smoke-master the little red smokehouse

SMOKE-MASTER
250R-FS
THE LITTLE RED
SMOKEHOUSE
250FS & 250 FSE
OPERATIONS AND
SERVICE MANUAL
CE VERSION
J&R MANUFACTURING, INC.
820 W. Kearney, Suite B
P. O. Box 850522
Mesquite, TX 75185-0522
(972) 285-4855 (Texas)
(800) 527-4831 (All 50 States & Canada)
(972) 289-0801 (Parts & Service)
(972) 288-9488 (Fax)
SN _______________
Original (English Language) Instructions
SMOKE-MASTER
Model 250R-FS
THE LITTLE RED
SMOKEHOUSE
Model 250FSE
OPERATIONS AND SERVICE
MANUAL
CE Version
MANUFACTURED BY:
J & R MANUFACTURING, INC.
820-B West Kearney
Mesquite, Texas
USA
Rev. 09-17
WARNINGS!
Disposal of Ashes
Ashes should be placed in a metal container with a tight-fitting lid. J&R offers
ash carts suitable for this purpose. The closed container of ashes should be
placed on a noncombustible floor or on the ground, well away from all
combustible materials, pending final disposal. If the ashes are disposed of by
burial in soil or otherwise locally dispersed, they should be retained in the closed
container until all cinders have thoroughly cooled.
Creosote – Formation and Need for Removal –
When wood is burned slowly, it produces tar and other organic vapors, which
combine with expelled moisture to form creosote. The creosote vapors condense
in the relatively cool chimney flue of a slow-burning fire. As a result, creosote
residue accumulates on the flue lining. When ignited this creosote makes an
extremely hot fire. The chimney connector and chimney should be inspected at
least twice monthly to determine if a creosote buildup has occurred. If creosote
has accumulated it should be removed to reduce the risk of a chimney fire.
Dedicated flue
If this unit is to be directly vented (no exhaust hood) do not connect to a flue
serving another appliance.
DANGER-Risk of Fire or Explosion
Do not burn garbage, gasoline, drain oil or other flammable liquids
WARNING-Risk of Fire
Do not operate with flue draft exceeding 0.03 in. water column.
Do not operate with fuel loading or ash removal doors open.
Do not store fuel or other combustible material within marked
installation clearances.
Inspect and clean flues and chimney regularly
If the pit stops (lights go off, etc.) and the front door feels excessively
hot to the touch, DO NOT OPEN THE PIT, as there may be a grease
fire inside. The pit will automatically resume operation when it cools
down. Open the doors only after it cools down.
NEVER OPEN A PIT DOOR UNTIL THE PIT HAS BEEN SWITCHED
TO EVAC FOR AT LEAST 60 SECONDS.
CAUTION-Hot Surfaces
Keep children away
Do not touch during operation
Maximum draft 0.03 in. water column
CONTENTS
MODELS 250R-FS, 250 FS, 250 FSE .............................................. 1
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS ..................................................... 2
DESIGN .........................................................................................
5
OPERATIONAL SEQUENCING ........................................................ 6
OPERATING PROCEDURES............................................................. 7
MAINTENANCE AND CLEANING..................................................... 11
TIMER INSTRUCTIONS ...................................................................13
TROUBLESHOOTING...................................................................... 14
MODEL 250 NOMENCLATURE AND IMAGES................................. 17
ELECTRICAL DRAWINGS............................................................... 31
THERMOSTAT INSTRUCTIONS ...................................................... 35
TIMER INSTRUCTIONS .................................................................... 39
WARRANTY.................................................................................... 42
WOOD SOURCE ............................................................................ 43
MODELS 250 R-FS; 250 FSE
These machines are solid-fuel fired meat smokers. They are intended to cook and smoke
meat from the raw state to the fully cooked state. They are intended to be used in indoorscommercial settings, such as restaurants, institutions, and catering kitchens.
The operation of these units is identical.
The difference is that the 250 R-FS is physically larger,
The electrical heating elements are always mounted in the convection fan
air stream at the top of the units. The heater elements are controlled by
either the primary or secondary thermostat but will only operate if the
Heater Element Switch on the control panel is energized.
Page 1 of 43
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
1.
Your unit will be shipped fully assembled. It can be handled with a
4000 pound capacity forklift. Uncrate and inspect for concealed
shipping damage. Install the casters (packed inside the unit).
2.
Move unit into position.
3.
Vent according to venting instructions on the following pages.
4.
Clearances: (in cm.) From Any Combustibles:
Above Top
Of Casing
From Front
From Back
From Sides
30.5
122
15
2.5
From Chimney
Connector
46
Floor: Unit to be installed on a non-combustible floor
5. Electrical
The unit will require 220 Volt, 19 Amp, 50/60Hz single-phase service.
Directly wire the unit, making the field connections inside the junction
box provided. Supply circuit requires two conductors plus a
(PE) ground (L1, L2, PE). A two pole, 20-amp breaker is required. Turn the
circuit breaker off and tag it whenever servicing as this is the only way to
completely de-energize all components of the machine.
Page 2 of 43
Venting Requirements
Our barbecue ovens are listed under multiple standards, including U.L. 737 (Fireplace
Stoves), U.L. 2162 (Commercial Wood-Fired Baking Ovens), and U.L. 391 (Solid-Fuel
and Combination-Fuel Central and Supplementary Furnaces. These listing provide two
alternatives for exhausting our units: direct venting and exhaust hood venting.
In all cases, it is imperative to obtain the approval of the AHJ (Authority Having
Jurisdiction). This will typically be the mechanical inspection department of the
local municipality’s building inspection division and/or the local fire marshal.
Option One: Direct Venting
Our listings under U.L. 737 and U.L. 391 permit direct venting and the
ventilation standard cited in each is NFPA 211 (Standard for Chimneys,
Fireplaces, Vents, and Solid-Fuel Burning Appliances). All of our enclosed
ovens are designed to be vented via a smokestack (chimney) with natural draft.
All models incorporate smoke-control (bypass) mechanisms to contain smoke
spillage when the oven doors or firebox doors are opened.
In all cases in which combustible construction is present, a factory-built Type
HT chimney is required (refer to NFPA 211 6.3.1.2 and U.L. 103). Examples of
such chimneys would be Selkirk “Ultra-Temp” and DuraVent “DuraTech”.
If no combustible construction is present (examples: exterior installations or
installations in which the oven is faced into a non-combustible exterior wall
and the chimney is either uncovered or covered with a non-combustible
weather covering), then a single wall metal chimney (Figure 5B) is acceptable
if approved by the AHJ.
Air Balance
The building air balance is very important to the proper operation of your pit. The
design requires an unimpeded flow of combustion air into the firebox and an
unimpeded exhaust flow from the chimney connector to the the building exterior,
whether the unit is directly vented or vented via an exhaust hood.
Combustion Air
Make sure adequate combustion air is available. Excerpt from NFPA 211 12.3:
“Solid-fuel burning devices shall be installed in a location and manner so as to
provide ventilation and combustion air supply to allow proper combustion of
fuel, chimney draft, and maintenance of safe temperatures… where buildings
are so tight that normal infiltration does not provide the necessary air, outside
air shall be introduced.”
Page 3 of 43
Option Two: Exhaust Hood Venting
U.L. 2162 cites NFPA 96 (Standard for Ventilation Control and Fire Protection
for Commercial Cooking Operations) as its ventilation standard. While NFPA
96 allows direct ventilation with factory-built grease ducts or properly
constructed welded ducts (with fire-rated enclosures), it also permits the
exhaust hood ventilation option for our units.
It is very important that the filter bank be located toward the rear of
the unit (near the chimney connector).
Refer to the specifications from the 2009 (or later) International Mechanical
Code Section 507.13.1 (Extra Heavy Duty Cooking Appliances, Single
Canopy, 700 CFM per linear foot of hood). Wall- mounted hoods will
require less volume (550 CFM per linear foot).
Notes :
1. Exhaust volume should be determined by the exhaust hood
manufacturer based on their products listing and local code requirements.
States such as California, Oregon, Washington, and Connecticut all have
code driven maximum exhaust volumes for specific equipment. For
example: California mandates that solid fuel exhaust hoods for a wall
mounted application can use NO MORE than 385 cfm/lf for solid fuel.
2. Spark arrestor type filters are required.
3. Hoods serving solid fuel equipment must be dedicated to solid fuel
only (no gas or electric) with their own dedicated fire protection system.
Page 4 of 43
DESIGN
TEMPERATURE CONTROL:
A thermostat activates and controls the combustion air supply to the
firebox and the exhaust from the pit through the flue damper. If the unit
is equipped with an electrical heating element, the thermostat also
controls it.
HEAT FLOW:
Heat and smoke flow through refractory lined flues into the cooking
chamber and are circulated by a convection fan system.
EVACUATION SYSTEM:
Turning the EVAC switch on opens a damper to directly vent the
firebox, opens exit dampers from the oven, and opens a fresh air supply
damper at the top of the oven as the smoke is evacuated from the
cooking chamber into the stack. Evacuation should be in 45 seconds to
2 minutes, depending on the net draft at the chimney connector (this
depends on the air balance in the building).
EVAC OR STACK FAN:
A jet blower fan maintains a draft in the stack and pulls fresh
ambient air into the stack to mix with the exhaust from the pit.
HIGH-LIMIT PROTECTION:
All dampers are closed and fans (except the cabinet cooling fans) are
shut off if the temperature in the cooking chamber reaches 450° (reset is
automatic upon cool down).
POWER INTERRUPTION PROTECTION:
Upon loss of power, all dampers close and the temperature will begin
to drop.
GREASE HANDLING:
Grease is held in the sump in the bottom (coolest) part of the oven
and is drained by opening a valve located behind an access door adjacent
to the firebox.
Page 5 of 43
OPERATIONAL SEQUENCING
COOK MODE:
Convection fan and EVAC fan are on. The primary (operator
adjustable) thermostat energizes and is in control. When this thermostat
requires additional temperature (sensed inside oven) to satisfy the set
point, its contacts close thereby energizing the flue damper motor (item
16) and the combustion air delay timer (item 13A). This causes the flue
damper (item 18) the EVAC dampers (item 17), the firebox bypass
damper (item 19), and the fresh air damper (item 20) to open. After a 90
second delay, the combustion air damper motor (item 13) is energized
(thus opening the combustion air damper (item 14)) and the combustion
air fan (item 12) is energized, while the firebox bypass damper, the EVAC
dampers and the fresh air damper close. This 90-second delay occurs on
every cycle of the thermostat. When the thermostat set point is satisfied,
the thermostat contacts open resulting in the flue damper closing, the
combustion air damper closing, and the combustion air motor (fan) deenergizing.
EVAC MODE:
The convection fan is off. The EVAC fan is on. The flue damper motor
is energized and the flue damper opens. The EVAC damper motor is
energized thus opening four dampers: two EVAC dampers (item 17), the
fresh air damper (item 20), and the firebox bypass damper (item 19). The
thermostats remain energized in this mode so that this mode can be
used in starting the fire (see the operating procedures section of this
manual). This mode is also used to vent the smoke from the unit prior to
opening the door.
COOK AND HOLD MODE:
The only difference between this mode and the “cook” mode is that
temperature control is shifted away from the primary thermostat to a
preset secondary (or “hold”) thermostat after the operator set timer on
the instrument panel counts down to zero. Then the temperature control
reverts to the secondary thermostat and all other aspects of the “cook”
mode are in operation.
HI-TEMP MODE:
If the oven temperature reaches 450 degrees all fans (except the
cabinet cooling fans) de-energize and all dampers close. When the
temperature falls below 450 degrees normal operations resume.
ELECTRICAL ELEMENTS:
The pit incorporates an electrical heating element in the oven which is
energized whenever the control thermostat calls for a temperature rise as
long as the “Element” switch is on. Turning the “Element” switch off only
deactivates the element, leaving the wood burning temperature controls
operational.
Page 6 of 43
OPERATING PROCEDURES
1. STARTING THE FIRE.
(Caution: Use only small quantities of green wood except for fire starting).
NEVER USE CHARCOAL LIGHTING FLUID, GASOLINE, OR OTHER
VOLATILE FUELS TO START THE FIRE.
a.
Manual Fire Starting WITH COLD PIT – no coals in firebox.
1. Use solid (safe) fire-starting blocks along with two small dry
pieces of wood and a couple of logs (use 6” diameter x 24” long
green hardwood in the firebox. As an alternative to the starter
blocks, use kindling.
2. Set Cooking Thermostat at desired temperature.
3. Select the “EVAC” position on the selector switch.
4. Light starter block or paper with match and close firebox door.
5. After about 10 minutes turn the “EVAC” switch off and the
“Cook” switch on (on “EVAC”, the oven will not begin warming
because the heat will be bypassed up the stack).
b. Manual Fire Starting – Coals Remaining in Firebox.
1. Shovel out dead ashes as required.
2. Set cooking thermostat at desired temperature.
3. Select the EVAC position on the selector switch.
4. Stir up live coals and place one or more small logs on the coals.
Close the firebox door.
5. Add more wood as needed to establish a good fire.
6. See above, Starting The Fire, a. 5.
2. LOADING THE MEAT.
a.
Model 250FSE Little Red Smokehouse.
1. Turn thermostat all the way down.
2. Turn on EVAC switch and wait at least 60 seconds before
opening door. This will allow most of the smoke to be cleared
from oven interior.
3. The unit is equipped with 10 pull out racks (shelves). Place meat
on racks – it may be necessary to remove some of the racks to fit
the product height – being careful to leave space at sides, front
and between the meat to allow good heat and smoke circulation.
4. Close door and latch. Turn off EVAC switch and turn on Cook
switch. Be sure to set the temperature indicator (red arrow) at
your desired cooking temperature (see 3 Cook Operation and 4
Cook and Hold Operation).
b. Model 250R-FS Smoke-Master. Same procedure as 1 through 4 above,
except this unit has seven racks instead of ten.
Page 7 of 43
3.
“COOK” OPERATION.
a. Set the Selector switch in the “Cook” position and set the thermostat
to the desired cooking temperature. If the unit is equipped with an
electric heating element turn HTR ELEM on as desired.
4.
“COOK AND HOLD” OPERATION.
a. Set the timer to the desired cooking time (see detailed
instructions about timer).
b. Turn the Selector switch to the “Cook and Hold” position.
c. After the cooking time has elapsed, temperature control
switches to an internal, preset, “hold” thermostat until
the Selector switch is changed. The “hold” temperature
is approximately 145 degrees. NOTE: The timer dial
does not move as it counts down. When the timer
indicator light is flashing, it is counting down. When this
light stops flashing, it has completed its countdown.
5.
INSPECTION OF MEAT.
a. It is best not to open the doors interrupting the cooking process any
more often than necessary. However, during the “get acquainted”
process of learning your pit, you will probably inspect the meat more
often. Remember you lose heat and moisture each time the door is
opened.
b. Evacuate – turn the thermostat all the way down, turn the EVAC
switch on and wait at least 60 seconds before opening doors.
Remember to turn off EVAC switch and reset thermostat to resume
normal cooking. Always EVAC & Wait before opening doors.
6.
INSPECTION OF FIREBOX.
a. Turn the EVAC switch on. Turn the thermostat down, otherwise
you will waste fuel. Do this always. Opening the firebox without
evacuating can result in a fire “flashback” as the hot wood seeks
fresh oxygen.
b. Wait at least 60 seconds and open the firebox door. Do this always.
c. Add wood as required.
d. Close the door, turn off the EVAC switch and reset the thermostat.
7.
REMOVAL OF MEAT.
a. Racks can be pulled out to access and remove the meat.
8.
HANDLING OF RENDERED GREASE.
a.
Grease that collects in the bottom of the cooking chamber should
be drained by threading the grease drain extension nipple onto the
drain valve fitting and draining the grease into a suitable
receptacle.
This grease should be stored in a closed barrel. Usually a company
that buys and sells used grease will furnish a barrel.
Page 8 of 43
9.
CLEANING OF PIT.
a. Daily.
1. Drain grease as often as needed.
prevent a fire hazard.
Drain after every cooking to
2. Clean racks.
3. Wipe down exterior of pit (including firebox door) using a mild
soap or detergent on wet cloth.
4. Clean any carbon build-up around the firebox door.
5. Place excess ashes in a fire-safe, closed container such as a
J&R Mfg. ash cart. Ashes can start fires (example: dumster
fires) several days after removing them from the firebox.
b. Weekly or Bi-Weekly.
1. Remove oven racks and apply oven cleaner to the interior
surfaces of the unit and wipe off. Be sure that all the oven
cleaner has been removed with clear water after cleaning.
2. We recommend that foil or plastic be placed on the floor in front
of pit when cleaning oven door and firebox door.
3. Clean the build-up on inside of firebox door.
4. Be very careful not to damage the electrical element in the top of
the pit (if your pit is equipped with this option).
c. Monthly:
1. Remove the convection fan cowling from the ceiling of the oven
and thoroughly clean ceiling, cowling, and fan impeller.
CAUTION: Turn off and tag breaker to prevent the convection
fan or elements from being energized.
d. Annually:
1. Remove all rear inspection panels and clean the rear damper
areas and stack plenum. Inspect and clean smokestack as
required. Remove all interior baffles (at inside rear of oven) and
clean.
10.
HIGH TEMPERATURE PROTECTION.
a. This pit is equipped with a safety thermostat control that will close
dampers, deactivate fans, etc. if the interior oven temperature
reaches 450 degrees.
c. If the pit stops (lights go off, etc.) and the front door feels excessively
hot to the touch, DO NOT OPEN THE PIT as there may be a grease
fire inside. The pit will automatically resume operation when it cools
down. Open the doors after it cools down.
Page 9 of 43
11. TROUBLE-SHOOTING.
a. Refer first to the Service Manual and then call our Service
Department at (972)-289-0801 if further assistance is required.
12. COOKING TIMES AND TEMPERATURE.
a. The Barbecue Recipe Book gives times and temperatures for nonconvection ovens.
b. This unit is a Convection Oven and consequently cooks faster than
ordinary ovens.
c. We recommend that you cook as follows:
PRODUCT
TEMPERATURE
TIME
1. Spareribs
250°
1½
hours
2. Loin (Baby-back) Ribs
250°
1
hour
3. Chicken Halves
250°
1½
hours
4. Beef Brisket
185°
11
hours
5. Prime Rib
250°
4
hours
11.
CAUTIONS.
a. Keep pit clean.
b. Keep grease drained.
c. Never allow exterior of pit near the top or the top itself to get
wet. This will void all warranties and could severely damage
the pit.
d. Always disconnect
or
cleaning.
the
pit
electrically
before
servicing
e. Refer to Cleaning (above) and DO IT!
f. A DIRTY PIT IS A
HAZARD. DRY WOOD CAN BE A
HAZARD, ESPECIALLY IF TOO MUCH IS USED (IT BURNS TOO
RAPIDLY TO CONTROL PROPERLY). NEVER OPEN A PIT DOOR
UNTIL IT HAS BEEN SWITCHED TO EVAC FOR AT LEAST 60
SECONDS. FLASHBACKS CAN OCCUR OTHERWISE. THE USE
OF DRY WOOD CAN BUILD UP VOLATILE GASES IN THE PIT AND
CAN ACTUALLY CAUSE SUDDEN PRESSURE INCREASES, WHICH
CAN FORCE MEAT DOORS OR FIREBOX DOORS OPEN.
Page 10 of 43
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE – CLEANING
MONTHLY:
The interior fan cowling area should be cleaned. Remove the convection
cowling (25), clean, and reinstall. Clean the convection fan impeller (26) at
the same time.
ANNUALLY:
Remove the rear upper exterior skin panel. Remove the bolts that secure
the hinged access cover (22) over the rear dampers and open the cover. For
older models remove the rear EVAC and Flue access plate and the rear
firebox damper access plate. Clean all the exposed cavities. Inspect and
clean, as needed, the flue beneath the firebox bypass damper (19). To
inspect this flue the damper will have to be in the open position. Either turn
the unit to the EVAC setting or disconnect the firebox damper linkage and
reconnect after inspection.
Inspect and repair/replace as needed the
damper gaskets associated with the EVAC dampers (17), the flue damper
(18), and the firebox damper.
Inside the oven, remove the convection cowling (25) by removing the two
“T” bolts (25A) and lifting the cowling off the rear clips. Then remove the
EVAC outlet baffles (28), the oven heat outlet baffle (29), and the oven heat
inlet baffle (30). Inspect and clean all areas behind these parts. Reinstall
the parts.
Remove the roof cover. Clean carbon from top components. Remove the
cover (20A) over the fresh air damper (20). Inspect, clean and repair/replace
as needed the fresh air inlet damper (20) and gasket.
Inspect and lubricate the combustion air linkages. Clean the combustion
air damper (14), and the combustion air inlet elbow (13B). Inspect the
combustion air damper gasket (13C).
Inspect and lubricate as needed the damper linkages.
Inspect the interior of the firebox.
refractory.
Repair as required any damaged
Page 11 of 43
GENERAL MAINTENANCE
Door Gaskets
The firebox door gasket and the oven door gasket should be smoke-tight.
To stop smoke leaks, you may need to shim the hinge side, the latch side, or
both. You may also need to “thicken” the gasketing by using additional
(allow 4 hours to cure before closing the door) RTV silicone between the
gasket and the body of the unit. Paper check the gasket seal by placing a
long strip of paper between the gasket and the unit body so that the paper
extends outside the door. Close and latch the door. Pull the paper toward
you. It should be very resistant to your effort. If it seems loose, further
adjust the door or the gasket thickness.
Page 12 of 43
USING YOUR “COOK & HOLD” FEATURE
I.
The Cook & Hold timer will reset the oven temperature to 145 degrees F at
the end of the time set on timer. However, it will take about 2 hours for
the oven to cool down from 250 degrees to 145 degrees. So, cut about 2
hours off the time you want it to cook.
II.
Make sure your timer is set correctly for your purposes. It is set properly
at the factory. See the detailed instructions in this manual for the timers.
III.
Procedures to follow:
1. Load oven with meat.
2. Set thermostat at desired cooking temp.
3. Stoke firebox.
4. Set hours to cook on timer (remember to reduce the cooking time
setting due to the long cool down time of the oven). It will gradually
cool from your thermostat setting to the preset 145° F hold setting.
Use trial and error to arrive at optimum timer settings.
5. Turn control from “COOK” to “COOK & HOLD”
IMPORTANT NOTE: In addition to the maintenance procedures
described elsewhere in this manual, the electric heating elements
and the convection fan impeller should be inspected regularly, daily
if possible, and cleaned if necessary. If there is a heavy build up of
soot or creosote, these surfaces should be cleaned with a stiff brush.
This is especially important if the heater elements are not frequently
employed. Heavy buildup on the elements can create a fire hazard.
Newer units with Idec "RTE" Timers:
Green "PWR" light will remain on, red "Out" light will illuminate when timer has timed out. For these
timers the factory settings are mode: A, scale: 0-10, range: h.
Older units with Omron Timers:
Red light will illuminate, and green light will begin flashing, then the red and green lights will remain
illuminated (steady, not flashing) when the timer times out. For these timers the factory settings are
mode: A, time range: 12, time units: hours.
Page 13 of 43
TROUBLESHOOTING
NOTE:
Always de-energize the unit or the component in the unit before
servicing and tag switches to warn others that service is in progress.
1.
NO POWER (NOTHING WILL ENERGIZE)
Check the power supply to the unit. If no supply voltage or improper
voltage, then check the breaker box. If power supply is OK then check for
proper voltage at the contact block on the unit. If the voltage there is
improper then repair the supply wiring from the junction box or from the
plug (or repair the plug). If there is the proper voltage at the contact block
then check the control fuse block and the high limit thermostat for
continuity. Replace if no continuity.
2.
CONVECTION FAN INOPERATIVE
Check the fuse and the high limit thermostat. Note that the unit must
be in the “COOK” or “COOK and HOLD” mode with EVAC off for this fan to
operate. Check the Convection Blower Contactor and Overload (CBO) (36
and 36A) and reset if needed (see enclosed sheet on the reset procedures). If
overload has not tripped then check for proper voltage between terminals 4
& 6 of the CBO. If OK, check the Convection Blower Motor (10) itself. It has
internal thermal protection. Replace the motor if defective. If the voltage
between terminals 4 & 6 is not correct then trace the circuit rearward to find
the problem.
3.
EVAC FAN INOPERATIVE
Check the fuse and high limit thermostat. This fan will be operative in
the “EVAC”, “COOK”, and “COOK and HOLD” modes. Duplicate the steps for
the convection fan described in #2 above except check the overload and
terminals on the EVAC Blower Contactor and Overload (35 and 35A) rather
than the Convection Blower Overload.
4.
CABINET COOLING FAN(S) INOPERATIVE
These fans should run at all times when the unit is plugged in or wired
into a power supply. Check the power supply and verify the proper voltage
to the contact block on the unit. If they are OK then check the wiring to
each motor. If the wiring is OK the fans should be replaced.
Page 14 of 43
5.
COMBUSTION AIR MOTOR (FAN) AND/OR COMBUSTION AIR
DAMPER MOTOR INOPERATIVE
Check the fuse and high limit thermostat. The combustion air fan (12)
and the Combustion Air Damper Motor (13) are energized when the unit is in
either the “COOK”, “COOK and HOLD”, or “EVAC” modes and the
appropriate thermostat is calling for a temperature increase (recall the 60
second delay for this fan after the thermostat contacts close). If the
combustion air damper actuator is energized (i.e. the damper is open) and
the wiring to the combustion air fan is OK, then replace the fan. If the
reverse is true, then check the Combustion Air Damper Motor and replace if
defective.
If both are inoperative check for proper voltage at terminal 3 of the
Combustion Air Delay Timer (13A).
If voltage is proper and neutral
continuity is verified at the Combustion Air Fan and the Combustion Air
Damper Motor then replace both components. If the voltage is not OK then
check for proper voltage between terminals 2 and 7 of the Combustion Air
Delay Timer. If the voltage there is OK then replace it. If not OK then check
the thermostat for proper voltage and replace/repair as needed.
6.
HEATER ELEMENT INOPERATIVE
First verify that a thermostat is calling for a temperature rise and that
the heater element switch is on. Next check the fuse and high limit
thermostat. Check the voltage between terminals 4 and 8 of the Heater
Element Relay (27A). If OK and if the wiring between the Heater Element
Relay and the Heater Element (27) is OK then replace the heater element. If
the voltage between terminals 4 and 8 is not OK, then trace the circuit
rearward to find the problem.
7.
EVAC DAMPER MOTOR INOPERATIVE
Check the fuse and high limit thermostat. Check for proper voltage at
terminal 4 of contact block A on the EVAC Switch (3). If voltage is OK and
the wiring is OK between the switch and the EVAC Damper Motor (15) then
the damper motor may need to be replaced. First, however, verify that the
damper motor has not just overheated. This damper motor has an internal
limit switch – it must be allowed to complete its power stroke and close its
limit switch contacts. Otherwise, it will overheat, trip out internally and
then eventually fail completely. When adjusting linkages always let the
motor complete its power stroke (amperage then drops to about 0.2) before
connecting any load to the pivoting arm. If voltage at terminal 4 is not OK
then trace the circuit rearward to find the problem.
8.
FLUE DAMPER MOTOR INOPERATIVE
Use the same procedure as for the EVAC Damper motor except verify
the voltage at terminal 4 of contact block B of the EVAC switch.
Page 15 of 43
9.
SMOKE LEAKS
Check for proper EVAC fan function. Has the unit been cleaned as per
the schedule in the cleaning maintenance section? Check the gaskets for
proper seal (see the cleaning maintenance section for adjustment details). If
gaskets are to be replaced it is important to remove all old gasket material
and mastic material and clean with solvent to degrease before installing a
new gasket. Use RTV silicone as mastic.
10. SOOTING ON MEAT.
The wood being used is either too dry, too much wood is being used, or
the unit is not venting properly. Check the flues and baffles for obstructions.
Check the stack for buildup. Check the EVAC fan function and verify the
operation of the flue damper.
11. COOKING FAST OR SLOW.
If the temperature is holding at the set point, then check the thermostat
calibration. If over-riding, then check all the gaskets, the Flue Damper
Motor, and the Combustion Air Damper Motor. If the temperature is underriding or is sluggish to respond, then check for flue or baffle obstructions,
stack buildup, EVAC fan function, Combustion Air Damper Motor function,
and check the Flue Damper Motor function.
12. UNEVEN COOKING.
Check the Convection Fan operation. Clean the convection fan cowling
and the convection fan impeller.
13. “POOFING” – PRESSURIZATION DURING OPERATION.
Unburned combustible gases can be driven off a wood fire when the fire
is oxygen deprived. When oxygen is reintroduced, these gases ignite and
result in a pressure increase. For this reason there is a 60 second delay in
every combustion air cycle. The flue damper and EVAC dampers open
immediately and after the delay of 60 seconds combustion air flows into the
firebox. If pressurization is observed check the Combustion Air Delay Timer.
If the delay time is correct, then check for proper drafting of the unit.
Pressurization usually results from improper firing of the unit. Green
wood is required. Dry wood can cause the pressurization problem. Too
much wood in the firebox can also be the culprit. The problem is directly
related to the rate of combustion (dry wood burns faster) and surface area
(quantity of fuel). Charcoal should not be used as a fire-starting aid due to
its large surface area.
Page 16 of 43
MODEL 250 SERIES NOMENCLATURE
1.
COOK – OFF -- COOK and HOLD Switch
2.
Timer
3.
EVAC Switch
4.
Heater Element Switch
5.
Oven Control Primary Thermostat
5A.
J Box for Secondary and High Limit Thermostats.
6.
Secondary (or Hold) Thermostat
7.
High Limit Thermostat
8.
6 Amp Slow Blow Fuse
9.
Cabinet Cooling Fan
10.
Convection Blower Motor
11.
EVAC (or Stack) Blower Motor
11A. EVAC Blower
12.
Combustion Air Fan
13.
Combustion Air Damper Motor
13A. Combustion Air Delay Timer
13B. Combustion Air Inlet Elbow
13C. Combustion Air Damper Gasket
14.
Combustion Air Damper
15.
EVAC Damper Motor
16.
Flue Damper Motor
17.
EVAC Damper (1 of 2)
18.
Flue Damper
19.
Firebox Bypass Damper
19A. Firebox Flue
20.
Fresh Air Inlet Damper
20A. Fresh Air Inlet Damper Cover
21.
Fresh Air Inlet
Page 17 of 43
MODEL 250 SERIES NOMENCLATURE
Continued
22.
Hinged Damper Access Cover
22A. Hinged Stack Plenum Access Cover
23.
Oven Heat Outlet (1 of 2)
24.
Oven Heat Inlet
25.
Convection Cowling
25A. Convection Cowling “T” Bolts (1 of 2)
25B. Convection Cowling Retainer Clips (1 of 2)
26.
Convection Blower Impeller
27.
Electric Heater Element
27A. Heater Element Relay
28.
EVAC Outlet Baffle (1 of 2)
28A. EVAC Outlet (1 of 2)
29.
Oven Heat Outlet Baffle
30.
Oven Heat Inlet Baffle
31.
Stack Connector
32.
Stack Jet Nozzle
33.
Grease Drain Valve
34.
Grease Drain Pan
35.
EVAC Blower Contactor
35A. EVAC Blower Overload
36.
Convection Fan Contactor
36A. Convection Fan Overload
37.
Firebox Door
38.
Firebox Door Silicone Rubber Gasket
39.
Firebox Door Fiberglass Gasket
Page 18 of 43
CONTROL PANEL
2
5
4
3
1
INSIDE CONTROL PANEL
8
13A
35
35A
36
27A
36A
9
HIGH LIMIT AND HOLD THERMOSTATS
7
6
Page 19 of 43
RESETTING OVERLOADS
RESET
HERE
Page 20 of 43
INTERIOR VIEW WITH ALL BAFFLES IN PLACE
25
25A
26
28
29
INTERIOR VIEW WITH MOST BAFFLES REMOVED
28A
23
30
Page 21 of 43
Page 22 of 43
INTERIOR VIEW COWLING REMOVED
27
26
25B
FIREBOX
DOOR
38
39
37
Page 23 of 43
Page 24 of 43
SIDE VIEW SHOWING COMBUSTION AIR ASSEMBLY
12
14
13
13C
13B
FRESH AIR INLET SHOWN WITH DAMPER OPEN
20
21
TOP VIEW
20A
11
10
5A
Page 25 of 43
Page 26 of 43
REAR VIEW WITH EXTERIOR PANELS REMOVED
15
16
11A
REAR VIEW WITH ACCESS PANELS OPEN
22A
22
STACK JET NOZZLE AND STACK CONNECTOR
31
32
Page 27 of 43
Page 28 of 43
ALL DAMPERS OPEN (EVAC POSITION)
17 *
28A
19
19A
* NOTE: DAMPERS ARE HIGHLIGHTED FOR
ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES
FLUE DAMPER OPEN
17 *
18 *
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lJD.
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Page 40 of 43
H3CR
H3CR
Solid-State Timer
H3CR
■ RANGE SELECTION
Operating mode display window
Power indicator (green LED)
flashes when timer operates,
lit when timer
stops operating
Operation mode selector
A ON-delay
B Repeat cycle/signal OFF start
B2: Repeat cycle/signal ON start
C: Signal ON/OFF-delay
D: Signal OFF-delay
E: Interval
Output indicator
(red LED)
Scale range
display windows
Time unit
display window
Time range selector
(1.2, 3, 12 or 30)
Time setting knob
(set time)
Time unit selector
(sec, min, hrs, 10h)
Time
range
1.2
3
12
30
0
Time units
hrs (hours)
0.12 to 1.2
0.3 to 3
1.2 to 12
3 to 30
sec(onds) min(utes)
0.05 to 1.2 0.12 to 1.2
0.3 to 3
0.3 to 3
1.2 to 12
1.2 to 12
3 to 30
3 to 30
Instantaneous output*
10h (10 hours)
1.2 to 12
3 to 30
12 to 120
30 to 300
* Set to time setting knob below zero.
Specifications
Part number
Supply
AC
voltage
DC
Operating voltage AC
DC
Power
AC
consumption
AC/DC
DC
Timing functions
H3CR-A
H3CR-AS
H3CR-A8
H3CR-A8S
24 V or 100 to 240 VAC, 50/60 Hz
12 V or 24 V
85% to 110% of rated supply voltage
90% to 110% of rated supply voltage at 12 VDC
10 VA
1.5 VA (AC), 0.8 W (DC)
1.3 W
ON-delay, Repeat cycle signal OFF ON-delay, Interval
start, Repeat cycle signal ON start,
Signal ON/OFF delay,
Signal OFF-delay, Interval
H3CR-A8EL/H3CR-A8E
■ H3CR-A, H3CR-AS (SIX-FUNCTION TIMERS)
Mode A
ON-Delay
Signal Start/Signal Reset
Power is applied continuously. Timing starts at the leading
edge of the start input. The output relay is energized when the
accumulated time equals the set time. Subsequent start
signals during or after timing will not be accepted. The output
relay or transistor will remain energized until a reset input is
applied or power is interrupted. The minimum signal input is
0.05 second.
t
Power (2 and 10)
Start (2 and 6)
Reset (2 and 7)
Control output: NC (8 and 11)
NC (1 and 4)
Control output: NO (9 and 11)
NO (1 and 3)
Start signal (remote control possible)
Reset signal
Power indicator
Flashing
(remote control possible)
t = set time
(Power continuously supplied)
Page 41 of 43
Lit
Revised
04-01-2017
WARRANTY
J & R MANUFACTURING, INC. warrants its equipment against defective parts and
workmanship under normal use and when installed in accordance with
manufacturer’s recommendations for a period (after date of shipment*) of twelve
(12) months on parts and ninty (90) days on labor with the following provisions:
1. This warranty does not apply if problems or claims are the result of: (a)
damage in transit (equipment becomes owner’s property upon shipment
from factory and owner must file claim with transport company); (b)
misuse, neglect, improper maintenance, and or unauthorized alterations
to equipment; (c) improper installation of exhaust stacks, air supply, and
extraneous exhaust systems; (d) improper voltage hook-up; (e) wind, rain,
hail, fire and acts of God.
2. In-warranty replacement parts will be credited only upon receipt
and inspection of defective parts at the factory. All shipping
charges are the responsibility of the owner, but, at the discretion
of J&R Manufacturing, ground shipping charges may be waived or
credited.
3. Labor to remove, replace, or repair defects under this warranty
must be authorized by factory. Premium time (overtime) and
travel time are not included in the warranty.
4. Sales, excise, and other taxes, food loss, and down-time are
not covered under this warranty.
5. The removal of manufacturer’s nameplate(s) voids the warranty.
It is the aim of J & R Manufacturing, Inc. to build the finest equipment possible and to
facilitate quick solutions to all problems that might arise with the lowest expense
possible to the user(s). To help us achieve this goal, please follow these procedures:
1. Telephone our service department at 972-289-0801 at the first sign of
a problem.
Have ready the Model and Serial Number of your
equipment.
2. Cooperate with our Service Department by making certain visual
checks as requested. Most problems are quick and easy to pinpoint and
resolve.
3. In the event it is necessary to use a service company, the factory will
contact its authorized service agency. If no authorized service agency is
available, please recommend a service company. The use of a service company
not specifically authorized by our Service Department at factory
headquarters may invalidate this warranty.
* or provable start up date, whichever is later (start up must be within 12 months of ship date)
Page 42 of 43
Remember to contact J&R for any additional information you need or to
order replacement parts or accessories.
Accessories include:
Ash Carts
Wood Carts
Ash Rakes
Contact J&R:
972-285-4855 (Main)
972-289-0801 (Parts and Service)
800-527-4831 (Toll Free-U.S and Canada)
sales@jrmanufacturing.com
www. jrmanufacturing.com
For firewood, we recommend:
Arnold Bros. Forest Products Inc.
201 N. Beltline Road, Irving, TX
75061 Phone: (972) 986-6339
www.abfpinc.com
Serving the Dallas / Ft. Worth Metroplex’s finest
restaurants, as well as throughout the U.S. and
abroad since 1976.
Cooking woods available:
Oak – Pecan – Hickory – Mesquite
For delivery: Call (972)986-6339
• Commercial: Ask for Rick
Page 43 of 43
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