super sport owner'

SUPER SPORT
OWNER’S MANUAL
268 SS Super Sport
268 SC Sport Cruiser
298 SS Super Sport
298 SC Sport Cruiser
Dear Valued Customer,
Welcome to the Monterey Life!
We would like to extend to you our “Thank You” for choosing a Monterey boat!
You have made an investment in our product and we are confident you will enjoy many years of boating pleasure. Your new boat has been built to the standards set forth by the United States Coast Guard, National Marine
Manufacturers Association and the American Boat and Yacht Council. We are proud to have you in our “Family!”
At this time, we need you to read your owner’s manual and become familiar with all systems on your boat. Make
certain that you and your dealer have filled out and mailed your warranty registration card back to us here at the
factory. It is very important to us and it is also a U.S. Federal Regulation.
This manual is an important aid in the operation and maintenance of your boat. The information is intended as a
guide and cannot cover every question you may have about your boat and boating in general. We encourage
you to contact your dealership for any additional information you might need. If there is a question about your
boat that can’t be answered by your dealer, please contact our factory direct by calling the Monterey Boats
Customer Service Department, (352) 529-9181 or online if you
prefer at: www.info@montereyboats.com.
If you are new to boating, we recommend you participate in a boating class or group to gain more knowledge
and confidence. Contact your dealer, local U.S. Coast Guard or U.S. Power Squadron Organizations for information in your area.
With proper care, routine service and preventive maintenance, your Monterey boat will not only reward you with
enjoyment, but with reliability, dependability and one of the higher resale values in today’s boating industry.
Enjoy your new boat and please respect our environment at all times. Always remember to practice safe boating
procedures for your protection as well as those around you.
Sincerely,
The M.O.S.T. (Monterey Owners Support Team)
Have a safe boating day!
DATE PURCHASED ____________________________________________________________________
DEALER/PHONE NUMBER ______________________________________________________________
BOAT MODEL __________________________________________________________________________
HULL ID NUMBER ______________________________________________________________________
TRAILER ID NUMBER __________________________________________________________________
ENGINE MAKE/MODEL __________________________________________________________________
ENGINE #1 SERIAL NUMBER ____________________________________________________________
ENGINE #2 SERIAL NUMBER ____________________________________________________________
DRIVE MAKE/MODEL __________________________________________________________________
DRIVE #1 SERIAL NUMBER ______________________________________________________________
DRIVE #2 SERIAL NUMBER ______________________________________________________________
To comply with Federal regulations it is important to return the warranty registration card within 15 days.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
M INTRODUCTION ...................................... M-1
New Boat Delivery..................................... M-2
Parts.......................................................... M-2
Specifications ............................................ M-3
Special Care & Cleaning ........................... M-3
Fire Extinguishing System......................... M-6
Special Gas Precautions........................... M-7
Generator Set ........................................... M-8
Boat Layouts & Details ............................ M-10
Air Conditioner ......................................... M-10
Electrical Schematics ............................... M-25
1 BOATING SAFETY .................................. 1-1
Boating Regulations .................................. 1-2
Boater Responsibilities ............................. 1-2
Required Safety Equipment ...................... 1-3
Emergencies ............................................. 1-7
Hazardous Conditions .............................. 1-8
Operation By Minors ................................ 1-10
Passenger Safety ..................................... 1-11
Water Sports ............................................ 1-11
General Precautions ................................ 1-12
Page
5 GETTING UNDERWAY ............................ 5-1
Safety Checklist ........................................ 5-1
Safety Equipment ..................................... 5-2
Boarding ................................................... 5-2
6 RUNNING ................................................. 6-1
Maneuvering Techniques .......................... 6-1
Salt Water ................................................. 6-2
Freezing Temperatures ............................. 6-3
Towing Procedure ..................................... 6-3
Anchoring ................................................. 6-4
Performance Boating ................................ 6-5
Propellers ................................................. 6-6
7 CARE AND MAINTENANCE ................... 7-1
Electrical ................................................... 7-1
Fuel System .............................................. 7-3
Steering System ....................................... 7-3
Corrosion Protection ................................. 7-3
General Maintenance ............................... 7-4
8 TROUBLESHOOTING ............................. 8-1
Trouble Check Chart ................................. 8-1
9 STORAGE ................................................ 9-1
2 BASIC RULES OF THE ROAD ................ 2-1
Aids to Navigation ..................................... 2-1
Right-of-Way ............................................. 2-4
3 CONTROLS AND INDICATORS .............. 3-1
Shift/Throttle Control ................................. 3-1
Instruments ............................................... 3-2
Switches ................................................... 3-4
Steering System ........................................ 3-8
4 OPERATION ............................................. 4-1
Fueling ...................................................... 4-1
Starting ..................................................... 4-2
Shifting/Running ....................................... 4-4
Warning Alarm .......................................... 4-4
Steering Controls ...................................... 4-5
Stopping .................................................... 4-5
Docking ..................................................... 4-6
Boat Trim ................................................... 4-7
Drive Trim Angle ....................................... 4-7
10 TRAILERING .......................................... 10-1
Classifications ......................................... 10-1
Trailer Components ................................. 10-2
Safety Chains ......................................... 10-2
Trailering Checklist ................................. 10-3
Backing Up Trailers ................................. 10-4
Launching ............................................... 10-5
Loading ................................................... 10-5
Slinging/Lifting ........................................ 10-6
11 SHIP SYSTEMS ..................................... 11-1
Electrical Systems .................................. 11-1
Water Systems ....................................... 11-8
Hot Water Heater .................................. 11-11
Sanitizing The Fresh Water System ..... 11-12
Sample Float Plan ................................ 11-17
12 GLOSSARY OF TERMS ........................ 12-1
WARRANTY
i-1
INTRODUCTION
Monterey Boats has long been known as a quality boat manufacturer with a commitment to customer
satisfaction. This manual is but one example to that commitment. We have carefully prepared this
information to assist you in the proper operation and care of your new boat, and some of the
responsibilities that go along with owning/operating a boat.
This section contains supplemental information about your Monterey boat that is different or not covered
elsewhere in this manual. If you have questions about your boat not covered in this manual, or in the other
supplied information, your dealer will be glad to assist you. Refer to the Table of Contents on page i-1 to
locate general information.
As part of your warranty responsibilities, you must perform periodic maintenance/ inspections as outlined
in this manual, the engine owner’s manual and other information supplied in the owner’s important
papers packet. Please keep this manual onboard for future reference and pass it along to the new owner
if you ever decide to sell the craft.
All information, illustrations, and specifications contained in this manual are based on the latest product
information available at the time of publication. Monterey Boats reserves the right to make changes at any
time, without notice and without incurring obligation, in colors, materials, equipment, specifications and
models.
Once again, thank you for choosing a Monterey boat; we wish you many years of boating enjoyment!
IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS
Safeguard information about your boat by recording the Hull Identification Number (HIN), and model and
serial numbers of major components and accessories. Keep a detailed Data Sheet for emergency
purposes in a safe place off the boat. In case of theft, damage, etc., report these numbers to local
authorities, your insurance agent, and your dealer.
NOTICE
By law, the HIN must be clearly visible and may not be removed, altered, or tampered with
in any way. The HIN is attached to the transom on the upper starboard side, above the
waterline.
BOATING TERMINOLOGY
LENGTH OVERALL (LOA)
Tip!
PORT SIDE
BEAM
An easy way to remember
PORT side from
STARBOARD side
is “PORT” and “LEFT”
both have four letters!
STARBOARD SIDE
TRANSOM
GUNWALE
HELM
FORWARD
AFT
RADAR ARCH
BOW
STERN
FREEBOARD
DRAFT
WATERLINE
KC-0941A
M-1
NEW BOAT DELIVERY
Your Monterey boat is inspected at each step of the manufacturing process. Before leaving the factory,
every Monterey boat undergoes a thorough check for systems operation, fit and finish. Your Monterey
Dealer also performs a Pre-Delivery inspection prior to final delivery. When the new boat is delivered to
you, the customer, a final check is performed during orientation. Both the Pre-Delivery and Final Delivery
inspections are documented (New Boat Checklist) to ensure trouble free operation and returned to
Monterey Boats.
At the time of new boat delivery, your Monterey Dealer will ask you to sign the completed Warranty
Registration and New Boat Checklist for the boat and other accessory equipment. By signing these
documents, you acknowledge that you have reviewed and understand all information.
PARTS
Should you require new parts or would like to order an option after your original purchase, please contact
your Monterey Boats Dealer to place your orders. Orders may not be placed with the manufacturer.
WARRANTY REGISTRATION AND NEW BOAT CHECKLIST
SUPER SPORT & CRUISER
1579 S.W. 18th Street
Williston, FL 32696
Tel 352-529-9181
Fax 888-922-6287
www.montereyboats.com
Boat Number (HIN): RGF
Boat Model:
Selling Dealer:
Dealer Code:
Engine Brand:
Engine Model:
Engine Serial #1:
Drive Serial #1:
Engine Serial #2:
Drive Serial #2:
Date of Sale:
Warranty Start Date:
Owner Name (Last, First):
Address:
State:
E-Mail Address:
Phone:
Zip:
SA
M
PL
E
City:
(We respect your privacy and will use for internal puposes only.)
2nd Phone:
PLEASE, INSPECT AND CHECK OFF THE FOLLOWING OPERATIONS
Indicate Status with the following Key: ¥ or 1 – OK, 2 – Needs Correction, 3- Completed, N/A – Not Applicable
BOAT
Boat gel coat, striping & graphics
Upholstery fit, clean and free of defects
Sundeck/Sun Island/lounger operation
Canvas fit, clean and free of defects
Cabin Doors, port lights, hatches, cabinet & head doors, latches
All thru-hull fittings, ball valves, head drain, galley drain, anchor
well drain, drain plug-hull, wet bar drain are secure, no leaks
Windshield fit
Ladders
EQUIPMENT
Running Lights (Navigation)
Cabin lights, cockpit lights
Toilet (Head) operation & hoses
Stereo – Radio, CD, remote control
Bilge Pumps – Auto float switch
Air Conditioner/Heater – operation & components secure
Water pressure system (let pressure stand 15 minutes to see if
pump goes on) & heater
Stove, coffee maker, oven, refrigerator, ice maker
Generator – Operation & components secure
Bilge Blower(s)
Wipers
Shore power (AC)
Tables
Plumbing Hose Clamps
Battery – Polarity, Voltage, Tight Connections
Battery Switch(es) - Operation
ENGINE – BEFORE STARTING
Engine mounts – tight
Fuel system operation - no leaks
Engine compartment components not missing, disconnected,
loose, kinked, pinched or could chafe
Hose clamps on engine & exhaust
Steering system operation, components secure, steering wheel
straight
Drains cooling system closed (Closed cooling coolant level)
Throttle control, operation & adjustment
Shifter control, operation & adjustment
Stern drive oil level at full mark
Crankcase & power steering oil levels at full mark
Stern drive trim operation
Prop Size:
Prop installed correctly with grease, nut(s), cotter pins
Prop rotation – Forward & Reverse
Neutral start switch, engine will not start in gear
Transom plate seal has no leaks – water, oil
COMMENTS
ENGINE - AFTER STARTING: (in water)
Oil pressure
Fuel line connectors – no leaks
Engine has no water or oil leaks
Idle speed per engine specs, in gear
Ignition timing check with timing light or scan tool
Gear shift works properly - forward, neutral, reverse
Instruments read correctly
Exhaust system - no leaks
SEA TRIAL
Boat performance
Port engine operation
Starboard engine operation
Steering –operation
Stern drive trim operation
Instruments register normal
Maximum R.P.M.
Technical Check Performed by
Technician
OWNER ORIENTATION
Review & familiarize Owner with operation of all features
and options on boat
Sea Trial with Owner
Review of Owners Manual
Review of Warranties
Review of Owner Responsibilities
Review of Service & Maintenance Procedures
Review of Care & Cleaning
Owner Orientation Performed by
Dealer Personnel
M-2
Date
I have read and agree with the checklist. I have read and
understand the Monterey Boats Lifetime Limited Warranty
as it appears on the back of this form.
Owner Signature
Distribution:
Date
PRE-DELIVERY FINAL CHECK
All accessory equipment operates (Mech. & Elect.)
Carpets, curtains, cushions & canvas installed
All boat, engine and accessory literature
Boat properly cleaned, interior and exterior
Trailer wiring, wheels, fenders & brakes
Factory CS – Green,
Dealer – Yellow,
Owner – Manila Card
Date
Rev 1204
SPECIFICATIONS
268 SS
268 SC
298 SS
298 SC
LOA
28’-10” (8.8 m)
28’-10” (8.8 m)
31’-10” (9.7 m)
31’-10” (9.7 m)
MOLDED HULL LENGTH
26’-6” (8.1 m)
26’-6” (8.1 m)
29’-7” (9.0 m)
29’-7” (9.0 m)
BEAM
8’-6” (2.6 m)
8’-6” (2.6 m)
9’-6” (2.9 m)
9’-6” (2.9 m)
5’-8” ( m)
5’-8” (1.5 m)
6’-0” (1.83 m)
6’-0” (1.83 m)
-
-
8’-0” (2.44 m)
8’-0” (2.44 m)
21°
21°
22°
22°
24” (60.9 cm)
24” (60.9 cm)
27” (68.6 cm)
27” (68.6 cm)
37”
39”
40”
40”
FUEL CAPACITY
89 gal (337 l)
89 gal (337 l)
142 gal (537 l)
142 gal (537 l)
WATER CAPACITY
15 gal (57 l)
15 gal (57 l)
15 gal (57 l)
15 gal (57 l)
WASTE CAPACITY
N/A
N/A
18 gal (68 l)
18 gal (68 l)
5500 lbs
(2495 kg)
5500 lbs
(2495 kg)
8000 lbs
(3629 kg)
8500 lbs
(3856 kg)
MODEL
BRIDGE CLEAR W/O ARCH
BRIDGE CLEAR W/ ARCH
DEAD RISE
DRAFT DRIVE UP
DRAFT DRIVE DOWN
STANDARD WEIGHT
●
Draft Up and Draft Down - Minimum shown, will increase based on loading and placement
●
Water and Waste Capacity - may differ according to options
●
Dry Weight - Average weight of base boat without options, fuel, water, waste, battery(ies) or gear.
SPECIAL CARE & CLEANING
The marine environment (sun, salt, pollution, and bird droppings) requires special products for proper care
and cleaning. Your dealer is best suited for recommendations on marine care and cleaning products that
work best in your area.
Canvas
The convertible/bimini top is made of acrylic materials. To gain longer life and top performance from your
canvas including windshield connector, side and aft curtains, bow and cockpit covers, we recommend the
following:
●
The canvas and clear plastic are not designed to withstand long periods of time exposed to the
elements as a protective cover at dock side or when your boat is in storage. A full, properly fitted,
light colored mooring transportation or storage cover should be used for these purposes.
If canvas gets wet during use, remove side curtains and open windshield so seams can dry out. The
air circulation will allow all canvas to dry and prevent the growth of mildew. Never store wet or damp
canvas.
● Occasionally set up all canvas and curtains and hose down with fresh water to remove accumulated
soot and dirt. Sweep or brush the underside of the canvas to prevent the accumulation of dirt and
mildew.
●
! WARNING !
Never trailer your boat with the convertible/bimini canvas (including side curtains, aft
curtain, windshield connector, bow cover and cockpit cover) up. Monterey Boats’ canvas is
not designed to withstand the high wind loads of trailering. Severe wind damage can occur
such as torn material, fastener pull-out and frame distortion. Damage caused by trailering
is not covered under the limited warranty.
M-3
The outer canvas surfaces can be cleaned with a soft scrub brush and either automotive convertible
top cleaners or household cleaners suitable for use on acrylic surfaces. The underside of the canvas
may be periodically sprayed with a spray disinfectant to prevent the growth of mildew.
● Do not store or dock your boat under trees. Tree sap is very corrosive to canvas and can also be
harmful to gelcoat and vinyl interiors.
● Adjust top bows to eliminate pockets in which rain water can accumulate. The weight of this
accumulated water can collapse the top or bag the canvas.
●
Zippers and snaps should never be forced. Occasionally lubricate with silicone/Teflon grease.
● When trailering, dismantle, roll or fold and securely stow all canvas to prevent damage. Monterey
recommends purchasing a transportation cover to keep your boat clean on the road. Your Monterey
Dealer will assist you in finding a suitable cover (not available from Monterey Boats).
● Roll clear plastic (isinglass) curtains (do not fold) and store in a clean, dry place.
● Do not allow petroleum products or bug sprays to come in contact with canvas.
●
NOTICE
Your Monterey boat is basically an open vehicle. Therefore, in spite of well-designed and
well-fitting canvas enclosures, your boat is not waterproof. We have made every effort to
design these enclosures to conform with the boat, but a certain amount of leakage may
occur, especially at the seam lines. After cleaning with soap and water, allow seams to
thoroughly dry. A sealant can be applied on the seams to somewhat close the needle holes
according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
Acrylic and Plexiglass
Acrylics and plexiglass have properties that make them ideal for the marine environment. Components
such as cabin doors and deck hatches need special care to prevent scratches and other damage. The
following guidelines will help keep acrylics and plexiglass looking good for years to come.
DO’S
●
●
●
●
●
Wash your hatches, windshield connector, side curtains and other clear plastic pieces, as well as
other acrylic components on your boat with a mild soap and plenty of lukewarm water.
Use a clean, soft cloth, applying only light pressure.
Rinse with clear water and dry by blotting with a damp cloth or chamois.
Grease, oil or tar may be removed with a good grade of hexane, aliphatic naphtha or kerosene.
These solvents may be obtained at a paint or hardware store and should be used in accordance with
the manufacturer’s recommendations.
To maintain a high-luster finish on your acrylics, we recommend that after properly cleaning, apply
Meguiar’s™ Mirror Glaze #10 with a soft towel. Note: If slight scratches appear on acrylics, use
Meguiar’s™ Mirror Glaze #17.
NOTICE
Clear plastic (isinglass) is subject to ultraviolet (sunlight) degradation over time. It may turn
yellow-brown (a burnt appearance) and get brittle. Two things that can accelerate this
degradation are:
1. Direct contact with aluminum or stainless steel frames. Use
“Standoffs.”
2. In salt water areas, dried salt crystals on the plastic will
amplify sunlight. Wash after each use and/or windy day.
M-4
DON’TS
Do not subject acrylic material to high temperatures when polishing.
● Do not use glass cleaning sprays, scouring compounds, or solvents like acetone, gasoline, benzene,
carbon tetrachloride or lacquer thinner.
● Do not use masking tapes, duct tapes or packing tapes on your acrylic materials.
● Do not drill holes in your acrylic materials without proper drill bits (special bits are used in acrylic
material to avoid damage).
●
Stainless Steel
Marine grade stainless steel components such as hardware, cleats, eyes, and rails offer superior corrosion
resistance. When properly maintained, stainless steel will not rust or stain, even in harsh saltwater
environments. However, if not maintained, stainless steel can rust, discolor, or even corrode. The following
guidelines will help keep stainless steel looking good for years to come.
DO’S
●
Clean stainless steel frequently (daily in salt or polluted environments) with mild soap and plenty of
water. Any cleaner safe for use on glass is usually safe for stainless.
●
Remove rust spots (especially around welds) immediately with a brass, silver, or chrome cleaner.
Irreversible pitting will develop under rust allowed to remain on stainless for any period of time.
●
Remove rust stains on gelcoat. See dealer for recommended product.
●
Protect stainless with waxes or polishes suitable for marine use.
DON’TS
●
Do not use coarse abrasives like sandpaper or steel wool which may actually cause rusting.
! CAUTION
Apply No-Slip tape or step plates on surfaces which are walked on. Waxed gel coat
surfaces are extremely slippery, especially when wet.
●
Do not use acids or bleaches which may etch the naturally occurring protective coating.
●
Do not leave stainless steel in contact with iron, steel, or other metals which cause contamination
leading to rust or corrosion.
M-5
Gel Coats
The smooth, beautiful skin of the fiberglass hull is made of gel coat. Gel coat is a strong but thin (though
thicker than automotive paint) layer of colored resin. The best way to keep the gel coat skin on your boat in
top condition is through regular maintenance. The following guidelines will help keep gel coat looking good
for years to come.
DO’S
●
Keep the gel coat surface out of direct sunlight or covered when not in use.
●
Wash gel coat frequently (daily in salt or polluted environments) with mild detergent and plenty of fresh
water. Remove any stains quickly. Gelcoat is microscopically porous, so long term staining may
become permanent.
●
Regularly (monthly in salt or polluted environments) wax gel coat surfaces with marine grade wax
recommended for fiberglass finishes.
DON’TS
●
Do not use plastic or other nonporous (non-breathable) materials to cover gel coat surfaces. Trapped
moisture from condensation can cause gel coat damage. Shrink wrap storage covers must be
properly ventilated, including hullsides.
●
Do not use abrasives, bleaches, ammonias, acids or harsh detergents. See your dealer for special
marine formulations.
●
NEVER wax a gel coat surface in direct sunlight.
●
Do not attempt to remove stains and scratches. Chalking, stains, and minor scratches can be
removed in most cases with careful rubbing and polishing with appropriate chemicals and is best
done by a professional – see your dealer.
FIRE EXTINGUISHING SYSTEM
SYSTEM
CHARGED
Some stern drive boats are equipped with an optional Automatic Fire Extinguishing
System for an engine compartment fire. The system is automatically actuated when
temperatures reach or exceed a preset limit.
When actuation occurs, a loud popping sound may be heard followed by “rushing” air
sound. When a discharge occurs, immediately shut down all electrical and
mechanical systems including engine, and powered ventilation (Blowers).
Do not open the engine hatch at this time! This feeds oxygen to the fire and
flashback can occur. Allow the extinguishing agent to “soak” the compartment for at
least fifteen (15) minutes, and wait for hot metals and fuels to cool before inspecting
for cause or damage.
SYSTEM
DISCHARGED
AUTOMATIC
FIRE
EXTINGUISHING
SYSTEM
KC-0084a
! WARNING !
Fire extinguishing agents and fire by-product fumes are toxic; do not breath fire fumes.
Accidental discharge can be dangerous and may cause serious injury. Do not attempt to
service the system unless qualified to do so.
! WARNING !
If fire is still active after system dishcarges: All occupants should immediately put on PFDs
(Personal Flotation Devices) and get off the boat.
M-6
! CAUTION
Extinguishing agent cylinders must be accurately weighed periodically according to the
manufacturer’s specifications to ensure that they are adequately charged.
SPECIAL GAS PRECAUTIONS
! DANGER !
Holding tank systems on boats produce odorless Methane gas which is extremely lethal in
enclosed spaces. Follow these precautions when working on your boat's holding tank
system to prevent injury:
● Before work, open all doors and hatches wide, and rig a good fan to disperse gas.
● During work, have another person frequently check on you.
● Before and during work, DON’T SMOKE.
! DANGER !
EXTREME HAZARD – Carbon monoxide gas (CO) is colorless, odorless and extremely
dangerous. All engines and fuel burning appliances produce CO as exhaust. Direct and
prolonged exposure to CO will cause BRAIN DAMAGE or DEATH. Signs of exposure to
CO include nausea, dizziness and drowsiness. Sources of CO include:
1
3
Blockage of boat exhausts by
obstruction.
Operating at slow speed or while dead
in the water.
5
Exhausts from other vessels in
confined areas.
KC-0465
KC-0467
KC-0463
2
Exhausts traveling along obstruction.
KC-0464
4
Operating with high bow angle.
6
Operating with canvas tops and side
curtains in place without ventilation.
KC-0466
KC-0468
KC-0469.1
ENSURE ADEQUATE VENTILATION FOR CORRECT AIR MOVEMENT THROUGH BOAT!
M-7
GENERATOR SET
The following procedure summarizes the operation of, and safety precautions for, the optional marine
generator available for your boat. Before operating your generator, read the owner's manual which
accompanies your generator.
Prestart
1. Check that the air cleaner is clean and properly installed.
2. Check the battery connections and electrolyte level (if battery has filler caps).
3. Check that the fuel tanks are full and that the fuel system is primed for operation.
HEAT
EXCHANGER
EXHAST
MIXER
ENGINE-DRIVEN
SEAWATER PUMP
KOHLER
COOLANT
RECOVERY
TANK
SEACOCK
HANDLE
INTAKE
STRAINER
SEAWATER
STRAINER
SEACOCK
KC-2058
4. Check that the oil level is at or near FULL mark.
! WARNING !
Hot coolant can cause severe burns. Do not remove the pressure cap when engine is hot.
5. Check that coolant level in coolant recovery tank is between the MIN and MAX marks. Periodically
remove the pressure cap and check on the fluid level when engine is cool. Do not rely solely on
level in the coolant recovery tank.
6. For initial startup only, prime the sea water pump by closing seacock, removing hose from water filter
outlet, filling hose and pump with clean water, replacing hose, and opening seacock.
CAUTION
Failure to have seacock open when generator is running, will result in serious engine
damage due to overheating.
7. Check that generator seacock is open.
8. Check that marine ship-to-shore transfer switch is in the proper position and that all breakers are in
the OFF position.
9. Open the manual fuel shut-off valve (if equipped).
M-8
Starting
! WARNING !
The blowers must be operated for a minimum of four minutes before each time the engine
is started. Failure to operate the blower can cause an explosion.
1. Operate the ventilation blowers for a minimum of four minutes and check the engine compartment for
gasoline vapors.
CAUTION
Do not crank the engine for more that seven seconds at a time. Allow a five second cool
down period between cranking attempts if the engine fails to start. If the engine fails to
start after three attempts , contact an authorized dealer for repairs. Failure to do so may
result in serious damage to the starter motor.
2. Press the controller master switch, or the remote start switch on the AC control panel, to the START
position and release switch when the unit has started.
CAUTION
Allow at least 30 seconds after shutdown before starting a hot engine. If the engine fails to
start after the first attempt, close the seacock before continuing. This will prevent sea water
from entering the engine cylinders through the exhaust valve.
CAUTION
After generator has started, check to be sure that water is flowing overboard from the
generator discharge. If there is no discharge, stop and check for leaks or obstructions.
Stopping
1. Run generator set at no load for five minutes to allow engine to cool down.
2. Switch the controller master switch, or the remote start switch on the AC control panel, to the STOP
position and wait until the generator set comes to a complete stop.
Circuit Protection
The AC circuit breaker on the generator controller will trip if a fault is detected in the AC output circuit. In
case of fault, refer to your generator owner's manual for troubleshooting information.
CAUTION
Only replace fuses with fuses of the same type (ABC or #AB (ceramic)) and ampere rating.
Do not use clear glass fuses.
Engine Shutdown Switches
The generator set engine is protected by three shutdown switches which automatically reset after the
engine cools down; or in the case of low oil pressure, if the problem is corrected.
Low Oil Pressure (LOP) – will shut down unit if pressure is 20 psi or less.
High Water Temperature (HWT) – will shut down unit if temperature is greater than 248°266°.
High Exhaust Temperature (HET) – will shut down unit if temperature is greater than
215° ± 5°.
M-9
BOAT LAYOUTS & DETAILS
The following illustrations are intended to give you, the boat owner, a brief overview of your new deck boat.
These illustrations are a representation and may not reflect all options or layouts. Your Monterey dealer or
their representative can give you a detailed demonstration of your boat and operation of its many features.
AIR CONDITIONER
The following describes the optional air conditioning unit available for your boat. Before operating your air
conditioner, read the accompanying owner's manual for more information.
The rated capacity of the air conditioning unit for the 298 CU is 5,000 Btu/hr.
The optional air conditioning unit is supplied with sea water through a sea water pump. The seacock must be
open to operate the heating/cooling unit.
WATER LINE
STRAINER
AIR
CONDITIONING
UNIT
SEAWATER
OUTLET
SEAWATER
PUMP
SEA COCK
SCOOP TYPE
THRU HULL INLET
KC-2088
CAUTION
After air conditioner has started, check to be sure that water is flowing overboard from the air
conditioner discharge. If there is no discharge, stop and check for leaks or obstructions.
M-10
VECTOR SERIES AIR CONDITIONER SELF CONTAINED UNIT WIRING DIAGRAM
M-11
Warning and Safety Labels
WARNING & SAFETY LABELS
Label placement shown is
approximate.
Volvo Engine
WARNING
GASOLINE VAPORS CAN EXPLODE
BEFORE STARTING ENGINE:
CHECK ENGINE COMPARTMENT FOR
GASOLINE OR VAPORS.
OPERATE BLOWER FOR 4 MINUTES.
RUN BLOWER BELOW CRUISING SPEED.
ENGINE AREA
LABELS
The labels on this page are a sample of the warning
and safety labels on your boat.
There may be
additional or differently worded labels. Please be
aware and use appropriate caution.
M-12
268 SS / SC General Features
Compass
Tachometer w/
Hour Meter Speedometer
Depth
Sounder
Transom Door
(Keep Closed &
Secure When
Underway)
Stern Seat Back
Retaining Pin
(Must be in place while
in upright position)
Engine Area
Fold Down Seat Back
Not a seat while in
upright position
Stereo
Remote
Bimini Top
Frame Bracket
Courtesy
Light
Cooler Storage
(Under Cushions)
Storage
Stern
Drive
Trim
Battery
Volts
Fuel
Engine Oil
Pressure
Engine
Temperature
Wet Bar
Blower Power
Indicators
Stern Light Pole Socket
Transom Shower
(Behind Transom Door)
Fuel Fill/Vent
Water
Fill/Vent
Pull-up cleat
Pull-up cleat
Ski Tow
Swim Ladder
Bilge
Pump
Blower
Horn
Trim Tab Plates &
Cylinders
Accessories
Light
Opening
Port Light
Navigation/
Anchor Lights
Courtesy
Light
Faucet
Pull Out For
Shower
Covered
Toilet Paper
Holder
Standard Self
Contained Head
(Toilet)
M-13
268 SC Features
Window Hatch/
Pass Thru
Overhead
Lights
Deck Hatch
Light
Switch
Swivel
Light
Stove
Storage
Speakers
Swivel
Light
Opening
Port Light
Swivel
Light
Mirror
(Storage Area
Behind Mirror)
Refrigerator
(Optional)
Portable
Stove
Storage
V Berth
Filler
Cushions
Deck Hatch
Docking
Lights
Carbon Monoxide
(CO) Detector
Head Door
Navigation
Lights
Access Hatch Below Companionway
Pull-up
Cleats
Horn
Ladder/Line
Storage
Locker
Storage
Locker
Drain
Telescoping
Ladder
Shower Sump
with Auto Pump
Speaker
Bilge Pump
Float Switch
Courtesy
Light
Bilge Pump
(Not Shown)
Glove
Box
Drink
Holder
Window Hatch/
Pass Thru
Flip-up
Bolster
Companionway Door/
Bow Access Steps
M-14
Pedestal Seat Bottom with
Swivel Brake & Fore/Aft Brake
(Secure before boat operation)
268 SS Features
Walk-Thru
Door
Walk –Thru
Door Latch
Cockpit Table
Base
Storage Area
Compass
Head
Storage
(Under Cushion)
Docking Lights
Navigation Lights
Pull-Up
Cleat
Horn
Locker Lid
Latch
Anchor
Roller/Frame
Anchor
Rope
Locker
M-15
268 Engine
Trim Tab
Pump
Blower
Hoses
Battery Trays
(Batteries not
installed by
Monterey)
Engine
Drive Trim Pump
Blowers
Red Battery Cable
(Positive)
Battery Trays (Batteries
not provided by
Monterey Boats)
Yellow Battery Cable
(Negative)
Engine
Bilge Pump
Float Switch
Fuel Tank Vent
Hose
Fuel Supply to
Engine
M-16
Fuel Fill Hose
298 SS / SC General Features
Not a seat
Stereo
while in upright
Remote
position
(optional)
Engine Hatch Switch
Stern Seat Back
(Bow Rider Only, Switch
Retaining Pin
Transom
for Cuddy Engine hatch
Door
(Must be in place while
located at helm)
in upright position)
Faucet
Pull Out For
Shower
Cuddy Panel
Circuit Breakers
Fwd Emergency Pump
Emergency Bilge Pump
Stereo Memory
Sump Pump
Electronics
Circuit Breakers
AC (Alt Crnt) Main
Air Conditioner
Battery
Switches
Port
Parallel
Stbd.
Cooler Storage
(Space not available
with Generator Option)
Circuit Breakers
Windlass (opt)–80A
Helm Main–50A
Cabin Main-50A
Bowrider Panel
Courtesy
Light
Battery
Switches
Port
Stbd.
Parallel
Storage or
Refrigerator Option
(not shown)
AC (Alt Crnt) Main
Circuit Breaker
Opening
Port Light
Ice Area
w/ drain
Faucet
Speakers
Cabin Light
Waste Tank
Level Indicator
Faucet
Pull Out For
Shower
Storage
Net
Covered
Toilet Paper
Holder
Vacu-Flush Toilet
(Head)
Seat Slide
Tension Knob
Courtesy Light
Access Hatch to
Storage and
Fuel Sender
Shower Curtain
(Cuddy Only)
M-17
298 SS / SC General Features
Water
Fill/Vent
Cockpit Cover or Aft
Curtain Bungee Clips
Waste Withdrawal
Stereo Remote
Gas Fill/Vent
Fender
Holder
Ski Tow
Ski Tow
Trim Tab
Trim Tab
Swim Ladder
Garboard Drain
Plug
Speedometer Pitot
(Volvo only, Merc
Drive has built in)
298 SS layouts
Courtesy
Light
Cabin
Folding Pass
Through Door
Bomar
Opening Cabin
Window
Cabin
Door
Strap
Head
Compass
Storage
(Under Cushion)
Docking
Lights
Navigation
Lights
Horn
Anchor
Locker
Windlass Under Lid
(Optional)
Anchor
Roller/Frame
M-18
Pull-up
Cleat
298 SS Helm
Compass
Speedometer
Tachometer with
Hour Meter
Stern Drive
Trim Indicators
Fuel
Stbd Volts
Port Volts
Stbd. Eng. Oil Pressure
Port Eng. Oil Pressure
Stbd. Eng. Temperature
Port Eng. Temperature
Depth Sounder
Trim Tab
Indicators
Throttle/Shift Control
(Opt. Gaffrig Shown)
Trim Tab
Rocker Switch
Fixed Fire
Extinguisher
Indicator Light
Engine Stop Switch
(Lanyard)
Blower Switch &
Circuit Breakers
Ignition Switches
Off
Steer Tilt
Release
Lever
On
Crank to Start
Stereo
Remote
Control
12-Volt Receptacle
& Breaker
(15A Max)
Optional Anchor
Windlass Switch
(Not Shown)
Optional Remote
Spot Light
Switches
(Not Shown)
Switch & Circuit Breaker
(In order Left to Right)
Engine Hatch
Bilge
Wiper
Eng. Rm. Lights
Docking Lights
Courtesy Lights
Panel Lights
Nav/Anchor
Exhaust
Accessory
Horn
Circuit Breaker
(In order Left to Right)
Depth Finder
Trim Tabs
Fire Ext.
Stbd. Ignition
Port Ignition
M-19
298 SS Cabin / Head
Waste Tank
Level Indicator
Opening Port
Light
Faucet (Pull out
for shower)
Water Intake
Hose
Toilet Paper
Holder w/ Cover
Vacu-Flush
Toilet (Head)
Vanity Mirror
& Cabinet
(Not Shown)
1
Electrical
Switch
Panel (AC)
Electrical
Switch
Panel (DC)
4
2
5
3
6
A
F
B
G
C
H
D
I
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Main (30A)
Microwave (15A)
Battery Charger (10A)
TV (10A)
Outlet (15A)
Water Heater (15A)
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
Cabin Lights (15A)
Stereo (15A)
Water Pump (10A)
12 Volt Receptacle (5A)
Accessory (15A)
Refrigerator (15A)
Head System (7.5A)
Macerator (7.5A)
TV (10A)
E
CO Monitor
Reset Breaker
(3A)
12 Volt
Receptacle
(15A Max)
Optional DVD Player
(not shown)
Stereo
Cabin
Light
Opening
Hatch
Speaker
Opening
Port Light
Optional LCD Flat
Panel TV
(not shown)
TV/
Telephone
Inlet
120 Volt
Electrical
Outlet
Microwave
M-20
120 Volt
Electrical
Outlet
Speaker
Optional
CD Changer
Fresh Water
Pump Filter
Screen
Assembly
Battery Charger
Fuses
Fresh
Water
Pump
Engine Heat
Exchange Hoses
Yellow battery
cable
Negative
Red battery
cable
Positive
Ground Buss Bar
(yellow wires)
Bilge
Pump
Float
Switch
Fuel Tank
Master Circuit
Breakers
(Bow Rider only)
Vacu-Flush/
Waste Tank
Assembly
298 SS Engine Area
M-21
Water
Heater
Battery
Charger
Battery Trays
(Batteries not
provided by
Monterey Boats)
298 SC Helm
Fuel
Compass
Depth
Sounder
Stern Drive
Trim
Indicators
Volts
Eng. Oil
Eng. Temp.
Tachometer Pressure
Eng. Oil
Pressure
Eng. Temp.
Tachometer
Speedometer
Note: Hour Meters on Engine
Room Bulkhead
Drive Trim
Switches
Trim Tab
Indicators
Throttle Control
(Volvo Shifter Shown)
Trim Tab
Rocker Switch
Fixed Fire
Extinguisher
Indicator Light
Engine Stop Switch
(Lanyard)
Blower Switch &
Circuit Breakers
Ignition Switches
Off
Steer Tilt
Release
Lever
On
Crank to Start
Stereo
Remote
Control
12-Volt Breaker &
Receptacle
(15A Max)
M-22
Switch & Circuit Breaker
(In order Left to Right)
Engine Hatch
Bilge
Wiper
Eng. Rm. Lights
Docking Lights
Courtesy Lights
Panel Lights
Nav/Anchor
Exhaust
Accessory
Horn
Circuit Breaker
(In order Left to Right)
Depth Finder
Trim Tabs
Fire Ext.
Stbd. Ignition
Port Ignition
298 SC Cabin Features
Halogen
Cabin Light
Switch/Circuit
Breaker Panel
Opening
Port Light Microwave
Halogen
Cabin Light
CO Detector
(Not Shown)
Halogen
Light
Storage
Net
Single Burner
Stove
Mid-Berth
Mattress
120-Volt
Electrical
Outlet
120-Volt
Electrical Outlet
Light Switch
Refrigerator
Electrical
Switch/Circuit
Breaker Panel (DC)
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
Cabin Lights (15A)
Stereo (15A)
Water Pump (10A)
12 Volt Receptacle (5A)
Accessory (15A)
Refrigerator (15A)
Head System (7.5A)
Macerator (7.5A)
TV (10A)
Main (30A)
Outlet (15A)
Microwave (15A)
Battery Charger (10A)
Water Heater (15A)
Air Conditioner (30A)
TV (10A)
Refrigerator (10A)
Stove (20A)
F
B
G
C
H
D
I
CO Monitor
Circuit Breaker
1
2
3
4
5
Halogen
Light
Air Conditioner
Control Panel
LCD Flat
Panel TV
12 Volt DC
Receptacle
(15A Max)
E
Electrical
Switch/Circuit
Breaker Panel (AC)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
A
Storage
6
Shore Power 1
or 2 Voltage
Indicator Switch
7
Reverse
Polarity
Switch &
Indicators
8
9
Air Conditioner
Vent
Stereo
DVD Player &
Storage
(Behind TV)
Companionway Door
with Molded-In Steps
Deck Hatch
Halogen
Lights
Lock
Mirror
(Storage Area
Behind Mirror)
Speakers
Located Under Cushion
Step Down Grate
(Lift to clean drain)
Filler
Cushions
Cockpit Table
Base
CD Changer
(Optional)
Air Conditioner
(Optional)
M-23
Waste
Tank
Vacu-Flush
Assembly
Fuel
Tank
Macerator
Generator
Muffler
Generator
Battery Tray
Engine Hour
Meters
Generator
Electric
Hatch Lift
Generator
Control Panel
Note:
Yellow battery cable is
Negative.
Black battery cable is Positive.
Sea Strainer
(Air Conditioner)
Sea Strainer
(Generator)
Float
Switch
Bilge
Pump
Antenna
Amplifier
Blower
298 CU Engine Area with Generator Option
M-24
Battery Trays
(Batteries not provided
by Monterey Boats)
268 Bowrider and Cuddy Starboard Switch Panel Wiring Diagram
Use “ATC” series fuses.
M-25
M-26
268 Bowrider and Cuddy Ignition Panel Wiring Diagram
268 Bowrider and Cuddy Instrument Panel Wiring Diagram
M-27
M-28
268 Bowrider and Cuddy DC Wiring Diagram Main
298 Bowrider AC Wiring Diagram Main (1 of 3)
M-29
298 Bowrider AC Wiring Diagram Gallery (2 of 3)
GALLEY ONLY
NOTE GREEN SCREW
GFCI OUTLET WIRING
WHITE FROM HNS WITH PLUG
NOTE SILVER SCREWS
GREEN
BREAK OFF "EARS"
WHITE
NOTE GREEN SCREW
3
WHITE
LINE
GREEN
LOAD
BLACK
2
WHITE
1
FROM HEAD GFCI INPUT
WHITE
3-Way .140 Pin Housing
AMP 1-350347-0 (54-0302-001)
HOT
HOT
1
BLACK
2
GREEN
3
WHITE
BLACK
LINE SIDE
GFCI OUTLET BOX
WHITE
15-0103-013 WHITE GFCI DUPLEX OUTLET
15-0104-005 WHITE OUTLET COVER
15-0104-004 CARLON OUTLET BOX
GREEN
BLACK
NOTE BRASS SCREWS
BLACK FROM HNS WITH PLUG
298 Bowrider AC Wiring Diagram Duplex (3 of 3)
DUPLEX WIRING
GREEN(S)
WHITE FROM PANEL PLUG
NOTE SILVER SCREWS
3-Way .140 Pin Housing
AMP 1-350347-0 (54-0302-001)
1
BLACK
2
GREEN
3
WHITE
BREAK AWAY TABS
BLACK
GREEN
WHITE
14-3 BOAT CABLE
NOTE BRASS SCREWS
15-0103-011 WHITE DUPLEX OUTLET
15-0104-005 WHITE OUTLET COVER
15-0104-004 CARLON OUTLET BOX
M-30
BLACK FROM PANEL PLUG
298 Bowrider Water System
M-31
M-32
298 Cuddy DC Wiring Diagram Main (1 of 5)
298 Bowrider DC Wiring Diagram Main (2 of 5)
M-33
M-34
298 Cuddy & Bowrider DC Wiring Diagram STBD Extension Harness (3 of 5)
BRN/WHT
10ga.YEL
TAN
GRAY
GRAY
LT.BLUE
YEL/RED
PURPLE
BRN/WHT
TAN
10ga.YEL
LT.BLUE
YEL/RED
10ga.RED/PUR
TAN/BLUE
10ga.RED/PUR
PURPLE
56" RED/PUR
30" TAN/BLU
24" YEL/RED
24" YEL/RED
ENGINE
ALARM
56" RED/PUR
NEUTRAL
SAFETY SW.
GREEN TAPE
12"
36"
18"
<190">
<310">
BUTT TERMINALS
#10 RINGS
24"
<56.00">
TAPE (TYP.)
YEL/RED
10ga.YEL
10ga.RED/PUR
GRAY
TAN
LT.BLUE
BRN/WHT
PURPLE
TAN/BLU
18"
298 DC WIRING DIAGRAM
STBD EXTENSION HARNESS (2 OF 4)
YEL/RED
10ga.YEL
10ga.RED/PUR
GRAY
TAN
LT.BLUE
BRN/WHT
PURPLE
TAN/BLU
36"
310"
8-WAY END
WIRE RUN DETAIL
MERC END
298 Cuddy & Bowrider DC Wiring Diagram PORT Extension Harness (4 of 5)
BRN/WHT
10ga.YEL
TAN
GRAY
GRAY
LT.BLUE
YEL/RED
PURPLE
BRN/WHT
TAN
10ga.YEL
LT.BLUE
YEL/RED
10ga.RED/PUR
TAN/BLUE
10ga.RED/PUR
PURPLE
56" RED/PUR
30" TAN/BLU
24" YEL/RED
24" YEL/RED
ENGINE
ALARM
56" RED/PUR
NEUTRAL
SAFETY SW.
RED TAPE
12"
18"
36"
<190">
<342">
BUTT TERMINALS
#10 RINGS
24"
<56.00">
TAPE (TYP.)
YEL/RED
10ga.YEL
10ga.RED/PUR
GRAY
TAN
LT.BLUE
BRN/WHT
PURPLE
TAN/BLU
M-35
18"
298 DC WIRING DIAGRAM
PORT EXTENSION HARNESS (4 OF 5)
YEL/RED
10ga.YEL
10ga.RED/PUR
GRAY
TAN
LT.BLUE
BRN/WHT
PURPLE
TAN/BLU
36"
342"
8-WAY END
WIRE RUN DETAIL
MERC END
M-36
298 Cuddy & Bowrider DC Wiring Diagram Ground Block Detail (5 of 5)
BLOCK "C"
BLOCK "B"
(22D) 10YEL
(261) 16YEL
(691B) 12YEL
(411) 14YEL
(691) 14YEL
(821) 14YEL
(22C) 8YEL
(561) 14YEL
(921) 14YEL
(251) 14YEL
(671) 14YEL
(171F) 10YEL
(071) 14YEL
(441) 14YEL
(161) 14YEL
(571) 14YEL
(22D) 8YEL
(771) 10YEL
BLOCK "A"
(22A) 8YEL
(191) 14YEL
(171A) 10YEL
GROUND BLOCK #070105010
(491) 14YEL
(911) 14YEL
(781A) 14YEL
(201) 10YEL
(281) 14YEL
(501) 14YEL
(551) 14YEL
(741) 14YEL
(051) 10YEL
(22B) 10YEL
BOATING
SAFETY
The popularity of boating and other water sports has undergone an explosion of growth in the past few years. Because of this, safety is an important
issue for everyone who shares in the use of our waterways.
This section covers general boating safety information. Throughout this
manual specific precautions and symbols identify safety related information.
!
The Safety Alert Symbol means ATTENTION! BECOME ALERT!
YOUR SAFETY IS INVOLVED!
! DANGER !
Indicates the presence of a hazard which WILL cause SEVERE
injury, death or substantial property damage.
! WARNING !
Indicates the presence of a hazard which CAN cause SEVERE
injury, death or substantial property damage.
! CAUTION
Indicates the presence of a hazard which WILL or CAN cause
MINOR or MODERATE personal injury or property damage.
The precautions listed in this manual and on the boat are not all-inclusive. If
a procedure, method, tool or part is not specifically recommended, you must
satisfy yourself that it is safe for you and others, and that the boat will not be
damaged or made unsafe as a result of your decision. REMEMBER –
ALWAYS USE COMMON SENSE WHEN OPERATING!
1-1
BOATING SAFETY
BOATING REGULATIONS
The U.S. Coast Guard is the authority of the waterways; they are there to
help the boating public. State boating regulations are enforced by local
authorities. You are subject to marine traffic laws and “Rules of the Road”
for both federal and state waterways; you must stop if signaled to do so by
enforcement officers, and permit to be boarded if asked.
There are many pamphlets, prepared by the Coast Guard, available to you.
These pamphlets explain “Rules of the Road”, signal lights, buoys, safety,
international and inland regulations and much more than is presented in
this manual. For more information contact your local U.S. Coast Guard Unit
or call the Coast Guard Boating Safety Hotline at 1-800-368-5647.
BOAT SAFETY LABELS
Your boat is affixed with various safety labels at the time of manufacture.
These labels appear at specific locations on the craft where safety is of
particular concern. Safety labels must remain legible. If you suspect a label
is missing or one becomes damaged, contact your dealer for immediate
replacement.
BOATER RESPONSIBILITIES
Registration
The U.S. Coast Guard requires that all power boats operated on the navigable waters of the United States must be registered in the state of main
use; also, many States require registration in that state whenever boating
on waters within their state boundary. Always contact your state boating
authorities (and neighboring states) for registration information on boats
and trailers. Your dealer can supply you with the appropriate forms.
Education
This manual is not intended to provide complete training on all aspects of
boat operation. We strongly recommend that all operators of this boat seek
additional training on boat handling and safety. Some states require youths
16 years of age and younger to complete a boating safety course before
operating any watercraft. Many others require operators under the age of
18 to be licensed in small boat operation.
The following is a listing of some of the agencies and organizations that
offer safety training or information. To find boating safety courses in your
area, call your state’s local boating agency or the Coast Guard boating
safety Courseline at 1-800-336-2628 (1-800-245-2628 in Virginia).
●
●
American Red Cross
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary
●
●
U.S. Power Squadrons
State Boating Offices
Insurance
You must get insurance before operating your new boat. Loss by fire, theft
or other causes, and liability protection against accidents is a must for
responsible boaters. The boat owner is legally responsible for any damage
or injury caused when he, or someone else operating the boat, is involved
in an accident. Many states have laws detailing minimum insurance needs.
Your insurance agent and your dealer can supply you with more information.
1-2
BOATING SAFETY
REQUIRED SAFETY EQUIPMENT
Your boat has been equipped at the factory with most federally required
Class 1 [4.8 m (16 ft.) to less than 7.9 m (26 ft.)] safety equipment. As the
owner, it is your responsibility to obtain other mandatory safety equipment not provided by the boat manufacturer, and to ensure all equipment is kept in good, serviceable condition.
MINIMUM REQUIRED SAFETY EQUIPMENT
EQUIPMENT
PERSONAL
FLOTATION
DEVICES (PFDs)
CLASS 1
4.8 to less than 7.9 m
(16 to less than 26 ft.)
CLASS 2
7.9 to less than 12.2 m
(26 to less than 40 ft.)
CLASS 3
12.2 to not more than 19.8 m
(40 to not more than 65 ft.)
One approved Type I, II, III or V (if used according to Coast Guard requirements) device
aboard for each person on board or being towed on water skis, etc.; and, in addition, one
throwable Type IV device.
FIRE
EXTINGUISHER
(Must say Coast
Guard Approved.)
At least one B-I type approved hand
portable fire extinguisher (Not
required on outboard motorboats less
than 26 feet in length and not carrying
passengers for hire if the construction
of such motorboats will not permit
entrapment of explosive or flammable
gasses or vapors and if fuel tanks are
not permanently installed.)
DAY AND NIGHT
VISUAL DISTRESS
SIGNALS
Orange flag with black square-and-disk (day); and an S-O-S electric light (night); or three
orange smoke signals, hand held or floating (day); or three red flares of hand held, meteor,
or parachute type (day/night).
Required only on coastal waters, the Great Lakes, territorial seas, and those waters connected
directly to them, up to a point where a body of water is less than two miles wide.
WHISTLE/HORN,
BELL
Every vessel less than 12 meters (39.4 ft.)
in length must carry an efficient sound
producing device.
At least two B-I type
approved portable fire
extinguishers; OR at
least one B-II type approved portable fire
extinguisher.
At least three B-I type
approved portable fire
extinguishers; OR at
least one B-I type plus
one B-II type approved
portable fire extinguisher.
Every vessel 12 meters (39.4 ft.) but less than 20
meters (65.6 ft.) in length must carry a whistle or horn
and a bell. The whistle or horn must be audible for 1/2
nautical mile. The mouth of the bell must be at least
200 mm (7.87 inches) in diameter.
KC-0081.2
NOTICE
Many state equipment requirements go beyond Coast Guard
requirements. Contact your state boating office for further
information.
Equipment requirements for coastal and inland waters differ.
Check with local authorities or the Coast Guard for further
information about coastal water requirements.
Personal Floatation Devices
Federal law also requires at least one Type I, II, III or V Personal Floatation
Device (PFD) for each person on board or being towed, and at least one
Type IV throwable PFD in the boat.
PFDs are intended to help save lives. Therefore, you and your passengers
should wear a PFD whenever boating. It is especially important that children and non-swimmers wear a PFD at all times. Make certain all passengers know how to put on and properly adjust their PFDs. Also, selecting the
proper type PFD for your kind of outing helps ensure your time on the water
can be the safest possible. There are four types of PFDs to wear and one
type used for throwing in emergency situations.
1-3
BOATING SAFETY
Type I:
Most buoyant PFD and effective on all waters, especially
open, rough water.
Type II: Good for calm water near shore on most inland waters
where quick rescue is likely.
TYPE I
LIFE PRESERVERS
KC-0041
Type III: Good for most inland water applications where quick rescue is likely. Come in various styles and some are designed
for watersport activities.
Type IV: Intended for heavy traffic inland waters where help is
always available. Designed to be thrown to a person in the
water and should never be worn.
Type V: Inflatable design for special use activities and may be used
instead of a Type I, II, or III PFD if used in accordance with
the approval conditions on the label and if worn when the
boat is underway. Some Type V PFDs provide increased
protection against hypothermia.
NOTICE
TYPE II
BUOYANT VESTS
KC-0051
●
If a Type V PFD is to be counted toward the minimum
carriage requirements, it must be worn.
●
Special PFDs are available for skiing and other watersports. These PFDs are constructed with materials
suitable for high impact falls.
Keep the following PFD points in mind:
●
Set an example and wear your PFD. Require your passengers to
wear them also.
●
Make sure the PFD fits properly; this is especially important for
children and non-swimmers.
●
At the beginning of each season, check PFDs for damage and
test for proper flotation.
TYPE III
FLOTATION AIDS
KC-0042
TYPE IV
THROWABLE DEVICES
KC-0071
TYPE V HYBRID PFD
MUST BE WORN
WHEN UNDERWAY
KC-0043
1-4
BOATING SAFETY
Fire Extinguisher
U.S. Coast Guard approved fire extinguishers are generally required
on all Class I-III boats. Extinguishers should be mounted in readily
accessible areas away from the engine compartment and alcohol
stove (if equipped). All passengers should know the location and
operating procedure of each extinguisher.
Any marine fire extinguisher must be classified to extinguish type B
fires (gasoline, oil, or grease).
The size and number of required fire extinguishers depend on the
size of your boat. Check pressure gauge regularly for proper pressure; have extinguisher filled if necessary.
OVERCHARGED
RECHARGE
KC-0083
Visual Distress Signals
Federal law also
requires boats 4.8
m (16 ft.) and
longer to carry
day and night
visual distress
signals when
operating on
coastal waters,
the Great Lakes,
territorial seas or
those waters
directly connected
to them, up to a
point where the
body of water is
less than two
miles wide. Carry
several types of
signaling devices
to handle a variety of conditions.
RED DISTRESS FLARE
(HAND)
ORANGE
FLAG
USE DAY AND NIGHT
USE DAY ONLY
USE
DAY
ONLY
ORANGE SMOKE
SIGNAL (HAND)
ARMS SIGNALS
(USE BRIGHT CLOTH)
RED METEOR FLARE
USE DAY AND NIGHT
USE DAY ONLY
ELECTRIC
DISTRESS
LIGHT
DYE MARKER
USE DAY ONLY
S
O
S
USE NIGHT ONLY
KC-0082
! WARNING !
Pyrotechnic signaling devices can cause injury and property damage if not handled properly. Follow manufacturer’s directions. Stow devices so they are inaccessible to
children.
NOTICE
●
●
Some pyrotechnics are restricted from use on certain bodies
of water, so always check with local authorities.
All signaling devices must be in serviceable condition, readily
accessible, and in compliance with Coast Guard requirements.
1-5
BOATING SAFETY
Recommended Equipment
As a precaution, a good boater will avoid potential problems on an outing
by having additional equipment on board. Normally, this equipment is
dependent on the body of water and the length of the trip; your dealer can
assist you:
KC-0090
KC-0090
●
First aid kit and manual
●
Waterproof flashlight
●
Anchor with sufficient line
●
Portable AM/FM radio with weather alert
●
Mooring lines and fenders
●
Spare flashlight and radio batteries
●
Bailing device (bucket, hand pump, etc.)
●
Sunglasses and sun block
●
Combination oar/boat hook
●
Tow line
●
Day/night visual distress signal
●
Cellular Phone
●
Lubricant
●
●
Tool kit
Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon
(EPIRB)
●
Spare propeller, nut and washer
●
Spare keys
●
Spare fuses and bulbs
●
Binoculars
●
Local charts, compass and GPS
●
Spare Fuel
●
Food and water provisions (extended cruise)
●
Auxiliary starting battery
1-6
BOATING SAFETY
EMERGENCIES
Be prepared to deal with emergencies before they happen. Try to formulate a plan for each type in advance so that decisions can be made
quickly and without hesitation. Precious moments lost can mean the
difference between losing and saving a life.
Reporting Accidents
The U.S. Coast Guard requires the owner or operator of a boat involved
in an accident to report the incident to the proper marine law enforcement agency for the State in which the accident occurred. Immediate
notification to the nearest State boating authority is required if a person
dies or disappears as a result of a recreational boating accident. If a person dies or injuries requiring more than first aid are involved, a formal
report must be filed within 48 hours of the accident. A formal report must
be filed within 10 days for accidents exceeding $500 in property damage
or complete loss of boat.
Giving Assistance
If you see a distress signal or suspect a boat is in trouble, you must
assume it is a real emergency and render assistance immediately. By
law, the operator in charge of the craft is obligated to provide assistance to any individual in danger if such assistance can be provided
safely. Failure to render assistance can result in a fine and/or imprisonment.
The 1971 Boating Safety Act grants protection to a “Good Samaritan”
boater providing good faith assistance, and absolves a boater from any
civil liability arising from such assistance.
Fires
Most fires are the result of gasoline and oil accumulating in the bilge
from careless fueling practices. Use the fire extinguisher at the base
of the flames using a sweeping motion. Prudent and accurate use of
the available chemicals should contain all but the worst fires. Verify
that the fire has been extinguished. If so, check damage and get
assistance immediately. If not, get out and swim at least 23 meters
(25 yards) upwind from the boat and use the visual distress signals to
get assistance.
On board fires involving the fuel system usually result in either an
explosion that completely destroys the boat, or the boat burning to the
waterline and self extinguishing. Deciding on abandoning the boat or
staying to fight the fire is difficult and depends on many factors. Try to
formulate a fire plan in advance to make that decision quickly and without hesitation.
KC-0164
Capsizing/Swamping
A boat may capsize or swamp when least expected. Like fires, try to
formulate a plan in advance on what to do if it should happen. Keep in
mind the following guidelines:
Try to turn the engine OFF to prevent damage.
● If others were on board, try to locate them, make sure they’re conscious and that they can swim.
● Stay with the boat, it will float! Climb up on the hull and try to
get assistance.
● Don’t try to swim to shore. It’s usually further than it looks.
●
KC-0170
1-7
BOATING SAFETY
DAYTIME
WARNING
NIGHTIME
WARNING
HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS
Every waterway poses hazards that you should avoid; shallow water,
tree stumps, sand bars, etc. Ask local boaters for information and consult a marine chart when boating on unfamiliar waters. As the operator
of the boat, you should try to avoid all hazards, known and unknown.
The following information does not contain all possible water hazards.
Weather
Small Craft Advisory - Winds
greater than 18 knots,
sustained for two hours or more
or hazardous wave conditions.
Following a storm, hazardous
wave conditions can persist
long after the high winds have
subsided.
Gale Warning - Sustained
winds (2 or more hours), of 3447 knots.
Getting caught in severe weather is hazardous. Check with local
weather stations, the U.S. Coast Guard, or Weather service broadcasts
(162.55 or 162.40 Megahertz) for the latest conditions. It is recommended to check the weather not only before but periodically while you
are boating.
Storms – Take common sense precautions if you are forced to operate
your boat in stormy conditions:
●
Wear PFDs
●
Stow gear below and lash equipment on deck.
●
Reduce speed and head for place of refuge you can reach most
easily.
●
If you lose power, keep boat headed into the waves by rigging a
sea anchor off the bow.
Fog – It is best to avoid operating your boat in foggy weather. When
fog sets in take bearings and log courses and speeds. You are required
to emit a five second blast from your horn or whistle once every minute.
Additionally, have passengers wear PFDs and observe for oncoming
vessels.
Dam Spillways
The water around a dam spillway is a hazardous area. It is subject to
rapid changes. Boaters must keep clear of the spillway areas below
dams.
Storm Warning - Sustained
winds of 48 knots or greater.
Shallow Water Operation
Operating in shallow water presents a number of hazards. If the
engine strikes an underwater hazard, check for boat and engine damage. If the engine vibrates excessively after striking an underwater
obstruction, it may indicate a damaged propeller.
Sand bars in narrow inlets are constantly shifting, making it difficult to
mark them with buoys. Sometimes, sand bars are indicated by waves
as they form into breakers when passing over the sand bar. If you
ground the boat on a sand bar, seek help from another boater or radio
for help.
Hurricane Warning - Forecast
winds of 64 knots and above.
Displayed only in connection
with a hurricane.
KC-0371
Actual Signal in red
1-8
In coastal areas, tides can affect water level as much as 9 m (30 ft.)
Check with local marinas or Coast Guard stations for tide tables and
current charts.
BOATING SAFETY
Warning Markers
It is a good idea to ask local authorities if there are hazardous areas and
how they are marked. Boaters must also recognize the flag designs which
indicate that skin divers are present and keep well clear of the area.
Watch for swimmers. Swimming areas may not be marked. Steer clear from
the area and always remain alert.
Distress flags indicate a fellow boater is in need of
assistance.
DISTRESS
KC-0942
Navigation markers serve as a means of identifying navigable routes, and indicate water hazards. Boaters should
become familiar with navigation markers and stay within
marked boundaries and clear of hazards.
K
DIVERS FLAG
RED
BOATING UNDER THE INFLUENCE
! WARNING !
Federal and state laws prohibit operating a boat under the
influence of alcohol and other drugs. These regulations are
actively enforced. Impaired operation may result in severe personal injury or death.
Boating, alcohol and the use of other drugs just
doesn't mix. These substances reduce your reaction
time and affect your better judgment. Combined with
the sun, wind, waves, and noise of other watercraft,
the effects of drugs are increased and will significantly reduce your reaction time. As the owner/operator, you are responsible for the alcohol/drug use
and on-board behavior of your passengers.
KC-0153
NOTICE
If the operator’s blood alcohol content is 0.10% (0.08% in some
states) or above, violators are subject to a civil penalty up to
$1,000 or criminal penalty up to $5,000, one year imprisonment
or both. Operating a boat under the influence can also result in
a loss of motor vehicle driving privileges.
BLUE
USED BY
RECREATIONAL
DIVERS INDICATES
DIVER’S
POSITION
O
ALPHA FLAG
RED
BLUE
WORLDWIDE
VESSELS
ENGAGED IN
DIVING
OPERATIONS DOES NOT
INDICATE
DIVER’S
POSITION
KC-0372
CARBON MONOXIDE
Carbon Monoxide (CO) is a colorless and odorless gas produced by all
engines and fuel burning appliances. Even with the best boat design and
construction, plus the utmost care in inspection, operation, and maintenance, hazardous levels of CO may still be present in accommodation
spaces under certain conditions. To reduce CO accumulation, always ventilate the boat interior by opening the deck hatches, windows or canvas to
provide adequate ventilation.
KC-0260
1-9
BOATING SAFETY
! DANGER !
EXTREME HAZARD – Carbon monoxide gas (CO) is colorless, odorless and extremely dangerous. All engines and fuel
burning appliances produce CO as exhaust. Direct and prolonged exposure to CO will cause BRAIN DAMAGE or
DEATH. Signs of exposure to CO include nausea, dizziness
and drowsiness. Sources of CO include:
Blockage of boat exhausts by
obstruction.
Operating with high bow angle.
KC-0466
KC-0463
Exhausts traveling along obstruction.
Exhausts from other vessels in confined
areas.
KC-0467
KC-0464
Operating at slow speed or while dead
in the water.
Operating with canvas tops and side
curtains in place without ventilation.
KC-0465
KC-0468
KC-0469.1
ENSURE ADEQUATE VENTILATION FOR CORRECT AIR MOVEMENT THROUGH BOAT!
OPERATION BY MINORS
Minors must always be supervised by an adult whenever operating a
boat. Many states have laws regarding the minimum age and licensing
requirements of minors. Be sure to contact the state boating authorities
for information.
1-10
BOATING SAFETY
PASSENGER SAFETY
Whenever you are going for an outing, make sure that at least one passenger is familiar with the operation and safety aspects of the boat in
case of emergency. Show all passengers the location of emergency
equipment and explain how to use it. Don’t allow passengers to drag
their feet or hands in the water, or sit on the bow, bow pulpit, deck, or
gunwale while the engine is running.
WATER SPORTS
Larger boats produce a wake too big for skiers. Only boats that are
equipped with a ski-tow eye should be used to pull water skiers.
NOTICE
It is unlawful to participate in water sports while under the
influence of alcohol or other drugs.
When participating in water sports, be safe and courteous and follow
these guidelines:
● Be considerate to fishermen and others you share the water with.
● Do not perform water sports in congested areas.
● Stay away from navigation markers.
● Stay away from other boats and water sports participants.
● Return immediately to a fallen water sport participant.
● Regularly inspect water sport equipment to ensure it is safe.
! WARNING !
●
●
●
●
●
●
●
Water sport participants must wear a USCG approved
flotation device. A type III water ski vest is an approved
and practical PFD.
Keep at least 30 m (100 ft.) away from all other objects.
When water sporting have an experienced driver and
aft facing observer in the boat.
Never water sport in shallow water or at night.
Never jump from a moving boat.
Always keep a downed water sporter in sight.
Turn the motor OFF before you get close to someone in
the water.
1-11
BOATING SAFETY
GENERAL PRECAUTIONS
CIRCLE
TURN LEFT
CUT MOTOR
Your safety, the safety of your passengers, and other boaters are
among your responsibilities as operator of this boat. Your boat must be
in compliance with U.S. Coast Guard safety equipment regulations. You
should know how to react correctly to adverse weather conditions, have
good navigation skills, and follow the “rules of the road” as defined by
the Coast Guard and state/county/local regulations.
! WARNING !
TURN RIGHT
SKIER O.K.
Read and understand this manual and the engine manual,
and be sure that you understand all controls and operating
instructions before attempting to operate the boat.
Improper operation can be extremely hazardous.
Before each outing you should check all safety equipment, such as fire
extinguishers, PFDs, flares, distress flags, flashlights, engine stop
switch, etc. They should be operable, in good condition, readily visible,
and easily accessed.
Tell someone of your travel plans. Check local weather reports before
casting off; do not leave the dock area when strong winds and electrical storms are in the area or predicted to be in the area.
SKIER IN WATER
Know the weight capacity of your boat. Do not overload your boat.
OUR ENVIRONMENT
BACK
TO DOCK
As a boater, you already appreciate nature’s beauty and
the peace of the great outdoors. It is a boater’s responsibility to protect the natural environment by keeping
waterways clean.
Don’t put anything in the water you wouldn’t want to
eat or drink!
SPEED FASTER
SPEED SLOWER
Conserve Fishery Resources
There is a tremendous drain on our fishery resources. Over-fishing and
pollution have strained the fish population. Do your part by keeping
only what you will eat by practicing catch-and-release.
Foreign Species
STOP
SPEED OK
KC-0270
WATER SPORT
HAND SIGNALS
1-12
If you trailer your boat from lake to lake, you may unknowingly introduce a foreign aquatic species from one lake to the next. Thoroughly
clean the boat below the water line, remove all weeds and algae, and
drain the bilge and livewells before launching the boat in a new body of
water.
BOATING SAFETY
Fuel and Oil Spillage
The spilling of fuel or oil into our waterways contaminates the environment and is dangerous to wildlife. Never discharge or dispose fuel or
oil into the water; it is prohibited and you could be fined. There are two
common, accidental types of discharge:
●
Overfilling the fuel tank
●
Pumping contaminated bilge water
! WARNING !
Fumes from rags can collect in bilge and be extremely hazardous. Never store rags used to wipe-up fuel or solvent
spills in the boat. Dispose of rags properly ashore.
Discharge and Disposal of Waste
Waste means all forms of garbage, plastics, recyclables, food, wood,
detergents, sewerage and even fish parts in certain waters - in short,
nearly everything. We recommend you bring back everything you take
out with you for proper disposal ashore.
If you have a marine sanitation device (head or marine toilet) installed,
use an approved pump-out facility at your marina. Many areas prohibit
the discharge of sewerage overboard or even an operable overboard
waste discharge.
Excessive Noise
Noise means engine noise, radio noise or even yelling. Many bodies of
water have adopted noise limits. Don’t use thru-transom exhaust
unless you’re well off shore. Music and loud conversation can carry a
considerable distance on water, especially at night.
Wake and Wash
Be alert for NO WAKE zones. You may be responsible for any damage
or injury caused by your wake/wash. Prior to entering a NO WAKE
zone, come off plane to the slowest steerable speed.
Exhaust Emissions
Increased exhaust (hydrocarbon) emissions pollute our water and air.
Keep your engine tuned and boat hull clean for peak performance.
Consult your dealer and engine manual for information.
1-13
BOATING SAFETY
Paints
If your boat is kept in water where marine growth is a problem, the use
of anti-fouling paint may reduce the growth rate. Be aware of environmental regulations that may govern your paint choice. Contact your
local boating authorities for information.
Cleaning Agents
Household cleaners should be used sparingly and not discharged into
waterways. Never mix cleaners and be sure to use plenty of ventilation
in enclosed areas. DO NOT use products which contain phosphates,
chlorine, solvents, non-biodegradable or petroleum based products.
Citrus based cleaners are excellent for marine cleaning purposes and
are safe for you and the environment. Refer to MAINTENANCE for
more information.
1-14
BASIC
RULES OF
THE ROAD
! WARNING !
The nautical rules of the road must be followed to prevent collisions between vessels. Like traffic laws for automobiles, the
operator is legally required to follow safe operating rules.
The following information outlines only the most basic of the nautical
rules of the road. For more information, contact your local U.S. Coast
Guard Auxiliary.
AIDS TO NAVIGATION
NAVIGATE TO
SOUTH OR WEST
NAVIGATE TO
NORTH OR EAST
Learn to recognize the different buoys and day markers; they are the
signposts of the waterway. There are 2 primary marking systems in use
in the U.S.; the Uniform State Waterway Marking System (USWMS)
used on inland waters and maintained by each state, and the Federal
Waterways Marking System (FWMS) used on coastal waters and
rivers and maintained by the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG). In addition,
the FWMS has two modified systems; Western River Buoyage, and
Intracoastal Waterway Buoyage. Be sure to check with local authorities
on the buoyage system in use.
The only buoys you are permitted to moor to are mooring buoys.
Mooring to a navigation buoy or other navigational aid or regulatory
marker is illegal.
NAVIGATE TO
STARBOARD
FACING UPSTREAM
NAVIGATE TO
PORT FACING
UPSTREAM
The type of hazard/warning buoys and markers depend on the area of
jurisdiction. Check with boating authorities for information on local
marking systems.
USWMS System
In the USWMS Lateral System, well defined channels are marked with
red and black buoys. Lateral means the sides of the channel are
marked and the boat should pass between them.
The USWMS Cardinal System is used when there is no well defined
channel or where an obstruction may be approached from more than
one direction. With the cardinal system:
MID-CHANNEL
RED
●
Pass north or east of BLACK-TOPPED WHITE buoy.
●
Pass south or west of RED-TOPPED WHITE buoy.
●
RED and WHITE VERTICALLY STRIPED buoy indicates boat
should pass outside of the buoy (away from shore).
BLACK
KC-0411
USWMS BOUYS
2-1
BASIC RULES OF THE ROAD
Uniform State Regulatory Markers
USWMS regulatory markers are white with international orange geometric shapes; you must obey regulatory markers.
FWMS System
CONTROLLED
AREA
DANGER
The FWMS Lateral System is for use on navigable waters except
Western Rivers and Intracoastal Waterways.
The markings on these buoys are oriented from the perspective of
being entered from seaward (the boater is going towards the port). This
means that red buoys are passed on the starboard (right) side when
proceeding from open water into port, and black buoys to port (left)
side.
DO NOT PASS
BETWEEN SHORE
AND BUOY
SPECIAL
PURPOSE
The right side (starboard) of the channel is marked with RED, even
numbered buoys. The left (port) side of the channel is marked with
GREEN, odd numbered buoys.
The middle of the channel is marked with RED and WHITE vertically
striped buoys; pass close to these buoys.
Obstructions, channel junctions, etc. are marked with RED and
GREEN horizontally striped buoys.
BOATS
KEEP OUT
INFORMATION
KC-0411
Day markers are colored and numbered the same as buoys. RED, triangular day markers with even numbers mark the starboard side of the
channel. GREEN, square day markers with odd numbers mark the port
side of the channel.
STARBOARD
DAY
MARKER
PORT
DAY
MARKER
KC-0440
MOORING
BUOY
WHITE WITH BLUE BAND
MAY SHOW WHITE
REFLECTOR OR LIGHT
KC-0412
USWMS REGULATORY
MARKERS
2-2
A RED band at the top means the preferred channel is to the left of the
buoy; a GREEN top band means the preferred channel is to the right of
the buoy.
BASIC RULES OF THE ROAD
Lights, bells and horns are used on buoys for night or poor visibility
conditions. Buoys with unique light flashing characteristics are identified on nautical charts with the specific flashing pattern.
Federal Waterways Marking System (FWMS)
Port Side
Odd Numbers
(Green)
3
1
Lighted Buoy
(Green Light)
Lateral Aids Marking
the Sides of Channels
as seen When Entering
From Seaward
5
Daymark
Can Buoy
2
4
Starboard Side
Even Numbers
(Red)
6
Lighted Buoy
(Red Light)
Safe Water Aids
Marking MId-Channels
and Fairways
(No Numbers–May be
Lettered)
Daymark
Nun Buoy
G
E
(Red)
Spherical Buoy
C
Daymark
Lighted (White Light)
Preferred
Channel
to Starboard
(Green and
Red)
L
C
Lighted Buoy
(Green Light)
Preferred Channel Aids
(No Numbers–May be
Lettered)
Preferred
Channel
to Port
(Green
and Red)
B
H
Can Buoy
Daymark
D
A
Lighted Buoy
(Red Light)
Nun Buoy
Light Structures
Daymark
KC-0441
Maneuvering a boat at night can be dangerous and confusing. To aid
boaters with navigation and warn of hazards, the U.S. Coast Guard
and state and local authorities maintain a variety of light structures.
Some light structures may be equipped with radio beacons, radar
reflectors, and/or fog signals.
Minor Lights – are colored according to the buoyage marking system
in use. They are similar to lighted buoys, except they are usually higher
and on more stable platforms to increase visibility. Most minor lights are
part of a series to mark a channel, river, or harbor.
2-3
BASIC RULES OF THE ROAD
Range Lights – are usually visible in one direction and help a boat
operator navigate in a generally safe direction. Steering a course to
keep range lights arranged in a line (one on top of the other) will help
guide a boat through a channel.
RANGE LIGHTS
FRONT
MARKER
LEFT OF RANGE LINE
ON RANGE LINE
REAR
MARKER
RIGHT OF RANGE LINE
KC-0442
RIGHT-OF-WAY
! CAUTION
In general, boats with less maneuverability have right-ofway over more agile craft. Likewise, smaller boats should
give-way to larger ones. You must stay clear of the vessel
with right-of-way and pass to his stern.
Whistle/Horn Signals
Signaling other boats with a whistle is similar to using turn signals on
an automobile. It is not necessary to use a whistle signal every time a
boat is nearby. In general, boat operators should signal their intention
to avoid potentially confusing or hazardous situations.
KC-0443
Lighthouses – can be
found at harbor entrances,
prominent headlands, isolated danger areas, and
along the coasts. These
striped or patterned structures have unique flashing
characteristics to help
identify them.
2-4
It is customary for the privileged boat to signal first, and the give-way
boat to return the same signal to acknowledge she understands and
will comply. Use the danger signal (five or more short and rapid blasts)
if intent is not clear.
Use the following whistle blasts early enough to be noticed and understood by other boaters:
● One long blast: Warning signal (coming out of slip or passing
astern)
● One short blast: Pass on my port side
● Two short blasts: Pass on my starboard side
● Three short blasts: Engines in reverse
● Five or more short and rapid blasts: Danger Signal!
BASIC RULES OF THE ROAD
Privileged Boats
12 O’CLOCK
Privileged boats have right-of-way and can hold course and
speed. Sailboats and boats paddled or rowed have the right-ofway over motor boats. Sailboats under power are considered
motorboats. Small pleasure craft must yield to large commercial
boats in narrow channels.
STAND-ON
(PRIVILEGED)
VESSEL
Burdened Boats
The burdened boat is the boat that must make whatever adjustments to course and speed necessary to keep out ot the way of
the privileged boat.
Crossing Situation
DANGER ZONE
In crossing situations, the boat to the right from the 12 o’clock
to the 4 o’clock position has the right-of-way. It must hold
course and speed. The burdened boat keeps clear and passes
behind the privileged boat. Boats going up and down a river
have the privilege over boats crossing the river.
GIVE-WAY
(BURDENED)
VESSEL
Meeting Head-On
Neither boat has the right-of-way in this situation. Both boats
should decrease speed, should turn to the right, and pass portto-port. However, if both boats are on the left side of a channel, each vessel
should sound two short horn blasts and pass starboard to starboard.
HONK
KC-0477
HONK
HONK
HONK
PASSING
PORT TO
PORT
4 O’CLOCK
MEETING
HEAD TO
HEAD
HONK
HONK
PASSING
STARBOARD TO
STARBOARD
KC-0475
2-5
BASIC RULES OF THE ROAD
Overtaking
The boat that is overtaking one ahead of it is the give-way boat and
must make any adjustments necessary to keep out of the way of the
stand-on boat. The stand-on boat should hold its course and speed.
STAND-ON
(PRIVILEGED)
VESSEL BEING
OVERTAKEN
The General Prudential Rule
HONK
(LONG)
STAND-O
(PRIVILEG
VESSEL BE
OVERTAK
The general prudential rule regarding right-of-way is that if a collision
appears unavoidable, neither boat has right-of-way. As prescribed in
the Rules of the Road, both boats must act to avoid collision.
Night Running
Boats operating between sunset and sunrise (hours vary by state)
must use navigational lights. Nighttime operation, especially during bad
weather or fog can be dangerous. All Rules of Road apply at night, but
it is best to slow down and stay clear of all boats, regardless of who
has right-of-way.
Protect your night vision by avoiding bright lights and have a passenger, if possible, help keep watch for other boats, water hazards, and
aids to navigation.
HONK
(LONG)
GIVE-WA
(BURDENE
VESSEL
OVERTAKI
GIVE-WAY
(BURDENED)
VESSEL
OVERTAKING
KC-0476
2-6
The size, speed, and direction of other vessels are determined at night
from the running lights. A green light indicates the starboard side of the
boat, and a red light indicates the port side. Generally, if you see a
green light, you have the right-of-way; if you see a red light, give-way to
vessel.
CONTROLS
AND
INDICATORS
Knowing the controls and indicators on your boat is essential for safe and
proper operation. The controls and indicators shown in this section may be
optional or slightly different than those on your boat.
SHIFT/THROTTLE CONTROLS
! WARNING !
Improperly maintained controls are hazardous and may cause
sudden loss of control. Make sure all shift/throttle hardware
and cables are regularly inspected and maintained. Improper
maintenance may result in a loss of control, resulting in serious injury or death.
The shift/throttle control on your boat differs from model to model and may
depend on the engine used. The following shift/throttle controls are typical
of the operation of most controls used. Be sure to consult the engine or
control manual for specific operational differences.
! CAUTION
Never shift too quickly from forward to reverse. Stay in neutral,
or idle position until the boat has lost most of its headway
before completing the shift to reverse or engine damage may
occur.
NOTICE
All shift/throttle controls are equipped with a safety switch for
“start in neutral only” operation. Be sure the control is in neutral before attempting to start the engine.
3-1
CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
Single Lever Controls
B
D
A
C
D
KC-0620.1
STARBOARD
PORT
CONTROL
CONTROL
LEVER
LEVER
Single lever controls operate as both a gear shifter and a throttle for a
select engine. The lever is detented in the neutral position for starting.
Shifting is accomplished by moving the lever into the first 15° of travel;
push the lever for forward, and pull the lever back for reverse. By
advancing the lever beyond 15°, you move from the shifting range to
the throttle range. Never attempt to shift without the engine running.
For engine warm-up, a separate lever or button on the control is used
for throttle advance while the transmission remains in neutral.
A. Neutral Position - Safety switch will allow
starting in this position only.
B. Forward Position - Press release button under handle to allow
shifting to forward (or reverse) position.
C. Reverse Position - Do not shift quickly from forward to reverse.
D. Throttle Position - Pushing in forward or pulling in reverse
increases engine speed.
Twin engine boats equipped with single lever controls have two levers,
a left lever for port engine control and a right lever for the starboard
engine. This makes it possible to operate one engine in forward and
the other in reverse for easier maneuvering in tight quarters.
Dual Lever Controls
KC-0651
A
B
KC-0653.1
Dual lever controls have individual levers for transmission shift and
engine throttle. For the shift lever(s), neutral is the detent position in
the middle of the lever’s travel. Pushing the lever(s) up or ahead shifts
the transmission(s) into forward and pulling the lever(s) down or back
shifts the transmission(s) into reverse. For the throttle lever(s), full
throttle position is all the way up or forward and idle position is all the
way down or back.
For engine warm-up, the shift lever(s) are positioned in neutral and the
throttle lever(s) are advanced as needed. For maneuvering at slow
speed, it is sometimes desirable to operate one engine in forward and
the
other in reverse.
A. Shift Lever - Neutral is in center detent position; push for forward, pull for reverse.
B. Throttle Lever - Full throttle is all the way up,
idle is all the way down.
Dual lever controls on twin engine boats have individual levers for
transmission shift and engine throttle for each engine, left levers for
the port engine and right levers for the starboard engine. Twin
engine controls are usually arranged with shift levers (all one size
and color) grouped together and throttle levers (all the same size and
color, but usually larger than the shift levers) grouped together.
KC-0654.1
INSTRUMENTS
All instruments are illuminated for night operation. Their type, number, and location vary; some may not appear on your model. If your
boat is equipped with twin-engines, there may be two sets of some
of the instruments described in this section; one set for each engine.
typically, instruments for the port side engine will be found on the
port side of the helm control panel; likewise for the starboard engine
instruments.
3-2
CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
If an instrument reading is outside of normal or recommended
ranges, investigate cause immediately or see your dealer. Consult
the engine operator’s manual for the normal recommended ranges.
Tachometer
20
15
10
25
30
35
5
0
40
RPM
Registers engine speed in revolutions per minute. Use this gauge to
keep the engine within the proper operating range. Consult the
engine manual for the proper RPM operating range for your engine.
x 100
KC-0700
Speedometer
Registers forward boat speed relative to the water in miles per hour.
Use this gauge to monitor fuel consumption and propeller performance. Since most marine speedometers are operated by water
pressure, accuracy is only approximate.
35
30
40
60
50
25
70
40
20
15
45
30
20
80
MPH
50
KPH
Fuel Gauge
This gauge registers approximate fuel level in the gas tanks. Since
the accuracy of your gauge varies with the attitude of your boat (trim
and list), and the fuel pick-up tube cannot withdraw all of the fuel in
the tank, it is wise to observe the One Third Rule. Use one third of
your gas to go out, one third to come back, and one third as a
reserve.
KC-0710
1/
2
E
F
FUEL
KC-0720
Water Pressure Gauge
Registers the water circulated by the water pump in pounds per
square inch (PSI). Use this gauge to observe that the engine cooling
system is operating properly. Consult the engine manual for the normal operating PSI range.
15
20
10
25
5
30
WATER
PRESS
Engine Trim Gauge
Shows the position of the outdrive unit and indicates the relative
position of the bow, from a horizontal plane. Use this gauge to monitor boat trim.
KC-0730
DN
UP
TRIM
Engine Sync Gauge
Indicates synchronization of engine speeds. Adjust throttles so that
needle is centered. Excessive noise and vibration can occur if
engines are not properly synchronized to each other
KC-0740
PORT
STBD
ENGINE
SYNC
Voltmeter
Indicates the condition of the main or cranking battery in volts DC.
Normal operating range is 12+ volts.
KC-0702
10 13 16
-
+
VOLTS
KC-0750
3-3
CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
Ammeter
0
50
-
Measures the charging current in the electrical system. Consult the
engine manual for the normal operating range.
50
+
AMP
Engine Water Temperature Gauge
KC-0760
0
5
6
C x 10
7
8
10 15
0
Engine Oil Pressure Gauge
24
F x 10
Indicates the pressure of the lubricating oil inside the engine.
Consult the engine manual for the normal operating range.
TEMP
KC-0770
1
0
Engine Hourmeter
Registers accumulated engine operating time, and is activated when
the ignition switch is in the “ON” position. Be aware that time will be
logged whenever the ignition switch is “ON”, even when the engine is
not running. Use the hourmeter to keep accurate logs for scheduled
maintenance.
KPa x 100
2
3
4
40
Indicates the engine water/coolant temperature inside the engine.
Consult the engine manual for the normal operating range.
80
PSI
OIL
KC-0780
SWITCHES
ENGINE
HOURS
0 00 0 00 0h
Quartz 100
KC-0782
Each electrical circuit on your boat is equipped with a control switch.
Some switches may have an LED indicator for easy ON/OFF identification. Most switches will have a fuse holder, or circuit breaker adjacent to the switch.
Master Power Switch – Disconnects the boat electrical systems
from the batteries. When not using the boat, keep this switch in the
OFF position.
ON
OFF
TYPICAL
BATTERY SWITCH
Battery Switch – Connects the battery(ies) to the electrical system.
Provides isolation and positive disconnect of battery(ies) to protect
against tampering, electrical fire hazards, and battery run-down.
Rotate switch to the OFF position when the boat is not in use.
KC-0704
! WARNING !
BOTH
1
2
Never turn switch to the OFF position while the
engine(s) is running or serious alternator/electrical system damage could occur.
OFF
TYPICAL BATTERY
SELECTOR SWITCH
KC-0705
S
SW
240
210
180
150
SE
120
KC-0703
3-4
Battery Selector Switch – Operates as a battery switch and provides the additional ability to connect two batteries in parallel for
starting in case one battery is low. Allows emergency starting of
either engine with the opposite battery. May be used in conjunction
with an isolator and third battery. Refer to Ship Systems for more
information.
Windshield Wiper Switch – Controls operation of windshield
wipers.
Compass – Aids with navigation by indicating where NORTH is
located. The compass must be adjusted for the area you are in and
CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
can be affected by instruments installed adjacent to it. The compass
must be compensated (corrected) for deflections caused by magnets
and electrical wiring in its vicinity.
After all optional equipment has been installed in the helm area, the
compass should then be compensated. Since the compass is an
important navigational aid, the compensating should be done by a
qualified compass adjuster. It is seldom that a compass can be corrected to zero deviation on all headings, so he will provide you with a
deviation card or chart showing the correction to be applied when
laying out a compass course or making your navigational calculations.
After the compass is adjusted, do not permit items which might affect
it to be placed near the compass, even temporarily. The compass
must be readjusted if any influencing item for which it has been compensated is removed or relocated, or added in the vicinity. As a rule
of thumb, electrical or metal items should be kept three or more feet
away from the compass so as not to affect its magnetic field.
COMPASS DEVIATION
HEADING
WEST
EAST
30°
5°
60°
5°
90°
6°
120°
4°
150°
3°
180°
1°
210°
1°
240°
2°
270°
4°
300°
4°
330°
5°
360°
6°
KC-0921
Get to know your compass. Watch how it swings. Check that its
readings are consistent on frequently sailed courses. Note if it
becomes sluggish, and above all, if it becomes erratic. These two
signs warn of alien magnetism or damaged compass.
Fuel Gauge Switch – Allows you to check the amount of fuel in the
fuel tank when the navigation lights are OFF or the ignition switch is
OFF.
Boarding and Courtesy Lights – Are controlled by selector switches for operation of boarding lights and cockpit courtesy lights. The
main DC breaker (Master Power) switch must first be in the ON position to activate lighting.
Navigation Lights Switch – Controls the running and anchor lights
for night operation. NAV position will turn on the red and green bow
lights, white stern light, and gauge illumination. ANC position turns
on only the white stern light for night anchoring.
ON/OFF
SWITCH
LIGHT
KC-0935
! CAUTION
Never operate the boat between sunset and sunrise with
the switch in the anchor light position. Running lights
are required to indicate direction and right-of-way at
night.
Blower Switch – Activates the engine box ventilation blower to
remove explosive fumes from the box and bilge areas.
! WARNING !
The blower must be operated for a minimum of five minutes before each time the engine is started. In addition,
the blower should be operated continuously when at idle
or slow speed running. Failure to operate the blower can
lead to conditions favorable for an explosion, with
severe personal injury or death resulting.
3-5
CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
Bilge Switch – Activates the bilge pump to remove excess water
from the bilge. Some models are equipped with an automatic bilge
pump setting. Switch to AUTO whenever the boat is in operation,
water will be pumped-out as it enters the bilge.
! CAUTION
Be sure to switch the bilge OFF when the boat is not in
use. Wave action or trailer travel can cause the pump to
run down the battery.
SHAL
ALARM
DEEP
KC104-18
KC104-18
GAS FUME DETECTOR
ON
ON
ALARM
OFF
WAIT
REST
KC-0936
Ignition Switch – Starts and stops the engine. Be sure to consult
the engine operator’s manual for information.
Depth Sounder – Indicates the distance between the bottom of
your boat and the earth’s surface directly below the transducer. To
avoid running aground in shallow water, always add extra distance
to meter reading. Consult the depth sounder operator’s manual for
more information.
Gas Fume Detector – Alarm will sound when gas fumes are
detected. Turn on bilge blower to evacuate fumes. The sensor for
the vapor detector is mounted in the bilge area where fumes collect.
Test the unit before each cruise to check for proper performance.
! WARNING !
If the gas fume detector indicates a dangerous condition, do the following:
●
●
BATTERY CHARGER
●
●
●
0
5
10
15
20
DC AMEPRES
DO NOT operate electrical equipment.
Extinguish open flames and smoking materials
immediately.
Turn engine(s) OFF.
Wait 5 minutes before opening the engine compartment to investigate the cause.
Determine cause and correct immediately before
resuming operation.
Engine Alarm System – Sounds alarm if the engine temperature
exceeds set limit or if oil pressure drops below set range. If alarm
sounds during operation, immediately shut down engines and determine cause. Consult the engine operator’s manual for more information.
KC104-16
KC104-16
! CAUTION
Continued operation after the warning alarm has sounded may cause severe engine damage.
3-6
CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
Battery Charger – Operates from the shore power or generator systems. It converts 110 volts A.C. to 12 volts D.C. to charge the batteries. The battery charger will either deliver full output to a discharged
battery, or deliver a trickle charge to a battery with minimal discharge. Consult the battery charger operator’s manual for more information.
Battery Isolator – Allows you to charge multiple batteries. The isolator automatically detects how much of a charge to send each battery.
It prevents batteries from being overcharged, and eliminates a higher
charged battery from discharging into a lower charged battery.
Consult the battery isolator operator’s manual for more information.
UP
DN
TYPICAL
TRIM
SWITCH
Horn Button – Push and hold to sound the horn.
KC-0931
Trim/Tilt Switch – Your engine is equipped with power trim and tilt,
this switch activates that function. Push and hold the switch until the
engine is at the desired angle. Use this switch in combination with
the trim gauge to maximize boat performance in the water. The tilt
switch raises the drive unit for trailering.
TRIM TAB SWITCHES
Trim Tab Switches – These rocker switches control the trim tabs
located on the port and starboard transom. Adjusting trim tabs will
improve the ride of your boat and correct listing from side to side due
to varying weight conditions. See the RUNNING section of this manual for further trimming procedures.
BOW DOWN
P
O
R
T
Engine Stop Switch and Lanyard – The engine stop switch stops
the engine when engaged. Attach the lanyard to the boat operator
whenever the engine is running. If the operator is thrown from the
seat or moves too far from the helm the lanyard will engage the
switch and shut off the engine.
S
T
B
D
BOW UP
KC-0932
To attach the lanyard, hold out the button head and slide the fork
beneath the safety switch. Attach the hook on the opposite end of
the lanyard to a strong piece of clothing on the operator, such as a
belt loop.
! WARNING !
Attach the Engine Stop Switch lanyard to the operator
before starting the engine. This will prevent the boat
from becoming a runaway if you are accidentally
thrown from the boat.
ENGINE
STOP SWITCH
SAFETY SWITCH
BUTTON HEAD
The Engine Stop Switch can only be effective when it is
in good working condition. Observe the following:
●
Never remove or modify the Engine Stop Switch
and/or lanyard.
●
Lanyard must always be free from obstructions that
could interfere with its operation .
ONCE A MONTH: Check switch for proper operation.
With engine running, pull lanyard. If engine does not
stop, see your DEALER for replacement of switch.
FORK
LANYARD
HOOK
KC-0950
3-7
CONTROLS AND INDICATORS
STEERING
CABLE
HELM UNIT
STEERING SYSTEMS
Your boat is equipped with a steering wheel for controlling the direction of travel. The steering system itself may be mechanical, powerassisted or hydraulic in operation.
Boat steering is not self-centering. Always keep a secure grip on the
steering wheel to maintain full boat control.
STEERING BAR
KCC 1885R1
With power-assisted systems, the helm unit transfers rotary motion
of the steering wheel to linear motion which pushes or pulls a cable.
The cable movement is sensed and a signal is sent to a hydraulic
pump which moves the hydraulic cylinder attached to the steering
arm.
STEERING BAR
HELM UNIT
With hydraulic steering, the manual hydraulic steering system does
not act like the power steering system in your car. The effort required
to turn the wheel will increase as the system is called on to exert
more force. As the steering wheel is turned, the pistons in the manual pump force hydraulic fluid to the cylinder, which then provides the
force necessary to turn the boat.
STEERING CABLE
KCC 1887R1
PUMP
CYLINDER
KCC 1888R1
3-8
With mechanical steering, the helm unit transfers rotary motion of the
steering wheel to linear motion in the cable which pushes or pulls the
steering arm. Some boats are equipped with two cables; one cable
pushes and the other pulls.
OPERATION
This section describes the basics of fueling, starting, running, trimming, and
docking your boat. Since there is a variety of control and engine options, be
sure to consult the other owner’s manuals provided with your boat.
FUELING
Built-in tanks have the fuel filler aft in the boat. The fuel tank is equipped
with either a shut-off valve or anti-siphon valve. The shut-off valve requires
you to manually turn the fuel valve, while the anti-siphon valve operates
automatically. Because gasoline fumes are heavier than air, they will sink to
the lowest part of your boat, such as the bilge. It is important to always
evacuate fumes with the blower before attempting to start the engine.
! WARNING !
Gasoline is extremely flammable and highly explosive under
certain conditions. When refueling, always stop the engine and
never smoke or allow open flames or sparks within 50 feet of
the fueling area.
Take care not to spill gasoline. If gasoline is spilled accidentally, wipe up all
traces of it with dry rags and immediately dispose of the rags properly
onshore. When fueling:
●
Know your fuel tank capacity. Be sure to have enough fuel to reach
your destination. If departing for an extended cruise, know the availability of fuel along your route.
●
Avoid fueling at night, except under well lighted conditions.
●
Moor your boat securely to the dock. Know the location of fire
extinguisher in case of emergency.
●
Keep accurate records on fuel consumption. A fuel log tracking
fuel use over time will help determine average consumption.
●
Close all doors, hatches, windows, and other compartments.
●
Extinguish cigarettes, pipes, stoves, and all other flame producing items.
●
Make sure all power is off, and do not operate any electrical switches.
●
Remove fuel fill cap. Insert hose nozzle and make sure nozzle is in
contact with or grounded against fill opening. This will reduce the risk
of static spark.
KC-0991
4-1
OPERATION
●
Add fuel. Do not fill to capacity to allow for fuel expansion.
●
Check oil level.
Notice
Each time you fill up, inspect fuel lines for leaks and hose
deterioration.
Notice
The Federal Water Pollution Control Act prohibits the discharge of oil or oily waste into the water. Violators can be
fined $5,000. We urge you to protect our fragile environment
by avoiding any type of discharge, trash, or litter into our
waterways.
After fueling, you should:
●
Close fill cap securely and wipe up spillage.
●
Open all windows, hatches, doors, and compartments.
●
Check all fuel lines and connections for leakage.
●
Run blower for at least five minutes before starting your boat. If you
smell gasoline fumes, continue to run blower.
STARTING
The following starting guidelines cover a wide variety of engine power and
accessory options. Be sure to follow the starting instructions contained in
the engine operator’s manual and tailor starting procedures for your
particular model.
4-2
●
Complete Pre-Operation checks found in the Getting Underway section.
●
Turn battery selection switch(es) to ON position.
●
Open engine hatch.
OPERATION
●
Operate bilge blower for at least five minutes prior to starting engine(s).
Continue to operate until underway at cruising speed.
●
Use manual bilge pump switch to remove any water in bilge below the
automatic switch level.
●
Make sniff test with your nose; this is a very effective way to detect
fumes.
●
Open seacocks for engine cooling water. Seacocks for washdowns,
heads, air conditioning, etc. are opened on an as needed basis.
TYPICAL SEACOCK AND STRAINER
STRAINER
OPEN
CLOSED
INCOMING RAW
WATER
SEACOCK
KC-2165
●
Close engine hatch.
●
Move stern drive(s) to full IN position.
●
Move trim tab controls to the full UP position.
●
Put shift lever(s) in NEUTRAL position.
●
Move throttle lever(s) fully forward and return to idle position. Throttle
linkage and cable must move freely.
●
Slightly advance throttle lever forward.
●
Turn the ignition key switch of one engine to START position. Release
key immediately after engine starts.
●
If engine will not start, move throttle to FULL position once or twice to
actuate the carburetor accelerator pump.
●
Operate engine at approximately 1000 to 1200 RPM for a few minutes
before starting other engine (if equipped).
●
Repeat steps for remaining engine, if equipped.
●
Make sure gauges indicate normal operating ranges. If not, shut down
engine(s) immediately and determine cause.
●
After running engine(s) at 1000 to 1200 RPM for several minutes,
reduce throttle to idle speed until you’re ready to depart.
4-3
OPERATION
! WARNING !
The blower must be operated for a minimum of four minutes
before each time the engine is started. In addition, the blower
should be operated continuously when at idle or slow speed
running. Failure to operate the blower can cause an explosion.
! CAUTION
To prevent damage to the engine:
●
Do not operate starter longer than a few seconds; let it cool
for several minutes before trying again.
●
Shift quickly and without hesitation. Never ease engine into
gear or shift mechanism could be damaged.
! CAUTION
Go slowly in reverse to avoid taking water in over the transom.
You can swamp the boat by taking on too much water.
SHIFTING/RUNNING
Follow these guidelines when shifting your boat:
●
Pause in neutral before shifting from forward to reverse, or reverse to
forward.
●
Avoid shifting into reverse while the boat is traveling forward at speed.
●
Keep the shifter control clean and clear of obstructions.
WARNING ALARM
! CAUTION
Continued operation after the warning alarm has sounded may
cause severe engine damage.
Your boat is equipped with a warning alarm that will sound if an engine
problem develops. If the warning alarm sounds, IMMEDIATELY throttle back
to idle speed and shift into neutral. IMMEDIATELY check the gauges and
stop the engine. On some models, the horn may emit a short chirping
sound during starting to verify operation.
4-4
OPERATION
STEERING CONTROLS
All boats have a tendency to wander somewhat at slow speeds. A natural
reaction to this effect is to steer the boat back and forth in an attempt to
compensate for wandering. Invariably, the compensation will result in oversteer and only worsen the effect. Keep the steering wheel in the center
position, the boat will wander back and forth somewhat, but the overall
course will be a straight one.
! WARNING !
The steering system must be in good operating condition for
safe boat operation. Frequent inspection, lubrication, and
adjustment by your dealer is recommended.
STOPPING
1. Slowly bring throttle control to the idle position and the shift control to
the NEUTRAL position. Bring the trim tabs to the UP position and the
outdrives to the IN position accordingly. If the boat has been driven for
a long period of time at high speed, allow the engine a 2-3 minute
cool-down period at low idle.
2. Turn the ignition key to the OFF position.
3. If any problems were encountered during the outing, have the boat
inspected by your dealer and request any necessary repairs before the
next outing.
! CAUTION
Do not use the engine stop switch for normal shutdown. Doing
so may impair your ability to re-start the engine quickly or may
create a hazardous swamping condition.
End of Day Shutdown
●
To prevent marine growth from accumulating on the hydraulic cylinder
shafts, make sure trim tabs are UP and outdrives are in the full IN
position.
●
Lock ignition key switch and remove ignition keys.
●
Stow and secure all equipment.
●
Pump bilges dry with manual switch. Leave on AUTO when finished.
●
Close all inlet seacocks and fuel valves.
●
Use fresh water to flush head and engines.
●
Inspect boat for damage.
●
Clean any spills, stains, or moisture from boat. Inspect and clean sea
strainers.
●
Turn battery select switches to OFF.
4-5
OPERATION
●
Turn off breaker on electrical panel except for the bilge pumps.
●
Remove any food, garbage, and wet gear from boat.
●
Secure lockers, hatches, and canvas as equipped.
●
If keeping boat in water, hook up shore power cord, make sure
battery charger light is ON, and check mooring lines.
DOCKING
Practice docking before attempting it for the first time. Use a float, like
a plastic milk jug with a line and small weight, as your docking target.
! WARNING !
Never use your hand, arm or other part of your body to
attempt to keep the boat from hitting the dock. The boat
could push against the dock, causing an injury.
WIND or CURRENT
Follow these guidelines when docking:
●
●
WIND or CURRENT
KC-1125
4-6
Approach docks with the port side of the boat if possible.
Come to a stop a short distance from the dock, then proceed
slowly.
● Have fenders, mooring lines, and crew ready.
● Observe how the wind and current are moving your boat.
Approach the dock with the boat pointed into the wind, if possible. If the wind or current is pushing you away from the dock,
use a sharper angle of approach. If you must approach the dock
downwind or down current, use a slow speed and shallow angle.
Be ready to reverse to stop and maintain position.
● If there is no wind or current, approach the dock at a 10 to 20
degree angle.
● If possible, throw a line to a person on the dock and have that
person secure a bow line.
● With the bow secure, swing the stern in with the engine, or pull it
in with a boat hook.
Before tying-up the boat, be sure to use enough fenders to protect
the boat from damage. If possible, tie-up with the bow towards the
waves with a good quality double-braided nylon line. Tie-up only to
the lifting or tie-down eyes; never use the handrails or windshield
frames. If the boat is to be moored for a long period of time, use
chafing protectors on lines to protect the gelcoat finish. Leave a little
slack in the lines to allow for some wave movement or tidal action if
applicable.
Follow these guidelines when departing:
● Very slowly shift into forward at idle speed.
● When the stern moves away from the dock, turn the engine
away from the dock.
● Cast off bow line and back away.
If the wind or current is pushing away from the dock, cast off all lines
and allow to drift until you are clear.
OPERATION
BOAT TRIM
The performance of your boat depends on load weight and distribution.
Distribute weight evenly, from bow to stern, and also from port to starboard.
After loading, the boat’s trim can be adjusted by changing the engine trim
angle and trim tabs.
DRIVE TRIM ANGLE
Engine trim angle is the angular relationship between the lower drive unit
and the transom of the boat. Boat trim while underway greatly affects boat
performance and efficiency. For best results, the boat should be on plane
and trimmed to reduce the wetted surface. With less boat in the water, both
speed and fuel economy increases. Engines with manual trim must be
adjusted for best overall operation for the load and conditions. Engines with
power trim should be adjusted continuously for best results.
DN
UP
TRIM
CORRECT
DN
UP
TRIM
IN TOO FAR
DN
UP
TRIM
OUT TOO FAR
KC-1157A
4-7
OPERATION
If the engine is trimmed in too far (closer to the boat bottom), speed
drops, fuel economy decreases, and the boat may not handle correctly.
However, it does provide better acceleration from a stand still; and
because it forces the bow down, visibility is improved. If the engine is
trimmed out too far (away from the boat bottom), steering torque may
increase, the boat may be difficult to get on a plane, and may bounce.
! WARNING !
Do not trim the engine out too far or the boat may begin to
“porpoise” (bounce up and down). Porpoising reduces
control and visibility.
To use power trim effectively, always start with the engine trimmed in.
As the boat planes, increase the angle out. Experience is the best
teacher for understanding proper trim.
Trim Tabs
Water is deflected and redirected as the trim tabs are raised and lowered. This change in water flow creates upward pressure under the
tabs, and raises the stern. When the stern raises, the bow is lowered.
Likewise, lowering the port tab will cause the port stern to raise, making the starboard bow lower.
Using trim tabs in conjunction with the power trim will compensate for
uneven weight distribution, listing, water conditions, and other factors
that cause inefficient operation. Remember that trim tabs are trimming
the hull while power trim is trimming the engine drive.
BOW
LOWERS
STERN
RISES
PORT TAB LOWERS
● PORT STERN RISES
● STARBOARD BOW LOWERS
STARBOARD TAB LOWERS
● STARBOARD STERN RISES
● PORT BOW LOWERS
HULL
KC-1155
WATER IS REDIRECTED
CREATING UPWARD
FORCE AT STERN
KC-1154
4-8
OPERATION
To use the trim tabs with the power trim
1. Adjust the trim tabs to achieve a planing attitude.
2. Use the power trim to position the prop path parallel to the water flow.
UNTRIMMED
UNTRIMMED
PLANING
PLANING
ATTITUDE
ATTITUDE
PROP PARALLEL TO WATER FLOW
PROP
PARALLEL TO WATER FLOW
KC-1153
KC-1153
3. Readjust the trim tabs to fine tune attitude.
4. Do not overtrim because bow will dig in, causing the boat to veer.
5. To avoid listing, do not move one tab significantly further down than the
other while underway.
! WARNING !
Improper use of trim tabs at high speeds can cause an
accident or injury.
4-9
OPERATION
4-10
GETTING
UNDERWAY
There are many things to consider to make your boating trip safe and
enjoyable. This section includes a safety checklist, boarding guidelines, boat loading, and capacity information.
The contents of this section should be read and understood before
casting off. Remember, if you have a problem during your cruise, you
can’t get out and fix it, or walk to safety or for help.
You are responsible for the safety of all passengers, the boat, and
any damage the boat or its wake may cause. Always keep passengers from blocking your view so that you do not run into other boats,
swimmers, water skiers, personal water vehicles, or aids to navigation.
SAFETY CHECKLIST
The following checks are essential to safe boating and must be performed before starting the engine. Get in the habit of performing
these checks in the same order each time so that it becomes routine.
✔ WEATHER
✔ EQUIPMENT
✔ FIRE
EXTINGUISHER
✔ DRAIN PLUG
! WARNING !
DO NOT launch the boat if any problem is found during
the Safety Check. A problem could lead to an accident
during the outing causing severe injury or death. Have
any problem attended to immediately; see your dealer.
Pre-Operation
●
Check the weather report, wind and water conditions.
●
Check that the required safety equipment is on board.
●
Check that the fire extinguisher is fully charged.
●
Check that bilge drain plug is installed properly.
●
Check that no fuel, oil or water is leaking or has leaked into the
bilge compartment.
●
Check all hoses and connections for leakage and damage.
●
Check engine and stern drive oil levels.
●
Check stern drive pump and trim tab pump fluid levels.
✔ BILGE
✔ HOSES
✔ OIL LEVELS
✔ FLUID LEVELS
5-1
GETTING UNDERWAY
✔ STEERING
✔ STRAINERS
✔ EXHAUST
✔ PROPELLER
✔ WATER INTAKE
✔ BATTERY
●
Check hydraulic steering fluid level.
●
Make sure water strainer for raw water intake is clean.
●
Check that raw water inlet seacocks are open.
●
Inspect exhaust connections for water leaks or gas stains.
Tighten loose connections.
●
Check the propeller for damage.
●
Check the engine cooling water intake pick-up for blockage.
●
Check that battery terminals are clean and tight.
●
Check electrical circuits (lights, pumps, horn, etc.) for proper
operation.
●
Check that throttle/shift control is in neutral.
●
Check that the steering system operates properly.
●
Check that all required maintenance has been performed.
During Operation
●
Check gauges frequently for signs of abnormal behavior.
●
Check that controls operate smoothly.
●
Check for excessive vibration.
After Operation
✔ CIRCUITS
✔ CONTROLS
●
Fill fuel tank to prevent moisture due to condensation.
●
Check for fuel, oil and water leakage.
●
Check the propeller for damage.
●
Complete END OF DAY SHUTDOWN checks found in the
Operation section of this manual.
SAFETY EQUIPMENT
✔ STEERING
✔ MAINTENANCE
Federal and local laws require certain safety equipment to be on
board at all times. In addition, responsible boaters carry other
equipment in case of emergency. Check with local boating authorities for any additional requirements over and above federal requirements.
BOARDING
✔ GAUGES
✔ FUEL
5-2
When boarding the boat, always step in. Do not jump. Avoid stepping on potentially slippery surfaces. Board one person at a time.
Do not board the boat while carrying gear. Set gear on the dock,
board the boat and then pick-up the gear.
GETTING UNDERWAY
Boat Loading
The performance of your boat is dependent on load weight and distribution.
Passengers should board one at a time and should distribute themselves to
maintain trim. Remember to distribute weight from right to left, and also
from front to back.
! WARNING !
All passengers should be carefully seated and not be riding on
the bow, bow pulpit, deck, gunwale, or rear sun deck while
underway.
●
Do not allow your passengers to ride with their feet dangling over the
side, floating debris can cause serious injury.
●
Avoid excess weight in the bow or stern.
●
Securely stow all extra gear in stowage areas to prevent load shifting.
Do not stow gear on top of safety equipment; safety equipment must be
quickly accessible.
●
In adverse weather, reduce the load in the boat. People/load capacity
ratings are based upon normal boating conditions.
●
Do not use the engine unit as a boarding ramp. Make sure engine is off
when swimmers, divers, and skiers are boarding to prevent injury.
Proper Weight Distribution
KC-1310
Improper (Starboard Heavy)
KC-1340
5-3
GETTING UNDERWAY
Capacity
Boats up to 26’ in the National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA)
program have a maximum rated load capacity, which is stated on the certification plate (if equipped). The person/load capacity is determined by various USCG formulas. Actual capacity is determined by the availability of
proper seating on the boat. Acceptable seating determines the number of
passengers, not the overall load capacity.
U.S. COAST GUARD
MAXIMUM CAPACITIES
XXPERSONS OR XXXX LBS.
XXXX POUNDS, PERSONS, GEAR
THIS BOAT COMPLIES WITH U.S. COAST
GUARD SAFETY STANDARDS IN EFFECT
ON THE DATE OF CERTIFICATION
MANUFACTURER:
MODEL:
DESIGN COMPLIANCE WITH BIA REQUIREMENTS BELOW IS
VERIFIED. MFGR. RESPONSIBLE FOR PRODUCTION CONTROL.
LOAD CAPACITY • COMPARTMENT VENTILATION
STEERING, FUEL AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
INTERNATIONAL LIGHTS •
MANEUVERABILITY
CERTIFIED
NATIONAL MARINE MANUFACTURERS ASSN.
KC-1445
! WARNING !
Do not exceed the USCG certified maximum capacities under
any circumstances. Overloading will reduce freeboard and
increase the likelihood of swamping, especially in heavy seas.
Overloading causes handling to become sluggish making it
hard to react quickly.
Overpowering outboard powered craft is extremely dangerous.
Overpowering will make the boat unstable and could cause
loss of helm control. Failure to maintain control could result in
severe injury or death.
5-4
6
RUNNING
We urge you and all others operating the boat to seek certified instruction
from the local boating authorities.
This section is designed to present the most basic operational principles. It
is NOT intended to cover all conditions encountered during operation. The
principles presented in this manual are limited directly to the operation of
the boat. The responsibility for the proper application of these principles
belongs to you.
MANEUVERING TECHNIQUES
Steering response depends on three factors: engine’s position, motion and
throttle.
Like an automobile, high speed maneuvering is relatively easy and
takes little practice to learn. Slow speed maneuvering, on the other
hand, is far more difficult and requires time and practice to master.
STERN
CIRCLE
BOW
CIRCLE
When making tight maneuvers, it is important to understand the
effects of turning. Since both thrust and steering are at the stern of
the boat, the stern will push away from the direction of the turn.
The bow follows a smaller turning circle than the stern.
The effects of unequal propeller thrust, wind, and current must also
be kept in mind. While wind and current may not always be present,
an experienced boater will use them to his advantage. Unequal
thrust is an aspect shared by all single engine propeller-driven
watercraft. A clockwise rotation propeller tends to cause the boat,
steering in the straight ahead position, to drift to starboard when
going forward, and to port when going backward. At high speed, this
effect is usually unnoticed, but at slow speed; especially during backing, it can be powerful. For this reason, many veteran boaters approach the
dock with the port side of the boat toward the dock, if possible.
KC-1474
6-1
RUNNING
6
Stopping
Twin-engine craft with counter-rotating engines operate with less propeller torque induced drifting, using the concept of counterrotation.
One engine propeller turns clockwise while the other turns counterclockwise. This helps maintain an even keel by eliminating the tendency of your dual-powered boat to veer.
KC-2340
Stopping (checking headway) is a technique that must be developed.
Since a boat has no brakes, reverse thrust is used to slow and stop
the boat. The momentum of the boat will vary according to the load
as well as the speed. Make it a practice to slow to idle (no-wake)
speed before shifting into reverse.
Twin-Engine Maneuvering
One thing to keep in mind when
STARBOARD TURN
maneuvering with twin-engine
powered boats at low speeds, is
SLOWER PROP
that turns are made by thrusts of
power from the engines and propeller, not by turning the outdrive
unit; this means at lower speeds,
steering your boat becomes a
combination of propeller direction,
engine thrusts, and steering wheel
SLOWER PROP
maneuvers.
To make sharp and close quarter
turns, observe the following:
PORT TURN
KC-1074
●
Before attempting to make close turns at low speed, bring the
throttles to idle so you can shift into reverse without damaging
the engine.
●
Reverse the direction of the engine on the side you want to turn.
For example, if you want to turn starboard, shift the starboard
engine into reverse. The forward speed of the port engine, along
with the reverse rotation of the starboard engine, will pivot your
boat into a starboard turn.
●
Practice using the throttles to control the boat. You should try
these maneuvers in open water before attempting them near
docks or other boats.
●
Use quick “bursts” of throttle to control the boat. Keep in mind
that once the boat starts to move, momentum will carry through.
It is best to learn maneuvering skills in open water away from traffic.
Adequate practice is the only way to develop your boating skills.
SALT WATER
TWIN ENGINE MANEUVERING
6-2
If boat is moored in salt water for long periods, tilt the engine out of
the water (except during freezing temperatures). After removing the
boat from the water, lower the engine to the run (down) position until
the cooling system has drained thoroughly. Hose the entire hull down
with fresh water and wipe dry.
RUNNING
6
Today’s engines are built for operation in either fresh or salt water.
Fresh water internal flushing is not normally required, however, it may
be desirable after use in salt, polluted, or brackish water. Your dealer
will assist you in securing the appropriate engine flushing device.
FREEZING TEMPERATURES
When the boat will be operated and left in the water and temperatures drop below freezing, the engine must remain in the tilted down
(submerged) position at all times to prevent water in the engine from
freezing. When the boat is removed from the water, drain the engine
completely.
TOWING PROCEDURE
If seas are rough, it may not be easy to extend the tow line from one
boat to another. In these cases, use a light throwing line with a weight
on one end and with the heavier towing line secured to it.
Never attempt to tow a much larger or grounded vessel. Because of
the tremendous stress caused by towing, use a tow line that is rated
at least 4 times the gross weight of the boat being towed. Tow ropes
must always be in good condition, free of any cuts or abrasions.
Attach tow line to the bow eye on the disabled boat. Attach the opposite end of the bridle only to the stern eyes of the tow boat. Wrap the
bridle with chafing gear where it rubs against the boat or any corners. Leave at least 2 boat lengths between the boats for adequate
movement.
STERN
EYES
TOW
LINE
BOW
EYE
! DANGER !
When towing, use only the bow and stern eyes; never
use cleats, handrails, etc. Do not allow anyone to be in
line with the tow rope. If the rope should break or pull
free, a dangerous recoil could occur which may seriously injure or kill anyone in its path.
KC-2116
Adjust the tow line to match wave action. Keep the boats on the
crest or in the trough of the waves at the same time. In protected,
calm waters, shorten the line for better handling. Always tow at
moderate speed, allowing for adverse wind and wave conditions.
Have the operator of the towed boat steer with you if possible.
If you need a tow, or wish to tow another boat, use great care. The
boat structure can be damaged by excessive pulling strain. You
should always offer help to a boat in trouble. However, towing a capsized, grounded, or hull damaged boat is dangerous. Give assistance to the occupants; then call the proper authorities.
6-3
RUNNING
6
ANCHORING
ANCHORS
Dropping Anchor
There are many types of anchors available on the market. The
choice of one anchor over another depends on many factors. An
anchor will usually hold best in a mixture of mud and clay or in hard
sand. For more information on anchors consult your dealer.
MUSHROOM
! WARNING !
Always anchor from the bow; NEVER anchor from the
stern. A small amount of current will make the boat
unsteady…a strong current can pull a boat, anchored by
the stern, under water and keep it there.
When anchoring, it is helpful to keep a few guidelines in mind.
DANFORTH
YACHTMAN'S
KC-1570
KC-1570
●
Make sure the line is tied to the anchor and tie the other end of
the line to the forward cleat or bow eye.
●
Head the boat into the wind or current over the spot where you
want to lower the anchor.
●
Stop the boat before lowering the anchor.
●
When the anchor hits bottom, slowly back up the boat, keeping
tension on the line. Let out an anchor line that is 6 to 7 times the
depth of the water. For example, if you are in 10 feet of water,
let out 60 to 70 feet of line.
●
Secure anchor line to the bow cleat. Pull on line to make sure
anchor is holding.
●
Occasionally check your position against the shoreline. If the
anchor is dragging and you are drifting, reset the anchor.
Weighing (Pulling In) Anchor
Start engine and move forward until anchor line is straight up and
down. Pull hard to lift anchor from the bottom material (use wind).
LINE
6 TO 7 TIMES
LINE 6 TO 7 TIMES
DEPTH OF WATER
DEPTH
OF WATER
KC-1535
KC-1535
6-4
If the anchor is stuck, attach anchor
line to the bow cleat so that it is
taut. The up and down motion of
the bow from wave action may lift
the anchor from the bottom. If the
anchor remains stuck, let out a few
more feet of line and attach it to the
bow cleat. Slowly maneuver the
boat around the anchor until the
anchor pulls loose. Be sure to keep
the line tight during this procedure.
RUNNING
6
PERFORMANCE BOATING
Some boat models; especially those with high horsepower engines, are
capable of impressive performance. Don’t be tempted to push your boat to
its limits until you are familiar with your boat’s operating characteristics. The
operator should have at least 10 hours of experience with the boat before
any extended full throttle operation.
Operators must get used to the unique handling characteristics of performance operation; practice adjusting the throttle, trim and steering in an open
body of water free of traffic. Never operate the boat when traffic is high or
when conditions are rough.
Here are some guidelines for performance operation. Read them, practice
them, and soon you will be operating your boat to its full capability.
Before Running
●
Keep the bottom clean and free of scum, barnacles and other growth.
Growth on the hull can slow the boat down considerably.
●
Prepare the boat. Be sure all gear is properly stowed and compartments are latched.
●
Weight distribution affects performance. Keep weight in the boat low
and evenly distributed. Remove unnecessary weight and keep on
shore.
●
The propellers should be of the proper pitch to turn the recommended
RPM rating for the engine and of the proper type for your average load
and individual requirements. Your dealer can help you select a performance propeller.
When Underway
! WARNING !
Keep one hand on the wheel and the other on the throttle at all
times. If the boat begins to operate in an unsafe way, pull back
on the throttle and trim the engines IN at the same time. Failure
to maintain control could result in severe injury or death.
●
Raise trim tabs above the boat bottom
●
Trim the engines out. Trimming the engine out at speed will cause the
boat to rise up. The boat will begin accelerating without adjusting the
throttles because less of the boat is dragging in the water. Steering will
become easier because the propellers have less torque.
! WARNING !
Do not trim the engine out too far or the boat may begin to
“porpoise” (bounce up and down). Porpoising lowers top speed
and fuel efficiency, and reduces control and visibility. Failure to
maintain control could result in severe injury or death.
6-5
RUNNING
6
●
Watch the tachometer to keep the engines within the full throttle
operating range. See the engine operator’s manual for the proper tachometer reading at full throttle.
Performance operation on smooth water is very stable, but quick
reactions and adjustments are needed to maintain control. Know
your limits and stay within them. Always keep one hand on the steering wheel and the other on the throttles; constant adjustments are
necessary for rapidly changing conditions. Depending on the speed,
keep watch well ahead so that you may have enough time to react.
PROPELLERS
The propeller converts the engine’s power into the thrust needed to
propel the boat. Care and selection of your propeller is very important to proper boat operation. Propellers are identified by two numbers, such as 13 x 19, and a material identification, such as aluminum or stainless steel. In the number sequence, the first number is
the diameter of the propeller and the second is the pitch.
Pitch is the angle of the blades expressed in the theoretical distance
a propeller travels in each revolution. In the above example, the pitch
is 19, or each revolution of the propeller pushes the boat 19 inches
through the water. A 19” pitch is considered “higher” pitched and a
15” propeller is considered “lower” pitched.
DIAMETER
KC-1580
Keep these guidelines in mind when selecting a propeller:
PITCH
(ONE REVOLUTION)
●
There are many different propeller designs for specific operating
characteristics, including the number of blades, relief holes, cupping, etc. Do not attempt to change propellers until after you
have a chance to determine your average load and individual
requirements. Your dealer is best qualified to help you select a
propeller.
●
Engine RPM must be within the recommended operating range.
Refer to the engine operator’s manual.
●
Higher propeller pitch reduces: RPM, acceleration, engine noise,
and usually improves fuel economy and top speed.
●
Lower propeller pitch increases: RPM, acceleration, engine
noise, reduces fuel economy and top speed.
KC-1581
! WARNING !
Before installing or removing the propeller:
●
Put the remote control in the “NEUTRAL” position.
●
Put the main switch in the “OFF” position and
remove
the key.
Failure to observe this warning could result in severe
injury.
6-6
RUNNING
6
A smaller pitch propeller should be selected for water skiing or for
heavy loads. A smaller pitch propeller will develop more thrust for
raising skiers quickly. When a skier has fallen, or a skier is not being
towed, it is important that the operator watch the tachometer to make
sure engine RPM does not continuously exceed the maximum full
throttle RPM range.
! WARNING !
DO NOT use your hand to hold the propeller when loosening the nut. You could be injured. Put a wood block
between the cavitation plate and the propeller blade to
prevent the propeller from turning.
Problems associated with propellers include ventilation, cavitation,
and blowout. These problems have similar symptoms and are best
diagnosed by an expert. If you think you have a propeller related
problem, consult your dealer.
6-7
RUNNING
6
6-8
CARE AND
MAINTENANCE
This section describes how to care and maintain your boat. It
includes information about maintaining electrical components, corrosion protection, and general maintenance.
ELECTRICAL
Battery
The boat is equipped with a 12-volt direct current (12 VDC) negative
ground electrical system. The positive (red) wire is hot and feeds current from the battery to the electrical systems. The negative (black)
wire is ground and completes the circuit back to the battery. Until the
engine is running at high idle or faster, all electrical power comes
from the main battery. Once the engine is started and running above
1200 rpm, electrical power is then provided by the engine alternator.
The alternator provides more power as engine speed is increased.
When the engine is operating, the alternator is charging the battery.
TERMINAL
POST
VENT CAP
VENT WELL
MAXIMUM
LIQUID
LEVEL
MINIMUM
LIQUID
LEVEL
Some models are equipped with a battery isolator that will automatically charge an accessory battery (such as a trolling motor battery)
when the engine is running. The isolator automatically isolates each
battery so that the lower charged battery will be charged first and the
full battery cannot discharge to the drained battery. A battery selector
switch may also be included for flexibility of use such as selecting
either battery for starting, paralleling batteries, etc. Many different
battery setups can be found; refer to Fish/Ski Features for more information.
! WARNING !
PLATES
KC-1620
ON
Batteries contain sulfuric acid which can cause severe
burns. Wear protective clothing to avoid acid contact
with skin, eyes, etc. Failure to observe this warning
could result in severe injury.
OFF
Be sure to turn OFF battery charger and battery switch before servicing batteries. Check the battery frequently for signs of corrosion. If
corrosion is evident, clean terminal posts with a baking soda and
water solution and a wire brush. Before cleaning, remove the vent
caps and seal the vent wells with corks to prevent the solution from
getting inside the battery. Also, check the fluid levels in the cells.
Usually, a level approximately 1/4 to 1/2 inch above the plates is sufficient. If needed, fill with distilled water; do not overfill! Some batteries
are sealed, and cannot be filled.
TYPICAL
BATTERY SWITCH
KC-0704
7-1
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Batteries are perishable products and will self-discharge. If you operate your boat sparingly, you may want to charge your battery occasionally (if not equipped with system battery charger). To recharge,
remove the battery from the boat and remove the battery caps (when
applicable). Recharge the battery according to the directions
enclosed with your battery charger. When installing the battery in the
boat, make sure the battery is secured in the battery box.
! WARNING !
Batteries produce explosive hydrogen gas. Never
attempt starting your engine with jumper cables under
any circumstances. Keep all sparks, flames and smoking
materials away from batteries. Risk of spark at the battery post igniting gasoline or hydrogen fumes is too
great. Always wear eye protection when near batteries
and have adequate ventilation when charging. An explosion can cause blindness or other serious injuries.
Gelled Electrolyte Batteries
KC-1620A
Batteries using gelled electrolyte (Gel-Cell) technology are being
used more frequently in the marine industry. Gelled electrolyte batteries offer reliable, maintenance free power. Gell-Cells are pressurized during manufacture and should never be opened. Gell-Cell batteries are designed for long life and have up to three times the cycle
life of a traditional wet cell battery. Because of their low self-discharge,gelled electrolyte batteries are ready for operation over
extended storage periods up to two years. Improper charging of a
gelled electrolyte battery will cause damage and shorten its life.
Follow the charging directions included with the battery and use only
a good constant potential, voltage-regulated, charger.
Circuit Breakers and Fuses
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Typical ATC Series
All electrical circuits are protected from overload by the use of fuses
or circuit breakers. In the event of an overload or short circuit, the
fuse will blow or circuit breaker will trip. If a circuit continuously overloads under normal operating conditions, have your boat inspected
by the dealer immediately.
! WARNING !
Never exceed the recommended fuse sizes or bypass
the fuse safeguard. Always install the proper (type and
rating) fuses whenever replacing or changing fuses.
Continuous fuse/breaker failures indicate a severe problem that requires immediate attention. Failure to install
correct fuse may result in damage to the electrical system or severe personal injury.
Fuse Block
Some boat models have each individual circuit protected with a circuit breaker located next to the switch. To reset a tripped circuit
breaker, switch OFF the circuit, wait about one minute for the breaker
to cool, push the breaker button fully, and switch ON the circuit.
7-2
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
! CAUTION
The electrical system is designed to protect you from
short circuits and overload. Any modifications to the
system, such as adding electrical accessories, should be
done by a qualified technician.
TYPICAL IN-LINE FUSE HOLDER
(TWIST AND PULL TO OPEN)
Some installed accessories, such as the stereo, have an additional
fuse located in the positive lead of the stereo. Some in-line fuse holders can be found near the battery.
FUEL SYSTEM
Fuel vents are normally located in the hull or transom below and in
the same general area as the fuel fills. Check to see that the fuel fill
and vent lines are free of obstructions and kinks. Be sure to check
fuel filter periodically and clean as needed.
Fuel lines, vent hoses, and drain hoses should be checked frequently
for leaks. Some models are equipped with removable inspection
plates for fuel system component inspection. If a leak occurs around
the fitting, then tightening of the hose clamps may be all that is necessary. However, if the leak continues, replace the hose immediately
to prevent a build-up of fluids or gases. Surface cracking on the hose
indicates wear, and replacement is recommended. Use fuel system
parts certified for marine use only; do not substitute automotive parts
in marine application.
STEERING SYSTEM
The steering system is the primary link for engine control and must
be inspected and maintained regularly. The hardware at both the
helm and engine end of the steering cable must be checked frequently for tightness. Refer to the engine operator’s manual for the
appropriate torques.
The steering bar must be lubricated monthly to ensure smooth operation. Turn the steering wheel to a full starboard turn to expose the
bar. Use a high quality waterproof marine grease and fully coat the
bar. Apply 2 - 4 shots of grease to fittings, if equipped. Turn the
steering wheel back and forth to work the grease in.
Hydraulic and power-assisted systems must also be inspected. Make
sure hydraulic hoses are tight and leak-free. Cylinder seals should be
checked for dampness indicating leakage. Check the fluid reservoir
monthly and top-off if necessary. Consult the steering system manufacturer’s manual for more information.
KC-1640
STEERING CABLE
ROTARY DRIVE
ASSEMBLY
STEERING BAR
SPENT
TRAVEL
TUBE
KCC 1884
RACK & PINION
DRIVE ASSEMBLY
STEERING BAR
STEERING CABLE
KCC 1886
INSPECT CONNECTIONS
AT PUMP
HELM PUMP RESERVOIR
CHECK FILL PLUG
and FLUID LEVEL
INSPECT CYLINDER
SEALS
CORROSION PROTECTION
Galvanic Corrosion
Galvanic corrosion (electrolysis), to the boater, is the break-up of
metals due to the effects of electrolytic action. When two dissimilar
metals are immersed in a conductive fluid (salt water), an electric
current is produced, much like a battery. As the current flows, it takes
with it tiny bits of the softer metal. If not stopped, a great deal of damage could occur.
INSPECT
HARDWARE
INSPECT FITTINGS AT CYLINDER
KCC 1888R2
7-3
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
If you operate in salt, polluted, or brackish waters, your boat should
be equipped with a transom mounted zinc anode to prevent damage
to those metal parts coming in contact with the water. The zinc is, by
design, self-sacrificing. It is slowly eroded away by electrolytic action
and requires periodic inspection for deterioration. If the zinc shows
extreme erosion, it must be replaced to continue protection, or damage to other metal parts may result.
Most engines are equipped with one or more zinc anodes which must
also be inspected regularly for deterioration. Some boat models may
be equipped with an electronic cathode system. This system emits a
low current electrical charge into the water close to the metal components. This charge cancels the effect of electrolysis.
! CAUTION
Never paint or coat zinc anodes or cathodes with any
substance. Once covered, they do not provide protection
from galvanic corrosion. Replace anodes if they have
deteriorated 50% or more.
Salt Water Corrosion
The entire boat should be rinsed with fresh water and washed immediately after use in salt water. If the boat is used primarily in salt water,
wax the hull monthly and apply corrosion inhibitor to all hardware.
See your dealer for products suitable for the marine salt water environment. Fresh water internal flushing is recommended when used in
salt, polluted, or brackish waters. Flush the entire engine cooling system with fresh water for at least 5 minutes after use in these waters.
See your dealer for appropriate flushing devices.
GENERAL MAINTENANCE
Marine Growth
If accelerated marine growth is a problem in your area, an anti-fouling
bottom paint may be necessary to slow growth and prevent gelcoat
damage. Before selecting a bottom paint, talk with other boaters and
your dealer to determine which product works best in your area. Many
local variables can affect the selection of paint. Be sure to follow the
paint manufacturer’s directions exactly.
Cleaning
Periodic cleaning is the best way to keep your boat looking new.
Regular washing and waxing keep dirt and scum from building up and
deteriorating the finish. Keeping your boat in “show room” condition
means greater personal satisfaction and higher resale value. Special
cleaning products are available from your dealer to remove mildew.
7-4
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Hull
Routine, periodic maintenance is the only practical way to keep the
surface of your boat looking shiny and new. Boats left outdoors will
gradually deteriorate from exposure to sunlight, water, dust and
chemicals in the air. Outdoor exposure may cause your boat’s surface to show a variety of changes, including:
●
Chalking (fine, powdery whiteness on the surface)
●
Fading (gradual loss of color)
●
Yellowing
●
Loss of gloss
Darker colors tend to exhibit these changes more rapidly than light
colors because they absorb more of the sun’s rays (ultraviolet and
infrared).
Keep your boat covered when not in use. Use heavy duck or canvas
(tarpaulin). DO NOT use sheet-plastic or other nonporous materials
which can trap moisture between the cover and the boat’s surface.
When washing the boat, be sure to use a mild detergent and warm
water solution. DO NOT use abrasive cleaners, solvents, ammonia
or chlorine as these will damage the gelcoat surface. Under extreme
conditions, special cleaners may be used to remove marine growth,
such as scum or algae, from the hull; see your dealer.
Waxing the entire gelcoat surface at least twice a season is recommended for all climates. Use of a specially formulated marine gelcoat
wax will prevent color fade and soil and scum adhesion. If the gelcoat has chalked or faded from lack of proper maintenance, buffing
may be necessary to bring back the shiny appearance. Hand buffing
with #7 rubbing compound or power buffing with glazing compound
#1 will quickly restore the surface.
Bottom Maintenance
The bottom of your boat must be kept clean! Any build-up of marine
life from water will create drag and affect the boat’s performance and
efficiency. Never use wire brushes or scouring pads on the bottom of
your boat, as this can cause small scratches that actually trap dirt.
Upholstery
Regular washing with mild detergent and warm water or automotive
vinyl cleaners is sufficient to keep the cushions, canopy top, and vinyl
coverings in good condition. Keep the cushions from becoming
soaked and dry off thoroughly after washing to prevent mildew accumulation after the boat is covered. Prop the cushions up in the boat
when covered to allow air circulation and spray with mildew repellent.
Lubricate canopy top snaps with petroleum jelly.
7-5
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
! CAUTION
Certain automotive, household and industrial cleaners can
cause further damage and discoloration. Solvents and dry
cleaning fluids, or products that contain dyes such as waxes,
should be used with caution. Whenever cleaning stubborn
stains, be sure to test the treatment in an unseen area first.
The following stain treatments should be used with discretion. Between steps, be sure to rinse thoroughly with plenty
of clean water and allow to dry.
Steps
Stain
Ballpoint Ink*
Chewing Gum
Coffee, Tea or Chocolate
Crayon
Eyeshadow
Grease
Ketchup
Latex Paint
Lipstick
Mildew or Wet Leaves*
Motor Oil
Paint, Oil Base (Dried)
Paint, Oil Base (Fresh)
Permanent Marker*
Shoe Polish*
Soil
Spray Paint
Suntan Lotion
Tar/Asphalt
Yellow Mustard
1
2
3
A
D
B
D
B
D
A
A
A
C
B
D
D
B
D
A
B
A
D
A
B
A
E
B
B
B
B
B
B
A
A
B
C
B
B
E
B
A
B
E
E
B
B
E
E
E
E
B
C
*These products contain certain dyes that stain permanently.
Treatment
A. Medium soft brush-warm soapy water.
B. Household spray cleaner (Fantastic).
C. One (1) tablespoon bleach to one (1) quart water.
D. Wipe or scrape off excess. (Chill gum with ice.)
E. Follow instructions of staining agent manufacturer.
Carpet
Occasional washing with mild detergent and warm water or household
carpet cleaners will keep the carpet clean. Thoroughly hose the detergent out of the carpet and into the bilge. This is usually the best time to
clean the bilge. Let the carpet dry in the sun to prevent any mildew or
odor caused by moisture.
7-6
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Windshield
A clean windshield is important. The windshield requires special
cleaning to prevent scratches to the surface. Use a mild soap solution and damp cloth only. Harsh detergents, solvents, chemicals or
dry cloths will scratch the surface.
Bilge
Your bilge accumulates oil and greasy dirt over a period of time
and should be cleaned out. Usually, ordinary soap and water does
not remove the accumulation, and something stronger is necessary. Consult your dealer for recommendations on special bilge
cleaning products.
Teak
Teak does not require refinishing, but should be cleaned occasionally with a teak cleaner, which can usually be found at a marine supply
store. The best way to keep teak in top condition is to oil it regularly
with teak oil, at least twice a year. Follow manufacturer’s instructions
and warnings carefully as some cleaners or oils may damage gelcoat, vinyl or aluminum. Avoid rust-producing steel wool pads when
cleaning. Scotchbrite or similar nonmetallic pads are recommended.
! CAUTION
Teak sealers can be harmful to other materials. Make
sure you thoroughly remove any of this oil that has
come in contact with the vinyls, gelcoats, etc. Teak
should not be varnished as the natural oils will cause
poor adhesion.
Interior Wood
Most interior wood is teak. If a scratch develops, it can be repaired
easily using a fine grade sandpaper (400 to 1000 grit). Use a tack
cloth to clean sanding residue, and then apply a small amount of
lemon oil. Let dry and wipe with a soft cloth.
Plexiglass
Plexiglass is susceptible to scratching. When cleaning, always apply
clean, lukewarm water and wipe with a soft, lint-free cloth. DO NOT
use the following:
●
Abrasive cleaners
●
Solvents
●
Glass cleaning solutions
●
Acetone, benzene, gasoline
●
Dry cleaning fluids
●
Alcohol or carbon tetrachloride
7-7
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Window Channels
A nylon pile is used in sliding window channels. NEVER use any
products that contain bleaching solutions in this area. Use only mild
detergent and water solution for cleaning. If windows stick, spray the
channels with silicone spray while working the window back and
forth.
Interior Fabric
Clean interior fabrics with dry cleaning fluid approved for use with
soft fabrics. Follow the label instructions carefully. Be sure to test
cleaners in an unseen area first.
! CAUTION
Dry cleaners require adequate ventilation during use.
Open all hatches and windows before application.
Use a soft cleanser to clean marks or stains on wallpaper; they will
usually come off with soap and water. Lightly rub the mark or stain
with a sponge or soft cloth and dry with a clean cloth.
Canvas
In most cases, boat canvas is subjected to more abuse than any
other item on the boat. Canvas must be regularly maintained for long
life and top performance.
Moisture, dirt and chemicals from industrial fallout, heat, ultraviolet
rays and salt water can all contribute to the deterioration of canvas.
These elements can cause serious damage if left unchecked. The
following guidelines should help keep your canvas in good condition
for years to come.
7-8
●
The convertible top is not designed to withstand long periods of
time exposed to the elements as a protective cover at dock side
or when your boat is in storage. A full, properly fitted, light colored mooring cover should be used for these purposes.
●
If canvas gets wet during use, remove side curtains and open
windshield so seams can dry out. The air circulation will allow all
canvas to dry and prevent the growth of mildew. Never store
folded or rolled up damp canvas.
●
Occasionally set up all canvas and curtains and hose down with
fresh water to remove accumulated soot and dirt. Sweep or
brush the underside of the canvas to prevent the accumulation
of dirt and mildew.
●
Wet canvas must be allowed to dry thoroughly before storage.
DO NOT allow canvas to dry loose since shrinkage can occur.
Erect all canvas fully on the boat when drying.
●
Do not allow the canvas to be exposed to direct sunlight for long
periods of time.
●
Use care when handling clear vinyl curtains and windows to prevent scratching.
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
●
Do not use cleaners on clear vinyl curtains and windows. Clean
with plenty of clean water and a soft, clean cloth.
●
Do not fold canvas parts. Loosely roll canvas to prevent damage.
●
Do not store canvas in poly bags. Canvas should be kept in a
well ventilated compartment.
●
The outer canvas surfaces can be cleaned with a soft scrub
brush and either automotive convertible top cleaners or household cleaners suitable for use on vinyl surfaces. The underside
of the canvas may be periodically sprayed with a spray disinfectant to prevent the growth of mildew.
●
Do not store or dock your boat under trees. Tree sap is very corrosive to canvas and can also be harmful to gelcoat and vinyl interiors.
●
Adjust top bows to eliminate pockets in which rain water can accumulate. The weight of this accumulated water can collapse the top
or bag the canvas.
●
Snaps and zippers should be regularly lubricated. Vaseline, silicone spray, or paraffin are some of the lubricants that are effective. Zippers should never be forced.
●
Never trailer your boat with the convertible top in the mounted
position. All canvas should be dismantled, rolled, and securely
stored while trailering your boat to prevent wind damage.
Stainless Steel and Chrome
Stainless steel and chrome plated parts are not totally resistant to
corrosion. Occasional cleaning and polishing with a marine chrome
and stainless polish will maintain and extend the useful life. In salt
water areas, rinse all hardware with fresh water and apply a light
coating of corrosion inhibitor oil to enhance appearance. Check hardware tightness at least once a season.
WATER
OUTLET
Bilge Pump(s)
Periodically check the bilge pump(s) inlet
screens for debris. Foreign materials can clog
the screen or become lodged in the bilge
pump impeller, which can cause the pump to
malfunction. Inspect all clamps and hoses for
tightness on a regular basis.
PUMP
SCREEN
KC-2020
Toilet
Basic maintenance on the toilet involves the following:
●
Use a nonabrasive cleaner for keeping the bowl clean.
●
A light coating of a general purpose marine lubricant on the
pump rods and slides will reduce friction of moving parts.
●
Use recommended deodorant and lubricant for the internal parts
of the head.
7-9
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Detectors
The gas vapor detector and Carbon Monoxide (CO) detector require
little maintenance. Consult the owner’s manual for periodic testing
procedures.
Trim Tabs
Inspect the trim tab pump periodically for fluid level. Fill with recommended fluid until full (if needed). Also inspect trim tabs for loose fasteners, leaking cylinders, and harness connections.
Alcohol Stoves
Carefully read and follow manufacturer’s operating instructions supplied with your stove, and observe the following:
KC-2260
7-10
●
Use only denatured alcohol labeled specifically for marine use.
●
Do not operate the stove while underway.
●
Do not fill stove near an open flame or hot object.
●
All alcohol spilled should be wiped up prior to lighting the stove.
TROUBLESHOOTING
The following chart will assist you in finding and correcting minor mechanical and electrical problems. If an engine problem is indicated, consult
your engine owner’s manual.
Some problems may require specialized skill and tools to correct them;
see your dealer.
TROUBLE CHECK CHART
Symptom
Engine will not crank
Engine cranks
but will not start
Poor boat
performance
Possible Cause
Remedy
●
Emergency safety switch not connected
●
Connect Switch
●
Throttle/shift control in gear
●
Place control in neutral
●
Main circuit breaker open
●
Reset breakers
●
Battery terminals corroded
●
Clean terminals and wiring
●
Weak battery
●
Charge/replace battery
●
Battery switch in OFF position
●
Place switch ON
●
Faulty ignition switch
●
Replace switch
●
Engine problem
●
See your dealer
●
No fuel in tank
●
Fill fuel tank
●
Fuel filter clogged
●
Clean/replace filter
●
Fuel valves closed
●
Open fuel valve(s)
●
Contaminated fuel
●
Replace fuel - see your
dealer
●
Engine problem
●
See your dealer
●
Contaminated fuel
●
Replace fuel - see your
dealer
●
Uneven load distribution
●
Adjust load/trim tabs
●
Engine trim wrong
●
Adjust engine trim
8-1
TROUBLESHOOTING
Symptom
Poor boat
performance (cont.)
Poor gas mileage
Throttle/shifting
problems
Excessive vibration
Electrical problems
No power
to AC outlets
Sink/shower
does not operate
Toilet will not flush
Toilet will not empty
8-2
Possible Cause
Remedy
●
Improper propeller selection
●
Change propeller
●
Damaged or obstructed propeller
●
Check/change propeller
●
Excessive water in bilge
●
Drain bilge
●
Engine problem
●
See your dealer
●
Engine trim wrong
●
Adjust engine trim
●
Marine growth on hull
●
Clean hull
●
Engine problem
●
See your dealer
●
Corroded cable
●
Clean/lubricate cable
●
Kink in cable
●
Replace cable - see your
dealer
●
Engine problem
●
See your dealer
●
Damaged or obstructed propeller
●
Check/change propeller
●
Engine problem
●
See your dealer
●
Blown fuse or open circuit
●
Replace fuse/repair open
circuit
●
Loose wiring connections
●
Clean and tighten wiring
●
Defective switch or gauge
●
Replace switch or gauge
●
Defective component
●
See your dealer
●
Ground fault circuit interrupter tripped
●
Reset GFIC
●
Loose shore power cord
●
Turn shore power OFF and
reconnect cord
●
AC breaker
●
Reset breaker
●
Fresh water pump circuit breaker is OFF
●
Turn breaker ON
●
Fresh water tank is empty
●
Fill tank
●
Fresh water pump is defective
●
See your dealer
●
Toilet circuit breaker is OFF
●
Turn breaker ON
●
Weak or discharged battery
●
Charge/change battery
●
Toilet seacock closed
●
Open seacock
●
Discharge valve closed
●
Open valve
●
Line to holding tank blocked
●
See your dealer
STORAGE
Storage or winter lay-up requires special preparation to prevent damage
to the boat. Perform all annual maintenance at this time.
Without proper preparation, storage for long periods of time may cause
internal parts of the engine and drive unit to rust because of lack of lubrication. Or, if the boat is stored in below freezing temperatures, water inside the
bilge or cooling system may freeze causing damage. Damage to the boat
due to improper storage will not be covered by the warranty. The following
procedures should help prevent damage to your boat.
While The Boat Is Still In The Water
1. Fill fuel tank and add the proper amount of fuel stabilizer and conditioner according to the manufacturer’s recommendations.
2. Operate boat for at least 15 minutes to be sure that treated fuel has
reached engine.
Notice
If the boat is to be stored for more than 5 months, stored in a
high moisture (humidity) environment, in temperature
extremes, or stored outdoors, “fog” the engine with a rust
preventative fogging oil according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. See your dealer.
When The Boat Is Removed From The Water
Notice
Remove the bilge drain plug immediately after taking the boat
out of the water. After washing, raise the bow of the boat high
to allow as much water as possible to drain while performing
other storage preparations.
●
Flush the engine cooling system with clean water. DO NOT exceed
1500 rpm when flushing.
●
Perform all scheduled maintenance. For stern drives, tuning the engine
and changing the oil and fuel filters is especially important.
●
Thoroughly clean the hull, deck and interior of the boat as soon as it is
removed from the water. Cleaning at this time is easier because the
marine growth is still wet. Be sure to allow for a couple of days of air
drying to prevent mildew due to trapped moisture.
9-1
STORAGE
●
Apply a coat of wax to the entire surface of the boat and rust inhibitor
on all metal parts.
●
Clean all traces of dirt, oil, grime, and grease from the engine and
bilge. Touch-up areas of engine where paint has been removed.
●
Prepare the engine for storage according to the instructions contained
in the engine owner’s manual.
●
Store the bilge drain plug in a plastic bag and tape it to the throttle
control lever so that it is easily found for reactivation.
●
Remove the batteries from the boat. Clean, fully charge and store the
batteries in an area not subject to freezing temperatures. Never store
batteries close to heat, spark, or flame producing devices.
●
Open all faucets and allow fresh water pump to empty water tank and
intake lines. Run the pump dry for one or two minutes before turning it
off.
●
Open all drains, including the one on the water heater (if equipped).
●
Empty holding tank for sanitary system, and flush with fresh water.
●
Close inlet seacock. Remove inlet hose from pump housing and temporarily attach a short hose to the inlet. Pour one quart of nontoxic
anti-freeze into container. With the open end of the temporary hose in
the container, pump the head until the colored fluid runs down the rim
of the bowl.
●
Close outlet seacock.
●
Remove strainer and seacock drain plugs to prevent damage from
freezing. Close all seacocks.
●
The boat bottom must be properly supported to prevent damage.
If stored on a trailer:
9-2
●
Repack trailer wheel bearings with water resistant wheel bearing
grease. If the trailer is equipped with bearing protectors, squirt grease
into hubs with a grease gun.
●
Park trailer and boat in a protected area. It is best to store boat on cradle. If the rig is left outside, install a boat cover. See your dealer.
●
Loosen tie-downs and winch line but be sure the boat is resting properly on hull supports.
●
Jack up trailer and place blocks under trailer frame to relieve weight on
trailer tires and springs.
●
Refer to engine and boat accessory manuals for further storage
instructions.
STORAGE
Reactivating The Boat After Storage
●
Charge and install batteries in boat.
●
Check engine and bilge for signs of nesting animals; clean as necessary.
●
Check entire engine for cracks and leaks caused by freeze damage.
●
Check hose condition and all hose clamps for tightness.
●
Install bilge drain plug.
●
Open and close all seacocks to check operation. Install all drain plugs
in strainers and seacocks.
●
Open all faucets and fill fresh water holding tank with about 20 gallons
of water. Turn fresh water pump on to allow water to flow through
faucets before closing them. Pump will run until operating pressure is
reached. Fill fresh water tank until full.
●
Perform daily maintenance. If not performed during lay-up, perform
annual maintenance.
●
If the boat is equipped with the optional fresh water cooling system
(stern drive only) and was drained for storage, fill the system with fresh
coolant solution.
●
Check and lubricate steering system.
●
Remove blocks from under trailer frame.
●
Tighten tie-downs and trailer winch line.
●
Check tire pressure and lug nuts on trailer.
●
Take the boat to the water and start it. It may take a minute of cranking
to allow the fuel system to prime. Allow a one minute cool down period
for every 15 seconds of cranking. When the engine starts, keep a close
watch over the gauge readings and check for leakage and abnormal
noises. Keep speeds low for the first 15 minutes until the engine has
reached normal operating temperature.
●
Refer to engine and boat accessory manuals for further reactivation
instructions.
9-3
STORAGE
9-4
TRAILERING
This section provides information about trailering. It describes the
hitch and safety chains, backing your trailer, preparing to launch,
launching, and loading your trailer. Also included is a trailering
checklist.
! WARNING !
●
The trailer must be matched for the boat’s weight and
hull.
●
The towing vehicle must have the capability of
pulling the load. Pulling a load that exceeds the
vehicle’s towing capacity may cause loss of control.
Notice
Check the certification label on the left forward side of
your trailer. The label is required to show the Gross
Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR), which is the load carrying capacity plus the weight of the trailer itself. Be sure
that the total weight of your boat, engine, gear, and
trailer do not exceed the GVWR.
Trailer laws on things such as lighting, registration, trailer brakes,
gross vehicle weight, etc., vary widely from state to state. Contact
your state Dept. of Motor Vehicles (and that of other states through
which you may be traveling) for laws you must be in compliance.
CLASSIFICATIONS
Trailers are separated into four classes based on gross vehicle
weight (GVW). Gross vehicle weight is equal the trailers weight
plus maximum load it may carry at 60 MPH.
● Class One
GVW under 2000 lbs.
● Class Two
GVW over 2000 under 3500 lbs.
● Class Three
GVW over 3500 under 5000 lbs.
● Class Four
GVW over 5000 lbs.
LATCH
TRAILER COUPLER
HITCH PIN
HOLE
PROPER SIZE
TOW BALL
HITCH PIN
CLAMP
TOWING VEHICLE
HITCH
KC-1651A
KC-1651A
10-1
TRAILERING
TRAILER COMPONENTS
Hitch
Hitches are divided into classes that specify the gross trailer weight
(GTW) and maximum tongue weight for each class. Always use a
hitch with the same class number as the trailer, or greater.
Most boat trailers connect to a ball hitch that is bolted or welded to
the towing vehicle. Special heavy-duty equalizing hitches are necessary for trailer tongue weights of 350 pounds or greater.
KC-1700A
MAXIMUM TONGUE WEIGHT
CRISSCROSS SAFETY
CHAINS
5000
TOW
VEHICLE
4500
LOADED
TRAILER
WEIGHT
(POUNDS)
4000
3500
3000
2500
2000
100
TRAILER
200
300
TONGUE WEIGHT (POUNDS)
400
KC-1446
The trailer hitch coupler must match the size of the hitch ball. Never
use a hitch ball that does not match the trailer coupler. The correct
ball diameter is marked on the trailer coupler.
BOTTOM VIEW OF HITCH
COUPLING
KC-1691A
Safety Chains
Safety chains on your boat trailer provide added insurance that it
will not become completely detached from the towing vehicle when
underway.
Crisscross the chains under the trailer tongue to prevent the tongue
from dropping to the road if the trailer separates from the hitch ball.
Rig the chains as tight as possible with just enough slack to permit
tight turns.
Make sure the proper chains are correctly attached between the
towing vehicle and trailer before and during each trip.
Trailer Jack
KC-5042
Manufacturers recommend using the jack (if equipped) to lift the coupling of a loaded trailer from the hitch ball and for moving the trailer
about when it is disconnected from the towing vehicle. The trailer
jack should be lowered to a minimum position and tilted horizontally
before towing the trailer.
Like any mechanical assembly, a jack requires maintenance to function properly over a long period of time. The drive gear and the rack
and pinion should be greased. The caster and wheel bearing should
be oiled frequently.
Tie-Downs
KC-5041
10-2
Ensuring that your boat is held securely in place on the trailer’s hull support, especially when underway, is extremely important. If it is not firmly
and properly secured, your boat can be damaged as it bounces against
the hull supports.
TRAILERING
Trailer Brakes
In some states, any trailer with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of
1,500 pounds or more is required to have brakes. Usually, this brake is
a self-contained, hydraulic surge system, with either a drum or disk
brake. Some trailer brake systems are electrically actuated and require
a control box inside the towing vehicle. Consult your trailer manufacturer’s owner’s manual for more information on operation, adjustments
and maintenance.
BRAKE FLUID
RESERVOIR
FILLER CAP
HAND WHEEL
WHEEL LOCK
SURGE BRAKE
CABLE
KC-1680
TRAILERING CHECKLIST
Below is a checklist to follow when trailering your boat:
●
Consult your state laws as to brake and axle load requirements.
Check brakes for proper operation and fluid level prior to departure
on each trip.
●
Check springs and undercarriage for loose parts.
●
Check tires for proper inflation. Under-inflated tires heat up rapidly
and tire damage or failure is likely to occur.
●
Wheel bearings and lug nuts should be checked before each trip.
WINCH
LINE
WINCH
STAND
BOW
TIE-DOWN
FRAME
CROSSMEMBER
KC-1711
10-3
TRAILERING
TRAILER PATH
KC-1736
●
Your boat should be fastened to the trailer by a line from the
bow eye to the winch line PLUS a bow tie-down to the winch
stand or trailer tongue. The stern of your boat should be tied
down to the trailer from the stern eyes.
●
Check to be sure the taillights and turning signals work prior to
towing.
●
Convertible tops are not designed to stay on boats at highway
speeds. Before towing, take down the convertible top, side curtains, and back cover.
●
Carry a spare tire for both your trailer and your towing vehicle
along with sufficient tools to change them.
●
Consult the engine operator’s manual for engine related trailering precautions.
●
On extended trips, carry spare wheel bearings, seals, and
races.
●
While traveling, check the wheel hubs every time you stop for
gas or refreshments. If the hub feels abnormally hot, the bearing should be inspected before continuing your trip.
●
When rounding turns on highways or streets, do not cut corners.
Also, go slow over railroad tracks.
●
Before backing your trailer into water, disconnect the light plug
from the towing vehicle to reduce the likelihood of blowing out
lights when they become submerged.
BACKING UP TRAILERS
If you have never
BACKING TO RIGHT
towed a trailer before,
take the time to practice backing your trailer
BACKING TO LEFT
before using it for the
first time. Follow these
guidelines when
backing:
FOLLOWING THRU TURN
10-4
●
Back slowly and
make small steering
adjustments.
●
Turn the car wheels in
the opposite direction you want the trailer to go.
●
After the trailer begins moving, turn the car to follow it.
●
Have a second person assist you with hand signals.
KC-1766
TRAILERING
LAUNCHING
Before launching your boat, stay to one side and watch a couple of
launchings to notice any problems on the ramp and the effects of
the wind and current on launching. It is a common courtesy to prepare the boat for launching away from the ramp especially during
busy periods. Perform the pre-launch sequence as follows:
1. Remove the boat cover, if equipped.
2. Check that bilge drain plug is in place.
3. Remove any additional trailering tie-downs from the boat.
4. Attach the bow and stern docking lines and fenders if necessary.
5. Disconnect the trailer lights from the car.
Launching with two people is recommended. Since all launches are
different from each other in some way, the following procedure must
be modified to fit the launch in use:
1. Back the boat down the ramp until the wheels are at least
halfway submerged. Keep the trailer/car combination as straight
as possible and at 90 degrees to the shore line.
2. Loosen and detach the bow strap from the bow eye.
3. Back the boat further down until the top of the fenders are about
2” above the water.
4. Board the boat and start it. If possible, remain on the trailer until
the engine has warmed-up.
LOADING
Loading, like launching, is best done with two people:
1. Back the trailer into the water until the top of the fenders are
about 3” above the water. Keep the trailer/car combination as
straight as possible and, if possible, at 90 degrees to the shoreline. Set the parking brake securely.
2. Approach the trailer in a straight line from at least 5’ out. Use
“bursts” of propeller thrust to move towards the trailer at the
slowest steerable speed. Guide the boat onto the support bunks.
3. Check to see that the boat is centered on the support rails and is
headed in a straight line for the bow stop (bumper board).
! WARNING !
Excessive throttle can cause the boat to travel over the
bumper board causing extensive damage to the boat,
trailer, and car and could cause severe personal injury.
4. Using a very light touch on the throttle, ease the boat forward
until the bow comes to rest against the bow stop (bumper
board).
10-5
TRAILERING
! CAUTION
The winch bow strap is merely a means of securing the
boat to the trailer and is not intended to winch or pull the
boat onto the trailer.
5. Attach and tighten the winch bow strap.
6. Pull the trailer up the ramp and attach any additional tie-downs
and connect the trailer light harness.
7. Pull drain plug.
8. Perform end of day shut down procedures.
SLINGING/LIFTING
LIFT RINGS
USE CHAFE
PROTECTION
SPREADER
BAR
SLINGS
SPREADER
BAR
KC-1866
If the boat is to be removed from the water without a trailer, follow
these guidelines:
10-6
●
Never attach lifting cables to cleats, ski tow eyes or hand rails.
Attach cables only to the lifting eyes in the transom and bow.
●
Cover lifting cables with rubber hose or other protectors to prevent damage to the finish.
●
Attach guide lines to the bow and stern to control movement.
●
Use spreader bars and keep lifting pressure vertical to prevent
side load damage.
●
Keep the bow slightly higher than the stern to prevent engine
damage.
SHIP
SYSTEMS
Your boat is equipped with several systems for operation. This section
describes the basic operational principles for the major systems. The procedures and illustrations in this section are typical and are intended to be representative of the system on your boat. Be sure to consult all system information provided with your boat before operation.
ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
Some boats are equipped with two electrical systems; a battery powered
direct current (DC) system, and a generator or shore powered alternating
current (AC) system. These systems have a load center panel which serves
as the main distribution panel.
The DC system supplies electricity to all of the boat’s electrical circuits
(lights, pumps, blowers, ignition, etc.)
The AC system supplies power to the electrical outlets, and to AC powered
systems (electric stove, water heater, microwave, refrigerator, etc.) when the
boat is moored to dock or slip.
DC Electrical System
! WARNING !
Considerable care has been taken to design a safe electrical
system to protect you from hazardous shocks. Any modifications to the system should always be done by a qualified technician to protect you from hazardous shock.
Your boat has a 12 volt negative ground DC system. The positive wire is hot,
and feeds current from the batteries to the various 12 volt systems, and the
negative wire is the ground.
Many boats are equipped with three batteries. Two batteries (cranking batteries) are used only to start the engine(s). The third battery is an auxiliary
battery that provides power to all of the other DC electrical circuits via the
master battery switch.
While the engines are running, all batteries are charged by the engine alternator(s), and the rate of charge is controlled by an internal voltage regulator.
11-1
SHIP SYSTEMS
The electrical system is grounded by grounding the cranking batteries to
the engine(s) and the auxiliary battery to the cranking batteries. The
engine(s) are connected by ground cable to provide added assurance that
a proper ground is being achieved. The engine(s) are then grounded to a
bonding strip located in the engine compartment.
The auxiliary battery is separated from the cranking batteries by an electronic solid state isolator. When the engines and ignition switches are
“OFF”, the isolator prevents accessory loads from depleting the cranking
batteries. When the batteries are being charged by the alternator(s), the
isolator automatically combines and isolates the alternator output and distributes the charge among the batteries according to individual need.
DC Master Panel
A typical DC master panel may consist of a voltmeter, a battery test switch,
a series of switch type and resettable circuit breakers, and the master
breaker switch.
Typical DC Control Panel
DC CONTROL
BATTERY
TEST
BANK
1 2
OFF
3
MASTER
BREAKER
AUTO BILGE PUMP
FWD
AFT
IGNITION
STBD
PORT
(single)
HEAD
FRESH
WATER
PUMP
REFRIG
CABIN LIGHTS
FWD
AFT
BILGE COCKPIT
LIGHTS LIGHTS
ACC
ACC
ACC
CARBON
MONOXIDE
DETECTOR
DC VOLTS
TYPICAL DC CONTROL PANEL
KC-1633
The meter allows you to check on the condition of the batteries. With master breaker switch in the “OFF” position, turn battery test switch to:
●
“1” to check the starboard engine cranking battery,
●
“2” to check the port engine cranking battery,
●
“3” to check the auxiliary battery, and
●
“OFF” to disable meter and test circuit.
! CAUTION
Never reset a breaker which has been automatically tripped
without first detecting and correcting the cause of the problem.
The switch type circuit breakers’ function is twofold: they allow you to manually enable or interrupt a circuit by moving the switch on or off, and they
protect the system receiving the DC current (power) by automatically opening the circuit if a short or overload condition occurs.
The resettable circuit breakers protect the system receiving DC power by
automatically opening the circuit if a short or overload occurs.
11-2
SHIP SYSTEMS
AC Electrical System
Models equipped with shore power AC systems are rated for 125
volts at 60 cycles. Source current can be provided from a 110 volt, 60
cycle shore power station.
The AC system in your boat is much like the system in your home.
The hot wire (usually black) sends current to the AC system. The
neutral wire (always white) sends current back to the source, and the
ground wire (always green) grounds all systems to a common
ground. In your boat the common ground is the copper bonding strip
located in the engine compartment.
! WARNING !
Considerable care has been taken to design a safe electrical system to protect you from hazardous shocks. Any
modifications to the system should always be done by a
qualified technician to protect you from hazardous
shock.
Typical AC Generator Control Panel
Many AC control panels consist of a voltmeter or main AC
breaker, a reversed polarity indicator light, and individual
circuit breakers.
AC CONTROL
REVERSED
POLARITY
GENERATOR CONTROL
WARNING
(GASOLINE ENGINES ONLY)
POWER
AVAILABLE
DC VOLTS
GASOLINE VAPORS CAN EXPLODE. BEFORE STARTING
GENERATOR OPERATE BLOWERS FOR 4 MINUTES
CHECK ENGINE COMPARTMENT FOR GAS OR VAPOR
ON/
BLOWER
STOP
START
PREHEAT
GENERATOR CONTROLS
Voltage Meter – Allows you to monitor the AC voltage.
Damage to components can occur if voltage entering your
system is less then 105 volts. Do not use AC powered
equipment if you get a reading of 105 volts or less.
GENERATOR
RUNNING
STOVE
WATER
HEATER
MICRO
OUTLETS
BATT
CHGR
REFRIG
SPARE
SPARE
Reversed Polarity Light – Indicates if the polarity of the
shoreside power source has been reversed, but will not indicate if
the boat polarity (wiring) is reversed.
GENERATOR
REVERSED SHOREPOWER
POLARITY
GENERATOR
SHOREPOWER
SLIDE PROTECTOR
TYPICAL AC CONTROL PANEL
KC-1634
! WARNING !
Every effort has been made at the factory to assure proper wiring polarity for the boat AC system. Any modification performed on the boat AC system must be made by
a qualified marine technician and checked to assure
compliance with ABYC guidelines and National Electrical
Codes.
Power Available Light – Indicates that power from the shore or from
the generator is available to the panel for distribution. This indicator
must be illuminated before switching the main AC breaker “ON.”
11-3
SHIP SYSTEMS
! WARNING !
If a reversed polarity warning is indicated, DO NOT USE
the shore power source. Immediately turn off the power
source on shore and disconnect the shore power cord.
Reversed polarity is a dangerous and potentially lethal
condition which may cause shock, electrocution, or
death.
Main AC Breaker – Switches the entire AC system “ON” and “OFF.”
This allows you to check for proper voltage and polarity immediately
after shore power cord connection has been made, before individual
circuits are enabled.
Individual Circuit Breakers – Allow you to manually enable or interrupt a circuit by flipping the switch “ON” or “OFF,” and they also protect the system receiving the AC load by automatically breaking the
circuit in cases of shorts or overloads.
! CAUTION
Never reset a breaker which has been automatically
tripped, without first discovery and remedying the cause
of the problem.
If your boat is equipped with a generator, the Generator Control
panel contains the starting/stopping controls for the generator as well
as the controls for switching between Shore Power and Generator.
Notice
Read the generator owner’s manual before operating
the generator for the first time. The manual contains
important operation and maintenance information.
Whenever operating the generator, you must first operate the engine
compartment blower for at least 4 minutes prior to starting, and continuously during generator operation to remove dangerous gas or
vapor.
! WARNING !
The blower must be operated for a minimum of four minutes before each time the engine is started. In addition,
the blower should be operated continuously when at idle
or slow speed running. Failure to operate the blower can
cause an explosion.
Notice
Models equipped with a diesel engine powered generator may have a PREHEAT switch used during starting.
11-4
SHIP SYSTEMS
Notice
Some models may be equipped with extra batteries
and a DC to AC converter. The converter will allow
certain AC appliances, such as a refrigerator, to operate from battery power while underway. The operation
of battery conversion systems is not discussed in this
manual.
Since boats equipped with shore power usually remain in the water
for extended periods, corrosion is the primary cause of AC electrical problems. Corroded connections can overheat plugs and receptacles and is usually first noticed at the plug. If signs of overheating
is evident, repairs must be made immediately before further damage is done.
SHORE POWER CORD
Shore Power Connection
One or two 125 volt receptacles are provided for shore power inlet.
The type of receptacle determines the amperage rating of the system. Four amperages may be found; 15 ampere, 30 ampere,
50 ampere 125V and 50 ampere 125/250V.
A 15 ampere shore cord could be viewed as an extension cord
for the boat. Fifteen ampere systems usually supply one
device such as a battery charger, and have no AC control
panel or individual branch circuits.
THREADED LOCKING COLLAR
BOAT RECEPTACLE
BOAT SIDE SHORE POWER CONNECTION
The 30 and 50 ampere systems are equipped with an AC
control panel for power distribution to branch circuits.
KC-2053
All shore power systems require a special, marine grade three-conductor cable to make a proper connection to the shore. Dockside
connections are plug-in while boat side connections plug-in and
are locked in position with a threaded locking collar to prevent accidental disconnection and enhance water resistance. If the proper
receptacle is not available at dock side, there are special adapters
available to connect to 50 ampere systems. Consult your dealer for
information on proper adapters.
Some boats may be equipped with two separate 30 ampere electrical systems (with separate AC Control Panels) or may use two
125V shore power cords to provide 250V service (in which case
the AC Control Panel will combine service automatically for large
appliances).
! WARNING !
Plugs and receptacles for different systems are
designed in noninterchangeable configurations. A plug
from one system cannot fit into the receptacle of
another system. Never attempt to modify a shore
power cable; use only commercially available adapters
for system modification.
11-5
SHIP SYSTEMS
To minimize shock and fire hazards when connecting and disconnecting shore cord:
To connect:
1. Turn “OFF” the boat’s main AC breaker switch.
2. If the outlet on the pier has a disconnect switch, turn the switch
in the “OFF” position.
3. Connect shore power cable at the boat first.
4. Make sure the cable has more slack than the mooring lines.
5. Remove the cap from the outlet on the pier. Connect the other
end of shore cable to the outlet on the pier.
6. If polarity warning indicator is activated, immediately disconnect
cable.
7. Set the shore disconnect switch in the “ON” position.
To disconnect:
1. Set the 110 volt AC MAIN switch in the “OFF” position.
2. If there is a disconnect switch on the shore, set the disconnect
switch in the “OFF” position.
3. Disconnect shore power cable at shore outlet first.
4. Disconnect the power cable from the inlet in the boat. Replace
the cap over the inlet.
5. Place cable in storage for future use.
! WARNING !
Some marinas have been known to “break” shore power
ground circuits to prevent electrolysis. Opening the
ground circuit creates a potentially dangerous on board
shock hazard. Ensure that your shore power cable
ground circuit is always continuous.
Generator Breaker – Makes or breaks the connection between the
generator and the AC control panel. DO NOT switch while the generator is operating.
Shore Power Breaker – Makes or breaks the connection between
shore power and the AC control panel. DO NOT switch while shore
power is being used.
Generator Running Light – Indicates that generator power is being
received by the AC control panel.
Reversed Polarity Light – Indicates if the polarity of the generator
output (wiring) has been reversed.
11-6
SHIP SYSTEMS
! WARNING !
If a reversed polarity warning is indicated, DO NOT USE
the generator. Immediately turn off the generator and
determine the source of the problem. Reversed polarity
is a dangerous and potentially lethal condition which
may cause shock, electrocution, or death.
Shore Power Light – Indicates that shore power is being received
by the AC control panel.
To Operate From Shore Power
1. Shut down generator if applicable. If equipped, Generator
Running indicator will go out.
2. Turn “OFF” generator breaker and main AC breaker. If equipped,
Power Available indicator will go out.
3. If so equipped, move the slide protector over the Generator
breaker.
4. Flip the Shore Power breaker to the “ON” position. The Power
Available indicator should illuminate.
5. Flip the Main AC breaker to the “ON” position. If the Reversed
Polarity light illuminates, flip the breaker “OFF” immediately.
! WARNING !
If a reversed polarity warning is indicated, DO NOT USE
the shore power source. Immediately turn off the power
source on shore and disconnect the shore power cord.
Reversed polarity is a dangerous and potentially lethal
condition which may cause shock, electrocution, or
death.
6. Flip individual circuit breakers “ON” as required.
To Operate From Generator Power
1. Shut down shore power if applicable. If equipped, Shore Power
indicator will go out.
2. Turn “OFF” shore power breaker and main AC breaker. If
equipped, Power Available indicator will go out.
3. If so equipped, move the slide protector over the Shore Power
breaker.
4. Flip the Generator breaker to the “ON” position. The Power
Available indicator should illuminate.
5. Flip the Main AC breaker to the “ON” position. If the Generator
Reversed Polarity light illuminates, flip the breaker “OFF” immediately.
! WARNING !
If a reversed polarity warning is indicated, DO NOT USE
the generator power source. Immediately turn off the
power source. Reversed polarity is a dangerous and
potentially lethal condition which may cause shock,
electrocution, or death.
6. Flip individual circuit breakers “ON” as required.
11-7
SHIP SYSTEMS
WATER SYSTEMS
Some boat models may be equipped with two or more water systems; a
fresh water system, a raw water system, and a head and waste containment
system.
The fresh water system provides potable (drinkable) water to items such as
sinks, showers, hot water heater, ice makers, or cockpit washdowns.
The raw water system provides outside (that which the boat is on) water to
items such as cockpit washdowns, heads (marine toilets), and engines.
The head and waste containment system provides outside (raw) water to
the head.
Fresh Water System
Two types of fresh water systems are common; a manual system and a
pressurized system. Manual systems consist of a storage tank and a hand
pump/faucet.
CITY WATER INLET
COCKPIT WASHDOWN
TANK FILLER
PUMP
SHOWER
HOT
WATER
HEATER
HEAD
VANITY
FROM
ENGINE
TO
FILTER
ENGINE
FRESH
WATER
TANK
ICEMAKER
COCKPIT
SHOWER
GALLEY
ACCUMULATOR
COLD
HOT
TYPICAL COMPLEX FRESHWATER SYSTEM
KC-2040
Pressurized systems can range from the simple type consisting of a storage
tank, electric pump and faucet, to the complex type consisting of a storage
tank, filter, electric pump, accumulator, city water hookup, water heater, and
any one of a number of showers, sinks, or other items which require potable
water.
Notice
All fresh water drainage is directed overboard.
Fresh Water Tank
The boat is fitted with a fresh water tank that is filled through the deck plate
filler marked “WATER.” The tank is vented through the hull, this allows air to
enter/escape as water levels rise and fall. The water tank is full when water
comes out of the vent.
11-8
SHIP SYSTEMS
Notice
Fill the tank only with potable water. Using and refilling the tank often will help keep it a source of clean
drinking water.
TYPICAL DECK PLATE KEY
To fill the tank:
1. Insert the filler cap (special) key provided with your boat.
2. Insert the key into the slot in the cap and turn counterclockwise
to unlock.
3. Remove the cap.
KC-2047
4. Using a sanitary drinking water hose (blue), fill the tank with
clean, fresh drinking water.
5. Replace the cap and lock into position with the key.
Filter, Pump, and Pressure Accumulator
Water is drawn from the tank by a self-priming pump located to port
and below the engine hatch. Before entering the pump, the water
passes through a filter to capture any contaminants. The pump provides a flow of water at a preset pressure to the remainder of the
system. Should the system develop a leak or become empty, a dry
tank shut down switch prevents pump burnout.
A pressure accumulator tank provides a smooth surge free flow of
water from the pump to various fresh water systems. The pressure
accumulator also reduces the need for excessive pump cycling by
maintaining a constant pressure in the lines.
PUMP
PRESSURE INLET
SWITCH
WATER
HOSE
PUMP
(FROM
OUTLET
TANK)
Initial Fresh Water System Startup
1. Fill the fresh water tank with approximately 20 gallons of
potable water.
2. Turn the FRESH WATER PUMP breaker “ON.”
3. Open the cold water galley faucet to allow air to escape. Close
the faucet when a steady flow of water is apparent.
FILTER
HOUSING
KC-2042.1
TYPICAL FRESHWATER PUMP
KC-2042.1
4. Open the hot water galley faucet to fill the water heater and
allow air to escape from the line. Close the faucet when a
steady flow of water is apparent.
5. Bleed air from the remainder of the faucets, showers, etc., in
the same manner as steps 3 and 4. After all lines have been
bled, the pump will build to operating pressure and then shut
off.
6. You may now continue to fill the tank to its capacity.
! CAUTION
The fresh water pump works on demand and WILL NOT
automatically shut-off when the tank is empty. If the
breaker switch is in the “ON” position, and the tank is
empty, the pump will run continuously and may overheat.
11-9
SHIP SYSTEMS
City Water Hookup
! CAUTION
Monitor the water system during initial usage of the “city
water” feature. In this mode, the boat is connected to an
unlimited source of water. NEVER leave boat unattended
while using the “city water” feature. Any major leak or
break in the system will allow abnormal bilge accumulation which in turn could cause sinking or swamping of
batteries and engine.
As an alternative to the fresh water tank, the fresh water system can
be connected to “city water.” Because the water enters the boat
under pressure, it bypasses the tank, the filter, the pump, and the
pressure accumulator. Also, since city water pressure can sometimes be higher than the boat system was designed for, your water
inlet may be equipped with a pressure regulator that limits the maximum pressure to 35 psi.
Notice
Using “city water” hookup does not replenish water
supply in the tank. The tank can only be filled at the
fresh water fill plate.
! WARNING !
Before connecting to any water fitting (dockside or otherwise), be sure the water is potable and suitable for
human consumption. Also, a special sanitary drinking
water hose is required for the potable water connection.
Never use common garden hose for drinking water.
To connect city water:
1. Turn the FRESHWATER PUMP breaker “OFF.”
2. Remove the threaded plug from the female swivel hose connector of the water inlet fitting. Clean any particles from the strainer.
3. Attach the proper sanitary drinking water hose to the water inlet
fitting. Be sure to clean both ends and flush the hose before
connecting. Foreign matter may damage the pressure regulator.
4. Before connecting to the dockside city water outlet, open the
valve fully to flush any rust particles that may be present.
5. Connect the hose to the dockside city water outlet.
11-10
CITY WATER INLET
COCKPIT WASHDOWN
TANK FILLER
PUMP
SHOWER
HOT
WATER
HEATER
HEAD
VANITY
FROM
ENGINE
TO
FILTER
ENGINE
FRESH
WATER
TANK
ICEMAKER
COCKPIT
SHOWER
G
ACCUMULATOR
COLD
HOT
TYPICAL FRESHWATER SYSTEM
SHIP SYSTEMS
HOT WATER HEATER
The hot water tank is equipped with a high pressure relief valve for
safety. Some models may have a thermostat that regulates the
heater to a specific water temperature. The thermostat is adjustable
to suit individual taste. The electric hot water heater is operated by
turning “ON” the WATER HEATER breaker switch located on the AC
panel.
The hot water tank also operates via a heat exchanger. Heated cooling water from the engines is delivered to a heat exchanger which in
turn heats the water in the hot water tank.
! CAUTION
Do not turn the hot water switch on unless the fresh
water system is charged. Damage to the heating element
will result if allowed to heat up with no water in the system.
To use the hot water heater:
1. With fresh water tank filled and pump “ON” or city water connection operating, turn HOT WATER HEATER breaker “ON.”
2. Turn on one of the hot water faucets to purge any remaining air
from the hot water system.
Notice
Some hot water heaters are equipped with a high temperature limit switch to protect the heating elements
should the heater be activated without water in the
tank. If for any reason the system does not operate,
turn the hot water heater breaker “OFF” and push the
reset button on the heater.
Fresh Water System Maintenance
The following maintenance actions should be performed monthly to
keep the fresh water system clean and sanitary:
●
Drain the fresh water tank completely (using all faucets, showers, etc.). Refill tank with at least 20 gallons of clean, fresh
water and drain again.
●
Clean fresh water pump inlet filter screen (if equipped).
●
Replace fresh water system filter(s) (if equipped).
●
Clean city water inlet strainer (if equipped).
●
Flush city water system (using all faucets, showers, etc.).
11-11
SHIP SYSTEMS
SANITIZING THE FRESH
WATER SYSTEM
If water in the tank has been allowed to stagnate and you suspect
that the fresh water system may be contaminated, sanitize the system. To sanitize:
1. Drain the fresh water tank completely (using all faucets, showers, etc.).
2. Mix a solution of 1/4 cup household bleach to 1 gallon of water
for every 15 gallons of tank capacity. Pour the solution into the
fresh water tank.
3. Fill the tank with clean, fresh water.
4. Turn fresh water pump “ON” and bleed air from all faucets,
showers, etc.
5. After approximately 3 hours, drain the system completely.
6. Flush the system with one full tank of water.
7. Fill tank with clean, fresh drinking water.
If you can smell or taste bleach in the water:
1. Drain the system completely.
2. Mix a solution of one quart of white vinegar to 5 gallons of water.
Pour the solution into the fresh water tank.
3. Allow the solution to remain in the tank until approximately one
hour of cruising time is logged.
Notice
Boat motion will “slosh” the vinegar/water solution to
help clean the tank.
4. Allow the solution to remain in the tank for at least one week.
5. Drain the fresh water system completely.
6. Flush the system with one full tank of water.
7. Fill the tank with clean, fresh drinking water.
Raw Water System
Boats may contain several raw water systems. Essentially, any component that requires outside water such as the engines, head, or
cockpit washdown will each have its own raw water intake.
All raw water systems have three things in common; each will have
its own thru-hull raw water intake, a seacock and a strainer. The seacock is very important as it protects a boat from sinking if a downstream hose or fitting should fail. It is therefore very important to
close any seacock not in use.
11-12
SHIP SYSTEMS
All raw water systems have some type of pump to draw water into
the boat. Engines have pulley driven pumps; heads may have manual push/pull or electric pumps; cockpit washdowns have electric
pumps. Some raw water systems may supply two components and
will have a flow control valve for directing water flow.
TO
HEAD
WASHDOWN
OUTLET
FOR HOSE
CONNECTION
WASHDOWN
OPEN
HEAD
OPEN
FLOW CONTROL
VALVE
RAW WATER
PUMP
SEACOCK
HANDLE
RAW WATER INTAKE
KC-2043
To operate a raw water system:
1. Open seacock.
2. Adjust flow control valve (if equipped).
3. Turn appropriate pump switch “ON” if necessary.
11-13
SHIP SYSTEMS
Head and Waste Containment System
Some boats are equipped with a head (marine toilet) and waste containment system. The head has either the manually operated system,
or the electrically operated system, which draws seawater in through
the hull to flush waste water from the marine toilet. The toilet pumps
the waste water on to a holding tank.
Waste Holding Tank
The boat is fitted with a waste holding tank that is emptied through
the deck plate fitting marked “WASTE.” Waste is pumped from the
head through a sanitary waste hose to the top portion of the tank. A
3/4" sanitary waste hose is attached to the bottom of the tank, and
runs to the dockside pumpout plate. An overboard vent keeps the
tank at atmospheric pressure regardless of waste levels.
All the components which comprise the waste system are made of
materials specially formulated to prevent odor permeation and to
resist chemical actions. It is strongly recommended that you regularly add chemical to your tank by flushing it through the head. The
chemical helps to control odor and break down the waste. Follow the
manufacturer’s instructions on the chemical before using.
Depending on the model, there are 3 basic waste system configurations; dockside pumpout, pumpout and overboard discharge, and
pumpout, discharge and macerator.
! CAUTION
Do not flush into a full holding tank. Attempting to flush
the head when the tank is full could result in damage to
the waste system.
A waste tank indicator may be installed to provide a visual indication
of the amount of waste in the tank.
Waste Disposal
WASTE DOCKSIDE
PUMPOUT FITTING
DOCKSIDE PUMPOUT
This system directs all waste to the holding tank. To clear
the tank of waste water, you will need to use the dockside
pumpout services provided at marinas, etc.
To empty the tank of waste, hook a suction hose to the
pumpout plate and to the dockside pump. The marina will
handle the proper disposal of the waste and may charge
for this service.
MANUAL
HAND PUMP
HEAD
VENT
SEACOCK
HOLDING
TANK
TYPICAL DOCK PUMPOUT SYSTEM
KC-2044
11-14
SHIP SYSTEMS
Macerator Pump
A “Y” valve is installed between the pumpout plate and the macerator
discharge seacock. The macerator pump is located between the “Y”
valve and the macerator discharge seacock. In this configuration all
waste is flushed from the head to the holding tank. The “Y” valve permits you to use the dockside pumpout feature, or to use the macerator to pump the waste from the holding tank overboard.
! CAUTION
Overboard discharge of waste should only be used in
approved areas. It is your responsibility to comply with
local regulations regarding the discharge of waste.
To pump out the holding tank using the macerator pump:
MACERATOR
PUMP
1.
Open the discharge seacock.
2.
Move the “Y” valve lever to the down or overboard position.
! CAUTION
Do not run the pump dry. Running the pump when there
is no waste to pump out of the holding tank will shorten
the life of the pump.
DISCHARGE
SEACOCK
Y VALVE
TYPICAL MACERATOR SYSTEM
KC-2046
3. Activate the macerator pump by turning its circuit breaker “ON.”
4. Close the macerator discharge seacock and turn macerator
pump “OFF” after the pumpout is complete.
Head Operating Instructions
Before operating the head for the first time, read the owner’s manual
for the marine toilet.
ELECTRICALLY OPERATED HEAD
1. Open the inlet water seacock below the cabin floor.
! CAUTION
Overboard discharge of waste should only be used in
approved areas. It is your responsibility to comply with
local regulations regarding the discharge of waste.
2. If overboard discharge is to be used, make sure the “Y” valve is
in the overboard position, and that the macerator discharge seacock is open.
11-15
SHIP SYSTEMS
3. To charge the head, depress the foot pedal on the lower left side
of the bowl, and push the flush button. Release the flush button
after the bowl is moistened, and then pump the floor pedal 2-4
times to fill the bowl with water.
4. To flush, depress the foot pedal and push the flush button at the
same time – hold until all waste is removed.
Notice
To empty the bowl of excess water, operate flush button
until water level decreases to desired level.
MANUALLY OPERATED HEAD
1. Open the inlet water seacock below the cabin floor.
2. If overboard discharge is to be used, make sure the “Y” valve is
in the overboard position, and that the macerator discharge seacock is open.
3. Pump the floor pedal 2-4 times to fill the bowl with water.
4. To flush, depress the foot pedal and operate flush handle next to
head at the same time. Operate handle until all waste is
removed.
Notice
To empty the bowl of excess water, operate flush button
until water level decreases to desired level.
11-16
SHIP SYSTEMS
SAMPLE FLOAT PLAN
Copy this page and fill out the copy before going boating. Leave the filled
out copy with a reliable person who can be depended upon to notify the
Coast Guard, or other rescue organization, should you not return as scheduled. DO NOT file this plan with the Coast Guard.
Name ______________________________________________________ Telephone _____________________________
Description of Boat:
Type _____________________ Color ______________________ Trim _____________________
Registration Number _____________________________________________________________________________
Length _____________ Name _____________________________ Make __________________________________
Other Info. ______________________________________________________________________________________
Persons Aboard:
Name
Age
Address & Telephone
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
Engine Type: _______________________________________________________ HP ____________________________
No. of Engines: _____________________________________________________ Fuel Capacity: ___________________
Survival Equipment:
PFDs ____________________________ Flares________________________ Mirror _________________________
Smoke Signals _____________________ Flashlight _____________________ Food __________________________
Paddles __________________________ Water ________________________ Anchor ________________________
Raft or Dinghy _______________________________ EPIRB ____________________________________________
Radio:
Yes _____ No ________ Type____________________________ Freq ______________________________
Cell Phone: Yes _____ No ________ Type____________________________ Number ___________________________
Destination___________________________________ Est. Time of Arrival______________________________________
Expect to Return By _________________________________________________________________________________
Auto Type ___________________ License No.___________________ Parked __________________________________
If not returned by _________________________ call the Coast Guard, or ______________________________________
(Local Authority). Coast Guard Telephone Number: _______________________________________________________
Local Authority Telephone Number: ______________________________________________________
11-17
SHIP SYSTEMS
11-18
GLOSSARY
OF TERMS
ABOARD – On or in the boat.
AFLOAT – On the water.
AFT – Toward the rear or stern of the boat.
AGROUND – Touching bottom.
AMIDSHIP – Center or middle of the boat.
ANCHOR – (1) An iron casting shaped to grip the lake bottom to hold the boat. (2) The act of setting the anchor.
ASHORE – On the shore.
ASTERN – Toward the stern.
BAIL – To remove water from the bottom of the boat with a pump, bucket, sponge, etc.
BAITWELL – A miniature livewell used to store and keep live bait alive and healthy.
BEAM – The widest point on the boat.
BEARING – Relative position or direction of an object from the boat.
BILGE – The lowest interior section of the boat hull.
BILGE KEELS – The raised areas or aluminum extrusions on the bottom of a boat that parallel the keel.
BOARDING – To enter the boat.
BOUNDARY WATERS – A body of water between two areas of jurisdiction; i.e., a river between two states.
BOW – The front of the boat.
BULKHEAD – Vertical partition (wall) in a boat.
BUNKS – Carpeted trailer hull supports.
BURDENED BOAT – Term for the boat that must “give-way” to boats with the right-of-way.
CAPACITY PLATE – A plate that provides maximum weight capacity and engine horsepower rating information. It is
located in full view of the helm.
CAPSIZE – To turn over.
CAST-OFF – To unfasten mooring lines in preparation for departure.
CENTER LINE – A lengthwise imaginary line which runs fore and aft with the boat’s keel.
CHINE – The point on a boat where the side intersects (meets) the bottom.
CLEAT – A deck fitting with ears to which lines are fastened.
CONSOLE – Also called helm. The steering wheel area of the boat.
CRANKING BATTERY – The main battery used for engine starting and electrical circuits.
CURRENT – Water moving in a horizontal direction.
DECK – The open surface on the boat where the passengers walk.
DEEP CYCLE BATTERIES – Special long-running batteries which can be repeatedly discharged and recharged
without significant loss of power.
DOLLY WHEEL – A rolling jack assembly at the front of the trailer used for positioning the coupler during trailer
hookup.
DRAFT – The depth of the boat below the water line, measured vertically to the lowest part of the hull.
ELECTROLYSIS – The break-up of metals due to the effects of galvanic corrosion.
FATHOM – Unit of depth or measure; 1 fathom equals 6 feet.
FENDERS – Objects placed alongside the boat for cushioning. Sometimes called bumpers.
12-1
GLOSSARY OF TERMS
FORE – Toward the front or bow of the boat. Opposite of aft.
FREEBOARD – The distance from the water to the gunwale.
FUEL SENDING UNIT – The electrical device that is mounted on the outside of a built-in fuel tank and controls
the dashboard fuel gauge.
GIVE-WAY BOAT – (1) Term for the boat that must take whatever action necessary to keep well clear of the boat
with the right-of-way in meeting or crossing situations. (2) The burdened boat.
GUNWALE – The rail or upper edge of a boat’s side.
HEAD – A marine toilet.
HELM – The steering wheel or command area.
HULL – The body of the boat.
HYPOTHERMIA – A physical condition where the body loses heat faster than it can produce it.
IN-LINE FUSE – A type of protective fuse located in the power wire of a direct current (DC) circuit usually near the
battery.
KEEL – The lowest portion of the boat; extends fore and aft along the boat’s bottom.
LIST – Leaning or tilt of a boat toward the side.
MAKING WAY – Making progress through the water.
MARINE CHART – Seagoing maps showing depths, buoys, navigation aids, etc.
MOORING – An anchor, chain, or similar device that holds a boat in one location.
NAVIGATION AID – Recognizable objects on land or sea such as buoys, towers or lights which are used to fix position to identify safe and unsafe waters.
NO-WAKE SPEED – The speed at which a boat travels to produce an imperceptible wake.
PFD – Personal flotation device.
PITOT TUBE – See SPEEDOMETER PICKUP TUBE.
PLANING HULL – A hull designed to lift, thereby reducing friction and increasing efficiency.
PORPOISE – A condition in which the bow bounces up and down caused by trimming the engine too far out.
PORT – (1) The left side of a boat when facing the bow. (2) A destination or harbor.
PRIVILEGED BOAT – Term used for the boat with the right-of-way.
RIGHT-OF-WAY – Term for the boat that has priority in meeting or crossing situations. The stand on or privileged
boat.
RULES OF THE ROAD – Regulations for preventing collisions on the water.
SPEEDOMETER PICKUP TUBE – Also called pitot tube. The plastic device that extends below the bottom of the
boat. It connects to the speedometer with plastic flexible tubing.
SPLASHWELL – The section of an outboard-equipped boat that is just forward of the transom.
STAND ON BOAT – Term for the boat that must maintain course and speed in meeting or crossing situations. The
privileged boat.
STARBOARD – The right side of the boat when looking towards the bow.
STERN – The back of the boat.
STOW – To pack the cargo.
SURGE BRAKES – A type of trailer braking system designed to automatically actuate when the tow vehicle’s
brakes are applied.
TRANSDUCER – The unit that sends/receives signals for the depth sounder.
TRANSOM – The transverse beam across the stern.
TRIM – Fore to aft and side to side balance of the boat when loaded.
UNDERWAY – Boat in motion; i.e., not moored or anchored.
USCG – United States Coast Guard
WAKE – The waves that a boat leaves behind when moving through the water.
WATERWAY – A navigable body of water.
V-PAD – A modified vee hull design with a small, flat area in the keel aft.
VISUAL DISTRESS SIGNAL – A device used to signal the need for assistance such as flags, lights and flares.
12-2
MONTEREY BOATS LIFETIME LIMITED WARRANTY
MONTEREY BOATS warrants that it will repair or replace defects in materials and workmanship in its products which it finds
to exist, which defects occur within the applicable warranty periods defined below, subject to the exclusions, limitations,
conditions and provisions noted below.
LIFETIME LIMITED STRUCTURAL HULL WARRANTY:
MONTEREY BOATS warrants to the original retail purchaser of its product beginning in model year 2005, if said product is
purchased from an authorized MONTEREY BOATS dealer, that MONTEREY BOATS, or its dealer at its direction, will repair
or replace the fiberglass hull of its product if it is found to be structurally defective in materials or workmanship for as long as
said original retail purchaser owns said product. For the purpose of this warranty, the fiberglass hull is defined as the single
fiberglass molded shell and integral structural components which are below the hull flange. This warranty is subject to the
exclusions, limitations, conditions and provisions noted below.
TEN YEAR TRANSFERABLE LIMITED STRUCTURAL HULL WARRANTY:
Beginning with the 2005 model year boats, MONTEREY BOATS also offers a Ten-Year Transferable Limited Structural Hull
Warranty. This Ten Year Limited Structural Hull Warranty may be transferred to subsequent purchasers (hereinafter “new
owner”) for a fee of $450.00 for sport boats and deck boats and $850.00 for super sports and cruisers. This transfer will only
apply to the balance of any warranty period left during the ten year period commencing on the date of purchase by the original
retail purchaser. Under this Warranty, MONTEREY BOATS will repair or replace the fiberglass hull if it is found to be
structurally defective in materials or workmanship within the first ten years after purchase. For the purpose of this warranty,
the fiberglass hull is defined as the single fiberglass molded shell and integral fiberglass structural components which are
below the hull flange. This warranty is subject to the exclusions, limitations, conditions and provisions noted below.
1. The request for transfer must be made in writing by the new owner and sent within thirty (30) days of the date of his/her
acquisition of the vessel to:
MONTEREY BOATS
1579 SW 18th Street
Williston, Florida 32696
2. The request must include: A copy of the bill of sale with the Hull ID number, the new owner’s name and address and a
Certified Check or Money Order for the correct transfer fee amount. MONTEREY BOATS will send a new warranty card
with the updated information once this information has been received.
3. Only the unused portion of the original Ten-Year Transferable Limited Structural Hull Warranty will apply for the benefit of
the new owner.
4. In the event fiberglass hull work is required, the new owner must return the product to the original selling dealer or to a
dealer authorized to service MONTEREY product.
5. The cost of returning the product to and from either the dealer, authorized representative or to MONTEREY BOATS will
be the sole responsibility of the owner.
LIMITED GENERAL WARRANTY
MONTEREY BOATS warrants to the original retail purchaser of its product, beginning in model year 2005, if said product is
purchased from an authorized MONTEREY BOATS dealer, that MONTEREY BOATS or its dealer at its direction, will repair
or replace defects in materials or workmanship in its product which it finds to exist which occur within one (1) year from the
date of purchase by the original retail purchaser, subject to the exclusions, limitations, conditions and provisions noted below.
WHAT IS NOT COVERED:
This warranty does not cover:
1. Any boat that has been repaired or altered by persons other than MONTEREY BOATS or an authorized MONTEREY
BOATS dealer, or modified in any way so as to affect its use and operation;
2. Engines, outdrives, controls, batteries, propellers, any other accessories or equipment that have been made by other
manufacturers, whether or not warranted by such other manufacturers;
3. Gelcoat finish cracking, crazing or blistering;
4. Any boat used for racing or commercial purposes or that has been subject to misuse, neglect, accident or structural
modification;
5. Windshield breakage, windshield leaks, hatch leaks, fuel gauges and fuel gauge systems, fuel tanks and any defect in
paint, upholstery, canvas, vinyl, plastics, fabrics, trim or other materials;
6. Installation of engines, generators, air conditioners, wake board towers, parts or other after market accessories produced,
installed or attached by anyone other than MONTEREY BOATS.
7. Loss of time, inconvenience, loss of the use of the boat or other matters not specifically covered hereunder; and
8. Any boat purchased by a consumer through an authorized dealer located in the United States, which said boat is
registered and/or operated outside the United States.
GENERAL PROVISIONS:
All general, special, indirect, incidental and/or consequential damages are excluded from this warranty and are totally
disclaimed by MONTEREY BOATS. It is the interest of the parties that the Owner’s sole and exclusive remedy is the repair
or replacement of the vessel or its allegedly defective component parts and that no other legal or equitable remedies shall be
available to said owner. Some states do not allow the exclusion of incidental or consequential damages so the inclusion of
incidental or consequential damages may not apply to you. This is a limited warranty; MONTEREY BOATS, makes no
warranty, other than contained herein; to the extent allowed by law any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a
particular purpose arising in state law are expressly excluded to the extent allowed by law, any implied warranty of
merchantability is limited to the duration of the one year limited general warranty. All obligations of MONTEREY BOATS are
specifically set forth herein. Some states do not allowed limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts, so the above
limitation may not apply to you. MONTEREY BOATS’ obligation with respect to this warranty is limited to making repairs to or
replacing the defective parts and no claim for breach of warranty shall be cause for cancellation or rescission of the contract
or sale for any boat manufactured by MONTEREY BOATS.
MONTEREY BOATS will discharge its obligations under this warranty as rapidly as possible, but cannot guarantee any specific
completion date due to the different nature of claims which may be made and services which may be required. MONTEREY
BOATS reserves the right to change or improve the design of its boats without obligation to modify any boat previously
manufactured. This limited warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which may vary from
state to state. MONTEREY BOATS shall in no way be responsible for any repairs not Pre-Authorized by a MONTEREY
BOATS Customer Service Manager or repairs performed by a repair shop not Pre-Authorized by a MONTEREY BOATS
Customer Service Manager.
MONTEREY BOATS does not authorize any person to create or assume for it any other obligation or liability with respect to
its boats. No person, including a MONTEREY BOATS dealer, is authorized to make any repairs or replacements under this
warranty without the prior written approval of MONTEREY BOATS. The sales personnel or other employees of MONTEREY
BOATS dealers are not authorized to make warranties concerning MONTEREY BOATS products.
MONTEREY BOATS shall have no obligation under this written warranty unless and until each of the following conditions are
met:
1. The original retail purchaser of its product completes and mails the Warranty Registration Card to MONTEREY BOATS
within fifteen (15) days from the date of the sale of the boat to that purchaser;
2. Notice of each warranty claim is given to the MONTEREY BOATS Dealer within a reasonable period of time after
discovery of any claimed defect;
3. Notice of each warranty claim is made in writing to MONTEREY BOATS within the applicable time periods identified in
the respective warranties as measured from the date of purchase by the original retail purchaser; and
4. All transportation charges incurred in transporting the boat for warranty work are paid for by the owner.
MONTEREY BOATS reserves the right to make changes at any time, without notice, in prices or to make changes in colors,
specifications, equipment, options, materials, etc., and MONTEREY BOATS shall be under no obligation to equip or modify
boats built prior to such changes.
IMPORTANT: Return of the Warranty Registration Card to MONTEREY BOATS is important for purposes of recording
customer information for notification and correction of product defects under the Federal Boat Safety Act.
MONTEREY BOATS is the registered tradename and trademark of SEABRING MARINE INDUSTRIES, INC., a Florida
Corporation, the warrantor herein.
SEABRING MARINE INDUSTRIES, INC.
d.b.a. MONTEREY BOATS
1579 SW 18th Street – Williston, Florida 32696
Telephone (352) 528-2628 / Facsimile (352) 529-2628
D E A L E R
Monterey Boats
1579 S.W. 18th Street
Williston, FL 32696
Phone 352-529-9181 Fax 352-529-9173
www.montereyboats.com
P/N MANUAL-SUPER-O/M-0
KCC Printed in USA
Rev. 12/2004
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