VersaMax E05 as Ethernet Remote I/O for Simplex and Dual

VersaMax E05 as Ethernet Remote I/O for Simplex and Dual
GE Fanuc Intelligent Platforms
Applied Solutions
VersaMax E05 as Ethernet Remote I/O
for Simplex and Dual Controllers
User’s Manual
May 2009
User’s Manual
Applied Solutions
This document is based on information available at the time of its publication. While efforts have
been made to be accurate, the information contained herein does not purport to cover all details or
variations in hardware or software, nor to provide for every possible contingency in connection with
installation, operation, or maintenance. Features may be described herein which are not present in
all hardware and software systems. GE Fanuc Intelligent Platforms, Inc. assumes no obligation of
notice to holders of this document with respect to changes subsequently made.
GE Fanuc Intelligent Platforms, Inc. makes no representation or warranty, expressed, implied, or
statutory with respect to, and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, sufficiency,
or usefulness of the information contained herein. No warranties of merchantability or fitness for
purpose shall apply.
©Copyright 2009 GE Fanuc Intelligent Platforms, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
All other brands, names, copyrights, or trademarks described herein are the property of their
respective holders or owners.
WARNING
The PACSystems PLC product is United States Export Controlled under the Export Control
Classification Number “4A994”. Any compiled objects that operate on it are United States Export
Controlled under the Export Control Classification Number “4D994”. It is the responsibility of all
parties using this application to understand and abide by these regulations. Export to restricted
countries is strictly forbidden.
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Table of Contents
1
Introduction ............................................................................................................ 6
Additional Documentation ..................................................................................................... 7
Devices on the Network ........................................................................................................ 7
Multiple Controllers ............................................................................................................... 8
2
Ethernet Global Data (EGD) Overview.................................................................. 9
Communications Overview ................................................................................................... 9
Ethernet Global Data Exchange Operation ..................................................................... 9
EGD Exchanges for Faults – SVC_Xchg ..................................................................... 10
3 EGD Exchanges, Control Words, Status Words, I/O Data Formats, and ENIU
System References ..................................................................................................... 11
System I/O Data References .............................................................................................. 11
Data Memory in the Ethernet NIU ....................................................................................... 12
References Used in the Ethernet NIU ........................................................................... 13
Discrete and Analog Outputs in the Ethernet NIU......................................................... 14
Using Multiple Exchanges for Systems with More than 256 Analog Outputs................ 14
Exchanging Data with One or Two Controllers ................................................................... 15
ENIU Operation with Two Controllers ........................................................................... 15
ENIU Operation if No Data is Received ........................................................................ 15
Control Data Format............................................................................................................ 16
Control Data Definitions ................................................................................................ 17
Status Data Format ............................................................................................................. 18
Status Data Definitions.................................................................................................. 18
Using the Control and Status Data...................................................................................... 19
Switching Control Back to the Primary Controller ......................................................... 19
Setting Up the Output Defaults...................................................................................... 19
Specifying Individual Output Defaults............................................................................ 20
Checking for Faults and Clearing Faults ....................................................................... 20
Using the Optional Application-Specific Command Word ................................................... 21
Setting Up a Heartbeat.................................................................................................. 21
Sequencing Outputs...................................................................................................... 21
Checking the Status of the Heartbeat / Sequence ........................................................ 21
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4 Setting Up a System using a Template Set: Simplex or Duplex Controllers and
One LAN....................................................................................................................... 22
Single and Dual Controller Architectures ............................................................................ 22
Simplex Controller – Single LAN ................................................................................... 22
Duplex Controller Single LAN........................................................................................ 23
Template Sets Overview ..................................................................................................... 23
Considerations for Setting up an ENIU System .................................................................. 33
Addressing of SVC Exchanges ..................................................................................... 36
EGD Addresses for Multiple Systems on one Ethernet System.................................... 37
Run Mode Store of Ethernet Global Data to the Ethernet NIU...................................... 37
Effect of a Run Mode Store on EGD Operation ............................................................ 38
Redundant Controller Considerations ................................................................................. 39
Switching Logic ............................................................................................................. 39
Predefined Signals for Custom Switching Logic............................................................ 40
Dedicated Signals ......................................................................................................... 41
Point Fault/Data Quality Feature......................................................................................... 42
Enabling Point Fault References................................................................................... 42
Operation of Point Fault References ............................................................................. 42
Adding “Outputs2_xxx_to_ENIU” Exchange ................................................................. 43
Adding Data to Input Exchanges................................................................................... 44
Configuring Input Registers in the Controller ................................................................ 45
Using Input Register Data in the Controller................................................................... 45
How Certain Operational Features are Set up in the Template Set .................................... 46
Input_Processing block ................................................................................................. 46
Using More Is or More Ais............................................................................................. 48
Input_Processing Error Codes ...................................................................................... 48
Chart of Production Periods and Consumption Timeouts ............................................. 50
Using Two Networks to Improve I/O Response Time ................................................... 52
5
Diagnostics........................................................................................................... 53
Ethernet NIU Fault Handling Version 2.1x versus Version 2.40.......................................... 53
Disabling Version 2.40 Fault Handling .......................................................................... 54
Checking for Faults Using the ENIU Status Data (Version 2.10 method) ..................... 54
Clearing Faults using Word 1 of the ENIU Control Data ............................................... 55
Clearing Faults using ClearFaults Data Range in SVC_Xchg_to_ENIU_xx (Version
2.40 and higher) ............................................................................................................ 55
ENIU Faults in the Controller PLC Fault Table (Version 2.40 and higher) .................... 55
Operation of Faults on Power Up, and Stop to Run of ENIU. ....................................... 56
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ENIU_Faults “C Block ................................................................................................... 56
Symbolic Variables for Fault Handling .......................................................................... 57
Viewing the Fault Tables in the Ethernet NIU ..................................................................... 57
Viewing Extra Fault Data............................................................................................... 57
PLC Fault Table Descriptions........................................................................................ 58
Using the Station Manager Function................................................................................... 59
Checking the IP Address of the Ethernet NIU ............................................................... 59
Verifying that the IP Address of the Ethernet NIU is Unique ......................................... 60
Testing Communications on the Network...................................................................... 60
Viewing the Exception Log ............................................................................................ 61
Checking the Network Connection ................................................................................ 61
Checking Exchanges with the STAT Command ........................................................... 62
Verifying that All Ethernet Global Data Exchanges are Working................................... 63
Checking the Cable Connections .................................................................................. 64
When the STAT LED is ON........................................................................................... 64
Stale Ethernet Global Data Status ...................................................................................... 65
If You Can’t Solve the Problem ........................................................................................... 65
6
Local Program Logic in the Ethernet NIU .......................................................... 66
Using the Local Logic Block ................................................................................................ 66
Reference Table Restrictions for User Logic ...................................................................... 66
Restricted Addresses .................................................................................................... 66
Addresses written to by EGD Exchanges ..................................................................... 66
7
Configuring PC-Based Controllers ..................................................................... 67
Configuring the Ethernet NIU .............................................................................................. 67
Configuring the PC-Based Controller.................................................................................. 68
Set Up I/O and Control/Feedback Data......................................................................... 71
8
Setting Up Output Defaults ................................................................................. 74
9
Worksheets for System Parameters................................................................... 75
Controller............................................................................................................................. 75
Second Controller (if used) ................................................................................................. 76
ENIU (complete for each ENIU) .......................................................................................... 77
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1 Introduction
The VersaMax family of products provides universally-distributed I/O that spans PLC and PCbased architectures. Designed for industrial and commercial automation, VersaMax I/O provides
a common, flexible I/O structure for local and remote control applications. This manual
describes installation, operation, and how to apply the VersaMax E05 CPU as an Ethernet
Network Interface Unit (ENIU). The E05 as Ethernet NIU makes it possible to use VersaMax
I/O remotely on an Ethernet network.
See the VersaMax PLC System Manual, GFK-1503 for details of the E05 CPU and installation
instructions.
Once set up by configuration, data exchange is completely automatic. System control can be
provided by any GE Fanuc master device capable of exchanging Ethernet Global Data. The
E05 as ENIU automatically provides the controller with status information in each exchange.
The application program logic in the controller can monitor this status data, and issue
appropriate commands to the E05 acting as an ENIU.
This chapter describes how the E05 as ENIU functions a remote I/O over Ethernet and
describes the Ethernet Global Data (EGD) exchanges that are used to communicate between
the ENIU and the controller(s).
The rest of the chapters in this manual explain how to implement an E05 as ENIU application:
Chapter 2: EGD Overview, summarizes Ethernet Global Data (EGD) operation.
Chapter 3: Control, Status, and I/O Data, describes the content of the data exchanged by the
E05 as ENIU and the controller.
Chapter 4: Software Setup, explains how to use Template Sets to set up an application using
E05s as ENIUs.
Chapter 5: Diagnostics, describes how to view and clear fault information for the E05 as ENIU.
Chapter 6: Local Program Logic in the E05 as ENIU, describes the Local Logic feature of the
E05 as ENIU.
Appendix A: Setting Up Output Defaults, describes how to set up optional default states or
values for output data.
.
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Additional Documentation
The VersaMax Enhanced E05 as ENIU and associated equipment will function as part of a
larger control system. Additional documentation will be required to complete the system
installation and configuration procedures for the system.
The following VersaMax user manuals provide additional information about VersaMax
equipment in the I/O Station:
VersaMax Modules, Power Supplies, and Carriers User’s Manual, GFK-1504. Describes the
many VersaMax I/O and option modules, power supplies, and carriers that can make up the I/O
Station. This manual also provides detailed system installation instructions.
VersaMax PLC System Manual, GFK-1503 Describes the installation and operation of a
VersaMax PLC System. This manual also contains general information about CPU operation
and program features. Much of this manual focuses on the VersaMax PLC, but it also includes
programming details you will need if the VersaMax Enhanced E05 as ENIU will use local
application logic.
VersaMax PLC Station Manager User’s Manual, GFK-1876. Describes the diagnostic
interface to the Ethernet functions of VersaMax CPU module IC200CPUE05. The information in
this manual also applies to the VersaMax Enhanced E05 as ENIU.
Devices on the Network
An Ethernet network can serve more than one NIU I/O Station. A system with one controller and
multiple I/O Stations is shown below.
Controller with Ethernet Interface
Multiple
Enhanced Ethernet
NIU
I/O Stations
The Ethernet Interface in the master PLC sees all of the modules on the network without regard
to their location in a specific I/O Station. That means each module must be assigned unique I/O
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references during configuration. The application program in the PLC sends output data on the
Ethernet network, and each NIU consumes all of the output data. Each E05 as ENIU then maps
the output data to its own output memory. During the output portion of each NIU’s I/O scan, it
automatically sends the appropriate output data to the modules in its I/O Station.
Similarly, when the master PLC receives data from the NIUs, it maps the I/O data into PLC
memory at the appropriate addresses. Therefore, it is important to be sure that all of the input
references are unique to prevent input data being accidentally overwritten. See chapter 3 for
more information about reference usage in the system.
Any GE Fanuc Ethernet interface master capable of exchanging Ethernet Global Data
messages, such as a PAC Systems, Series 90-30, or Series 90-70, can function as a controller
for the VersaMax E05 as ENIU.
Multiple Controllers
Many applications will use one master to control one or more I/O Stations on the network.
However, it is also possible to have two masters, with one serving as the primary controller and
the other as a secondary controller to provide backup operation should communications with the
primary controller be lost. When using more than one master, it is important to balance the
needs of the application against the greater complexity of coordinating the controllers.
Controller 1 with Ethernet Interface
Controller 2 with Ethernet Interface
Multiple
Enhanced Ethernet
NIU
I/O Stations
Any GE Fanuc Ethernet interface master capable of exchanging Ethernet Global Data
messages, such as a PAC Systems, Series 90-30 or Series 90-70 CPU, can function as a
controller for the VersaMax Enhanced E05 as ENIU. In a system that uses a primary and
secondary controller, it is not necessary for the controllers to be the same type.
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2 Ethernet Global Data (EGD) Overview
This chapter describes what Ethernet Global Data is and how it operates.
▪
Basic EGD Operation
▪
ENIU Input and Output Exchange configuration
▪
ENIU SVC Exchange configuration
Communications Overview
The mechanism used for communications between the controller (or two controllers) and ENIUs
on the network is the Ethernet Global Data exchange.
Ethernet Global Data provides periodic data transfer over an Ethernet network. It supports fast,
efficient communications because it is connectionless and is not acknowledged.
Caution
Because Ethernet Global Data (EGD) communication is connectionless and not acknowledged, it
is important to include error-checking and interlocking circuitry in the application to ensure the
safety of personnel and equipment in the event that EGD data is lost. Failure to heed this
warning could result in injury to personnel and damage to equipment.
Ethernet Global Data Exchange Operation
In EGD communications, a device (called a producer) shares a portion of its memory contents
periodically with one or more other devices (called consumers). This sharing of memory
between devices is called an exchange. As illustrated below, each exchange begins with 10
words of NIU status data or CPU control data, followed by up to 1380 bytes of input or output
data. The overall maximum length of a single exchange is 1400 bytes.
▪
The E05 as ENIU’s produced data exchanged consists of status data and the input data
being sent to the controller.
First byte
To
Master
Status
10 words
Produced Exchange Data
Last byte
Discrete and Analog Module Input Data
Maximum Input Data Length = 1380 bytes
Maximum Total Data Length = 1400 bytes
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▪
The E05 as ENIUs consumed data exchange consists of control data and output data from
the controller.
First byte
To
NIU
Control
10 words
Consumed Exchange Data
Last byte
Discrete and Analog Module Output Data
Maximum Output Data Length = 1380 bytes
Maximum Total Data Length = 1400 bytes
Chapter 3 describes the content of the status and control data, and explains how it can be used
in the application. Chapter 4 describes how to configure EGD exchanges. If the system includes
both a primary and secondary controller, EGD exchanges must be configured for both the
primary and secondary controllers. In addition, if the system includes a secondary controller, the
E05 as ENIU must be configured for two consumed exchanges. However, the ENIU uses data
from only one controller at a time.
EGD Exchanges for Faults – SVC_Xchg
An Ethernet NIU uses one EGD consumed data exchange and one produced data exchange for
Fault Reporting and Clearing. One pair of exchanges is required for each path from the ENIU to
the controller(s).
The exchange from the ENIU has 24 words of Fault Reporting data. The exchange from the
controller has 1 word to acknowledge Fault Report and 1 word to clear faults in the ENIU.
First byte
To
Master
SVC_Xchg_from_ENIU_xx
Produced Exchange Data
Fault data
24 words
SVC_Xchg_to_ENIU_xx
Consumed Exchange Data
Fault acknowledge and clear
First byte
To
NIU
Last byte
Last byte
2 words
The second word in the SVC_Xchg_to_ENIU_xx can be used to clear faults in an individual
ENIU. See chapter 9 for details.
All other fields in the SVC_Xchgs are used internally by the ENIU and “C” blocks in controllers
and do not have fields that need to be accessed.
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3 EGD Exchanges, Control Words, Status Words, I/O Data
Formats, and ENIU System References
This chapter describes the content of the data exchanged by the Ethernet NIU and the
controller.
▪
System I/O Data References
▪
Data Memory in the Ethernet NIU
▪
▪
References Used in the Ethernet NIU
▪
Discrete and Analog Outputs in the Ethernet NIU
Exchanging Data with One or Two Controllers
▪
ENIU Operation with Two Controllers
▪
ENIU Operation if No Data is Received
▪
Control Data Format
▪
Status Data Format
▪
Using the Control and Status Data
▪
Switching Back to the Primary Controller
▪
Setting Up the Output Defaults
▪
Checking for Faults and Clearing Faults
▪
Using the Optional Application-Specific Command Word
System I/O Data References
I/O modules are added to the Ethernet NIU configuration and their parameters are configured by
the same method they are configured in a PLC system.
To a controller, the I/O data it exchanges with Ethernet NIUs on the network is part of its overall
I/O system. If the same controller serves multiple Ethernet NIUs and their I/O Stations, each I/O
Station MUST use a unique set of Input references and Output references, as shown in the
simplified example below (default values from Template Sets are shown). Duplicated Input
references for multiple Ethernet NIUs would be overwritten in the controller’s memory. Duplicate
Output references would result in the same outputs being used in multiple ENIUs.
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Controller
%I from ENIUs
%Q1 – 1024
%AI from ENIUs
%AQ1 - 256
ENIU 1
ENIU 2
ENIU 3
%I1 – 200
%Q from CTL
%AI1 – 128
%AQ1 from CTL
%I201-400
%Q from CTL
%AI129 - 256
%AQ from CTL
%I401 - 600
%Q from CTL
%AI257 - 384
%AQ from CTL
If an I/O Station has two controllers, the local I/O in each controller could use some or all of the
same I/O references. In the illustration below, both controllers use the same local references.
Primary
Controller
Secondary
Controller
%I1 from ENIUs
%Q1 – 1024
%AI from ENIUs
%AQ1 - 256
%I1 from ENIUs
%Q1 – 1024
%AI from ENIUs
%AQ1 - 256
ENIU 1
ENIU 2
ENIU 3
%I1 – 200
%Q from CTL
%AI1 - 128
%AQ from CTL
%I201 – 400
%Q from CTL
%AI129 - 256
%AQ from CTL
%I401 – 600
%Q from CTL
%AI257 - 384
%AQ from CTL
Data Memory in the Ethernet NIU
The Ethernet NIU has the following types of data memory:
Discrete Input Points - %I
2,048 (fixed)
Discrete Output Points - %Q
2,048 (fixed) only 1,024* available in EGD Output
exchanges
Discrete Global Memory - %G
1280 (fixed) – used internally by ENIU code
Internal Coils - %M
1024 (fixed). – used internally by ENIU code
Output (Temporary) Coils %T
256 bits (fixed). – used internally by ENIU code
System Status References %S
128 bits (%S, %SA, %SB, %SC - 32 bits each)
(fixed)
Register Memory - %R
Default of 10112, up to 32128
Analog Inputs - %AI
Default of 2048, up to 32128
Analog Outputs - %AQ
Default of 2048, up to 32128 only 256* available
in EGD Output exchanges
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* The ENIU continually monitors the EGD Exchanges (“Outputs_xxx_to_ENIUs”) and
automatically controls %Q1-1024 and %AQ1-256 from the data it receives or if data is not
received it puts these outputs in the commanded state (off, hold last, default).
References Used in the Ethernet NIU
The references used by the Ethernet NIU for its I/O, status, and control data are assigned
during configuration. The configuration steps are explained in chapter 4.
The ENIU maps data into its internal memory as shown below. The references shown in italics
for status and control data are required for correct operation.
Type of Data
Ethernet NIU References
Discrete Inputs from field devices
%I0001 - %I2048 (bits)
Discrete Outputs from controller (primary / only)
Must be %M0001 - %M1024 (bits)
Discrete Outputs from optional secondary
controller
Must be %G001 - %G1024 (bits)
Ethernet Global Data Exchange status
(consumed from primary / only controller)
Must be %T0001 - %T0016 (bits)
Ethernet Global Data Exchange status
(consumed from secondary controller)
Must be %T0017 - %T0032 (bits)
Ethernet Global Data Exchange status (produced
by ENIU)
Must be %T0033 - %T0048 (bits)
Analog Inputs from field devices
%AI001 – configuration limit
Analog Outputs from controller (primary / only)
Must be %R0001 - %R0256 (words)
Analog Outputs from optional secondary
controller
Must be %R0257 - %R0512 (words)
ENIU Status data to be sent to controller(s)
Must be %R1101 - %R1110 (words)
Control Data (from primary / only controller)
Must be %R1111 - %R1120 (words)
Control Data (from secondary controller)
Must be %R1121 - %R1130 (words)
Used internally by ENIU
%G1029 - %G1280
Used internally by ENIU
%T1 - %T256
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Discrete and Analog Outputs in the Ethernet NIU
The ENIU is configured in the EGD consumed exchanges to place the discrete output data it
receives from the primary controller into its internal coils (%M) table, and optional secondary
controllers into its internal coils (%G) table. It places analog output data from the primary
controller and the secondary controller in its register (%R) table. The ENIU will only work
properly with up to 1024 discrete outputs and 256 analog outputs and the outputs must go to the
data ranges specified (%M1 and %R1 for the exchange from the Primary and %G1 and %R257
for the exchange from the Secondary).
The ENIU moves the discrete and analog output data to the %Q and %AQ tables after
determining that data is being received from an active controller. If no active controller is
available then the ENIU moves zeros, hold last state, or default values to the %Q and %AQ
tables as directed by the control bit from the last active controller.
Typically, the controller sends the maximum number of outputs (1024 discrete and 256 analog).
When the data is received, the ENIU places it in memory beginning at the first reference in each
table (for example, %Q0001). The maximum number of outputs does not need to be sent but
the location where the outputs start in the ENIU must not be changed. The exchange definitions
for both the controller and the Ethernet NIU can be adjusted for improved performance by only
transferring the data actually used in the system.
Using Multiple Exchanges for Systems with More than 256 Analog Outputs
In a system with multiple Ethernet NIUs, it is possible for the total amount of analog output data
of all the ENIUs to exceed the 256 word limit of one ENIU. In that case, the controller must
produce multiple exchanges to send all the output data. Each exchange can have the same
discrete outputs (%Q), but different analog outputs (%AQ). When an Ethernet NIU receives its
exchange, it stores the discrete outputs in discrete memory as described above. However,
some of the Ethernet NIUs will use different reference addresses for the analog output data than
are used in the controller:
Exchange 1
Exchange 2
ENIU 1
ENIU 1
Discrete Outputs
%M0001 - %M1024
Controller
Controller
%Q0001 - %Q1024
%R0001 - %R0256
%R0001 - %R0256
%Q0001 - %Q1024
Analog Outputs
%AQ001 - %AQ256
%AQ001 - %AQ256
%AQ257 - %AQ512
%M0001 - %M1024
ENIU 2
Discrete
Outputs
ENIU 2
%AQ257 - %AQ512
%M0001 - %M1024
%R0001 - %R0256
%M0001 - %M1024
Analog Outputs
%R0001 - %R0256
Note: the same technique can be used if more than 1024 discrete outputs are required.
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Exchanging Data with One or Two Controllers
In addition to the Ethernet NIU’s primary controller, there can also be a secondary controller that
provides backup if the primary controller becomes unavailable. Chapter 4 explains how to set up
messaging between the ENIU and one or two controllers.
ENIU Operation with Two Controllers
If the system includes a primary controller and a secondary controller, both controllers regularly
send output and control data for the I/O Station, and receive the latest input and status data
from the Ethernet NIU.
During normal operation, the Ethernet NIU uses the output and control data it receives from its
primary controller. However, if the ENIU stops receiving data from the primary controller for the
configured timeout period, the ENIU begins using output and control data from the secondary
controller instead.
After the ENIU has started using data from the secondary controller, it keeps using data from
the secondary controller until it receives a command from the primary controller (in the control
data portion of the output message) telling it to switch back.
The primary controller can also command the Ethernet NIU to switch to the secondary. If the
secondary controller is not available, the Ethernet NIU will NOT switch.
ENIU Operation if No Data is Received
If the Ethernet NIU does not receive output and control data from any controller within the
configured timeout period, the ENIU either sets the outputs in the I/O Station to their defaults or
holds them in their last states or zeroes the outputs. The choice of how outputs will behave if
communications are lost is determined by the output control bits (described later in this section).
If the Ethernet NIU has not received output and control data from any controller since the ENIU
powered up, the state of the ENIU outputs is normally the default state. It is possible to change
this option so that the ENIU outputs are zeroed after powerup if no controller communications
have been received. To make this change go, to the variable InitDefaults for the ENIU in
CIMPLICITY ME and change the initial value from 1 to 0. Then store to the ENIU. This must be
done for each ENIU that is to operate this way.
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Control Data Format
The first 10 words of data consumed by the Ethernet NIU are control data. They determine the
behavior of outputs if communications are lost, and can be used to clear faults.
In addition, if there are two controllers, the control data determines which of the controllers will
supply the I/O Station outputs.
Bit 0
Not Used, set to 0
Bit 1
Enable Hold Last State Mode
Bit 2
Enable Set Outputs to Defaults Mode
Bit 3
Switch to Primary Controller
Bit 4
Switch to Backup Controller
Bit 5
Not Used, set to 0
Bit 6
Not Used, set to 0
Bit 7
Clear Faults
Bit 8
Copy of %S33, PRI_UNT
Bit 9
Copy of %S34, SEC_UNT
Bit 10
Copy of %S35, LOC_RDY
Bit 11
Copy of %S36, LOC_ACT
Bit 12
Copy of %S37, REM_RDY
Bit 13
Not Used with E05 as ENIU
Bit 14
Not Used with E05 as ENIU
Bit 15
Reserved must be 0
Bits 8-12 used with Redundant Controllers
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Word 1: Control Data
0
1
2
Word 2: Available for Use by Application
Words 3 – 10 should be set to zero
The application program in the controller(s) is responsible for correctly setting the content of this
control data as described in the following table. Unused words should be set to zero.
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Control Data Definitions
Enable Hold
Last State
Mode:*
Set this bit if outputs in the I/O Station should hold their last commanded state when
communications are lost. For systems with two controllers, this bit should be the same in both
the primary and secondary controller exchanges.
Enable Set
Outputs to
Default Mode: *
Set this bit if outputs in the I/O Station should go to their configured defaults when
communications are lost. If this bit is set, bit 1 (Hold Last State) is ignored. For systems with
two controllers, this bit should be the same in both the primary and secondary controller
exchanges.
Switch to
Primary
Controller:
If the secondary controller is presently controlling the NIU and providing output data for the I/O
Station, the primary controller must set this bit to regain control of the I/O Station. See
“Switching Back to the Primary Controller” below for additional steps that are necessary to
return to normal operation with the primary controller.
Switch to
Secondary
Controller:
If the primary controller is presently controlling the NIU and providing output data for in the I/O
Station, it can switch control to the secondary by setting this bit. If this bit is set, bit 3 (Switch to
Primary) should NOT be set. If the secondary controller is not present, the switch will not
occur.
Clear Faults:
Setting this bit clears all faults in ALL Ethernet NIUs that receive the same exchange. In a
system with two controllers, only the exchange from the currently-active controller is used to
clear faults. ENIUs clear fault when this bit goes high (when ENIU sees a rising edge).
Bits 8-12
When redundant controllers are used, the ENIU uses these bits to determine the Active and
Standby controllers
Word 2,
Available to
Application:
The application program in the controller(s) can optionally use word 2 as described later in this
section.
* See the section on setting up the output defaults.
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Status Data Format
The 10 words of status data sent by the Ethernet NIU provide the controller(s) with information
about output and fault status in the format shown below. The application program in the
controller(s) should continually monitor this status data from the ENIU.
Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
Bit 8
Bit 9
Bit 10
Bits 11–15
0
1
2
3
4
Outputs being controlled
Primary has Hold Last State Mode enabled
Primary has Set Outputs to Defaults Mode enabled
Primary in Control
Secondary in Control
Reserved
Reserved
Faults Exist
Reserved
Secondary has Hold Last State Mode enabled
Secondary has Set Output to Defaults Mode enabled
Not Used
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
13
14
15
Word 1: Status and Fault Data
O
1
2
3
4
Word 2: Copy of Control Data Word 2 (Application-based) from Primary Controller
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Word 3: Copy of Control Data Word 2 (Application-based) from Secondary Controller
Words 4 - 10: Reserved
Status Data Definitions
Outputs Being
Controlled:
Set if the I/O Station outputs are being controlled from the application program, and are
not defaulted or in Hold Last State mode. If this bit is set, bits 1 and 2 should NOT be set.
Controller has Hold
Last State Mode
Enabled:
The ENIU sets bits 1 and 9 to mirror the present Hold Last State control bit being
received from the primary controller and the secondary controller
Controller has Set
Outputs to Defaults
Mode:
The ENIU sets bits 2 and 10 to mirror the present Outputs Default control bit being
received from the primary controller and the secondary controller.
Primary in Control:
Set when the primary controller is presently controlling the NIU and providing output data
for the I/O Station. If this bit is set, bit 4 (Secondary in control) should NOT be set.
Secondary in
Control:
Set when the secondary controller is presently controlling the NIU and providing output
data for in the I/O Station. If this bit is set, bit 3 (Primary in Control) should NOT be set.
Faults Exist:
Set when any fault exists in the Ethernet NIU.
Words 2 & 3, Copy
of Optional Control
Data
The ENIU mirrors the content of word 2 of the control data in these status words. If the
ENIU is receiving outputs from the primary controller, status word 2 has content. If the
ENIU is receiving outputs from the secondary controller, status word 3 has content.
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Using the Control and Status Data
The application program in the controller(s) should monitor the Ethernet NIU status data, and
use the control data to interact with the NIU.
Switching Control Back to the Primary Controller
When the Ethernet NIU is using output data from the secondary controller, the application
program in the primary controller must follow the steps below to regain control of the ENIU.
1. Start up with bit 3 reset.
2. Synchronize the program state with data from the secondary controller (this happens
automatically with redundant controllers).
3. Set bit 3 ( “Switch to Primary Controller”) of the control data going to the ENIU.
4. The primary controller must then reset the bit 3 to 0 when all Ethernet NIUs report “primary
in control” in their input status data.
Setting Up the Output Defaults
If the Ethernet NIU does not receive any communication with the controller(s) within the
configured timeout period, it sets the outputs in the I/O Stations to specified states. These
output states are determined by commands previously received in the output data control bits.
Bit 1
Bit 2
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Enable Hold Last State Mode
Enable Set Outputs to Defaults Mode
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Word 1: Control Data
If control bit 1 is set to 1, the ENIU will hold the outputs at their last commanded state.
If control bit 2 is set to 1, the ENIU will set outputs to their individual default state (see below).
Bit 2 takes precedence; if both bits 1 and 2 are inadvertently set, the ENIU sets outputs to their
default states.
If control bits 1 and 2 are both 0, outputs are set to 0.
When the Ethernet NIU has both primary and secondary controllers, control bits 1 and 2 should
be set the same by both. If they are not the same, the Ethernet NIU will use the values it
received from the last controller that provided outputs before communications were lost.
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Specifying Individual Output Defaults
If the control outputs are set to have the outputs default instead of hold last state, ordinarily all
outputs will default to zero. If that is suitable for the application, no further action is needed.
However, for some applications taking outputs to a safe state requires setting them to one or
forcing analog outputs to individually-specified values.
An optional procedure can be used to set up defaults for the Ethernet NIU. Use of this
procedure is described in appendix A.
Checking for Faults and Clearing Faults
See chapter 5 for details.
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Using the Optional Application-Specific Command Word
The word 2 of the command data can be used by the controller for several purposes.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Word 1: Control Data
0
1
2
Word 2: Available for Use by Application
Words 3 – 10 should be set to zero
Setting Up a Heartbeat
For example, the controller could use a free-running counter as a heartbeat for the value of this
word, then check the incoming Ethernet NIU status block to make sure the ENIU is still running.
In redundant applications, each controller could check the other controller’s heartbeat to
determine whether the other controller is operating.
Sequencing Outputs
This word could also be used to sequence outputs. The controller would set the outputs to a
particular state and set the sequence number in the command data. When the Ethernet NIU
returns the same sequence number in its status data, the controller knows that the ENIU has
received the outputs. The controller can then take the next step in the sequence.
Checking the Status of the Heartbeat / Sequence
The primary controller’s heartbeat/sequence ID word is returned in the second word of the ENIU
status block. The secondary controller’s heartbeat/sequence ID word is returned in the third
word of the ENIU status block.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
13
14
15
Word 1: Status and Fault Data
O
1
2
3
4
Word 2: Copy of Control Data Word 2 (Application-based) from Primary Controller
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Word 3: Copy of Control Data Word 2 (Application-based) from Secondary Controller
Words 4 - 10: Reserved
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4 Setting Up a System using a Template Set: Simplex or
Duplex Controllers and One LAN
▪
Single and Dual Controller Architectures
▪
Template Sets Overview
▪
Considerations for Setting up an ENIU System
▪
Redundant Controller Considerations
▪
Point Fault/Data Quality Feature
▪
How Certain Operational Features are Set up in the Templates
▪
EGD Timing for the Project Templates
Single and Dual Controller Architectures
This chapter summarizes the steps for setting up a system that has a single controller or dual
controllers (either RX7i or RX3i) and a single LAN to the Ethernet NIUs.
Simplex Controller – Single LAN
Rx7i
Rx7i
or
or
Rx3i
Ethernet
Switch
Single LAN Simplex
Star
Rx3i
Self-healing Fiber Ring
VLAN Support
Single LAN Simplex
Fiber Ring
Note: This manual does not cover setting up the Ethernet architecture or topology. Figures
showing the Ethernet architecture are shown to indicate possible architectures.
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Duplex Controller Single LAN
Rx7i
RMX Sync
or
Rx7i
RMX Sync
or
RX3i
RMX Sync
RX3i
RMX Sync
Ethernet
Switch
Single LAN Duplex Controller
Star Architecture
Self-healing Fiber Ring
VLAN Support
Single LAN Duplex Controller
Fiber Ring Architecture
Note: This manual does not cover setting up the Ethernet architecture or topology. Figures
showing the Ethernet architecture are shown to indicate possible architectures.
Template Sets Overview
Template Sets are provided on the GE Fanuc support Web site as the mechanism to set up
systems using E05s as ENIUs. Using the Template Sets is the easiest and most efficient way to
set up a system using E05s as ENIUs. The Template Sets can be found on the GE Fanuc
support website under Developer Downloads, Applied Solutions
Choosing the Template Set.
Step 1 – Is this a Proficy Machine Edition (PME) project or a Proficy Process System
(PPS) project.
Step 2 – Is there a single controller or redundant controllers.
Step 3 – How many E05 ENIUs are in the system (including expansion)
Choose the Template set that is for PME or PPS, has single or redundant controllers,
and has more E05 ENIUs than the application needs. The extra E05 ENIUs will be
deleted. The template set contains a project for the controller(s) and one or more
projects for the ENIUs. The template set includes all EGD Exchanges between the
controller(s) and the ENIUs. It is preconfigured to operate with 1024 discrete outputs and
256 analog outputs to be shared by the set of ENIUs. The template set is preconfigured
to work with 200 discrete inputs and 128 analog inputs from each ENIU. If your
application will work within these preconfigured I/O sizes, it is recommended that you
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use the preconfigured sizes. Changing the defaults to work with more I/O is described
later in this chapter.
Creating a project folder
After downloading a template, either duplicate or do a SaveAs of the template folder.
Rename the duplicate or SaveAs folder to the folder name for your application. Save the
downloaded template as a model to refer to as you develop your application.
Changing the Number of ENIUs in the Controller(s)
The templates come with a particular number of ENIUs. The template chosen should
have more than the number of ENIUs the application requires or the exact number of
ENIUs the application requires (including any planned expansion).
Rung 5 of the ENIU_Interface block in the controller is where the Number of ENIUs is
set.
Change the Constant in the Input to the MOVE_INT block in Rung 5. The example
below shows 10 as the Constant.
If there are extra ENIUs that are not needed (including planned expansion) they can be
deleted. Any exchanges in the controller(s) for deleted ENIUs can also be deleted.
Do NOT delete any symbolic variables, even symbolic variables associated with ENIUs
that have been deleted.
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Determine Ethernet Settings. Determine the Ethernet setting for the controllers and
ENIUs.
IP Address and Subnet Mask for Ethernet interface in the controller that will
communicate with the Ethernet NIUs. Note: Redundant IP is not used for
communication to the ENIUs.
IP Address for any additional Ethernet interfaces in the controller(s), including IP
Address, Subnet Mask, Gateway Address, Redundant IP Address (if used) and
any other Ethernet options that may be used.
IP Address and Subnet Mask for Ethernet interface in each ENIU.
At this point if a Template Set that has been downloaded from the GE Fanuc support
Web site, and Ethernet addresses have been entered in the configurations. The I/O
communication between the controller(s) and ENIU(s) will be functional after a store is
performed to the controller(s) and ENIU(s).
Decide how faults in the ENIUs will be handled. The default method is for the ENIU to
send non-fatal faults to the controller(s) and for the “C” block “ENIU_Faults” in the
controller to put the faults in the controller’s PLC Fault Table. Optionally, the sending
of faults to the controller can be disabled and the faults can then be viewed/cleared
by connecting the programmer to the ENIU. See Chapter on Diagnostics for more
details on how to work with faults and the Fault Tables.
Modifying the amount of Outputs sent to the ENIUs (if necessary).
The default quantity of Outputs is 1024 %Q and 256 %AQ. These outputs are shared by
all of the ENIUs in the system. If a smaller quantity of Outputs is all that is required, it is
recommended that the default quantity by used. If a larger quantity of Outputs is required
an additional Output Exchange can be added to the controller(s). The existing Output
exchange (Outputs_xxx_to_ENIUs) will be used to deliver %Q1 to %Q1024 and %AQ1
to %AQ256 to half of the ENIUs. The new Output exchange (Outputs2_xxx_to_ENIUs)
will be used to deliver %Q1025 to %Q2048 and %AQ257 to %AQ512 to the second half
of the ENIUs.
See detailed steps to add Outputs2_xxx_to_ENIUs later in this chapter.
How Outputs get used in the ENIU.
The Output exchange delivers all the discrete and analog outputs to all the ENIUs that
receive the exchange. To use the outputs in an ENIU, simply configure an Output
module using the addresses of the outputs.
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Modifying the amount of Inputs sent from the ENIUs to the controller(s) (if
necessary).
The default quantity of Inputs in the template sets is 200 %I and128 %AI from each
ENIU. The number of inputs should be determined including any needed spares. The IO
Mapping is given in the following table. If all of your ENIUs have less than 200 %I and
less than 128 %AI (including spares), the preconfigured input mapping should be used.
ENIUs with No Discrete or No Analog Inputs
If an ENIU has no Discrete or no Analog Input the data ranges in the EGD exchange for
the discrete or analog inputs can be deleted. In addition the value of the array dimension
for the symbolic variable in the controller needs to be set to zero. See example on
changing number of inputs later in this chapter.
Note: The EGD Input Exchange must not be deleted, the controller(s) uses it to
determine if the communication to the ENIU is working.
ENIU with no Inputs and only Outputs
If an ENIU has no Inputs and only Outputs, the data ranges in the EGD exchange for the
discrete and analog inputs can be deleted, but the Exchange MUST NOT be deleted.
The controller uses the 10 Status Words in the exchange to determine the health of the
communication with the ENIU. In addition the value of the array dimension for the
symbolic variables for the inputs in the controller need to be set to zero. See example on
changing number of inputs later in this chapter.
How the inputs from the ENIUs are addressed in the controller(s).
The EGD Input exchanges move the inputs from the ENIUs to the controllers. The
software of the controller(s) uses the EGD Input exchange configuration to determine the
number of inputs from each ENIU and packs the inputs consecutively in the appropriate
input table (%I, %AI). No spaces are left between the inputs from the ENIUs. If at a later
time the number of inputs from an ENIU changes it will affect the address where inputs
from all ENIUs with a higher number will be placed in the controller Input table. For this
reason the number of inputs from each ENIU should be carefully considered, including
any spares that may be needed in the future.
The Template sets are configured with the Input addresses in the EGD exchanges so
that the inputs in the ENIU have the same reference table address that they will have in
the controllers for the first 10 ENIUs, for the next 10 ENIUs the reference numbers
repeat in the ENIUs. This is done because the E05 only has 2048 %I references (see
the IO Mapping Table).
Input Modules in an ENIU must have their reference addresses in the range of
input addresses that are sent to the controllers(s) in the EGD Input Exchange.
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Preconfigured I/O Mapping in E05 as ENIU Template Sets
Discrete Inputs
Analog Inputs
Discrete Outputs
ENIU_01
%I001 to %I200
%AI001 to %AI128
ENIU_02
%I201 to %I400
%AI129 to %AI256
ENIU_03
%I401 to %I600
%AI257 to %AI384
%Q0001 to %Q1024 and %AQ001 to
%AQ256 are sent from the controller and
received by all ENIUs Any reference
address can be used in any ENIU
ENIU_04
%I601 to %I800
%AI385 to %AI512
ENIU_05
%I801 to %I1000
%AI513 to %AI640
ENIU_06
%I1001 to %I1200
%AI641 to %AI768
ENIU_07
%I1201 to %I1400
%AI769 to %AI896
ENIU_08
%I1401 to %I1600
%AI897 to %AI1024
ENIU_09
%I1601 to %I1800
%AI1025 to %A1152
ENIU_10
%I1801 to %I2000
%AI1153 to %AI1280
ENIU_11
%I001 to %I200
%AI001 to %AI128
ENIU_12
%I201 to %I400
%AI129 to %AI256
ENIU_13
%I401 to %I600
%AI257 to %AI384
ENIU_14
%I601 to %I800
%AI385 to %AI512
ENIU_15
%I801 to %I1000
%AI513 to %AI640
ENIU_16
%I1001 to %I1200
%AI641 to %AI768
ENIU_17
%I1201 to %I1400
%AI769 to %AI896
ENIU_18
%I1401 to %I1600
%AI897 to %AI1024
ENIU_19
%I1601 to %I1800
%AI1025 to %A1152
ENIU_20
%I1801 to %I2000
%AI1153 to %AI1280
Analog Outputs
As an example:
ENIU #1 sends %I00001 to %I00200 in an EGD exchange to the controller(s) and the EGD
exchange in the controller(s) puts the data in %I00001 to %I00200.
ENIU #2 sends %I00201 to %I00400 in an EGD exchange to the controller(s) and the EGD
exchange in the controller(s) puts the data in %I00201 to %I00400.
Note: If word data (%R or %W) needs to be sent from ENIUs to the controller(s)
the word data can be sent as part of the %AI data by moving the word data into
the %AI addresses sent to the controllers or an additional data range can be
added to EGD exchanges to send data to the controller(s) (see the example later
in this chapter), or
Changing the number of inputs from an ENIU
Inputs are sent from the ENIU to the controller(s) in the EGD Exchange
“Inputs_from_ENIU_xx”. where xx is the ENIU number.
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To change the number of inputs from an ENIU the following changes need to be made:
Change the amount of I/O in the Produced EGD exchange “Inputs_from_ENIU_xx” in
the ENIU target.
The input address in every higher numbered ENIU must be adjusted to reflect the
change made to the input size. The controller end will adjust the addressing
automatically.
In the controller the inputs in the consumer EGD exchange “Inputs_from_ENIU_xx” are
placed in a symbolic variable. The array dimension of the symbolic variable needs to be
changed to the new length.
In addition if redundant controllers are used, in addition to the array dimension of the
input symbolic variable being changed, the array dimension of the xfer_pri and xfer_sec
symbolic variables must also be changed.
Example of changing the amount of input points
This example shows the steps to change the amount of discrete inputs in ENIU01 from
the default 200 to 320 in a system with 2 ENIUs.
Step1 Change the ENIU_01 Produced exchange
Existing default exchange
Modified exchange – length of discrete inputs changed to 320
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Step 2 Change ENIU_02 Produced exchange for new reference address
Existing default exchange
Modified exchange – reference address changed from %I00201 to %I00321
Note: If the application has more than 2 ENIUs, all higher numbered ENIUs must have
their produced exchange modified with corrected reference addresses.
Step 3 – Change the Array Dimension in the Controller
The existing default value for the array dimension of the discrete inputs in the exchange
“Inputs_from_ENIU_01”
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The array dimension changed to 320. Note the length in the EGD exchange will change
automatically when the array dimension is changed.
Step 4 – Change Array dimension for Xfer Variables (Only for Redundant
Controllers)
The default value (200) of array dimension of “ENIU01_Xfer_Pri_InputsDiscrete”
The array dimension of “ENIU01_Xfer_Pri_InputsDiscrete” set to 320
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The array dimension of variable ENIU01_Xfer_Sec_InputsDiscrete also needs to be
changed in the same way.
The new setup with more discrete inputs from ENIU01 can now be stored to the
controller(s) and ENIUs.
The output status of the Call to the Input_Processing “C” block should be checked. The
status should have a value of 1. If the status is not 1 there is an error and inputs are not
being received by the controller program. The list of the error codes can be found later
in this chapter. The Call to Input_Processing_xxx is found in the ENIU_Intferface_xxx
block at rung 11.
Checking the location of Inputs in the Controller(s)
The variable “eniuoffsetarray” displays the starting address for inputs from each ENIU.
To check the location of the inputs:
The program must be stored to the controller
The controller must be running (ENIU do not need to be connected)
Input_Processing status must be 1
Open a Watch window and add the variable eniuoffsetarray.
Click the + to expand the array.
eniuoffsetarray is a two dimension array. The first dimension in the ENIU number. The
second dimension is of length 4 and has the starting addresses of the inputs
[eniunumber],[0] is the starting address for discrete inputs for the ENIU
[eniunumber],[1] is the starting address for analog inputs for the ENIU
[eniunumber],[2] is the starting address for more discrete inputs for the ENIU
[eniunumber],[3] is the starting address for more analog inputs for the ENIU
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Do NOT change the array dimensions for the variable eniuoffsetarray. If the array size is
changed either the program will not store or the controller will fault.
eniuoffsetarray in a Watch Window looks like this
ENIU01
Discrete starting address
%I1
ENIU01
ENIU02
Discrete starting address
%I201
ENIU02
This figure shows ENIUs 1-5 with default values for the inputs. More Inputs are not used
in this example. See the section later in this chapter on the Input_processing block for
more information on more inputs.
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Considerations for Setting up an ENIU System
This section discusses some choices to consider on how an ENIU system is setup.
Control by Standby Controller in a Redundant Controller Application
There are options to have the ENIUs only “Receive Outputs from the Active controller”. If this
option is selected and the ENIU is not receiving Outputs from the Active controller, the ENIU
treats this situation the same as losing communication with both controllers.
The following cases explain the choices on how to handle the situation where one or more
ENIUs are receiving their Outputs from the standby controller.
There are multiple cases to consider.
Case 1: Both controllers have communications with all ENIUs (this is the same as all ENIUs that
are powered up and in Run mode). One or more ENIUs are using the Output Exchanges from
the standby controller. This case is likely to happen.
This can happen for a number of reason, the communications to the Active controller
could drop out for a short time, a ENIU could power up while the secondary controller is
active, etc.
The Inputs from the ENIUs are going to both controllers. The Standby controller receives
the values for the Outputs from the Active control over the Reflective Memory (RMX) link
between the controller and sends the Outputs values it receives from the Active
controller to the ENIUs
The system will continue to run fine with all ENIUs receiving Outputs and the controllers
receiving Inputs from all ENIUs.
If the “Receive Outputs from the Active controller” option has been enabled, and ENIU
using Outputs from the Backup Controller will behave as if the communication to both
controllers has been lost.
The recommended action is to issue a command from the controllers to have all ENIUs
use the Output Exchange from the Active Controller. The reason for this
recommendation is to avoid the situation of one or more ENIUs receiving outputs from
the Standby controller when the communication to the active controller is not working.
See case 2 for a discussion of this case.
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Case 2: Standby controller has communications with all ENIUs (this is the same as all ENIUs
that are powered up and in Run mode). Active Controller can only communicate with some of
the ENIUs. One or more ENIUs are using the Output Exchanges from the standby controller.
This case is not very likely to happen, depends on the Ethernet Architecture.
This can happen if an intermediate Ethernet Switch is down or if certain Ethernet cables
are disconnected.
The Inputs from the ENIUs that can only communication with the Standby controller are
the area of concern. Remember from Case 1, the Outputs are transferred from the
Active Controller to the Standby Controller. That is what is happening, but the Outputs
generated by the Active Controller are generated without the Inputs being updated.
There are choices to be made:
“Receive Outputs from the Active controller” could be used (needs to be set up in
the configuration and cannot be changed while the system is running). If
“Receive Outputs from the Active controller” is used then the Outputs in the
ENIUs that are only communicating with the Standby Controller will be treated as
if there is no communication to a controller.
A command can be sent from the controllers to tell all the ENIUs to take their
Outputs from the Standby Controller.
The Controller logic program can command a Role Switch to make the Standby
Controller the Active Controller.
The recommendation is to either use “Receive Outputs from the Active controller”
or command a role switch to make the Standby Controller the Active Controller.
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Case 3: Active Controller can communicate with some but not all ENIUs. Standby Controller can
communicate with some but not all ENIUs. Both Controllers can communicate with some ENIUs
but neither Controller can communicate will all ENIUs. This case is likely to happen, one case is
the loss of a port in an Ethernet switch.
No matter which controller is Active there are some ENIUs that will get their Outputs
from the Standby Controller.
The Outputs are solved in the Active Controller and transferred to the Standby
Controller. The Outputs are solved without the Input from the ENIUs that the Active
Controller can not communicate with.
There are choices to be made:
“Receive Outputs from the Active controller” could be used (needs to be set up in
the configuration and cannot be changed while the system is running). If
“Receive Outputs from the Active controller” is used then the Outputs in the
ENIUs that are only communicating with the Standby Controller will be treated as
if there is no communication to a controller.
A command can be sent from the controllers to tell all the ENIUs to take their
Outputs from the Standby Controller. This just moves the problem and does not
fix it.
The Controller logic program can command a Role Switch to make the Standby
Controller the Active Controller. This just moves the problem and does not fix it.
The recommendation is to use “Receive Outputs from the Active controller”.
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Addressing of SVC Exchanges
All EGD Exchanges between the controller(s) and the ENIUs are multicast, which means they
are sent to a group address.
Each ENIU must have a different Group for the SVC exchange(s) it receives from the
controller(s). This is done to decrease the Ethernet communication load on each ENIU, which
maximizes the performance of the system.
Note: All ENIUs use the same Group for the SVC exchange they produce.
All ENIU use Group address 32 for the “SVC_Xchg_from_ENIU_xx” exchange
Table of Group numbers for “SVC_Xchg_to_ENIU_xx” exchange
ENIU Number
SVC_Xchg_to_ENIU_xx
ENIU Number
Group Number
SVC_Xchg_to_ENIU_xx
Group Number
01
11
11
21
02
12
12
22
03
13
13
23
04
14
14
24
05
15
15
25
06
16
16
26
07
17
17
27
08
18
18
28
09
19
19
29
10
20
20
30
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EGD Addresses for Multiple Systems on one Ethernet System
If multiple ENIU systems are placed on the same Ethernet sub-network, great care must be
taken with the Group numbers that are used in the ENIUs.
Caution
Improper choice of group numbers will cause the Ethernet performance of the ENIUs to be
degraded which can result in communication timeouts and Outputs in the ENIUs being set to
their command state for a loss of communication.
The table below list the recommendation for how Group addresses should be assigned if
multiple E05 ENIU systems are placed on the same Ethernet sub-network
1st system use
Default Group #s
Suggested Group #s
for 2nd System
Suggested Group #s
for 3rd System
Inputs_from…
2
4
6
Outputs_to…
1
3
5
SVC_Xchg_from…
32
9
8
ENIU# +10
Must be unique group
numbers that are not used
anywhere else
Must be unique group
numbers that are not used
anywhere else
Exchange Name
SVC_Xchg_to…
Note: Group numbers have a range of 1 to 32
Run Mode Store of Ethernet Global Data to the Ethernet NIU
Logic Developer version 5.8 and later includes a Run Mode Store property for Ethernet Global
Data exchanges, as shown in the illustration of the Inspector window on the previous page. By
default, the Run Mode Store property is set to False. It should NOT be changed for most
Ethernet NIU applications. Run Mode Store for Ethernet Global Data is not supported for
redundancy systems.
It is always possible to add new Ethernet Global Data exchanges in a Run Mode Store without
setting the Run Mode Store property to True. Also, programmer-generated Ethernet Global Data
exchanges in PPS applications can always be modified in a Run Mode Store, whether or not
Run Mode Store is enabled in the exchange configuration.
Caution
The Ethernet NIU uses Ethernet Global Data to exchange input and output data for the I/O
modules in the station with one or more CPUs. Modifying an Ethernet Global Data exchange in
the Ethernet NIU using Run Mode Store can cause a bump in data transfer, or possibly take the
exchange offline. It is important to understand the risk of data loss when making a Run Mode
Store change to Ethernet Global Data.
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After careful consideration of the consequences, individual exchanges can be configured to
allow modification or deletion in a Run Mode Store. Use of this feature requires an Ethernet NIU
with revision 5.50 or later NIU firmware and revision 5.50 or later Ethernet firmware. The
Ethernet Transmitter Module in the I/O Station must also support Run Mode Store of Ethernet
Global Data (firmware revision 5.50 or later is required).
Effect of a Run Mode Store on EGD Operation
Changes to the Ethernet Global Data in the Ethernet NIU must correspond to changes made in
the CPU(s). It is important to be aware that the Ethernet NIU and CPU(s) will NOT receive and
apply new EGD configurations simultaneously.
Performing a Run Mode Store does not stop the production or consumption of existing
exchanges that have not been modified.
Changes implemented with a Run Mode Store of Ethernet Global Data take effect while the
Ethernet NIU is running - no stop is required.
Added exchanges will start consumption or production shortly after the activation of any logic
that is part of the Run Mode Store sequence.
The Ethernet NIU does not use EGD signatures (if EGD signatures are enabled in the controller,
they are ignored by the Ethernet NIU). After a Run Mode Store, the Ethernet NIU can only
determine the compatibility of a modified Ethernet Global Data exchange that it consumes by
the checking the length of the exchange. If the length does not match, the Ethernet NIU stops
consuming the exchange. A store to update the corresponding producer/consumer is needed to
resume consumption of the exchange.
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Redundant Controller Considerations
Switching Logic
Switching logic is provided in CRE and CRU Controller templates. Switching conditions are
generated in the ladder block ENIUs_Ctrl_Check. The switching conditions are solved in the
block ENIUs_Interface. The basic operation of the switching logic is:
When an Ethernet NIU is powered up, the Ethernet NIU defaults to the Primary
Controller. The application can use the switching logic to request that the Ethernet NIUs
use the Secondary controller when it is the Active Controller.
Transfer of controller causes the Ethernet NIU to follow the other controller using the
same LAN as used before.
The switching logic can be customized for the application by revising the logic in the block
ENIUs_Interface.
There are two rungs with a similar structure, which are used for switching to primary controller
LAN A, or secondary controller LAN A. The following control signals control switching between
the controllers:
ControlWords_LANA_B[0].X[3],
ControlWords_LANA_B[0].X[4],
The logic controlling these coils can be modified as needed.
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Predefined Signals for Custom Switching Logic
The following predefined signals are available for use in any custom switching logic or HMI
application. These signals are in addition to the standard system variables (# variables) that are
available in controller applications. See GFK-2222 PACSystems CPU Reference Manual and
GFK-2308 PACSystems Hot Standby CPU Redundancy Manual for more details on system
variables.
Signal Name
Description
ENIUxx_on_PriA
ENIUxx_on_SecA
ENIUxx is being controlled by primary controller on LAN A
ENIUxx_CommOK_PrimaryA
ENIUxx_CommOK_SecondaryA
ENIUxx communication good to primary controller on LAN A
ENIUxx_Flt
Ctl_by_Standby
No communication to ENIUxx
NoENIUonPriLANA
No Ethernet NIUs are being controlled by primary controller
on LAN A
NoENIUonSecLANA
No Ethernet NIUs are being controlled by secondary
controller on LAN A
ENIUonPriLANA
At least one Ethernet NIU is being controlled by primary
controller on LAN A
ENIUonSecLANA
At least one Ethernet NIU is being controlled by secondary
controller on LAN A
Pri_New_Mstr
Sec_New_Mstr
Operation has switched to the primary controller
StatusWords_LANy_ENIU_xx
10 words of status data sent by Ethernet NIU to controller(s)
**
ENIUxx is being controlled by secondary controller on LAN
A
ENIUxx communication good to secondary controller on
LAN A
Standby controller only – Standby controller in controlling
one or more Ethernet NIUs
Operation has switched to the secondary controller
** See chapter 3 for information on the ten words of status data sent by the Ethernet NIU to the
controller(s)
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Dedicated Signals
Certain signals should not be either deleted or renamed. These signals must be marked as
Publish in their properties. Renaming, deleting or marking Publish as false will cause a failure
when the program is downloaded to the controller. These signals are available for use in any
custom switching logic or HMI annunciation.
Signal Name
Signal Name
Signals for each Ethernet NIU (indicated by xx) and both LANs (indicated by y)
ENIUxx_LAN_y_InputsDiscrete
InEx_Status_LANy_ENIU_xx
ENIUxx_LAN_y_InputsAnalog
StatusWords_LANy_ENIU_xx
ENIUxx_LAN_y_InputsRegister
SVC_In_Status_LANy_ENIU_xx
ENIUxx_LAN_y_Xtra_InputsAnalog
SVC_Out_Status_LANy_ENIU_xx
ENIUxx_LAN_y_Xtra_InputsDiscrete
Fltdata_LANy_ENIUxx
ENIUxx_LAN_y_Xtra_InputsRegister
RCC_Response_LANy_ENIUxx
ENIUxx_Xfer_Pri_InputsDiscrete
ENIUxx_Xfer_Sec_InputsDiscrete
ENIUxx_Xfer_Pri_InputsAnalog
ENIUxx_Xfer_Sec _InputsAnalog
ENIUxx_Xfer_Pri_InputsRegister
ENIUxx_Xfer_Sec_InputsRegister
ENIUxx_Xfer_Pri_Xtra_InsAnalog
ENIUxx_Xfer_Sec_Xtra_InsAnalog
ENIUxx_Xfer_Pri_Xtra_InsDiscrete
ENIUxx_Xfer_Sec_Xtra_InsDiscrete
ENIUxx_Xfer_Pri_Xtra_InsRegister
ENIUxx_Xfer_Sec_Xtra_InsRegister
ENIUxx_Xfer_Pri_StWords
ENIUxx_Xfer_Sec_StWords
Signals for each Ethernet NIU (indicated by xx)
RCC_Request_ENIUxx
fltbuf_eniu_xx
Fltack_ENIUxx
fltptr_eniu_xx
ENIUxx_Register_Data
ENIUxx_Register_Xtra_Data
Signals for both LANs (indicated by y)
OutEx_Status_LANy
Signals common to all Ethernet NIUs and both LANs
ControlWords_LANA_B
Sw_Pri_A
Eniuoffsetarray
Sw_Pri_B
LANA_LSW
Sw_Sec_A
LANB_LSW
Sw_Sec_B
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Point Fault/Data Quality Feature
If enabled, Discrete and Analog inputs have a property known as Point Faults References.
PPS Systems data quality uses the Point Fault feature of the PACSystems controller. Refer to
Proficy Process System documentation for use of Data Quality feature with in PPS Controller
Function Block.
See GFK-2222 PACSystems CPU Reference Manual for more details on Point Faults.
Enabling Point Fault References
Point Faults are always enabled in a PPS System. In a non-PPS System, the Point Faults
feature is disabled by default and if needed must be enabled as shown below.
Operation of Point Fault References
When communication to an Ethernet NIU is lost, the CPU sets Point Faults for all %I and %AI
inputs from that ENIU. When communication to an Ethernet NIU is restored and inputs are
received the CPU clears Point Faults for all %I and %AI inputs from that ENIU.
The setting/clearing of Point Fault data is performed by the Input_Processing block.
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Adding “Outputs2_xxx_to_ENIU” Exchange
Adding a second produced exchange from the controllers allow the number of Outputs to be
increased up to double (2048 %Q, 512 %AQ). %Q1 to %Q1024 and %AQ1 to %AQ256 are
transmitted in the “Outputs_xxx_to ENIU” exchange which is received by some of the ENIUs
(usually half). %Q1025 to %Q2048 and %AQ257 to %AQ512 are transmitted in the
“Outputs2_to ENIU” exchange that is received by the remained of the ENIUs. Note that the
Outputs in these ENIU show up in %Q1 to %Q1024 and %AQ1 to %AQ256 and this cannot be
changed.
Outputs2_to_ENIUs is created as a new Produced Exchange in the controllers(s) and is set up
as shown in the figure. The Exchange ID and Destination must be set as shown in the Inspector
window of the figure.
The Produced Period and Consumption Timeout for “Outputs2_to_ENIUs” should be set the
same as the respective values for “Outputs_to_ENIUs”
Note: If redundant controllers are used the Produce in Backup Mode parameter will be in the
Inspector window and must be set to True.
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In each ENIU that will receive the “Outputs2_xxx_to_ENIUs” exchange the existing
“Outputs_xxx_to_ENIUs” exchange must have the ExchangeID and Destination changed as to
match what the controller is using in the produced exchange
This figure shows the setting from the Primary controller. For the exchange from the Secondary
controller in a redundant system the Exchange ID will be 1002.
Adding Data to Input Exchanges
In addition to input data, the Ethernet NIU can send back other data to the controller(s). For
example, intelligent modules or local logic in the I/O Station can produce data that is needed in
the controller. There are two ways to send this additional data to the controller:
Another data range can be added to the Inputs_from_ENIU_xx exchange.
Local_User_Logic can move the data into unused portions on the %I or %AI data
ranges.
For example, the following Ethernet Global Data Exchange for ENIU_01 has ten input register
words (%R15001-10) assigned for extra I/O station data.
Multiple data ranges can be added as long as the total length of the EGD exchange is less than
1400 bytes in length.
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Configuring Input Registers in the Controller
Input register data must be added to the Ethernet Global Data input exchange from the I/O
Station in the controller application. The input register data is added in one or more separate
data areas after the InputsAnalog in the exchange. Specific symbolic variables,
“ENIUxx_LAN_y_InputsRegister must be used. An example is shown below.
In the symbolic variable ENIUxx_LAN_y_InputsRegister (xx represents the Ethernet NIU
number and y represents the LAN). The length of the data area is specified by setting the
value in Array Dimension 1 in the properties of the variable.
In addition, the length of variable ENIUxx_Register_Data must be set to match the length of
variable ENIUxx_LAN_y_InputsRegister
For systems with redundant controllers the ENIUxx_Xfer_(pri/sec)_InputsRegister need to have
the array dimension set.
Using Input Register Data in the Controller
ENIUxx_Register_Data is the symbolic variable provided for use in the controller application. In
addition ENIUxx_Xfer_pri_InputsRegister and ENIUxx_Xfer_sec_InputsRegister are used in
redundant controller applications to transfer the Register data to the standby controller.
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How Certain Operational Features are Set up in the Template Set
The following are described in this section:
Input_Processing “C” block and the Inputs to it
Input_Processing block Error Codes
Chart for determining EGD Exchange Production Period and Timeout Value
Input_Processing block
The Input_Processing receives status and inputs from the EGD exchanges
(Inputs_from_ENIU_xx) and does the following:
Checks to see that Inputs are correctly configured by checking the values entered for the array
dimensions on the Input exchange data range variables.
Checks to see that Inputs are being received from the ENIU(s).
Loads input values into the %I and %AI reference tables.
Sets and Clears Input Fault bits if the option is selected in the Controller parameters.
In redundant systems transfers input values from the Active unit to the Standby.
The Input_Processing block has 8 input parameters and 1 output parameter.
Inputs
Start_Eniu – must be 1
End_ENIU – number of the last ENIU or number of ENIU in the system
Start_is – This is an offset as to where the discrete inputs should be placed in the %I
table
Start_ais - This is an offset as to where the analog inputs should be placed in the %AI
table
More_is - This is an offset as to where the extra discrete inputs should be placed in the
%I table. Requires adding a new data range in the EGD Input exchange
More_ais - This is an offset as to where the extra analog inputs should be placed in the
%AI table. Requires adding a new data range in the EGD Input exchange
Num_lans – Must be 1 applications that use E05s as ENIUs
Fail_mode – determines what to do with inputs if communication is lost to an ENIU. A
value of “0” means zero inputs, a value if “1” means hold last value.
Outputs
Status – result of the Input_Processing. Must be “1” for inputs to be updated. Any other
value indicates an error in the setup of the Input_Processing of Variables associated
with inputs
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The Input_Processing Parameters and the Call are preconfigured in the templates.
Figure of Call to Input_Processing block with display of the Parameters
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Using More Is or More Ais
The Input_Processing block can accommodate two sets of pointer to determine where discrete
and analog inputs are placed in the %I and %AI reference tables.
More Is and More Ais are provided to solve the difficulty that occurs if additional discrete or
analog inputs are needed after the program in the controllers is completed. If the number of
inputs from an ENIU is increased, the address of all inputs in the controller(s) from higher
numbered ENIUs increases. That would mean extensive rework of the program to readdress the
inputs.
More Is and More Ais provide a means to add more inputs without changing the addresses of
existing inputs.
The input parameters start_is and start_ais are pointers that specify where the discrete and
analog inputs associated with the symbolic variables ENIUxx_LAN_A_InputsDiscrete/Analog.
The Input parameter more_is and more_ais are pointer that specify where the discrete and
analog inputs associated with the symbolic variables
ENIUxx_LAN_A_Xtra_InputsDiscrete/Analog
To use the more_is and more_ais, add data ranges to the Input Exchanges from the ENIU and
use the ENIUxx_LAN_A_Xtra_InputsDiscrete/Analog symbolic variables for the ranges. The
more_is and more_ais input parameters are set to the offset in the reference table where the
Xtra inputs are to be placed. Eniuoffset array will indicated where the more input are located in
array elements [x],[3] and [x],[4].
The input processing block will do error checking on the more inputs. For redundant systems
remember to set the array dimensions for the symbolic variable for the transfer variables to the
redundant controller.
Input_Processing Error Codes
The input processing function requires configuration of the I/O parameters. The status variable
on the output of the block contains a value of 0001 when the configuration is correct. Most error
codes identify the number of the Ethernet NIU in the upper byte and the error code in lower
byte. Error codes that do not include an Ethernet NIU number have 00 in the upper byte and
report the error code in the lower byte. It is best to display the error code in Hex.
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Error Codes are:
BAD_I_DATATYPE_LANA
BAD_AI_DATATYPE_LANA
BAD_EX_DATATYPE_LANA
BAD_I_DATATYPE_LANB
BAD_AI_DATATYPE_LANB
BAD_EX_DATATYPE_LANB
BAD_I_DATASIZE_LANA
BAD_AI_DATASIZE_LANA
BAD_EX_DATASIZE_LANA
BAD_I_DATASIZE_LANB
BAD_AI_DATASIZE_LANB
BAD_EX_DATASIZE_LANB
I_DATASIZE_A_B_DIFFERENT
AI_DATASIZE_A_B_DIFFERENT
EX_DATASIZE_A_B_DIFFERENT
xx10
xx11
xx12
xx13
xx14
xx15
xx16
xx17
xx18
xx19
xx1a
xx1b
xx1c
xx1d
xx1e
HIGHEST_I_EXCEEDS_32000
HIGHEST_AI_EXCEEDS_TABLE
xx21
xx22
I_DATA_START_NOT_BYTE_BOUNDARY
0024
BAD_I_DATATYPE_PRI_XFER
BAD_I_DATATYPE_SEC_XFER
BAD_AI_DATATYPE_PRI_XFER
BAD_AI_DATATYPE_SEC_XFER
BAD_EX_DATATYPE_PRI_XFER
BAD_EX_DATATYPE_SEC_XFER
BAD_I_MORE_DATATYPE_PRI_XFER
BAD_I_MORE_DATATYPE_SEC_XFER
BAD_AI_MORE_DATATYPE_PRI_XFER
BAD_AI_MORE_DATATYPE_SEC_XFER
BAD_I_MORE_DATATYPE_LANA
BAD_AI_MORE_DATATYPE_LANA
BAD_EX_MORE_DATATYPE_LANA
BAD_I_MORE_DATATYPE_LANB
BAD_AI_MORE_DATATYPE_LANB
BAD_EX_MORE_DATATYPE_LANB
BAD_I_MORE_DATASIZE_LANA
BAD_AI_MORE_DATASIZE_LANA
BAD_EX_MORE_DATASIZE_LANA
BAD_I_MORE_DATASIZE_LANB
BAD_AI_MORE_DATASIZE_LANB
BAD_EX_MORE_DATASIZE_LANB
xx41
xx42
xx43
xx44
xx45
xx46
xx47
xx48
xx49
xx4a
xx50
xx51
xx52
xx53
xx54
xx55
xx56
xx57
xx58
xx59
xx5a
xx5b
I_MORE_DATASIZE_A_B_DIFFERENT
AI_MORE_DATASIZE_A_B_DIFFERENT
EX_MORE_DATASIZE_A_B_DIFFERENT
xx5c
xx5d
xx5e
I_MORE_DATA_SIZE_NOT_BYTE_MULTIPLE
HIGHEST_MORE_I_EXCEEDS_32000
HIGHEST_MORE_AI_EXCEEDS_TABLE
xx60
xx61
xx62
I_MORE_DATA_START_NOT_BYTE_BOUNDARY
START_ADDR_ZERO_WITH_I_MORE_DATA_LEN
START_ADDR_ZERO_WITH_AI_MORE_DATA_LEN
I_DATASIZE_PRI_XFER_DIFFERENT
I_DATASIZE_SEC_XFER_DIFFERENT
AI_DATASIZE_PRI_XFER_DIFFERENT
AI_DATASIZE_SEC_XFER_DIFFERENT
EX_DATASIZE_PRI_XFER_DIFFERENT
EX_DATASIZE_SEC_XFER_DIFFERENT
I_MORE_DATASIZE_PRI_XFER_DIFFERENT
I_MORE_DATASIZE_SEC_XFER_DIFFERENT
AI_MORE_DATASIZE_PRI_XFER_DIFFERENT
AI_MORE_DATASIZE_SEC_XFER_DIFFERENT
I_DATA_OVERWRITES_XTRA_I_DATA
AI_DATA_OVERWRITES_XTRA_AI_DATA
0064
xx66
xx67
xx71
xx72
xx73
xx74
xx75
xx76
xx77
xx78
xx79
xx7a
0xa0
0xa1
I_XTRA_DATA_OVERWRITES_I_DATA
AI_XTRA_DATA_OVERWRITES_AI_DATA
START_ENIU_INPUT_BAD
END_ENIU_LESS_THAN_START_ENIU
ENIU_GREATER_THAN_63
I_DATA_START_ADDRESS_BAD
AI_DATA_START_ADDRESS_BAD
I_XTRA_DATA_START_ADDRESS_BAD
AI_XTRA_DATA_START_ADDRESS_BAD
0xa3
0xa4
0xb0
0xb1
0xb2
00c1
00c2
00c4
00c5
IO_LAN_STATUS_BAD
ETM_LANA_BAD
ETM_LANB_BAD
REGISTER_DATA_TOO_SMALL
0xf2
0xf3
0xf4
0x31
Note: Inputs are not passed to the %I and %AI reference tables of the controller until the
Input_Processing block is configured correctly and returning a status of 0001.
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Chart of Production Periods and Consumption Timeouts
For proper operation of the system, the Production Period and Consumption Timeout of all the
EGD Exchanges between the controller and ENIUs must be set correctly. If the Production
Period or Timeout Values are set too small, the system will experience communication loss
between the controller(s) and the ENIUs. This can show up as loss of communication to all
ENIUs or can show up as occasional drops outs of communication to one or more ENIUs.
The SVC_Xchgs are always set to 200 milliseconds Production Periods and 600 millisecond
Timeouts in the Template Sets. The SVC_Xchg Production Periods and Timeouts can be
changed to higher numbers without any problems. Changing them to higher numbers will result
in a slower response of ENIU Faults being reported to the Fault Table in the controllers. The
Timeout Value should always be 3 times the Production Period.
Note: Decreasing the Production Period of the SVC_Xchgs is likely to cause communication
dropouts with the Input and Output Exchange communication.
The Production Period and Timeout values for Output and Input Exchanges are given in the
following table. All Output and Input exchanges will have the same values for Production
Period and Timeout. The values given in the table will result in the fastest response time of the
I/O without communication dropouts occurring. The values given in the table were determined
by testing the Template Set for 48 hours or more to insure no communication dropouts
occurred. The Output and Input Exchange Production Periods and Timeouts can be changed
to higher numbers without any problems. Changing them to higher numbers will result in a
slower response of the I/O. All Output and Input Exchanges should have the same Value for
Production Period. The Timeout Value should always be (3 times the Production Period plus 2)
milliseconds.
Note: Decreasing the Production Period of the SVC_Xchgs is likely to cause communication
dropouts with the Input and Output Exchange communication. Communication dropouts will
result in the ENIU Outputs going to the safe state (user defined: zero, hold last state, or use
defaults) until communication is reestablished. This usually shows up as the outputs chattering.
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EGD Timing for the Project Templates
In the preconfigured Template Sets, the Ethernet Global Data I/O exchanges have been set up
with appropriate default produced periods and default consumed update timeouts. These default
values accommodate almost any I/O mix and corresponding exchange sizes for a system with
the number of Ethernet NIUs in the template, and accommodate a single programmer on the
same Ethernet LAN that is used for the Ethernet I/O. The produced periods and consumer
update timeouts can be modified, as long as the maximum number of I/O Stations and the
exchange sizes listed below is not exceeded.
Ethernet NIU Ethernet Global Data Settings for E05 as ENIU Version 2.4x or Greater
Tested produced period and consumed update timeout settings for E05 as ENIU EGD
Exchanges* with PACSystems RX7i or RX3i controllers for PPS/PME:
IO Exchanges
Suggested Values
ENIU I/O
Stations
Input Exchanges
per I/O Station
Output Exchanges
from Controller(s)
SVC Exchanges
Suggested Values
Produced
Period(ms)
Consumed
Timeout (ms)
Produced
Period(ms)
Consumed
Timeout(ms)
Setting with RX7i Controller(s) and E05s as ENIUs
Up to 5
1 (301 bytes)
1 (660 bytes)
20
62
200
600
Up to 10
1 (301 bytes)
1 (660 bytes)
20
62
200
600
Up to 20
1 (301 bytes)
2 (660 bytes)
28
86
200
600
Settings withRX3i Controller(s) and E05s as ENIUs
Up to 5
1 (301 bytes)
1 (660 bytes)
20
62
200
600
Up to 10
1 (301 bytes)
1 (660 bytes)
20
62
200
600
Up to 20
1 (301 bytes)
2 (660 bytes)
28
86
200
600
If SVC exchanges (used for faults) are not needed for the application, they can all be deleted
from the controller(s) and the Ethernet NIUs in Machine Edition.
* The tables above are based on Ethernet NIU I/O Stations that consume a 660-byte output
data Ethernet Global Data exchange, and produce a 301-byte input data EGD exchange. All
I/O data EGD exchanges between Ethernet NIU(s) and controller(s) in a system should be set
to the same produced period and consumed update timeout. For any Ethernet NIU I/O Stations
requiring much slower update rates, different produced period and consumer update timeout
values may be used for the EGD exchanges for that I/O Station.
The suggested produced period and consumer update timeout values are based on Ethernet
NIU I/O Stations consisting of:
200 discrete inputs (bits) and 128 Analog Inputs (16 bit words)
The number of the Ethernet Global Data exchanges and their frequency of production have the
greatest effect on performance. The size of the exchanges also impacts performance.
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The produced period parameter determines how frequently an Ethernet device attempts to send
the output data. To account for latencies in the interface and any other network devices, as well
as the possibility that a packet could be dropped on the network, the guideline for determining
the consumed update timeout parameter is to multiply the produced period by 3 and add 2
milliseconds. If the update timeout period of a consumer is exceeded before a new exchange
arrives, the timeout status informs the consumer that new data has not arrived within the
expected period. The Ethernet NIU uses this timeout status as an indication that it should
default the output data. Timeout status is also available to the application program in the
Ethernet NIU or controller. Under normal operating conditions, exchanges are received within
the consumed update times listed in the previous table. For example, an output exchange in a
system that is configured as described above with five I/O Stations will be received in 18
milliseconds or less. This can be considered the one-way update rate for that configuration. As
usual, for the overall system I/O response time, controller scan time also must be taken into
consideration.
Using Two Networks to Improve I/O Response Time
For applications that require performance or update rates faster than the times listed in the
preceding tables, consider breaking your single I/O network into two separate I/O networks.
This will require an additional Ethernet module in each controller.
Example: A single I/O network with 18 I/O Stations would typically have EGD exchange produce
periods of 28 milliseconds and EGD exchange consumer timeout values of 86 milliseconds.
The performance of the I/O system can be improved by splitting the single network with 18 I/O
Stations into two networks with 9 I/O Station each. Each 9 I/O Station network then can be
configured for produce periods of 20 milliseconds and EGD exchange consumed timeout values
of 62 milliseconds.
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5
Diagnostics
▪
This chapter describes:
▪
Version 2.40 (and higher) Fault Handling
▪
Viewing the Fault Tables in the Ethernet NIU
▪
Using the Station Manager
-
Checking the IP Address of the Ethernet NIU
-
Testing communications on the network
-
Viewing the Exception Log
-
Checking the Network Connection
▪
Stale Ethernet Global Data Status
▪
What to do if you can’t solve the problem
Ethernet NIU Fault Handling Version 2.1x versus Version 2.40
The Fault handling operations in Version 2.40 and higher of the ENIU have been substantially
changed from Version 2.10.
Version 2.10 provided a bit in the first status word from the ENIU to indicate that a fault is
present in the ENIU. To view the fault Proficy Machine Edition needed to be connected to the
ENIU and the fault table(s) displayed.
Version 2.10 provided a bit in the first control word sent to the ENIUs to clear faults in all of the
ENIUs, or Proficy Machine Edition could be connected to the ENIU and the fault table(s)
cleared.
Version 2.40 and higher provides the same functionality as Version 2.10 but in addition provides
the following
ENIU non-fatal faults are sent to the controller (must be PACSystems) in the
SVC_Xchg_from_ENIU_xx exchange and the ENIU_Faults “C” block puts the faults in the
controller’s PLC Fault Table
Faults can be cleared in an individual ENIU by sending commands in the “ClearFaults” data
range in the SVC_Xchg_to_ENIU_xx exchange.
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Disabling Version 2.40 Fault Handling
Version 2.40 fault handling can be disabled. To disable Version 2.40 fault handling and return to
Version 2.10 fault handling, set the initial value of the ENIU variable “enable_ph1_flts” to some
value other than “0” and store the program to the ENIU. This must be done for each ENIU that is
to have Version 2.40 fault handling disabled.
To re-enable Version 2.40 fault handling change the initial value of “enable_ph1_flts” to “0” and
store the program to the ENIU.
Checking for Faults Using the ENIU Status Data (Version 2.10 method)
To use the ENIU status data for fault handling, the application program in the controller(s)
should monitor Ethernet NIU status word 1 bit 7 to check for faults in an ENIU
Bit 7: Faults Exist
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
2
1
0
Word 1: Status and Fault Data
15
14
13
12
11
Word 2: Copy of Control Data Word 2 (Application-based) from Primary Controller
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
Word 3: Copy of Control Data Word 3 (Application-based) from Secondary Controller
Words 4 - 10: Reserved
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Clearing Faults using Word 1 of the ENIU Control Data
The controller can clear faults by setting bit 7 in the control data portion of its produced
exchange. This will clear all faults in ALL the Ethernet NIUs that receive the Outputs_to_ENIUs
exchange. This works in all versions of the ENIU.
Bit 7
15
14
13
12
Clear Faults
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Word 1: Control Data
15
14
13
12
Word 2: Available for Use by Application
Words 3 – 10 should be set to zero
Clearing Faults using ClearFaults Data Range in SVC_Xchg_to_ENIU_xx
(Version 2.40 and higher)
Faults in an individual ENIU can be cleared by placing a value of 1 or 2 in the variable
ClearFaults_ENIUxx in the controller. xx is the ENIU number. Placing a value of 1 in this
variable will clear the ENIU PLC Fault Table. Placing a value of 2 in this variable will clear the
ENIU IO Fault Table. The clear operation a one shot operation. After the clear is done the
ClearFaults_ENIUxx variable should be set back to 0 for long enough for the ENIU to receive it
before another clear is done.
Note: Clearing the fault table in the controller does NOT clear the fault tables in the ENIU(s).
ENIU Faults in the Controller PLC Fault Table (Version 2.40 and higher)
A fault in the controller PLC fault table from an ENIU looks like this:
“Application Msg (ENIU #) - <fault text, 24 characters>”
A loss of an IO Module in rack 0 slot 7 from ENIU 02 would produce the following message:
“Application Msg (2) - 0.7: Loss of Module”
Any fatal faults will stop the ENIU. Because the ENIU has stopped, the fatal faults will not be
sent to the controller. Fatal faults can be viewed by connecting the programmer to the ENIU and
viewing the faults before the ENIU is restarted.
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Operation of Faults on Power Up, and Stop to Run of ENIU.
On Power Up and Stop to Run transitions of an Ethernet NIU, the ENIU logs a message into its
PLC Fault Table indicating the event has occurred. In addition, the ENIU retransmits the
contents of its fault tables to the controller. If the Ethernet NIU’s PLC Fault Table has overflowed
(has more than 16 faults stored), only the FIRST 8 and LAST 8 faults from the ENIU PLC Fault
Table are retransmitted to the controller. Similarly, if the ENIU I/O Fault Table has overflowed
(has more than 32 faults stored), only the FIRST 16 and LAST 16 faults from the ENIU I/O Fault
Table are retransmitted to the controller. Like other faults from the ENIU, these faults are
logged into the controller’s PLC Fault Table as application messages.
ENIU_Faults “C Block
The “C” block ENIU_Faults is required in the controller (only PACSystems supported) to provide
the Version 2.40 functionality.
If the “C” block is added to the controller the parameter for the block must be configured. The
block has one input parameter, see figure below, which specifies the number of ENIUs.
The input parameter specifies the number of ENIUs (number 1 to number of ENIUs) for fault
processing. When the “C” block is called the input should be a constant which is the number of
ENIUs in the system. If the input is left blank, a fault is generated in the controller’s PLC Fault
Table.
The block will only process faults from the number of ENIUs specified by this input. If the
number on the input is greater than the number of Ethernet NIUs that are actually present, a
fault is generated in the PLC Fault Table for any ENIUs that are not communicating with the
controller (even if they do not exist).
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Symbolic Variables for Fault Handling
Specific symbolic variables must be used in the controller for the SVC_Xchg EGD exchanges,
or the fault-handling feature will not log faults.
These symbolic variables must be declared as variables in the controller and published either
Internally or Externally. Otherwise, either the controller program will not store to the PLC or the
PLC will log a fault when it attempts to go to Run mode.
The project templates described in this manual will automatically declare the variables in the
controller and set up the SVC_Xchgs with the correct variables.
Viewing the Fault Tables in the Ethernet NIU
The Ethernet NIU maintains two fault tables that can be accessed with a connected
programmer.
The I/O Fault Table lists faults associated with modules in the I/O Station, such as the loss or
addition of a module.
The PLC Fault Table lists faults associated with the ENIU itself. Fault descriptions are listed on
the next page. For each fault, see the “User Action” column for information about correcting the
fault.
Viewing Extra Fault Data
In the PLC Fault Table, double-clicking a fault entry will display additional fault data as shown
below:
280001000300050000000000000000000000000000000000
Note: The Station Manager utility can be used to view more detailed information about specific
faults.
For the Ethernet NIU, the leftmost 14 digits of fault extra data (underlined in the example above)
show the corresponding Log Event (2 digits) and Entries 2, 3, and 4 in that order (4 digits each).
The example above is reporting an Log Event 28, Entry 2=1, Entry 3=3, and Entry 4=5.
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PLC Fault Table Descriptions
PLC Fault
Backplane communications with PLC fault; lost
request
Bad local application request; discarded request
Bad remote application request; discarded request
Can’t locate remote node; discarded request
User Action
If problem persists, contact GE Fanuc.
If problem persists, contact GE Fanuc.
Try to validate the operation of the remote node. *
Error reported when message received where IP/MAC
address cannot be resolved. Error may indicate that remote
host is not operational on the network.
Comm_req - Bad task ID programmed
Internal request for unknown Ethernet Interface task.
Comm_req - Wait mode not allowed
Internal request error.
Config’d gateway addr bad; can’t talk off local net
Error in configuration. Verify IP address, Subnetwork Mask,
and default Gateway IP address are correct.
Connection to remote node failed;
Underlying communications software detects error
resuming without it
transferring data; resuming. If persistent error, check
connection to LAN and operation of remote node.
LAN controller fault; restart LAN I/F
Hardware fault, perform power cycle. *
LAN controller Tx underflow; attempt recovery
Internal system error. *
LAN controller underrun/overrun; resuming
Internal system error. *
LAN data memory exhausted - check parms;
The Ethernet NIU does not have free memory to process
resuming
communications. *
LAN duplicate MAC Address; resuming
A frame was received in which the source MAC Address was
the same as this station’s MAC Address. Immediately isolate
the offending station; it may be necessary to turn it off or
disconnect it from the network. This station remains Online
unless you intervene to take it Offline.
LAN I/F can’t init - check parms; running soft Sw utl Internal system error. *
LAN I/F capacity exceeded; discarded request
Verify that connection limits are not being exceeded.
LAN interface hardware failure; switched off network Replace Ethernet NIU.
LAN network problem exists; performance degraded Backlog of transmission requests due to excessive traffic on
the network. For a sustained period the MAC was unable to
send frames as quickly as requested. *
LAN severe network problem; attempting recovery
External condition prevented transmission of frame in
specified time. Could be busy network or network problem.
Check transceiver to make sure it is securely attached to the
network. Check for unterminated trunk cable.
LAN system-software fault; aborted
Internal system error. *
connection resuming
LAN system-software fault; restarted LAN I/F
Internal system error. *
LAN system-software fault; resuming
Internal system error. *
LAN transceiver fault; OFF network until fixed
Transceiver or transceiver cable failed or became
disconnected. Reattach the cable or replace the transceiver
cable. Check SQE test switch if present on transceiver.
Local request to send was rejected; discarded
Internal error. Check that the Ethernet NIU is online.*
request
Memory backup fault; may lose config/log on restart Internal error accessing FLASH device. * May need to
replace Ethernet NIU.
Module software corrupted; requesting reload
Catastrophic internal system error. *
Module state doesn’t permit Comm_req; discarded
Ethernet NIU cannot process request. Make sure Ethernet
NIU is configured and online.
Unsupported feature in configuration
Attempt has been made to configure a feature not supported
by the Ethernet NIU version.
*If this problem persists, contact GE Fanuc.
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Using the Station Manager Function
The built-in Station Manager function of the Ethernet NIU provides additional tools for
troubleshooting that are particularly useful during system startup.
For Ethernet NIU systems with Dual LANs, each Ethernet interface has a separate Station
Manager and both Station Managers must be accessed separately.
Use of the Station Manager requires an operator interface device, either a computer running
terminal emulation software or an ASCII terminal. The commands that can be used with the
Station Manager are described in the Station Manager User’s Manual. For PACSystems
controllers, this manual is catalog number GFK-2225. For Series 90 systems, it is GFK-1186.
Both manuals are available online at GEFanuc.com.
The Station Manager can be used to:
Check the IP Address of the local Ethernet NIU.
Make sure the IP Address is unique on the network.
Display additional information about a node, such as its data rate and parity.
Test communications on the network.
View the Exception log, which lists the same types of faults as the PLC Fault Table.
View communications errors with the TALLY command.
Check Status of Exchanges with the Stat command.
View Details of individual Exchanges with the Xchange command.
Checking the IP Address of the Ethernet NIU
With the terminal connected directly to the Station Manager port on the Ethernet NIU, issue the
NODE command:
> node
IC695 Peripheral Ethernet Interface
Copyright (c) 2003-2005.
All rights reserved.
Version 3.60 (35A1) TCP/IP
Version 2.50 (20A1) Loader
IP Address = 10.0.0.2
Subnet Mask = 255.255.0.0
Gateway = 0.0.0.0
MAC Address = <<080019010203>>
SNTP Not Configured
Station Manager Port:
Data Rate = 9600,
Parity = NONE,
Flow Control = NONE
Source of Soft Switches: PLC Configuration
Source of IP Address:
Oct 24, 2005
Configuration
16:33:31.8
Date/time initialized from PLC CPU
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The NODE command also displays other identifying information about the Ethernet NIU as
shown above.
Verifying that the IP Address of the Ethernet NIU is Unique
Make sure the Ethernet NIU does not have the same IP Address as another node.
Disconnect the LAN cable from the Ethernet NIU.
Log on to another device on the network
From the other device, ping the IP Address assigned to the Ethernet NIU.
If you get an answer to the ping, it means the chosen IP address is already in use by another
node. You must correct this situation by assigning unique IP Addresses.
Testing Communications on the Network
During system setup, use the Station Manager utility to test each installed Ethernet device to be
sure that each is operational and configured with proper TCP/IP parameters. To do that:
Enter the LOGIN command:
login
The password prompt appears:
Password:
The factory default password is:
system (lower case).
Enter the default password, or other password if it has been changed.
If the password matches the current password for the Modify level, the Modify prompt appears:
=
Use the PING command to test the ability to reach individual nodes. The test works by sending
an ICMP echo request message to a specific destination and waiting for a reply. Most
nodes on TCP/IP networks implement ping.
PING can reach remote IP networks through gateways.
Enter the PING command using the IP address for the destination to be tested. A typical
PING command is shown below:
= ping 10.0.0.2 10
Ping initiated
<<< Ping Results >>>
Command: ping 10.0.0.2 10 100 64
Sent = 10, Received = 10, No Timely Response = 0
Late/Stray Responses = 0
Round–trip (ms) min/avg/max 0/1/10
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Viewing the Exception Log
When the Ethernet NIU detects an unusual condition, it records information about the condition
in its exception log. The exception log can be viewed using the Station Manager LOG
command. For example:
> log
<<< Extended Exception Log >>>
IC695 Peripheral Ethernet Interface version 3.60 (35A1)
Log displayed 24-OCT-2005 16:39:32.5
Log initialized using valid RAM information
Log last cleared 21-OCT-2005 09:33:46.9
Date
Time
Event Count Entry 2 through Entry 6
24-OCT-2005 16:38:52.9
1H
1H
0000H 0001H 0000H 0000H 0000H
24-OCT-2005 14:01:22.2
20H
1H
0001H 0000H 0000H 0001H 0117H
->24-OCT-2005 09:33:47.2
2aH
1H
0004H 0000H 0000H 0004H 0192H
Scode
Remote IP Addr:Port
or Producer ID:Exchg
Local IP Addr: Port
Each new (not repeating) log event is also sent to the PLC Fault Table, where it can be viewed
using the programming software.
The Station Manager LOG command returns the time/date of each exception event, a
hexadecimal code that identifies the fault type (for example, 28H for an Ethernet Global Data
fault), a count, and additional data in entries 2 through 6. When an error occurs, this information
may pinpoint the cause more precisely than the PLC Fault Table display.
Checking the Network Connection
If the LAN LED is off, the Ethernet NIU is not able to send or receive on the network. The usual
cause is some type of hardware problem. If this occurs, follow the procedure below.
1. Check to be sure that the network cables are securely fastened to the Ethernet NIU and
to the network connection device (hub, switch, etc).
2. Use the Station Manager to check the network interface task using a TALLY L
command. The TALLY L command displays a list of tallies for all network interface tasks,
and will identify specific communications errors that may be occurring.
If the Ethernet NIU is the only device experiencing problems:
1. Be sure the network cable is properly connected to the Ethernet NIU and to the network
connection device.
2. Verify that the network connection device is operating properly on the network. (Are
other devices operating on the same network segment?)
3. Make sure the Ethernet NIU is seated and secured properly.
4. Replace the network cable with a known good cable.
5. Verify that the system power supply is properly grounded.
If all stations are experiencing the problem, the network is probably at fault. Contact the
network administrator.
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Checking Exchanges with the STAT Command
The existence and correct operation of Exchanges can be checked using the STAT command
Using the Station Manager, type STAT G
The Station Manager will show the configured exchanges for this device, show their status and
indicate the number of exchanges that have occurred.
> stat g
<<< EGD Status >>>
Ndx
--0H
1H
2H
Producer ID
------------10.10.10.3
10.10.10.2
10.10.10.11
24-OCT-2005
Exchange ID
----------1
1
1
16:46:05.0
Mode
-------CONSUMER
CONSUMER
PRODUCER
Transfers
State
Completed
-------------- ----------ACTIVE(00H)
1379368
ACTIVE(00H)
1447992
ACTIVE(01H)
1399605
The State column indicates whether the Exchange is active or idle and gives a code in
hexadecimal that indicates the status.
For Produced Exchanges, (01H) indicates the exchange is being sent
For Consumed Exchanges:
00H and 01H indicate the exchange is being received properly and on time
05H indicates the exchange is being received properly and on time, but the data is stale.
The PLC has not updated the data since the last exchange was received. It is normal to
receive Stale indications if the PLC Scan is longer than the EGD Production Period.
06H indicates the exchange is not being received.
0eH indicates the exchange is being received but the number of bytes received is different
than expected. The exchange is not being used due to the length error.
Individual Exchange setups can be viewed by using the Xchange command in station manager.
Type “Xchange <producer ID> <exchange ID>”
The Data Ranges in each exchange can be viewed using the EGDREAD command in the
Station Manager.
Type “EGDREAD <producer ID> <exchange ID>”
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Verifying that All Ethernet Global Data Exchanges are Working
One at a time, connect a Station Manager to each Ethernet port in the controller(s) and each
Ethernet NIU.
For each connection, execute the stat g command in Station Manager to be sure all EGD
Exchanges are working properly.
Stat g should return a display like the one illustrated below, which shows stat g response data
from ENIU_01 in a system with two controllers.
Each line of the response represents one exchange.
The State column shows whether an exchange is working. The state should be Active and the
value should be 00H, 01H, 03H, or 05H if the exchange is working. If the value is 06H or 07H,
the exchange is not being received or is taking too long to be received. If the state is 0eH, the
size of the exchange in bytes at the producing and receiving ends is not the same and must be
fixed.
EGD Exchanges in a Single Controller System
In a single controllers system, each Ethernet NIU should have the following exchanges
(xx=ENIU#)
Produced Exchange – ProducerID 10.10.10.xx; ExchangeID 1 – Inputs from ENIUxx
Produced Exchange – ProducerID 10.10.10.xx; ExchangeID 1xx – SVC from ENIUxx
Consumed Exchange – ProducerID 10.10.10.101; ExchangeID 1 – Outputs Pri to ENIUs
Consumed Exchange – ProducerID 10.10.10.101; ExchangeID 1001 – Outputs Sec to ENIUs
Consumed Exchange – ProducerID 10.10.10.101; ExchangeID 1xx – SVC Pri to ENIUs
Consumed Exchange – ProducerID 10.10.10.101; ExchangeID 11xx – SVC Sec to ENIUs
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EGD Exchanges in a Dual Controller, Single LAN System
In a dual controller system single LAN, the primary controller should have the following
exchanges (xx=ENIU#)
Produced Exchange – ProducerID 10.10.10.101; ExchangeID 1 – Outputs to ENIUxx
Produced Exchange – ProducerID 10.10.10.101; ExchangeID 1xx – SVC to ENIUxx (one per ENIU)
Consumed Exchange – ProducerID 10.10.10.xx; ExchangeID 1 – Inputs from ENIUxx (one per ENIU)
Consumed Exchange – ProducerID 10.10.10.xx; ExchangeID 1xx – SVC from ENIUxx (one per ENIU)
The secondary controller should have the following exchanges (xx=ENIU#)
Produced Exchange – ProducerID 10.10.10.101; ExchangeID 1001 – Outputs to ENIUxx
Produced Exchange – ProducerID 10.10.10.101; ExchangeID 11xx – SVC to ENIUxx (one per ENIU)
Consumed Exchange – ProducerID 10.10.10.xx; ExchangeID 1 – Inputs from ENIUxx (one per ENIU)
Consumed Exchange – ProducerID 10.10.10.xx; ExchangeID 1xx – SVC from ENIUxx (one per ENIU)
Outputs %Q001 to %Q1024 are sent from both the controllers to all Ethernet NIUs .
Analog outputs %AQ001 to %AQ256 are sent from both the controllers to all the Ethernet NIUs.
Checking the Cable Connections
Verification should be done on the communication path between each controller and the
Ethernet NIUs. Put controller(s) in Run mode. Disconnect the Ethernet cable at each controller.
One at a time, connect the Ethernet cables. For each cable connection:
In the controller, turn one (or more) discrete outputs on and off. Verify that the outputs come
on in all Ethernet NIUs. This can be done by using Reference View tables in the
controller to control the outputs, and viewing the outputs in the Ethernet NIU’s Reference
View table. Do the same with analog outputs.
Repeat the same steps to check that the configured inputs from the Ethernet NIU are being
correctly received by the controller(s). Each Ethernet NIU will be sending a different range of
input to the controller(s).
When the STAT LED is ON
Sometimes problems can occur even when the STAT LED is on, indicating normal operation. In
that case, check if the LAN LED is steadily on, indicating that the Ethernet NIU is successfully
attached to the Ethernet network, but there is no network activity.
To find out whether the Ethernet interface component in the Ethernet NIU can access the
module’s CPU, issue successive TALLY C commands. If the PlcSweep tally is not increasing,
there are no windows being provided by the CPU. If any of the following tallies: PlcAbt, MyAbt,
or Timeout are incrementing, there may be a hardware problem with the backplane interface.
Check the PLC Fault Table entries.
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Stale Ethernet Global Data Status
A stale data status is a non-fatal status. Although an Ethernet Global Data exchange is
producing at the correct period, the data in the exchange can be old (stale) if the controller has
not yet updated it. If the produced period for an exchange is less than the controller’s scan time,
the Ethernet device can send the same data in more than one Ethernet Global Data exchange.
If the controller has not updated the EGD data before the exchange produced period expires,
the Ethernet device sends the same data again.
Stale data status can also occur from an Ethernet NIU if the ENIU uses local logic. The use of
local logic can increase scan time to become close to or larger than the Ethernet Global Data
input data exchange’s producer period. Each consumed EGD exchange status word received
by the consumer of the exchange provides the indication of stale data. The stale data status is
available for use by the application. The occurrence of stale data can also be determined by
using the Ethernet Transmitter Module’s Station Manager command – “tally G”. A count of stale
data occurrences for the Ethernet Transmitter Module’s produced EGD exchanges is displayed
along with other tally G data.
If You Can’t Solve the Problem
If you are not able to solve the problem, call GE Fanuc Automation. Please have the following
information available when you call.
The name and catalog number marked on the module
Description of symptoms of problem. Depending on the problem, you may also be asked for the
following information:
The application program and the PLC sweep time at the time the problem occurred.
A list of the configuration parameters for the Ethernet device that failed.
A list of reported errors. This can be the contents of the Ethernet exception log, the contents of
the PLC Fault Table, or both.
A description of the network configuration. This should include the following:
The number of systems accessing the network
The type of network cable used (for example, twisted pair, fiber optic, etc.)
The length of network cable
The manufacturer and quantity of hubs and network switches.
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6 Local Program Logic in the Ethernet NIU
This section describes the Local Logic feature of the Ethernet NIU.
▪
Using the Local Logic Block
▪
Reference Table Restrictions for Local Logic
Using the Local Logic Block
The E05 as Ethernet NIU allows the addition of logic to be executed locally in the I/O Station.
When the E05 is load with the code to make in an Ethernet NIU, an empty LD logic block named
“Usr_Lgc” is created and is called from Main.
NOTE: Even if Usr)Lgc is not used, the block MUST be left in the program. Deleting the block
will cause a store to the Ethernet NIU to fail.
Reference Table Restrictions for User Logic
Restricted Addresses
The following reference table addresses MUST NOT be written to by Usr_Lgc:
%R00001 to %R09999
All %M
All %G
All %T
Addresses written to by EGD Exchanges
The Ethernet Global Data exchanges “Outputs_Pri _to_ENIU” and “Outputs_Sec_to_ENIU”
write to %M, %G, and %R addresses (which are in the Restricted Addresses listed above) and
the Ethernet NIU then writes to the following addresses (listed below) every scan of the ENIU:
%Q00001 to %Q01024
%AQ0001 to %AQ0256
The ENIU functionality writes to these reference addresses every scan of the ENIU. If Usr_Lgc
writes to any of these reference addresses the Usr_Lgc values will go to the reference
addresses.
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7 Configuring PC-Based Controllers
Any GE Fanuc Ethernet interface master capable of exchanging Ethernet Global Data
messages, such as the Series 90-30 CPU, Series 90-70 CPU, or PC Control can function as a
controller for the Ethernet NIU. However, these other controllers do NOT support Redundant I/O
LANs, Fault Reporting to the controller or Remote COMMREQ Calls.
In a system that has a primary and secondary controller, it is not necessary for the controllers to
be the same type.
This chapter describes configuration steps when a PC-based controller (either QuickPanel
Control or PC Control) will be used as a controller for an Ethernet NIU:
▪
Configuring the ENIU
▪
Configuring the Controller
Configuring the Ethernet NIU
Follow the steps in chapter 6 to complete the hardware configuration of an Ethernet NIU. Follow
the steps in chapter 7 to configure Ethernet Global Data exchanges.
Because other controllers DO NOT support fault reporting to the controller or Remote
COMMREQ Calls, if you are using any of the provided templates, delete the SVC exchanges
from the Ethernet Global Data configuration in the Ethernet NIU.
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Configuring the PC-Based Controller
For each Ethernet NIU, control variables are needed to handle both produced and consumed
data.
The produced data structure consists of three elements.
Command, 10 words
Discrete out, 1024 bits
Analog out, 256 words
The controller receives a consumed data structure from each Ethernet NIU. This structure
consists of:
Status, 10 words
Discrete input data, as required for each Ethernet NIU
Analog input data, as required for each Ethernet NIU
Logic is required to drive the command words and respond to the status feedback. Refer to
chapter 9 for more information on the data in the command and status words.
Add an Ethernet Global Data driver for the I/O LAN, if it is not already present .
Select Ethernet I/O from the New Driver list from Control I/O Drivers.
Right-click on Ethernet I/O Driver and select Add Node.
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Create a node for each Ethernet NIU in the system.
Right-click on a Node and select ‘Properties’ to open the Inspector window.
Select Generic Device as the Node Type:
Enter the IP Address of the Ethernet NIU.
Enter 6 for Number of Slots.
Select Slot 1 and open the properties inspector, expand the Module Properties field.
Select Analog Output as the module type.
Enter 10 for Number of Terminals (this is the 10 words of command data to the Ethernet
NIU).
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Configure the remaining slots, as follows;
Slot 2 - Discrete Outputs, 1024 Terminals
Slot 3 – Analog Outputs, 256 Terminals
Slot 4 – Analog Inputs, 10 Terminals (this is the ten status words from the Ethernet NIU)
Slot 5 - Discrete Inputs, enter number of digital inputs from Ethernet NIU
Slot 6 – Analog Inputs, enter number of analog inputs from Ethernet NIU
When completed, the configuration screen should be similar to the example below:
As shown above, slots 2, 3, 5, and 6 are for discrete/analog outputs and inputs, slot 1 is the ten
control words to the Ethernet NIU, and slot 4 is the ten status words from the Ethernet NIU.
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Set Up I/O and Control/Feedback Data
Create the variables to contain the data for the Ethernet Global Data exchanges. Each variable
will be an array of the appropriate size. For each Ethernet NIU create the variables described
below.
The produced data consists of:
Command, 10 words
Discrete out, 1024 bits
Analog out, 256 words
This data is common to all Ethernet NIUs. However, each Ethernet NIU must have its own copy
of this data. Provision must be made to aggregate the outputs and then copy all elements to the
individual Ethernet NIU variables.
The consumed data consists of:
Status data, 10 words.
Discrete inputs, as required for each Ethernet NIU.
Analog inputs, as required for each Ethernet NIU.
Open each slot and drag and drop the appropriate variable to each terminal:
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Select the node and open the Produced Exchange field in the property inspector window:
Enter the Exchange ID. This must match the Exchange ID used in the Ethernet NIU’s
consumed exchange.
Set the Consumer Type field to Group ID and the Group ID to 1. This must match the
value used in the Ethernet NIU’s consumed exchange
Set the Producer Period (see chapter 8 for recommendations on Producer Period).
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Open up the Consumed Exchange field.
Enter Exchange ID. This must match the Exchange ID used in the Ethernet
NIU produced exchange.
Set the Producer Type to Group ID and set the Group ID to 2. The Group ID
value must match the Destination value in the ENIU produced data
exchange.
Consumer Period (leave at 10ms).
Update Timeout (see chapter 7 for recommendations on Update Timeout
value).
Repeat for each Ethernet NIU node.
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8 Setting Up Output Defaults
This chapter explains how to establish output defaults for applications where needed.
1. In Proficy Machine Edition, select the Variable Table and locate the Ethernet NIU
variables. The variables are in a table of the form <Devicename><variable name>
2. In the Ethernet NIU section, locate the specific output (Qxxxx or AQxxxx) that is to be
given a default value. If unable to locate a variable with the current reference address,
create a new variable and give it the desired address. A range of new variables with
sequential addresses can be generated using the Duplicate command, available by
right-clicking.
3. If creating output variables (Qxxxx), you must set the Retentive property to True or the
Default value will not be stored properly.
4. Do not execute the command to delete unused variable as this will delete your added
variables and initial values.
5. In the properties of the selected variable, change the Initial Value to the desired default
value.
6. Download to the Ethernet NIU while Machine Edition is online. The initial values will be
downloaded and also stored to flash. Default values are loaded into a holding buffer from
flash when the Ethernet NIU starts up.
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9 Worksheets for System Parameters
▪
Controller
▪
Second Controller (if used)
▪
ENIU(s)
Controller
Parameters of the Ethernet Module for I/O Lan
IP Address:
Subnet Mask:
Gateway:
EGD Local
Producer ID:
IP Address of the Ethernet Transmitter
Module
Subnet Mask of the Ethernet Transmitter
Module
If used
NOTE: The Local Producer ID is set by
the template set to 10.10.10.101
Parameters of the Ethernet Module for other communications
IP Address:
Subnet Mask:
Gateway:
User’s Manual
IP Address of the Ethernet Transmitter
Module
Subnet Mask of the Ethernet Transmitter
Module.
If used
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Second Controller (if used)
Parameters of the Ethernet Module for I/O Lan
IP Address:
Subnet Mask:
Gateway:
EGD Local
Producer ID:
IP Address of the Ethernet Transmitter
Module
Subnet Mask of the Ethernet Transmitter
Module
If used
NOTE: The Local Producer ID is set up
by the template set
Parameters of the Ethernet Module for other communications
IP Address:
Subnet Mask:
Gateway:
User’s Manual
IP Address of the Ethernet Transmitter
Module
Subnet Mask of the Ethernet Transmitter
Module.
If used
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ENIU (complete for each ENIU)
Parameters of the Ethernet Module for I/O Lan
IP Address:
Subnet Mask:
Gateway:
EGD Local
Producer ID:
IP Address of the Ethernet Transmitter
Module
Subnet Mask of the Ethernet
Transmitter Module
If used
NOTE: The Local Producer ID is set by
the template set to 10.10.10.xx
Parameters of the Ethernet Module for other communications (if used)
IP Address:
Subnet Mask:
Gateway:
User’s Manual
IP Address of the Ethernet Transmitter
Module
Subnet Mask of the Ethernet
Transmitter Module.
If used
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IO Modules in ENIU
Slot
User’s Manual
Module Type
Ref Addresses
COMMREQs
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