Larchmont United Methodist Church (LUMC)
Kitchen usage policies and procedures
I General
A.
Priority of kitchen use is a privilege extended to first LUMC members
supporting church wide events, followed by church ministry groups, then church
affiliated groups or individual members. The kitchen is also available for use for
public events, however they must be sponsored by a LUMC member or approved
by Kitchen Committee.
1.
Church Events - Primary participants are LUMC members. These
are church-wide events (e.g., Spirit Sunday, blessing of the animals) or
events sponsored by church ministry groups, church-affiliated groups
(e.g., men’s or women’s group meeting, boy scout function, youth group
function) or individual members (e.g., family reunion, receptions)
a.
Food prepared in the kitchen should follow Norfolk City
Health Code requirements as a guide.
b.
Food prepared outside of the church kitchen may be
brought into the kitchen to be prepared for serving (e.g., a
church-wide pot luck luncheon).
2.
Public events-Church member-sponsored events, primarily
focused on providing food to non-LUMC members.
a.
Food prepared in the kitchen must follow all Norfolk City
Health Code requirements.
b.
Food prepared outside of the church kitchen may be
brought into the kitchen to be prepared for serving (e.g., a
church-wide pot luck luncheon).
3.
All groups must obtain approval for using the kitchen from the
LUMC Board of Trustees. The process is:
a.
Request Board approval by filling out the LUMC Kitchen
Use Request Form (See Attachment 1. Kitchen Use Request Form.
Also available on the LUMC website, www.larchmontumc.org)
b.
Turn form into church office at least one month prior to
the event. The Board considers routine kitchen use requests on
the second Tuesday of each month unless of an urgent nature (i.e.
Funeral)
c.
Requests will be considered based upon availability,
expected use, event classification, and mission of the group
B.
Kitchen fees are as follows ( Kitchen only, use of any other room is in
addition to the fees below) NEST, a church-sponsored ministry, is exempt from
these charges
1.
Church events
Use fee
Church-wide function $0
Church-affiliated
$0
Individual members
$25
2
2.
Public events
$100
1
Cleaning/key deposit
251
$251
$25
$50
Fee waived if Kitchen Committee member is present during kitchen use and cleanup.
C.
Each person or group approved to use the kitchen will receive
instructions from a Certified Kitchen Manager or kitchen committee member on
equipment use, food handling safety, and post-event cleaning and sanitizing
requirements. There is a check list available for initial startup of event. (For
guidance Attachment 2. Kitchen Use Check Sheet)
D.
Public events require a Certified Kitchen Manager to open the kitchen.
After the event the manager will inspect for cleanliness, and lock the kitchen.
E.
The church custodian does not clean the kitchen. Each kitchen usergroup is responsible for cleaning and sanitization of the kitchen and equipment
in accordance with this document prior to leaving at the end of an event (For
guidance
Attachment 3. Kitchen End-of-Use Check Sheet).
F.
LUMC re-usable dinnerware is provided. Disposable food-service items
will be at the expense of the using group.
G.
All LUMC kitchen policies and procedures, safe food-handling information
and requirements, based on Norfolk City Health Code, as well as kitchen
equipment use are contained in this folder and are available on the LUMC
website.
H.
Comments regarding quality of experience using kitchen and
opportunities to improve are welcome. Please find for this review, Attachment
4.
II Personal Responsibilities for safe food handling
A. A break in safe food handling is one of the most common
ways food is contaminated, increasing the risk of food
borne illness. Many of the most common acts of
contamination occur when personnel do not follow basic
rules. These include
1. Anyone with symptoms of a communicable disease,
such as sneezing, coughing, fever, diarrhea, nausea
or sore throat should be excluded from working in
the kitchen or serving food.
B. The most important thing you can do is properly wash your
hands (See Attachment) as often as necessary. You must
wash hand:
1. After
a. Using the restroom
b. Touching your clothes
c. Touching your face, body, or hair
d. Smoking, eating, drinking, or chewing gum
e. Taking out the garbage
f. Using a chemical compound or other type of
chemical
g. Clearing tables or handling dirty dishes
h. Coughing or
handkerchief
i.
sneezing,
Touching anything else
contaminate your hands
2. Before handling clean dishes
3. Before and after handling raw food
C. Clothing
1. Clothing must be clean.
or
using
that
a
could
2. Aprons are an effective way to protect clothing
from splashes and spills. Aprons and clothes are
not to be used for wiping hands. They are not
substituted for either paper or cloth towels.
D. Hair restraints
1. Clothing and hair restraints must be designed and
worn in a way that will keep all hair (including body
hair) from contacting food, clean equipment,
utensils, linens, and unwrapped single-use items.
2. Hairnets, baseball caps, ponytail holders, and beard
nets are all acceptable means of keeping hair
restrained and out of food.
3. Long hair should be pulled back in a restraint.
E. Jewelry.
1. The only jewelry allowed on hands and arms is a
plain wedding band.
2. All other types of exposed jewelry, including
medical alert bracelets are prohibited.
III. Safe food storage, preparation and service
b.
The Five Risk Factors for Foodborne Illness (Attachment) provides a
summary of risk factors in food storage, preparation, and service.
c.
Potentially hazardous foods
A.
Some foods are more likely to cause a food borne illness than
others. These foods are commonly referred to as potentially hazardous
foods (time/temperature control for safety or TCS). They are generally
high in protein, moist, and chemically neutral or only slightly acidic.
Some foods are considered potentially hazardous (TCS) because the way
they are processed or prepared may make them more likely to become
contaminated (e.g., sliced melons, cut leafy greens, raw sprouts)
B.
FDA Food identifies the following as potentially hazardous foods
Milk and milk products
Cut tomatoes
Poultry
Tofu
Baked or boiled potatoes
Cooked rice
Shell eggs
Cut leafy greens
Fish
Garlic in oil mixtures
Fresh sprouts and seeds
Cooked beans
Meats-beef, pork, lamb (raw
Shellfish and crustaceans
or heat-treated)
Cut melons
Soy-protein foods
d.
Thawing frozen foods
A.
Frozen foods must never be thawed on counter at room
temperature.
B.
There are four approved methods for properly thawing frozen,
potentially hazardous food.
1.
Thawing as part of the cooking process. The process
between thawing and cooking must be uninterrupted, with the
product reaching the required minimum internal cooking
temperature.
2.
Thawing in a microwave. Once thawed, the cooking
process can continue in the microwave or the product can be
transferred directly to a conventional cooking process. Products
being thawed in a microwave must be regularly rotated to ensure
even thawing. All microwave thawed food should be cooked
immediately
3.
Thawing in a refrigerator is the preferred method. This
method takes many hours so advanced planning is necessary.
Products thawed using this method must be placed in a pan to
collect drippings and placed at the proper storage level to avoid
cross-contamination (see Attachment H. Keeping Food Safe in
Storage for guidance on proper refrigerator storage).
4.
Thawing under cool running water. Water should be 70°F
or less and must be constantly running and draining away from the
product. A prep sink may be designated for this purpose, the use
of a colander to keep product above sink surface is preferred. The
sink must be properly washed, rinsed, and sanitized, both before
and after thawing. The product should be in a food-grade
container. Once thawed, the product should be either cooked
immediately or transferred to a refrigerator, stored at the proper
storage level to avoid cross-contamination (see Attachment h.
Keeping Food Safe in Storage for guidance on proper freezer
storage).
C.
Proper cooking temperatures. Minimum internal cooking
temperatures for different foods have been established to kill the
microorganisms they most commonly harbor.
D.
All internal temperatures must be measured using a stainless
steel-probed thermometer (available in kitchen)
E.
Minimum Internal Cooking Temperature Chart is available for
review at end of this section.
F.
Specific internal temperature requirements using a stovetop or
oven are provided. Essential to remember that temperature control of all
food items whether cold or hot is one key to the prevention of food
borne illnesses.
G.
Adding raw products to previously-cooked products (e.g., soup,
chili) requires:
1.
Cooking to an internal temperature of 165°F and the
product must be stand, covered, for at least two minutes after
cooking.
H.
All food cooked in a microwave including raw meat, poultry, fish,
or eggs requires:
Cooking to an internal temperature of 165°F and the product must
be stand, covered, for at least two minutes after cooking.
I.
All leftover foods must be reheated to a minimum internal
temperature of 165°F.
MINIMUM INTERNAL TEMPERATURE CHART
Food
Internal temperature minimums
Commercially processed
135°F for 15 seconds
products,
Steamed/cooked
vegetables and fruit
whole roasts (beef, pork),
145°F for 4 minutes
Beef steak, veal, lamb,
145°F for 15 seconds
pork, fish, Shell eggs made
order3
Ground meat products of
155°F for 15 seconds
all types
Commutated (i.e., mixed)
meats, injected meats,
mechanically tenderized
meats
All poultry
165°F for 15 seconds
All stuffed meat products
3
When using eggs in a sauce that cannot be heated to 145°F, such as hollandaise sauce, use only
pasteurized egg products.
e.
Cooling foods for Storage
A.
Improperly cooled food is one of the most common causes of
food borne illness.
B.
The temperature danger zone (most active growth of bacteria) is
between 41°F and 135°F.
C.
When cooked food will not be served right away, it must be
cooled as quickly as possible. Large containers of hot food placed in a
refrigerator serve as incubators for bacteria as the food cools slowly. The
presence of hot food often will increase the temperature in the
refrigerator to an unsafe temperature. Therefore the following
recommendations are provided. The commonly approved method (FDA
Model Food Code) involves two stages
1.
Cool hot cooked food from 135°F to 70°F within two hours.
2.
Then cool to 41°F or lower in an additional two hours for a
total cooling time of six hours.
D.
General rules for increasing cooling rates.
1.
Reduce volume or mass by separating products into
smaller pieces or containers. Flat, shallow containers with more
cooling surface are ideal. Metal containers should be stainless
steel.
2.
E.
Leave products at least partially uncovered during cooling.
Common methods for rapid cooling.
1.
Ice baths. The pot or container of hot product is partially
submerged in an ice water solution. A larger pot or clean prep sink
can be used for the ice water solution. The product must be
stirred regularly and ice should not be deep enough to
contaminate food
2.
Cooling wand. Commercially available product.
Particularly effective if used with an ice bath. It is important the
ice wand is sanitized before use.
3.
f.
Adding ice as an ingredient.
Eight major food allergens.
A.
The Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (January
1, 2006) requires plain language labeling or verbal disclosure for all foods
containing one or more of the following4:
g.
Milk and milk products
Eggs
Fish
Soy
Shellfish
Peanuts
Tree nuts
Wheat protein
PREVENTION OF CROSS CONTAMINATION
A.
Cross-contamination is one of the leading causes of food borne
illnesses. Generally refers to biological contamination, or essentially
contaminating different food items with bacteria or allergens from other
foods.
B.
Particularly dangerous when a ready-to-eat food becomes
contaminated as that food is not heated.
C.
Essential to prevent cross contamination of food products served
to people with life threatening allergies.
4
This labeling is not required of foods prepared for a private event. While it is up to each person to
inquire about food content, it is prudent to ensure all attendees are made aware if any of the eight major
food allergens is being used.
D.
Many episodes of cross contamination can be prevented by
proper food storage and handling. (Attachment Keeping Food Safe in
Storage)
E.
Careful planning of preparation areas can prevent contamination
as well. Decisions such as a vegetable prep area and a meat prep area
help to reduce likelihood of contamination.
F.
There are three main types of cross contamination:
1.
Food-to-food –
Occurs with raw meat products or other food items
harboring pathogens comes into contact with food items
that are ready-to-eat or require minimal further
preparation. Direct example-unwashed vegetables mixed
with washed vegetables prior to salad preparation.
Indirect example- raw chicken in a refrigerator dripping
down into rice stored below
2.
People-to-food
a.
Occurs when people spread contaminants to food.
b.
Prevention
i.
See Section 2.a. Personal health and
hygiene above.
WASHING
is
Key message CAREFUL HAND
essential
to
prevention
of
contamination
ii.
Bare hands should never come in contact
with ready-to-eat foods (i.e., foods which will not
be cooked prior to serving, such as salad or cooked
meat being plated)
1.
Ideally suitable utensils such as deli
tissue, spatulas, or tongs should be used in
combination with single use gloves. These
utensils should be clean and not used in
more than on item.
2.
When using single use gloves
a.
Gloves are not a replacement
for proper hand washing techniques
or good personal hygiene practices.
b.
Wash hands prior to donning
a new pair of disposable gloves.
c.
Remember single use gloves
can become contaminated and
should be changed anytime hands
would need to be washed.
IT IS NEVER PERMISSIBLE TO WASH
GLOVES AND CONTINUE SERVING
3.
Equipment-to-food
a.
Occurs during food preparation.
Equipment is
contaminated and food products that come in contact become
contaminated
as
well.
Especially
dangerous
when
contaminated food is considered ready-to-eat food.
b.
Cutting boards, other work surfaces, knives, and
thermometers are common pieces of equipment implicated in
cross contamination. Wooden cutting boards are permitted if in
good condition without cuts and divots that can harbor
bacteria.
c.
All food prep surfaces and equipment should be
properly cleaned and sanitized between food items. All
equipment with removable parts should be broken down
and cleaned separately.
Sanitizing buckets and clothes
should be readily available for all surface cleaning.
h.
Cleaning and sanitizing Food Service Ware, Utensils and Surfaces
A.
Food service ware (dish and utensils) washing using the
dishwasher. The dishwasher provides proper cleaning and completes its
cycle with a 180°F sanitizing, rinse cycle. (See paragraph 4.f. Dishwasher,
below, for specific instructions)
1.
Dishwasher -Turn the dishwasher on immediately upon
arrival using the small toggle switch on the front bottom panel.
The thermometer will read 180°F when ready to use.
2.
Using the dishwasher is a four-step process.
a.
Each item must be scraped completely clean of
food (this may require pre-soaking). Use the “kitchen use
only” trashcan. If not done, dishware and utensils on the
lower levels will not clean properly and the dishwasher
filter will clog.
b.
Place items in the appropriate dishwasher rack.
Most have racks specifically designed for their storage.
c.
Stack dishwasher racks in the dishwasher
(suggested bottom-to-top stacking- flatware, glasses, cups,
bowls, dishes as high as the dishwasher space allows).
d.
Place 1 tablespoon of dishwasher powder into a
depression on the dishwasher door (each depression holds
1 tablespoon if poured to a level not to exceed the door
wall).
e.
Close the door, push down the handle.
The red cycle light will come on. Each cycle is three
minutes. Remove the dish racks at the end of the cycle.
f.
Either air-dry items in their dishwasher racks or
wipe dry with a clean paper towel.
g.
Place used towels in a plastic bag and leave the bag
on the triple sink when leaving the kitchen after the event
B.
Manual ware washing or hand ware washing.
With few
exceptions all cookware and dishes available can be washed in the
dishwasher. If you decide to use the triple sink be aware that this
washing involves five steps. First, each item must be scraped clean of
food (this may require pre-soaking). Each item is then hand-washed in
the first sink, using hot, soapy water, rinsed in the second sink with hot
clean water, dipped into the third sink containing sanitizing solution for
15 seconds, and, finally, allowed to air dry before being stowed away.
1.
CAUTION. The hot water out of the faucet is 140°F.
2.
The articulated faucet will reach all three sinks.
3.
You will hear what appears to be a dripping/leaking sound
under the dishwasher. It is the normal sound caused by an air gap
in the drain system.
4.
THERE IS NOT A GARBAGE DISPOSAL IN THE SINK SYSTEM
. Each item must be scraped completely clean of food into either a
refuse container or the trash can. (this may require pre-soaking).
Use the “kitchen use only” trashcan (it rolls) prior to washing.
5.
The high, flexible faucet will work with the normal faucet
on (center valve leading to the high, flexible faucet turned toward
the sink). To use the high-flexible faucet only, turn on the regular
faucet and turn the center valve, leading to the high-flexible
faucet, toward the windows.
C.
Procedure for using wash sink:
1.
Fill the wash sink ½ to ¾ full with hot (as hot as you can
stand it) soapy water (normally ½ to ¾ squirt from the soap bottle)
2.
Fill the rinse sink ½ to ¾ full with hot (as hot as you can
stand it) clean water.
3.
Fill the sanitizing sink ½ to ¾ full with hot sanitizing
solution (use the glass bottle located on the shelf above the sink to
measure 4 oz. of bleach if using 9” of water in the sanitizing sink or
6 oz. of bleach if using 12” in the sanitizing sink. Bleach is under
the sink next to the dishwasher.) Sanitizing solution should be
changed when it appears to have heavy debris or has been in use
over 2 hours.
4.
Hand washing items is a five-step process. (to reiterate)
a.
Each item must be scraped completely clean of
food (this may require pre-soaking). Use the “kitchen use
only” trashcan. This is necessary since there is no garbage
disposal. If not done, the sink drain will clog!
b.
Hand-wash each item in the first sink, using hot,
soapy water.
c.
Rinse in the second sink with hot clean water.
d.
Dip into the third sink containing sanitizing solution
for 15 seconds or wet using the sanitizer spray bottle
e.
Allow to air dry before stowing away. If you are
going to reuse the item, dry with a clean towel.
f.
Place used towels in a plastic bag and leave the bag
on the triple sink when leaving the kitchen after the event
D.
Surfaces
1.
Each horizontal work surface
a.
Will be cleaned with soapy water, rinsed with clean
water, and sprayed or wiped-down with sanitizing solution
between or after each use.
b.
Sanitizing solution should be allowed to remain on
the surface for at least 15 seconds, after which the surface
may be dried with a cloth or left to air-dry.
c.
Use the red cleaning bucket located above the
warewash sink to clean surfaces. Follow directions on
soap container. Empty, rinse, and let the cleaning bucket
air-dry on a sink sideboard when complete.
2.
After using the kitchen, each vertical surface will be
cleaned with soapy water, rinsed with clean water, and sprayed or
wiped-down with sanitizing and allowed to air-dry. This includes
the food processor, mixer and coffee maker
E.
Sanitizer.
All sanitizing liquid is based on a bleach/water mixture
to attain 50-100 ppm of chlorine (there should be little to no chlorine
smell). If you have a question about concentration, test the mixture with
a chlorine test strip located in the bin on the rack above the freezer.
Bleach is located in a container on the floor next to the dishwasher
a.
Use the glass bottle located on the shelf above the
ware wash sink to measure 4 oz. of bleach if using 9” of
water in the sanitizing sink or 6 oz. of bleach if using 12” in
the sanitizing sink.
b.
For sanitizing work surfaces/items either lightly
coat the surface or item using the sanitizer spray bottle
located on the shelf above the ware wash sink or, in the
green sanitizer bucket mix one capful of bleach to a 3/4full bucket of water.
F.
Cleanup of bodily fluids. Clean up of bodily fluids requires special
procedures and equipment. A Bodily Fluid Clean up kit (in a labeled
bucket) is located in the closet across from the hallway entrance door.
See Attachment i. Procedures for Clean-up of Bodily Fluids, for further
information. (Manuals for all equipment are kept in a black folder labeled
“LUMC Kitchen Equipment Manuals” located on top of the freezer).
IV.
Equipment Usage
A.
Range
1.
General information
1.
The range is gas. Be careful to follow instructions. If in
doubt, call a kitchen committee member!
2.
Once you turn the gas on, you MUST light all burner and
griddle pilot lights.
3.
You MAY light the pilot lights of either one or both ovens.
They work independently.
4.
The exhaust hood is automatic. It comes on as required. It
may be turned on manually using the hood fan toggle switch
located on the left front of the hood.
5.
Hood lights are turned on using the hood light toggle
switch located on the left front of the hood.
2.
Starting procedure
1.
Turn on the main gas line turning the valve located close
to the wall at the left rear of the range ¼ turn (it will be parallel to
the pipe).
2.
Turn on the range gas by turning the valve located on the
left front of the range ¼ turn clockwise (it will point to the left).
3.
Light each set of burner pilots by depressing the electronic
ignition button for each (each ignition switch serves a front-to-back
pair of burners). If the pilots don’t light in a few seconds, turn on
the appropriate burners while pressing the electronic ignition
button until the burners and their pilot lights).
4.
Light the griddle pilot light by pressing the electronic
ignition button on the range front close to the grill (You can view
the griddle pilot by bending down and looking under the griddle
from the front of the range.).
5.
To light one or both of the ovens, open the lower panel in
front of the range by pushing the bottom of the panel up and
pulling the top of the panel out and down. Turn the Off/Pilot/On
knob so “Pilot” is down (where the indicator arrow is located).
Push in the knob while pressing the electronic ignition button. The
pilot light may be viewed by looking into the front of the range
bottom near the electronic ignition button. It may take several
seconds to light.
ENSURE THE PILOT IS LIGHTED BEFORE
PROCEEDING. Hold the Off/Pilot/On knob down for approximately
30 seconds to ensure the thermister is heated.
Release the
Off/Pilot/On knob and turn the knob so “On” is pointed down
toward the indicator arrow. The stove is now ready for use.
3.
Use procedure
a.
Burners control knobs are located in pairs on the range. In
each pair, the left knob controls the front burner; the right knob
controls the back burner.
b.
Set the stove or griddle to required temperature for use.
Heating to set temperature may take several minutes.
c.
If you wish to use the convection feature on one or both
ovens, use the toggle switch on the front of the range located over
the oven or ovens you choose. (Note: the convection feature turns
off while the oven door is open.)
4.
Shutting down procedure
1.
Turn off all burners.
2.
Set the ovens and griddle to off.
3.
Under the bottom range panels, turn both Off/Pilot/On
knobs so “Off” is toward the bottom.
4.
Turn the range gas knob located on the left front of the
range ¼-turn counter-clockwise (it will point down).
5.
Turn the main gas valve located close to the wall behind
the stove ¼-turn (it will be perpendicular to the pipe).
If the range exhaust hood or lights were turned on manually, turn
them off using the toggle switches on the left front of the hood.
B.
Refrigerator
1.
The refrigerator temperature is pre-set. Do not attempt to
change it. Should you notice the temperature is above 38°F for a
prolonged period, contact a kitchen committee member.
2.
All shelves in the refrigerator are height-adjustable.
3.
The left side of the refrigerator is designed to hold either one
sheet pan or two ½-sheet pans (located on the shelves to the right of the
refrigerator) per holder set. They slide onto the holder set. There are
more holders available. See a kitchen committee member if you need to
adjust or add more holder sets. No food should be placed directly on the
bottom of the refrigerator, all should be on shelves.
4.
All food should be placed in the refrigerator based upon Health
Department Storage Standards, charts are posted and full instructions are
available in the Kitchen Manual.
5.
If in preparation for your event you need to store food in the
refrigerator or freezer all open food should be labeled and dated. Food
for specific events should be labeled. Unlabeled and undated food will be
discarded based upon routine refrigerator inspections.
6.
At end of event remove all foods from the refrigerator and ensure
it is cleaned after each kitchen use (See Kitchen End of Use Check Sheet
enclosure).
C.
Freezer
1.
The freezer temperature is pre-set. Do not attempt to change it.
Should you notice the temperature is above 0°F for a prolonged period,
contact a kitchen committee member.
2.
If you wish to store food in the freezer when preparing for an
event, see a kitchen committee member.
3.
All food placed in the freezer should be labeled, if left more than
two weeks, it will be discarded.
D.
Coffee makers
1. Bunn drip machine in coffee area
1.
Upon arrival ensure the coffee machine is plugged in and
switch in back in the on position. It will take up to 20 minutes for
the coffee maker to come to a ready status
2.
The coffee maker is ready to brew a pot of coffee when
the green light at the control Panel
3.
Remove the filter basket from the top of the machine and
place a filter into the basket
4.
Place coffee grounds into the filter. Use either 1-table
spoon of coffee grounds per cup of coffee to be brewed, or 1-cup
of coffee grounds per 12-cup pot.
5.
Slide the filter holder back into the coffee machine.
6.
Brewed coffee will flow into the 12-cup pot below the
coffee filter. Do not remove the pot until the brewing process is
complete. There is no automatic shut off.
7.
To keep brewed coffee hot, use the switches on the top
front of the machine to turn on necessary hot plates.
8.
At the end of the event, make sure all hot pads are turned
off and all 12-cup pots are empty, clean, sanitized and returned to
the coffee machine for storage.
9.
Coffee mugs, sweeteners, dry coffee creamer, and mixing
sticks are on the counter and on shelves.
10.
Coffee cups and saucers are located in the storage area
below the coffee maker in stacked racks.
G.
55-cup percolators
1.
Two 55-cup percolators are located in the kitchen storage
area. One pot is labeled “Coffee,” the other is labeled “Hot Water.
2.
Procedure
a.
Measure water. Remove cover, percolating tube,
and basket assembly. Fill coffee maker with fresh, cold
water to the desired fill line marked on the inside of the
coffee maker’s body. Do not fill coffee maker past the top
fill line.
b.
Measure coffee. Measure appropriate amount of
coffee (see chart below) into coffee basket then set coffee
basket onto the percolating tube. Position the bottom of
the percolating tube into the heating well, but do not
force it into place. Place the lid onto the coffee maker and
turn to lock. Arrows on the lid indicate correct direction in
order to lock.
c.
Brew coffee. Plug in the coffee maker’s cord. The
small, red light in the front of the coffee maker will come
on when the coffee is ready (time to brew depends on
how much coffee is being made). A full pot will take
between 35 – 45 minutes.
d.
Serve coffee. Once the ready light is on, remove
the coffee basket and percolator by reversing the
assembly procedure above. Replace the coffee maker
cover; ensuring it is secured as described above. Push or
pull the faucet and hold to fill the cup or mug. The faucet
automatically shuts off when released.
e.
Clean and sanitize the coffee maker after each use.
Do not immerse base in water. Rinse inside of the coffee
maker with soapy water, rinse, and dry. Clean faucet by
pouring several cups of hot water into the coffee maker
and run the water through the faucet. Wipe exterior with
a damp cloth and dry. Place the dry, re-assembled coffee
maker into its box and re-stow in the kitchen storage
closet.
i.
Digital Thermometers
A.
Both types of digital thermometers
1.
Are located in a plastic container kept on the shelves to
the right of the refrigerator.
2.
B.
Sensing points are located on the tips of their probes.
Direct-reading digital thermometer
1.
There are two direct-reading, stainless steel probed
thermometers
2.
Remove them from their plastic case
3.
Before each use, clean the probe with soap and water and
sanitize the probe with either the sanitizer spray or use a sanitizing
swab located in a plastic bin above the sink.
4.
To measure temperature, ensure the tip of the probe is in
the thermal center of the product (never close to or in contact with
a bone). Liquid and semi-liquid products should be stirred before
checking temperatures (see section 2.c. for proper cooking
temperatures).
C.
Remote-reading
1.
There is one remote-reading thermometer.
2.
This thermometer is capable of reading temperatures of
two different products simultaneously.
3.
Caution:
a.
The remote reading wires are easily damaged. Do
not pinch or crush them. Close oven doors or pot covers
carefully when using the probes.
b.
Do not expose the transmitter or receiver to
i.
Direct heat or hot surface.
ii.
Water (they are not water-proof). Wipe
with damp rag only.
c.
Wear heat-resistant gloves when handling a probe.
d.
Before each use, clean the probes with soap and
water and sanitize the probes with either the sanitizer
spray or use a sanitizing swab located in a plastic bin above
the sink.
e.
To measure temperature, ensure the tip of the
probe is in the thermal center of the product (never close
to or in contact with a bone). Liquid and semi-liquid
products should be stirred before checking temperatures
(see section 2.c. for proper cooking temperatures
f.
The receiver will register anywhere up to 100 feet
away for the transmitter.
4.
Directions for use (it is recommended you read the
instruction manual located in the “LUMC Kitchen Equipment
Manuals” folder prior to first use)
a.
Automatic registration (of probe).
i.
Plug the two probes into S1 and S2 on the
transmitter.
ii.
Slide the switch on the rear of the receiver
to OPERATER REMOTE SENSOR 1 and “---“ under
PROBE TEMP will blink on the LCD during the
registration process.
iii.
Slide the switch on the rear of the
transmitter to ON. This needs to be done within 60
seconds of turning the receiver to OPERATE in
order for the receiver to automatically register the
signal from the transmitter.
iv.
Registration is complete when the unit
beeps. REMOTE SENSOR 1 remains on and the
temperature probe sensor 1 is shown under PROBE
TEMP.
b.
Insert probe sensor 1 into the first product to be
measured.
c.
Insert probe sensor 2 into the second product to be
measured.
d.
Insert the products into the oven or pot.
e.
Position the probe sensor wires so they will not be
pinched or crushed when closing the oven doors or
covering the pot being used.
f.
Stand or hand the transmitter away from any heat
source.
g.
Press S1/S2 so REMOTE SENSOR 1 is displayed.
h.
Press the MEAT button until the proper product is
displayed.
i.
Set appropriate temperature for the product by
pressing either the TASTE (Rare/Medium/Well) or /
(Temperature up/down) buttons.
j.
Press S1/S2 so REMOTE SENSOR 2 is displayed.
k.
Repeat steps g. and h. above.
l.
Press S1/S2 so REMOTE SENSOR 1 is displayed.
m.
Using the timer (optional).
i.
Press T1/T2 so TIMER T1 appears. Press
MIN one time for each minute you desire. Press
START/STOP to start the countdown.
ii.
When the countdown is complete, the
receiver will beep and the time display will blink for
20 seconds.
n.
When the temperature probe of sensor 1 reaches
the set temperature the receiver will beep continuously
and the temperature under PROB TEMP will blink
continuously. If probe sensor 2 temperature is reached
before probe sensor 1, the receiver will beep continuously
and the 2 or REMOTE SENSOR 2 will blink continuously
indicating the product it is measuring is done.
o.
Press STOP to turn off the alert. The alert will beep
and blink after two minutes if the PROBE TEMP
temperature remains above the SET TEMP temperature.
The alert stops when the PROBE EMP temperature falls
below the SET TEMP temperature.
p.
When the product is done, remove it from the
oven or pot, and remove the probe from the product by
grabbing the probe, not the wire. Use heat-resistant
gloves.
q.
Turn off the transmitter and receiver.
r.
Clean (with damp rag) and sanitize (with sanitizer
wipe located in a plastic bin above the sink) and dry (either
air-dry or with a clean towel) the probes. Return the
entire assembly to the proper (labeled) plastic bin on the
shelf to the right of the refrigerator.
V.
Physical components of kitchen and storage items
A. Roll Down Window
1.
The roll-down has two latches, one of which will have key inserted
at all times
2.
The latches are opened and closed by turning them clockwise or
counterclockwise. You will hear a click when engaged or disengaged.
3.
Carefully push up the roll-down to its full-open position or pull
down to its fully closed position using the bar across the bottom of the
roll-down fixture.
4.
Ensure you clean the roll-down pass-through surface prior to
leaving the kitchen at the end of the event.
B. Work Tables
1.
May be configured for each function.
2.
Unlock wheels to move.
3.
Relock wheels when in place.
4.
Return tables to original configuration when complete.
5.
Clean and sanitize work tables as directed in paragraph for flat
surface cleaning.
6.
Return dish, glass, and cup storage racks to their previous
locations .
C. Dish carts
1.
May be moved to accommodate each function.
2.
Be careful when removing and replacing the plastic covers.
3.
Unlock wheels when moving.
4.
Relock wheels when in place.
5.
Ensure dishes are dry before replacing the plastic covers.
6.
When finished return dish carts to their storage spot under a work
table.
D. Glass and cup rolling storage (dishwasher) racks
1.
May be moved to accommodate each function.
2.
Be careful. Wheels do not lock.
3.
The cup and glass racks are designed for use (and may be stacked)
in the dishwasher.
4.
Ensure cups and glasses are dry before replacing the plastic
covers.
5.
When finished, return racks to their storage spot under a work
table or in storage closets in coffee area.
E. Silverware and serving pieces
1.
Metal containers are on shelves above freezer. Silverware should
be completely dry and sorted when placed in holders
2.
Plastic containers appropriately labeled are available on the metal
shelving to the right for most of small utensils.
3.
Larger ladles, tongs and spoons are on metal shelving above sink.
VI.
Kitchen Committee Information
1. Kitchen Committee. The Kitchen Committee works under and reports to
the Trustees, who are ultimately responsible for church facilities. Tasks
listed below such as inspections and safety issues are shared
responsibilities with the trustees. A member of the Trustees will serve on
the Kitchen committee. The committee will keep the Trustees informed
of kitchen use and needs. The committee periodically will provide a
formal update to the Trustees.
Kitchen committee responsibilities
include:
i. Kitchen use
1. Screen and approve Kitchen Use Request Forms
2. Assign a responsible Kitchen Committee member to each
kitchen use request.
3. Guide the requestor through proper use of the kitchen and
ensure the Kitchen Use Request Form is completed.
4. Ensure the church office maintains an adequate number of
LUMC Kitchen Use Packets on-hand (See LUMC Kitchen
Use Request Form page 2 for contents.)
5. Ensure the kitchen and equipment is in proper working
order and properly stored after each use. Counter-sign
the completed Kitchen End-of-Use Check Sheet and file.
ii. Kitchen cleanliness and sanitation
1. Ensure the kitchen is clean and sanitary after each use.
2. Conduct a quarterly deep cleaning and sanitizing of the
kitchen and equipment.
3. Ensure the proper sanitizing mixture is prepared in the
spray bottle.
4. Schedule annual cleaning of the grease trap and
ventilation hood (filters and ducts).
5. Maintain contact with the City Health Department (as
necessary).
iii. Kitchen supplies
1. Keep an inventory of equipment and supplies.
2. Ensure an adequate level of expendable supplies
(examples: dishwashing powder, hand-washing soap).
3. Maintain control of the kitchen keys.
4. Maintain control of Restaurant Warehouse access cards.
5. Respond to any Kitchen Use Feedback forms or other
feedback concerning the kitchen.
iv. Annual Operating Budget
1. Track and periodically review actual kitchen use costs.
2. Provide kitchen use costs to the Trustees as part of the
annual operating budget build.
v. Meetings
1. Once per quarter, as a minimum.
2. Called by the Board of Trustee member.
A. Attachments/Forms
1. LUMC Kitchen Use Request Form
2. LUMC Kitchen Start-up Check Sheet
3. LUMC Kitchen End-of-Event Check Sheet
4. LUMC Kitchen Feedback Form
5. Policies and Procedures for Clean-up of Bodily Fluid
ATTACHMENT 1 LARCHMONT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
KITCHEN USE REQUEST FORM
Date of request:
Date of event (state if periodic):
Event start time:
Time to enter kitchen:
Event end time:
Expected time to leave kitchen:
Ministry/group/individual requesting kitchen use:
LUMC sponsor:
Event description:
Event classification (See page 1/circle one): Church
Public
Number attending the event:
Person responsible for event:
Address:
Home phone number:
Mobile phone number:
Person supervising food preparation and service:
Certified kitchen manager (circle one)?
Yes
LUMC kitchen committee member (circle one)?
No
Yes
Address:
Home phone number:
Licensed catering company (circle one)?
Business name:
Mobile phone number:
Yes
No
No
Contact name:
Address:
Phone:
Use Fee paid (See page 1. List amount):
$ ____________
Cleaning/key deposit (See page 1. List amount): $ ____________
LUMC representative receiving fee/deposit
___________________________________
______________
Signature
______________________________
Printed name
Date
Event approved by LUMC Board of Trustees
___________________________________
______________
Signature
______________________________
Printed name
Date
Kitchen committee member assigned
Name:
Date:
Work/home phone:
Mobile phone:

Person responsible for the event and person supervising food preparation and service
received
1. Location of the LUMC Kitchen Use Policies and Procedures folder.
2. Location of the Kitchen Equipment Manuals folder.
3. Contact information of the LUMC kitchen committee member assigned to
the event.
4. A LUMC Kitchen Use packet (contains copies of this completed form, Kitchen
Start-Up Form, Kitchen End of Use Check Sheet, LUMC Kitchen Use Feedback
Form)

Person supervising food preparation and service trained in
1. Cleanliness and sanitation requirements, policies, procedures, and location of
supplies.
2. Proper use of equipment and serving ware.

Responsible person, person supervising food preparation and service, and caterer (if
applicable) received a copy of the LUMC Kitchen End of Use Check Sheet.

Time set for kitchen committee member to inspect the kitchen after use in company
with the responsible person or his/her representative (must be either day of the event
or the next day).
Phone Number (in the event it is a representative):

All kitchen use questions answered.
ATTACHMENT 2 : LARCHMONT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
KITCHEN START-UP CHECK SHEET

Light turned on (switch at hallway door).

Locate the Kitchen Equipment and Kitchen Use folders (Located on the shelf near the
roll-down window.).

Familiarize yourself with the kitchen layout, and equipment and supply locations.

Turn on dishwasher (If needed. Switch at bottom front of machine. It takes about 15
minutes to reach 180 degrees. See instructions paragraph 4.f. page 11 in the main
document.).

Plug in Bunn-type coffee maker (As needed. Located in the Social Hall. It takes about 20
minutes to a “Ready” light.).

Fill and start percolating coffee machines (If needed. It takes 25 minutes for coffee to
be ready to serve. Don’t forget to remove the coffee when the “Ready” light comes on.
The coffee will continue to brew if you don’t.).

Turn on light above range (If needed. Switch at left of hood structure.).

Light range (If needed. See instructions paragraph 4.a. page 8 in the main document.
CAUTION: If you use the range top or ovens, once the gas is turned on, pilot lights
for all six burners and the griddle MUST BE lighted! The griddle will get hot. Leave
the wooden board in-place if not using the grill.

WASH HANDS! This should be done often

Wash and sanitize any equipment or surfaces you will be using.
ATTACHMENT 3: KITCHEN END-OF-USE CHECK SHEET
Filled out by:
Date:
Checked by Kitchen Committee member (intials):
Date:

Gas to range off (back valve and front knob)

Range clean (griddle, griddle grease tray, burners and surrounding area, drip pan below
burners, backsplash, shelf, ovens, oven doors)

Microwave clean (interior, exterior)

Refrigerator empty and clean (interior, exterior)

Freezer empty and clean (interior, exterior)

Dishes and flatware clean and stored in flatware containers

Pots, pans, and other utensils and equipment cleaned, sanitized, and stored (dry prior to
storing)

Dishwasher turned off

Water to warewash sink faucet off

Warewash sink clean and sanitized

Bunn coffee machine turned off, cleaned, sanitized, and stowed in Social Hall

All unused, disposable dinnerware (plates, bowls, plastic flatware) products removed
from the kitchen.

Used towels, washcloths, and aprons in a plastic bag (leave on warewash sink)

All garbage containers and trash cans next to hand-wash sinks empty, clean, new liner
bags installed (bring garbage and trash out to trashcans behind church kitchen)

All work surfaces clean and sanitized

Floor swept and mopped (Always use string mop. Use handled brush to scrub as
necessary.)

Roll down to Social Hall down and locked (leave key in a lock).

Rolling carts cleaned, sanitized, and stowed (one in kitchen, one in social hall)

Brooms and mops returned to janitor’s closet (wet mops stored vertically with mop
head up)

Doors locked (Social Hall, Library, outdoor, hallway)
NOTES:
(1) Use the red cleaning bucket located above the warewash sink to clean surfaces.
Follow directions on soap container. Empty, rinse, and let the cleaning bucket
air-dry on a sink sideboard when complete.
(2) Sanitizer. All sanitizing liquid is based on a bleach/water mixture to attain 50100 ppm of chlorine (there should be little to no chlorine smell). If you have a
question about concentration, test the mixture with a chlorine test strip located
in a bin on the rack above the freezer.
a. For sanitizing hand-washed items, use the glass bottle located on the
shelf above the warewash sink to measure 4 oz. of bleach if using 9” of
water in the sanitizing sink or 6 oz. of bleach if using 12” in the sanitizing
sink.
b. For sanitizing work surfaces and other items that are not cleaned in the
dishwasher or warewash sink either,
i. Lightly coat the surface or item using the sanitizer spray bottle
located on the shelf above the warewash sink or, in the green
sanitizer bucket mix one capful of bleach to a 3/4-full bucket of
water.
ii. Empty, rinse, and let the sanitizer bucket air-dry on a sink
sideboard when complete.
c. Bleach is located in a bottle on the floor next to the dishwasher.
(3) Cleaning supplies are located in the janitor closet (double doors) in the hallway
to the right of the kitchen hall entrance.
a. Brooms are hanging from brackets on the wall or door.
b. A small broom and dustpan are located on the janitor’s cart.
c. For cleaning (wet mopping) the floor, mix the cleaning solution (Pine sol
located in a large bottle on the floor) per the directions on the bottle, in
the janitor’s bucket (fill the bucket to the top of the wave preventer,
about three gallons). Use the string mop.
d. Return all cleaning equipment to the janitor’s closet stowed properly
(e.g., mop head’s up, mop handles hanging into the deep sink)
e. Additional paper hand towels and hand wash soap are located on the top
shelf. A key to the paper towel dispensers is hanging on a hook on the
right leg of the storage shelves about eye-level.
ATTACHMENT 4: LARCHMONT UNITIED METHODIST CHURCH
KITCHEN USE FEEDBACK FORM
Name:
Date:
Submitting person/group:

Discrepancy or problems (describe in as much detail as possible):
Recommended solution (if applicable):

Supplies needed:

Other feedback:
Thank you for your time and feedback. We strive continually to make our LUMC kitchen safer,
more efficient, and easier to use. Turn in completed form to the LUMC administrative office. If
the office is not open, slip the form under the office door or put the form into the Trustee box
located in pigeonhole boxes across the hall from the family restroom around the corner from
the LUMC administrative office.
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