Data Brochure - BlueRidge Company

D 370
- Data Brochure
House Control 370
Occupied
UnOccupied
Power
WWSD
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
Optimum Start / Stop
24 hr. Timer
Timer Active
70°F
(21°C)
12 hrs.
• Dial the desired duration
6
of the UnOccupied period.
• Press start button at the time of day
you want the UnOcc. period to begin.
Timer Active light turns on.
18
0
24
40
(4)
UnOccupied
Duration
100
(38)
DHW
Pump / Vlv
1 Cooling
System
Pump
2 Zone 2
Boiler
The House Control 370 is a microprocessor-based control that provides individual temperature control for either 4 zones of radiant floor or 4 zones of baseboard heating. The supply
water temperature to the zones is modulated based on both the outdoor temperature and
indoor temperature feedback from each of the zones. This indoor-outdoor reset strategy
reduces indoor temperature swings and increases system efficiency. Other energy saving
features include a heating system warm weather shut down (WWSD) and the ability to lower
indoor temperatures for a night setback period. The control has an Optimum Start / Stop
feature which automatically calculates when to bring each zone out of night setback in order
ensure they are returned to their normal operating temperature as the setback period ends.
The 370 also allows integration of an indirect fired DHW tank into the system. This helps
provide faster DHW tank pick-up times and greater energy savings.
Zone 1 /
3 Zone 3
4 Zone 4
UnOccupied
Start
06/99
90
70
0 = always Occupied
24 = always UnOccupied
50
of full
% output
30
R
House Control 370
10
NR T L / C
Four Zones, DHW, Boiler / Mixing
LR 58223
Control Strategy ...................
Sequence of Operation ........
Installation ............................
Settings .................................
pg. 2
pg. 6
pg. 10
pg. 14
Occupied
Power
WWSD
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
Optimum Start / Stop
24 hr. Timer
Timer Active
12 hrs.
• Dial the desired duration of the
6
UnOccupied period.
• Press start button at the time of day
you want the UnOcc. period to begin.
Timer Active light turns on.
18
0
24
40
(4)
UnOccupied
Duration
100
(38)
DHW
Pump / Vlv
1 Cooling
System
Pump
2 Zone 2
Boiler
3 Zone 3
Zone 1 2 3 4
Occ. only Off
Boiler
Boiler Supply
3
Heating Curve
130°F
100
220
Off
3.6 120
0.2
DHW Pump
Off
170°F
2
Zone 1 /
DHW during UnOcc.
DHW Priority
DHW Valve
Zone 1 Cooling
Zone 1 Heating
165
Min. Boiler
Supply / Return
Max. System
Supply
90
70
0 = always Occupied
24 = always UnOccupied
50
Test
full
% ofoutput
R
House Control 370
10
2
3
4
Sys Power Var.
Pmp N
L Pmp
5
6
7
Power
120 V (ac) ±10% 50/60 Hz 1000 VA
Var. Pump 240 V 50/60 Hz 2.4 A 1/6 hp, fuse T2.5 A 250 V
Relays
120 V (ac) 5 A 1/3 hp, pilot duty 240 VA
NRTL/C
LR 58223
Four Zones, DHW, Boiler / Mixing
Do not apply power here
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Com RTU RTU Com RTU RTU Com UnO Zo Com Boil Sup Out
Sen 1
2 Sen 3
4 Sen Sw In Sen Sen Sen Sen
Caution: Signal
wiring must be
rated at least 300V
Made in Canada by
tekmar Control Systems Ltd.
30
1
Boiler Return
Mixing
pg. 16
pg. 19
pg. 20
pg. 20
4 Zone 4
UnOccupied
Start
Thermal Motor
Optimum Start
Occ/UnOcc
1
70°F
(21°C)
Testing the Control ......
Error Messages ............
Technical Data ..............
Limited Warranty ..........
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
Boiler
DHW
DHW Com
Pmp / Vlv Dem Dem 1-2
1
2
Com
3-4
3
Outputs
Zone Valves or
Zone Pumps
4
Output
System
Pump
M
Input
120 V (ac)
Power
Supply
M
M
Output
Var. Speed
Injection
Pump
M
or
Cooling
70
TIME
PRGM 1
2
AMPM
UNOCC
OVR
S M T W T F S
LR 58233 E150539
M
70
70
Input
tekmar RTUs or
Indoor Sensors
70
Input
tekmar
Timer
Input
Input
Inputs
Output
tekmar
Universal Sensors Outdoor Sensor Boiler
Zone Control Included / Optional
Included
1 of 20
Output
DHW Valve or
DHW Pump
Input
DHW
Demand
signal
Copyright © D 370 -06/99
Control Strategy
OUTDOOR RESET
• The heat supplied to a building is proportional to the temperature of the
water and the surface area of the heating element. A small surface area
such as baseboard radiators requires a higher water temperature than
a larger surface area such as radiant floors.
Constant
Room Temperature
Outdoor
Temperature
Drop
Heat
Loss
Increase
• The heat lost from a building is dependent on the outdoor temperature.
As the outdoor temperature drops, the building heat loss increases.
Heating Curve 
Heating Curve Parallel Shift 
All heating curves begin at the heating curve starting point. If the
heating curve starting point is adjusted, the heating curve will be
parallel shifted. The heating curve starting point is either set manually
through a dial, or it is determined automatically by the control through
indoor temperature feedback.
3.6 3.0 2.4 2.0
1.6
210
(99)
190
(88)
1.2
170
(77)
1.0
150
(65)
0.8
Heating
Curve
Starting
Point
0.6
0.4
0.2
130
(54)
110
(43)
90
(32)
Supply water temperature
A hot water heating system can be accurately controlled by modulating
the supply water temperature as the outdoor temperature changes.
Using this approach, the heat lost from the building is exactly matched
by the heat input to the building. A tekmar reset control utilizes a
heating curve to set the relationship between outdoor temperature and
supply water temperature. The heating curve determines the amount
the supply water temperature is raised for every 1° drop in outdoor
air temperature. The heating curve is sometimes called an outdoor
reset ratio.
70
(21)
90
(32)
70
(21)
50
30
10
(10)
(-1)
(-12)
Outdoor air temperature
-10
(-23)
°F
(°C)
Indoor Temperature Feedback 
Most buildings have internal heat gains due to people, passive solar
heating and mechanical or electrical equipment. If only the outdoor
temperature is measured, the control cannot compensate for these
internal heat gains and the building may overheat. In order to prevent
overheating, indoor temperature feedback should be combined with
the outdoor reset strategy. From this indoor temperature feedback, the
control can change the heating curve starting point in order to match
the supply water temperature to the heat loss of the building. If the
indoor temperature is too warm, the control automatically shifts the
starting point and the heating curve down. If the indoor temperature is
too cold, the control shifts the starting point and heating curve up.
3.6 3.0 2.4 2.0
1.6
Pa
ra
1.2
170
(77)
1.0
150
(65)
lle
lS
UP
hif
to
fH
0.8
ea
DO
tin
W
N
gC
ur
ve
0.6
130
(54)
0.4
110
(43)
0.2
90
(32)
Supply water temperature
190
(88)
Warm Weather Shut Down (WWSD) 
When the outdoor air temperature is equal to the heating curve starting
point, no additional heat is required in the building and therefore the
heating system can be shut down. The WWSD point is normally the
same as the heating curve starting point.
210
(99)
70
(21)
90
(32)
70
(21)
50
(10)
30
(-1)
10
(-12)
-10
(-23)
°F
(°C)
Outdoor air temperature
BOILER OPERATION
The supply water temperature from a boiler can be controlled by cycling
the boiler on and off. Modulation of the boiler’s operating temperature in
hot water heating systems not only provides more comfort but also offers
significant energy savings. The cooler the boiler runs, the more efficient
it is due to less heat losses up the flue and reduced boiler jacket losses.
3.6 3.0 2.4 2.0
1.6
190
(88)
Minimum Boiler
Supply Setting
130°F
1.2
170
(77)
1.0
150
(65)
Minimum Boiler Supply 
0.8
Most boilers require a minimum supply water temperature in order to
prevent corrosion from flue gas condensation. The control should
therefore only modulate the boiler supply water temperature down to
the boiler manufacturer’s minimum recommended operating temperature. Some boilers are designed to condense and should be operated
at low water temperatures as much as possible for maximum efficiency.
0.6
Copyright © D 370 -06/99
2 of 20
210
(99)
WWSD
Point
70°F
130
(54)
0.4
110
(43)
0.2
90
(32)
70
(21)
90
(32)
70
(21)
50
30
10
(10)
(-1)
(-12)
Outdoor air temperature
-10
(-23)
°F
(°C)
Supply water temperature
Control Strategy
In order to properly control a hot water heating system, the heat supplied
to the building must equal the heat lost by the building.
Boiler Differential 
on
Boi
ler
on
Control Strategy
Bo
i le r
off
160°F (71°C)
off
iler
Bo
165°F(74°C)
ile r
Supply Water Temperature
Differential = 10°F (5°C)
Bo
An on / off boiler must be operated with a differential in order to prevent
short cycling. When the supply water temperature drops below the
bottom rail of the differential, the boiler is turned on. The boiler is then
kept on until the supply water temperature rises above the top rail of
the differential. If the differential is too wide, there can be large supply
water temperature swings; however, if the differential is too narrow, the
boiler short cycles and operates inefficiently. Some controls automatically calculate the boiler differential in order to achieve an appropriate
balance between temperature swings and boiler efficiency. This also
permits the control to adapt to changing loads and conditions.
155°F (68°C)
Time
MIXING OPERATION
The full range of water temperatures required through a heating season
can be provided with a standard (non-condensing) boiler by incorporating a modulating mixing device into the system. Mixing valves or variable
speed injection pumps are commonly used to modulate both the system
supply water temperature and the boiler return water temperature. The
modulation of water temperatures improves comfort in the building and
also protects the boiler from cool return water. For more detailed
information on mixing methods consult Essay E 021.
System
Loop
Boiler
Loop
Mixing
Device
Boiler Protection 
Cool water is often returned to the boiler from low temperature radiant floor heating systems or when the
heating system is recovering from night setback. This cool boiler return water may cause the boiler to operate
at such a low temperature that the flue gases condense. Alternatively, when the boiler surfaces are hot due
to previous loads such as domestic hot water generation, the large temperature difference (∆T) between the
boiler and its return water can cause the boiler to become thermally shocked. Proper protection of the boiler
under these circumstances requires a modulating mixing device that can temporarily reduce the heating
load. This is normally accomplished by closing a valve or reducing the speed of an injection pump.
Mix
Maximum System Supply 
Some systems, such as hydronic radiant floor heating, usually operate at water temperatures that are below
the minimum boiler supply temperature. This is due to the large surface area of the floors which radiate a
significant amount of heat at low water temperatures. Floor heating systems and flat panel convectors also
have a maximum surface temperature limit for occupant health reasons. In such systems a modulating
mixing device is normally required to limit the supply water temperature.
Mix
DOMESTIC HOT WATER (DHW)
An indirect fired DHW tank can be integrated into the hydronic heating system for greater
system efficiency and faster DHW recovery.
DHW Supply 
Indirect DHW tanks are typically heated with a boiler water temperature of 180 to 200°F
(82 to 93°C). When outdoor reset is used, the boiler supply water may be well below this
temperature and therefore an outdoor reset override is required. When the DHW tank
calls for heat, the control must turn on the appropriate pumps or valve and ensure there
is hot boiler supply water.
P
DHW Priority 
It is often desirable to temporarily suspend the flow of heat to the heating system when
the DHW tank calls for heat. This allows the DHW tank to recover faster than when both
the DHW and heating system operate simultaneously. If the heating system has a large
thermal mass, a relatively short interruption of the heat supply is not noticed by the
occupants. Heating systems with a smaller thermal mass may cool down while the
heating system is turned off. DHW Priority is therefore an optional feature.
6
5
4
Preventing Building Freeze Up when DHW Priority is used
There is always the possibility of an excessively long DHW call for heat due to a broken
pipe, faulty aquastat or other problems. At cold outdoor conditions the building may freeze
when there is a long DHW draw with DHW Priority selected. In order to prevent this, the
control must override the DHW Priority and simultaneously operate the DHW and heating
systems. The maximum time allotted for DHW Priority should decrease as the outdoor
temperature drops.
3 of 20
3
2
1
-40°F
-20
20
60
(-40)°C (-29)
(-7)
(-16)
Outdoor air temperature
DHW priority demand time limit (hours)
(minimum 20 minutes)
7
100°F
(38)°C
Copyright © D 370 -06/99
Control Strategy
Boiler Shock Protection
When DHW priority is used, the temperature within the heating system terminal unit
may be significantly lower than the boiler temperature once the DHW operation is
complete. If the DHW pump or valve is simply turned off and the heating system pump
turned on, a large ∆T can develop across the boiler. This may induce thermal shock of
the boiler. In order to provide a smooth transition between the DHW and heating system
loads, the control must simultaneously operate the DHW pump and heating system
pump for a short period of time. This mixes the water returning to the boiler and
minimizes the possibility of thermal shock.
P
DHW
Tank
Mixing
DHW Post Purge 
During the DHW operation, the boiler temperature is normally raised above 180°F (82°C).
Once the DHW tank is satisfied, the residual heat within the boiler should be purged in
order to reduce stand-by losses. When the heating system does not require heat, the
boiler can be purged into the DHW tank. This is accomplished by turning the boiler off but
keeping the DHW pump or valve operating for a purging period. If the boiler supply
temperature drops below the DHW tank temperature, heat will be removed from the DHW
tank. Therefore, the post purge is terminated if the boiler supply is not hot enough. This
means that the DHW post purge will not always take the same length of time.
P
M
DHW Setback 
During the night, or when people are not within the building, energy can be saved by lowering the DHW tank temperature. A lower tank
temperature is achieved when the system control ignores the call for heat from the DHW aquastat. In order to prevent a cold DHW
temperature at the start of the Occupied period, the system control must raise the tank temperature before the setback period ends.
ZONING OPERATION
In a multiple zone heating system, the zones may have different internal heat gains, heat losses or different temperature settings.
Each zone must therefore have individual temperature control. For maximum comfort, the heat should be continuously supplied
to the zone at the same rate the zone is losing heat. The most accurate method of accomplishing this is by outdoor reset; however,
it is not normally economical to modulate the supply water temperature to every zone.
Outdoor reset can be combined with zoning for a more cost effective solution. Through
90%
85%
100%
indoor sensors, a zone control can provide indoor temperature feedback to the outdoor
time on
time on
time on
reset control. The outdoor reset control will then adjust the supply water temperature to
satisfy the zone with the highest water temperature requirement. Heat to the remaining
M
M
M
zones will be cycled on and off by the zone control using zone valves or pumps. Since the
heat is cycled on and off, accurate PID control logic should be provided to maintain a stable
indoor temperature.
Heat
Source
PID Zoning Logic 
Proportional (P)
In order to prevent indoor temperature swings, the heat supplied to each zone must be
proportional to the heat required by the zone. Proportional control logic can be
accomplished by pulse width modulation (PWM). A typical PWM system has a fixed
operating cycle. During this operating cycle, the on time of the zone relay is varied
based on the difference between the desired zone temperature and the actual zone
temperature. As the zone temperature drops, the relay on time increases and as the
zone temperature rises, the relay on time decreases.
72 °F
(22°C)
10 minutes
5 minutes
70 °F
(22°C)
on
15 minutes
72 °F
(22°C)
Integral (I)
no heat
15 minutes
68 °F
(20°C)
no heat
13 minutes
70 °F
Controls that are strictly proportional suffer from a problem of offset. The amount of heat
(21°C)
droop
supplied to the zone depends on how far the space temperature is below the desired
68 °F
(20°C)
15 minutes
15 minutes
setpoint. This implies that as the heating load increases, the average room temperature
droops. On the coldest day of the year, the most heat is required and therefore the room
temperature must be coldest.
In order to overcome this offset, integral control logic is used. Only digital controls can provide integral control logic due to the lengthy
response time of buildings. Integral control logic is based on time. The longer the room temperature is below the desired setpoint,
the more heat is supplied to the room. With integral control logic, full heat can be supplied to the room on the coldest day of the
year without requiring that the room be cold.
Derivative (D)
In order to speed up the control’s response to quick changes in the heating load, derivative control logic is required. However,
sudden room temperature changes, for example from an open door or window, should be ignored by an intelligent control.
P + I + D = PID
If proportional, integral and derivative (PID) control logic are combined, the control is more able to prevent excessive temperature
swings and provide a stable room temperature under all conditions. It not only takes into account how much the room temperature
has drooped, but also how long there has been a droop and how fast the temperature is changing.
Copyright © D 370 -06/99
4 of 20
Zone Load Staggering 
Zone 1
On
On
Zone 2
On
Zone 3
On
On
Zone 4
Post Purge
(Boiler off, Pump on)
Zone Post Purge 
Before the last zone is turned off in a heating cycle, the boiler is turned off but the zone continues to draw heat from the boiler. This
post purge of the boiler reduces stand-by losses and reduces overall energy consumption.
UNOCCUPIED (NIGHT SETBACK)
During the night, or at times when people are not within the building, energy can be saved by lowering the building temperature for an
UnOccupied (Night Setback) period.
Due to the large thermal mass of buildings, it takes a long time for the indoor space temperature to significantly change whenever the
heating system is turned on or off. The building heat up or cool down time is further increased when high mass heating systems are
used (e.g. radiant floors). In most cases night setback cannot be used with these systems due to the long recovery time required in the
morning. A typical system is demonstrated in the adjacent diagram.
At the start of the night setback period the heat is turned off, but the heat
contained within the slab or radiator continues to heat the building and
there is a delay before the space temperature begins to drop. At the end
of this delay the temperature within the building gradually decreases, and
may eventually reach the required UnOccupied temperature after sufficient time has elapsed. Once the setback period is complete, the heat is
turned on again but there is a long recovery time required to raise the
space temperature to the desired setpoint. The length of the delay and
recovery periods changes with outdoor temperature and is different for
each zone within the building.
A comfortable setback can be provided if the control “learns” the
response time for each zone within the building. Based on the zone’s
response time, the control can then calculate an Optimum Stop time and
an Optimum Start time. At the Optimum Stop time the control turns off the
zone valve or pump before the selected UnOcc time in order to overcome
the delay period. At the Optimum Start time, the control starts to raise the
zone temperature before the selected Occ time in order to overcome the
recovery period. This allows night setback to be used with most
heating systems.
Optimum Start / Stop with Water Temperature Boost 
When Optimum Start / Stop is combined with Outdoor Reset, the
control can boost the water temperature during the recovery period.
This provides a faster recovery and allows a longer setback for greater
energy savings.
10 P.M. 11 P.M.
11 A.M.
Occ
70°F (21°C)
UnOcc
65°F
(18°C)
Recovery
Period
Delay
Period
9 P.M.
10 P.M.
8 A.M.
5 A.M.
Setback Period
Room Temperature
Occ
70°F
(21°C)
Optimum
Stop
UnOcc
65°F (18°C)
Optimum
Start
Recovery
Period
Delay
Period
9 P.M. 10 P.M.
6 A.M.
8 A.M.
Setback Period
Room Temperature
Occ
70°F
(21°C)
Optimum
Stop
The accuracy of the Optimum Start / Stop routine depends on the
feedback available to the control.
Optimum Start / Stop with both Outdoor and Indoor Sensors 
The response time of the building varies with outdoor temperature and is also different
for each zone. The most accurate Optimum Start / Stop routine is therefore achieved
when both the indoor and outdoor temperatures are monitored during transitions between
UnOccupied and Occupied modes.
Optimum Start / Stop with only Indoor Sensors 
When only indoor temperature feedback is available, the control must base all Optimum
Start / Stop calculations on only indoor temperature. If there are large variations in outdoor
temperature, this method cannot provide the same level of accuracy as when both indoor
and outdoor sensors are used.
Optimum Start / Stop with only an Outdoor Sensor 
Every building, and often each zone within the building, has a different response time.
When only an outdoor sensor is used, the control must assume a particular response time
for the entire building. Therefore this is generally the least accurate method of calculating
Optimum Start / Stop times.
5 of 20
8 A.M.
Setback Period
UnOcc
65°F (18°C)
Optimum
Start
Shorter
Recovery
Period
Delay
Period
Room
Temperature
Units (RTU's)
Outdoor
Sensor
Room
Temperature
Units (RTU's)
Outdoor
Sensor
Copyright © D 370 -06/99
Control Strategy
In a multiple zone system, there can be sudden load changes on the boiler and system
due to multiple zones turning on or off. These sudden load changes often lead to boiler
short cycling and unnecessary mechanical stresses. The operation of the system can be
improved by staggering the starting points of each zone relay within the operating cycle.
Staggering of the zones maintains a relatively constant system flow rate which improves
boiler operation. Controlled staggering can also minimize boiler running time and improve
system efficiency when only a few zones are needed for short periods.
Sequence of Operation
POWERING UP THE CONTROL
After the House Control 370 is powered up, a software version code is displayed for 2
seconds and then the red indicator lights are turned on for 4 seconds. When the control is
powered up, the green Power light remains on continuously. For the first fifteen minutes
after power up, the Test light flashes and the control responds immediately to changes of
settings. This allows the installer to test the operation of the system. After 15 minutes the
control enters its normal operating mode in which reactions to setting changes are
significantly slower. A slower reaction time to setting changes allows the control to provide
a stable room temperature.
Test
M
70
Only in the first 15 minutes after power up, does
the control respond immediatley to settings
adjustments.
Operation
WARM WEATHER SHUT DOWN (WWSD)
When the outdoor temperature rises above the highest Room Temperature Unit (RTU) dial
setting and all heating zones are satisfied, the WWSD light is turned on and the variable
speed injection pump and all zone relays are turned off. If the system pump is not required
for a DHW operation, the system pump is also turned off. When an external Zone Control
input is used, the WWSD light is only turned on when all the zones connected to the 370
and all the zones connected to the Zone Control are satisfied.
WWSD
M
M
BOILER OPERATION
If the DIP switch is set to Boiler, the system supply water temperature is controlled by turning
the boiler on and off. An outdoor reset strategy is used with indoor temperature feedback from
each of the 4 zones. The boiler differential is automatically calculated. When the 370 control
is used in the boiler mode (DIP switch set to Boiler ), the boiler sensor must be installed on
the supply pipe of the boiler, and the boiler sensor DIP switch must be set to Boiler Supply.
If the boiler sensor DIP switch is set to Boiler Return, a combination of LEDs will flash, as
shown in the error message table, to indicate an illegal DIP switch setting. To eliminate the
error message, simply set the boiler sensor DIP switch to Boiler Supply.
Boiler
M
M
Sensor
Maximum Boiler Supply −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
The 370 has a Max. System Supply dial that can be used to set a maximum boiler supply
water temperature. If the supply water temperature approaches the Max. System Supply
dial setting, the Maximum Supply light is turned on and the 370 operates the boiler at one
differential below the Max. System Supply setting. At no time does the control allow the
target boiler supply temperature to exceed 212°F (100°C).
170°F
Maximum
Supply
120
Max. System
Supply
Minimum Boiler Supply 
The 370 has a Min. Boiler Supply dial which sets a minimum target boiler
supply temperature. This dial has an Off position for condensing and
electric boilers. If the boiler is fired and the boiler supply temperature is
near or below the Min. Boiler Supply dial setting, the 370 turns on the
Minimum Boiler light and reduces the heating load on the boiler. During
this warm up period, some of the zones may be prevented
from operating until the boiler supply water is at the required
minimum temperature.
220
Minimum
Boiler
M
M
130°F
Sensor
100
Off
MIXING OPERATION
If the DIP switch is set to Mixing, the system supply water temperature is
controlled by varying the speed of an injection pump. See Essay E 021 for
more information. An outdoor reset strategy is used with indoor temperature
feedback from each of the 4 zones.
Mixing
Boiler Control 
Boiler
When both a Supply and Boiler Sensor are present and located on the
mixed supply and boiler supply piping, the DIP switches must be set to
Boiler Supply and Mixing. The 370 controls the boiler directly and
automatically calculates the required boiler differential. The boiler
aquastat (limit) should be set at least 20°F (11°C) higher than
boiler design.
130°F
Mixing
Off
165
Min. Boiler
Supply
Boiler Supply
100
Boiler Load Reset 
As the heating load on the mixed loop increases, the speed of the
variable speed injection pump increases. Over time, the 370 also raises
the boiler temperature to satisfy this increased heating load. The 370
also ensures the target boiler supply temperature is above the Min.
Boiler Supply dial setting, but does not exceed 212°F (100°C).
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165
Min. Boiler
Supply
Supply
Sensor
Boil
Sensor
Boiler Enable
130°F
If no Boiler Sensor is installed and the Min. Boiler Supply dial is set to
the Off position, the Boiler relay can be used to provide a heat demand
to an external multiple boiler staging control. In order to prevent short
cycling the 370 turns on the Boiler relay when the variable speed
output is between 10% and 25%. The Boiler relay then has a minimum
on time of 3 minutes and a minimum off time of 20 seconds.
Mixing
100
Off
165
Min. Boiler
Supply
From Heat Source
Supply
Sensor
Boiler Enable With Boiler Protection
Only when the boiler supply water temperature is measured by a boiler
return sensor, can the 370 provide direct boiler protection. The DIP
switch must be set to Boiler Return. The aquastat in the boiler should
be set to Boiler Outdoor design water temperature. When the boiler is
fired and the boiler return temperature is near (or below) the Min. Boiler
Supply dial setting, the 370 turns on the Minimum Boiler light and
reduces the heating load on the boiler. During this warm up period, the
injection pump is run at a slower speed and some of the zones may be
prevented from operating.
To Heat Source
Boiler Return
Mixing
130°F
Operation
100
Off
165
Min. Boiler
Supply
Boiler Load Reduction
When the Boiler relay is turned on after a period of no operation, the
370 only allows one zone to operate until the boiler supply water
temperature reaches the Min. Boiler Supply setting and the system
supply water temperature approaches the target supply temperature.
This helps the boiler to warm up as fast as possible. Once the target
system supply water temperature is reached, the other zones are
allowed to operate.
Supply
Sensor
Boil
Sensor
Maximum System Supply 
The 370 has a Max. System Supply dial that can be used to set an upper limit to the system
supply water temperature. If the supply water temperature approaches the Max. System
Supply dial setting, the 370 turns on the Maximum Supply light and reduces the speed
of the injection pump.
170°F
Maximum
Supply
120
220
Max. System
Supply
DOMESTIC HOT WATER (DHW)
The DHW tank requests heat from the 370 through a DHW Demand. Whenever 24 V (ac)
or 120 V (ac) is applied to the DHW Dem — DHW Dem (22 and 23) terminals on the 370,
the control registers a DHW Demand and turns on the DHW Demand light. An aquastat,
setpoint control or other switching device can be used to generate a DHW Demand by wiring
the voltage signal through the switching device and into the DHW Dem — DHW Dem
terminals.
22 23
DHW
DHW
Demand
DemDem
DHW Valve / DHW Pump 
Once the 370 has received a DHW Demand, the sequence of operation is dependent on the position of the DHW Valve / DHW Pump
DIP switch.
DHW Valve
P
DHW Valve (Boiler Operation)
M
If the DIP switch is set to DHW Valve, the system pump is turned on
and the DHW valve is opened through the DHW Pmp / Vlv relay. The
370 assumes a fast acting zone valve is used and the Thermal Motor
DIP switch has no effect on the operation of the DHW Pump/ Vlv relay.
DHW Valve (Mixing Operation)
If the DIP switch is set to DHW Valve, the DHW valve is opened
through the DHW Pmp / Vlv relay. The boiler loop pump must be
turned on through an external relay that is operated by the DHW valve
end switch.
DHW Pump
P
DHW Pump (Boiler or Mixing Operation)
If the DIP switch is set to DHW Pump, the 370 turns on the DHW
Pump through the DHW Pmp / Vlv relay. Operation of the system
and boiler pump is not required (See application A 370-5).
DHW Supply Temperature 
During the DHW operation, the 370 targets a boiler water temperature of at least 180°F (82°C).
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DHW Priority −−−−−−−−−−−−−−
The DHW system can be given priority over the 370 heating operation by setting the DIP
switch to DHW Priority. The operation of the control during DHW Priority depends primarily
on whether the control is used in boiler reset or mixing reset. If the DIP switch is set to Boiler,
the zone relays are turned off when a DHW Demand is received. If the DIP switch is set to
Mixing, the variable speed injection pump is turned off when the control receives a DHW
Demand.
DHW Priority
Off
DHW Mixing Purge
When the DIP switch is set to DHW Priority and some zones require heat, the 370 performs a DHW Mixing Purge once the DHW
Demand is removed. During the Mixing Purge period, the 370 simultaneously operates the DHW and heating systems. The 370
allows a maximum Mixing Purge period of 2 minutes for fast acting zone valves and pumps and a longer purge period for thermal
motor zone valves. The actual length of the purge period is dependent on the boiler supply water temperature. At the end of the
Mixing Purge period, the DHW Pmp / Vlv relay is turned off but the system pump and zone relays continue to operate.
Operation
DHW Post Purge 
When the DHW Demand is removed and none of the zones require heat, the 370 turns off the boiler but continues to run the DHW
pump or system pump and DHW valve. This purges some residual heat from the boiler. The 370 allows a maximum purge time of
4 minutes. If the boiler supply temperature drops below 150°F (66°C) or below the Min. Boiler Supply dial setting, the 370 stops the
DHW Post Purge.
DHW Setback 
The DHW During UnOcc. DIP switch selects whether DHW setback is desired while the
370 is in UnOccupied mode. If the DHW during UnOcc. DIP switch is set to Off, the DHW
Demand is ignored during the UnOccupied period. However, if Optimum Start is selected,
the 370 will respond to the DHW Demand in the last hour of the UnOccupied mode. This
will generally ensure that the DHW storage tank is up to temperature by the time the
Occupied period begins. If the DIP switch is set to DHW during UnOcc., the 370 responds
to the DHW Demand at all times.
DHW during UnOcc.
Off
ZONING OPERATION
The 370 can directly control the temperature of up to 4 heating zones. In order to measure
the indoor temperature, each zone requires either an Indoor Sensor or a Room Temperature Unit (RTU). With an RTU the desired zone temperature is set using the RTU dial, but
with an Indoor Sensor the desired zone temperature is fixed at 70°F (21°C).
70
PID Zoning Logic 
The 370 operation is based on a 15 minute cycle. During every cycle
the control turns on each zone relay for a specific on time. The required
on time is calculated based on the PID response of the zone during the
previous cycles. If the zone needs more heat, the on time is increased,
and if the zone needs less heat, the on time is reduced. In order to
prevent short cycling, the 370 ensures that the zone relays remain on
or off for at least 3 minutes.
RTU
Indoor Sensor
15 minute Cycle
Relay On Time
Relay On Time
Zone Load Staggering 
The 370 staggers the operation of the zones in order to achieve a
steady load on the boiler while minimizing boiler running time and
preventing boiler short cycling.
More Heat
Relay On Time
Less Heat
External Zone Control Input 
Control of additional zones can be provided by connecting a tekmar
Zone Control (Maximum of 6) to the 370. The Zone Control signals to
the 370 whenever one of its zones requires heat. Upon receiving a
Zone Control heat demand, the 370 turns on its system pump and
shifts the Heating Curve to satisfy the heating requirements of both its
own zones and the zones connected to the Zone Control.
tekmar
Zone Control
LR 58233 E150539
tekmar
Boiler or Heating System Control
LR 58233 E150539
Zone Control Load Synchronization
The 370 monitors the heat demand signals from the Zone Control and synchronizes the start times of its own zones with those of
the Zone Control. More information on using a Zone Control with the 370 is provided in Application Brochures A 370.
Note In order for the 370 to provide the most efficient operation, the warmer zones (RTU dials set higher) should be connected
to the 370 and the cooler zones (RTU dials set lower) should be connected to the Zone Control(s).
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Fast Acting Zone Valves or Zone Pumps 
If the Thermal Motor DIP switch is set to Off, the 370 assumes that fast acting electric
motor zone valves or zone pumps are connected to the zone relays. The system pump
is therefore turned on as soon as the first zone relay is operated. One minute before the
last zone relay is turned off, the 370 purges the boiler.
Slow Acting Zone Valves with Thermal Motors 
When the DIP switch is set to Thermal Motor, the 370 assumes that slow acting zone
valves with thermal actuating motors are connected to the zone relays. With slow acting
zone valves, the 370 allows a 3 minute period for the first zone valve to open before the
system pump is turned on. The total operating time for the zone relays is also increased
by an extra 2 minutes. This helps compensate for the longer opening versus closing time
of the slow acting zone valves. For one minute after the last zone relay is turned off, the
370 purges the boiler.
Thermal Motor
Fast acting
zone valve or
zone pump
Off
Thermal Motor
Slow acting
zone valve
Off
When the DIP switch on the 370 is set to Zone 1 Cooling, zone relay 1 can either be used
to enable an auxiliary cooling control system or to directly operate a central cooling unit.
Zone 1 Cooling
Zone 1 Heating
Cooling Control (RTU is present) 
If Zone 1 Cooling is selected and an RTU or Indoor Sensor is connected to terminals Com
Sen — RTU 1 (5 & 6), the 370 can directly control a central cooling system using zone
relay 1. If an RTU is used, the desired indoor temperature is set using the RTU dial down
to 73°F (23°C), but if an Indoor Sensor is used, the desired indoor temperature is fixed
at 77°F (25°C). Zone relay 1 is allowed to turn on once the heating zones in the 370 have
been satisfied for at least 45 minutes, and is turned off whenever any zone requires heat.
The 370 varies the on time of zone relay 1 over a 30 minute cycle. As the cooling load
increases, the on time of the zone relay increases. In order to prevent short cycling, the
370 ensures that zone relay 1 remains on or off for at least 3 minutes.
Cooling Enable (no RTU) 
If Zone 1 Cooling is selected and there is no RTU or Indoor Sensor connected to terminals
Com Sen — RTU 1 (5 & 6), the 370 can enable an auxiliary cooling control through zone
relay 1. Zone relay 1 is turned on once the heating zones in the 370 have been satisfied
for at least 45 minutes, and is turned off whenever any zone requires heat.
5 6
24 25 26
Com RTU
Sen 1
Com
1-2 1
2
C
RTU
Cooling Control
24 25 26
5 6
Com RTU
Com
Sen 1
1-2
UNOCCUPIED (NIGHT SETBACK)
1
2
C
The 370 can be switched into UnOccupied mode through the built in 24 hr. Timer or by
closing an external switch or timer relay wired between the terminals Com Sen — UnO Sw
(11 & 12) on the control.
NO RTU
Occupied
24 hr. Timer 
The 370 has a built in 24 hr. Timer which can be used to set a single UnOccupied event
during a 24 hour period. The 24 hr. Timer is activated by pushing the Start button at the
desired starting time for the UnOccupied period. The duration of the UnOccupied period
is set using the UnOccupied Duration dial. Once the Start button is pushed, the Timer
Active light is turned on and the 370 enters the UnOccupied mode each day at the same
starting time. The 24 hr. Timer can be deactivated by pressing the Start button again.
A new UnOccupied period starting time can then be selected by repeating the
above procedure.
Note:
If an external switch is closed between the terminals Com Sen — UnO Sw (11
and 12), the 24 hr. Timer is disabled. An external UnOccupied switch and the 24 hr. Timer
should not be used at the same time.
Cooling Enable
UnOccupied
Optimum Start / Stop
12 hrs.
• Dial the desired duration of the
6
UnOccupied period.
• Press start button at the time of day
you want the UnOcc. period to begin.
Timer Active light turns on.
24
UnOccupied
Duration
Start
0 = always Occupied
24 = always UnOccupied
A switch or external timer with a dry relay contact output can be wired between the
terminals Com Sen — UnO Sw (11 and 12) on the 370. When the switch or relay contact
is closed, the 370 registers an UnOccupied signal. If Optimum start/stop is selected, then
the UnOccupied operation will occur 12 hours later. A tekmar Timer 031 is available which
can be programmed to provide individual UnOccupied schedules for each day of the
week with up to two separate UnOccupied events per day. For more information on the
Timer 031, see the Data Brochure D 031.
11 12
TIME
SCHD 1
2
AMPM
UNOCC
OVR
Com Uno
Su Mo Tu WeTh Fr Sa
Sen Sw
70°F
(21°C)
UnOccupied Temperature 
When the 370 is in UnOccupied mode, the UnOccupied light is turned on and the
UnOccupied dial is used to set the desired temperature within the UnOccupied zones.
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18
0
UnOccupied Switch Input 
Note:
If the RTU dial for an UnOccupied zone is set below the UnOccupied dial, the
370 continues to use the RTU dial as the desired temperature within that zone.
24 hr. Timer
Timer Active
UnOccupied
40
(4)
100
(38)
UnOccupied
Copyright © D 370 -06/99
Operation
COOLING OPERATION
Individual Zone Selection 
The DIP switches on the 370 are used to select which zones are switched into
UnOccupied mode. If the DIP switch for a specific zone is set to Occ / UnOcc, that zone
is switched into UnOccupied mode whenever the 370 receives an UnOccupied signal. If
the DIP switch for a specific zone is set to Occ. only, that zone remains in the Occupied
mode at all times.
Occ/UnOcc
1 2 3 4
Occ. only
Optimum Start / Stop 
The Optimum Start / Stop feature is enabled when the DIP switch is set to Optimum Start.
The 370 turns on the Optimum Start / Stop light each time the first zone enters its delay
or recovery period. Either the tekmar Timer 031 or the built in 24 hr. Timer on the 370 can
be used with the Optimum Start / Stop feature. The tekmar Timer 031 has a DIP switch
which must be set to Optimum Start / Stop in order to synchronize the timer with the 370
Optimum Start / Stop function.
Optimum Start
Off
SYSTEM PUMP OPERATION
The System Pump light is turned on every time the relay contact between terminals Sys Pmp — Power L (1 & 3) is closed.
During heating operation, the system pump operates whenever any zone requires heat. This includes zones in an external tekmar Zone
Control. If thermal motor zone valves are used, the system pump is held off for the first three minutes of the zone cycle in order to give the
zone valve sufficient time to open. The system pump may also operate for an additional purge period once the zone relays are turned off.
When in Boiler Operation and Dip Switch set to DHW. For other details of the operation of the system pump during DHW operation,
see the DHW section on page 7.
Installation
Pump / Valve Exercising 
The zone valves, zone pumps and system pump are exercised to help prevent corrosion from building up and subsequently jamming
the equipment. Every three days the 370 runs through an exercising procedure.
Exercising procedure
The 370 first exercises the zone valves or pumps. If a zone valve or zone pump has not been operated in the past 3 days, the 370
turns on the zone relay for 10 seconds.
Note The zone relay exercising time is increased to 3 minutes if the DIP switch is set to Thermal Motor.
After the zone valves or pumps have been exercised, the 370 exercises the system pump. If the system pump has not operated
in the past 3 days, the 370 turns on the Sys Pmp relay for 10 seconds.
After the system pump has been exercised then, if the DIP switch is set to Mixing and the variable speed injection pump has not
operated in the past 3 days, the 370 turns on the variable speed injection pump at full speed for 10 seconds.
Once the exercising procedure is complete, the 370 returns to its normal operating sequence.
Installation
Caution
Improper installation and operation of this control could result in damage to the equipment and possibly even personal injury.
It is your responsibility to ensure that this control is safely installed according to all applicable codes and standards. This
electronic control is not intended for use as a primary limit control. Other controls that are intended and certified as safety
limits must be placed into the control circuit.
STEP ONE
GETTING READY
Check the contents of this package. If any of the contents listed are missing or damaged, please contact your wholesaler or tekmar sales
representative for assistance.
Type 370 includes:
• One House Control 370 • One Outdoor Sensor 070
• Two Universal Sensors 071
• Data Brochures D 370, D 070, D 001
• Application Brochures A 370
• Essay E 021
Other information available:
• Essays
Note Carefully read the details of the Sequence of Operation sections in all applicable brochures to ensure that you have chosen the
proper control for your application.
STEP TWO
MOUNTING THE BASE
Remove the control from its base by pressing down on the release clip in the wiring chamber and sliding the control upwards. The base
is then mounted in accordance with the instructions in the Data Brochure D 001.
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STEP THREE
ROUGH-IN WIRING
All electrical wiring terminates in the control base wiring chamber. The base has standard 7/8" (22 mm) knockouts which accept common
wiring hardware and conduit fittings. Before removing the knockouts, check the wiring diagram and select those sections of the chamber
with common voltages. Do not allow the wiring to cross between sections as the wires will interfere with safety dividers which should
be installed at a later time.
Power must not be applied to any of the wires during the rough-in wiring stage.
• Install the Outdoor Sensor 070 and Boiler Sensor 071 according to the instructions in the Data Brochure D 070 and run the wiring
back to the control. If the 370 is used as a mixing control, a Supply Sensor 071 is required. Install the Supply Sensor according to
the instructions provided in the Data Brochure 070 and run the wiring back to the control.
• If an Indoor Sensor 076 is used, install the Indoor Sensor(s) according to the installation instructions in the Data Brochure 070 and
run the wiring back to the control.
• If an RTU 054 is used, install the RTU(s) according to the installation instructions provided in the Data Brochure D 054 and run the
wiring back to the control.
• If a Zone Control is used, run the wires from the Zone Control to the 370. Refer to the instructions supplied with the Zone Control.
• Run wiring from the other system components (pumps, boiler, motorized zone valves, etc.) to the control.
• Run wires from the 120 V (ac) power to the control. Use a clean power source to ensure proper operation.
• Multi-strand 16 AWG wire is recommended for all 120 V (ac) wiring due to its superior flexibility and ease of installation into
the terminals.
ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS TO THE CONTROL
The installer should test to confirm that no voltage is present at any of the wires. Push the control into the base and slide it down until
it snaps in firmly.
Powered Input Connections 

1 2 3 4
Sys
120 V (ac) Power
Po wer Var.
Pmp N
Connect the 120 V (ac) power supply to terminals Power N — L (2 and 3).
L Pmp
DHW Demand
If a DHW Demand is used, connect the wiring from the DHW Demand circuit to
terminals DHW Dem — DHW Dem (22 and 23). When 120 V (ac) or 24 V (ac) is applied
to these terminals, the control recognizes a DHW Demand.
Output Connections 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
DHW
DHW Com
Boiler Pmp / Vlv DemDem 1-2
Com
1
2 3-4 3
4
System Pump
Connect one wire from the system pump to the Sys Pmp (1) terminal on the control. The
other wire on the system pump must be connected to the Neutral (2) side of the 120 V
(ac) power supply. The control closes a dry relay contact between Sys Pmp — Power L
when operation of the system pump is required.
1 2 3 4
Sys
Variable Speed Injection Pump
Po wer Var.
Pmp N
The 370 can vary the speed of a permanent capacitor, impedence protected or
equivalent pump motor that has a locked rotor current of less than 2.4 A. Most small
wet rotor circulators are suitable as described in Essay E 021. The variable speed
output must not be used on pumps which have a centrifugal switch. The 370 has an
internal overload protection fuse which is rated at 2.5 A 250 V (ac). This fuse is not field
replaceable. Contact your tekmar sales representative for details on the return and
repair procedures if this fuse is blown.
1 2 3 4
Sys
Connect the 120 V (ac) or 24 V (ac) Boiler circuit to terminals Boiler — Boiler (18 and
19). The 370 closes a dry relay contact between these terminals when boiler operation
is required.
11 of 20
Po wer Var.
Pmp N
Connect one wire from the variable speed injection pump to the Var. Pmp (4) terminal
on the control. The other wire on the variable speed injection pump must be connected
to the Neutral (2) side of the 120 V (ac) power supply, or to L2 for a 240 V (ac) power
supply. The control varies the power to the pump in order to change its speed.
Boiler
L Pmp
L Pmp
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
DHW
DHW Com
Boiler Pmp / VlvDemDem 1-2
Com
1
2 3-4 3
4
Copyright © D 370 -06/99
Installation
STEP FOUR
DHW Pump / Valve
Connect the 120 V (ac) or 24 V (ac) circuit from the DHW pump or the DHW valve to
terminals DHW Pmp / Vlv — DHW Pmp / Vlv (20 and 21) on the control. The control
closes a dry relay contact between these terminals when DHW heating is required.
Zone Pumps and Zone Valves
It is best to start the heating zones at output relay 4 and work towards the output relay 1.
• If Zone 4 is used, connect the Zone 4 Pump or Valve circuit to the Com 3-4 — 4
(27 and 29) terminals on the control.
• If Zone 3 is used, connect the Zone 3 Pump or Valve circuit to the Com 3-4 — 3
(27 and 28) terminals on the control.
• If Zone 2 is used, connect the Zone 2 Pump or Valve circuit to the Com 1-2 — 2
(24 and 26) terminals on the control.
• If Zone 1 is used for heating (DIP switch set to Zone 1 Heating), connect the wire from
the Zone 1 Pump or Valve to the Com 1-2 — 1 (24 and 25) terminals on the control.
Note
Do not connect a zone pump and zone valve circuit to the same Com terminal.
The 370 closes a dry relay contact between the Com and output terminals
when a zone requires heat.
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
DHW
DHW Com
Boiler Pmp / Vlv DemDem 1-2
DHW
DHW Com
Boiler Pmp / Vlv DemDem 1-2
4
Com
1
2 3-4 3
4
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
DHW
DHW Com
Boiler Pmp / Vlv DemDem 1-2
Com
1
2 3-4 3
4
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
DHW
DHW Com
Boiler Pmp / Vlv DemDem 1-2
Com
1
2 3-4 3
4
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
DHW
DHW Com
Boiler Pmp / Vlv DemDem 1-2
Installation
2 3-4 3
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
Cooling System
If a cooling system is used and the DIP switch is set to Zone 1 Cooling, connect the
wires from the cooling unit isolation relay to terminals Com 1-2 — 1 (24 and 25) on
the control. The 370 closes a dry relay contact between these terminals when cooling
is required.
Com
1
Com
1
2 3-4 3
4
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
DHW
DHW Com
Boiler Pmp / Vlv DemDem 1-2
Com
1
2 3-4 3
4
Sensor and Unpowered Input Connections −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
Do not apply power to these terminals as this will damage the control.
Outdoor Sensor
Connect the two wires from the Outdoor Sensor 070 to the terminals Com Sen — Out
Sen (14 and 17). The Outdoor Sensor measures the outdoor air temperature.
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Com RTU RTU Com RTU RTU Com UnO Zo Com Boil Sup Out
Sen 1
2 Sen 3
4 Sen Sw In Sen Sen Sen Sen
Supply Sensor
Connect the two wires from the Supply Sensor 071 to terminals Com Sen — Sup Sen
(14 and 16). The Supply Sensor measures the supply water temperature after mixing
has occurred.
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Com RTU RTU Com RTU RTU Com UnO Zo Com Boil Sup Out
Sen 1
2 Sen 3
4 Sen Sw In Sen Sen Sen Sen
Boiler Sensor
Connect the two wires from the Boiler Sensor 071 to terminals Com Sen — Boil Sen
(14 and 15). The Boiler Sensor measures the supply water temperature from the boiler.
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Com RTU RTU Com RTU RTU Com UnO Zo Com Boil Sup Out
Unoccupied Switch
Sen 1
If an external timer or switch is used, connect the two wires from the external dry contact
switch to the Com Sen —UnO Sw (11 and 12) terminals. When these terminals short
together, the control registers an UnOccupied signal.
Note If an external switch is closed between the terminals Com Sen — UnO Sw
(11 and 12), the 24 hr. Timer is disabled and the Optimum Start / Stop information
is lost. It is recommended that either the 24 hr. Timer or an external timer/ switch
is used, not both at the same time.
4 Sen Sw In Sen Sen Sen Sen
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Com RTU RTU Com RTU RTU Com UnO Zo Com Boil Sup Out
Sen 1
2 Sen 3
4 Sen Sw In Sen Sen Sen Sen
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Com RTU RTU Com RTU RTU Com UnO Zo Com Boil Sup Out
Zone Control Input
If an external Zone Control is used, connect the wire from the Com Sen terminal on the
Zone Control to terminal Com Sen (11) on the 370. Connect the wire from the Zo Out
terminal on the Zone Control to terminal Zo In (13) on the 370.
Note The wires from the Zone Control are polarity sensitive. The system will not
operate if the wires are reversed.
Copyright © D 370 -06/99
2 Sen 3
12 of 20
Sen 1
2 Sen 3
4 Sen Sw In Sen Sen Sen Sen
Room Temperature Units (RTU) and Indoor Sensors
RTUs and / or Indoor Sensors provide indoor temperature feedback to the control.
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
DIP Switch set to Zone 1 Heating
Com RTU RTU Com RTU RTU Com UnO Zo Com Boil Sup Out
• If zone 4 is used, connect an RTU 054 or Indoor Sensor 076 to the Com Sen —
RTU 4 (8 and 10) terminals on the control.
• If zone 3 is used, connect an RTU 054 or Indoor Sensor 076 to the Com Sen —
RTU 3 (8 and 9) terminals on the control.
Sen 1
2 Sen 3
4 Sen Sw In Sen Sen Sen Sen
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Com RTU RTU Com RTU RTU Com UnO Zo Com Boil Sup Out
Sen 1
2 Sen 3
4 Sen Sw In Sen Sen Sen Sen
• If zone 2 is used, connect an RTU 054 or Indoor Sensor 076 to the Com Sen —
RTU 2 (5 and 7) terminals on the control.
• If the zone 1 is used for heating, an RTU 054 or Indoor Sensor 076 must be
connected to the Com Sen — RTU 1 (5 and 6) terminals on the control.
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Com RTU RTU Com RTU RTU Com UnO Zo Com Boil Sup Out
Sen 1
2 Sen 3
4 Sen Sw In Sen Sen Sen Sen
DIP Switch set to Zone 1 Cooling
• If the zone 1 relay is used to enable an external cooling control system, an RTU or
Indoor Sensor is not required for this zone.
• If the zone 1 relay is used to control a cooling unit, an RTU 054 or Indoor Sensor
076 must be connected to the Com Sen — RTU 1 (5 and 6) terminals on the control.
Sen 1
2 Sen 3
4 Sen Sw In Sen Sen Sen Sen
TESTING THE WIRING
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Com UnO Zo Com Boil Sup Out
Sen Sw In Sen Sen Sen Sen
Each terminal block must be unplugged from its header on the control before power
is applied for testing. Pull straight down to unplug the terminal block.
The following tests are to be performed using standard testing practices and procedures and
should only be carried out by properly trained and experienced persons.
A good quality electrical test meter, capable of reading from at least 0 — 200 V (ac) and at
least 0 — 2,000,000 Ohms, is essential to properly test the wiring and sensors.
Test the Sensors −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
In order to test the sensors and Room Temperature Units (RTUs), the actual temperature
at each sensor and RTU location must be measured. A good quality digital thermometer
with a surface temperature probe is recommended for ease of use and accuracy of testing.
Where a digital thermometer is not available, a spare sensor can be strapped alongside
the one to be tested and the readings compared. Test the sensors and RTU(s) according
to the instructions in the Data Brochures D 070 and D 054.
Ω
Ω
Test the Power Supply 
Make sure exposed wires or bare terminals are not in contact with other wires or grounded
surfaces. Turn on the power and measure the voltage between the Power N — L (2 and 3)
terminals using an AC voltmeter, the reading should be between 110 and 130 V (ac).
Test the Powered Inputs 
If a DHW Demand is used, measure the voltage between terminals DHW Dem — DHW Dem (22 and 23). When the DHW Demand
device (aquastat etc.) calls for heat, you should measure between 22 and 130 V (ac) at the terminals. When the DHW Demand device
is off, you should measure less than 5 V (ac).
Test the Outputs 
System Pump
If a system pump is connected to the Sys Pmp (1) terminal, make sure power to the terminal block is off and install a jumper between
the terminals Sys Pmp — Power L (1 and 3). When power is applied to the terminals Power N — L (2 and 3), the system pump should
start. If the pump does not turn on, check the wiring between the terminal block and the pump and refer to any installation or
troubleshooting information supplied with the pump. If the pump operates properly, disconnect the power and remove the jumper.
Variable Speed Injection Pump
If a variable speed injection pump is connected to the terminal Var. Pmp (4), make sure power to the terminal block is off and install
a jumper between the terminals Power L — Var . Pmp (3 and 4). When power is applied to terminals Power N — L (2 and 3), the
variable speed injection pump should operate at full speed. If the pump does not operate, check the wiring between the terminal
block and the pump and refer to any installation or troubleshooting information supplied with the pump. If the pump operates properly,
disconnect the power and remove the jumper.
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Copyright © D 370 -06/99
Installation
STEP FIVE
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Com RTU RTU Com RTU RTU Com UnO Zo Com Boil Sup Out
Boiler
If a boiler is connected to the terminals Boiler — Boiler (18 and 19), make sure power to the boiler circuit is off and install a jumper
between the terminals. When the boiler circuit is powered up, the boiler should fire or if a Boiler Control is used, the Boiler Control
should register a Heat Demand. If the Boiler Control does not register a Heat Demand, check the wiring between the terminal block
and the Boiler Control. If the boiler does not turn on, refer to any installation or troubleshooting information supplied with the boiler
and/or Boiler Control. If the boiler operates properly, disconnect the power and remove the jumper.
DHW Pump or Valve
If a DHW pump or DHW valve is connected to the terminals DHW Pmp / Vlv — DHW Pmp / Vlv (20 and 21), make sure the power
to the pump or valve circuit is off and install a jumper between the terminals. When the DHW circuit is powered up, the DHW pump
should turn on or the DHW valve should open completely. If the DHW valve or pump does not operate, check the wiring between
the terminals and the pump or valve and refer to any installation or troubleshooting information supplied with these devices.
Zone Pump or Valve
• If a zone pump or zone valve is connected to the terminals Com 3-4 —4 (27 and 29), make sure power to the pump or valve circuit
is off and install a jumper between the terminals Com 3-4— 4 (27 and 29). When the zone circuit is powered up, the zone pump
should turn on or the zone valve should open completely. If no response occurs, check the wiring between the terminal and the
pump or valve and refer to any installation or troubleshooting information supplied with these devices.
• If a zone pump or valve is connected to the terminals Com 3-4 — 3 (27 and 28), follow a similar procedure as described above
for the zone 4 relay.
• If a zone pump or valve is connected to the terminals Com 1-2 — 2 (24 and 26), follow a similar procedure as described above
for the zone 4 relay.
• If a zone pump or valve is connected to the terminals Com 1-2— 1 (24 and 25), follow a similar procedure as described above
for the zone 4 relay.
Connect the Control 
• Make sure all power to the devices and terminal blocks is off and remove any remaining jumpers from the terminals.
• Reconnect the terminal blocks to the control by carefully aligning them with their respective headers on the control and then pushing
the terminal blocks into the headers. The terminal blocks should snap firmly into place.
Settings
• Install the supplied safety dividers between the unpowered sensor inputs and the powered 120 V (ac) or 24 V (ac) wiring chambers.
• Do not apply power to the control until the adjustment dials and DIP switches are properly set for your application. See the Settings
section of this brochure for details on how to set the dials and DIP switches.
• Once the settings are complete, apply power to the control. The operation of the control on power up is described in the Sequence
of Operation section of this brochure.
Settings
Before adjusting the dial settings, read through the sequence of operation section of this brochure to ensure that you understand how
the control operates.
STEP SIX
ESSENTIAL CONTROL SET
Using the Internal 24 hr. Timer −
First determine the length of time required for the UnOccupied period and turn the
UnOccupied Duration dial to the desired duration length. If the dial is set to 24 hours, the
370 remains in UnOccupied mode continuously. If the dial is set to 0 hours, the 370
remains in Occupied mode continuously.
Press the Start button at the desired starting time for the UnOccupied period. Once the
Start button is pressed, the 370 enters the UnOccupied period at the same starting time
each day.
24 hr. Timer
Timer Active
• Dial the desired duration of the
UnOccupied period.
• Press start button at the time of day
you want the UnOcc. period to begin.
Timer Active light turns on.
12 hrs.
6
18
0
24
UnOccupied
Example: The user wants an UnOccupied period starting at 10 pm and ending at 6 am.
The Unoccupied Duration dial is set to 8 hours and the Start button is pressed
at 10 pm. Once the Start button is pressed, the control goes into UnOccupied
mode from 10 pm until 6 am the next morning. This cycle is repeated 7 days
a week.
Copyright © D 370 -06/99
14 of 20
Duration
UnOccupied
Duration
Start
0 = always Occupied
24 = always UnOccupied
Minimum Boiler Supply 
Most boilers require a minimum operating temperature to prevent corrosion from flue gas
condensation. The Min. Boiler Supply dial should be set to the lowest supply water
temperature at which the boiler can operate without causing the boiler flue gases to
condense. Consult the boiler manufacturer for recommended minimum boiler supply
temperatures. Some typical settings are given below. If a condensing or electric boiler is
used, the Min. Boiler Supply dial can be set to Off.
Typical settings:
130°F
100
Off
165
Min. Boiler
Supply
• Steel fire tube boilers . . . . . . 140 to 160°F (60 to 71°C)
• Cast iron boilers . . . . . . . . . . 135 to 160°F (57 to 71°C)
• Copper tube boilers . . . . . . . 135 to 150°F (57 to 66°C)
Maximum System Supply −
If the 370 is used in Boiler mode, the 370 helps prevent the boiler supply water
temperature from rising above the Max. System Supply dial setting. If the 370 is used
in Mixing mode, the 370 helps prevent the mixed supply water temperature from
rising above the Max. System Supply dial setting. The Max. System Supply dial should
be set to the maximum temperature allowed in the system loop. There are many
factors which may limit the allowable supply temperature in a radiant floor heating slab.
A few of these are provided below.
170°F
120
220
Max. System
Supply
• Some tubing manufacturers recommend that their products not be maintained at
temperatures exceeding 140°F (60°C). Consult the tubing manufacturer for
specific details.
• No where in the concrete should the temperature be maintained above 170°F (77°C).
• The surface temperature of a radiant floor heating slab should normally not exceed
85°F (29°C). The slab surface temperature is affected by the slab thermal resistance
and the supply water temperature to the slab.
70°F
(21°C)
The UnOccupied dial sets the desired indoor temperature during UnOccupied (Night
Setback) mode. When a Zone Control is used, the zones connected to the Zone Control
are not affected by the UnOccupied dial on the 370. The Zone Control has its own
UnOccupied mode which is explained in more detail in the Data Brochure supplied with
the Zone Control.
40
(4)
Settings
Unoccupied Temperature −−−−−−−−−−−
100
(38)
UnOccupied
Heating Curve −−−−−−−−−−−−−
The Heating Curve dial setting determines the number of degrees the supply water
temperature is raised for every one degree drop in outdoor temperature. The Heating
Curve dial position can be calculated from the following formula.
1
design supply temperature – desired room temperature

desired room temperature – design outdoor temperature
Heating Curve =
2
3
0.2
3.6
Heating Curve
Example: A system is designed to supply 120°F (49°C) water when the outdoor
temperature is 10°F (-12°C). The desired room temperature is 70°F (21°C).
120 - 70°F (49 - 21°C)
50°F (28°C)

=
 = 0.8
70 - 10°F (21 - (-12)°C)
60°F (16°C)
If the design supply water temperature is unknown, the Heating Curve dial can be set to
a trial value using the typical design supply water temperatures given below.
3.6 3.0 2.4 2.0
=
1.6
190
(88)
1.2
170
(77)
1.0
150
(65)
0.8
Typical design supply temperatures:
0.6
• Hydronic radiant floors …......100 to 130°F (38 to 54°C)
• Baseboard radiators …..........160 to 190°F (71 to 88°C)
• Fan coils …............................180 to 210°F (82 to 99°C)
DIP Switch Settings −
15 of 20
210
(99)
WWSD
Point
130
(54)
0.4
110
(43)
0.2
90
(32)
Supply water temperature
Heating Curve
70
(21)
90
(32)
70
(21)
50
30
10
(10)
(-1)
(-12)
Outdoor air temperature
-10
(-23)
°F
(°C)
Copyright © D 370 -06/99
Mixing — Boiler
If a variable speed injection pump is used for mixing reset, the DIP switch must be set
to Mixing. If mixing is not required (no variable speed injection pump), set this DIP
switch to Boiler. Refer to Sequence of Operation for setting the Boiler Return / Boiler
Supply.
Boiler Return
Mixing
Boiler
Boiler Supply
Occ / UnOcc — Occ. Only
Each zone can be selected to operate in either Occupied only mode or in both Occupied
and UnOccupied modes. If the DIP switch is set to 1,2 Occ. only, the zones connected
to relays 1 and 2 remain in the Occupied mode at all times. If the DIP switch is set to
1,2 Occ / UnOcc, zones 1 and 2 are switched into UnOccupied mode each time the 370
receives an UnOccupied signal. Zones 3 and 4 can be individually selected for
Occupied only or both UnOccupied and Occupied mode operation.
Occ/UnOcc
Zone 1 2 3 4
Occ. only
Optimum Start
The Optimum Start / Stop feature is used during transitions between the UnOccupied
mode (Night Setback) and the Occupied mode. When the DIP switch is set to Optimum
Start, the 370 raises the building temperature during the final stages of the UnOccupied
period. This helps ensure the building is at the Occupied temperature as soon as theb
Occupied period begins. If the Optimum Start DIP switch is set to Off, the 370 does not
start raising the building temperature until the UnOccupied period ends. More information on the Optimum Start feature is provided on page 5 of this brochure.
Optimum Start
Off
Thermal Motor
Thermal Motor
Zone valves with thermal actuating motors have long opening and
closing times. In order for the 370 to compensate for these longer
times, the DIP switch should be set to Thermal Motor. If fast acting
electric motor zone valves or zone pumps are used, the DIP switch
must be set to Off.
Off
DHW during UnOcc.
DHW during UnOcc.
If the DHW tank requires heating during the UnOccupied mode, the DIP switch should
be set to DHW during UnOcc.. When this DIP switch is set to Off, the 370 ignores all
DHW Demands during the UnOccupied period.
Off
DHW Priority
It is often desirable to temporarily suspend the flow of heat to the heating system when
there is a DHW Demand. As described on page 3, it is important to consider the relative
thermal mass of the heating system and the pick-up time of the DHW tank before using
DHW Priority.
Testing
If the DIP switch is set to DHW Priority, the 370 dedicates the boiler entirely to heating
the DHW tank. If the DHW Priority DIP switch is set to Off, both the DHW tank and the
heating system can simultaneously demand heat from the boiler.
DHW Priority
Off
DHW Valve / DHW Pump
If a valve is used to transfer heat to the DHW tank, the DIP switch should be set to DHW
Valve. If a pump is used to transfer heat to the DHW tank, the DIP switch should be set
to DHW Pump. During DHW operation, the system pump is also turned on if the DIP
switch is set to DHW Valve.
DHW Valve
DHW Pump
Zone 1 Cooling / Zone 1 Heating
The zone 1 relay can be used to control a heating zone or to operate a cooling system.
If zone 1 is to be used for a heating zone, the DIP switch must be set to Zone 1 Heating.
If zone 1 is used for cooling, the DIP switch must be set to Zone 1 Cooling.
Zone 1 Cooling
Zone 1 Heating
Testing the Control
STEP SEVEN
OPERATIONAL TEST OF CONTROL FUNCTIONS
The House Control 370 has a test routine which is used to test the main control functions. The 370 continually
checks the sensors and displays an error message whenever a fault is found. See page 19 for the list of error
messages. When the Test button is pushed, the Test light is turned on. The WWSD, Maximum Supply,
Minimum Boiler and Optimum Start / Stop lights are turned off and the individual outputs and relays are tested
in the following test sequence.
Copyright © D 370 -06/99
16 of 20
Test
Test Sequence 
Each step in the test sequence lasts 10 seconds. At the end of each step, the device continues to operate until it is turned off in a
later step.
During the test routine, the test sequence can be paused by pressing the Test button. The test sequence remains paused at that point
for up to 5 minutes. If the Test button is not pressed again while the test sequence is paused, the control exits the entire test routine.
Once the test sequence is paused, the Test button can be pressed again to skip to the next step. This can also be used to rapidly
skip through the test sequence. To reach the desired step, repeatedly press and release the Test button until the appropriate device
and indicator light turn on.
Step 1 - If the DIP switch is set to Mixing, the variable speed injection pump is ramped
up to 100% over 10 seconds.
90
1
2
DHW
Pump / Vlv
70
Step 2 - The DHW Pmp / Vlv relay is turned on.
50
Step 3 - The Sys Pmp relay is turned on.
Step 4 - The Boiler relay is turned on.
30
System
Pump
10
Boiler
DHW
Pump / Vlv
Step 5 - The DHW Pmp / Vlv, Sys Pmp, Boiler and Variable Speed Injection Pump are
turned off.
System
Pump
Boiler
Boiler
DHW
Pump / Vlv
Step 9 - Once the zone 2 relay is turned off, the control tests the zone 1 relay. If the DIP
switch is set to Zone 1 Heating, the control follows a similar procedure as above
to test the zone 1 relay. If the DIP switch is set to Zone 1 Cooling, the control
will also turn on the zone 1 relay for 10 seconds.
Step 10 - After the test sequence is complete, the Test light begins flashing and the
control enters a fast mode of operation. During this time, the control is much
more responsive to setting adjustments. If the dial on an RTU is turned up, the
on time of the zone relay increases immediately. After fifteen minutes, the
control reverts back to normal operating conditions and the zone on times are
based on the average indoor temperatures during the previous 15 minute cycle.
5
1
Zone 1 /
Cooling
2
Zone 2
System
Pump
3
Zone 3
Boiler
4
Zone 4
1
Zone 1 /
Cooling
7
1
Zone 1 /
Cooling
2
Zone 2
2
Zone 2
3
Zone 3
3
Zone 3
4
Zone 4
4
Zone 4
1
Zone 1 /
Cooling
2
Zone 2
3
Zone 3
4
Zone 4
9
6
8
10
Test
Testing
Step 8 - Once the zone 3 relay is turned off, the control follows a similar procedure to
test the zone 2 relay. If an RTU 054 or Indoor Sensor 076 is not connected to
the terminals Com Sen — RTU 2 (5 and 7), the control skips this step.
4
DHW
Pump / Vlv
System
Pump
Step 6 - If an RTU 054 or Indoor Sensor 076 is connected to the terminals Com Sen —
RTU 4 (8 and 10), the control turns on the zone 4 relay for 10 seconds.
Step 7 - Once the zone 4 relay is turned off, the control follows a similar procedure to
test the zone 3 relay. If an RTU 054 or Indoor Sensor 076 is not connected to
the terminals Com Sen — RTU 3 (8 and 9), the control skips this step.
3
Manual Test −−−−−−−−−−−−−
While the control is in the fast mode of operation and the Test light is flashing, check that
each RTU operates the proper zone valve or zone pump. Turn up the RTU dial to turn the
zone on, turn the dial down to turn the zone off. If an Indoor Sensor is used, a cold spray
to the sensor will turn the zone on.
Test
M
70
Indicator Lights "On" 
Adjusting RTU settings provides an immediate
response for the first 15 minutes only.
Power
• 120 V (ac) power is applied to the control and the control
is energized.
DHW Demand
• The DHW tank is requesting heat.
WWSD
• Heat is not required in the heating system.
Maximum Supply
• The supply temperature is approaching the Max. System Supply dial setting and the 370 will not increase
the supply temperature any further.
Minimum Boiler
• The supply temperature from the boiler is below the Min. Boiler Supply dial setting and the 370 is
reducing the load on the boiler in order to increase the boiler supply temperature as fast as possible.
DHW Pmp / Vlv
• The relay contacts between DHW Pmp / Vlv— DHW Pmp / Vlv (20 and 21) are closed and the DHW
pump or DHW valve should be turned on or opened.
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Copyright © D 370 -06/99
System Pump
• The relay contacts between Sys Pmp—Power L (1 and 3) are closed and the system pump should
be turned on.
Boiler
• The relay contacts between Boiler — Boiler (18 and 19) are closed and the boiler should be turned on.
Zone 1 / Cooling
• The relay contacts between Com 1-2— 1 (24 and 25) are closed and the device connected to this relay
should be turned on.
Zone 2
• The relay contacts between Com 1-2— 2 (24 and 26) are closed and the device connected to this relay
should be turned on.
Zone 3
• The relay contacts between Com 3-4— 3 (27 and 28) are closed and the device connected to this relay
should be turned on.
Zone 4
• The relay contacts between Com 3-4— 4 (27 and 29) are closed and the device connected to this relay
should be turned on.
% full output lights
• These lights indicate the percentage of full speed the variable speed injection pump is operating at.
Test
• The control is proceeding through the programmed test sequence.
Occupied
• The control is in Occupied mode.
Unoccupied
• The control is in UnOccupied (Night Setback) mode.
Optimum Start / Stop
• The control is warming the building up during the final stages of the UnOccupied period, or the heating
system is turned off during the final stages of the Occupied period.
Timer Active
• The timer is set to enter the UnOccupied mode every 24 hours at the time of day the Start button
was pressed.
STEP EIGHT
TROUBLESHOOTING
As in any troubleshooting procedure, it is important to isolate a problem as much as possible before proceeding. The Error Messages
and Test button greatly simplify troubleshooting of the 370. When the control is flashing an Error Message, identify the fault from the
look-up table on page 18 and follow standard testing procedures to confirm the problem. If you suspect a wiring fault, return to steps
three, four and five, and carefully check all external wiring and wiring connections.
Sensor and Internal Faults 
• If an Outdoor Sensor fault occurs, the 370 assumes a fixed outdoor temperature of 32°F (0°C) and will regulate the supply water
temperature accordingly. An error message is displayed.
• If an RTU / Indoor Sensor fault occurs or the Zone Control input Zo - in short circuits, the 370 operates as if that RTU or Zone Control
is not connected. An error message is displayed.
• If the enclosure overheats, the 370 turns off the variable speed injection pump and displays an error message until it cools off.
• If an internal control fault occurs, the 370 displays an error message. Press the Test button to clear the error message. If the error
message remains, the control must be returned for repair.
During Mixing Operation
Testing
• If a Supply Sensor fault occurs, the 370 displays an error message and turns the variable speed injection pump off.
• If a Boiler Sensor fault occurs and the Min. Boiler dial is not in the Off position, the 370 displays an error message and turns the
Boiler relay off.
During Boiler Operation
• If a Boiler Sensor and a Supply Sensor fault occur, the 370 displays an error message and turns the Boiler relay off.
Adjustment of Settings
• If the outdoor air temperature is near the Occupied dial setting and the rooms are cold, increase the Occupied dial setting. If the
rooms are too hot, decrease the Occupied dial setting.
• If the outdoor air temperature is cold and the rooms are cold, increase the Heating Curve dial setting by 0.1 per day.
STEP NINE
BEFORE YOU LEAVE
• Make sure the wiring safety dividers are installed in their proper locations between compartments with different voltages.
• Install the wiring cover over the wiring chamber and secure it to the base with the two screws provided. Place the front cover on the
control and snap it into place. Install a lock if security is required.
• A sticker has been provided with the control. It is designed to be placed over the Zone 1 ... Zone 4 words so that the zone names can
be written onto the control.
1/
• Place this brochure, and all other brochures relating to the installation, in the protective plastic bag supplied
1 Zone
Kitchen
Cooling
with the control.
m
2 Zone
Living R2
m
r
• Place the bag in a conspicuous location near the control for future reference.
Bed3 m
3 Zone
se
a
• It is important to explain the operation of the control to the end user and to anyone else who may be operating
B
4 Zone 4
the system.
Copyright © D 370 -06/99
18 of 20
Error Messages
Whenever a fault is detected in any of the sensors and / or room temperature units (RTUs), the indicator lights will flash in specific ways
to indicate the location of the problem. For detailed Sensor and RTU testing instructions see Data Brochures D 070 and D 054.
Outdoor sensor short circuit
Outdoor sensor open circuit
Zo — in short circuit
Light on continually
Light flashing
Occupied
Power
WWSD
Occupied
Power
WWSD
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
Optimum Start / Stop
Optimum Start / Stop
Timer Active
Light off
Supply sensor short circuit
Timer Active
Supply sensor open circuit
Occupied
Power
WWSD
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
Optimum Start / Stop
Timer Active
Boiler sensor short circuit
Boiler sensor open circuit
Occupied
Power
WWSD
Occupied
Power
WWSD
Occupied
Power
WWSD
Occupied
Power
WWSD
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
Optimum Start / Stop
Optimum Start / Stop
Optimum Start / Stop
Timer Active
Timer Active
RTU 1 short circuit
Timer Active
RTU 2 short circuit
Optimum Start / Stop
Timer Active
RTU 3 short circuit
RTU 4 short circuit
Occupied
Power
WWSD
Occupied
Power
WWSD
Occupied
Power
WWSD
Occupied
Power
WWSD
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
Optimum Start / Stop
Timer Active
Optimum Start / Stop
Optimum Start / Stop
Timer Active
RTU 1 Temperature sensor missing
Timer Active
RTU 2 Temperature sensor missing
Optimum Start / Stop
Timer Active
RTU 3 Temperature sensor missing
RTU 4 Temperature sensor missing
Occupied
Power
WWSD
Occupied
Power
WWSD
Occupied
Power
WWSD
Occupied
Power
WWSD
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
Optimum Start / Stop
Timer Active
Optimum Start / Stop
Optimum Start / Stop
Timer Active
Enclosure is overheated
Timer Active
Internal fault
Timer Active
Illegal Error Code DIP Switch Setting
Occupied
Power
WWSD
Occupied
Power
WWSD
Occupied
Power
WWSD
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
Timer Active
Optimum Start / Stop
Timer Active
Optimum Start / Stop
Timer Active
Error Messages
Optimum Start / Stop
Optimum Start / Stop
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Copyright © D 370 -06/99
Technical Data
House Control 370 Four Zones , DHW, Boiler / Mixing
Literature
Control
Packaged Weight
Dimensions
Approvals
Ambient conditions
condensing.
Power supply
Var. Pump
Relays
Demands
Sensors included
required:
Optional devices
Timer
UnOcc. Duration
Unoccupied
—
—
—
—
—
—
D 370, A 370’s, D 001, D 070, E 021.
Microprocessor PID control; This is not a safety (limit) control.
3.5 lb. (1600 g), Enclosure A, blue PVC plastic
6-5/8” H x 7-9/16” W x 2-13/16” D (170 x 193 x 72 mm)
CSA NRTL /C, meets ICES & FCC regulations for EMI/RFI.
Indoor use only, 32 to 122°F (0 to 50°C), <90% RH non-
—
—
—
—
—
120 V (ac) ±10% 50/60 Hz 1000 VA
240 V (ac) 50/60 Hz 2.4 A 1/6 hp, fuse T2.5 A 250 V
120 V (ac) 5 A 1/3 hp, pilot duty 240 VA
24 to 120 V (ac) 2 VA
NTC thermistor, 10 kΩ @ 77°F (25°C ±0.2°C) ß=3892
Outdoor Sensor 070 and 2 of Universal Sensor 071
RTU 054 or 055. (Ordered Separately)
tekmar type #: 031, 367, 368.
24 hour, 1 event / day, 3 minute backup
0 to 24 hours
40 to 100°F (4 to 38°C)
—
—
—
—
—
Heating Curve
Max. System Supply
Min. Boiler Supply
— 0.2 to 3.6
— 120 to 220°F (49 to 104°C)
— Off, 100 to 165°F (Off, 38 to 74°C)
Occupied
Power
WWSD
UnOccupied
DHW
Demand
Maximum
Supply
Minimum
Boiler
Optimum Start / Stop
24 hr. Timer
Timer Active
18
0
24
40
(4)
UnOccupied
Duration
100
(38)
DHW
Pump / Vlv
1 Cooling
System
Pump
2 Zone 2
Boiler
70
50
Heating Curve
130°F
100
220
Off
3.6 120
0.2
3 Zone 3
DHW Pump
Off
170°F
3
Zone 1 /
165
Min. Boiler
Supply / Return
Max. System
Supply
Test
full
% ofoutput
R
10
Four Zones, DHW, Boiler / Mixing
3
4
Sys Power Var.
Pmp N
L Pmp
5
6
7
Do not apply power here
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Com RTU RTU Com RTU RTU Com UnO Zo Com Boil Sup Out
Sen 1
2 Sen 3
4 Sen Sw In Sen Sen Sen Sen
Caution: Signal
wiring must be
rated at least 300V
Made in Canada by
tekmar Control Systems Ltd.
30
House Control 370
2
Boiler
Boiler Supply
2
90
0 = always Occupied
24 = always UnOccupied
1
Zone 1 2 3 4
Occ. only Off
DHW during UnOcc.
DHW Priority
DHW Valve
Zone 1 Cooling
Zone 1 Heating
4 Zone 4
UnOccupied
Start
Boiler Return
Mixing
1
70°F
(21°C)
12 hrs.
• Dial the desired duration of the
6
UnOccupied period.
• Press start button at the time of day
you want the UnOcc. period to begin.
Timer Active light turns on.
Thermal Motor
Optimum Start
Occ/UnOcc
Power
120 V (ac) ±10% 50/60 Hz 1000 VA
Var. Pump 240 V 50/60 Hz 2.4 A 1/6 hp, fuse T2.5 A 250 V
Relays
120 V (ac) 5 A 1/3 hp, pilot duty 240 VA
NRTL/C
LR 58223
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
Boiler
DHW
DHW Com
Pmp / Vlv Dem Dem 1-2
1
2
Com
3-4
3
4
The installer must ensure that this control and its wiring are isolated and/or shielded from strong sources of electromagnetic noise.
Conversely, this Class B digital apparatus complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules and meets all requirements of the Canadian
Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations. However, if this control does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception,
which can be determined by turning the control off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by reorienting or
relocating the receiving antenna, relocating the receiver with respect to this control, and/or connecting the control to a different circuit
from that to which the receiver is connected.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel brouilleur du Canada.
Caution The nonmetallic enclosure does not provide grounding between conduit connections. Use grounding type bushings and jumper
wires.
Attention Un boîtier nonmétallique n’assure pas la continuité électrique des conduits. Utiliser des manchons ou des fils de accord
spécialement conçus pour la mise á la terre.
Limited Warranty and Product Return Procedure
Limited Warranty The liability of tekmar Control Systems Ltd. and tekmar
Control Systems, Inc. (“tekmar”) under this warranty is limited. The purchaser,
by taking receipt of the tekmar product (“product”), acknowledges receipt of
the terms of the warranty and acknowledges that it has read and
understands same.
replacement product. Returned products that are not defective are not covered by this warranty.
This warranty does not apply if the product has been damaged by negligence
by persons other than tekmar, accident, fire, Act of God, abuse or misuse; or
has been damaged by modifications, alterations or attachments made subsequent to purchase which have not been authorized by tekmar; or if the
product was not installed in compliance with tekmar’s instructions and the
local codes and ordinances; or if due to defective installation of the product;
or if the product was not used in compliance with tekmar’s instructions.
tekmar warrants each tekmar product against defects in workmanship and materials, if the product is installed and used in compliance with tekmar's instructions. The
warranty period is for a period of twenty-four (24) months from the production date
if the product is not installed during that period, or twelve (12) months from the
documented date of installation if installed within twenty-four (24) months from the
production date.
This warranty is in lieu of all other warranties, express or implied, which the
Governing Law (being the law of British Columbia) allows parties to contractually exclude, including, without limitation, warranties of merchantability,
fitness for a particular purpose, durability or description of the product, its
non-infringement of any relevant patents or trademarks, and its compliance
with or non-violation of any applicable environmental, health or safety legislation; the term of any other warranty not hereby contractually excluded is
limited such that it shall not extend beyond twenty-four (24) months from the
production date, to the extent that such limitation is allowed by the Governing Law.
The liability of tekmar under this warranty shall be limited to, at tekmar's sole discretion: the cost of parts and labor provided by tekmar to repair defects in materials
and/or workmanship of the defective product; or to the exchange of the defective
product for a replacement product; or to the granting of credit limited to the original
cost of the defective product, and such repair, exchange or credit shall be the sole
remedy available from tekmar, and, without limiting the foregoing in any way,
tekmar is not responsible, in contract, tort or strict product liability, for any
other losses, costs, expenses, inconveniences, or damages, whether direct, indirect, special, secondary, incidental or consequential, arising from ownership or use
of the product, or from defects in workmanship or materials, including any liability
for fundamental breach of contract.
Product Return Procedure Products that are believed to have defects in workmanship or materials must be returned, together with a written description of the
defect, to the tekmar representative for that territory. If the address of the representative is not known, please request it from tekmar at the telephone number
listed below
This warranty applies only to those products returned to tekmar during the
warranty period. This warranty does not cover the cost of the parts or labor
to remove or transport the defective product, or to reinstall the repaired or
Control Systems
.
tekmar Control Systems Ltd., Canada
tekmar Control Systems, Inc., U.S.A.
Head Office: 4611 - 23rd Street
Vernon, B.C. Canada V1T 4K7
Tel. (250) 545-7749 Fax. (250) 545-0650
Web Site: www.tekmarcontrols.com
Product design, software and literature are Copyright © 1999 by:
tekmar Control Systems Ltd. and tekmar Control Systems, Inc.
20 of 20
All specifications are subject to change without notice.
Printed in Canada. D 370 -06/99.