Food Technology Worksheets

Technology
first
Teacher’s resource
CONSULTANT Lois Aspin
Amber Fanning, Rosalie Gualtieri
Worksheets
NAME
CLASS
1.1
What do you know about
bacteria?
Literacy
Complete the table. You may refer to your text if necessary.
c
Course Book p 6
Bacteria name
Source of contamination
Foods involved
Symptoms
Salmonella
Found in the
of
animals, particularly
.
Cross-contamination is frequently
the cause of contamination.
Raw meat, poultry and
. It may occur
in foods that have not been
properly
.
Vomiting, diarrhoea and
listlessness within
hours.
Clostridium
perfringens
Raw meat,
in soil and
handling.
Cold and
meat such as casseroles
and stew.
, diarrhoea
and abdominal cramping
within
hours.
Foods eaten cold such as
custards, cold meats and
pre-prepared
fare.
Vomiting,
and
abdominal cramps within
hours.
Lives in the
of
humans and animals and is
transferred by poor hygiene in
the workplace.
Raw and
meat and poultry.
Abdominal upset and
severe diarrhoea. May be
for young
children.
Dust, water,
shellfish,
Milk products, soft
, manufactured
meats and softice-cream.
Nausea, vomiting and
diarrhoea within
hours.
coated
food
Staphlyococcus Many people carry this bacteria in
passages, mouths
and infected skin. It is
by coughing and sneezing.
(Escherichia)
Listeria
1
,
and insects.
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NAME
1.2
Hands on
c
Course Book p 11
CLASS
Storing bread
Have you ever noticed how some bread goes stale when stored incorrectly?
Design and conduct your own experiment to discover more about the storage of bread
and find the best ways to store and preserve bread.
Aim
To test the keeping quality of bread by comparing a home-made loaf with a commercially
produced loaf.
Equipment
Method
1
2
3
4
Diagrams
Results
Conclusion
2
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NAME
1.3
CLASS
Sensory properties of food
crossword
Vocabulary
c
1
2
3
4
5
6
Course Book p 14
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Across
Down
2 A spicy meal.
1 When a flavour is weak, it is said to be
3 A typically sour food.
5 If a flavour is strong, it is said to be
7 These are found on the tongue and are used to
detect different flavours.
.
.
2 A typically salty food.
4 The main sense used when eating.
6 Texture is also known as
.
10 Flavour is said to be the combination of taste
and smell,
and appearance.
8 A sense that helps to determine whether food has
gone ‘off’.
11 Sometimes certain colours lead us to
certain flavours.
9 This food has a crisp texture.
12 A typically sweet food.
13 The first sensory property that is seen in a food.
14 A typically bitter food.
3
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NAME
CLASS
1.4
Hands on
c
Course Book p 18
Denaturation of egg whites
Aim
Ingredients
Equipment
To observe and record
denaturation of egg
whites.
6 eggs
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon lemon juice or
tartaric acid
1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
Electric beaters
6 small bowls
Stopwatch
Pen and paper
Method
1
Carefully separate the egg yolks and egg whites. Place each egg white in a separate
bowl.
2
Number the bowls from 1 to 6.
3
Using electric beaters on a high setting, beat the first egg white until it forms stiff
peaks. Use your stopwatch to record the time taken. Observe the consistency of the
mixture.
4
Beat the second egg white as described in Step 3. Use a stop watch to record the time
taken. Keep beating this egg white for another 2–3 minutes after the peaks have
formed. Record the time taken and observe the results.
5
Add salt to the third egg white then beat as described in Step 3. Observe and record
your results, including the time taken.
6
Add sugar to the fourth egg white then beat as described in Step 3. Observe and
record your results, including the time taken.
7
Add lemon juice or tartaric acid to the fifth egg white then beat as described in Step
3. Observe and record your results, including the time taken.
8
Add bicarbonate of soda to the sixth egg white and then beat as described in Step 3.
Observe and record your results, including the time taken.
Results
Egg no.
Time taken
Final consistency
1
Explain the process of denaturation.
2
Which additive(s) aided the stiffening of the egg white?
3
Why do you need to be accurate with the timing and
speed of the electric mixer?
4
Explain what happens when the egg white is over-beaten.
1
2
3
4
5
6
4
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NAME
1.5
Vocabulary
CLASS
Food preparation utensils
and equipment
Identify the utensils and equipment shown below.
c
Course Book p 20
b
a
c
d
e
g
f
h
Word bank
k
peeler
apple corer
poultry shears
whisk
colander
mortar and pestle
food processor
blender
cook’s knife
bread knife
slotted spoon
i
j
5
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NAME
1.6
Literacy
CLASS
Making a recipe card
Chocolate fudge slice
Design a recipe card for this recipe using ‘plain English’ (no jargonistic cooking terms).
Include diagrams for each step and label all equipment or utensils used.
c
Course Book p 22
e
te fudge slic
la
o
c
o
h
C
e
ip
Rec
Preparation time
Cooking time
Diagrams
Method
6
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NAME
1.7
Literacy
CLASS
Food additives
1
Match the definitions using the additive list provided below.
2
List one food that this additive may be used in.
Additive
c
Description
Food
Prevent food products from drying out
Used to help keep dry, powdery products from
clumping together
Course Book p 23
Give a food product a uniform consistency
and texture
Protect foods against the action of
micro-organisms
Sweeten a product without the use of sugar
Improve or restore the taste or flavour of a food
Add or restore colour in food products
Additive list
•
anti-caking agents
•
flavourings
•
artificial sweeteners
•
humectants
•
colours
•
preservatives
•
thickeners and
vegetable gums
Activity
Bring in a package of a processed food product such as a packet sauce mix or bag of crisps. Observe the
additives present in the ingredient list. Swap your product with a partner and then discuss your findings.
Record the additives below.
Product name
Product name
Additives present
Additives present
7
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NAME
1.8
Vocabulary
c
CLASS
Big bickies flowchart
A flowchart is a diagrammatical representation of a process.
Use the symbols below to construct your own flowchart for making Milk Arrowroot biscuits as described in the text. Show how the product is manufactured including the raw
ingredients, processes and steps involved in making the finished product.
operation
inspection
storage
delay/wait
operation and
inspection
transport/
movement
Course Book p 24
8
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NAME
CLASS
Garnish findaword
1.9
Vocabulary
c
strawberries
tomato rose
van dyke
wafer
zest
icing sugar
lime wedge
mint
parsley
piping
sauce
shallot
celery curl
cherries
chocolate
coulis
crouton
cream
doily
Course Book p 27
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9
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NAME
1.10
Hands on
c
CLASS
Design an experiment
There are many forces that might damage eggs, such as pressure (crushing or squeezing),
temperatures (hot or cold) and physical movement (being dropped). What other forces
can you think of?
Design an experiment that tests the protective qualities of an egg carton.
Aim
To test the protective qualities of an egg carton and determine whether it is a suitable form
of packaging.
Course Book p 30
Equipment
Method
Results
Conclusion
10
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NAME
1
CLASS
c
Chapter test
TOTAL
Course Book p 34
50
Food preparation and processing
True or false?
1 You must wash your hands with cold, soapy water before preparing food.
2 Dehydration is a relatively new form of food preservation.
10
3 pH is a measure of acidity and alkalinity.
4 To blanch something is to boil it for a long period of time.
5 Texture is not one of the sensory properties of food.
6 Flavour is a combination of taste and smell.
7 Dextrinisation is the browning process formed by the action of heat on sucrose.
8 Syneresis is seen when liquid weeps from a lemon meringue pie.
9 Labour-saving devices are generally mechanical.
10 Paper and cardboard packaging is very difficult to print on.
Short answer questions
1 State two rules for personal hygiene.
2 Define ‘cross-contamination’ and
describe how it occurs.
11
2
3 Explain one reason why food safety
legislation exists.
2
4 Identify the three groups of
micro-organisms.
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2
3
NAME
1
CLASS
Chapter test continued
5 List three favourable conditions for
bacterial growth.
13 List three utensils used in the kitchen.
3
3
14 What does it mean to ‘bake’ something?
6 Name one bacteria associated with
food poisoning and state one source
of contamination.
7 Identify one environmental cause of food
spoilage.
8 Explain how moisture levels may affect
food preservation and give an example
to support your answer.
1
2
15 Explain the difference between primary
processing and secondary processing.
1
4
16 Select one packaging material. Describe
it and outline one advantage and one
disadvantage.
9 Why are watermelon and lettuce not
suitable for freezing?
3
1
17 What is modified atmosphere packaging?
10 List four sensory properties of food.
2
4
11 Name one food product that undergoes
caramelisation.
1
12 Name one product that undergoes
gelatinisation.
1
12
4
18 What does it mean if a product is
biodegradable?
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1
NAME
1
CLASS
Chapter review
c
Course Book p 34
Food preparation and processing
It is now time to test your successful completion of this chapter. Use the checklist below. Provide relevant
information or examples to show that you understand what you have studied.
Students learn to
Information, examples or comments
Demonstrate safe, cooperative and hygienic work practices.
Assess food handling requirements for a variety of food situations.
Describe legislation specifically linked to food safety.
Outline the causes of food deterioration and spoilage.
Identify ingredients that pose a high risk for food deterioration and spoilage.
Describe techniques and methods that make food products less prone
to deterioration and spoilage.
Explain the principles of food preservation.
Describe a range of methods used to preserve and store food safely.
Apply the principles of food preservation and storage when producing
food products.
Discuss the reasons why basic ingredients need to be cooked for
consumption.
Appreciate the role food components play in the sensory qualities of food.
Examine the functional properties of a variety of foods.
Prepare food products that demonstrate the functional properties
of ingredients.
Identify the properties of foods that make them suitable for particular
preparation techniques/cooking methods.
13
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NAME
1
CLASS
Chapter review continued
Create food items using combinations of basic ingredients.
Explain how different cuisines are created by varying basic
ingredients and techniques.
Generate procedural text to outline the steps in processing and
preparing food products using a word processing package.
Demonstrate appropriate selection of techniques and equipment
in food preparation.
Discuss social implications of technological developments in
domestic food preparation equipment.
Explain how various methods of food processing and preparation
affect the physical characteristics of food.
Outline ways in which nutritive loss can be minimised during
preparation and processing.
Identify the various levels of food processing and accompanying changes.
Identify the role of additives in food processing.
Discuss the environmental, social, health and economic implications
of food processing.
Select and apply appropriate presentation techniques and styles of
service for various occasions.
Outline the functions of packaging, including its persuasive effect
on consumers.
Suggest suitable packaging for a variety of food types in different
circumstances.
Identify food labelling requirements.
Consider the ethical issues regarding declarations of ingredients.
List the activities and information that you enjoyed
the most this unit.
14
Identify areas for improvement where more revision
or research are required for you to completely
understand the topic.
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NAME
CLASS
2.1
Test your nutrition
knowledge!
Literacy
Tick the main food sources of each nutrient.
c
Course
Course Book
Book pp 36
6
Nutrients
Main functions
Milk,
yoghurt,
cheese
P
Allows body to
and repair.
Found in many body chemicals.
C
Supply
L
Source of energy.
Provide
Protect
organs.
Vegetables, Fruits
legumes
Bread,
cereals, rice,
pasta,
noodles
.
and
Vitamin A
Necessary for growth, healthy
skin and
.
Vitamin C
Increases resistance
to
.
Calcium
For strong bones
and
.
Iron
Forms haemoglobin that
transports
in the blood.
W
Transports nutrients around
the body.
Assists
.
Maintains body
.
Moistens and protects
body parts.
15
Lean meat,
eggs, fish,
poultry, nuts,
legumes
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NAME
2.2
Literacy
c
Course Book p 47
CLASS
Diet-related disorders
Rachel and Daniel are newborn twins. If good food habits are established early in life
then they may prevent the following diet-related disorders later in life.
Use the Word bank to complete the following sentences.
lack of
Type 2 is when there is too much
.
in the blood because of a
Coeliac disease is sensitivity to the
in wheat called
. The lining
of the small intestine can be affected making it difficult to absorb nutrients.
results from consuming more energy from foods than the body needs. The
extra energy is converted to body
.
Anaemia results from a chronic shortage of
. Fatigue is a common
symptom because iron and protein form haemoglobin, which carries
blood.
Osteoporosis occurs from a lack of
adulthood.
in the
, resulting in fragile bones in
Coronary
disease is where the arteries narrow from the build-up of fatty
deposits, which may trigger a blood clot and cause a heart attack. A high
fat diet, obesity and high blood pressure are linked to the disease.
or high blood pressure is linked to a high
diet.
High intakes of
and red meat appear to increase the risk of
cancer. Maintaining a healthy
and consuming a diet that includes a variety
of vegetables, fruits, legumes, grains and some
3 fatty acids appear to
protect against the cancer.
Word bank
glucose
hypertension
calcium
diabetes
alcohol
16
gluten
saturated
omega
obesity
insulin
oxygen
sodium
colon
iron
heart
fat
protein
weight
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NAME
2.3
Case study
c
Course Book p 51
CLASS
Kayla’s story
When she was 16 years old, Kayla almost died. Like many young Australians Kayla
thought she had to be fit and lose weight so she could be like the pop stars, celebrities
and other women portrayed in magazines. She believed people would like her more if
she were skinnier. So each day her primary focus was on getting thinner.
She undertook several gym classes a day and would walk whenever she had free
time. She started her diet by cutting back from three meals to two and then one and
eventually none. Soon she was hiding food in her pockets and surviving on chewing
gum, cups of tea and maybe a glass of orange juice. In six months she lost a third of
her body weight.
During the first two months of her diet, Kayla’s friends and family told her how
well she looked but later they started telling her that she looked too thin. However,
every time Kayla looked in the mirror she only saw a plump figure.
When her weight reached 40 kilograms Kayla’s family knew they had a problem
with their daughter. They tried to get her to eat but Kayla would lose her temper, kick
throw her arms around and eventually lie on the floor and curl up in the foetal position. At 30 kilograms Kayla’s body resembled skin and bones; but she still felt fat. She
had little energy and her condition was life-threatening. Her parents were advised to
take her to a specialist rehabilitation centre with counselling and treatment. Here they
were surprised to meet some boys who also suffered from the same condition. Kayla
stayed at the centre for two months. She has slowly eaten her way back to health.
1 What condition do you think Kayla suffered
from?
5 Identify the similarities and differences of Kayla’s
condition to bulimia.
2 What motivated Kayla to lose weight?
3 What foods was Kayla surviving on?
6 Why would it be stereotyping to suggest that
eating disorders only happen to girls?
4 Why do you think counselling is part of the
treatment?
17
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NAME
2.4
Literacy
c
Course Book p 57
Word
bank
cereals
grow
growth
food
sugars
safely
water
milks
breastfeeding
vegetables
growth
salt
variety
fish
energy
saturated
physical
wholegrain
18
CLASS
The Australian Dietary
Guidelines for Children and
Adolescents in Australia
1 Use the words from the Word bank to complete the following.
Encourage and support
.
Enjoy a wide
of nutritious foods and drink plenty of water.
Children and adolescents should be encouraged to:
•
eat plenty of
, legumes and fruit
•
eat plenty of
(including breads, rice, pasta and noodles), preferably
•
include lean meat,
•
include
, yoghurts, cheeses and/or alternatives
•
choose
as a drink.
, poultry and/or alternatives
Reduced-fat milks are not suitable for young children under 2 years because
of their high
needs, but should be encouraged for older children and
adolescents. Low fat diets are not suitable for infants.
Care should be taken to:
•
limit
fat and moderate total fat intake
•
choose foods low in
•
consume only moderate intakes of
sugars.
and foods containing added
Children and adolescents need sufficient nutritious foods to
develop normally.
and
should be checked regularly for young children.
activity is important for all children and adolescents.
Care for your child’s
: prepare and store it
2 What health problems are the dietary guidelines trying to prevent?
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.
NAME
2.5
Hands on
c
CLASS
What’s the package
telling you?
You need to be wise when examining food packages. A food may claim to be fat-free while
the nutrition panel may indicate it is very high in sugar.
Aim
Equipment
Method
To interpret the information
provided on a food package.
Packaged food.
Examine a food package
and complete the activities.
Course Book p 58
Results
Product:
1 Complete the following table on the product’s nutritional information.
Servings per package
Serving size
Nutritional information
Quantity per serving
Quantity per 100 g
Energy
Protein
Fat—total
—saturated
Carbohydrates
—sugars
Fibre
Sodium
2 Tick which claims or symbols appear on the package.
Light
Diet
No added salt
Reduced fat
Low sugar
19
Reduced salt
% fat free
No added sugars
Low salt
Low fat
High fibre
Glycemic Index
Fat free
Source of fibre
Heart Foundation Tick
Low cholesterol
Fibre added
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NAME
2.5
CLASS
continued
3 Tick the nutritional value of the product in the table below. Use the daily nutrient
requirements for adolescents as a guide.
Yes
No
Unsure
Low in energy
A good protein source
Low in saturated fat
Low in fat
A sweet food
A starchy food
A salty food
A good source of fibre
Approximate daily requirements for adolescents
Protein
50–70 g (1 g per kg of body weight)
Energy
8 100–13 500 kJ
Sodium
920–2300 mg
Soluble fibre
30–40 g
Saturated fat
15 g
Carbohydrate
50–100 g
Total fat
30–80 g
Note that a low-fat food has less than 3 g of fat per 100 g.
4 Write two paragraphs in your workbook answering the following questions.
• When would you use this product?
• What impact could this product have on health?
• What improvements could be made to the nutritional value of this product?
20
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NAME
CLASS
NORCO Light Prestige
ice-creams
2.6
Case study
The Light Prestige range of ice-creams, made by NORCO, was the first Australian icecream to carry the GI symbol. The Glycemic Index ranks the carbohydrates in food
from 0–100, based on their immediate effect on blood glucose levels.
A food has a high GI if it is ranked at 70 or more; medium GI if ranged between
56 and 69; and low GI when it’s 55 or less. Carbohydrates that are digested quickly
and make blood glucose levels rise sharply have a high GI. Low GI carbohydrates give
a more gradual rise in blood glucose levels.
The NORCO Light Prestige ice-creams have a low GI ranking. Low GI foods are
ideal for people who want to avoid rapid changes in their blood glucose levels, for
example pregnant women or anyone who is interested in health and weight control.
c
Course Book p 59
1 Highlight the answers to the following questions in
the text.
High/Medium
GI foods
white bread
potato
cornflakes
jasmine rice
watermelon
parsnip
• What is the GI index?
• Why are low GI values preferable to high GI
values?
• Who should consume low GI foods?
2 Find these low and high GI foods in the findaword.
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21
soft drink
crumpet
bagel
popcorn
jelly beans
sugar
Low GI foods
muesli
basmati rice
legumes
diet yoghurt
fruit loaf
milk
lentils
cherries
sultanas
bran
corn
porridge
carrot
noodles
banana
kumara
barley
pasta
grain breads
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NAME
CLASS
2.7
Case study
c
This is my life!
Complete the Nutritional needs section of the table with words from the Word bank (note
that some of these words need to be used more than once). Use your own knowledge or
ask family members to help you complete your own history.
Word bank
iron
energy
phosphorus
folate
calcium
vitamin
breast milk
protein
water
Course Book p 60
Stage
Pregnancy
and lactation
Nutritional needs
for the growth of new tissue.
for the formation of bones
My history
I am the child of
My siblings are
.
and teeth.
Iron and
C and B for the
increased blood supply required.
to reduce the risk of neural
tube defect.
.
Substances my mother had to avoid in her pregnancy
were
.
Infancy
for its
antibodies and nutrients.
-giving foods as the baby
becomes more active.
C and iron around six
months.
I was born on (date)
at (time)
at (venue)
.
I weighed
.
When I was a baby I was fed
(breast or
formula milk).
I crawled at
months and walked at
months.
I got my first tooth at
months
The first foods I ate were
.
Childhood
-giving foods as well as well
as foods containing
B to
release energy.
for growth.
Calcium and
for
strengthening bones and teeth.
to avoid dehydration.
I started school in (year)
Adolescence
22
-giving foods.
for growth.
for strong bones.
particularly for girls.
at (school)
.
I lost my first tooth when I was
years old.
A teacher at primary school was
.
Some of the after school activities I was involved in
were
.
My favourite foods were
.
I started high school in (year)
at (school)
.
My height is
cm.
The activities I enjoy include
My favourite foods are
In the near future I plan to
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.
.
.
NAME
2.8
Vocabulary
CLASS
Food selection
Australians should eat more fruits and vegetables.
Name a fruit or vegetable that starts with each letter of the alphabet. Find at least 20
names.
A
c
Course Book p 64
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
23
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NAME
2.9
CLASS
Food selection
1 Highlight which of the following foods is lower in fat and give the reason.
Vocabulary
c
Course Book p 64
Reason
French fries
Potato wedges
Apple pie and cream
Baked apple and ice-cream
Grilled fish
Battered fish
Skim milk
Whole milk
Tuna in oil
Tuna in brine
Cream-filled biscuit
Plain biscuit
Pasta with a
tomato sauce
Pasta with bacon
and cream
A meat lover’s pizza
Margherita pizza (cheese
and tomato topping)
Help these people out!
2 Phil has to cut down on his lipid intake. What could he order instead of his favourite
fish and chips when dining out?
3 Sara is pregnant. Suggest a low-fat, high-calcium lunch suitable for Sara to take to
work.
4 Christopher and his friends love takeaway fast foods. Suggest a healthy fast food meal.
5 Studying makes Michelle want to snack. Suggest some healthy snack choices.
24
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NAME
2.10
Hands on
c
Course Book p 65
CLASS
Evaluating processed and
unprocessed foods
1 Choose one of the following unprocessed foods:
• tomatoes
• corn
• potato
• chicken
• strawberries
• mince meat.
2 Conduct a supermarket survey to find six different types of processed foods that use the
unprocessed food as a main ingredient, for example frozen chicken nuggets.
3 List the processed foods.
4 Select one of these products and write down the ingredient list.
Product:
Ingredients:
5 List the product’s nutritional
information on the table. Using
a nutritional database find the
nutritional information about the
unprocessed food. Use words such
as ‘fresh’ or ‘raw’ to refine your
search. Complete the table and
compare the results.
6 Give reasons why Australians
eat a lot of processed foods.
Processed food
per 100 g
eg frozen chicken nuggets
Unprocessed
per 100 g
raw chicken breast
Energy (kJ)
Protein
Carbohydrate—total
Sugars
Fibre
Fats—total
7 What are the advantages and disadvantages of eating processed foods?
25
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NAME
2
CLASS
Chapter test
c
Course Book p 66
TOTAL
50
Nutrition and consumption
Multiple choice
1 Which of the following essential nutrients makes
up most of our body weight:
a lipids
b carbohydrates
c water
d minerals?
2 What do carbohydrates break down to after
digestion:
a glucose
b lactose
c sucrose
d fructose?
3 Which of the following essential nutrients does
not produce energy:
a protein
b carbohydrates
c lipids
d minerals?
4 Which of the following is a vitamin:
a folate
b calcium
c sodium
d all of the above?
5 Which vitamin is mostly found in citrus fruits:
a A
b B complex
c C
d D?
26
10
6 Which food is not a complete protein food:
a soy milk
b baked beans
c fish
d soya beans?
7 Which of these claims on a label means the food
is highest in fat:
a reduced fat
b fat free
c low-fat
d diet?
8 Which of these claims on a label would mean the
product was the lowest in salt:
a no added salt
b low-salt
c reduced salt
d light?
9 According to the Australian Dietary Guidelines,
which of the following milks is not recommended
for children under two:
a breast milk
b reduced fat milk
c whole milk
d soy milk?
10 According to the Australian Dietary Guidelines
Australians should eat plenty of:
a vegetables and lean meat
b cereals and vegetables
c milk and cereals
d low fat foods and milk.
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NAME
2
CLASS
Chapter test continued
Short answer questions
4
1 Complete the table.
Nutrient
Two functions
Two food sources
7 Give three examples of foods that have
increased or decreased in consumption
in Australia over the last 50 years.
Increased
6
Decreased
Water
Lipids
2 What is the main function of calcium
in the body?
3 Plan a lunch for school-aged children
that includes two calcium-rich foods.
Underline the calcium-rich food(s).
2
2
8 Give one reason why consumption of
processed foods has increased in
Australia.
1
9 Give examples of how the following
factors may influence food selections
of a teenager.
6
Factor
Example
Physiology
Psychology
4 Plan a lunch for an adult that includes
two fibre-rich foods. Underline the
fibre-rich foods.
Geography
2
Social
Technology
Economic
10 What do the following symbols mean?
5 Identify three problems that may result
from a low-fibre diet.
a Low GI
4
3
b Healthy Heart Foundation Tick
6 Give an example of a functional food and
explain one health benefit of this food.
2
11 Using your knowledge of the Healthy
Eating Pyramid complete the table
below.
Eat moderately foods
27
Eat least foods
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8
NAME
2
CLASS
c
Chapter review
Course Book p 66
Nutrition and consumption.
It is now time to test your successful completion of this chapter. Use the checklist below. Provide relevant
information or examples to show that you understand what you have studied.
Students learn to
Information, examples or comments
Explain the role of nutritional components of food in the body.
Describe the significant role of fibre in the diet.
Discuss the role of nutritionally modified foods in the diet.
Discuss current developments in nutritional modification of food.
Outline conditions of over and under nutrition with reference to at
least two diet-related disorders.
Explore the incidence of and reasons for eating disorders in women
and men.
Describe the nature of anorexia and how it compares with other
forms of eating disorders.
Explore the impact of changes in food consumption patterns to health.
Outline how a healthy diet can assist in preventing/managing
diet-related disorders.
Identify broad guidelines for healthy eating to promote optimal
health and prevent disease.
Analyse the nutritive content of food using electronic databases.
Discuss the value to the customer of endorsed labelling symbols.
Outline the special nutritive requirements at different stages of the
lifecycle for both females and males.
28
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NAME
2
CLASS
Chapter review continued
Design, plan and prepare balanced diets for various stages
of the lifecycle.
Conduct an advanced web search to identify trends in food
consumption.
Tabulate data using a spreadsheet and generate graphs for
analysis.
List the activities and information that you enjoyed the most in this unit.
Identify areas for improvement where more revision or research are required for you to completely understand
the topic.
29
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NAME
3.1
Vocabulary
CLASS
Australian bush tucker
1 Complete the brainstorm with as many different Australian bush foods as you can
think of.
Wattleseed
c
Course Book p 69
Native
Australian
Bush
Tucker
2 Name a recipe or dish in which this food could be used. One example has been
completed for you.
30
Tucker
Recipe or dish
Wattleseed
Wattleseed damper
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NAME
CLASS
Recipe modification
3.2
Lemon myrtle is a versatile bush food.
Find a suitable cake recipe that may be modified to include lemon myrtle as part of its
ingredient listing. In the space below, give your cake a name, rewrite the ingredients and
method. Include a serving suggestion. Your teacher may allow you to make and sample
this cake in class time.
Hands on
c
Course Book p 74
Recipe
Method
Ingredients
n
Serving suggestio
31
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NAME
3.3
Literacy
CLASS
Early European influences
The First Fleet landed at Sydney Cove on
January, 1788. On arrival,
the first settlers’ immediate needs were
and
, but
they were uncertain of how to obtain these. Aboriginal peoples had survived on the land
with their unique lifestyle, habits, and hunting and
c
Course Book p 77
these seemed
techniques, but
to the new settlers.
The Australian
and climate were very different from what they
were used to, thus many
failed. The free settlers and convicts were
not farmers, nor fishermen, and had very little previous knowledge about
The food supply was
.
with carefully measured quantities
of flour, salted
, sugar and
until
there could be enough food produced to sustain everyone. Seeds and
withered quickly due to the different climate.
After
years of hard work on the land, the first crops eventually
succeeded. Corn,
and
were grown because
they suited the dry, harsh climate better than the British staples such as
and
.
Word bank
2
26
agriculture
barley
crops
food
32
alien
gathering
land
meat
potatoes
rationed
rye
shelter
vines
wheat
rice or dried peas
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NAME
3.4
Vocabulary
c
CLASS
Early European diet
findaword
V
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B
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Y
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Z
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G
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B
K
J
N
B
O
L
E
E
S
J
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Z
Y
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Q
N
B
O
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Y
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Q
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L
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S
L
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N
N
U
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U
X
C
E
E
A
R
H
Y
A
W
A
N
K
S
Y
K
I
M
A
G
R
Y
F
W
F
F
S
N
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V
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I
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D
T
O
M
A
T
O
M
I
R
D
Q
D
T
O
H
G
H
S
D
A
M
P
E
R
S
B
C
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K
L
X
D
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Y
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W
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K
K
E
H
W
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N
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K
M
Z
N
E
R
F
X
P
O
F
O
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W
F
D
Q
Z
B
L
P
M
C
N
H
E
G
D
I
R
R
O
P
L
W
T
T
D
B
Course Book p 79
crustaceans
damper
dried peas
fish
fruits
kangaroo
33
native spinach
parrots
porridge
possum
tea
salt
sugar
rum
shellfish
wallaby
wild currants
wild tomato
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NAME
3.5
CLASS
Multicultural influences
crossword
1
Vocabulary
c
Course Book p 82
2
4
3
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
Across
Down
2 Italian migration led to an increase in the varieties of this food available in Australia.
6 A staple food of many Asian cultures.
3 A British dish traditionally consisting of moistcooked meat and vegetables.
8 Middle Eastern cooking introduced a variety
of flat
to Australian cuisine.
4 German migrants established this industry in
the Barossa Valley.
9 This Mexican dish is a hard-cooked corn
round filled with meat.
5 When people migrate, they can bring
food habits and cooking
techniques with them.
10 An Asian herb which is now widely available.
11 The Irish depend greatly on this food.
34
1 A popular Greek dessert.
7 Many
farmhands.
migrants worked as
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NAME
3.6
Vocabulary
c
CLASS
Cooking methods:
past and present
Link the following definitions to the appropriate preparation or cooking terms.
Terms
Definitions
stew
food is plunged quickly into boiling water and then refreshed in cold water
stir-fry
foods such as meats are cooked outdoors on a flat plate heated by gas or coal
roast
a special type of radiation is used to cook the food
pan fry
a dry heating method which cooks food from above
casserole
food is exposed to high concentrations of smoke and dry conditions
steam
food is simmered slowly over a long period of time
blanch
food is cooked in a deep pan, stirring constantly
grill
a dry heat method of cooking, whereby food is subject to dry currents of
hot air
microwave
a method of moist cooking that involves placing food in a covered
ovenproof container
saute
food is fried quickly in a pan with a little fat
barbecue
food is cooked in a liquid near the boiling point
smoke
food is cooked in a cooking vessel filled with steam
poach
food is cooked in a flat, round cooking vessel
Course Book p 83
35
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NAME
3.7
Literacy
c
CLASS
Modern Australia
Complete the sentences describing modern diet and lifestyle.
1 The migration of many cultures to Australia has resulted in
2 With quick and efficient transportation methods, food is
Course Book p 87
3 Australians eat in a way that reflects our relaxed and casual environment,
for example
4 The real changes in Australian diet have come from the small suppliers, producers
and educators who
5 Foods such as olives and sundried tomatoes used to be unusual delicatessen foods,
whereas now
6 With the vast array of foods available to us, Australians must be conscious of nutrition. Healthy modern foods include
7 Due to our fast-paced lifestyle, we demand convenience foods such as
8 Both parents in a family are more likely than ever to work, thus there is more
expendable income for
36
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NAME
3.8
Hands on
c
CLASS
Media and food advertising
Aim
Method
To examine the
type and number
of television food
advertisements that
persuade or influence
consumers to buy
a product.
Course Book p 90
1 Watch television during ‘prime time’ (usually 6–8 pm). It
may be wise to record this period as you could have
trouble noting all the advertisements as they are broadcast.
2 Select six different food advertisements from the ones
which appeared during your viewing time. Use these six
advertisements to complete the table below (record each
product only once).
3 After viewing, complete the questions.
Results
Product advertised
Time
1 What is your overall
impression of the media’s
influence on the sale of
foods?
37
Image portrayed/technique used
2 What is your opinion of the
body images and lifestyles
portrayed in these
advertisements?
Target market
3 Which advertising technique
do you consider to be the
most successful?
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NAME
CLASS
3.9
Influences on food selection
Complete the brainstorm diagrams below for each factor influencing food selection by
giving examples for each.
Vocabulary
c
Economic
factors
Course Book p 94
Technological
factors
Physiological
factors
Social
factors
Geographical
factors
Psychological
factors
Religious
factors
Media and
advertising
factors
38
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NAME
3.10
Hands on
c
CLASS
Researching the technology
of genetic engineering
Genetic engineering is a recent technology that has brought about much ethical and moral
debate. Use a variety of resources such as books, journals and the Internet to research the
following areas. Make brief notes of your findings.
1 A definition of ‘genetic engineering’.
Course Book p 95
2 Which foods are currently genetically modified?
3 Which countries accept and/or reject the technology of genetic engineering?
4 How has a technology such as genetic engineering influenced our food availability
and selection?
39
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NAME
3
CLASS
c
Chapter test
Course Book p 96
TOTAL
50
Food in Australia
True or false?
10
1 ‘Bush tucker’ refers to the variety of foods such as fruits and insects that are native
to Australia.
2 The word ‘indigenous’ means foreign or unfamiliar.
3 European settlement occurred in 1688.
4 Before the Europeans arrived, the Indigenous people had great difficulty obtaining foods.
5 Indigenous peoples searched for wild tomato during the summer months.
6 The rations of the first settlers were made up of whisky, rice, fruit and beer.
7 ‘Migration’ is the movement of people from one place to another.
8 Hunger has an important influence on food selection.
9 Alcohol is prohibited for followers of the Mormon religion.
10 Nearly 20 per cent of all women now work.
Short answer questions
1 What is a nomadic society?
2 List three foods that Indigenous people
may have hunted or gathered.
2
3 Identify five foods that coastal Indigenous
tribes may have eaten.
3
4 Name one bush food that is used in
contemporary cooking.
40
5
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1
NAME
3
CLASS
Chapter test continued
5 Explain why food was rationed for the
first settlers.
3
11 How can personal values influence food
selection? Provide an example to support
your answer.
3
12 Give an example to show how social
factors have influenced our current food
consumption patterns.
2
6 What is scurvy and how is it prevented?
3
7 Why did the settlers avoid much of the
native bush tucker?
3
13 What is the purpose of the Australian
Dietary Guidelines?
8 Select one country/region and identify
a food that has been introduced to
Australia from that country/region.
1
14 Name two foods that have shown an
increase in consumption over the past
two decades.
9 Identify three factors that may influence
our food habits.
41
2
3
15 How can the family income affect food
purchases?
10 Select one of the factors identified in the
previous question. Provide an example
showing how this factor influences
food habits.
3
4
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2
NAME
3
CLASS
Chapter review
c
Course Book p 96
Food in Australia
It is now time to test your successful completion of this chapter. Use the checklist below. Provide relevant
information or examples to show that you understand what you have studied.
Students learn to
Information, examples or comments
Investigate traditional and contemporary uses
of bush foods.
Modify a recipe to include traditional ingredients/
bush food.
Discuss the impacts of early European influences on
food habits.
Consider the nutritional implications to Indigenous
Australians of fewer traditional foods being eaten as a
consequence of European settlement.
Identify the major multicultural influences on
contemporary Australian diets.
Investigate/examine the food habits of a specific culture.
Discuss the defining characteristics of Australian food.
Design, plan and prepare safe food items, which reflect
the changing nature of Australian cuisine.
Examine influences on food selection and the changes
in eating habits.
Assess the relative impact of current circumstances on
food selection.
Examine the impact of the media on food selection.
42
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NAME
3
CLASS
Chapter review continued
Relate changes in consumption patterns to their social,
economic, nutritional and environmental impact.
Investigate the development of the Australian food
industry in response to the emergence of food-related
technologies.
List the activities and information that you enjoyed the most this unit.
Identify areas for improvement where more revision or research are required for you to completely understand
the topic.
43
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NAME
4.1
Vocabulary
c
Course Book p 98
Afghanistan
Bangladesh
Burma
Cambodia
China
Cook Islands
East Timor
Ethiopia
Fiji
India
Indonesia
Kenya
Laos
Namibia
Nauru
Nepal
Pakistan
Philippines
Samoa
Solomon islands
Thailand
Tonga
Uganda
Vanuatu
Vietnam
Zambia
44
CLASS
Developing countries of the
world findaword
Around 80 per cent of the world’s population live in developing countries. Australia
provides aid to many countries through the work of charities and government assistance. Aid money from Australia is used to provide food and shelter and meet other
basic needs. Australia also provides resources and advice on building, education and
technology and encourages trade agreements with these countries.
1 Below is a list of some of the countries Australian governments and charities assist.
Find each country in the findaword.
A
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T
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V
2 Can you name ten countries that are classed as ‘developed’ countries?
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4.2
Hands on
c
Course Book p 100
CLASS
Prepare some formula milk
During pregnancy a woman’s body prepares itself for breastfeeding. Even the baby
prepares by sucking his or her thumb in the womb.
In the first few days after birth little milk is produced; instead colostrum is available, which contains antibodies to help the baby fight infection. When breastmilk is
produced, it is sterile.
Formula milk is a good alternative to breastmilk. Technology has improved
formula milk so that it now has a similar composition to breastmilk, but does not
provide colostrum. Formula milk is also not as easily digested as breastmilk.
In Australia, formula feeding was a popular trend in the period 1960–80. Today
breastfeeding is more widely encouraged. The companies that produce formula milk
have tried to maintain their sales by promoting their milk in developing countries.
Aim
To make some formula breastmilk.
1 Wash bottles, teats, caps,
cups and spoon.
Equipment
A serve of formula milk
Plastic baby bottles used for
formula feeding
Equipment used to sterilise the
bottles for example a saucepan
and water for boiling; or chemical
sanitisers
2 Boil for 5 minutes. Keep
bottles capped until use.
3 Boil fresh water for
5 minutes. Allow to cool.
Method
1 Examine the information
provided on the packaging
of the formula milk.
2 Prepare the formula as
indicated on the package.
The instructions may be
similar to the following
diagrams.
4 Pour 210 ml of the warm
water into sterilised
bottle.
5 Pour the powder
into the bottle.
6 Cap bottle and shake.
Test temperature on your
wrist before feeding.
45
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4.2
CLASS
continued
1 Why must hands be washed before preparing formula milk?
2 Why must the bottles and teats be sterilised?
3 Why must the water be boiled before being combined with the formula milk powder?
4 Why must you use the correct amount of formula?
5 Why should any milk left over in the bottle be thrown out?
6 What was the cost of the formula milk?
7 Why do you think that formula feeding in developing countries has led to an increase in child mortality
rates?
46
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4.3
Literacy
CLASS
Getting value for money
When on a limited income you need to make smart food choices.
Use the words from the Word bank to fill in the blanks in the following shopping hints.
Spend
of your food budget on foods that you should eat most of to
provide energy, vitamins, minerals and fibre. These foods include breads, cereals, rice,
c
Course Book p 102
pasta, vegetables, legumes and fruit.
Spend
on foods that you need in moderate amounts, such as meat,
fish, chicken, eggs, cheese, milk and yoghurt.
Spend
on foods with few nutrients, such as chocolate, crisps, lollies,
sweet biscuits, cordial and soft drinks.
Choose a high-fibre, low-sugar breakfast
. These breakfast products
are usually cheaper and more nutritious. You can also add your own fruit.
Fruits and vegetables that are in
are more tasty and cheaper.
Use any leftover vegetables to make
and stews.
Dried or tinned peas, beans and lentils are inexpensive, low in fat and high in
.
Over-ripe
makes excellent desserts like apple
or
smoothies.
Canned fruit are economical but buy those without added
Use
.
milk for cooking, as it is cheaper and just as nutritious.
Homemade muffins, slices and
Make your own salad
are healthier and cheaper.
. All you need is olive oil, vinegar and some
herbs.
Plan the weekly meals before and write a
Check the
list.
for weekly specials.
Do not buy something you don’t really need just because it is on
Do not shop on an empty
.
. It can make you buy more.
Use cheaper varieties of meats but make sure the meat is
.
vegetables can be cheaper than fresh and just as nutritious.
Word bank
newspapers
stomach
cakes
frozen
soups
47
shopping
dressing
special
powdered
sugar
pie
season
least
cereal
moderately
lean
most
fibre
fruit
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CLASS
Practical mathematics
4.4
Most people have a limited budget. Calculating the cost of a meal helps in setting and
sticking to a budget.
Hands on
1 Calculate the cost of the Tuna mornay recipe. To help, visit your local food store
or an online supermarket chain. Use a calculator or a computer spreadsheet
program.
c
Course Book p 103
Ingredients
(4 serves)
Price of the
packaged
ingredient
Net weight of
the packaged
ingredient
Calculation
(Divide the price by the net
weight then multiply by weight
actually required in recipe.)
Cost
2 tablespoons butter
(60 g)
$1.09
250 g
$1.09 ÷ 250 x 60 =
$0.2616
$0.26
2 tablespoons flour (60 g)
1 cup milk (250 ml)
220 g can tuna
a few sprigs chopped
parsley
1
2
cup breadcrumbs
(125 g)
1 cup grated cheese
(250 g)
1 tablespoon lemon juice
(30 ml)
Total cost
2 What other ingredients can be used in a mornay?
3 What extra costs would a restaurant add if they were to work out the cost of this meal?
48
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4.5
Literacy
c
Course Book p 108
CLASS
Staple foods of the world
Use the Word bank to complete the passage below.
A staple food is a
food that the population eats on a
basis. They tend to be
and easily obtained. Many
countries grow staple foods that are best suited to their
Wheat is the most popular
conditions.
grain produced. Different types of wheat
are grown. Soft wheat (low gluten content) is best for biscuits and cakes while hard wheat
(higher gluten content) is more suitable for bread and pasta.
Rice is primarily grown in
, although Australia is now a large
producer of rice in the world. Growing rice requires lots of
. Rice
may be eaten as a grain, ground into flour, or made into rice
Maize is grown either as sweet
.
or ground into flour. Maize is used
to make polenta, corn tortillas,
and of course, corn on the cob.
is a hardy crop that will tolerate extreme weather conditions. The
grain is ground and used to make a porridge (called gruel) or breads. It may also be used
to make straw-like brooms or brushes.
Cassava is not a grain but a
, harvested from under the
like a potato. It is grown in the poorest parts of Africa, as it is also
reliable in all sorts of climatic conditions.
Sago or
is a food product made from the sago palm. The spongy
centre of the plant stem (known as the pith) is removed and shaped into small pellets. This
plant is grown in
areas.
Word bank
climatic
water
tuber
regular
soil
49
noodles
cornflakes
basic
cheap
cereal
tropical
corn
Asia
tapioca
millet
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4.6
Literacy
c
Course Book p 119
CLASS
Malnutrition
When there is a severe shortage of food, children and adults in developing countries may
experience under nutrition, a form of malnutrition resulting from a lack of one or more
nutrients.
Match these forms of under nutrition with their symptom(s).
Disease and nutrient deficiency
Symptoms
Scurvy (Vitamin C)
Loss of appetite and extreme tiredness
Rickets (Vitamin D and calcium)
Loss of weight, weakened muscles and exhaustion
Beri Beri (Vitamin B)
Dryness of mucous membranes causes night blindness
then total blindness
Xerophthalamia (Vitamin A)
Children’s bones become weak, legs become deformed
under the weight of the body
Goitre (iodine)
Young children appear to be just skin and bones,
except for their stomachs which are swollen because
of water retention
Marasmus (protein and energy )
Growth failure in children and poor healing of wounds
Anaemia (iron and folate)
An appearance of being just skin and bones
Kwashiorkor (protein)
Swelling of the thyroid gland in the neck
Brainstorm
Why is there inadequate access to food and water in many developing countries?
50
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4.7
Hands on
c
CLASS
A fundraising venture
for charity
There are many charities and aid agencies that help people living in poverty both in
Australia and in developing countries. Form groups to complete the following activities.
1 Decide on a developing country or an Australian charity that you would like to
support.
2 Brainstorm activities charities and aid agencies organise to help raise money.
Course Book p 120
3 Design and label an idea for a promotional item or event that could be organised to
raise funds for your chosen country or charity.
4 How would you promote your item or event?
5 How could the money raised be used in the developing country so that poverty can
be prevented now as well as in the future?
51
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NAME
CLASS
A food hamper for
people in need
4.8
Hands on
Many charities require food donations. Make a food hamper that can be given to people
in need. It is best to stick to staple non-perishable foods, but you can also include some
treats.
c
Aim
To make a food hamper to help those in need.
Course Book p 121
Ingredients
You could include processed foods such as:
• canned soup, fish and vegetables
• dried fruits
1 Which charity or charities will benefit from your
effort?
2 List two dishes that can be made from the following ingredients.
• pasta and rice
• packet cake mixes
a Canned tomatoes
• flour
• breakfast cereal
• bottled sauces
b Canned tuna
• long life products.
You could also prepare some foods yourself. Suitable
foods include:
• jams
c Long life milk
• relishes
• slices
3 How could you package the home-made biscuits
and slices?
• fruit cake
• biscuits.
Method
1 Prepare any foods that will be included in the
hamper.
4 What information could you place on the labels
for your home-made gifts?
2 Assemble these with the processed foods in a suitable container, such as a basket.
3 Use clear cellophane and ribbon wrappings to
make your hamper look attractive.
52
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NAME
4
CLASS
Chapter test
c
Course Book p 122
TOTAL
50
Food equity
True or false?
10
1 A tariff is a tax on imports.
2 Replacing breast milk with formula feeding in poorer families is not recommended.
3 Beef is the most popular livestock in Australia.
4 Lamb and chicken are examples of staple foods in developing countries.
5 A developing country has high levels of production of goods and services.
6 McDonald’s and Kellogg’s are multinational corporations.
7 Coffee and sugar are examples of cash crops.
8 Excessive alcohol increases the appetite.
9 Diabetes and obesity are diseases linked to over consumption.
10 Centrelink is an example of a government support agency.
Short answer questions
1 List two consequences of having insufficient clean water.
2
2 Identify six groups in Australia who experience food inequity.
6
3 Identify three nutritional problems that are experienced by some Indigenous people.
3
4 Identify four staple foods.
4
53
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4
CLASS
Chapter test continued
5 List one advantage and one disadvantage of globalisation.
3
6 Give two examples of natural disasters that affect food availability.
2
7 Plan a low-cost dinner for a family on a very low income. Explain your choice.
5
8 Suggest three ways aid agencies try to support developing countries.
5
Extended response
Briefly compare subsistence farming to industrial farming.
10
54
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4
CLASS
Chapter review
c
Course Book p 122
Food equity
It is now time to test your successful completion of this chapter. Use the checklist below. Provide relevant information or examples to show that you understand what you have studied.
Students learn to
Information, examples or comments
Explain the circumstances that relate to food
inequities.
Identify groups at risk of food inequity both locally
and globally.
Discuss how belonging to more than one risk group
can compound nutritional disadvantage.
Examine food production and distribution on a
global scale.
Explain the consequences of malnutrition.
Identify dietary diseases associated with malnutrition.
Identify the role of agencies which provide aid.
Design, plan and prepare safe and nutritious food
items that are appropriate to specific situations.
Examine a group that experiences food inequity
and investigate available support networks.
55
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4
CLASS
Chapter review continued
List the activities and information that you enjoyed the most in this unit.
Identify areas for improvement where more revision or research are required for you to completely understand
the topic.
56
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CLASS
5.1
Reasons for developing
food products
Literacy
Use words from the Word bank to complete the passage below.
Consumers often become
c
Course Book p 126
with existing food products. Food com-
panies devote large amounts of money to developing new products in order to remain
and to satisfy consumer
Market
.
have led food manufacturers to produce food products that
meet the increasing
and nutritional demands of today’s consumer.
Products that are low in
, salt and
are promoted in
all supermarkets.
Technological developments have meant that manufacturers can produce foods for
new equipment or appliances. An example of this is the huge range of
mixes available for use in home bread
When a company
.
, it is more likely to invest more money into
researching and
new food products.
Recently consumers have become concerned with the need for product safety.
Manufacturers have designed
-
ucts. Screw-top jars have a
top, while juice and sauce bottles have
seals under their
seals on many prod.
Foods may also be developed for special
defence force
such as camping trips,
packs, or foods to be consumed in
.
Word bank
bored
bread
competitive
concerns
demand
57
developing
fat
foil
health
lids
machines
pop
proof
purposes
ration
space
sugar
succeeds
tamper
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5.2
Hands on
CLASS
Airline meals
Design a suitable main meal and dessert that may be served on an airline. Give the recipe
a name and remember to include all foods to be served with it on the tray as well as condiments and cutlery. Draw the tray in the space provided and separate each food item.
Meal name
c
Course Book p 132
58
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NAME
5.3
Hands on
c
Course Book p 135
CLASS
Costing a packet cake-mix
Aim
To determine the cost of making a packet cake-mix and compare this to the cost of a
commercially produced packet cake-mix.
Equipment
Scales
Standard cup
Spoon measures and a calculator
Computer and the Internet for researching prices
Method
Complete the table using the appropriate formula. The first product has been calculated
for you.
Results
Formula: Ingredient cost = (quantity required ÷ unit size) × cost of unit.
Ingredient
Weight sold
Self-raising flour 1 kg
Cost per unit
Quantity used
Working
Cost
$2.47
1 cup = 200 g
(200 ÷ 1000) x 2.47 = 0.494
$0.49
Sugar
Butter
Vanilla
Milk powder
TOTAL
$
Conclusion
How does the cost of the home-made packet cake-mix compare to the commercially produced cake-mix?
59
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5.4
Literacy
c
CLASS
New product design briefs
A design brief is a statement of the aims of a project and the criteria for the product. A
design brief might instruct you to ‘design a packaged and prepared vegetable meal kit for
working parents’.
For each of the following foods, suggest a purpose and develop a design brief.
Ice Magic
Course Book p 140
Yakult (fermented milk drink)
Arnott’s Snack Right biscuit varieties
Sanitarium Up & Go (breakfast drink)
Logicol spread
60
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5.5
Vocabulary
c
Course Book p 140
CLASS
Surveying consumers
Select a new food product and devise a ten-question survey to determine whether the
product is well-liked amongst your classmates.
Drafting survey questions
The most important starting point in any survey is to draft your ideas for questions. Ask
yourself whether or not the questions actually help you to determine what you are trying
to find out. Many questions can be downright useless! Above all, you need to make sure
that each question makes sense and can be easily understood and answered.
Don’t ask for too much personal information, especially if you do not need it. Many
people are reluctant to list their name, phone number and address on a survey.
Measuring responses
Look at your questions and determine the most accurate and efficient way of measuring
responses. You may offer categories for the participant to select from, include
multiple choices or invite an open response. Whatever you decide, make sure you know
how you are going to tabulate your findings in order to obtain your results.
Delivering the survey
Make sure that the participants know exactly what they are filling out. Give participants
a clear and concise introduction to your survey as you hand over the survey sheet or get
your clipboard ready to read questions and take down responses.
Draft your survey questions below, then type them out. Make sure there are no
spelling or punctuation errors.
Food product
61
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NAME
5.6
Hands on
c
Course Book p 141
CLASS
Creating a breakfast drink
Design
Work in pairs to design and make a recipe for your own new and innovative breakfast
drink. Include up to six ingredients and make a quantity large enough to serve 6–8 people.
Draft your recipe in the space below.
Produce
Complete a food order and have it approved by your teacher. Make the drink in class and
produce enough to allow 6–8 students in your class to have a small sample.
Recipe
Method
Ingredients
Evaluate
Sample 4–6 breakfast drinks and complete the evaluation table below using the numbering scale provided.
Beverage no.
Colour
Flavour
Texture
Overall Rating
1 = Very poor
1
2 = Poor
2
3 = Fair
3
4 = Good
4
5 = Excellent
5
6
62
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5.7
CLASS
Standard recipe card
Using the template provided, design a recipe card for your Craisin product.
Hands on
c
Course Book p 143
Preparation time
Serves
Recipe
Ingredients
63
Method
Picture
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NAME
5.8
Hands on
c
CLASS
Creating a line extension
A line extension is an enhancement of an already existing product. Companies introduce
new flavours and varieties to entice customers.
Design
1 Select an existing product as the base for a line extension, for example bread, icecream, milk or cornflakes.
then
2 Research suitable recipes and complete an ingredient list and method for manufacture.
Course Book p 145
Product chosen:
Ingredient list
Method
Produce
Prepare the product in class and have other students sample it and provide feedback in relation to its flavour and
overall appeal.
Evaluate
What is your response to this line extension? What did others think? Do you think that it would be successful
in the marketplace? Why or why not?
64
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5.9
Vocabulary
c
Course Book p 146
CLASS
Conducting an interview
Investigate a product that is a speciality of your local area. Interview a relevant spokesperson about the product, how and where it is produced, where it is sold or distributed
and how it is marketed. Present an oral report on your findings.
• Research your food product, region/location and marketing techniques before you
write any questions.
• Draft your ideas for questions, then modify them to make sure they are useful and
make sense.
• Enter your questions into a word processor. Type each question in a list down the
page, leaving enough room between questions to write down the response (consider
that your writing may be larger when you are writing in a hurry). Don’t forget to
bring your pen and questions with you to the interview.
• Bring a small tape recorder with you (especially if you cannot write quickly) to
capture comments that you may miss during the interview.
• Remember to be polite, approachable and portray appropriate body language.
Introduce yourself properly and pay attention during the interview by nodding your
head or further probing the interviewee with other related questions. Be aware of the
time during the interview, as the interviewee may only have a certain period of time
available.
After taking the above into consideration, draft your interview questions below.
Product information
Food product
Spokesperson
Research notes
Draft interview questions
65
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5.10
Hands on
c
Course Book p 148
CLASS
Promotion study
1 Select a company that produces food in Australia. Use the Internet to research how
one product is promoted in the community.
2 Identify the promotional techniques used by this company, and briefly explain how
they work or why they are successful.
Company
Product
Promotional technique
Promotional technique
Promotional technique
Promotional technique
3 Use your own words to comment on the importance of considering target markets
when planning promotional techniques.
66
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NAME
5
CLASS
Chapter test
c
Course Book p 150
TOTAL
50
Food product development
Multiple choice
1 Reduced fat mayonnaise is a line extension brought about by:
a new technological developments
b recent market concerns
c other copy cat products
d other innovative products.
10
2 Select the incorrect statement:
a customer satisfaction is important to food companies
b consumers are loyal to brands they have purchased in the past
c consumers demand protection for their health
d safety threats on foods are not taken very seriously.
3 An innovative food for a ‘special application’ would not usually include:
a meals for airlines
b meals for army ration packs
c meals for lunches on the run
d meals for camping.
4 Identify the three main steps of food product development:
a plan, design, produce
b plan, budget, evaluate
c design, produce, test
d design, produce, evaluate.
5 Determining whether or not a product will make sufficient profit to be worth the money and effort invested
in development is also known as:
a identifying needs
b economic viability
c consumer feedback
d sensory assessment.
Short answer questions
1 Name two relatively new food products that have been released on the market.
2
67
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NAME
5
CLASS
Chapter test continued
2 List three reasons for developing new food
products and provide an example for each.
3 What impact have innovative new
convenience foods had on society?
4 It is said that new products are being
developed to match our lives. Provide an
example of how this might apply to your
family.
5 Provide an example of how food
innovations impact on the environment.
6
production—recipe development
c
evaluation—market assessment.
9 What is a prototype?
2
2
10 List the four main roles of market research
in new food product development.
4
11 Briefly describe two aspects of a
marketing mix.
2
3
3
68
b
6
3
6 Define a ‘sustainable resource’.
7 Convenience foods may impact on our
nutritional wellbeing. Identify three
diet-related disorders that may occur
due to a poor diet.
8 Describe what usually occurs during the
following stages of food product
development:
a design—developing ideas
3
12 Describe a celebrity endorsement.
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4
NAME
5
CLASS
Chapter review
c
Course Book p 150
Food product development
It is now time to test your successful completion of this chapter. Use the checklist below. Provide relevant
information or examples to show that you understand what you have studied.
Students learn to
Information, examples or comments
Explore the purpose of product development.
Identify new food products.
Examine the characteristics of new food products.
Recognise the effect of introducing new food
products to society.
Outline the design and development process for
food products.
Design, produce and evaluate a food product.
Outline the role of market research in new food
product design and development.
Identify the elements of a marketing mix.
Analyse the effectiveness of a range of marketing
and promotional techniques for new food products.
Promote a new food product for a specific market.
Investigate the application of emerging
technologies in the development of a new food
product.
Design an innovative, new-to-the-world
food product.
69
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5
CLASS
Chapter review continued
List the activities and information that you enjoyed the most this unit.
Identify areas for improvement where more revision or research are required for you to completely understand
the topic.
70
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NAME
6.1
Literacy
CLASS
Functions of food
1 Use the words from the Word bank to fill in the blanks.
We all need food to survive.
tain good
. Food has
Growth and
c
food nutrients are needed to mainmain functions in the body.
.
Our body cells must
and
as we do.
is the building block for every body tissue cell such as bone,
, skin and
Course Book p 152
.
Provide
Our body needs
to help us carry out physical
and body
. Two helpful energy-rich nutrients include
and
. Excess
can lead to
.
and
the body’s cells
Our skin is often
or
need to be able to
. All cells of our body
themselves and we must be able to
good health. We must eat well and
help us fight
and
regularly to
.
Word bank
activities
carbohydrate
cut
develop
development
disease
energy
exercise
fat
food
grazed
grow
health
infection
maintain
muscle
obesity
processes
protein
repair
six
teeth
three
2 Use the following keywords in a sentence or short paragraph.
71
a
Stunted
b
Deficiency
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NAME
6.2
Vocabulary
CLASS
The gastro-intestinal tract
1 Look at the following diagram of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract. Complete the
missing names of each organ and then describe its function in the process of digestion
in the space provided.
2 Using a red pen or pencil, mark the location or places you would be likely to find:
c
a
villi
b
salivary glands
c
the rectum
d
gastric juices.
Course Book p 153
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
72
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NAME
6.3
Literacy
CLASS
Nutrient functions and
sources
Using your text book to assist you, complete the following table and paste it into your
work book.
c
Course Book p 157
Nutrient
Function
Protein
There are two main types:
and
.
proteins
contain all of the essential
amino acids.
A constituent of all
and
hard and soft body tissue.
Required to make
,
and
.
Carbohydrates
There are three main types:
,
and
dietary fibre.
Lipids
These are obtained from both
and
sources.
73
Food sources
.
,
Used as a source of
.
is converted to
glycogen and
in the
liver and muscles.
Provides
kJ of
per gram.
Provides
kJ of
per gram.
Contains fat soluble Vitamins
,
,
and
.
Contains
3 and 6 fatty
.
proteins include meat,
,
,
,
and yoghurt.
proteins include nuts,
,
,
cereal and
.
sources
include wholegrain breads and
,
,
.
Foods containing simple
include cakes and
Saturated fats include
and meat.
Monounsaturated fats include
oil and
Polyunsaturated fats include most
oils.
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,
and
.
,
oil.
NAME
6.3
CLASS
continued
Nutrient
Vitamins
The two main groups are
and
vitamins.
Minerals
These are only required in
amounts.
74
Function
Food sources
Vitamins are involved in a range of
functions such as normal cell
and
,
the production of
and
the healing of
and
.
soluble sources include
fish
,
and
.
B Vitamins are found in
products and lean
.
Vitamin C is found in
fruits.
Main minerals include
,
,
,
,
,
,
,
and
.
Calcium is essential for the formation
of
and
.
Calcium-rich foods include
and
Iron-rich foods include
and
Magnesium is found in
cereals and
.
Zinc is found in
.
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.
,
.
and
NAME
6.4
Case study
c
Course Book p 159
CLASS
Diet planning activity
Rose is 82 years of age and lives in a retirement village. Her husband passed away nine
years ago, so she is accustomed to being alone. She has family who visit occasionally
and bring any special supplies such as medication.
Rose has a small frame, a slim build and does not lead an active lifestyle. She has
someone come in to do the cleaning for her once a week, and most of her groceries are
delivered by the local supermarket.
She is not overly enthusiastic about cooking complex meals for herself, and she
must be careful with what she selects because she has dentures which sometimes cause
her difficulty. During her last visit to the doctor, Rose’s blood count showed that she
was slightly anaemic and lacking in good quality protein.
Taking the above information into account, plan a daily diet for Rose to follow. Use the
template below and remember to include quantities for each meal. Justify your choices.
Foods and beverages
Justification
Breakfast
Morning tea
Lunch
Afternoon tea
Dinner
Supper
75
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NAME
6.5
Case study
c
Course Book p 159
CLASS
Eating like an ironman
Geoff has just found out that four of his
friends are intending to enter an ironman
triathlon which is four months away.
Geoff is reasonably fit—he rides his bike
every morning and jogs most nights—but
he knows that performing over a whole
day without a break will be difficult!
After deciding to enter the triathlon,
Geoff realises that he needs to do the
proper research about planning his diet
leading up to the event. He makes an
appointment with a nutritionist at his
local medical centre. Here he is given the
following information.
• training in the months before the event:
– consume foods from all food groups
– increase carbohydrate foods in
particular to accommodate for the
increase in energy needs through
more exercise
– increase fluid intake (particularly
water)
– eat a good supply of B Vitamins to
aid in energy release
– slightly increase protein foods to
assist in building body tissue
1 Where does Geoff go to obtain his dietary
information?
2 What should Geoff do now (four months before
the event)?
3 Why does Geoff need to be aware of the GI of
certain foods?
– increase consumption of low-GI
foods
• 1–2 days before the event:
– eat carbohydrate-rich foods to fill
the liver’s glycogen stores
– load up on carbohydrates, using
carbohydrate powder dissolved in
1 litre of water (remember to drink
another litre of water afterwards)
– limit or avoid foods high in fat and
protein as they take longer to digest
• during the event:
– consume liquid carbohydrates
(sugars) through sports drinks and
concentrated gel shots
– consume energy-rich power bars
– consume 1 gram salt each hour
– ensure regular fluid intake (drink at
least every 15–25 minutes)
• after the event:
– replace the depleted liver glycogen
stores with carbohydrate-rich foods
– continue drinking plenty of fluids
– avoid alcohol as it causes
dehydration.
5 What is stored in the liver?
6 Explain why Geoff should not eat battered fish
and chips the night before the event.
7 Should Geoff celebrate finishing the triathlon
with a beer or a glass of champagne? Explain.
4 List some good protein-rich foods that Geoff
could eat in the coming months.
76
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NAME
6.6
Literacy
c
Course Book p 160
CLASS
Allergies off the menu
The Education and Health departments will work alongside the NSW Canteen Association to implement policies to help school canteens become allergy friendly.
While a junk food-free canteen may sound boring, Beacon Hill Primary School
principal Wayne Stevenson can guarantee the food is delicious. For nearly two years,
the school has scrapped peanut butter from the tuck-shop menu to safeguard health and
safety. In its place, the school has added a range of items including lasagna, mini subs
and other snacks approved by the NSW Canteen Association.
Mr Stevenson, who has been the principal of the school for the past 10 years said
while there were only two current pupils who were allergic, it was important to cut all
peanut products from the menu.
Mr Stevenson said, ‘Thank goodness we haven’t had any reactions at the school yet,
but we have to be careful.’ Due to the severity of one child’s reaction, the school has an
adrenaline injection syringe auto injector and staff had been trained to use it. For more
details on food allergy, visit <www.allergyfacts.org.au>.
Manly Daily Saturday 10 May 2003
1 Which organisations are working together to produce policies for allergy-free canteens?
2 List other foods sold at a canteen that might contain peanuts or peanut products.
3 Does your school canteen have an allergy-free policy? What is the policy?
4 Do you know anyone with a food allergy? How does their diet need to be modified?
5 Visit the allergy website provided. Research anaphylaxis and provide a description below.
77
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NAME
6.7
Literacy
c
Course Book p 165
CLASS
Factors that influence food
habits
Complete the following statements.
Social practices which might affect our food habits include peer pressure. An example of
this is when
Religious restrictions or taboos may dictate our food habits. This is seen in the Jewish
religion when they do not eat
Geography impacts on what we eat. Climates in certain areas restrict
For example,
People’s economic situations influence their food habits. Australians can generally afford
to eat at least once per day. However if a country is at war, the government of that country
may direct money
Developments in technology such as
mean that foods are made more available to us.
Individual preferences such as past experiences impact on our food habits. An example of
a negative past experience might be
The media influences our food habits with influential food marketing. This means
78
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NAME
6.8
Vocabulary
c
CLASS
Factors influencing food
habits
Match up each of the following examples with the factors influencing food habits.
Remember that the influential factors include:
•
social practices
•
technological developments
•
religious practices
•
individual preferences
•
geographic location
•
mass media
•
economic situation
Course Book p 165
Example
Factor
You have strong beliefs in animal rights and choose not to consume any animal products.
You wanted to make mango sorbet for your birthday, but it is winter and fresh
imported mangoes are extraordinarily expensive in the supermarket.
Your friends at school are drinking a new flavoured drink and you wish to try it too.
You see a commercial for a new low fat mayonnaise that is made to look and sound healthy.
You purchase a microwave oven and decide that you are going to spend less time
preparing and cooking food. You go to the supermarket and buy microwave meals.
Your faith requires you to fast for Ramadan.
You were force-fed pumpkin as a child and now as an adolescent you find that it makes you ill.
You wish to grow strawberries in your garden, but you live in an area where frosts are common.
A new harvester which picks and sorts much more efficiently means that your favourite
fruit is available at a lower price and in bigger quantities.
Both of your parents have good jobs and you are able to eat whatever and whenever you like.
You live in a country such as Mexico or Spain, and take a sleep or siesta after a large meal
in the middle of the day.
You run out of time the day before you have to host a party at home. You are required
to shop over the Internet and have your groceries delivered.
You are Catholic and do not eat meat on Good Friday.
You live in a war-torn country and your home and farming business have been destroyed.
You must rely on rations supplied by overseas charity organisations.
79
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NAME
6.9
CLASS
Modern diet and lifestyle
crossword
1
2
Vocabulary
3
c
4
5
6
7
Course Book p 166
8
Across
9
7 A condition that
commonly occurs in
middle age due to poor
diet, lack of exercise
and weight gain.
11
8
foods have
had some form of prepreparation.
13
9
is needed
on all food products to
make people aware of
its nutrient value.
10
is put on
junk food to make it
more expensive.
10
12
14
Down
1
has been introduced to protect people from poor food and diet
habits.
12 A tool used by many
individuals who lead
inactive lifestyles.
2
13 Sufferers of this
psychological disorder
deny themselves food
and nutrition.
4 Due to safety fears, many children are not allowed to
14 A lifestyle which is
inactive or lazy.
7 A condition where a pocket or blow-out forms in the bowel wall.
80
are designed to prevent or reduce the incidence of obesity in
Australia.
3 Starved or underweight.
5 An
unsupervised.
person is 10–19% above their ideal body weight for age.
6 Food that is purchased and ready to eat.
11 This type of disease is a major killer of Australian men and women.
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NAME
6.10
Hands on
c
CLASS
Modified food products
1 Visit a supermarket or use your own knowledge to complete the table. List examples
of food products that fit the descriptions provided.
Low/reduced
salt
Low/reduced
sugar
Low/reduced
fat
Fibre enriched
Vitamin/
mineral enriched
Course Book p 170
2 Compare an original and modified version of the same product, for example Italian dressing and fat-free
Italian dressing. In the space provided, copy out the ingredients and nutrition panel for each.
Product 1
Ingredients
Nutrition panel
Product 2
3 Analyse the different nutrient panels and ingredients. What are the main differences? How is the modified
product different to the original?
81
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NAME
CLASS
Active non-nutrient
findaword
6.11
Vocabulary
c
resistant starch
soy
yoghurt
lactobacillus
microorganisms
phytoestrogens
phytochemicals
prebiotics
probiotics
fermented
functional
free radicals
hormone
hypertension
immunity
antioxidants
bifidobacteria
cheese
cultures
digestion
enhance
Course Book p 178
82
S
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F
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NAME
6
CLASS
Chapter test
c
TOTAL
Course Book p 178
50
Food selection and health
Multiple choice
1 Which is not a function of food:
a to provide energy
b to repair and maintain body cells
c to make the stomach feel full
d to aid in growth and development?
2 Scurvy is a deficiency of:
a Vitamin A
b Vitamin B
c Vitamin C
d Vitamin D.
3 The rhythmic movement that moves food
through the digestive tract is called:
a gravity
b peristalsis
c digestion
d bloating.
4 Digestion begins in the:
a mouth
b stomach
c small intestine
d large intestine.
5 Protein breaks down into:
a fatty acids
b amino acids
c simple sugars
d glycerol.
83
5
Short answer questions
1 Name the particular part of the small
intestine where digestion occurs.
1
2 List two tasks that the stomach performs.
2
3 What is the only food that is absorbed
through the walls of the stomach?
1
4 In your own words, describe metabolism.
1
5 List the six food nutrients and provide
an example of a good food source.
6
6 Identify and list three different factors that
may alter an individual’s nutritional needs.
3
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NAME
CLASS
6
Chapter test continued
7 Select one of the factors from the previous
question. Use examples to explain how
that factor could alter nutritional needs.
3
12 Who are the three main groups of people
responsible for nutrition levels?
1
1
13 List one strategy that the government has
either proposed or implemented in order to
improve Australia’s nutrition levels.
14 Select one food guide. Write down its correct
name and explain who might use it and for
what reason.
2
8 What does ‘RDI’ stand for?
9 Identify and list three different factors that
may alter an individual’s food selection
habits.
10 Select one of the factors from the previous
question. Use examples to explain how
that factor could alter nutritional needs.
3
3
3
15 Define ‘active non-nutrients’.
2
11 Explain the following disorders:
a anorexia nervosa
b anaemia
c
8
16 Select one active non-nutrient. Name it,
explain why it is beneficial and list some
good food sources.
3
17 Explain why active non-nutrients are not
the only answer to improving our health
levels.
2
osteoporosis
d diverticulitis.
84
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NAME
6
CLASS
Chapter review
c
Course Book p 178
Food selection and health
It is now time to test your successful completion of this chapter. Use the checklist below. Provide relevant
information or examples to show that you understand what you have studied.
Students learn to
Information, examples or comments
Outline the functions of food in the body.
Describe the process of digestion.
Outline the sources and functions of the components of food.
Identify RDIs of major nutrients for various life stages.
Select foods that provide a balanced intake of nutrients.
Design and prepare a meal/menu/dish to meet the needs of
specific groups.
Recognise the factors that influence food habits and explain
how they affect food choices.
Outline the effects of excess/insufficient nutrient intakes.
Discuss some different responses to general nutrition levels.
Evaluate the usefulness of nutritional food guides.
Analyse the nutritional value of a menu, meal or food item.
Modify a menu, meal or food item to reflect food guides.
Design, plan and prepare safe and nutritious food items to
reflect food guides.
Evaluate the potential health benefits of active non-nutrients.
85
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NAME
6
CLASS
Chapter review continued
List the activities and information that you enjoyed the most in this unit.
Identify areas for improvement where more revision or research are required for you to completely understand
the topic.
86
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NAME
7.1
Vocabulary
c
Course Book p 180
CLASS
Food service and catering
ventures findaword
F
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N
airline
bed and breakfast
bistro
cafe
cafeteria
canteen
caterer
charity
Chinese
coffee shop
function
87
hospital
hotel
Indian
Italian
location
motel
pizzeria
prison
restaurant
sandwich shop
school
stall
takeaway
tavern
Thai
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NAME
7.2
Case study
c
Course Book p 180
CLASS
Carla’s catering
Carla runs a catering business. She caters for all types of functions, from board room
lunches to weddings and 21st birthdays.
Carla’s business is doing very well. She started by doing most of the work herself
but now employs many casuals who either work as kitchen hands or wait staff.
The one thing that Carla finds time-consuming about running a business is managing the finances. She has to work out staff wages, including their income tax, pay
food bills, pay rent, pay personal income tax and collect GST for the government. At
the same time she is trying to make an income for herself by aiming to make a profit.
The GST is a government service tax which compels service businesses to add 10%
to their prices. Consumers pay this tax and businesses pass it on to the federal government. Many foods are exempt from GST unless a service is involved. GST must be
charged on catered food.
1 Is Carla’s business a profit or non-profit-making venture?
2 Suggest three or more people or groups who may indirectly benefit from Carla’s business. Outline how each
person or group benefits.
3 Besides yourself, who else in society may benefit from your spending?
4 What is GST?
5 Give two reasons why customers would be willing to use a catering service like Carla’s business.
88
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NAME
7.3
Literacy
CLASS
Employment opportunities
Jamie is 16 years old and wants to find a part-time or casual job working in the food
service and catering industry.
Advise Jamie on the following aspects of employment.
1 Finding employment:
c
Course Book p 184
2 Typical employment opportunities for a 16-year-old in the food and catering industry:
3 Future career opportunities in the food service and catering industry:
4 Distinguish between part-time and casual employment:
5 If Jamie’s career progressed to a management position what would being a manager
involve?
89
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NAME
7.4
CLASS
Rights and responsibilities
Read the sections about rights and responsibilities of employers and employees and
consumers in the textbook, then answer the following questions.
Case study
c
Course Book p 188
Julia has a part-time waiting job at a city restaurant. She has worked there for two
months. The first week she had to work five nights straight without pay to see if she was
capable. After this period, her employer started to pay her at an hourly rate. This rate
is significantly less than her friends earn doing similar work at other venues. They also
get a break when working a full day on Saturday but Julia has to work continuously.
Currently the restaurant is advertising for an apprentice chef. Julia is keen to apply
but her boss has already told Julia that from his experience only males make good chefs.
1 Under legislation, what employee rights should
Julia be entitled to?
3 List four attributes that cannot legally form the
basis for discrimination in employment and customer service.
2 What should Julia do to improve the situation?
Josh loves his job as a sandwich-maker as he gets
to have fun with the customers. In fact his employer
has commented on how his personality has attracted
more customers to the store and sales have increased.
Currently Josh is receiving award wages and
conditions. However, his employer has complained
1 What responsibilities should the employer expect
from Josh?
2 Give an example of how Josh’s employer has been
responsible.
90
that Josh often comes in late, sometimes does not
wear correct footwear and uses equipment unsafely,
even though Josh has been trained in occupational
safety. In fact, Josh has even received a warning letter
for dismissal because he decided it would be fun to
lock a fellow co-worker in the freezer.
3 Under industrial legislation, what is meant by the
term ‘award’?
4 How does an enterprise agreement differ from an
award?
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NAME
7.5
CLASS
Consumer rights and
responsibilities
Case study
c
Course Book p 191
You start work very early in the morning. On your way to work you take a short cut
that passes the back door entrance to the Rose Petal Cafe located on Cook Street. Each
morning you notice that a delivery of food has been left on the doorstep of the cafe.
Fresh milk, meat pies, frozen dim sims and cream-filled doughnuts are constantly being
left on the doorstep either in their cardboard boxes or on open plastic trays.
Even though you have told the cafe that you think this practice is unhygienic the
cafe continues to have deliveries before staff arrive for work. While you don’t use the
cafe, you have noticed that some of your workmates, who do use the cafe, are often
away because of food poisoning.
1 Write a letter to the environmental health officer of the local
council to raise your concerns.
In your letter try and state some
basic consumer rights.
Your address
Date
Address of the council
2 What actions can an environmental health officer take?
Dear
Signature
91
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NAME
7.6
Literacy
c
Course Book p 193
CLASS
Menus
PICCOLO’S IS A POPULAR ITALIAN
restaurant. Classic starters
include prosciutto with melon
as well as garlic prawns.
Entrées include oysters Kilpatrick, mussels in white wine
and avocado and prawns. If
pasta is your thing you can have
seafood cannelloni, saffron
linguine with chilli prawns or
chicken ravioli with cheese sauce.
For mains, there’s a choice
of crumbed chicken breast on
garlic mash, beef fillet with
rosemary
potatoes,
fresh
barramundi fillet on rocket,
prawn risotto with a lemon
sauce and veal parmigiana.
Piccolo’s is also renowned
for its homemade chocolate
gelato and custard filled
profiteroles.
Starters are around $8,
entrées cost between $15 and
$18, mains are between $22
and $30 and the desserts are
$10. Piccolo’s offers an à la
carte menu and also offers a
two-course table d’hôte menu
for $40 per person. This
includes a choice of two
entrées and two mains.
1 Use the newspaper article to help you write an à la carte menu for the restaurant.
À la carte menu
Prices
Starters
Prices
Mains
Entrées
Desserts
2 Select the dishes you would place on the table d’hôte menu for Piccolo’s.
Entrée
or
Main
or
Price
92
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CLASS
7.7
Hands on
c
Design a function menu for
a special occasion
1 Select a special occasion requiring catering for instance a school formal, wedding or
18th birthday.
2 Make decisions and complete the table below to help you identify the factors you
must consider when planning function menus.
Course Book p 197
The occasion
Time of year
Time of day
Number to be catered for
Venue
Money-cost per person
Age(s) and gender of guests
Any preferences of guests or health
considerations
Time length of function
Time available to prepare function
Staff available to prepare and serve
Facilities available to cook and
serve food
3 Using recipe books or recipe finders on the Internet, design an appropriate menu for your special occasion.
Function menu
4 Justify why your menu is appropriate.
5 Produce one or more of the dishes from your menu to evaluate further the suitability of your chosen menu.
93
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NAME
7.8
Literacy
c
Course Book p 201
CLASS
Recipe development
Study the recipe and complete the
following activities.
1 Highlight the following elements of
a recipe on the recipe card:
• name
• ingredients
• method
• portion size
• cost per portion.
2 Use the following verbs to complete
the recipe:
• stir
• spoon
• serve
• cover
• drop
• place
• rub
• stir
• sift
• cook.
s
up dumpling
r
y
s
n
e
ld
o
G
Recipe
Serves 4
3 Is this recipe suitable for a large-scale
function of 100 people? Give a
reason.
4 Using all or some of the ingredients
listed below, design a recipe:
• plain or self-raising flour
• butter
• egg(s)
• milk
• sugar
• extra 2 ingredients of your choice.
Make sure to include all the elements of
a recipe and use procedural text for the
method. Write your recipe in your
workbook.
portion
Cost 80 cents a
bowl.
Method
nch of salt into a
pi
a
d
an
ur
flo
e
bly, and
_ th
1 __________
re is fine and crum
tu
ix
m
e
th
til
un
_ in the butter
2 __________
gs
in
Dumpl
e centre.
ture to form
make a well in th
flour
into the flour mix
ilk
m
d
an
g
eg
d
1 cup self-raising
_ the combine
ped
3 __________
40 g butter, chop
a soft dough.
1 egg
a large pan.
p ingredients in
ru
sy
ilk
the sugar has
_
m
__
on
__
po
__
es
1 tabl
4 ____
til combined and
un
at
he
m
iu
ed
_ syrup over m
5 __________
ing to the boil.
Syrup
the syrup.
dissolved and br
of the dough into
s
on
po
ts
er
ss
1 cup sugar
de
_
6 __________
to a simmer.
2 cups water
reduce the heat
d
an
_
a dumpling
__
__
__
ife inserted into
7 ____
kn
a
til
un
or
,
es
40 g butter
_ for 20 minut
lden syrup
8 __________
2 tablespoons go
of the syrup.
on juice
comes out clean.
izzle with some
dr
1 tablespoon lem
d
an
es
at
pl
g
_ onto servin
pped cream.
9 __________
ediately with whi
m
im
gs
in
pl
m
du
_
10 __________
e or reheat.
t suitable to freez
no
is
pe
ci
re
is
Note: Th
Ingredients
94
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NAME
7.9
Literacy
c
Course Book p 202
Word
bank
invoice
wastage
computerised
trolleys
email
crystals
cool room
dry
use by
requisition
freezer
FIFO
safe
incorrect
temperatures
first
CLASS
Purchasing systems
1 Use the words in the Word bank to complete the flow chart on the procedures
employed by a community hospital when chilled food is delivered.
Ordering
A fully
stock control system is used to make it easier to
fax orders to suppliers.
Receiving
When the delivery arrives the stores officer examines for signs of
handling. For example, frost
on packets of frozen chicken nuggets
indicate that they may have been defrosted and then refrozen.
dates are
also checked so too is the
to ensure the correct food and quantity have
been delivered.
Controlling
Stock is safely transported to the appropriate storage areas using
Chilled and fresh foods are placed in the
, frozen foods in the
, while non perishables are
stock.
of store
rooms are constantly monitored to ensure foods remain fresh and
. The
system of stock control is implemented so that old stock is moved to the
front
.
Issuing
All staff must use a
sheet to obtain stock. The stock controller issues the
food ensuring the FIFO system is implemented to prevent
of stock.
2 Place each of the following foods under the appropriate storage conditions on the
table below.
fresh milk
tinned tomatoes
onions
spaghetti
oranges
ice-cream
fresh fish
paper towels
olive oil
bacon
potatoes
coffee
frozen peas
frozen pies
Cool room (0–4°C)
95
or
Dry stock (5–10°C)
Freezer (–18 °C)
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NAME
CLASS
Tablesetting and service
7.10
How a table is set and how food is served can be influenced by many factors including
ethnic influences, the menu, the occasion, and the location, for example restaurant,
private home or outdoors.
Literacy
1 Name the tablesetting items.
Casual
A
c
B
e
C
D
Course Book p 205
d
E
2 Predict the occasion and
menu.
b
c
a
3 Name the tablesetting items.
Formal
A
h
B
C
D
E
f
g
F
G
H
j
a
i
J
e
96
I
b
d c
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NAME
CLASS
7.10
continued
4 Predict an occasion and menu for each setting.
5 Complete the following tablesetting rules.
97
•
Always use c
c
crisp tablecloths as well as dry, shiny, glassware,
and crockery.
•
Arrange cutlery 2 cm from the table edge in order of c
o
in.
•
Glasses are placed above the t
in respect to the d
working from the
knife. This is referred to as the one o’clock position
plate.
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NAME
7
CLASS
c
Chapter test
TOTAL
Course Book p 208
50
Food service and catering
True or false?
10
1 A function menu is always a three-course
meal.
2 Give an example of the social
contribution of food service and
catering ventures.
1
2 A barista (coffee maker) is a front-of-house
career opportunity in food service and catering.
3 The food service and catering industry collect
GST for the federal government.
4 Reporting safety problems is a responsibility
of an employee.
3 List two common injuries in the food
service and catering industry.
2
4 Outline three rights that catering
employees have under industry awards.
3
5 Workers compensation is a right of all
workers.
6 Working conditions negotiated in an
enterprise agreement must always be greater
than the award conditions.
7 Smoking near food is not permitted at
outdoor eating venues.
8 A table d’hôte menu is a set menu at a set
price.
5 List four areas in which employees and
customers cannot suffer from
discrimination.
9 A cheese platter can be listed under the
dessert section of a menu.
4
10 Most chefs do not worry about measuring
when developing recipes.
Short answer questions
1 List one example of a food service and
catering venture that operates for:
a profit
6 List four consumer rights.
2
b non-profit.
98
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4
NAME
7
CLASS
Chapter test continued
7 Outline two courses of action that an
environmental health officer can
2
undertake if food premises are not meeting
the standards set by the NSW Food Act 2003.
8 Describe an à la carte menu and outline
an advantage of this type of menu.
12 List five elements that should appear on
recipes used by the food service and
catering industry.
2
13 Match the following styles of plating
food with their descriptions.
9 Describe a menu du jour and outline an
advantage of this type of menu.
Semi-silver
service
The main item is put on the plate
while the vegetables are served in a
separate container from which the
customer helps him or herself.
Par plate
service
The food attendant prepares all or
part of a dish at a small table or
trolley beside the customer’s table.
Plate service
An empty plate is presented to the
customer and the food attendant
serves all the food using as fork and
spoon.
2
Silver service
The main item is put on a plate while
vegetables are placed onto the plate
at the table by a food attendant.
4
Guéridon
service
All the food is put on a plate before
being served.
2
10 For the foods listed below, identify two features
restaurant staff should examine when receiving
the foods:
a fresh fruit such as apples
2
b frozen food such as fish fingers.
11 Identify four factors that need to be
considered when planning a menu.
Provide an example of each factor.
Factor
99
5
Example
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5
NAME
7
CLASS
c
Chapter review
Course Book p 208
Food service and catering
It is now time to test your successful completion of this chapter. Use the checklist below. Provide relevant
information or examples to show that you understand what you have studied.
Students learn to
Information, examples or comments
Examine a variety of food service and catering operations.
Discuss the contribution to society made by the hospitality industry.
Conduct an advanced web search to investigate employment
opportunities in the hospitality industry.
Outline the responsibilities of employers and employees under
various pieces of legislation with regard to food establishments.
Assess and manage risks when preparing and managing foods.
Demonstrate safe work practices when preparing and managing foods.
Outline the rights and responsibilities of consumers with regard
to food establishments.
Compare and contrast a variety of menus from a range of catering
and service operations.
Identify the elements of a recipe.
Compare a recipe for small-scale production with a recipe for use in
large-scale catering.
Develop or modify a recipe suitable for large-scale catering.
Examine organisational systems used in a service or catering operation.
Design, plan and prepare safe and appealing food items
appropriate for catering for small or large-scale functions.
Determine the appropriate table layout or setting for a specific
style of meal.
100
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NAME
7
CLASS
Chapter review continued
List the activities and information that you enjoyed the most in this unit.
Identify areas for improvement where more revision or research are required for you to completely understand
the topic.
101
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NAME
CLASS
8.1
Hands on
c
Course Book p 212
Make your own baby food
Babies around the age of six months need to be weaned as their bodies are rapidly
growing and developing. Initially foods need to be pureed, as babies need to learn to chew.
With a little time, effort and technology, preparing baby food can be an easy and
satisfying activity.
Aim
Equipment
To prepare some
baby food and
compare it
to similar
commercially
made varieties.
1 sample of commercially produced vegetable puree baby food
1 sample of commercially produced stewed fruit puree
1 sample of commercially produced baby jelly
ingredients as listed below
pan
food processor
Method
Prepare the baby food as instructed below then compare to similar commercial varieties.
uree
Vegetable p
pumpkin
mara or piece of
ku
or
t
rro
ca
e
rg
la
1 Peel a
es.
and cut into piec
er; cover
nt of boiling wat
ou
am
l
al
sm
a
in
2 Place
rough.
il until cooked th
with a lid and bo
sor until
e in a food proces
re
Pu
f.
of
er
at
w
3 Drain
smooth.
Stewed fruit puree
1
2
Baby jelly
1
2
102
Stir 1 teaspoon of gelatine in
50 mls of boiled water.
Stir in 50 mls of 100% fruit
juice and chill.
3
Peel, core and slice 1 pear, apple or peach.
Place in a small pan with 2 tablespoons of
water. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat
and simmer until soft and pulpy. Add more
water if required.
Drain water off. Puree in a food processor
until smooth.
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NAME
CLASS
8.1
continued
1 What are some advantages of making your own baby food?
2 Taste-test home-made varieties and commercial baby food. Which do you prefer and why?
3 Complete the following hints.
•
Pureed fruit and vegetables can be frozen in ice-cube trays. When required, pop out one or two and
heat. If using a m
, watch it does not get too hot!
•
Start off by introducing the baby to one fruit or vegetable at a time. Mix the vegetables up as the
baby gets older and mix in some pureed meats. When the baby is older, use a f
for
mashing the food.
•
Babies have a sweet tooth. Breast milk is very sweet. Start off with sweeter vegetables such as
c
and z
and fruits such as p
.
•
Always work with c
•
Never add s
•
Try to use fresh f
and v
. Frozen vegetables and canned fruits in
natural juice are good substitutes if fresh foods cannot be used.
•
Throw away l
103
hands and use clean u
.
or salt.
food and never reheat food.
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NAME
8.2
Literacy
c
Course Book p 213
CLASS
Childhood
Help!
My oldest child has just started school. BJ* is often asked to birthday parties. From
what I’ve observed there is a lot of activity to keep the many children occupied and
there is always an interesting birthday cake. Sometimes the children are given a theme
so they can even go in fancy dress. In three weeks time BJ will turn six and it will be my
turn to host the party. Can you help me plan a fun and safe party for BJ?
Signed
Anxious parent
*Note that BJ can be either a boy or a girl.
Party theme
Party menu
Birthday cake—draw and label your idea
Activities
104
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NAME
8.3
Hands on
c
Course Book p 214
CLASS
Teenagers—work out your
daily diet
More than a third of teenagers in Australia are not eating a balanced diet. Complete the
following activity to see if you are one of them!
Method
For three or more days, every time you eat or drink something, write it down on the table
below. Have a separate table for each day.
Note: ‘Extras’ are any food or drink that do not fit into the food groups of the
Australian Guide to Healthy Eating.
Name
Meal
Day
Food groups
Extras
Cereals
Fruit
Vegetables
Meat and
alternatives
Milk and milk
alternatives
Water
Items not in
food groups
5–11
3
3
1
3
8 glasses
1–3
Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner
Snacks
Total for the day
Recommended
serves*
* Based on the recommended serves for 12–18 years from the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating.
Evaluation
Name
Using the data write up a report card
about your diet. Give yourself a
grade from A to E and then justify
your grade in your comments. Try
and include some suggestions for
improving your diet.
Grade (circle):
105
Age
A
B
C
D
E
Comments:
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NAME
8.4
Literacy
CLASS
Dietary guidelines for
Australian adults
Using your knowledge of nutrition give a reason why each of the guidelines are
recommended for good health.
c
Course Book p 215
Guidelines
Why
Enjoy a wide variety of nutritious foods:
• eat plenty of vegetables, legumes and fruit
• eat plenty of cereals (including breads, rice, pasta
and noodles), preferably wholegrain
• include lean meat, fish, poultry and/or alternatives
• include milks, yoghurts, cheeses and /or alternatives
(reduced fat varieties should be chosen where
appropriate)
• drink plenty of water.
Take care to:
• limit saturated fat and moderate total fat intake
• choose foods low in salt
• limit alcohol intake if you choose to drink
• consume only moderate amounts of sugars and
foods containing added sugars.
Prevent weight gain—be physically active and eat
according to your energy needs.
Care for your food—prepare and store it safely.
Encourage and support breastfeeding.
106
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NAME
8.5
CLASS
Eating out
1 Australian adults are increasingly eating out as part of their lifestyle. Circle the
healthy choices on the menus of these popular cuisines.
Literacy
c
Course Book p 216
Chinese
Vietnamese & Thai
Modern Australian Italian
Steamed dim sim or
Deep fried prawn
cutlets
Clear hot soup (pho) Grilled fish and
or Deep fried crab
vegetables or
cakes
Battered fish and
chips
Fried calamari or
Char grilled baby
octopus
Stir-fry chicken and
Fresh prawn spring
vegetables with rice
rolls or Fried spring
noodles or Crispy skin
rolls
chicken on crispy noodles
Caesar salad or
Potato wedges with
sour cream and
sweet chilli sauce
Tortellini in creamy
sauce or Spaghetti
tossed in a fresh
tomato sauce
Fried rice or Boiled rice
Grilled pork satays
or Coconut-based
beef curry
Salad, cottage cheese
and tuna wrap or
Grilled avocado,
cheese and bacon
on Turkish bread
Pizza with salami,
ham and cheese or
Pizza with cheese,
capsicum and
mushrooms
Fried ice-cream or
Fresh lychees
Ginger fruit salad
or Crunchy toffee
banana bites
Cheesecake or
Carrot cake
Lemon gelato or Creamfilled profiterole with
chocolate sauce
2 Calculate the kilojoule content of three different lunches for workers.
Worker 1
KJ
Worker 2
KJ
Worker 3
KJ
Meat patty
544
2 slices wholegrain bread
440
Doughnut
669
Large hamburger bun
837
Egg
500
Cappuccino with full
cream milk and sugar
276
Fried onions
82
Chips
1046
Caffeine-free soft drink
500
Lettuce, tomato and cucumber 40
Orange juice
400
Total
Total
Total
3 Complete the following table to indicate which worker consumed the most of each.
kilojoules
dietary fibre
caffeine
vitamin C
saturated fat
Worker
107
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NAME
CLASS
8.6
Hands on
c
Course Book p 218
Which milk is that?
Aim
Milk is important for the growth and development of many age groups. It supplies nutrients such as calcium and protein. Today there are many types of milks available including
some that are lactose free.
Equipment
Method
Water
Varieties of chilled milks:
• rice (regular)
• soy (regular)
• skim
• reduced fat
• whole
1 The milks should be placed in separate glasses labelled
only with a letter. (Only the teacher should know the
identity of the milk.) The packaging should be kept for
later use.
2 Students should sample each type of milk and record
their results. Water should be drunk after each taste test
to clean the palate.
Results
Complete the following table. When rating the visual appeal and flavour of the samples, use values of 0–10,
based on the following scale:
• 6–10 if you liked the appearance or flavour of the product (10 being the highest rating)
• 5 if you neither like or dislike the appearance or flavour of the product
• 0–4 if you dislike the appearance or flavour of the product (0 being the lowest rating).
Milk sample
Visual appeal
Flavour
Total score /20
What milk do you think it is?
What milk is it?
A
B
C
D
E
108
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NAME
CLASS
8.6
continued
1 Which milk do you prefer?
2 Total the scores for the class. Which milk was preferred overall?
3 Determine which milks would be most suitable for the following groups and explain why.
•
People with lactose intolerance
•
Young children
•
Adults
•
Vegans
4 Name two dishes that use milk as a main ingredient.
5 Name two food products made from milk.
Extension
Research the meaning of the terms ‘pasteurised’ and ‘homogenised’ that appear on many fresh milk packages.
109
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NAME
8.7
Literacy
c
Course Book p 222
CLASS
Obesity
The body mass index (BMI) is used to estimate the best weight range for your health. It
is calculated by dividing your weight in kilograms by your squared height in metres.
For example if a adult male weighed 84 kg and was 1.82 m tall, this is how you would
calculate their BMI:
84
=
1.82 x 1.82
84
3.31
=
25 (BMI)
What the BMI number indicates
Score
Conclusion
<18
You are very underweight and possibly malnourished
18–20
You are underweight
20–25
You are within a healthy weight range
26–30
You are mildly overweight
>31
You are very overweight or obese
* Note that this scale is based on Caucasian adults 18 years and older. Different BMI scales for children
have also been developed.
1 Determine the BMI and health status of the following 25-year-olds.
Sally weighs 74 kg and is 163 cm tall.
Mark weighs 65 kg and is 178 cm tall.
2 List eight tips you would recommend if you were writing a magazine article about sensible weight control.
Control your weight by:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
110
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NAME
8.8
Hands on
c
CLASS
Try some vegan food
Eating a vegan diet may not be as hard as it seems. There are many foods available that
make good substitutes for meats, eggs, milk, fish and poultry. Look for them in the health
food and chilled food sections of the supermarket.
Aim
Method
To try some
vegan foods.
Examine, prepare and taste-test some vegan foods. You could try:
• soy sausages
• vegetarian rissoles
Course Book p 225
• nut-meat products
• tofu products
• tinned soya beans
• flavoured bacon chips (in herb and spice section of supermarket)
• TVP.
1 Which products did you try?
2 Which products did you like?
6 Examine the following ingredients in Macaroni
bake. What modifications could be made for a
vegan?
2 tablespoons butter
3 List the ingredients on the package of one of the
products.
1
2
1
2
onion, diced
capsicum, diced
300 g minced beef
425 g tinned tomato
1 beef stock cube
125 g macaroni
4 Which ingredient(s) in the product supplies
protein?
1
2
1
2
cup fresh breadcrumbs
cup cheese
5 Give three reasons why people may choose a
vegan diet.
7 Explain the difference between a vegan and a
lacto-ovo-vegetarian.
111
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NAME
8.9
Literacy
c
Course Book p 228
CLASS
Considering a camping trip
Read this fact sheet from a national motoring association and then answer the questions.
Food tastes good when cooked over a campfire or a gas stove, so stick to easy meals
and plan in advance. It’s better to take more than you need, particularly if heading off
to remote areas and you eat more when active outdoors.
A standard camping menu:
• breakfast—porridge/cereal, milk and bread with jam/honey/Vegemite, fruit
• lunch—sandwiches or noodles, fruit
• dinner—sausages, rissoles or chops with a salad or cooked vegetables, stews or
pasta
• snacks—fruit, muesli/fruit bars, biscuits and sultanas
• drinks—tea/coffee, cordial and plenty of water.
The following shows some basic items to take with you.
Equipment
Gas stove and fuel
Billies/cooking pots
with lids
Thermos
Esky
Plenty of water
Food
Seasonings;
powdered milk;
cooking oil
Parmesan cheese (keeps well, useful for flavouring)
Dried foods such as pasta, rice, noodles and soups
Snack bars and nuts
Tinned foods such as tuna and fruit
Meat for roasting in open fires;
long life juices
Try these fun outdoor recipes:
• Breakfast wrap-ups—fry eggs and sausages, insert in flour tortillas with lashings
of tomato sauce.
• Eggs on an open fire—cut an orange in half and eat the pulp. Crack an egg into
the orange skin and place it in the embers until the egg turns white.
• Quick mini-pizzas—spread tomato paste on a tortilla, add some toppings,
sprinkle with cheese. Cook in a frying pan until the cheese melts.
• Baked potatoes—pierce each potato three times with a fork, wrap in aluminium
foil and cover in embers on edge of fire.
• Banana boats—peel back a strip of banana skin about 3 cm wide. Scoop out a
trench in the banana. Fill trench with marshmallows and milk chocolate
squares. Fold the banana peel back and wrap in foil. Place on hot coals for
about 10 minutes.
• Yum sticks—make a dough (self-raising flour, water, a little butter). Mould
dough around a stick that is about as thick as your finger to form a long test
tube shape about 10 cm long. Cook slowly over coals. Slide bread off stick and
fill with golden syrup.
112
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NAME
8.9
CLASS
continued
1 Why would it be essential to pack more than you need when camping?
2 Why do you think you need to take plenty of water?
3 List five other pieces of cooking or cleaning equipment you may need to pack when camping.
4 List four seasonings you can pack.
5 Why do you think powdered milk is recommended?
6 Why do you think the Australian army trains its members in using bush foods?
113
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NAME
CLASS
School canteens—
traffic-light foods findaword
8.10
Vocabulary
Under NSW government policy school canteens need to implement a traffic-light system
of grouping foods.
Green (Go) foods are drawn from the basic food groups and are low in saturated fat,
sugar and/or salt and rich in nutrients. These foods should feature prominently on the menu.
Amber (Caution) foods are moderate in saturated fat, sugar and/or salt and moderately high in energy but also provide a range of nutrients. Serving sizes should also be
moderate and not large.
Red (Stop) foods are poor in nutrients, high in energy, saturated fat, sugar and/or
salt. These foods can be made available through the canteen no more than twice per
term, making them ‘occasional foods’ as consistent with the Dietary Guidelines.
c
Course Book p 229
Find the ‘Go’, ‘Caution’ and ‘Stop’ foods in the findaword below.
E
R
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A
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S
B
I
S
U
V
114
Green
foods
fruit
reduced fat milk
cheese
yoghurt
vegetables
wholegrain bread
high-fibre bread
cereal
lean meat
fish
poultry
eggs
water
Amber
pasta
foods
lasagne
pizzas
low-fat pies
chicken nuggets
noodles
low-salt snacks
low-fat snacks
ice-cream
Red foods lollies
soft drink
deep-fried foods
pastries
chips
iced cakes
chocolate bars
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NAME
CLASS
8
Chapter test
c
TOTAL
Course Book p 236
50
Special needs
True or false?
1 If trying to lose weight you should avoid
all carbohydrates.
2 If trying to lose weight you should avoid
all fats.
3 Breast milk or formula milk supplies all
the nutrients required for a baby for the
first 4–6 months.
4 Dental caries are caused by excessive
consumption of fat.
10
5 A pregnant woman should be eating for two.
6 If recovering from illness or injury, more
protein is required.
7 Anaemia results from a lack of Vitamin C.
8 Alcohol is high in kilojoules and may lead
to obesity.
9 Coeliac disease results from an allergy
to peanuts.
10 Hypertension is linked to a low salt diet.
Short answer questions
1 For each of the following stages of the lifecycle identify three nutritional requirements and
outline why they are required.
Life stage
Nutritional requirements
Pregnancy
1
Why they are required
2
3
Adolescence
1
2
3
Aged
1
2
3
115
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6
NAME
8
CLASS
Chapter test continued
2 List two substances that should be
avoided during pregnancy.
2
8 Suggest two foods suitable for bushwalkers.
Explain why they are suitable.
4
3 List one advantage of breastfeeding.
1
9 Distinguish between the three
different types of vegetarians.
4 Define the term ‘weaning’ and give an
example of suitable food.
5 List five dietary guidelines for
Australians over 65.
6 Plan a lunch for a child who is lactose
intolerant. Explain how your lunch meets
the nutritional needs of children.
3
2
5
10 Identify two support groups or
organisations that aim to improve health
of Australians, particularly those with
special needs.
2
Extended response
5
Discuss the causes of a diet-related disorder and
how it could be prevented.
5
7 Plan a breakfast for an adult who has
been told that they need to cut down on
fat. Explain why your breakfast is suitable.
116
5
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NAME
8
CLASS
Chapter review
c
Course Book p 236
Special needs
It is now time to test your successful completion of this chapter. Use the checklist below. Provide relevant
information or examples to show that you understand what you have studied.
Students learn to
Information, examples or comments
Identify the circumstances that may lead an individual to have
special needs.
Outline the special requirements for each stage of the lifecycle.
Explore the impact of a variety of health needs on food
requirements of individuals.
Investigate the effects of lifestyle on food needs.
Examine cultural influences and religious beliefs which may
impact upon food needs.
Identify the logistical impacts on food needs and suggest
suitable methods of meeting these logistical needs.
Examine a range of support networks available for individuals
with special needs.
Identify examples of foods that are processed or prepared to
suit individuals with special needs.
Assess the suitability of a range of processed or prepared foods
for dietary disorders.
Explore methods of processing and preparing foods in the home
to suit a specific need.
Analyse the nutritive value of a dish.
Identify foods that are suitable for a number of special needs.
117
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NAME
8
CLASS
Chapter review continued
Design, plan and prepare a menu/meal/dish suitable for a
particular special need.
Research the circumstances of a particular group.
Organise a dietary plan.
Produce a multimedia presentation to educate members of
the community.
List the activities and information that you enjoyed the most in this unit.
Identify areas for improvement where more revision or research are required for you to completely understand
the topic.
118
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NAME
9.1
CLASS
Breads of the world findaword
Find the following types of breads in the findaword. Do you know where and how each of these
breads are traditionally made?
Vocabulary
c
Course Book p 238
119
sourdough
stollen
tortilla
zop
pikelets
pitta
pizza
pretzel
pumpernickel
rotis
rye
lavash
matzo
naan
olive
panettone
pagnotta
parathas
cob
corn
croissant
damper
focaccia
irish soda
kugelhopf
babka
bagel
baguette
bap
bhaturas
brioche
chapatis
Q
K
A
L
A
N
A
L
T
N
P
Y
P
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P
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P
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NAME
9.2
Literacy
c
Course Book p 239
120
CLASS
Damper recipe scramble
Look at the Mini cheesy damper recipe below. You will notice that the method has been
scrambled.
In the space below, rewrite this recipe in the correct order and justify your selections. Your
teacher may allow you to make these in class.
s
eesy damper
h
c
i
in
M
e
ip
Rec
Ingredients
g flour
4 cups self-raisin
30 g butter
ilk
2 cups whole m
y grated
2 teaspoons finel
parmesan cheese
ated
1 cup coarsely gr
tasty cheese
1
p coarsely grated
2 cu
parmesan cheese
Method
garine.
ith butter or mar
1 Serve warm w
minutes.
oven for about 15
t
ho
in diameter.
a
in
ke
Ba
2
unds about 7 cm
ro
t
ou
t
cu
to
er
tt
se.
3 Use a scone cu
d parmesan chee
an
y
st
ta
ed
at
gr
coarsely
d until
4 Sprinkle with
surface and knea
ed
ur
flo
ly
ht
lig
a
to
5 Turn dough on
fingertips
smooth.
rub in butter with
d
an
l
w
bo
e
rg
la
a
6 Sift flour into
rumbs.
istency of breadc
ns
co
until the
ed parmeson.
7 Add finely grat
to 220˚C.
8 Preheat oven
thickness.
about 1.5 cm in
to
t
ou
h
ug
do
s
ky dough.
9 Pres
ix it to a soft stic
m
to
ilk
m
gh
ou
. Make sure
10 Stir in en
greased oven tray
a
to
on
h
ug
do
of
11 Place rounds
other.
just touching each
e
ar
that they
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NAME
9.3
CLASS
Sensory evaluation of bread
Hands on
1 Complete the table below for nine different types of bread.
c
Bread
Country of origin
Special features
Brief description
Course Book p 240
2 Select your favourite bread from the table above. In 1–2 paragraphs, list the features
that make this bread appealing to you.
121
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NAME
9.3
CLASS
continued
3 Design your own type of bread. Plan the ingredients that you intend to use and the quantities required. Make
your bread in class or at home for homework. Bring your bread into class for everyone to sample and
evaluate. Use the space provided to scribble notes and ideas.
Design
122
Plan
Evaluate
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NAME
CLASS
Reasons for celebration
9.4
Complete the following passage using the words provided in the Word bank. (You may
use each word more than once.) Use your text to assist you.
Literacy
reasons
celebrations are those which involve family, friends and relatives. They may
be either formal or
cel. In Australia, we commonly celebrate
ebrations informally, such as a family
or picnic. If large numbers of people
are to be served at a
event, then
are usually a quick and easy
way of serving guests. Foods such as cold meats,
, pasta and chilled deserts
are commonly served.
c
Course Book p 244
reasons
is understood as the values, knowledge,
, behaviours and dress
that are passed through each generation. We usually learn
from our
. Some examples of
celebrations include
Day,
ceremonies,
Year and
Festivals. Due to the multicultural nature of Australia, we are able to
in
many of these celebrations.
reasons
Word bank
Aboriginal
Anzac
Australia
barbecue
beliefs
birthdays
buffets
casual
certain
Chinese
Christmas
cultural
culture
Easter
faith
family
God(s)
Historical
123
influential
initiation
lantern
New
parents
participate
Passover
Ramadan
Ramanavami
religion
religions
religious
Sabbath
salads
social
weddings
worship
Valentine’s
is understood as a person’s system of
and
. Different
may eat special foods on
occasions because it reminds them of their
or
their
. Some Christian reasons for celebration include
and
. Jewish celebrations include The
and
. Muslim celebrations include
,
while Hindus celebrate
.
reasons
Cultural and religious celebrations may be based on an
event.
Some special occasions which have
backgrounds include
Day and
Day.
reasons
The
is the most important and
unit for almost
every individual. Some reasons for
celebrations might include
,
and
reunions.
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NAME
9.5
Hands on
c
Course Book p 246
CLASS
Locations for social
celebrations
Copy and complete this table using a word processor. You should include information
about another three locations. Remember to think creatively!
Location name
Formal/
informal
Description
Features/
facilities offered
Royal Botanical
Gardens
Informal
Suitable for picnics, all food must
be brought, no BBQ or other
cooking facilities available
Toilets nearby, seating,
some shelter, picturesque
environment
Plan an event
Design
Design a special occasion to celebrate the return or departure of a family friend or relative.
Plan
In your plan, consider all the following issues:
• location
• guest list
• foods to be served
• decorations
• entertainment.
Produce
1 Produce a list of things to do (as if you were actually going to carry out the celebration). For example, book the local community centre hall, make a shopping list, etc.
2 Plan a time schedule or program of events for the celebration. For example, 6 pm
guests arrive, 6–6.30 pm finger foods and drinks served, etc.
Evaluate
1 Evaluate the amount of work required to carry out such an event.
2 Investigate the costs of using a catering or party planning company to cover this
event. You may do this over the Internet.
3 Is it worth the time, money and effort to design the event yourself?
124
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NAME
9.6
CLASS
Foods, techniques and
equipment crossword
Vocabulary
1
2
3
c
5
4
6
9
7
8
10
Course Book p 247
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Across
18
3 Equipment must be tested
for
before the
event.
19
4 Food is of best quality and
price during this time.
9 Space in
and
freezers must be adequate
for the foods purchased
for any event.
13 Workers must undergo
in order to use
any special kitchen
equipment.
16
must be tied back
or covered.
17 When preparing and serving
food,
must be clean.
18 Foods are prepared just
before the event to ensure
they are of top
.
19 An item of protective
clothing.
125
Down
1 A host orders food in suitable
quantities to avoid this.
10 Dirty equipment will attract
visits from
.
2
11 A
line approach
allows food preparation to flow
quickly.
must be washed
regularly.
5 The term given to bread that has
become hard.
6 Crossis avoided
by using correct chopping
boards for meat and
vegetables.
7 The
accurately.
must be followed
8 Used to transfer food.
12
must be adequate for
the number of guests attending
an event.
14 Foods for special occasions
must be appropriate to the
appeal, occasion, likes and
of the group.
15 A variety in colour, flavour and
is important.
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NAME
9.7
Hands on
c
Course Book p 249
CLASS
Year 10 formal dinner
This is a formal function to be held at a local function centre. Sixty students, their
partners, 10 teachers and 20 parents will be attending the event.
Design
1 Select a theme for the celebration.
2 Plan an appropriate three-course menu. Word process it to display on your tables.
3 Use the space below to start brainstorming some possible ideas.
Theme
Menu items
Place card/decorations
Produce
1 Select one food item on your menu to prepare. Make sure your teacher approves the
recipe first. Complete a food order.
2 Design and make a place card. Bring in a suitable table decoration to be used when
presenting your food.
Evaluate
1 Evaluate the success of your meal in one page. Discuss what went well, what you
might change, why you selected this food item and so on.
126
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CLASS
Dinner planning activity—
with a twist!
9.8
Hands on
c
Course Book p 253
You have just decided to host your own birthday party and invite five guests to help you
celebrate the special occasion. You send out an invitation to Mark, Peter, Avril and
Simone, only to realise that some of your guests will have special dietary requirements.
• Mark has a severe peanut allergy and does not like to eat any nuts.
• Peter does not have any special requirements.
• Avril is lactose intolerant. She can eat small amounts of dairy products, but too
much will make her feel ill.
• Simone is Muslim and does not eat any pork products.
What will you serve? Instead of making numerous separate meals for your guests,
investigate possible recipes that would meet the needs of all of your guests. You may
design your menu in groups of 2–3.
Use the space provided below to brainstorm, then write out your menu. Attach your
ingredients and method. Share this with the class.
Possible ideas
Menu card
127
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9.9
Literacy
c
Course Book p 255
CLASS
Video dialogue
1 In pairs, select one consideration from the following list:
•
nutritional value of food
•
food appeal
•
occasion and setting
•
characteristics of diners
•
resources.
2 Imagine that you have been employed by TAFE to produce a 2–3 minute video
presentation aimed at educating new hospitality students about planning menus. In
the space provided below, draft the dialogue that you will use in the video. Make it
as fun and interesting as possible and remember to comment only on the topic area
that you have selected.
3 Perform this in front of the class (you may use props if necessary).
4 After each pair’s performance, evaluate its success in teaching students about that
aspect of menu planning. Comment on any improvements that could be made.
Area to consider when menu planning:
Dialogue:
128
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9.10
Hands on
c
Course Book p 264
CLASS
Convenience foods
brainstorm
You own a catering company. An employee who is hosting a wedding breakfast
tomorrow morning has called in sick at 2 pm. You must host the event yourself, despite
the short notice.
You will have ten workers assisting you this afternoon and in the morning. There is
minimal time to shop this afternoon. You know that you will have to rely heavily on
partly or fully processed convenience foods to assist you and your team.
The bride has requested that certain foods be served at the function. These include:
•
fruit punch, smoothies, fresh juices, tea and coffee
•
warm Danish pastries filled with fruit
•
fruit salad and yoghurt
•
mini pikelets with colourful and tasty toppings
•
crepes with savoury fillings such as mushrooms.
1 List three other suitable foods to be served.
2 In the space below, brainstorm all possible convenience foods which could be purchased to help save time and effort when preparing the above foods.
Suitable convenience foods
129
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9.11
Literacy
c
Course Book p 264
CLASS
Cocktail party convenience
foods
1 Complete the following table.
Food
Convenient ingredients
Mini pancakes
pancake shake mix, bottled French mustard, cold deli
roast beef slices, bottled parsley flakes
Toast triangles
Bacon and mushroom tartlets
Spinach and cheese triangles
Fruit platters
Cheese platters
2 Design your own cocktail party food. Give it an exciting and creative name and
include possible convenient ingredients for you to use.
130
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9
CLASS
c
Chapter test
Course Book p 264
TOTAL
50
Food for special occasions
Multiple choice
1 Which of the following is not a type of bread:
a bagel
b bap
c bhaturas
d barooshka
2 A food that provides the basis of a diet is called:
a staple
b stable
c mainstay
d base.
3 An example of unleavened bread is:
a croissant
b lavash
c foccacia
d pizza base.
4 Small pieces of toast that are decoratively
topped and served as an appetiser are
called:
a crudités
b vol au vents
c canapés
d terrine.
10
5 This type of food service is used when
medium to large numbers of people are to
be served:
a barbecue
b buffet
c silver service
d take-away.
Short answer questions
1 List three reasons for celebration.
3
2 Select one reason from the previous question and provide an example.
2
3 State one guideline for selecting and preparing food for special occasions.
2
4 State one technique for handling food for a special occasion.
2
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CLASS
9
Chapter test continued
5 Use your own words to explain cross-contamination.
3
6 List one rule for using equipment at a special occasion.
2
7 Explain the purpose of a Caterers Quantity Guide.
3
8 List three factors to consider when planning a menu.
3
9 Select one factor from the previous question. Provide examples explaining how it influences menu
planning.
10 Define the following keywords:
a meal portioning
3
6
b sedentary
c
commercial.
11 What does task sequencing mean?
3
12 Name the last area in a commercial kitchen.
1
13 Give a definition of a garnish.
2
14 Who makes food look its best?
1
15 List two tips to remember when presenting food for a special event.
4
132
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9
CLASS
c
Chapter review
Course Book p 264
Food for special occasions
It is now time to test your successful completion of this chapter. Use the checklist below. Provide relevant
information or examples to show that you understand what you have studied.
Students learn to
Information, examples or comments
Outline the significance of food throughout history.
Explore the special occasions celebrated by various groups.
Design, plan and prepare food items for special occasions.
Plan a menu for a special occasion using products in the marketplace.
Devise a work flow plan to be used when conducting a practical
activity.
Demonstrate appropriate food handling and presentation skills for
a special occasion.
Plan, prepare and host a function to celebrate a special occasion that
incorporates the use of convenience foods.
List the activities and information that you enjoyed the most this unit.
Identify areas for improvement where more revision or research are required for you to completely understand
the topic.
133
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10.1
CLASS
Aussie food today
Read the information about Australian food habits posted on an international travel
website. Then answer the questions in your workbooks.
Case study
c
Course Book p 267
Eating habits in Australia have undergone a mini-revolution in recent decades and the
sampling of Australian food can be a visit’s highlight. Even 20 years ago Australian
food had not much of an international reputation—common meals consisted of foods
such as meat pies, steaks, lamingtons and pumpkin scones. Since 1945, the country’s
original Anglo-Irish population base has been enriched by successive waves of Italians,
Greeks, Yugoslavs, Turks, Lebanese, Indians, Thais, Chinese, Malays, Indonesians,
Viet-namese and Cambodians, each of which added its own cuisine to the Australian
diet.
Given the climate, fresh produce and diverse ethnic roots, it’s no surprise that the
sunny, spicy flavours of the Mediterranean and Asian cuisines permeate Australian
menus. In fact chefs often combine cultures to create ‘fusion food’. For instance, chefs
often splash Spanish olive oil with one hand while tossing chopped Asian coriander into
a salad with the other.
Meat still plays a vital part in the staple Australian diet and the available choice and
quality are both impressive and inexpensive by international standards. You can try
juicy beef steaks, lamb, pork, poultry or, if you’re more adventurous, kangaroo, emu,
crocodile or even witchetty grub—an Aboriginal delicacy.
Australia also has a superb range of seafood—prawns, lobsters, octopus, oysters,
mud crabs, Balmain Bugs, and a huge variety of fresh fish. This is complemented by
fresh vegetables and a wide range of fruit from Tasmanian apples to tropical juicy
Queensland mangoes.
There is also nothing ordinary about an Australian sandwich—we’re masters at
packing a bread roll with fresh ingredients made to your order, as the people who crowd
city parks at lunchtime to enjoy their custom-prepared ‘sambos’ can testify. Dining
facilities are available to suit all requirements from first-class restaurants, bistros, cafes
and good quality fast-food outlets to pub counters. The trend towards outdoor eating
has seen tables with colourful umbrellas spring up on pavements everywhere.
Having morning and afternoon tea is still a very widespread custom. While
Australians drink lots of tea, coffee drinking has also taken off—a huge variety of
coffees are on offer, from the traditional ‘long black’ to the frothy cappuccino.
Adapted from <http://asian-tours.com/australia/people.html>.
1 List cultures that influence modern Australian
cuisine.
4 List some examples of dining venues that are available in Australia.
2 What is meant by the term ‘fusion food’?
5 List some examples of popular Australian beverages.
3 Give examples of seafoods that have become
popular in Australia.
6 How do the foods consumed today differ from
eating patterns earlier in Australia’s history?
134
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10.2
Case study
c
Course Book p 270
CLASS
Lenard’s
Lenard’s is a successful franchised store located in Australia and South Africa, retailing
fresh, pre-prepared poultry, lamb, pork and beef products. Butcher Lenard Poulter
started Lenard’s in 1987 when he realised that people were working longer hours and
leading busier lifestyles. Lenard developed a range of freshly prepared poultry meals
that saved the consumer time and introduced them to new flavours. It helped that these
meals were also good value for money.
The choices available to consumers include crumbed products such as Chicken kiev
and Chicken schnitzel. Kebabs and marinated chicken strips for stir-fries and stroganoff
are popular sellers, as are chicken sausages, patties, lasagne, spring rolls and chicken
strudel. After purchasing, the consumer just needs to cook the meat.
Lenard’s has also developed an ‘easy living’ range of fast and delicious meals that
are ready to eat after just ten minutes in the microwave or 25 minutes in the oven.
This range features products such as Traditional Italian meatballs, Chicken and vegetable hot pot, Creamy coconut curry chicken breast and Beef and Asian vegetables
with hokkien noodles. You simply add your own pasta, rice or vegetables.
1 What types of products does Lenard’s sell?
5 List three meals you can purchase from Lenard’s
‘easy living’ range.
2 Why did Lenard Poulter start the business?
3 Why did he choose to produce freshly prepared
chicken meals?
6 In two columns outline advantages and
disadvantages of the trend towards using
prepared fresh products.
4 List six examples of products you may purchase
from Lenards.
135
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NAME
CLASS
10.3
Make your own
herb-flavoured vinegar
Hands on
Fresh herbs are full of flavour and add flavour to foods such as salads.
c
Course Book p 270
Aim
To prepare a salad dressing.
Ingredients
2 12 cups of red or white vinegar
glass bottles
one or more of the following herbs:
• 1 cup chopped basil leaves
• 6 bay leaves
• 30 g fresh dill
• 1 clove of chopped garlic
• 2 stems of rosemary or tarragon
Method
1 Pour vinegars and herbs into sterilised bottles or jars and seal tightly.
2 Store in a dry cool place for 2–3 weeks.
3 Strain the vinegars.
4 Re-bottle with decorative stems of herbs.
5 Seal tightly and store in a cool, dry place.
6 Label the bottles.
Alternatively, flavour 3 cups of virgin olive oil with 12 cup of fresh chopped basil,
2 cloves of garlic, 2 small red chillis or 4 sprigs of rosemary.
1 Why is it best to sterilise your bottles or jars?
2 How can you sterilise?
3 Why should the vinegar be left for a few weeks?
136
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NAME
CLASS
What’s in the cereal box?
10.4
Examine the nutritional panel of the cereals below or look up an Australian online
nutrition database. Use the information to complete the table below for 100 g of or
100mls of the product.
Literacy
1 Which cereal is highest in:
a kilojoules
c
b protein
c
fat
Course Book p 271
d sugars
e
fibre
f
iron?
Breakfast
cereal bar
Breakfast
drink
Bix
cereal
Corn
cereal
Bran
cereal
Free choice
cereal
Whole
milk
Name of product
Energy (Kj)
Protein (g)
Total fat (g)
Saturated fat (g)
Total carbohydrate (g)
Sugars (g)
Dietary fibre (g)
Sodium (mg)
Iron (mg)
Calcium (mg)
137
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10.4
CLASS
continued
2 What are some nutritional problems that can occur when products high in sugar, fat or kilojoules are part
of your daily food intake? Complete the following table.
Problems
Sugars
Fat
Kilojoules
3 What nutritional problems can occur when the diet is lacking in particular nutrients? Complete the
following table.
Problems
Fibre
Iron
Calcium
4 What is an advantage of adding milk to your cereal?
5 Using the information gained from the activity, write a paragraph outlining the advantages and disadvantages of breakfast bars and drinks.
138
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NAME
CLASS
Know your drinks
10.5
Examine the table and then answer the following questions.
Hands on
Beverages (1 cup serving)
Skim milk Orange juice Bottled water
c
Course Book p 272
Diet soft drink
Sports drink
Kilojoules
320
490
0
4
205
Fat
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
Carbohydrates
4%
9%
0%
0%
6%
Protein
16%
4%
0%
0%
0%
Calcium
30%
2%
2%
0%
0%
Potassium
11%
12%
0%
0%
0%
Magnesium
8%
0%
1%
0%
0%
Sodium
6%
0%
0%
0%
5%
Vitamin A
25%
4%
0%
0%
0%
Vitamin C
4%
130%
0%
0%
0%
Vitamin D
25%
0%
0%
0%
0%
Phosphorus
20%
0%
0%
2%
0%
1 Which drink is highest in:
a kilojoules
2 Sports drinks are commonly called electrolyte replacement
drink. Which nutrient supplies the electrolyte in these
drinks?
b
protein
3 What type of carbohydrate is most likely in the sports drink
to provide quick energy?
c
carbohydrates
d
calcium
4 Electrolyte drinks now come in many flavours. If some
orange juice were to be included in the drink, how would it
change the nutrient composition of the sport’s drink?
e
vitamin A
5 Suggest a health risk associated with high intake of sodium.
f
vitamin C?
6 Why is water essential when undertaking sport?
139
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NAME
CLASS
Buffet service
10.6
Pretend a page in your workbook is a buffet table. Cut out the pictures and paste them
on the buffet table in a logical and attractive manner. (Hint—divide the table into
sections.) Draw arrows to indicate how guests can move around the table.
Hands on
c
Course Book p 275
Bread rolls
Pavlova
Tossed salad
Coleslaw
Vegetarian lasagne
Cake plates
140
Cutlery
Sour cream
Coffee and tea cups
Roasted herb chicken pieces
Dessert spoons
Dinner plates
Gravy boat
Serviettes
Mud cake
Fruit platter
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NAME
10.7
Hands on
CLASS
Decorate a mock cocktail
You can have some fun decorating drinks!
Aim
To decorate a mock cocktail.
c
Course Book p 278
Ingredients
3 cups of fruit cup cordial
1.25 litre bottle of lemonade
1.25 litre bottle of ginger ale
ice-cubes
punch bowl
cocktail glasses
Equipment
Method
Any of the following may be used in decoration:
1 Mix the punch ingredients in a punch bowl.
• strawberries
2 Pour into a cocktail glass.
• mint leaves
3 Design and present a suitable garnish for the cocktail. Common examples include:
• lemons
• oranges
•
placing a fanned strawberry on the glass
• sugar
•
coating rim of cocktail glass in egg white and
then dipping in sugar
•
placing fruit pieces on a cocktail stick
•
slicing and twisting oranges on the glass.
• egg white
• cocktail sticks
• cocktail umbrellas
• cocktail glasses
• glace cherries
• straws
Questions
1 Who in the class had the best looking cocktail?
2 Are you happy with your cocktail?
3 How could you have improved it?
141
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NAME
10.8
Hands on
CLASS
Food presentation
1 Colour and cut out the items on this page.
2 Arrange them on your plate to make an appealing and modern food presentation.
3 Paste your arrangement in your book.
c
Course Book p 280
Chicken drumstick
142
Scoop of boiled rice
Carrot slices
Broccoli florets
Sprig of flat leaf parsley
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NAME
10.9
CLASS
Factors influencing food
trends crossword
Vocabulary
1
c
2
3
4
5
Course Book p 285
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Across
1 The symbol on buns at
Easter.
17
4 Prefers not to eat meat.
6 Eaten on Good Friday.
7 An Italian food which is
often served as fast food or
home delivered.
8 A traditional Indian dish.
18
Down
13 A traditional French
breakfast food.
1 Placed in English puddings for
good luck.
15 A popular outdoor meal in
Australia.
2 Often preferred over savoury
foods.
16 Lolly-filled object used in
Mexico.
3 This meat is commonly eaten
at Christmas in the US.
17 A gift on Valentine’s Day.
5 A French delicacy.
14 A Japanese delicacy.
18 The course traditionally
eaten before pasta in Italy.
6 Ingredient in Australian
Christmas cake.
16 Commonly eaten at the
movies.
143
9 An Islamic fasting period.
10 Steamed Chinese food from a
trolley.
11 Eaten when celebrating a
special event.
12 A food not eaten by Muslims.
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CLASS
10
Chapter test
c
Course Book p 290
TOTAL
50
Food trends
Food trends
10
Match the food with the food trends.
Genetically modified foods
Marinated stir-fry strips
Meal replacements
Flavoured sports mineral water
Prepared fresh foods
Canola
Heat and serve foods
Free range eggs
Fresh herbs
Diet soup powder
Electrolyte replacement drinks
Frozen lasagne
Functional ingredients
Power energy chocolate bar
Spices
Coriander
Organic produce
Cinnamon
Snack bars
Calcium
Short answer questions
1 Outline one advantage and disadvantage of organic foods.
Advantage
2
Disadvantage
2 Explain what is meant by the term ‘genetically modified food’.
1
144
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10
CLASS
Chapter test continued
3 Outline one advantage and one disadvantage of genetically modified foods.
Advantage
2
Disadvantage
4 Define the term ‘functional food’.
2
5 Use an example of a functional food and outline its benefits to the consumer.
2
6 Define a ‘garnish’ or ‘decoration’.
1
7 Give two examples of a garnish and two examples of a decoration.
For each example, suggest a suitable accompanying dish.
Garnish 1
Dish
Garnish 2
Dish
Decoration 1
Dish
Decoration 2
Dish
4
8 List four places where you could see the work of a food stylist.
4
9 Describe three techniques that food stylist may use on food when shooting a
television commercial.
3
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NAME
10.10
CLASS
Chapter test continued
10 How should you plate food so that it looks appetising?
4
11 Give an example of a cultural food taboo or belief.
1
12 Describe a festive tradition celebrated in Australia and the traditional food representing this event.
4
Extended response
In two paragraphs, explain why companies use promotions and describe the different methods they employ.
10
146
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NAME
10
CLASS
c
Chapter review
Course Book p 290
Food trends—what’s in?
It is now time to test your successful completion of this chapter. Use the checklist below. Provide relevant
information or examples to show that you understand what you have studied.
Students learn to
Information, examples or comments
Compare past and present food trends.
Identify current trends in food, food service and food presentation.
Identify examples of services offered by a range of hospitality establishments.
Plate food for service.
Design, plan, prepare and present appealing and contemporary food that
reflects the latest food trends.
Identify examples of food styling and photography.
Explain the influence of food styling and photography in promoting food
trends.
Style food for photography.
Relate recent food trends to the factors that influenced them using examples.
Discuss the role of the media in promoting new food trends.
List the activities and information that you enjoyed the most in this unit.
Identify areas for improvement where more revision or research are required for you to completely understand
the topic.
147
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