big Fork, Montana.
FOR SALE-Send
106 for list of Shotguns
Kifli s. IIaudguns. Ammunition, or send 25< for
all lists. Frayseth's, Willmar, Miun.
MISCELLANEOUS
p
-
~
~
ELECTRIP PENCIL: Engraves all Metals,
$I..")). Keyer Mfg., 105H-Q Springfield, Chicaao 43.
JOBS--1Iigh Pay. South America. the Islands. USA. forcigu countries. All trades. Clerical. labor. engineers, drivers, others. Women
also. Faro paid. Application forms. For information Write Section 93H, National Employment Information, 1020 Broad, Newark, N. J.
HAWAIIAN KONA Koffee Generous Trial
Package, Hawaiian Souvenir
Green Diamonds" Key Chain. Hawaiian Lnrky Emblem
Shoulder Patch For Your Shooting Jacket.
Your Choice One Dollar Postpaid. William
Wilson. Box 167. Hilo, Hawaii.
SPORTSMEN-HUNTERS - Shooters - Lets
Save You Money. Your used guns as part
payment toward new Rifles. Shotguns, Handsfuns. Ammo. Scones. Mounts. Reloading tools.
send 25$ coin o f stamps for list-particulars
-Free hunting tips book. Refunded first order in full. Berkshire Gun Rack. Six Lakes.
Michigan.
BUY SURPLUS direct from Government.
Boat. motor, truck, jeep, hunting, fishing,
camping, sporting Equipment. Radio, Photowraphic. Power tools, machinery & hundreds
others listed in our Bulletin "Surplus Sales."
Price $1.00. Box 169UH, East Htfd. 8, Conn.
100 TRICK KNOCKOUTS for self-defense $1.
-I$
nois.
each. Priest, Box 251, Evanston 1, 1111-
COIN COLLECTORS. Number one exchange
publication. Sample 304 Numismatic News,
lola, Wisconsin.
catalog. Writ
"INTERESTING MAILS" - 25$ keeps Your
mailbox full three months. Bentz (Desk-R/7),
Chatawa, Mississippi.
(Continued from page 43)
or each paying shooter bring the total up
o over 60,000 people who enjoyed the cool
Â¥omforand shooting facilities of the range.
And yet of over $2,059,000 set aside for
urther development and construction i n
,ome 18 county parks and recreation areas,
mly $42,340 was marked for Trail Glade.
Fhis sum paid for the automatic skeet ma;hines on the No. 1 field, concrete towers
ind walks, and 5% acres of lawns over the
sntire Trail Glade area. A former Army
Engineer barracks was remodeled into the
;offee shop, with attractive pine panelling
md old guns decorating the walls. Coffee
,hop business will supplement Trail Glade's
ncome.
The sports park is a new concept in civic
iffairs, especially when the main promoters
)f the idea happen to be shooters. Miami's
Sports Park Association, formed by the leadng shooter-sportsmen of the city, was a
ion-profit organization tentatively set up to
sxpress public support for a public range
orogram. The association had two important
aims. First was to strive for county approval,
instead of just the city's okay. Second was
to help run the range.
Working at the county level was a keystone of the Sports Park Association's successful operation. Miami shooters recalled
the days before Pearl Harbor when there
had been 15 fine outdoor ranges. Some of
the ranges had permanent clubhouses, frame,
brick or cement block buildings which served
as social centers as well as places to keep
rifles under cover. As much as 100 yards
for smallbore and even longer big bore and
pistol ranges were parts of these attractive
layouts in the expanding Miami area. But
the shooters learned with the booming growth
of the city that ranges were only as permanent as the approval of the county commissioners, the local political forces.
Too often adverse politics has entered into
closing some ranges. Too often building contractors, with their eyes on grassy expanses
of flat range land, have worked to get smallbore ranges adjudged public nuisances. Such
pressure is impossible to buck, as the small,
unorganized clubs found to their distress.
But the Sports Park Association planned to
work with the county commissioners, helping them to expand recreation facilities for
everybody through the sports park idea.
Paramount in the shooters' proposal to get
a range was their idea of a unified sports
park which included recreation like water
sports and archery as well as shooting.
And to clinch the deal, the Sports Park
Association shooters offered to help run the
whole show, and relieve the county of the
need for working out tedious details. The
Miami crowd were quite different from most
shooting clubs which operate in starry-eyed
indifference to the ~ o l i t i c a land social needs
of some of the other citizens.
Luck, horse sense, and enthusiasm tempered with careful planning built the Trail
Glade range. A member of the board of
governors of the Everglades Drainage District was one of the ten shooters who got the
ball rolling for the range project. This was
important, for the sports park group intended to obtain the use of land under control of the district. One slight drawback
held them up: most of this land was under
two to four feet of water at different times
of the year!
Such land could not economically be filled
without draining. Draining would have involved a tremendous cost, so great that if i t
had been done the county would have been
obliged to use the dry land for something
far more important than a playground. Then
luck came up smiling. The Army Engineers,
planning to build some dikes for flood control study, asked the county commissioners
where they might have some waste land on
which to build their dikes.
The Drainage Commission offered the engineers a piece of underwater Florida real
estate which they obligingly diked and
drained. Having completed their study, the
Army Engineers struck camp and pulled out,
leaving behind several barrack sheds and
their dikes. Again lady luck, wearing a
"10-X" shooting coat instead of a flowing
robe, smiled on the shooters. An active Miami marksman was appointed by the governor as a member of the flood control
commission.
From this post he was able to encourage
the Everglades Drainage District (of which
he was a member, also,) to convey to Dade
County for park purposes 160 acres of the
very land on which the test dike had been
built.
Next, the county commissioners were persuaded to accept the land for the purpose
intended. There was one way to accomplish
this, and that was by showing the commissioners the sad light of the Dade Count
sportsmen in the shooting game, and COI
vince them that all the sportsmen i n tb
county were in favor of the project.
Many important citizens of Miami helpei
With their endorsement a membership drii
to increase the association got under
The swelling membership rolls proved
project was a genuine community affair, ni
just a special interest deal involving a fe:..
Original range layouts were resented by the
Sports Park Association. With the approval
of the county commissioners, the Sports Park
Association finally triumphed, had finally
achieved the goal set so long before.
I t took great courage on the part of the
park department and the county commissioners to make the unusual move of recommending and building a shooting range. Yet
early fears that they might be condemned for
providing shooting facilities have proved
entirely without cause.
"The pleased reaction of parents who
come out here wtih their youngsters for the
first time make us feel that we are iust
beginning" reports shooting superintendent
Maury LaLonde. "So long as we can give
TAXIDERMIST
preliminary instruction in shooting and instill the basic principles of safety and range
TAxIDERlfIsT Magazine... Green.
conduct, we have no fear for the future-"
field Center. 11 X.Y. Devoted Exclusively to
Taxidermy Methods. Photos. Trial Year's Sub- The future of Trail Glade is integrated with
scription, $1.00.
the community. As long as there are parks
FINE DETAILED Sculptor Taxidermy. 37
for people to play, shooters will fire at Trail
years experience. A. E. Masters, Master-TaxiGlade.
0
dcrmist. 1174 Beaver St.. 'Missoula. Mont.
AMAL1Nt-i Nl-W
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r
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whether raw wood
oil
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So to make your gun a show piece you'll be proud t o
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Or i f his supply hasn't yet arrived, order direct. Big
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...
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LOOK F
O
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T H I S DISPLAY
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Ifyou're not now selling
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"This really has been a wild goose chase!"
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8140 N. Ridgeway Ave.
I
Skokie, Illinois
Genuine Down Insulated
1
family, too.
1 RUSH Free Folder on Down insulated Garments to:
1 Name
1 Address
I
I
L'-2- - - - - - - - - - ----I
ZoneÃÃ
‘S
‘att
I
I
FLAIG'S 1pciU.c
I
JOBBING:
Sako barreled-actions, rifles (sporter and Mannlicher type), and Sako .222 actions. Lyman;
Weaver; Unertl; Leupold; Pacific; BM; Redding;
Redfield; Pachmayr; Williams; Marble; Echo;
Buehler; Jaeger; Sierra; Hornady; Boyt; Tri-Pak;
King; C&H; Wilson; RCBS; G&H; Mershon; ACE
Products; Husqvarna action, Stith Scopes, Hoppers, Argus, McKinzie, Forster, Un-Speed, Birchw o o d and FERIACH GUNS. Norma and Thaison. Sheridan, Hi-Score Smiley, Wilsonite, Kollmorgen, Judd, Douglas, Colt, Alcan, Acme,
Polychoke, Schultz & Larsen, Speer components.
AUTHORIZED
INSTALLDTION
MI L LVALE, P A .
........$92.50
......................$17.00
................. .$ 5.00
1
PRECISION-CHAMBERED BARRELED ACTIONS
....
Ã
‘
Ã
‘
Ã
‘
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........$99.52
............$75.00
E N G R A V E D F.N. A C T I O N S
NEW
w i t h b o l t f o r g e d f o r l o w scope safety, w i t h
f i n e l y e n g r a v e d t r i g g e r guard, f l o o r p l a t e
a n d receiver r e g u l a r l y $74.50, SPECIAL
PRICE b o t h No. 1 & No. 3 . . . . . . $59.50
This i s your chance t o save $15.00.
ENGRAVED F.N STRIPPED RECEIVERSN E W .......Ã
.............................
$20.00
.
5 7.50
ENGRAVED F.N. FLOOR PLATES ...........
ENGRAVED F.N. TRIGGER GUARD,
---..-.-$11.00
STRIPPED
F. N. Complete bolts, with l o w scope safety.......S22.00
F. N. Stripped receivers, tapped for scope __-Ñ.$14.0
ENFIELD PARTS-NEW
SCHULTZ S. IARSEN PRODUCTS:
Imported Barreled-Action, white,
Caliber 7 x 61 S&H, sporter wt.
With Douglas Sporter barrel, white
Sharpe & Larsen Action only
Sharpe & Hart Unprimed Cases,
7 x 61, per 100
Sharpe & Hart 160-Gr. S. P.
ammo, per box of 20
CALIBERS: 220 Swift; 22-250; 257R; 270; 7MM; 308 Win.;
Also 250 Sov., 300 Sav., 243 Win., 244 Rem.
30-06.
1. Latest F. N. Mouser Action - (or HVA Action, $10.00 additional)
2. Best grade Ackley Chrome Moly Barrel, or Douglas Chrome Moly UltraRifled Barrels with the smooth, hard, swedged rifling in most calibers,
including 243 Win. and 244 Rem.
3. Each unit precision chambered to mirror finish with proper headspace.
4. Each unit test-fired with sample fired case included for your inspection.
5. Length and rifle twist as wanted-otherwise we w i l l ship recommended length and twist.
6. Choice of soorter, Medium Heovv, or Heavy. weight
barrels.
7. Barrels have fine-ground finish. ..
Price $67.50 Sporter weight. 51/2 Ibs. $72.50 Medium Heavy Weight (oppr. .700 at muzzle) 7 Ibs.
Heavy weight $77.50.
($7.50 additional for the Douglas Premium Grade Barrel)
($12.50 additional for NEW ENGRAVED FN ACTION)
CHECK THESE FEATURES:
Now bail able^^. N . M A G N U M ACTION on .300, .375. H&H
semi-oct. ribbed 26" barrel, sheard bead fitted in ramp, $ 1 10.00
ACTIONS
BARRELS
F. N. ACTIONS IMPORTED-LITE
K R A G PARTS:
'
Receivers, stripped, $4.00; Bolts, stripped ........$7.00
51.50
.
Trigger Guards, $3.00; Sear-Trigger Units .-....
M a n e Springs. $1.50; Safes .
................
$1.50
.
New! SPRINGFIELD Issue
30-06 BARRELS
Completely Chambered and Threaded, 2-Groove.
(Special Volume
Prices on Request)
Only $8.00
Â¥eeÂ¥eeeÂ¥oÂ¥o¥¥e¥¥Â
New! K R A G 2 - ~ r o o v e
WGT. vanadium
steel barrels, blued w i t h ramp (.220 Swift, .257-R,
.250-3000, .270, 7 mm o r 30-04), $74.00 PREPAID.
F. N. ACTIONS, Boehler 24" proof steel barrels,
semi-octagon ribbed, matted. Sheared bead i n
ramp. Caliber .270, 3 0 8 Win. or 7 mm. 30-06,
22-250-220 swift 2 6 " 2 5 7 ~ - 2 5 0 sav. $95.00.
IMPORTED SAKO BARRELLED-ACTIONS, 3 0 0 H&H
and .375 H&H, blued, $89.95.
SAKO ACTIONS on 26" 41/2*
med. heavy
ACKLEY OR DOUGLAS chrome moly barrel, white,
$84.00. .222 Cal.
SAKO ACTION on imported medium heavy barrel, blued, n o sights. Ready for stocking. .222
Rem. caliber £90.00
BOEHLER BARRELS, proof steel, semi-oc
ribbed, matted entire length. Made b y f
SODIA o f Ferlach, Austria i n .25, .270, 7mm, .31
8mn and -375. 26" Highly accurate-in
th
white, $45.00. (Fitted to your action, w i t h shear
bead, complete price $60.00)
N e w Springfield 4-groove barrels . . . . . .
FRANZ SOD1A Baehler proof steel barrels, 2
gradual taper. About
1-10 twist, caliber .25,
(Fitted to your action, headspaced and
test fired, $10.00 more).
STOCK FITTING & FINISHI
30-40 BARRELS
Completely Chambered and Threaded.
Only $15.00
Note:
y
o
-Some "Seconds'*
pecks,
slight
Supply Limited!
Either of the above
Sprigfield
or
Kraa
Barrels expertly fitted
Action-headspaced
to
and
test-fired~S2.50additional.
i n Walnut
small
off
checks~50%
bird.1
1ist.j
FINEST PENNA. BLACK WALNUT BLANKS & STOCKS:
Rifle blanks, all grades, $4.00 to $20 00 Walnut shotun blanks, $1.00 to $15.00. Walnut inletted stock
most rifles; standard $5.00; x x grade (butt) $7.00'
ofhers $10.00 to S12.00. Also Penna. burls and rare
burls available NOW: x x x grade $17.50-$20.00,
xxxx S25.00; super Burls up to $35.00.
OREGON MYRTLE BLANKS & STOCKS: Rifle blanks,
S5.00 to $7.00. Inletted stocks for all rifles $7.00 to
$12.00. Some Seconds, All Grades, 50% off.
%I
AMMUNITION
$6.00 per 100
.45 Auto Commercial M.C. Ammo.- ..---.
$6.00 per 100
gr. B.T.M.C. ...........................
Case Lots of 1500 ..................
_$75.00
2 5 - 2 0 S.P. 86-Gr. ------.-.---........
$6.00 per 100
Rare Birds Eye Maple-dense wood,
30-06 Govt. issue-M.C. 150 gr-1943-44 ..$5.50 per 100
Lots of 500 or moreÑ10~ less. Case of
figured blanks $30.50. Fancy $25.00.
1500 30-06 M.C. $70.00. FOB MILLVALE.
ONCE FIRED CASES
-.
FERLACH "OVER-UNDER"
22 Hornet .300 Savage -------ÑÑ----_
___.$2.50-100
.30-30 Winchester -.----........._.__$3.00-100
...-...
.308 Winchester (Boxed) .
..................$6.00~100
222 Reminoton -----~------Ñ_...--.~.---~-.$6.00Ñ~
250-2000 savage (Boxed) .ÑÑÑÑÃ
$6.00~100
8 MM Mauser (Imported, Germany)-175
ACME RELOADING TOOLS
12 go. Model 200~availableat once
ACE TRIGGER
SHOE S2.00
For most rifles, shotguns a 9 d g u n s .
FINE %" LEATHER
SLINGS, Imported.
For narrow swivels.
Woven l e a t h e r ,
$3.50; vlain $3.00.
.... .$B9.95
ONE WEEK
SERVICE
turn 6 i n l e t your
5s.00 each; 6 or more
we
highly
rifle blanks.
$4.00 each.
Rare Q u i l t e d M a p l e
Rifle stock blanks Fancy $20.00; Full Font
$25.00; Super $30.00. (Turned & inletted fs
most rifles' $5.00 more).
6
more.
inletted *porter
type
for
most action-barrels, $5.0
I
TURKEY G U N
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $330
MADE I N FERLACH AUSTRIA light-weight, racy,
engraved, beautifully checkered. Weighs only 61/2
perfectly balanced. 24" Boehler proof steel barrel12 gauge; lower barrel chambered for anyone of t
Hornet, 222 Rem., 257 R, 270, 7 MM or 30-06. The i
ownership pleasure and good shooting, too! MADE
"g'ea^Fr
S A C K E D B Y 40 YEARS
O F O P T I C A L EXPERIENCE
N O R M A BULLETS
Â
AMMUNITION
0
Write for FREE New Cataloq-List
U N P R I M E D CASES
No. 27
A C E DOUBLE-SET
TRIGGER
Fitted to your
Mauser or F.N. Ac$6.00 more.
tion
-
AfitUe., Pa.
.
I NOW,
HUSQVARNA
MONTE-CARLO
LIGHTWEIGHT
Combines all outstanding features of the Series 4100 Husqvarna Lightweight rifle, but
designed specifically for use with telescopic sights. Incorporates, the new Husqvarna
HVA Action with slide safety, lightweight, 20%-inch barrel ofufinest Swedish steel,
Monte-Carlo stock of selected European Walnut has built-in eheek piece, handcheckered pistol and foregrip. Receiver is drilled and tapped to accommodate the
ESQUIRE 2-piece top mount, and other popular scope mounts. Overall weight (les
scope and mount) 6 lbs., 12 oz. The Monte-Carlo Lightweight-calibers 30-06, .270
.308, and 7 MM (7 x 57)-popularly priced, $145.50.
tion) $57.50; the popular ESQUIRE VARIABLE
POWER SCOPE (adjusts from 2% power to 8 owe;
magnification) $89.50.
I
ESQUIRE HUNTING SCOPES
- itflS
Â¥if
4.
ESQUIRE SCOPE
MO,.UN~~
TOP 2% x -8x : BOTTOM 4 x 81
Designed and engineered with all finer features found
in most expensive hunting scopes, and-offering these
additional advantages: ino ocular focusing, &eater
light transmission, larger field of view, lightweight
26mm steel construction, precision ground optics,
extremely accurate windage and elevation adjustments, and-of course-moisture and dust-proof.
Crosshair reticule or crosshair-dot reticule, same
price. ESQUIRE 4X SCOPE (4 power magnifica-
,
machined for
fit to contour of HVA Rc
ceivers; mounting screws aredefinitely aligned to 6
the factory drilling and tapping. Built-in Windage
adjustments permit perfect bore sighting of scope
and minimize internal adjustments of scope reticule.
Scope mounts easily in 26 mm split rings. hfounl
and Rings, cnmnln+- Q l 7
,
+
AVAILABLE di
ALL HUSQVARNA FRANCHISE DEALERS
Write for Literature
a
*
,
,. .
P. 0. Box 1 191, lacoma 1, Wash.
Canada, Dorken ~ r o ~ ~ p & _ 1McCill
0 8 St., Montreal.
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