MPLS on the QFX Series

MPLS on the QFX Series
Release
13.2
Published: 2014-09-26
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Juniper Networks, Inc.
1194 North Mathilda Avenue
Sunnyvale, California 94089
USA
408-745-2000
www.juniper.net
Juniper Networks, Junos, Steel-Belted Radius, NetScreen, and ScreenOS are registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. in the United
States and other countries. The Juniper Networks Logo, the Junos logo, and JunosE are trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. All other
trademarks, service marks, registered trademarks, or registered service marks are the property of their respective owners.
Juniper Networks assumes no responsibility for any inaccuracies in this document. Juniper Networks reserves the right to change, modify,
transfer, or otherwise revise this publication without notice.
MPLS on the QFX Series
13.2
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
All rights reserved.
The information in this document is current as of the date on the title page.
YEAR 2000 NOTICE
Juniper Networks hardware and software products are Year 2000 compliant. Junos OS has no known time-related limitations through the
year 2038. However, the NTP application is known to have some difficulty in the year 2036.
END USER LICENSE AGREEMENT
The Juniper Networks product that is the subject of this technical documentation consists of (or is intended for use with) Juniper Networks
software. Use of such software is subject to the terms and conditions of the End User License Agreement (“EULA”) posted at
http://www.juniper.net/support/eula.html. By downloading, installing or using such software, you agree to the terms and conditions of
that EULA.
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Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Table of Contents
About the Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Documentation and Release Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Supported Platforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Using the Examples in This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Merging a Full Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv
Merging a Snippet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv
Documentation Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Documentation Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Requesting Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Self-Help Online Tools and Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Opening a Case with JTAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
Part 1
Overview
Chapter 1
MPLS Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
MPLS Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Understanding MPLS Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Provider Edge Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
MPLS Protocol and Label-Switched Paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
IP Over MPLS for Customer Edge Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
BGP Layer 3 VPN Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Routing Instances for Layer 3 VPN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Provider Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Components Required for All Switches in the MPLS Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Interior Gateway Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
MPLS Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
RSVP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Family mpls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Understanding MPLS Label Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
MPLS Label-Switched Paths and MPLS Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Reserved Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
MPLS Label Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Penultimate-Hop Popping and Ultimate-Hop Popping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Understanding CoS MPLS EXP Classifiers and Rewrite Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
EXP Classifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
EXP Rewrite Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Schedulers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Understanding Using MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPNs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPNs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
Chapter 2
MPLS Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
MPLS Feature Support on the QFX Series and EX4600 Switch Overview . . . . . . 15
Supported MPLS Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Unsupported MPLS Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Supported MPLS Scaling Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Chapter 3
Introduction to LDP for QFX5100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
LDP Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Junos OS LDP Protocol Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
LDP Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Tunneling LDP LSPs in RSVP LSPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Tunneling LDP LSPs in RSVP LSPs Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Label Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
LDP Message Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Discovery Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Session Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Advertisement Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Notification Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
LDP Session Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
LDP Graceful Restart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Part 2
Configuration
Chapter 4
Configuration Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
MPLS Configuration Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Chapter 5
LDP Configuration Guidelines for QFX5100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Minimum LDP Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Enabling and Disabling LDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Enabling Strict Targeted Hello Messages for LDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Filtering Inbound LDP Label Bindings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Examples: Filtering Inbound LDP Label Bindings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Filtering Outbound LDP Label Bindings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Examples: Filtering Outbound LDP Label Bindings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Specifying the Transport Address Used by LDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Collecting LDP Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
LDP Statistics Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Disabling LDP Statistics on the Penultimate-Hop Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
LDP Statistics Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Tracing LDP Protocol Traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Tracing LDP Protocol Traffic at the Protocol and Routing Instance
Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Tracing LDP Protocol Traffic Within FECs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Examples: Tracing LDP Protocol Traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Chapter 6
Configuration Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Example: Configuring MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPNs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Example: Tunneling IPv6 Traffic over MPLS IPv4 Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Example: Configuring LDP Downstream on Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
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Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Table of Contents
Chapter 7
Configuration Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Configuring the Ingress PE Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Configuring the Egress PE Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Configuring MPLS on Provider Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Configuring Static Label Switched Paths for MPLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Configuring the Ingress PE Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Configuring the Provider and the Egress PE Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Configuring MPLS Firewall Filters and Policers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Configuring an MPLS Firewall Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Applying an MPLS Firewall Filter to an MPLS Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Configuring Policers for LSPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Configuring CoS Bits for an MPLS Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Configuring a Global MPLS EXP Classifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Configuring Rewrite Rules for MPLS EXP Classifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Configuring MPLS to Gather Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Configuring Automatic Bandwidth Allocation for LSPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Configuring Automatic Bandwidth Allocation on LSPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Configuring the Automatic Bandwidth Allocation Interval . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Configuring the Maximum and Minimum Bounds of the LSP’s
Bandwidth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Configuring the Automatic Bandwidth Adjustment Threshold . . . . . . . . 84
Configuring a Limit on Bandwidth Overflow and Underflow
Samples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Configuring Passive Bandwidth Utilization Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Requesting Automatic Bandwidth Allocation Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Configuring Reporting of Automatic Bandwidth Allocation Statistics . . . . . . . . . 88
Configuring the LDP Timer for Hello Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Configuring the LDP Timer for Link Hello Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Configuring the LDP Timer for Targeted Hello Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Configuring the Delay Before LDP Neighbors Are Considered Down . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Configuring the LDP Hold Time for Link Hello Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Configuring the LDP Hold Time for Targeted Hello Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Configuring the Interval for LDP Keepalive Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Configuring the LDP Keepalive Timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Configuring LDP Route Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Configuring LDP Graceful Restart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Enabling Graceful Restart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Disabling LDP Graceful Restart or Helper Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Configuring Reconnect Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Configuring Recovery Time and Maximum Recovery Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Configuring the Prefixes Advertised into LDP from the Routing Table . . . . . . . . . . 97
Example: Configuring the Prefixes Advertised into LDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Configuring LDP LSP Traceroute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Configuring Miscellaneous LDP Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Configuring LDP to Use the IGP Route Metric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Preventing Addition of Ingress Routes to the inet.0 Routing Table . . . . . . . . 99
Multiple-Instance LDP and Carrier-of-Carriers VPNs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
Configuring MPLS and LDP to Pop the Label on the Ultimate-Hop
Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Enabling LDP over RSVP-Established LSPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Enabling LDP over RSVP-Established LSPs in Heterogeneous Networks . . . 101
Configuring the TCP MD5 Signature for LDP Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Configuring LDP Session Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Disabling SNMP Traps for LDP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Configuring LDP Synchronization with the IGP on LDP Links . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Configuring LDP Synchronization with the IGP on the Router . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Configuring the Label Withdrawal Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Ignoring the LDP Subnet Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Chapter 8
Configuration Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
[edit protocols mpls] Hierarchy Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
[edit protocols rsvp] Hierarchy Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
auto-bandwidth (MPLS Statistics) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
auto-bandwidth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
adjust-interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
adjust-threshold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
adjust-threshold-overflow-limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
adjust-threshold-underflow-limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
exp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
maximum-bandwidth (Protocols MPLS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
minimum-bandwidth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-threshold-change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-threshold-value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
monitor-bandwidth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
system-defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Chapter 9
LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
allow-subnet-mismatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
authentication-algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
authentication-key (Protocols LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
authentication-key-chain (Protocols LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
deaggregate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
disable (Protocols LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
dod-request-policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
downstream-on-demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
egress-policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
explicit-null (Protocols LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
export (Protocols LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
fec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
graceful-restart (Protocols LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
hello-interval (Protocols LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
helper-disable (LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
hold-time (Protocols LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
ignore-lsp-metrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
igp-synchronization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
import (Protocols LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
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Table of Contents
interface (Protocols LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
keepalive-interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
keepalive-timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
l2-smart-policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
label-withdrawal-delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
ldp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
ldp-synchronization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
log-updown (Protocols LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
maximum-neighbor-recovery-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
no-forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
policing (Protocols LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
preference (Protocols LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
reconnect-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
recovery-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
session (ldp) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
session-protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
strict-targeted-hellos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
targeted-hello . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
traceoptions (Protocols LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
track-igp-metric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
traffic-statistics (Protocols LDP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
transport-address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Part 3
Administration
Chapter 10
Routine Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Verifying That MPLS Is Working Correctly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Verifying the Physical Layer on the Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Verifying the Routing Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Verifying the Core Interfaces Being Used for the MPLS Traffic . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Verifying RSVP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Chapter 11
Operational Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
clear ldp neighbor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
clear ldp session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
clear ldp statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
clear mpls lsp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
clear rsvp session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
clear rsvp statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
monitor label-switched-path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
ping mpls bgp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
ping mpls l2circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
ping mpls l3vpn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
ping mpls ldp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
ping mpls lsp-end-point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
ping mpls rsvp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
request mpls lsp adjust-autobandwidth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
show ldp database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
show ldp fec-filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
show ldp interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
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show ldp neighbor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
show ldp path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
show ldp route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
show ldp session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
show ldp statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
show ldp traffic-statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
show security keychain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
show link-management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
show link-management peer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
show link-management routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240
show link-management statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
show link-management te-link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
show mpls call-admission-control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
show mpls cspf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
show mpls diffserv-te . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
show route forwarding-table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
show mpls interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
show mpls lsp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
show mpls lsp autobandwidth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
show mpls path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
show mpls static-lsp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
show rsvp interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
show rsvp neighbor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288
show rsvp session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
show rsvp statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
show rsvp version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
show ted database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
show ted link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
show ted protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
traceroute mpls ldp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
traceroute mpls rsvp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
Part 4
Troubleshooting
Chapter 12
Troubleshooting Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327
Issues and Limitations in Operation of MPLS Features on the QFX Series and on
EX4600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327
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Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
List of Figures
Part 1
Overview
Chapter 1
MPLS Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Figure 1: Label Encoding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Figure 2: MPLS Label Swapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Chapter 3
Introduction to LDP for QFX5100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Figure 3: Swap and Push When LDP LSPs Are Tunneled Through RSVP LSPs . . . 22
Figure 4: Double Push When LDP LSPs Are Tunneled Through RSVP LSPs . . . . . 22
Part 2
Configuration
Chapter 6
Configuration Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Figure 5: MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Figure 6: IPv6 Networks Linked by MPLS IPv4 Tunnels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
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List of Tables
About the Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Table 1: Notice Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Part 1
Overview
Chapter 2
MPLS Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Table 3: MPLS Features on the QFX Series and on the EX4600 Switch . . . . . . . . 15
Table 4: MPLS Scaling Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Part 2
Configuration
Chapter 5
LDP Configuration Guidelines for QFX5100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Table 5: from Operators That Apply to LDP Received-Label Filtering . . . . . . . . . . 33
Table 6: to Operators for LDP Outbound-Label Filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Chapter 6
Configuration Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Table 7: Local CE Switch in the MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPN Topology . . . . . . . . . . 45
Table 8: Remote CE Switch in the MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPN Topology . . . . . . . . 45
Table 9: Layer 3 VPN Components of the Local PE Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Table 10: Layer 3 VPN Components of the Remote PE Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Chapter 7
Configuration Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Table 11: Supported Match Conditions for MPLS Firewall Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Table 12: Supported Actions for MPLS Firewall Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Part 3
Administration
Chapter 11
Operational Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Table 13: Output Control Keys for the monitor label-switched-path
Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Table 14: monitor label-switched-path Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Table 15: show ldp database Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Table 16: show ldp fec-filters Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Table 17: show ldp interface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Table 18: show ldp neighbor Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Table 19: show ldp path Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Table 20: show ldp route Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Table 21: show ldp session Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Table 22: show ldp statistics Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Table 23: show ldp traffic-statistics Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
Table 24: show security keychain Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
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Table 25: show link-management Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
Table 26: show link-management peer Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Table 27: show link-management routing Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240
Table 28: show link-management statistics Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Table 29: show link-management te-link Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Table 30: show mpls call-admission-control Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
Table 31: show mpls cspf Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Table 32: show mpls diffserv-te Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Table 33: show route forwarding-table Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
Table 34: show mpls interface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
Table 35: show mpls lsp Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
Table 36: show mpls lsp autobandwidth Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
Table 37: show mpls path Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
Table 38: show mpls static-lsp Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
Table 39: show rsvp interface Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
Table 40: show rsvp neighbor Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288
Table 41: show rsvp session Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
Table 42: show rsvp statistics Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
Table 43: show rsvp version Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
Table 44: show ted database Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
Table 45: show ted link Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
Table 46: show ted protocol Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
Table 47: traceroute mpls ldp Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
Table 48: traceroute mpls rsvp Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321
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Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
•
Documentation and Release Notes on page xiii
•
Supported Platforms on page xiii
•
Using the Examples in This Manual on page xiii
•
Documentation Conventions on page xv
•
Documentation Feedback on page xvii
•
Requesting Technical Support on page xvii
Documentation and Release Notes
®
To obtain the most current version of all Juniper Networks technical documentation,
see the product documentation page on the Juniper Networks website at
http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/.
If the information in the latest release notes differs from the information in the
documentation, follow the product Release Notes.
Juniper Networks Books publishes books by Juniper Networks engineers and subject
matter experts. These books go beyond the technical documentation to explore the
nuances of network architecture, deployment, and administration. The current list can
be viewed at http://www.juniper.net/books.
Supported Platforms
For the features described in this document, the following platforms are supported:
•
QFX Series standalone switches
Using the Examples in This Manual
If you want to use the examples in this manual, you can use the load merge or the load
merge relative command. These commands cause the software to merge the incoming
configuration into the current candidate configuration. The example does not become
active until you commit the candidate configuration.
If the example configuration contains the top level of the hierarchy (or multiple
hierarchies), the example is a full example. In this case, use the load merge command.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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If the example configuration does not start at the top level of the hierarchy, the example
is a snippet. In this case, use the load merge relative command. These procedures are
described in the following sections.
Merging a Full Example
To merge a full example, follow these steps:
1.
From the HTML or PDF version of the manual, copy a configuration example into a
text file, save the file with a name, and copy the file to a directory on your routing
platform.
For example, copy the following configuration to a file and name the file ex-script.conf.
Copy the ex-script.conf file to the /var/tmp directory on your routing platform.
system {
scripts {
commit {
file ex-script.xsl;
}
}
}
interfaces {
fxp0 {
disable;
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 10.0.0.1/24;
}
}
}
}
2. Merge the contents of the file into your routing platform configuration by issuing the
load merge configuration mode command:
[edit]
user@host# load merge /var/tmp/ex-script.conf
load complete
Merging a Snippet
To merge a snippet, follow these steps:
1.
From the HTML or PDF version of the manual, copy a configuration snippet into a text
file, save the file with a name, and copy the file to a directory on your routing platform.
For example, copy the following snippet to a file and name the file
ex-script-snippet.conf. Copy the ex-script-snippet.conf file to the /var/tmp directory
on your routing platform.
commit {
file ex-script-snippet.xsl; }
2. Move to the hierarchy level that is relevant for this snippet by issuing the following
configuration mode command:
xiv
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
[edit]
user@host# edit system scripts
[edit system scripts]
3. Merge the contents of the file into your routing platform configuration by issuing the
load merge relative configuration mode command:
[edit system scripts]
user@host# load merge relative /var/tmp/ex-script-snippet.conf
load complete
For more information about the load command, see the CLI User Guide.
Documentation Conventions
Table 1 on page xv defines notice icons used in this guide.
Table 1: Notice Icons
Icon
Meaning
Description
Informational note
Indicates important features or instructions.
Caution
Indicates a situation that might result in loss of data or hardware damage.
Warning
Alerts you to the risk of personal injury or death.
Laser warning
Alerts you to the risk of personal injury from a laser.
Tip
Indicates helpful information.
Best practice
Alerts you to a recommended use or implementation.
Table 2 on page xv defines the text and syntax conventions used in this guide.
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions
Convention
Description
Examples
Bold text like this
Represents text that you type.
To enter configuration mode, type the
configure command:
user@host> configure
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
xv
MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions (continued)
Convention
Description
Examples
Fixed-width text like this
Represents output that appears on the
terminal screen.
user@host> show chassis alarms
•
Introduces or emphasizes important
new terms.
•
•
Identifies guide names.
A policy term is a named structure
that defines match conditions and
actions.
•
Identifies RFC and Internet draft titles.
•
Junos OS CLI User Guide
•
RFC 1997, BGP Communities Attribute
Italic text like this
Italic text like this
No alarms currently active
Represents variables (options for which
you substitute a value) in commands or
configuration statements.
Configure the machine’s domain name:
Represents names of configuration
statements, commands, files, and
directories; configuration hierarchy levels;
or labels on routing platform
components.
•
To configure a stub area, include the
stub statement at the [edit protocols
ospf area area-id] hierarchy level.
•
The console port is labeled CONSOLE.
< > (angle brackets)
Encloses optional keywords or variables.
stub <default-metric metric>;
| (pipe symbol)
Indicates a choice between the mutually
exclusive keywords or variables on either
side of the symbol. The set of choices is
often enclosed in parentheses for clarity.
broadcast | multicast
# (pound sign)
Indicates a comment specified on the
same line as the configuration statement
to which it applies.
rsvp { # Required for dynamic MPLS only
[ ] (square brackets)
Encloses a variable for which you can
substitute one or more values.
community name members [
community-ids ]
Indention and braces ( { } )
Identifies a level in the configuration
hierarchy.
; (semicolon)
Identifies a leaf statement at a
configuration hierarchy level.
Text like this
[edit]
root@# set system domain-name
domain-name
(string1 | string2 | string3)
[edit]
routing-options {
static {
route default {
nexthop address;
retain;
}
}
}
GUI Conventions
Bold text like this
xvi
Represents graphical user interface (GUI)
items you click or select.
•
In the Logical Interfaces box, select
All Interfaces.
•
To cancel the configuration, click
Cancel.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions (continued)
Convention
Description
Examples
> (bold right angle bracket)
Separates levels in a hierarchy of menu
selections.
In the configuration editor hierarchy,
select Protocols>Ospf.
Documentation Feedback
We encourage you to provide feedback, comments, and suggestions so that we can
improve the documentation. You can provide feedback by using either of the following
methods:
•
Online feedback rating system—On any page at the Juniper Networks Technical
Documentation site at http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/index.html, simply click the
stars to rate the content, and use the pop-up form to provide us with information about
your experience. Alternately, you can use the online feedback form at
https://www.juniper.net/cgi-bin/docbugreport/.
•
E-mail—Send your comments to techpubs-comments@juniper.net. Include the document
or topic name, URL or page number, and software version (if applicable).
Requesting Technical Support
Technical product support is available through the Juniper Networks Technical Assistance
Center (JTAC). If you are a customer with an active J-Care or JNASC support contract,
or are covered under warranty, and need post-sales technical support, you can access
our tools and resources online or open a case with JTAC.
•
JTAC policies—For a complete understanding of our JTAC procedures and policies,
review the JTAC User Guide located at
http://www.juniper.net/us/en/local/pdf/resource-guides/7100059-en.pdf.
•
Product warranties—For product warranty information, visit
http://www.juniper.net/support/warranty/.
•
JTAC hours of operation—The JTAC centers have resources available 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, 365 days a year.
Self-Help Online Tools and Resources
For quick and easy problem resolution, Juniper Networks has designed an online
self-service portal called the Customer Support Center (CSC) that provides you with the
following features:
•
Find CSC offerings: http://www.juniper.net/customers/support/
•
Search for known bugs: http://www2.juniper.net/kb/
•
Find product documentation: http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/
•
Find solutions and answer questions using our Knowledge Base: http://kb.juniper.net/
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
xvii
MPLS on the QFX Series
•
Download the latest versions of software and review release notes:
http://www.juniper.net/customers/csc/software/
•
Search technical bulletins for relevant hardware and software notifications:
http://kb.juniper.net/InfoCenter/
•
Join and participate in the Juniper Networks Community Forum:
http://www.juniper.net/company/communities/
•
Open a case online in the CSC Case Management tool: http://www.juniper.net/cm/
To verify service entitlement by product serial number, use our Serial Number Entitlement
(SNE) Tool: https://tools.juniper.net/SerialNumberEntitlementSearch/
Opening a Case with JTAC
You can open a case with JTAC on the Web or by telephone.
•
Use the Case Management tool in the CSC at http://www.juniper.net/cm/.
•
Call 1-888-314-JTAC (1-888-314-5822 toll-free in the USA, Canada, and Mexico).
For international or direct-dial options in countries without toll-free numbers, see
http://www.juniper.net/support/requesting-support.html.
xviii
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 1
Overview
•
MPLS Overview on page 3
•
MPLS Features on page 15
•
Introduction to LDP for QFX5100 on page 19
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
1
MPLS on the QFX Series
2
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 1
MPLS Overview
•
MPLS Overview on page 3
•
Understanding MPLS Components on page 4
•
Understanding MPLS Label Operations on page 7
•
Understanding CoS MPLS EXP Classifiers and Rewrite Rules on page 11
•
Understanding Using MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPNs on page 14
MPLS Overview
You can configure Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) to increase transport efficiency
in the network. MPLS services can be used to connect various sites to a backbone network
and to ensure better performance for low-latency applications such as voice over IP
(VoIP) and other business-critical functions.
MPLS has the following advantages over conventional packet forwarding:
Related
Documentation
•
Packets arriving on different ports can be assigned different labels.
•
A packet arriving at a particular provider edge (PE) switch can be assigned a label that
is different from that of the same packet entering the network at a different PE switch.
As a result, forwarding decisions that depend on the ingress PE switch can be easily
made.
•
Sometimes it is desirable to force a packet to follow a particular route that is explicitly
chosen at or before the time the packet enters the network, rather than letting it follow
the route chosen by the normal dynamic routing algorithm as the packet travels through
the network. In MPLS, a label can be used to represent the route so that the packet
need not carry the identity of the explicit route.
•
MPLS Feature Support on the QFX Series and EX4600 Switch Overview on page 15
•
Understanding MPLS Components on page 4
•
Understanding MPLS Label Operations on page 7
•
Understanding CoS MPLS EXP Classifiers and Rewrite Rules on page 11
•
Junos OS MPLS Applications Library for Routing Devices
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
3
MPLS on the QFX Series
Understanding MPLS Components
MPLS includes a number of components. While some components are required for all
MPLS applications, others might not be, depending on the specific application.
This topic includes:
•
Provider Edge Switches on page 4
•
Provider Switch on page 5
•
Components Required for All Switches in the MPLS Network on page 5
Provider Edge Switches
To implement MPLS on a network, you must configure two provider edge (PE)
switches—that is, an ingress PE switch and an egress PE switch. In addition, you must
configure one or more provider switches as transit switches within the network to support
the forwarding of MPLS packets.
The ingress PE switch (the entry point to the MPLS tunnel) receives a packet, analyzes
it, and pushes an MPLS label onto it. This label places the packet in a forwarding
equivalence class (FEC) and determines its handling and destination through the MPLS
tunnel. The egress PE switch (the exit point from the MPLS tunnel) pops the MPLS label
off the outgoing packet.
Within an MPLS tunnel, the network traffic is bidirectional. Therefore, each PE switch
can be configured to be both an ingress switch and an egress switch, depending on the
direction of the traffic.
The following MPLS components are configured on the PE switches but not on the
provider switches:
•
MPLS Protocol and Label-Switched Paths on page 4
•
IP Over MPLS for Customer Edge Interfaces on page 4
•
BGP Layer 3 VPN Configuration on page 4
•
Routing Instances for Layer 3 VPN on page 5
MPLS Protocol and Label-Switched Paths
Each PE switch must be configured to support the MPLS protocol. You must also configure
label-switched paths (LSPs) at the [edit protocols mpls] hierarchy level.
IP Over MPLS for Customer Edge Interfaces
You can configure the customer edge interfaces of the PE switches for IP over MPLS
using a Layer 3 interface and a static route from the ingress PE switch to the egress PE
switch. See “Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge Switches” on page 67.
BGP Layer 3 VPN Configuration
If you are implementing a Layer 3 virtual private network (VPN), you must configure the
BGP routing protocol on the PE switches.
4
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: MPLS Overview
Routing Instances for Layer 3 VPN
If you are implementing a Layer 3 VPN, you must configure a routing instance. A routing
instance is a collection of routing tables, interfaces, and routing protocol parameters.
The set of interfaces belongs to the routing tables, and the routing protocol parameters
control the information in the routing tables.
QFX Series devices and EX4600 support VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) routing
instances for Layer 3 VPNs.
Each routing instance has a unique name and a corresponding IP unicast table. For
example, if you configure a routing instance with the name my-instance, its corresponding
IP unicast table will be my-instance.inet.0. All routes for my-instance are installed in
my-instance.inet.0.
Provider Switch
You must configure one or more provider switches as transit switches within the network
to support the forwarding of MPLS packets. You can add provider switches without
changing the configuration of the PE switches.
A provider switch does not analyze packets. It refers to an MPLS label forwarding table
and swaps one label for another. The new label determines the next hop along the MPLS
tunnel. A provider switch cannot perform push or pop operations.
Components Required for All Switches in the MPLS Network
The following MPLS components are configured on both the PE switches and the provider
switches:
•
Interior Gateway Protocol on page 5
•
MPLS Protocol on page 6
•
RSVP on page 6
•
Family mpls on page 6
Interior Gateway Protocol
MPLS works in coordination with OSPF as the interior gateway protocol (IGP). Therefore,
you must configure OSPF as the IGP on the loopback interface and core interfaces of
both the PE switches and the provider switches.
The core interfaces can be either Gigabit Ethernet or 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, and
they can be configured as either individual interfaces or as aggregated Ethernet interfaces.
NOTE: The core interfaces cannot be configured with VLAN tagging or a
VLAN ID. When you configure them to belong to family mpls, they are removed
from the default VLAN if they were members of that VLAN. They operate as
an exclusive tunnel for MPLS traffic.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
5
MPLS on the QFX Series
MPLS Protocol
You must enable the MPLS protocol on all switches that participate in the MPLS network
and apply it to the core interfaces of both the PE and provider switches. You do not need
to apply it to the loopback interface because the MPLS protocol uses the framework
established by the RSVP signaling protocol to create LSPs. On the PE switches, the
configuration of the MPLS protocol must also include the definition of an LSP.
RSVP
RSVP is a signaling protocol that allocates and distributes labels throughout an MPLS
network. RSVP sets up unidirectional paths between the ingress PE switch and the egress
PE switch. RSVP makes the LSPs dynamic; it can detect topology changes and outages
and establish new LSPs to allow traffic to move around a failure.
You must enable RSVP and apply it to the loopback interface and the core interface of
both the PE and provider switches. The path message contains the configured information
about the resources required for the LSP to be established.
When the egress PE switch receives the path message, it sends a reservation message
back to the ingress PE switch. This reservation message is passed along from switch to
switch along the same path as the original path message. Once the ingress PE switch
receives this reservation message, an RSVP path is established.
The established LSP stays active as long as the RSVP session remains active. RSVP
continues activity through the transmissions and responses to RSVP path and reservation
messages. If the messages stop for three minutes, the RSVP session terminates and the
LSP is lost.
RSVP runs as a separate software process in Junos OS and is not in the packet-forwarding
path.
Family mpls
You must configure the core interfaces used for MPLS traffic to belong to family mpls.
NOTE: You can enable family mpls on either individual interfaces or on
aggregated Ethernet interfaces. You cannot enable it on tagged VLAN
interfaces.
Related
Documentation
6
•
MPLS Feature Support on the QFX Series and EX4600 Switch Overview on page 15
•
Understanding Using MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPNs on page 14
•
Understanding CoS MPLS EXP Classifiers and Rewrite Rules on page 11
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge Switches on page 67
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Switches on page 71
•
Configuring Rewrite Rules for MPLS EXP Classifiers on page 79
•
Configuring a Global MPLS EXP Classifier on page 78
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: MPLS Overview
•
Junos OS MPLS Applications Library for Routing Devices
•
Junos OS VPNs Library for Routing Devices
Understanding MPLS Label Operations
In the traditional packet-forwarding paradigm, as a packet travels from one switch to
the next, an independent forwarding decision is made at each hop. The IP network header
is analyzed and the next hop is chosen based on this analysis and on the information in
the routing table. In an MPLS environment, the analysis of the packet header is made
only once, when a packet enters the MPLS tunnel (that is, the path used for MPLS traffic).
When an IP packet enters a label-switched path (LSP), the ingress provider edge (PE)
switch examines the packet and assigns it a label based on its destination, placing the
label in the packet’s header. The label transforms the packet from one that is forwarded
based on its IP routing information to one that is forwarded based on information
associated with the label. The packet is then forwarded to the next provider switch in
the LSP. This switch and all subsequent switches in the LSP do not examine any of the
IP routing information in the labeled packet. Rather, they use the label to look up
information in their label forwarding table. They then replace the old label with a new
label and forward the packet to the next switch in the path. When the packet reaches
the egress PE switch, the label is removed, and the packet again becomes a native IP
packet and is forwarded based on its IP routing information.
This topic describes:
•
MPLS Label-Switched Paths and MPLS Labels on page 7
•
Reserved Labels on page 8
•
MPLS Label Operations on page 8
•
Penultimate-Hop Popping and Ultimate-Hop Popping on page 10
MPLS Label-Switched Paths and MPLS Labels
When a packet enters the MPLS network, it is assigned to an LSP. Each LSP is identified
by a label, which is a short (20-bit), fixed-length value at the front of the MPLS label (32
bits). Labels are used as lookup indexes for the label forwarding table. For each label,
this table stores forwarding information. Because no additional parsing or lookup is done
on the encapsulated packet, MPLS supports the transmission of any other protocols
within the packet payload.
Figure 1 on page 8 shows the encoding of a single label. The encoding appears after
data link layer headers, but before any network layer header.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
7
MPLS on the QFX Series
Figure 1: Label Encoding
Reserved Labels
Labels range from 0 through 1,048,575. Labels 0 through 999,999 are for internal use.
Some of the reserved labels (in the range 0 through 15) have well-defined meanings.
The following reserved labels are used by QFX Series devices and EX4600:
•
0, IPv4 Explicit Null label—This value is valid only when it is the sole label entry (no
label stacking). It indicates that the label must be popped on receipt. Forwarding
continues based on the IP version 4 (IPv4) packet.
•
1, Router Alert label—When a packet is received with a top label value of 1, it is delivered
to the local software module for processing.
•
3, Implicit Null label—This label is used in the signaling protocol (RSVP) only to request
label popping by the downstream switch. It never actually appears in the encapsulation.
Labels with a value of 3 must not be used in the data packet as real labels. No payload
type (IPv4 or IPv6) is implied with this label.
MPLS Label Operations
QFX Series devices and EX4600 support the following MPLS label operations:
8
•
Push
•
Pop
•
Swap
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: MPLS Overview
NOTE: There is a limit with regard to the number of labels that QFX devices
and EX4600 can affix (push operations) to the label stack or remove (pop
operations) from the label stack.
•
For Push operations—As many as three labels are supported.
•
For Pop operations—As many as two labels are supported.
The push operation affixes a new label to the top of the IP packet. For IPv4 packets, the
new label is the first label. The time to live (TTL) field value in the packet header is derived
from the IP packet header. The push operation cannot be applied to a packet that already
has an MPLS label.
The pop operation removes a label from the beginning of the packet. Once the label is
removed, the TTL is copied from the label into the IP packet header, and the underlying
IP packet is forwarded as a native IP packet
The swap operation removes an existing MPLS label from an IP packet and replaces it
with a new MPLS label, based on the following:
•
Incoming interface
•
Label
•
Label forwarding table
Figure 2 on page 9 shows an IP packet without a label arriving on the customer edge
interface (ge-0/0/1) of the ingress PE switch. The ingress PE switch examines the packet
and identifies that packet’s destination as the egress PE switch. The ingress PE switch
applies label 100 to the packet and sends the MPLS packet to its outgoing MPLS core
interface (ge-0/0/5). The MPLS packet is transmitted on the MPLS tunnel through the
provider switch, where it arrives at interface ge-0/0/5 with label 100. The provider switch
swaps label 100 with label 200 and forwards the MPLS packet through its core interface
(ge-0/0/7) to the next hop on the tunnel, which is the egress PE switch. The egress PE
switch receives the MPLS packet through its core interface (ge-0/0/7), removes the
MPLS label, and sends the IP packet out of its customer edge interface (ge-0/0/1) to a
destination that is beyond the tunnel.
Figure 2: MPLS Label Swapping
Figure 2 on page 9 shows the path of a packet as it passes in one direction from the
ingress PE switch to the egress PE switch. However, the MPLS configuration also allows
traffic to travel in the reverse direction. Thus, each PE switch operates as both an ingress
switch and an egress switch.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
9
MPLS on the QFX Series
Penultimate-Hop Popping and Ultimate-Hop Popping
The switches enable penultimate-hop popping (PHP) by default with IP over MPLS
configurations. With PHP, the penultimate provider switch is responsible for popping the
MPLS label and forwarding the traffic to the egress PE switch. The egress PE switch then
performs an IP route lookup and forwards the traffic. This reduces the processing load
on the egress PE switch, because it is not responsible for popping the MPLS label.
Related
Documentation
10
•
The default advertised label is label 3 (Implicit Null label). If label 3 is advertised, the
penultimate-hop switch removes the label and sends the packet to the egress PE
switch.
•
If ultimate-hop popping is enabled, label 0 (IPv4 Explicit Null label) is advertised and
the egress PE switch of the LSP removes the label.
•
Understanding MPLS Components on page 4
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge Switches on page 67
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Switches on page 71
•
Junos OS MPLS Applications Library for Routing Devices
•
Junos OS VPNs Library for Routing Devices
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: MPLS Overview
Understanding CoS MPLS EXP Classifiers and Rewrite Rules
You can use class of service (CoS) within MPLS networks to prioritize certain types of
traffic during periods of congestion by applying packet classifiers and rewrite rules to the
MPLS traffic. (For information about DSCP and IEEE 802.1p classifiers and general
information about classifiers, see Understanding CoS Classifiers. For information about
DSCP and IEEE 802.1p rewrite rules, see Understanding CoS Rewrite Rules.)
When a packet enters a customer-edge interface on the ingress provider edge (PE)
switch, the switch associates the packet with a particular CoS servicing level before
placing the packet onto the label-switched path (LSP). The switches within the LSP
utilize the CoS value set at the ingress PE switch. The CoS value that was embedded in
the classifier is translated and encoded in the MPLS header by means of the experimental
(EXP) bits.
EXP classifiers map incoming MPLS packets to a forwarding class and a loss priority, and
assign MPLS packets to output queues based on the forwarding class mapping. EXP
classifiers are behavior aggregate (BA) classifiers.
EXP rewrite rules change (rewrite) the CoS value of the EXP bits in outgoing packets on
the egress queues of the switch so that the new (rewritten) value matches the policies
of a targeted peer. Policy matching allows the downstream routing platform or switch
in a neighboring network to classify each packet into the appropriate service group.
NOTE: There is no default EXP classifier. There is no default EXP rewrite rule.
If you want to classify incoming MPLS packets using the EXP bits, you must
configure a global EXP classifier. If you want to rewrite the EXP bit value at
the egress interface, you must configure EXP rewrite rules and apply them
to logical interfaces.
EXP classifiers and rewrite rules are applied only to interfaces that are
configured as family mpls (for example, set interfaces xe-0/0/35 unit 0 family
mpls.)
This topic includes:
•
EXP Classifiers on page 11
•
EXP Rewrite Rules on page 12
•
Schedulers on page 13
EXP Classifiers
Unlike DSCP and IEEE 802.1p BA classifiers, EXP classifiers are global to the switch and
apply to all switch interfaces that are configured as family mpls. When you configure and
apply an EXP classifier, MPLS traffic on all family mpls interfaces uses the EXP classifier,
even on interfaces that also have a fixed classifier. If an interface has both an EXP classifier
and a fixed classifier, the EXP classifier is applied to MPLS traffic and the fixed classifier
is applied to all other traffic.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
11
MPLS on the QFX Series
Also unlike DSCP and IEEE 802.1p BA classifiers, there is no default EXP classifier. If you
want to classify MPLS traffic based on the EXP bits, you must explicitly configure an EXP
classifier and apply it the switch interfaces. Each EXP classifier has eight entries that
correspond to the eight EXP CoS values (0 through 7, which correspond to bits 000
through 111).
You can configure as many EXP classifiers as you want. However, the switch uses only
one MPLS EXP classifier as a global classifier on all interfaces. After you configure an
MPLS EXP classifier, you can configure it as the global EXP classifier by including the
EXP classifier in the [edit class-of-service system-defaults classifiers exp] hierarchy. All
switch interfaces use the global EXP classifier to classify MPLS traffic.
Only one EXP classifier can be configured as the global EXP classifier at any time. If you
want to change the global EXP classifier, delete the global EXP classifier configuration
(use the user@switch# delete class-of-service system-defaults classifiers exp
configuration statement), then configure the new global EXP classifier.
If an EXP classifier is not configured, then if a fixed classifier is applied to the interface,
the MPLS traffic uses the fixed classifier. If no EXP classifier and no fixed classifier is
applied to the interface, MPLS traffic is treated as best-effort traffic. DSCP classifiers
are not applied to MPLS traffic.
Because the EXP classifier is global, you cannot configure some ports to use a fixed IEEE
802.1p classifier for MPLS traffic on some interfaces and the global EXP classifier for
MPLS traffic on other interfaces. When you configure a global EXP classifier, all MPLS
traffic on all interfaces uses the EXP classifier.
NOTE: The switch uses only the outermost label of incoming EXP packets
for classification.
NOTE: MPLS packets with 802.1Q tags are not supported.
EXP Rewrite Rules
As MPLS packets enter or exit a network, edge switches might be required to alter the
class-of-service (CoS) settings of the packets. EXP rewrite rules set the value of the EXP
CoS bits within the header of the outgoing MPLS packet on family mpls interfaces. Each
rewrite rule reads the current forwarding class and loss priority associated with the packet,
locates the chosen CoS value from a table, and writes that CoS value into the packet
header, replacing the old CoS value. EXP rewrite rules apply only to MPLS traffic.
EXP rewrite rules apply only to logical interfaces. You cannot apply EXP rewrite rules to
physical interfaces.
There are no default EXP rewrite rules. If you want to rewrite the EXP value in MPLS
packets, you must configure EXP rewrite rules and apply them to logical interfaces. If no
rewrite rules are applied, all MPLS labels that are pushed have a value of zero (0). The
EXP value remains unchanged on MPLS labels that are swapped.
12
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: MPLS Overview
You can configure as many EXP rewrite rules as you want, but you can only apply 16 EXP
rewrite rules at any time on the switch. On a given logical interface, all pushed MPLS
labels have the same EXP rewrite rule applied to them. You can apply different EXP
rewrite rules to different logical interfaces on the same physical interface.
You can apply an EXP rewrite rule to an interface that has a DSCP, DSCP IPv6, or IEEE
802.1p rewrite rule. Only MPLS traffic uses the EXP rewrite rule. MPLS traffic does not
use DSCP or DSCP IPv6 rewrite rules.
If the switch is performing penultimate hop popping (PHP), EXP rewrite rules do not take
effect. If both an EXP classifier and an EXP rewrite rule are configured on the switch, then
the EXP value from the last popped label is copied into the inner label. If either an EXP
classifier or an EXP rewrite rule (but not both) is configured on the switch, then the inner
label EXP value is sent unchanged.
NOTE: On each physical interface, either all forwarding classes that are being
used on the interface must have rewrite rules configured or no forwarding
classes that are being used on the interface can have rewrite rules configured.
On any physical port, do not mix forwarding classes with rewrite rules and
forwarding classes without rewrite rules.
Schedulers
The schedulers for using CoS with MPLS are the same as for the other CoS configurations
on the switch. Default schedulers are provided only for the best-effort, fcoe, no-loss, and
network-control forwarding classes. If you configure a custom forwarding class for MPLS
traffic, you need to configure a scheduler to support that forwarding class and provide
bandwidth to that forwarding class. See Understanding CoS Output Queue Schedulers
and Example: Configuring Queue Schedulers for more information.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding CoS Classifiers
•
Understanding Applying CoS Classifiers and Rewrite Rules to Interfaces
•
Configuring a Global MPLS EXP Classifier on page 78
•
Configuring Rewrite Rules for MPLS EXP Classifiers on page 79
•
Configuring CoS Bits for an MPLS Network on page 77
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
13
MPLS on the QFX Series
Understanding Using MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPNs
You can use MPLS-based Layer 3 virtual private networks (VPNs) to securely connect
geographically diverse sites across an MPLS network. MPLS services can be used to
connect various sites to a backbone network and to ensure better performance for
low-latency applications such as voice over IP (VoIP) and other business-critical functions.
A VPN uses a public telecommunications infrastructure, such as the Internet, to provide
remote offices or individual users with secure access to their organization’s network.
VPNs are designed to provide the same level of performance and security as privately
owned or leased networks but without the attendant costs.
This topic describes:
•
MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPNs on page 14
MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPNs
In Junos OS, Layer 3 VPNs are based on RFC 4364, BGP/MPLS IP Virtual Private Networks.
RFC 4364 defines a mechanism by which service providers can use their IP backbones
to provide VPN services to their customers. A Layer 3 VPN is a set of sites that share
common routing information and whose connectivity is controlled by a collection of
policies. The sites that make up a Layer 3 VPN are connected over a provider’s existing
public Internet backbone.
Customer networks, because they are private, can use either public or private addresses,
as defined in RFC 1918, Address Allocation for Private Internets. When customer networks
that use private addresses connect to the public Internet infrastructure, the private
addresses might overlap with the same private addresses used by other network users.
BGP/MPLS VPNs solve this problem by adding a VPN identifier prefix to each address
from a particular VPN site, thereby creating an address that is unique both within the
VPN and on the public Internet. In addition, each VPN has its own VPN-specific routing
table that contains the routing information for that VPN only. Two different VPNs can
use overlapping addresses. Each route within a VPN is assigned an MPLS label (for
example, MPLS-ARCH, MPLS-BGP, or MPLS-ENCAPS). When BGP distributes a VPN
route, it also distributes an MPLS label for that route. Before a customer data packet
travels across the service provider’s backbone, it is encapsulated along with the MPLS
label that corresponds to the route within the customer’s VPN that is the best match
based on the packet’s destination address. This MPLS packet is further encapsulated
with another MPLS label or with an IP, so that it gets tunneled across the backbone to
the egress provider edge (PE) switch. Thus, the backbone core switches do not need to
know the VPN routes.
Related
Documentation
14
•
Understanding MPLS Label Operations on page 7
•
Understanding MPLS Components on page 4
•
Junos OS VPNs Library for Routing Devices
•
Junos OS MPLS Applications Library for Routing Devices
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 2
MPLS Features
•
MPLS Feature Support on the QFX Series and EX4600 Switch Overview on page 15
•
Supported MPLS Scaling Values on page 17
MPLS Feature Support on the QFX Series and EX4600 Switch Overview
This topic describes the major MPLS features that are supported and not supported on
the QFX Series and on the EX4600 switch.
NOTE: The command-line interface (CLI) on QFX Series devices and on the
EX4600 switch displays even the MPLS related configuration statements
that are not supported. However, configuring the unsupported statements
on a device will have no effect on the operation of the device. See the
following topics for the list of supported MPLS related configuration
statements on QFX Series devices and on the EX4600 switch:
•
“[edit protocols mpls] Hierarchy Level” on page 107 for the list of supported
configuration statements at the [edit protocols mpls] hierarchy level
•
“[edit protocols rsvp] Hierarchy Level” on page 112 for the list of supported
configuration statements at the [edit protocols rsvp] hierarchy level
•
Supported MPLS Features on page 15
•
Unsupported MPLS Features on page 17
Supported MPLS Features
Table 3 on page 15 lists the major MPLS features that are supported on the QFX Series
and on the EX4600 switch, and the Juniper Networks Junos operating system (Junos
OS) release in which they were introduced.
Table 3: MPLS Features on the QFX Series and on the EX4600 Switch
Feature
QFX Series
EX4600
QFX standalone switch or EX4600 switch as an MPLS
provider edge (PE) switch or provider switch
Junos OS 12.2X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
15
MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 3: MPLS Features on the QFX Series and on the EX4600 Switch (continued)
Feature
QFX Series
EX4600
QFX standalone switch or EX4600 switch as a route reflector
for BGP labeled routes
Junos OS 12.2X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
BGP labeled unicast
Junos OS 12.2X50-D10
Junos OS Junos OS
13.2X51-D25
Classifiers for MPLS firewall filters
Junos OS 12.3X50-D10
Junos OS Junos OS
13.2X51-D25
Class of service (CoS) for MPLS traffic
Junos OS 12.3X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
Graceful restart for OSPF and RSVP protocols
Junos OS 12.2X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
IP over MPLS label-switched paths (LSPs)
Junos OS 12.2X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
IPv6 tunneling for MPLS to tunnel IPv6 traffic over an
MPLS-based IPv4 network (6PE)
Junos OS 12.3X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
IS-IS (TE)
Junos OS 12.2X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
IS-IS as an interior gateway protocol (IGP) for MPLS
Junos OS 12.2X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
LDP-based signaling
Junos OS 12.2X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
LDP tunneling (LDP over RSVP)
Junos OS 12.3X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
Maximum transmission unit (MTU) discovery for MPLS paths
Junos OS 12.3X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
MPLS-based Layer 3 virtual private networks (VPNs)
Junos OS 12.3X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
MPLS firewall filters
Junos OS 12.2X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
MPLS OAM-LSP ping and traceroute
Junos OS 12.3X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
MPLS RSVP auto bandwidth
Junos OS 13.2X51-D15
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
MPLS traffic engineering
Junos OS 12.2X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
OSPF version 2 (OSPFv2) as an interior gateway protocol
(IGP) for MPLS
Junos OS 12.2X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
Per VRF Label support
Junos OS 12.2X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
RSVP as a signaling protocol for MPLS
Junos OS 12.2X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
SNMP MIB support
Junos OS 12.2X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
Static LSPs
Junos OS 12.2X50-D10
Junos OS 13.2X51-D25
16
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: MPLS Features
Unsupported MPLS Features
The following major MPLS features are not supported on the QFX Series or on the EX4600
switch:
Related
Documentation
•
Auto-policer
•
Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) for MPLS LSPs
•
Carrier-over-carrier BGP inter- autonomous systems (AS) L3VPN implementations
•
Configuring LSP priority and preemption
•
ECMP for incoming MPLS packets
•
Fast reroute
•
Link coloring using administrative groups
•
MPLS-based circuit cross-connects (CCC)
•
MPLS-based Layer 2 virtual private networks (VPNs)
•
MPLS over routed VLAN interfaces (RVIs) and Layer 3 subinterfaces
•
Node protection, link protection, and egress protection
•
Point-to-multipoint LSP support
•
Port mirroring on MPLS interfaces
•
Virtual Private LAN Service (VPLS)
•
MPLS Configuration Guidelines on page 29
•
Supported MPLS Scaling Values on page 17
•
Issues and Limitations in Operation of MPLS Features on the QFX Series and on EX4600
on page 327
•
Interprovider and Carrier-of-Carriers VPNs
•
Understanding MPLS Components on page 4
•
Understanding CoS MPLS EXP Classifiers and Rewrite Rules on page 11
•
Junos OS MPLS Applications Library for Routing Devices
Supported MPLS Scaling Values
This topic lists the MPLS scaling values supported on QFX Series and on EX4600 switches.
Table 4 on page 18 lists the MPLS scaling values supported on Juniper QFX and on
EX4600 switches.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
17
MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 4: MPLS Scaling Values
Feature
QFX3500 Scaling Value
QFX5100 and EX4600 Scaling Value
Maximum number of MPLS
labels in a packet’s label stack
3 labels for Push operations
3 labels for Push operations
2 labels for Pop operations
2 labels for Pop operations
1 label for Swap operations
1 label for Swap operations
Maximum number of MPLS
labels on provider switches
4096
16386
Maximum number of tunnel
(combination of routes and
LSPs) initiations
Ingress LSPs: 1024
Ingress LSPs: 1024
Transit LSPs: 4000
Transit LSPs: 16386
Maximum number of unique
next-hops on egress provider
edge (PE) switches
512
512
Maximum number of MPLS
firewall filters
768
1536
Virtual Routing and Forwarding
(VRF)
1K
1K
Layer 3 Host
IPV4: 8K
See Understanding the Unified Forwarding
Table.
Layer 3 Longest Prefix Match
(LPM)
IPV4: 16K
See Understanding the Unified Forwarding
Table.
IPV6: 4K
Related
Documentation
18
•
MPLS Feature Support on the QFX Series and EX4600 Switch Overview on page 15
•
MPLS Configuration Guidelines on page 29
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 3
Introduction to LDP for QFX5100
•
LDP Introduction on page 19
•
Junos OS LDP Protocol Implementation on page 20
•
LDP Operation on page 20
•
Tunneling LDP LSPs in RSVP LSPs on page 20
•
Tunneling LDP LSPs in RSVP LSPs Overview on page 21
•
Label Operations on page 21
•
LDP Message Types on page 22
•
Discovery Messages on page 23
•
Session Messages on page 23
•
Advertisement Messages on page 23
•
Notification Messages on page 23
•
LDP Session Protection on page 24
•
LDP Graceful Restart on page 24
LDP Introduction
The Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) is a protocol for distributing labels in
non-traffic-engineered applications. LDP allows routers to establish label-switched
paths (LSPs) through a network by mapping network-layer routing information directly
to data link layer-switched paths.
These LSPs might have an endpoint at a directly attached neighbor (comparable to IP
hop-by-hop forwarding), or at a network egress node, enabling switching through all
intermediary nodes. LSPs established by LDP can also traverse traffic-engineered LSPs
created by RSVP.
LDP associates a forwarding equivalence class (FEC) with each LSP it creates. The FEC
associated with an LSP specifies which packets are mapped to that LSP. LSPs are
extended through a network as each router chooses the label advertised by the next hop
for the FEC and splices it to the label it advertises to all other routers. This process forms
a tree of LSPs that converge on the egress router.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
19
MPLS on the QFX Series
Junos OS LDP Protocol Implementation
The Junos OS implementation of LDP supports LDP version 1. The Junos OS supports a
simple mechanism for tunneling between routers in an interior gateway protocol (IGP),
to eliminate the required distribution of external routes within the core. The Junos OS
allows an MPLS tunnel next hop to all egress routers in the network, with only an IGP
running in the core to distribute routes to egress routers. Edge routers run BGP but do not
distribute external routes to the core. Instead, the recursive route lookup at the edge
resolves to an LSP switched to the egress router. No external routes are necessary on
the transit LDP routers.
LDP Operation
You must configure LDP for each interface on which you want LDP to run. LDP creates
LSP trees rooted at each egress router for the router ID address that is the subsequent
BGP next hop. The ingress point is at every router running LDP. This process provides an
inet.3 route to every egress router. If BGP is running, it will attempt to resolve next hops
by using the inet.3 table first, which binds most, if not all, of the BGP routes to MPLS
tunnel next hops.
Two adjacent routers running LDP become neighbors. If the two routers are connected
by more than one interface, they become neighbors on each interface. When LDP routers
become neighbors, they establish an LDP session to exchange label information. If
per-router labels are in use on both routers, only one LDP session is established between
them, even if they are neighbors on multiple interfaces. For this reason, an LDP session
is not related to a particular interface.
LDP operates in conjunction with a unicast routing protocol. LDP installs LSPs only when
both LDP and the routing protocol are enabled. For this reason, you must enable both
LDP and the routing protocol on the same set of interfaces. If this is not done, LSPs might
not be established between each egress router and all ingress routers, which might result
in loss of BGP-routed traffic.
You can apply policy filters to labels received from and distributed to other routers through
LDP. Policy filters provide you with a mechanism to control the establishment of LSPs.
For LDP to run on an interface, MPLS must be enabled on a logical interface on that
interface. For more information, see the Logical Interfaces.
Related
Documentation
•
Logical Interfaces
Tunneling LDP LSPs in RSVP LSPs
You can tunnel LDP LSPs over RSVP LSPs. The following sections describe how tunneling
of LDP LSPs in RSVP LSPs works:
20
•
Tunneling LDP LSPs in RSVP LSPs Overview on page 21
•
Label Operations on page 21
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 3: Introduction to LDP for QFX5100
Tunneling LDP LSPs in RSVP LSPs Overview
If you are using RSVP for traffic engineering, you can run LDP simultaneously to eliminate
the distribution of external routes in the core. The LSPs established by LDP are tunneled
through the LSPs established by RSVP. LDP effectively treats the traffic-engineered LSPs
as single hops.
When you configure the router to run LDP across RSVP-established LSPs, LDP
automatically establishes sessions with the router at the other end of the LSP. LDP
control packets are routed hop-by-hop, rather than carried through the LSP. This routing
allows you to use simplex (one-way) traffic-engineered LSPs. Traffic in the opposite
direction flows through LDP-established LSPs that follow unicast routing rather than
through traffic-engineered tunnels.
If you configure LDP over RSVP LSPs, you can still configure multiple OSPF areas and
IS-IS levels in the traffic engineered core and in the surrounding LDP cloud.
Label Operations
Figure 3 on page 22 depicts an LDP LSP being tunneled through an RSVP LSP. (For
definitions of label operations, see Label Description.) The shaded inner oval represents
the RSVP domain, whereas the outer oval depicts the LDP domain. RSVP establishes an
LSP through routers B, C, D, and E, with the sequence of labels L3, L4. LDP establishes
an LSP through Routers A, B, E, F, and G, with the sequence of labels L1, L2, L5. LDP views
the RSVP LSP between Routers B and E as a single hop.
When the packet arrives at Router A, it enters the LSP established by LDP, and a label
(L1) is pushed onto the packet. When the packet arrives at Router B, the label (L1) is
swapped with another label (L2). Because the packet is entering the traffic-engineered
LSP established by RSVP, a second label (L3) is pushed onto the packet.
This outer label (L3) is swapped with a new label (L4) at the intermediate router (C)
within the RSVP LSP tunnel, and when the penultimate router (D) is reached, the top
label is popped. Router E swaps the label (L2) with a new label (L5), and the penultimate
router for the LDP-established LSP (F) pops the last label.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
21
MPLS on the QFX Series
Figure 3: Swap and Push When LDP LSPs Are Tunneled Through RSVP LSPs
Figure 4 on page 22 depicts a double push label operation (L1L2). A double push label
operation is used when the ingress router (A) for both the LDP LSP and the RSVP LSP
tunneled through it is the same device. Note that Router D is the penultimate hop for the
LDP-established LSP, so L2 is popped from the packet by Router D.
Figure 4: Double Push When LDP LSPs Are Tunneled Through RSVP LSPs
LDP Message Types
LDP uses the message types described in the following sections to establish and remove
mappings and to report errors. All LDP messages have a common structure that uses a
type, length, and value (TLV) encoding scheme.
22
•
Discovery Messages on page 23
•
Session Messages on page 23
•
Advertisement Messages on page 23
•
Notification Messages on page 23
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 3: Introduction to LDP for QFX5100
Discovery Messages
Discovery messages announce and maintain the presence of a router in a network. Routers
indicate their presence in a network by sending hello messages periodically. Hello
messages are transmitted as UDP packets to the LDP port at the group multicast address
for all routers on the subnet.
LDP uses the following discovery procedures:
•
Basic discovery—A router periodically sends LDP link hello messages through an
interface. LDP link hello messages are sent as UDP packets addressed to the LDP
discovery port. Receipt of an LDP link hello message on an interface identifies an
adjacency with the LDP peer router.
•
Extended discovery—LDP sessions between routers not directly connected are
supported by LDP extended discovery. A router periodically sends LDP targeted hello
messages to a specific address. Targeted hello messages are sent as UDP packets
addressed to the LDP discovery port at the specific address. The targeted router decides
whether to respond to or ignore the targeted hello message. A targeted router that
chooses to respond does so by periodically sending targeted hello messages to the
initiating router.
Session Messages
Session messages establish, maintain, and terminate sessions between LDP peers. When
a router establishes a session with another router learned through the hello message, it
uses the LDP initialization procedure over TCP transport. When the initialization procedure
is completed successfully, the two routers are LDP peers and can exchange advertisement
messages.
Advertisement Messages
Advertisement messages create, change, and delete label mappings for forwarding
equivalence classes (FECs). Requesting a label or advertising a label mapping to a peer
is a decision made by the local router. In general, the router requests a label mapping
from a neighboring router when it needs one and advertises a label mapping to a
neighboring router when it wants the neighbor to use a label.
Notification Messages
Notification messages provide advisory information and signal error information. LDP
sends notification messages to report errors and other events of interest. There are two
kinds of LDP notification messages:
•
Error notifications, which signal fatal errors. If a router receives an error notification
from a peer for an LDP session, it terminates the LDP session by closing the TCP
transport connection for the session and discarding all label mappings learned through
the session.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
23
MPLS on the QFX Series
•
Advisory notifications, which pass information to a router about the LDP session or the
status of some previous message received from the peer.
LDP Session Protection
LDP session protection is based on the LDP targeted hello functionality defined in RFC
5036, LDP Specification, and is supported by the Junos OS as well as the LDP
implementations of most other vendors. It involves sending unicast User Datagram
Protocol (UDP) hello packets to a remote neighbor address and receiving similar packets
from the neighbor router.
If you configure LDP session protection on a router, the LDP sessions are maintained as
follows:
1.
An LDP session is established between a router and a remote neighboring router.
2. If all of the direct links between the routers go down, the LDP session remains up so
long as there is IP connectivity between the routers based on another connection over
the network.
3. When the direct link between the routers is reestablished, the LDP session is not
restarted. The routers simply exchange LDP hellos with each other over the direct link.
They can then begin forwarding LDP-signaled MPLS packets using the original LDP
session.
By default, LDP targeted hellos are set to the remote neighbor so long as the LDP session
is up, even if there are no more link neighbors to that router. You can also specify the
duration you would like to maintain the remote neighbor connection in the absence of
link neighbors. When the last link neighbor for a session goes down, the Junos OS starts
an LDP session protection timer. If this timer expires before any of the link neighbors
come back up, the remote neighbor connection is taken down and the LDP session is
terminated. If you configure a different value for the timer while it is currently running,
the Junos OS updates the timer to the specified value without disrupting the current state
of the LDP session.
LDP Graceful Restart
LDP graceful restart enables a router whose LDP control plane is undergoing a restart to
continue to forward traffic while recovering its state from neighboring routers. It also
enables a router on which helper mode is enabled to assist a neighboring router that is
attempting to restart LDP.
During session initialization, a router advertises its ability to perform LDP graceful restart
or to take advantage of a neighbor performing LDP graceful restart by sending the graceful
restart TLV. This TLV contains two fields relevant to LDP graceful restart: the reconnect
time and the recovery time. The values of the reconnect and recovery times indicate the
graceful restart capabilities supported by the router.
When a router discovers that a neighboring router is restarting, it waits until the end of
the recovery time before attempting to reconnect. The recovery time is the length of time
a router waits for LDP to restart gracefully. The recovery time period begins when an
24
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 3: Introduction to LDP for QFX5100
initialization message is sent or received. This time period is also typically the length of
time that a neighboring router maintains its information about the restarting router,
allowing it to continue to forward traffic.
You can configure LDP graceful restart in both the master instance for the LDP protocol
and for a specific routing instance. You can disable graceful restart at the global level
for all protocols, at the protocol level for LDP only, and on a specific routing instance.
LDP graceful restart is disabled by default, because at the global level, graceful restart
is disabled by default. However, helper mode (the ability to assist a neighboring router
attempting a graceful restart) is enabled by default.
The following are some of the behaviors associated with LDP graceful restart:
•
Outgoing labels are not maintained in restarts. New outgoing labels are allocated.
•
When a router is restarting, no label-map messages are sent to neighbors that support
graceful restart until the restarting router has stabilized (label-map messages are
immediately sent to neighbors that do not support graceful restart). However, all other
messages (keepalive, address-message, notification, and release) are sent as usual.
Distributing these other messages prevents the router from distributing incomplete
information.
•
Helper mode and graceful restart are independent. You can disable graceful restart in
the configuration, but still allow the router to cooperate with a neighbor attempting
to restart gracefully.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
25
MPLS on the QFX Series
26
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
PART 2
Configuration
•
Configuration Guidelines on page 29
•
LDP Configuration Guidelines for QFX5100 on page 31
•
Configuration Examples on page 43
•
Configuration Tasks on page 67
•
Configuration Statements on page 107
•
LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100 on page 123
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
27
MPLS on the QFX Series
28
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 4
Configuration Guidelines
•
MPLS Configuration Guidelines on page 29
MPLS Configuration Guidelines
When configuring MPLS on QFX Series devices or on EX4600, keep the following in mind:
•
Standalone switches support up to 8000 external IP prefixes only. Therefore, we
recommend the following:
•
If your ingress provider edge (PE) switch needs to support more than 8000 external
IP prefixes, use a larger capacity device as an ingress PE switch.
•
If you use a switch as a route reflector for BGP labeled routes, use it as a dedicated
route reflector (that is, the switch must not participate in managing data traffic).
•
If you use a switch as a PE switch or as a route reflector for BGP labeled routes,
configure routing policies on the PE switch and the route reflector to filter external
IP routes from the routing table.
The configuration example for a routing policy named fib_policy (at the [edit
policy-options and [edit routing-options hierarchy levels) to filter BGP labeled routes
from the inet.0 routing table is given below:
user@switch# show policy-options
policy-statement fib_policy {
from {
protocol bgp;
rib inet.0;
}
then reject;
}
user@switch# show routing-options
forwarding-table {
export fib_policy;
}
•
Packet fragmentation using the allow-fragmentation statement at the [edit protocols
mpls path-mtu] hierarchy level is not supported on QFX Series deivices or on the
EX4600 switch. Therefore, you must ensure that the maximum transmission unit
(MTU) values configured on every MPLS interface is sufficient to handle MPLS packets.
The packets whose size exceeds the MTU value of an interface will be dropped.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
29
MPLS on the QFX Series
Related
Documentation
30
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge Switches on page 67
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Switches on page 71
•
Configuring a Global MPLS EXP Classifier on page 78
•
Configuring Rewrite Rules for MPLS EXP Classifiers on page 79
•
MPLS Feature Support on the QFX Series and EX4600 Switch Overview on page 15
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 5
LDP Configuration Guidelines for QFX5100
•
Minimum LDP Configuration on page 31
•
Enabling and Disabling LDP on page 31
•
Enabling Strict Targeted Hello Messages for LDP on page 32
•
Filtering Inbound LDP Label Bindings on page 32
•
Filtering Outbound LDP Label Bindings on page 34
•
Specifying the Transport Address Used by LDP on page 36
•
Collecting LDP Statistics on page 37
•
Tracing LDP Protocol Traffic on page 39
Minimum LDP Configuration
To enable LDP on a single interface, include the ldp statement and specify the interface
using the interface statement. This is the minimum LDP configuration. All other LDP
configuration statements are optional.
ldp {
interface interface-name;
}
To enable LDP on all interfaces, specify all for interface-name.
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include these statements, see the statement
summary sections.
Enabling and Disabling LDP
LDP is routing-instance-aware. To enable LDP on a specific interface, include the following
statements:
ldp {
interface interface-name;
}
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include these statements, see the statement
summary sections.
To enable LDP on all interfaces, specify all for interface-name.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
If you have configured interface properties on a group of interfaces and want to disable
LDP on one of the interfaces, include the interface statement with the disable option:
interface interface-name {
disable;
}
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section.
Enabling Strict Targeted Hello Messages for LDP
Use strict targeted hello messages to prevent LDP sessions from being established with
remote neighbors that have not been specifically configured. If you configure the
strict-targeted-hellos statement, an LDP peer does not respond to targeted hello
messages coming from a source that is not one of its configured remote neighbors.
Configured remote neighbors can include:
•
Endpoints of RSVP tunnels for which LDP tunneling is configured
•
Layer 2 circuit neighbors
If an unconfigured neighbor sends a hello message, the LDP peer ignores the message
and logs an error (with the error trace flag) indicating the source. For example, if the LDP
peer received a targeted hello from the Internet address 10.0.0.1 and no neighbor with
this address is specifically configured, the following message is printed to the LDP log
file:
LDP: Ignoring targeted hello from 10.0.0.1
To enable strict targeted hello messages, include the strict-targeted-hellos statement:
strict-targeted-hellos;
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
Filtering Inbound LDP Label Bindings
You can filter received LDP label bindings, applying policies to accept or deny bindings
advertised by neighboring routers. To configure received-label filtering, include the import
statement:
import [ policy-names ];
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
The named policy (configured at the [edit policy-options] hierarchy level) is applied to
all label bindings received from all LDP neighbors. All filtering is done with from
statements. Table 5 on page 33 lists the only from operators that apply to LDP
received-label filtering.
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Chapter 5: LDP Configuration Guidelines for QFX5100
Table 5: from Operators That Apply to LDP Received-Label Filtering
from Operator
Description
interface
Matches on bindings received from a neighbor that is
adjacent over the specified interface
neighbor
Matches on bindings received from the specified LDP
router ID
next-hop
Matches on bindings received from a neighbor advertising
the specified interface address
route-filter
Matches on bindings with the specified prefix
If a binding is filtered, it still appears in the LDP database, but is not considered for
installation as part of a label-switched path (LSP).
Generally, applying policies in LDP can be used only to block the establishment of LSPs,
not to control their routing. This is because the path that an LSP follows is determined
by unicast routing, and not by LDP. However, when there are multiple equal-cost paths
to the destination through different neighbors, you can use LDP filtering to exclude some
of the possible next hops from consideration. (Otherwise, LDP chooses one of the possible
next hops at random.)
LDP sessions are not bound to interfaces or interface addresses. LDP advertises only
per-router (not per-interface) labels; so if multiple parallel links exist between two routers,
only one LDP session is established, and it is not bound to a single interface. When a
router has multiple adjacencies to the same neighbor, take care to ensure that the filter
does what is expected. (Generally, using next-hop and interface is not appropriate in this
case.)
If a label has been filtered (meaning that it has been rejected by the policy and is not
used to construct an LSP), it is marked as filtered in the database:
user@host> show ldp database
Input label database, 10.10.255.1:0-10.10.255.6:0
Label Prefix
3 10.10.255.6/32 (Filtered)
Output label database, 10.10.255.1:0-10.10.255.6:0
Label Prefix
3 10.10.255.1/32 (Filtered)
For more information about how to configure policies for LDP, see the Routing Policy
Feature Guide for Routing Devices.
Examples: Filtering Inbound LDP Label Bindings
Accept only /32 prefixes from all neighbors:
[edit]
protocols {
ldp {
import only-32;
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
33
MPLS on the QFX Series
...
}
}
policy-options {
policy-statement only-32 {
term first {
from {
route-filter 0.0.0.0/0 upto /31;
}
then reject;
}
then accept;
}
}
Accept 131.108/16 or longer from router ID 10.10.255.2 and accept all prefixes from all
other neighbors:
[edit]
protocols {
ldp {
import nosy-neighbor;
...
}
}
policy-options {
policy-statement nosy-neighbor {
term first {
from {
neighbor 10.10.255.2;
route-filter 131.108.0.0/16 orlonger accept;
route-filter 0.0.0.0/0 orlonger reject;
}
}
then accept;
}
}
Filtering Outbound LDP Label Bindings
You can configure export policies to filter LDP outbound labels. You can filter outbound
label bindings by applying routing policies to block bindings from being advertised to
neighboring routers. To configure outbound label filtering, include the export statement:
export [policy-name];
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
The named export policy (configured at the [edit policy-options] hierarchy level) is applied
to all label bindings transmitted to all LDP neighbors. The only from operator that applies
to LDP outbound label filtering is route-filter, which matches bindings with the specified
prefix. The only to operators that apply to outbound label filtering are the operators in
Table 6 on page 35.
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Chapter 5: LDP Configuration Guidelines for QFX5100
Table 6: to Operators for LDP Outbound-Label Filtering
to Operator
Description
interface
Matches on bindings sent to a neighbor that is adjacent over the specified
interface
neighbor
Matches on bindings sent to the specified LDP router ID
next-hop
Matches on bindings sent to a neighbor advertising the specified interface
address
If a binding is filtered, the binding is not advertised to the neighboring router, but it can
be installed as part of an LSP on the local router. You can apply policies in LDP to block
the establishment of LSPs, but not to control their routing. The path an LSP follows is
determined by unicast routing, not by LDP.
LDP sessions are not bound to interfaces or interface addresses. LDP advertises only
per-router (not per-interface) labels. If multiple parallel links exist between two routers,
only one LDP session is established, and it is not bound to a single interface.
Do not use the next-hop and interface operators when a router has multiple adjacencies
to the same neighbor.
Filtered labels are marked in the database:
user@host> show ldp database
Input label database, 10.10.255.1:0-10.10.255.3:0
Label Prefix
100007 10.10.255.2/32
3 10.10.255.3/32
Output label database, 10.10.255.1:0-10.10.255.3:0
Label Prefix
3 10.10.255.1/32
100001 10.10.255.6/32 (Filtered)
For more information about how to configure policies for LDP, see the Routing Policy
Feature Guide for Routing Devices.
Examples: Filtering Outbound LDP Label Bindings
Block transmission of the route for 10.10.255.6/32 to any neighbors:
[edit protocols]
ldp {
export block-one;
}
policy-options {
policy-statement block-one {
term first {
from {
route-filter 10.10.255.6/32 exact;
}
then reject;
}
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
then accept;
}
}
Send only 131.108/16 or longer to router ID 10.10.255.2, and send all prefixes to all other
routers:
[edit protocols]
ldp {
export limit-lsps;
}
policy-options {
policy-statement limit-lsps {
term allow-one {
from {
route-filter 131.108.0.0/16 orlonger;
}
to {
neighbor 10.10.255.2;
}
then accept;
}
term block-the-rest {
to {
neighbor 10.10.255.2;
}
then reject;
}
then accept;
}
}
Specifying the Transport Address Used by LDP
You can control the transport address used by LDP. The transport address is the address
used for the TCP session over which LDP is running. To configure transport address
control, include the transport-address statement:
transport-address (router-id | interface);
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
If you specify the router-id option, the address of the router identifier is used as the
transport address (unless otherwise configured, the router identifier is typically the same
as the loopback address). If you specify the interface option, the interface address is used
as the transport address for any LDP sessions to neighbors that can be reached over that
interface. Note that the router identifier is used as the transport address by default.
You cannot specify the interface option when there are multiple parallel links to the same
LDP neighbor, because the LDP specification requires that the same transport address
be advertised on all interfaces to the same neighbor. If LDP detects multiple parallel links
to the same neighbor, it disables interfaces to that neighbor one by one until the condition
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Chapter 5: LDP Configuration Guidelines for QFX5100
is cleared, either by disconnecting the neighbor on an interface or by specifying the
router-id option.
Collecting LDP Statistics
LDP traffic statistics show the volume of traffic that has passed through a particular FEC
on a router.
When you configure the traffic-statistics statement at the [edit protocols ldp] hierarchy
level, the LDP traffic statistics are gathered periodically and written to a file. You can
configure how often statistics are collected (in seconds) by using the interval option. The
default collection interval is 5 minutes. You must configure an LDP statistics file; otherwise,
LDP traffic statistics are not gathered. If the LSP goes down, the LDP statistics are reset.
To collect LDP traffic statistics, include the traffic-statistics statement:
traffic-statistics {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
interval interval;
no-penultimate-hop;
}
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
This section includes the following topics:
•
LDP Statistics Output on page 37
•
Disabling LDP Statistics on the Penultimate-Hop Router on page 38
•
LDP Statistics Limitations on page 38
LDP Statistics Output
The following sample output is from an LDP statistics file:
FEC
10.255.350.448/32
Type
Packets
Bytes
Shared
Transit
0
0
No
Ingress
0
0
No
10.255.350.450/32
Transit
0
0
Yes
Ingress
0
0
No
10.255.350.451/32
Transit
0
0
No
Ingress
0
0
No
220.220.220.1/32
Transit
0
0
Yes
Ingress
0
0
No
220.220.220.2/32
Transit
0
0
Yes
Ingress
0
0
No
220.220.220.3/32
Transit
0
0
Yes
Ingress
0
0
No
May 28 15:02:05, read 12 statistics in 00:00:00 seconds
The LDP statistics file includes the following columns of data:
•
read—Number of bytes of data passed by the FEC since its LSP came up.
•
read—FEC for which LDP traffic statistics are collected.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
37
MPLS on the QFX Series
•
read—Number of packets passed by the FEC since its LSP came up.
•
read—This number (which appears next to the date and time) might differ from the
actual number of the statistics displayed. Some of the statistics are summarized before
being displayed.
•
Shared—A Yes value indicates that several prefixes are bound to the same label (for
example, when several prefixes are advertised with an egress policy). The LDP traffic
statistics for this case apply to all the prefixes and should be treated as such.
•
Type—Type of traffic originating from a router, either Ingress (originating from this
router) or Transit (forwarded through this router).
Disabling LDP Statistics on the Penultimate-Hop Router
Gathering LDP traffic statistics at the penultimate-hop router can consume excessive
system resources, on next-hop routes in particular. This problem is exacerbated if you
have configured the deaggregate statement in addition to the traffic-statistics statement.
For routers reaching their limit of next-hop route usage, we recommend configuring the
no-penultimate-hop option for the traffic-statistics statement:
traffic-statistics {
no-penultimate-hop;
}
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can configure the traffic-statistics statement,
see the statement summary section for this statement.
NOTE: When you configure the no-penultimate-hop option, no statistics are
available for the FECs that are the penultimate hop for this router.
Whenever you include or remove this option from the configuration, the LDP
sessions are taken down and then restarted.
The following sample output is from an LDP statistics file showing routers on which the
no-penultimate-hop option is configured:
FEC
10.255.245.218/32
10.255.245.221/32
13.1.1.0/24
13.1.3.0/24
Type
Transit
Ingress
Transit
Ingress
Transit
Ingress
Transit
Ingress
Packets
0
4
statistics disabled
statistics disabled
statistics disabled
statistics disabled
statistics disabled
statistics disabled
Bytes
0
246
Shared
No
No
LDP Statistics Limitations
The following are issues related to collecting LDP statistics by configuring the
traffic-statistics statement:
•
38
You cannot clear the LDP statistics.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: LDP Configuration Guidelines for QFX5100
•
If you shorten the specified interval, a new LDP statistics request is issued only if the
statistics timer expires later than the new interval.
•
A new LDP statistics collection operation cannot start until the previous one has
finished. If the interval is short or if the number of LDP statistics is large, the time gap
between the two statistics collections might be longer than the interval.
When an LSP goes down, the LDP statistics are reset.
Tracing LDP Protocol Traffic
The following sections describe how to configure the trace options to examine LDP
protocol traffic:
•
Tracing LDP Protocol Traffic at the Protocol and Routing Instance Levels on page 39
•
Tracing LDP Protocol Traffic Within FECs on page 40
•
Examples: Tracing LDP Protocol Traffic on page 40
Tracing LDP Protocol Traffic at the Protocol and Routing Instance Levels
To trace LDP protocol traffic, you can specify options in the global traceoptions statement
at the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level, and you can specify LDP-specific options by
including the traceoptions statement:
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
Use the file statement to specify the name of the file that receives the output of the
tracing operation. All files are placed in the directory /var/log. We recommend that you
place LDP-tracing output in the file ldp-log.
The following trace flags display the operations associated with the sending and receiving
of various LDP messages. Each can carry one or more of the following modifiers:
•
address—Trace the operation of address and address withdrawal messages.
•
binding—Trace label-binding operations.
•
error—Trace error conditions.
•
event—Trace protocol events.
•
initialization—Trace the operation of initialization messages.
•
label—Trace the operation of label request, label map, label withdrawal, and label
release messages.
•
notification—Trace the operation of notification messages.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
39
MPLS on the QFX Series
•
packets—Trace the operation of address, address withdrawal, initialization, label
request, label map, label withdrawal, label release, notification, and periodic messages.
This modifier is equivalent to setting the address, initialization, label, notification, and
periodic modifiers.
You can also configure the filter flag modifier with the match-on address sub-option
for the packets flag. This allows you to trace based on the source and destination
addresses of the packets.
•
path—Trace label-switched path operations.
•
path—Trace label-switched path operations.
•
periodic—Trace the operation of hello and keepalive messages.
•
route—Trace the operation of route messages.
•
state—Trace protocol state transitions.
Tracing LDP Protocol Traffic Within FECs
LDP associates a forwarding equivalence class (FEC) with each LSP it creates. The FEC
associated with an LSP specifies which packets are mapped to that LSP. LSPs are
extended through a network as each router chooses the label advertised by the next hop
for the FEC and splices it to the label it advertises to all other routers.
You can trace LDP protocol traffic within a specific FEC and filter LDP trace statements
based on an FEC. This is useful when you want to trace or troubleshoot LDP protocol
traffic associated with an FEC. The following trace flags are available for this purpose:
route, path, and binding.
The following example illustrates how you might configure the LDP traceoptions statement
to filter LDP trace statements based on an FEC:
[edit protocols ldp traceoptions]
set flag route filter match-on fec policy "filter-policy-for-ldp-fec";
This feature has the following limitations:
•
The filtering capability is only available for FECs composed of IP version 4 (IPv4)
prefixes.
•
Layer 2 circuit FECs cannot be filtered.
•
When you configure both route tracing and filtering, MPLS routes are not displayed
(they are blocked by the filter).
•
Filtering is determined by the policy and the configured value for the match-on option.
When configuring the policy, be sure that the default behavior is always reject.
•
The only match-on option is fec. Consequently, the only type of policy you should
include is a route-filter policy.
Examples: Tracing LDP Protocol Traffic
Trace LDP path messages in detail:
40
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Chapter 5: LDP Configuration Guidelines for QFX5100
[edit]
protocols {
ldp {
traceoptions {
file ldp size 10m files 5;
flag path;
}
}
}
Trace all LDP outgoing messages:
[edit]
protocols {
ldp {
traceoptions {
file ldp size 10m files 5;
flag packets;
}
}
}
Trace all LDP error conditions:
[edit]
protocols {
ldp {
traceoptions {
file ldp size 10m files 5;
flag error;
}
}
}
Trace all LDP incoming messages and all label-binding operations:
[edit]
protocols {
ldp {
traceoptions {
file ldp size 10m files 5 world-readable;
flag packets receive;
flag binding;
}
interface all {
}
}
}
Trace LDP protocol traffic for an FEC associated with the LSP:
[edit]
protocols {
ldp {
traceoptions {
flag route filter match-on fec policy filter-policy-for-ldp-fec;
}
}
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
41
MPLS on the QFX Series
}
42
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 6
Configuration Examples
•
Example: Configuring MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPNs on page 43
•
Example: Tunneling IPv6 Traffic over MPLS IPv4 Networks on page 52
•
Example: Configuring LDP Downstream on Demand on page 60
Example: Configuring MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPNs
You can implement an MPLS-based Layer 3 virtual private network (VPN) on QFX3500
switches to interconnect sites for customers who want the service provider to handle all
the Layer 3 routing functions. To support an MPLS-based Layer 3 VPN, you need to add
components of the Layer 3 VPN to the configuration of the two provider edge (PE)
switches. You do not need to change the configuration of the provider switches.
This example shows how to configure an MPLS-based Layer 3 VPN spanning two
corporate sites:
•
Requirements on page 44
•
Overview and Topology on page 44
•
Configuring the Local PE Switch on page 47
•
Configuring the Remote PE Switch on page 49
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
43
MPLS on the QFX Series
Requirements
This example uses the following software and hardware components:
•
Junos OS Release 12.3x50 or later for the QFX Series
•
Three QFX3500 switches
Before you configure the Layer 3 VPN components, you must configure the basic
components for an MPLS network:
•
Configure two PE switches. See “Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge Switches” on
page 67.
•
Configure one or more provider switches. See “Configuring MPLS on Provider Switches”
on page 71.
Overview and Topology
Layer 3 VPNs allow customers to leverage the service provider’s technical expertise to
ensure efficient site-to-site routing. The customer’s customer edge (CE) switch uses a
routing protocol such as BGP or OSPF to communicate with the service provider’s provider
edge (PE) switch to carry IP prefixes across the network. MPLS-based Layer 3 VPNs use
only IP over MPLS; other protocol packets are not supported. This example includes two
PE switches, PE1 and PE2.
In the basic MPLS configuration of the PE switches using IP over MPLS, the PE switches
were configured to use OSPF as the routing protocol between the MPLS switches and
RSVP as the signaling protocol. Traffic engineering was enabled. A label-switched path
(LSP) was configured.
The following components must be added to the PE switches for an MPLS-based Layer
3 VPN:
•
BGP group with family inet-vpn unicast
•
Routing instance with instance type vrf
Figure 5 on page 44 illustrates the topology of this MPLS-based Layer 3 VPN.
Figure 5: MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPN
Table 7 on page 45 shows the settings of the customer edge interface on the local CE
switch.
44
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Examples
Table 7: Local CE Switch in the MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPN Topology
Property
Settings
Description
Local CE switch hardware
QFX3500 switch
CE1
Customer edge interface
ge-0/0/14 unit 0
family inet
address 51.51.0.14/16
Interface that connects CE1 to PE1.
Table 8 on page 45 shows the settings of the customer edge interface on the remote CE
switch.
Table 8: Remote CE Switch in the MPLS-Based Layer 3 VPN Topology
Property
Settings
Description
Remote CE switch hardware
QFX3500 switch
CE2
Customer edge interface
ge-0/0/14 unit 0
family inet
address 11.22.26.1/16
Interface that connects CE2 to PE2.
Table 9 on page 45 shows the Layer 3 VPN components of the local PE switch.
Table 9: Layer 3 VPN Components of the Local PE Switch
Property
Settings
Description
Local PE switch hardware
QFX3500 switch
PE1
Customer edge interface
ge-0/0/14 unit 0
family inet
address 51.51.0.1/16
Connects PE1 to CE1.
xe-0/0/6 unit 0
family inet address 60.0.0.60/16
family mpls
Connects PE1 to P.
Core interface
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
NOTE: The family inet configuration
should already have been completed as
part of the basic MPLS configuration of
the PE switch for IP over MPLS. It is
included here to show what was
specified for that portion of the
configuration.
NOTE: This portion of the configuration
should already have been completed as
part of the basic MPLS configuration. It
is included here to show what was
specified for that portion of the
configuration.
45
MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 9: Layer 3 VPN Components of the Local PE Switch (continued)
Property
Settings
Description
Loopback interface
lo0 unit 0
family inet address 21.21.21.21/32
NOTE: This portion of the configuration
should already have been completed as
part of the basic MPLS configuration. It
is included here to show what was
specified for that portion of the
configuration.
BGP
bgp
Added for the Layer 3 VPN configuration.
Routing instance
L3VPN-1
Added for the Layer 3 VPN configuration.
Table 10 on page 46 shows the Layer 3 VPN components of the remote PE switch.
Table 10: Layer 3 VPN Components of the Remote PE Switch
Property
Settings
Description
Remote PE switch hardware
QFX3500 switch
PE2
Customer edge interface
ge-0/0/14 unit 0
family inet
address 11.22.26.14/16
family mpls
Connects PE2 to CE2.
For the Layer 3 VPN configuration, added
family mpls.
NOTE: The family inet configuration
should already have been completed as
part of the basic MPLS configuration of
the PE switch for IP over MPLS. It is
included here to show what was
specified for that portion of the
configuration.
Core interface
xe-0/0/6 unit 0
family inet address 60.2.0.60/16
family mpls
Connects PE1 to P.
Loopback interface
lo0 unit 0
family inet address 22.22.22.22/32
NOTE: This portion of the configuration
should already have been completed as
part of the basic MPLS configuration. It
is included here to show what was
specified for that portion of the
configuration.
BGP
bgp
Added for the Layer 3 VPN configuration.
Routing instances
L3VPN-1
Added for the Layer 3 VPN configuration.
46
NOTE: This portion of the configuration
should already have been completed as
part of the basic MPLS configuration. It
is included here to show what was
specified for that portion of the
configuration.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Examples
Configuring the Local PE Switch
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure the Layer 3 VPN components on the local PE switch, copy the
following commands and paste them into the switch terminal window of PE1:
[edit]
set protocols bgp local-address 21.21.21.21 family inet-vpn unicast
set protocols bgp group PE1-PE2 type internal
set protocols bgp neighbor 22.22.22.22
set routing-instances L3VPN-1 instance-type vrf
set routing-instances L3VPN-1 description "BETWEEN PE1 AND PE2"
set routing-instances L3VPN-1 interface ge-0/0/14.0
set routing-instances L3VPN-1 route-distinguisher 21:21
set routing-instances L3VPN-1 vrf-target target:21:21
set routing-instances L3VPN-1 vrf-table-label
set routing-options router-id 21.21.21.21
set routing-options autonomous-system 10
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To configure the Layer 3 VPN components on the local PE switch:
1.
Configure BGP, specifying the loopback address as the local address and specifying
family inet-vpn unicast:
[edit protocols bgp]
user@switchPE1# set local-address 21.21.21.21 family inet-vpn unicast
2.
Configure the BGP group, specifying the group name and type:
[edit protocols bgp]
user@switchPE1# set group PE1-PE2 type internal
3.
Configure the BGP neighbor, specifying the loopback address of the remote PE
switch as the neighbor’s address:
[edit protocols bgp]
user@switchPE1# set neighbor 22.22.22.22
4.
Configure the routing instance, specifying the routing-instance name and using vrf
as the instance type:
[edit routing-instances]
user@switchPE1# set L3VPN-1 instance-type vrf
5.
Configure a description for this routing instance:
[edit routing-instances]
user@switchPE1# set L3VPN-1 description "BETWEEN PE1 AND PE2"
6.
Configure the routing instance to use a route distinguisher:
[edit routing-instances]
user@switchPE1# set L3VPN-1 route-distinguisher 21:21
NOTE: Each routing instance that you configure on a PE switch must
have a unique route distinguisher associated with it. VPN routing
instances require a route distinguisher to allow BGP to distinguish
between potentially identical network layer reachability information
(NLRI) messages received from different VPNs. If you configure different
VPN routing instances with the same route distinguisher, the commit
fails.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
47
MPLS on the QFX Series
7.
Configure the VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) target of the routing instance:
[edit routing-instances]
user@switchPE1# set L3VPN-1 vrf-target target:21:21
NOTE: You can create more complex policies by explicitly configuring
VRF import and export policies using the import and export options. See
the Junos OS VPNs Library for Routing Devices.
8.
Configure this routing instance with vrf-table-label, which maps the inner label of
a packet to a specific VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) table and allows the
examination of the encapsulated IP header:
[edit routing-instances]
user@switchPE1# set L3VPN-1 vrf-table-label
9.
Configure the router ID and autonomous system (AS):
NOTE: We recommend that you explicitly configure the router identifier
under the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level to avoid unpredictable
behavior if the interface address on a loopback interface changes.
[edit routing-options]
user@switchPE1# set router-id 21.21.21.21 autonomous-system 10
Results
Display the results of the configuration:
user@switchPE1> show configuration
interfaces {
ge-0/0/14 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 51.51.0.1/16;
}
}
}
lo0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 21.21.21.21/32;
}
}
}
xe-0/0/6 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 60.0.0.60/16;
}
family mpls;
}
}
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Chapter 6: Configuration Examples
protocols {
mpls {
label-switched-path 21-22 {
from 21.21.21.21;
to 22.22.22.22;
no-cspf;
}
interface xe-0/0/6.0;
interface lo0.0;
bgp {
local-address 21.21.21.21;
family inet-vpn {
unicast;
}
group PE1-PE2 {
type internal;
neighbor 22.22.22.22;
}
}
ospf {
traffic-engineering;
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface ge-0/0/14.0;
interface lo0.0;
interface xe-0/0/6.0;
}
}
}
routing-instances {
L3VPN-1 {
instance-type vrf;
description "BETWEEN PE1 AND PE2";
route-distinguisher 21:21;
vrf-target target:21:21;
vrf-table-label;
}
routing-options {
router-id 21.21.21.21;
autonomous-system 10;
Configuring the Remote PE Switch
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure the Layer 3 VPN components on the remote PE switch, copy the
following commands and paste them into the switch terminal window of PE2:
[edit]
set protocols bgp local-address 22.22.22.22 family inet-vpn unicast
set protocols bgp group PE1-PE2 type internal
set protocols bgp neighbor 21.21.21.21
set routing-instances L3VPN-1 instance-type vrf
set routing-instances L3VPN-1 description "BETWEEN PE1 AND PE2"
set routing-instances L3VPN-1 interface ge-0/0/14.0
set routing-instances L3VPN-1 route-distinguisher 21:21
set routing-instances L3VPN-1 vrf-target target:21:21
set routing-instances L3VPN-1 vrf-table-label;
set routing-options router-id 22.22.22.22
set routing-options autonomous-system 10
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To configure Layer 3 VPN components on the remote PE switch:
Configure BGP, specifying the loopback address as the local address and specifying
family inet-vpn unicast:
1.
[edit protocols bgp]
user@switchPE2# set local-address 22.22.22.22 family inet-vpn unicast
Configure the BGP group, specifying the group name and type:
2.
[edit protocols bgp]
user@switchPE2# set group PE1-PE2 type internal
Configure the BGP neighbor, specifying the loopback address of the remote PE
switch as the neighbor’s address:
3.
[edit protocols bgp]
user@switchPE2# set neighbor 21.21.21.21
Configure the routing instance, specifying the routing-instance name and using vrf
as the instance type:
4.
[edit routing-instances]
user@switchPE2# set L3VPN-1 instance-type vrf
Configure a description for this routing instance:
5.
[edit routing-instances]
user@switchPE1# set L3VPN-1 description "BETWEEN PE1 AND PE2"
Configure the routing instance to apply to the customer edge interface:
6.
[edit routing-instances]
user@switchPE2# set L3VPN-1 interface ge-0/0/14.0
Configure the routing instance to use a route distinguisher, using the format
ip-address:number:
7.
[edit routing-instances]
user@switchPE2# set L3VPN-1 route-distinguisher 21:21
Configure the VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) target of the routing instance:
8.
[edit routing-instances]
user@switchPE2# set L3VPN-1 vrf-target target:21:21
Configure this routing instance with vrf-table-label, which maps the inner label of
a packet to a specific VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) table and allows the
examination of the encapsulated IP header.
9.
[edit routing-instances]
user@switchPE2# set L3VPN-1 vrf-tabel-label
10.
Configure the router ID and autonomous system (AS):
[edit routing-options]
user@switchPE2# set router-id 22.22.22.22 autonomous-system 10
Results
Display the results of the configuration:
user@switchPE2> show configuration
interfaces {
ge-0/0/14 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 11.22.26.14/16;
}
}
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Chapter 6: Configuration Examples
}
lo0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 22.22.22.22/32;
}
}
}
xe-0/0/6 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 60.2.0.60/16;
}
family mpls;
}
}
protocols {
mpls {
label-switched-path 22-21 {
from 22.22.22.22;
to 21.21.21.21;
no-cspf;
}
interface xe-0/0/6.0;
interface lo0.0;
bgp {
local-address 22.22.22.22;
family inet-vpn {
unicast;
}
group PE1-PE2 {
type internal;
neighbor 21.21.21.21;
}
}
ospf {
traffic-engineering;
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface ge-0/0/14.0;
interface lo0.0;
interface xe-0/0/6.0;
}
}
}
routing-instances {
L3VPN-1 {
instance-type vrf;
description"BETWEEN PE1 AND PE2";
route-distinguisher 21:21;
vrf-target target:21:21;
vrf-table-label;
}
routing-options {
router-id 22.22.22.22;
autonomous-system 10;
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MPLS on the QFX Series
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge Switches on page 67
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Switches on page 71
Example: Tunneling IPv6 Traffic over MPLS IPv4 Networks
This example shows how to configure Junos OS to tunnel IPv6 over an MPLS-based IPv4
network. External BGP (EBGP) is used between the customer edge (CE) and provider
edge (PE) devices. The remote CE devices have different AS numbers for loop detection.
•
Requirements on page 52
•
Overview on page 52
•
Configuration on page 55
•
Verification on page 60
Requirements
No special configuration beyond device initialization is required before you configure this
example.
Overview
Detailed information about the Juniper Networks implementation of IPv6 over MPLS is
described in the following Internet drafts:
•
Internet draft draft-ietf-l3vpn-bgp-ipv6-07.txt, BGP-MPLS IP VPN extension for IPv6
VPN (expires January 2006)
•
Internet draft draft-ooms-v6ops-bgp-tunnel-06.txt, Connecting IPv6 Islands over IPv4
MPLS using IPv6 Provider Edge Routers (expires July 2006)
These Internet drafts are available on the IETF website at http://www.ietf.org/.
This example shows you how to interconnect a two IPv6 networks over an IPv4-based
network core, giving you the ability to provide IPv6 service without having to upgrade the
routers in your core network. Multiprotocol Border Gateway Protocol (MP-BGP) is
configured to exchange routes between the IPv6 networks, and data is tunneled between
these IPv6 networks by means of IPv4-based MPLS.
In Figure 6 on page 53, PE1 and PE2 are dual-stack BGP routers or switches, meaning
they have both IPv4 and IPv6 stacks. The PE devices link the IPv6 networks through the
customer edge (CE) routers or switches to the IPv4 core network. The CE devices and
the PE devices connect through a link layer that can carry IPv6 traffic. The PE devices
use IPv6 on the CE router-facing interfaces and use IPv4 and MPLS on the core-facing
interfaces. Note that one of the connected IPv6 networks could be the global IPv6 Internet.
52
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Examples
Figure 6: IPv6 Networks Linked by MPLS IPv4 Tunnels
The two PE devices are linked through an MP-BGP session using IPv4 addresses. They
use the session to exchange IPv6 routes with an IPv6 (value 2) address family indicator
(AFI) and a subsequent AFI (SAFI) (value 4). Each PE router sets the next hop for the
IPv6 routes advertised on this session to its own IPv4 address. Because MP-BGP requires
the BGP next hop to correspond to the same address family as the network layer
reachability information (NLRI), this IPv4 address needs to be embedded within an IPv6
format.
The PE devices can learn the IPv6 routes from the CE devices connected to them using
MP-BGP or through static configuration. Note that if BGP is used as the
PE-router-to-CE-router protocol, the MP-BGP session between the PE device and CE
device could occur over an IPv4 or IPv6 Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) session.
Also, the BGP routes exchanged on that session would have SAFI unicast. You must
configure an export policy to pass routes between IBGP and EBGP, and between BGP
and any other protocol.
The PE routers have MPLS LSPs routed to each others’ IPv4 addresses. IPv4 provides
signaling for the LSPs by means of RSVP. These LSPs are used to resolve the next-hop
addresses of the IPv6 routes learned from MP-BGP. The next hops use IPv4-mapped
IPv6 addresses, while the LSPs use IPv4 addresses.
The PE devices always advertise IPv6 routes to each other using a label value of 2, the
explicit null label for IPv6 as defined in RFC 3032, MPLS Label Stack Encoding. As a
consequence, each of the forwarding next hops for the IPv6 routes learned from remote
PE routers normally push two labels. The inner label is 2 (this label could be different if
the advertising PE device is not a Juniper Networks routing or switching platform), and
the outer label is the LSP label. If the LSP is a single-hop LSP, then only Label 2 is pushed.
It is also possible for the PE devices to exchange plain IPv6 routes using SAFI unicast.
However, there is one major advantage in exchanging labeled IPv6 routes. The
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
53
MPLS on the QFX Series
penultimate-hop router for an MPLS LSP can pop the outer label and then send the
packet with the inner label as an MPLS packet. Without the inner label, the
penultimate-hop router would need to discover whether the packet is an IPv4 or IPv6
packet to set the protocol field in the Layer 2 header correctly.
When the PE1 device in Figure 6 on page 53 receives an IPv6 packet from the CE1 device,
it performs a lookup in the IPv6 forwarding table. If the destination matches a prefix
learned from the CE2 device, then no labels need to be pushed and the packet is simply
sent to the CE2 device. If the destination matches a prefix that was learned from the PE2
device, then the PE1 router pushes two labels onto the packet and sends it to the Provider
router. The inner label is 2 and the outer label is the LSP label for the PE2 router.
Each provider router in the service provider’s network handles the packet as it would any
MPLS packet, swapping labels as it passes from provider router to provider router. The
penultimate-hop provider router for the LSP pops the outer label and sends the packet
to the PE2 router. When the PE2 router receives the packet, it recognizes the IPv6 explicit
null label on the packet (Label 2). It pops this label and treats it as an IPv6 packet,
performing a lookup in the IPv6 forwarding table and forwarding the packet to the CE3
router.
This example includes the following settings:
•
In addition to configuring the family inet6 statement on all the CE router–facing
interfaces, you must also configure the statement on all the core-facing interfaces
running MPLS. Both configurations are necessary because the router must be able to
process any IPv6 packets it receives on these interfaces. You should not see any regular
IPv6 traffic arrive on these interfaces, but you will receive MPLS packets tagged with
Label 2. Even though Label 2 MPLS packets are sent in IPv4, these packets are treated
as native IPv6 packets.
•
You enable IPv6 tunneling by including the ipv6-tunneling statement in the configuration
for the PE routers. This statement allows IPv6 routes to be resolved over an MPLS
network by converting all routes stored in the inet.3 routing table to IPv4-mapped IPv6
addresses and then copying them into the inet6.3 routing table. This routing table can
be used to resolve next hops for both inet6 and inet6-vpn routes.
NOTE: BGP automatically runs its import policy even when copying routes
from a primary routing table group to a secondary routing table group. If
IPv4 labeled routes arrive from a BGP session (for example, when you have
configured the labeled-unicast statement at the [edit protocols bgp family
inet] hierarchy level on the PE router), the BGP neighbor’s import policy
also accepts IPv6 routes, since the neighbor’s import policy is run while
doing the copy operation to the inet6.3 routing table.
•
54
When you configure MP-BGP to carry IPv6 traffic, the IPv4 MPLS label is removed at
the destination PE router. The remaining IPv6 packet without a label can then be
forwarded to the IPv6 network. To enable this, include the explicit-null statement in
the BGP configuration.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Examples
Configuration
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text
file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network
configuration, and then copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy
level.
Device PE1
set interfaces xe-0/0/5 unit 2 family inet6 address ::10.1.1.2/126
set interfaces xe-0/0/5 unit 2 family mpls
set interfaces xe-0/0/6 unit 5 family inet address 10.1.1.5/30
set interfaces xe-0/0/6 unit 5 family inet6
set interfaces xe-0/0/6 unit 5 family mpls
set interfaces lo0 unit 2 family inet address 1.1.1.2/32
set protocols mpls ipv6-tunneling
set protocols mpls interface xe-0/0/5.2
set protocols mpls interface xe-0/0/6.5
set protocols bgp group toCE1 type external
set protocols bgp group toCE1 local-address ::10.1.1.2
set protocols bgp group toCE1 family inet6 unicast
set protocols bgp group toCE1 export send-bgp6
set protocols bgp group toCE1 peer-as 1
set protocols bgp group toCE1 neighbor ::10.1.1.1
set protocols bgp group toPE2 type internal
set protocols bgp group toPE2 local-address 1.1.1.2
set protocols bgp group toPE2 family inet6 labeled-unicast explicit-null
set protocols bgp group toPE2 export next-hop-self
set protocols bgp group toPE2 export send-v6
set protocols bgp group toPE2 neighbor 1.1.1.4
set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface xe-0/0/6.5
set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface lo0.2 passive
set protocols rsvp interface xe-0/0/6.5
set policy-options policy-statement next-hop-self then next-hop self
set policy-options policy-statement send-bgp6 from family inet6
set policy-options policy-statement send-bgp6 from protocol bgp
set policy-options policy-statement send-bgp6 then accept
set policy-options policy-statement send-v6 from family inet6
set policy-options policy-statement send-v6 from protocol bgp
set policy-options policy-statement send-v6 from protocol direct
set policy-options policy-statement send-v6 then accept
set routing-options router-id 1.1.1.2
set routing-options autonomous-system 2
Device PE2
set interfaces xe-0/0/5 unit 10 family inet address 10.1.1.10/30
set interfaces xe-0/0/5 unit 10 family inet6
set interfaces xe-0/0/5 unit 10 family mpls
set interfaces xe-0/0/6 unit 13 family inet6 address ::10.1.1.13/126
set interfaces xe-0/0/6 unit 13 family mpls
set interfaces lo0 unit 4 family inet address 1.1.1.4/32
set protocols mpls ipv6-tunneling
set protocols mpls interface xe-0/0/5.10
set protocols mpls interface xe-0/0/6.13
set protocols bgp group toPE1 type internal
set protocols bgp group toPE1 local-address 1.1.1.4
set protocols bgp group toPE1 family inet6 labeled-unicast explicit-null
set protocols bgp group toPE1 export next-hop-self
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MPLS on the QFX Series
set protocols bgp group toPE1 export send-v6
set protocols bgp group toPE1 neighbor 1.1.1.2
set protocols bgp group toCE3 type external
set protocols bgp group toCE3 local-address ::10.1.1.13
set protocols bgp group toCE3 family inet6 unicast
set protocols bgp group toCE3 export send-bgp6
set protocols bgp group toCE3 peer-as 3
set protocols bgp group toCE3 neighbor ::10.1.1.14
set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface xe-0/0/5.10
set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface lo0.4 passive
set protocols rsvp interface xe-0/0/5.10
set policy-options policy-statement next-hop-self then next-hop self
set policy-options policy-statement send-bgp6 from family inet6
set policy-options policy-statement send-bgp6 from protocol bgp
set policy-options policy-statement send-bgp6 then accept
set policy-options policy-statement send-v6 from family inet6
set policy-options policy-statement send-v6 from protocol bgp
set policy-options policy-statement send-v6 from protocol direct
set policy-options policy-statement send-v6 then accept
set routing-options router-id 1.1.1.4
set routing-options autonomous-system 2
Device P
56
set interfaces xe-0/0/5 unit 6 family inet address 10.1.1.6/30
set interfaces xe-0/0/5 unit 6 family inet6
set interfaces xe-0/0/5 unit 6 family mpls
set interfaces xe-0/0/6 unit 9 family inet address 10.1.1.9/30
set interfaces xe-0/0/6 unit 9 family inet6
set interfaces xe-0/0/6 unit 9 family mpls
set interfaces lo0 unit 3 family inet address 1.1.1.3/32
set protocols mpls interface xe-0/0/5.6
set protocols mpls interface xe-0/0/6.9
set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface xe-0/0/5.6
set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface xe-0/0/6.9
set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface lo0.3 passive
set protocols rsvp interface xe-0/0/5.6
set protocols rsvp interface xe-0/0/6.9
set routing-options router-id 1.1.1.3
set routing-options autonomous-system 2
Device CE1
set interfaces xe-0/0/5 unit 1 family inet6 address ::10.1.1.1/126
set interfaces xe-0/0/5 unit 1 family mpls
set interfaces lo0 unit 1 family inet6 address ::1.1.1.1/128
set protocols bgp group toPE1 type external
set protocols bgp group toPE1 local-address ::10.1.1.1
set protocols bgp group toPE1 family inet6 unicast
set protocols bgp group toPE1 export send-v6
set protocols bgp group toPE1 peer-as 2
set protocols bgp group toPE1 neighbor ::10.1.1.2
set policy-options policy-statement send-v6 from family inet6
set policy-options policy-statement send-v6 from protocol direct
set policy-options policy-statement send-v6 then accept
set routing-options router-id 1.1.1.1
set routing-options autonomous-system 1
Device CE3
set interfaces xe-0/0/5 unit 14 family inet6 address ::10.1.1.14/126
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Configuration Examples
set interfaces xe-0/0/5 unit 14 family mpls
set interfaces lo0 unit 5 family inet6 address ::1.1.1.5/128
set protocols bgp group toPE2 type external
set protocols bgp group toPE2 local-address ::10.1.1.14
set protocols bgp group toPE2 family inet6 unicast
set protocols bgp group toPE2 export send-v6
set protocols bgp group toPE2 peer-as 2
set protocols bgp group toPE2 neighbor ::10.1.1.13
set policy-options policy-statement send-v6 from family inet6
set policy-options policy-statement send-v6 from protocol direct
set policy-options policy-statement send-v6 then accept
set routing-options router-id 1.1.1.5
set routing-options autonomous-system 3
Configuring Device PE1
Step-by-Step
Procedure
The following example requires you to navigate various levels in the configuration
hierarchy. For information about navigating the CLI, see Using the CLI Editor in Configuration
Mode in the CLI User Guide.
To configure Device PE1:
1.
Configure the interfaces.
[edit interfaces]
user@PE1# set xe-0/0/5 unit 2 family inet6 address ::10.1.1.2/126
user@PE1# set xe-0/0/5 unit 2 family mpls
user@PE1# set xe-0/0/6 unit 5 family inet address 10.1.1.5/30
user@PE1# set xe-0/0/6 unit 5 family inet6
user@PE1# set xe-0/0/6 unit 5 family mpls
user@PE1# set lo0 unit 2 family inet address 1.1.1.2/32
2.
Configure MPLS on the interfaces.
[edit protocols mpls]
user@PE1# set ipv6-tunneling
user@PE1# set interface xe-0/0/5.2
user@PE1# set interface xe-0/0/6.5
3.
Configure BGP.
[edit protocols bgp]
user@PE1# set group toCE1 type external
user@PE1# set group toCE1 local-address ::10.1.1.2
user@PE1# set group toCE1 family inet6 unicast
user@PE1# set group toCE1 export send-bgp6
user@PE1# set group toCE1 peer-as 1
user@PE1# set group toCE1 neighbor ::10.1.1.1
user@PE1# set group toPE2 type internal
user@PE1# set group toPE2 local-address 1.1.1.2
user@PE1# set group toPE2 family inet6 labeled-unicast explicit-null
user@PE1# set group toPE2 export next-hop-self
user@PE1# set group toPE2 export send-v6
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MPLS on the QFX Series
user@PE1# set group toPE2 neighbor 1.1.1.4
4.
Configure OSPF
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
user@PE1# set interface xe-0/0/6.5
user@PE1# set interface lo0.2 passive
5.
Configure a signaling protocol.
[edit protocols]
user@PE1# set rsvp interface xe-0/0/6.5
6.
Configure the routing policies.
[edit policy-options]
user@PE1# set policy-statement next-hop-self then next-hop self
user@PE1# set policy-statement send-bgp6 from family inet6
user@PE1# set policy-statement send-bgp6 from protocol bgp
user@PE1# set policy-statement send-bgp6 then accept
user@PE1# set policy-statement send-v6 from family inet6
user@PE1# set policy-statement send-v6 from protocol bgp
user@PE1# set policy-statement send-v6 from protocol direct
user@PE1# set policy-statement send-v6 then accept
7.
Configure the router ID and the autonomous system (AS) number.
[edit routing-options]
user@PE1# set router-id 1.1.1.2
user@PE1# set autonomous-system 2
Results
From configuration mode, confirm your configuration by entering the show interfaces,
show policy-options, show protocols, and show routing-options commands. If the output
does not display the intended configuration, repeat the instructions in this example to
correct the configuration.
user@R1# show interfaces
xe-0/0/5 {
unit 2 {
family inet6 {
address ::10.1.1.2/126;
}
family mpls;
}
}
xe-0/0/6 {
unit 5 {
family inet {
address 10.1.1.5/30;
}
family inet6;
family mpls;
}
}
lo0 {
58
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Chapter 6: Configuration Examples
unit 2 {
family inet {
address 1.1.1.2/32;
}
}
}
user@R1# show policy-options
policy-statement next-hop-self {
then {
next-hop self;
}
}
policy-statement send-bgp6 {
from {
family inet6;
protocol bgp;
}
then accept;
}
policy-statement send-v6 {
from {
family inet6;
protocol [ bgp direct ];
}
then accept;
}
user@R1# show protocols
mpls {
ipv6-tunneling;
interface xe-0/0/5.2;
interface xe-0/0/6.5;
}
bgp {
group toCE1 {
type external;
local-address ::10.1.1.2;
family inet6 {
unicast;
}
export send-bgp6;
peer-as 1;
neighbor ::10.1.1.1;
}
group toPE2 {
type internal;
local-address 1.1.1.2;
family inet6 {
labeled-unicast {
explicit-null;
}
}
export [ next-hop-self send-v6 ];
neighbor 1.1.1.4;
}
}
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MPLS on the QFX Series
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface xe-0/0/6.5;
interface lo0.2 {
passive;
}
}
}
rsvp {
interface xe-0/0/6.5;
}
user@R1# show routing-options
router-id 1.1.1.2;
autonomous-system 2;
If you are done configuring the device, enter commit from configuration mode.
Configure the other devices in the topology, as shown in “CLI Quick Configuration” on
page 55.
Verification
Confirm that the configuration is working properly.
Verifying That the CE Devices Have Connectivity
Purpose
Action
Make sure that the tunnel is operating.
From operational mode, enter the ping command.
user@CE1> ping ::10.1.1.14
PING6(56=40+8+8 bytes) ::10.1.1.1 -->
16 bytes from ::10.1.1.14, icmp_seq=0
16 bytes from ::10.1.1.14, icmp_seq=1
16 bytes from ::10.1.1.14, icmp_seq=2
::10.1.1.14
hlim=61 time=10.687 ms
hlim=61 time=9.239 ms
hlim=61 time=1.842 ms
user@CE3> ping ::10.1.1.1
PING6(56=40+8+8 bytes) ::10.1.1.14 --> ::10.1.1.1
16 bytes from ::10.1.1.1, icmp_seq=0 hlim=61 time=1.484 ms
16 bytes from ::10.1.1.1, icmp_seq=1 hlim=61 time=1.338 ms
16 bytes from ::10.1.1.1, icmp_seq=2 hlim=61 time=1.351 ms
Meaning
The IPv6 CE devices can communicate over the core IPv4 network.
Related
Documentation
Example: Configuring LDP Downstream on Demand
This example shows how to configure LDP downstream on demand. LDP is commonly
configured using downstream unsolicited advertisement mode, meaning label
advertisements for all routes are received from all LDP peers. As service providers integrate
the access and aggregation networks into a single MPLS domain, LDP downstream on
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Chapter 6: Configuration Examples
demand is needed to distribute the bindings between the access and aggregation
networks and to reduce the processing requirements for the control plane.
Downstream nodes could potentially receive tens of thousands of label bindings from
upstream aggregation nodes. Instead of learning and storing all label bindings for all
possible loopback addresses within the entire MPLS network, the downstream aggregation
node can be configured using LDP downstream on demand to only request the label
bindings for the FECs corresponding to the loopback addresses of those egress nodes
on which it has services configured.
•
Requirements on page 61
•
Overview on page 61
•
Configuration on page 61
•
Verification on page 64
Requirements
This example uses the following hardware and software components:
•
M Series router
•
Junos OS 12.2
Overview
You can enable LDP downstream on demand label advertisement for an LDP session by
including the downstream-on-demand statement at the [edit protocols ldp session]
hierarchy level. If you have configured downstream on demand, the Juniper Networks
router advertises the downstream on demand request to its peer routers. For a
downstream on demand session to be established between two routers, both have to
advertise downstream on demand mode during LDP session establishment. If one router
advertises downstream unsolicited mode and the other advertises downstream on
demand, downstream unsolicited mode is used.
Configuration
Configuring LDP Downstream on Demand
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To configure a LDP downstream on demand policy and then configure that policy and
enable LDP downstream on demand on the LDP session:
1.
Configure the downstream on demand policy (DOD-Request-Loopbacks in this
example).
This policy causes the router to forward label request messages only to the FECs
that are matched by the DOD-Request-Loopbacks policy.
[edit policy-options]
user@host# set prefix-list Request-Loopbacks 10.1.1.1/32
user@host# set prefix-list Request-Loopbacks 10.1.1.2/32
user@host# set prefix-list Request-Loopbacks 10.1.1.3/32
user@host# set prefix-list Request-Loopbacks 10.1.1.4/32
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user@host# set policy-statement DOD-Request-Loopbacks term 1 from prefix-list
Request-Loopbacks
user@host# set policy-statement DOD-Request-Loopbacks term 1 then accept
2.
Specify the DOD-Request-Loopbacks policy using the dod-request-policy statement
at the [edit protocols ldp] hierarchy level.
The policy specified with the dod-request-policy statement is used to identify the
prefixes to send label request messages. This policy is similar to an egress policy
or an import policy. When processing routes from the inet.0 routing table, the Junos
OS software checks for routes matching the DOD-Request-Loopbacks policy (in
this example). If the route matches the policy and the LDP session is negotiated
with DOD advertisement mode, label request messages are sent to the
corresponding downstream LDP session.
[edit protocols ldp]
user@host# set dod-request-policy DOD-Request-Loopbacks
3.
Include the downstream-on-demand statement in the configuration for the LDP
session to enable downstream on demand distribution mode.
[edit protocols ldp]
user@host# set session 1.1.1.1 downstream-on-demand
Distributing LDP Downstream on Demand Routes into Labeled BGP
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To distribute LDP downstream on demand routes into labeled BGP, use a BGP export
policy.
1.
Configure the LDP route policy (redistribute_ldp in this example).
[edit policy-options]
user@host# set policy-statement redistribute_ldp term 1 from protocol ldp
user@host# set policy-statement redistribute_ldp term 1 from tag 1000
user@host# set policy-statement redistribute_ldp term 1 then accept
2.
Include the LDP route policy, redistribute_ldp in the BGP configuration (as a part of
the BGP group configuration ebgp-to-abr in this example).
BGP forwards the LDP routes based on the redistribute_ldp policy to the remote PE
router
[edit protocols bgp]
user@host# set group ebgp-to-abr type external
user@host# set group ebgp-to-abr local-address 192.168.0.1
user@host# set group ebgp-to-abr peer-as 65319
user@host# set group ebgp-to-abr local-as 65320
user@host# set group ebgp-to-abr neighbor 192.168.6.1 family inet unicast
user@host# set group ebgp-to-abr neighbor 192.168.6.1 family inet labeled-unicast
rib inet.3
user@host# set group ebgp-to-abr neighbor 192.168.6.1 export redistribute_ldp
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To restrict label propagation to other routers configured in downstream unsolicited mode
(instead of downstream on demand), configure the following policies:
1.
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Configure the dod-routes policy to accept routes from LDP.
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Chapter 6: Configuration Examples
user@host# set policy-options policy-statement dod-routes term 1 from protocol
ldp
user@host# set policy-options policy-statement dod-routes term 1 from tag
1145307136
user@host# set policy-options policy-statement dod-routes term 1 then accept
2.
Configure the do-not-propagate-du-sessions policy to not forward routes to neighbors
1.1.1.1, 2.2.2.2, and 3.3.3.3.
user@host# set policy-options policy-statement do-not-propagate-du-sessions
term 1 to neighbor 1.1.1.1
user@host# set policy-options policy-statement do-not-propagate-du-sessions
term 1 to neighbor 2.2.2.2
user@host# set policy-options policy-statement do-not-propagate-du-sessions
term 1 to neighbor 3.3.3.3
user@host# set policy-options policy-statement do-not-propagate-du-sessions
term 1 then reject
3.
Configure the filter-dod-on-du-sessions policy to prevent the routes examined by
the dod-routes policy from being forwarded to the neighboring routers defined in
the do-not-propagate-du-sessions policy.
user@host# set policy-options policy-statement filter-dod-routes-on-du-sessions
term 1 from policy dod-routes
user@host# set policy-options policy-statement filter-dod-routes-on-du-sessions
term 1 to policy do-not-propagate-du-sessions
4.
Specify the filter-dod-routes-on-du-sesssion policy as the export policy for BGP
broup ebgp-to-abr.
[edit protocols bgp]
user@host# set group ebgp-to-abr neighbor 192.168.6.2 export
filter-dod-routes-on-du-sessions
Results
From configuration mode, confirm your configuration by entering the show policy-options
and show protocols ldp commands. If the output does not display the intended
configuration, repeat the instructions in this example to correct the configuration.
user@host#
show policy-options
prefix-list Request-Loopbacks {
10.1.1.1/32;
10.1.1.2/32;
10.1.1.3/32;
10.1.1.4/32;
}
policy-statement DOD-Request-Loopbacks {
term 1 {
from {
prefix-list Request-Loopbacks;
}
then accept;
}
}
policy-statement redistribute_ldp {
term 1 {
from {
protocol ldp;
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tag 1000;
}
then accept;
}
}
user@host#
show protocols ldp
dod-request-policy DOD-Request-Loopbacks;
session 1.1.1.1 {
downstream-on-demand;
}
user@host#
show protocols bgp
group ebgp-to-abr {
type external;
local-address 192.168.0.1;
peer-as 65319;
local-as 65320;
neighbor 192.168.6.1 {
family inet {
unicast;
labeled-unicast {
rib {
inet.3;
}
}
}
export redistribute_ldp;
}
}
Verification
Verifying Label Advertisement Mode
Purpose
Confirm that the configuration is working properly.
Use the show ldp session command to verify the status of the label advertisement mode
for the LDP session.
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Action
Issue the show ldp session and show ldp session detail commands:
•
The following command output for the show ldp session command indicates that the
Adv. Mode (label advertisement mode) is DOD (meaning the LDP downstream on
demand session is operational):
user@host> show ldp session
Address
State
1.1.1.2
Operational
•
Connection
Open
Hold time
22
Adv. Mode
DOD
The following command output for the show ldp session detail command indicates
that the Local Label Advertisement mode is Downstream unsolicited, the default value
(meaning downstream on demand is not configured on the local session). Conversely,
the Remote Label Advertisement mode and the Negotiated Label Advertisement mode
both indicate that Downstream on demand is configured on the remote session
user@host> show ldp session detail
Address: 1.1.1.2, State: Operational, Connection: Open, Hold time: 24
Session ID: 1.1.1.1:0--1.1.1.2:0
Next keepalive in 4 seconds
Passive, Maximum PDU: 4096, Hold time: 30, Neighbor count: 1
Neighbor types: configured-tunneled
Keepalive interval: 10, Connect retry interval: 1
Local address: 1.1.1.1, Remote address: 1.1.1.2
Up for 17:54:52
Capabilities advertised: none
Capabilities received: none
Protection: disabled
Local - Restart: disabled, Helper mode: enabled,
Remote - Restart: disabled, Helper mode: enabled
Local maximum neighbor reconnect time: 120000 msec
Local maximum neighbor recovery time: 240000 msec
Local Label Advertisement mode: Downstream unsolicited
Remote Label Advertisement mode: Downstream on demand
Negotiated Label Advertisement mode: Downstream on demand
Nonstop routing state: Not in sync
Next-hop addresses received:
1.1.1.2
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CHAPTER 7
Configuration Tasks
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge Switches on page 67
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Switches on page 71
•
Configuring Static Label Switched Paths for MPLS on page 72
•
Configuring MPLS Firewall Filters and Policers on page 74
•
Configuring CoS Bits for an MPLS Network on page 77
•
Configuring a Global MPLS EXP Classifier on page 78
•
Configuring Rewrite Rules for MPLS EXP Classifiers on page 79
•
Configuring MPLS to Gather Statistics on page 80
•
Configuring Automatic Bandwidth Allocation for LSPs on page 81
•
Configuring Reporting of Automatic Bandwidth Allocation Statistics on page 88
•
Configuring the LDP Timer for Hello Messages on page 91
•
Configuring the Delay Before LDP Neighbors Are Considered Down on page 92
•
Configuring the Interval for LDP Keepalive Messages on page 93
•
Configuring the LDP Keepalive Timeout on page 94
•
Configuring LDP Route Preferences on page 94
•
Configuring LDP Graceful Restart on page 94
•
Configuring the Prefixes Advertised into LDP from the Routing Table on page 97
•
Configuring LDP LSP Traceroute on page 98
•
Configuring Miscellaneous LDP Properties on page 99
Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge Switches
To implement MPLS, you must configure two provider edge (PE) switches—an ingress
PE switch and an egress PE switch—and at least one provider switch. You can configure
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MPLS on the QFX Series
the customer edge (CE) interfaces on the PE switches of the MPLS network using IP over
MPLS.
This topic describes how to configure an ingress PE switch and an egress PE switch using
IP over MPLS:
1.
Configuring the Ingress PE Switch on page 68
2. Configuring the Egress PE Switch on page 69
Configuring the Ingress PE Switch
To configure the ingress PE switch:
1.
Configure an IP address for the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set lo0 unit 0 family inet address 192.168.10.1/32
user@switch# set xe-0/0/5 unit 0 family inet address 10.1.5.1/24
user@switch# set xe-0/0/6 unit 0 family inet address 10.1.6.1/24
NOTE: You cannot use routed VLAN interfaces (RVIs) or Layer 3
subinterfaces as core interfaces.
2. Configure OSPF on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
NOTE: You can use the switch address as an alternative to the loopback
interface.
[edit protocols ospf]
user@switch# set area 0.0.0.0 interface lo0.0
user@switch# set area 0.0.0.0 interface xe-0/0/5.0
user@switch# set area 0.0.0.0 interface xe-0/0/6.0
3. Configure OSPF traffic engineering:
[edit protocols ospf]
user@switch# set traffic-engineering
4. Configure RSVP on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
[edit protocols rsvp]
user@switch# set interface lo0.0
user@switch# set interface xe-0/0/5.0
user@switch# set interface xe-0/0/6.0
5. Configure MPLS traffic engineering.
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set traffic-engineering
6. Configure MPLS on the core interfaces:
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set interface xe-0/0/5.0
user@switch# set interface xe-0/0/6.0
7. Configure family mpls on the logical units of the core interfaces, thereby identifying
the interfaces that will be used for forwarding MPLS packets:
[edit interfaces]
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user@switch# set xe-0/0/5 unit 0 family mpls
user@switch# set xe-0/0/6 unit 0 family mpls
8. Configure a customer edge interface as a Layer 3 routed interface, specifying an IP
address:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set xe-0/0/3 unit 0 family inet address 121.100.10.1/16
9. Configure this Layer 3 customer edge interface for the routing protocol:
[edit]
user@switch# set protocols ospf area 0.0.0 interface xe-0/0/3.0
10. Configure an LSP on the ingress PE switch (192.168.10.1) to send IP packets over MPLS
to the egress PE switch (192.168.12.1):
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set label-switched-path lsp_1 to 192.168.12.1
11. Disable constrained-path LSP computation for this LSP:
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set label-switched-path lsp_1 no-cspf
12. Configure a static route from the ingress PE switch to the egress PE switch, thereby
indicating to the routing protocol that the packets will be forwarded over the MPLS
LSP that has been set up to that destination:
[edit routing-options]
user@switch# set static route 2.2.2.0/24 next-hop 192.168.10.1
user@switch# set static route 2.2.2.0/24 resolve
Configuring the Egress PE Switch
To configure the egress PE switch:
1.
Configure an IP address for the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set lo0 unit 0 family inet address 192.168.12.1/32
user@switch# set xe-0/0/5 unit 0 family inet address 10.1.20.1/24
user@switch# set xe-0/0/6 unit 0 family inet address 10.1.21.1/24
NOTE: You cannot use routed VLAN interfaces (RVIs) or Layer 3
subinterfaces as core interfaces.
2. Configure OSPF on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
NOTE: You can use the switch address as an alternative to the loopback
interface.
[edit protocols ospf]
user@switch# set area 0.0.0.0 interface lo0.0
user@switch# set area 0.0.0.0 interface xe-0/0/5.0
user@switch# set area 0.0.0.0 interface xe-0/0/6.0
3. Configure RSVP on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
[edit protocols rsvp]
user@switch# set rsvp interface lo0.0
user@switch# set rsvp interface xe-0/0/5.0
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user@switch# set rsvp interface xe-0/0/6.0
4. Configure MPLS on the core interfaces:
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set interface xe-0/0/5.0
user@switch# set interface xe-0/0/6.0
5. Configure family mpls on the logical units of the core interfaces, thereby identifying
the interfaces that will be used for forwarding MPLS packets:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set xe-0/0/5 unit 0 family mpls
user@switch# set xe-0/0/6 unit 0 family mpls
6. Configure a customer edge interface as a Layer 3 routed interface, specifying an IP
address:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set xe-0/0/3 unit 0 family inet address 2.2.2.1/16
7. Configure this Layer 3 customer edge interface for the routing protocol:
[edit]
user@switch# set protocols ospf area 0.0.0 interface xe-0/0/3
8. Configure an LSP on the egress PE switch (192.168.12.1) to send IP packets over MPLS
to the ingress PE switch (192.168.10.1):
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set label-switched-path lsp_2 to 192.168.10.1
9. Disable constrained-path LSP computation for this LSP:
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set label-switched-path lsp_2 no-cspf
10. Configure a static route from the ingress PE switch to the egress PE switch, thereby
indicating to the routing protocol that the packets will be forwarded over the MPLS
LSP that has been set up to that destination:
[edit routing-options]
user@switch# set static route 121.121.121.0/24 next-hop 192.168.12.1
user@switch# set static route 121.121.121.0/24 resolve
Related
Documentation
70
•
MPLS Configuration Guidelines on page 29
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Switches on page 71
•
MPLS Feature Support on the QFX Series and EX4600 Switch Overview on page 15
•
Understanding MPLS Components on page 4
•
Understanding CoS MPLS EXP Classifiers and Rewrite Rules on page 11
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Configuration Tasks
Configuring MPLS on Provider Switches
To implement MPLS, you must configure at least one provider switch as a transit switch
for the MPLS packets.
MPLS requires the configuration of an interior gateway protocol (OSPF) and a signaling
protocol (RSVP) on the core interfaces and the loopback interface of all the switches.
This procedure includes the configuration of OSPF on the provider switch.
To configure the provider switch, complete the following tasks:
1.
Configure OSPF on the loopback and core interfaces:
NOTE: You can use the switch address as an alternative to the loopback
interface.
[edit protocols ospf]
user@switch# set area 0.0.0.0 interface lo0.0
user@switch# set area 0.0.0.0 interface xe-0/0/5.0
user@switch# set area 0.0.0.0 interface xe-0/0/6.0
user@switch# set area 0.0.0.0 interface ae0
NOTE: You cannot use routed VLAN interfaces (RVIs) or Layer 3
subinterfaces as core interfaces.
2. Configure MPLS on the core interfaces:
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set interface xe-0/0/5.0
user@switch# set interface xe-0/0/6.0
user@switch# set interface ae0
3. Configure RSVP on the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
[edit protocols rsvp]
user@switch# set interface lo0.0
user@switch# set interface xe-0/0/5.0
user@switch# set interface xe-0/0/6.0
user@switch# set interface ae0
4. Configure an IP address for the loopback interface and the core interfaces:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set lo0 unit 0 family inet address 127.1.1.1/32
user@switch# set xe-0/0/5 unit 0 family inet address 10.1.5.1/24
user@switch# set xe-0/0/6 unit 0 family inet address 10.1.6.1/24
user@switch# set ae0 unit 0 family inet address 10.1.9.2/24
5. Configure family mpls on the logical units of the core interfaces, thereby identifying
the interfaces that will be used for forwarding MPLS packets:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set xe-0/0/5 unit 0 family mpls
user@switch# set xe-0/0/6 unit 0 family mpls
user@switch# set ae0 unit 0 family mpls
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NOTE: You can configure family mpls on either individual interfaces or
aggregated Ethernet interfaces. You cannot configure it on tagged VLAN
interfaces.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge Switches on page 67
•
MPLS Configuration Guidelines on page 29
•
MPLS Feature Support on the QFX Series and EX4600 Switch Overview on page 15
•
Understanding MPLS Components on page 4
•
Understanding CoS MPLS EXP Classifiers and Rewrite Rules on page 11
Configuring Static Label Switched Paths for MPLS
Configuring static label-switched paths (LSPs) for MPLS is similar to configuring static
routes on individual switches. As with static routes, there is no error reporting, liveliness
detection, or statistics reporting.
To configure static LSPs, configure the ingress PE switch and each provider switch along
the path up to and including the egress PE switch.
For the ingress PE switch, configure which packets to tag (based on the packet’s
destination IP address), configure the next switch in the LSP, and the tag to apply to the
packet. Manually assigned labels can have values from 0 through 1,048,575.
For the transit switches in the path, configure the next switch in the path and the tag to
apply to the packet. Manually assigned labels can have values from 1,000,000 through
1,048,575.
The egress PE switch removes the label and forwards the packet to the IP destination.
However, if the previous switch removed the label, the egress switch examines the
packet’s IP header and forwards the packet toward its IP destination.
Before you configure a static LSP, you must configure the basic components for an MPLS
network:
•
Configure two PE switches. See “Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge Switches” on
page 67.
NOTE: Do not configure LSPs at the [edit protocols mpls
label-switched-path] hierarchy level on the PE switches.
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Chapter 7: Configuration Tasks
•
Configure one or more provider switches. See “Configuring MPLS on Provider Switches”
on page 71.
This topic describes how to configure an ingress PE switch, one or more provider switches,
and an egress PE switch for static LSP:
1.
Configuring the Ingress PE Switch on page 73
2. Configuring the Provider and the Egress PE Switch on page 73
Configuring the Ingress PE Switch
To configure the ingress PE switch:
1.
Configure an IP address for every core interface:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set interface-name unit logical-unit-number family inet address address
NOTE: You cannot use routed VLAN interfaces (RVIs) or Layer 3
subinterfaces as core interfaces.
2. Configure the name associated with the static LSP:
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set static-label-switched-path lsp-name
3. Configure the next hop switch for the LSP:
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set static-label-switched-path lsp-name ingress next-hop address-of-next-hop
4. Specify the address of the egress switch for the LSP:
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set static-label-switched-path lsp-name ingress to address-of-egress-switch
5. Configure the new label that you want to add to the top of the label stack:
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set static-label-switched-path lsp-name ingress push out-label
Configuring the Provider and the Egress PE Switch
To configure a static LSP for MPLS on the provider and egress PE switch:
1.
Configure a transit static LSP:
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set static-label-switched-path lsp-name transit incoming-label
2. Configure the next hop switch for the LSP:
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set static-label-switched-path lsp-name transit incoming-label next-hop
address-of-next-hop
3. Only for provider switches, remove the label at the top of the label stack and replace
it with the specified label:
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set static-label-switched-path lsp-name transit incoming-label swap out-label
4. Only for the egress PE switch, remove the label at the top of the label stack:
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NOTE: If there is another label in the stack, that label becomes the label
at the top of the label stack. Otherwise, the packet is forwarded as a native
protocol packet (typically, as an IP packet).
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set static-label-switched-path lsp-name transit incoming-label pop
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge Switches on page 67
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Switches on page 71
•
Understanding MPLS Label Operations on page 7
Configuring MPLS Firewall Filters and Policers
You can configure firewall filters to filter MPLS traffic. To use an MPLS firewall filter, you
must first configure the filter and then apply it to an interface you have configured for
forwarding MPLS traffic. You can also configure a policer for the MPLS filter to police
(that is, rate-limit) the traffic on the interface to which the filter is attached.
NOTE: You can configure ingress MPLS firewall filters only. Egress MPLS
firewall filters are not supported. You cannot apply MPLS firewall filters to
loopback interfaces.
When you configure an MPLS firewall filter, you define filtering criteria (terms, with match
conditions) for the packets and an action (action, or action modifier) for the switch to
take if the packets match the filtering criteria.
•
Table 11 on page 74 describes the match conditions you can configure for MPLS firewall
filters at the [edit firewall family mpls filter filter-name term term-name from] hierarchy
level.
NOTE: If a packet has multiple MPLS labels, the filter applies the match
conditions to only the bottom label in the label stack.
Table 11: Supported Match Conditions for MPLS Firewall Filters
Match Condition
Description
exp number
Experimental (EXP) bit number or range of bit numbers in the MPLS header of a
packet.
For number, you can specify one or more values from 0 through 7 in binary, decimal
or hexadecimal format, as given below:
74
•
A single EXP bit—for example, exp 3
•
Several EXP bits—for example, exp 0,4
•
A range of EXP bits—for example, exp [0-5]
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Chapter 7: Configuration Tasks
Table 11: Supported Match Conditions for MPLS Firewall Filters (continued)
Match Condition
Description
label number
MPLS label value or range of label values in the MPLS header of a packet.
For number, you can specify one or more values from 0 through 1048575 in decimal
or hexadecimal format, as given below:
•
•
A single label—for example, label 3
•
Several labels—for example, label 0,4
•
A range of labels—for example, label [0-5]
Table 12 on page 75 describes the actions you can configure for MPLS firewall filters
at the [edit firewall family mpls filter filter-name term term-name then] hierarchy level.
Table 12: Supported Actions for MPLS Firewall Filters
Action
Description
accept
Accept a packet
count counter-name
Count the number of packets that pass this filter or term.
NOTE: We recommend that you configure a counter for each term in a firewall
filter, so that you can monitor the number of packets that match the conditions
specified in each filter term.
discard
Discard a packet silently without sending an Internet Control Message Protocol
(ICMP) message
policer
Starting with Junos OS 13.2X51-D15, you can send traffic matched by an MPLS filter
to a two-color policer.
three-color-policer
Starting with Junos OS 13.2X51-D15, you can send traffic matched by an MPLS filter
to a three-color policer.
•
Configuring an MPLS Firewall Filter on page 75
•
Applying an MPLS Firewall Filter to an MPLS Interface on page 76
•
Configuring Policers for LSPs on page 76
Configuring an MPLS Firewall Filter
To configure an MPLS firewall filter:
1.
Configure the filter name, term name, and at least one match condition—for example,
match on MPLS packets with EXP bits set to either 0 or 4:
[edit firewall family mpls]
user@switch# set filter ingress-exp-filter term term-one from exp 0,4
2. In each firewall filter term, specify the actions to take if the packet matches all the
conditions in that term—for example, count MPLS packets with EXP bits set to either
0 or 4:
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MPLS on the QFX Series
[edit firewall family mpls filter ingress-exp-filter term term-one then]
user@switch# set count counter0
user@switch# set accept
Applying an MPLS Firewall Filter to an MPLS Interface
To apply the MPLS firewall filter to an interface you have configured for forwarding MPLS
traffic (using the family mpls statement at the [edit interfaces interface-name unit
unit-number] hierarchy level):
NOTE: You can apply firewall filters only to filter MPLS packets that enter
an interface.
1.
Apply the firewall filter to an MPLS interface—for example, apply the firewall filter to
interface xe-0/0/5:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# set xe-0/0/5 unit 0 family mpls filter input ingress-exp-filter
2. Review your configuration and issue the commit command:
[edit interfaces]
user@switch# commit
commit complete
Configuring Policers for LSPs
Starting with Junos OS 13.2X51-D15, you can send traffic matched by an MPLS filter to a
two-color policer or three-color policer. MPLS LSP policing allows you to control the
amount of traffic forwarded through a particular LSP. Policing helps to ensure that the
amount of traffic forwarded through an LSP never exceeds the requested bandwidth
allocation. LSP policing is supported on regular LSPs, LSPs configured with DiffServ-aware
traffic engineering, and multiclass LSPs. You can configure multiple policers for each
multiclass LSP. For regular LSPs, each LSP policer is applied to all of the traffic traversing
the LSP. The policer's bandwidth limitations become effective as soon as the total sum
of traffic traversing the LSP exceeds the configured limit.
You configure the multiclass LSP and DiffServ-aware traffic engineering LSP policers in
a filter. The filter can be configured to distinguish between the different class types and
apply the relevant policer to each class type. The policers distinguish between class types
based on the EXP bits.
You configure LSP policers under the family any filter. The family any filter is used because
the policer is applied to traffic entering the LSP. This traffic might be from different
families: IPv6, MPLS, and so on. You do not need to know what sort of traffic is entering
the LSP, as long as the match conditions apply to all types of traffic.
When configuring MPLS LSP policers, be aware of the following limitations:
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Related
Documentation
•
LSP policers are supported for packet LSPs only.
•
LSP policers are supported for unicast next hops only. Multicast next hops are not
supported.
•
The LSP policer runs before any output filters.
•
Traffic sourced from the Routing Engine (for example, ping traffic) does not take the
same forwarding path as transit traffic. This type of traffic cannot be policed.
•
MPLS Feature Support on the QFX Series and EX4600 Switch Overview on page 15
•
Supported MPLS Scaling Values on page 17
•
Overview of Policers
Configuring CoS Bits for an MPLS Network
When traffic enters a labeled-switch path (LSP) tunnel, the CoS bits in the MPLS header
are set in one of two ways:
•
The number of the output queue into which the packet was buffered and the packet
loss priority (PLP) bit are written into the MPLS header and are used as the packet’s
CoS value. This behavior is the default, and no configuration is required. The Junos OS
Class of Service Library for Routing Devices explains the IP CoS values, and summarizes
how the CoS bits are treated.
•
You set a fixed CoS value on all packets entering the LSP tunnel. A fixed CoS value
means that all packets entering the LSP receive the same class of service.
To set a fixed CoS value on all packets entering the LSP:
1.
Specify a class of service value for the LSP:
NOTE: The CoS value set using the class-of-service statement at the [edit
protocols mpls] hierarchy level supersedes the CoS value set at the [edit
class-of-service] hierarchy level for an interface. Effectively, the CoS value
configured for an LSP overrides the CoS value set for an interface.
[edit protocols mpls]
user@switch# set class-of-service cos-value
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding CoS Classifiers
•
Understanding CoS MPLS EXP Classifiers and Rewrite Rules on page 11
•
Configuring a Global MPLS EXP Classifier on page 78
•
Configuring Rewrite Rules for MPLS EXP Classifiers on page 79
•
Defining CoS Rewrite Rules
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Configuring a Global MPLS EXP Classifier
EXP packet classification associates incoming packets with a particular MPLS CoS
servicing level. EXP behavior aggregate (BA) classifiers examine the MPLS EXP value in
the packet header to determine the CoS settings applied to the packet. EXP BA classifiers
allow you to set the forwarding class and loss priority of an MPLS packet based on the
incoming CoS value.
You can configure as many EXP classifiers as you want, however, the switch uses only
one MPLS EXP classifier as a global classifier, which is applied only on interfaces
configured as family mpls. All family mpls switch interfaces use the global EXP classifier
to classify MPLS traffic.
If an EXP classifier is configured, MPLS traffic on family mpls interfaces uses the EXP
classifier. If an EXP classifier is not configured, then if a fixed classifier is applied to the
interface, the MPLS traffic uses the fixed classifier. If no EXP classifier and no fixed
classifier is applied to the interface, MPLS traffic is treated as best-effort traffic. DSCP
classifiers are not applied to MPLS traffic.
NOTE: There is no default MPLS EXP classifier. If you want to use an MPLS
EXP classifier, you must configure it. The MPLS EXP classifier is global and
applies only to all family mpls interfaces on the switch. You can configure as
many MPLS EXP classifiers as you want, but you can only use one MPLS EXP
classifier on switch interfaces at any time.
To configure a unicast MPLS EXP classifier using the CLI:
1.
Create an EXP classifier and associate it with a forwarding class, a loss priority, and
a code point:
[edit class-of-service classifiers]
user@switch# set (dscp | ieee-802.1 | exp) classifier-name forwarding-class
forwarding-class-name loss-priority level code-points [aliases] [bit-patterns]
2. Apply the EXP classifier to the switch interfaces:
[edit class-of-service]
user@switch# set system-defaults classifiers exp classifier-name
Related
Documentation
78
•
Understanding CoS MPLS EXP Classifiers and Rewrite Rules on page 11
•
Understanding Applying CoS Classifiers and Rewrite Rules to Interfaces
•
Defining CoS Unicast BA Classifiers (DSCP, DSCP IPv6, IEEE 802.1p)
•
Configuring Rewrite Rules for MPLS EXP Classifiers on page 79
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Configuration Tasks
Configuring Rewrite Rules for MPLS EXP Classifiers
You configure EXP rewrite rules to alter CoS values in outgoing MPLS packets on the
outbound family mpls interfaces of a switch to match the policies of a targeted peer.
Policy matching allows the downstream routing platform or switch in a neighboring
network to classify each packet into the appropriate service group.
To configure an EXP CoS rewrite rule, create the rule by giving it a name and associating
it with a forwarding class, loss priority, and code point. This creates a rewrite table. After
the rewrite rule is created, enable it on a logical family mpls interface. EXP rewrite rules
can only be enabled on logical family mpls interfaces, not on physical interfaces or on
interfaces of other family types. You can also apply an existing EXP rewrite rule on a
logical interface.
NOTE: There are no default rewrite rules.
You can configure as many EXP rewrite rules as you want, but you can only use 16 EXP
rewrite rules at any time on the switch. On a given family mpls logical interface, all pushed
MPLS labels have the same EXP rewrite rule applied to them. You can apply different
EXP rewrite rules to different logical interfaces on the same physical interface.
NOTE: On each physical interface, either all forwarding classes that are being
used on the interface must have rewrite rules configured, or no forwarding
classes that are being used on the interface can have rewrite rules configured.
On any physical port, do not mix forwarding classes with rewrite rules and
forwarding classes without rewrite rules.
NOTE: To replace an existing rewrite rule on the interface with a new rewrite
rule of the same type, first explicitly remove the existing rewrite rule and then
apply the new rule.
To create an EXP rewrite rule for MPLS traffic and enable it on a logical interface:
1.
Create an EXP rewrite rule:
user@switch# set class-of-service rewrite-rules exp rewrite-rule-name forwarding-class
forwarding-class-name loss-priority level code-points [aliases] [bit-patterns]
For example, to configure an EXP rewrite rule named exp-rr-1 for a forwarding class
named mpls-1 with a loss priority of low that rewrites the EXP code point value to 001:
user@switch# set class-of-service rewrite-rules exp exp-rr-1 forwarding-class mpls-1
loss-priority low code-points 001
2. Apply the rewrite rule to a logical interface:
user@switch # set class-of-service interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit rewrite-rules
exp rewrite-rule-name
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For example, to apply a rewrite rule named exp-rr-1 to logical interface xe-0/0/10.0:
user@switch# set class-of-service interfaces xe-0/0/10 unit 0 rewrite-rules exp exp-rr-1
NOTE: In this example, all forwarding classes assigned to port xe-0/0/10
must have rewrite rules. Do not mix forwarding classes that have rewrite
rules with forwarding classes that do not have rewrite rules on the same
interface.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding CoS MPLS EXP Classifiers and Rewrite Rules on page 11
•
Understanding Applying CoS Classifiers and Rewrite Rules to Interfaces
•
Monitoring CoS Rewrite Rules
•
Defining CoS Rewrite Rules
•
Configuring a Global MPLS EXP Classifier on page 78
Configuring MPLS to Gather Statistics
You can configure MPLS so that it periodically gathers traffic statistics about all MPLS
sessions, including transit sessions, by configuring the statistics statement. You must
configure the statistics statement if you want to collect MPLS traffic statistics using
SNMP polling of MPLS Management Information Bases (MIBs).
To enable or disable MPLS statistics collection, include the statistics statement:
statistics {
auto-bandwidth;
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
interval seconds;
no-transit-statistics;
}
You can configure these statements at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit protocols mpls]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls]
The default interval is 300 seconds.
If you configure the file option, the statistics are placed in a file, with one entry per LSP.
During the specified interval, the following information is recorded in this file:
•
80
The number of packets, number of bytes, packets per second, and bytes per second
transmitted by each LSP. Feature parity for the display of packet and byte statistics
for sub-LSPs of a point-to-multipoint LSP on the Junos Trio chipset is supported in
Junos OS Releases 11.1R2, 11.2R2, and 11.4.
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Chapter 7: Configuration Tasks
•
The percent of bandwidth transmitted over a given LSP in relation to the bandwidth
percentage configured for that LSP. If no bandwidth is configured for an LSP, 0 percent
is recorded in the percentage column.
At the end of each periodic report, a summary shows the current time, total number of
sessions, number of sessions read, number of sessions ignored, and read errors, if any.
Ignored sessions are typically those not in the up state or those with a reserved
(0 through 15) incoming label (typically the egress point of an LSP). The reason for a
read error appears on the same line as the entry for the LSP on which the error occurred.
Gathering statistics is an unreliable process; occasional read errors might affect their
accuracy. Sample output follows:
lsp6
0 pkt
0
lsp5
0 pkt
0
lsp6.1
34845 pkt
2926980
lsp5.1
0 pkt
0
lsp4
0 pkt
0
Dec 7 17:28:38 Total 6 sessions: 5 success,
Related
Documentation
•
Byte
0 pps
Byte
0 pps
Byte
1049 pps
Byte
0 pps
Byte
0 pps
0 fail, 1 ignored
0
0
88179
0
0
Bps
Bps
Bps
Bps
Bps
0
0
132
0
0
Configuring Automatic Bandwidth Allocation for LSPs on page 81
Configuring Automatic Bandwidth Allocation for LSPs
Automatic bandwidth allocation allows an MPLS tunnel to automatically adjust its
bandwidth allocation based on the volume of traffic flowing through the tunnel. You can
configure an LSP with minimal bandwidth, and this feature can dynamically adjust the
LSP’s bandwidth allocation based on current traffic patterns. The bandwidth adjustments
do not interrupt traffic flow through the tunnel.
At the end of the automatic bandwidth allocation time interval, the current maximum
average bandwidth usage is compared with the allocated bandwidth for the LSP. If the
LSP needs more bandwidth, an attempt is made to set up a new path where bandwidth
is equal to the current maximum average usage. If the attempt is successful, the LSP’s
traffic is routed through the new path and the old path is removed. If the attempt fails,
the LSP continues to use its current path.
If you have configured link and node protection for the LSP and traffic has been switched
to the bypass LSP, the automatic bandwidth allocation feature continues to operate and
take bandwidth samples from the bypass LSP. For the first bandwidth adjustment cycle,
the maximum average bandwidth usage taken from the original link and node-protected
LSP is used to resignal the bypass LSP if more bandwidth is needed. (Link and node
protection are not supported on QFX Series switches.)
If you have configured fast-reroute for the LSP, you might not be able to use this feature
to adjust the bandwidth. Because the LSPs use a fixed filter (FF) reservation style, when
a new path is signaled, the bandwidth might be double-counted. Double-counting can
prevent a fast-reroute LSP from ever adjusting its bandwidth when automatic bandwidth
allocation is enabled. (Fast reroute is not supported on QFX Series switches.)
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To configure automatic bandwidth allocation, complete the steps in the following
sections:
•
Configuring Automatic Bandwidth Allocation on LSPs on page 82
•
Requesting Automatic Bandwidth Allocation Adjustment on page 87
Configuring Automatic Bandwidth Allocation on LSPs
To enable automatic bandwidth allocation on an LSP, include the auto-bandwidth
statement:
auto-bandwidth {
adjust-interval seconds;
adjust-threshold percent;
adjust-threshold-overflow-limit number;
adjust-threshold-underflow-limit number;
maximum-bandwidth bps;
minimum-bandwidth bps;
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-interval
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-threshold-change
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-threshold-value
monitor-bandwidth;
}
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name]
If an LSP has an automatic bandwidth configuration, you can disable automatic bandwidth
adjustments on a particular path (either primary or secondary) by configuring a static
bandwidth value and by disabling the CSPF computation (using the no-cspf statement).
For example:
user@host> show protocols mpls
label-switched-path primary-path {
to 192.168.0.1;
ldp-tunneling;
optimize-timer 3571;
least-fill;
link-protection;
adaptive;
auto-bandwidth {
adjust-interval 7177;
adjust-threshold 5;
minimum-bandwidth 1m;
maximum-bandwidth 2500000000;
adjust-threshold-overflow-limit 2;
resignal-minimum-bandwidth;
}
primary primary-path;
secondary secondary-path {
bandwidth 0;
no-cspf;
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priority 0 0;
}
}
The statements configured at the [edit protocols mpls label-switched-path
label-switched-path-name auto-bandwidth] hierarchy level are optional and explained in
the following sections:
•
Configuring the Automatic Bandwidth Allocation Interval on page 83
•
Configuring the Maximum and Minimum Bounds of the LSP’s Bandwidth on page 83
•
Configuring the Automatic Bandwidth Adjustment Threshold on page 84
•
Configuring a Limit on Bandwidth Overflow and Underflow Samples on page 84
•
Configuring Passive Bandwidth Utilization Monitoring on page 86
Configuring the Automatic Bandwidth Allocation Interval
At the end of the automatic bandwidth allocation interval, the automatic bandwidth
computation and new path setup process is triggered.
NOTE: To prevent unnecessary resignaling of LSPs, it is best to configure an
LSP adjustment interval that is at least three times longer than the MPLS
automatic bandwidth statistics interval. For example, if you configure a value
of 30 seconds for the MPLS automatic bandwidth statistics interval (interval
statement at the [edit protocols mpls statistics] hierarchy level), you should
configure a value of at least 90 seconds for the LSP adjustment interval
(adjust-interval statement at the [edit protocols mpls label-switched-path
label-switched-path-name auto-bandwidth] hierarchy level). See also
“Configuring Reporting of Automatic Bandwidth Allocation Statistics” on
page 88.
To specify the bandwidth reallocation interval in seconds for a specific LSP, include the
adjust-interval statement:
adjust-interval seconds;
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth]
Configuring the Maximum and Minimum Bounds of the LSP’s Bandwidth
You can maintain the LSP’s bandwidth between minimum and maximum bounds by
specifying values for the minimum-bandwidth and maximum-bandwidth statements.
To specify the minimum amount of bandwidth allocated for a specific LSP, include the
minimum-bandwidth statement:
minimum-bandwidth bps;
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You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth]
To specify the maximum amount of bandwidth allocated for a specific LSP, include the
maximum-bandwidth statement:
maximum-bandwidth bps;
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth]
Configuring the Automatic Bandwidth Adjustment Threshold
Use the adjust-threshold statement to specify the sensitivity of the automatic bandwidth
adjustment of an LSP to changes in bandwidth utilization. You can set the threshold for
when to trigger automatic bandwidth adjustments. When configured, bandwidth demand
for the current interval is determined and compared to the LSP’s current bandwidth
allocation. If the percentage difference in bandwidth is greater than or equal to the
specified adjust-threshold percentage, the LSP’s bandwidth is adjusted to the current
bandwidth demand.
For example, assume that the current bandwidth allocation is 100 megabits per second
(Mbps) and that the percentage configured for the adjust-threshold statement is 15
percent. If the bandwidth demand increases to 110 Mbps, the bandwidth allocation is not
adjusted. However, if the bandwidth demand increases to 120 Mbps (20 percent over
the current allocation) or decreases to 80 Mbps (20 percent under the current allocation),
the bandwidth allocation is increased to 120 Mbps or decreased to 80 Mbps, respectively.
To configure the threshold for automatic bandwidth adjustment, include the
adjust-threshold statement:
adjust-threshold percent;
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth]
Configuring a Limit on Bandwidth Overflow and Underflow Samples
The automatic bandwidth adjustment timer is a periodic timer which is triggered every
adjust interval to determine whether any bandwidth adjustments are required on the
LSP's active path. This interval is typically configured as a long period of time, usually
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hours. If, at the end of adjust interval, the change in bandwidth is above a certain adjust
threshold, the LSP is resignaled with the new bandwidth.
During the automatic bandwidth adjustment interval, the router might receive a steady
increase in traffic (increasing bandwidth utilization) on an LSP, potentially causing
congestion or packet loss. To prevent this, you can define a second trigger to prematurely
expire the automatic bandwidth adjustment timer before the end of the current
adjustment interval.
Every statistics interval, the router samples the average bandwidth utilization of an LSP
and if this has exceeded the current maximum average bandwidth utilization, the
maximum average bandwidth utilization is updated.
During each sample period, the following conditions are also checked:
•
Is the current average bandwidth utilization above the active bandwidth of the path?
•
Has the difference between the average bandwidth utilization and the active bandwidth
exceeded the adjust threshold (bandwidth utilization has changed significantly)?
If these conditions are true, it is considered to be one bandwidth overflow sample. Using
the adjust-threshold-overflow-limit statement, you can define a limit on the number of
bandwidth overflow samples such that when the limit is reached, the current automatic
bandwidth adjustment timer is expired and a bandwidth adjustment is triggered. Once
this adjustment is complete, the normal automatic bandwidth adjustment timer is reset
to expire after the periodic adjustment interval.
To specify a limit on the number of bandwidth overflow samples before triggering an
automatic bandwidth allocation adjustment, configure the adjust-threshold-overflow-limit
statement:
adjust-threshold-overflow-limit number;
Similarly, if the current average bandwidth utilization is below the active bandwidth of
the path by the configured adjusted threshold (meaning that bandwidth utilization has
gone down significantly), the sample is considered to be an underflow sample. The
adjusted (new signaling) bandwidth after an adjustment due to underflow is the maximum
average bandwidth among the underflow samples. You can specify a limit on the number
of bandwidth underflow samples before triggering an automatic bandwidth allocation
adjustment by configuring the adjust threshold-underflow-limit statement:
adjust-threshold-underflow-limit number;
These statements can be configured at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth]
You must configure the adjust-threshold and minimum-bandwidth statements whenever
you configure the adjust-threshold-underflow-limit statement. You must configure the
adjust-threshold and maximum-bandwidth statements whenever you configure the
adjust-threshold-overflow-limit statement
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•
You must configure a nonzero value for the adjust-threshold statement if you configure
the adjust-threshold-overflow-limit or adjust-threshold-underflow-limit statement.
•
Any bandwidth increase or decrease below the value configured for the adjust-threshold
statement does not constitute an overflow or underflow condition.
•
To prevent unlimited increases in LSP bandwidth (to limit overflow beyond a certain
bandwidth), you must also configure the maximum-bandwidth statement when you
configure the adjust-threshold-overflow-limit statement.
The following describes the other aspects of the adjust-threshold-overflow-limit
statement:
•
It only applies to bandwidth overflows. If the bandwidth is decreasing, the normal
automatic bandwidth adjustment interval is used.
•
It does not affect manually triggered automatic bandwidth adjustment.
•
It applies to single-class DiffServ-TE LSPs.
•
Because the adjust-threshold-overflow-limit statement can trigger a bandwidth
adjustment, it cannot be enabled at the same time as the monitor-bandwidth statement
(for information about that statement, see “Configuring Passive Bandwidth Utilization
Monitoring” on page 86).
•
You cannot configure automatic bandwidth adjustments to occur more often than
every 300 seconds. The adjust-threshold-overflow-limit statement is subject to the
same minimum value with regard to the minimum frequency of adjustment allowed.
Overflow condition based adjustments can occur no sooner than 300 seconds from
the start of the overflow condition. Therefore it is required that:
sample interval x adjust-threshold-overflow-limit >= 300s
These values are checked during the commit operation. An error is returned if the value
is less than 300 seconds.
•
If you change the value of the adjust-threshold-overflow-limit statement on a working
router, you can expect the following behavior:
•
If you increase the current value of the adjust-threshold-overflow-limit statement,
the old value is replaced with the new one.
•
If you decrease the current value of the adjust-threshold-overflow-limit statement
and the current bandwidth overflow count is less than the new value, the old value
is replaced with the new one.
•
If you decrease the current value of the adjust-threshold-overflow-limit statement
and the current bandwidth overflow count is greater than the new value, the
adjustment timer is immediately expired and a bandwidth adjustment is initiated.
Configuring Passive Bandwidth Utilization Monitoring
Use the monitor-bandwidth statement to switch to a passive bandwidth utilization
monitoring mode. In this mode, no automatic bandwidth adjustments are made, but the
maximum average bandwidth utilization is continuously monitored and recorded.
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To configure passive bandwidth utilization monitoring, include the monitor-bandwidth
statement:
monitor-bandwidth;
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth]
If you have configured an LSP with primary and secondary paths, the automatic bandwidth
allocation statistics are carried over to the secondary path if the primary path fails. For
example, consider a primary path whose adjustment interval is half complete and whose
maximum average bandwidth usage is currently calculated as 50 Mbps. If the primary
path suddenly fails, the time remaining for the next adjustment and the maximum average
bandwidth usage are carried over to the secondary path.
Requesting Automatic Bandwidth Allocation Adjustment
For MPLS LSP automatic bandwidth allocation adjustment, the minimum value for the
adjustment interval is 5 minutes (300 seconds). You might find it necessary to trigger a
bandwidth allocation adjustment manually, for example in the following circumstances:
•
When you are testing automatic bandwidth allocation in a network lab.
•
When the LSP is configured for automatic bandwidth allocation in monitor mode (the
monitor-bandwidth statement is included in the configuration as described in
“Configuring Passive Bandwidth Utilization Monitoring” on page 86), and want to initiate
an immediate bandwidth adjustment.
To use the request mpls lsp adjust-autobandwidth command, the following must be true:
•
Automatic bandwidth allocation must be enabled on the LSP.
•
The criteria required to trigger a bandwidth adjustment have been met (the difference
between the adjust bandwidth and the current LSP path bandwidth is greater than
the threshold limit).
A manually triggered bandwidth adjustment operates only on the active LSP path. Also,
if you have enabled periodic automatic bandwidth adjustment, the periodic automatic
bandwidth adjustment parameters (the adjustment interval and the maximum average
bandwidth) are not reset after a manual adjustment.
For example, suppose the periodic adjust interval is 10 hours and there are currently
5 hours remaining before an automatic bandwidth adjustment is triggered. If you initiate
a manual adjustment with the request mpls lsp adjust-autobandwidth command, the
adjust timer is not reset and still has 5 hours remaining.
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To manually trigger a bandwidth allocation adjustment, you need to use the request mpls
lsp adjust-autobandwidth command. You can trigger the command for all affected LSPs
on the router, or you can specify a particular LSP:
user@host> request mpls lsp adjust-autobandwidth
Once you execute this command, the automatic bandwidth adjustment validation process
is triggered. If all the criteria for adjustment are met, the LSP’s active path bandwidth is
adjusted to the adjusted bandwidth value determined during the validation process.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring MPLS to Gather Statistics on page 80
•
Configuring Reporting of Automatic Bandwidth Allocation Statistics on page 88
•
request mpls lsp adjust-autobandwidth on page 200
•
show mpls lsp on page 262
Configuring Reporting of Automatic Bandwidth Allocation Statistics
Automatic bandwidth allocation allows an MPLS tunnel to automatically adjust its
bandwidth allocation based on the volume of traffic flowing through the tunnel. You can
configure the device to collect statistics related to automatic bandwidth allocation by
completing the following steps:
1.
To collect statistics related to automatic bandwidth allocation, configure the
auto-bandwidth option for the statistics statement at the [edit protocols mpls]
hierarchy level. These settings apply to all LSPs configured on the router on which
you have also configured the auto-bandwidth statement at the [edit protocols mpls
label-switched-path label-switched-path-name] hierarchy level.
statistics {
auto-bandwidth;
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
interval seconds;
no-transit-statistics;
}
2. Specify the filename for the files used to store the MPLS trace operation output using
the file option. All files are placed in the directory /var/log. We recommend that you
place MPLS tracing output in the file mpls-log.
3. Specify the maximum number of trace files using the files number option. When a
trace file named trace-file reaches its maximum size, it is renamed trace-file.0, then
trace-file.1, and so on, until the maximum number of trace files is reached. Then the
oldest trace file is overwritten.
4. Specify the interval for calculating the average bandwidth usage by configuring a time
in seconds using the interval option. You can also set the adjustment interval on a
specific LSP by configuring the interval option at the [edit protocols mpls
label-switch-path label-switched-path-name statistics] hierarchy level.
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NOTE: To prevent unnecessary resignaling of LSPs, it is best to configure
an LSP adjustment interval that is at least three times longer than the
MPLS automatic bandwidth statistics interval. For example, if you
configure a value of 30 seconds for the MPLS automatic bandwidth
statistics interval (interval statement at the [edit protocols mpls statistics]
hierarchy level), you should configure a value of at least 90 seconds for
the LSP adjustment interval (adjust-interval statement at the [edit
protocols mpls label-switched-path label-switched-path-name
auto-bandwidth] hierarchy level).
5. To trace automatic bandwidth allocation, include the autobw-state flag for the MPLS
traceoptions statement at the [edit protocols mpls] hierarchy level.
The following configuration enables the MPLS traceoptions for automatic bandwidth
allocation. The trace records are stored in a file called auto-band-trace (the filename
is user configurable):
[edit protocols mpls]
traceoptions {
file auto-band-trace size 10k files 10 world-readable;
flag autobw-state;
}
6. Using the show log command, you can display the automatic bandwidth allocation
statistics file generated when you configure the auto-bandwidth statement. The
following shows sample log file output taken from an MPLS statistics file named
auto-band-stats on a router configured with an LSP named E-D. The log file shows
that LSP E-D is operating over its reserved bandwidth limit initially. Before Oct 30
17:14:57, the router triggered an automatic bandwidth adjustment (you might see two
sessions for an LSP undergoing an automatic bandwidth adjustment). By Oct 29
17:16:57, the LSP has been reestablished at a higher bandwidth and is now shown
using less than 100 percent of its Reserved Bw (reserved bandwidth).
user@host> show log auto-band-stats
E-D
(LSP ID 5, Tunnel ID 6741)
209 pkt
17094 Byte
1 pps
90 Bps Util
240.01% Reserved Bw
37 Bps
decr nh 0x952c224, type 4, flags 0x0, n_gw 1, nhid 0 to refcount 1Oct 30 17:13:57 Total 1 sessions: 1
success, 0 fail, 0 ignored
E-D
(LSP ID 5, Tunnel ID 6741)
241 pkt
19737 Byte
1 pps
88 Bps Util
234.67% Reserved Bw
37 Bps
decr nh 0x952c224, type 4, flags 0x0, n_gw 1, nhid 0 to refcount 1Oct 30 17:14:27 Total 1 sessions: 1
success, 0 fail, 0 ignored
E-D
(LSP ID 5, Tunnel ID 6741)
276 pkt
22607 Byte
1 pps
95 Bps Util
253.34% Reserved Bw
37 Bps
decr nh 0x952c224, type 4, flags 0x0, n_gw 1, nhid 0 to refcount 1Oct 30 17:14:57 Total 1 sessions: 1
success, 0 fail, 0 ignored
E-D
(LSP ID 5, Tunnel ID 6741)
0 pkt
0 Byte
0 pps
0 Bps Util
0.00% Reserved Bw
37 Bps
E-D
(LSP ID 6, Tunnel ID 6741)
0 pkt
0 Byte
0 pps
0 Bps Util
0.00% Reserved Bw
101 Bps
decr nh 0x952c224, type 4, flags 0x0, n_gw 1, nhid 0 to refcount 1decr nh 0x952c308, type 4, flags 0x0,
n_gw 1, nhid 0 to refcount 1Oct 30 17:15:27 Total 2 sessions: 2 success, 0 fail, 0 ignored
E-D
(LSP ID 5, Tunnel ID 6741)
0 pkt
0 Byte
0 pps
0 Bps Util
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0.00% Reserved Bw
37 Bps
E-D
(LSP ID 6, Tunnel ID 6741)
33 pkt
2695 Byte
1 pps
89 Bps Util
87.69% Reserved Bw
101 Bps
decr nh 0x952c224, type 4, flags 0x0, n_gw 1, nhid 0 to refcount 1decr nh 0x952c308, type 4, flags 0x0,
n_gw 1, nhid 0 to refcount 1Oct 30 17:15:57 Total 2 sessions: 2 success, 0 fail, 0 ignored
E-D
(LSP ID 5, Tunnel ID 6741)
0 pkt
0 Byte
0 pps
0 Bps Util
0.00% Reserved Bw
37 Bps
E-D
(LSP ID 6, Tunnel ID 6741)
65 pkt
5338 Byte
1 pps
88 Bps Util
86.70% Reserved Bw
101 Bps
decr nh 0x952c224, type 4, flags 0x0, n_gw 1, nhid 0 to refcount 1decr nh 0x952c308, type 4, flags 0x0,
n_gw 1, nhid 0 to refcount 1Oct 30 17:16:27 Total 2 sessions: 2 success, 0 fail, 0 ignored
E-D
(LSP ID 6, Tunnel ID 6741)
97 pkt
7981 Byte
1 pps
88 Bps Util
86.70% Reserved Bw
101 Bps
decr nh 0x952c308, type 4, flags 0x0, n_gw 1, nhid 0 to refcount 1Oct 30 17:16:57 Total 1 sessions: 1
success, 0 fail, 0 ignored
7. Issue the show mpls lsp autobandwidth command to display current information
about automatic bandwidth allocation. The following shows sample output from the
show mpls lsp autobandwidth command taken at about the same time as the log file
shown previously:
user@host> show mpls lsp autobandwidth
Lspname
Last
Requested
Reserved
Highwater
AdjustTime LastAdjust
BW
BW
BW
mark
Left (sec)
E-D
300bps
812.005bps 812bps
1.56801kbps 294 sec
Wed Oct 30 17:15:26 2013
8. Issue the file show command to display the MPLS trace file. You need to specify the
file location and file name (the file is located in /var/log/. The following shows sample
trace file output is taken from an MPLS trace file named auto-band-trace.0.gz on a
router configured with an LSP named E-D. The trace file shows that LSP E-D is
operating over its reserved bandwidth limit initially. At Oct 30 17:15:26, the router
triggers an automatic bandwidth adjustment (you might see two sessions for an LSP
undergoing an automatic bandwidth adjustment). By Oct 29 17:15:57, the LSP has
been reestablished at a higher bandwidth and is now shown using less than 100
percent of its Reserved Bw (reserved bandwidth).
user@host> file show /var/log/auto-band-trace.0.gz
Oct 30 17:13:57 trace_on: Tracing to "/var/log/E/auto-band-trace" started
Oct 30 17:13:57.466825 LSP E-D (id 5) new bytes arrived
2714 in 29
sec
Oct 30 17:14:27.466713 E-D
(LSP ID 5, Tunnel ID 6741)
241
pkt
19737 Byte
1 pps
88 Bps Util 234.67% Reserved Bw
37 Bps
Oct 30 17:14:27.466962 LSP E-D (id 5, old id 5); sampled bytes
19737 >
bytes recorded
17094
Oct 30 17:14:27.467035 LSP E-D (id 5) new bytes arrived
2643 in 29
sec
Oct 30 17:14:57.466599 E-D
(LSP ID 5, Tunnel ID 6741)
276
pkt
22607 Byte
1 pps
95 Bps Util 253.34% Reserved Bw
37 Bps
Oct 30 17:14:57.466758 LSP E-D (id 5, old id 5); sampled bytes
22607 >
bytes recorded
19737
Oct 30 17:14:57.466825 LSP E-D (id 5) new bytes arrived
2870 in 29
sec
Oct 30 17:15:26.265816 Adjust Autobw: LSP E-D (id 5) curr adj bw 300bps updated
with 812.005bps
Oct 30 17:15:26.266064 mpls LSP E-D Autobw change 512.005bps >= threshold 75bps
Oct 30 17:15:26.363372 Autobw Success: LSP E-D () (old id 5 new id 6) update
prev active bw 300 bps with 812 bps
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Chapter 7: Configuration Tasks
Oct 30 17:15:26.363686 RPD_MPLS_PATH_BANDWIDTH_CHANGE: MPLS path (lsp E-D)
bandwidth changed, path bandwidth 812 bps
Oct 30 17:15:27.364751 RPD_MPLS_LSP_BANDWIDTH_CHANGE: MPLS LSP E-D bandwidth
changed, lsp bandwidth 812 bps
Oct 30 17:15:27.466849 E-D
(LSP ID 5, Tunnel ID 6741)
0
pkt
0 Byte
0 pps
0 Bps Util 0.00% Reserved Bw
37 Bps
Oct 30 17:15:27.467050 E-D
(LSP ID 6, Tunnel ID 6741)
0
pkt
0 Byte
0 pps
0 Bps Util 0.00% Reserved Bw
101 Bps
Oct 30 17:15:57.466858 E-D
(LSP ID 5, Tunnel ID 6741)
0
pkt
0 Byte
0 pps
0 Bps Util 0.00% Reserved Bw
37 Bps
Oct 30 17:15:57.467106 E-D
(LSP ID 6, Tunnel ID 6741)
33
pkt
2695 Byte
1 pps
89 Bps Util 87.69% Reserved Bw
101 Bps
Oct 30 17:15:57.467201 LSP E-D (id 6, old id 5); LSP up after autobw adjustment
and active for 30 sec
Oct 30 17:15:57.467398 LSP E-D (id 6) psb bytes
2695 < bytes recorded
22607 total bytes
2695 in 30 sec
Oct 30 17:15:57.467461 First sample of the adjust interval after automatic bw
adjustment
Oct 30 17:15:57.467594 Update curr max avg bw 0bps of LSP E-D with new bw
716.225bps
Oct 30 17:16:27.466830 E-D
(LSP ID 5, Tunnel ID 6741)
0
pkt
0 Byte
0 pps
0 Bps Util 0.00% Reserved Bw
37 Bps
Oct 30 17:16:27.467079 E-D
(LSP ID 6, Tunnel ID 6741)
65
pkt
5338 Byte
1 pps
88 Bps Util 86.70% Reserved Bw
101 Bps
Oct 30 17:16:27.467171 LSP E-D (id 6, old id 6); sampled bytes
5338 >
bytes recorded
2695
Oct 30 17:16:27.467237 LSP E-D (id 6) new bytes arrived
2643 in 29
sec
Oct 30 17:16:57.466712 E-D
(LSP ID 6, Tunnel ID 6741)
97
pkt
7981 Byte
1 pps
88 Bps Util 86.70% Reserved Bw
101 Bps
Oct 30 17:16:57.466870 LSP E-D (id 6, old id 6); sampled bytes
7981 >
bytes recorded
5338
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Automatic Bandwidth Allocation for LSPs on page 81
•
show mpls lsp autobandwidth on page 276
Configuring the LDP Timer for Hello Messages
LDP hello messages enable LDP nodes to discover one another and to detect the failure
of a neighbor or the link to the neighbor. Hello messages are sent periodically on all
interfaces where LDP is enabled.
There are two types of LDP hello messages:
•
Link hello messages—Sent through the LDP interface as UDP packets addressed to
the LDP discovery port. Receipt of an LDP link hello message on an interface identifies
an adjacency with the LDP peer router.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
•
Targeted hello messages—Sent as UDP packets addressed to the LDP discovery port
at a specific address. Targeted hello messages are used to support LDP sessions
between routers that are not directly connected. A targeted router determines whether
to respond or ignore a targeted hello message. A targeted router that chooses to
respond does so by periodically sending targeted hello messages back to the initiating
router.
By default, LDP sends hello messages every 5 seconds for link hello messages and every
15 seconds for targeted hello messages. You can configure the LDP timer to alter how
often both types of hello messages are sent. However, you cannot configure a time for
the LDP timer that is greater than the LDP hold time. For more information, see
“Configuring the Delay Before LDP Neighbors Are Considered Down” on page 92.
Configuring the LDP Timer for Link Hello Messages
To modify how often LDP sends link hello messages, specify a new link hello message
interval for the LDP timer using the hello-interval statement:
hello-interval seconds;
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
Configuring the LDP Timer for Targeted Hello Messages
To modify how often LDP sends targeted hello messages, specify a new targeted hello
message interval for the LDP timer by configuring the hello-interval statement as an
option for the targeted-hello statement:
targeted-hello {
hello-interval seconds;
}
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include these statements, see the statement
summary sections for these statements.
Configuring the Delay Before LDP Neighbors Are Considered Down
The hold time determines how long an LDP node should wait for a hello message before
declaring a neighbor to be down. This value is sent as part of a hello message so that
each LDP node tells its neighbors how long to wait. The values sent by each neighbor do
not have to match.
The hold time should normally be at least three times the hello interval. The default is
15 seconds for link hello messages and 45 seconds for targeted hello messages. However,
it is possible to configure an LDP hold time that is close to the value for the hello interval.
NOTE: By configuring an LDP hold time close to the hello interval (less than
three times the hello interval), LDP neighbor failures might be detected more
quickly. However, this also increases the possibility that the router might
declare an LDP neighbor down that is still functioning normally. For more
information, see “Configuring the LDP Timer for Hello Messages” on page 91.
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The LDP hold time is also negotiated automatically between LDP peers. When two LDP
peers advertise different LDP hold times to one another, the smaller value is used. If an
LDP peer router advertises a shorter hold time than the value you have configured, the
peer router’s advertised hold time is used. This negotiation can affect the LDP keepalive
interval as well.
If the local LDP hold time is not shortened during LDP peer negotiation, the user-configured
keepalive interval is left unchanged. However, if the local hold time is reduced during
peer negotiation, the keepalive interval is recalculated. If the LDP hold time has been
reduced during peer negotiation, the keepalive interval is reduced to one-third of the new
hold time value. For example, if the new hold-time value is 45 seconds, the keepalive
interval is set to 15 seconds.
This automated keepalive interval calculation can cause different keepalive intervals to
be configured on each peer router. This enables the routers to be flexible in how often
they send keepalive messages, because the LDP peer negotiation ensures they are sent
more frequently than the LDP hold time.
When you reconfigure the hold-time interval, changes do not take effect until after the
session is reset. The hold time is negotiated when the LDP peering session is initiated
and cannot be renegotiated as long as the session is up (required by RFC 5036, LDP
Specification). To manually force the LDP session to reset, issue the clear ldp session
command.
Configuring the LDP Hold Time for Link Hello Messages
To modify how long an LDP node should wait for a link hello message before declaring
the neighbor down, specify a new time in seconds using the hold-time statement:
hold-time seconds;
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
Configuring the LDP Hold Time for Targeted Hello Messages
To modify how long an LDP node should wait for a targeted hello message before
declaring the neighbor down, specify a new time in seconds using the hold-time statement
as an option for the targeted-hello statement:
targeted-hello {
hold-time seconds;
}
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include these statements, see the statement
summary sections for these statements.
Configuring the Interval for LDP Keepalive Messages
The keepalive interval determines how often a message is sent over the session to ensure
that the keepalive timeout is not exceeded. If no other LDP traffic is sent over the session
in this much time, a keepalive message is sent. The default is 10 seconds. The minimum
value is 1 second.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
The value configured for the keepalive interval can be altered during LDP session
negotiation if the value configured for the LDP hold time on the peer router is lower than
the value configured locally. For more information, see “Configuring the Delay Before
LDP Neighbors Are Considered Down” on page 92.
To modify the keepalive interval, include the keepalive-interval statement:
keepalive-interval seconds;
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
Configuring the LDP Keepalive Timeout
After an LDP session is established, messages must be exchanged periodically to ensure
that the session is still working. The keepalive timeout defines the amount of time that
the neighbor LDP node waits before deciding that the session has failed. This value is
usually set to at least three times the keepalive interval. The default is 30 seconds.
To modify the keepalive interval, include the keepalive-timeout statement:
keepalive-timeout seconds;
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
The value configured for the keepalive-timeout statement is displayed as the hold time
when you issue the show ldp session detail command.
Configuring LDP Route Preferences
When several protocols calculate routes to the same destination, route preferences are
used to select which route is installed in the forwarding table. The route with the lowest
preference value is selected. The preference value can be a number in the range 0 through
255. By default, LDP routes have a preference value of 9.
To modify the route preferences, include the preference statement:
preference preference;
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
Configuring LDP Graceful Restart
When you alter the graceful restart configuration at either the [edit routing-options
graceful-restart] or [edit protocols ldp graceful-restart] hierarchy levels, any running LDP
session is automatically restarted to apply the graceful restart configuration. This behavior
mirrors the behavior of BGP when you alter its graceful restart configuration.
By default, graceful restart helper mode is enabled, but graceful restart is disabled. Thus,
the default behavior of a router is to assist neighboring routers attempting a graceful
restart, but not to attempt a graceful restart itself.
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To configure LDP graceful restart, see the following sections:
•
Enabling Graceful Restart on page 95
•
Disabling LDP Graceful Restart or Helper Mode on page 95
•
Configuring Reconnect Time on page 96
•
Configuring Recovery Time and Maximum Recovery Time on page 96
Enabling Graceful Restart
To enable LDP graceful restart, you also need to enable graceful restart on the router.
To enable graceful restart, include the graceful-restart statement:
graceful-restart;
You can include this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit routing-options]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-options]
The graceful-restart statement enables graceful restart for all protocols supporting this
feature on the router. For more information about graceful restart, see the Junos OS
Routing Protocols Library for Routing Devices.
By default, LDP graceful restart is enabled when you enable graceful restart at both the
LDP protocol level and on all the routing instances. However, you can disable both LDP
graceful restart and LDP graceful restart helper mode.
Disabling LDP Graceful Restart or Helper Mode
To disable LDP graceful restart and recovery, include the disable statement:
ldp {
graceful-restart {
disable;
}
}
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
You can disable helper mode at the LDP protocols level only. You cannot disable helper
mode for a specific routing instance. To disable LDP helper mode, include the
helper-disable statement:
ldp {
graceful-restart {
helper-disable;
}
}
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
The following LDP graceful restart configurations are possible:
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•
LDP graceful restart and helper mode are both enabled.
•
LDP graceful restart is disabled but helper mode is enabled. A router configured in this
way cannot restart gracefully but can help a restarting neighbor.
•
LDP graceful restart and helper mode are both disabled. The router does not use LDP
graceful restart or the graceful restart type, length, and value (TLV) sent in the
initialization message. The router behaves as a router that cannot support LDP graceful
restart.
A configuration error is issued if you attempt to enable graceful restart and disable helper
mode.
Configuring Reconnect Time
After the LDP connection between neighbors fails, neighbors wait a certain amount of
time for the gracefully restarting router to resume sending LDP messages. After the wait
period, the LDP session can be reestablished. You can configure the wait period in seconds.
This value is included in the fault tolerant session TLV sent in LDP initialization messages
when LDP graceful restart is enabled.
Suppose that Router A and Router B are LDP neighbors. Router A is the restarting Router.
The reconnect time is the time that Router A tells Router B to wait after Router B detects
that Router A restarted.
To configure the reconnect time, include the reconnect-time statement:
graceful-restart {
reconnect-time seconds;
}
You can set the reconnect time to a value in the range from 30 through 300 seconds. By
default, it is 60 seconds.
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can configure these statements, see the
statement summary sections for these statements.
Configuring Recovery Time and Maximum Recovery Time
The recovery time is the amount of time a router waits for LDP to restart gracefully. The
recovery time period begins when an initialization message is sent or received. This period
is also typically the amount of time that a neighboring router maintains its information
about the restarting router, allowing it to continue to forward traffic.
To prevent a neighboring router from being adversely affected if it receives a false value
for the recovery time from the restarting router, you can configure the maximum recovery
time on the neighboring router. A neighboring router maintains its state for the shorter
of the two times. For example, Router A is performing an LDP graceful restart. It has sent
a recovery time of 900 seconds to neighboring Router B. However, Router B has its
maximum recovery time configured at 400 seconds. Router B will only wait for
400 seconds before it purges its LDP information from Router A.
To configure recovery time, include the recovery-time statement and the
maximum-neighbor-recovery-time statement:
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Chapter 7: Configuration Tasks
graceful-restart {
maximum-neighbor-recovery-time seconds;
recovery-time seconds;
}
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can configure these statements, see the
statement summary sections for these statements.
Configuring the Prefixes Advertised into LDP from the Routing Table
You can control the set of prefixes that are advertised into LDP and cause the router to
be the egress router for those prefixes. By default, only the loopback address is advertised
into LDP. To configure the set of prefixes from the routing table to be advertised into
LDP, include the egress-policy statement:
egress-policy policy-name;
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
NOTE: If you configure an egress policy for LDP that does not include the
loopback address, it is no longer advertised in LDP. To continue to advertise
the loopback address, you need to explicitly configure it as a part of the LDP
egress policy.
The named policy (configured at the [edit policy-options] or [edit logical-systems
logical-system-name policy-options] hierarchy level) is applied to all routes in the routing
table. Those routes that match the policy are advertised into LDP. You can control the
set of neighbors to which those prefixes are advertised by using the export statement.
Only from operators are considered; you can use any valid from operator. For more
information, see the Junos OS Routing Protocols Library for Routing Devices.
Example: Configuring the Prefixes Advertised into LDP
Advertise all connected routes into LDP:
[edit protocols]
ldp {
egress-policy connected-only;
}
policy-options {
policy-statement connected-only {
from {
protocol direct;
}
then accept;
}
}
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Configuring LDP LSP Traceroute
You can trace the route followed by an LDP-signaled LSP. LDP LSP traceroute is based
on RFC 4379, Detecting Multi-Protocol Label Switched (MPLS) Data Plane Failures. This
feature allows you to periodically trace all paths in a FEC. The FEC topology information
is stored in a database accessible from the CLI.
A topology change does not automatically trigger a trace of an LDP LSP. However, you
can manually initiate a traceroute. If the traceroute request is for an FEC that is currently
in the database, the contents of the database are updated with the results.
The periodic traceroute feature applies to all FECs specified by the oam statement
configured at the [edit protocols ldp] hierarchy level. To configure periodic LDP LSP
traceroute, include the periodic-traceroute statement:
periodic-traceroute {
disable;
exp exp-value;
fanout fanout-value;
frequency minutes;
paths number-of-paths;
retries retry-attempts;
source address;
ttl ttl-value;
wait seconds;
}
You can configure this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit protocols ldp oam]
•
[edit protocols ldp oam fec address]
You can configure the periodic-traceroute statement by itself or with any of the following
options:
•
exp—Specify the class of service to use when sending probes.
•
fanout—Specify the maximum number of next hops to search per node.
•
frequency—Specify the interval between traceroute attempts.
•
paths—Specify the maximum number of paths to search.
•
retries—Specify the number of attempts to send a probe to a specific node before
giving up.
•
source—Specify the IPv4 source address to use when sending probes.
•
ttl—Specify the maximum time-to-live value. Nodes that are beyond this value are not
traced.
•
98
wait—Specify the wait interval before resending a probe packet.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Configuration Tasks
Configuring Miscellaneous LDP Properties
The following sections describe how to configure a number of miscellaneous LDP
properties:
•
Configuring LDP to Use the IGP Route Metric on page 99
•
Preventing Addition of Ingress Routes to the inet.0 Routing Table on page 99
•
Multiple-Instance LDP and Carrier-of-Carriers VPNs on page 100
•
Configuring MPLS and LDP to Pop the Label on the Ultimate-Hop Router on page 100
•
Enabling LDP over RSVP-Established LSPs on page 100
•
Enabling LDP over RSVP-Established LSPs in Heterogeneous Networks on page 101
•
Configuring the TCP MD5 Signature for LDP Sessions on page 101
•
Configuring LDP Session Protection on page 102
•
Disabling SNMP Traps for LDP on page 103
•
Configuring LDP Synchronization with the IGP on LDP Links on page 103
•
Configuring LDP Synchronization with the IGP on the Router on page 104
•
Configuring the Label Withdrawal Timer on page 104
•
Ignoring the LDP Subnet Check on page 104
Configuring LDP to Use the IGP Route Metric
Use the track-igp-metric statement if you want the interior gateway protocol (IGP) route
metric to be used for the LDP routes instead of the default LDP route metric (the default
LDP route metric is 1).
To use the IGP route metric, include the track-igp-metric statement:
track-igp-metric;
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
Preventing Addition of Ingress Routes to the inet.0 Routing Table
By configuring the no-forwarding statement, you can prevent ingress routes from being
added to the inet.0 routing table instead of the inet.3 routing table even if you enabled
the traffic-engineering bgp-igp statement at the [edit protocols mpls] or the [edit
logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls] hierarchy level. By default, the
no-forwarding statement is disabled.
To omit ingress routes from the inet.0 routing table, include the no-forwarding statement:
no-forwarding;
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
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Multiple-Instance LDP and Carrier-of-Carriers VPNs
By configuring multiple LDP routing instances, you can use LDP to advertise labels in a
carrier-of-carriers VPN from a service provider provider edge (PE) router to a customer
carrier customer edge (CE) router. This is especially useful when the carrier customer is
a basic Internet service provider (ISP) and wants to restrict full Internet routes to its PE
routers. By using LDP instead of BGP, the carrier customer shields its other internal routers
from the Internet. Multiple-instance LDP is also useful when a carrier customer wants to
provide Layer 2 or Layer 3 VPN services to its customers.
For an example of how to configure multiple LDP routing instances for carrier-of-carriers
VPNs, see the Multiple Instances for Label Distribution Protocol Feature Guide.
Configuring MPLS and LDP to Pop the Label on the Ultimate-Hop Router
The default advertised label is label 3 (Implicit Null label). If label 3 is advertised, the
penultimate-hop router removes the label and sends the packet to the egress router. If
ultimate-hop popping is enabled, label 0 (IPv4 Explicit Null label) is advertised.
Ultimate-hop popping ensures that any packets traversing an MPLS network include a
label.
To configure ultimate-hop popping, include the explicit-null statement:
explicit-null;
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
NOTE: Juniper Networks routers queue packets based on the incoming label.
Routers from other vendors might queue packets differently. Keep this in
mind when working with networks containing routers from multiple vendors.
For more information about labels, see Label Description and Label Allocation.
Enabling LDP over RSVP-Established LSPs
You can run LDP over LSPs established by RSVP, effectively tunneling the LDP-established
LSP through the one established by RSVP. To do so, enable LDP on the lo0.0 interface
(see “Enabling and Disabling LDP” on page 31). You must also configure the LSPs over
which you want LDP to operate by including the ldp-tunneling statement at the [edit
protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name] hierarchy level:
[edit]
protocols {
mpls {
label-switched-path lsp-name {
from source;
to destination;
ldp-tunneling;
}
}
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}
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
Related
Documentation
•
Tunneling LDP LSPs in RSVP LSPs Overview on page 21
Enabling LDP over RSVP-Established LSPs in Heterogeneous Networks
Some other vendors use an OSPF metric of 1 for the loopback address. Juniper Networks
routers use an OSPF metric of 0 for the loopback address. This might require that you
manually configure the RSVP metric when deploying LDP tunneling over RSVP LSPs in
heterogeneous networks.
When a Juniper Networks router is linked to another vendor’s router through an RSVP
tunnel, and LDP tunneling is also enabled, by default the Juniper Networks router might
not use the RSVP tunnel to route traffic to the LDP destinations downstream of the other
vendor’s egress router if the RSVP path has a metric of 1 larger than the physical OSPF
path.
To ensure that LDP tunneling functions properly in heterogeneous networks, you can
configure OSPF to ignore the RSVP LSP metric by including the ignore-lsp-metrics
statement:
ignore-lsp-metrics;
You can configure this statement at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit protocols ospf traffic-engineering shortcuts]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ospf traffic-engineering shortcuts]
To enable LDP over RSVP LSPs, you also still need to complete the procedure in Section
“Enabling LDP over RSVP-Established LSPs” on page 100.
Configuring the TCP MD5 Signature for LDP Sessions
You can configure an MD5 signature for an LDP TCP connection to protect against the
introduction of spoofed TCP segments into LDP session connection streams.
A router using the MD5 signature option is configured with a password for each peer for
which authentication is required. The password is stored encrypted.
LDP hello adjacencies can still be created even when peering interfaces are configured
with different security signatures. However, the TCP session cannot be authenticated
and is never established.
To configure an MD5 signature for an LDP TCP connection, include the session and
authentication-key statement:
session address {
authentication-key md5-authentication-key;
}
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For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include these statements, see the statement
summary section for the session statement.
Use the session statement to configure the address for the remote end of the LDP session.
The md5-authentication-key (password) can be up to 69 characters long. Characters can
include any ASCII strings. If you include spaces, enclose all characters in quotation marks.
You can also configure an authentication key update mechanism for the LDP routing
protocol. This mechanism allows you to update authentication keys without interrupting
associated routing and signaling protocols such as Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) and
Resource Reservation Setup Protocol (RSVP).
To configure the authentication key update mechanism, include the key-chain statement
at the [edit security authentication-key-chains] hierarchy level, and specify the key option
to create a keychain consisting of several authentication keys.
[edit security authentication-key-chains]
key-chain key-chain-name {
key key {
secret secret-data;
start-time yyyy-mm-dd.hh:mm:ss;
}
}
To configure the authentication key update mechanism for the LDP routing protocol,
include the authentication-key-chain statement at the [edit protocols ldp] hierarchy level
to associate the protocol with the [edit security authentication-key-chains] authentication
keys.
[edit protocols ldp]
group group-name {
neighbor address {
authentication-key-chain key-chain-name;
}
}
For more information about the authentication key update feature, see Configuring the
Authentication Key Update Mechanism for BGP and LDP Routing Protocols.
Configuring LDP Session Protection
An LDP session is normally created between a pair of routers that are connected by one
or more links. The routers form one hello adjacency for every link that connects them
and associate all the adjacencies with the corresponding LDP session. When the last
hello adjacency for an LDP session goes away, the LDP session is terminated. You might
want to modify this behavior to prevent an LDP session from being unnecessarily
terminated and reestablished.
You can configure the Junos OS to leave the LDP session between two routers up even
if there are no hello adjacencies on the links connecting the two routers by configuring
the session-protection statement. You can optionally specify a time in seconds using the
timeout option. The session remains up for the duration specified as long as the routers
maintain IP network connectivity.
session-protection {
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timeout seconds;
}
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section.
Disabling SNMP Traps for LDP
Whenever an LDP LSP makes a transition from up to down, or down to up, the router
sends an SNMP trap. However, it is possible to disable the LDP SNMP traps on a router,
logical system, or routing instance.
For information about the LDP SNMP traps and the proprietary LDP MIB, see the SNMP
MIBs and Traps Reference and Interpreting the Enterprise-Specific LDP MIB.
To disable SNMP traps for LDP, specify the trap disable option for the log-updown
statement:
log-updown {
trap disable;
}
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can include this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
Configuring LDP Synchronization with the IGP on LDP Links
LDP is a protocol for distributing labels in non-traffic-engineered applications. Labels
are distributed along the best path determined by the IGP. If synchronization between
LDP and the IGP is not maintained, the LSP goes down. When LDP is not fully operational
on a given link (a session is not established and labels are not exchanged), the IGP
advertises the link with the maximum cost metric. The link is not preferred but remains
in the network topology.
LDP synchronization is supported only on active point-to-point interfaces and LAN
interfaces configured as point-to-point under the IGP. LDP synchronization is not
supported during graceful restart.
To advertise the maximum cost metric until LDP is operational for synchronization, include
the ldp-synchronization statement:
ldp-synchronization {
disable;
hold-time seconds;
}
To disable synchronization, include the disable statement. To configure the time period
to advertise the maximum cost metric for a link that is not fully operational, include the
hold-time statement.
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can configure this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
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Configuring LDP Synchronization with the IGP on the Router
You can configure the time the LDP waits before informing the IGP that the LDP neighbor
and session for an interface are operational. For large networks with numerous FECs, you
might need to configure a longer value to allow enough time for the LDP label databases
to be exchanged.
To configure the time the LDP waits before informing the IGP that the LDP neighbor and
session are operational, include the igp-synchronization statement and specify a time in
seconds for the holddown-interval option:
igp-synchronization holddown-interval seconds;
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can configure this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
Configuring the Label Withdrawal Timer
The label withdrawal timer delays sending a label withdrawal message for a FEC to a
neighbor. When an IGP link to a neighbor fails, the label associated with the FEC has to
be withdrawn from all the upstream routers if the neighbor is the next hop for the FEC.
After the IGP converges and a label is received from a new next hop, the label is
readvertised to all the upstream routers. This is the typical network behavior. By delaying
label withdrawal by a small amount of time (for example, until the IGP converges and
the router receives a new label for the FEC from the downstream next hop), the label
withdrawal and sending a label mapping soon could be avoided. The
label-withdrawal-delay statement allows you to configure this delay time. By default,
the delay is 60 seconds.
If the router receives the new label before the timer runs out, the label withdrawal timer
is canceled. However, if the timer runs out, the label for the FEC is withdrawn from all of
the upstream routers.
By default, LDP waits for 60 seconds before withdrawing labels to avoid resignaling LSPs
multiple times while the IGP is reconverging. To configure the label withdrawal delay
time in seconds, include the label-withdrawal-delay statement:
label-withdrawal-delay seconds;
For a list of hierarchy levels at which you can configure this statement, see the statement
summary section for this statement.
Ignoring the LDP Subnet Check
In Junos OS Release 8.4 and later releases, an LDP source address subnet check is
performed during the neighbor establishment procedure. The source address in the LDP
link hello packet is matched against the interface address. This causes an interoperability
issue with some other vendors’ equipment.
To disable the subnet check, include the allow-subnet-mismatch statement:
allow-subnet-mismatch;
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This statement can be included at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit protocols ldp interface interface-name]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp interface interface-name]
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Configuration Statements
•
[edit protocols mpls] Hierarchy Level on page 107
•
[edit protocols rsvp] Hierarchy Level on page 112
•
auto-bandwidth (MPLS Statistics) on page 113
•
auto-bandwidth on page 114
•
adjust-interval on page 115
•
adjust-threshold on page 115
•
adjust-threshold-overflow-limit on page 116
•
adjust-threshold-underflow-limit on page 116
•
exp on page 117
•
maximum-bandwidth (Protocols MPLS) on page 118
•
minimum-bandwidth on page 118
•
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-interval on page 119
•
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-threshold-change on page 119
•
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-threshold-value on page 120
•
monitor-bandwidth on page 120
•
system-defaults on page 121
[edit protocols mpls] Hierarchy Level
This topic lists the supported configuration statements at the [edit protocols mpls]
hierarchy level on the QFX Series. For more information about these statements, see the
Junos OS MPLS Applications Library for Routing Devices.
NOTE: The command-line interface (CLI) on QFX Series devices displays
even the MPLS related configuration statements that are not supported.
However, configuring the unsupported statements on a device will have no
effect on the operation of the device.
protocols {
mpls {
admin-down;
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advertisement-hold-time seconds;
class-of-service cos-value;
diffserv-te{
bandwidth-model {
extended-mam;
mam;
rdm;
}
te-class-matrix {
tenumber {
priority priority;
traffic-class {
ctnumber priority priority;
}
}
}
}
disable;
exclude-srlg;
explicit-null;
hop-limit number;
interface (interface-name | all) {
disable;
}
ipv6-tunneling;
label-switched-path lsp-name {
adaptive;
admin-down;
associate-backup-pe-groups;
associate-lsp lsp-name {
from from-ip-address;
}
auto-bandwidth {
adjust-interval seconds;
adjust-threshold percentage;
maximum-bandwidth bps;
minimum-bandwidth bps;
monitor-bandwidth;
}
backup;
bandwidth bps {
ct0 bps;
ct1 bps;
ct2 bps;
ct3 bps;
}
class-of-service cos-value;
corouted-bidirectional;
corouted-bidirectional-passive;
description text;
disable;
exclude-srlg;
from address;
hop-limit number;
install {
destination-prefix/prefix-length <active>;
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}
inter-domain;
ldp-tunneling;
lsp-attributes {
encoding-type (ethernet | packet | pdh | sonet-sdh);
gpid (ethernet | hdlc | ipv4 | pos-scrambling-crc-16 | pos-no-scrambling-crc-16 |
pos-scrambling-crc-32 | pos-no-scrambling-crc-32 | ppp);
signal-bandwidth type;
switching-type (fiber | lambda | psc-1 | tdm);
}
metric metric;
no-cspf;
no-decrement-ttl;
no-install-to-address;
no-record;
oam{
lsp-ping-interval seconds;
mpls-tp-mode seconds;
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size maximum-file-size> <world-readable |
no-world-readable>;
flag flag;
no-remote-trace;
}
}
optimize-hold-dead-delay seconds;
optimize-timer seconds;
p2mp lsp-name;
policing {
filter filter-name;
no-auto-policing;
}
preference preference;
primary path-name {
adaptive;
class-of-service cos-value;
hop-limit number;
no-cspf;
no-decrement-ttl;
optimize-timer seconds;
preference preference;
(record | no-record);
select (manual | unconditional);
standby;
}
(record | no-record);
retry-limit number;
retry-timer seconds;
revert-timer seconds;
secondary path-name {
adaptive;
bandwidth bps {
ct0 bps;
ct1 bps;
ct2 bps;
ct3 bps;
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}
class-of-service cos-value;
hop-limit number;
no-cspf;
no-decrement-ttl;
optimize-timer seconds;
preference preference;
(record | no-record);
select (manual | unconditional);
standby;
}
standby;
jtemplate;
to address;
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
}
log-updown {
no-trap {
mpls-lsp-traps;
rfc3812-traps;
}
(syslog | no-syslog);
trap;
trap-path-down;
trap-path-up;
}
mib-mpls-show-p2mp;
no-cspf;
no-decrement-ttl;
no-propagate-ttl;
no-record;
oam{
lsp-ping-interval seconds;
mpls-tp-mode seconds;
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size maximum-file-size> <world-readable |
no-world-readable>;
flag flag;
no-remote-trace;
}
}
optimize-aggressive;
optimize-hold-dead-delay;
optimize-switchover-delay;
optimize-timer;
path path-name {
(address | hostname) <loose | strict>;
}
path-mtu {
rsvp {
mtu-signaling;
}
}
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preference;
record;
revert-timer;
rsvp-error-hold-time;
smart-optimize-timer;
standby;
static-label-switched-path lsp-name {
bypass bypass-name {
description string;
next-hop (address | interface-name | address/interface-name);
push out-label;
to address;
}
ingress {
class-of-service cos-value;
description string;
install {
destination-prefix <active>;
}
metric metric;
next-hop (address | interface-name | address/interface-name);
no-install-to-address;
policing {
filter filter-name;
no-auto-policing;
}
preference preference;
push out-label;
to address;
}
transit incoming-label {
description string;
next-hop (address | interface-name | address/interface-name);
pop;
swap out-label;
}
statistics {
auto-bandwidth;
file filename <files number> <size maximum-file-size> <world-readable |
no-world-readable>;
interval seconds;
}
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size maximum-file-size> <world-readable |
no-world-readable>;
flag flag;
}
traffic-engineering;
transit-lsp-association transit-association-lsp-group-name {
from-1 address-of-associated-lsp-1;
from-2 address-of-associated-lsp-2;
lsp-name-1 name-of-associated-lsp-1;
lsp-name-2 name-of-associated-lsp-2;
}
}
}
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Related
Documentation
•
Junos OS MPLS Applications Library for Routing Devices
[edit protocols rsvp] Hierarchy Level
This topic lists the supported configuration statements at the [edit protocols rsvp]
hierarchy level on the QFX Series. For more information about these statements, see the
Junos OS MPLS Applications Library for Routing Devices.
protocols {
rsvp {
disable;
graceful-deletion-timeout seconds;
graceful-restart {
disable;
helper-disable;
maximum-helper-recovery-time seconds;
maximum-helper-restart-time seconds;
}
hello-acknowledgements;
interface interface-name {
(aggregate | no-aggregate);
authentication-key key;
bandwidth bps;
disable;
hello-interval seconds;
(reliable | no-reliable);
subscription {
percentage;
ct0 percentage;
ct1 percentage;
ct2 percentage;
ct3 percentage;
}
update-threshold percentage;
}
keep-multiplier number;
load-balance bandwidth;
no-interface-hello;
no-node-id-subobject;
no-p2mp-sublsp;
node-hello
preemption {
(aggressive | disabled | normal);
soft-preemption cleanup-timer seconds;
}
refresh-time seconds;
setup-protection;
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size maximum-file-size> <world-readable |
no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
tunnel-services {
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devices device-names;
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Junos OS MPLS Applications Library for Routing Devices
auto-bandwidth (MPLS Statistics)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
auto-bandwidth;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls statistics],
[edit protocols mpls statistics]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Collect statistics related to automatic bandwidth.
routing and trace—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control and trace-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Automatic Bandwidth Allocation for LSPs on page 81
•
Configuring MPLS to Gather Statistics on page 80
•
statistics
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auto-bandwidth
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
114
auto-bandwidth {
adjust-interval seconds;
adjust-threshold percent;
adjust-threshold-overflow-limit number;
adjust-threshold-underflow-limit number;
maximum-bandwidth bps;
minimum-bandwidth bps;
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-interval
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-threshold-change
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-threshold-value
monitor-bandwidth;
}
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Allow an MPLS tunnel to automatically adjust its bandwidth allocation based on the
volume of traffic flowing through the tunnel.
The statements are explained separately.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Automatic Bandwidth Allocation for LSPs on page 81
•
request mpls lsp adjust-autobandwidth on page 200
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Chapter 8: Configuration Statements
adjust-interval
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
adjust-interval seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth],
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Specify the bandwidth reallocation interval.
seconds—Bandwidth reallocation interval, in seconds.
Range: 300 through 315,360,000 seconds
Default: 86,400 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Automatic Bandwidth Allocation Interval on page 83
adjust-threshold
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
adjust-threshold percent;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth],
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Specify how sensitive the automatic bandwidth adjustment for a label-switched path
(LSP) is to changes in bandwidth utilization.
percent—Bandwidth demand for the current bandwidth adjustment interval is determined
and compared to the LSP’s current bandwidth allocation. If the percentage difference
in bandwidth is greater than or equal to the percentage specified by this statement,
the LSP’s bandwidth is adjusted to the current bandwidth demand.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Automatic Bandwidth Adjustment Threshold on page 84
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adjust-threshold-overflow-limit
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
adjust-threshold-overflow-limit number;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth],
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Specify the number of consecutive bandwidth overflow samples before triggering a
bandwidth adjustment.
number—Number of consecutive bandwidth overflow samples.
Range: 1 through 65,535
Default: This feature is disabled by default.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring a Limit on Bandwidth Overflow and Underflow Samples on page 84
adjust-threshold-underflow-limit
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
adjust-threshold-underflow-limit number;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth],
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Specify the number of consecutive bandwidth underflow samples before triggering a
bandwidth adjustment.
number—Number of consecutive bandwidth underflow samples.
Range: 1 through 65,535
Default: This feature is disabled by default.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
116
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring a Limit on Bandwidth Overflow and Underflow Samples on page 84
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Chapter 8: Configuration Statements
exp
Syntax
Rewrite Rule
Configuration
Global Classifier
Association with
Interfaces
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
exp classifier-name {
import (classifier-name | default);
forwarding-class class-name {
loss-priority level {
code-points [ aliases ] [ bit-patterns ];
}
}
}
exp rewrite-name {
import (rewrite-name | default);
forwarding-class class-name {
loss-priority level {
code-point [ aliases ] [ bit-patterns ];
}
}
}
exp classifier-name;
[edit class-of-service classifiers],
[edit class-of-service rewrite-rules]
[edit class-of-service system-defaults classifiers]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Define the EXP code point mapping that is applied to MPLS packets. EXP classifiers are
not applied to any traffic except MPLS traffic. EXP classifiers are applied only to interfaces
that are configured as family mpls (for example, set interfaces xe-0/0/35 unit 0 family
mpls.)
You can configure as many EXP classifiers as you want. However, the switch uses only
one EXP classifier as a global MPLS classifier on all interfaces. You specify the global
EXP classifier in the [edit class-of-service system-defaults] hierarchy.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
classifier-name—Name of the EXP classifier.
interfaces—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring a Global MPLS EXP Classifier on page 78
•
Configuring Rewrite Rules for MPLS EXP Classifiers on page 79
•
Understanding CoS MPLS EXP Classifiers and Rewrite Rules on page 11
•
Understanding Applying CoS Classifiers and Rewrite Rules to Interfaces
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maximum-bandwidth (Protocols MPLS)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
maximum-bandwidth bps;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth],
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Specify the maximum amount of bandwidth in bits per second (bps).
bps—Maximum amount of bandwidth.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Maximum and Minimum Bounds of the LSP’s Bandwidth on page 83
minimum-bandwidth
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
118
minimum-bandwidth bps;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth],
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Set the minimum bandwidth in bps for an LSP with automatic bandwidth allocation
enabled.
bps—Miniminum bandwidth for the LSP.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Maximum and Minimum Bounds of the LSP’s Bandwidth on page 83
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 8: Configuration Statements
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-interval
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-interval seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth],
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
Release Information
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Description
Specify the duration (in seconds) for which minimum bandwidth is frozen.
Options
seconds—Minimum bandwidth reallocation interval, in seconds.
Range: 300 through 31,536,000 seconds.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Maximum and Minimum Bounds of the LSP’s Bandwidth on page 83
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-threshold-change
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-threshold-change percentage;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth],
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Specify the percentage change in maximum average bandwidth to freeze the minimum
bandwidth.
percentage—Percentage change in maximum average bandwidth.
Range: Range: 0 through 100 percent.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Maximum and Minimum Bounds of the LSP’s Bandwidth on page 83
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minimum-bandwidth-adjust-threshold-value
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
minimum-bandwidth-adjust-threshold-value bps;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth],
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Specify the value in bits per second (bps) to freeze the minimum bandwidth if the
maximum average bandwidth falls below this value.
bps—Threshold value for minimum bandwidth if the maximum average bandwidth falls
below the specified value.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Maximum and Minimum Bounds of the LSP’s Bandwidth on page 83
monitor-bandwidth
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
120
monitor-bandwidth;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name
auto-bandwidth],
[edit protocols mpls label-switched-path lsp-name auto-bandwidth]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Do not automatically adjust bandwidth allocation. However, the maximum average
bandwidth utilization is monitored on the LSP, and the information is recorded in the
MPLS statistics file.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Passive Bandwidth Utilization Monitoring on page 86
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 8: Configuration Statements
system-defaults
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
system-defaults {
classifiers exp classifier-name;
}
[edit class-of-service]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Configure the global EXP classifier used on all interfaces to classify MPLS traffic.
Although you can configure as many EXP classifiers as you want, the switch uses only
one EXP classifier as a global MPLS classifier on all interfaces. All switch interfaces use
the EXP classifier specified as the system default to classify MPLS traffic.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
The statements are explained separately.
interfaces—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring a Global MPLS EXP Classifier on page 78
•
Configuring Rewrite Rules for MPLS EXP Classifiers on page 79
•
Understanding CoS MPLS EXP Classifiers and Rewrite Rules on page 11
•
Understanding Applying CoS Classifiers and Rewrite Rules to Interfaces
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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122
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 9
LDP Configuration Statements for
QFX5100
•
allow-subnet-mismatch on page 124
•
authentication-algorithm on page 125
•
authentication-key (Protocols LDP) on page 126
•
authentication-key-chain (Protocols LDP) on page 127
•
deaggregate on page 128
•
disable (Protocols LDP) on page 129
•
dod-request-policy on page 130
•
downstream-on-demand on page 130
•
egress-policy on page 131
•
explicit-null (Protocols LDP) on page 131
•
export (Protocols LDP) on page 132
•
fec on page 133
•
graceful-restart (Protocols LDP) on page 134
•
hello-interval (Protocols LDP) on page 135
•
helper-disable (LDP) on page 136
•
hold-time (Protocols LDP) on page 137
•
ignore-lsp-metrics on page 138
•
igp-synchronization on page 138
•
import (Protocols LDP) on page 139
•
interface (Protocols LDP) on page 140
•
keepalive-interval on page 141
•
keepalive-timeout on page 142
•
l2-smart-policy on page 142
•
label-withdrawal-delay on page 143
•
ldp on page 144
•
ldp-synchronization on page 147
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•
log-updown (Protocols LDP) on page 148
•
maximum-neighbor-recovery-time on page 149
•
no-forwarding on page 150
•
policing (Protocols LDP) on page 151
•
preference (Protocols LDP) on page 152
•
reconnect-time on page 153
•
recovery-time on page 153
•
session (ldp) on page 154
•
session-protection on page 155
•
strict-targeted-hellos on page 155
•
targeted-hello on page 156
•
traceoptions (Protocols LDP) on page 157
•
track-igp-metric on page 159
•
traffic-statistics (Protocols LDP) on page 160
•
transport-address on page 161
allow-subnet-mismatch
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp interface interface-name],
[edit protocols ldp interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.3.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Description
Ignore the LDP subnet check. For Junos OS Release 8.4 and later releases, an LDP source
address subnet check was added for the neighbor establishment procedure. The source
address in the LDP link hello packet is matched against the interface address.
Default
The source address in the LDP link hello packet is matched against the interface address.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
124
allow-subnet-mismatch;
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Ignoring the LDP Subnet Check on page 104
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
authentication-algorithm
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
authentication-algorithm algorithm;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols bgp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols bgp group group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols bgp group group-name neighbor address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp session session-address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
bgp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
bgp group group-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
bgp group group-name neighbor address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp session session-address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-options bmp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-options bmp station station-name],
[edit protocols bgp],
[edit protocols bgp group group-name],
[edit protocols bgp group group-name neighbor address],
[edit protocols ldp session session-address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols bgp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols bgp group group-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols bgp group group-name
neighbor address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp session session-address],
[edit routing-options bmp],
[edit routing-options bmp station station-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.6.
Statement introduced for BGP in Junos OS Release 8.0.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced for BMP in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Statement introduced for BMP in Junos OS Release 13.3.
Configure an authentication algorithm type.
algorithm—Specify one of the following types of authentication algorithms:
•
aes-128-cmac-96—Cipher-based message authentication code (AES128, 96 bits).
•
hmac-sha-1-96—Hash-based message authentication code (SHA1, 96 bits).
•
md5—Message digest 5.
Default: hmac-sha-1-96
NOTE: The default is not displayed in the output of the show bgp bmp
command unless a key or key-chain is also configured.
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Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Route Authentication for BGP
•
Configuring BGP Monitoring Protocol Version 3
authentication-key (Protocols LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
126
authentication-key md5-authentication-key;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp session address],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp session address],
[edit protocols ldp session address],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp session address]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Configure the MD5 authentication signature. The maximum length of the authentication
signature is 69 characters.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the TCP MD5 Signature for LDP Sessions on page 101
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
authentication-key-chain (Protocols LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
authentication-key-chain key-chain;
[edit logical-systems name protocols ldp session address],
[edit logical-systems name routing-instances instance-name protocols ldp session address],
[edit protocols ldp session address],
[edit routing-instances instance-name protocols ldp session address]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.0.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3 for the QFX Series.
Description
Apply and enable an authentication keychain to the routing device. Note that the
referenced key chain must be defined. When configuring the authentication key update
mechanism for LDP, you cannot commit the 0.0.0.0/allow statement with authentication
keys or key chains. The CLI issues a warning and fails to commit such configurations.
Options
key-chain—Authentication keychain name. It can be up to 126 characters. Characters can
include any ASCII strings. If you include spaces, enclose all characters in quotation
marks (“ ”).
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Authentication Key Update Mechanism for BGP and LDP Routing Protocols
•
Configuring Miscellaneous LDP Properties on page 99
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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deaggregate
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
deaggregate | no-deaggregate;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Control forwarding equivalence class (FEC) deaggregation on the router. The use of the
deaggregate statement in LDP is a standard practice that we recommend for LDP
deployments.
Deaggregation is disabled on the router.
deaggregate—Deaggregate FECs.
no-deaggregate—Aggregate FECs.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
128
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring FEC Deaggregation
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
disable (Protocols LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
disable;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp graceful-restart],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name
routing-options graceful-restart],
[edit protocols ldp graceful-restart],
[edit protocols ldp interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name routing-options graceful-restart]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Explicitly disable LDP on an interface, or explicitly disable LDP graceful restart.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
LDP is enabled on interfaces configured with the LDP interface statement. LDP graceful
restart is automatically enabled when graceful restart is enabled under the [edit
routing-options] hierarchy level.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling and Disabling LDP on page 31
•
Configuring LDP Graceful Restart on page 94
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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dod-request-policy
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
dod-request-policy dod-request-policy-name;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit protocols ldp]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Specify the name of the LDP downstream on demand request policy. LDP sends label
request messages only for those FECs matching in the downstream on demand request
policy.
dod-request-polcy-name—Specify the name of the downstream on demand request
policy.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring LDP Downstream on Demand on page 60
downstream-on-demand
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
130
downstream-on-demand;
[edit logical systems logical-system-name protocols ldp session session-address],
[edit protocols ldp session session-address]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Enable LDP downstream on demand on the LDP session. LDP is widely deployed in
downstream unsolicited advertisement mode. As service providers integrate the access
and aggregation networks into a single MPLS domain, LDP downstream on demand is
needed to distribute the bindings between access and aggregation networks to minimize
the workload for the access node (AN) control plane and to avoid the storage of tens of
thousands of label bindings from upstream aggregation nodes.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring LDP Downstream on Demand on page 60
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
egress-policy
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
egress-policy [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Description
Control the prefixes advertised into LDP.
Default
Only the loopback address is advertised.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
policy-names—Name of one or more routing policies.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Prefixes Advertised into LDP from the Routing Table on page 97
explicit-null (Protocols LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
explicit-null;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Advertise label 0 to the egress router of a label-switched path (LSP).
If you do not include the explicit-null statement in the MPLS configuration, label 3 (implicit
null) is advertised.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring MPLS and LDP to Pop the Label on the Ultimate-Hop Router on page 100
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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export (Protocols LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
132
export [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Apply policy filters to outbound LDP label bindings. Filters are applied to all label bindings
from all neighbors.
policy-names—Name of one or more routing policies.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Filtering Outbound LDP Label Bindings on page 34
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
fec
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
fec fec-address {
bfd-liveness-detection {
detection-time threshold milliseconds;
ecmp;
failure-action {
remove-nexthop;
remove-route;
}
holddown-interval milliseconds;
ingress-policy ingress-policy-name;
minimum-interval milliseconds;
minimum-receive-interval milliseconds;
minimum-transmit-interval milliseconds;
multiplier detection-time-multiplier;
no-adaptation;
transmit-interval {
minimum-interval milliseconds;
threshold milliseconds;
}
version (0 | 1 | automatic);
}
no-bfd-liveness-detection;
periodic-traceroute {
disable;
exp exp-value;
fanout fanout-value;
frequency minutes;
paths number-of-paths;
retries retry-attempts;
source address;
ttl ttl-value;
wait seconds;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-systems-name protocols ldp oam],
[edit protocols ldp oam]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Allows you to configure BFD for a specific LDP forwarding equivalence class (FEC).
fec-address—Specify the FEC address.
The other statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
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Related
Documentation
•
Configuring BFD for LDP LSPs
graceful-restart (Protocols LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
graceful-restart {
disable;
helper-disable;
maximum-neighbor-recovery-time value;
reconnect-time seconds;
recovery-time value;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Configure LDP graceful restart on the LDP master protocol instance or for a specific
routing instance.
NOTE: When you alter the graceful restart configuration at either the [edit
routing-options graceful-restart] or [edit protocols ldp graceful-restart] hierarchy
levels, any running LDP session is automatically restarted to apply the graceful
restart configuration. This behavior mirrors the behavior of BGP when you
alter its graceful restart configuration.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
134
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring LDP Graceful Restart on page 94
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
hello-interval (Protocols LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
hello-interval seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp targeted-hello],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp targeted-hello],
[edit protocols ldp interface interface-name],
[edit protocols ldp targeted-hello],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp targeted-hello]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Support for LDP targeted hellos added in Junos OS Release 9.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Control the LDP timer that regulates how often hello messages are sent. You can control
the rate both link hello messages and targeted hello messages are sent depending on
the hierarchy level at which you configure the hello-interval statement.
seconds—Length of time between transmission of hello packets.
Range: 1 through 65,535 seconds
Default: 5 seconds for link hello messages, 15 seconds for targeted hello messages
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the LDP Timer for Hello Messages on page 91
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
helper-disable (LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
136
helper-disable;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp graceful-restart],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp graceful-restart],
[edit protocols ldp graceful-restart],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp graceful-restart]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Disable helper mode for LDP graceful restart. When helper mode is disabled, a router
cannot help a neighboring router that is attempting to restart LDP.
Helper mode is enabled by default on all routing protocols (including LDP) that support
graceful restart.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring LDP Graceful Restart on page 94
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
hold-time (Protocols LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
hold-time seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp targeted-hello],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp targeted-hello],
[edit protocols ldp interface interface-name],
[edit protocols ldp targeted-hello],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp targeted-hello]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Support for LDP targeted hellos added in Junos OS Release 9.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Specify how long an LDP node should wait for a hello message before declaring a neighbor
to be down. This value is sent as part of a hello message so that each LDP node tells its
neighbors how long to wait. You can specify times for both link hello messages and
targeted hello messages depending on the hierarchy level at which you configure the
hold-time statement.
seconds—Hold-time value.
Range: 1 through 65,535 seconds
Default: 15 seconds for link hello messages, 45 seconds for targeted hello messages
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Delay Before LDP Neighbors Are Considered Down on page 92
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ignore-lsp-metrics
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
ignore-lsp-metrics;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ospf traffic-engineering shortcuts],
[edit protocols ospf traffic-engineering shortcuts]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Cause OSPF to ignore the RSVP LSP metric.
Some other vendors use an OSPF metric of 1 for the loopback address. Juniper Networks
routers use an OSPF metric of 0 for the loopback address. This can cause interoperability
problems when you configure LDP tunneling over RSVP LSPs in heterogeneous networks.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling LDP over RSVP-Established LSPs in Heterogeneous Networks on page 101
igp-synchronization
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
igp-synchronization holddown-interval seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Configure the time the LDP waits before informing the IGP that the LDP neighbor and
session for an interface are operational. For large networks with numerous FECs, you
might need to configure a longer value to allow enough time for the LDP label databases
to be exchanged.
holddown-interval seconds—Time the LDP waits before informing the IGP that the LDP
neighbor and session for an interface are operational.
Default: 10 seconds
Range: 10 through 60 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
138
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring LDP Synchronization with the IGP on the Router on page 104
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
import (Protocols LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
import [ policy-names ];
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Apply policy filters to received LDP label bindings. Filters are applied to all label bindings
from all neighbors.
policy-names—Name of one or more routing policies.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Filtering Inbound LDP Label Bindings on page 32
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
interface (Protocols LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
interface interface-name {
disable;
hello-interval seconds;
hold-time seconds;
transport-address (interface | loopback);
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Enable LDP on one or more router interfaces.
LDP is disabled on all interfaces.
interface-name—Name of an interface. To configure all interfaces, specify all.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
140
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling and Disabling LDP on page 31
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
keepalive-interval
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
keepalive-interval seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Set the keepalive interval value.
seconds—Keepalive value.
Range: 1 through 65,535
Default: 10 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Interval for LDP Keepalive Messages on page 93
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
keepalive-timeout
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
keepalive-timeout seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Set the keepalive timeout value. The keepalive timeout defines the amount of time that
the neighbor LDP node waits before determining that the session has failed.
seconds—Keepalive timeout value.
Range: 1 through 65,535
Default: 30 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the LDP Keepalive Timeout on page 94
l2-smart-policy
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
142
l2-smart-policy;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 8.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Prevent LDP from exporting IPv4 FECs over sessions with Layer 2 neighbors only. IPv4
FECs received over such sessions are filtered out.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring LDP IPv4 FEC Filtering
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
label-withdrawal-delay
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
label-withdrawal-delay seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Delay the withdrawal of labels to reduce router workload during IGP convergence.
seconds—Configure the number of seconds to wait before withdrawing labels for the
LDP LSPs.
Default: 60 seconds
Range: 0 through 300 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the Label Withdrawal Timer on page 104
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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ldp
Syntax
144
ldp {
(deaggregate | no-deaggregate);
egress-policy [ policy-names ];
explicit-null;
export [ policy-names ];
graceful-restart {
disable;
helper-disable;
maximum-neighbor-recovery-time seconds;
reconnect-time seconds;
recovery-time seconds;
}
import [ policy-names];
interface (interface-name | all) {
disable;
hello-interval seconds;
hold-time seconds;
transport-address (interface | router-id);
}
keepalive-interval seconds;
keepalive-timeout seconds;
log-updown {
trap disable;
}
no-forwarding;
oam {
bfd-liveness-detection {
detection-time threshold milliseconds;
ecmp;
failure-action {
remove-nexthop;
remove-route;
}
holddown-interval milliseconds;
minimum-interval milliseconds;
minimum-receive-interval milliseconds;
minimum-transmit-interval milliseconds;
multiplier detection-time-multiplier;
no-adaptation;
transmit-interval {
minimum-interval milliseconds;
threshold milliseconds;
}
}
fec fec-address {
bfd-liveness-detection {
detection-time threshold milliseconds;
ecmp;
failure-action {
remove-nexthop;
remove-route;
}
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
holddown-interval milliseconds;
ingress-policy ingress-policy-name;
minimum-interval milliseconds;
minimum-receive-interval milliseconds;
minimum-transmit-interval milliseconds;
multiplier detection-time-multiplier;
no-adaptation;
transmit-interval {
minimum-interval milliseconds;
threshold milliseconds;
}
version (0 | 1 | automatic);
}
no-bfd-liveness-detection;
periodic-traceroute {
disable;
exp exp-value;
fanout fanout-value;
frequency minutes;
paths number-of-paths;
retries retry-attempts;
source address;
ttl ttl-value;
wait seconds;
}
}
ingress-policy ingress-policy-name;
periodic-traceroute {
disable;
exp exp-value;
fanout fanout-value;
frequency minutes;
paths number-of-paths;
retries retry-attempts;
source address;
ttl ttl-value;
wait seconds;
}
}
p2mp;
policing {
fec fec-address {
ingress-traffic filter-name;
transit-traffic filter-name;
}
}
preference preference;
session address {
authentication-algorithm algorithm;
authentication-key authentication-key;
authentication-key-chain key-chain-name;
}
strict-targeted-hellos;
traceoptions {
file filename <files number <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
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}
track-igp-metric;
traffic-statistics {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
interval interval;
no-penultimate-hop;
}
transport-address (address | interface | router-id);
}
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name
protocols],
[edit protocols],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for EX Series switches.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Enable LDP routing on the router or switch.
You must include the ldp statement in the configuration to enable LDP on the router or
switch.
Default
LDP is disabled on the router.
Options
The other statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
146
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Minimum LDP Configuration on page 31
•
Enabling and Disabling LDP on page 31
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
ldp-synchronization
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
ldp-synchronization {
disable;
hold-time seconds;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ospf interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name
protocols ospf interface interface-name],
[edit protocols ospf interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ospf interface interface-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Enable synchronization by advertising the maximum cost metric until LDP is operational
on the link.
The other statements are explained separately.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring LDP Synchronization with the IGP on LDP Links on page 103
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
log-updown (Protocols LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
log-updown {
trap disable;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Disable LDP traps on the router, logical system, or routing instance.
trap disable—Disable LDP traps.
Default: LDP traps are enabled on the router.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
148
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Disabling SNMP Traps for LDP on page 103
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
maximum-neighbor-recovery-time
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
maximum-neighbor-recovery-time seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp graceful-restart],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp graceful-restart],
[edit protocols ldp graceful-restart],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp graceful-restart]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4. Statement changed from
maximum-recovery-time to maximum-neighbor-recovery-time in Junos OS Release 9.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Specify the maximum amount of time to wait before giving up an attempt to gracefully
restart.
seconds—Configure the maximum recovery time, in seconds.
Range: 120 through 1800 seconds
Default: 140 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Recovery Time and Maximum Recovery Time on page 96
•
Configuring Graceful Restart Options for LDP
•
no-strict-lsa-checking
•
recovery-time
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
no-forwarding
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
150
no-forwarding;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Do not add ingress routes to the inet.0 routing table even if traffic-engineering bgp-igp
(configured at the [edit protocols mpls] hierarchy level) is enabled.
The no-forwarding statement is disabled. Ingress routes are added to the inet.0 routing
table instead of the inet.3 routing table when traffic-engineering bgp-igp is enabled.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Preventing Addition of Ingress Routes to the inet.0 Routing Table on page 99
•
Configuring Virtual-Router Routing Instances in VPNs
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
policing (Protocols LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
policing {
fec fec-address {
ingress-traffic filter-name;
transit-traffic filter-name;
}
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Enable policing of forwarding equivalence classes (FECs) for LDP.
fec fec-address—Specify the address for the FEC.
ingress-traffic filter-name—Specify the name of the filter for policing ingress FEC traffic.
transit-traffic filter-name—Specify the name of the filter for policing transit FEC traffic.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Policers for LDP FECs
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
preference (Protocols LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
preference preference;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit protocols ldp interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit protocols ldp interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp interface interface-name]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Set the route preference level for LDP routes.
preference—Preferred value.
Range: 0 through 255
Default: 9
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
152
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring LDP Route Preferences on page 94
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
reconnect-time
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
reconnect-time seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp graceful-restart],
[edit protocols ldp graceful-restart],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp graceful-restart]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.1.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Specify the length of time required to reestablish a Label Distribution Protocol (LDP)
session after graceful restart.
seconds—Time required for reconnection.
Range: 30 through 300
Default: 60 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring LDP Graceful Restart on page 94 on LDP Feature Guide for Routing Devices
•
Configuring Graceful Restart Options for LDP
recovery-time
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
recovery-time seconds;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp graceful-restart],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp graceful-restart],
[edit protocols ldp graceful-restart],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp graceful-restart]
Release Information
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Description
Specify the amount of time a router waits for LDP to restart gracefully.
Options
seconds—Configure the recovery time, in seconds.
Range: 120 through 1800 seconds
Default: 140 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring Recovery Time and Maximum Recovery Time on page 96
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MPLS on the QFX Series
session (ldp)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
session address {
authentication-algorithm algorithm;
authentication-key authentication-key;
authentication-key-chain key-chain-name;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
authentication-algorithm statement introduced in Junos OS Release 7.6.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Specify the address for the remote end of the LDP session.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
154
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the TCP MD5 Signature for LDP Sessions on page 101
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
session-protection
Syntax
session-protection {
timeout seconds;
}
Hierarchy Level
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Description
Configure when an LDP session is torn down and resignaled after the router stops receiving
hello messages from a neighboring router. You might want to modify this behavior to
prevent an LDP session from being unnecessarily terminated and reestablished. The LDP
session remains up for the duration specified as long as the routers maintain IP network
connectivity.
Options
timeout seconds—Time in seconds before the LDP session is torn down and resignaled.
Range: 1 through 65,535 seconds
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring LDP Session Protection on page 102
strict-targeted-hellos
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
strict-targeted-hellos;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Prevent LDP sessions from being established with remote neighbors that have not been
specifically configured. LDP peers will not respond to targeted hellos coming from a
source that is not one of the configured remote neighbors.
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Enabling Strict Targeted Hello Messages for LDP on page 32
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MPLS on the QFX Series
targeted-hello
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
156
targeted-hello {
hello-interval seconds;
hold-time seconds;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Specify the LDP timer and LDP hold time for targeted hellos.
The remaining statements are explained separately.
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring the LDP Timer for Hello Messages on page 91
•
Configuring the Delay Before LDP Neighbors Are Considered Down on page 92
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 9: LDP Configuration Statements for QFX5100
traceoptions (Protocols LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
traceoptions {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
flag flag <flag-modifier> <disable>;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
match-on address option for the filter flag modifier added in Junos OS Release 10.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
LDP protocol-level trace options.
The default LDP protocol-level trace options are inherited from the routing protocols
traceoptions statement included at the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level.
disable—(Optional) Disable the tracing operation. You can use this option to disable a
single operation when you have defined a broad group of tracing operations, such
as all.
file filename—Name of the file to receive the output of the tracing operation. Enclose the
name within quotation marks. All files are placed in the directory ldp-log. We
recommend that you place LDP tracing output in the file ldp-log.
files number—(Optional) Maximum number of trace files. When a trace file named
trace-file reaches its maximum size, it is renamed trace-file.0, then trace-file.1, and
so on, until the maximum number of trace files is reached. Then the oldest trace file
is overwritten.
Range: 2 through 1000
Default: 2 files
If you specify a maximum number of files, you must also include the size statement to
specify the maximum file size.
flag flag—Tracing operation to perform. To specify more than one tracing operation,
include multiple flag statements.
•
address—Operation of address and address withdrawal messages
•
binding—Label-binding operations
•
error—Error conditions
•
event—Protocol events
•
initialization—Operation of initialization messages
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MPLS on the QFX Series
•
label—Operation of label request, label map, label withdrawal, and label release
messages
•
notification—Operation of notification messages
•
packets—Equivalent to setting address, initialization, label, notification, and periodic
flags (see also the filter flag modifier)
•
path—Label-switched path operations
•
periodic—Operation of hello and keepalive messages
•
route—Operation of route messages
•
state—Protocol state transitions
flag-modifier—(Optional) Modifier for the tracing flag. You can specify one or more of
these modifiers:
•
detail—Provide detailed trace information.
•
disable—Disable this trace flag.
•
filter—Filter to apply to this flag. The filter flag modifier can be applied only to the route,
path, and binding flags. This flag modifier has the following options:
•
match-on—Match on argument specified. The match-on option has the following
suboptions:
•
address—Filter based on the source and destination addresses of packets. Available
for the packets flag option only.
•
•
fec—Filter based on the FEC associated with the traced object.
policy policy-name—Specify the filter policy.
•
receive—Packets being received.
•
send—Packets being transmitted.
no-world-readable—(Optional) Prevent all users from reading the log file.
size size—(Optional) Maximum size of each trace file, in kilobytes (KB), megabytes (MB),
or gigabytes (GB). When a trace file named trace-file reaches this size, it is renamed
trace-file.0. When the trace-file again reaches this size, trace-file.0 is renamed
trace-file.1 and trace-file is renamed trace-file.0. This renaming scheme continues
until the maximum number of trace files is reached. Then the oldest trace file is
overwritten.
Syntax: xk to specify KB, xm to specify MB, or xg to specify GB
Range: 10 KB through the maximum file size supported on your system
Default: 1 MB
If you specify a maximum file size, you must also include the files statement to specify
the maximum number of files.
world-readable—(Optional) Enable any user to read the log file.
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Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing and trace—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control and trace-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Tracing LDP Protocol Traffic on page 39
•
Network Management Administration Guide for Routing Devices
track-igp-metric
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
track-igp-metric;
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Cause the IGP route metric to be used for the LDP routes instead of the default LDP route
metric (the default LDP route metric is 1).
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Configuring LDP to Use the IGP Route Metric on page 99
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traffic-statistics (Protocols LDP)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
traffic-statistics {
file filename <files number> <size size> <world-readable | no-world-readable>;
interval seconds;
no-penultimate-hop;
}
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
LDP traffic statistics display the amount of traffic passed through a router for a particular
FEC.
file filename—Name of the file to receive the output of the LDP statistics operation.
Enclose the name within quotation marks. All files are placed in the directory /var/log.
files number—(Optional) Maximum number of LDP statistics files. When a statistics file
named ldp-stat reaches its maximum size, it is renamed ldp-stat.0, then ldp-stat.1,
and so on, until the maximum number of LDP statistics files is reached. Then the
oldest file is overwritten.
Range: 2 through 1000
Default: 2 files
If you specify a maximum number of files, you also must include the size statement to
specify the maximum file size.
interval seconds—(Optional) Specify the interval at which the statistics are polled and
written to the file.
Default: 300 seconds (5 minutes)
no-penultimate-hop—(Optional) Do not collect traffic statistics on the penultimate hop
router.
no-world-readable—(Optional) Prevent all users from reading the log file.
size size—(Optional) Maximum size of each statistics file, in kilobytes (KB), megabytes
(MB), or gigabytes (GB). When a statistics file named ldp-stat reaches this size, it is
renamed ldp-stat.0. When ldp-stat again reaches this size, ldp-stat.0 is renamed
ldp-stat.1 and ldp-stat is renamed ldp-stat.0. This renaming scheme continues until
the maximum number of statistics files is reached. Then the oldest statistics file is
overwritten.
Syntax: xk to specify KB, xm to specify MB, or xg to specify GB
Range: 10 KB through the maximum file size supported on your system
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Default: 1 MB
If you specify a maximum file size, you also must also include the files statement to
specify the maximum number of files.
world-readable—(Optional) Enable log file access for all users.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
routing—To view this statement in the configuration.
routing-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Collecting LDP Statistics on page 37
transport-address
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Options
transport-address (interface | router-id);
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols ldp interface interface-name],
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols
ldp],
[edit protocols ldp],
[edit protocols ldp interface interface-name],
[edit routing-instances routing-instance-name protocols ldp interface interface-name]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.3X50 for the QFX Series.
Enable control of the transport address used by LDP.
router-id
interface—The first IP address on the interface is used as the transport address.
router-id—The router identifier is used as the transport address.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
interface—To view this statement in the configuration.
interface-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Specifying the Transport Address Used by LDP on page 36
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PART 3
Administration
•
Routine Monitoring on page 165
•
Operational Mode Commands on page 169
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CHAPTER 10
Routine Monitoring
•
Verifying That MPLS Is Working Correctly on page 165
Verifying That MPLS Is Working Correctly
To verify that MPLS is working correctly, perform the following tasks:
1.
Verifying the Physical Layer on the Switches on page 165
2. Verifying the Routing Protocol on page 166
3. Verifying the Core Interfaces Being Used for the MPLS Traffic on page 166
4. Verifying RSVP on page 166
Verifying the Physical Layer on the Switches
Purpose
Action
Meaning
Verify that the interfaces are up. Perform this verification task on each of the switches.
user@switch> show interfaces xe-* terse
Interface
xe-0/0/0
xe-0/0/0.0
xe-0/0/1.0
xe-0/0/2.0
xe-0/0/3.0
xe-0/0/4.0
xe-0/0/5.0
Admin
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
xe-0/0/6.0
up
Link Proto
up
up
up
up
up
inet
up
up
inet
mpls
up
inet
mpls
Local
Remote
2.2.2.1/16
10.1.5.1/24
10.1.6.1/24
The show interfaces terse command displays status information about the 10-Gigabit
Ethernet interfaces on the switch. This output verifies that the interfaces are up. The
output for the protocol family (Proto column) of the core interfaces (xe-0/0/5.0 and
xe-0/0/6.0), shows that these interfaces are configured as both inet and mpls. The Local
column for the core interfaces shows the IP address configured for these interfaces.
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Verifying the Routing Protocol
Purpose
Action
Verify the state of the configured routing protocol. You should perform this verification
task on each of the switches. The state should be Full. If you have configured OSPF as
the routing protocol, use the show ospf neighbor command to verify that the routing
protocol is communicating with the switch neighbors.
user@switch> show ospf neighbor
Address
127.1.1.1
Meaning
Interface
xe—0/0/5
State
Full
ID
10.10.10.10
Pri
128
Dead
39
The show ospf neighbor command displays the status of the routing protocol that has
been configured on this switch. The output shows that the state is Full, meaning that the
routing protocol is operating correctly—that is, hello packets are being exchanged between
directly connected neighbors. For additional information on checking and monitoring
routing protocols, see the Junos OS Routing Protocols and Policies Command Reference .
Verifying the Core Interfaces Being Used for the MPLS Traffic
Purpose
Action
Verify that the state of the MPLS interface is Up. You should perform this verification
task on each of the switches.
user@switch> show mpls interface
Interface
ge—0/0/5
ge—0/0/6
Meaning
State
Up
Up
Administrative groups
<none>
<none>
The show mpls interface command displays the status of the core interfaces that have
been configured to belong to family mpls. This output shows that the interface configured
to belong to family mpls is up.
Verifying RSVP
Purpose
166
Verify the state of the RSVP session. You should perform this verification task on each
of the switches.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Routine Monitoring
user@switch> show
Action
rsvp session
Ingress RSVP: 1 sessions
To
From
State
127.1.1.3
127.1.1.1
Up
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
Rt Style Labelin Labelout LSPname
0 1 FF
300064 lsp_to_pe2_ge1
Egress RSVP: 1 sessions
To
From
State
127.1.1.1
127.1.1.3
Up
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
Rt Style Labelin Labelout LSPname
0 1 FF 299968
- lsp_to_pe1_ge1
Transit RSVP: 0 sessions
Total 0 displayed, Up 0, Down 0
Meaning
Related
Documentation
This output confirms that the RSVP sessions are up.
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Edge Switches on page 67
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Switches on page 71
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Operational Mode Commands
•
clear ldp neighbor
•
clear ldp session
•
clear ldp statistics
•
clear mpls lsp
•
clear rsvp session
•
clear rsvp statistics
•
monitor label-switched-path
•
ping mpls bgp
•
ping mpls l2circuit
•
ping mpls l3vpn
•
ping mpls ldp
•
ping mpls lsp-end-point
•
ping mpls rsvp
•
request mpls lsp adjust-autobandwidth
•
show ldp database
•
show ldp fec-filters
•
show ldp interface
•
show ldp neighbor
•
show ldp path
•
show ldp route
•
show ldp session
•
show ldp statistics
•
show ldp traffic-statistics
•
show security keychain
•
show link-management
•
show link-management peer
•
show link-management routing
•
show link-management statistics
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170
•
show link-management te-link
•
show mpls call-admission-control
•
show mpls cspf
•
show mpls diffserv-te
•
show route forwarding-table
•
show mpls interface
•
show mpls lsp
•
show mpls lsp autobandwidth
•
show mpls path
•
show mpls static-lsp
•
show rsvp interface
•
show rsvp neighbor
•
show rsvp session
•
show rsvp statistics
•
show rsvp version
•
show ted database
•
show ted link
•
show ted protocol
•
traceroute mpls ldp
•
traceroute mpls rsvp
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
clear ldp neighbor
Syntax
Description
Options
clear ldp neighbor
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<neighbor>
Tear down Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) neighbor connections.
none—Tear down connections with all LDP neighbors for all routing instances.
instance instance name—(Optional) Clear the LDP session for the specified routing instance
only.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
neighbor—(Optional) Clear an LDP session for the specified neighbor (IP address) only.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
clear
•
show ldp neighbor on page 211
clear ldp neighbor on page 171
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear ldp neighbor
user@host> clear ldp neighbor
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clear ldp session
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
clear ldp session
<destination>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Clear Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) sessions.
none—Clear LDP sessions for all destinations for all routing instances.
destination—(Optional) Clear an LDP session for the specified destination (IP address).
instance instance-name—(Optional) Clear the LDP session for the specified routing
instance only.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
clear
•
show ldp session on page 219
clear ldp session on page 172
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear ldp session
user@host> clear ldp session
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
clear ldp statistics
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
clear ldp statistics
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Set all Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) statistics to zero.
none—Set all LDP statistics to zero for all routing instances.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Clear the LDP session for the specified routing
instance only.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
clear
•
show ldp statistics on page 224
•
show ldp traffic-statistics on page 228
clear ldp statistics on page 173
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear ldp statistics
user@host> clear ldp statistics
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clear mpls lsp
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 174
Syntax (EX and QFX Series Switches) on page 174
clear mpls lsp
<autobandwidth>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<name name>
<optimize | optimize-aggressive>
<path regular-expression>
<statistics>
Syntax (EX and QFX
Series Switches)
clear mpls lsp
<autobandwidth>
<name name>
<optimize | optimize-aggressive>
<path regular-expression>
<statistics>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Description
Release the routes and states associated with MPLS label-switched paths (LSPs), and
start new LSPs.
CAUTION: This command disconnects existing Resource Reservation Protocol
(RSVP) sessions on the ingress routing device. If there is a time lag between
the old path being torn down and the new path being set up, this command
might impact traffic traveling along the LSPs.
Options
none—Reset and restart all LSPs that originated from this routing device; that is, all LSPs
for which this routing device is the ingress routing device. Depending on the number
of LSPs involved, it might take a while to restart all the LSPs.
autobandwidth—(Optional) Clear LSP autobandwidth counters.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
name name—(Optional) Reset and restart the specified LSP or group of LSPs. You can
include wildcard characters in the interface name, as described in the Junos Network
Interfaces Configuration Guide.
optimize | optimize-aggressive—(Optional) Run nonpreemptive optimization or aggressive
optimization computation now.
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path regular-expression—(Optional) Clear the specific LSP path matching the specified
regular expression.
statistics—(Optional) Clear LSP statistics. You cannot clear the MPLS LSP statistics
using a regular expression (name and path options) on transit routers.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
clear
•
show mpls lsp on page 262
•
show rsvp session on page 293
clear mpls lsp on page 175
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear mpls lsp
user@host> clear mpls lsp
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clear rsvp session
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 176
Syntax (EX and QFX Series Switches) on page 176
clear rsvp session
<connection-destination address>
<connection-source address>
<gracefully>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<lsp-id identifier>
<name name>
<optimize-fast-reroute>
<tunnel-id identifier>
Syntax (EX and QFX
Series Switches)
clear rsvp session
<connection-destination address>
<connection-source address>
<gracefully>
<lsp-id identifier>
<name name>
<optimize-fast-reroute>
<tunnel-id identifier>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Description
Options
Reset and restart Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) sessions.
none—Reset and restart all RSVP sessions for which this routing device is the ingress,
transit, or egress routing device.
connection-source address—(Optional) Source address for GMPLS and MPLS LSPs from
the RSVP sender template.
connection-destination address—(Optional) Destination address for GMPLS and MPLS
LSPs from the RSVP sender template.
gracefully—(Optional) Gracefully reset an RSVP session for a nonpacket LSP in two
passes. In the first pass, the Admin-Status object is signaled along the path to the
other endpoint of the RSVP session. In the second pass, the path used by the RSVP
session is torn down. This option can only be used on the ingress or egress routing
device of the RSVP session and is only valid for nonpacket LSPs.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
lsp-id identifier—(Optional) LSP identifier (source port) for the RSVP sender template.
name name—(Optional) Reset and restart the specified RSVP session.
optimize-fast-reroute—(Optional) Begin fast reroute optimization.
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tunnel-id identifier—(Optional) Tunnel identifier (destination port) for the RSVP session.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
clear
•
clear mpls lsp on page 174
•
show rsvp session on page 293
clear rsvp session on page 177
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear rsvp session
user@host> clear rsvp session
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clear rsvp statistics
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
Release Information
Description
Options
Syntax on page 178
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 178
clear rsvp statistics
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
clear rsvp statistics
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Clear Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) packet and error statistics.
none—Clear RSVP packet and error statistics.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
clear
•
show rsvp statistics on page 302
clear rsvp statistics on page 178
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear rsvp statistics
user@host> clear rsvp statistics
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monitor label-switched-path
Syntax
Release Information
monitor label-switched-path lsp-name
<logical-system (logical-system-name)>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Logical system support introduced in Junos OS Release 9.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Description
Display the real-time status of the specified RSVP label-switched path (LSP). You can
also use this command to monitor LSPs configured within logical systems.
Options
logical-system ( logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
lsp-name—Name of the LSP.
Additional Information
You can track the amount of traffic traversing an RSVP LSP and observe its essential
parameters, such as uptime, ingress and egress addresses, labels, routes, and ports.
Values are typically sampled every second. The display also allows you to scroll to other
currently running LSPs. You cannot use this command to display information about static
LSPs or LDP-signaled LSPs.
The output of this command shows how much each field has changed since you started
the command or since you cleared the counters by using the c key. To control the output
of the monitor label-switched-path command while it is running, use the keys listed in
Table 13 on page 179. The keys are not case-sensitive.
Table 13: Output Control Keys for the monitor label-switched-path
Command
Key
Action
c
Clears the screen and refreshes the display for this LSP.
f
Freezes the display, preventing new information from being displayed.
l
Monitors a different LSP. After you type l, you can type the new LSP name.
n
Displays information about the next LSP (whose name is alphabetically higher
than the current LSP name) configured on the router.
p
Goes to the previous LSP (whose name is alphabetically lower than the current
LSP name) configured on the router.
q or Esc
Quits the command and returns to the command prompt.
t
Thaws, or restarts, the data display for this LSP.
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Required Privilege
Level
trace
List of Sample Output
monitor label-switched-path on page 181
Output Fields
Table 14 on page 180 describes the output fields for the monitor label-switched-path
command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 14: monitor label-switched-path Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
(1)
Displays the following information:
(2)
•
hostname—Name of the router.
•
Seconds—Time elapsed since this display was started.
•
Time—Current local time.
Delay—Length of the time delay, in milliseconds, required to obtain the information in the monitor
display. The first number shows the current sampling delay. The second number shows the shortest
delay recorded to date. The third number shows the worst delay recorded to date. This delay can vary
substantially depending on the system load.
(3)
(4)
(5)
Displays the following:
•
To—Destination address of the LSP.
•
From—Originating address of the LSP.
•
State—Current state of the LSP: Up or Down.
Displays the following:
•
LSPName—Name of the LSP.
•
Type—Type of LSP: Ingress, Egress, or Transit.
Displays the following:
•
Label in—Incoming label of the LSP.
•
Label out—Outgoing label of the LSP.
(6)
Port number—Port number for the sending router, the port number for the receiving router, and the
protocol ID. For MPLS traffic engineering applications, the protocol ID is always 0.
(7/8)
Record route—All intermediate and egress router addresses for this LSP.
(9/10/11)
Displays traffic statistics:
•
Output packets—Number of packets that have traversed this LSP, and the change (delta) in the
number since the last sample, typically 1 second ago.
•
Output bytes—Number of bytes that have traversed this LSP, and the change (delta) in the number
since the last sample, typically 1 second ago.
(12)
Displays any errors the router encountered while attempting to retrieve information on the LSP.
(13)
Lists the keyboard commands you can use to navigate to other LSPs. For a description of the keyboard
commands, see Table 13 on page 179.
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Sample Output
monitor label-switched-path
user@host> monitor label-switched-path
(1) host
Seconds: 112
Time: 15:32:22
(2)
Delay: 0/0/0
(3) To 10.10.10.16, From 10.10.10.17, state: Up
(4)
LSPname: k, type: Ingress
(5)
Label in: -, Label out: 126000
(6)
Port number: sender 1, receiver 45583, protocol 0
(7)
Record Route: <self> 192.168.224.196
(8)
192.168.224.202 192.168.224.179
(9)
Traffic statistics:
Current delta
(10)
Output packets:
0
[0]
(11)
Output bytes:
0
[0]
(12)
(13)Next='n', Prev='p', Quit='q' or ESC, Freeze='f', Thaw='t', Clear='c',
LSP='l'
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ping mpls bgp
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
ping mpls bgp fec
<bottom-label-ttl>
<count count>
<destination address>
<detail>
<exp forwarding-class>
<instance routing-instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<size bytes>
<source source-address>
<sweep>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1.
Check the operability of MPLS BGP-signaled label-switched path (LSP) connections.
Press Ctrl+c to interrupt a ping mpls bgp command.
bottom-label-ttl—(Optional) Time-to-live (TTL) value for the bottom label in the label
stack. The range of values is 1 through 255. The default value is 255.
count count—(Optional) Number of ping requests to send. If count is not specified, five ping
requests are sent. The range of values is 1 through 1,000,000. The default value is
5.
destination address—(Optional) Specify an address other than the default (127.0.0.1/32)
for the ping echo requests. The address can be anything within the 127/8 subnet.
detail—(Optional) Display detailed information about the echo requests sent and received.
exp forwarding-class—(Optional) Value of the forwarding class for the MPLS ping packets.
fec—Ping a BGP-signaled LSP using the forwarding equivalence class (FEC) prefix and
length.
instance routing-instance-name—(Optional) Allows you to ping a combination of the
routing instance and forwarding equivalence class (FEC) associated with an LSP.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on the specified logical system.
size bytes—(Optional) Size of the LSP ping request packet (88 through 65468 bytes).
Packets are 4-byte aligned. For example, If you enter a size of 89, 90, 91, or 92, the
router or switch uses a size value of 92 bytes. If you enter a packet size that is smaller
than the minimum size, an error message is displayed reminding you of the 88-byte
minimum.
source source-address—(Optional) IP address of the outgoing interface. This address is
sent in the IP source address field of the ping request. If this option is not specified,
the default address is usually the loopback interface (lo.0).
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sweep—(Optional) Automatically determine the size of the maximum transmission unit
(MTU).
Additional Information
If the LSP changes, the label and interface information displayed when you issued the
ping command continues to be used. You must configure MPLS at the [edit protocols
mpls] hierarchy level on the remote router or switch to ping an LSP terminating there.
You must configure MPLS even if you intend to ping only BGP forwarding equivalence
classes (FECs).
In asymmetric MTU scenarios, the echo response might be dropped. For example, if the
MTU from System A to System B is 1000 bytes, the MTU from System B to System A is
500 bytes, and the ping request packet size is 1000 bytes, the echo response is dropped
because the PAD TLV is included in the echo response, making it too large.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
network
ping mpls bgp fec count on page 183
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
An exclamation point (!) indicates that an echo reply was received. A period (.) indicates
that an echo reply was not received within the timeout period. An x indicates that an
echo reply was received with an error code. Packets with error codes are not counted in
the received packets count. They are accounted for separately. To display the error codes,
use the detail option (for example, ping mpls bgp 10.255.245.222 detail).
Sample Output
ping mpls bgp fec count
user@host> ping mpls bgp 10.255.245.222 count 10
!!!xxx...x--- lsping statistics ---10 packets transmitted, 3 packets received,
70% packet loss 4 packets received with error status, not counted as received.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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ping mpls l2circuit
Syntax
Release Information
ping mpls l2circuit (interface interface-name | virtual-circuit virtual-circuit-id neighbor address)
<count count>
<destination address>
<detail>
<exp forwarding-class>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
reply-mode (application-level-control-channel | ip-udp | no-reply)
<size bytes>
<source source-address>
<sweep>
<v1>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
The size and sweep options were introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
The reply-mode option and its suboptions are introduced in Junos OS Release 10.4R1.
Description
Check the operability of the MPLS Layer 2 circuit connections. Type Ctrl+c to interrupt a
ping mpls l2circuit command. You can also issue this command within logical systems.
Options
count count—(Optional) Number of ping requests to send. If count is not specified, five ping
requests are sent. The range of values is 1 through 1,000,000. The default value is
5.
destination address—(Optional) Specify an address other than the default (127.0.0.1/32)
for the ping echo requests. The address can be anything within the 127/8 subnet.
detail—(Optional) Display detailed information about the echo requests sent and received.
exp forwarding-class—(Optional) Value of the forwarding class for the MPLS ping packets.
interface interface-name—Ping an interface configured for the Layer 2 circuit on the egress
provider edge (PE) router.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on the specified logical system.
reply-mode—(Optional) Reply mode for the ping request. This option has the following
suboptions:
application-level-control-channel—Reply using an application level control channel.
ip-udp—Reply using an IPv4 or IPv6 UDP packet.
no-reply—Do not reply to the ping request.
NOTE: The reply-mode option and its suboptions
application-level-control-channel, ip-udp, and no-reply are also available
in Junos OS Release 10.2R4 and 10.3R2.
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size bytes—(Optional) Size of the label-switched path (LSP) ping request packet (96
through 65468 bytes). Packets are 4-byte aligned. For example, If you enter a size
of 97, 98, 99, or 100, the router or switch uses a size value of 100 bytes. If you enter
a packet size that is smaller than the minimum size, an error message is displayed
reminding you of the 96-byte minimum.
source source-address—(Optional) IP address of the outgoing interface. This address is
sent in the IP source address field of the ping request. If this option is not specified,
the default address is usually the loopback interface (lo.0).
sweep—(Optional) Automatically determine the size of the maximum transmission unit
(MTU).
v1—(Optional) Use the type 9 Layer 2 circuit type, length, and value (TLV).
virtual-circuit virtual-circuit-id neighbor address—Ping the virtual circuit identifier on the
egress PE router or switch and the specified neighbor, testing the integrity of the
Layer 2 circuit between the ingress and egress PE routers or switches.
Additional Information
You must configure MPLS at the [edit protocols mpls] hierarchy level on the egress PE
router or switch (the router or switch receiving the MPLS echo packets) to ping a Layer
2 circuit.
In asymmetric MTU scenarios, the echo response may be dropped. For example, if the
MTU from System A to System B is 1000 bytes, the MTU from System B to System A is
500 bytes, and the ping request packet size is 1000 bytes, the echo response is dropped
because the PAD TLV is included in the echo response, making it too large.
NOTE: The ping mpls l2circuit command is available on many different
platforms. However, the various options are not supported on all the
platforms. For example, ping mpls l2circuit interface interface-name
reply-mode is not supported on QFX Series and EX4600 switches.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
network
•
MPLS Feature Support on the QFX Series and EX4600 Switch Overview on page 15
ping mpls l2circuit interface on page 186
ping mpls l2circuit virtual-circuit detail on page 186
ping mpls l2circuit interface <interface-name> reply-mode on page 186
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
An exclamation point (!) indicates that an echo reply was received. A period (.) indicates
that an echo reply was not received within the timeout period. An x indicates that an
echo reply was received with an error code. Packets with an error code are not counted
in the received packets count. They are accounted for separately.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Sample Output
ping mpls l2circuit interface
user@host> ping mpls l2circuit interface so-1/0/0.1
Request for seq 1, to interface 69, labels <100000, 100208>, packet size 100
Reply for seq 1, return code: Egress-ok, time: 0.439 ms
ping mpls l2circuit virtual-circuit detail
user@host> ping mpls l2circuit virtual-circuit 200 neighbor 10.255.245.122/32 detail
Request for seq 1, to interface 68, labels <100048, 100128>, packet size 100
Reply for seq 1, return code: Egress-ok time: 0.539 ms
ping mpls l2circuit interface <interface-name> reply-mode
user@host> ping mpls l2circuit interface lt-1/2/0.21 reply-mode application-level-control-channel
!!!!!
--- lsping statistics --5 packets transmitted, 5 packets received, 0% packet loss
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ping mpls l3vpn
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
ping mpls l3vpn prefix prefix-name
<l3vpn-name>
<bottom-label-ttl>
<count count>
<destination address>
<detail>
<exp forwarding-class>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<size bytes>
<source source-address>
<sweep>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
The size and sweep options were introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Check the operability of a MPLS Layer 3 virtual private network (VPN) connection. Type
Ctrl+c to interrupt a ping mpls l3vpn command.
bottom-label-ttl—(Optional) Display the time-to-live value for the bottom label in the
label stack.
count count—(Optional) Number of ping requests to send. If count is not specified, five
ping requests are sent. The range of values is 1 through 1,000,000. The default value
is 5.
destination address—(Optional) Specify an address other than the default (127.0.0.1/32)
for the ping echo requests. The address can be anything within the 127/8 subnet.
detail—(Optional) Display detailed information about the echo requests sent and received.
exp forwarding-class—(Optional) Value of the forwarding class for the MPLS ping packets.
l3vpn-name—(Optional) Layer 3 VPN name.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on the specified logical system.
prefix prefix-name—Ping to test whether a prefix is present in a provider edge (PE) router’s
or switch's VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) table, by means of a Layer 3 VPN
destination prefix. This option does not test the connection between a PE router or
switch and a customer edge (CE) router or switch.
size bytes—(Optional) Size of the label-switched path (LSP) ping request packet (96
through 65468 bytes). Packets are 4-byte aligned. For example, If you enter a size
of 97, 98, 99, or 100, the router or switch uses a size value of 100 bytes. If you enter
a packet size that is smaller than the minimum size, an error message is displayed
reminding you of the 96-byte minimum.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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source source-address—(Optional) IP address of the outgoing interface. This address is
sent in the IP source address field of the ping request. If this option is not specified,
the default address is usually the loopback interface (lo.0).
sweep—(Optional) Automatically determine the size of the maximum transmission unit
(MTU).
Additional Information
You must configure MPLS at the [edit protocols mpls] hierarchy level on the egress PE
router or switch (the router or switch receiving the MPLS echo packets) to ping a Layer
2 circuit.
In asymmetric MTU scenarios, the echo response may be dropped. For example, if the
MTU from System A to System B is 1000 bytes, the MTU from System B to System A is
500 bytes, and the ping request packet size is 1000 bytes, the echo response is dropped
because the PAD TLV is included in the echo response, making it too large.
If the Layer 3 VPN traffic transits a route reflector within the network, the ping mpls l3vpn
command does not work.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
network
ping mpls l3vpn on page 188
ping mpls l3vpn detail on page 188
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
An exclamation point (!) indicates that an echo reply was received. A period (.) indicates
that an echo reply was not received within the timeout period. An x indicates that an
echo reply was received with an error code. When an echo reply is received with an error
code, the packets are not counted in the received packets count, and are counted
seperately..
Sample Output
ping mpls l3vpn
user@host> ping mpls l3vpn vpn1 prefix 10.255.245.122/32
!!!!!
--- lsping statistics --5 packets transmitted, 5 packets received, 0% packet loss
ping mpls l3vpn detail
user@host> ping mpls l3vpn vpn1 prefix 10.255.245.122/32 detail
Request for seq 1, to interface 68, labels <100128, 100112>
Reply for seq 1, return code: Egress-ok
Request for seq 2, to interface 68, labels <100128, 100112>
Reply for seq 2, return code: Egress-ok
Request for seq 3, to interface 68, labels <100128, 100112>
Reply for seq 3, return code: Egress-ok
Request for seq 4, to interface 68, labels <100128, 100112>
Reply for seq 4, return code: Egress-ok
Request for seq 5, to interface 68, labels <100128, 100112>
Reply for seq 5, return code: Egress-ok
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--- lsping statistics --5 packets transmitted, 5 packets received, 0% packet loss
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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ping mpls ldp
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
ping mpls ldp fec
<count count>
<destination address>
<detail>
<exp forwarding-class>
<instance routing-instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<p2mp root-addr ip-address lsp-id identifier>
<size bytes>
<source source-address>
<sweep>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
size and sweep options introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
instance option introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0.
p2mp, root-address, and lsp-id options introduced in Junos OS Release 11.2.
Check the operability of MPLS LDP-signaled label-switched path (LSP) connections.
Type Ctrl+c to interrupt a ping mpls command.
count count—(Optional) Number of ping requests to send. If count is not specified, five ping
requests are sent. The range of values is 1 through 1,000,000. The default value is
5.
destination address—(Optional) Specify an address other than the default (127.0.0.1/32)
for the ping echo requests. The address can be anything within the 127/8 subnet.
detail—(Optional) Display detailed information about the echo requests sent and received.
exp forwarding-class—(Optional) Value of the forwarding class for the MPLS ping packets.
fec—Ping an LDP-signaled LSP using the forwarding equivalence class (FEC) prefix and
length.
instance routing-instance-name—(Optional) Allows you to ping a combination of the
routing instance and forwarding equivalence class (FEC) associated with an LSP.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on the specified logical system.
p2mp root-addr ip-address lsp-id identifier—(Optional) Ping the end points of a
point-to-multipoint LSP. Enter the IP address of the point-to-multipoint LSP root
and the ID number of the point-to-multipoint LSP.
size bytes—(Optional) Size of the LSP ping request packet (88 through 65468 bytes).
Packets are 4-byte aligned. For example, If you enter a size of 89, 90, 91, or 92, the
router or switch uses a size value of 92 bytes. If you enter a packet size that is smaller
than the minimum size, an error message is displayed reminding you of the 88-byte
minimum.
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source source-address—(Optional) IP address of the outgoing interface. This address is
sent in the IP source address field of the ping request. If this option is not specified,
the default address is usually the loopback interface (lo.0).
sweep—(Optional) Automatically determine the size of the maximum transmission unit
(MTU).
Additional Information
If the LSP changes, the label and interface information displayed when you issued the
ping command continues to be used. You must configure MPLS at the [edit protocols
mpls] hierarchy level on the remote router or switch to ping an LSP terminating there.
You must configure MPLS even if you intend to ping only LDP forwarding equivalence
classes (FECs).
You can configure the ping interval for the ping mpls ldp command by specifying a new
time in seconds using the lsp-ping-interval statement at the [edit protocols ldp oam]
hierarchy level. For more information, see the Junos OS MPLS Applications Library for
Routing Devices.
In asymmetric MTU scenarios, the echo response may be dropped. For example, if the
MTU from System A to System B is 1000 bytes, the MTU from System B to System A is
500 bytes, and the ping request packet size is 1000 bytes, the echo response is dropped
because the PAD TLV is included in the echo response, making it too large.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
network
ping mpls ldp fec count on page 191
ping mpls ldp p2mp root-addr lsp-id on page 191
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
An exclamation point (!) indicates that an echo reply was received. A period (.) indicates
that an echo reply was not received within the timeout period. An x indicates that an
echo reply was received with an error code. Packets with error codes are not counted in
the received packets count. They are accounted for separately.
Sample Output
ping mpls ldp fec count
user@host> ping mpls ldp 10.255.245.222 count 10
!!!xxx...x--- lsping statistics ---10 packets transmitted, 3 packets received,
70% packet loss 4 packets received with error status, not counted as received.
ping mpls ldp p2mp root-addr lsp-id
user@host>ping mpls ldp p2mp root-addr 10.1.1.1/32 lsp-id 1 count 1
Request for seq 1, to interface 71, no label stack.
Request for seq 1, to interface 70, label 299786
Reply for seq 1, egress 10.1.1.3, return code: Egress-ok, time: 18.936 ms
Local transmit time: 2009-01-12 03:50:03 PST 407.281 ms
Remote receive time: 2009-01-12 03:50:03 PST 426.217 ms
Reply for seq 1, egress 10.1.1.4, return code: Egress-ok, time: 18.936 ms
Local transmit time: 2009-01-12 03:50:03 PST 407.281 ms
Remote receive time: 2009-01-12 03:50:03 PST 426.217 ms
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Reply for seq 1, egress 10.1.1.5, return code: Egress-ok, time: 18.936 ms
Local transmit time: 2009-01-12 03:50:03 PST 407.281 ms
Remote receive time: 2009-01-12 03:50:03 PST 426.217 ms
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ping mpls lsp-end-point
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
ping mpls lsp-end-point prefix-name
<count count>
<destination address>
<detail>
<exp forwarding-class>
<instance routing-instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<size bytes>
<source source-address>
<sweep>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
The size and sweep options were introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
The instance option was introduced in Junos OS Release 10.0.
Check the operability of MPLS label-switched path (LSP) endpoint connections. Type
Ctrl+c to interrupt a ping mpls command.
count count—(Optional) Number of ping requests to send. If count is not specified, five ping
requests are sent. The range of values is 1 through 1,000,000. The default value is
5.
destination address—(Optional) Specify an address other than the default (127.0.0.1/32)
for the ping echo requests. The address can be anything within the 127/8 subnet.
detail—(Optional) Display detailed information about the echo requests sent and received.
exp forwarding-class—(Optional) Value of the forwarding class for the MPLS ping packets.
instance routing-instance-name—(Optional) Ping a combination of the routing instance
and forwarding equivalence class (FEC) associated with an LSP connection.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on the specified logical system.
prefix-name—LDP forwarding equivalence class (FEC) prefix or RSVP LSP endpoint
address.
size bytes—(Optional) Size of the LSP ping request packet. If the endpoint is LDP-based,
the minimum size of the packet is 88 bytes. If the endpoint is RSVP-based, the
minimum size of the packet is 100 bytes. The maximum size in either case is
65468 bytes.
source source-address—(Optional) IP address of the outgoing interface. This address is
sent in the IP source address field of the ping request. If this option is not specified,
the default address is usually the loopback interface (lo.0).
sweep—(Optional) Automatically determine the size of the maximum transmission unit
(MTU).
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
Additional Information
If the LSP changes, the label and interface information displayed when you issued the
ping command continues to be used. You must configure MPLS at the [edit protocols
mpls] hierarchy level on the remote router or switch to ping an LSP terminating there.
You must configure MPLS even if you intend to ping only LDP forwarding equivalence
classes (FECs).
In asymmetric MTU scenarios, the echo response may be dropped. For example, if the
MTU from System A to System B is 1000 bytes, the MTU from System B to System A is
500 bytes, and the ping request packet size is 1000 bytes, the echo response is dropped
because the PAD TLV is included in the echo response, making it too large.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
network
ping mpls lsp-end-point detail on page 194
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
An exclamation point (!) indicates that an echo reply was received. A period (.) indicates
that an echo reply was not received within the timeout period. An x indicates that an
echo reply was received with an error code. Packets with an error code are not counted
in the received packets count. They are accounted for separately.
Sample Output
ping mpls lsp-end-point detail
user@host> ping mpls lsp-end-point 10.255.245.119 detail
Route to end point address is via LDP FEC
Request for seq 1, to interface 67, label 100032
Reply for seq 1, return code: Egress-ok
Request for seq 2, to interface 67, label 100032
Reply for seq 2, return code: Egress-ok
Request for seq 3, to interface 67, label 100032
Reply for seq 3, return code: Egress-ok
Request for seq 4, to interface 67, label 100032
Reply for seq 4, return code: Egress-ok
Request for seq 5, to interface 67, label 100032
Reply for seq 5, return code: Egress-ok
--- lsping statistics --5 packets transmitted, 5 packets received, 0% packet loss
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ping mpls rsvp
Syntax
ping mpls rsvp
<lsp-name>
<count count>
<destination address>
<detail>
<dynamic-bypass>
<egress egress-address>
<exp forwarding-class>
<interface interface-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<manual-bypass>
<multipoint>
<size bytes>
<source source-address>
<standby standby-path-name>
<sweep>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
The egress and multipoint options were introduced in Junos OS Release 9.2.
The size and sweep options were introduced in Junos OS Release 9.6.
The dynamic-bypass and manual-bypass options were introduced in Junos OS Release
10.2.
Description
Check the operability of MPLS RSVP-signaled label-switched path (LSP) connections.
Type Ctrl+c to interrupt a ping mpls command.
Options
count count—(Optional) Number of ping requests to send. If count is not specified, five ping
requests are sent. The range of values is 1 through 1,000,000. The default value is
5.
destination address—(Optional) Specify an address other than the default (127.0.0.1/32)
for the ping echo requests. The address can be anything within the 127/8 subnet.
detail—(Optional) Display detailed information about the echo requests sent and received.
NOTE: When using the detail option, the reported time is based on the
system time configured on the local and remote routers. Differences in
these system times can result in inaccurate one way ping trip times being
reported.
In practice, it is difficult to synchronize the system times of independent
Juniper Networks routers with sufficient accuracy to provide a meaningful
time value for the detail option (even when synchronized using NTP).
dynamic-bypass—(Optional) Ping dynamically generated bypass LSPs, used for protecting
other LSPs.
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egress egress-address—(Optional) Only the specified egress router or switch responds
to the ping request.
exp forwarding-class—(Optional) Value of the forwarding class for the MPLS ping packets.
interface—(Optional) Specify the name of the interface protected by the manual bypass
LSP. This option is only available when you have also used the manual-bypass option.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on the specified logical system.
lsp-name—Ping an RSVP-signaled LSP using an LSP name.
manual-bypass—(Optional) Ping manually configured bypass LSPs, used for protecting
other LSPs. For this option, you must also specify the interface protected by the
manual bypass LSP using the interface option.
multipoint—(Optional) Send ping requests to each of the egress routers or switches
participating in a point-to-multipoint LSP. You can also include the egress option to
ping a specific egress router or switch participating in a point-to-multipoint LSP.
size bytes—(Optional) Size of the LSP ping request packet (100 through 65468 bytes).
Packets are 4-byte aligned. For example, if you enter a size of 101, 102, 103, or 104,
the router or switch uses a size value of 104 bytes. If you enter a packet size that is
smaller than the minimum size, an error message is displayed reminding you of the
100-byte minimum.
source source-address—(Optional) IP address of the outgoing interface. This address is
sent in the IP source address field of the ping request. If this option is not specified,
the default address is usually the loopback interface.
standby standby-path-name—(Optional) Name of the standby path.
sweep —(Optional) Automatically determine the size of the maximum transmission unit
(MTU).
Additional Information
If the LSP changes, the label and interface information displayed when you issued the
ping command continues to be used. You must configure MPLS at the [edit protocols
mpls] hierarchy level on the remote router or switch to ping an LSP terminating there.
You must configure MPLS even if you intend to ping only LDP forwarding equivalence
classes (FECs).
In asymmetric MTU scenarios, the echo response may be dropped. For example, if the
MTU from System A to System B is 1000 bytes, the MTU from System B to System A is
500 bytes, and the ping request packet size is 1000 bytes, the echo response is dropped
because the PAD TLV is included in the echo response, making it too large.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
196
network
ping mpls rsvp (Echo Reply Received) on page 197
ping mpls rsvp (Echo Reply with Error Code) on page 197
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
ping mpls rsvp detail on page 197
ping mpls rsvp multipoint egress detail count on page 197
ping mpls rsvp multipoint detail count on page 197
ping mpls rsvp destination detail count size on page 198
ping mpls rsvp destination detail sweep size on page 198
Output Fields
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
An exclamation point (!) indicates that an echo reply was received. A period (.) indicates
that an echo reply was not received within the timeout period. An x indicates that an
echo reply was received with an error code. Packets with an error code are not counted
in the received packets count. They are accounted for separately.
Sample Output
ping mpls rsvp (Echo Reply Received)
user@host> ping mpls rsvp test1
!!!!!--- lsping statistics ---5 packets transmitted, 5 packets received, 0% packet
loss
ping mpls rsvp (Echo Reply with Error Code)
user@host> ping mpls rsvp test2
!!xxx--- lsping statistics ---5 packets transmitted, 2 packets received, 60%
packet loss3 packets received with error status, not counted as received.
ping mpls rsvp detail
user@host> ping mpls rsvp to-green detail
Request for seq 1, to interface 67, labels <100095, 0, 0>
Reply for seq 1, return code: Egress-ok
Request for seq 2, to interface 67, labels <100095, 0, 0>
Reply for seq 2, return code: Egress-ok
ping mpls rsvp multipoint egress detail count
user@host>ping mpls rsvp sample-lsp multipoint egress 192.168.1.3 detail count 1
Request for seq 1, to interface 70, label 299952
Request for seq 1, to interface 70, no label stack.
Request for seq 1, to interface 67, no label stack.
Reply for seq 1, egress 192.168.1.3, return code: Egress-ok, time: 0.242 ms
Local transmit time: 1205310695s 215737us
Remote receive time: 1205310695s 215979us
--- lsping, egress 192.168.1.3 statistics --1 packets transmitted, 1 packets received, 0% packet loss
ping mpls rsvp multipoint detail count
user@host>ping mpls rsvp sample-lsp multipoint detail count 1
Request for seq 1, to interface 70, label 299952
Request for seq 1, to interface 70, no label stack.
Request for seq 1, to interface 67, no label stack.
Reply for seq 1, return code: Unknown TLV, time: 9.877 ms
Local transmit time: 1205310615s 347317us
Remote receive time: 1205310615s 357194us
Reply for seq 1, egress 192.168.1.3, return code: Egress-ok, time: 0.351 ms
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Local transmit time: 1205310615s 347262us
Remote receive time: 1205310615s 347613us
Reply for seq 1, egress 192.168.1.13, return code: Egress-ok, time: 0.301 ms
Local transmit time: 1205310615s 347167us
Remote receive time: 1205310615s 347468us
Timeout for seq 1, egress 192.168.1.1
Timeout for seq 1, egress 192.168.1.4
Timeout for seq 1, egress 192.168.1.14
--- lsping, egress 192.168.1.1 statistics --1 packets transmitted, 0 packets received, 100% packet loss
--- lsping, egress 192.168.1.3 statistics --1 packets transmitted, 1 packets received, 0% packet loss
--- lsping, egress 192.168.1.4 statistics --1 packets transmitted, 0 packets received, 100% packet loss
--- lsping, egress 192.168.1.13 statistics --1 packets transmitted, 1 packets received, 0% packet loss
--- lsping, egress 192.168.1.14 statistics --1 packets transmitted, 0 packets received, 100% packet loss
ping mpls rsvp destination detail count size
user@host>ping mpls rsvp chaser-access destination 192.168.0.1 detail count 1 size 4468
Request for seq 1, to interface 88, label 299984, packet size 4468
Reply for seq 1, return code: Egress-ok, time: 44.804 ms
Local transmit time: 2009-03-30 22:05:02 CEST 408.629 ms
Remote receive time: 2009-03-30 22:05:02 CEST 453.433 ms
--- lsping statistics --1 packets transmitted, 1 packets received, 0% packet loss
ping mpls rsvp destination detail sweep size
user@router> ping mpls rsvp chaser-access destination 192.168.0.1 detail sweep size 4500
Request for seq 1, to interface 86, no label stack., packet size 100
Reply for seq 1, return code: Egress-ok, time: -39.264 ms
Local transmit time: 2009-04-24 14:05:40 CEST 541.423 ms
Remote receive time: 2009-04-24 14:05:40 CEST 502.159 ms
Request for seq 2, to interface 86, no label stack., packet size 2300
Reply for seq 2, return code: Egress-ok, time: -38.179 ms
Local transmit time: 2009-04-24 14:05:41 CEST 544.240 ms
Remote receive time: 2009-04-24 14:05:41 CEST 506.061 ms
Request for seq 3, to interface 86, no label stack., packet size 4500
Timeout for seq 3
Request for seq 4, to interface 86, no label stack., packet size 3400
Reply for seq 4, return code: Egress-ok, time: -37.545 ms
Local transmit time: 2009-04-24 14:05:45 CEST 549.953 ms
Remote receive time: 2009-04-24 14:05:45 CEST 512.408 ms
Request for seq 5, to interface 86, no label stack., packet size 3952
Reply for seq 5, return code: Egress-ok, time: -37.176 ms
Local transmit time: 2009-04-24 14:05:46 CEST 555.881 ms
Remote receive time: 2009-04-24 14:05:46 CEST 518.705 ms
Request for seq 6, to interface 86, no label stack., packet size 4228
Reply for seq 6, return code: Egress-ok, time: -36.962 ms
Local transmit time: 2009-04-24 14:05:47 CEST 561.809 ms
Remote receive time: 2009-04-24 14:05:47 CEST 524.847 ms
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Request for seq 7, to interface 86, no label stack., packet size 4368
Reply for seq 7, return code: Egress-ok, time: -36.922 ms
Local transmit time: 2009-04-24 14:05:48 CEST 568.738 ms
Remote receive time: 2009-04-24 14:05:48 CEST 531.816 ms
Request for seq 8, to interface 86, no label stack., packet size 4440
Reply for seq 8, return code: Egress-ok, time: -36.855 ms
Local transmit time: 2009-04-24 14:05:49 CEST 575.669 ms
Remote receive time: 2009-04-24 14:05:49 CEST 538.814 ms
Request for seq 9, to interface 86, no label stack., packet size 4476
Timeout for seq 9
Request for seq 10, to interface 86, no label stack., packet size 4460
Reply for seq 10, return code: Egress-ok, time: -36.906 ms
Local transmit time: 2009-04-24 14:05:53 CEST 584.382 ms
Remote receive time: 2009-04-24 14:05:53 CEST 547.476 ms
Request for seq 11, to interface 86, no label stack., packet size 4480
Timeout for seq 11
Request for seq 12, to interface 86, no label stack., packet size 4472
Timeout for seq 12
Request for seq 13, to interface 86, no label stack., packet size 4468
Reply for seq 13, return code: Egress-ok, time: -36.943 ms
Local transmit time: 2009-04-24 14:06:00 CEST 594.884 ms
Remote receive time: 2009-04-24 14:06:00 CEST 557.941 ms
Request for seq 14, to interface 86, no label stack., packet size 4476
Timeout for seq 14
Request for seq 15, to interface 86, no label stack., packet size 4472
Timeout for seq 15
--- lsp ping sweep result--Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) is 4468 bytes
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request mpls lsp adjust-autobandwidth
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 200
Syntax (EX and QFX Series Switches) on page 200
request mpls lsp adjust-autobandwidth
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<name lsp-name>
Syntax (EX and QFX
Series Switches)
request mpls lsp adjust-autobandwidth
<name lsp-name>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Description
Manually trigger a bandwidth allocation adjustment for active label-switched paths
(LSPs).
Without running this command, the bandwidth adjustment is recomputed at a
configurable interval. The default interval is 5 minutes. If you do not want to wait for the
periodic adjustment (for example, during a software demonstration), this command is
useful.
During bandwidth allocation adjustment, the LSP stays up to enable the bandwidth to
be changed without dropping any traffic. This functionality is often referred to as
make-before-break.
Options
none—Manually trigger a bandwidth allocation adjustment for all active LSP paths.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
name lsp-name—(Optional) Manually trigger a bandwidth allocation adjustment on the
specified LSP only.
Additional Information
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
200
For this command to work properly, the following conditions must exist:
•
Automatic bandwidth allocation must be enabled on the LSP. The parameters for
adjustment interval and maximum average bandwidth are not reset after you issue
the request mpls lsp adjust-autobandwidth command.
•
The difference between the adjusted bandwidth and the current LSP path bandwidth
must be greater than the threshold limit.
maintenance
•
auto-bandwidth on page 114
•
Configuring Automatic Bandwidth Allocation for LSPs on page 81
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
request mpls lsp adjust-auto-bandwidth on page 201
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
request mpls lsp adjust-auto-bandwidth
user@host> request mpls lsp adjust-auto-bandwidth
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201
MPLS on the QFX Series
show ldp database
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show ldp database
<brief | detail | extensive>
<inet | l2circuit>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<session session>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D10 for the QFX Series and for EX4600
switches.
Display entries in the LDP database.
none—Display standard information about all entries in the LDP database for all routing
instances.
brief | detail | extensive—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
inet | l2circuit—(Optional) Display only IPv4 or Layer 2 circuit bindings.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display routing instance information for the specified
instance only.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
session session—(Optional) Display database for the specified session only. session is
the destination address of the LDP session.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
202
view
•
MPLS Feature Support on the QFX Series and EX4600 Switch Overview on page 15
show ldp database on page 204
show ldp database l2circuit detail on page 204
show ldp database session on page 205
show ldp database (Ingress Node with Multipoint LDP Inband Signaling for
Point-to-Multipoint LSPs) on page 205
show ldp database (Egress Node with Multipoint LDP Inband Signaling for
Point-to-Multipoint LSPs) on page 206
show ldp database l2circuit extensive on page 206
Table 15 on page 203 describes the output fields for the show ldp database command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Table 15: show ldp database Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Input label
database
Label received from the other router.
All levels
Output label
database
Label advertised to the other router.
All levels
session-identifier
Session identifier, which includes the local and remote label space identifiers.
All levels
Label
Label binding to a route prefix.
All levels
Prefix
Route prefix. either the , or the
All levels
It can be one of the following values:
•
IP prefix.
•
Point-to-multipoint root address, multicast source address, and multicast
group address when multipoint LDP (M-LDP) inband signaling is configured.
•
Layer 2 encapsulation type.
Layer 2 encapsulation types are displayed in the format L2CKT control word
status encapsulation-type vc-number, for example, L2CKT CtflWord FRAME RELAY
VC 2
•
•
control-word-status—Displays whether the use of the control word has been
negotiated for this virtual circuit:
•
NoCtrlWord
•
CtrlWord
encapsulation-type—Encapsulation type:
•
FRAME RELAY
•
ATM AAL5
•
ATM CELL
•
VLAN
•
ETHERNET
•
CISCO_HDLC
•
PPP
•
VC number—Virtual circuit number. It can have any numeric value.
•
(Stale)—When you display the LDP database for the neighbor of a restarting
router, the bindings leaned from the restarting neighbor are displayed as
(Stale). Stale bindings are deleted if they are not refreshed within the recovery
time.
MTU
MTU of the Layer 2 circuit. MTU is displayed for all encapsulation types except
ATM cell encapsulations.
detail
VCCV Control
Channel types
Virtual Circuit Connection Verification (VCCV) control channel types
extensive
•
MPLS router alert label
•
MPLS PW label with TTL=1
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Table 15: show ldp database Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
VCCV Control
Verification types
The only valid VCCV control verification type is LSP ping.
extensive
TDM payload size
Size of the Time Division Multiplex (TDM) payload.
All levels
TDM bitrate
Bit rate for the TDM traffic.
All levels
Requested VLAN ID
(VLANs) VLAN identifier of the Layer 2 circuit.
detail
Cell bundle size
(ATM cell encapsulations) Maximum number of cells that the Layer 2 circuit
can receive in a packet.
detail
State
State of the label binding:
detail
•
Active—Label binding has been installed and distributed appropriately. A
label binding is almost always in this state.
•
New—New label that has not yet been distributed.
•
MapRcv—Waiting to receive a label mapping message.
•
MapSend—Waiting to send a label mapping message.
•
RelRcv—Waiting to receive a label release message.
•
RelRsnd—Waiting to receive a label release message before resending
label mapping message.
Age
•
RelSend—Waiting to send a label release message.
•
ReqSend—Waiting to send a label request message.
•
W/dSend—Waiting to send a label withdrawal message.
Time elapsed since the binding was created.
detail
Sample Output
show ldp database
user@host> show ldp database
Input label database, 10.255.245.222:0--10.255.245.221:0
Label
Prefix
3
10.255.245.221/32 (Stale)
100018
10.255.245.222/32
100011
L2CKT FRAME RELAY VC 11
Output label database, 10.255.245.222:0--10.255.245.221:0
Label
Prefix
3
10.255.245.221/32
100018
10.255.245.222/32
100011
L2CKT FRAME RELAY VC 1
show ldp database l2circuit detail
user@host> show ldp database l2circuit detail
Input label database, 10.255.245.44:0--10.255.245.45:0
Label
Prefix
100176
L2CKT CtrlWord ATM CELL (VC Mode) VC 100
Cell bundle size: 80
204
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
100256
State: Active
Age: 9:48
L2CKT CtrlWord FRAME RELAY VC 101
MTU: 4470
State: Active
Age: 9:48
Output label database, 10.255.245.44:0--10.255.245.45:0
Label
Prefix
100048
L2CKT CtrlWord ATM CELL (VC Mode) VC 100
Cell bundle size: 80
State: Active
Age: 9:48
100112
L2CKT CtrlWord FRAME RELAY VC 101
MTU: 4470
State: Active
Age: 9:48
show ldp database session
user@host> show ldp database session 10.1.1.195
Input label database, 10.0.0.194:0--10.1.1.195:0
Label
Prefix
100002
10.255.245.197/32
100003
10.255.245.196/32
100004
10.0.0.194/32
3
10.1.1.195/32
100000
L2CKT NoCtrlWord FRAME RELAY VC 1
100001
L2CKT CtrlWord FRAME RELAY VC 2
Output label database, 10.0.0.194:0--10.1.1.195:0
Label
Prefix
100003
10.255.245.197/32
100004
10.1.1.195/32
100002
10.255.245.196/32
3
10.0.0.194/32
100000
L2CKT CtrlWord FRAME RELAY VC 2
100001
L2CKT NoCtrlWord FRAME RELAY VC 1
show ldp database (Ingress Node with Multipoint LDP Inband Signaling for Point-to-Multipoint LSPs)
user@host> show ldp database
Input label database, 1.1.1.2:0--1.1.1.3:0
Label
Prefix
299808
1.1.1.2/32
3
1.1.1.3/32
299792
1.1.1.6/32
299776
10.255.2.227/32
299840
P2MP root-addr 1.1.1.2, grp: 232.2.2.2, src: 1.2.7.7
299824
P2MP root-addr 1.1.1.2, grp: 232.1.1.2, src: 192.168.219.11
Output label database, 1.1.1.2:0--1.1.1.3:0
Label
Prefix
3
1.1.1.2/32
299776
1.1.1.3/32
299808
1.1.1.6/32
299792
10.255.2.227/32
Input label database, 1.1.1.2:0--1.1.1.6:0
Label
Prefix
299856
1.1.1.2/32
299792
1.1.1.3/32
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3
299776
299888
299808
299824
299840
299872
1.1.1.6/32
10.255.2.227/32
P2MP root-addr 1.1.1.2,
P2MP root-addr 1.1.1.2,
P2MP root-addr 1.1.1.2,
P2MP root-addr 1.1.1.2,
P2MP root-addr 1.1.1.2,
grp:
grp:
grp:
grp:
grp:
232.2.2.2,
232.1.1.1,
232.1.1.2,
232.1.1.3,
ff3e::1:2,
src:
src:
src:
src:
src:
1.2.7.7
192.168.219.11
192.168.219.11
192.168.219.11
abcd::1:2:7:7
Output label database, 1.1.1.2:0--1.1.1.6:0
Label
Prefix
3
1.1.1.2/32
299776
1.1.1.3/32
299808
1.1.1.6/32
299792
10.255.2.227/32
show ldp database (Egress Node with Multipoint LDP Inband Signaling for Point-to-Multipoint LSPs)
user@host> show ldp database
Input label database, 10.255.2.227:0--1.1.1.3:0
Label
Prefix
299808
1.1.1.2/32
3
1.1.1.3/32
299792
1.1.1.6/32
299776
10.255.2.227/32
Output label database, 10.255.2.227:0--1.1.1.3:0
Label
Prefix
299856
1.1.1.2/32
299776
1.1.1.3/32
299792
1.1.1.6/32
3
10.255.2.227/32
Input label database, 10.255.2.227:0--1.1.1.6:0
Label
Prefix
299856
1.1.1.2/32
299792
1.1.1.3/32
3
1.1.1.6/32
299776
10.255.2.227/32
Output label database, 10.255.2.227:0--1.1.1.6:0
Label
Prefix
299856
1.1.1.2/32
299776
1.1.1.3/32
299792
1.1.1.6/32
3
10.255.2.227/32
299888
P2MP root-addr 1.1.1.2, grp: 232.2.2.2,
299808
P2MP root-addr 1.1.1.2, grp: 232.1.1.1,
299824
P2MP root-addr 1.1.1.2, grp: 232.1.1.2,
299840
P2MP root-addr 1.1.1.2, grp: 232.1.1.3,
299872
P2MP root-addr 1.1.1.2, grp: ff3e::1:2,
src:
src:
src:
src:
src:
1.2.7.7
192.168.219.11
192.168.219.11
192.168.219.11
abcd::1:2:7:7
show ldp database l2circuit extensive
user@host> show ldp database l2circuit extensive
Input label database, 10.255.245.198:0--10.255.245.194:0
Label
Prefix
299872
L2CKT CtrlWord PPP VC 100
MTU: 4470
VCCV Control Channel types:
MPLS router alert label
MPLS PW label with TTL=1
VCCV Control Verification types:
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Label
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
LSP ping
Prefix
State: Active
Age: 19:23:08
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show ldp fec-filters
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show ldp fec-filters
<fec>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display information about configured Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) forwarding
equivalence class (FEC) filters.
fec—(Optional) Display FEC filter information for the specified FEC.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display FEC filter information for the specified
instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show ldp fec-filters on page 208
Table 16 on page 208 lists the output fields for the show ldp fec-filters command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 16: show ldp fec-filters Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Ingress
Names of the FEC filters on the ingress routers.
Transit
Names of the FEC filters on the transit routers.
Sample Output
show ldp fec-filters
user@host> show ldp fec-filters 10/8
10.22.1.2/32
Ingress: f1-10.22.1.2/32 (index: 3)
Transit: (null) (index: 0)
208
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show ldp interface
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show ldp interface
<brief | detail | extensive>
<interface-name>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display the status of Label Distribution Protocol (LDP)-enabled interfaces.
none—Display standard status information about all LDP-enabled interface for all routing
instances.
interface-name—(Optional) Display information for the specified interface.
brief | detail | extensive—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display information for the specified routing instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show ldp interface extensive on page 210
Table 17 on page 209 describes the output fields for the show ldp interface command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 17: show ldp interface Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of
Output
Interface
Interface name.
All levels
Label space ID
Label space identifier that the router is advertising on the interface.
All levels
Nbr count
Number of neighbors on the interface.
All levels
Next hello
How long until the next hello packet is sent on this interface, in
seconds.
All levels
Hello interval
One-third of the negotiated hold time (in seconds). If the
user-configured value for the hello interval is smaller than the
computed value, the user-configured value is used.
detail
extensive
Hold time
Configured hold time, in seconds.
detail
extensive
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Table 17: show ldp interface Output Fields (continued)
Level of
Output
Field Name
Field Description
Transport address
Address to which the neighbor wants the local route to establish
the LDP session.
extensive
Local hello interval
Locally configured hello interval.
extensive
Sample Output
show ldp interface extensive
user@host> show ldp interface extensive
Interface
Label space ID
Nbr count
Next hello
fe-0/0/3.0
10.255.245.6:0
2
0
Hello interval: 1, Hold time: 15, Transport address: 10.255.245.6
Local hello interval: 2, Index: 69
210
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show ldp neighbor
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show ldp neighbor
<brief | detail | extensive>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<neighbor-address>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
neighbor-address option added in Junos OS Release 8.5.
Display Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) neighbor information.
none—Display standard information about LDP neighbors for all routing instances.
brief | detail | extensive—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display information for the specified routing instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
neighbor-address—(Optional) Display information about the specified LDP neighbor.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
clear ldp neighbor on page 171
show ldp neighbor extensive on page 212
Table 18 on page 211 describes the output fields for the show ldp neighbor command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 18: show ldp neighbor Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Address
IP address of the neighbor.
All levels
Interface
Interface over which the neighbor was discovered.
All levels
Label space ID
Label space identifier advertised by the neighbor.
All levels
Hold time
Remaining hold time before the neighbor expires, in seconds.
All levels
Transport address
Address to which the neighbor wants the local route to establish
the LDP session.
detail
Configuration sequence
Counter that increments whenever the neighbor changes its
configuration.
detail
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Table 18: show ldp neighbor Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Up for
Length of time the LDP neighbor has been in operation.
detail extensive
Reference count
Reference count for the LDP neighbor.
extensive
Hold time
Displays the neighbor's hold time. The hold time is the proposed
hold times for the local and peer routers.
extensive
Proposed local/peer
Hold time value proposed by the local router and the peer router.
extensive
Sample Output
show ldp neighbor extensive
user@host> show ldp neighbor extensive
Address
Interface
Label space ID
Hold Time
192.168.37.23
so-1/0/0.0
10.255.245.5:0
44
Transport address: 10.255.245.5, Configuration sequence: 6
Up for 00:03:37
Reference count: 1
Hold time: 45, Proposed local/peer: 15/45
212
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show ldp path
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show ldp path
<brief | detail | extensive>
<destination>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) label-switched paths (LSPs).
none—Display standard information about all LDP LSPs for all routing instances.
brief | detail | extensive—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
destination—(Optional) Restrict the output to entries that match the specified destination
prefix.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display information for the specified routing instance
only.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show ldp path extensive on page 214
Table 19 on page 213 describes the output fields for the show ldp path command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 19: show ldp path Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Output Session
(label)
Session ID and labels that this system has sent using LDP. These correspond
to MPLS packets received.
Input Session
(label)
Session ID and labels that this system has received using LDP. These correspond
to MPLS packets transmitted.
route
MPLS route.
Attached route
Route corresponding to the LSP.
Ingress route
The router acts as the ingress for the LSP.
Reference count
Reference count for the LDP neighbor.
Transit route
Names of the forwarding equivalence class (FEC) filters on the transit routers.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 19: show ldp path Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Global label
MPLS label that is used globally.
Sample Output
show ldp path extensive
user@host> show ldp path extensive
Output Session (label)
Input Session (label)
10.255.14.220:0(3)
( )
Attached route: 10.255.14.221/32
Reference count: 3, Global label: 3
10.255.14.220:0(100000)
10.255.14.220:0(3)
Attached route: 10.255.14.220/32, Ingress route
Reference count: 2, Transit route, Global label: 100000
10.255.14.220:0(100001)
10.255.14.220:0(100001)
Attached route: 10.255.14.214/32, Ingress route
Reference count: 2, Transit route, Global label: 100001
214
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show ldp route
Syntax
Release Information
show ldp route
<brief | detail | extensive>
<destination>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Description
Display the entries in the Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) internal topology table. The
internal topology table contains routes from inet.0 and inet.3 and is used when binding
a label to a forwarding equivalence class (FEC).
Options
none—Display standard information about all entries in the LDP internal topology table
for all routing instances.
brief | detail | extensive—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
destination—(Optional) Restrict the output to entries that are longer than the specified
destination prefix and prefix length.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display entries for the specified routing instance
only.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show ldp route detail on page 217
show ldp route extensive on page 217
Table 20 on page 215 describes the output fields for the show ldp route command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 20: show ldp route Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Destination
Destination prefix.
Next-hop intf/lsp/table
Interface that is the next hop to the destination prefix.
Next-hop address
IP address of the next hop.
Session ID
LDP session ID.
Route flags
Information about the route. For example, the Ingress TTL propagate
flag indicates that the time-to-live (TTL) value is being propagated
with the route.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 20: show ldp route Output Fields (continued)
216
Field Name
Field Description
Bound to outgoing label
The route has been bound to LSPs with the label being distributed for
that LSP.
Topology entry
The topology that the route is bound to.
Ingress route status
Status of the ingress route. For example, it could be Active or Inactive.
Last modified
The length of time since the ingress route status last changed.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Sample Output
show ldp route detail
user@host> show ldp route 10.255.8.5 detail
Destination
Next-hop intf/lsp
Next-hop address
10.255.8.5/32
f1
Session ID 10.255.170.84:0--10.255.170.92:0
fe-0/0/0.0
192.168.100.2
Session ID 10.255.170.84:0--10.255.8.5:0
so-0/2/1.0
Session ID 10.255.170.84:0--10.255.8.5:0
so-0/2/2.0
Session ID 10.255.170.84:0--10.255.8.3:0
Bound to outgoing label 299776, Topology entry: 0x8c38a80
BFD dest addr
BFD state LSP-ping Next-hop addr
Next-hop intf/lsp
127.0.0.64
up
up
192.168.100.2
fe-0/0/0.0
127.0.1.64
up
up
so-0/2/1.0
127.0.2.64
up
up
so-0/2/2.0
127.0.3.64
up
up
f1
.....
show ldp route extensive
user@host> show ldp route extensive
Destination
Next-hop intf/lsp/table
10.0.0.0/30
ge-1/2/0.18
Session ID 192.168.0.6:0--192.168.0.5:0
Route flags: None
Destination
Next-hop intf/lsp/table
10.0.0.4/30
ge-1/2/0.18
Session ID 192.168.0.6:0--192.168.0.5:0
Route flags: None
Destination
Next-hop intf/lsp/table
10.0.0.8/30
ge-1/2/1.21
Session ID 192.168.0.6:0--192.168.0.4:0
Route flags: None
Destination
Next-hop intf/lsp/table
10.0.0.12/30
ge-1/2/1.21
Session ID 192.168.0.6:0--192.168.0.4:0
Route flags: None
Destination
Next-hop intf/lsp/table
10.0.0.16/30
ge-1/2/0.18
Route flags: None
Destination
Next-hop intf/lsp/table
10.0.0.18/32
Route flags: None
Destination
Next-hop intf/lsp/table
10.0.0.20/30
ge-1/2/1.21
Route flags: None
Destination
Next-hop intf/lsp/table
10.0.0.21/32
Route flags: None
Destination
Next-hop intf/lsp/table
192.168.0.1/32
ge-1/2/0.18
Session ID 192.168.0.6:0--192.168.0.5:0
Route flags: None
Destination
Next-hop intf/lsp/table
192.168.0.2/32
ge-1/2/1.21
Session ID 192.168.0.6:0--192.168.0.4:0
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Next-hop address
10.0.0.17
Next-hop address
10.0.0.17
Next-hop address
10.0.0.22
Next-hop address
10.0.0.22
Next-hop address
Next-hop address
Next-hop address
Next-hop address
Next-hop address
10.0.0.17
Next-hop address
10.0.0.22
217
MPLS on the QFX Series
ge-1/2/0.18
10.0.0.17
Session ID 192.168.0.6:0--192.168.0.5:0
Route flags: None
Destination
Next-hop intf/lsp/table
Next-hop address
192.168.0.3/32
ge-1/2/1.21
10.0.0.22
Session ID 192.168.0.6:0--192.168.0.4:0
Route flags: None
Destination
Next-hop intf/lsp/table
Next-hop address
192.168.0.4/32
ge-1/2/1.21
10.0.0.22
Session ID 192.168.0.6:0--192.168.0.4:0
Bound to outgoing label 299808, Topology entry: 0x92a483c
Ingress route status: Active, Last modified: 00:01:19 ago
Route flags: Ingress TTL propagate, Transit TTL propagate
Destination
Next-hop intf/lsp/table
Next-hop address
192.168.0.5/32
ge-1/2/0.18
10.0.0.17
Session ID 192.168.0.6:0--192.168.0.5:0
Bound to outgoing label 299792, Topology entry: 0x92a47f8
Ingress route status: Active, Last modified: 00:01:19 ago
Route flags: Ingress TTL propagate, Transit TTL propagate
Destination
Next-hop intf/lsp/table
Next-hop address
192.168.0.6/32
lo0.6
Bound to outgoing label 3, Topology entry: 0x92a4a5c
Ingress route status: Inactive
Route type: Egress route
Route flags: None
218
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show ldp session
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show ldp session
<brief | detail | extensive>
<destination>
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display information about Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) sessions.
none—Display standard information about all LDP sessions for all routing instances.
brief | detail | extensive—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
destination—(Optional) Restrict LDP session display to the specified address.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display routing instance information for the specified
instance. If instance-name is omitted, information is displayed for the master instance.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
clear ldp session on page 172
show ldp session brief on page 222
show ldp session detail on page 222
show ldp session extensive on page 223
Table 21 on page 219 describes the output fields for the show ldp session command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 21: show ldp session Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Address
Transport address of the session.
any
State
State of the session: Nonexistent, Connecting, Initialized, OpenRec, OpenSent,
Operational, or Closing. The states correspond to the state diagram specified
in Internet Draft LDP Specification draft-ietf-mpls-rfc3036bis-01.txt.
any
Connection
TCP connection state: Closed, Opening, or Open.
any
Hold time
Time remaining until the session will be closed, in seconds.
any
Session ID
LDP identifiers of the peers of this session.
detail extensive
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MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 21: show ldp session Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Next keepalive
Time until next keepalive is sent, in seconds.
detail extensive
Active
Whether the local router is playing the active role in the session and during
session establishment.
detail extensive
Passive
Whether the local router is playing the passive role in the session and during
session establishment.
detail extensive
Maximum PDU
Maximum protocol data unit (PDU) size (packet size) for the session.
detail extensive
Hold time
Time remaining until the session will be closed, in seconds. This value
corresponds to the one configured using the keepalive-timeout statement
configured at the [edit protocols ldp] hierarchy level.
detail extensive
Neighbor count
Number of neighbors that are contributing to the session.
detail extensive
Keepalive interval
Keepalive interval, in seconds.
detail extensive
Connect retry
interval
TCP connection retry interval, in seconds.
detail extensive
Local address
Local transport address.
detail extensive
Remote address
Remote transport address.
detail extensive
Up for
Time that this session has been up.
detail extensive
Last down
Time since the session last went down.
detail extensive
Reason
Reason the session went down:
detail extensive
220
•
Aborted graceful restart
•
Authentication key was changed
•
Bad type length value (TLV)
•
Bad protocol data unit (PDU) packets
•
Command-line interface (CLI) command
•
Connect time expired
•
Connection error
•
Connection reset
•
Error during initialization
•
Hold time expired
•
No adjacency or all adjacencies down
•
Notification received
•
Received notification from peer
•
Unexpected End of File (EOF)
•
Unknown reason
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Table 21: show ldp session Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Number of session
flaps
Number of times the session changes from up to down.
detail extensive
Restarting
LDP is in the process of gracefully restarting.
detail extensive
Capabilities
advertised
LDP capabilities advertised to a peer.
detail extensive
Capabilities
received
LDP capabilities received from a peer.
detail extensive
Protection
Information about the status of MPLS LDP session protection.
detail extensive
restart complete in
nnn msec
Amount of time (in milliseconds) remaining until graceful restart is declared
complete.
detail extensive
Local
Information about graceful restart for the local end of an LDP session. Graceful
restart and helper mode are independent.
detail extensive
•
Restart—Status of the grateful restart feature at the local end of the LDP
session: enabled or disabled.
•
Helper mode—Status of the helper mode feature at the local end of the LDP
session: enabled or disabled. When this feature is enabled, the local end of
the LDP session can help the restarting router with its LDP restart procedures.
•
Reconnect time—Amount of time to wait from when a restart is initiated until
the router can exchange LDP messages with its neighbors. The default is
60000 msec and is not configurable. (Reconnect timeout refers to "FT
Reconnect timeout" in draft-ietf-mpls-ldp-restart-06, Internet Draft Graceful
Restart Mechanism for LDP.)
Remote
Information about graceful restart at the remote end of an LDP session. Graceful
restart and helper mode are independent.
•
Restart—Status of the grateful restart feature at the remote end of the LDP
session: enabled or disabled.
•
Helper mode—Status of the helper mode feature at the remote end of the
LDP session: enabled or disabled. When this feature is enabled, the remote
detail extensive
end of the LDP session can help the restarting router with its LDP restart
procedures.
•
Reconnect time—Amount of time in milliseconds from when a restart is
initiated until the remote router can exchange LDP messages with its
neighbors.
Local maximum
recovery time
Amount of time during which the restarting node attempts to recover its lost
states with help from its neighbors (in milliseconds).
detail extensive
Next-hop addresses
received
Next-hop addresses received on the session.
detail extensive
Queue depth
Number of messages that are queued for sending to the peers in the group.
extensive
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Table 21: show ldp session Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Message type
Type of message being sent:
extensive
•
•
Initialization—Session initialization negotiation messages sent by an LSR
to an LDP peer when the transport connection is established.
•
Keeaplive—Keepalive timer messages sent by an LSR to an LDP peer to
keep the session active when there is no information or PDU exchanged
between them.
•
Notification—Notification messages (such as state of the LDP session) or
error information (such as bad PDU length) sent by an LSR to an LDP peer.
•
Address—Message sent by an LSR to an LDP peer to advertise interface
addresses.
•
Address withdraw—Message sent by an LSR to an LDP peer to withdraw
a previously advertised interface address.
•
Label mapping—Message sent by an LSR to an LDP peer to advertise label
mapping for a forwarding equivalence class (FEC).
•
Label request—Message sent by an LSR to an LDP peer to request a label
mapping for an FEC.
•
Label withdraw— Message sent by an LSR to an LDP peer to withdraw a
previously advertised FEC-label mapping.
•
Label release—Message sent by an LSR to an LDP peer to notify the peer
that a specific FEC-label mapping has been released.
•
Label abort—Message sent by an LSR to an LDP peer to abort a label
request message.
•
Total—Messages sent and received during the lifetime of the session.
•
Last 5 seconds—Messages sent and received during the current session.
Sample Output
show ldp session brief
user@host> show ldp session brief
Address
State
10.255.72.160
Operational
10.255.72.164
Operational
10.255.72.172
Operational
Connection
Open
Open
Open
Hold time
21
20
21
show ldp session detail
user@host> show ldp session detail
Address: 192.168.0.3, State: Operational, Connection: Open, Hold time: 27
Session ID: 192.168.0.2:0--192.168.0.3:0
Next keepalive in 7 seconds
Passive, Maximum PDU: 4096, Hold time: 30, Neighbor count: 1
Neighbor types: discovered
Keepalive interval: 10, Connect retry interval: 1
Local address: 192.168.0.2, Remote address: 192.168.0.3
Up for 00:00:02
Capabilities advertised: none
Capabilities received: none
Protection: disabled
Local - Restart: enabled, Helper mode: enabled, Reconnect time: 60000
Remote - Restart: enabled, Helper mode: enabled, Reconnect time: 60000
222
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Local maximum neighbor reconnect time: 120000 msec
Local maximum neighbor recovery time: 240000 msec
Local Label Advertisement mode: Downstream unsolicited
Remote Label Advertisement mode: Downstream unsolicited
Negotiated Label Advertisement mode: Downstream unsolicited
Nonstop routing state: Not in sync
Next-hop addresses received:
10.0.0.5
10.0.0.33
show ldp session extensive
user@host> show ldp session extensive
Address: 192.168.0.3, State: Operational, Connection: Open, Hold time: 22
Session ID: 192.168.0.2:0--192.168.0.3:0
Next keepalive in 2 seconds
Passive, Maximum PDU: 4096, Hold time: 30, Neighbor count: 1
Neighbor types: discovered
Keepalive interval: 10, Connect retry interval: 1
Local address: 192.168.0.2, Remote address: 192.168.0.3
Up for 00:05:37
Capabilities advertised: none
Capabilities received: none
Protection: disabled
Local - Restart: enabled, Helper mode: enabled, Reconnect time: 60000
Remote - Restart: enabled, Helper mode: enabled, Reconnect time: 60000
Local maximum neighbor reconnect time: 120000 msec
Local maximum neighbor recovery time: 240000 msec
Local Label Advertisement mode: Downstream unsolicited
Remote Label Advertisement mode: Downstream unsolicited
Negotiated Label Advertisement mode: Downstream unsolicited
Nonstop routing state: Not in sync
Next-hop addresses received:
10.0.0.5
10.0.0.33
Queue depth: 0
Message type
Total
Last 5 seconds
Sent
Received
Sent
Received
Initialization
1
1
0
0
Keepalive
33
33
1
1
Notification
0
0
0
0
Address
1
1
0
0
Address withdraw
0
0
0
0
Label mapping
7
5
0
0
Label request
0
0
0
0
Label withdraw
3
1
0
0
Label release
1
3
0
0
Label abort
0
0
0
0
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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show ldp statistics
Syntax
show ldp statistics
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Description
Display Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) statistics.
Options
none—Display LDP statistics for all routing instances.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display information for the specified routing instance
only.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
clear ldp statistics on page 173
show ldp statistics on page 227
Table 22 on page 224 lists the output fields for the show ldp statistics command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 22: show ldp statistics Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Total Sent,
Received
Total number of each message type sent and received.
Last 5
seconds Sent,
Received
Number of each message type sent and received in the last 5 seconds.
224
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Table 22: show ldp statistics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Message type
LDP message types:
•
Hello—Messages that enable LDP nodes to discover one another and to detect the failure of a neighbor or
of the link to the neighbor.
•
Initialization—Messages that indicate an LDP session has started.
•
Keepalive—Messages that ensure that the keepalive timeout is not exceeded.
•
Notification—Advisory information and signal error information.
•
Address—Messages with address information.
•
Address withdrawal—Messages regarding address withdrawal.
•
Label mapping—Messages with label mapping information.
•
Label request—Request for a label mapping from a neighboring router.
•
Label withdrawal—Withdrawal message sent by the downstream LSR to recall a label that it previously
mapped. If an LSR that has received a label mapping subsequently determines that it no longer needs that
label, it can send a label release message that frees the label for use.
•
Label release—Message sent by the downstream LSR to recall a label that it previously mapped. If an LSR
that has received a label mapping subsequently determines that it no longer needs that label, it can send a
label release message that frees the label for use.
•
Label abort—Messages about label interruptions.
•
All UDP—All hello messages sent by LSRs to the well-known UDP port, 646.
•
All TCP—All LDP session messages.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 22: show ldp statistics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Event type
LDP events and errors:
•
Sessions opened—Number of LDP sessions that have been opened.
•
Sessions closed—Number of LDP sessions that have been closed.
•
Topology changes—Number of changes to the known LDP topology.
•
No interface—Number of missing interface address messages. When a new LDP session is initialized and
before sending label lapping or label request messages, the LSR advertises its interface addresses with one
or more address messages.
•
No session—Number of missing session messages. Session messages are used to establish, maintain, and
terminate sessions between LDP peers.
•
No adjacency—The exchange of hello adjacency messages results in the creation of an adjacency. The LDP
identifier, together with the sender's LDP identifier in the PDU header, enables the receiver to match the
initialization message with one of its hello adjacencies. If there is no matching hello adjacency, the LSR sends
a session the initialization message is rejected.
•
Unknown version—The LDP protocol version is not supported by the receiver, or it is supported but is not the
version negotiated for the session during session establishment.
•
Malformed PDU—An LDP PDU received on a TCP connection for an LDP session is malformed if the LDP
identifier in the PDU header is unknown to the receiver, or if it is known but is not the LDP identifier associated
by the receiver with the LDP peer for this LDP session.
An LDP PDU is considered to be malformed if the LDP protocol version is not supported by the receiver, or
it is supported but is not the version negotiated for the session during session establishment.
An LDP PDU is considered malformed if the PDU length field is too small (less than 14) or too large (greater
than maximum PDU length).
•
Malformed message—Malformed LDP messages that are part of the LDP discovery mechanism are handled
by silently discarding them.
An LDP message is malformed if the message type is unknown. If the message type is less than 0x8000
(high order bit = 0), it is an error signaled by the unknown message type status code.
An LDP message is considered to be malformed If the message length is too large, meaning that the message
extends beyond the end of the containing LDP PDU.
The LDP message is considered to be malformed if the message length is too small, meaning that it is smaller
than the smallest possible value component.
The LDP message is considered to be malformed if the message is missing one or more mandatory parameters.
•
Unknown message type—If the message type is less than 0x8000 (high order bit = 0) or greater than or equal
to 0x8000 (high order bit = 1) it is considered to be an unknown message.
•
Inappropriate message—The message is not of the type that the receiver expects to receive.
•
Malformed TLV—The TLV lLength is too large or the receiver cannot decode the TLV value. This can indicate
an issue in either the sending or receiving LSR.
•
Bad TLV value—The TLV Length is too large.
•
Missing TLV—The TLV is missing one or more mandatory parameters.
•
PDU too large—The PDF is greater than the maximum PDU length. Section "Initialization Message" in RFC
5036 describes how the maximum PDU length for a session is determined.
Total
Total number of each event or error.
Last 5
seconds
Number of each event or error in the last 5 seconds.
226
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Sample Output
show ldp statistics
user@host> show ldp statistics
Message type
Total
Sent
Received
Hello
265
263
Initialization
2
2
Keepalive
112
111
Notification
0
0
Address
2
2
Address withdraw
0
0
Label mapping
7
6
Label request
0
0
Label withdraw
2
0
Label release
0
2
Label abort
0
0
All UDP
265
263
All TCP
123
121
Event type
Sessions opened
Sessions closed
Topology changes
No interface
No session
No adjacency
Unknown version
Malformed PDU
Malformed message
Unknown message type
Inappropriate message
Malformed TLV
Bad TLV value
Missing TLV
PDU too large
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Last 5 seconds
Sent
Received
2
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
1
0
Total
Last 5 seconds
2
0
11
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
227
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show ldp traffic-statistics
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show ldp traffic-statistics
<instance instance-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<p2mp>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
p2mp option added in Junos OS Release 11.2.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Display Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) traffic statistics.
none—Display LDP traffic statistics for all routing instances.
instance instance-name—(Optional) Display LDP traffic statistics for the specified routing
instance only.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
p2mp—(Optional) Display only the data traffic statistics for a point-to-multipoint LSP.
Additional Information
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
To collect output from this command on a periodic basis, configure the traffic-statistics
statement for the LDP protocol. For more information, see the Junos MPLS Applications
Configuration Guide.
view
•
clear ldp statistics on page 173
show ldp traffic-statistics on page 229
show ldp traffic-statistics p2mp on page 230
show ldp traffic-statistics p2mp (Multipoint LDP Inband Signaling for
Point-to-Multipoint LSPs) on page 230
Table 23 on page 228 lists the output fields for the show ldp traffic-statistics command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 23: show ldp traffic-statistics Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Message type
LDP message types.
228
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Table 23: show ldp traffic-statistics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
FEC
Forwarding equivalence class (FEC) for which LDP traffic statistics are collected.
For P2MP LSPs, FEC appears as a combination of root address and the LSP ID (root_addr:lsp_id).
For M-LDP P2MP LSPs, FEC appears as a combination of root address multicast source address, and
multicast group address (root_addr:lsp_id/grp,src).
Type
Type of traffic originating from a router, either Ingress (originating from this router) or Transit (forwarded
through this router).
Packets
Number of packets passed by the FEC since its LSP came up.
Bytes
Number of bytes of data passed by the FEC since its LSP came up.
Shared
Whether a label is shared by prefixes: Yes or No. A Yes value indicates that several prefixes are bound
to the same label (for example, when several prefixes are advertised with an egress policy). The LDP
traffic statistics for this case apply to all the prefixes and should be treated as such.
Nexthop
The next hop address for P2MP LSPs. (This is the downstream LDP Session ID.)
Sample Output
show ldp traffic-statistics
user@host> show ldp traffic-statistics
FEC
Type
10.35.3.0/30
10.35.10.1/32
Bytes
Shared
Transit
0
0
Yes
Ingress
0
0
No
0
0
Yes
Ingress
0
0
No
Transit
0
0
No
Ingress
11
752
No
Transit
10.255.245.214/32
192.168.37.36/30
Transit
0
0
Yes
Ingress
0
0
No
FEC(root_addr:lsp_id)
Nexthop
10.255.72.160:16777217 192.168.8.81
192.168.8.1
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Packets
Packets
Bytes
Shared
152056
14597376
No
152056
14597376
No
229
MPLS on the QFX Series
192.168.8.65
152056
14597376
No
show ldp traffic-statistics p2mp
user@host> show ldp traffic-statistics p2mp
FEC(root_addr:lsp_id) Nexthop
10.255.72.160:16777217192.168.8.81
192.168.8.1
192.168.8.65
Packets
152056
152056
152056
Bytes Shared
14597376
No
14597376
No
14597376
No
show ldp traffic-statistics p2mp (Multipoint LDP Inband Signaling for Point-to-Multipoint LSPs)
user@host> show ldp traffic-statistics p2mp
P2MP FEC Statistics:
FEC(root_addr:lsp_id/grp,src)
Shared
11.99.0.73:239.10.0.1,11.98.0.10
No
No
11.99.0.73:239.10.0.2,11.98.0.10
No
No
11.99.0.73:239.10.0.1,11.98.0.20
No
No
11.99.0.73:239.10.0.2,11.98.0.20
No
Nexthop
Packets
Bytes
11.99.0.117
243408
121217184
11.99.0.13
236286
117670428
11.99.0.117
248800
123902400
11.99.0.13
240759
119897982
11.99.0.117
250286
124642428
11.99.0.13
243741
121383018
11.99.0.117
252970
125979060
11.99.0.13
245218
122118564
No
230
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show security keychain
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show security keychain
<brief | detail>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.2.
Display information about authentication keychains configured for the Border Gateway
Protocol (BGP), the Label Distribution Protocol (LDP) routing protocols, the Bidirectional
Forwarding Detection (BFD) protocol, and the Intermediate System-to-Intermediate
System (IS-IS) protocol.
none—Display information about authentication keychains.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show security keychain brief on page 232
show security keychain detail on page 233
Table 24 on page 231 describes the output fields for the show security keychain command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 24: show security keychain Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
keychain
The name of the keychain in operation.
All levels
Active-ID Send
Number of routing protocols packets sent with the active key.
All levels
Active-ID Receive
Number of routing protocols packets received with the active key.
All levels
Next-ID Send
Number of routing protocols packets sent with the next key.
All levels
Next-ID Receive
Number of routing protocols packets received with the next key.
All levels
Transition
Amount of time until the current key will be replaced with the next key
in the keychain.
All levels
Tolerance
Configured clock-skew tolerance, in seconds, for accepting keys for a
key chain.
All levels
Id
Identification number configured for the current key.
detail
Algorithm
Authentication algorithm configured for the current key.
detail
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
231
MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 24: show security keychain Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
State
State of the current key.
detail
The value can be:
•
receive
•
send
•
send-receive
For the active key, the State can be send-receive, send, or receive. For
keys that have a future start time, the State is inactive. Compare the
State field to the Mode field.
Option
For IS-IS only, the option determines how Junos OS encodes the
message authentication code in routing protocol packets.
detail
The values can be:
•
basic—Based on RFC 5304.
•
isis-enhanced—Based on RFC 5310.
The default value is basic. When you configure the isis-enhanced option,
Junos OS sends RFC 5310-encoded routing protocol packets and
accepts both RFC 5304-encoded and RFC 5310-encoded routing
protocol packets that are received from other devices.
When you configure basic (or do not include the options statement in
the key configuration) Junos OS sends and receives RFC 5304-encoded
routing protocols packets, and drops 5310-encoded routing protocol
packets that are received from other devices.
Because this setting is for IS-IS only, the TCP and the BFD protocol
ignore the encoding option configured in the key.
Start-time
Time that the current key became active.
detail
Mode
Mode of each key (Informational only.)
detail
The value can be
•
receive
•
send
•
send-receive
The mode of the key is based on the configuration. Suppose you
configure two keys, one with a start-time of today and the other with
a start-time of next week. For both keys, the Mode can be send-receive,
send, or receive, regardless of the configured start-time. Compare the
Mode field to the State field.
Sample Output
show security keychain brief
user@host> show security keychain brief
232
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
keychain
hakr
Active-ID
Send Receive
3
3
Next-ID
Send Receive
1
1
Transition
Tolerance
1d 23:58
3600
show security keychain detail
user@host> show security keychain detail
keychain
Active-ID
Next-ID
Transition
Send Receive
Send Receive
hakr
3
3
1
1
1d 23:58
Id 3, Algorithm hmac-md5, State send-receive, Option basic
Start-time Wed Aug 11 16:28:00 2010, Mode send-receive
Id 1, Algorithm hmac-md5, State inactive, Option basic
Start-time Fri Aug 20 11:30:57 2010, Mode send-receive
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Tolerance
3600
233
MPLS on the QFX Series
show link-management
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
show link-management
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) peer and traffic engineering link information.
This command has no options.
view
•
show link-management peer on page 238
•
show link-management routing on page 240
•
show link-management statistics on page 243
•
show link-management te-link on page 245
show link-management on page 237
Table 25 on page 234 describes the output fields for the show link-management command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 25: show link-management Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Peer Name
Name of the peer.
System identifier
Internal identifier for the peer. The range of values is 0 through 64,000.
State
State of the peer: Up or Down.
Control address
Address to which a control channel is established.
CC local ID
Identifier assigned to the control channel by the local peer. The range of values is 1 through
4,294,967,296.
CC remote ID
Identifier assigned to the control channel by the remote peer. The range of values is 1 through
4,294,967,296.
State
State of the control channel: Up or Down.
TxSeqNum
Sequence number of the hello message being sent to the peer. The range of values is 1 through
4,294,967,295.
RcvSeqNum
Sequence number of the last hello message received from the peer. The range of values is
0 through 4,294,967,295.
234
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Table 25: show link-management Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Flags
Code that provides information about the control channel. Currently supports only code value
R, which indicates that the control channel is restarting after a failure in the control plane, as
when the Link Management Protocol (LMP) process starts or restarts.
TE links
Traffic-engineered links that are managed by their peer.
TE link name
Name of the traffic-engineered link.
State
State of the traffic-engineered link: Up, Down, or Init.
Local identifier
Identifier of the local side of the link.
Remote identifier
Identifier of the remote side of the link.
Local address
Address of the local side of the link.
Remote address
Address of the remote side of the link.
Encoding
Physical layer media type determined by the interfaces contained in the traffic-engineered
link. Typical values include SDH/SONET, Ethernet, Packet, and PDH.
Switching
Type of switching that can be performed on the traffic-engineered link. Supported values are
PSC-1 and Packet.
Minimum bandwidth
Smallest single allocation of bandwidth possible on the traffic-engineered link. This number
is equal to the smallest bandwidth interface that is a member of the traffic-engineered link
(in bps).
Maximum bandwidth
Largest single allocation of bandwidth possible on the traffic-engineered link. This number
is equal to the largest bandwidth interface that is a member of the link (in bps).
Total bandwidth
Sum of the bandwidth, in bits per second (bps) and megabits per second (Mbps), of all
interfaces that are members of the link.
Available bandwidth
Sum of the bandwidths of all interfaces that are members of the link and that are not yet
allocated (in bps).
Name
Name of the interface.
State
State of the interface: Up or Down.
Local ID
Identifier of the local side of the interface.
Remote ID
Identifier of the remote side of the interface.
Bandwidth
Bandwidth, in bps or Mbps, of the member interface.
Used
Whether the resource is allocated to an LSP: Yes or No.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
235
MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 25: show link-management Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
LSP-name
LSP name.
236
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Sample Output
show link-management
user@host> show link-management
Peer name: PEER-A, System identifier: 11973
State: Up, Control address: 10.255.245.4
CC local ID CC remote ID State
TxSeqNum
24547
24547 Up
1027
TE links:
pro4-ba
RcvSeqNum Flags
1026
TE link name: pro4-ba, State: Init
Local identifier: 2662, Remote identifier: 0, Encoding: SDH/SONET, Switching:
PSC-1,
Minimum bandwidth: 155.52Mbps, Maximum bandwidth: 155.52Mbps, Total bandwidth:
155.52Mbps,
Available bandwidth: 155.52Mbps
Name
State Local ID Remote ID
so-1/0/2
Up
21271
0
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Bandwidth Used
155.52Mbps
No
LSP-name
237
MPLS on the QFX Series
show link-management peer
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show link-management peer
<name peer-name>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) peer link information.
none—Display all peer link information.
name peer-name—(Optional) Display information for the specified peer only.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
show link-management on page 234
•
show link-management routing on page 240
•
show link-management statistics on page 243
•
show link-management te-link on page 245
show link-management peer on page 239
Table 26 on page 238 describes the output fields for the show link-management peer
command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 26: show link-management peer Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Peer Name
Name of the peer.
System identifier
Internal identifier for the peer. The range of values is 0 through 64,000.
State
State of the peer: Up or Down.
Control address
Address to which a control channel is established.
Hello interval
How often the routing device sends Link Management Protocol (LMP) hello packets.
Hello dead interval
How long LMP waits before declaring the control channel to be dead. This is an interval during which
the routing device receives no LMP hello packets from the neighbor on a control that is active or up.
CC local ID
Identifier assigned to the control channel by the local peer. The range of values is 1 through
4,294,967,296.
CC remote ID
Identifier assigned to the control channel by the remote peer. The range of values is 1 through
4,294,967,296.
238
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Table 26: show link-management peer Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
State
State of the control channel: Up or Down.
TxSeqNum
Sequence number of the hello message being sent to the peer. The range of values is 1 through
4,294,967,295.
RcvSeqNum
Sequence number of the last hello message received from the peer. The range of values is 0 through
4,294,967,295.
Flags
Code that provides information about the control channel. Currently supports only code value R,
which indicates that the control channel is restarting after a failure in the control plane, as when the
Link Management Protocol (LMP) process starts or restarts.
TE links
Traffic-engineered links that are managed by their peer.
Sample Output
show link-management peer
user@host> show link-management peer
Peer name: sonet, System identifier: 41448
State: Up, Control address: 70.70.70.70
Hello interval: 10000, Hello dead interval: 30000
CC local ID CC remote ID State
TxSeqNum RcvSeqNum Flags
3265
0 ConfSnd
1
0 R
TE links:
to-sonet
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
239
MPLS on the QFX Series
show link-management routing
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show link-management routing
<peer <name name> | te-link <name name>>
<resource <name name>>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) peer or traffic engineering link information
from the routing process.
none—Display all peer and traffic-engineered link information.
peer <name name>—(Optional) Display information for all peers or for the specified peer
only.
resource <name name>—(Optional) Display information for all resources or for the
specified resource only.
te-link <name name>—(Optional) Display information for all traffic-engineered forwarding
paths or for the specified path only.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
show link-management on page 234
•
show link-management peer on page 238
•
show link-management statistics on page 243
•
show link-management te-link on page 245
show link-management routing on page 242
Table 27 on page 240 describes the output fields for the show link-management routing
command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 27: show link-management routing Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Peer Name
Name of the peer.
System identifier
Internal identifier for the peer. The range of values is 0 through 64,000.
State
State of the peer: Up or Down.
Control address
Address to which a control channel is established.
Control channel
Interface over which control packets are sent.
240
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Table 27: show link-management routing Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
State
State of the control channel.
TE link name
Traffic-engineered link name.
State
State of the traffic-engineered link: Up or Down.
Local identifier
Identifier of the local side of the link.
Remote identifier
Identifier of the remote side of the link.
Local address
Address of the local side of the link.
Remote address
Address of the remote side of the link.
Encoding
Physical layer media type determined by the interfaces contained in the traffic-engineered link. Typical
values include SDH/SONET, Ethernet, and Packet.
Minimum bandwidth
Smallest single allocation of bandwidth, in bits per second (bps) or megabits per second (Mbps),
possible on the traffic-engineered link. This number is equal to the smallest bandwidth interface that
is a member of the traffic-engineered link.
Maximum bandwidth
Largest single allocation of bandwidth, in bps or Mbps, possible on the traffic-engineered link. This
number is equal to the largest bandwidth interface that is a member of the link (in bps).
Total bandwidth
Sum of the bandwidth, in bps or Mbps, of all interfaces that are members of the link.
Available bandwidth
Sum of the bandwidth, in bps or Mbps, of all interfaces that are members of the link and that are not
yet allocated.
Resource
Forwarding adjacency LSP information.
Type
Type of resource. The type is always a forwarding adjacency LSP.
State
State of the LSP: Up or Down.
System Identifier
Internal identifier for the peer. The range of values is 0 through 64,000.
Total bandwidth
Bandwidth resource, in bps or Mbps, on the TE-link learned from the routing process.
Traffic parameters
•
Encoding—Physical layer media type determined by the interfaces contained in the traffic-engineered
link. Typical values include SDH/SONET, Ethernet, and Packet.
•
Switching—Type of switching that can be performed on the traffic-engineered link: PSC-1 and
Packet.
•
Granularity—Layer 2 data for switching Layer 2 LSPs for this resource. Not supported. This value is
always unknown.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
241
MPLS on the QFX Series
Sample Output
show link-management routing
user@host> show link-management routing
Peer name: __rpd:fe-0/1/0.0, System identifier: 2147483649
State: Up, Control address: (null)
Control-channel
State
fe-0/1/0.0
Active
Peer name: __rpd:fe-0/1/2.0, System identifier: 2147483650
State: Up, Control address: (null)
Control-channel
State
fe-0/1/2.0
Active
Peer name: __rpd:so-0/2/0.0, System identifier: 2147483651
State: Down, Control address: (null)
Control-channel
State
so-0/2/0.0
Peer name: __rpd:so-0/2/1.0, System identifier: 2147483652
State: Down, Control address: (null)
Control-channel
State
so-0/2/1.0
...
TE link name: __rpd:fe-0/1/0.0, State: Up
Local identifier: 2147483649, Remote identifier: 0,
Local address: 192.168.37.66, Remote address: 192.168.37.66,
Encoding: Ethernet, Minimum bandwidth: 0bps, Maximum bandwidth: 100Mbps,
Total bandwidth: 100Mbps, Available bandwidth: 100Mbps
TE link name: __rpd:fe-0/1/2.0, State: Up
Local identifier: 2147483650, Remote identifier: 0,
Local address: 192.168.37.73, Remote address: 192.168.37.73,
Encoding: Ethernet, Minimum bandwidth: 0bps, Maximum bandwidth: 100Mbps,
Total bandwidth: 100Mbps, Available bandwidth: 100Mbps
TE link name: __rpd:so-0/2/0.0, State: Down
Local identifier: 2147483651, Remote identifier: 0,
Local address: 192.168.37.82, Remote address: 192.168.37.95,
Encoding: Ethernet, Minimum bandwidth: 0bps, Maximum bandwidth: 155.52Mbps,
Total bandwidth: 155.52Mbps, Available bandwidth: 155.52Mbps
...
Resource: falsp-bd, Type: LSP, State: Dn System identifier: 2147483652,
Total bandwidth: 0bps, Traffic parameters: Encoding: Packet, Switching: Packet,
Granularity: Unknown
Resource: falsp-be, Type: LSP, State: Up System identifier: 2147483654,
Total bandwidth: bw[1]=10Mbps, Traffic parameters: Encoding: Packet,
Switching: Packet, Granularity: Unknown
242
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show link-management statistics
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show link-management statistics
<peer <name name>>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 8.0.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display statistical information for Link Management Protocol (LMP) packets.
none—Display information for all peers.
peer <name name>—(Optional) Display information for all peers or for the specified peer
only.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
show link-management on page 234
•
show link-management peer on page 238
•
show link-management routing on page 240
•
show link-management te-link on page 245
show link-management statistics on page 244
Table 28 on page 243 describes the output fields for the show link-management statistics
command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 28: show link-management statistics Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Received packets
Number of received packets by message type. If the count for a message type is zero, that message
type is not displayed. If the count for all message types is zero, this field is not displayed.
Received bad packets
Number of received bad packets by message type. If the count for a message type is zero, that message
type is not displayed. If the count for all message types is zero, this field is not displayed.
Small packets
Number of packets that are too small.
Wrong protocol version
Number of packets specifying the wrong LMP version.
Messages for unknown
peer
Number of packets destined for an unknown peer.
Messages for bad state
Number of packets indicating a state that does not match the recipient.
Stale acknowledgments
Number of configAck and LinkSummaryAck packets received that have a stale message ID.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
243
MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 28: show link-management statistics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Stale negative
acknowledgments
Number of configNack and LinkSummaryNack packets received that have a stale message ID.
Sent packets
Number of sent packets by message type. If the count for a message type is zero, that message type
is not displayed. If the count for all message types is zero, this field is not displayed.
Retransmitted packets
Number of retransmitted packets by message type. If the count for a message type is zero, that
message type is not displayed. If the count for all message types is zero, this field is not displayed.
Dropped packets
Number of packets sent, by message type, that have been dropped by the receiver after the LMP
retransmission interval has been exceeded. If the count for a message type is zero, that message type
is not displayed. If the count for all message types is zero, this field is not displayed.
Sample Output
show link-management statistics
user@host> show link-management statistics peer pro4-a
Statistics for peer pro4-a
Received packets
Config: 1
Hello: 2572
Small packets: 0
Wrong protocol version: 0
Messages for unknown peer: 0
Messages for bad state: 0
Stale acknowledgments: 0
Stale negative acknowledgments: 0
Sent packets
Config: 2
ConfigAck: 1
Hello: 2572
Retransmitted packets
Config: 1
244
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show link-management te-link
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show link-management te-link
<brief | detail>
<name name>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display the resources used to set up Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS)
traffic-engineered forwarding paths.
none—Display information for all traffic-engineered links.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
name name—(Optional) Display information for the specified traffic-engineered link only.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
show link-management on page 234
•
show link-management peer on page 238
•
show link-management routing on page 240
•
show link-management statistics on page 243
show link-management te-link on page 246
Table 29 on page 245 describes the output fields for the show link-management te-link
command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 29: show link-management te-link Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
TE link name
Traffic-engineered link name.
State
State of the traffic-engineered link: Up or Down.
Local identifier
Identifier of the local side of the link.
Remote identifier
Identifier of the remote side of the link.
Local address
Address of the local side of the link.
Remote address
Address of the remote side of the link.
Encoding
Physical layer media type determined by the interfaces contained in the traffic-engineered link. Typical
values include SDH/SONET, Ethernet, Packet, and PDH.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
245
MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 29: show link-management te-link Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Switching
Type of switching that can be performed on the traffic-engineered link. Supported values are PSC-1
and Packet.
Minimum bandwidth
Smallest single allocation of bandwidth, in bits per second (bps) or megabits per second (Mbps),
possible on the traffic-engineered link. This number is equal to the smallest bandwidth interface that
is a member of the traffic-engineered link.
Maximum bandwidth
Largest single allocation of bandwidth, in bps or Mbps, possible on the traffic-engineered link. This
number is equal to the largest bandwidth interface that is a member of the link.
Total bandwidth
Sum of the bandwidth, in bps or Mbps, of all interfaces that are members of the link (in bps).
Available Bandwidth
Sum of the bandwidth, in bps or Mbps, of all interfaces that are members of the link and that are not
yet allocated.
Name
Name of the interface.
State
State of the interface: Up or Down.
Local ID
Identifier of the local side of the interface.
Remote ID
Identifier of the remote side of the interface.
Bandwidth
Bandwidth, in bps or Mbps, of the member interface.
Used
Whether the resource is allocated to an LSP: Yes or No.
LSP-name
LSP name.
Sample Output
show link-management te-link
user@host> show link-management te-link
TE link name: FA-bd, State: Up
Local identifier: 4144, Remote identifier: 0, Local address: 2.2.2.1,
Remote address: 2.2.2.2, Encoding: Ethernet, Switching: Packet,
Minimum bandwidth: 0bps, Maximum bandwidth: 0bps, Total bandwidth: 0bps,
Available bandwidth: 0bps
Name
State Local ID Remote ID
Bandwidth Used LSP-name
falsp-bd
Dn
43077
0
0bps No
TE link name: FA-be, State: Up
Local identifier: 4145, Remote identifier: 0, Local address: 1.1.1.1,
Remote address: 1.1.1.2, Encoding: Ethernet, Switching: Packet,
Minimum bandwidth: 0bps, Maximum bandwidth: 10Mbps, Total bandwidth: 10Mbps,
Available bandwidth: 8Mbps
Name
State Local ID Remote ID
Bandwidth Used LSP-name
falsp-be
Up
43076
0
10Mbps Yes e2elsp-bf
246
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show mpls call-admission-control
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
Release Information
Description
Options
Syntax on page 247
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 247
show mpls call-admission-control
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<lsp-name>
show mpls call-admission-control
<lsp-name>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) label-switched path (LSP) call admission
control (CAC) information.
none—Display CAC information for all LSPs.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
lsp-name—(Optional) Display CAC information for the specified LSP only.
Additional Information
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
The available bandwidth on an LSP path at a particular class type is the total path
bandwidth at that class type minus the total bandwidth reserved by any Layer 2
connection at that class type.
view
show mpls call-admission-control on page 248
Table 30 on page 247 describes the output fields for the show mpls call-admission-control
command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 30: show mpls call-admission-control Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Available bandwidth
Current available bandwidth on each LSP path. Depending on whether the LSP is an E-LSP or a regular
LSP, either per-class bandwidth or a single bandwidth value (corresponding to best-effort bandwidth
at ct0) is displayed. The available bandwidth on an LSP path at a particular class type is the total
path bandwidth at that class type minus the total bandwidth reserved by some Layer 2 connections
at that class type.
Layer2 connections
Different Layer 2 connections that had some bandwidth requirement and were admitted into an LSP
path.
LSP name
LSP pathname.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
247
MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 30: show mpls call-admission-control Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Neighbor address
Neighbor address from which CAC and bandwidth booking are configured for Layer 2 circuits.
Circuit
Interface name and circuit information.
Primary
LSP's primary standby path.
Standby
LSP's secondary standby path.
VC bandwidth
Bandwidth constraints associated with a Layer 2 circuit route.
Sample Output
show mpls call-admission-control
user@host# show mpls call-admission-control
LSP name: pro1-be
*Primary
Available bandwidth: 0bps
LSP name: pro1-be-1
*Primary
Available bandwidth: 60kbps
LSP name: pro1-be-gold
*Primary
Available bandwidth: <ct0 50kbps> <ct1 20kbps> <ct2 30kbps> <ct3 0bps>
Layer2 connections:
Neighbor address: 10.255.245.215, Circuit: so-0/3/0.0(vc 5)
VC bandwidth: <ct0 50kbps> <ct1 40kbps> <ct2 40kbps>
LSP name: pro1-be-gold-2
*Primary
Available bandwidth: <ct0 0bps> <ct1 40kbps> <ct2 40kbps> <ct3 0bps>
LSP name: pro1-be-silver
*Primary
prim1
Available bandwidth: <ct0 10kbps> <ct1 20kbps> <ct2 0bps> <ct3 40kbps>
Layer2 connections:
Neighbor address: 10.255.245.215, Circuit: so-0/3/0.1(vc 3)
VC bandwidth: <ct0 20kbps> <ct1 20kbps>
Standby
sec1
Available bandwidth: <ct0 10kbps> <ct1 10kbps> <ct2 20kbps> <ct3 0bps>
Layer2 connections:
Neighbor address: 10.255.245.215, Circuit: so-0/3/0.1(vc 3)
VC bandwidth: <ct0 20kbps> <ct1 20kbps>
248
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show mpls cspf
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
Release Information
Description
Options
Syntax on page 249
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 249
show mpls cspf
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
show mpls cspf
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Constrained Shortest Path First (CSPF)
statistics.
none—Display MPLS CSFP statistics.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show mpls cspf on page 250
Table 31 on page 249 describes the output fields for the show mpls cspf command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 31: show mpls cspf Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Queue length
Number of LSPs queued for automatic path computation.
current
Current queue length.
maximum
Maximum queue length (high-water mark).
dequeued
Number of aborted computation attempts.
Paths
Counters for label-switched path computations.
total
Sum of the next four fields.
successful
Number of path computations that were successfully completed.
no route
Number of path computations that failed because the destination
is unreachable.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
249
MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 31: show mpls cspf Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Sys Error
Number of path computations that failed because of lack of
memory.
CSPFs
Total number of CSPF computations. A single path might require
multiple CSPF computations.
Time
Time, in seconds, required to perform the label-switched path
computation.
Total
Total amount of time consumed by the CSPF path computation
algorithm.
CSPFs
Total number of CSPF computations.
Avg per CSPF
Average amount of time required for each CSPF computation.
% of rpd
Percentage of routing process CPU used in the CSPF computation.
Sample Output
show mpls cspf
user@host> show mpls cspf
CSPF statistics
Queue length
current
0
Paths
total
0
Time (secs)
total
0.000000
250
maximum
0
successful
0
CSPFs
0.000000
dequeued
0
no route
0
avg per CSPF
0.000000
sys error
0
% of rpd
0.0000
CSPFs
0
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show mpls diffserv-te
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
Release Information
Description
Options
Syntax on page 251
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 251
show mpls diffserve-te
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
show mpls diffserve-te
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) label-switched path (LSP) Differentiated
Services (DiffServ) class and preemption priority information.
none—Display DiffServ classes and priorities used by MPLS LSPs.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show mpls diffserv-te on page 252
Table 32 on page 251 describes the output fields for the show mpls diffserv-te command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 32: show mpls diffserv-te Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Bandwidth model
Bandwidth constraint model supported. The maximum allocation
model (MAM) for EXP-inferred LSPs (E-LSPs) is currently supported.
TE class
DiffServ traffic engineering class.
Traffic class
MPLS class type that corresponds to the DiffServ traffic engineering
class:
Priority
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
•
ct0—Best effort
•
ct1—Assured forwarding
•
ct2—Expedited forwarding
•
ct3—Network control
MPLS preemption priority for this class type, a value from 0 through
7. Interior gateway protocols (IGPs) distribute information about
the available bandwidth for each traffic engineering class.
251
MPLS on the QFX Series
Sample Output
show mpls diffserv-te
user@host> show mpls diffserv-te
Bandwidth model: Maximum Allocation Model with support for E-LSPs.
TE class
Traffic class
Priority
te0
ct0
3
te1
ct1
2
252
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show route forwarding-table
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show route forwarding-table
<detail | extensive | summary>
<ccc ccc-interface-name>
<destination>
<family family-name>
<label label>
<matching ip_prefix>
<multicast>
<vpn vpn>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display the Routing Engine's forwarding table, including the network-layer prefixes and
their next hops. This command is used to help verify that the routing protocol process
has relayed the correction information to the forwarding table. The Routing Engine
constructs and maintains one or more routing tables. From the routing tables, the Routing
Engine derives a table of active routes, called the forwarding table.
none—Display the routes in the forwarding table.
detail | extensive | summary—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
ccc—(Optional) Display the specified circuit cross-connect interface name for entries to
match.
destination —(Optional) Display the destination prefix.
family family-name —(Optional) Display routing table entries for the specified family:
ethernet-switching, inet, inet6, iso, mpls, vlan classification.
label label —(Optional) Display route entries for the specified label name.
matching ip_prefix —(Optional) Display route entries for the specified IP prefix.
multicast—(Optional) Display route entries for multicast routes.
vpn vpn —(Optional) Display route entries for the specified VPN.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
view
•
Example: Configuring MPLS on EX Series Switches
•
Configuring MPLS on Provider Switches (CLI Procedure)
show route forwarding-table on page 255
show route forwarding-table summary on page 256
show route forwarding-table extensive on page 256
show route forwarding-table ccc on page 258
show route forwarding-table family on page 258
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
253
MPLS on the QFX Series
show route forwarding-table label on page 258
show route forwarding-table matching on page 259
show route forwarding-table multicast on page 259
Output Fields
Table 33 on page 254 lists the output fields for the show route forwarding-table command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear. Field names might
be abbreviated (as shown in parentheses) when no level of output is specified or when
the detail keyword is used instead of the extensive keyword.
Table 33: show route forwarding-table Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Routing table
Name of the routing table (for example, inet, inet6, mpls).
All levels
Address family
Address family (for example, IP, IPv6, ISO, MPLS).
All levels
Destination
Destination of the route.
detail, extensive
Route Type (Type)
How the route was placed into the forwarding table. When the detail keyword
is used, the route type might be abbreviated (as shown in parentheses):
All levels
•
cloned (clon)—(TCP or multicast only) Cloned route.
•
destination (dest)—Remote addresses directly reachable through an interface.
•
destination down (iddn)—Destination route for which the interface is
unreachable.
•
interface cloned (ifcl)—Cloned route for which the interface is unreachable.
•
route down (ifdn)—Interface route for which the interface is unreachable.
•
ignore (ignr)—Ignore this route.
•
interface (intf)—Installed as a result of configuring an interface.
•
permanent (perm)—Routes installed by the kernel when the routing table is
initialized.
•
user—Routes installed by the routing protocol process or as a result of the
configuration.
Route reference
(RtRef)
Number of routes to reference.
detail, extensive
Flags
Route type flags:
extensive
Nexthop
254
•
none—No flags are enabled.
•
accounting—Route has accounting enabled.
•
cached—Cache route.
•
incoming-iface interface-number —Check against incoming interface.
•
prefix load balance—Load balancing is enabled for this prefix.
•
sent to PFE—Route has been sent to the Packet Forwarding Engine.
•
static—Static route.
IP address of the next hop to the destination.
detail, extensive
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Table 33: show route forwarding-table Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Next hop type
(Type)
Next-hop type. When the detail keyword is used, the next-hop type might be
abbreviated (as indicated in parentheses):
detail, extensive
•
broadcast (bcst)—Broadcast.
•
deny—Deny.
•
hold—Next hop is waiting to be resolved into a unicast or multicast type.
•
indexed (idxd)—Indexed next hop.
•
indirect (indr)—Indirect next hop.
•
local (locl)—Local address on an interface.
•
routed multicast (mcrt)—Regular multicast next hop
•
multicast (mcst)—Wire multicast next hop (limited to the LAN).
•
multicast discard (mdsc)—Multicast discard.
•
multicast group (mgrp) —Multicast group member.
•
receive (recv)—Receive.
•
reject (rjct) Discard. An ICMP unreachable message was sent.
•
resolve (rslv)—Resolving the next hop.
•
unicast (ucst)—Unicast.
•
unilist (ulst)—List of unicast next hops. A packet sent to this next hop goes
to any next hop in the list.
Index
Software index of the next hop that is used to route the traffic for a given prefix.
detail, extensive none
Route
interface-index
Logical interface index from which the route is learned. For example, for interface
routes, this is the logical interface index of the route itself. For static routes, this
field is zero. For routes learned through routing protocols, this is the logical
interface index from which the route is learned.
extensive
Reference (NhRef)
Number of routes that refer to this next hop.
none detail, extensive
Next-hop interface
(Netif)
Interface used to reach the next hop.
none detail, extensive
Alternate forward
nh index
Index number of the alternate next hop interface. Seen with multicast option
only.
extensive
Next-hop L3
Interface
The next hop layer 3 interface. This option can be expressed as a VLAN name
and is only seen with the multicast option.
extensive
Next-hop L2
Interfaces
The next hop layer 2 interfaces. Seen with multicast option only.
extensive
Sample Output
show route forwarding-table
user@switch> show route forwarding-table
Routing table: default.inet
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
255
MPLS on the QFX Series
Internet:
Destination
default
default
0.0.0.0/32
2.2.2.0/24
2.2.2.0/32
2.2.2.1/32
2.2.2.2/32
2.2.2.2/32
2.2.2.255/32
3.3.3.0/24
3.3.3.0/32
3.3.3.1/32
3.3.3.1/32
3.3.3.2/32
3.3.3.255/32
4.4.4.0/24
8.8.8.8/32
9.9.9.9/32
10.10.10.10/32
10.93.8.0/21
10.93.8.0/32
10.93.13.238/32
10.93.13.238/32
10.93.15.254/32
10.93.15.255/32
14.14.14.0/24
14.14.14.0/32
14.14.14.2/32
14.14.14.2/32
14.14.14.2/32
14.14.14.255/32
224.0.0.0/4
224.0.0.1/32
224.0.0.5/32
255.255.255.255/32
Type RtRef Next hop
user
2 0:12:f2:21:cf:0
perm
0
perm
0
intf
0
dest
0 2.2.2.0
dest
0 0:21:59:cc:89:c0
intf
0 2.2.2.2
dest
0 2.2.2.2
dest
0 2.2.2.255
intf
0
dest
0 3.3.3.0
intf
0 3.3.3.1
dest
0 3.3.3.1
dest
0 0:21:59:cc:89:c1
dest
0 3.3.3.255
user
0 3.3.3.2
user
0 3.3.3.2
intf
0 9.9.9.9
user
0 3.3.3.2
intf
0
dest
0 10.93.8.0
intf
0 10.93.13.238
dest
0 10.93.13.238
dest
0 0:12:f2:21:cf:0
dest
0 10.93.15.255
ifdn
0
iddn
0 14.14.14.0
user
0
intf
0 14.14.14.2
iddn
0 14.14.14.2
iddn
0 14.14.14.255
perm
1
perm
0 224.0.0.1
user
1 224.0.0.5
perm
0
Type Index NhRef Netif
ucst
333
5 me0.0
rjct
36
2
dscd
34
1
rslv 1309
1 ae0.0
recv 1307
1 ae0.0
ucst 1320
1 ae0.0
locl 1308
2
locl 1308
2
bcst 1306
1 ae0.0
rslv 1313
1 ae1.0
recv 1311
1 ae1.0
locl 1312
2
locl 1312
2
ucst 1321
24 ae1.0
bcst 1310
1 ae1.0
ucst 1321
24 ae1.0
ucst 1321
24 ae1.0
locl 1280
1
ucst 1321
24 ae1.0
rslv
323
1 me0.0
recv
321
1 me0.0
locl
322
2
locl
322
2
ucst
333
5 me0.0
bcst
320
1 me0.0
rslv 1319
1 ge-0/0/25.0
recv 1317
1 ge-0/0/25.0
rjct
36
2
locl 1318
2
locl 1318
2
bcst 1316
1 ge-0/0/25.0
mdsc
35
1
mcst
31
3
mcst
31
3
bcst
32
1
show route forwarding-table summary
user@switch> show route forwarding-table summary
Routing table: default.inet
Internet:
user:
6 routes
perm:
5 routes
intf:
8 routes
dest:
12 routes
ifdn:
1 routes
iddn:
3 routes
show route forwarding-table extensive
user@switch> show route forwarding-table summary
Routing table: default.inet [Index 0]
Internet:
Destination: default
Route type: user
Route reference: 2
256
Route interface-index: 0
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Flags: sent to PFE, rt nh decoupled
Nexthop: 0:12:f2:21:cf:0
Next-hop type: unicast
Next-hop interface: me0.0
Index: 333
Reference: 5
Destination: default
Route type: permanent
Route reference: 0
Flags: none
Next-hop type: reject
Route interface-index: 0
Destination: 0.0.0.0/32
Route type: permanent
Route reference: 0
Flags: sent to PFE
Next-hop type: discard
Route interface-index: 0
Destination: 2.2.2.0/24
Route type: interface
Route reference: 0
Flags: sent to PFE
Next-hop type: resolve
Next-hop interface: ae0.0
Destination: 2.2.2.0/32
Route type: destination
Route reference: 0
Flags: sent to PFE
Nexthop: 2.2.2.0
Next-hop type: receive
Next-hop interface: ae0.0
Destination: 2.2.2.1/32
Route type: destination
Route reference: 0
Flags: sent to PFE
Nexthop: 0:21:59:cc:89:c0
Next-hop type: unicast
Next-hop interface: ae0.0
Destination: 2.2.2.2/32
Route type: interface
Route reference: 0
Flags: sent to PFE
Nexthop: 2.2.2.2
Next-hop type: local
Destination: 2.2.2.2/32
Route type: destination
Route reference: 0
Flags: none
Nexthop: 2.2.2.2
Next-hop type: local
Destination: 2.2.2.255/32
Route type: destination
Route reference: 0
Flags: sent to PFE
Nexthop: 2.2.2.255
Next-hop type: broadcast
Next-hop interface: ae0.0
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Index: 36
Index: 34
Reference: 2
Reference: 1
Route interface-index: 66
Index: 1309
Reference: 1
Route interface-index: 66
Index: 1307
Reference: 1
Route interface-index: 66
Index: 1320
Reference: 1
Route interface-index: 0
Index: 1308
Reference: 2
Route interface-index: 66
Index: 1308
Reference: 2
Route interface-index: 66
Index: 1306
Reference: 1
257
MPLS on the QFX Series
show route forwarding-table ccc
user@switch> show route forwarding-table ccc ge-0/0/0.10
Routing table: default.mpls
MPLS:
Destination
Type RtRef Next hop
Type Index NhRef Netif
ge-0/0/0.10 (CCC) user
0 3.3.3.2
Push 300112 1343
2 ae1.0
show route forwarding-table family
user@switch> show route forwarding-table family mpls
Routing table: default.mpls
MPLS:
Destination
Type RtRef
default
perm
0
0
user
0
1
user
0
2
user
0
299776
user
0
299792
user
0
299808
user
0
299824
user
0
299840
user
0
299856
user
0
299872
user
0
299888
user
0
299904
user
0
299920
user
0
299936
user
0
299952
user
0
299968
user
0
299984
user
0
300000
user
0
300016
user
0
300032
user
0
300048
user
0
300064
user
0
ge-0/0/0.1 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.2 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.3 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.4 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.5 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.7 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.8 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.9 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.10 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.11 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.12 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.13 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.14 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.15 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.16 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.17 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.18 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.19 (CCC) user
0
ge-0/0/0.20 (CCC) user
0
Next hop
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.2
Type Index NhRef Netif
dscd
50
1
recv
49
3
recv
49
3
recv
49
3
Pop
1334
2 ge-0/0/0.10
Pop
1339
2 ge-0/0/0.14
Pop
1341
2 ge-0/0/0.2
Pop
1344
2 ge-0/0/0.11
Pop
1345
2 ge-0/0/0.13
Pop
1346
2 ge-0/0/0.18
Pop
1347
2 ge-0/0/0.16
Pop
1348
2 ge-0/0/0.7
Pop
1349
2 ge-0/0/0.20
Pop
1350
2 ge-0/0/0.19
Pop
1351
2 ge-0/0/0.17
Pop
1352
2 ge-0/0/0.9
Pop
1353
2 ge-0/0/0.1
Pop
1354
2 ge-0/0/0.12
Pop
1355
2 ge-0/0/0.8
Pop
1356
2 ge-0/0/0.4
Pop
1357
2 ge-0/0/0.5
Pop
1358
2 ge-0/0/0.3
Pop
1359
2 ge-0/0/0.15
Push 300064 1340
2 ae1.0
Push 299872 1328
2 ae1.0
Push 299792 1323
2 ae1.0
Push 300016 1337
2 ae1.0
Push 299824 1325
2 ae1.0
Push 299920 1331
2 ae1.0
Push 299840 1326
2 ae1.0
Push 299888 1329
2 ae1.0
Push 300112 1343
2 ae1.0
Push 299776 1322
2 ae1.0
Push 299952 1333
2 ae1.0
Push 300096 1342
2 ae1.0
Push 299984 1335
2 ae1.0
Push 299936 1332
2 ae1.0
Push 299808 1324
2 ae1.0
Push 300000 1336
2 ae1.0
Push 300032 1338
2 ae1.0
Push 299904 1330
2 ae1.0
Push 299856 1327
2 ae1.0
show route forwarding-table label
user@switch> show route forwarding-table label 29976
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Routing table: default.mpls
MPLS:
Destination
Type RtRef Next hop
299776
user
0
Type Index NhRef Netif
Pop
1334
2 ge-0/0/0.10
show route forwarding-table matching
user@switch> show route forwarding-table matching 3
Routing table: default.inet
Internet:
show route forwarding-table multicast
user@switch> show route forwarding-table multicast
Routing table: default.inet
Internet:
Destination
Type RtRef Next hop
224.0.0.0/4
perm
1
224.0.0.1/32
perm
0 224.0.0.1
224.0.0.5/32
user
1 224.0.0.5
Type Index NhRef Netif
mdsc
35
1
mcst
31
3
mcst
31
3
Routing table: __master.anon__.inet
Internet:
Destination
Type RtRef Next hop
224.0.0.0/4
perm
0
224.0.0.1/32
perm
0 224.0.0.1
Type Index NhRef Netif
mdsc 1289
1
mcst 1285
1
Routing table: default.inet6
Internet6:
Destination
Type RtRef Next hop
ff00::/8
perm
0
ff02::1/128
perm
0 ff02::1
Type Index NhRef Netif
mdsc
43
1
mcst
39
1
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MPLS on the QFX Series
show mpls interface
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
Release Information
Description
Options
Syntax on page 260
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 260
show mpls interface
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
show mpls interface
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display information about Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS)-enabled interfaces.
none—Display information about MPLS-enabled interfaces.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Additional Information
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
MPLS is enabled on an interface when the interface is configured with both the set protocol
mpls interface interface-name and set interface interface-name unit 0 family mpls
statements.
view
show mpls interface on page 261
Table 34 on page 260 describes the output fields for the show mpls interface command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 34: show mpls interface Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Interface
Name of the interface.
State
State of the interface: Up or Dn (down).
Administrative groups
Administratively assigned colors of the link.
Maximum labels
Maximum number of MPLS labels upon which MPLS can operate
on a logical interface. This is configured using the maximum-labels
statement at the [edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces
interface-name unit logical-unit-number family mpls] or the [edit
interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family mpls]
hierarchy levels.
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Table 34: show mpls interface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Static protection revert time
Time (in seconds) that a static LSP must wait before traffic reverts
from the bypass path to the original path. This is configured using
the protection-revert-time statement at the [edit logical-systems
logical-system-name protocols mpls interface interface-name static]
or the [edit protocols mpls interface interface-name static] hierarchy
levels.
Always mark connection
protection tlv
Enabled or Disabled: Enabled indicates that the
always-mark-connection-protection-tlv statement is configured at
the [edit logical-systems logical-system-name protocols mpls interface
interface-name static] or the [edit protocols mpls interface
interface-name static] hierarchy levels. When this statement is
configured, it marks all OAM traffic transiting this interface in
preparation for switching the traffic to an alternate path based on
the OAM functionality. To switch traffic to the bypass LSP, the
switch-away-lsps statement must be configured.
Switch away lsps
Enabled or Disabled: Enabled indicates that the switch-away-lsps
statement is configured at the [edit logical-systems
logical-system-name protocols mpls interface interface-name static]
or the [edit protocols mpls interface interface-name static] hierarchy
levels. This enables you to switch an LSP away from a network node
using a bypass LSP. This feature can be used in maintenance of
active networks when a network device needs to be replaced
without interrupting traffic passing through the network. The LSPs
can be either static or dynamic.
Sample Output
show mpls interface
user@host> show mpls interface
Interface: ge-0/2/1.57
State: Up
Administrative group: <none>
Maximum labels: 5
Static protection revert time: 5 seconds
Always mark connection protection tlv: Disabled
Switch away lsps : Disabled
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show mpls lsp
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
Release Information
Syntax on page 262
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 262
show mpls lsp
<brief | detail | extensive | terse>
<autobandwidth>
<bidirectional | unidirectional>
<bypass>
<count-active-routes>
<defaults>
<descriptions>
<down | up>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<lsp-type>
<name name>
<p2mp>
<statistics>
<transit>
show mpls lsp
<brief | detail | extensive | terse>
<bidirectional | unidirectional>
<bypass>
<descriptions>
<down | up>
<lsp-type>
<name name>
<p2mp>
<statistics>
<transit>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
defaults option added in Junos OS Release 8.5.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
autobandwidth option added in Junos OS Release 11.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Description
Display information about configured and active dynamic Multiprotocol Label Switching
(MPLS) label-switched paths (LSPs).
Options
none—Display standard information about all configured and active dynamic MPLS LSPs.
brief | detail | extensive | terse—(Optional) Display the specified level of output. The
extensive option displays the same information as the detail option, but covers the
most recent 50 events.
autobandwidth—(Optional) Display automatic bandwidth information. This option is
explained separately (see show mpls lsp autobandwidth).
bidirectional | unidirectional—(Optional) Display bidirectional or unidirectional LSP
information, respectively.
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bypass—(Optional) Display LSPs used for protecting other LSPs.
count-active-routes—(Optional) Display active routes for LSPs.
defaults—(Optional) Display the MPLS LSP default settings.
descriptions—(Optional) Display the MPLS label-switched path (LSP) descriptions. To
view this information, you must configure the description statement at the [edit
protocol mpls lsp] hierarchy level. Only LSPs with a description are displayed. This
command is only valid for the ingress routing device, because the description is not
propagated in RSVP messages.
down | up—(Optional) Display only LSPs that are inactive or active, respectively.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
lsp-type—(Optional) Display information about a particular LSP type:
•
bypass—Sessions for bypass LSPs.
•
egress—Sessions that terminate on this routing device.
•
ingress—Sessions that originate from this routing device.
•
transit—Sessions that pass through this routing device.
name name—(Optional) Display information about the specified LSP or group of LSPs.
p2mp—(Optional) Display information about point-to-multipoint LSPs.
statistics—(Optional) (Ingress and transit routers only) Display accounting information
about LSPs. Statistics are not available for LSPs on the egress routing device, because
the penultimate routing device in the LSP sets the label to 0. Also, as the packet
arrives at the egress routing device, the hardware removes its MPLS header and the
packet reverts to being an IPv4 packet. Therefore, it is counted as an IPv4 packet,
not an MPLS packet.
NOTE: If a bypass LSP is configured for the primary static LSP, display
cumulative statistics of packets traversing through the protected LSP
and bypass LSP when traffic is re-optimized when the protected LSP
link is restored. (Bypass LSPs are not supported on QFX Series switches.)
When used with the bypass option (show mpls lsp bypass statistics),
display statistics for the traffic that flows only through the bypass LSP.
transit—(Optional) Display LSPs transiting this routing device.
Required Privilege
Level
view
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MPLS on the QFX Series
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
•
clear mpls lsp on page 174
•
show mpls lsp autobandwidth on page 276
show mpls lsp defaults on page 270
show mpls lsp descriptions on page 270
show mpls lsp detail on page 270
show mpls lsp extensive on page 271
show mpls lsp ingress extensive on page 272
show mpls lsp extensive (automatic bandwidth adjustment enabled) on page 273
show mpls lsp p2mp on page 274
show mpls lsp p2mp detail on page 274
show mpls lsp detail count-active-routes on page 274
show mpls lsp statistics extensive on page 275
Table 35 on page 264 describes the output fields for the show mpls lsp command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 35: show mpls lsp Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Ingress LSP
Information about LSPs on the ingress routing device. Each session has one line
of output.
All levels
Egress LSP
Information about the LSPs on the egress routing device. MPLS learns this
information by querying RSVP, which holds all the transit and egress session
information. Each session has one line of output.
All levels
Transit LSP
Number of LSPs on the transit routing devices and the state of these paths.
MPLS learns this information by querying RSVP, which holds all the transit and
egress session information.
All levels
P2MP name
Name of the point-to-multipoint LSP. Dynamically generated P2MP LSPs used
for VPLS flooding use dynamically generated P2MP LSP names. The name uses
the format identifier:vpls:router-id:routing-instance-name. The identifier is
automatically generated by Junos OS.
All levels
P2MP branch count
Number of destination LSPs the point-to-multipoint LSP is transmitting to.
All levels
P
An asterisk (*) under this heading indicates that the LSP is a primary path.
All levels
address
(detail and extensive) Destination (egress routing device) of the LSP.
detail extensive
To
Destination (egress routing device) of the session.
brief
From
Source (ingress routing device) of the session.
brief detail
State
State of the LSP handled by this RSVP session: Up, Dn (down), or Restart.
brief detail
Active Route
Number of active routes (prefixes) installed in the forwarding table. For ingress
LSPs, the forwarding table is the primary IPv4 table (inet.0). For transit and
egress RSVP sessions, the forwarding table is the primary MPLS table (mpls.0).
detail extensive
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Table 35: show mpls lsp Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Rt
Number of active routes (prefixes) installed in the routing table. For ingress
RSVP sessions, the routing table is the primary IPv4 table (inet.0). For transit
and egress RSVP sessions, the routing table is the primary MPLS table (mpls.0).
brief
P
Path. An asterisk (*) underneath this column indicates that the LSP is a primary
path.
brief
ActivePath
(Ingress LSP) Name of the active path: Primary or Secondary.
detail extensive
LSPname
Name of the LSP.
brief detail
Statistics
Displays the number of packets and the number of bytes transmitted over the
LSP. These counters are reset to zero whenever the LSP path is optimized (for
example, during an automatic bandwidth allocation).
extensive
Aggregate statistics
Displays the number of packets and the number of bytes transmitted over the
LSP. These counters continue to iterate even if the LSP path is optimized. You
can reset these counters to zero using the clear mpls lsp statistics command.
extensive
Packets
Displays the number of packets transmitted over the LSP.
brief extensive
Bytes
Displays the number of bytes transmitted over the LSP.
brief extensive
DiffServeInfo
Type of LSP: multiclass LSP (multiclass diffServ-TE LSP) or
Differentiated-Services-aware traffic engineering LSP (diffServ-TE LSP).
detail
LSPtype
Type of LSP: static Static configured or dynamic Dynamic configured. Also
indicates if the LSP is a Penultimate hop popping LSP or an Ultimate hop popping
LSP.
detail extensive
Bypass
(Bypass LSP) Destination address (egress routing device) for the bypass LSP.
All levels
LSPpath
Indicates whether the RSVP session is for the primary or secondary LSP path.
LSPpath can be either primary or secondary and can be displayed on the ingress,
egress, and transit routing devices.
detail
Bidir
(GMPLS) The LSP allows data to travel in both directions between GMPLS
devices.
All levels
Bidirectional
(GMPLS) The LSP allows data to travel both ways between GMPLS devices.
All levels
FastReroute
desired
Fast reroute has been requested by the ingress routing device.
detail
Link protection
desired
Link protection has been requested by the ingress routing device.
detail
LoadBalance
(Ingress LSP) CSPF load-balancing rule that was configured to select the LSP's
path among equal-cost paths: Most-fill, Least-fill, or Random.
detail extensive
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Table 35: show mpls lsp Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Signal type
Signal type for GMPLS LSPs. The signal type determines the peak data rate for
the LSP: DS0, DS3, STS-1, STM-1, or STM-4.
All levels
Encoding type
LSP encoding type: Packet, Ethernet, PDH, SDH/SONET, Lambda, or Fiber.
All levels
Switching type
Type of switching on the links needed for the LSP: Fiber, Lamda, Packet, TDM,
or PSC-1.
All levels
GPID
Generalized Payload Identifier (identifier of the payload carried by an LSP):
HDLC, Ethernet, IPv4, PPP, or Unknown.
All levels
Protection
Configured protection capability desired for the LSP: Extra, Enhanced, none, One
plus one, One to one, or Shared.
All levels
Upstream label in
(Bidirectional LSPs) Incoming label for reverse direction traffic for this LSP.
All levels
Upstream label out
(Bidirectional LSPs) Outgoing label for reverse direction traffic for this LSP.
All levels
Suggested label
received
(Bidirectional LSPs) Label the upstream node suggests to use in the Resv
message that is sent.
All levels
Suggested label
sent
(Bidirectional LSPs) Label the downstream node suggests to use in the Resv
message that is returned.
All levels
Autobandwidth
(Ingress LSP) The LSP is performing autobandwidth allocation.
detail extensive
MinBW
(Ingress LSP) Configured minimum value of the LSP, in bps.
detail extensive
MaxBW
(Ingress LSP) Configured maximum value of the LSP, in bps.
detail extensive
Dynamic MinBW
(Ingress LSP) Displays the current dynamically specified minimum bandwidth
allocation for the LSP, in bps.
detail extensive
Adjustment Timer
(Ingress LSP) Configured value for the adjust-timer statement, indicating the
total amount of time allowed before bandwidth adjustment will take place, in
seconds.
detail extensive
Adjustment
Threshold
(Ingress LSP) Configured value for the adjust-threshold statement. Specifies
how sensitive the automatic bandwidth adjustment for an LSP is to changes in
bandwidth utilization.
detail extensive
Time for Next
Adjustment
(Ingress LSP) Time in seconds until the next automatic bandwidth adjustment
sample is taken.
detail extensive
Time of Last
Adjustment
(Ingress LSP) Date and time since the last automatic bandwidth adjustment
was completed.
detail extensive
Max AvgBW util
(Ingress LSP) Current value of the actual maximum average bandwidth
utilization, in bps.
detail extensive
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Table 35: show mpls lsp Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Overflow limit
(Ingress LSP) Configured value of the threshold overflow limit.
detail extensive
Overflow sample
count
(Ingress LSP) Current value for the overflow sample count.
detail extensive
Bandwidth
Adjustment in nnn
second(s)
(Ingress LSP) Current value of the bandwidth adjustment timer, indicating the
amount of time remaining until the bandwidth adjustment will take place, in
seconds.
detail extensive
Underflow limit
(Ingress LSP) Configured value of the threshold underflow limit.
detail extensive
Underflow sample
count
(Ingress LSP) Current value for the underflow sample count.
detail extensive
Underflow Max
AvgBW
(Ingress LSP) The highest sample bandwidth among the underflow samples
recorded currently. This is the signaling bandwidth if an adjustment occurs
because of an underflow.
detail extensive
Active path
indicator
(Ingress LSP) A value of * indicates that the path is active. The absence of *
indicates that the path is not active. In the following example, “long” is the active
path.
detail extensive
*Primary long
Standby short
Primary
(Ingress LSP) Name of the primary path.
detail extensive
Secondary
(Ingress LSP) Name of the secondary path.
detail extensive
Standby
(Ingress LSP) Name of the path in standby mode.
detail extensive
State
(Ingress LSP) State of the path: Up or Dn (down).
detail extensive
COS
(Ingress LSP) Class-of-service value.
detail extensive
Bandwidth per
class
(Ingress LSP) Active bandwidth for the LSP path for each MPLS class type, in
bps.
detail extensive
Priorities
(Ingress LSP) Configured value of the setup priority and the hold priority
respecitively (the setup priority is displayed first), where 0 is the highest priority
and 7 is the lowest priority. If you have not explicitly configured these values,
the default values are displayed (7 for the setup priority and 0 for the hold
priority).
detail extensive
OptimizeTimer
(Ingress LSP) Configured value of the optimize timer, indicating the total amount
of time allowed before path reoptimization, in seconds.
detail extensive
SmartOptimizeTimer
(Ingress LSP) Configured value of the smart optimize timer, indicating the total
amount of time allowed before path reoptimization, in seconds.
detail extensive
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Table 35: show mpls lsp Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Reoptimization in
xxx seconds
(Ingress LSP) Current value of the optimize timer, indicating the amount of time
remaining until the path will be reoptimized, in seconds.
detail extensive
Computed ERO (S
[L] denotes strict
[loose] hops)
(Ingress LSP) Computed explicit route. A series of hops, each with an address
followed by a hop indicator. The value of the hop indicator can be strict (S) or
loose (L).
detail extensive
CSPF metric
(Ingress LSP) Constrained Shortest Path First metric for this path.
detail extensive
Received RRO
(Ingress LSP) Received record route. A series of hops, each with an address
followed by a flag. (In most cases, the received record route is the same as the
computed explicit route. If Received RRO is different from Computed ERO, there
is a topology change in the network, and the route is taking a detour.) The
following flags identify the protection capability and status of the downstream
node:
detail extensive
•
0x01—Local protection available. The link downstream from this node is
protected by a local repair mechanism. This flag can be set only if the Local
protection flag was set in the SESSION_ATTRIBUTE object of the
corresponding Path message.
•
0x02—Local protection in use. A local repair mechanism is in use to maintain
this tunnel (usually because of an outage of the link it was routed over
previously).
•
0x03—Combination of 0x01 and 0x02.
•
0x04—Bandwidth protection. The downstream routing device has a backup
path providing the same bandwidth guarantee as the protected LSP for the
protected section.
•
0x08—Node protection. The downstream routing device has a backup path
providing protection against link and node failure on the corresponding path
section. If the downstream routing device can set up only a link-protection
backup path, the Local protection available bit is set but the Node protection
bit is cleared.
•
0x09—Detour is established. Combination of 0x01 and 0x08.
•
0x10—Preemption pending. The preempting node sets this flag if a pending
preemption is in progress for the traffic engine LSP. This flag indicates to the
ingress legacy edge router (LER) of this LSP that it should be rerouted.
•
0x20—Node ID. Indicates that the address specified in the RRO’s IPv4 or IPv6
sub-object is a node ID address, which refers to the router address or router
ID. Nodes must use the same address consistently.
•
0xb—Detour is in use. Combination of 0x01, 0x02, and 0x08.
Index number
(Ingress LSP) Log entry number of each LSP path event. The numbers are in
chronological descending order, with a maximum of 50 index numbers displayed.
extensive
Date
(Ingress LSP) Date of the LSP event.
extensive
Time
(Ingress LSP) Time of the LSP event.
extensive
Event
(Ingress LSP) Description of the LSP event.
extensive
Created
(Ingress LSP) Date and time the LSP was created.
extensive
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Table 35: show mpls lsp Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Resv style
(Bypass) RSVP reservation style. This field consists of two parts. The first is the
number of active reservations. The second is the reservation style, which can
be FF (fixed filter), SE (shared explicit), or WF (wildcard filter).
brief detail extensive
Labelin
Incoming label for this LSP.
brief detail
Labelout
Outgoing label for this LSP.
brief detail
LSPname
Name of the LSP.
brief detail
Time left
Number of seconds remaining in the lifetime of the reservation.
detail
Since
Date and time when the RSVP session was initiated.
detail
Tspec
Sender's traffic specification, which describes the sender's traffic parameters.
detail
Port number
Protocol ID and sender or receiver port used in this RSVP session.
detail
PATH rcvfrom
Address of the previous-hop (upstream) routing device or client, interface the
neighbor used to reach this router, and number of packets received from the
upstream neighbor.
detail
PATH sentto
Address of the next-hop (downstream) routing device or client, interface used
to reach this neighbor, and number of packets sent to the downstream routing
device.
detail
RESV rcvfrom
Address of the previous-hop (upstream) routing device or client, interface the
neighbor used to reach this routing device, and number of packets received
from the upstream neighbor. The output in this field, which is consistent with
that in the PATH rcvfrom field, indicates that the RSVP negotiation is complete.
detail
Record route
Recorded route for the session, taken from the record route object.
detail
Soft preempt
Number of soft preemptions that occurred on a path and when the last soft
preemption occurred. Only successful soft preemptions are counted (those
that actually resulted in a new path being used).
detail
Soft preemption
pending
Path is in the process of being soft preempted. This display is removed once
the ingress router has calculated a new path.
detail
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Table 35: show mpls lsp Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
MPLS-TE LSP
Defaults
Default settings for MPLS traffic engineered LSPs:
defaults
•
LSP Holding Priority—Determines the degree to which an LSP holds on to its
session reservation after the LSP has been set up successfully.
•
LSP Setup Priority—Determines whether a new LSP that preempts an existing
LSP can be established.
•
Hop Limit—Specifies the maximum number of routers the LSP can traverse
(including the ingress and egress).
•
Bandwidth—Specifies the bandwidth in bits per second for the LSP.
•
LSP Retry Timer—Length of time in seconds that the ingress router waits
between attempts to establish the primary path.
The XML tag name of the bandwidth tag under the auto-bandwidth tag has been updated
to maximum-average-bandwidth . You can see the new tag when you issue the show mpls
lsp extensive command with the | display xml pipe option. If you have any scripts that use
the bandwidth tag, ensure that they are updated to maximum-average-bandwidth.
Sample Output
show mpls lsp defaults
user@host> show mpls lsp defaults
MPLS-TE LSP Defaults
LSP Holding Priority
LSP Setup Priority
Hop Limit
Bandwidth
LSP Retry Timer
0
7
255
0
30 seconds
show mpls lsp descriptions
user@host> show mpls lsp descriptions
Ingress LSP: 3 sessions
To
LSP name
10.0.0.195
to-sanjose
10.0.0.195
to-sanjose-other-desc
Total 2 displayed, Up 2, Down 0
Description
to-sanjose-desc
other-desc
show mpls lsp detail
user@host> show mpls lsp detail
Ingress LSP: 1 sessions
192.168.0.4
From: 192.168.0.5, State: Up, ActiveRoute: 0, LSPname: E-D
ActivePath: (primary)
LSPtype: Static Configured, Penultimate hop popping
LoadBalance: Random
Encoding type: Packet, Switching type: Packet, GPID: IPv4
*Primary
State: Up
Priorities: 7 0
SmartOptimizeTimer: 180
Computed ERO (S [L] denotes strict [loose] hops): (CSPF metric: 30)
10.0.0.18 S 10.0.0.22 S
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Received RRO (ProtectionFlag 1=Available 2=InUse 4=B/W 8=Node 10=SoftPreempt
20=Node-ID):
10.0.0.18 10.0.0.22
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
Egress LSP: 1 sessions
192.168.0.5
From: 192.168.0.4, LSPstate: Up, ActiveRoute: 0
LSPname: E-D, LSPpath: Primary
Suggested label received: -, Suggested label sent: Recovery label received: -, Recovery label sent: Resv style: 1 FF, Label in: 3, Label out: Time left: 157, Since: Wed Jul 18 17:55:12 2012
Tspec: rate 0bps size 0bps peak Infbps m 20 M 1500
Port number: sender 1 receiver 46128 protocol 0
PATH rcvfrom: 10.0.0.18 (lt-1/2/0.17) 3 pkts
Adspec: received MTU 1500
PATH sentto: localclient
RESV rcvfrom: localclient
Record route: 10.0.0.22 10.0.0.18 <self>
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
Transit LSP: 0 sessions
Total 0 displayed, Up 0, Down 0
show mpls lsp extensive
user@host> show mpls lsp extensive
Ingress LSP: 1 sessions
192.168.0.4
From: 192.168.0.5, State: Up, ActiveRoute: 0, LSPname: E-D
ActivePath: (primary)
LSPtype: Static Configured, Ultimate hop popping
LoadBalance: Random
Encoding type: Packet, Switching type: Packet, GPID: IPv4
*Primary
State: Up
Priorities: 7 0
SmartOptimizeTimer: 180
Computed ERO (S [L] denotes strict [loose] hops): (CSPF metric: 30)
10.0.0.18 S 10.0.0.22 S
Received RRO (ProtectionFlag 1=Available 2=InUse 4=B/W 8=Node 10=SoftPreempt
20=Node-ID):
10.0.0.18 10.0.0.22
11 Sep 20 15:54:35.032 Make-before-break: Switched to new instance
10 Sep 20 15:54:34.029 Record Route: 10.0.0.18 10.0.0.22
9 Sep 20 15:54:34.029 Up
8 Sep 20 15:54:20.271 Originate make-before-break call
7 Sep 20 15:54:20.271 CSPF: computation result accepted 10.0.0.18 10.0.0.22
6
5
4
3
2
Sep
Sep
Sep
Sep
Sep
20
20
20
20
20
15:52:10.247
15:52:10.246
15:52:10.243
15:52:09.745
15:52:09.745
Selected as active path
Record Route: 10.0.0.18 10.0.0.22
Up
Originate Call
CSPF: computation result accepted 10.0.0.18 10.0.0.22
1 Sep 20 15:51:39.903 CSPF failed: no route toward 192.168.0.4
Created: Thu Sep 20 15:51:08 2012
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
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Egress LSP: 1 sessions
192.168.0.5
From: 192.168.0.4, LSPstate: Up, ActiveRoute: 0
LSPname: E-D, LSPpath: Primary
Suggested label received: -, Suggested label sent: Recovery label received: -, Recovery label sent: Resv style: 1 FF, Label in: 3, Label out: Time left: 148, Since: Thu Sep 20 15:52:10 2012
Tspec: rate 0bps size 0bps peak Infbps m 20 M 1500
Port number: sender 1 receiver 49601 protocol 0
PATH rcvfrom: 10.0.0.18 (lt-1/2/0.17) 27 pkts
Adspec: received MTU 1500
PATH sentto: localclient
RESV rcvfrom: localclient
Record route: 10.0.0.22 10.0.0.18 <self>
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
Transit LSP: 0 sessions
Total 0 displayed, Up 0, Down 0
show mpls lsp ingress extensive
user@host> show mpls lsp ingress extensive
Ingress LSP: 1 sessions
50.0.0.1
From: 10.0.0.1, State: Up, ActiveRoute: 0, LSPname: test
ActivePath: (primary)
LSPtype: Static Configured
LoadBalance: Random
Encoding type: Packet, Switching type: Packet, GPID: IPv4
*Primary
State: Up
Priorities: 7 0
OptimizeTimer: 300
SmartOptimizeTimer: 180
Reoptimization in 240 second(s).
Computed ERO (S [L] denotes strict [loose] hops): (CSPF metric: 3)
1.1.1.2 S 4.4.4.1 S 5.5.5.2 S
Received RRO (ProtectionFlag 1=Available 2=InUse 4=B/W 8=Node 10=SoftPreempt
20=Node-ID):
1.1.1.2 4.4.4.1 5.5.5.2
17 Aug 3 13:17:33.601 CSPF: computation result ignored, new path less avail
bw[3 times]
16 Aug 3 13:02:51.283 CSPF: computation result ignored, new path no benefit[2
times]
15 Aug 3 12:54:36.678 Selected as active path
14 Aug 3 12:54:36.676 Record Route: 1.1.1.2 4.4.4.1 5.5.5.2
13 Aug 3 12:54:36.676 Up
12 Aug 3 12:54:33.924 Deselected as active
11 Aug 3 12:54:33.924 Originate Call
10 Aug 3 12:54:33.923 Clear Call
9 Aug 3 12:54:33.923 CSPF: computation result accepted 1.1.1.2 4.4.4.1
5.5.5.2
8 Aug 3 12:54:33.922 2.2.2.2: No Route toward dest
7 Aug 3 12:54:28.177 CSPF: computation result ignored, new path no benefit[4
times]
6 Aug 3 12:35:03.830 Selected as active path
5 Aug 3 12:35:03.828 Record Route: 2.2.2.2 3.3.3.2
4 Aug 3 12:35:03.827 Up
3 Aug 3 12:35:03.814 Originate Call
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2 Aug 3 12:35:03.814 CSPF: computation result accepted 2.2.2.2 3.3.3.2
1 Aug 3 12:34:34.921 CSPF failed: no route toward 50.0.0.1
Created: Tue Aug 3 12:34:35 2010
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
show mpls lsp extensive (automatic bandwidth adjustment enabled)
user@host> show mpls lsp extensive
Ingress LSP: 1 sessions
192.168.0.4
From: 192.168.0.5, State: Up, ActiveRoute: 0, LSPname: E-D
ActivePath: (primary)
Node/Link protection desired
LSPtype: Static Configured, Penultimate hop popping
LoadBalance: Random
Autobandwidth
MinBW: 300bps, MaxBW: 1000bps, Dynamic MinBW: 1000bps
Adjustment Timer: 300 secs AdjustThreshold: 25%
Max AvgBW util: 963.739bps, Bandwidth Adjustment in 0 second(s).
Min BW Adjust Interval: 1000, MinBW Adjust Threshold (in %): 50
Overflow limit: 0, Overflow sample count: 0
Underflow limit: 0, Underflow sample count: 9, Underflow Max AvgBW: 614.421bps
Encoding type: Packet, Switching type: Packet, GPID: IPv4
*Primary
State: Up
Priorities: 7 0
Bandwidth: 1000bps
SmartOptimizeTimer: 180
Computed ERO (S [L] denotes strict [loose] hops): (CSPF metric: 30)
10.0.0.18 S 10.0.0.22 S
Received RRO (ProtectionFlag 1=Available 2=InUse 4=B/W 8=Node 10=SoftPreempt
20=Node-ID):
192.168.0.6(flag=0x20) 10.0.0.18(Label=299792) 192.168.0.4(flag=0x20)
10.0.0.22(Label=3)
12 Apr 30 10:25:17.024 Make-before-break: Switched to new instance
11 Apr 30 10:25:16.023 Record Route: 192.168.0.6(flag=0x20)
10.0.0.18(Label=299792) 192.168.0.4(flag=0x20) 10.0.0.22(Label=3)
10 Apr 30 10:25:16.023 Up
9 Apr 30 10:25:16.023 Automatic Autobw adjustment succeeded: BW changes from
300 bps to 1000 bps
8 Apr 30 10:25:15.946 Originate make-before-break call
7 Apr 30 10:25:15.946 CSPF: computation result accepted 10.0.0.18 10.0.0.22
6 Apr 30 10:16:42.891 Selected as active path
5 Apr 30 10:16:42.891 Record Route: 192.168.0.6(flag=0x20)
10.0.0.18(Label=299776) 192.168.0.4(flag=0x20) 10.0.0.22(Label=3)
4 Apr 30 10:16:42.890 Up
3 Apr 30 10:16:42.828 Originate Call
2 Apr 30 10:16:42.828 CSPF: computation result accepted 10.0.0.18 10.0.0.22
1 Apr 30 10:16:14.064 CSPF: could not determine self[2 times]
Created: Tue Apr 30 10:15:16 2013
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
Egress LSP: 0 sessions
Total 0 displayed, Up 0, Down 0
Transit LSP: 0 sessions
Total 0 displayed, Up 0, Down 0
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show mpls lsp p2mp
user@host> show mpls lsp p2mp
Ingress LSP: 2 sessions
P2MP name: p2mp-lsp1, P2MP branch count:
To
From
State Rt
10.255.245.51
10.255.245.50
Up
0
P2MP name: p2mp-lsp2, P2MP branch count:
To
From
State Rt
10.255.245.51
10.255.245.50
Up
0
Total 2 displayed, Up 2, Down 0
1
P
*
1
P
*
ActivePath
path1
LSPname
p2mp-branch-1
ActivePath
path1
LSPname
p2mp-st-br1
Egress LSP: 0 sessions
Total 0 displayed, Up 0, Down 0
Transit LSP: 0 sessions
Total 0 displayed, Up 0, Down 0
show mpls lsp p2mp detail
user@host> show mpls lsp p2mp detail
Ingress LSP: 2 sessions
P2MP name: p2mp-lsp1, P2MP branch count: 1
10.255.245.51
From: 10.255.245.50, State: Up, ActiveRoute: 0, LSPname: p2mp-branch-1
ActivePath: path1 (primary)
P2MP name: p2mp-lsp1
LoadBalance: Random
Encoding type: Packet, Switching type: Packet, GPID: IPv4
*Primary
path1
State: Up
Computed ERO (S [L] denotes strict [loose] hops): (CSPF metric: 25)
192.168.208.17 S
Received RRO (ProtectionFlag 1=Available 2=InUse 4=B/W 8=Node 10=SoftPreempt):
192.168.208.17
P2MP name: p2mp-lsp2, P2MP branch count: 1
10.255.245.51
From: 10.255.245.50, State: Up, ActiveRoute: 0, LSPname: p2mp-st-br1
ActivePath: path1 (primary)
P2MP name: p2mp-lsp2
LoadBalance: Random
Encoding type: Packet, Switching type: Packet, GPID: IPv4
*Primary
path1
State: Up
Computed ERO (S [L] denotes strict [loose] hops): (CSPF metric: 25)
192.168.208.17 S
Received RRO (ProtectionFlag 1=Available 2=InUse 4=B/W 8=Node 10=SoftPreempt):
192.168.208.17
Total 2 displayed, Up 2, Down 0
show mpls lsp detail count-active-routes
user@host> show mpls lsp detail count-active-routes
Ingress LSP: 1 sessions
213.119.192.2
From: 156.154.162.128, State: Up, ActiveRoute: 1, LSPname: to-lahore
ActivePath: (primary)
LSPtype: Static Configured
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LoadBalance: Random
Autobandwidth
MinBW: 5Mbps MaxBW: 250Mbps
Adjustment Timer: 300 secs
Max AvgBW util: 60.2599Mbps, Bandwidth Adjustment in 0 second(s).
Overflow limit: 0, Overflow sample count: 0
Encoding type: Packet, Switching type: Packet, GPID: IPv4
*Primary
State: Up
Priorities: 7 0
Bandwidth: 5Mbps
SmartOptimizeTimer: 180
Computed ERO (S [L] denotes strict [loose] hops): (CSPF metric: 4)
10.252.0.177 S
Received RRO (ProtectionFlag 1=Available 2=InUse 4=B/W 8=Node 10=SoftPreempt
20=Node-ID):
10.252.0.177
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
Egress LSP: 0 sessions
Total 0 displayed, Up 0, Down 0
Transit LSP: 0 sessions
Total 0 displayed, Up 0, Down 0
show mpls lsp statistics extensive
user@host> show mpls lsp statistics extensive
Ingress LSP: 1 sessions
192.168.0.4
From: 192.168.0.5, State: Up, ActiveRoute: 0, LSPname: E-D
Statistics: Packets 302, Bytes 28992
Aggregate statistics: Packets 302, Bytes 28992
ActivePath: (primary)
LSPtype: Static Configured, Penultimate hop popping
LoadBalance: Random
Encoding type: Packet, Switching type: Packet, GPID: IPv4
*Primary
State: Up
Priorities: 7 0
SmartOptimizeTimer: 180
Computed ERO (S [L] denotes strict [loose] hops): (CSPF metric: 30)
10.0.0.18 S 10.0.0.22 S
Received RRO (ProtectionFlag 1=Available 2=InUse 4=B/W 8=Node 10=SoftPreempt
20=Node-ID):
10.0.0.18 10.0.0.22
6 Oct 3 11:18:28.281 Selected as active path
5 Oct 3 11:18:28.281 Record Route: 10.0.0.18 10.0.0.22
4 Oct 3 11:18:28.280 Up
3 Oct 3 11:18:27.995 Originate Call
2 Oct 3 11:18:27.995 CSPF: computation result accepted 10.0.0.18 10.0.0.22
1 Oct 3 11:17:59.118 CSPF failed: no route toward 192.168.0.4[2 times]
Created: Wed Oct 3 11:17:01 2012
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
show mpls lsp autobandwidth
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show mpls lsp autobandwidth
<brief | detail | extensive>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Display automatic bandwidth information for the LSP(s).
brief | detail | extensive —(Optional) Display the specified level of output. The extensive
option displays the same information as the detail option, but covers the most recent
50 events.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
show mpls lsp on page 262
show mpls lsp autobandwidth on page 277
Table 36 on page 276 describes the output fields for the show mpls lsp autobandwidth
command. Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 36: show mpls lsp autobandwidth Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
To
Destination (egress routing device) of the session.
All Levels
From
Source (ingress routing device) of the session.
All Levels
LSPname
Name of the LSP.
All Levels
Min BW
(Ingress LSP) Configured minimum value of the LSP, in bps.
detail extensive
Max BW
(Ingress LSP) Configured maximum value of the LSP, in bps.
detail extensive
Max AvgBW util
(Ingress LSP) Current value of the actual maximum average bandwidth
utilization, in bps.
detail extensive
Overflow limit
(Ingress LSP) Configured value of the threshold overflow limit.
detail extensive
Overflow sample
count
(Ingress LSP) Current value for the overflow sample count.
detail extensive
Underflow limit
(Ingress LSP) Configured value of the threshold underflow limit.
detail extensive
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Table 36: show mpls lsp autobandwidth Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Underflow sample
count
(Ingress LSP) Current value for the underflow sample count.
detail extensive
Adjustment Timer
(Ingress LSP) Configured value for the adjust-timer statement, indicating the
total amount of time allowed before bandwidth adjustment will take place, in
seconds.
detail extensive
Adjustment
Threshold
(Ingress LSP) Configured value for the adjust-threshold statement. Specifies
how sensitive the automatic bandwidth adjustment for an LSP is to changes in
bandwidth utilization.
detail extensive
Time for Next
Adjustment
(Ingress LSP) Time in seconds until the next automatic bandwidth adjustment
sample is taken.
detail extensive
Time of Last
Adjustment
(Ingress LSP) Date and time since the last automatic bandwidth adjustment
was completed.
detail extensive
Last BW
Previous active bandwidth of the LSP.
detail extensive
Last Requested BW
Bandwidth requested in the previous automatic bandwidth adjustment.
detail extensive
Last Signaled BW
Bandwidth signaled in the previous automatic bandwidth adjustment.
detail extensive
Highest Watermark
BW
Maximum bandwidth used by the LSP.
detail extensive
Total AutoBw
Adjustments
Total number of attempts to adjust automatic bandwidth including failed and
successful adjustments.
detail extensive
Successful
Adjustments
Number of successful automatic bandwidth adjustments.
detail extensive
Failed Adjustments
Number of failed automatic bandwidth adjustments.
detail extensive
Sample Output
show mpls lsp autobandwidth
user@host> show mpls lsp autobandwidth extensive
To: 10.255.106.133,
From: 10.255.106.135, LSPname: r0-r1
Min BW: 100kbps, Max BW: 0bps, Max AvgBW util: 2.33249Mbps
Overflow limit: 0, Overflow sample count: 0
Underflow limit: 0, Underflow sample count: 0
Adjustment Timer: 300 sec, Adjustment Threshold: 0
Time for Next Adjustment: 23 sec, Time of Last Adjustment: Fri Jun 3 21:05:37
2011
Last BW: 100kbps, Last Requested BW: 2.2169Mbps, Last Signaled BW: 2.2169Mbps,
Highest Watermark BW: 2.33249Mbps
Total AutoBw Adjustments: 1, Successful Adjustments: 1, Failed Adjustments: 0
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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show mpls path
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
Release Information
Description
Options
Syntax on page 279
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 279
show mpls path
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<path-name>
show mpls path
<path-name>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display dynamic Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) label-switched paths (LSPs).
none—Display standard information about all MPLS LSPs.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
path-name—(Optional) Display information about the specified LSP only.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show mpls path on page 279
Table 37 on page 279 describes the output fields for the show mpls path command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 37: show mpls path Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Path name
Information about ingress LSPs. Each path has one line of output.
Address
Addresses of the routing devices that form the LSP.
Strict/loose address
Whether the address is a configured as a strict or loose address.
Sample Output
show mpls path
user@host> show mpls path
Path name
Address
p1
123.456.55.6
123.456.1.6
p2
191.456.1.4
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Strict/loose address
Strict
Loose
Strict
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show mpls static-lsp
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show mpls static-lsp
<brief | detail | extensive | terse>
<bypass>
<descriptions>
<down | up>
<ingress>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<lsp-type>
<name name>
<statistics>
<transit>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 10.1.
Display information about configured and active static Multiprotocol Label Switching
(MPLS) label-switched paths (LSPs).
none—Display standard information about all configured and active static MPLS LSPs.
brief | detail | extensive | terse—(Optional) Display the specified level of output. The
extensive option displays the same information as the detail option, but covers the
most recent 50 events.
bypass—(Optional) Display LSPs used for protecting other static LSPs.
descriptions—(Optional) Display the MPLS static LSP descriptions. To view this
information, you must configure the description statement at the [edit protocols
mpls static-label-switched-path path-name bypass], [edit protocols mpls
static-label-switched-path path-name ingress], or [edit protocols mpls
static-label-switched-path path-name transit incoming-label] hierarchy levels. Only
static LSPs with a description are displayed.
down | up—(Optional) Display only static LSPs that are inactive or active, respectively.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
lsp-type—(Optional) Display information about a particular LSP type:
•
bypass—Sessions for bypass LSPs.
•
ingress—Sessions that originate from this routing device.
•
transit—Sessions that pass through this routing device.
name name—(Optional) Display information about the specified static LSP or group of
LSPs.
statistics—(Optional) Display accounting information about static LSPs.
transit—(Optional) Display static LSPs transiting this routing device.
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Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show mpls static-lsp extensive on page 282
show mpls static-lsp statistics ingress on page 282
Table 38 on page 281 describes the output fields for the show mpls static-lsp command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 38: show mpls static-lsp Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Ingress LSPs
Information about the static LSPs on the ingress routing device. Each session
has one line of output.
All levels
Transit LSPs
Number of static LSPs on the transit routing devices and the state of these
paths. MPLS learns this information by querying RSVP, which holds all the transit
and egress session information.
All levels
Bypass LSPs
Information about the bypass LSPs configured on the routing device. Each
session has one line of output.
All levels
LSPname
Name of the static LSP.
All levels
To
Destination (egress routing device) of the session.
All levels
State
State of the static LSP handled by this RSVP session: Up, Dn (down), or Restart.
All levels
Packets
Number of packet transiting the static LSP (statistics option only).
All levels
Bytes
Number of bytes transiting the static LSP (statistics option only).
All levels
Nexthop
IP address for the next-hop router for the static LSP.
detail, extensive
Bypass
(Bypass LSP) Destination address (egress routing device) for the bypass LSP.
All levels
Link protection
desired
Link protection has been requested by the ingress routing device.
detail, extensive
LabelOperation
Label operation to perform: Push, Pop, Swap.
detail, extensive
Outgoing-label
Outgoing label to use for the MPLS packet in either push or swap label
operations.
detail, extensive
Created
(Ingress LSP) Date and time the static LSP was created.
extensive
Bandwidth
Bandwidth configured for the static LSP.
detail, extensive
Resv style
(Bypass) RSVP reservation style. This field consists of two parts: the number
of active reservations and the reservation style, which can be FF (fixed filter),
SE (shared explicit), or WF (wildcard filter).
All levels
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Sample Output
show mpls static-lsp extensive
user@host> show mpls static-lsp extensive
Ingress LSPs:
LSPname: alpha-to-beta, To: 192.168.14.1
State: Dn
Nexthop: 192.168.10.1
LabelOperation: Push, Outgoing-label: 1000001
Created: Thu Jan 14 16:44:43 2010
Bandwidth: 0 bps
Total 1, displayed 1, Up 0, Down 1
Transit LSPs:
Total 0, displayed 0, Up 0, Down 0
Bypass LSPs:
Total 0, displayed 0, Up 0, Down 0
show mpls static-lsp statistics ingress
user@host> show mpls static-lsp statistics ingress
Ingress LSPs:
LSPname
To
alpha-to-beta
192.168.14.1
Total 1, displayed 1, Up 0, Down 1
282
State
Dn
Packets
NA
Bytes
NA
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show rsvp interface
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
Release Information
Description
Options
Syntax on page 283
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 283
show rsvp interface
<brief | detail | extensive>
<link-management>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
show rsvp interface
<brief | detail | extensive>
<link-management>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display the status of Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP)-enabled interfaces and
packet statistics.
none—Display standard information about the status of RSVP-enabled interfaces and
packet statistics.
brief | detail | extensive | link-management—(Optional) Display the specified level of
output.
link-management—(Optional) Use the link-management option to display the control
peers and corresponding TE-link information created by the Link Management
Protocol (LMP).
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show rsvp interface brief on page 286
show rsvp interface detail on page 286
show rsvp interface extensive on page 286
show rsvp interface link-management on page 287
Table 39 on page 283 lists the output fields for the show rsvp interface command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 39: show rsvp interface Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
RSVP interface
Number of interfaces on which RSVP is active. Each interface has one line of
output.
All levels
Interface
Name of the interface.
All levels
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Table 39: show rsvp interface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Index
Index of the interface.
detail
State
State of the interface.
All levels
•
Disabled—No traffic engineering information is displayed.
•
Down—Interface is not operational.
•
Enabled—Displays traffic engineering information.
•
Up—Interface is operational.
NoAuthentication
Interface does not support RSVP authentication.
detail
NoAggregate
Interface does not support refresh reduction.
detail
NoReliable
Interface does not support refresh reduction message ID extension.
detail
NoLinkProtection
Interface does not support link protection.
detail
HelloInterval
Frequency at which RSVP hellos are sent on this interface (in seconds).
detail
Address
IP address of the local interface.
detail
Active control
channel
Next-hop link address to transmit messages.
None specified
TElink
Traffic-engineered links that are managed by the peer they are associated with.
None specified
Active resv
Number of reservations that are actively reserving bandwidth on the interface.
All levels
PreemptionCnt
Number of times an RSVP session was preempted on this interface.
detail
Update threshold
Percentage change in reserved bandwidth to trigger an IGP update.
detail
Subscription
User-configured subscription factor.
All levels
bc number
Bandwidth allocated for the specified bandwidth constraint.
extensive
ct number
Bandwidth allocated for the specified class type.
extensive
Static BW
Total interface bandwidth, in bps.
All levels
Available BW
Amount of bandwidth that RSVP is allowed to reserve, in bps. It is equal to
(static bandwidth * subscription factor).
al levels
Reserved BW
Currently reserved bandwidth, in bps.
All levels
SoftPreemptionCnt
Number of times a soft preemption occurred on this interface. This number is
not included in the PreemptionCnt value.
detail
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Table 39: show rsvp interface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Overbooked BW
Currently overbooked bandwidth, in bps, by class type (ct0 through ct3).
detail
Highwater mark
Highest bandwidth that has ever been reserved on this interface, in bps.
brief
PacketType
Type of RSVP packet.
detail
Total Sent
Total number of packets sent.
detail
Total Received
Total number of packets received since RSVP was enabled.
detail
Last 5 seconds Sent
Number of packets sent in the last 5 seconds.
detail
Last 5 seconds
Received
Number of packets received in the last 5 seconds.
detail
Path
Statistics about Path messages, which are sent from the RSVP sender along
the data paths and store path state information in each node along the path.
detail
PathErr
Statistics about PathErr messages, which are advisory messages that are sent
upstream to the sender.
detail
PathTear
Statistics about PathTear messages, which remove path states and dependent
reservation states in any routers along a path.
detail
Resv
Statistics about Resv messages, which are sent from the RSVP receiver along
the data paths and store reservation state information in each node along the
path.
detail
ResvErr
Statistics about ResvErr messages, which are advisory messages that are sent
when an attempt to establish a reservation fails.
detail
ResvTear
Statistics about ResvTear messages, which remove reservation states along
a path.
detail
Hello
Number of RSVP hello packets that have been sent to and received from
the neighbor.
detail
Ack
Acknowledge message for refresh reductions.
detail
Srefresh
Summary refresh messages.
detail
EndtoEnd RSVP
Statistics for the number of end-to-end RSVP messages sent.
detail
Queue
CoS transmit queue number and its associated forwarding class designation.
extensive
TxRate
Configured bandwidth in Mbps and configured bandwidth as a percentage of
the specified queue.
extensive
Priority
Weight of the queue relative to other configured queues, in percentage.
extensive
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Table 39: show rsvp interface Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
queue-priority-value
Low, High, None, or Exact. None indicates no rate limiting. Exact indicates the
extensive
queue transmits at the configured rate only.
Sample Output
show rsvp interface brief
user@host> show rsvp interface brief
RSVP interface: 1 active
Active Subscr- Static
Interface
State resv
iption BW
de0.0
Up
1
23%
10Mbps
Available
Reserved
BW
BW
989.992kbps 1.31Mbps
Highwater
mark
1.31Mbps
show rsvp interface detail
user@host> show rsvp interface detail
so-0/1/1.0 Index 6, State: Ena/Up
NoAuthentication, NoAggregate, NoReliable, NoLinkProtection
HelloInterval 3(second)
Address 192.168.207.29, 10.255.245.194
ActiveResv 0, PreemptionCnt 0, Update threshold 10%
Subscription 100%, StaticBW 155.52Mbps, AvailableBW 155.52Mbps
ReservedBW [0] 155Mbps[1] 0bps[2] 0bps[3] 0bps[4] 0bps[5] 0bps[6] 0bps[7] 0bps
SoftPreemptionCnt1
OverbookedBW [0] 0bps[1] 0bps[2] 0bps[3] 0bps[4] 155Mbps[5] 0bps[6] 0bps[7] 0bps
PacketType
Total
Last 5 seconds
Sent
Received
Sent
Received
Path
16
0
1
0
PathErr
0
0
0
0
PathTear
1
0
0
0
Resv
0
11
0
1
ResvErr
0
0
0
0
ResvTear
0
0
0
0
Hello
66
67
1
1
Ack
0
0
0
0
Srefresh
0
0
0
0
EndtoEnd RSVP
0
0
0
0
...
show rsvp interface extensive
user@host> show rsvp interface extensive
so-1/0/0.0 Index 72, State Ena/Up
NoAuthentication, NoAggregate, NoReliable, NoLinkProtection
HelloInterval 9(second)
Address 192.168.213.22, 10.255.240.175
ActiveResv 1, PreemptionCnt 0, Update threshold 10%
Subscription 100%,
bc0 = (ct0+ct1+ct2+ct3), StaticBW 622.08Mbps
bc1 = (ct1+ct2+ct3), StaticBW 466.56Mbps
bc2 = (ct2+ct3), StaticBW 311.04Mbps
bc3 = ct3, StaticBW 155.52Mbps
ct0: StaticBW 155.52Mbps, AvailableBW 522.08Mbps
ReservedBW [0] 0bps[1] 0bps[2] 0bps[3] 0bps[4] 0bps[5] 0bps[6] 0bps[7] 0bps
ct1: StaticBW 155.52Mbps, AvailableBW 366.56Mbps
ReservedBW [0] 100Mbps[1] 0bps[2] 0bps[3] 0bps[4] 0bps[5] 0bps[6] 0bps[7] 0bps
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ct2: StaticBW 155.52Mbps, AvailableBW 311.04Mbps
ReservedBW [0] 0bps[1] 0bps[2] 0bps[3] 0bps[4] 0bps[5] 0bps[6] 0bps[7] 0bps
ct3: StaticBW 155.52Mbps, AvailableBW 155.52Mbps
ReservedBW [0] 0bps[1] 0bps[2] 0bps[3] 0bps[4] 0bps[5] 0bps[6] 0bps[7] 0bps
Queue
TxRate
Priority Exact
0
155.52Mbps
25%
Low
1
155.52Mbps
25%
Low
2
155.52Mbps
25%
Low
3
155.52Mbps
25%
Low
show rsvp interface link-management
user@host> show rsvp interface link-management
RSVP interface: 2 active
PEER-C State: Up
Active Control Channel: so-0/1/0.0
TElink: TElnk1, Link ID: 37811
ActiveResv 0, PreemptionCnt 0
StaticBW 155.52Mbps, ReservedBW: 0bps, AvailableBW: 155.52Mbps
TElink: TElnk2, Link ID: 37808
ActiveResv 1, PreemptionCnt 0
StaticBW 155.52Mbps, ReservedBW: 0bps, AvailableBW: 155.52Mbps
PEER-B State: Up
Active Control Channel: so-1/0/0.0
TElink: TElnkAB1, Link ID: 1598
ActiveResv 0, PreemptionCnt 0
StaticBW 622.08Mbps, ReservedBW: 0bps, AvailableBW: 622.08Mbps
TElink: TElnkAB2, Link ID: 1597
ActiveResv 0, PreemptionCnt 0
StaticBW 622.08Mbps, ReservedBW: 0bps, AvailableBW: 622.08Mbps
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show rsvp neighbor
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
Release Information
Description
Options
Syntax on page 288
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 288
show rsvp neighbor
<brief | detail>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
show rsvp neighbor
<brief | detail>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) neighbors that were discovered
dynamically during the exchange of RSVP packets.
none—Display standard information about RSVP neighbors.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show rsvp neighbor on page 292
show rsvp neighbor detail on page 292
Table 40 on page 288 lists the output fields for the show rsvp neighbor command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 40: show rsvp neighbor Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
RSVP neighbor
Number of neighbors that the routing device has learned of. Each neighbor has
one line of output.
All levels
via
Name of the interface where the neighbor has been detected. In the case of
generalized MPLS (GMPLS) LSPs, the name of the peer where the neighbor
has been detected.
detail
Address
Address of a learned neighbor.
All levels
Idle
Length of time the neighbor has been idle, in seconds.
All levels
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Table 40: show rsvp neighbor Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Up/Dn
Number of neighbor up or down transitions detected by RSVP hello packets. If
the up count is 1 greater than the down count, the neighbor is currently up.
Otherwise, the neighbor is down. Neighbors that do not support RSVP hello
packets, such as routers running Junos OS Release 3.2 or earlier, are not reported
as up or down.
All levels
Up cnt and Down
cnt
Number of neighbor up or down transitions detected by RSVP hello packets. If
the up count is 1 greater than the down count, the neighbor is currently up.
Otherwise, the neighbor is down. Neighbors that do not support RSVP hello
packets, such as routers running Junos OS Release 3.2 or earlier, are not reported
as up or down.
detail
status
State of the RSVP neighbor:
detail
•
Up—Routing device can detect RSVP Hello messages from the neighbor.
•
Down—Routing device has received one of the following indications:
•
•
Communication failure from the neighbor.
•
Communication from IGP that the neighbor is unavailable.
•
Change in the sequence numbers in the RSVP Hello messages sent by the
neighbor.
Restarting—RSVP neighbor is unavailable and might be restarting. The
neighbor remains in this state until it has restarted or is declared dead. This
state is possible only when graceful restart is enabled.
•
Restarted—RSVP neighbor has restarted and is undergoing state recovery
(graceful restart) procedures.
•
Dead—Routing device has lost all communication with the RSVP neighbor.
Any RSVP sessions with that neighbor are torn down.
LastChange
Time elapsed since the neighbor state changed either from up to down or from
down to up. The format is hh:mm:ss.
All levels
Last changed time
Time elapsed since the neighbor state changed either from up to down or from
down to up.
detail
HelloInt
Frequency at which RSVP hellos are sent on this interface (in seconds).
All levels
HelloTx/Rx
Number of hello packets sent to and received from the neighbor.
All levels
Hello
Number of RSVP hello packets that have been sent to and received from the
neighbor.
detail
Message received
Number of Path and Resv messages that this routing device has received from
the neighbor.
detail
Remote Instance
Identification provided by the remote routing device during Hello message
exchange.
detail
Local Instance
Identification sent to the remote routing device during Hello message exchange.
detail
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Table 40: show rsvp neighbor Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Refresh reduction
Measure of processing overhead requests of refresh messages. Refresh reduction
extensions improve routing device performance by reducing the process
overhead, thus increasing the number of LSPs a routing device can support.
Refresh reduction can have the following values:
detail
•
operational—All four RSVP refresh reduction extensions—message ack,
bundling, summary refresh, and staged refresh timer—are functional between
the two neighboring routing devices. For a detailed explanation of these
extensions, see RFC 2961.
•
incomplete—Some RSVP refresh reduction extensions are functional between
the two neighboring routing devices.
•
no operational—Either the refresh reduction feature has been turned off, or
the remote routing device cannot support the refresh reduction extensions.
Remote end
Neighboring routing device’s status with regard to refresh reduction:
•
detail
enabled—Remote routing device has requested refresh reduction during RSVP
message exchanges.
•
Ack-extension
disabled—Remote routing device does not require refresh reduction.
An RSVP refresh reduction extension:
•
detail
enabled—Both local and remote routing devices support the ack-extension
(RFC 2961).
•
Link protection
disabled—Remote routing device does not support the ack-extension.
Status of the MPLS fast reroute mechanism that protects traffic from link failure:
•
detail
enabled—Link protection feature has been turned on, protecting the neighbor
with a bypass LSP.
•
disabled—No link protection feature has been enabled for this neighbor.
LSP name
Name of the bypass LSP.
detail
Bypass LSP
Status of the bypass LSP. It can have the following values:
detail
•
does not exist—Bypass LSP is not available.
•
connecting—Routing device is in the process of establishing a bypass LSP,
and the LSP is not available for link protection at the moment.
•
operational—Bypass LSP is up and running.
•
down—Bypass LSP has gone down, with the most probable cause a node or
a link failure on the bypass path.
Backup routes
Number of user LSPs (or routes) that are being protected by a bypass LSP
(before link failure).
detail
Backup LSPs
Number of LSPs that have been temporarily established to maintain traffic by
refreshing the downstream LSPs during link failure (not a one-to-one
correspondence).
detail
Bypass explicit
route
Explicit route object's (ERO) path that is taken by the bypass LSP.
detail
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Table 40: show rsvp neighbor Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Restart time
Length of time a neighbor waits to receive a Hello from the restarting node
before declaring the node dead and deleting the states (in milliseconds).
detail
Recovery time
Length of time during which the restarting node attempts to recover its lost
states with help from its neighbors (in milliseconds). Recovery time is advertised
by the restarting node to its neighbors, and applies to nodal faults. The restarting
node considers its graceful restart complete after this time has elapsed.
detail
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Sample Output
show rsvp neighbor
user@host> show rsvp neighbor
RSVP neighbor: 2 learned
Address
Idle Up/Dn LastChange HelloInt HelloTx/Rx
192.168.207.203
0 3/2
13:01
3
366/349
192.168.207.207
0 1/0
22:49
3
448/448
show rsvp neighbor detail
user@host> show rsvp neighbor detail
RSVP neighbor: 2 learned
Address: 192.168.207.203
via: ecstasyl status: Up
Last changed time: 28:47, Idle: 0 sec, Up cnt: 3, Down cnt: 2
Message received: 632
Hello: sent 673, received 656, interval 3 sec
Remote instance: 0x6432838a, Local instance: 0x74b72e36
Refresh reduction: operational
Remote end: enabled, Ack-extension: enabled
Link protection: enabled
LSP name: Bypass_to_192.168.207.203
Bypass LSP: operational, Backup routes: 1, Backup LSPs: 0
Bypass explicit route: 192.168.207.207 192.168.207.224
Restart time: 60000 msec, Recovery time: 0 msec
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show rsvp session
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax on page 293
Syntax (EX and QFX Series Switches) on page 293
show rsvp session
<brief | detail | extensive | terse>
<bidirectional | unidirectional>
<bypass>
<down | up>
<interface interface-name>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<lsp-type>
<name session-name>
<p2mp>
<session-type>
<statistics>
<te-link te-link>
Syntax (EX and QFX
Series Switches)
show rsvp session
<brief | detail | extensive | terse>
<bidirectional | unidirectional>
<bypass>
<down | up>
<interface interface-name>
<lsp-type>
<name session-name>
<p2mp>
<session-type>
<statistics>
<te-link te-link>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2X51-D15 for the QFX Series.
Description
Options
Display information about Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) sessions.
none—Display standard information about all RSVP sessions.
brief | detail | extensive | terse—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
bidirectional | unidirectional—(Optional) Display information about bidirectional or
unidirectional RSVP sessions only, respectively.
bypass—(Optional) Display RSVP sessions for bypass LSPs.
down | up—(Optional) Display only LSPs that are inactive or active, respectively.
interface interface-name—(Optional) Display RSVP sessions for the specified interface
only.
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logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
lsp-type—(Optional) Display information about RSVP sessions with regard to LSPs:
•
bypass—Sessions used for bypass LSPs.
•
lsp—Sessions used to set up LSPs.
•
nolsp—Sessions not used to set up LSPs.
name session-name—(Optional) Display information about the named session.
p2mp—(Optional) Display point-to-multipoint information.
session-type—(Optional) Display information about a particular session type:
•
egress—Sessions that terminate on this routing device.
•
ingress—Sessions that originate from this routing device.
•
transit—Sessions that transit through this routing device.
statistics—(Optional) Display packet statistics.
te-link te-link—(Optional) Display sessions with reservations on the specified TE link.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
clear rsvp session on page 176
show rsvp session on page 298
show rsvp session statistics on page 298
show rsvp session detail on page 298
show rsvp session detail (Path MTU Output Field) on page 299
show rsvp session detail (GMPLS) on page 299
show rsvp session extensive on page 300
show rsvp session p2mp (Ingress Router) on page 300
show rsvp session p2mp (Transit Router) on page 301
Table 41 on page 294 describes the output fields for the show rsvp session command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 41: show rsvp session Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Ingress RSVP
Information about ingress RSVP sessions.
detail
Ingress RSVP
Information about ingress RSVP sessions. Each session has one line of output.
All levels
Egress RSVP
Information about egress RSVP sessions.
All levels
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Table 41: show rsvp session Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Transit RSVP
Information about the transit RSVP sessions.
All levels
P2MP name
(Appears only when the p2mp option is specified). Name of the
point-to-multipoint LSP path.
All levels
P2MP branch count
(Appears only when the p2mp option is specified). Number of LSPs receiving
packets from the point-to-multipoint LSP.
All levels
To
Destination (egress routing device) of the session.
All levels
From
Source (ingress routing device) of the session.
All levels
State
State of the path: Up, Down, or AdminDn. AdminDn indicates that the LSP is
being taken down gracefully.
All levels
Address
Destination (egress routing device) of the LSP.
detail
From
Source (ingress routing device) of the session.
detail
LSPstate
State of the LSP that is being handled by this RSVP session. It can be either Up,
Dn (down), or AdminDn. AdminDn indicates that the LSP is being taken down
gracefully.
brief detail
Rt
Number of active routes (prefixes) that have been installed in the routing table.
For ingress RSVP sessions, the routing table is the primary IPv4 table (inet.0).
For transit and egress RSVP sessions, the routing table is the primary MPLS table
mpls.0).
brief
Active Route
Number of active routes (prefixes) that have been installed in the forwarding
table. For ingress RSVP sessions, the forwarding table is the primary IPv4 table
(inet.0). For transit and egress RSVP sessions, the forwarding table is the primary
MPLS table (mpls.0).
detail
LSPname
Name of the LSP.
brief detail
LSPpath
Indicates whether the RSVP session is for the primary or secondary LSP path.
LSPpath can be either primary or secondary and can be displayed on the ingress,
egress, and transit routing devices. LSPpath can also indicate when a graceful
LSP deletion has been triggered.
detail
Bypass
(Egress routing device) Destination address for the bypass LSP.
detail
Bidir
(When LSP is bidirectional) LSP will allow data to travel in both directions
between GMPLS devices.
detail
Bidirectional
(When LSP is bidirectional) LSP will allow data to travel both ways between
GMPLS devices.
detail
Upstream label in
(When LSP is bidirectional) Incoming label for reverse direction traffic for
this LSP.
detail
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Table 41: show rsvp session Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Upstream label out
(When LSP is bidirectional) Outgoing label for reverse direction traffic for
this LSP.
detail
Recovery label
received
(When LSP is bidirectional) Label the upstream node suggests for use in the
Resv message that is sent.
detail
Recovery label sent
(When LSP is bidirectional) Label the downstream node suggests for use in its
Resv messages that is returned.
detail
Suggested label
received
(When LSP is bidirectional) Label the upstream node suggests for use in the
Resv message that is sent.
detail
Suggested label
sent
(When LSP is bidirectional) Label the downstream node suggests for use in its
Resv message that is returned.
detail
Resv style or Style
RSVP reservation style. This field consists of two parts. The first is the number
of active reservations. The second is the reservation style, which can be FF (fixed
filter), SE (shared explicit), or WF (wildcard filter).
brief detail
Label in
Incoming label for this LSP.
brief detail
Label out
Outgoing label for this LSP.
brief detail
Time left
Number of seconds remaining in the lifetime of the reservation.
brief detail
Since
Date and time when the RSVP session was initiated.
detail
Tspec
Sender's traffic specification, which describes the sender's traffic parameters.
detail
DiffServ info
Indicates whether the LSP is a multiclass LSP (multiclass diffServ-TE LSP) or
a Differentiated-Services-aware traffic engineering LSP (diffServ-TE LSP).
detail
bandwidth
Bandwidth for each class type (ct0, ct1, ct2, or ct3).
detail
Port number
Protocol ID and sender/receiver port used in this RSVP session.
detail
Attrib flags
Non-PHP indicates that ultimate hop popping has been requested by the LSP
extensive
using this RSVP session
FastReroute
desired
Fast reroute has been requested by the ingress routing device.
detail
Soft preemption
desired
Soft preemption has been requested by the ingress routing device.
detail
FastReroute
desired
(Data [not a bypass or backup] LSP when the protection scheme has been
requested) Fast reroute (one-to-one backup) has been requested by the
ingress routing device.
detail extensive
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Table 41: show rsvp session Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Link protection
desired
(Data [not a bypass or backup] LSP when the protection scheme has been
requested) Link protection (many-to-one backup) has been requested by the
ingress routing device.
detail extensive
Node/Link
protection desired
(Data [not a bypass or backup] LSP when the protection scheme has been
requested) Node and link protection (many-to-one backup) has been requested
by the ingress routing device.
detail extensive
Type
LSP type:
detail extensive
•
Link protected LSP—LSP has been protected by link protection at the outgoing
interface. The name of the bypass used is also listed here (extensive).
•
Node/Link protected LSP—LSP has been protected by node and link protection
at the outgoing interface. The name of the bypass used is also listed here
(extensive).
•
Protection down—LSP is not currently protected.
•
Bypass LSP—LSP that is used to protected one or more user LSPs in case of
link failure.
•
Backup LSP at Point-of-Local-Repair (PLR)—LSP that has been temporarily
established to protected a user LSP at the ingress of a failed link.
•
Backup LSP at Merge Point (MP)—LSP that has been temporarily established
to protected a user LSP at the egress of a failed link.
New bypass
New bypass (the bypass name is also displayed) has been activated to protect
the LSP.
extensive
Link protection up,
using bypass-name
Link protection (the bypass name is also displayed) has been activated for
the LSP.
extensive
Creating backup
LSP, link down
A link down event occurred, and traffic is being switched over to the bypass LSP.
extensive
Deleting backup
LSP, protected LSP
restored
Link has come back up and the LSP has been restored. Because the backup
LSP is no longer needed, it is deleted.
extensive
Path mtu
Displays the value of the path MTU received from the network (through
signaling) and the value used for forwarding. This value is only displayed on
ingress routing devices with the allow-fragmentation statement configured at
the [edit protocols mpls path-mtu] hierarchy level. If there is a detour LSP, the
path MTU for the detour is also displayed.
detail
PATH rcvfrom
Address of the previous-hop (upstream) routing device or client, interface the
neighbor used to reach this routing device, and number of packets received
from the upstream neighbor.
detail
Adspec
MTU signaled from the ingress routing device to the egress routing device by
means of the adspec object.
detail
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Table 41: show rsvp session Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
PATH sentto
Address of the next-hop (downstream) routing device or client, interface used
to reach this neighbor (or peer-name in the GMPLS LSP case), and number of
packets sent to the downstream routing device.
detail
Explct route
Explicit route for the session. Normally this value will be the same as that of
record route. Differences indicate that path rerouting has occurred, typically
during fast reroute.
detail
Record route
Recorded route for the session, taken from the record route object. Normally
this value will be the same as that of explct route. Differences indicate that path
rerouting has occurred, typically during fast reroute.
detail
Sample Output
show rsvp session
user@host> show rsvp session
Ingress RSVP: 1 sessions
To
From
State
Rt Style Labelin Labelout LSPname
10.255.245.214 10.255.245.212 AdminDn 0 1 FF
22293 LSP Bidir
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
Egress RSVP: 2 sessions
To
From
State Rt Style Labelin Labelout LSPname
10.255.245.194 10.255.245.195 Up
0 1 FF
39811
- Gpro3-ba Bidir
10.255.245.194 10.255.245.195 Up
0 1 FF
3
- pro3-ba
Total 2 displayed, Up 2, Down 0
Transit RSVP: 1 sessions
To
From
State Rt Style Labelin Labelout LSPname
10.255.245.198 10.255.245.197 Up
0 1 SE 100000
3 pro3-de
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
show rsvp session statistics
user@host> show rsvp session statistics
Ingress RSVP: 2 sessions
To
From
State
10.255.245.24
10.255.245.22
Up
10.255.245.24
10.255.245.22
Up
Total 2 displayed, Up 2, Down 0
Egress RSVP: 2 sessions
To
From
State
10.255.245.22
10.255.245.24
Up
10.255.245.22
10.255.245.24
Up
Total 2 displayed, Up 2, Down 0
Transit RSVP: 0 sessions
Total 0 displayed, Up 0, Down 0
Packets
0
44868
Bytes
0
2333136
LSPname
pro3-bd
pro3-bd-2
Packets
0
0
Bytes
0
0
LSPname
pro3-db
pro3-db-2
show rsvp session detail
user@host> show rsvp session detail
Ingress RSVP: 1 sessions
1.1.1.1
From: 2.2.2.2, LSPstate: Up, ActiveRoute: 0
298
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
LSPname: to-a, LSPpath: Primary
Suggested label received: -, Suggested label sent: Recovery label received: -, Recovery label sent: 3
Resv style: 1 FF, Label in: -, Label out: 3
Time left:
-, Since: Fri Mar 26 18:42:42 2004
Tspec: rate 300kbps size 300kbps peak Infbps m 20 M 1500
DiffServ info: diffServ-TE LSP, bandwidth: <ct1 300kbps>
Port number: sender 1 receiver 15876 protocol 0
PATH rcvfrom: localclient
Adspec: sent MTU 1500
PATH sentto: 192.168.37.16 (t1-0/2/1.0) 1 pkt
show rsvp session detail (Path MTU Output Field)
user@host> show rsvp session detail
Ingress RSVP: 1 sessions
10.255.245.3
From: 10.255.245.5, LSPstate: Up, ActiveRoute: 3
LSPname: to-c, LSPpath: Primary
Suggested label received: -, Suggested label sent: Recovery label received: -, Recovery label sent: 100432
Resv style: 1 FF, Label in: -, Label out: 100432
Time left:
-, Since: Mon Aug 16 17:54:40 2006
Tspec: rate 0bps size 0bps peak Infbps m 20 M 9192
Port number: sender 1 receiver 57843 protocol 0
FastReroute desired
PATH rcvfrom: localclient
Adspec: sent MTU 4470
Path mtu: received 4470, using 4458 for forwarding
PATH sentto: 192.168.37.89 (so-0/2/3.0) 11 pkts
RESV rcvfrom: 192.168.37.89 (so-0/2/3.0) 10 pkts
Explct route: 192.168.37.89
Record route: <self> 192.168.37.89 192.168.37.87
Detour is Up
Detour Tspec: rate 0bps size 0bps peak Infbps m 20 M 9192
Detour adspec: sent MTU 1512
Path mtu: received 1512, using 1500 for forwarding
show rsvp session detail (GMPLS)
user@host> show rsvp session detail
Ingress RSVP: 1 sessions
192.168.4.1
From: 192.168.1.1, LSPstate: Dn, ActiveRoute: 0
LSPname: gmpls-r1–to-r3, LSPpath: Primary
Bidirectional, Upstream label in: 21253, Upstream label out: —
Suggested label received: -, Suggested label sent: 21253
Recovery label received: -, Recovery label sent: —
Resv style: 0 —, Label in: -, Label out: —
Time left:
-, Since: Mon Aug 16 17:54:40 2006
Tspec: rate 0bps size 0bps peak 155.52Mbps m 20 M 1500
Port number: sender 2 receiver 46115 protocol 0
PATH rcvfrom: localclient
Adspec: sent MTU 1500
PATH MTU: received 0
PATH sentto: 10.35.1.5 (so-0/2/3.0) 11 pkts
Explct route: 100.100.100.100 93.93.93.93
Record route: <self> 100.100.100.100 93.93.93.93
Total 1 displayed, Up 0, Down 1
Egress RSVP: 0 sessions
Total 0 displayed, Up 0, Down 0
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Transit RSVP: 0 sessions
Total 0 displayed, Up 0, Down 0
show rsvp session extensive
user@host> show rsvp session extensive
Ingress RSVP: 1 sessions
192.168.0.4
From: 192.168.0.5, LSPstate: Up, ActiveRoute: 0
LSPname: E-D, LSPpath: Primary
LSPtype: Static Configured
Suggested label received: -, Suggested label sent: Recovery label received: -, Recovery label sent: 299808
Resv style: 1 FF, Label in: -, Label out: 299808
Time left:
-, Since: Thu Sep 20 15:54:20 2012
Tspec: rate 0bps size 0bps peak Infbps m 20 M 1500
Port number: sender 2 receiver 61576 protocol 0
Attrib flags: Non-PHP
PATH rcvfrom: localclient
Adspec: sent MTU 1500
Path MTU: received 1500
PATH sentto: 10.0.0.18 (lt-1/2/0.17) 41 pkts
RESV rcvfrom: 10.0.0.18 (lt-1/2/0.17) 40 pkts
Explct route: 10.0.0.18 10.0.0.22
Record route: <self> 10.0.0.18 10.0.0.22
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
Egress RSVP: 1 sessions
192.168.0.5
From: 192.168.0.4, LSPstate: Up, ActiveRoute: 0
LSPname: E-D, LSPpath: Primary
Suggested label received: -, Suggested label sent: Recovery label received: -, Recovery label sent: Resv style: 1 FF, Label in: 3, Label out: Time left: 140, Since: Thu Sep 20 15:52:10 2012
Tspec: rate 0bps size 0bps peak Infbps m 20 M 1500
Port number: sender 1 receiver 49601 protocol 0
PATH rcvfrom: 10.0.0.18 (lt-1/2/0.17) 44 pkts
Adspec: received MTU 1500
PATH sentto: localclient
RESV rcvfrom: localclient
Record route: 10.0.0.22 10.0.0.18 <self>
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
Transit RSVP: 0 sessions
Total 0 displayed, Up 0, Down 0
show rsvp session p2mp (Ingress Router)
user@host> show rsvp session p2mp
Ingress RSVP: 3 sessions
P2MP name: test, P2MP branch count: 1
To
From
State
10.255.10.95
10.255.10.2
Up
P2MP name: test2, P2MP branch count: 2
To
From
State
10.255.10.23
10.255.10.2
Up
10.255.10.16
10.255.10.2
Up
Total 3 displayed, Up 3, Down 0
300
Rt Style Labelin Labelout LSPname
0 1 SE
3 to-pe1
Rt Style Labelin Labelout LSPname
0 1 SE
299776 to-pe3
0 1 SE
299776 to-pe4
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Egress RSVP: 0 sessions
Total 0 displayed, Up 0, Down 0
Transit RSVP: 0 sessions
Total 0 displayed, Up 0, Down 0
show rsvp session p2mp (Transit Router)
user@host> show rsvp session p2mp
Ingress RSVP: 1 sessions
P2MP name: test, P2MP branch count: 1
To
From
State
10.255.10.23
10.255.10.95
Up
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
Egress RSVP: 1 sessions
P2MP name: test, P2MP branch count: 1
To
From
State
10.255.10.95
10.255.10.2
Up
Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
Transit RSVP: 2 sessions
P2MP name: test2, P2MP branch count: 2
To
From
State
10.255.10.23
10.255.10.2
Up
10.255.10.16
10.255.10.2
Up
Total 2 displayed, Up 2, Down 0
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Rt Style Labelin
0 1 SE
-
Labelout LSPname
299792 to-pe2
Rt Style Labelin Labelout
0 1 SE
3
-
LSPname
to-pe1
Rt Style Labelin Labelout
0 1 SE 299776
299808
0 1 SE 299776
299856
LSPname
to-pe3
to-pe4
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MPLS on the QFX Series
show rsvp statistics
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
Release Information
Description
Options
Syntax on page 302
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 302
show rsvp statistics
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
show rsvp statistics
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) packet and error statistics.
none—Display RSVP packet and error statistics.
logical-system (all |logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
clear rsvp statistics on page 178
show rsvp statistics on page 305
Table 42 on page 302 describes the output fields for the show rsvp statistics command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 42: show rsvp statistics Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Packet Type
Statistics about different RSVP messages.
Total Sent
Total number of packets sent since RSVP was enabled.
Total Received
Total number of packets received since RSVP was enabled.
Last 5 seconds Sent
Total number of packets sent in the last 5 seconds.
Last 5 seconds
Received
Number of packets received in the last 5 seconds.
Path
Statistics about Path messages, which are sent from the RSVP sender along the data paths and
which store path state information in each node along the path.
PathErr
Statistics about PathErr messages, which are advisory messages that are sent upstream to the sender.
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Table 42: show rsvp statistics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
PathTear
Statistics about PathTear messages, which remove path states and dependent reservation states in
any routing devices along a path.
Resv FF
Statistics about fixed-filter reservation style messages, which consist of distinct reservations among
explicit senders.
Resv WF
Statistics about wildcard-filter reservation style messages, which consist of shared reservations
among wildcard senders.
Res SE
Statistics about shared-explicit reservation style messages, which consist of shared reservations
among explicit senders.
ResvErr
Statistics about ResvErr messages, which are advisory messages that are sent when an attempt to
establish a reservation fails.
ResvTear
Statistics about ResvTear messages, which remove reservation states along a path.
ResvConf
Statistics about ResvConfirm messages, which are responses to confirm a reservation request.
Ack
Acknowledge message for refresh reductions.
SRefresh
Summary refresh messages.
Hello
Number of RSVP hello packets that have been sent to and received from the neighbor.
EndtoEnd RSVP
Statistics for the number of End-to-end RSVP messages.
Errors
Statistics about errored RSVP packets.
Rcv pkt bad length
The packet was not processed because its length is inappropriate.
Rcv pkt unknown type
The packet is not one of the well-known RSVP types, as defined in RFC 2205, Resource ReSerVation
Protocol (RSVP).
Rcv pkt bad version
The packet is not an RSVP version 1 packet.
Rcv pkt auth fail
The packet failed authentication checks.
Rcv pkt bad checksum
The RSVP checksum check failed.
Rcv pkt bad format
General packet processing failed because the packet was badly formed.
Memory allocation fail
An internal resource failure occurred.
No path information
A reservation was received, but no sender is active.
Resv style conflict
The same session contains inconsistent reservation styles.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 42: show rsvp statistics Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Port conflict
There were inconsistent port numbers for the same session.
Resv no interface
An interface for the receive reservation packets cannot be located.
PathErr to client
Number of PathErr packets delivered to the local client.
ResvErr to client
Number of ResvErr packets delivered to the local client.
Path timeout
Number of times the sender timed out because the path was removed.
Resv timeout
Number of times the receiver timed out because the reservation was removed.
Message out-of-order
Records the number of RSVP incoming messages that are considered out of order. This is detected
from the message ID object’s sequence number.
Unknown ack msg
A neighboring routing device replies with an ACK object that contains an unknown message ID. This
can indicate a message ID handshake problem. For example, a router receives an ACK for message
IDs 1, 2, and 3. However, it only has state for message IDs 1 and 3. The router increments the unknown
ack counter by 1.
Recv nack
If a neighboring router receives an unknown message ID in an RSVP refresh message, the router sends
a Resv nack message back to the sender. This can happen if that neighbor has been rebooted. For
this case, the router sends a regular RSVP refresh message to recover the state and start the
message-ID handshake process again.
Recv duplicated msg-id
Number of times the same message ID is used by two different RSVP messages. This duplication is
usually caused when a neighboring routing device restarts.
No TE-link to recv Hop
Counter of packets discarded because a TE link was not found.
Rcv pkt disabled
interface
Number of RSVP packets received on an interface that is not enabled for RSVP.
Transmit buffer full
Number of times the buffer for assembling an outgoing RSVP message was not large enough.
Transmit failure
Number of times the RSVP task failed to send out a packet.
Receive failure
Number of times the RSVP task failed to read an incoming packet.
P2MP RESV discarded
by appl
Number of Resv messages discarded because the MPLS label is not valid for the P2MP LSP application.
Rate limit
Number of RSVP packets dropped due to rate limiting.
Err msg loop detected
Number of RSVP error messages that have looped back to their originator. This is detected by checking
the error node address in the ERROR_SPEC object.
304
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Sample Output
show rsvp statistics
user@host> show rsvp statistics
PacketType
Total
Sent
Received
Path
355
408
PathErr
2
13
PathTear
101
139
Resv FF
0
0
Resv WF
0
0
Resv SE
419
225
ResvErr
0
0
ResvTear
0
13
ResvConf
0
0
Ack
682
1414
SRefresh
395198
236030
Hello
578809
578221
EndtoEnd RSVP
0
0
Errors
Rcv pkt bad length
Rcv pkt unknown type
Rcv pkt bad version
Rcv pkt auth fail
Rcv pkt bad checksum
Rcv pkt bad format
Memory allocation fail
No path information
Resv style conflict
Port conflict
Resv no interface
PathErr to client
ResvErr to client
Path timeout
Resv timeout
Message out-of-order
Unknown ack msg
Recv nack
Recv duplicated msg-id
No TE-link to recv Hop
Rcv pkt disabled interface
Transmit buffer full
Transmit failure
Receive failure
P2MP RESV discarded by appl
Rate limit
Err msg loop detected
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Total
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
10
0
0
0
38
0
8
57
0
2978
86
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
306
0
Last 5 seconds
Received
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
2
4
4
0
0
Sent
Last 5 seconds
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
305
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show rsvp version
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
Release Information
Description
Options
Syntax on page 306
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 306
show rsvp version
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
show rsvp version
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display information about the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) protocol settings,
such as the version of the RSVP software, the refresh timer and keep multiplier, and local
RSVP graceful restart capabilities on a routing device.
none—Display RSVP protocol settings.
logical-system (all |logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show rsvp version on page 307
Table 43 on page 306 describes the output fields for the show rsvp version command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 43: show rsvp version Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Resource ReSerVation
Protocol, version
RSVP software version.
RSVP protocol
Status of RSVP: Enabled or Disabled.
R(refresh timer)
Configured time interval used to generate periodic RSVP messages.
K(keep multiplier)
Number of RSVP messages that can be lost before an RSVP state is declared stale.
Preemption
Currently configured preemption capability: Aggressive, Disabled, or Normal. The default is Normal.
Soft-preemption
cleanup
Time, in seconds, that an LSP is kept after it has been soft preempted. This is a global property of the
RSVP protocol.
Graceful deleting
timeout
Currently configured value for the graceful-deletion-timeout statement. The router that initiates the
graceful deletion procedure for an RSVP session waits for the graceful deletion timeout interval to
ensure that all routers along the path (especially the ingress and egress routers) have prepared for
the LSP to be taken down.
306
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Table 43: show rsvp version Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
NSR Mode
Status of the nonstop active routing feature for RSVP on the restarting device: Disabled,
Enabled/Master, or Enabled/Standby.
NSR State
State of the nonstop active routing feature for RSVP on the restarting device.
Possible values are:
•
Idle
•
TE-link sync complete
•
Neighbor sync complete
•
Path state sync complete
•
Resv state sync complete
•
Bypass sync complete
•
Init sync complete
Setup protection
Status of point-to-point and point-to-multipoint LSP setup protection configuration on the device:
Enabled or Disabled
Graceful restart
Status of the graceful restart feature for RSVP on the restarting routing device: Enabled or Disabled.
Restart helper mode
Status of the helper mode feature: Enabled or Disabled. When this feature is enabled, the restarting
routing device can help the neighbor with its RSVP restart procedures.
Maximum helper restart
time
Number of milliseconds (ms) configured for the maximum helper restart time. The maximum helper
restart time is the length of time the routing device waits before declaring that an RSVP neighbor
attempting to restart gracefully is down.
Maximum helper
recovery time
Number of milliseconds configured for the maximum helper recovery time. The maximum helper
recovery time is the amount of time the routing device maintains the state of an RSVP neighbor
attempting to restart gracefully.
Restart time
Number of milliseconds that a neighbor waits to receive a Hello message from the restarting node
before declaring the node dead and deleting the states.
Recovery time
Number of milliseconds during which the restarting node attempts to recover its lost states with help
from its neighbors. Recovery time is advertised by the restarting node to its neighbors, and applies to
nodal faults. The restarting node considers its graceful restart complete after this time has elapsed.
P2p transit LSP nexthop
mode
Point-to-point transit LSP nexthop mode on PTX Series devices. The possible values are Chained or
P2mp transit LSP
nexthop mode
Point-to-multipoint transit LSP nexthop mode on PTX Series devices. The possible values are Chained
or Unchained
Unchained
Sample Output
show rsvp version
user@host> show rsvp version
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
307
MPLS on the QFX Series
Resource ReSerVation Protocol, version 1. rfc2205
RSVP protocol:
Enabled
R(refresh timer):
30 seconds
K(keep multiplier):
3
Preemption:
Normal
Soft-preemption cleanup:
30 seconds
Graceful deletion timeout:
30 seconds
NSR mode:
Enabled/Master
NSR state:
Init sync complete
Setup protection:
Disabled
Graceful restart:
Disabled
Restart helper mode:
Enabled
Maximum helper restart time: 20000 msec
Maximum helper recovery time: 180000 msec
Restart time:
0 msec
P2p transit LSP nexthop mode: Unchained
P2mp transit LSP nexthop mode: Unchained
308
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show ted database
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
Release Information
Description
Options
Syntax on page 309
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 309
show ted database
<brief | detail | extensive>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
<system-name>
show ted database
<brief | detail | extensive>
<system-name>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display the entries in the Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) traffic engineering
database.
none—Display standard information about all entries in the traffic engineering database.
brief | detail | extensive—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
system-name—(Optional) Display traffic engineering database information for a particular
system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show ted database brief on page 311
show ted database detail system-name on page 312
show ted database extensive on page 312
Table 44 on page 309 describes the output fields for the show ted database command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 44: show ted database Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
TED database
Number of nodes and pseudonodes participating in IS-IS and OSPF domain
routing.
All levels
ID
Hostname and address of the node that the link is coming from. An address of
.00 indicates that the node is the routing device itself. An address in the range
0.01 through 0.FF indicates that the node is a pseudonode. If the node contains
a router ID, it is displayed in parentheses.
brief
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
Table 44: show ted database Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
NodeID
Hostname and address of the node that the link is coming from. An address of
.00 indicates that the node is the routing device itself. An address in the range
0.01 through 0.FF indicates that the node is a pseudonode.
extensive
Type
Type of node. It can be either Rtr (router) or Net (pseudonode).
All levels
Age(s)
How long since the node was last refreshed, in seconds.
All levels
LnkIn
Number of nodes pointing toward this node.
All levels
LnkOut
Number of nodes to which this node points.
All levels
Protocol
Protocol that reported the node information:
All levels
•
IS-IS(1)—IS-IS Level 1.
•
IS-IS(2)—IS-IS Level 2.
•
OSPF (area-number)—OSPF from the specified area.
To
Address on the far end of a link.
detail extensive
Local
Address of the local interface being used to reach the remote node.
detail extensive
Remote
Address of the interface on the remote node.
detail extensive
Metric
Configured traffic engineering metric.
extensive
Static BW
Total interface bandwidth in bps.
extensive
Reservable
bandwidth
Subscription factor for the interface, which is the percentage of the link
bandwidth that can be used for the RSVP reservation process. You configure
this by including the subscription statement when configuring RSVP.
extensive
Available BW
[priority]
(Must include diffserv-te statement when configuring LSPs) Amount of
bandwidth actually reserved by RSVP for each priority level. The bandwidth
shown is for the entire interface, not for each individual LSP.
extensive
Diffserv-TE BW
Model
Bandwidth constraint model used by the LSPs.
extensive
Available BW
[TE-class]
(Must include the diffserv-te statement when configuring LSPs) Amount of
bandwidth actually reserved by RSVP for each traffic engineering class.
extensive
Static BW
[CT-class]
Total interface bandwidth used by an MPLS traffic class, in bps.
extensive
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Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Table 44: show ted database Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Interface Switching
Capability
Descriptor (n)
Information about the interface switching capability descriptor, which is a
subtype length value (TLV) of the link TLV. n is the index number.
extensive
•
•
•
Switching type—Type of switching to be performed on a particular link:
•
PSC-1—Packet switch-capable 1
•
PSC-2—Packet switch-capable 2
•
PSC-3—Packet switch-capable 3
•
PSC-4—Packet switch-capable 4
•
L2SC—Layer-2-switch-capable
•
TDM—Time-division-multiplexing-capable
•
LSC—Lambda switch-capable
•
FSC—Fiber switch-capable
Encoding type—Encoding of the LSP being requested:
•
Packet
•
Ethernet
•
ANSI/ETSI PDH
•
Reserved
•
SDH /SONET
•
Digital Wrapper
•
Lambda (photonic)
•
Fiber
•
FiberSDH/SONET
Maximum LSP BW [priority] bps—Maximum LSP bandwidth information.
Amount of bandwidth actually reserved for each priority level. The bandwidth
shown is for the entire interface.
•
•
[n]—Priority level. The range is from 0 (high) through 7 (low).
•
n Mbps—Amount of the maximum bandwidth.
Minimum LSP BW—Minimum LSP bandwidth in Mbps. Amount of bandwidth
actually reserved for each priority level. The bandwidth shown is for the entire
interface. Minimum LSP BW is displayed only when switching type is PSC-1 or
TDM.
•
Interface MTU—Displayed only when switching type is TDM.
•
Interface supports standard SONET/SDH—Displayed only when switching type
is TDM.
Sample Output
show ted database brief
user@host> show ted database brief
TED database: 6 ISIS nodes 6 INET nodes
ID
Type Age(s) LnkIn LnkOut Protocol
cheviot.00(123.456.1.10)
Rtr
383
1
1 IS-IS(2) IS-IS(1)
corriedale.00(123.456.1.11)
Rtr
36
2
0 IS-IS(2) IS-IS(1)
wolff.00(123.456.1.12)
Rtr
399
0
0 IS-IS(2) IS-IS(1)
perendale.00(123.456.1.13)
Rtr
385
2
0 IS-IS(2) IS-IS(1)
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
311
MPLS on the QFX Series
merino.00(123.456.1.14)
romney.00(123.456.1.15)
Rtr
Rtr
379
427
1
0
3 IS-IS(2) IS-IS(1)
2 IS-IS(2) IS-IS(1)
show ted database detail system-name
user@host> show ted database detail merino
TED database: 6 ISIS nodes 6 INET nodes
NodeID: merino.00(123.456.1.14)
Type: Rtr, Age: 507 secs, LinkIn: 1, LinkOut: 3
Protocol: IS-IS(2)
To: corriedale.00(123.456.1.11), Local: 123.456.8.206, Remote: 123.456.8.207
To: perendale.00(123.456.1.13), Local: 123.456.8.204, Remote: 123.456.8.205
To: cheviot.00(123.456.1.10), Local: 123.456.10.65, Remote: 123.456.10.66
Protocol: IS-IS(1)
To: corriedale.00(123.456.1.11), Local: 123.456.8.206, Remote: 123.456.8.207
To: perendale.00(123.456.1.13), Local: 123.456.8.204, Remote: 123.456.8.205
To: cheviot.00(123.456.1.10), Local: 123.456.10.65, Remote: 123.456.10.66
show ted database extensive
user@host> show ted database extensive
TED database: 0 ISIS nodes 2 INET nodes
NodeID: 10.255.245.196
Type: Rtr, Age: 46 secs, LinkIn: 1, LinkOut: 1
Protocol: OSPF(0.0.0.0)
To: 10.255.245.24, Local: 4.4.4.4, Remote: 5.5.5.5
Metric: 1
Static BW: 155.52Mbps
Reservable BW: 155.52Mbps
Available BW [TE-class] bps:
[te0] 155.52Mbps
[te1] 155.52Mbps
[te2] 155.52Mbps
[te4] 155.52Mbps
[te5] 155.52Mbps
[te6] 155.52Mbps
[te7] 155.52Mbps
Diffserv-TE BW model: Maximum allocation model
Static BW [CT-class] bps:
[ct0] 155.52Mbps
[ct1] 155.52Mbps
[ct2] 155.52Mbps
[ct3] 155.52Mbps
Interface Switching Capability Descriptor(1):
Switching type: PSC-1
Encoding type: SDH/SONET
Maximum LSP BW [priority] bps:
[0] 155.52Mbps
[1] 155.52Mbps
[2] 155.52Mbps
[4] 155.52Mbps
[5] 155.52Mbps
[6] 155.52Mbps
Minimum LSP BW: 155.52Mbps
Interface MTU: 1285
Interface Switching Capability Descriptor(2):
Switching type: TDM
Encoding type: SDH/SONET
Maximum LSP BW [priority] bps:
[0] 155.52Mbps
[1] 155.52Mbps
[2] 155.52Mbps
[4] 155.52Mbps
[5] 155.52Mbps
[6] 155.52Mbps
Minimum LSP BW: 155.52Mbps
Interface supports standard SONET/SDH
312
[te3] 155.52Mbps
[3] 155.52Mbps
[7] 155.52Mbps
[3] 155.52Mbps
[7] 155.52Mbps
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show ted link
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
Release Information
Description
Options
Syntax on page 313
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 313
show ted link
<brief | detail>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
show ted link
<brief | detail>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) traffic engineering database link
information.
none—Display standard information about traffic engineering database link information.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show ted link brief on page 314
show ted link detail on page 314
Table 45 on page 313 describes the output fields for the show ted link command. Output
fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 45: show ted link Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
ID
Hostname and address of the node that the link is coming from. An address of
.00 indicates that the node is the routing device itself. An address in the range
0.01 through 0.FF indicates that the node is a pseudonode.
brief
-->ID
Hostname and address of the node that the link is going to. An address of .00
indicates that the node is the routing device itself. An address in the range 0.01
through 0.FF indicates that the node is a pseudonode.
brief
hostname
Hostname and address of the node that the link is coming from. An address of
.00 indicates that the node is the routing device itself. An address in the range
0.01 through 0.FF indicates that the node is a pseudonode.
detail
hostname
Hostname and address of the node that the link is going to. An address of .00
indicates that the node is the routing device itself. An address in the range 0.01
through 0.FF indicates that the node is a pseudonode.
detail
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Table 45: show ted link Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Local Path
Number of paths CSPF on the local routing device has placed on the link.
All levels
Local BW
Amount of bandwidth the local routing device has placed on the link.
All levels
Sample Output
show ted link brief
user@host> show ted link brief
TED link:
ID
->ID
LocalPath LocalBW
cheviot.00(123.456.1.10)
merino.00(123.456.1.14)
0 0bps
merino.00(123.456.1.14)
corriedale.00(123.456.1.11)
0 0bps
merino.00(123.456.1.14)
perendale.00(123.456.1.13)
0 0bps
merino.00(123.456.1.14)
cheviot.00(123.456.1.10)
0 0bps
romney.00(123.456.1.15)
corriedale.00(123.456.1.11)
0 0bps
romney.00(123.456.1.15)
perendale.00(123.456.1.13)
0 0bps
show ted link detail
user@host> show ted link detail
TED link:
cheviot.00(123.456.1.10)->merino.00(123.456.1.14), LocalPath 0
localBW [0] 0bps
[1] 0bps
[2] 0bps
[3] 0bps
localBW [4] 0bps
[5] 0bps
[6] 0bps
[7] 0bps
merino.00(123.456.1.14)->corriedale.00(123.456.1.11), LocalPath 0
localBW [0] 0bps
[1] 0bps
[2] 0bps
[3] 0bps
localBW [4] 0bps
[5] 0bps
[6] 0bps
[7] 0bps
merino.00(123.456.1.14)->perendale.00(123.456.1.13), LocalPath 0
localBW [0] 0bps
[1] 0bps
[2] 0bps
[3] 0bps
localBW [4] 0bps
[5] 0bps
[6] 0bps
[7] 0bps
merino.00(123.456.1.14)->cheviot.00(123.456.1.10), LocalPath 0
localBW [0] 0bps
[1] 0bps
[2] 0bps
[3] 0bps
localBW [4] 0bps
[5] 0bps
[6] 0bps
[7] 0bps
romney.00(123.456.1.15)->corriedale.00(123.456.1.11), LocalPath 0
localBW [0] 0bps
[1] 0bps
[2] 0bps
[3] 0bps
localBW [4] 0bps
[5] 0bps
[6] 0bps
[7] 0bps
romney.00(123.456.1.15)->perendale.00(123.456.1.13), LocalPath 0
localBW [0] 0bps
[1] 0bps
[2] 0bps
[3] 0bps
localBW [4] 0bps
[5] 0bps
[6] 0bps
[7] 0bps
314
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
show ted protocol
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
Release Information
Description
Options
Syntax on page 315
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 315
show ted protocol
<brief | detail>
<logical-system (all | logical-system-name)>
show ted protocol
<brief | detail>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.5 for EX Series switches.
Display information about the protocols from which the Multiprotocol Label Switching
(MPLS) traffic engineering database learned about its nodes.
none—Display standard information about the protocols from which the traffic engineering
database learned about its nodes.
brief | detail—(Optional) Display the specified level of output.
logical-system (all | logical-system-name)—(Optional) Perform this operation on all logical
systems or on a particular logical system.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show ted protocol on page 316
Table 46 on page 315 describes the output fields for the show ted protocol command.
Output fields are listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 46: show ted protocol Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Protocol name
Protocol that reported the node information:
•
IS-IS(1)—IS-IS Level 1.
•
IS-IS(2)—IS-IS Level 2.
•
OSPF (area-number)—OSPF from the specified area.
Credibility
If the protocols provide conflicting information about a node, the protocol with
the highest credibility value is the one that the traffic engineering database uses.
Self node
Address the protocol uses as the local address.
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
315
MPLS on the QFX Series
Sample Output
show ted protocol
user@host> show ted protocol
Protocol name
Credibility Self node
IS-IS(2)
2 (highest) corriedale.00(123.456.1.11)
IS-IS(1)
1
corriedale.00(123.456.1.11)
316
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
traceroute mpls ldp
Syntax
Release Information
traceroute mpls <ldp> fec
<destination>
<detail>
<exp>
<fanout>
<logical-system>
<no-resolve>
<paths>
<retries>
<routing-instance>
<source>
<ttl>
<update>
<wait>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 8.4.
Description
Trace route to a remote host for an MPLS label-switched path signaled by the LDP. Use
traceroute mpls ldp as a debugging tool to locate MPLS label-switched path forwarding
issues in a network. (Currently supported for IPv4 packets only.)
Options
fec—Specify the IP address and optional prefix of the forwarding equivalence class (FEC).
destination—(Optional) Specify the destination address to use when sending probes.
detail—(Optional) Display detailed output.
exp—(Optional) Specify the class-of-service to use when sending probes. The range of
values is 0 through 7. The default value is 7.
fanout—(Optional) Specify the maximum number of nexthops to search per node. The
range of values is 1 through 16. The default value is 16.
logical-system—(Optional) Specify the name of the logical system for the traceroute
attempt.
no-resolve—(Optional) Specify not to resolve the hostname that corresponds to the IP
address.
paths—(Optional) Specify the number of paths to search. The range of values is 1 through
255. The default value is 16.
retries—(Optional) Specify the number of times to resend probe. values. The range of
values is 1 through 9. The default value is 3.
routing-instance routing-instance-name—(Optional) Specify the name of the routing
instance for the traceroute attempt.
source source-address—(Optional) Specify the source address of the outgoing traceroute
packets.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
ttl value—(Optional) Specify the maximum time-to-live value to include in the traceroute
request, in seconds. The range of values is 1 through 125 and the default value is 64.
wait seconds—(Optional) Specify the number of seconds to wait before resending a
probe. The range of values is 5 through 15 and the default value is 10 seconds.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
network
traceroute mpls ldp on page 319
traceroute mpls ldp detail on page 319
Table 47 on page 318 describes the output fields for the traceroute mpls ldp fec command
and the traceroute mpls ldp fec detail commands. Output fields are listed in the
approximate order in which they appear.
Table 47: traceroute mpls ldp Output Fields
318
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Probe options
Probe options specified in the traceroute mpls ldp fec
command.
all levels
ttl
Time to live value of the labeled packet.
none specified
Label
Outgoing label used for forwarding the packet along
the label-switched paths.
none specified
Protocol
Signaling protocol used. For this command, it is LDP.
none specified
Address
Address of the next hop.
none specified
Previous Hop
Address of the previous hop. Previous hop address
of the first hop is null.
none specified
Probe status
Forwarding status from the first hop to the last-hop
label-switching router (egress point in the
label-switched paths).
none specified
Hop
Address of the hops in the label-switched path from
the first hop to the last hop. Depth indicates the level
of the hop.
detail
Parent
Address of the previous hop. Parent value for the first
hop is null.
detail
Return Code
Return code for reporting the result of processing the
echo request by the receiver.
detail
Response time
Time for the echo request to reach the receiver.
detail
Multipath type
Labels or addresses used by the specified multipath
type. If multipaths are not used, the value is none.
detail
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
Table 47: traceroute mpls ldp Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Label Stack
Label stack used to forward the packet.
detail
Sample Output
traceroute mpls ldp
user@router> traceroute mpls ldp 4.4.4.4
Probe options: ttl 64, retries 3, wait 10, paths 16, exp 7, fanout 16
ttl
Label Protocol
Address
Previous Hop
Probe Status
1
100016 LDP
24.24.24.1
(null)
Success
2
100000 LDP
20.20.20.2
24.24.24.1
Success
3
3 LDP
22.22.22.4
20.20.20.2
Egress
Path 1 via fe-0/3/3.101 destination 127.0.0.64
traceroute mpls ldp detail
user@router> traceroute mpls ldp 4.4.4.4 detail
Probe Options: ttl 64, retries 3, wait 10, paths 3, exp 7
Hop 24.24.24.1 Depth 1
Parent (null)
Return code: Label switched at stack-depth 1
Response time 165.93 msec
Multipath type: IP bitmask
Address Range 1: 127.0.0.0 ~ 127.0.3.255
Label Stack:
Label 1 Value 100032 Protocol LDP
Hop 20.20.20.2 Depth 2
Parent 24.24.24.1
Return code: Upstream interface index unknown label-switched at stack-depth
1
Response time 19.05 msec
Multipath type: IP bitmask
Address Range 1: 127.0.0.0 ~ 127.0.3.255
Label Stack:
Label 1 Value 100000 Protocol LDP
Hop 22.22.22.4 Depth 3
Parent 20.20.20.2
Return code: Egress-ok at stack-depth 1
Response time 0.79 msec
Multipath type: None
Label Stack:
Label 1 Value 3 Protocol LDP
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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MPLS on the QFX Series
traceroute mpls rsvp
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
traceroute mpls <rsvp> lsp-name
<detail>
<egress>
<exp>
<logical-system>
<multipoint>
<no-resolve>
<retries>
<source source-address>
<ttl>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.2.
egress, multipoint, and ttl options added in Junos OS Release 11.2.
Trace route to a remote host for an MPLS LSP signaled by RSVP. Use traceroute mpls
rsvp as a debugging tool to locate MPLS label-switched path (LSP) forwarding issues
in a network. (Currently supported for IPv4 packets only.)
lsp-name—Specify the name of the LSP to be traced.
detail—(Optional) Display detailed output.
egress—(Optional) Request that a specific point-to-multipoint egress node reply to the
trace route. The trace route would follow the associated sub-LSP to the egress node.
exp—(Optional) Specify the class of service to use when sending probes. The range of
values is 0 through 7. The default value is 7.
logical-system—(Optional) Specify the name of the logical system for the traceroute
attempt.
multipoint—(Optional) Perform a trace route on a point-to-multipoint LSP.
no-resolve—(Optional) Specify not to resolve the hostname that corresponds to the IP
address.
retries—(Optional) Specify the number of times to resend probe. The range of values is
1 through 9. The default value is 3.
source source-address—(Optional) Specify the source address of the outgoing traceroute
packets.
ttl—(Optional) Specify the number of hops to follow before forcing the trace route to
quit.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
320
network
traceroute mpls rsvp on page 322
traceroute mpls rsvp detail on page 322
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
traceroute mpls rsvp multipoint (branch node for sub-LSPs) on page 323
traceroute mpls rsvp multipoint (single-hop sub-LSPs) on page 323
Output Fields
Table 48 on page 321 describes the output fields for the traceroute mpls rsvp lsp-name
and traceroute mpls rsvp lsp-name detail commands. Output fields are listed in the
approximate order in which they appear.
Table 48: traceroute mpls rsvp Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Probe options
Probe options specified in the traceroute mpls rsvp
lsp-name command.
all levels
ttl
Time-to-live value of the labeled packet.
none specified
Label
MPLS label used to forward the packets along the LSP.
none specified
Protocol
Signaling protocol used. For this command, it is
RSVP-TE.
none specified
Address
Address of the next hop.
none specified
Previous Hop
Address of the previous hop. Previous hop address of
the first hop is null.
none specified
Probe status
Forwarding status from the first hop to the last-hop
label-switching router (egress point in the
label-switched paths). Displays Success if the trace to
a hop is successful or Egress if the trace has reached
the last router on the path.
none specified
Hop
Address of the hops in the label-switched path from the
first hop to the last hop. Depth indicates the level of the
hop.
detail
Parent
Address of the previous hop. Parent value for the first
hop is null.
detail
Return Code
Return code for reporting the result of processing the
echo request by the receiver.
detail
Sender timestamp
Displays the timestamp when the MPLS echo request
is sent to the next hop.
detail
Receiver
timestamp
Timestamp when the echo request from the previous
hop is received and acknowledged with an echo
response by the next hop.
detail
Response time
Time for the echo request to reach the receiver.
detail
MTU
Size of the largest packet that includes the label stack
forwarded to the next hop.
detail
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Table 48: traceroute mpls rsvp Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
Level of Output
Multipath type
Labels or addresses used by the specified multipath
type. If multipaths are not used, the value is none.
detail
Label stack
Label stack used to forward the packet.
detail
Path
Displays the sub-lsp path number for this traceroute,
the interface used, and the destination address.
all levels
Sample Output
traceroute mpls rsvp
user@host> traceroute mpls rsvp lsp-chicago-atlanta
Probe options: retries 3, exp 7
ttl
1
2
3
Label
299792
299803
3
Protocol
RSVP—TE
RSVP—TE
RSVP—TE
Address
192.168.1.2
192.168.2.3
192.168.3.4
Previous Hop
(null)
192.168.1.2
192.168.2.3
Probe Status
Success
Success
Egress
Path 1 via ge-0/0/0.1 destination 127.0.0.64
traceroute mpls rsvp detail
user@host> traceroute mpls rsvp lsp-chicago-atlanta detail
Probe options: retries 3, exp 7
Hop 192.168.1.2 Depth 1
Probe status: Success
Parent: (null)
Return code: Label-switched at stack-depth 1
Sender timestamp: 2008-04-17 09:35:27 EDT 400.88 msec
Receiver timestamp: 2008-04-17 09:35:27 EDT 427.87 msec
Response time: 26.99 msec
MTU: Unknown
Multipath type: IP bitmask
Address Range 1: 127.0.0.64 ~ 127.0.0.127
Label Stack:
Label 1 Value 299792 Protocol RSVP-TE
Hop 192.168.2.3 Depth 2
Probe status: Success
Parent: 192.168.1.2
Return code: Upstream interface index unknown label-switched at stack-depth
1
Sender timestamp: 2008-04-17 09:35:27 EDT 522.13 msec
Receiver timestamp: 2008-04-17 09:35:27 EDT 548.69 msec
Response time: 26.55 msec
MTU: 1518
Multipath type: IP bitmask
Address Range 1: 127.0.0.64 ~ 127.0.0.127
Label Stack:
Label 1 Value 299803 Protocol RSVP-TE
322
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 11: Operational Mode Commands
traceroute mpls rsvp multipoint (branch node for sub-LSPs)
The following traceroute output is for a point-to-multipoint LSP where the penultimate
node is a branch node for the sub-LSPs.
user@host> traceroute mpls rsvp multipoint p2mplsp
Probe options: retries 3, exp 7
ttl
1
2
3
4
Label
300000
299968
299952
299920
Protocol
RSVP-TE
RSVP-TE
RSVP-TE
RSVP-TE
Address
81.1.2.2
81.2.3.3
81.3.4.4
81.4.6.6
Previous Hop
(null)
81.1.2.2
81.2.3.3
81.3.4.4
Probe Status
Success
Success
Success
Egress
Path 1 via lt-1/2/0.102 destination 127.0.0.64
ttl
4
Label
299920
Protocol
RSVP-TE
Address
81.4.5.5
Previous Hop
81.3.4.4
Probe Status
Egress
Path 2 via lt-1/2/0.102 destination 127.0.0.64
traceroute mpls rsvp multipoint (single-hop sub-LSPs)
The following traceroute output is for a point-to-multipoint LSP with multiple single-hop
sub-LSPs.
user@host> traceroute mpls rsvp multipoint p2mplsp
Probe options: retries 3, exp 7
ttl
1
Label
0
Protocol
RSVP-TE
Address
81.1.2.2
Previous Hop
(null)
Probe Status
Egress
Path 1 via lt-1/2/0.102 destination 127.0.0.64
ttl
1
Label
0
Protocol
RSVP-TE
Address
81.1.8.8
Previous Hop
(null)
Probe Status
Egress
Path 2 via lt-1/2/0.108 destination 127.0.0.64
ttl
1
Label
0
Protocol
RSVP-TE
Address
81.1.9.9
Previous Hop
(null)
Probe Status
Egress
Path 3 via lt-1/2/0.109 destination 127.0.0.64
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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324
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PART 4
Troubleshooting
•
Troubleshooting Procedures on page 327
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325
MPLS on the QFX Series
326
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CHAPTER 12
Troubleshooting Procedures
•
Issues and Limitations in Operation of MPLS Features on the QFX Series and on
EX4600 on page 327
Issues and Limitations in Operation of MPLS Features on the QFX Series and on EX4600
The following issues exist in the operation of MPLS features on QFX Series devices and
on the EX4600 switch. In each case, the described behavior is the expected behavior.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring an MPLS firewall filter on a switch that is deployed as an egress provider
edge (PE) switch has no effect.
•
Configuring the revert-timer statement at the [edit protocols mpls] hierarchy level has
no effect.
•
If you configure the BGP labeled unicast address family (using the labeled-unicast
statement at the [edit protocols bgp family inet] hierarchy level) on a QFX switch or
an EX4600 switch deployed as a route reflector for BGP labeled routes, path selection
will occur at the route reflector, and a single best path will be advertised. This will result
in loss of BGP multipath information.
•
MPLS Feature Support on the QFX Series and EX4600 Switch Overview on page 15
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MPLS on the QFX Series
328
Copyright © 2014, Juniper Networks, Inc.