© Operating TAC Xenta 527

TAC Xenta
©
Operating TAC Xenta 527
TAC Xenta
©
Operating TAC Xenta 527
Copyright © 2004 TAC AB. All rights reserved.
This document, as well as the product it refers to, is only intended for licensed users. TAC AB owns the copyright of this document and reserves
the right to make changes, additions or deletions. TAC AB assumes no responsibility for possible mistakes or errors that might appear in this
document.
Do not use the product for other purposes than those indicated in this document.
Only licensed users of the product and the document are permitted to use the document or any information therein. Distribution, disclosure,
copying, storing or use of the product, the information or the illustrations in the document on the part of non-licensed users, in electronic or
mechanical form, as a recording or by other means, including photo copying or information storage and retrieval systems, without the express
written permission of TAC AB, will be regarded as a violation of copyright laws and is strictly prohibited.
Trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Microsoft® and Windows® are registered trademarks of
The Microsoft Corporation.
Trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
TAC Vista®, TAC Menta®, TAC Xenta® and TAC I-talk® are registered trademarks of TAC AB.
TAC Xenta, Operating TAC Xenta 527
Contents
Contents
1
2
3
4
5
6
Introduction
7
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
7
8
8
9
Structure .....................................................................................................................
Typographic Conventions ..........................................................................................
Prerequisites ...............................................................................................................
How to Use this Book ................................................................................................
TAC Xenta 527 Overview
11
2.1
2.1.1
2.1.2
2.1.3
2.1.4
2.1.5
2.1.6
2.1.7
2.2
2.2.1
12
12
13
14
14
15
15
15
16
16
Start Using the TAC Xenta 527 .................................................................................
Logging in ..................................................................................................................
Navigator Display in Xenta 527.................................................................................
The Menus..................................................................................................................
Online Help ................................................................................................................
Changing your Password............................................................................................
Printing Logs ..............................................................................................................
Logging out ................................................................................................................
Internet Security .........................................................................................................
Installing Certificates .................................................................................................
Accessing I/NET from the Xenta 527
19
3.1
3.2
3.3
19
20
23
Using I/NET Signals within a Project ........................................................................
Browsing the I/NET System ......................................................................................
Controlling I/NET Points ...........................................................................................
Monitoring I/NET Events and Alarms
25
4.1
4.1.1
4.1.2
4.1.3
4.2
4.2.1
4.2.2
4.2.3
25
25
26
29
30
30
33
34
I/NET Event Pages .....................................................................................................
The Dynamic Event Page...........................................................................................
Filtering Dynamic Events ..........................................................................................
The Static Event Page ................................................................................................
I/NET Alarm Pages ....................................................................................................
The Dynamic Alarm Page ..........................................................................................
The Static I/NET Alarm Page ....................................................................................
How Alarm states Change..........................................................................................
I/NET Trend Logs
37
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.3.1
5.3.2
5.3.3
37
37
38
39
40
41
Trend Log Overview ..................................................................................................
Configuring and Viewing I/NET Trend Logs ............................................................
The Trend Viewer ......................................................................................................
The Graph View .........................................................................................................
The Configure View...................................................................................................
The Table View..........................................................................................................
Working with I/NET Time Schedules
43
6.1
43
Time Scheduling Overview........................................................................................
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Contents
6.2
7
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Viewing and Editing I/NET Time Schedules.............................................................
45
Requirements
47
7.1
7.2
7.2.1
47
47
48
Index
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Computer Requirements.............................................................................................
Web Browser Requirements.......................................................................................
Loading the Java™ Plugin .........................................................................................
49
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1
1 Introduction
Introduction
This manual describes the daily use of the TAC Xenta 527. It is intended
for users with basic Internet experience.
The TAC Xenta 527 provides the same capabilities as the Xenta 511,
along with additional features that support the use of I/NET systems.
For information describing the basic operation of the Xenta 527, refer
to the Xenta 511 documentation. The focus of this manual is to explain
features that are unique to the Xenta 527. In some cases however, frequently-used features that are common to both the Xenta 527 and Xenta
511 are repeated in this manual.
For more information on programming and configuration of the Xenta
527, please refer to the Engineering TAC Xenta 527 manual (DocNet).
Note
We are continuously improving and correcting our documentation.
This manual may have been updated.
Please check our Docnet site at www.tac.com for the latest version.
1.1
Structure
The remaining chapters cover the following items.
2 TAC Xenta 527 Overview
Instructions for logging-in to the Xenta 527, changing passwords, using
menus, etc.
3 Accessing I/NET from the Xenta 527
Instructions for accessing and using I/NET from a web browser, including using I/NET points within a project, browsing the I/NET system,
and controlling I/NET points.
4 Monitoring I/NET Events and Alarms
Overview of the Alarm Viewer including Alarm Stack, Alarm History,
personalizing alarm texts, and sending alarms via E-mail.
5 I/NET Trend Logs
Guide for configuring and viewing I/NET trend logs.
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1 Introduction
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6 Working with I/NET Time Schedules
Instructions for viewing and editing I/NET time schedules.
7 Requirements
PC and Web browser requirements, including Java Plug-in installation.
1.2
Typographic Conventions
Throughout the manual the following specially marked texts may occur.
!
Warning
Alerts you that failure to take, or avoid, a specific action might result
in physical harm to you or to the hardware.
Caution
Alerts you to possible data loss, breaches of security, or other more
serious problems.
Important
Alerts you to supplementary information that is essential to the completion of a task.
Note
Alerts you to supplementary information.
Tip
Alerts you to supplementary information that is not essential to the
completion of the task at hand.
1.3
Prerequisites
To be able to profit from the contents in this manual, you are recommended to read the following manual:
•
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Operating TAC Xenta 511, document number 0-004-7846-1.
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1.4
1 Introduction
How to Use this Book
This document follows a standard style indicating keystrokes, cursor
movement, navigation, and data entry. TAC software is intended to be
used primarily with a mouse. However, you may use keyboard equivalents as indicated below.
Filenames
Filenames appear in this manual as they appear on the screen of your
computer. To further identify them as files, they appear as uppercase,
italicized letters with any file extensions included. For instance, the configuration file used by your computer upon start up is shown as CONFIG.SYS.
Menu Commands
Menu selections are shown in bold font with initial capitalization as in
Edit. A menu item with the arrow symbol (>) indicates another menu
level.
Keystrokes
Keystrokes are shown in bold surrounded by square brackets. For example, the Y key is shown as [Y], and the Enter key is shown as [Enter].
Certain standard keys are used within the application to perform certain
system functions within editors, message boxes, etc. These are the
[Enter], [Esc], [Tab], and Up and Down Arrow keys.
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•
[Enter] Key — Use this key to accept or activate a function, typically a highlighted button.
•
[Esc] Key — Use this key to cancel an action or editor. You may
use the [Esc] key to back up from successive levels of windows
until you return to the main application window.
•
[Tab] Key — Use this key to cycle through the available active
buttons or entry fields in an editor or screen.
•
Up/Down Arrows — Use these keys to move the highlighted
selection from one item to another in the various list, drop-down,
and combo boxes found in the editors.
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1 Introduction
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2
2 TAC Xenta 527 Overview
TAC Xenta 527 Overview
This manual describes how to use the tools of an installed Xenta 527,
such as graphics, alarms, trend logs, and time schedules.
An overview:
Browser
Internet
TAC Xenta 527
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Chapter 2:
General Info.
Logging in, etc.
Chapter 3:
Accessing I/NET
- Browsing the I/NET system
- Controlling I/NET points
Chapter 4:
Alarm Monitoring
- Alarm Viewer
- Alarm Configuration
Chapter 5:
Trend Monitoring
- Trend Viewer
- Trend Object
Administration
Chapter 6:
Time Scheduling
- Time Schedules
- Time object editor
Chapter 7:
PC and browser
requirements
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2.1
Start Using the TAC Xenta 527
2.1.1
Logging in
Throughout this manual, the assumption is made that the PC being used
is a Pentium 133 MHz with 64 MB RAM or higher. It is also assumed
that the PC is connected to the Internet/Intranet using Internet Explorer,
version 6.0 or higher, with some additional plug-ins; see chapter 7.
1
In the web browser Address field enter the IP address of the
Xenta 527 (Example: 172.20.20.66)
If you get a Security Alert, click Yes to continue.
Fig. 2.1: Depending on Browser settings, a Security Alert message
may appear.
A login page will appear: (If it does not appear, please check section 7.2 “Web Browser Requirements” on page 47.)
If you want to install a certificate please see 2.2.1 “Installing Certificates” on page 16
Fig. 2.2: The Log in page
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2 TAC Xenta 527 Overview
Enter your Username and Password (provided by your System
Administrator).
A Welcome page will appear. (If it does not appear, please check
section 7.2.1 “Loading the Java™ Plugin” on page 48.)
Fig. 2.3: Sample portion of the Welcome page.
2.1.2
Navigator Display in Xenta 527
Note
The displayed pages are site-dependant. The layout and contents will
most likely differ from the ones presented here, which only serve as an
example.
There are two main options for presenting information in the Xenta 527;
the Java-enabled Tree view and the non-Java Menu view.
The Java-enabled Tree view.
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The non-Java Menu view.
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2 TAC Xenta 527 Overview
2.1.3
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The Menus
You reach the different pages by clicking on the menus, which lead to
submenus and finally to the pages.
Note
Depending on your access rights, set by the System Administrator,
some menus and pictures will be accessible and others will not.
You can return to a previous page by clicking on the Back arrow in your
browser.
At the top-right portion of the Xenta 527 web frame, 3 buttons are visible as shown in the following figure:
Fig. 2.4: The Home (return), Refresh (rewrite page) and Logout buttons.
2.1.4
Online Help
If you click on the Help menu, you can select different help pages,
which are viewed by topic or from a general index.
Fig. 2.5: Opening the Online Help window
Close the Help window by clicking on the X-button in the upper righthand corner of the window.
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2.1.5
2 TAC Xenta 527 Overview
Changing your Password
Using the Xenta 527, each individual can change their log-in password.
Select Configuration > User Administration > Change Password.
Then enter Old Password, New Password and Confirm New Password.
Finally, click on Save New Password to establish the new password.
Fig. 2.6: The Change (your own) Password page
2.1.6
Printing Logs
Trend logs may be printed or copied into other applications, such as
Microsoft Excel. Please refer to chapter 5 “I/NET Trend Logs” on
page 37 for more information.
2.1.7
Logging out
You can log out any time by clicking on the Logout button in the top
row.
By default, if you do not access the Xenta 527 for 15 minutes you will
automatically be logged out. The duration of this timeout setting can be
changed.
Fig. 2.7: Logging in after a logout.
Simply click on “Click here to login” to begin accessing the Xenta 527
again.
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2 TAC Xenta 527 Overview
2.2
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Internet Security
The connection is encrypted using SSL (Secure Sockets Layer), which
is supported by the web browsers.
The SSL protocol is an encryption method which protects data
exchanged between you and the TAC Xenta 527 from being read or
manipulated by someone else over the internet/intranet.
Your web browser creates encryption keys for each session. These are
sent as cryptograms to the TAC Xenta 527, allowing only this device to
decrypt the data.
2.2.1
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Installing Certificates
1
Click View Certificate in the Security Alert Dialog.
2
The Certificate dialog opens.
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2 TAC Xenta 527 Overview
3
Click Install Certificate in the Certificate dialog. The Install
Certificate Wizard opens.
4
Click Next in the following dialogs. We recommend that you use
the default settings. Click Finish to end the wizard and install the
certificate.
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2 TAC Xenta 527 Overview
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3 Accessing I/NET from the Xenta 527
Accessing I/NET from the Xenta 527
The TAC Xenta 527 allows you to access an I/NET system in either of
the following ways:
•
By accessing I/NET signals that have been specifically defined
within a project.
•
By browsing the I/NET system and locating its available signals.
(The browse function is not available for users with “web user”
privileges.)
Each of these methods for accessing I/NET has its own advantages, as
described in this chapter.
3.1
Using I/NET Signals within a Project
When the Xenta 527 is loaded with a project that contains I/NET signals, you have the ability to quickly access these signals without having
to browse through the I/NET system. However, if you have system
administrator or operator privileges, you retain the ability to manually
browse the I/NET system, even when a project is loaded.
Fig. 3.1: I/NET Signals in a Project
You can access I/NET-related signals just as you would access any
other signals. Depending on your project, they may be located in value
pages, graphic pages, link pages, alarm pages, or event pages. Refer to
the Xenta 511 documentation for information about the various pages
that allow you to directly supervise your building control system.
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3 Accessing I/NET from the Xenta 527
3.2
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Browsing the I/NET System
The TAC Xenta 527 allows the system administrator and users with
operator privileges to navigate through the I/NET system. Starting with
a list of links, you can penetrate through each layer of the I/NET system.
This allows you to navigate your way to any point (or signal) that is
exposed to the TAC Xenta 527, regardless of the currently loaded
project.
Browse the I/NET system as follows:
1
Using a web browser connected to the Xenta 527, select Utilities >
INet > Browse INet from the navigation pane.
Fig. 3.2: Browsing I/NET
If you are not using Java, you can browse I/NET by selecting
Browse INet from the menu page.
Fig. 3.3:
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Beginning to Browse I/NET from the Menu Page
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3 Accessing I/NET from the Xenta 527
2
The first page displayed when you begin browsing I/NET is the
Link page. This page lists all of the I/NET links that are exposed to
the Xenta 527.
Fig. 3.4:
Penetrating a Link from the Link Page
Select a link to expose the next level of the I/NET network.
Each time you penetrate down to the next layer of the I/NET system, the Xenta 527 retrieves information from I/NET. Depending
on the speed and success of network communications, as well as
the number of items being enumerated, you may see the following
indication that the Xenta 527 is busy:
This indication will remain on the screen until the next page of
information appears.
3
After penetrating a link, the Stations page appears. This page lists
each station that exists beneath the selected link. A hypertext link
near the bottom of the page allows you to return to the previous
level if necessary.
Fig. 3.5:
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Penetrating a Station from the Stations Page
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3 Accessing I/NET from the Xenta 527
TAC Xenta, Operating TAC Xenta 527
Select a station to penetrate down to the next level of the I/NET network.
4
After penetrating a station, the Points page appears. This page lists
each point that resides in the selected station.
Fig. 3.6:
The Points Page
Up to three actions are available for points listed on this page, as
follows:
•
View or edit a trend log for a point with a TR extension (refer
to Chapter 6, “I/NET Trend Logs”, on page 37, for more
information).
•
View or edit a time schedule for a point with a TS extension
(refer to Chapter 7, “Working with I/NET Time Schedules”,
on page 43, for more information).
•
Control a point (refer to “Controlling I/NET Points”, below).
None of these actions are available to users with “web user” privileges. You must be a system administrator or have “operator” privileges in order to perform any of these actions.
You have successfully browsed one segment of your I/NET network. If
necessary, use the hypertext link near the bottom of each page to return
to previous levels of the network. You can then browse to other segments of the network.
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3.3
3 Accessing I/NET from the Xenta 527
Controlling I/NET Points
The TAC Xenta 527 allows the system administrator, as well as users
with “operator” privileges, to control I/NET points.
Control a point as follows:
1
Open the Point Control dialog. Depending on your project, this
may be as simple as clicking on a link that leads to the Point Control dialog from a value page, graphic page, link page, alarm page,
or event page.
If necessary, you can manually browse through the I/NET network,
locate the desired point, and click on the point’s Control link to
open the Point Control editor. Refer to “Browsing the I/NET System” on page 20 for instructions.
Fig. 3.7:
Point Control
The Point Control dialog shows the point’s current status, including
the following information:
•
Current value
•
Alarm status
•
Acknowledged status
•
Old data status
Note
When viewing a point’s value, be aware that the Xenta 527 uses an
Ansi-C 32-bit standard for floating points. Point values that exceed
this limit of floating points are subject to inconsistent displays.
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3 Accessing I/NET from the Xenta 527
2
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Depending on the type of point that you are controlling, the Point
Control editor provides the following functions:
•
Control Value — For analog point types, this field allows you
to type in a value. For discrete point types, this field provides
a drop-down list of available control states. When you download a control state to a point, the control command defined
for the control state is sent to the point.
•
Download — Use this function to download the control value
to the point.
•
Test — This function allows you to toggle the test mode "ON"
or "OFF". Use the Test mode to isolate one or more points
from external hardware. This allows you to verify controller
operation for selected points without affecting or using the
external hardware. This also allows you to manually enter
states/values for points.
Note
While using the Test mode, the I/NET controller continues to update
the database for the selected point. Your states/values for the point can
be overridden by the controller. To prevent the controller from overriding you states/values, also place the point in Manual mode.
•
Manual/Automatic — Allows you to toggle the point between
the two options (manual mode or automatic mode). Manual
mode disables all automatic functions from controlling the
external hardware (i.e., ATS, DDC, Demand, etc.).
Note
While a point is in the Manual mode, the state/value you enter is also
sent to the connected hardware.
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•
Ack — Allows you to acknowledge an alarm if the selected
point is in alarm.
•
Release — (Door Outputs only) Allows you to momentarily
release the output strike for a door.
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4
4 Monitoring I/NET Events and Alarms
Monitoring I/NET Events and Alarms
The TAC Xenta 527 allows you to monitor I/NET events and alarms
from a web browser. Filtering options allow you to refine the displayed
information. You can also acknowledge alarms when you are viewing
alarm pages.
The way that events and alarms are displayed within a web browser will
differ depending on the type of page you are viewing. The following
pages are available:
•
Dynamic pages – These pages require that you use a Java-enabled
web browser. This allows the displayed information to update
automatically.
•
Static pages – These pages are only updated when you load or
refresh the page. Static pages do not require that you enable Java
within your web browser.
You can acknowledge alarms from a dynamic or static alarm page.
4.1
I/NET Event Pages
Event pages display system messages (network activity) and transactions (access control and door activity) that have occurred within the
I/NET system. Events that represent an I/NET alarm condition may also
appear within an alarm page, depending on how information is being filtered or blocked.
4.1.1
The Dynamic Event Page
Dynamic event pages display a periodically-updated table of I/NET
events. You can read, block, sort, and filter the events contained in the
table.
The dynamic event page is available only if an application designer has
included it in the Xenta 527’s currently loaded project. In this case, you
can access the dynamic event page by expanding a site folder in the sys-
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4 Monitoring I/NET Events and Alarms
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tem view and locating the page within the site’s hierarchy. The following figure shows an example of the dynamic event page.
Fig. 4.1: Dynamic Event Page
Buttons at the top of the dynamic event page allow you to perform various functions, as described below:
Filter
Define and apply a filter to the dynamic event page.
Refer to “Filtering Dynamic Events” below for more
information about this function.
Find
Search through the events for the string of characters
that you define.
Customize Add, remove, and organize the columns in the
dynamic event page.
4.1.2
Print
Print the dynamic event page.
Updates
ON
Allow the dynamic event page to periodically update
the displayed data.
Updates
OFF
Freeze the current display of data by turning periodic
updating off.
Filtering Dynamic Events
The dynamic event page provides you with the ability to filter the displayed events. The filter dialog is divided into tabbed panels that offer
categorized options for filtering. You can use as many of the options as
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4 Monitoring I/NET Events and Alarms
are necessary to achieve the desired filtering. Apply the filter by clicking the OK button.
Fig. 4.2: Launching the Filter Dialog
Filtering Events by Date and Time
Use the Date and Time tabbed panel to narrow the dynamic event
page’s focus to a specified span of dates and times. A From and To
option is available for selection. Activate (!) one or both of these
options to define a date and time filter.
By default, the current date and time are displayed in each field. Define
your own dates and times by highlighting and adjusting portions of the
current settings.
Example:
In the following example we’ll create a filter that will limit the dynamic
event page to only those events that occurred yesterday and today:
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1
Click the filter button
2
On the Date and Time tabbed panel, activate (!) the From field.
3
Highlight the day portion of the current setting and click the down
arrow button once to set it to yesterday’s date.
4
Starting with the hour, highlight and reset each portion of the current time setting by typing a zero. (Typing a zero for each portion
of the time setting is quicker than using the up/down arrow buttons.)
5
Leave the To option deactivated (#). This allows the filter to
include events up to the current date and time.
to open the Filter dialog.
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Filtering Events by Text
The following tabbed panels allow you to create a filter that is based on
a string of text appearing within events:
•
Address – Filter for an address by specifying all or part of the
desired address.
•
Device Name – Filter for a device name by specifying all or part
of the desired device name.
•
Event – Filter for specific event text by specifying all or part of
the desired text.
•
Value – Filter for a value by specifying all or part of the desired
value.
•
Message – Filter for a message by specifying all or part of the
desired message.
•
Tenant – Filter for a message by specifying all or part of the
desired message.
•
Individual – Filter for a message by specifying all or part of the
desired message.
When defining a text-based filter, use a question mark (?) as a wildcard
for any alphanumeric character that can be variable. Use an asterisk (*)
as a wildcard for any span of alphanumeric characters that can be variable.
Examples:
•
An address filter of *A? will show all events with the text "AI" or
"AO" at the end of the address.
•
A Tenant filter of 2? will show all events with a tenant in the
range of 20 to 29.
•
An Individual filter of 5?4 will show all events containing an
Individual number of 504, 514, 524, 534, 544, ..., 594.
Filtering Events by Number
The following tabbed panels allow you to create a filter that is based on
a number or range of numbers appearing within events:
•
Site Number – Filter for events containing specific site numbers
(from 0 to 63).
•
Cell – Filter for events containing specific cell numbers (from 0 to
1023).
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•
Priority – Filter for events with specific priority (from 1 to 2). A
priority of 1 represents a Critical alarm. A priority of 2 represents
a Priority alarm
•
Zone – Filter for events containing specific zone numbers (from 0
to 64).
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4 Monitoring I/NET Events and Alarms
When defining a number-based filter, a From and To option is available
for selection. By activating (!) an option, the field associated with the
option becomes active. Use these fields to define a range of numbers for
the filter.
Example:
On the Site Number tabbed panel, setting the From field to 25 and leaving the To option deactivated (#) allows the display of events with a
site number from 25 to 63.
Filtering Events by Status
Use the Status tabbed panel to filter events based on their current status. The following status conditions are available for inclusion in the filter:
•
Normal (I/Net AckNormal)
•
Passive Unacked (I/Net Normal)
•
Active Unacked (I/Net Alarm)
•
Active Acked (I/Net Ack)
•
Blocked
•
Unblocked
•
Event
By default, all status conditions are active (!), allowing them to be
included in the dynamic event page. Deactivate (#) any status conditions you would like to exclude from the dynamic event page.
4.1.3
The Static Event Page
Important
The static event page is only available to the system administrator and
users with "Operator" privileges. Users with "Web User" privileges
cannot access the static event page.
The static event page displays a snapshot of I/NET events. The static
information is created when you first load the page, and is rebuilt each
time you refresh the page. You can read events from within the static
event page, however, blocking, sorting, and filtering functions are not
available.
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Access the static event page by selecting Utilities > INet > Events from
the system view. The following figure shows an example of the static
event page.
Fig. 4.3: Static Event Page
4.2
I/NET Alarm Pages
Alarms are simply events that represent an I/NET alarm condition.
These events may or may not appear within an alarm page, depending
on how the page’s information is being filtered or blocked.
4.2.1
The Dynamic Alarm Page
The dynamic alarm page displays a periodically-updated table of active
I/NET alarms. This table represents I/NET’s alarm stack. You can read,
acknowledge, block, sort, and filter the alarms contained in the table.
Fig. 4.4: Dynamic Alarm Page
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4 Monitoring I/NET Events and Alarms
You can also view the alarm history log for any I/NET point that
appears in the table. The alarm stack and alarm history views are
described below.
Alarm Stack View
Fig. 4.5: Alarm stack with three active alarms, two unacknowledged
passive alarms, two active acknowledged alarms, and one blocked alarm.
When alarms trip, they are considered active (red, no dash). They
appear in the alarm stack and are assigned an Identification time.
After viewing the alarm information, the user can acknowledge the
active alarm; it becomes active and acknowledged (green, with checkmark).
When the event that caused the alarm has been corrected (alarm passive) and the alarm has been acknowledged, the alarm will disappear
from the alarm stack.
If the event that caused the alarm is corrected (naturally or by manually
correcting the issue) before the alarm has been acknowledged, it
becomes passive and unacknowledged (red, with dash).
Under special circumstances it may be necessary to temporarily block
an alarm (for example, during commissioning). Refer to “Blocking and
Purging Alarms” on page 32 for a description of this feature.
A summary of the Alarm Viewer symbols and their meaning is given
below. Alarm states are further explained in section 4.2.3 ”How Alarm
states Change” on page 34.)
Symbol
Description
Indicates an active, unacknowledged alarm; the background color is red.
Indicates an unacknowledged, passive (reset) alarm; the
background color is red.
Indicates an active, acknowledged alarm; the background
color is green.
Indicates a blocked alarm; a red x with white background
color.
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The column widths of the table are adjustable. Move the cursor to the
line between the columns in the table header. When the cursor changes
to a double arrow, hold down the left mouse button and drag the column
to a suitable size.
Blocking and Purging Alarms
Alarms are blocked differently depending on the type of alarm stack
being viewed – internal or external. Internal alarms originate from your
Vista system. Alarms received from the I/NET system are considered
external.
•
When you block an internal alarm, it will not re-occur in the stack.
In this case, the alarm must be unblocked to be activated again.
•
When you block an external alarm, the alarm is only hidden from
the alarm view. The alarm can still occur, but it will not be displayed while it is being blocked.
When you un-block an I/NET alarm, a purge command is sent to
the I/NET system. Normally, you should acknowledge an I/NET
alarm before you purge it. This allows the I/NET system to make a
record of the purged alarm.
Caution
Blocking alarms is not recommended, as vital information may go
undetected.
Filtering and Sorting Alarms
The alarms in the Alarm Viewer are displayed in rows. The alarm list
can be filtered to show selected categories of alarms. A shortcut menu
is available for accessing other Alarm Viewer options: right-click anywhere in the Alarm Viewer window (see example in the diagram on the
previous page). These options include the following:
Selecting
Result
Alarm History
Switches to the Alarm History log view.
Acknowledge
Acknowledges the selected alarm.
Block
Disables the selected internal alarm from reoccurring or prevents the selected external alarm from
being displayed.
Unblock
Enables the selected internal alarm or purges the
selected I/NET alarm.
Sort (the alarms) By state
By priority
By date and time
By ID
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4 Monitoring I/NET Events and Alarms
Show (the indi- Active unacknowledged
cated items)
Passive unacknowledged
Active acknowledged
Blocked
Row number
Grid
Print
Prints the alarm stack view
Help
Show help about the Alarm Viewer
Alarm History View
You can view the history of any alarm in the dynamic alarm page by
right-clicking the alarm and selecting Alarm History from the resulting
popup menu.
Fig. 4.6: Alarm History View
The Alarm History View displays a dynamic event page, showing the
history of the selected alarm. Because it is a dynamic event page, there
are various options for filtering the Alarm History View. Refer to “Filtering Dynamic Events” on page 26 for more information.
4.2.2
The Static I/NET Alarm Page
The static alarm page displays a snapshot of I/NET alarms. The static
information is created when you first load the page, and is rebuilt each
time you refresh the page. You can read and acknowledge alarms from
within the static alarm page, however, sorting, filtering, and blocking
functions are not available. Since the blocking function is not available,
it is also not possible to purge I/NET alarms on the static alarm page.
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Access the static alarm page by selecting Utilities > INet > Alarms from
the system view. The following figure shows an example of the static
alarm page.
Fig. 4.7: Static I/NET Alarm Page
4.2.3
How Alarm states Change
One way to understand the different types of alarms is to study how the
state of an alarm can change.
When an alarm occurs, it is displayed as a red row in the alarm viewer.
If the alarm is acknowledged, the row turns green and displays a checkmark. If an active alarm is reset before being acknowledged, the row
stays red and displays a dash (—) symbol. When an acknowledged
alarm resets, it disappears from the alarm page.
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4 Monitoring I/NET Events and Alarms
Normal
Alarm
trips
Alarm active
unacknowledged
Alarm is
acknowledged
Block
Un-block
Alarm blocked
Alarm
resets
Alarm
trips
Alarm is
reset
Alarm is
acknowledged
Block
Alarm active
acknowledged
Alarm passive
unacknowledged
Block
Fig. 4.8: Alarm state transitions.
In the TAC Xenta 527, it is also possible to define that an internal alarm
should be automatically acknowledged when tripped. It will then appear
in red with a dash. External alarms can not be automatically acknowledged.
Alarms can be blocked in all active states. Block or unblock an alarm by
selecting it in the alarm view, right-clicking it, and selecting Block or
Unblock from the resulting popup menu. The affect that blocking has
on an alarm is dependent on whether the alarm is internal or external.
Refer to “Blocking and Purging Alarms” on page 32 for more information.
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5 I/NET Trend Logs
5
I/NET Trend Logs
5.1
Trend Log Overview
Trend logs show the variation of specified values over time. The logging may be started and stopped in different ways. Only the System
Administrator and ‘Operator-profile’ users can perform the administrative tasks of configuring trend logs.
5.2
Configuring and Viewing I/NET Trend Logs
In the following example, we will browse to an I/NET point that has a
trend log extension. We will then configure the trend log and view a
graph.
1
Using a web browser connected to the Xenta 527, select Utilities >
INet > Browse INet from the navigation pane, and begin browsing
the I/NET system. If necessary, refer to “Browsing the I/NET System” on page 24 for instructions.
2
Locate an I/NET point that has a trend log (TR) extension. Any
I/NET point can have a TR extension.
Fig. 5.1:
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The Points Page
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5 I/NET Trend Logs
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3
Click on the TR link to view the point’s trend log setup.
Fig. 5.2:
5.3
Viewing the Trend Log Setup
The Trend Viewer
The Trend Viewer in the TAC Xenta 527 displays historical logged data
from the defined trend log objects in the system. The user can change
the scale of the x-axis and the y-axis, select which trends to display,
zoom in and out, reload data, print the overview, list the trend log data
in a table, and activate or deactivate the grid in the Trend Viewer.
There are three views available in Trend Viewer:
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•
Graph
•
Configure
•
Table
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5.3.1
5 I/NET Trend Logs
The Graph View
The Graph view shows the logged data as a trend chart.
Fig. 5.3: A Graph View example
There are three mouse pointer functions, which can be selected by clicking on the triangle-shaped zoom tool.
Pointer
Appearance
Function
The coordinates can be seen in the status bar at the
bottom of the page.
Zoom in.
Zoom out.
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To zoom in on a specific period of time in the Trend Viewer, you can
use the tools shown below:
Use the navigate tool to pan the current view.
Use the zoom tool to zoom in and out.
Note! If you select the Zoom out (-) tool and click left in
the picture, you will get a ‘best fit’ display of the available data.
Right click anywhere in the Graph view to get the following shortcut
menu options.
Menu option
Description
Refresh
Updates the picture contents.
Configured view Sets the trend chart to view the configured time
window.
5.3.2
Show
Shows or hides data.
Print
Prints the trend chart.
Help
Shows help about the Trend Viewer.
The Configure View
The Configure view is used to customize the trend chart properties.
Fig. 5.4: A Configure View example
The following settings can be customized for each log.
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•
Visible: Display the logged data (select Yes or No).
•
Name: Name of the logged signal (read-only).
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5 I/NET Trend Logs
•
Color: Change the color of the plot line (click the colored field
and a new window with color palette opens).
•
Type: Select to display the data as a Line or Bar graph.
•
Sample points: Display the measured points (Yes or No) or only
the graph.
To make it easier to read the graph, a grid can be independently
switched on/off both horizontally and vertically. Select or clear the
Show Grid check box
In the lower part of the window, some additional read-only Chart settings are displayed.
Note
These setting modifications are only valid for the current session. Permanent changes must be performed in XBuilder.
5.3.3
The Table View
The Table view shows the logged data as a table with values.
Fig. 5.5: Table View Example
There are two sorting options available from the drop-down list box:
•
Log: Select which log value to list.
•
Events: Select All or Values only.
If you right click anywhere in the Table view, you will get the following
shortcut menu options.
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Menu option
Description
Print
Prints the Table view.
Help
Shows help about the Trend Viewer.
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6
6 Working with I/NET Time Schedules
Working with I/NET Time Schedules
The TAC Xenta 527 provides a special editor that allows you to modify
I/NET Seven time schedules. Only the System Administrator and
‘Operator-profile’ users can perform the administrative tasks of configuring time schedules.You can access this editor by browsing through
the I/NET system until you locate an I/NET point that has a TS (time
schedule) extension. However, you may also find that your Xenta 527
is loaded with a project that contains links to I/NET time schedules. In
this case, you can click a link to jump directly to a time schedule, without having to browse through the I/NET system.
6.1
Time Scheduling Overview
The TS extension in I/NET allows you to create schedules (independent, master, or slave) for any of the DC and DO points currently residing in a controller. The elements of these schedules allow you to control
points based on the day of the week, the time of day, scheduled holidays, or unscheduled temporary events
Schedule Types
Time schedules are assigned to one of the following three schedule
types:
•
Independent — Independent schedules are used to apply a schedule to a single point.
•
Master — Master schedules are used to apply a schedule to multiple points.
•
Slave — Slave schedules allow a point to follow a master schedule
except for differences that you specify.
Independent and Master Time Schedule Actions
The following actions are available when you are working with an Independent or Master time schedule. Slave time schedules use a different
set of actions (refer to Slave Time Schedule Actions, below).
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•
Start — This action turns on a point controlled by this schedule at
the desired time of day. This action issues the first control command (0 or 1) of the point.
•
Ostart (Independent only) — Optimized start is a special start
related to room temperature. When you use Ostart, the time you
enter is actually the target occupancy time. The system actually
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6 Working with I/NET Time Schedules
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starts up the device before this time in order to achieve the desired
temperature at the target occupancy time. The target temperature
information is defined in the Temperature Control Editor.
•
Stop — This action turns off a point controlled by this schedule at
the desired time of day. This action issues the second control command (0 or 1) of the point.
•
Ostop (Independent only) — Optimized stop is a special stop command related to room temperature. When you use Ostop, the time
you enter is actually the target vacancy time. This lets the system
shut off an HVAC unit while the room is still occupied and still
maintain the desired temperature range. This saves the energy (and
money) required to run the fan for the extra few minutes involved.
•
Cycle — This action lets you select the time you wish duty cycling
to start, and indicate the duty cycle pattern (minutes off, minutes
on) for the point controlled by this schedule. A duty cycle pattern
might be 10 minutes off and 50 minutes on. The cycle repeats
indefinitely until it is overridden by a start or stop command or
another cycle command.
•
Ocycle (Independent only) — Optimized cycling retains the
advantages of regular duty cycling but gives you some control
over room temperature. You define the cycle start time and number of minutes off and on just as you do for Cycle. Optimized duty
cycling shortens the off time of the cycle if the temperature deviates from the target temperature defined for the point.
This time, subtracted from the off portion of the cycle, is added to
the on time. This keeps the total cycle time the same no matter how
great the temperature deviation and the resulting compensation.
This is important in maintaining a staggered order of on/off times.
If the temperature drifts from the target far enough, the point ultimately remains on: cycle ON time equals the maximum and cycle
OFF time equals zero.
Slave Time Schedule Actions
A slave schedule displays a copy of a master schedule. You can determine if you want the slave point to mirror, optimize, or ignore each
command listed in the master point schedule.
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•
Mirror — As the name suggests, this option causes the slave point
to copy the specified action.
•
Optimize — This option causes the slave point to optimize the
start, stop, or cycle action defined in the master point. Refer to the
discussion of optimized cycling, start, and stop, described in Independent and Master Time Schedule Actions, above.
•
Ignore — This option causes the slave point to ignore or skip the
specified action.
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6.2
6 Working with I/NET Time Schedules
Viewing and Editing I/NET Time Schedules
In the following example, we will browse to an I/NET point that has a
time schedule extension, and then edit the schedule.
1
Using a web browser connected to the Xenta 527, select Utilities >
INet > Browse INet from the navigation pane, and begin browsing
the I/NET system. If necessary, refer to “Browsing the I/NET System” on page 24 for instructions.
2
Locate an I/NET point that has a time schedule (TS) extension.
Discrete control (DC) and discrete output (DO) points can have a
TS extension.
Fig. 6.1:
3
Click on the TS link to view the point’s time schedule.
Fig. 6.2:
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The Points Page
Viewing an I/NET Time Schedule
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6 Working with I/NET Time Schedules
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The time schedule screen displays a summary of all commands (up
to 17) defined for the selected schedule. The summary shows the
action, the time that the action will occur, the days of the week that
use the action, which special schedules (if any) will use the action,
and which temporary schedules (if any) will use the action.
4
To edit the schedule, select an action from the drop-down list and
click Edit.
Fig. 6.3:
5
Use the time schedule editor to make any necessary adjustments to
the selected action. Refer to “Time Scheduling Overview” on page
43 for a description of the schedule types and their actions. For a
complete description of this editor and its parameters, refer to the
I/NET Seven Operator Guide and Technical Reference Guide.
Fig. 6.4:
6
Selecting an Action
Time Schedule Editor
When you are finished making adjustments to the selected action,
click Save to except your settings and to close the editor.
You can continue selecting actions and making adjustments to the
schedule as necessary. Each time you save your changes, the Xenta 527
sends the updated schedule to the I/NET system.
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7
Requirements
7.1
Computer Requirements
7 Requirements
The minimum hardware requirement is a Pentium 133 MHz and 64 MB
of RAM. The recommendation is a Pentium 200 MHz and 96 MB of
RAM.
7.2
Web Browser Requirements
The web browser used must support a number of standards.
From the Log in page (see “The Log in page” on page 11), click Help
to get a summary of the web site requirements and your browser properties:
The recommended web browser is Microsoft Internet Explorer, version
6.0 or higher.
Fig. 7.1: Browser requirements and information
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7 Requirements
7.2.1
TAC Xenta, Operating TAC Xenta 527
Loading the Java™ Plugin
Java™ Plug-in is a software component that allows you to run Java programs (called applets) inside your web browser. Many web browsers,
though not all, come with their own internal support for running applets.
We recommend, however, that you use Sun’s Java Plug-in. The main
reason is that the internal Java support provided by most browsers is
based on an old version of the Java platform. This means that they are
not capable of running applets that use the latest and most useful features that the Java platform can offer. By using Java Plug-in from Sun,
you ensure that you have the most up-to-date Java platform.
Obtaining the Java Plug-in
A simple way to obtain the Java Plug-in is to use the TAC Download
Java Plug-in page (there is a link from the Java Plug-in Help page):
<http://download.tac.com/software/sun/java/javadownload.html>.
Recommended version for TAC Xenta 527 is Java JRE Version is 1.4.2.
Configuring the Java Plug-in
In most cases, after you install the Java plug-in, no further configuration
is necessary. The Java Plug-in will smoothly handle the Java programs
in your browser, without any appreciable delay.
However, the Java Plug-in provides a Java Plug-in Control Panel,
should you need to change the plug-in configuration. Launch the Java
Plug-in Control Panel as follows:
1
In the Windows Start menu, select Settings and then Control
Panel. This will open up the Windows Control Panel.
2
Look for the Java coffee-cup icon with the label Java Plug-in followed by a version number. If you do not find the Java Plug-in
icon, the plug-in is probably not installed on your computer.
3
Double-click the icon to launch the Java Plug-in Control Panel.
The Java Plug-in Control Panel enables you to adjust how the Java Plugin runs Java programs in your browser.
Recommended Settings of the Java Plug-in
It is possible to have the Java Plug-in installed on your PC, without it
being the default Java support for running programs in your browser.
Make sure that the Java Plug-in will be used in your browser by selecting the appropriate browser check boxes in the Java Control panel.
For more information on the Java Plug-in, visit the Java Plug-in home
page:
<http://java.sun.com/products/plugin/>
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Index
A
Accessing I/NET 19
Ack (point control) 24
acknowledged (alarm) 31
active (alarm) 31
Alarm blocking and purging 32
Alarm History 33
Alarm Monitoring 25
Alarm stack 31
Alarm states 35
applets 48
Automatic mode 24
B
block (alarm) 31
browser 12, 47
Browsing I/NET 20
C
coffee-cup icon 48
Configure view 40
Control Value (point control) 24
Controlling I/NET Points 23
coordinates (trend graph) 39
D
Docnet 7
Download (point control) 24
Dynamic pages 25
E
Engineering TAC Xenta 511 7
Events Monitoring 25
Index
H
hardware requirement 47
Help menu 14
Home 14
I
I/NET Signals 19
Internet security 16
IP address 12
J
Java™ Plug-in 48
L
logging in 12
logging out 15
logout 14
M
Manual mode 24
menus 14
O
overview 11
P
passive (alarm) 31
password 13, 15
Plug-in 48
Point Control 23
programming and configuration 7
purging I/NET alarms 32
R
F
refresh 14
Release (door point) 24
requirements 47
filtering (alarms) 32
filtering (events) 26
S
G
Graph view 39
grid 41
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sample points 41
Security Alert 12
sorting (alarms) 32
SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) 16
standards 47
Static pages 25
49 (52)
Index
TAC Xenta, Operating TAC Xenta 527
T
Table view 41
Test mode 24
Time Schedules 43
Trend Logs 37
Trend Viewer 38
W
web browser 47
Z
zoom tool (trend graph) 40
50 (52)
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TAC helps people feel and function better, as a direct result of greater indoor climate. This is
®
made possible by TAC’s concept of Open Systems for Building IT , which utilizes information
technology to provide clients with advantages such as indoor climate optimization, energy
savings, flexibility, security, reduced expenses and user-friendly operation.
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