Achtu
Yokoga
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
STABILOCK® 4032
Communication Test Set
© 2002 Willtek Communications GmbH
All rights reserved. No part of this manual or
the associated software may be reproduced or
copied in any form (print, photocopy or any other
process) without the written approval of Willtek.
Willtek Communications GmbH
Gutenbergstrasse 2 – 4
85737 Ismaning
Germany
Tel.: +49 89 9 96 41-0
Fax: +49 89 9 96 41-160
Manual Version: 0209-622-A
STABILOCK 4032
STABILOCK 4032
List of Contents
Chapter 1: Startup
Notes on Safety .............................................................................................. 1-3
Power fuse ................................................................................................ 1-3
Grounding ................................................................................................. 1-3
Shutdown upon defect .............................................................................. 1-3
Maintenance.............................................................................................. 1-3
What You Should Know.................................................................................. 1-4
Equipment Supplied........................................................................................ 1-4
Preparations for First Startup ......................................................................... 1-5
Different power supplies ........................................................................... 1-5
Admissible line voltage ............................................................................. 1-5
Replacing fuse .......................................................................................... 1-6
Line/battery in parallel............................................................................... 1-6
Preparations for Battery Powering............................................................ 1-7
Feed-in point ....................................................................................... 1-7
Battery voltage and power requirement .............................................. 1-7
Fuse..................................................................................................... 1-7
Preparing battery cable ....................................................................... 1-7
Battery/line in parallel .......................................................................... 1-7
Permissible RF input power ...................................................................... 1-8
Switch-on .................................................................................................. 1-9
Chapter 2: Front and Rear Panel
Front Panel ..................................................................................................... 2-3
Meaning of Keys ....................................................................................... 2-4
Meaning of Rotary Knobs ....................................................................... 2-13
Meaning of Sockets ................................................................................ 2-14
Meaning of Slide Switches...................................................................... 2-15
Back Panel.................................................................................................... 2-16
AF DETECTOR + 10 MHz REFERENCE (module 1) ........................... 2-17
IF UNIT (module 3) ................................................................................. 2-18
MOD GENERATOR A (module 4) .......................................................... 2-18
SLAVE COMPUTER (module 7) ............................................................ 2-19
MONITOR CONTROL (module 9) .......................................................... 2-19
HOST COMPUTER (module 10) ............................................................ 2-19
POWER SUPPLY ................................................................................... 2-19
Chapter 3: Operating
Notation Rules ................................................................................................ 3-3
Prompt to Operate Key ............................................................................. 3-3
Assigning units .......................................................................................... 3-4
Keys with dual assignments ..................................................................... 3-4
Repeated striking of key ........................................................................... 3-4
Cursor Movements.................................................................................... 3-5
Screen Messages in Running Text........................................................... 3-5
Operating Rules .............................................................................................. 3-6
Types of Fields.......................................................................................... 3-6
Entry fields........................................................................................... 3-6
Text fields ............................................................................................ 3-7
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Display fields ....................................................................................... 3-7
Moving to Entry Fields .............................................................................. 3-8
Entering New Numeric Values .................................................................. 3-8
Fast Access to Numeric Fields ................................................................. 3-8
Altering Numeric Values ........................................................................... 3-9
Selecting Units in Mixed Numeric Fields .................................................. 3-9
Converting Units of RF Level .................................................................... 3-9
Selecting Scroll Variables ....................................................................... 3-10
Working with Softkeys............................................................................. 3-10
Working with Channel Numbers ............................................................. 3-10
SIMPLEX/AUTO-SIMPLEX Mode .......................................................... 3-11
DUPLEX Mode........................................................................................ 3-12
Entry Examples............................................................................................. 3-14
Setting signal generator to 50.00055 MHz........................................ 3-14
Setting output level of signal generator to EMF ................................ 3-14
Setting signal generator to –40 dBm output level ............................. 3-14
How many mV correspond to –22.0 dBm output level?.................... 3-14
Tuning frequency of test receiver in 20-kHz increments ........................ 3-15
Setting test receiver for AM demodulation ........................................ 3-15
Listening to FM modulation of received 100-MHz signal .................. 3-15
Examining unknown AF signal .......................................................... 3-16
Generating 345-MHz signal with 2.8 kHz FM (f = 2 kHz).................. 3-16
Chapter 4: Masks
Status Mask ................................................................................................... 4-3
Callup of masks......................................................................................... 4-3
Functions of softkeys ................................................................................ 4-4
Meaning of fields ....................................................................................... 4-5
SELF-CHECK ................................................................................................. 4-6
Calling up the mask................................................................................... 4-6
Starting the program ................................................................................. 4-6
Program messages................................................................................... 4-7
Basic RX Mask ............................................................................................... 4-8
Callup of mask .......................................................................................... 4-8
Functions of softkeys ................................................................................ 4-8
Meaning of fields ....................................................................................... 4-9
Available instruments ........................................................................ 4-11
Meter locations in basic RX mask........................................................... 4-11
Basic TX Mask ............................................................................................. 4-12
Callup of mask ........................................................................................ 4-12
Functions of softkeys .............................................................................. 4-12
Meaning of fields ..................................................................................... 4-13
Available instruments .............................................................................. 4-14
Meter locations in basic TX mask ........................................................... 4-14
Basic DUPLEX Mask ................................................................................... 4-15
Callup of mask ........................................................................................ 4-15
Functions of softkeys .............................................................................. 4-15
Meaning of fields ..................................................................................... 4-16
Instruments of basic DUPLEX mask....................................................... 4-17
Meter locations in basic DUPLEX mask ................................................. 4-18
GENERAL PARAMETERS .......................................................................... 4-19
Callup of mask ........................................................................................ 4-19
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Functions of softkeys .............................................................................. 4-19
Meaning of fields ..................................................................................... 4-20
Example: Pre-attenuation ...................................................................... 4-24
TX measurements: ............................................................................ 4-24
RX measurements: ........................................................................... 4-24
ZOOM .......................................................................................................... 4-25
Function of instruments........................................................................... 4-25
Callup of instruments .............................................................................. 4-28
Functions of softkeys .............................................................................. 4-29
Meaning of fields ..................................................................................... 4-30
RX SPECIALS .............................................................................................. 4-31
Callup and start of an RX Special........................................................... 4-31
Description of Specials ........................................................................... 4-32
TX SPECIALS............................................................................................... 4-36
Callup and start of a TX Special ............................................................. 4-36
Description of Specials ........................................................................... 4-36
Meaning of other softkeys....................................................................... 4-39
DUPLEX SPECIALS..................................................................................... 4-40
Callup and start of a DUPLEX Special ................................................... 4-40
Description of Specials ........................................................................... 4-41
Meaning of other softkeys....................................................................... 4-42
OPTION CARD ............................................................................................. 4-43
Calling up the mask ................................................................................ 4-43
Softkey functions..................................................................................... 4-44
Meaning of the input fields ...................................................................... 4-44
Meters of the mask OPTION CARD ....................................................... 4-46
TTL INPUTS............................................................................................ 4-46
Chapter 5: Applications
Introduction ..................................................................................................... 5-3
Test Setup....................................................................................................... 5-4
Basic TX Settings ........................................................................................... 5-5
Frequency Offset and Carrier Frequency ................................................ 5-6
Boundary conditions:........................................................................... 5-6
Measurement frequency offset ........................................................... 5-6
Measurement carrier frequency .......................................................... 5-6
Purpose of measurement.................................................................... 5-7
Typical limit values .............................................................................. 5-7
RF Power (broadband) ............................................................................. 5-8
Boundary conditions............................................................................ 5-8
Measurement ...................................................................................... 5-8
Purpose of measurement.................................................................... 5-9
Typical limit values .............................................................................. 5-9
RF Power (test bandwidth 3 MHz).......................................................... 5-10
Boundary conditions.......................................................................... 5-10
Measurement ................................................................................... 5-10
Modulation Frequency Response ........................................................... 5-12
Boundary conditions.......................................................................... 5-12
Special Measurement ....................................................................... 5-12
Manual Measurement ....................................................................... 5-13
Purpose of measurement.................................................................. 5-13
Typical limit values for FM and ΦM................................................... 5-13
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Modulation Sensitivity ............................................................................. 5-14
Boundary conditions.......................................................................... 5-14
Special Measurement ....................................................................... 5-14
Manual Measurement ....................................................................... 5-14
Purpose of measurement.................................................................. 5-15
Typical limit values ............................................................................ 5-15
Modulation Distortion (fmod = 1 kHz) ....................................................... 5-16
Boundary conditions.......................................................................... 5-16
Measurement .................................................................................... 5-16
Purpose of measurement.................................................................. 5-16
Typical limit values ............................................................................ 5-16
Residual Modulation ............................................................................... 5-17
Boundary conditions.......................................................................... 5-17
Measurement .................................................................................... 5-17
Purpose of measurement.................................................................. 5-17
Typical limit values ............................................................................ 5-17
Deviation Limiting.................................................................................... 5-18
Boundary conditions.......................................................................... 5-18
Measurement .......................................................................................... 5-18
Purpose of measurement.................................................................. 5-18
Typical limit values for FM................................................................. 5-18
Harmonics ............................................................................................... 5-19
Boundary conditions.......................................................................... 5-19
Measurement .................................................................................... 5-19
Purpose of measurement.................................................................. 5-19
Typical limit values ............................................................................ 5-19
Basic RX Settings ................................................................................... 5-20
Sensitivity (S/N and SINAD) ................................................................... 5-22
Boundary conditions.......................................................................... 5-22
Special Measurement ....................................................................... 5-22
Measurement SINAD manual ........................................................... 5-23
Measurement S/N manual ................................................................ 5-23
Purpose of measurement.................................................................. 5-23
Typical limit values ............................................................................ 5-23
AF Frequency Response ........................................................................ 5-24
Boundary conditions.......................................................................... 5-24
Special Measurement ....................................................................... 5-24
Manual Measurement ....................................................................... 5-24
Purpose of measurement.................................................................. 5-25
Typical limit values for FM and ΦM................................................... 5-25
Demodulation Distortion.......................................................................... 5-26
Boundary conditions.......................................................................... 5-26
Measurement ................................................................................... 5-26
Purpose of measurement.................................................................. 5-26
Typical limit values ............................................................................ 5-26
IF Bandwidth and Centre-frequency Offset ............................................ 5-27
Boundary conditions.......................................................................... 5-27
Special Measurement ....................................................................... 5-27
Manual Measurement ....................................................................... 5-27
Purpose of measurement.................................................................. 5-28
Typical limit values ............................................................................ 5-28
Squelch Characteristic ............................................................................ 5-29
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Boundary conditions.......................................................................... 5-29
Special Measurement ....................................................................... 5-29
Manual Measurement ....................................................................... 5-30
Purpose of measurement.................................................................. 5-31
Typical limit values ............................................................................ 5-31
Limiter Characteristic .............................................................................. 5-32
Boundary conditions.......................................................................... 5-32
Measurement .................................................................................... 5-32
Purpose of measurement.................................................................. 5-32
Typical limit values ............................................................................ 5-33
Basic DUPLEX Settings.......................................................................... 5-34
Select input/output socket ................................................................. 5-35
Signal Transfer........................................................................................ 5-36
Boundary conditions.......................................................................... 5-36
Special Measurement ....................................................................... 5-36
Purpose of measurement.................................................................. 5-36
Typical limit values ............................................................................ 5-37
Selective-call encoder and decoder ............................................................. 5-38
Technical data......................................................................................... 5-38
Encoder ............................................................................................. 5-38
Decoder ............................................................................................. 5-38
Basic Sequential Mask............................................................................ 5-39
Setting Mode of Operation ...................................................................... 5-40
CALL.................................................................................................. 5-40
DECODE ........................................................................................... 5-40
CALL → DECODE ............................................................................ 5-40
CALL ← DECODE ............................................................................ 5-40
Selecting AF or RF Signal Path .............................................................. 5-41
Basic RX mask visible....................................................................... 5-41
Basic TX mask visible ....................................................................... 5-42
Basic DUPLEX mask visible ............................................................. 5-42
Carrier Keying ................................................................................... 5-42
Selecting Standard Tone Sequence ....................................................... 5-42
Modifying Tone-sequence Parameters................................................... 5-43
Entering Call Number.............................................................................. 5-44
Double-tone Sequence ..................................................................... 5-44
Declaring Test Parameters ..................................................................... 5-46
Call Delay .......................................................................................... 5-46
Encoder Tolerance ............................................................................ 5-46
Number of Tones Decoded ............................................................... 5-46
Decoder Bandwidth ........................................................................... 5-46
Timeout.............................................................................................. 5-46
Test Procedure........................................................................................ 5-48
One-shot Test.................................................................................... 5-48
Continuous Test ................................................................................ 5-48
Level Setting...................................................................................... 5-49
Call Tone Sequence with Continuous Tone...................................... 5-50
Transients of Test Item ..................................................................... 5-50
Results of Decoding .......................................................................... 5-51
Results readout on controller ............................................................ 5-51
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Chapter 6: Spectrum Analyzer, Oscilloscope, Tracking
Spectrum Analyzer ......................................................................................... 6-3
Basic Analyzer Mask................................................................................. 6-3
Setting Reference Level ...................................................................... 6-4
Setting Centre Frequency ................................................................... 6-4
Setting Frequency Resolution ............................................................. 6-4
Functions of Softkeys (basic analyzer mask) ..................................... 6-5
Marker Submask ....................................................................................... 6-6
Functions of Softkeys (marker submask)............................................ 6-7
Harmonics Submask................................................................................. 6-8
Functions of Softkeys (harmonics submask) ...................................... 6-9
Setting Reference Level .................................................................... 6-10
Oscilloscope.................................................................................................. 6-12
AUTOTRIG Scope Mask......................................................................... 6-12
Setting Zero Line ............................................................................... 6-13
Selecting Test Signal......................................................................... 6-13
Inserting a Filter................................................................................. 6-14
Vertical Deflection Coefficient ........................................................... 6-15
Horizontal Deflection Coefficient ....................................................... 6-15
VARIABLE TRIGGER Scope Mask ........................................................ 6-16
One-shot Function............................................................................. 6-17
Freeze Function ................................................................................ 6-17
Measuring Curve Trace..................................................................... 6-18
Tracking .................................................................................................. 6-19
Callup of tracking mask........................................................................... 6-20
Operation ................................................................................................ 6-20
Setting RF output level ...................................................................... 6-20
Meaning of level scale....................................................................... 6-21
Setting start/stop frequencies............................................................ 6-22
Setting frequency resolution.............................................................. 6-22
Meaning of softkeys .......................................................................... 6-23
Technical data......................................................................................... 6-24
Chapter 7: MEMORY
Introduction ..................................................................................................... 7-3
Memory card ................................................................................................... 7-4
Slot for memory cards............................................................................... 7-4
Two kinds of memory card........................................................................ 7-5
Battery lifetime .......................................................................................... 7-6
Changing battery – old memory card........................................................ 7-7
Procedure for replacing button cell ..................................................... 7-7
Changing battery – new memory card...................................................... 7-8
Procedure for replacing button cell ..................................................... 7-8
SYSTEM CARDs .................................................................................... 7-10
MEMORY Mask ............................................................................................ 7-11
Calling up Directory................................................................................. 7-11
Formatting memory cards ....................................................................... 7-14
Deleting Individual Files .......................................................................... 7-15
Copying memory cards ........................................................................... 7-15
Naming Files ........................................................................................... 7-16
Renaming Files ....................................................................................... 7-17
Setting and Deleting Write Protection..................................................... 7-18
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Storing and Recalling Setups ................................................................. 7-20
Storing a setup .................................................................................. 7-20
Recalling a setup............................................................................... 7-20
Modifying a stored setup......................................................................... 7-21
Storing and Printing Screen Content ...................................................... 7-22
Storing screen content ...................................................................... 7-22
Printing stored screen content .......................................................... 7-23
Loading System Programs ........................................................................... 7-24
Chapter 8: AUTORUN and Use of IEEE-bus Controller
Introduction ..................................................................................................... 8-3
Rationalized testing with AUTORUN programs........................................ 8-3
Requirements............................................................................................ 8-3
AUTORUN = BASIC + IEEE ..................................................................... 8-4
AUTORUN Mask ............................................................................................ 8-6
Calling up AUTORUN mask ..................................................................... 8-6
Display field............................................................................................... 8-8
Editing line................................................................................................. 8-8
Status line ................................................................................................. 8-9
Softkeys of AUTORUN mask.................................................................. 8-10
Editing Programs .......................................................................................... 8-11
Editing keys............................................................................................. 8-11
Editing commands .................................................................................. 8-12
Writing Programs .......................................................................................... 8-14
Fundamentals ......................................................................................... 8-14
Syntax check........................................................................................... 8-15
Variables and units ................................................................................. 8-16
Variables in IEEE commands ........................................................... 8-16
String variables ....................................................................................... 8-17
Internally used string variable M$ ..................................................... 8-17
String variables in IEEE commands.................................................. 8-18
Splitting and joining strings ............................................................... 8-18
Permissible operands ............................................................................. 8-19
Joining operands ............................................................................... 8-19
When memory gets scarce ..................................................................... 8-21
Executing Programs ..................................................................................... 8-22
Saving Programs .................................................................................... 8-23
Loading Programs ........................................................................................ 8-24
Deleting Program in RAM ............................................................................. 8-25
AUTORUN Test Reports .............................................................................. 8-26
Storing AUTORUN test reports............................................................... 8-26
Printing AUTORUN test reports.............................................................. 8-27
BASIC Commands........................................................................................ 8-28
BEEP....................................................................................................... 8-29
CHAIN ..................................................................................................... 8-30
CHR$ ...................................................................................................... 8-32
CLS ......................................................................................................... 8-33
END......................................................................................................... 8-34
FOR...NEXT ............................................................................................ 8-36
GET ......................................................................................................... 8-38
GOSUB...RETURN ................................................................................. 8-39
GOTO...................................................................................................... 8-41
HEX ......................................................................................................... 8-42
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HEX$ ....................................................................................................... 8-43
IF...THEN ................................................................................................ 8-44
IF OUTLIMIT / IF INLIMIT ....................................................................... 8-46
INPUT...................................................................................................... 8-48
KEY ......................................................................................................... 8-50
LEN ......................................................................................................... 8-53
LET.......................................................................................................... 8-54
ONERROR GOTO .................................................................................. 8-55
PAUSE .................................................................................................... 8-56
PRINT...................................................................................................... 8-57
RDOUT.................................................................................................... 8-60
RDXY ...................................................................................................... 8-61
REMARK................................................................................................. 8-62
SETUP .................................................................................................... 8-63
TIMEOUT ................................................................................................ 8-64
TRACE .................................................................................................... 8-65
VAL.......................................................................................................... 8-66
VAL$........................................................................................................ 8-67
WAIT ....................................................................................................... 8-68
IEEE Commands ................................................................................... 8-69
The IEEE-488 Bus .................................................................................. 8-69
History ..................................................................................................... 8-69
Bus structure ........................................................................................... 8-70
Creating IEEE-488 system...................................................................... 8-71
What settings are necessary ?.......................................................... 8-72
When IEEE and when AUTORUN ?....................................................... 8-73
How to create an IEEE program ............................................................. 8-74
Programming examples .................................................................... 8-75
Tips & tricks ....................................................................................... 8-76
Notation ............................................................................................. 8-76
IEEE programming conventions ............................................................. 8-77
Basic setting............................................................................................ 8-77
Entry of Special Characters .................................................................... 8-78
Standard Commands .............................................................................. 8-79
Test jobs.................................................................................................. 8-84
Output of Setting Parameters ................................................................. 8-86
Special Commands ................................................................................. 8-87
Output Format ....................................................................................... 8-100
Exponential output format ............................................................... 8-100
Decimal output format ..................................................................... 8-100
Service Request.................................................................................... 8-100
Error Messages..................................................................................... 8-101
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Chapter 9: Hardware Options and Accessories
Introduction ..................................................................................................... 9-3
Extra accessories...................................................................................... 9-4
Cross if applicable
! DUPLEX-FM/ΦM Stage
! Modulation Generator GEN B
! Control Interface A, B, C, D
! OPTION CARD
! DATA Module
! ASCII Keyboard
! VSWR Test Probe
! VSWR Test Set
! RS-232/Centronics Interface
! SSB Stage
! External Battery
! RF Generator
! Spectrum Analyzer
! ACPM
! 2nd RF generator + Fast Tracking
! FEX
! ........................................
! ........................................
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Chapter 10: Software Options
Introduction ................................................................................................... 10-3
General Description ...................................................................................... 10-4
Connection setup .................................................................................... 10-4
Background signaling.............................................................................. 10-4
Test Setup ............................................................................................... 10-5
Checking background parameters.......................................................... 10-6
SAT Loop Measurement ......................................................................... 10-6
Boundary conditions.......................................................................... 10-6
Measurement → SAT loop............................................................... 10-6
Cross if applicable
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NMT 450i/900 (Scandinavia)
NMT 450i
NMT 900 (Scandinavia)
Natel-C (Switzerland)
NMT France
NMT 450/900 BS Test
NMT Turkey
NMT Benelux
NMT 450 universal
NMT 900 universal
Network C Austria (NMT 450i)
Network C Germany
Network C Portugal
Network C SAPO
EAMPS
NAMPS
DSAT/DST (NAMPS)
ETACS-UK
TACS Japan (J-TACS)
NTACS
RC 2000 HD
DIGI-S (includes VDEW Digital)
FMS
VDEW digital
VDEW direct dialing
VDEW digital (Bosch)
ZVEI binary
ZVEI binary (600 Baud)
ZVEI extended
AT&T Microcell
Cityruf
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POCSAG (NRZ)
POCSAG (FFSK)
Trunking (MPT 1327/PAA 2424)
Combiner Test
US Signalling Formats
LTR + US Signalling
NADC 45 BS Test
NADC 45 MS Test
NADC (DAMPS) MS Test
NADC (DAMPS) BS Test
NADC MS Test AUTORUN
GSM/DCS 1800/1900 MS Test
GSM BS Test
GSM MS Test AUTORUN
PDC MS Test
ATIS
DECT
CDMA BS Test
Tetra MS Test
Tetra BS Test
IS-136 MS and IS-136 DB
Tracking
2,1 GHz Analyzer Tracking
Fast IEEE Measurements
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Chapter 11: Training
Introduction ................................................................................................... 11-3
Status Mask .................................................................................................. 11-4
Objectives ............................................................................................... 11-4
Callup of status mask.............................................................................. 11-4
Messages of status mask ....................................................................... 11-5
The terms "Mask" and "Entry field" ......................................................... 11-5
Display of entry fields .............................................................................. 11-6
Opening numeric field ............................................................................. 11-7
Correcting entry....................................................................................... 11-7
Closing numeric field............................................................................... 11-7
Rejecting illegal entries ........................................................................... 11-8
Enquiring for permissible entry limits ...................................................... 11-8
Finding further entry fields ...................................................................... 11-9
Moving to next entry field ...................................................................... 11-10
Enquiring for scroll variables................................................................. 11-10
Familiarization with softkeys ................................................................. 11-11
What are "default" settings?.................................................................. 11-12
Total Reset ...................................................................................... 11-12
Switching on/off .................................................................................... 11-12
RX Mask ..................................................................................................... 11-13
Objectives ............................................................................................. 11-13
Callup of RX mask ................................................................................ 11-13
LEDs mark operating status ................................................................. 11-13
Switching GEN A to RX/TX signal path ................................................ 11-14
A voyage of discovery........................................................................... 11-14
Fast access to entry fields .................................................................... 11-15
Access to offset field ............................................................................. 11-16
Handwheel instead of numerics block .................................................. 11-17
Stepped alteration of frequency ............................................................ 11-18
Stepped alteration of level .................................................................... 11-18
Mixed numeric fields ............................................................................. 11-19
Softkeys of RX mask............................................................................. 11-20
TX Mask...................................................................................................... 11-23
Objectives ............................................................................................. 11-23
Callup of TX mask................................................................................. 11-23
Indication of operating status ................................................................ 11-23
Entry fields of TX mask ......................................................................... 11-24
Offset field of TX mask.......................................................................... 11-24
RF frequency measurement ................................................................. 11-25
Internal squelch..................................................................................... 11-25
Softkeys of TX mask ............................................................................. 11-26
Analog Instruments..................................................................................... 11-27
Objectives ............................................................................................. 11-27
Instruments of RX mask........................................................................ 11-27
RMS/dBr instrument........................................................................ 11-27
Level measurement with reference value ....................................... 11-29
Instrument zooming......................................................................... 11-29
Defining measurement range.......................................................... 11-30
DIST instrument .............................................................................. 11-32
SINAD instrument............................................................................ 11-33
MOD instrument .............................................................................. 11-34
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PWR instrument .............................................................................. 11-36
Weighting with CCITT filter.............................................................. 11-37
Instruments of TX mask ........................................................................ 11-38
RMS/dBr instrument ........................................................................ 11-38
DIST instrument .............................................................................. 11-38
DEMOD instrument ......................................................................... 11-39
PWR instrument .............................................................................. 11-39
OFFSET instrument ........................................................................ 11-39
Training with DUPLEX Mask ...................................................................... 11-40
Objectives ............................................................................................. 11-40
Main feature of DUPLEX mode ............................................................ 11-40
Callup of DUPLEX mask....................................................................... 11-40
AUTO SIMPLEX mode ......................................................................... 11-41
Details of DUPLEX mode...................................................................... 11-41
RX/TX operation of modulation generators .......................................... 11-42
Juggling with channel numbers ............................................................ 11-43
Measuring duplex signal transfer .......................................................... 11-45
Selection of input/output ....................................................................... 11-46
Parameter Mask ......................................................................................... 11-47
Objectives ............................................................................................. 11-47
Callup of parameter mask..................................................................... 11-47
Softkeys of parameter mask ................................................................. 11-47
Entry fields of parameter mask ............................................................. 11-48
Chapter 12: Appendix
Front panel.................................................................................................... 12-3
AF-signal paths ............................................................................................. 12-5
Versions status ............................................................................................. 12-7
Executing Firmware Update ......................................................................... 12-8
Preserving momentary setup .................................................................. 12-8
Exchanging EPROMs ............................................................................. 12-9
Procedure ........................................................................................ 12-10
Startup after EPROM replacement ....................................................... 12-11
Technical Data ............................................................................................ 12-17
Index ........................................................................................................... 12-25
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Declaration of EEC Conformity
Manufacturer
Willtek Communications GmbH
Gutenbergstrasse 2 – 4
85737 Ismaning
Germany
Product Name
STABILOCK 4032
This product conforms with the regulations of the following European Directives:
The low-voltage directive
73/23/EEC
has been superseded
by the directive 93/68/EEC
EMC Directive
89/336/EEC
The conformity of this product to the above-mentioned directives is proved by
application of the following Standards:
EMC
EN 55022, class B (1995)
EN 60801, part 2, test level 1 (1994)
ENV 50140, test level 2 (1995)
IEC 1000-4-4, test level 3 (1995)
Safety
EN 61010, part 1 (1993)
Ismaning, December 6th 1996
Rudi Glotz, Quality Manager
This declaration may not be interpreted as an assurance of characteristics. The
safety instructions in the product documentation should be observed.
Document name: C_40323.DOC
0-15
STABILOCK 4032
"
0-16
STABILOCK 4032
Note please: Since mid of 2002 the manufacturer of the STABILOCK
4032 has the new legal name Willtek Communications GmbH. This
renaming is reflected by the current available basic operating manual
of the Communication Test Set. However, the descriptions of the
numerous hardware and software options could still show older
company names like Acterna or Wavetek.
1
Startup
Power fuse
Notes on Safety
Notes on Safety
STABILOCK 4032 has been built and tested in line with DIN 57411 Part I/VDE 0411
Part 1 (protective measures for electronic measuring apparatus). The instrument
left the works quite correctly engineered for safety. To maintain this state and
ensure safe operation, observe carefully what is said below:
Power fuse
Only use fuses of the type stated (see section "Replacing fuse"). Do NOT patch
your fuses or short the fuse holder.
Grounding
The line plug of STABILOCK 4032 may only be connected to a socket with a
grounding contact. The protection (grounding) that this produces may not be
cancelled by using an extension cable that has no safety ground conductor. Nor
is it permissible to intentionally interrupt the safety ground conductor either inside
or outside the instrument (eg by undoing the connection for the safety ground
conductor).
ω
If there is no grounding through the safety conductor and a defect occurs, the
housing of STABILOCK 4032 could become live, which is highly dangerous!
Shutdown upon defect
If you suspect that the 4032 is not safe to operate, shut it down immediately and
secure it in such a way that it cannot be switched on again, especially by persons
who are unaware of the danger. Then contact a Willtek service agency.
Maintenance
Before any adjustment, maintenance, repair or replacement of parts the instrument must be separated from all voltage sources if it will be necessary to open it.
Maintenance or repairs on the instrument while voltage is applied should only be
performed by someone who is well aware of the dangers involved by this.
1-3
1
What You Should Know
Maintenance
What You Should Know
The firmware of STABILOCK 4032 (internal operating system stored in EPROMs) is
what produces the performance features of the communication tester. And
because this firmware is constantly being maintained and further developed, you
can expect to have to make a number of firmware updates to your
STABILOCK 4032. Of course, the operating instructions sent you with the new
EPROMs are of little use if you do not know what has been changed or what has
been added.
So, when firmware is updated, you should first refer to the sections "Version
status" and "STABILOCK 4032 Lifeline" (Chapter 12) of the new operating
instructions. There you will find the information you need in short form.
Superscript digits in the text mark important passages that have been altered or
newly included. The version status tells you about the meaning of the digits. In this
way you can find out at any time, for example, whether an IEEE command marked
by a superscript digit is also available on your communication tester.
"
Maybe you received these operating instructions together with a new 4032 and
not with an update. In that case you will not be interested in "water under the
bridge", and you can safely ignore the superscript digits.
Equipment Supplied
Your STABILOCK 4032 is delivered to you with the following standard accessories:
2 x Miniature line fuses 3.15 A
1 x Power cable
1 x TNC/BNC adapter
1 x TNC protective cap
1 x Front-panel cover
1 x Headphones plug
1 x Memory card (32 kbytes, blank)
1 x Operating manual
The ordered options are usually already incorporated in the Communication Test
Set. You can see what options are in your 4032 at any time by calling up the
socalled status mask on the screen. The callup of the status mask is described
in Chapter 4.
1-4
Different power supplies
Preparations for First Startup
Preparations for First Startup
1
Different power supplies
Before switching STABILOCK 4032 on with the [POWER] button, refer to the
illustrations below to find out what version of the POWER SUPPLY your Communication Test Set is fitted with.
The power supply without a DC input is standard. If you want to be able to operate
STABILOCK 4032 away from a power outlet, you need the optional AC/DC power
supply (ordering code 204 033, Fig. 1.2).
"
Do you have an older STABILOCK 4031/4032 (serial number < 1388123)? If so,
do not use its power supply (204 031) in a later STABILOCK Communication
Test Set!6).
Fig. 1.1: Power supply6) without DC input.
Fig. 1.2: Power supply6) with DC input.
Admissible line voltage
Both power supplies adjust automatically to the applied line voltage (ie 110 or
230 Vac). The line-voltage tolerances within which the power supply will work
correctly can be found on its back panel.
1-5
Preparations for First Startup
Replacing fuse
Replacing fuse
You will need the following fuse, regardless of the line voltage:
T3.15/250D
"
(slow-blow; 3.15 A; 5.2 x 20 mm)
Note that, with older versions of the power supply, the rating of the fuse depends
on the applied line voltage. But you cannot go wrong as long as you look at what
is printed on the power supply module.
Line/battery in parallel
When STABILOCK 4032 is being line-powered, this does not mean that an
external battery has to be disconnected6). This parallel mode of operation will not
endanger either the battery or the 4032. The line takes priority, so the battery is
neither discharged nor charged.
1-6
Preparations for Battery Powering
Preparations for First Startup
Preparations for Battery Powering
1
Feed-in point
In mobile use STABILOCK 4032 can also be powered from a battery (external).
The connecting cable for this should have a cross-section of at least 1.5 mm2.
The feed-in point (3-way flange connector) is located on the back panel on the
POWER SUPPLY module6).
Battery voltage and power requirement
A battery voltage of between 10.5 and 32 Vdc is permissible (at turn-on a
minimum voltage of 10.8 Vdc is necessary). For 12 Vdc the current drain is
approx. 7.5 A and for 24 Vdc approx. 3.75 A.
Fuse
There is a miniature fuse T16/32 V (slow; 16 A; format 6.3 mm x 32 mm) in the
lefthand fuse holder6). The rating of this fuse is independent of the battery voltage.
Preparing battery cable
When you connect a lead to the battery connector, it is best to refer to the marking
next to the flange connector for the poling. The third terminal of the battery
connector is left vacant6). The battery connector and the flange connector are
non-reversible. If the poling is nevertheless reversed, eg when connecting the
battery, an internal protective diode will prevent any damage occurring to
STABILOCK 4032. Note that the battery cable must be capable of conducting up
to 10 A rated current, and check the ready cable for shorting across the poles
before using it.
Battery/line in parallel
If an external battery is connected to STABILOCK 4032, the unit can still be fed
from the line6). The line takes priority, so the battery will not be discharged in
parallel mode, but it will not be charged either.
1-7
Preparations for First Startup
Permissible RF input power
Permissible RF input power
The permissible input power of STABILOCK 4032 means the average value of
the applied power (Paverage or Pav for short).
RF DIRECT socket
ω
Make sure under all circumstances that no signal of more than 500 mW is fed
into the RF DIRECT input/output socket. If this critical limit is exceeded, the highly
sensitive RF input stage of the Communication Test Set will immediately be
destroyed. The time during which the maximum permissible average power may
be applied to the RF DIRECT socket is not limited.
RF socket
Power of up to Pav = 50 W may be applied to the RF socket for any length of time.
The Communication Test Set can for a short time sustain higher input power up
to Pav = 125 W. The following diagram illustrates for Pav = 125 W the relationship
between permissible duration of application and the waiting time between two
measurements:
Room temperature T ≤ 35 °C
125 W
0W
1 min
5 min
1 min = permissible duration of application
5 min = waiting time between two measurements
For power of 50 W < Pav < 125 W the permissible duration of application is
correspondingly lower. When you reach the permissible duration of application,
the message REDUCE RF POWER appears on the monitor.
ω
When the message REDUCE RF POWER appears on the monitor, you must
immediately reduce the applied power to Pav ≤ 50 W. Otherwise the internal power
attenuator will be destroyed. Furthermore: For as long as power of Pav ≥ 50 W
is applied, STABILOCK 4032 may not be switched off (switch-off → attenuator
= 0 dB → danger for preamplifier). The REDUCE RF POWER message may also
remain during the cooling-off phase of the power attenuator, meaning that
STABILOCK 4032 is not ready to measure during this time.
1-8
Switch-on
Preparations for First Startup
Switch-on
Once you have completed the preparations for first-time startup, you can connect
your STABILOCK 4032 to the line without any worry and start it by striking the
[POWER] key. Switch-on is confirmed by a short signal tone; after a few seconds one
of the socalled screen masks will appear on the monitor. You can adjust the
intensity of the display with the INTENS rotary knob.
If you have not made any entries on STABILOCK 4032 for 20 to 25 min, the
momentarily displayed mask will be replaced by a screen protection. As soon as
a key is pressed, the monitor will again show the mask originally displayed. The
GENERAL PARAMETERS foldout tells you how to disable this screen protection
(see Chapter 4).
Now you should familiarize yourself with the "Notation Rules" in Chapter 3. After
that there are two ways of getting acquainted with STABILOCK 4032. If you have
already gained experience with computer-controlled communication test sets,
you are likely to find detailed guidance an encumbrance, so we recommend the
trial-and-error method because, as the saying goes, an ounce of practice is worth
a pound of theory. What is more, the user-friendly concept of the 4032 guarantees
a high rate of success. And you need not worry about damaging the set, as long
as you ensure that no signals of an impermissibly high level are applied to the
inputs. The maximum values are marked on the front panel.
You will find any help you need for the trial-and-error approach through the Index
of Terms and in Chapters 2, 3 and 4. These provide information in condensed
form. Refer to Chapters 2 and 3 respectively if you get into difficulties with the
following:
•
•
meanings of keys, sockets, knobs and switches
elementary rules of operation
Chapter 4 shows the various masks of the 4032. The accompanying text answers
questions about the following points:
•
•
•
callup of mask
functions of softkeys
meanings of mask fields
1-9
1
Preparations for First Startup
Switch-on
If you lack experience in computer-controlled communication test sets or attach
importance to thorough instruction, then you should turn to Chapter 11. There is
a course made up of different lessons that teach the essentials of operating
STABILOCK 4032.
The course lasts about three or four hours. You should take the time because then
you will acquire a really good grounding in proper use of the Communication Test
Set. You will derive the greatest benefit from the course if you do not simply read
through it but instead actually practice the many entry instructions on the 4032.
1-10
2
Front and Rear Panel
Front Panel
Front Panel
The function of the particular control is explained in this section under the same
number.
2
4032 STABILOCK
REMOTE
MEMORY
UNIVERSAL ANALOG/DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TEST SET
CARD
8
9
ENTER
4
5
6
UNIT/SCROLL
1
2
7
FREQU
LEVEL
MOD FREQ
FM AM OM
0
3
.
OFF
+
-
STEP
INTENS
POWER
ON/OFF
S2
S1
S3
DUPLEX
dB REL
RX
TX
VOLT
S4
SCOPE ANALYZER MEMORY
S6
S5
RX MOD
BEAT DF
DIST
SINAD
CCITT
VOLTM
DEMOD
GEN A
MOD GEN
PRINT
AUX
B/SAT
HELP
EXT
CLEAR
SCOPE INPUT
POS
20 dB
600
RF
DIRECT
600
600
DEMOD
AC
DC
VOLTM
RF
50
MOD GEN
EMF
MAX
0,5 W
MAX
<2 V
EMF
MAX
30 Hz
<2 V
20 V
30 kHz
600
0...20 kHz
MAX
8 Vpp
RL > 200
0...20 kHz
4032 STABILOCK
1 M
REMOTE
0...20 kHz
MEMORY
UNIVERSAL ANALOG/DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TEST SET
CARD
8
9
ENTER
4
5
6
UNIT/SCROLL
1
2
7
FREQU
LEVEL
MOD FREQ
FM AM OM
0
3
.
OFF
-
STEP
+
INTENS
POWER
ON/OFF
S2
S1
DUPLEX
dB REL
RX
TX
S3
VOLT
S4
SCOPE ANALYZER MEMORY
S6
S5
RX MOD
BEAT DF
DIST
SINAD
CCITT
VOLTM
DEMOD
GEN A
MOD GEN
PRINT
AUX
B/SAT
EXT
HELP
CLEAR
SCOPE INPUT
POS
20 dB
600
RF
DIRECT
RF
50
DEMOD
600
600
AC
DC
VOLTM
MOD GEN
MAX
0,5 W
EMF
<2 V
MAX
EMF
MAX
30 Hz
<2 V
20 V
30 kHz
600
0...20 kHz
RL > 200
MAX
8 Vpp
0...20 kHz
1 M
0...20 kHz
2-3
Front Panel
Meaning of Keys
Meaning of Keys
1
[TX]
Calls up the basic TX mask (transmitter measurement).
[TX] also takes you to the basic TX mask if a submask has
been called up. In this case [TX] substitutes for multiple
operation of the softkey {RETURN}.
2
Unnamed
This is repeatedly tapped to select the modes SIMPLEX,
AUTO-SIMPLEX and optionally DUPLEX (basic DUPLEX
mask). SIMPLEX = manual switchover between TX and
RX; AUTO-SIMPLEX = automatic switchover from RX to
TX if the RF power fed in is ≥ approx. 30 mW.
Fig. 2.1: Illuminating LEDs signal the mode selected.
3
2-4
[RX]
Calls up the basic RX mask (receiver measurement). [RX]
also takes you to the basic RX mask if a submask has been
called up. In this case [RX] substitutes for multiple operation
of the softkey {RETURN}.
Meaning of Keys
4
[VOLT/dB_REL]
Front Panel
! Calls up the RMS pointer instrument on the screen (AF
voltmeter with RMS display + AF counter), as long as
one of the three basic masks (RX, TX, DUPLEX) is
current. If display of the AF POWER meter has been
declared in the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask, this
will appear instead of the RMS meter as long as the
VOLTM input is coupled with [VOLTM].
! If the RMS instrument (or AF POWER) has already been
called up, it will be replaced by the dBr meter (relative
level measurement). The reference value (0 dB) is the
level measured immediately before by the RMS meter.
The reference value is maintained if you switch to another AF signal source with [VOLTM], [DEMOD] or
[RX_MOD/MOD_GEN] (important for SAT loop measurement
for example).
5
[DIST]
Calls up the DIST (distortion factor) pointer instrument on
the screen if one of the three basic masks is current.
6
[BEAT/SINAD]
! Calls up the SINAD meter on the screen if the RX or
DUPLEX mask is present.
! Enables an RF frequency offset (beat) to be listened to
on the internal loudspeaker if the TX mask is present
(beat = frequency offset between input signal and tuned
frequency of test receiver).
! If the BEAT function is not called up in TX mode, the
loudspeaker reproduces the AF signal momentarily applied to the AF instruments of the 4032 (signal selection
with [VOLTM], [RX_MOD/MOD_GEN] or [DEMOD]).
7
[CCITT]
Inserts the CCITT P53 A filter (psophometric weighting)
into the signal path to the AF instruments of the 4032.
Tapping the key again takes the filter out of the signal path.
By selecting a scroll variable the CCITT filter can also be
cut into the signal path to the DEMOD instrument (see
"OPTION CARD" in Chapter 4).
8
[VOLTM]
Conducts the signal from the input socket of the same
name VOLTM to the momentarily called AF instruments.
The [VOLTM] key is interlocked with the [DEMOD] and
[RX_MOD/MOD_GEN] keys.
9
[DEMOD]
Conducts the demodulated signal from the 4032 test receiver internally to the momentarily called AF instruments.
This function is disabled if the RX mask is called. The
key is interlocked with the [VOLTM] and
[DEMOD]
[RX_MOD/MOD_GEN] keys.
2-5
2
Front Panel
Meaning of Keys
10
[RX_MOD/MOD_GEN]
Conducts the modulation signal of the current modulation signal source(s) GEN A, EXT and GEN B (option)
to the momentarily called AF instruments. The
[RX_MOD/MOD_GEN] key is interlocked with the [VOLTM] and
[DEMOD] keys.
11
[GEN_A]
Activates the modulation generator GEN A with the settings
(frequency, level) selected on the screen. Striking the key
again will cut out generator GEN A. If the RX or DUPLEX
mask is called up, GEN A can be switched to the RX or TX
signal path by repeatedly striking the [GEN_A] key (level input
field = Mod. or Lev.). But in the TX mode only the TX signal
path is possible (level input field = Lev.).
! If the TX signal path is switched (red LED illuminated),
the modulation signal is output AC-coupled on socket
MOD GEN and DC-coupled on socket Bu 29 (back
panel).
! If the RX signal path is switched (green LED illumina-
ted), the modulation signal feeds the modulator of the
4032 signal generator. This modulation signal can be
brought out DC-coupled but only on socket Bu 27 (back
panel).
! If further modulation-signal sources are activated (EXT
and optionally GEN B), the result will be a sum modulation signal (modulation overlaying).
12
[B/SAT]
Activates the modulation generator GEN B (option) with the
settings (frequency, level) selected on the screen. Tapping
the key again will cut the generator out.
If the RX or DUPLEX mask is called up, GEN B can be
switched to the RX or TX signal path (see [GEN_A]) by
repeatedly tapping the [B/SAT] key. In the TX mode only the
TX signal path is possible (see Chapter 8, Modulation Generator GEN B).
The green LED assigned to the [B/SAT] key has a special
function when the optional data module is used for testing
radiotelephones. In such cases the LED will only illuminate
when there is background signaling (SAT; cf Chapter 10).
2-6
Meaning of Keys
13
[EXT]
Front Panel
Couples the signal fed in on socket EXT MOD into the
RX/TX signal path of the modulation generators. Tapping
the key again will disconnect the signal.
In DUPLEX mode the external modulation signal can be
coupled into the RX or TX signal path of the modulation
generators (see [GEN_A]) by repeatedly tapping the [EXT]
key.
14
[CLEAR]
Triggers a reset pulse for the microprocessors of the 4032
but without deleting the set test parameters. [CLEAR] will
generally eliminate any blockage of the internal digital
signal processing. A total reset eliminates stubborn blockages, but replaces test parameters set by the user with
works settings (defaults) and calls up the status mask.
To execute a total reset, press the [OFF] key, keep it
depressed and additionally press the [CLEAR] key for a short
time.
15
[HELP]
! Shows up all entry fields of a mask by briefly brightening
them up (inverted display), ie provided that no entry field
has been opened.
! Following
[HELP] the individual entry fields show a number between 0 and 99. The numbers serve for identifying
the fields if they are assigned contents by AUTORUN or
controller programs.
! Reports permissible entry values for that field which is
momentarily open.
[TX] + [MOD_FREQ] + [HELP] → Message "Range: 30 Hz 30 kHz" at the foot of the mask
16
[PRINT]
Causes printout of the momentary screen content. First the
4032 has to be adapted to the printer: the Printer field
of the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask (call: [AUX] +
{DEF.PAR} + {ETC}) permits selection from the available printer-driver software. On the ink-jet printer option the DIP
switches have to be set to LISTEN ALWAYS.
17
[AUX]
Leads to the submask OPTION CARD, enabling the optional modules (eg AF filter) to be cut in and out. The softkey
functions of the mask permit further branching into lower
mask levels, which are mostly tied to options.
2-7
2
Front Panel
18
[MEMORY]
Meaning of Keys
Calls up the MEMORY mask. This mask offers several
functions in conjunction with the memory cards:
! Storage of several complete device settings.
! Storage of screen contents (eg measured results or
scope curves).
! Storage and starting of AUTORUN test routines.
! Loading and starting of system programs (software op-
tions) for testing radio-data sets and cellular radiotelephones.
19
[ANALYZER]
! Calls up the spectrum analyzer (entry fields and pano-
ramic display) on the screen if the TX mask is selected.
! Calls up the sweep generator (see Chapter 6) if the RX
mask is selected.
20
[SCOPE]
21 S1 to S6
Inserts the oscilloscope (entry fields and oscilloscope display) in the lower half of the TX, RX and DUPLEX mask.
Softkeys of the 4032. The functions of the individual softkeys are always stated in the bottommost line of the
screen. A displayed function is not executed until after the
associated softkey has been struck. So you do not see the
called function but the one that can be called at the moment.
→ couples socket RF DIRECT as th current RF
input/output; at the same time the softkey showes RF as the
new function that can be called
{RF_DIR}
22 Cursor block
! As long as no entry field has been opened, the individual
entry fields of a mask can be located with the four cursor
keys (sustained pressing of a cursorkkey produces a
repeat function).
! If an entry field for numeric values has been opened, eg
with [ENTER], the keys pointing to the left and right will
move the cursor within the entry field.
23
[POWER]
The power button of the 4032. When it is switched on again,
the Communication Test Set has the same operating status
as before it was switched off, meaning that interrupted
chores can rapidly be resumed.
A total reset replaces all settings on the 4032 with works
settings (defaults) and causes the status mask to be called
up. To execute a total reset, press the [OFF] key, keep it
depressed and additionally switch on the 4032 with the
[POWER] key.
2-8
Meaning of Keys
24
[+]
Front Panel
! Leads together with the sign into the Offset entry field
of the RX mask or DUPLEX mask (option), provided that
the RF Frequency field was opened immediately beforehand.
[FREQU]
+ [+] → offset field is opened with plus sign
! Increases the frequency value in the RF Frequency
field or the level value in the Level field by the defined
stepping width every time it is tapped, ie provided that
the corresponding entry field (STEP) for stepping width
has been opened (see also explanations to [STEP] key).
+ [FREQU] + <150 (MHz)> + [ENTER] + [FREQU] + [STEP] +
<20> + [ENTER] + [+] → every time [+] is tapped, the frequency of the 4032 signal generator is incremented by 20
kHz: 150.02 MHz; 150.04 MHz etc.
[RX]
! Issues the plus sign if the RF level is to be set with dBm
or dB units, ie provided that the Level field is open.
! If it is tapped several times, it displays scroll variables
when the currently active field is a scroll field. When the
top end of the list of scroll variables is reached, [+]
produces no more reaction, ie scroll back with [-].
25
[-]
This function is analogous to [+].
2-9
2
Front Panel
26
[STEP]
Meaning of Keys
! Displays the STEP entry field for defining a stepping
width (see also 24 [+]). The entry must be terminated
with [ENTER]. The prerequirement for calling the STEP
field is that the RF Frequency field with the units MHz
or the Level field has been opened (frequency or level
variation).
+ [LEVEL] + [STEP] + [6] + [ENTER] → the level of the signal
generator can now be altered in 6-dB increments with [+]
and [-] if the STEP field has been opened
[RX]
! If the STEP field is already on-screen but not inverted,
[STEP] will relocate and open this field, ie provided that
no entry field has been opened.
! Changes over the lower and upper sideband in duplex
mode.
Example: Before [STEP] the Communication Test Set
transmits in the lower sideband and receives in the
upper sideband. After [STEP] the Communication Test
Set transmits in the upper sideband and receives in the
lower sideband.
Requirement: the RF Frequency field is opened and
the units in the field are NoL or NoU.
2-10
Meaning of Keys
27
[FM_AM_ÉM]
Front Panel
In the RX and DUPLEX mask (option) this immediately
opens the Mod entry field and in the TX mask the Lev.
entry field. [FM_AM_ÉM] also automatically triggers switch-on
of the modulation generator GEN A.
! If the [UNIT/SCROLL] key is operated several times immedi-
ately after [FM_AM_ÉM], this will select the class of modulation in the mask header (at the same time the matching
unit is set in the Mod field).
[TX]
+ [FM_AM_ÉM] + [UNIT/SCROLL] → TX-FM, TX-ΦM, TX-AM
! If a numeric value is entered in the Mod field (RX mask)
following [FM_AM_ÉM], this value will specify the modulation (eg frequency deviation). The matching unit (kHz,
rad, %) can subsequently be assigned with [UNIT/SCROLL],
provided the Mod field is open. A selected modulation
value (eg 2.4 kHz) is stored if you set another class of
modulation (eg 60 %).
[RX] + [FM_AM_ÉM] + <2.4> +
2.4 kHz
[UNIT/SCROLL]
→ 2.4 rad, 2.4 %,
! If a numeric value is entered in the Lev. field (TX mask)
following [FM_AM_ÉM], this value will specify the output
level of mod. generator GEN A. [UNIT/SCROLL] then selects
the unit (mV, V or dBm).
[TX]
28
[MOD_FREQ]
+ [FM_AM_ÉM] + [4] + [UNIT/SCROLL] → 4 mV, 4 V, 4 dBm
Leads to immediate opening of the AF GEN A entry field
(modulation frequency of GEN A). [MOD_FREQ] also automatically triggers switch-on of the modulation generator
GEN A.
+ [MOD_FREQ] + [2] + [ENTER] + [FM_AM_ÉM] + <1.2 (V)> + [ENTER]
→ a signal with f = 2 kHz and V = 1.2 V appears on socket
MOD GEN
[TX]
2-11
2
Front Panel
29
[OFF]
Meaning of Keys
! Cuts out the 4032 signal generator, ie provided that the
Level entry field has been opened. Switch on again
(with original level value) using [LEVEL].
! Removes a STEP entry field from the screen that has
been fetched with [STEP], ie provided that the STEP field
has been opened.
30
[UNIT/SCROLL]
a) Operating this key several times permits assignment of
the required unit to the entered numeric value in the current
(brightened up) mixed numeric field, ie provided that the
[UNIT/SCROLL] key is pressed immediately after entering the
numeric value (and before [ENTER]).
[RX]
+ [LEVEL] + [4] + [UNIT/SCROLL] → 4 mV, 4 µV, 4 dBm, 4 dBµ
b) Operating the key several times shows the available
entry variants of the current scroll field.
c) Operating the key several times produces conversion of
the numeric value in the Level field to the required unit
(dB, V/mV or dBm), ie provided that the entry in the Level
field was terminated immediately beforehand with [ENTER].
+ [LEVEL] + <12 (mV)> + [ENTER] + [NIT/SCROLL] → the display
in the level field changes between -25.4 dBm, 81.6 dBµ,
12 mV
[RX]
d) Operating the key several times immediately after
[FM_AM_ÉM] produces selection of the class of modulation
(indicated in the mask header).
31
[LEVEL]
Leads in the RX and DUPLEX mask (option) to immediate
opening of the Level entry field.
32
[FREQU]
Leads to immediate opening of the RF Frequency entry
field.
33 Numeric cluster Used to enter numerics in the current (brightened up) field.
The start of the entry opens the field and clears the previously contained value. If only one digit is to be altered, it
is better to open the field with [ENTER] and mark the digit
concerned with the cursor.
2-12
Meaning of Rotary Knobs
34
[ENTER]
Front Panel
! Terminates entries in numeric fields as long as the
entered value is legal. Any attempt to create an illegal
value is advised by a warning tone; the numeric field will
then show that value again which it had before the illegal
entry.
! Opens numeric fields without altering their content.
Meaning of Rotary Knobs
35 INTENS
Adjusts the intensity of the screen display. Automatic cutout prevents burns on the monitor. This is activated if no
entry is made for about 20 to 25 min. If this automatic cutout
is disabled, you must reduce screen intensity to prevent
burns (see also chapter 4, "GENERAL PARAMETERS").
36 Unnamed
Volume control; effective when monitoring a current AF
signal or a frequency offset (cf 6 [BEAT/SINAD]). Current AF
signal = signal applied to AF instruments; selection of
signal with [VOLTM], [DEMOD] or [RX_MOD/MOD_GEN].
37 Unnamed
Attenuator for the level of the modulation signal fed in on
socket EXT MOD. With this control it is possible, for example, to vary the frequency deviation produced by the external modulation signal in a receiver measurement. The
attenuator control is only active if the adjacent slide switch
is set to VAR >35 kΩ.
38 POS
Positions the zero line of an oscillogram on the vertical axis,
ie provided that the SCOPE function has been called up.
39 Unnamed
Multifunction handwheel for continuously altering numeric
values and calling up entry variables for the scroll field. The
handwheel always governs the current (brightened up)
field.
! Alteration of numeric values: open the entry field with
[ENTER] for example, move the cursor to the required
position → turning the handwheel alters the value of the
position, carries also being allowed for. The alteration
immediatelyaffectsthedisplayofthemeasuredresults
concerned.
+ [VOLT] + [GEN_A] + [RX_MOD/MOD_GEN] + [FM_AM_ÉM] + <value>
→ the alterations of the level value in the Lev entry field
(with the handweel) is immediately shown on the RMS
meter
[TX]
! Callup of entry variables for the scroll field: the entry
variables are shown by slowly turning the handwheel
clockwise or counterclockwise.
2-13
2
Front Panel
Meaning of Sockets
Meaning of Sockets
40 RF DIRECT
RF input/output (input for transmitter measurement; output
for receiver measurement). Coupling to the internal RF
input/output stage with the softkey function {RF_DIR}. The
power of a signal that is fed in may under no circumstances
exceed 500 mW, otherwise the input stage/attenuator will
be destroyed! RF DIRECT is to be used primarily for very
small RF input signals. In DUPLEX mode RF DIRECT may
be selected as a separate signal-generator output (see
also explanations to RF socket).
41 RF
RF input/output (input for transmitter measurement; output
for receiver measurement) with a 20-dB attenuator in the
signal path. Coupling to the internal RF input/output stage
with the softkey function {RF}. The permissible input power
of a signal that is applied constantly is 50 W, and shortterm
(1 min) 125 W is permissible (see also Chapter 1, "Preparations for Startup"). If the TX-ΦM or TX-FM mask is called
up, a squelch suppresses weak RF input signals onwards
from the IF stage (switching threshold approx. -40 dBm).
In DUPLEX mode the RF socket is to be used as a common
input/output, as long as there is a difference of at least 60
dB between output level and input level. If the difference is
smaller (transponder measurements), select the RF DIRECT socket with {RF_DIR}. The latter is then the output and
socket RF the input (the RF socket remains active because
the DUPLEX output coupling is not affected by the switchover).
42 Unnamed
Jack socket for connecting headphones of any impedance
(the internal loudspeaker is then disconnected).
43 VOLTM
Input for the AF signal. The signal can only be applied to
the AF meters of the 4032 if the VOLTM key is tapped (cf
points 49 and 50).
44 DEMOD
AF output for the demodulated TX signal. The DEMOD key
has no effect on the DEMOD socket.
2-14
Meaning of Slide Switches
Front Panel
45 MOD GEN
AF output for the modulation signal, ie provided that the TX
signal path is switched for the modulation-signal source(s).
If several modulation-signal sources are activated - GEN A,
EXT and optionally GEN B - the sum signal appears on the
MOD GEN socket. The output is shortcircuit-proof; a transformer balances the output signal (cf point 51).
46 EXT MOD
AF input for an external modulation signal (cf point 52).
47 SCOPE INPUT
AF input for the 4032 oscilloscope (cf point 53).
48 MEMORY
CARD
Slot for memory cards (a memory card is a battery-buffered
RAM data medium for software options, AUTORUN programs, complete device settings and screen contents).
Meaning of Slide Switches
49 SYM
Determines whether the earthy pole of the VOLTM socket
is connected to ground (unbalanced input) or not (balanced
input).
50 600 Ω/100 kΩ
Puts the input impedance of the VOLTM socket on 600 Ω
or on 100 kΩ.
51 600 Ω/10 Ω
Puts the output impedance of the MOD GEN socket on
600 Ω or on 10 Ω.
52 600 Ω/
VAR > 35 kΩ
Puts the input impedance of the EXT MOD socket on 600 Ω
or on 35 kΩ. In the VAR >35 kΩ setting it is possible to
reduce the level of the applied modulation signal with the
adjacent attenuator (37).
53 AC/DC
Determines whether the input socket of the oscilloscope
(47) is DC-coupled or AC-coupled.
2-15
2
Back Panel
Meaning of Slide Switches
Back Panel
Standard Configurations:
Stage 1
Stage 3
Stage 4
Stage 7
Stage 9
Stage 10
–
2-16
AF DETECTOR + 10 MHz REFERENCE
IF UNIT
MOD GENERATOR A
SLAVE COMPUTER
MONITOR CONTROL
HOST COMPUTER
POWER SUPPLY
AF DETECTOR + 10 MHz REFERENCE (module 1)
Back Panel
AF DETECTOR + 10 MHz REFERENCE (module 1)
Socket 15 (Bu 15):
Interface for connecting module 2 (OPTION CARD) with
adapter cable 384 752 (see also Chapter 9, section
"OPTION CARD") or for connecting external filters.
Point
=
2
pin not used
Cross =
pin conducts control signal used
internally
Pin 6
=
TTL control output
Pin 8
=
output (to external AF filter)
Pin 10 =
output (to external notch filter)
Pin 12 =
+15 V to GND (Imax = 50 mA)
Pin 16 =
TTL control input
Pin 20 =
input (from external AF filter)
Pin 22 =
input (from external notch filter)
Pin 25 =
–15 V to GND (Imax = 50 mA)
Fig. 2.2: Socket Bu 15: pinning
Socket 12 (Bu 12):
Input for synchronizing the internal 10-MHz reference oscillator (see data sheet for specifications) with an external
signal. Synchronization range approx. 1 x 10-6 Hz
0.2 V Vsyn 1 V
Ri = 200 Ω
Socket 13 (Bu 13):
Output for synchronizing external oscillators with the
10-MHz reference oscillator.
f = 10 MHz
Pout = 4 mW
Ri = 50 Ω
2-17
Back Panel
IF UNIT (module 3)
IF UNIT (module 3)
The IF unit performs the AM, FM or ΦM demodulation of the IF signal. The
frequency-offset measurement, the selective power measurement and the analyzer signal are also evaluated in the IF unit.
Socket 103 (Bu 103): Delivers IF signal for GSM or DAMPS option.
Do not feed any signal into this socket!
MOD GENERATOR A (module 4)
Socket 29 (Bu 29):
DC-coupled output for the modulation signal in TX mode
(transmitter testing). If several modulation-signal sources
are connected into the TX signal path (GEN A, EXT MOD
and optionally GEN B), an output amplifier adds the individual signals and produces the sum signal on Bu 29 (modulation overlay).
Vmax = 5 Vrms (EMF)
Ri = 600 Ω
The signal on the MOD GEN socket (front panel) is identical to that on Bu 29 but AC-coupled (output transformer).
Socket 27 (Bu 27):
DC-coupled output for the modulation signal in RX mode
(receiver testing). The signal corresponds to that which is
fed to the modulators of the 4032 internally. If several
modulation-signal sources are connected into the RX signal path (GEN A, EXT MOD and optionally GEN B), an
output amplifier adds the individual signals and produces
the sum signal on Bu 27 (modulation overlay). There is no
signal (0 V) on Bu 27 in TX mode.
The maximum output level of 2 V (peak) into 600 Ω represents, depending on the class of modulation, 100 % AM or
40 kHz FM (35.3 mV = 1 rad ΦM).
2-18
SLAVE COMPUTER (module 7)
Back Panel
SLAVE COMPUTER (module 7)
The slave computer is responsible for all internal measurements and the control
signals required for them.
2
MONITOR CONTROL (module 9)
The monitor control is responsible for displaying the screen masks and for the
scope and analyzer display.
HOST COMPUTER (module 10)
The host computer is responsible for the operation, the Memory Card and
IEEE-bus interface and the AUTORUN function.
Socket 20 (Bu 20):
IEEE-488 interface of STABILOCK 4032. An IEEE-bus
printer can be connected to Bu 20 for logging measured
results (set DIP switches on printer to LISTEN ALWAYS).
POWER SUPPLY
User notes: see Chapter 1
2-19
Back Panel
2-20
POWER SUPPLY
3
Operating
Prompt to Operate Key
Notation Rules
Notation Rules
The rules about notation in this section will simplify your work with the operating
manual. The whole purpose of the rules is to state requests for the entry of test
parameters in a compressed but unambiguous form. So make a mental note of
the forms of notation, because they apply throughout for all chapters.
Prompt to Operate Key
3
[CLEAR}
Notation for keys.
{ZOOM}
Notations for softkeys (these are the six function keys
along the bottom edge of th screen).,
[VOLTM]
+ [GEN_A]
Notation for entry prompts. In plain text this example
means: first press the [VOLTM] key and then the [GEN_A] key.
If there is just lower-case text between pointed brackets, there is no key with this
name. In such cases entries are meant, examples of which will be given below.
If a number appears between pointed brackets, this refers to the entry of this
number on the keypad.
Operate the [FREQU] key
[FREQU]
[FREQU]
+ <value> + [ENTER]
1. [FREQU]
2. <value>
3. [ENTER]
This string means that first you press the [FREQU] key
and then, using the keys of the numeric cluster,
enter the required (frequency) value. Finally you
transfer the value to the 4032 with [ENTER]. <value>
can also mean that you only have to alter a
previously entered value with the hand
This is the numeric stringing of the preceding
example.
3-3
Notation Rules
Assigning units
Assigning units
If a unit has to be assigned to a numeric value (this is possible with some entries
using the [UNIT/SCROLL] key), the required unit is shown in parentheses.
<4 (mV)>
[FREQU]
+ <158 (MHz)> +
After entering the numeric value 4, keep
tapping the [UNIT/SCROLL] key until the unit mV
appears next to the numeric value.
[ENTER]
You are prompted to enter the (frequency) value
158 MHz and transfer it to the 4032 with [ENTER].
Keys with dual assignments
Many of the socalled softkeys as well as the [dB_REL/VOLT] key on the AF field (front
panel) have dual occupancy. Repeated tapping of such keys produces alternation
between the two functions, ie if a change of function is permissible. The prompt
to operate a key always names the function that is to be called up.
[dB_REL]
Tap the [dB_REL/VOLT] key to call up the dB REL
function (the associated LED illuminates). If
the dB REL function is already present, the key
may not be operated because this would call
up the VOLT function.
Repeated striking of key
Tapping some keys ([GEN_A], [B/SAT], [EXT], [CCITT]) a number of times will cancel
the function previously called up with this same key. The prompt to operate a key
of this kind always refers, unless expressly stated otherwise, to calling up the
function. The LEDs assigned to the keys will show whether a function has already
been called up.
[GEN_A]
3-4
Activate the modulation generator with the
[GEN_A] key. If the generator is already operative
(associated LED illuminated), do not operate the
key.
Cursor Movements
Notation Rules
Cursor Movements
Prompts to move the cursor are indicated as follows:
<cursor u>
Cursor up
<cursor d>
Cursor down
<cursor l>
Cursor left
<cursor r>
Cursor right
...<value> + [ENTER] + <cursor d> +
<value>...
After entering a numeric value, tap the cursor
key that points downwards (location of a new
entry field) and again enter a value.
Screen Messages in Running Text
Offset
Notation for texts when they are to be read off the screen.
Following the text IEEE-488 ADR.: IEEE-488 ADR.: is a screen message that
there is a number ... on the screen
you will look at later when calling up the
shown in inverted form.
socalled status mask.
3-5
3
Operating Rules
Types of Fields
Operating Rules
The operating rules for correct working with the 4032 concern in the first place
proper filling in of the entry fields displayed on the screen. When reading this
section for the first time, open the "Basic RX Mask" for an illustration of the
examples.
Types of Fields
Each screen mask consists of entry fields, text fields and display fields.
Entry fields
Entry fields have to be selected by the user and are then ready to accept an entry.
The entry may be a frequency or level value, for example, or one of several entry
suggestions that are presented. Entry fields are therefore divided up into "scroll
fields" and "numeric fields":
Scroll fields
Scroll fields offer at least two "scroll variables", one of which is to be selected. The
scroll field EXT, for example, has the scroll variables AC coupled and DC
coupled.
Numeric fields
Numeric fields are to be filled in with values entered on the numeric cluster.
Numeric fields are subdivided again into "pure numeric fields", "mixed numeric
fields" and "hidden numeric fields".
Pure numeric fields
Pure numeric fields only require the entry of a numeric value, the unit is fixed. The
pure numeric field AF GEN A, for example, contains the value 1.0000, the unit
kHz being unalterable.
Mixed numeric fields
Mixed numeric fields require the entry of a numeric value and then allow
assignment of the required unit by repeated operation of the [UNIT/SCROLL] key. In
the mixed numeric field Mod, for instance, the units kHz, % and rad can be
selected.
Hidden numeric fields
Hidden numeric fields are pure numeric fields that are not necessarily displayed
on the screen. They can be made to appear and disappear as required. In the
foldout of the basic RX mask, for example, the two hidden numeric fields STEP
and CONT are on-screen. The foldout explains how they are made visible and
blanked.
3-6
Types of Fields
Operating Rules
Text fields
Text fields primarily have the task of giving a name to the entry fields that are
assigned to them. The content of entry fields can alter, but not that of text fields.
A text field is usually followed by a single entry field. Such fields are simply given
the name of the associated text field in the operating instructions. If the Offset
entry field is being spoken of, for instance, the numeric field is meant that appears
next to the Offset text field. In the foldout of the basic RX mask the content of
this field is 0.0 kHz.
If a text field is followed by several entry fields - this being an exception - the entry
fields are designated after their content. That content is named which the fields
have after a total reset (default setting).
Display fields
Display fields are not accessible for the user. In these fields the Communication
Test Set reports measured results, for instance, or shows status messages (see
also "Status Mask" foldout). The user has no access to display fields. Text fields
are also allocated to display fields to show the meaning of the field(s). Display
fields are always named in the operating instructions after the text field that
accompanies them.
3-7
3
Operating Rules
Moving to Entry Fields
Moving to Entry Fields
The current entry field is always brightened up on the screen. Only this field can
be accessed (in the foldout of the basic RX mask the current field CONT is dark
because of the inverted display). Any entry field can be moved to with the four
cursor keys, as long as no numeric field has been opened. The field that has been
moved to is at the same time the current entry field.
Entering New Numeric Values
If the current entry field is a numeric field, access begins by opening the field:
entry of the numeric value on the keypad automatically opens the field and
deletes the original content. [ENTER] opens numeric fields without deleting their
content. An opened numeric field can always be recognized by the flashing of the
cursor.
Individual digits can be overwritten if they are marked with the cursor. Use the
cursor key pointing right or left for this purpose.
Entries in numeric fields by way of the keypad must always be terminated with
otherwise they will not be valid. [ENTER] closes an opened numeric field,
recognizable by the fact that the flashing cursor disappears. Then is it possible to
move to every other entry field with the four cursor keys.
[ENTER],
Fast Access to Numeric Fields
The numeric fields that are most often required - RF Frequency, Level,
AF GEN A, and Mod. or Lev. - can be located and opened with a single
keystroke. Tap one of the following keys: [FREQU], [LEVEL], [MOD_FREQ] or [FM_AM_ÉM].
With the fast access to one of the fields named above, you exit from the numeric
field that was active before, even if an entry has not been terminated with [ENTER].
In this case the entry is lost and is replaced by the old content of the numeric field.
Therefore you should always terminate numeric fields immediately after making
an entry.
3-8
Altering Numeric Values
Operating Rules
Altering Numeric Values
Method 1: Move to the numeric field concerned with the cursor keys and open it
with [ENTER], or use one of the keys for fast access to numeric fields. Mark the
particular digit with the cursor and overwrite it with the new value. After [ENTER]
the altered numeric value is valid.
Method 2: Move to the numeric field concerned with the cursor keys and slightly
turn the handwheel. This opens the field. One of the keys for fast access to
numeric fields also goes this far. Move the cursor to the required position and turn
the handwheel until the required value appears at the cursor position. Note that
when you go over 9 or under 0 there will be a carry at the adjacent position. Every
variation of a numeric value with the handwheel is immediately valid. Confirmation with [ENTER] is only necessary when you leave the field again. Use the
handwheel to observe the effect of continuously altering the input value on a
measurement result.
Selecting Units in Mixed Numeric Fields
Move to the numeric field concerned with the cursor keys and open it with [ENTER],
or use one of the keys for fast access to numeric fields. Enter the required numeric
value and immediately afterwards press the [UNIT/SCROLL] key several times. This
assigns the numeric value the available units. Terminate the entry as usual with
[ENTER].
Converting Units of RF Level
The Level entry field for the RF level of the 4032 signal generator is a mixed
numeric field with the speciality that the entered level value can be converted into
one with the unit you commonly use. The available units are: µV/mV, dBm and
dBµ.
First enter the value with the required unit and terminate the Level field with
[ENTER]. Afterwards press the [UNIT/SCROLL] key several times and the value will be
converted to the other units and displayed in the field.
3-9
3
Operating Rules
Selecting Scroll Variables
Selecting Scroll Variables
Move to the scroll field concerned with the cursor keys and press the [UNIT/SCROLL]
key several times. The handwheel may also be turned slowly (left/right). Both
result in the scroll field displaying all its scroll variables one after the other. The
variable that is displayed is valid. Confirmation with [ENTER] is unnecessary, you
can leave the field again immediately.
Working with Softkeys
The softkeys (row of keys below the screen) are given their function by the mask
that is called up. The function that a softkey has at any particular time is shown
by the brightened up fields at the bottom edge of the screen.
Very often the softkeys have dual assignments, ie as soon as the one function is
called up (by striking the softkey), the key is assigned the other function to show
what you can subsequently change to. {RF_DIR} connects the RF DIRECT socket
for instance. The softkey function immediately changes to {RF} so that this same
softkey - when it is struck again - will enable the RF socket to be connected.
For softkeys with dual assignments you always see the function that is being
offered to you, ie not the one you have. If softkey S1 shows the {RF} function for
instance, this means that the RF DIRECT socket is connected and the 4032 is
offering you the RF socket as an alternative. Therefore, the displayed softkey
function is not confirmation of the momentary operating status, it is a pointer to
the alternative function using the same softkey.
Working with Channel Numbers
The STABILOCK 4032 allows you to work with channel numbers (instead of
frequencies) in all modes (SIMPLEX, AUTO-SIMPLEX, DUPLEX).
3-10
SIMPLEX/AUTO-SIMPLEX Mode
Operating Rules
SIMPLEX/AUTO-SIMPLEX Mode
First call up the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask by entering
and make the following declarations:
[AUX]
+
[DEF.PAR]
1. Channel space enter the value of the active channel spacing.
2. Duplex space
enter the value zero so that later, when working with channel numbers, you do not have to observe any upper/lower
band.
3. Channel
enter the channel number of any valid channel number/frequency pair.
4. Corresp. freq. enter the frequency value from the channel number/frequency pair chosen above in 3.
5. Channel no.
select the scroll variable so that frequencies increase or
decrease with ascending channel number.
The STABILOCK 4032 is now prepared to work with channel numbers in the
SIMPLEX modes. The link between values of frequency and channel numbers is
produced by the declarations above. Call up the basic RX or TX mask:
1. Declare with [FREQU] the RF Frequency field to be the current (opened) field
and switch to channel-number entry (NoL or NoU) with [UNIT/SCROLL]. The field
will then indicate the channel number of the frequency that was previously
shown in the same field (tuning frequency of signal generator or test receiver).
2. Enter the channel number momentarily required with the numeric keys. It is
irrelevant whether you make your entry for the lower-band (NoL) or upperband (NoU) channel. After confirmation with [ENTER] the signal generator or
test receiver is immediately set to the appropriate frequency.
3. Open the field again, eg with [ENTER], and mark the channel number with the
aid of the cursor keys. Now any channel numbers can be set quite simply with
the handwheel (confirmation with [ENTER] is unnecessary).
4. To return to frequency display you use [ENTER] and [UNIT/SCROLL]. The frequency is displayed of the last channel number that was set.
3-11
3
Operating Rules
DUPLEX Mode
DUPLEX Mode
First call up the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask by entering
and make the following declarations:
[AUX]
+
[DEF.PAR]
1. Channel space enter the value of the active channel spacing.
2. Duplex space
enter the value of the duplex spacing.
3. Channel
enter the channel number of any valid channel number/frequency pair.
4. Corresp. freq.enter the frequency value from the channel number/frequency pair chosen above in 3.
5. Channel no.
select the scroll variable so that frequencies increase or
decrease with ascending channel number.
6.RX ↔ TX (MHz) select the scroll variable to determine whether fRX is to be
automatically offset upwards or downwards from fTX by the
duplex spacing. The NOT variable prevents this (fRX and fTX
set separately). This declaration is not absolutely necessary when working with channel numbers; it is only of
importance for the direct entry of frequencies.
The STABILOCK 4032 is now prepared to work with channel numbers in the
DUPLEX mode. The link between values of frequency and channel numbers is
produced by the declarations above. Call up the basic DUPLEX mask:
3-12
DUPLEX Mode
Operating Rules
1. Declare with [FREQU] the RF Frequency field in the RX portion of the mask
to be the current (opened) field and switch to channel-number entry (NoU or
NoL) with [UNIT/SCROLL].
2. Enter with the numeric keys the number of the channel on which the 4032
signal generator is to transmit in the upper band (NoU) or lower band (NoL).
After confirmation with [ENTER] the signal generator is immediately set to the
appropriate frequency. At the same time the test receiver - without further ado
- is tuned and offset by the duplex spacing.
3. Open the field again, eg with [ENTER], and mark the channel number with the
aid of the cursor keys. Now any channel numbers can be set quite simply with
the handwheel (confirmation with [ENTER] is unnecessary). The corresponding
channel number is set automatically in the TX portion of the mask.
4. To return to frequency display you use [ENTER] and [UNIT/SCROLL]. The frequencies (fRX, fTX) are displayed of the channel numbers that were last set.
5. Points 2 through 4 apply in corresponding fashion if, to start with, the
RF Frequency field in the TX portion of the mask is switched to channelnumber entry.
6. If you want to enter the frequencies fRX, fTX directly, it is likewise sufficient to
enter just one value. As a result of declaration 6 the other value is produced
automatically. If the test receiver and signal generator of the 4032 are to be
tuned to random frequencies (no forced duplex spacing), the NOT variable
must have been selected.
3-13
3
Entry Examples
Entry Examples
Setting signal generator to 50.00055 MHz
1. [RX] + [FREQU] + <50.0005 (MHz)> + [ENTER]
2. [+] + <0.05> + [ENTER]
Calling up the RX mask switches the signal generator on. Then enter the
frequency, roughly to start with, as far as the 100-Hz place in the RF Frequency
field (50.0005 MHz). For fine tuning open the offset field with [+] and enter the
value 0.05 kHz (maximum resolution 50 Hz). 50 Hz resolution is possible up to
f = 500 MHz and above that 100 Hz.
Setting output level of signal generator to EMF
1. [RX] + {EMF}
({EMF} is alternative function to {50_Á})
Striking the {EMF} softkey changes the name of the entry field for output level from
Level/50Ω to Level/EMF and doubles the set output level. It is not possible to
switch to EMF level if the units in the Level/50Ω field are dBm.
Setting signal generator to –40 dBm output level
1. [RX] + [LEVEL] + <-40> + [UNIT/SCROLL] + [ENTER]
After entering the value -40 in the Level field, you can assign it dBm as units
with [UNIT/SCROLL] before terminating the entry with [ENTER].
How many mV correspond to –22.0 dBm output level?
1. [RX] + [LEVEL] + <-22 (dBm)> +
[ENTER]
+ [UNIT/SCROLL]
First enter the level value –22 in the Level field, assign it dBm as units and
terminate the entry with [ENTER]. [UNIT/SCROLL] then converts the set level value to
the other units that are available. Confirm the display that is to be kept (eg
17.7 mV) with [ENTER].
3-14
Entry Examples
Tuning frequency of test receiver in 20-kHz increments
Starting frequency = 153.0100 MHz
1. [TX] + [FREQU] + <153.0100 (MHz)> + [ENTER]
2. [FREQU] + [STEP] + <20> + [ENTER] + [+]
Calling up the TX mask switches on the test receiver. First enter the starting
frequency in the RF Frequency field and terminate this entry with [ENTER]. Then
open the RF Frequency field again with [FREQU] anddisplaythehiddennumeric
field STEP with [STEP]. After you have entered and confirmed the value 20 kHz,
the tuned frequency will be increased by 20 kHz every time you strike the plus
key.
Setting test receiver for AM demodulation
1.
[TX]
+ [FM_AM_ÉM] + [UNIT/SCROLL] +
[ENTER]
Declare the Lev field of the TX mask as the current field and then choose the
demodulation, visible in the mask header, with [UNIT/SCROLL]. Confirmation of this
with [ENTER] is not absolutely necessary.
Listening to FM modulation of received 100-MHz signal
1. [TX] + [FM_AM_ÉM] + [UNIT/SCROLL] + [ENTER]
2. [FREQU] + <100 (MHz)> + [ENTER]
3. [DEMOD]
In step 1 set the FM demodulation (display TX-FM) in the mask header and
confirm it. Step 2 tunes the test receiver to 100 MHz. [DEMOD] then applies the
demodulated signal to the input of the internal AF-signal processing so that the
signal can be listened to over the internal loudspeaker (set the volume with the
rotary knob beneath the [BEAT/SINAD] key). If the BEAT function is called up (red
LED illuminated), the demodulated signal is not heard but instead a frequency
offset between the tuned frequency of the test receiver and the actual frequency
of the input signal.
3-15
3
Entry Examples
Examining unknown AF signal
1. [VOLT] + [VOLTM]
Apply the AF signal to the VOLTM socket (front panel). [VOLTM] couples this socket
to the internal AF-signal processing. [VOLT] produces the RMS pointer meter on
the screen, no matter what basic mask (RX, TX, optionally DUPLEX) happens to
be called up. The meter indicates the level (RMS) and frequency of the AF signal.
The signal can also be looked at as a curve using the SCOPE function (see
Chapter 6).
Generating 345-MHz signal with 2.8 kHz FM (f = 2 kHz)
1. [RX] + [FREQU] + <345 (MHz)> + [ENTER]
2. [FM_AM_ÉM] + <2.8> + [UNIT/SCROLL] + [ENTER]
3. [MOD_FREQ] + <2> + [ENTER]
4. {RF}
Set the signal generator to 345 MHz, enter the value 2.8 in the Lev field and
select the kHz units (means frequency modulation). [FM_AM_ÉM] automatically cuts
in modulation generator GEN A. In the third step you define the modulation
frequency as 2 kHz. Finally connect the RF socket on which you wish to tap the
signal (signal level = value in Level field).
3-16
Masks
4
Callup of masks
Status Mask
Status Mask
The status mask tells you about the current status of the 4032 (fitted options,
IEEE-bus address, software versions of microprocessors).
Callup of masks
Cold start 1:
Press the [OFF] key, keep it depressed and additionally
press the [CLEAR] key for a short time.
Cold start 2:
Press the [OFF] key, keep it depressed and switch on the
communication test set with the [POWER] key.
Warm start:
[AUX]
+ {DEF.PAR} + {STATUS}
4
Caution: Cold start 1 and cold start 2 replace all settings made by the user with
default settings! This does not happen if you call up a mask with warm start.
4-3
Status Mask
Functions of softkeys
Functions of softkeys
{HW_REVISIONS}
Takes you to a mask of the same name that provides
information about the development status of individual
4032 stages (useful when telephoning for service). This
mask also allows to call up the self-diagnostic program
SELF CHECK (Go/No-Go function check of important stages and modules).
Fig. 4.1: The two pages of the HW-REVISIONS mask. {MORE} takes you from the first page
to the second.5) The numbers tell you the design status of the individual modules and
installed hardware options. The numbers displayed in the figure do not reflect the actual
state.
{START}
! Calls up the RX mask if the status mask has been called
up with cold start 1 or cold start 2.
! Takes you back to the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask
if the status mask has been called up with warm start.
{OPTIONS}
Takes you to the OPTION mask, offering a list with details
of the fitted options (especially the OPTION CARD).
Fig. 4.2: The two pages of the OPTIONS mask. {MORE} takes you from the first page to the
second.5) Ready built-in options are indicated by installed and separated by hardware
or software option; dashes mean that an option is missing.
4-4
Meaning of fields
Status Mask
Meaning of fields
SERIAL NO
(display field); shows the serial number of your particular
STABILOCK 4032.
IEEE-488 ADR
(pure numeric field); content = IEEE-bus address of the
4032.
TALK & LISTEN
(scroll field); the scroll variables specify the IEEE-bus operating mode:
TALK ONLY
unidirectional data flow (4032 is talker);
TALK & LISTEN bidirectional data flow (4032 is talker or
listener).
CR&LF
(scroll field); the scroll variables specify the IEEE-bus control command:
CR
Carriage Return.
CR&LF
Carriage Return & Line Feed.
EOI
(scroll field); the scroll variables specify the IEEE-bus control command:
EOI
"End or Identify" is declared
"End or Identify" is not declared
DCL
(scroll field); the scroll variables define whether the Communication Test Set executes a reset or a total reset after
a DCL (Device Clear):
DCL = CLR + OFF Total reset,
DCL = CLR
Reset, like striking [CLEAR].
SOFTWARE
VERSIONS
(display fields); message from the 4032 saying with what
software versions the internal processors HOST, CRT,
RF/AF as well as CELL-GEN/ANA (DATA module option)
and IFC (RS-232/Centronics interface option) are working.
The number of the particular software version (x.xx) is
indicated together with the software checksum CRC (xxxx).
By referring to the checksums it is possible to find a fault in
the system software when you ask for service over the
telephone for example.
4-5
4
SELF-CHECK
Calling up the mask
SELF-CHECK
The SELF-CHECK mask allows you to call up a diagnostics program that checks
the function of all important stages and modules of the 4032 in less than 20 s.
Fig. 4.3: SELF-CHECK mask; all stages tested here are ok.
Calling up the mask
[AUX]
+ {DEF.PAR.} + {STATUS} + {HW-REVISIONS} + {SELF-CHECK}
This calling up should only be done if you see one of the basic masks on screen
(RX, TX or DUPLEX).
Starting the program
{START_SELF-CHECK}
Before starting the diagnostics program, two conditions
have to be fulfilled:
! 4032 reference oscillator warmed up (wait approx. 10
min).
! No cable connected to RF/AF sockets of the 4032.
{START_LED-TEST}
Tests all LEDs of STABILOCK 4032. The first time you
strike the softkey, all LEDs light up. Strike it a secondtime
to end the test.
{RETURN}
Takes you back to the HW-REVISIONS mask.
4-6
Program messages
SELF-CHECK
Program messages
ok
Stage test passed
failed
Stage test not passed
not installed
Hardware option to be tested is missing
related test
failed
Stage test cannot be performed due to failure of other stage
The diagnostics program is finished when one of the following messages is
displayed in the status line at the bottom edge of the mask:
Self Check
passed ok
all stages functioning well
Self Check
failed
one stage at least failed
4
4-7
Basic RX Mask
Callup of mask
Basic RX Mask
The basic RX mask activates the signal generator of the 4032 for receiver testing.
Fig. 4.4: Mask RX FM; content of entry fields
= default values (setting ex works)
Callup of mask
[RX]
Functions of softkeys
{RF_DIR}
(alternative function: {RF}); determines which of the two RF
input/output sockets (RF DIRECT or RF) is coupled to the
RF output stage of the signal generator.
{CONT_OFF}
(alternative function: {EMF_CONT}); blanks the numeric field
CONT from the mask (displayed with {EMF_CONT}, but not for
amplitude modulation).
{EMF}
(alternative function: {50_Á}); determines whether the level
of the signal generator set with the Level field is the EMF
or the output level measured into 50 Ω. The EMF function
cannot be called up if dBm units are selected in the Level
entry field.
{SPECIAL}
takes you to the selection menu of the RX Specials (see
"RX Specials").
{ZOOM}
takes you to the selection menu for displaying full-format
instruments.
4-8
Meaning of fields
Basic RX Mask
Meaning of fields
RF Frequency
(mixed numeric field [MHz, NoL, NoU]); the content of the
numeric field determines the carrier frequency of the generator signal. When you are working with channel numbers
(NoL: channel number in lower band; NoU: channel number in upper band), the assignment between frequency and
channel number applies that is made in the GENERAL
PARAMETERS mask.
STEP
(hidden numeric field); can be allocated with {STEP} either to
the RF Frequency or Level (opened) field. As long as
the STEP field is inverted, the plus/minus keys will permit
step by step alteration of the carrier frequency or of the RF
output level (step width = content of STEP field). {OFF}
blanks the (opened) STEP field.
Offset
(pure numeric field); the entered value (including sign +/-)
detunes the carrier frequency upwards or downwards (fine
tuning of the carrier frequency). Fast access with [FREQU] + [+]
or [FREQU] + [-]. The actual carrier frequency is then the
sum of the values in RF Frequency and Offset.
Level
(mixed numeric field [dBm, dBµ, µV/mV]); the content determines the level of the signal generator (Level/50Ω →
level into 50 Ω; Level/EMF → level is EMF). As long as an
entry has not yet been terminated with [ENTER], the required
units can be assigned to the entered value with
[UNIT/SCROLL]. If an entry has been terminated with [ENTER],
[UNIT/SCROLL] then causes conversion of the entered value to
the other units. [OFF] switches off the signal generator; for
this the Level field must be open; switch on again with
[LEVEL].
4-9
4
Basic RX Mask
CONT
Meaning of fields
(hidden numeric field); an entered value, after confirmation
with [ENTER], reduces the RF level of the signal generator
without switching interruptions by the attenuator by max.
20 dB (necessary for squelch measurements).
Example: Level = –60 dBm; {EMF_CONT} + <10> + [ENTER] →
the output level of the signal generator is reduced continuously to –70 dBm (value in Level field remains at
-60 dBm however). Continuous level reduction is possible
with the handwheel. The CONT field can be cut in/out with
the softkey {EMF_CONT}/{CONT_OFF} (not for AM). After
{CONT_OFF} the actual output level and the value in the
Level field again correspond.
AF GEN A
(pure numeric field); the entered value defines the modulation frequency of modulation generator GEN A (the same
applies to the GEN B field when the GEN B option is
installed). GEN A + GEN B active = superimposed modulation.
Mod
(mixed numeric field [rad, %, kHz]); the content of this field
determines the modulation of the carrier signal (phase
deviation, modulation depth or frequency deviation). As
long as an entry has not yet been terminated with [ENTER],
the required units can be assigned to the entered value with
[UNIT/SCROLL]; thus simultaneous selection of the class of
modulation.
Repeated tapping of the [GEN_A] key (until the associated
red LED lights) replaces the Mod. field by the mixed numeric field Lev. (see also foldout Basic TX Mask). This field
determines the level of modulation generator GEN A. The
GEN A signal then no longer goes to the modulator of the
4032 however, but instead is output AC-coupled on socket
MOD GEN and DC-coupled on socket Bu 29 (rear panel).
EXT
4-10
(scroll field); the scroll variables (AC and DC coupled)
determine the coupling of the external modulation-signal
source. The field is only produced on the screen if the EXT
MOD input socket has been connected to the modulationsignal path with [EXT].
Meter locations in basic RX mask
Basic RX Mask
Available instruments
RMS
(RMS AF voltmeter and AF frequency counter); call up with
[VOLT]
dBr
(relative level measurement); call up with [dB_REL]
DIST
(distortion meter); call up with [DIST]
MOD
(modulation meter); call up with [EXT]
SINAD
(SINAD meter); call up with [SINAD]
PWR
(RF power meter); call up with {ZOOM} + {POWER}
AF POWER
(AF power meter); call up alternatively to RMS by GENERAL PARAMETERS mask
4
Meter locations in basic RX mask
Fig. 4.5:
1 = MOD can only be called up with [EXT])
2 = SINAD or DIST
3 = RMS or dBr or AF POWER
4-11
Basic TX Mask
Callup of mask
Basic TX Mask
The basic TX mask activates the test receiver of the 4032 for transmitter testing.
Fig. 4.6: Mask TX FM; contents of entry
fields = default values (settings ex works).
Callup of mask
[TX]
Functions of softkeys
{RF_DIR}
(alternative function: {RF}); determines which of the two RF
input/output sockets (RF DIRECT or RF) is coupled to the
RF input stage of the test receiver.
If the maximum permissible input power on socket RF
DIRECT (500 mW) is exceeded, the input stage will immediately be destroyed!
{COUNT}
(alternative function: {OFFSET}); {COUNT} switches on the RF
frequency counter. {OFFSET} switches on the offset counter.
The measured values are displayed in the RF Frequency
field (frequency counter) and Offset field (offset counter).
{PEAKHOLD}
(alternative function: {NORM}); {PEAKHOLD} makes the DEMOD modulation meter store the highest value measured
and constantly display it. In AM measurements modulation
peaks are only detected at the instant of sampling. With
{NORM} the DEMOD instrument always displays the momentary modulation.
{SPECIAL}
takes you to the selection menu of the TX Specials (see
"TX Specials").
4-12
Meaning of fields
Basic TX Mask
{+20_dB}
(alternative function: {-20_dB}); increases the level of modulation generator GEN A by 20 dB for checking the effectiveness of modulation limiting for instance. {-20_dB} reduces
the level by 20 dB.
{ZOOM}
takes you to the selection menu for displaying full-format
instruments.
Meaning of fields
RF Frequency
(mixed numeric field [MHz, NoL, NoU]); the entered value
tunes the test receiver. When you are working with channel
numbers (NoL: channel number in lower band; NoU: channel number in upper band), the assignment between frequency and channel number applies that is made in the
GENERAL PARAMETERS mask. If the COUNT function is
called up, the field becomes a display field (displayed value
is at the same time the tuning of the test receiver).
STEP
(hidden numeric field); can be allocated with [STEP] to the
(opened) RF Frequency field. As long as the STEP field
is inverted, the plus/minus keys permit step by step alteration of the carrier frequency (step width = content of STEP
field). [OFF] blanks the (opened) STEP field.
Offset
(display field); indicates the frequency offset of the RF input
signal from the tuning frequency of the test receiver (display >>>>>>: measuring range exceeded). The field is not
displayed if the COUNT function is called up.
AF GEN A
(pure numeric field); the entered value defines the modulation frequency of modulation generator GEN A (the same
applies to the GEN B field when the GEN B option is
installed).
Lev
(mixed numeric field [mV, V, dBm]); the content determines
the level of modulation generator GEN A. As long as an
entry has not yet been terminated with [ENTER], [UNIT/SCROLL]
will permit selection of the units (the same applies to the
GEN B option). The following applies to the dBm unit: the
output impedance must be set to 600 Ω so that the level on
the MOD GEN socket corresponds to the display in the
Lev. field. If the field is inverted but no entry has been
commenced, [UNIT/SCROLL] leads to selection of the class of
demodulation, recognizable in the mask header.
EXT
(display field); points out that the EXT MOD input socket
has been connected to the modulation-signal path with
[EXT] (automatically AC-coupled in the TX mode).
4-13
4
Basic TX Mask
Available instruments
Available instruments
RMS
(RMS AF voltmeter and AF frequency counter); call up with
[VOLT].
dBr
(relative level measurement); call up with [dB_REL].
DIST
(distortion meter); call up with
DEMOD
(modulation meter); called up automatically.
OFFSET
[DIST].
(analog display of frequency offset); call up with
{ZOOM}
+
{OFFSET}.
PWR
(RF power meter); called up automatically as long as the
RF socket is selected.
AF POWER
(AF power meter); call up alternatively to RMS by GENERAL PARAMETERS mask.
SEL.PWR
(selective RF power meter); call up with {SPECIAL} + {SEL.PWR}.
VSWR
(display of voltage standing-wave ratio with option VSWR
measuring head); alternative function of {SEL.PWR}.
Meter locations in basic TX mask
Fig. 4.7:
1 = PWR
2 = DEMOD
3 = RMS oru dBr or AF POWER or DIST
4-14
Callup of mask
Basic DUPLEX Mask
Basic DUPLEX Mask
The basic DUPLEX mask simultaneously activates the signal generator and the
test receiver (DUPLEX unit) of the 4032.
Fig. 4.8: Mask DUPLEX ; contents of entry
fields = default values (settings of ex works).
4
Callup of mask
Strike the key arranged between the [TX] and [RX] keys until the "DUPLEX" LED
illuminates (callup is only possible if the DUPLEX FM/ΦM Demodulator is installed).
Functions of softkeys
{RF_DIR}
(alternative function: {RF}); determines which of the two RF
input/output sockets (RF DIRECT or RF) is coupled to the
test receiver and signal generator. Exception: the broadband RF power meter (PWR instrument) and the DUPLEX
stage are connected directly to the RF socket and thus not
affected by any switchover of the coupling.
If the maximum permissible input power on socket RF
DIRECT (500 mW) is exceeded, the input stage will be
destroyed!
{CONT_OFF}
(alternative function: {EMF_CONT}); blanks the numeric field
CONT from the mask (displayed again with {EMF_CONT}).
{EMF}
(alternative function: {50_Á}); determines whether the level
of the signal generator set with the Level field is the EMF
or the output level measured into 50 Ω. The EMF function
cannot be called up if dBm units are selected in the Level
entry field.
4-15
Basic DUPLEX Mask
Meaning of fields
{SPECIAL}
takes you to the selection menu of the DUPLEX Specials
(see "DUPLEX Specials").
{PEAKHOLD}
(alternative function: {NORM}); {PEAKHOLD} makes the DEMOD modulation meter store the highest value measured
and constantly display it. In AM measurements modulation
peaks are only detected at the instant of sampling. With
{NORM} the DEMOD instrument always displays the momentary modulation.
{ZOOM}
takes you to the selection menu for displaying full-format
instruments (see "Zoom").
Meaning of fields
RF Frequency
(mixed numeric field [MHz, NoL, NoU]); determines in the
RX part of the mask the carrier frequency of the signal
generator, in the TX part of the mask the tuning frequency
of the test receiver. For the automatic offset of the frequency values by the duplex spacing and linking of the
frequency values to the channel numbers (NoL and NoU)
the same applies as in the GENERAL PARAMETERS
mask.
Offset
(pure numeric field/display field); enables fine tuning of the
carrier frequency in the RX part of the mask. In the TX part
of the mask the Offset field indicates a frequency offset
between the applied RF signal and the tuning frequency of
the test receiver.
Level
(mixed numeric field [dBm, dBµ, µV/mV]); the content determines the level of the signal generator (Level/50Ω →
level into 50 Ω; Level/EMF → level is EMF). As long as an
entry has not yet been terminated with [ENTER], the required
units can be assigned to the entered value with
[UNIT/SCROLL]. If an entry has been terminated with [ENTER],
[UNIT/SCROLL] then causes conversion of the entered value to
the other units. [OFF] switches the signal generator off; for
this purpose the Level field must be open. Switch on again
with [LEVEL].
CONT
(hidden numeric field); the content defines a continuous
RF-level setting range (with no switching interruptions by
the attenuator), as required for squelch measurements.
The CONT field can be cut in/out with the softkey
{EMF_CONT}/{CONT_OFF}. Instead of the CONT field the STEP
field can be called up.
4-16
Instruments of basic DUPLEX mask
Basic DUPLEX Mask
STEP
(hidden numeric field); can be assigned to the (opened)
Level field with [STEP]. As long as the STEP field is inverted, the plus/minus keys permit step by step alteration of
the RF output level (step width = content of STEP field).
[OFF] blanks the (opened) STEP field. Instead of the STEP
field the CONT field can also be displayed.
AF GEN A
(pure numeric field); the entered value defines the modulation frequency of modulation generator GEN A (the same
applies to the GEN B field when the optional modulation
generator GEN B is installed).
Mod
(mixed numeric field [rad, %, kHz]); the content of this field
determines the modulation of the carrier signal (phase
deviation, modulation depth or frequency deviation). As
long as an entry has not yet been terminated with [ENTER],
the required units can be assigned to the entered value with
[UNIT/SCROLL]. Thus the class of modulation/demodulation is
set at the same time (AM not possible).
EXT
(scroll field); the scroll variables (AC and DC coupled)
determine the coupling of the external modulation-signal
source. The field is only produced on the screen if the EXT
MOD input socket has been connected to the modulationsignal path with [EXT].
Instruments of basic DUPLEX mask
RMS
(RMS AF voltmeter and AF frequency counter); call up with
[VOLT].
dBr
(relative level measurement); call up with [dB_REL].
DIST
(distortion meter); call up with [DIST].
SINAD
(SINAD meter); call up with [SINAD].
MOD
(modulation meter RX); call up with [RX_MOD/MOD_GEN].
DEMOD
(modulation meter TX); call up with [DEMOD].
OFFSET
(analog display of frequency offset); call up with
{ZOOM}
+
{OFFSET}.
PWR
(RF power meter); called up automatically.
AF POWER
(AF power meter); call up alternatively to RMS by GENERAL PARAMETERS mask.
4-17
4
Basic DUPLEX Mask
Meter locations in basic DUPLEX mask
Meter locations in basic DUPLEX mask
Fig. 4.9:
1 = PWR
2 = DEMOD or MOD
3 = RMS or dBr or AF POWER or DIST or
SINAD
4-18
Callup of mask
GENERAL PARAMETERS
GENERAL PARAMETERS
In this mask declarations can be made about generally valid operating parameters. A total reset replace the declarations with the default settings that are made
ex works.
"
Calling up system programs (SYSTEM CARDs) can alter the declarations in the
mask fields.
4
Fig. 4.10: Mask GENERAL PARAMETERS;
contents of entry fields = default values
(settings ex works).
Fig. 4.11: Mask GENERAL PARAMETERS
after {-_ETC_-}.
Callup of mask
[AUX]
+ {DEF.PAR}
Functions of softkeys
{STATUS}
leads to callup of the status mask.
{-_ETC_-}
turns to the second page of the GENERAL PARAMETERS
mask ({RETURN} takes you back to the first page).
{RETURN}
takes you back to the OPTION CARD mask.
4-19
GENERAL PARAMETERS
Meaning of fields
Meaning of fields
Channel space
(pure numeric field); the content determines the channel
spacing when you work with channel numbers.
Duplex space
(pure numeric field); in the DUPLEX mask the entered
value produces automatic offset of the transmit and receive
frequencies by the duplex spacing (see also RX ↔ TX
field).
Channel
(pure numeric field); the entered channel number is assigned to the frequency stated in the Corresp. frequ.
field.
Corresp. frequ
(pure numeric field); the entered frequency is assigned to
the channel number declared in the Channel field.
Channel no.
(scroll field); the two scroll variables (arrow pointing up or
down) determine whether the frequency increases or decreases with ascending channel number when you are
working with channel numbers.
RX ↔ TX (MHz)
(scroll field); the three scroll variables enable the following
declarations when you work with frequency values in the
DUPLEX mask:
RX > TX
the carrier frequency of the signal
generator, offset by the duplex spacing,
is automatically above the tuning
frequency of the test receiver.
RX < TX
the carrier frequency of the signal
generator, offset by the duplex spacing,
is automatically below the tuning
frequency of the test receiver.
NOT
the signal generator and the test
receiver can be tuned as wished, there
is no automatic coupling.
AF meter
(scroll field); the three scroll variables affect the RMS instrument:
RMS
the RMS voltmeter is displayed in the
masks.
dBm
instead of the RMS instrument the AF
power meter AF POWER (meter display:
dBm into 600 Ω) is displayed in the
masks if the VOLTM input socket is
coupled.
WATT
as described under "dBm", but meter
display in watts (select the reference
impedance in the adjacent pure numeric
field).
4-20
Meaning of fields
RF power
GENERAL PARAMETERS
(scroll field with four scroll variables); two scroll variables
determine whether the RF power meters PWR and
SEL.PWR indicate the measured value in watts or dBm
(into 50 Ω).
In modulation mode AM the RF power meter PWR displays
peak power if one of the scroll variables is set to WATT
PEAK 5 W or WATT PEAK 150 W (power range 5 W
respectively 150 W). In that case PEAK is displayd on the
power meter.
Pre-attenuation (pure numeric field); in TX testing the content automatically
corrects the measured value with externally connected
pre-attenuation (eg display of the actual transmitted power
before the attenuator). In RX testing the actual RF output
level is greater by the value in the Pre-attenuation field
than the value indicated in the Level field. Level shows the
level that the radio set receives (level after the external
attenuator). Example: see following page.
If any other value than 0 is entered in the Pre-attenuation field, the pointer ATT appears at appropriate points
in the basic masks to draw your attention to the correction
of the measured value or level (eg next to the Level field
and in the header of the PWR instrument).
Delay (TX-Sens) (pure numeric field); the content of the field defines a time
duration. This time is waited when the TX Special SENS
(measurement of modulation sensitivity) is running after
each alteration of the set variable so that transient responses of the radio transmitter can decay
Delay (Squelch) (pure numeric field); the content of the field defines a time
duration. This time is waited when the RX Special
SQUELCH (measurement of squelch characteristics) is
running after each alteration of the set variable so that
transient responses of the radio receiver can decay.
Delay (Decode)
(pure numeric field); the content of the field defines a time
duration (0 to 999 ms). The decoder of the 4032 is activated
delayed by this time after keying of the radio transmitter.
Requirements: TX or DUPLEX mask called up; RF socket
coupled; demodulated signal is decoded; no continuous
input signal but transmitter keying. Application: avoiding
transients of the transmitter of the test item when decoding
(selective call or VDEW extension dialing).
4-21
4
GENERAL PARAMETERS
Meaning of fields
Printer
(scroll field); the scroll variables HP-2225, EPSON FX80
and PT 88 produce matching of the IEEE-488 interface
(data format) to the printers of the same name with an
IEEE-488 interface. If the optional RS-232/Centronics interface is incorporated, the scroll variables RS232 and
Centronics can also be set. In this case the "Epson
Graphics" data format automatically applies for output on
these interfaces. The Mem.Card scroll variable diverts
print output to MEMORY CARD.
RS232 Config
(scroll field); with scroll variables it is possible to set eight
different communication protocols for the RS-232 interface
(number of data bits, even/odd parity, number of stop bits).
The control commands for this interface are described in
Chapter 8.
RS232 Baudrate
(scroll field); with eight scroll variables the baud rate for
data transfer on the RS-232 interface can be set between
110 Baud and 9600 Baud.
Serial Input
Terminator
(scroll field); six scroll variables like CR+LF or EOT define
the end marking necessary for the RS-232 control command SER_In (see Chapter 8). If scroll variable Number is
set, a 3-digit number can also be entered in a numeric field
to define after how many incoming characters the serial
reading operation is terminated (see also Chapter 8, special commands WRITE or SLAVE).
Serial Input
Handshake
(scroll field); the scroll variables RTS ↔ CTS and No
Handshake define whether the level on pin 4 of the RS232 interface signals that STABILOCK 4032 is ready to
receive. If scroll variable RTS ↔ CTS is entered and the
Communication Test Set is ready to receive, pin 4 will be
High. If the set is not ready to receive, pin 4 is Low. With No
Handshake pin 4 is always Low and the set does not show
its readiness to receive. Readiness to send of the opposite
station (CTS signal) is checked independently of the selected scroll variable. For this, apply the CTS signal to pin 5 In
addition to this hardware handshake, a software handshake is also possible (see Chapter 8, special commands
WRITE or SLAVE).
Needle damping
(pure numeric field); the entered value determines the
needle damping of the simulated pointer meters as soon as
the automatic range switching has been replaced by a fixed
measurement range (large value = strong damping).
4-22
Meaning of fields
GENERAL PARAMETERS
Demod
(RMS Value)
(scroll field); the scroll variables kHz and mv/V define
whether, in TX mode, the RMS meter displays the level of
the demodulated signal with the unit mV/V after [DEMOD]
(normal case) or the level is converted to the corresponding
frequency deviation (average value) and the result is displayed. Use this average indication if the DEMOD meter
(peak indication) fails to produce a clear reading (eg when
interference is superimposed).
Screen Saver
(scroll field); if the X scroll variable is entered, the screen
protection is activated after about 20 to 25 min. A blank in
the scroll field shuts down the screen protection. In this
case the brightness has to be reduced to prevent burns
(see also Chapter 2, Meaning of Rotary Knobs, INTENS).
When the Communication Test Set is switched on again or
after [CLEAR], the screen protection is automatically activated.
4-23
4
GENERAL PARAMETERS
Example: Pre-attenuation
Example: Pre-attenuation
If you work with external pre-attenuation, and this is correctly entered in the
Pre-attenuation field, you do not have to make any further allowance for the
pre-attenuation.
TX measurements:
Fig. 4.12: You want to measure the RF power
of a 100-W transmitter over a longish period.
The maximum permissible continuous input
power on the RF socket is 50 W however.
Thus external pre-attenuation of, for example, 3 dB is necessary. Without an entry in the
Pre-attenuation field the 4032 would
then indicate 50 W. If you enter the value 3 in
the Pre-attenuation field, the 4032 indicates the actual transmitted power, ie 100 W.
The entry saves you subsequent correction of
the measured value with the possibility of
making an error. But make sure that the entry
in the Pre-attenuation field is also altered if you change the pre-attenuation!
RX measurements:
Fig. 4.13: You have provided external pre-attenuation of, for example, 3 dB for TX measurements and now want to carry out RX
measurements without removing the pre-attenuation. The value 3 is still entered in the
Pre-attenuation field. The Level field indicates 5 µV for example. This is the level
directly on the RF input of the radio set. The
actual output level of the 4032 signal generator is 7 µV to compensate for the effect of the
attenuator. Again make sure that the entry in
the Pre-attenuation field is altered if you
change the pre-attenuation!
4-24
Function of instruments
ZOOM
ZOOM
This chapter shows the zoom display of the analog instruments that can be called
up proceeding from the basic RX, TX and DUPLEX (option) masks.
Function of instruments
PWR
MOD
4
Fig. 4.14: Instrument PWR. Broadband RF
power meter; measures signals fed in on
the RF socket. Selection of the units in the
GENERAL PARAMETERS mask (RF Power field).
Fig. 4.15: Instrument MOD. Modulation
meter RX; indicates the modulation of the
4032 signal generator.
OFFSET
DEMOD
Fig. 4.16: Instrument OFFSET. Frequencyoffset meter; indicates the frequency offset
of a carrier signal applied to the RF or RF
DIRECT socket from the tuning frequency
of the 4032 test receiver contained in the
entry field RF Frequency.
Fig. 4.17: Instrument DEMOD. Modulation
meter TX; indicates the modulation of the
RF signal applied to the RF or RF DIRECT
socket.
4-25
ZOOM
Function of instruments
RMS
dBr
Fig. 4.18: Instrument RMS. RMS AF voltmeter and AF frequency counter; after
[RX_MOD/MOD_GEN] the display applies for the
modulation signal, after [DEMOD] for the demodulated signal and after [VOLTM] for the
signal applied to the VOLTM socket.
Fig. 4.19: Instrument dBr. Level meter (relative); the reference level (0 dB) is the level
indicated by the RMS meter immediately
before the dBr instrument is called up.
DIST
SINAD
Fig. 4.20: Instrument DIST. Distortion-factor meter; the display applies to the same
signal sources described for the RMS instrument.
Fig. 4.21: Instrument SINAD. SINAD meter; after [RX_MOD/MOD_GEN] the display applies
for the modulation signal, after [VOLTM] for
the signal applied to the VOLTM socket.
4-26
Function of instruments
ZOOM
AF PWR
Fig. 4.22: Instrument AF-POWER. AF power meter; measures the power of the signal applied to the VOLTM socket. Selection
of the units in the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask (AF Meter field).
4
4-27
ZOOM
Callup of instruments
Callup of instruments
Each of the three basic masks offers the {ZOOM} softkey. {ZOOM} produces reassignment of the softkeys with the designations of the instruments that can
momentarily be zoomed. The selection menu that is offered is determined in part
by the operating status of the 4032. The following variants are possible:
RX-Maske
POWER - MOD - RMS
after striking [VOLT] key, if RMS is declared in
GENERAL PARAMETERS mask (AF Meter
field).
POWER - MOD - dBr
after
[dB_REL]
POWER - MOD - DIST
after
[DIST]
POWER - MOD - SINAD
after
[SINAD]
POWER - MOD - AF PWR
after [VOLTM] + [VOLT], if dBm or WATT is
declared in GENERAL PARAMETERS mask
(AF Meter field).
TX-Maske
POWER - OFFSET - DEMOD - RMS
after striking [VOLT] key, if RMS is declared in
GENERAL PARAMETERS mask (AF Meter
field).
POWER - OFFSET - DEMOD - dBr
after
[dB_REL]
POWER - OFFSET - DEMOD - DIST
after
[DIST]
POWER - OFFSET - DEMOD - AF PWR after [VOLTM] + [VOLT], if dBm or WATT is
declared in GENERAL PARAMETERS mask
(AF Meter field).
DUPLEX-Maske
POWER - OFFSET - DEMOD - RMS
after striking [VOLT] key, if RMS is declared in
GENERAL PARAMETERS mask (AF Meter
field).
POWER - OFFSET - DEMOD - dBr
after
[dB_REL]
POWER - OFFSET - DEMOD - DIST
after
[DIST]
POWER- OFFSET - DEMOD - SINAD
after
[SINAD]
POWER - OFFSET - DEMOD - AF PWR after [VOLTM] + [VOLT], if dBm or WATT is
declared in GENERAL PARAMETERS mask
(AF Meter field).
4-28
Functions of softkeys
ZOOM
Striking the appropriate softkey produces large-format display of the required
instrument. Thereby the actual input field of the basic mask is transferred to the
enlarged format display. If wished, [CCITT] inserts the CCITT P53-A filter in the
signal path to the AF instruments RMS/dBr/AF PWR, DIST and SINAD.
Functions of softkeys
Without any special declaration the analog instruments will work with automatic
switching of the measurement range. If this is not wished, the measurement
range can be adapted to requirements very effectively.
{RANGE}
inserts in the header of the instruments the numeric fields
Center and Range +/-. The two numeric fields permit
individual definition of a measurement range. If a measurement range has already been specified in this way, it will
become valid again after {RANGE}.
{AUTO}
produces automatic switching of the measurement range.
If a measurement range has already been specified with
the RANGE function, it will be replaced by the automatic
range switching. {AUTO} does not delete the specified measurement range however; it immediately becomes valid
again after {RANGE}.
{RETURN}
takes you back to the particular basic mask without adopting a specified measurement range in the normal display
of the instrument concerned. After {RETURN} the basic
masks again show the instruments that were displayed
before calling up the zoom function, with automatic switching of the measurement range.
4-29
4
ZOOM
Meaning of fields
Meaning of fields
Center
(pure or mixed numeric field, depending on the instrument);
the content of the field is assigned to the scale centre of the
instrument.
Range +/-
(pure numeric field); the content of the field defines the
upper and lower end of the scale, referred to the centre
value.
Example: Center = 160 mV; Range +/- = 20.00 →
pointer at lower end of scale corresponds to 140 mV, at
upper end of scale to 180 mV.
xxxxxxx
(numeric or scroll field); the activated input field (brightened
up) of the basic mask will be transferred into the enlarged
format display and displayed at the bottom right corner of
the screen. As long as this field is activated on the zoomed
display, the field content can be varied the usual way (for
example, value variation using the spin wheel). The reaction can be simultanuously red on the meter.
4-30
Callup and start of an RX Special
RX SPECIALS
RX SPECIALS
RX Specials are complete programs that execute typical receiver tests within
seconds (sensitivity, IF bandwidth and centre-frequency offset, AF frequency
response, squelch characteristic). Relevant test parameters can be set beforehand as wished. The RX Specials are a standard part of the 4032.
Callup and start of an RX Special
The selection menu of the RX Specials is called up from the basic RX mask with
{SPECIAL}. This produces reassignment of the softkeys with the available Special
functions (selection menu). At the same time the mask of the last Special used
(Special mask field) is displayed in the bottom half of the basic RX mask.
If you now strike the softkey of the required Special function, the appropriate
mask is called up. [HELP] will mark all fields that can accept entries: In the RX mask
field only set the correct channel frequency (RF Frequency field) plus the test
modulation (Mod. field). The remaining entry fields of the RX mask are filled in
automatically by the Specials.
After the entry of relevant test parameters and selection of scroll variables in the
Special mask field (see below), {RUN} will start the Special. The program can be
aborted with the alternative function {STOP}. {RETURN} takes you back to the basic
RX mask.
RX mask field
Fig. 4.23: Monitor
display after striking (for the first
time) the {SPECIAL}
softkey. The softkeys then enable
individual Specials
to be called up.
Special mask field
4-31
4
RX SPECIALS
Description of Specials
Description of Specials
{SENS}
measures receiver sensitivity; the Special mask field contains three entry fields (content of the fields in this case
default values):
20 dB
(pure numeric field); enter the required
SINAD or S/N reference value. The value
is stored assigned to the test method so
that the reference value is automatically
adapted if the test method is altered.
SINAD
(scroll field); the selected scroll variable
SINAD or S/N determines the test
method.
dBm
(scroll field); select under the scroll
variables the unit of measurement that
the result is to have.
After the start of the routine the RF level of the signal generator
is successively approximated, beginning at –77 dBm, and
with each step a SINAD or S/N measurement is performed.
This continues until the measured value corresponds to the
given reference value (permissible tolerance: 0.5 dB S/N;
0.8 dB SINAD). The result, the corresponding RF level, is
displayed in the Special mask field with the required unit of
measurement.
Fig. 4.24:
Special SENS.
4-32
Description of Specials
{BANDW}
RX SPECIALS
measures IF bandwidth and centre-frequency offset; the
Special mask field contains one entry field (content in this
case a default value):
6 dB
(pure numeric field); enter the value of
the attenuation to which the bandwidth is
to be referred.
The routine first measures the background noise with noise
suppression of 10 dB. The associated RF level is then
increased by the value of the attenuation (normally 6 dB).
The routine then detunes the carrier frequency towards
greater values until 10 dB noise suppression is reached
again. The frequency offset necessary for this is buffered
and the frequency detuning is repeated, this time towards
smaller values. From the two offset values the routine
computes the bandwidth and the centre-frequency offset
and indicates their values in the Special mask field.
Fig. 4.25:
Special BANDW.
4-33
4
RX SPECIALS
{AF_RESP}
Description of Specials
measures AF frequency response; the Special mask field
contains eight entry fields (content in this case default
values):
1 kHz
(pure numeric field); enter the frequency
that is to represent the reference point 0
dB.
0.15
(pure numeric fields); enter up to seven
bis 6 kHz
frequencies at which the routine is to
measure the AF level.
The routine first determines the AF level at the reference
frequency and sets this value as a reference for relative
level measurement at all seven frequencies. The AF frequency response is thus a display of the relative level
deviation together with the corresponding frequencies.
Fig. 4.26:
Special AF RESP.
{SQUELCH}
4-34
measures the characteristics of the squelch; the Special
mask field contains two entry fields (content in this case
default values):
RX MUTE
(scroll field); select the scroll variable
RX MUTE if the squelch cutout (AF off) is
to be determined. If you set the scroll
variable RX UNMUTE, the squelch cutin
(AF on) is determined.
dBm
(scroll field); select under the scroll
variables the unit of measurement that
the result is to have.
Description of Specials
RX SPECIALS
After the start the Special first continually reduces the RF
level of the signal generator, beginning at –80 dBm, in 5-dB
steps until the squelch switches (AF path blocked). This
roughly determined level is increased by 15 dB and then
reduced again in 1-dB steps until the squelch switches
once more. This level is then increased by 2 dB and reduced in 0.2-dB steps until the squelch again switches. The
level obtained in this way is the squelch cutout value RX
MUTE.
If the cutin value of the squelch is called for, the routine then
increases the level again, proceeding from the RX MUTE
value, in 0.2-dB steps until the squelch enables the AF path
(RX UNMUTE). The squelch hysteresis is the difference
between the two levels.
With the exception of the first approximation to the cutout
value RX MUTE, all changes in level are made with the aid
of the CONT function (continuous alteration of level without
interruption).
If transient responses in the receiver disturb the measurement, a delay should be entered in the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask in the Delay field (squelch). The routine
then waits a suitable length of time after each change in RF
level before checking the AF level.
In the Special mask field the hysteresis plus the MUTE or
UNMUTE value are indicated. [UNIT/SCROLL] shows the other
value depending on which scroll field brightens up.
Fig. 4.27:
Special SQUELCH.
4-35
4
TX SPECIALS
Callup and start of a TX Special
TX SPECIALS
TX Specials are complete programs that perform the two typical transmitter tests
of modulation sensitivity and AF frequency response within seconds. Relevant
test parameters can be set beforehand as wished. The TX Specials are a
standard part of the 4032.
Callup and start of a TX Special
The selection menu of the TX Specials is called up from the basic TX mask with
{SPECIAL}. This produces reassignment of the softkeys with the Special functions
{SENS} and {AF_RESP} (the other functions SEL.PWR and DC-CAL. are not Specials;
there is more about this at the end of the chapter). At the same time the mask of
the last Special used (Special mask field) is displayed in the bottom half of the
basic TX mask.
If you now strike the softkey of the required Special function, the appropriate
mask is called up. [HELP] marks all fields that can accept entries:
In the TX mask field only set the correct channel frequency (RF Frequency
field) plus the modulation frequency (AF GEN A field). The other entry fields of
the TX mask are filled in automatically by the Specials.
After the entry of relevant test parameters and selection of scroll variables in the
Special mask field (see below), {RUN} will start the Special. The program can be
aborted with the alternative function {STOP}. {RETURN} takes you back to the basic
TX mask.
Description of Specials
{SENS}
4-36
measures modulation sensitivity; the Special mask field
contains two entry fields (content of the fields in this case
default values):
Deviation
(pure numeric field); in this field enter the
modulation value to which the sensitivity
is to be referred (eg test modulation).
expected
(pure numeric field); in this field enter the
Value
value of modulation sensitivity that you
expect.
Description of Specials
TX SPECIALS
To prevent the transient responses of modulators with AGC
from affecting the measurement, a delay (pause between
the individual measurements of the routine) can be entered
in the Delay (TX Sens) field of the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask.
The SENS routine first checks whether the required modulation is exceeded at twice the expected value. If this is not
so, the routine is terminated and you can start the Special
again with an expected value that has been corrected
upwards. If the first check shows a relevant value however,
this will start the actual measuring routine.
The program first determines what modulation results from
half the expected value of the AF level, computes from this
information the slope of the modulation characteristic and
then sets the AF level that will most likely produce the
required modulation. If this level results in modulation with
±2 % tolerance referred to the rating, the routine will report
this level as the result in the Special mask field. If the
modulation is outside of the tolerance window however, the
routine calculates the slope again from the last current
measured value and then tries again to approximate to the
correct AF level.
If the characteristic is very nonlinear and the approximation
is unsuccessful, the routine again sets half the expected
value, increases the level step by step by 5 % of half the
expected value and thus approaches the rating for the
modulation. In this case the result will show an error of
maximally ±5 %.
Fig. 4.28:
Special SENS.
4-37
4
TX SPECIALS
{AF_RESP}
Description of Specials
measures AF frequency response; the Special mask field
contains eight entry fields:
1 kHz
(pure numeric field); enter the frequency that
is to represent the reference point 0 dB.
(pure numeric fields); enter up to seven
0.15 kHz
... 6 kHz
frequencies at which the routine is to
measure the AF level.
The routine evaluates the demodulation signal coming
from the 4032 test receiver (automatic switchover to DEMOD). First the AF level is determined at the reference
frequency, and then this value is used as a reference for
relative level measurement at all seven test frequencies.
The result for the AF frequency response is indication of the
relative level deviation together with the corresponding
frequencies.
Fig. 4.29:
Special AF RESP.
4-38
Meaning of other softkeys
TX SPECIALS
Meaning of other softkeys
{SEL.PWR}
(alternative function: {VSWR}); {SEL.PWR} inserts the simulated pointer instrument of the selective RF power meter
(bandwidth = 30 kHz) in the Special mask field. In contrast
to the broadband RF power meter PWR, the small signal at
P < 0 dBm may be applied to the RF DIRECT socket.
Declarations in the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask permit selection of the unit of measurement and automatic
correction of the measured value with external pre-attenuation (see also Chapter 9).
Fig. 4.30:
Selective RF power
meter.
{VSWR}
inserts the display field of the VSWR meter in the Special
mask field (VSWR measurement needs option VSWR
measuring head; see Chapter 9).
Fig. 4.31:
VSWR display.
{DC-CAL.}
produces DC calibration of the FM demodulator
in the 4032. This adjustment is necessary if the zero of the
demodulated signal is of importance. Data telegrams that
are transmitted by the NRZ (non return to zero) method, for
instance, require correct zero adjustment of the demodulator so that data bits 1 and 0 are reliably detected. {DC-CAL.}
does not call up any mask.
{DC-CAL.}
4-39
4
DUPLEX SPECIALS
Callup and start of a DUPLEX Special
DUPLEX SPECIALS
In the DUPLEX mode (option, calls for DUPLEX FM/ΦM stage) the 4032 offers
routines for measuring signal transfer (DESENS), AF frequency response and
DC zero adjustment of the FM demodulator.
Callup and start of a DUPLEX Special
The menu of the DUPLEX Special is called up from the basic DUPLEX mask with
{SPECIAL}. This leads to reassignment of the softkeys with the Special functions
{DESENS} and {AF_RESP} (the {DC-CAL.} function is not a Special). At the same time
the mask of the Special that was last used is displayed in the bottom half of the
basic DUPLEX mask (Special mask field).
Tap the softkey of the required Special function to call up the appropriate mask.
will then mark all fields that can accept entries:
Set the correct channel frequencies in the DUPLEX mask field (RF Frequency
fields) and the required test modulation (Mod. field). The selection of the AF
signal path (eg DEMOD or VOLTM) and of the instruments (eg SINAD meter or
dBr meter) is made by the Specials automatically.
[HELP]
After the entry of relevant test parameters and selection of scroll variables in the
Special mask field (see below), {RUN} will start the Special. The program can be
aborted with the alternative function {STOP}. {RETURN} takes you back to the basic
DUPLEX mask.
4-40
Description of Specials
DUPLEX SPECIALS
Description of Specials
{DESENS}
measures signal transfer in duplex operation, ie desensitizing or how much the sensitivity of the radio receiver is
reduced when the radio transmitter is operating. The Special mask field contains two entry fields (content of the
fields in this case default values):
20 dB
(pure numeric field); enter the required
SINAD or S/N reference value. The value
is stored assigned to the test method so
that the reference value is automatically
adapted if the test method is altered.
SINAD
(scroll field); the selected scroll variable
SINAD or S/N determines the test
method.
The DESENS routine first performs the RX Special SENS
and determines the receiver sensitivity with the radio transmitter switched off (measured value S1). Then an instruction appears at the bottom edge of the monitor telling you
to key the transmitter or switch to TX. If this is not done
within about eight seconds, the routine will be terminated.
Otherwise the receiver sensitivity is measured again (value
S2). The result of the measurement, the difference between the two measured values (desensitizing), appears in
the Special mask field in dB.
Fig. 4.32:
Special DESENS.
4-41
4
DUPLEX SPECIALS
{AF_RESP}
Meaning of other softkeys
measures AF frequency response; the Special mask field
has eight entry fields:
1 kHz
(pure numeric field); enter the frequency
that is to be the 0 dB reference point.
0.15
(pure numeric fields); enter up to seven
bis 6 kHz
frequencies at which the routine is to
measure the AF level.
The input signal for the DUPLEX transceiver is that of the
4032 signal generator. The signal returned from the transceiver, offset by the duplex spacing, is evaluated. First the
routine modulates the signal generator with the reference
frequency and determines for this frequency the AF level
on the output of the DUPLEX FM/ΦM demodulator. This
measured value is the reference value for relative level
measurement at all seven test frequencies. The result for
the AF frequency response is indication of the relative level
deviation for the corresponding frequencies.
Fig. 4.33:
Special AF RESP.
Meaning of other softkeys
{DC-CAL.}
4-42
produces DC calibration of the FM demodulator
in the 4032. This adjustment is necessary if the zero of the
demodulated signal is of importance. Data telegrams that
are transmitted by the NRZ (non return to zero) method, for
instance, require correct zero adjustment of the demodulator so that data bits 1 and 0 are reliably detected. {DC-CAL.}
does not call up any mask.
{DC-CAL.}
Calling up the mask
OPTION CARD
OPTION CARD
The OPTION CARD mask enables you to:
a) operate the modules installed on the OPTION CARD (see also Chapter 9);
b) branch to masks of software options loaded from memory card (see also
Chapter 7);
c) call up the mask for operating control interface A, B or C (see also Chapter 9);
d) branch to DTMF mask (see also Chapter 5);
e) branch to mask levels of selective-call systems (see also Chapter 5);
f) call up the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask.
"
4
a) through d) only with corresponding options installed.
Fig. 4.34: OPTION CARD mask: OPTION
CARD shown equipped with the 300-Hz
highpass filter, 3-kHz lowpass filter and CNet Expander.
Calling up the mask
[AUX]
That mask can be started from any other mask.
4-43
OPTION CARD
Softkey functions
Softkey functions
{DATA}
Activates the DATA MODULE option, automatically loads
the system program (software option) from the inserted
SYSTEM CARD and calls up the corresponding mask.
{DATA} produces entry into the test procedure for radio-data
sets and cellular radiotelephones.
{CONTROL}
(Optional) Calls up the CONTROL INTERFACE mask
(control of the optional control interface).
{SEQU}
Calls up the basic sequential mask (testing of selective-call
sets).
{DTMF}
(Optional) Calls up the DTMF mask (control of the optional
DTMF module).
{DEF.PAR}
Calls up the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask.
{RETURN}
Returns to the mask from where the OPTION CARD was
called up.
Meaning of the input fields
Filter 1 :
(text field/scroll field); if the slot Bu 1 on the OPTION CARD
is still vacant, the text field is followed by dashes. If a filter
module is inserted in the slot however, the text field is
followed by a scroll field and a display field (brief designation of the installed, optional module). The scroll field uses
the variables "X" and """ (space).
X
Filter will be connected into the AF signal
path when leaving the OPTION CARD
mask (see block diagram next page).
"
Filter will be cut out of the AF signal path
when leaving the mask.
Filter 2 :
(text field/scroll field); function corresponds to that of filter
1, related to slot Bu 2. To connect both filters in series: both
variables = X.
Var Notch:
(text field/scroll field); if the variable notch filter is installed
on the OPTION CARD, it substitutes, by selecting scroll
variable X, the standard notch filter. [DIST] connects the
variable notch filter (f = 200 to 600 Hz, self-tuning) into the
AF signal path for distortion measurement.
"
When measuring distortion all other filters have to be switched off.
4-44
Meaning of the input fields
Option:
OPTION CARD
(text field/scroll field); if a module is installed in slot Bu 6 on
the OPTION CARD (eg C-Net Expander), the module can
be connected into the AF signal path by selecting scroll
variable X (see Fig. 4.35 ).
4
Fig. 4.35: Block diagram: Switchable paths of signal sources TX DEMOD and C-Net
Expander to meters RMS/dBr (RMS level meter/relative level meter) and DEMOD (modulation meter).
Filters 1,2 and
CCITT are also
used for
demodulation
measurements
(scroll field); With this scroll field you can decide whether
the signal of the momentary AF signal source goes to the
DEMOD meter directly or filtered (see also Fig. 4.35). This
is selected with the scroll variables "X" and """ (space):
X
"
Filters activated on the OPTION CARD
(filter 1 and/or filter 2) and/or the standard CCITT filter are inserted in the AF
signal path to the DEMOD meter when
you leave the OPTION CARD mask. The
note FLT in the header of the DEMOD
meter shows that the signal is now
filtered.
The signal of the momentary AF signal
source goes to the DEMOD meter unfiltered.
If the 4-kHz bandpass filter (option) is cut into the AF signal
path for example, it is possible in NMT systems to filter out
the pilot tone (SAT) and measure its shift.
Independently of the choice of scroll variables the RMS
meter is fed with the filtered signal as soon as the CCITT
filter and/or a filter on the OPTION CARD is activated.
4-45
OPTION CARD
Meters of the mask OPTION CARD
Meters of the mask OPTION CARD
DC VOLT
DC AMPERE
DC voltmeter; calls for module 248 172 on OPTION CARD.
DC ammeter; calls for module 248 172 on OPTION CARD.
The ZOOM field can be located with the cursor keys. If the field is brightened up,
[UNIT/SCROLL] calls up the full-format display of the instrument on the screen
The signal inputs for both meters are on the back panel, OPTION CARD:
Bu 91 and Bu 92
Bu 93 and Bu 94
ammeter
voltmeter
For further information see Chapter 9, DC Voltmeter/Ammeter.
TTL INPUTS
If the 4032 is equipped with one of the control interfaces (option), the TTL INPUTS
field shows the logic levels applied to the TTL inputs of the control interface. The
first three digits relate to the trigger inputs, the remaining eight digits relate to the
TTL inputs of socket Bu 22 of the control interface (see also Chapter 9).
4-46
Applications
5
Introduction
Introduction
In this chapter we shall be looking at solutions to typical measuring tasks: put the
Communication Test Set into its basic TX or RX setting and then turn to the
section shown in the contents for the measuring task you wish to carry out. Each
section is a complete application: concrete entry instructions for the 4032, a list
of the boundary conditions that are to be maintained plus information about the
purpose of the measurement and indications of permissible limit values.
Measurements that are normally time-consuming are speedily carried out with
the "Specials" of the 4032. If the 4032 offers a Special for a particular measuring
task, the entry instructions are headed "Special Measurement". The entry instructions for common, purely manual measurements are also listed (in addition) if
there is a Special. The entry instructions are always contained in a frame: the
entries on the left, and a brief explanation on the right.
"
For the entry instructions it is assumed that the measurement concerned is a
one-shot measurement. This means that all the necessary entries are listed. For
series of measurements however it is sufficient to enter parameters like test
modulation or reference frequencies just once because the 4032 retains these
values. In the course of series of measurements therefore, only the remaining
relevant entry instructions have to be followed.
All settings, limit values and boundary conditions stated in this chapter are based
to a large extent on the Recommendations of the CEPT (Conference of European
Postal and Telecommunications Administrations) for mobile radio services. Within
these operating instructions the figures are simply intended as realistic examples
however. Only the various national specifications are binding, so consult the
testing regulations or licensing conditions of the responsible PTT administration.
For the terms "maximum frequency deviation" and "(FM) test modulation" used
below, the conditions are the usual ones:
•
•
•
Maximum permissible frequency deviation = ±20 % of the channel spacing,
ie ±4 kHz for a channel spacing of 20 kHz for example.
Test modulation = 60 % of the maximum permissible frequency deviation
(fmod = 1 kHz).
Channel frequency = rated carrier or receiver frequency of the radio set, not
to be confused with the actual frequency of the radio set.
5-3
5
Test Setup
Test Setup
With the test setup that is shown, it will usually be possible to perform all standard
transmitter and receiver measurements. In the case of receiver measurements
the required RF output level will determine whether the radio set has to be
connected to the RF or RF DIRECT socket. Normally connection will be made to
the RF socket.
In transmitter measurements the radio set will also normally be connected to the
RF socket. Depending on the particular measurement however, the input level of
a small signal may be less than the permissible minimum of 10 mW. In such cases
you should use the RF DIRECT socket so that the specifications of the 4032
continue to apply. For precise details of the minimum and maximum values on the
two RF input/output sockets, refer to the data sheet of the communication test set.
SI 4032 STABILOCK
SCHLUMBERGER
REMOTE
UNIVERSAL ANALOG/DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TEST SET
MEMORY
CARD
FREQU
7
8
9
ENTER
LEVEL
4
5
6
UNIT/SCROLL
MOD FREQ
1
2
FM AM OM
0
3
.
OFF
+
-
STEP
INTENS
POWER
ON/OFF
DUPLEX
dB REL
RX
TX
S3
S2
S1
VOLT
S4
SCOPE ANALYZER MEMORY
S6
S5
RX MOD
BEAT DF
DIST
SINAD
CCITT
VOLTM
DEMOD
GEN A
MOD GEN
PRINT
AUX
B/SAT
HELP
EXT
CLEAR
SCOPE INPUT
POS
20 dB
600
RF
DIRECT
DEMOD
600
600
AC
DC
VOLTM
RF
50
MOD GEN
MAX
0,5 W
EMF
<2 V
MAX
EMF
MAX
30 Hz
<2 V
20 V
30 kHz
AF
600
0...20 kHz
RL > 200
AF
MAX
8 Vpp
0...20 kHz
1 M
0...20 kHz
AF
RF
RX
TX
external
Modulation generator
Transceiver
Fig. 5.1: Typical setup for standard RX/TX measurements: The external modulation generator is necessary if modulation overlaying is required and the Communication Test Set is
not fitted with the GEN B option (second internal modulation generator).
5-4
Basic TX Settings
Basic TX Settings
The basic TX settings are the foundation for all standard transmitter measurements. It is sufficient to perform these basic settings once before starting the
actual transmitter measurements. In the course of transmitter measurements the
basic settings will normally be maintained unaltered, meaning that only a few
extra entries are necessary.
1.
[TX]
2.
{RF}
Call up TX mask.
3.
[FREQU]
or
{RF_DIR}
Connect to appropriate input socket.
+ <value> + [ENTER]
Tune test receiver to channel frequency of
radio set and confirm entry.
4.
[MOD_FREQ]
5.
[DEMOD]
6.
[FM_AM_ÉM]
+ <1> +
[ENTER]
fmod = 1 kHz (GEN A).
Demodulated signal is switched through to
AF instruments.
+
[UNIT/SCROLL]
Switch-on of GEN A and selection of
modulation (display TX-AM, TX-FM, TXΦM in mask header).
5
7. Switch on transmitter of radio set
Following the last step of the basic settings the Lev entry field (modulation level
for radio set) in the TX mask is ready to accept a value; the following LEDs must
illuminate red on the front panel of the 4032: TX, DEMOD and GEN A. Now you
can commence any standard transmitter measurement.
If you use TX Specials, you can skip step 5. of the basic TX settings because the
Specials automatically switch the demodulated signal through to the AF instruments.
Fig. 5.2: Basic TX setting: The following operating parameters are declared in the mask
for example:
channel frequency = 75.2750 MHz
fmod = 1.0000 kHz
modulation = FM
RF socket is active input
Lev field is active and expects, depending on
test to be performed, entry or variation of
modulation level.
5-5
Basic TX Settings
Frequency Offset and Carrier Frequency
Frequency Offset and Carrier Frequency
Boundary conditions:
•
•
•
•
Carrier unmodulated
Warning: P > 500 mW on RF DIRECT will destroy input stage!
Observe specified measurement range (see data sheet) in precision offset
measurements because actual measurement range is greater
For carrier-frequency measurement only apply signal to RF socket
Measurement frequency offset
1. Check basic TX settings.
2. Read measured frequency offset in Offset field.
The frequency offset is measured with the accuracy stated in the data sheet up
to the specified value. This accuracy is no longer guaranteed for greater values.
An overflow of the measurement range is signaled by the offset field with the
display ">>>>>>" or "------" (very large offset).
If, after the offset measurement, the test receiver is automatically tuned to the
frequency of the input signal with {COUNT}, the offset field may show a residual
offset of up to ±40 Hz. This residual offset results from the different resolution of
the frequency counter compared to the frequency entry format in the RF Frequency field.
Acoustic adjustment of transmit frequency: If the BEAT function is called up with
the [BEAT/SINAD] key, the frequency offset of the input signal from the tuning
frequency of the test receiver can be heard on the internal loudspeaker (volume
setting with rotary knob).
Measurement carrier frequency
1. Check basic TX settings.
2.
{COUNT}
Switch on frequency counter.
3. Read carrier frequency in RF Frequency field.
If the frequency of the signal reduces during measurement, it is possible in
exceptional cases that the display in the RF Frequency field will not react. In this
case the frequency counter measures an harmonic. If you suspect that the
measurement is erroneous, switch the counter off and back on again immediately
with {OFFSET} + {COUNT} to obtain the correct measured result.
As long as the {COUNT} function is active, the test receiver of the 4032 is
automatically tuned to the measured frequency.
5-6
Frequency Offset and Carrier Frequency
Basic TX Settings
Purpose of measurement
To check whether the carrier frequency of a transmit signal is within tolerances.
If the frequency offset from the rated value exceeds the permissible limit, a
receiver will no longer be able to demodulate the signal properly for example, ie
there will be distortion. Large frequency offsets lead to adjacent-channel interference.
Typical limit values
The permissible frequency offset depends on the frequency range. The CEPT
permits much greater offsets in UHF than in VHF:
Frequency range
Permissible offset
30 bis 50 MHz
±0,60 kHz
50 bis 100 MHz
±1,35 kHz
100 bis 300 MHz
±2,00 kHz
300 bis 1000 MHz
±2,50 kHz
Fig. 5.3: The Offset display field indicates that the carrier frequency of the device
under test deviates from the rated channel
frequency.
5
Fig. 5.4: Carrier frequency: As soon as the
COUNT function is called up, the RF Frequency field indicates the carrier frequency of the device under test.
5-7
Basic TX Settings
RF Power (broadband)
RF Power (broadband)
Boundary conditions
•
•
•
•
Pmax = 50 W (continuous application) or Pmax = 125 W for maximally 1 min
(see also Chapter 1 "Permissible RF input power")
Carrier signal applied unmodulated to RF socket
Check setting of pre-attenuation
If necessary, first perform zero adjustment for PWR meter with {SPECIAL} +
{DC-CAL.} with input open-circuit (for zero adjustment FM modulation must be
selected)
Measurement
1. Check basic TX settings
2. Read average carrier power on PWR meter
The power measurement is broadband with the specification given in the data
sheet. If the measuring unit Watt or dBm is selected in the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask (RF Power field) the PWR instrument displays the average value of
the applied power. In modulation mode AM the peak power is displayed if one of
the scroll variables WATT PEAK 5 W or WATT PEAK 150 W is selected. If
pre-attenuation is applied externally, the resulting falsification of the measured
value can be compensated for automatically by entering the pre-attenuation
value in the Pre-attenuation field of the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask.
The ATT pointer in the header of the PWR meter indicates that the display of the
measured value is corrected by the factor of the pre-attenuation (see "General
Parameters").
Fig. 5.5: Transmitting power: The PWR meter,
which is always displayed in the TX mask,
shows the average carrier power of the device
under test. The measurement is broadband, so
the channel frequency (RF Frequency field)
is insignificant.
5-8
RF Power (broadband)
Basic TX Settings
If the REDUCE RF POWER message appears on the monitor for P > 50 W,
immediately reduce the applied power to P ≤ 50 W (see also Chapter 1, "Permissible RF input power").
Purpose of measurement
To check whether the average carrier power of a radio set meets the specifications. Values that are too low mean a loss of range and values that are too high
produce propagation overshoot.
Typical limit values
The standard value of the carrier power may be exceeded by maximally 2 dB
under extreme test conditions and underrun by maximally 3 dB.
5
5-9
Basic TX Settings
RF Power (test bandwidth 3 MHz)
RF Power (test bandwidth 3 MHz)
Boundary conditions
•
•
•
•
•
Carrier unmodulated
Level > 0 dBm → apply signal to RF socket
Level < 0 dBm → apply signal to RF DIRECT socket
Warning: P > 500 mW on RF DIRECT will destroy input stage!
Check setting of pre-attenuation
Measurement
1. Check basic TX settings.
2.
{COUNT}
Tune 4032 test receiver to frequency of RF
input signal.
3.
{SPECIAL}
Call up menu of TX Specials.
4.
{SEL.PWR}
Switch-on of selective power RF meter.
5. Read measured value on SEL.PWR meter.
The average value of the applied power is measured with 3 MHz bandwidth to
max. +37 dBm (see data sheet). Selection of the measuring unit (Watt or dBm)
in the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask, RF Power field. If pre-attenuation is
applied externally, the resulting falsification of the measured value can be compensated for automatically by entering the pre-attenuation value in the Pre-attenuation field of the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask. The ATT pointer in the
header of the SEL.PWR meter indicates that the display of the measured value
is corrected by the factor of the pre-attenuation (see chapter 4, "General Parameters" ).
It is not possible to measure the power of harmonics because the mixer of the
input stage is in this case overdriven by the fundamental. The display >>>>>
signals overflow of the measurement range. If the message REDUCE RF POWER
appears on the monitor for very high overloading (P > 50 W), reduce the applied
power immediately (see also Chapter 1, "Permissible RF input power").
5-10
RF Power (test bandwidth 3 MHz)
Basic TX Settings
Fig. 5.6: Selective power measurement:
Here the SEL.PWR meter shows the measured value with dBm units because these units
were declared in the RF Power field of the
GENERAL PARAMETERS mask.
5
5-11
Basic TX Settings
Modulation Frequency Response
Modulation Frequency Response
Boundary conditions
•
•
•
•
When applying signal to RF DIRECT socket, observe deviation restriction
(see data sheet)
Warning: P > 500 mW on RF DIRECT will destroy input stage!
Disconnect CCITT filter
Disconnect filter on OPTION CARD (if present)
Special Measurement
1. Check basic TX settings.
2. <value>
Alter modulation level (Lev field) with
handwheel until DEMOD meter shows
required modulation (eg 20 % of maximum
frequency deviation).
3.
{SPECIAL}
Call up menu of TX Specials.
4.
{AF._RESP.}
Special for modulation frequency response.
5. <value> + [ENTER]
Enter 0-dB reference frequency in inverted
field and confirm (unless default is accepted).
6. <cursor d> + <value> + [ENTER]
Alter fmod (7 reference values) if necessary.
7.
Start measuring routine.
{RUN}
8. Read modulation frequency response (7 reference values) from Special mask field.
If the CCITT filter is cut in, a warning signal is heard after {RUN}. Measurement
with the filter is not permissible because the filter characteristic affects the
measured result too much.
Fig. 5.7: Modulation frequency response:
The Special mask field in the bottom half of
the display shows seven reference values for
the modulation frequency response of the
device under test. 1 kHz has been declared
as the 0-dB reference frequency.
5-12
Modulation Frequency Response
Basic TX Settings
Manual Measurement
1. Check basic TX settings.
2. <value>
Alter modulation level (Lev field) with
handwheel until DEMOD meter shows
required modulation (eg 20 % of maximum
frequency deviation).
3.
[dB_REL]
Normalize level of demodulated signal
(fmod = 1 kHz).
4.
[MOD_FREQ]
+ <value>
Vary fmod
5. During step 4. read on dBr meter whether dB tolerance range is maintained.
If the carrier signal of the radio set is phase-modulated, ensure that the maximum
frequency deviation is not exceeded at the highest modulation frequency. The use
of deviation limiting would falsify the measured result. See Introduction for
definition of maximum frequency deviation (page 5-3).
Purpose of measurement
To check whether the frequency or phase deviation or modulation depth of a
carrier signal - depending on the frequency of the modulation signal - remains
within the permissible tolerance range (modulation frequency response). If the
curve of the modulation frequency response goes out of the tolerance range,
transmission quality will be degraded.
Typical limit values for FM and ΦM
For defining a reference point (0 dB) the carrier signal should be modulated with
1 kHz so that the frequency deviation reaches 20 % of maximum deviation (eg
20 % of 4 kHz = 0.8 kHz). If the modulation frequency fmod is then varied between
300 Hz and 6 kHz, the relative AF level of the demodulated signal must remain
within the following tolerances:
fmod
limit values
0,3 kHz...3 kHz:
+1 dB...-3 dB
>3 kHz...<6 kHz
The level may not exceed the value measured at 3 kHz
≥6 kHz
The level must be at least 6 dB below the value
measured at 1 kHz
5-13
5
Basic TX Settings
Modulation Sensitivity
Modulation Sensitivity
Boundary conditions
•
•
•
•
•
When applying signal to RF DIRECT socket, observe deviation restriction
(see data sheet)
Warning: P > 500 mW on RF DIRECT will destroy input stage!
Disconnect CCITT filter
Disconnect filter on OPTION CARD (if present)
If necessary select a delay in the Delay (TX-Sens) field of the GENERAL
PARAMETERS mask
Special Measurement
1. Check basic TX settings.
2.
{SPECIAL}
Call up menu of TX Specials.
3.
{SENS}
Special for modulation sensitivity.
4. <value> + [ENTER]
Enter nominal frequency deviation (eg
value of test modulation) in Deviation
field (unless default is accepted).
5. <cursor d> + <value> + [ENTER]
Enter expected level (sensitivity) in
Expected Value field.
6.
Start measuring routine.
{RUN}
7. Read value displayed to right of expected value.
If the entry in the Expected Value field differs very much from the actual
modulation sensitivity, the Special is terminated after a short duration and "-----"
is indicated as the result.
Manual Measurement
1. Check basic TX settings.
2. <value>
3. Read AF level in Lev field.
5-14
Alter modulation level (Lev field) with
handwheel until DEMOD meter shows
required modulation (eg test modulation).
Modulation Sensitivity
Basic TX Settings
Purpose of measurement
To check what AF level (fmod = 1 kHz) is necessary on the microphone input of
the radio set to produce a certain frequency or phase deviation or modulation
depth (modulation sensitivity). The test parameter "Frequency deviation", "Phase
deviation" or "Modulation depth" is usually the test modulation. The modulation
sensitivity influences the volume information of radiocommunication at the transmitting end.
Typical limit values
The modulation sensitivity also depends very much on the sensitivity of the
microphone that is used, so no typical limit values can be given.
Fig. 5.8: Modulation sensitivity: The Special
SENS was started with the test parameters
Deviation: 2.80 kHz a n d expected
Value: 500 mV. The result shows that the
device under test has modulation sensitivity
of 464 mV.
5
5-15
Basic TX Settings
Modulation Distortion (fmod = 1 kHz)
Modulation Distortion (fmod = 1 kHz)
Boundary conditions
•
•
•
•
Disconnect CCITT filter
Disconnect filter on OPTION CARD (if present)
Warning: P > 500 mW on RF DIRECT will destroy input stage!
Modulation frequency fmod = 1 kHz.
Measurement
1. Check basic TX settings.
2. <value>
Alter modulation level (Lev field) with
handwheel until DEMOD meter shows test
modulation.
3.
Call up DIST meter.
[DIST]
4. Read modulation distortion on DIST meter.
The OPTION CARD, fitted with the variable notch filter, is required (see Chapter 9)
for measuring modulation distortion with modulation frequencies between 200
and 600 Hz (to CEPT).
Purpose of measurement
To check what distortion the AF signal already exhibits at the transmitting end.
The distortion factor is the ratio of the sum RMS value of all harmonics of an AF
signal to the RMS value of the overall AF signal (fundamental plus harmonics). A
large distortion factor degrades transmission quality.
Typical limit values
The distortion factor may not exceed a value of 10 % at fmod = 1 kHz.
Fig. 5.9: Modulation distortion: The DIST
meter confirms that the modulation distortion
of the device under test does not exceed the
permissible limit value.
5-16
Residual Modulation
Basic TX Settings
Residual Modulation
Boundary conditions
•
•
Disconnect filter on OPTION CARD (if present)
Warning: P > 500 mW on RF DIRECT will destroy input stage!
Measurement
1. Check basic TX settings.
2. <value>
Alter modulation level (Lev field) with
handwheel until DEMOD meter shows test
modulation.
3.
[CCITT]
Cut in weighting filter.
4.
[dB_REL]
AF level (at test modulation) becomes
reference level (0 dB) for dBr meter.
5.
[GEN_A]
Cut out modulation generator GEN A.
5
6. Read weighted signal/noise ratio on dBr meter.
Purpose of measurement
To check what residual modulation appears referred to the test modulation (hum,
noise) if the transmitter of the radio set is not modulated with a useful signal.
Excessive residual modulation causes a disturbing background noise that impairs intelligibility.
Typical limit values
Weighted S/N ratio at least –40 dB.
Fig. 5.10: Weighted S/N ratio: The display on
the dBr meter shows that the device under
test in this case exhibits a weighted S/N ratio
of -30.8 dB (CCITT weighting).
5-17
Basic TX Settings
Deviation Limiting
Deviation Limiting
Boundary conditions
•
•
Warning: P > 500 mW on RF DIRECT will destroy input stage!
Disconnect filter on OPTION CARD (if present)
Measurement
1. Check basic TX settings.
2. <value>
Alter modulation level (Lev field) with
handwheel until DEMOD meter shows test
modulation.
3.
Increase AF output level by 20 dB.
{+20_dB}
4. Read maximum modulation on DEMOD meter.
After the measurement {-20_dB} restores the original test modulation. If the DEMOD meter will not permit a clear reading on frequency-modulated signals
because of superimposed interference, the RMS meter can be used for a
"steady" display of the average value of the frequency deviation (see Chapter 4,
"GENERAL PARAMETERS", DEMOD (RMS VALUE) field).
Purpose of measurement
To check if, when there is a strong modulation signal on the microphone input of
the radio set, the maximum permissible modulation (deviation or AM depth) is
exceeded. If the limit value is not maintained, adjacent-channel interference may
result.
Typical limit values for FM
The frequency deviation must remain between 70 and 100 % of the maximum
permissible frequency deviation.
Fig. 5.11: Deviation limiting: After the output
level of the modulation generator GEN A has
been increased to 33.8 mV with {+20_dB} (Lev
field), the DEMOD meter shows +4.10 kHz
peak deviation in this case. Thus the device
under test slightly exceeds the maximum
permissible value (here 4 kHz).
5-18
Harmonics
Basic TX Settings
Harmonics
Boundary conditions
•
•
Warning: P > 500 mW on RF DIRECT will destroy input stage!
Specifications of analyzer apply for measurement with unmodulated carrier
Measurement
1. Check basic TX settings.
2.
{COUNT}
Tune test receiver to carrier frequency of
radio-set transmitter.
3.
[ANALYZER]
Switch on analyzer.
4.
{HARM}
Call up harmonics submask; set reference
level in Ref. Level scroll field so that
brightened up field at bottom edge of
analyzer window is of minimum height and
message OVERLOAD! does not yet appear.
5.
{FREEZE}
Freeze display.
6. Read levels of harmonics (dBc values).
The first seven harmonics are always detected up to a fundamental frequency of
142.79 MHz. At higher fundamental frequencies the analyzer only measures
harmonics up to 999.9999 MHz. Details of harmonics measurement are given in
Chapter 6.
Purpose of measurement
To check whether the harmonics of the carrier signal are below the permissible
limits. If the limit is not maintained, this can lead to interference in the frequency
range into which the harmonic intrudes.
Typical limit values
According to CEPT Recommendation TR17, no harmonic may exceed a power
limit of 0.25 µW.
Fig. 5.12: Harmonics: The harmonics measurement shows an absolute level of +34.3 dBm
for the fundamental (75.2750 MHz), a relative
level of –30 dBc for the second harmonic,
–37 dBc for the third harmonic, etc.
With 0,37 mW (+34,3 dBm – 30 dBc = –
4,3 dBm) the second harmonic exceeds the
permissible limit.
5-19
5
Basic TX Settings
Basic RX Settings
Basic RX Settings
The basic RX settings are the foundation for all standard receiver measurements.
It is sufficient to perform these basic settings once before starting the actual
receiver measurements. In the course of receiver measurements the basic
settings will normally be maintained unaltered, meaning that only a few extra
entries are necessary.
1.
[RX]
2.
{RF}
Call up RX mask.
3.
[FREQU]
4.
[LEVEL]
5.
[MOD_FREQ]
6.
[VOLTM]
7.
[FM_AM_ÉM]
or {RF_DIR}
Connect to appropriate input socket.
+ <value> + [ENTER]
Tune signal generator to channel
frequency of radio set.
+ <20 (µV)> + [ENTER]
Set RF output level to 20 µV (EMF).
+ <1> + [ENTER]
fmod = 1 kHz (GEN A)
Connect VOLTM socket (AF input).
+ <value> +
+ [ENTER]
[UNIT/SCROLL]
Enter value for test modulation in Mod
field and select class of modulation (kHz,
%,red); GEN_A switched on automatically.
8. Switch on receiver of radio set.
Following the last step of the basic settings the Mod entry field (brightened up) in
the RX mask is active; the LEDs RX (green), GEN A (green) and VOLTM (yellow)
must illuminate on the front panel. Now you can commence any standard receiver
measurement.
If you use RX Specials, you can skip steps 6. and 7. of the basic RX settings. The
RX Specials automatically couple the VOLTM socket and set a modulation
frequency of 1 kHz if this is necessary.
5-20
Basic RX Settings
"
Basic TX Settings
When you are altering the RF output level, there may be a jump in level of > 0.1
dBm at the boundary between +5.0 dBm and +5.1 dBm (RF DIRECT socket) or
–15.0 dBm and –14.9 dBm (RF socket). At these level boundaries a second
output stage is cut in or cut out respectively, meaning that the actual jump in level
depends on the tolerances of both amplifiers (see data sheet). This jump in level
will not appear when the level is altered continuously with {EMF_CONT}.
Fig. 5.13: Basic RX setting: In the RX mask
the following operating parameters are declared here:
RF is the active RF socket
RF level = 20.0 µV/EMF
channel frequency = 85.0750 MHz
fmod = 1.0000 kHz
modulation = FM
test modulation = 2.40 kHz
5
5-21
Basic TX Settings
Sensitivity (S/N and SINAD)
Sensitivity (S/N and SINAD)
Boundary conditions
•
•
•
Cut out squelch of radio set
Disconnect filter on OPTION CARD (if present)
Only measure SINAD with fmod = 1 kHz
Special Measurement
1. Check basic RX settings.
2.
[CCITT]
Cut in weighting filter.
3.
{SPECIAL}
Call up menu of RX Specials.
4.
{SENS}
Call up Special for receiver sensitivity; line
Sensitivity appears with three entry
fields: first select measuring method (S/N
or SINAD) in centre field (scroll field)
5.
{RUN}
Start measuring routine.
6. Read measured result from Special mask field.
The Special stores the entered reference value for the two measuring methods
S/N and SINAD. When the measuring method is selected therefore, the reference
value last entered is set automatically. After the measurement [UNIT/SCROLL] converts the measured value to the other units if the units scroll field is brightened up.
Fig. 5.14: Receiver sensitivity: Special SENS
was started after selecting test method (SINAD), reference value (20 dB) and units that
measured result is to have (here dBµ): the
result of the measurement is 1.2 dBµ (corresponding to value in Level field).
5-22
Sensitivity (S/N and SINAD)
Basic TX Settings
Measurement SINAD manual
1. Check basic RX settings.
2.
[CCITT]
3.
[SINAD]
4.
[LEVEL]
Cut in weighting filter.
Call up SINAD meter.
+ <value>
Alter RF output level of signal generator
with handwheel until SINAD meter shows
required reference value.
5. Read level value (EMF) in Level field.
Measurement S/N manual
1. Check basic RX settings2.
[CCITT]
Cut in weighting filter.
3.
[dB_REL]
Call up dBr meter.
4.
[GEN_A]
5.
[LEVEL]
Switch off modulation generator GEN A.
+ <value>
Alter RF output level of signal generator
with handwheel until dBr meter shows
required reference value.
6. Read level value (EMF) in Level field-
Check the measured result by switching modulation generator GEN A on again
and resetting the AF level value with [VOLT] + [dB_REL]. If GEN A is then switched
off again, the dBr meter should immediately show the required reference value.
If there are deviations, adjust the RF level in the Level field with the handwheel.
Purpose of measurement
To determine what RF level is required on the antenna input of the radio set so
that the AF signal on the loudspeaker output of the radio set exhibits a specific
signal quality, characterized by the S/N or SINAD.
S
N
[dB] = 20 × log
Signall evel
Noiselevel
SINAD [dB] = 20 × log
Signallevel + Noiselevel + Harmoniclevel
Noiselevel + Harmoniclevel
Typical limit values
6 dBµV (2 µV) EMF for 12 dB SINAD or 20 dB S/N.
5-23
5
Basic TX Settings
AF Frequency Response
AF Frequency Response
Boundary conditions
•
•
Disconnect CCITT filter
Disconnect filter on OPTION CARD (if present)
Special Measurement
1. Check basic RX settings.
2.
{SPECIAL}
Call up menu of RX Specials.
3.
{AF_RESP}
Special for AF frequency response.
4. <value> + [ENTER]
Enter 0-dB reference frequency in inverted
field and confirm (unless default is
accepted).
5. <cursor d> + <value> + [ENTER]
Alter fmod (7 reference values) if necessary.
6.
Start measuring routine.
{RUN}
7. Read AF frequency response (7 reference values).
If the CCITT filter is cut in, a warning signal is heard after {RUN} and the warning
CCITT Filter is on appears in the status line. Measurement with the CCITT
filter is not permissible because the filter characteristic affects the measured
result too much.
Manual Measurement
1. Check basic RX settings.
2.
[dB_REL]
3.
[MOD_FREQ]
Call up dBr meter.
+ <value>
Vary frequency of modulation signal
between 300 Hz and 6 kHz with
handwheel.
4. During step 3. read on dBr meter whether permissible dB tolerance range is
maintained.
5-24
AF Frequency Response
Basic TX Settings
Purpose of measurement
To check whether the AF frequency response of the radio set - depending on the
frequency of the modulation signal - remains within the permissible tolerance
range (modulation frequency response). If the curve of the modulation frequency
response goes out of the tolerance range, the standard of intelligibility will be
degraded.
Typical limit values for FM and ΦM
If the modulation frequency fmod is varied between 300 Hz and 6 kHz, the AF level
of the demodulated signal must remain within the following tolerances:
fmod
limit values
0,3 kHz...3 kHz
+1 dB...–3 dB
>3 kHz...<6 kHz
The level may not exceed the value measured at 3 kHz
≥6 kHz
The level must be at least 6 dB below the value
measured at 1 kHz
5
Fig. 5.15: AF frequency response: The Special mask field in the bottom half of the display
shows the AF frequency response of the device under test in the form of seven reference
values. The value 1.00 kHz has been declared as the 0-dB reference frequency.
5-25
Basic TX Settings
Demodulation Distortion
Demodulation Distortion
Boundary conditions
•
•
•
Disconnect CCITT filter
Disconnect filter on OPTION CARD (if present)
Modulation frequency fmod = 1 kHz
Measurement
1. Check basic RX settings.
2.
[DIST]
Call up DIST meter.
3. Read demodulation distortion on DIST meter.
The OPTION CARD, fitted with the variable notch filter, is required for measuring
demodulation distortion with modulation frequencies between 200 and 600 Hz.
Purpose of measurement
To check to what extent the receiver of the radio set distorts the useful AF signal.
The distortion factor is the ratio of the sum RMS value of all harmonics of an AF
signal to the RMS value of the overall AF signal (fundamental plus harmonics). A
large distortion factor degrades the standard of intelligibility.
Typical limit values
The distortion factor may not exceed 10 % for fmod = 1 kHz.
Fig. 5.16: Demodulation distor tion: The
DIST meter shows a distortion factor of 4.2 %
for the device under test.
5-26
IF Bandwidth and Centre-frequency Offset
Basic TX Settings
IF Bandwidth and Centre-frequency Offset
Boundary conditions
•
Cut out squelch on radio set
Special Measurement
1.
Check basic RX settings.
2.
{SPECIAL}
Call up menu of RX Specials.
3.
{BANDW}
Call up IF Special.
4.
<value> + [ENTER]
Enter reference value of attenuation.
5.
{RUN}
Start measuring routine.
6.
Read measured values for IF bandwidth and offset from nominal centre frequency.
If the measured IF bandwidth is greater than 51 kHz, the displayed result is "------".
5
Manual Measurement
1.
Check basic RX settings
2.
[GEN_A]
3.
[LEVEL]
+ <0.04 (µV)> + [ENTER]
RF output level = 0.04 µV/EMF
4.
[LEVEL]
+ [OFF]
Switch off signal generator.
5.
[dB_REL]
6.
[LEVEL]
7.
[STEP]
8.
[FREQU]
+ [+] + <5> +
9.
[ENTER]
+ <value>
Switch off modulation generator GEN A.
Call up dBr meter.
+ <value>
Switch on signal generator and increase
level until dBr meter shows –10 dB (noise
suppression).
+ <value> + [ENTER] + [+]
[ENTER]
Increase RF level by reference value of
attenuation (eg 6 dB).
First roughly detune signal generator (with
Offset field) by +5 kHz.
Open Offset field and finely detune offset
value with handwheel until dBr meter
again shows –10 dB: note offset value.
10. Repeat steps 8. and 9. with –5 kHz
11. The two noted offset values, added together, are the IF bandwidth; centrefrequency-offset = (f+– f–)/2.
5-27
Basic TX Settings
IF Bandwidth and Centre-frequency Offset
Purpose of measurement
The measurement determines indirectly the bandwidth of the IF filter and its
centre-frequency offset. Too small a bandwidth reduces the standard of intelligibility, too large a bandwidth reduces adjacent-channel selectivity and thus sensitivity. Highly unbalanced IF filters (large centre-frequency offset) produce distortion of the AF signal.
Fig. 5.17: IF filter curve: The numbers refer to the different steps in
manual measurement.
Typical limit values
Depending on the channel spacing the nominal bandwidth is between 8 and
15 kHz. The permissible centre-frequency offset is 0.5 to 1 kHz.
Fig. 5.18: IF bandwidth and centre-frequency
offset: The Special BANDW was started here
with the usual parameter 6 dB as the reference value of the attenuation. In contrast to
time-consuming manual measurement, the
Special presents the values measured for IF
bandwidth (14.70 kHz) and centre-frequency offset (-0.10 kHz) after just a few
seconds.
5-28
Squelch Characteristic
Basic TX Settings
Squelch Characteristic
Boundary conditions
•
•
Cut in squelch on radio set
For a slowly responding squelch declare a delay in the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask (Delay Squelch field)
Special Measurement
1. Check basic RX settings.
2.
{SPECIAL}
Call up menu of RX Specials.
3.
{SQUELCH}
Call up squelch Special; the line Squelch
contains two scroll fields: in left field select
RX Mute (measurement to determine
muting threshold of squelch) or RX
Unmute (unmuting threshold)
4.
{RUN}
Start measuring routine.
5
5. Read measured values for switching threshold and hysteresis.
After the measurement the second threshold value that is not displayed can be
produced with [UNIT/SCROLL] if the RX Mute or RX Unmute field is active (inverted).
If a time duration has been declared in the Delay Squelch field of the
GENERAL PARAMETERS mask, this time will be waited between the individual
setting steps (RF level value) so that slow squelches have sufficient time to
respond.
Fig. 5.19: Squelch characteristic: Here the
Special SQUELCH showed 0.27 µV as the
muting threshold (RX Mute) of the squelch.
The hysteresis is 1.7 dB.
5-29
Basic TX Settings
Squelch Characteristic
Manual Measurement
1. Check basic RX settings
2.
[LEVEL]
+ <value>
3. <value>
Reduce RF output level with handwheel
until AF signal drops abruptly: note RF
level (RX Mute).
Increase RF level with handwheel until AF
signal abruptly appears: note RF level (RX
Unmute).
4. Difference between levels is squelch hysteresis
If the attenuator switches during the manual measurement (recognizable by the
sound) close to the point of response of the squelch, it will not be possible to
determine the exact level (RX Mute/RX Unmute) because of the hysteresis. In this
case set the closest RF level (unit dBm) that does not produce muting of the AF
and show the CONT field with the {EMF_CONT} softkey. Then alter the initial value of
the CONT field (eg 0 dB) with the handwheel. Thus you continuously reduce the
output level of the signal generator by the particular dB value (max. –20 dB). The
actual RF output level is the sum of the values in the fields Level/EMF and CONT.
Fig. 5.20: Squelch characteristic:
When the increasing RF level on
the antenna input of the radio set
reaches the enabling threshold
(RX Unmute) of the squelch, the
latter enables the AF signal.
When the decreasing RF level
reaches the blocking threshold
(RX Mute), the AF signal is blocked or muted. The hysteresis
prevents uncontrolled response
of the squelch when the RF level
alters minimally.
5-30
Squelch Characteristic
Basic TX Settings
Purpose of measurement
To determine at what RF level on the antenna input of the radio set the receiver
blocks the AF signal path (muting threshold) and enables it again (unmuting
threshold). The difference between the two RF levels is the squelch hysteresis in
dB. If the muting threshold is set too high, it will spoil the high sensitivity of a
receiver.
Typical limit values
Both switching thresholds are generally below the value for receiver sensitivity.
The hysteresis is commonly about 2 dB.
5
5-31
Basic TX Settings
Limiter Characteristic
Limiter Characteristic
Boundary conditions
•
•
Call up AF POWER meter; first locate GENERAL PARAMETERS mask
Use RF DIRECT socket
Measurement
1. Check basic RX settings.
2.
[LEVEL]
3.
[dB_REL]
4.
[LEVEL]
+ <2 (µV)> + [ENTER]
Set RF output level of 2 µV EMF and
volume on radio set to 25 % of rated AF
power.
Call up dBr meter.
+ <100 (mV)> + [ENTER]
Set RF output level to 100 mV EMF.
5. Read relative change in level on dBr meter.
Purpose of measurement
To check how much the loudspeaker level of the receiver alters when a weak and
a strong RF signal are applied alternately to the antenna input. The limiter should
prevent the occurrence of any largish fluctuations in volume.
Fig. 5.21: Limiter characteristic: After the AF
level has been normalized at 2 µV RF level
by calling up the dBr meter, the meter now
shows -1.3 dB at 100 mV RF level.
5-32
Limiter Characteristic
Basic TX Settings
Typical limit values
Maximally ±3 dB change in AF level referred to the AF level for 2 µV RF input
level.
Fig. 5.22: Limiter characteristic:
The AF output level of the radio set
is virtually independent of the RF
input level after the limiter has responded.
5
5-33
Basic TX Settings
Basic DUPLEX Settings
Basic DUPLEX Settings
The basic DUPLEX settings are a combination of the basic TX and RX settings:
1. Call up the basic DUPLEX mask (option).
2. Couple the current RF input/output socket.
3. Tune the signal generator to channel frequency fTX of the radio set*).
4. Tune the test receiver to channel frequency fRX of the radio set*).
5. Set the RF level to the required value (eg 20 µV).
6. Set the modulation frequency (eg 1 kHz).
7. Select the modulation (eg 2.4 kHz frequency deviation).
*) If the linking of the two frequency values with the duplex spacing has been
declared in the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask, it is sufficient to enter just one
value (see also chapter 4, "GENERAL PARAMETERS").
"
[STEP] changes the lower and upper sideband (see also Chapter 2, "Meaning of
Keys", 26).
5-34
Basic DUPLEX Settings
Basic TX Settings
Select input/output socket
Select the RF socket as the current input/output if the device under test is a
single-port radio set. The level of the signal generator must then be at least 60 dB
smaller than the transmit level of the radio set so that the two signals are
adequately isolated. Normally this condition is always satisfied.
In the case of a dual-port radio set connect its transmitter to the RF socket and
its receiver to the RF DIRECT socket. Couple the RF DIRECT socket as the
current RF output with {RF_DIR}. The RF socket remains effective as the RF input
because the duplex demodulator is connected directly behind this socket, before
the RF/RF DIRECT switchover.
If a duplex radio set is to be tested on several channels, the entry procedure can
be very much shortened by making suitable declarations in the GENERAL
PARAMETERS mask (refer to Chapter 3, Operating Rules - Working with channel
numbers).
5
Fig. 5.23: Basic DUPLEX setting: Here the
following parameters are specified in the DUPLEX mask:
RF is the active socket
fTX = 85.0750 MHz
fRX = 75.2750 MHz
RF level = 20.0 µV
fmod = 1.0000 kHz
modulation = FM
test modulation = 2.400 kHz
5-35
Basic TX Settings
Signal Transfer
Signal Transfer
Boundary conditions
•
•
•
•
Switch off squelch of radio set
Set RF output level on Level/EMF
Switch off transmitter of radio set before starting, switch on receiver
Disconnect filter on OPTION CARD (if present)
Special Measurement
1. Check basic DUPLEX settings.
2.
{SPECIAL}
Call up menu of DUPLEX Specials.
3.
{DESENS}
Call up Special for measuring duplex
signal transfer (desensitizing). Line
Desens appears with two entry fields. First
select test method (S/N or SINAD) in
righthand field (scroll field). Then enter S/N
or SINAD reference value in lefthand field.
4.
{RUN}
Start test routine.
5. Following request on screen, switch on transmitter within 8 s.
6. Read measured value for duplex signal transfer (in dB).
Purpose of measurement
Single-port duplex radio sets use one and the same antenna for their transmitter
and receiver, the transmitted and received signals being isolated from one
another by a duplexer. Duplex signal transfer is a measure of this isolation. Good
isolation should be aimed at so that as little transmitted power as possible
reaches the receiver input and reduces receiver sensitivity, ie desensitizing. The
duplex signal transfer results from two measurements of sensitivity on the radio
receiver with the transmitter switched off and on. The ratio between the two values
is the duplex signal transfer expressed in dB.
5-36
Signal Transfer
Basic TX Settings
Typical limit values
The duplex signal transfer (desensitizing) should not exceed 3 dB.
Fig. 5.24: Duplex signal transfer: The Special
DESENS was used to test a device with the
parameters SINAD (test method) and 10 dB
(reference value). Result: 1.6 dB duplex signal transfer.
5
5-37
Selective-call encoder and decoder
Technical data
Selective-call encoder and decoder
The standard STABILOCK 4032 comes with a selective-call encoder and decoder. Common standard tone sequences can be used whose parameters (frequency, tone duration, pause) permit variation (user tone sequences). A user
tone sequence can be stored. What are called "sequential masks" are used to
operate the encoder and decoder and to display the measured results.
Technical data
Encoder
Setting ranges
With all standard and user-defined tone sequences it is possible to vary tones
1 to 15 in all parameters (tones 16 to 30: duration and pause can only be varied uniformly).
Frequenzy
200 to 3000 Hz
Resolution
0,1 Hz
Tone duration
1 to 9999 ms at least one cycle
Resolution
1 ms
Pause duration
0 to 9999 ms
Resolution
1 ms
Decoder
Frequenzy measurement
Measuring range
300 to 3000 Hz
Resolution
0,1 Hz
Measuring error*)
< 2 Digit
Tone duration measurement
Measuring range
40 to 9999 ms
Resolution
0,1 ms
Measuring error*)
< 3 ms + 2 cycles of lowest frequency in
tone sequence
5-38
Basic Sequential Mask
Selective-call encoder and decoder
Pause duration measurement
Measurement range
2 to 9999 ms
Resolution
0,1 ms
Measuring error*)
< 3 ms + 2 cycles of lowest frequency in
tone sequence
Receiving bandwidth
Setting range
±0,1 % to ±9,9 %
Response time measurement
2 to 9999 ms
Resolution
1 ms
*) Measuring errors referres to signal on VOLTM socket with level > 360 mVeff.
Basic Sequential Mask
The basic sequential mask is called up with [AUX] + {SEQU}. This means that the
monitor shows the basic mask that was last current (TX, RX or optionally
DUPLEX) in the top half of the screen and the basic sequential mask in the
bottom half. With [HELP] all entry fields can now be identified by briefly brightening
them up. The entry fields are accessed as usual with the cursor keys. For the
fields in the top half of the screen there is still the possibility of rapid access, eg
with [FREQU].
Fig. 5.25: Basic sequential mask: Before the
call with [AUX] + {SEQU} the basic RX mask was
current, and it is kept in the upper half of the
screen. The scroll field in the centre shows
that the mode CALL → DECODE is set. The
pointer ZVEI I reminds you of the standard
tone sequence that is presently set.
5-39
5
Selective-call encoder and decoder
Setting Mode of Operation
Setting Mode of Operation
One of four possible operating modes can be selected in the basic sequential
mask for selective calling. These modes are:
CALL
DECODE
CALL → DECODE
CALL ← DECODE
CALL
The encoder generates the required call tone sequence (the decoder is not
activated).
DECODE
The decoder expects the arrival of a tone sequence. When this appears, it is
decoded. The encoder is not activated in this mode.
CALL → DECODE
This is the mode for an acknowledgement call. First the encoder generates the
required call tone sequence. Then the decoder waits for the arrival of a tone
sequence. When this appears, it is decoded. Switching from encoding to decoding takes about 80 ms (without the optional DUPLEX FM/ΦM stage). The option
reduces the switching time to approx. 15 ms.
"
If the generator of the 4032 is keyed (see "Carrier Keying"), this lengthens the
switching time by approx. 20 ms.
The last pause of a call tone sequence (see "Modifying Tone-sequence Parameters") is not waited for in the CALL → DECODE mode; after the last tone of the
call tone sequence the decoder is activated with a delay of only 5 ms or 100 ms.
CALL ← DECODE
This mode is only possible if the optional DUPLEX FM/ΦM unit is incorporated.
To begin with, the decoder expects the arrival of a tone sequence. As soon as this
appears, it is decoded. With the arrival of the last tone, the delay begins that is
entered in the Call Delay field (at least 100 ms), before the encoder outputs
the call tone sequence. During the minimum delay of 100 ms the decoder is able
to decode a tone sequence with maximally five tones. The decoding of more
extensive tone sequences lasts longer (eg about 380 ms for a 30-tone sequence),
so that in such cases the minimum delay of 100 ms cannot be maintained. The
call tone sequence is then output immediately upon completion of decoding.
5-40
Selecting AF or RF Signal Path
Selective-call encoder and decoder
You can set the required mode of operation with [UNIT/SCROLL], by turning the
handwheel or by striking the plus/minus keys. First the scroll field in the centre of
the screen must be located with the cursor keys.
If one of the control interfaces is available, relay 3 of this option is set automatically when the decoder (4032) begins a decoding operation. The relay can be
used, for example, to trigger the expected tone sequence on the radio set. At the
end of the decoding operation the relay drops out again.
Selecting AF or RF Signal Path
An AF or RF signal path is possible for the output and feeding in of the tone
sequences. The call tone sequence generated by the encoder can always be
brought out as an AF signal on the MOD GEN socket (front panel) and on socket
Bu 29 (back panel) if the AF generators (GEN A, GEN B) are switched on the TX
signal path. In the RX or DUPLEX mode the tone sequence signal (AF) is
available at socket Bu 27 (back panel) if the generators are switched on the RX
signal path.
The AF can be fed in on the VOLTM socket (front panel), which must be
connected to the internal AF signal processing with [VOLTM].
If the RF signal path is used, the current RF parameters (modulation, transmit/receive frequency, RF level) must be set before the basic sequential mask is called
up in the basic RX and TX mask and the RF socket must be activated. If the
DUPLEX FM/ΦM unit is integrated, the DUPLEX mask automatically adopts
these values. The basic mask into which the basic sequential mask is transferred
determines whether the RF signal path may be used simultaneously for the
output and feeding in of the tone sequences:
Basic RX mask visible
Output of the call tone sequence on the RF socket. The feeding in of a tone
sequence is only possible on the VOLTM socket because the test receiver is not
activated.
Exception: In the CALL → DECODE mode there is an internal switch from RX
to TX as soon as the call tone sequence is output. After decoding of the arriving
tone sequence (or termination of decoding) there is a switch back to RX. This
means that specially in this mode RF output and RF feed-in is permissible on the
RF socket if the basic RX mask is visible.
5-41
5
Selective-call encoder and decoder
Selecting Standard Tone Sequence
Basic TX mask visible
RF feed-in of a tone sequence is permissible on the RF socket. For this purpose
connect the decoder to the demodulator with [DEMOD]. Output of the call tone
sequence is only possible on the socket MOD GEN/Bu 29 because the signal
generator is not activated.
Basic DUPLEX mask visible
RF output of the call tone sequence and RF feed-in of a tone sequence are
permissible on the RF socket. For this purpose connect the decoder to the
demodulator with [DEMOD].
Carrier Keying
In the CALL and CALL → DECODE modes carrier keying is possible if the signal
generator of the 4032 is first switched off in the RX or DUPLEX mask with [LEVEL]
+ [OFF]. The encoder then keys the signal generator automatically. Following any
carrier delay that is set (content of Call Delay field) the call tone sequence is
sent and the signal generator is switched off again.
Selecting Standard Tone Sequence
calls up the SEQUENTIALS submask, which allows you to select
different standard tone sequences. A tone sequence is selected by moving the
cursor in front of the appropriate entry with the cursor keys and then executing
[UNIT/SCROLL]. The encoder and the decoder adapt to the parameters of the
selected tone sequence.
{SYSTEM}
The USER entry stands for a stored tone sequence with parameters defined by
the user.
{RETURN} takes you back to the basic sequential mask. Here the display field in the
centre of the screen always shows the name of the selected tone sequence.
Fig. 5.26: SEQUENTIALS submask: This
submask of the basic sequential mask permits you to select the tone sequence whose
parameters are to be valid for the encoder
and decoder. In this case the EURO tone
sequence has been selected.
5-42
Modifying Tone-sequence Parameters
Selective-call encoder and decoder
Modifying Tone-sequence Parameters
takes you from the basic sequential mask to the PARAMETER submask.
This shows the parameters of the selected tone sequence. In this mask too, [HELP]
briefly brightens up all entry fields. In this case they are all pure numeric fields.
All of them can be located with the cursor keys and the entered values can be
modified. Terminate each entry with [ENTER]. In this way individual frequency
values can be allocated to the call digits 0 through F. You can also modify the
parameters TIME (tone duration) and PAUSE (duration of pause until next tone)
individually for tones 1 through 15. For tones 16 through 30 only a common TIME
and PAUSE value can be declared.
{PARAM.}
The R entry field defines the repeat tone. You can locate this entry field with the
cursor keys and open it with [ENTER]. Enter hex characters A through F with the
softkeys. As usual, terminate the entry with [ENTER].
If one and the same value is to be entered throughout in the TIME or PAUSE
column, it is sufficient to enter the new value just once. After confirmation of the
value with [ENTER], {ALL_LIKE_CURSOR} will change all values to the new value.
causes the 4032 to store the momentarily set tone-sequence
parameters as a USER tone sequence in RAM. The parameters of this tone
sequence can then be called up by way of the SEQUENTIALS submask just like
those of the standard tone sequences. (CAUTION: Master Reset also deletes the
parameters of a USER tone sequence.)
{STORE_TO_USER}
cancels all modifications to parameters. If this softkey is struck, a modified
standard tone sequence will return to its standard parameters. A modified USER
tone sequence will again take on the parameters that were originally stored.
{STD}
{RETURN} takes you back to the basic sequential mask. If values have been altered
in the PARAMETER submask, the encoder and decoder will adopt the new
values. In such a case the pointer n.Std (non-standard) beneath the name of
the tone sequence in the basic sequential mask will indicate to you that the
original (standard) parameters are not being used.
Fig. 5.27: PARAMETER submask: The mask
not only shows the parameters of the currently active tone sequence, it also permits
modification of the parameters. The repeat
tone is entered in the R field.
5-43
5
Selective-call encoder and decoder
Entering Call Number
Entering Call Number
The pure numeric field No. in the basic sequential mask holds call numbers up
to the 15th digit if the field is located with the cursor keys. If the field already
contains a call number, this can be deleted with [OFF] before entering the new one.
For entering hexadecimals the softkeys are assigned the hex digits A through F
as soon as the field is opened, eg with [ENTER]. Incorrect entries can be corrected
by overwriting them when they are marked by the cursor. As usual, entries are to
be terminated with [ENTER].
If a call number consists of more than 15 digits (maximally 30 digits), the
remaining digits are to be entered in the Add field, which can also be located with
the cursor keys. When the call tone sequence is output, the digits of the Add field
are joined precisely to the digits of the No. field.
Double-tone Sequence
As long as only modulation generator GEN A is available, Add is a common text
field with an associated numeric field. If the 4032 contains the GEN B option
however, Add is a scroll field with the scroll variables Add and 2nd:
Add
Encoder generates single-tone sequence with maximally 30 tones.
2nd
Encoder generates double-tone sequence with maximally 15 tones.
The numeric field (accessed with cursor keys) that is assigned to the scroll field
thus holds either the digits 16 to 30 of a single-tone sequence or the digits of a
double-tone sequence. In the case of a double-tone sequence the associated
digits in the fields No. and 2nd form the digit pair of a double tone.
If double tones are only to be generated at the end of a single-tone sequence (eg for
driving a siren), proceed as follows: locate the 2nd field with the cursor, open the field
with [ENTER] and move the cursor to the location after which double tones are wished.
5-44
Entering Call Number
Fig. 5.28: Single-tone and double-tone sequence: If a single-tone sequence has
more than 15 call digits, the remaining digits must be entered in the Add field.
Selective-call encoder and decoder
Fig. 5.29: The GEN B option also enables
double-tone sequences to be generated, like
here for example with the double tones 1-2,
3-4, 5-6, etc.
5
5-45
Selective-call encoder and decoder
Declaring Test Parameters
Declaring Test Parameters
Five other entry fields of the basic sequential mask enable test parameters to be
entered: two for the encoder, three for the decoder.
Call Delay
A call delay of the call tone sequence, as required in the CALL ← DECODE mode
(eg testing of a base station), can be declared in the Call Delay field (permissible value: 0 to 999 ms). If no call delay is permissible, the field content is forced
set to 0.
Encoder Tolerance
An intentionally produced frequency offset of the call tones (call tone sequence)
tests the decoding bandwidth of the device. The frequency offset is entered as a
percentage deviation of the call tone frequency from rated values (PARAMETER
submask) in the Tolerance field (permissible value: 0 to 9.9 %). This field has
an associated scroll field for selecting the sign (+/-).
Number of Tones Decoded
The value in the No. of Tones field specifies how many call tones of an incoming
tone sequence are to be decoded by the decoder (permissible value: 0 to 30).
Decoder Bandwidth
If call tones arrive with a frequency offset, it will depend on the value in the
Bandwidth +/- field whether these tones are then decoded. In an analogous
manner to the encoder tolerance, this decoder bandwidth also refers to the rated
frequency of the call tones (PARAMETER submask). Values between 0 and
±9.9 % are permissible for the decoder tolerance (typically 2.5 %).
Timeout
The entry in the Timeout field (permissible value: 0 to 9999 ms) prevents the
decoder from remaining blocked by incomplete tone sequences. The timeout
counter is started at the end of a call tone, and reset at the start of the following
call tone. If no call tone is received during timeout, the decoding is stopped.
5-46
Declaring Test Parameters
Selective-call encoder and decoder
Fig. 5.30: Test parameters: Here, for example,
the declared test parameters are:
call delay = 150 ms
encoder tolerance = +5.0 %
number of decoded tones = 5
decoder tolerance = ±2.5 %
timeout = 2000 ms
5
5-47
Selective-call encoder and decoder
Test Procedure
Test Procedure
After you have selected the operating mode and entered the appropriate parameters, {ONE_SHOT} or {CONT.} will trigger the test.
One-shot Test
causes a test cycle to run one time. Depending on the chosen
selective-call operating mode the 4032 starts to output the required tone sequence, for instance, or it awaits the arrival of a tone sequence. As long as the test
cycle is in progress, softkey S3 has the {STOP} function to enable the test to be
terminated. The one-shot test is possible in each of the four selective-call
operating modes.
{ONE_SHOT}
Continuous Test
causes a test cycle to run repeatedly. But the continuous test is only
possible if the CALL or DECODE selective-call operating mode is selected beforehand:
{CONT.}
CALL
The required call tone sequence is output continuously.
Before each output of the tone sequence there is the start
delay declared in the Call Delay field. The minimum
start delay is 100 ms. If the value in the Call Delay field
is smaller, it will be increased to 100 ms automatically. This
test cannot be performed in carrier keying to protect the
attenuator of the 4032 against rapid wear.
DECODE
The arriving tone sequences are decoded continuously
and the call digits are entered in the Tones field.
As long as the test cycle is in progress, softkey S4 has the
enable the test to be terminated.
5-48
{STOP}
function to
Test Procedure
Selective-call encoder and decoder
Level Setting
AF output of tone sequence: Call up TX basic mask, switch AF generators to
TX path and enter desired AF level in input field Lev. of basic mask. Output signal
of the tone sequence is available on socket MOD GEN (front panel) and on socket
Bu 29 (back panel).
RF output of tone sequence: Select RX or DUPLEX basic mask, switch AF
generators to RX signal path and enter desired modulation in input field Mod. of
basic mask.
Single tones are output with the level entered in the input field Lev. of GEN A
respectively with the modulation set in the input field Mod. For double tones
following formula applies:
LevelA+B = (Level A/2) + (Level B/2) resp. DeviationA+B = (Dev. A/2) + (Dev. B/2)
This combination is necessary for correct siren control and applies to sequential
masks only.
5-49
5
Selective-call encoder and decoder
Test Procedure
Call Tone Sequence with Continuous Tone
If the GEN A and GEN B generators are switched off, they will be switched on
automatically by {ONE_SHOT} and {CONT.} for the duration of the call tone sequence(s). If a continuous tone is necessary before or after the call tone sequence
(declare the frequency in the AF GEN A field), switch GEN A on before the test
(in case of RF output select RX signal path). GEN B should be switched on (in
case of RF output select RX signal path) if the call tone sequence is to have an
underlying continuous tone.
Call tone sequences can be reproduced on the loudspeaker of the 4032 by
coupling the modulation generator(s) with the internal AF signal processing by
means of [RX_MOD/MOD_GEN].
Transients of Test Item
Strong transients of the transmitter (test item) can lead to incorrect decoding of
received tone sequences by the 4032. This can be avoided by not activating the
decoder until the transients have decayed. It is best if you use the one-shot
function of the 4032 oscilloscope for precisely measuring the duration of the
transients (demodulated transmitted signal). Then enter this time in the Delay
(Decode) field of the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask (permissible value: 0 to
999 ms). This delay takes effect for the decoder when the following requirements
are satisfied:
•
•
•
•
RF socket is coupled.
DUPLEX or TX mask is called up.
Demodulated signal is decoded.
No sustained input signal on RF socket but transmitter keying.
The delay begins with the transmitter keying. If the delay is too long, the tone
sequence will not be decoded from the beginning.
5-50
Test Procedure
Selective-call encoder and decoder
Results of Decoding
The 4032 enters the call digits of a decoded tone sequence in the Tones display
field of the basic sequential mask. Up to 30 single tones are decoded (no double
tones).
The reaction time of an acknowledgement-call system can be read from the
Response Time display field if the CALL → DECODE mode is selected.
Measurement of very fast response times (< 100 ms) calls for the DUPLEX
FM/ΦM option.
The 4032 shows the parameters of the decoded tone sequence after {NUM} in the
DECODING submask. The decoded call digits (NR) appear with the measured
frequency (FREQ.), the frequency deviation from rating (DEV) plus the measured
tone duration (TIME) and pause duration (PAUSE). {16-30} turns to the second
page of the DECODING submask.
The DECODING submask also offers the {ONE_SHOT} and {CONT.} functions,
meaning that you do not have to leave this mask for repeated or continuous
decoding with parameter display. While decoding is in progress you do not have
to worry about switching backwards and forwards between the pages of the
DECODING submask - the decoding is not affected.
You can start decoding at any time in the DECODING submask because the
DECODE selective-call operating mode is automatically activated, regardless of
the operating mode that you selected in the basic sequential mask.
Fig. 5.31: DECODING submask: In this
mask the 4032 enters the parameters of a
decoded tone sequence (here, for example, a
EURO tone sequence) including the deviation of the frequency from its rating. After the
last tone there is no defined pause duration,
consequently the display shows >>>>.>.
Results readout on controller
The decoded call digits of a tone sequence (content of Tones field) can be read
to a controller with the IEEE command RESULt1 (digits 1 to 20) or RESULt2
(digits 21 to 30).
5-51
5
Selective-call encoder and decoder
5-52
Test Procedure
Spectrum Analyzer
Oscilloscope
Tracking
6
Basic Analyzer Mask
Spectrum Analyzer
Spectrum Analyzer
With the spectrum analyzer of STABILOCK 4032 you can determine the occupancy
of a frequency band for example, analyze the spectral distribution of an RF signal or
evaluate the graphic display of the harmonics of a fundamental. The analyzer is fed
the test signal, depending on the power level, on the RF or RF DIRECT socket.
"
Optional analyzer: The standard analyzer described below is only available if
your Communication Test Set is not fitted with the optional analyzer (ordering
code: 248 291). If you are using the more powerful optional analyzer, refer to the
separate operating instructions (Chapter 9).
Basic Analyzer Mask
The analyzer can only be called up in the TX operating mode:
1.
[TX]
Call up basic TX mask.
2.
[ANALYZER]
Call up basic analyzer mask.
The [ANALYZER] entry clears the basic TX mask and produces full-format display
of the basic analyzer mask. [HELP] and [PRINT] retain their usual functions in this
mask (and its submasks).
Calling up the basic mask simultaneously activates the analyzer. Two entry fields
can then be accessed with the cursor keys for selecting the reference level and
the centre frequency.
Fig. 6.1: Basic analyzer mask. A reference
level of +10 dBm is set in the Ref. Level
scroll field. The dynamic range of the analyzer
display is thus matched optimally to the dynamic range of the applied 10-MHz signal.
6-3
6
Spectrum Analyzer
Basic Analyzer Mask
Setting Reference Level
If the Ref. Level scroll field at the upper edge of the screen is the current
(intensified) entry field, [UNIT/SCROLL], slow turning of the handwheel or striking the
plus/minus keys will lead as usual to callup of the available scroll variables
(reference-level values). The critical limits of the reference level depend on
whether the RF or RF DIRECT socket is being used.
In the mask the set reference level corresponds to the top edge of the analyzer
window. The bottom edge represents a level value of 80 dB below the reference
level (dynamic range of display: 80 dB). The scale marks on the left and right
edges of the window (10 dB/div) simplify reading of the values in between.
The reference level should be set so that the strongest component of the
displayed spectrum does not quite reach the top edge of the analyzer window.
This prevents any overdriving of the analyzer and at the same time optimal use
is made of its dynamic range.
If there are strong signal components outside of the displayed spectrum, these
can also overdrive the analyzer because its input stage is broadband. In this case
the optimal setting of the reference level goes by the strongest component in the
overall frequency range of the analyzer (2 to 999.9999 MHz).
Setting Centre Frequency
The analyzer initially adopts that value for the centre frequency of the displayed
frequency spectrum that is shown in the RF Frequency field of the basic TX
mask. In the basic analyzer mask this value can be altered if the mixed numeric
field Center Freq. is current. Enter new values on the numeric keys (confirm
with [ENTER]) or alter the set value continuously with the handwheel.
Setting Frequency Resolution
The frequency resolution of the spectrum that is to be displayed is determined by
the scroll variables 20 kHz/Div., 200 kHz/Div. and 1 MHz/Div. of the Span
scroll field. Depending on the set resolution the overall width of the window thus
corresponds to the frequency range 200 kHz, 2 MHz or 10 MHz.
6-4
Basic Analyzer Mask
Spectrum Analyzer
Functions of Softkeys (basic analyzer mask)
{RF-DIR}
(alternative function {RF}) This permits, like in the basic
masks, connection on the RF or RF DIRECT input.
{MARKER}
This calls up the analyzer submask "Marker", in which
precise determination of frequency and level is possible
with a marker line.
{ONE_SHOT}
Triggers a single measurement. The display of the measured frequency spectrum is frozen on the screen.
{HARM}
This calls up the analyzer submask "Harmonics", in which
harmonics (nmax = 7) of the applied RF signal are shown in
the form of a bar chart.
{CONTIN}
Triggers continuous measurement. The display of the measured frequency spectrum is continuously updated. After
{CONTIN} the softkey has the alternative function {FREEZE}.
{FREEZE} freezes the display that is visible when the softkey
is operated. The softkey then adopts the CONTIN function
again.
{RETURN}
Takes you back to the basic TX mask. You can also exit
from the basic analyzer mask with [AUX], [MEMORY], [TX], [RX]
or by calling the basic duplex mask. The centre frequency
last set is adopted in the particular mask.
6-5
6
Spectrum Analyzer
Marker Submask
Marker Submask
The marker submask adopts all settings made in the basic analyzer mask,
although these can still be altered as described above. Only alteration of the
centre frequency with the handwheel is no longer possible: in the marker submask the handwheel can only be used to shift the position of the marker that is
displayed.
The submask shows four display fields, these being in direct relation to the
current marker position:
Marker frequency
the Marker Freq. display field shows the frequency of
the marked spectral component.
Marker level
the Level display field shows the level of the marked
spectral component.
Offset frequency
from the Offset Freq. display field you can read the
offset of the marker frequency from the centre frequency.
Offset level
the Level display field indicates the offset of the marker
level from the level measured at centre frequency. The
offset level is a relative level quantity.
6-6
Marker Submask
Spectrum Analyzer
Functions of Softkeys (marker submask)
{RF-DIR}
(alternative function {RF}); this permits, like in the basic
masks, connection on the RF or RF DIRECT input.
{TUNE}
Adopts the marker frequency last set as the new centre
frequency in the Center Freq. field. This shifts the
analyzer window along the frequency axis in the "continuous measurement" mode. {TUNE} is also permissible in a
frozen display. The adoption of the marker frequency as
the new centre frequency does not take effect until after
{CONTIN} however.
{ONE_SHOT}
Triggers a single measurement. The display of the measured frequency spectrum is frozen on the screen.
{OFF}
Returns to the basic analyzer mask.
{CONTIN}
Triggers continuous measurement. The display of the measured frequency spectrum is continuously updated. After
{CONTIN} the softkey has the alternative function {FREEZE}.
{FREEZE} freezes the display that is visible when the softkey
is operated. The softkey then adopts the {CONTIN} function
again.
{RETURN}
Returns to the basic TX mask.
6
Fig. 6.2: Marker submask. The marker (vertical dotted line) has been set with the
handwheel 14.6250 MHz. The level of the
corresponding spectral component reaches -21 dBm. The marker is offset from the
centre frequency (10 MHz) by +4.6500 MHz;
the level measured at the marker frequency is
-24 dBc below the level at centre frequency.
6-7
Spectrum Analyzer
Harmonics Submask
Harmonics Submask
The harmonics submask shows harmonics of the applied RF signal in the form
of vertical bars. Down to a fundamental frequency of 2 MHz and up to one of
142.79 MHz, seven harmonics (ie including the fundamental) are always displayed. At higher fundamental frequencies the harmonics submask only shows the
actual harmonics whose frequency does not go beyond the upper analyzer limit
of 999.9999 MHz.
From the basic analyzer mask the harmonics submask takes the values for
reference level and centre frequency for the entry fields Ref. Level and
Center Freq. Both values can be altered in the submask in the same way as
in the basic mask.
If the centre frequency has been determined manually by marker tuning, there
may be slight differences between the set centre frequency and the actual carrier
frequency. This frequency offset will not affect harmonics measurement up to a
value of about 400 kHz because an offset measurement is also performed. The
analyzer balances the result of the offset measurement against the set centre
frequency, thus producing correct frequency readings for the harmonics.
The level of the harmonics, referred to the level of the fundamental (carrier
frequency), determines the height of the bars that are shown. Weak harmonics
produce short bars and strong harmonics produce long ones. The bar at the
lefthand edge of the display (n = 1) always represents the fundamental, its
absolute level (dBm) being shown in the bottom right corner of the display. The
relative levels (dBc, c = carrier) given the individual harmonic bars are referred to
this value: there is a linear relationship between bar height and value in dBc.
Fig. 6.3: Harmonics submask.
6-8
Harmonics Submask
Spectrum Analyzer
Functions of Softkeys (harmonics submask)
{RF-DIR}
(alternative function {RF}) This permits, like in the basic
masks, connection on the RF or RF DIRECT input.
{ONE_SHOT}
Triggers a single measurement. The display of the measured harmonics spectrum is frozen on the screen.
{CONTIN}
Triggers continuous measurement. The display of the measured harmonics spectrum is continuously updated. After
{CONTIN} the softkey has the alternative function {FREEZE}.
{FREEZE} freezes the display that is visible when the softkey
is operated. The softkey then adopts the {CONTIN} function
again.
{RETURN}
Takes you back to the basic analyzer mask.
6
6-9
Spectrum Analyzer
Harmonics Submask
Setting Reference Level
The harmonics submask offers two means of optimally matching the sensitivity
of the analyzer to the applied RF signal. If the analyzer is overloaded because the
reference level is too low, for instance, the message OVERLOAD ! will appear. You
should then increase the reference level (ie reduce the sensitivity) in increments
by repeatedly tapping the plus key, for example, until the message disappears
and a bar chart appears.
On the other hand the sensitivity of the analyzer should not be reduced unnecessarily, because otherwise the background noise of the set will obscure weak
harmonics. The sensitivity is set optimally when the dynamic range of the signal
makes full use of the dynamic range of the analyzer display (80 dB). In this case
harmonics will show up optimally against the background noise of the analyzer.
But if the sensitivity of the analyzer is reduced by way of the reference level to
such an extent that the fundamental only calls for a dynamic range of 60 dB for
instance, then 20 dB of dynamic display range is unnecessarily lost for weak
harmonics.
The reserve dynamic range of the analyzer that is not used appears as a bright
zone at the bottom edge of the harmonics submask. If the field is at least 10 dB,
you can set a smaller reference level (as long as the lower limit is not yet reached)
and thus match the dynamic range of the display better to the dynamic range of
the signal. This will improve measuring accuracy, especially for weak harmonics.
6-10
Harmonics Submask
Spectrum Analyzer
6
Fig. 6.4: Effect of reference level. When the reference level is set optimally (left), no
dynamic display range is wasted. If the reference level is too high (right), weak harmonics
hardly contrast against the background noise, the measurement is then rather dubious.
6-11
Oscilloscope
AUTOTRIG Scope Mask
Oscilloscope
The oscilloscope (or simply scope) of STABILOCK 4032 shows the characteristics of AF signals applied internally or externally on the monitor. You can call
up the scope from each of the three basic masks (TX, RX and optionally duplex)
using [SCOPE]. If you wish to examine the modulation signal of an RF signal that
is fed in, only the appropriate RF input socket has to be coupled with {RF} or
{RF_DIR} before calling up the scope.
AUTOTRIG Scope Mask
The [SCOPE] entry clears the bottom half of the current basic mask and shows
instead one of the two scope masks: AUTOTRIG or VARIABLE TRIGGER. [HELP]
and [PRINT] again retain their usual functions in these masks. In the remaining
upper half of the original basic mask the settings (eg tuned frequency, level, type
of modulation) can be altered at any time. The corresponding entry fields are
accessed as usual with the cursor keys or by fast access.
The two scope masks have no mask header; they are named after the softkeys
used to produce them on the display. The masks differ primarily through the fact
that in one the triggering is automatic, while in the other the trigger level can be
varied. Now strike {AUTOTRIG} and call up the AUTOTRIG mask if it is not already
shown on the screen.
Fig. 6.5: AUTOTRIG mask. Display of the
GEN A modulation signal. The vertical deflection coefficient is 12.5 mV/div, the horizontal deflection coefficient is 1 ms/div.
6-12
AUTOTRIG Scope Mask
Oscilloscope
{RETURN} takes you from the AUTOTRIG mask back to the basic mask that was
active before the scope was called up. You can also leave the scope mode
immediately with [TX], [RX], [AUX], [MEMORY] or by calling up the basic duplex mask
(option). All the major scope settings are stored when you exit from the scope
mode.
Setting Zero Line
The position of the zero line in the scope window can be shifted with the POS
control (front panel, scope field). For this it is best to choose the AUTOTRIG mask,
because only then will the zero line be displayed in the absence of an input signal.
If the zero line is outside the scope window, an arrow symbol (trace finder)
appears at the left edge of the screen, pointing to where the zero line is located
and thus assisting use of the POS control.
Selecting Test Signal
The {EXT} softkey function and its alternative function {INT} permit you to decide
whether an internally processed AF signal is to be displayed or one applied
directly to the scope input:
{EXT}
couples the SCOPE INPUT socket (front panel) directly to the scope input.
on the other hand applies one of the internally processed AF signals to the
scope.
{INT}
The maximum level applied to the scope input should not exceed 24 Vpp.
Upwards of this value 12-V clamping diodes in the input stage will limit the test
signal.
One of the internally processed AF signals can be selected with the [VOLTM],
[DEMOD] and [RX_MOD/MOD_GEN] keys. The signal can then - unlike the signal applied
to the SCOPE INPUT - be fed via the 1-kHz notch filter or the optional modules
on the OPTION CARD before it reaches the scope input (see also Chapter 12,
"AF-signal Paths").
[VOLTM]
Selects the signal applied to the AF input socket of the
same name.
[DEMOD]
Selects the demodulated signal in the TX and duplex (option) modes.
[RX_MOD/MOD_GEN]
Selects the modulation signal. If several modulation-signal
sources are activated, the sum signal will be displayed.
6-13
6
Oscilloscope
AUTOTRIG Scope Mask
Inserting a Filter
Deciding whether the internally processed AF signal is to be applied to the scope
input directly or by way of a filter is made as follows:
[VOLT]
The AF signal goes to the scope directly if no optional
module is activated on the OPTION CARD (see chapter 2,
"OPTION CARD"). As soon as one of the optional modules
Filter 1/2 or Option is activated, it will be inserted in
the signal path to the scope.
[DIST]
The AF signal goes by way of the 1-kHz notch filter. The
scope input receives the signal without its 1-kHz component (residual distortion signal). If the optional module Var
Notch is activated on the OPTION CARD, this filter will be
inserted into the signal path instead of the 1-kHz filter.
Calling up the basic scope mask simultaneously activates the scope. Two scroll
fields that can be accessed with the cursor keys then permit setting of the vertical
and horizontal deflection coefficients.
Fig. 6.6: Residual distortion signal. A high
level has been set for GEN A in the Lev field
of the basic TX mask. The resulting residual
distortion signal becomes visible as soon as
[DIST] inserts the 1-kHz notch filter in the AF
signal path.
6-14
AUTOTRIG Scope Mask
Oscilloscope
Vertical Deflection Coefficient
If the scroll field in the bottom left corner of the scope window is active (brightened
up), [UNIT/SCROLL], slow turning of the handwheel or striking the plus/minus keys
will call up the available deflection coefficients. The value in the scroll field is the
one that is valid. The number, graduation and units of the deflection coefficients
are dependent on the operating mode and the selected AF signal. For the units
(%/div, Hz/div, V/div or rad/div) the allocations are as follows (MOD =
RX MOD/MOD GEN):
RX-AM RX-FM RX-ΦM TX-AM TX-FM TX-ΦM DUPLEX-FM DUPLEX-ΦM
MOD
%
Hz
rad
V
V
V
Hz
rad
DEMOD
---
---
VOLTM
V
V
---
V
Hz
rad
Hz
rad
V
V
V
V
V
V
If the SCOPE INPUT is coupled with {EXT}, the vertical deflection coefficient will
always take the V/div unit.
Overloading of preamplifier
The vertical deflection coefficient is decisive for the amplification factor of the
scope preamplifier. Too high an amplification factor leads to overloading and thus
to an inaccurate signal display. This can very likely be the case when a weak
residual distortion signal is to be displayed (overloading through fundamental).
If the preamplifier is overloaded, Overload will appear in the status line at the
bottom edge of the screen. In this case a faithful display of the signal is only
possible if a larger vertical deflection coefficient is set.
Horizontal Deflection Coefficient
The second scroll field at the bottom edge of the scope window, in the same way
as described above, permits setting of the X deflection. The number, graduation
and units (s/div) of the deflection coefficients are not dependent on the operating
mode.
6-15
6
Oscilloscope
VARIABLE TRIGGER Scope Mask
VARIABLE TRIGGER Scope Mask
The VARIABLE TRIGGER mask, permitting manual setting of the trigger level, is
called up with {VARIABLE_TRIGGER}. You can change from one scope mask to another
at any time.
A marker at the lefthand edge of the display shows the trigger level that was set
the last time the mask was called up. With the handwheel it is then possible to
shift the marker along the level axis and thus to set the trigger level.
In the VARIABLE TRIGGER mask the handwheel is reserved for setting the
trigger level. Alteration of the deflection coefficients is permissible just as in the
AUTOTRIG mask, but it can only be done with [UNIT/SCROLL] or the plus/minus
keys.
If the trigger condition is not satisfied, {BEAMFND} produces a narrow brightened up
bar at the left edge of the screen. The location and the vertical extension of the
bar correspond to the location of the signal and the peak-to-peak value. The bar
display is updated by {BEAMFND}. Thus the bar will not show a shift in the zero
(turning of POS control), for example, until the {BEAMFND} softkey is struck.
There are the following possibilities for satisfying the trigger condition:
•
•
•
Correct the location of the trigger level with the handwheel
Correct the zero position of the signal with the POS control
Increase the vertical deflection coefficient
Softkey {NEG_TRIG} (alternative function {POS_TRIG}) permits selection of the triggering instant; {NEG_TRIG} produces triggering on the negative (falling) edge of the
signal, {POS_TRIG} triggers on the positive signal edge.
6-16
VARIABLE TRIGGER Scope Mask
Oscilloscope
Fig. 6.7: VARIABLE TRIGGER mask. In contrast to the AUTOTRIG mask, the trigger level
can be set manually. The marker at the lefthand edge of the screen shows the position of
the trigger level. If the trigger condition is not satisfied, {BEAMFND} produces a bar that
indicates the location and peak-to-peak value of the test signal.
One-shot Function
{ONE_SHOT} triggers a one-shot measurement as soon as the trigger condition is
satisfied. The one-shot measurement will use deflection coefficients altered
beforehand. The measured result (curve trace) is frozen.
The one-shot function is available in both scope masks. It indicates the momentary trigger level at the lefthand edge of the screen with the trigger marker, but
does not permit alteration of the level: the required level must be set in the
VARIABLE TRIGGER mask before calling up the one-shot function.
{ONE_SHOT} assigns new functions to softkeys S5 and S6. {CONTIN} takes you back
to continuous measurement, ie you exit from the one-shot function; the stored
curve trace is then deleted. With {SETMARK} the frozen curve trace can be precisely
measured in time (see section "Measuring Curve Trace").
Freeze Function
The freeze function is virtually identical to the one-shot function. {FREEZE} uses
automatic triggering however and freezes a curve trace irrespective of a trigger
condition: the curve trace is stored that is visible at the instant when the softkey
is operated. The freeze function is available in both scope masks. It assigns the
{CONTIN} function to softkey S5 (exit from freeze function) and the {SETMARK}
function to softkey S6 (see section "Measuring Curve Trace").
6-17
6
Oscilloscope
Measuring Curve Trace
As soon as the {ONE_SHOT} or {FREEZE} function is called up, the handwheel takes
on a new function: it alters the width of a "timing field", while the time duration,
corresponding to the momentary width of the field, appears in the bottom right
corner of the scope window. Thus any part of a curve acquired by the field can be
precisely measured in time. {SETMARK} sets the start position (zero point) of the
timing field. Use the handwheel to move the shiftable edge of the timing field to
the required start position (beginning or end of the curve section) and then strike
the softkey. The timing field can then be extended over the curve section with the
handwheel. The resolution of the timing field is 1/40 of the horizontal deflection
coefficient.
When the function {ONE_SHOT} or {FREEZE} function is called up, the handwheel can
only be used to set the expansion of the timing field. Scroll variables can only be
called up with [UNIT/SCROLL] or the plus/minus keys.
Fig. 6.8: Timing measurement. First the shiftable edge of the timing field was moved to
the negative amplitude of the signal curve
with the handwheel. {SETMARK} defined this
point as the new start position of the timing
field, which can then be expanded as required. The portion of the signal marked here
has a duration of 1650 µs.
6-18
Tracking
Tracking
With tracking, frequency-related network analyses can be performed, eg graphic
display of a filter curve. Together with the VSWR test set (ordering code: 248 145)
you can measure the reflexion coefficient of antennas, 50 Ω attenuators etc.
The Communication Test Set produces a sweep signal for the purpose, which has
to be fed into the network that is being examined. At the same time the signal level
following the network is measured and shown as a curve on the monitor of the
STABILOCK as a function of frequency. The RF DIRECT socket is the signal
source and the RF socket is the test input.
Fig. 6.9: Connection of a bipole
to the STABILOCK.
4032 STABILOCK
REMOTE
MEMORY
UNIVERSAL ANALOG/DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TEST SET
CARD
FREQU
7
8
9
ENTER
LEVEL
4
5
6
UNIT/SCROLL
MOD FREQ
1
2
FM AM OM
0
3
.
OFF
-
STEP
+
INTENS
POWER
ON/OFF
DUPLEX
dB REL
RX
TX
S3
S2
S1
VOLT
S4
SCOPE ANALYZER MEMORY
S6
S5
RX MOD
BEAT DF
DIST
SINAD
CCITT
VOLTM
DEMOD
GEN A
MOD GEN
PRINT
AUX
B/SAT
EXT
HELP
CLEAR
SCOPE INPUT
POS
20 dB
RF
DIRECT
600
RF
50
DEMOD
600
600
AC
DC
VOLTM
MOD GEN
MAX
0,5 W
EMF
<2 V
MAX
EMF
MAX
30 Hz
<2 V
20 V
30 kHz
600
0...20 kHz
R L > 200
MAX
8 Vpp
0...20 kHz
1 M
0...20 kHz
6-19
6
Tracking
Callup of tracking mask
Callup of tracking mask
First set STABILOCK to duplex mode. Then tap the [ANALYZER] key. This leads to
display of the tracking mask. After a short pause, during which the message
Calculating appears, display of the curve begins on the screen (if the test
input is open, this will be a straight line at the bottom edge of the screen window).
In the tracking mask [HELP] also briefly illuminates all entry fields. You can move
to any entry field with the cursor keys. The entry field for the RF output level can
also be positioned on with [LEVEL].
Fig. 6.10: Tracking mask.
Operation
Setting RF output level
The numeric field RF Level at the top edge of the mask is for setting the RF
output level on the RF DIRECT socket. Select the unit (dBm, dBµ, µV/mV) as in
the basic RX mask. There is no limit to the RF output level, ie as long as the RF
input level on the RF socket remains below –10 dBm. Higher input levels are
limited by the duplex input stage and thus lead to unwanted compression of the
displayed curve. It is especially important to remain within the maximum permissible RF input level when testing active (amplifying) networks.
6-20
Operation
Tracking
Meaning of level scale
For relative level measurements the tracking mask shows a scale with 10-dB
divisions along the left margin. Relative level measurement means that only level
differences (in dB) can be measured, and not absolute levels (eg in dBm). A
typical relative level measurement is that of tracing the –3-dB point in a filter
curve. For exact measurement of level differences an adjustable marker line can
be produced on the screen with the {MARKER} softkey (see section "Meaning of
softkeys").
The 0-dB mark on the scale corresponds approximately to a input level of
–10 dBm. Therefore a displayed curve may not exceed this mark if it is to be
shown undistorted. This restriction will be eliminated later so that active networks
can produce curves in the positive range of the dB scale. The dB scale has
already been prepared for this: the second largest value in the scale is a scroll
field with the scroll variables 0, +10, +20 and +30 that alters the scaling
appropriately.
For analyzing passive networks it is best to set the scroll variable 0. Optimal use
is then made of the tracking display window with dynamic range of 0 to –70 dB
(see illustration).
6
Fig. 6.11: Lowpass-filter curves plotted
with the tracking function.
Fig. 6.12: When analyzing passive networks
it is always best to do without the unnecessary display dynamic range between 0 and
+40 dB and instead to spread the useful
dynamic range to between 0 and –70 dB.
Then the curve becomes visible in the lower
level range.
6-21
Tracking
Operation
Setting start/stop frequencies
The start/stop frequency of the sweep signal is determined by the content of the
appropriate numeric fields (bottom edge of mask). On the horizontal frequency
axis of the tracking mask the start frequency is at the left edge of the mask and
the stop frequency at the right edge.
Permissible values of start frequency: 27 to 998.9999 MHz
Permissible values of stop frequency: 28 to 999.9999 MHz
After every alteration in the start/stop frequency the Calculating message
appears for a few seconds in the status line before display of the curve commences. If inadmissible values are entered or if the sweep width (difference between
start and stop frequency) is not at least 1 MHz, an error message will appear in
the status line on the monitor.
Setting frequency resolution
The frequency resolution determines how precise a curve is displayed. The
higher the frequency resolution, the more closely the displayed curve will correspond to the real characteristic. The frequency resolution is produced by the scroll
field Points with the scroll variables 50, 100 and 200. The set scroll variable
determines at how many frequency points on the displayed curve a measurement
of level is made. This means that greater frequency resolution will always result
in a slower update cycle for the curve, ie that alterations do not become visible
until after a longish interval.
6-22
Operation
Tracking
Meaning of softkeys
{MARKER}
Inserts a marking line with which the displayed curve can be
precisely measured (level/frequency association). As long as the
marker is visible, only the position of the marker can be varied with
the spinwheel (scroll variables can no longer be selected). The
current position of the marker is shown by the Marker Freq.
display field, the associated relative level (referred to the 0-dB
mark on the scale) appearing in the Level field.
{Calibr.}
No function at present.
{RETURN}
Takes you back to the mask that was previously active.
Fig. 6.13: Marker function. The marking line,
which is adjustable with the spinwheel, permits exact measurement of relative level. The
Marker Freq. field indicates the frequency
at the current position of the marker, the
Level field shows the corresponding relative
level.
6
6-23
Tracking
Technical data
Technical data
Maximum permissible RF input level on RF socket
Displayed level dynamic range
Resolution in relative level measurement
Maximum frequency range of sweep signal
Minimum sweep width
Maximum sweep width
Maximum frequency resolution
6-24
–10 dBm
70 dB
1 dB
27 MHz...999,9999 MHz
1 MHz
972,9999 MHz
5 kHz
MEMORY
7
Introduction
Introduction
"MEMORY" is a special mode of the 4032 that works with the memory card
storage medium. Starting from the MEMORY mask, five different functions can
be used:
•
•
•
•
•
Storage and recall of complete device settings (setups). In this way the 4032
can be set up very quickly - even by someone with little experience - for
different test applications that are always occurring.
Storage and printout of screen contents. With this function you can store a
measured result or oscilloscope curve, for example, when you are out testing,
and then print it out when you arrive back at your base. You can also use this
function when the screen contents are to be printed out a number of times
and unaltered.
Writing, storing, loading and starting AUTORUN programs. A program of this
kind can perform a complete and automatic acceptance test on a radio set for
example.
Storage and printout of AUTORUN test reports. This function logs an AUTORUN test on memory card. This means that you can dispense with a printer
for AUTORUN tests in the field. The test reports can be printed out when you
return to base. The printout of a stored AUTORUN test report is identical to
one that is printed out immediately.
Loading of system programs (software options) for the testing of radio-data
sets. Here the system programs handle the control of the DATA MODULE
hardware option. A loaded system program is started automatically by calling
up the DATA mask.
The first four functions above can be tried with the memory card that is included
in the standard accessories. For the fifth function you require a software option
(a memory card that is supplied written with a system program ex works) and the
DATA MODULE.
On the following pages you are told how to work with memory cards and the
individual MEMORY functions. Details of testing radio-data systems with the aid
of system programs are given in Chapter 10.
7-3
7
Memory card
Slot for memory cards
Memory card
Memory cards are the storage medium for MEMORY mode. They contain RAM
chips to hold data. Retention of data is ensured by a built-in lithium button cell.
"
When you receive a memory card, enter the date on it for how long the battery is
expected to last, ie unless the date has already been entered ex works. The lifetime
of a battery starts on the day a memory card is despatched.
Note on care: Do not clean memory cards with liquids or detergents because this
can lead to contact problems.
Slot for memory cards 7)
When you push a memory card into the memory card slot (front panel), make
sure it is the right way round (Fig. 7.1). Do not use force, slight pressure is enough
to make the electric contacts engage with the pins of the connector. If the card is
the wrong way round, a mechanical block will prevent electrical contact. Observe
the handling instructions on the memory card and only use original cards.
4032 STABILOCK
REMOTE
MEMORY
UNIVERSAL ANALOG/DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TEST SET
CARD
FREQU
7
8
9
ENTER
UNIT/SCROLL
LEVEL
4
5
6
MOD FREQ
1
2
3
FM AM OM
0
.
OFF
-
STEP
+
INTENS
POWER
ON/OFF
DUPLEX
dB REL
RX
TX
S3
S2
S1
VOLT
S4
SCOPE ANALYZER MEMORY
S6
S5
RX MOD
BEAT DF
DIST
SINAD
CCITT
VOLTM
DEMOD
GEN A
MOD GEN
PRINT
AUX
B/SAT
EXT
HELP
CLEAR
SCOPE INPUT
POS
20 dB
RF
DIRECT
600
RF
50
DEMOD
600
600
AC
DC
VOLTM
MOD GEN
MAX
0,5 W
EMF
<2 V
MAX
EMF
MAX
30 Hz
<2 V
20 V
30 kHz
600
0...20 kHz
R L > 200
MAX
8 Vpp
0...20 kHz
1 M
0...20 kHz
Fig. 7.1: The picture shows how a memory card should be inserted in the slot on the 4032.
Mechanical coding prevents it from being inserted in the wrong way.
7-4
Two kinds of memory card
Two kinds of memory card
Memory card
3)
A modified memory card has been shipped since the end of 1994. The new card
uses a different type of battery. The two kinds of memory card are easy to
distinguish:
new
Write-protect switch
Snap lock
Battery,
ordering code
859 009
Battery compartment
Write-protect switch
Battery compartment
7
old
Phillips screw
Battery,
ordering code
859 006
Fig. 7.2: The major differences between the new (top) and the old memory card.
7-5
Memory card
Battery lifetime
Battery lifetime
New memory card
Old memory card
The built-in lithium button cell (ordering
code 859 009) has a lifetime of 5 years,
regardless of the capacity of the memory
card.
The lifetime of the built-in lithium button
cell (ordering code 859 006) depends
on the capacity of the memory card:
7-6
Storage capacity
Battery lifetime
32 Kbytes
4 years
64 Kbytes
2 years
128 Kbytes
1 year
Changing battery – old memory card
Memory card
Changing battery – old memory card
To prevent any loss of data, you should replaca lithium button cells before the final
date shown on the memory card (ordering code for new batteries: 859 006).
Procedure for replacing button cell
1. Power up the Communication Test Set and push the memory card into the
slot. If you want to avoid any risk, make a copy of the memory card until you
know that the battery has been replaced properly (note: memory cards
containing a system program cannot be copied).
2. Undo the Phillips screw at the location shown in Fig. 7.3. This screw holds
the battery compartment shut, which you can now open.
3. Take out the button cell (note the polarity and the indication on the memory
card), insert a new cell with the right polarity and close the battery compartment.
4. Enter the expiry date of the new button cell on the memory card in one of the
fields provided for this purpose (see table on page 7-6).
Check
5. Take the memory card out of the slot for at least 10 min and then push it back
in again.
6. Call up the MEMORY mask. The directory of the memory card must now
show the same entries as before you replaced the button cell. If not, the
contents of the memory card have been deleted! In such an event, check that
the battery is correctly poled. If you have lost a system program, contact your
nearest Willtek office or an authorized representative.
Undo Phillips
screw here
and open battery compartment.
Fig. 7.3: The battery of a memory card has a limited lifetime.
So do not forget to replace it in
good time.
Proper disposal of used button cells
Do not put lithium batteries in the waste-paper basket. Take them to a point of
collection for problem refuse. Willtek Communications GmbH and its sales offices
will also take back button cells for correct, ie environment-friendly, disposal.
7-7
7
Memory card
Changing battery – new memory card
Changing battery – new memory card
To prevent any loss of data, you should replaca lithium button cells before the final
date shown on the memory card (ordering code for new batteries: 859 009).
Procedure for replacing button cell
1. Power up the Communication Test Set and push the memory card into the
slot. If you want to avoid any risk, make a copy of the memory card until you
know that the battery has been replaced properly (note: memory cards
containing a system program cannot be copied).
2. Release the lid of the battery compartment. To do this, press the tag in the
direction of the arrow with a fingernail, as shown in Fig. 7.4. Remove the lid
of the battery compartment.
3. Take out the used button cell. Watch out for the correct polarity when inserting
the fresh button cell, see Fig. 7.5.
The underside of the memory card bears an illustration showing you how to
insert the button cell the right way round.
Risk of data loss! If the battery is wrongly poled, it will not contact the
memory card and the stored data will be lost.
ω
Risk of polarity reversal! The illustration of battery replacement does not apply
to some of the new memory cards (battery wrongly poled).
No matter what model of memory card you have: you cannot go wrong as
long as the battery is facing upwards with its plus pole, ie the same way as
the top of the memory card with the name MEMORY CARD.
4. Replace the lid of the battery compartment the right way round (the tag must point
in the direction of the write-protect switch) and let it click into place.
5. Enter the expiry date of the new button cell on the memory card.
Check
6. Take the memory card out of the slot for at least 10 min and then push it back
in again.
7. Call up the MEMORY mask. The directory of the memory card must now
show the same entries as before you replaced the button cell. If not, the
contents of the memory card have been deleted! In such an event, check that
the battery is correctly poled. If you have lost a system program, contact your
nearest Willtek office or an authorized representative.
7-8
Changing battery – new memory card
Memory card
Fig. 7.4: To open the battery
compartment, press the tag on
the lid in the direction of the
arrow.
Fig. 7.5: Watch out for correct
polarity when inserting the battery. A wrongly poled battery
will cause the stored data to
be lost.
7
Proper disposal of used button cells
Do not put lithium batteries in the waste-paper basket. Take them to a point of
collection for problem refuse. Willtek Communications GmbH and its sales offices
will also take back button cells for correct, ie environment-friendly, disposal.
7-9
Memory card
SYSTEM CARDs
SYSTEM CARDs
memory cards that are supplied ready with a system program are called SYSTEM
CARDs to distinguish them from the normal memory cards. SYSTEM CARDs are
identical technically to memory cards but cannot be copied. For this reason these
memory cards - if they do not permit the battery to be replaced - have to be
replaced by new cards before the battery expires (replacement by the factory or
a sales agency).
"
There should be no memory card in the slot on the 4032 when it is switched on
or off (risk of losing data, noticable by sudden appearance of error message, eg
CHECKSUM WRONG).
7-10
Calling up Directory
MEMORY Mask
MEMORY Mask
It does not matter what the momentary operating status of the Communication
Test Set is, the MEMORY mask can be called up at any time with [MEMORY]; this
is the starting point for all MEMORY functions. {RETURN} takes you back to the
mask that was on screen immediately before the MEMORY mask was called up.
Calling up Directory
After the MEMORY mask has been called up with [MEMORY], it always shows a
directory of ready loaded programs plus the contents of the currently adapted
memory card and its memory capacity. The names of loaded programs are listed
in the two screen lines beneath the text field EXECUTABLE PROGRAMS. The
directory shows maximally two entries because the RAM of the 4032 can only
hold one AUTORUN program and one system program.
The capacity of the adapted memory card can be read next to the text field FILES
ON MEMORY CARD.
The directory of the memory card appears beneath the text field FILES ON
MEMORY CARD: this shows a list of automatically reserved setup entries (see
section "Formatting memory cards") and, depending on the memory content of
the card, the names of AUTORUN programs or stored masks (screen contents).
For SYSTEM CARDs only the name of the stored system program is displayed.
7
Fig. 7.6: The two pages of the MEMORY mask: The first page (left) is only different from
the second page in its softkey functions. Here, for example, the socalled cursor bar marks
the entry TEST.AUT in the directory FILES ON MEMORY CARD.
7-11
MEMORY Mask
Calling up Directory
If there is no memory card in the slot on the front panel when the MEMORY mask
is called up, the mask will simply show the directory EXECUTABLE PROGRAMS.
If you then, having called up the MEMORY mask, insert a memory card, {ETC} +
{NEW_DIR} will take you to the complete directory. {ETC} turns to the second page of
the MEMORY mask. The softkeys that are presented here automatically return to
the first page of the MEMORY mask after the function concerned has been
executed.
For clear distinction the different files (data records) have a label consisting of
three letters that is automatically added to the name of the file.
SET
AUT
EXE
SYS
PIC
RES
=
=
=
=
=
=
Setup
AUTORUN program*)
AUTORUN program*)
System program
Screen content
AUTORUN test report
*) Unlike files with the label AUT, files with the label EXE cannot be edited.
Depending on its capacity a memory card can hold the following files:
Memory card
SET-Files
AUT-, EXE-, PIC,
16-KByte-RES-Files
4-KByte-RES-Files
32 Kbytes
10
1 *)
1 **)
64 Kbytes
10
3 *)
1 **)
10
*)
1 **)
128 Kbytes
256 Kbytes
***)
10
7
10 *)
1 **)
*) The number is the sum of the AUT, EXE, PIC and 16-Kbyte RES files that can
be stored. So it is possible to store either one AUT or one EXE or one PIC or
one 16-Kbyte RES file on a 32-Kbyte card; a 64-Kbyte card on the other hand
can hold one AUT, one EXE and one PIC file for example (any combinations
permissible).
**) On each memory card a 4-Kbyte RES file can be stored in addition (see
Chapter 8, "AUTORUN Test Reports"). This corresponds roughly to a full
page of A4 format.
***)This memory card can only be used with the new memory card interface. You
know this is installed if MEMORY 2 appears in the title line of the MEMORY
mask and hardware revision 2 is entered under MEMCARD-IFC in the
HW-REVISIONS mask.7)
7-12
Calling up Directory
MEMORY Mask
SYSTEM CARDs only contain the ordered system program; users cannot store
files on these cards.
Only entries with the label AUT, EXE or SYS are possible in the directory
EXECUTABLE PROGRAMS because only callable programs can be loaded into the
RAM of the 4032. Setups are executed immediately after they have been loaded,
and screen contents are immediately printed out.
Fig. 7.7: Directory of memory card: According to the directory FILES ON memory
card the inserted memory card contains the
AUTORUN program MOBILE.AUT and two
setups. The AUTORUN program is already
loaded in the RAM of the 4032; therefore
MOBILE.AUT also appears in the directory
EXECUTABLE PROGRAMS.
Fig. 7.8: Directory of SYSTEM CARD: The
RAM of the 4032 contains no AUTORUN program. The inserted SYSTEM CARD contains
the system program NMT-900.SYS, which
can be loaded into main memory.
7
7-13
MEMORY Mask
Formatting memory cards
Formatting memory cards
Before a new memory card can store files, it has to be formatted. This later
speeds up access to the stored files. SYSTEM CARDs are provided with write
protection to prevent them from being formatted by accident. The formatting
procedure is as follows:
1. Call up the MEMORY mask.
2. Insert the memory card.
3. Turn to the second page of the MEMORY mask with {ETC}.
4. Start the formatting with {FORMAT}. If a used memory card is formatted again, all its
files will be deleted. To prevent deletion by mistake, in such cases {FORMAT} is
followed on the screen by the question OVERWRITE ????, which can be
answered with {YES} or {NO}.
5. Formatting only takes a few seconds and it is finished when the first page of the
MEMORY mask appears and the current directory is displayed.
After formatting there are ten files reserved for setups on a memory card,
depending on its capacity. Up to eight more files are reserved for AUTORUN
programs, AUTORUN test reports or screen contents. The reserved setup files
can immediately be recognized in the FILES ON memory card directory by the
label .SET (without any name preceding). Reserved AUT, EXE, RES or PIC files
on the other hand are concealed as "blank entries" in the righthand column of the
FILES ON memory card directory. The entry is not given a name until an
AUTORUN program or screen contents are stored.
Any entry in the directory can be marked with the brightened up cursor bar, which
can be manipulated with the four cursor keys. All further entries then refer to the
marked entry.
Fig. 7.9: Directory of memory card immediately after formatting.
7-14
Deleting Individual Files
MEMORY Mask
Deleting Individual Files
Whereas {FORMAT} will delete all data on a memory card, {ERASE} can be used to
delete specific files. SYS files cannot be deleted on SYSTEM CARDs.
1. Mark the entry that is to be deleted with the cursor bar in the directory FILES ON
memory card.
2. Call up the second page of the MEMORY mask with {ETC}.
3. Call up the deletion routine with
{ERASE}
.
4. Check that the entry for deletion really is marked and then start the deletion routine
with {YES} or abort it with {NO}.
If the deleted file is an AUT, EXE, RES or PIC file, its name will be removed
entirely from the directory. The label SET is left over in the directory from a deleted
SET file.
Copying memory cards
In contrast to the content of SYSTEM CARDs, that of normal memory cards can
be copied. The destination card is formatted automatically. The copying routine
uses the AUTORUN RAM of the 4032 as a buffer, so any AUTORUN program
stored in the RAM will be deleted. A loaded system program will survive the
copying routine unharmed. The copying procedure is quite simple:
7
1. Adapt the source card.
2. Call up the second page of the MEMORY mask with {ETC}.
3. Start the copying routine with {COPY}.
4. If there is an AUTORUN program in the RAM of the 4032, you are asked
AUTORUN MEMORY USED. OVERWRITE ?. Answering {YES} produces a prompt to
adapt the destination card, {NO} aborts the copying routine.
5. Insert the destination card and strike any softkey.The destination card must have
the same capycity as the source card.
6. Wait for the prompt INSERT SOURCE CARD, insert the source card and again
strike any softkey.
7. Repeat the exchange of cards according to the instructions on the screen. The
copying procedure is ended when the COPY finished message appears on the
screen.
7-15
MEMORY Mask
Naming Files
Naming Files
When you store a SET, AUT, EXE or PIC file, you can give an individual name to
the marked file entry. For this purpose the softkeys - after the storing routine has
been called up (see following sections) - show the characters of the alphabet, to
begin with in groups of maximally six letters. At the same time the screen tells you
to enter the file name (INPUT FILE NAME...).
As soon as you strike a softkey, the letters of the group you have selected are
shown individually, one on each of the six softkeys. Striking a softkey then puts
the letter concerned into the marked file entry, at the point where the flashing
cursor is located. At the same time the softkeys will again show the letter groups
so that you can select the next character. To correct an entry error, mark it with
the cursor and then overwrite it.
A name may have no more than ten characters, and spaces also count as
characters. After entering the last character you must strike [ENTER] to leave the
text entry mode.
It is not absolutely essential to enter a name. If you choose not to and strike
[ENTER] when the request INPUT FILE NAME... appears, the 4032 will give the
file a name automatically:
HARDCOPY
for PIC files;
AUTORUN
for AUT files;
Fx
for SET files (x = 0-9, depending on where the SET file
comes in the directory).
Fig. 7.10: When the files shown here were
stored, they were not given individual names,
their naming was left to the 4032.
7-16
Renaming Files
MEMORY Mask
If the marked file already has a name, you are first asked, after calling the storage
routine, whether the file content is to be overwritten: {NO} terminates the routine,
{YES} produces the request INPUT FILE NAME... and the text entry mode. If
the existing file name is to be deleted, first strike [OFF] before entering a new name
on the softkeys. But it is also possible to modify or add to an existing file name.
Renaming Files
A file that already has a name can be renamed with {RENAME}. Here only the name
of the file is altered, its content remains unchanged. SYS entries cannot be
renamed however.
Marking file: In the directory FILES ON MEMORY CARD use the cursor bar to
mark the file whose name is to be altered.
Altering file name: {RENAME} calls up the text entry mode (see section "Naming Files"). The old name can now be altered or added to. Strike softkey S6
twice to delete the character that the cursor is marking.
Storing new file name: If the new file name is shorter than the old one, [OFF]
will delete the surplus characters (to the right of the cursor); the new file name
is stored at the same time. If [OFF] is not used, you must terminate the entry
with [ENTER].
7
7-17
MEMORY Mask
Setting and Deleting Write Protection
Setting and Deleting Write Protection
{PROTECT} is used to protect the particular file on memory card against accidental
erasure or overwriting that is marked by the cursor bar (software write protection).
Protected files can be recognized in the directory FILES ON MEMORY CARD by
the letter "P" after the file identification. If {PROTECT} is made for a file that is
already protected, this cancels the write protection. But before this happens, the
4032 will ask you for confirmation, ie {YES} or {NO}.
Fig. 7.11: The files marked "P" are protected against accidental erasure or overwriting.
Newer MEMORY CARDs and SYSTEM CARDs contain a small slide switch that
interrupts the WRITE line and offers extra write protection for all files (hardware
write protection). In contrast to the software write protection this is also effective
if, because of interference, uncontrolled write pulses reach the memory card.
The switch setting on memory cards is detected by the 4032 and, as the case
may be, the status line will show a prompt to reset the write protection. With
memory cards it is advisable to set the hardware write protection as soon as the
files on the memory card no longer have to be altered.
On SYSTEM CARDs the switch setting is not detected by the 4032, meaning that
the user has to check it. The hardware write protection should not be activated on
SYSTEM CARDs so that the 4032 can read the content of the GENERAL
PARAMETERS mask, for example, to the memory card at any time. The advantage of this is that when a system program is repeatedly loaded, standard entries
do not have to be made again.
7-18
Setting and Deleting Write Protection
MEMORY Mask
Write protect activated
Write protect not
activated
old
Write protect
activated
Write protect
not activated
new
Fig. 7.12: When set correctly, the write-protect switch will reliably safeguard the files on a
memory card against accidental erasure or overwriting. The slide switch on the new
memory card (left) is different to that on the old one.
7
7-19
MEMORY Mask
Storing and Recalling Setups
Storing and Recalling Setups
STABILOCK 4032 will automatically store its momentary settings if the set is
switched off with [POWER] or switched from one of the three basic masks to
another. If you have to interrupt a transmitter test because of a receiver test for
instance, the Communication Test Set will immediately adopt the settings that it
had before when you return to the TX mask (values in the entry fields, called up
instruments and so on).
Furthermore, the Communication Test Set can store 13 other setups quite
independently of one another on a memory card. And what is more, including the
conventions agreed in the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask. In this way
STABILOCK 4032 can be set up very speedily for different test applications that
are constantly recurring.
Storing a setup
1. Set up the operating status that is to be saved (eg select the mask, fill in the entry
fields of the mask, choose instruments and modulation generators, call up the
scope, etc). If required, extra conventions that are relevant for the operating status
can be made in the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask.
2. Insert the memory card.
3. Call up the MEMORY mask with
[MEMORY]
.
4. Move the cursor bar to a vacant or an occupied SET location.
5. Start the storage of the device setup with {STORE}.
6. If you have marked an occupied SET location, the 4032 will ask OVERWRITE ???.
Answer {YES} if the new setup is to replace the old one, or {NO} if you want to stop
the storage procedure.
7. Give the SET entry a name (see section "Naming Files"). Confirm the entry with
[ENTER] and then the operating status or setup is stored.
Recalling a setup
1. Mark the required SET entry in the directory FILES ON MEMORY CARD with the
cursor bar.
2. Load the marked setup with {RECALL}. As soon as the setup is loaded, the
Communication Test Set will adopt exactly that status which it had when the setup
was stored.
7-20
Modifying a stored setup
MEMORY Mask
Modifying a stored setup
1. Mark the set up that is to be altered in the directory FILES ON MEMORY CARD
with the cursor bar.
2. Call up this setup with
{RECALL}
.
3. Modify the operating status as required.
4. Call up the MEMORY mask again with [MEMORY].
5. Make sure that the cursor bar is still on the name of the setup that is to be altered
and start the saving of this operating status with {STORE}.
6. When the screen asks OVERWRITE ??? answer with {YES}.
7. Change the name of the setup (see section "Naming Files") or adopt it unaltered
with [ENTER].
7
7-21
MEMORY Mask
Storing and Printing Screen Content
Storing and Printing Screen Content
Storing screen content
1. Insert the memory card.
2. Call up the MEMORY mask with [MEMORY].
3. Mark any blank entry in the righthand column of the directory FILES ON MEMORY
CARD with the cursor bar. If the directory shows a PIC entry that may be overwritten, this will have to be marked. An AUT, EXE or RES file cannot be overwritten
by a PIC file (delete AUT, EXE or RES file with {ERASE}).
4. Strike the STORE softkey.
5. If you mark a blank entry, answer the question on the screen about what is to be
stored with {PICTURE}. This puts the 4032 into the text entry mode (see section
"Naming Files"). If you mark a PIC entry, the 4032 will ask OVERWRITE ????,
which can be answered with {YES} or {NO}. {YES} calls up the text entry mode, {NO}
terminates the storage routine. After confirmation of the file name with [ENTER], the
4032 reports: NEXT HARDCOPY WILL BE STORED ON CARD.
6. Leave the MEMORY mask and set the Communication Test Set so that the monitor
shows the required picture (eg measured results, scope or analyzer display).
7.
[PRINT] will save the screen content shown at the moment the key is struck. The
storage procedure is confirmed by the message STORING PICTURE ON CARD in
the status line and is terminated when this message extinguishes.
If a 32-Kbyte memory card on which a PIC file is to be stored already contains
an AUT or EXE file, the RAM of the 4032 can be used to save the AUT or EXE
file. To do this, load the file into the RAM (see section "Storing and Loading
AUTORUN Program") before it is deleted on the memory card with {ERASE}. Now
the PIC file can be stored. If the PIC file is deleted after the screen content has
been printed out, the AUT or EXE file can be stored again on the memory card.
7-22
Storing and Printing Screen Content
MEMORY Mask
Printing stored screen content
1. Insert the memory card.
2. Make sure that the IEEE-bus printer is ready and that the correct printer driver is
set in the Printer field of the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask.
3. Call up the MEMORY mask with
[MEMORY]
.
4. Mark the PIC entry with the cursor bar.
5.
produces a question: whether the stored display should be shown first on
the screen (answer {YES}) or printed immediately (answer {NO}). If the stored display
is shown on the screen, the status line tells you Screen shows a restored
hardcopy and the next question is PRINT THIS PICTURE. If you answer this
question with {YES}, the screen content is printed out. A {NO} answer takes you back
to the MEMORY mask.
{RECALL}
7
7-23
Loading System Programs
Storing and Printing Screen Content
Loading System Programs
System programs stored on SYSTEM CARDs can only be loaded. Loading
followed by storage on a memory card is not possible. A total reset erases the
system program in the 4032’s RAM. If the Communication Test Set is switched off
or disconnected from the power line the system program is not lost.
The RAM of the 4032 can only hold one system program. If the directory
EXECUTABLE PROGRAMS reports a loaded AUT or EXE file, then the system
program can be loaded in addition to it.
If a SYSTEM CARD is inserted, the system program that is stored on it will be
loaded and started automatically when the DATA mask is called up ([AUX] + {DATA}).
If a system program is supplied on a number of memory cards, place the first card
in the slot and start the load operation. Insert next card will appear to tell
you to insert the next system card. But a SYS file can be loaded like any other
file:
1. Insert the SYSTEM CARD.
2. Call up the MEMORY mask with [MEMORY].
3. Move the cursor bar onto SYS file in the directory FILES ON MEMORY CARD.
4. Use {RECALL} to load the program into the RAM of the 4032. If a system program is
supplied on a number of memory cards, place the first card in the slot and start the
load operation. Insert next card will appear to tell you to insert the next
system card. The loading procedure is ended as soon as the program name
appears in the directory EXECUTABLE PROGRAMS.
The loaded system program starts automatically as soon as the DATA mask is
called up to test a radio-data set (requires normally the DATA module hardware
option).
7-24
AUTORUN
and
Use of IEEE-bus Controller
8
Rationalized testing with AUTORUN programs
Introduction
Introduction
Rationalized testing with AUTORUN programs
AUTORUN programs turn STABILOCK
4032 into a fully automatic radio test set
for just about any task. Controlled by an
AUTORUN program the set will execute
a series of tests without any human
intervention, for example, and at the
same time produce a report with evaluation of the measured results. It is
also possible for an AUTORUN program to stop what it is doing and show
you entry or adjustment instructions on
the display of STABILOCK 4032. Once
you have responded to these, the program will continue with the new entries
or adjustments.
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
SETTX
MODULation
FOR I=100 mV TO 1000 mV STEP 20 mV
KEY 1 TO 6,"CONTINUE",GOTO 80
GENAL #I
IF M_RMS > 220 mV GOTO 100
KEY RUN
NEXT I
END
Fig. 8.1: Listing of AUTORUN program.
BASIC commands make sure your program
runs in the required sequence, IEEE commands take care of setting up the equipment and retrieving the measured results.
AUTORUN programs can automatically reproduce virtually all manual functions
of STABILOCK 4032, from connecting the RF sockets to calling up a special test
routine.
AUTORUN programs are a particular advantage if you want to take care of
extensive tests - that keep occurring - in a speedy and thorough fashion. Typical
examples of these are automatic acceptance tests after repairs or regular routine
checks as part of maintenance.
8
Requirements
1 x STABILOCK 4032
1 x Keyboard (recommended accessory)
or AUTORUN Editor ARE (software option)
Ordering code: 248 192
Ordering code: 897 100
AUTORUN programs are normally entered into the main memory of STABILOCK
4032 with the keyboard (ASCII). One of the control interfaces is necessary for
connecting the keyboard.
8-3
Introduction
AUTORUN = BASIC + IEEE
If you often have to write extensive programs, you are better off with AUTORUN
Editor ARE instead of the keyboard. ARE is a powerful, menu-prompted editor for
program development on IBM-compatible PCs. By way of an IEEE interface card
of the type PC II A (National Instruments) the PC transfers an AUTORUN program to STABILOCK 4032 for execution. Here are some of the features of ARE:
•
•
•
•
The block function; this shifts, copies, prints and stores any parts of the
program.
An expandable library holds program modules that are frequently required.
ARE manages line numbers automatically, even for goto statements.
AUTORUN programs can also be copied from STABILOCK 4032 to the PC
on the IEEE interface. This permits convenient revising of existing AUTORUN
programs.
AUTORUN = BASIC + IEEE
AUTORUN programs use two different kinds of commands, which will be looked
at more closely later on in the sections "BASIC Commands" and "IEEE Commands":
BASIC commands
BASIC commands (BASIC: Beginner’s Allpurpose Symbolic Instruction Code) provide for the required program sequence. They also enable the further processing of measured results, the entry of numeric values and character
strings (texts) and the formatted output of reports on a
printer.
IEEE commands
IEEE commands are used for setting STABILOCK 4032
and for retrieving measured results. The effect of these
commands can be grasped intuitively. For example, the
IEEE commands for calling up the basic TX mask and
retrieving the measured RMS value are simply SETTX and
M_RMS.
8-4
AUTORUN = BASIC + IEEE
Introduction
This page is intentionally left blank
8
8-5
AUTORUN Mask
Calling up AUTORUN mask
AUTORUN Mask
The AUTORUN mask is the basic starting point for all AUTORUN functions:
•
•
•
Write program
Edit program
Execute program
Calling up AUTORUN mask
Preparation
! Call up the MEMORY mask with
Callup
Case 1: RAM contains an AUTORUN program.
Striking the {AUTORUN} softkey calls up the AUTORUN mask
(Fig. 8.3). The name of the program appears in the mask
header. You can now edit the program or start it with {RUN}.
[MEMORY] and check
that it shows the {AUTORUN} softkey (if not, switch to the
next softkey level of the MEMORY mask with {ETC}
(Fig. 8.2)).
! Check whether the main memory (RAM) of Test Set
already contains an AUTORUN program. If so, the
MEMORY mask will indicate the name of the program
(with AUT label) in the directory of main memory.
Directory of RAM
Directory of memory card
Fig. 8.2: This is what the MEMORY mask
looks like when there is no memory card in
the slot and main memory is entirely empty.
{ETC} takes you to the next softkey level.
8-6
Fig. 8.3: The AUTORUN mask shows a listing
of the current program as soon as you call it up.
Requirement: program (here FUG_EXTEND)
must first be filed in main memory.
Calling up AUTORUN mask
Callup
(continued)
AUTORUN Mask
Case 2: RAM contains no AUTORUN program.
After you strike the {AUTORUN} softkey, STABILOCK 4032
does not show the AUTORUN mask but waits for the entry
of a program name (see box). Reason: STABILOCK 4032
assumes that a new program is to be written. This requires
entry of the program name in advance. Immediately after
confirmation of the entry, the display shows the AUTORUN
mask (Fig. 8.4). Now you can start writing the new program.
Fig. 8.4: The
AUTORUN mask
immediately after
callup (case 2). The
declared program
name is TEST.
Return
{RETURN} takes you back to the MEMORY mask. The loaded
AUTORUN program is kept in main memory.
Issuing a new program name
If the RAM contains no AUTORUN program, striking the {AUTORUN} softkey will assign
the softkeys of the MEMORY mask the letters of the alphabet, first in groups of six
letters each. In the directory of RAM the cursor flashes in the entry field for the program
name.
To enter a letter, first strike the softkey whose group contains the required letter (eg
softkey {GHIJKL} for the letter "H"). This labels the six softkeys with the six letters of the
chosen group.
Striking a softkey enters the assigned letter at the position of the cursor in the entry
field, and the softkeys again offer you the letter groups for entering the next character.
Always confirm entry of the name with [ENTER].
Tips: If the program may have the standard name AUTORUN, simply strike the [ENTER]
key after the {AUTORUN} softkey. To enter spaces, move the cursor on by one position.
Incorrect letters are just overwritten. [OFF] deletes all characters to the right of the
cursor. Abort an entry with [MEMORY]. For changing an existing name, see Chapter 7.
8-7
8
AUTORUN Mask
"
Display field
Once the screen shows the AUTORUN mask, the keys of STABILOCK 4032 are
disabled. Exceptions: all softkeys, [PRINT], [HELP] and [CLEAR].
The AUTORUN mask is divided up into three areas, each of which has a precisely
defined purpose (Fig. 8.5).
Display field
The display field of the AUTORUN mask constantly shows the listing during the
entry of a program. During the execution of a program the PRINT commands
produce the output of values or text in the display field (output to a printer is extra).
The display field comprises 16 lines of 49 characters each. If a program listing
has more than 16 lines for example, the listing is automatically "scrolled": each
new program line shifts the topmost line out of the display field.
Editing line
Below the display field is the editing line (Fig. 8.6). This is for entering new
program lines and socalled direct commands (BASIC commands without a line
number that are executed as soon as they are entered: eg PRINT "TEST"). For
the subsequent editing of program lines that already exist in the editing line there
are editing functions (see section "Editing programs"). The momentary write
position is marked by a flashing cursor (after you call up the AUTORUN mask the
cursor does not become visible until you first strike a key).
Display field (16 lines)
Status line
Editing line
Fig. 8.5: The AUTORUN mask is split into
three areas. All of these are relevant when
you are developing a program. During the
execution of a program the editing line is of
no significance.
8-8
Fig. 8.6: Here the ready program line 830
was fetched back into the editing line with
the EDIT command. Program lines can only
be modified there.
Status line
AUTORUN Mask
Entries in the editing line are only possible with the keyboard. Each entry
(program line, direct command) must be terminated by pressing the [RCL/RET] key
on the keyboard. This transfers the current contents of the editing line to the
display field. At the same time the editing line is prepared for the next entry.
Status line
The status line (directly above the softkeys) is reserved exclusively for error
messages. Thus, for example, an attempt to execute the wrong direct command
PRONT "Test" will immediately produce an error message.
8
8-9
AUTORUN Mask
Softkeys of AUTORUN mask
Softkeys of AUTORUN mask
{LIST}
Produces a complete list of the AUTORUN program currently in main memory (always starting with the first program line). If the listing is of more than ten lines, it will
automatically be scrolled until the last program line appears
in the display field. During this listing the {LIST} softkey takes
on a STOP function (stops the scrolling of the listing).
Listing of a specific section of a program is possible with
the LIST editing command (see section "Editing commands"). Lines subsequently inserted in a program do not
appear at the right place in the listing until after {LIST}.
{PRINTER}
This offers the choice of whether or not a printer is to log all
entries during editing. Repeated striking of the softkey
activates/deactivates this function, accompanied by acknowledgement messages:
Edit mode Printing On
Edit mode Printing Off
{PRINTER} is only effective when you are editing programs;
PRINT commands in programs are not affected by this
function.
{RETURN}
Takes you back to the MEMORY mask.
{RUN}
This starts the AUTORUN program currently in main memory. [OFF] terminates program execution (press the key
until termination).
{HELP_VAR}
As long as this softkey is pressed, the display will show the
mask that was visible immediately before calling up the
MEMORY mask. All entry fields of this mask have "identification numbers" assigned to them. You need these to enter
new values in the entry fields with the IEEE command
WRTVAriable.
8-10
Editing keys
Editing Programs
Editing Programs
You need the keyboard or the AUTORUN editor ARE for editing programs (see
under "Requirements"). The AUTORUN editor comes with its own operating
instructions. So here we will concentrate on editing with the keyboard.
The keyboard has keys for editing program lines when they are in the editing line.
There are also editing commands that affect defined sections of a program (eg
deleting whole program blocks or renumeration).
Editing keys
There are keys on the keyboard for six editing functions (Fig. 8.7). The second
occupancy of the keys (upper symbol) is valid if you hold one of the two SHIFT
keys depressed and then press the particular editing key.
←
Moves the cursor one
character to the left.
→
Repeated callup of this function moves the cursor alternately to the end
and the beginning of the line.
→
Moves the cursor one character to
the right.
DEL→Deletes from the position of the
cursor up to the end of the line.
DEL
Deletes the character to the left of the
cursor.
RCL
RET
8
Fetches the entry last confirmed
back into the editing line.
Confirms the entry.
SHIFT keys
Fig. 8.7: For editing the momentary program line the keyboard offers six editing functions,
partly accessed through SHIFT.
8-11
Editing Programs
Editing commands
Editing commands
The editing commands must be entered letter by letter as direct commands from
the keyboard and confirmed with [RCL/RET]. Instead of the full name of the
command you may also just enter the first three letters (eg DEL instead of
DELETE).
AUTO
Automatically issues line numbers.
AUTO x,y
x = first line number, y = increment
If you do not enter parameters x and y, they both default to 10. If
an automatically issued line number is the same as one that
already exists, the new program line will replace the previous one.
The AUTO function is disabled if you do not enter a program line
after a line number but immediately strike [RCL/RET].
Example: AUTO 100,5
After entry of the command, the line number 100 is in the editing
line and you can start entering the program line. As soon as this is
terminated with [RCL/RET], the next line number (105) appears in the
editing line.
DELETE
Permits deletion of specific program lines or whole program
blocks.
DELETE x
Deletes the program line with line number x.
DELETE x,
Deletes all program lines from line number x onwards.
DELETE x,y Deletes all program lines from line number x through y.
DELETE ,y
Deletes all program lines up to line number y.
As an alternative to the DELETE x command, a program line will
also be deleted if you press the [RCL/RET] key immediately after
entering the particular line number.
EDIT
Fetches a completed program line back into the editing line.
EDIT x
x = number of program line to be edited.
The program line can be altered in any way and confirmation with
[RCL/RET] will then put it straight back into the program. But: the
altered program line does not appear in the listing until you list the
program again with {LIST}.
8-12
Editing commands
LIST
Editing Programs
Offers the function of the softkey of the same name in the AUTORUN mask plus the possibility of listing specific program blocks.
LIST
Lists complete program.
LIST x
Lists program line x.
LIST x,
Lists program from line x to end.
LIST x,y
Lists program from line x through y.
LIST ,y
Lists program from first line through line y.
When the LIST command is used, the {LIST} softkey adopts the
STOP function, ie so that you can terminate the listing.
RENUM
Issues new line numbers for an entire program. This command is
particularly useful if a program block has to be inserted between
two program lines, but there are no longer enough vacant line
numbers available. The destinations of GOTO and GOSUB commands are corrected automatically.
RENUM
Renumbers program with increment 10. 1st line number = 10.
RENUM x,y
Renumbers program with increment y. 1st line number = x.
Example: The following program is renumbered first with RENUM,
then with RENUM 30,20.
Original numbering
of program
5 SETRX
10 PRINT "RX-TEST"
15 SOFT_SPECIAL
20 SOFT_SENS
25 GOTO 5
RUN
Numbering
after command
RENUM
10
20
30
40
50
SETRX
PRINT "RX-TEST"
SOFT_SPECIAL
SOFT_SENS
GOTO 10
Numbering
after command
RENUM 30,20
30 SETRX
50 PRINT "RX-TEST"
70 SOFT_SPECIAL
90 SOFT_SENS
110 GOTO 30
Starts the program, like the softkey of the same name, and also
permits starting the program onwards from a certain program line.
RUN
Starts program from first program line.
RUN x
Starts program from line x.
8-13
8
Writing Programs
Fundamentals
Writing Programs
An AUTORUN program is a logical series of commands that are executed in the
given sequence after the program is started. The short programs in the sections
"BASIC Commands" and "IEEE Commands" give a wealth of examples. We will
not be giving you a thorough course in programming here because, firstly, we do
not want the manual to become too "heavy" and, secondly, there are a lot of good
books on this subject on the market anyway.
Fundamentals
Program lines
! Permissible line numbers: 1 through 9999
! Maximum line length: 49 characters
! Each completed program line must be transfered from
the editing line into the display field of the AUTORUN
mask with the [RCL/RET] key of the keyboard.
! A program line may include several IEEE and BASIC
commands. As delimiters you need a colon after BASIC
commands and a semicolon after IEEE commands.
Example: 10 SETTX;PRINT A:PRINT"DEMO":SETRX
20 LET A=MPOWEr:PRINT A
Program size
! Maximum 16 Kbytes (if this is not enough, you can load
"continuations" of a program from memory card with the
BASIC command CHAIN).
Syntax rules
! After line numbers you need not enter a space, although
you can for the sake of clarity.
! A BASIC command must be followed by either a non-
!
!
!
!
!
8-14
alphabetic character or (at least) one space (eg PRINT
A or PRINT"DEMO"). This does not apply to the commands CLS, END and TRACE.
For commands you can use upper-case and lower-case
notation (eg PRINT=print, SETTX=settx).
With variables no distinction is made between uppercase and lower-case notation.
BASIC commands and numeric values must not be
interrupted by spaces.
When entering IEEE commands, you can use the short
form (first five letters), eg WRTVA instead of WRTVAriable.
When entering BASIC commands, you can use the
short form (first three letters), eg PRI A instead of
PRINT A.
Exception: The command ONERROR GOTO must not
be abbreviated.
Syntax check
Direct commands
Writing Programs
! The BASIC commands BEEP, CLS, LET, PRINT and
TRACE can also be executed directly. Thus, for example, you can enter PRINT A (without a line number) if
you want to know the current contents of the variable A.
IEEE commands cannot be executed directly.
Arithmetic
! Only the four basic arithmetic operations are permissi-
ble (eg PRINT (3#4)/2-3+1).
Syntax check
The syntax check is handled by interpreters. In other words, after the start of the
program each line is interpreted one after the other and the appropriate action is
initiated. If the BASIC interpreter comes across a command in a program line that
it cannot interpret, this command is automatically assumed to be an IEEE
command and is handed over to the IEEE interpreter. If this cannot interpret the
command either, there must be a syntax error.
"
When a program line is transfered from the editing line to the display field, there
is no syntax check. This is always made after the start of the program. A detected
syntax error causes the program to be aborted and leads to an error message
indicating the erroneous program line (exception: branch to an error routine,
triggered by the BASIC command ONERROR GOTO).
Incorrectly entered direct commands or commands that are not admissible as
direct commands will lead to the error message:
0201: FUNCTION NOT AVAILABLE IN IMMEDIATE MODE.
When the AUTORUN mask has been selected, [HELP] lists condensed usful
information, about the syntax of the editing commands.
8
8-15
Writing Programs
Variables and units
Variables and units
Permissible variables
The 260 variables A0 (A=A0) through Z9 may be
used in AUTORUN programs for storing numeric
values.
Permissible units
A variable may be assigned a numeric value or a
numeric value with one of the following units:
f
T
m
R
P
V
I
Level
MHz
s
%
ohm
W
V
A
dBm
kHz
ms
rad
mW
mV
mA
dBµ
Hz
µs
kHz
µW
µV
10 A=5
20 B=5 MHZ
30 C=-15dBm
dB
Line 10 assigns the numeric value 5 to variable A.
A space between the numeric value and the units is
permissible but not necessary (line 20). In the units
you can use upper-case and lower-case letters
(line 30).
Variables in IEEE commands
If variables are used in IEEE commands, the variable must be preceded by a
double sharp #. The units of a numeric value can either be declared simultaneously with the variable or stated explicitly in the IEEE command (see example).
Missing or impermissible units (eg MODAF 2.5 mA) trigger an error message.
10
20
30
40
50
60
SETRX
MODAF
F=3.5
MODAF
F=4.5
MODAF
8-16
2.5 kHZ
kHZ
#F
#F kHZ
First the program calls up the RX mask (line 10) and
sets AF generator GEN A to 2.5 kHz with IEEE
command MODAF (line 20). Then GEN is set by a
variable assignment with units to 3.5 kHz (line 30
and 40) and finally by a variable assignment without
units to 4.5 kHz (line 50 and 60).
String variables
Writing Programs
String variables
Character strings may consist of a series of characters between inverted commas (the string itself must contain no inverted commas). Examples of strings are
persons’ names, equipment designations, adjustment instructions or any messages. AUTORUN programs can show these strings on the display, print them out
or check to see if they correspond to a reference string.
Permissible
string variables
STABILOCK 4032 provides the 26 string variables
A$ through Z$ for storing character strings (string
variable M$ has a special function). Each string
variable can hold strings of maximally 49 characters.
10 A$="TEST PROGRAM" The string TEST PROGRAM is first saved in string
20 PRINT A$
variable A$ and then printed out.
Internally used string variable M$
"
String variable M$ has a meaning of its own: each IEEE command of the type
"test job" automatically files the measured result in string variable M$. The
original contents of M$ are then irrevocably lost!
10 LET A=M_RMS
20 PRINT A
30 PRINT M$
The IEEE command M_RMS (query of RMS meter)
passes the measured result to variable A in line 10.
The result is also automatically contained in string
variable M$. So both outputs (lines 20 and 30) lead
to the same result!
When used with the IEEE command SER_In M$ is the only string variable that
reads in a string of up to 1000 characters on the RS 232 interface (option). In this
case too the content of M$ is overwritten by following measuring assignments, so
it is advisable to assign the content immediately to other string variables by
splitting the strings (see example):
M$=SER_In
A$=M$(1,49)
B$=M$(50,98)
C$=M$(99,147)
8-17
8
Writing Programs
String variables
String variables in IEEE commands
Just like with variables, string variables in IEEE commands must also be preceded by a double sharp #.
10 A$="TEST "
20 DISP_#A$
30 DISP_#A$PROGRAM
The IEEE command DISP in line 20 produces display of the text TEST. Line 30 displays the text TEST
PROGRAM.
Splitting and joining strings
Parts of a string variable can be isolated by stating the start and end position of
that part of the string which is to be isolated in brackets after the string variable.
1234567890123
A$="CHANNEL = 142"
PRINT A$(11,13)
The channel number 142 adopts positions 11
through 13 in string A$. So the PRINT command will
only output the channel number.
A number of string variables can be joined with the "+" operator. But the resulting
string must not be longer than 49 characters.
A$="Serial No. = "
B$="6788954"
C$=A$+B$
PRINT C$
8-18
The string variables A$ and B$ are joined to form
string variable C$. The total string Serial No. =
6788954 is output.
Permissible operands
Writing Programs
Permissible operands
Many BASIC commands require the entry of socalled operands, different kinds
being permissible:
Numeric operands
Operand
Example
Numeric value without units
4, -2.5
Numeric value with units
5 MHz, 4 V
Variable A0 to Z9 (see "Variables and Units")
B
IEEE command of type "test job"
M_RMS
BASIC command leading to numeric value
LEN, HEX
String operands
"
String
"TEST"
String variable
A$
BASIC command leading to string
CHR$
In the explanation of the commands in the "BASIC Commands" section, only the
permissible type of operand is stated. You should then use one of the operands
listed above.
Joining operands
Numeric operands may be joined with the following operators:
+
–
$
/
Addition (also valid for joining string operands)
Subtraction
Multiplication
Division
8
All operators have the same priority. A superordinate priority is only possible with
bracketed expressions.
Examples:
1+2$3+4=11
(1+2)$(3+4)=21
2 V+3 V=5 V
M_RMS+2 mV=eg 12 mV
8-19
Writing Programs
"
Permissible operands
If numeric operands show units, there are special rules for joining them:
•
•
•
Operands with different units must not be joined (error message: DIMENSION
MISMATCH. Eg MHz and uV ?).
Operands with and without units may be joined. The result always takes the
units of the operand to the right of the operator. If this operand has no units,
the result will not have any units either.
10 A=5
Here an operand without units (A) and an operand
20 B=10 kHz
with units (B) are joined by the operator "+". Line 30
30 PRINT A+B
produces as the result 15.0000 kHz, but line 40
40 PRINT B+A
only 15 (different number of places: see BASIC
command "PRINT").
8-20
When memory gets scarce
Writing Programs
When memory gets scarce
The main memory of STABILOCK 4032 offers maximally 16 Kbytes for AUTORUN programs. Longer programs are only possible by joining subroutines with
the BASIC command CHAIN. Sometimes, however, a program will only be a few
bytes too long. In such cases it is better to take another close look at the listing
and try to relieve it of "ballast". Basically you can say that each character takes
up one byte. There are the following ways of cutting down on program:
1. Use the short forms of the commands all the way through (for BASIC
commands only the first three letters, for IEEE commands only the first five
letters).
2. Shorten comments in REM lines.
3. Fit several commands into one program line (saves line numbers and control
characters CR+LF).
4. Delete spaces in PRINT commands that are only inserted to make the
expression look "pretty" (formatting). Eight of these spaces can be replaced
by the separator "," without any loss of clarity (saves seven bytes). Example:
PRINT,"POWER" instead of PRINT"
POWER"
5. Delete spaces that are only inserted for the clarity of the listing. These also
include spaces between a line number and the first command of the program
line.
8
8-21
Executing Programs
Executing Programs
Start
AUTORUN programs are started with the {RUN} softkey or
with the command RUN x (x = line number). Communication monitor will then begin to execute the program line by
line.
Execution
All setting instructions of an AUTORUN program can be
followed on the screen if this is not deactivated by the IEEE
command CRT_OFF. If the basic RX mask is called up with
IEEE command SETRX for example, this really will show
the RX mask on the display.
As long as an AUTORUN program is running, the display
will show the script AUTORUN in the top left corner. This
enables a clear distinction between operating states set by
the program and those set manually.
During program execution all keys of STABILOCK 4032
are normally disabled (exceptions: [CLEAR] and [OFF]). Commands like KEY and PAUSE will enable the softkeys however; the INPUT command permits extra entries on the
numeric keypad.
End
As soon as a program is ended, the display shows the
AUTORUN mask. Otherwise the test set retains its last
operating state. The display field shows the results of the
PRINT commands executed by the program (if a program
has a lot of PRINT commands, printed reports are preferable because the display field with its 16 lines can only show
the last PRINT outputs).
Abort
[OFF] interrupts execution of the program (keep the key
pressed until the program aborts).
Reset
[CLEAR] eliminates a blockade of the internal data processing, but without deleting the program. The AUTORUN
mask must then be called up again. A total reset clears the
program in main memory.
8-22
Saving Programs
Saving Programs
The RAM of STABILOCK 4032 can only hold a single AUTORUN program. This
program is overwritten when you enter a new program or another AUTORUN
program is loaded from a memory card. So AUTORUN programs should always
be saved on memory cards. The procedure for this is as follows:
Insert the memory card in the slot
(front panel).
Call up the MEMORY mask with
the [MEMORY] key.
Blank field
Locate any blank field in the directory of the memory card with the
cursor bar, or an AUTORUN file
that may be overwritten.
Start saving operation
with {STORE}.
Answer the question STORE WHAT ?
by striking the {AUTORUN} softkey.
AUTORUN file
Start saving operation
with {STORE}.
Answer the question OVERWRITE ?
by striking the {YES} or the {NO} softkey.
{YES} overwrites the selected AUTORUN file on the memory card, {NO}
stops the saving operation.
The saving operation is finished as soon
as the message INFO: STORING
PROGRAM disappears from the screen.
8-23
8
Loading Programs
Loading Programs
Insert the memory card in the slot
(front panel).
Call up the MEMORY mask with
the [MEMORY] key.
Place the cursor bar on the required AUTORUN file in the directory
of the memory card.
Start the loading operation with
{RECALL}.
YES Does main memory already include an AUTORUN program?
Answer the OVERWRITE ? question with {YES} or {NO}. {YES} overwrites the AUTORUN program in main
memory with the new program, {NO}
stops the loading operation.
NO
The AUTORUN program is loaded
immediately without queries.
The loading operation is finished as soon as the
message INFO: LOADING PROGRAM disappears from the display and the name of the
loaded program appears in the directory of
main memory. After calling up the AUTORUN
mask you can start or edit the program.
8-24
Deleting Program in RAM
Deleting Program in RAM
Call up the MEMORY mask with
the [MEMORY] key.
Place the cursor bar on the AUTORUN file displayed in the directory of main memory.
Start the deleting operation with
{ERASE}.
Answer the question ARE YOU
SURE ? with {YES} or with {NO}.
{YES} deletes the AUTORUN program in main memory, {NO} stops
the deleting operation.
8
8-25
AUTORUN Test Reports
Storing AUTORUN test reports
AUTORUN Test Reports
The results of AUTORUN programs are usually test reports on paper. For this you
need a printer. But if you do not have one available (eg when servicing in the field),
you can still carry out AUTORUN programs, because every test report can also
be stored on a Memory Card and printed out later.
Storing AUTORUN test reports
Call up the second page of the
GENERAL PARAMETERS mask:
[AUX]+{DEF.PAR.}+{ETC}
Select the Printer scroll field
with the cursor keys.
Using [UNIT/SCROLL] enter the scroll
variable Mem.Card in the field.
Adapt the Memory Card.
Start the AUTORUN program. The
test report is then not output to a
printer but stored on a Memory
Card in a RESULT.RES file.
After the start of an AUTORUN program, the name RESULT.RES is automatically
given to the RES file. At the same time 4 or 16 Kbytes (depending on the vacant
capacity of the Memory Card) are reserved for the file.
If the test report is too large for the reserved memory, a second RES file is created
automatically. This is then given the name RESULT.RES, while the first RES file
is renamed RESULTFULL.RES.
If an AUTORUN test report is written to a Memory Card that already contains a
RESULT.RES file, the data of the new AUTORUN test report will be added to this
file. To prevent this happening, the RESULT.RES file and, if there is one, the
RESULTFULL.RES file should always be renamed before starting another
AUTORUN program (see Chapter 7, section "Renaming Files").
8-26
Printing AUTORUN test reports
"
AUTORUN Test Reports
If you want to store an AUTORUN test report, there must be sufficient capacity
available on the adapted Memory Card. If there is not enough, the AUTORUN
program is halted and an error message appears. After remedying this error (eg
by deleting unwanted files or adapting another Memory Card), you have to start
the AUTORUN program again.
Printing AUTORUN test reports
Call up the second page of the
GENERAL PARAMETERS mask:
[AUX]+{DEF.PAR.}+{ETC}
Select the Printer scroll field
with the cursor keys and enter a
suitable printer driver in the field
with [UNIT/SCROLL].
Make sure the IEEE-bus printer is
ready. Adapt the Memory Card.
Call up the Memory mask and
mark the RES file for printing with
the cursor bar.
8
causes the stored AUTORUN test report to be printed out.
{RECALL}
8-27
BASIC Commands
Printing AUTORUN test reports
BASIC Commands
Command
BEEP
Purpose
Generate alarm tone
CHAIN
Join two or more AUTORUN programs
CHR$
Convert numeric code into ASCII characters
CLS
Clear display contents
END
Terminate program execution
FOR-NEXT
Execute program section several times
GET
Include measured figure in string variable
GOSUB
Call up subroutine
GOTO
Skip program section
HEX
Convert hexadecimal to decimal
HEX$
Convert decimal figure to hexadecimal
IF-INLIMIT
Relation-dependent program branch
IF-OUTLIMIT
Relation-dependent program branch
IF-THEN
Relation-dependent program branch
INPUT
Request user input
KEY
Softkey-dependent program branch
LEN
Determine length of string
LET
Variable assignment
ONERROR GOTO
Program branch upon error message
PAUSE
Interrupt program until user responds
PRINT
Output texts and values (on display and printer)
RDOUT
Transfer measured value to variable
RDXY
Read values from the screen
REMARK
Insert remarks in programs
SETUP
Load setup from Memory Card
TIMEOUT
Program branch if time overrun
TRACE
Troubleshooting in programs
VAL
Convert string to numeric value
VAL$
Convert numeric value to string
WAIT
Interrupt program for defined period
8-28
BEEP
BASIC Commands
BEEP
Purpose
Generate alarm tone.
Syntax
BEEP
Effect
Each BEEP command generates an alarm tone (f = 2.8 kHz)
lasting 250 ms.
Example
10
20
30
40
50
BEEP: BEEP: BEEP
WAIT 1000
BEEP: PAUSE "ADJUST SIGNAL"
INPUT A
IF A>20 THEN BEEP
Line 10 triggers the beep three times. Then the program waits 1 s
(line 20) before, accompanied by a further beep, reading out the
message ADJUST SIGNAL on the display (line 30). In line 40 the
program requests the user to enter a numeric value; if the entered
value is greater than 20, the entry is acknowledged with a beep
(line 50).
8
8-29
BASIC Commands
CHAIN
CHAIN
Purpose
Join two or more AUTORUN programs. If the capacity of main
memory (16 Kbytes) is too small for a program for instance, the
program can be split up into subroutines of 16 Kbytes each. At the
end of one subroutine CHAIN calls up the following one.
Syntax
CHAIN [file name]
or
CHAIN # [string variable]
Effect
[file name]
Name of AUTORUN program stored on Memory
Card
[string variable]
eg A$, where A$ must include name of AUTORUN
program stored on Memory Card
C H A I N stops further program execution, loads the specified
AUTORUN program from the Memory Card in the slot and starts
this program. The new program clears the original one in main
memory!
CHAIN resets the count variable of FOR...NEXT loops to the initial
value. The contents of all other variables are preserved, however,
and can continue to be used by the new program. If the CHAIN
command is in a subroutine (GOSUB), there is no return to the
main program.
Example
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
INPUT"DATE = ?",A$
INPUT"UNIT TYPE = ?",B$
INP"CHOOSE PROGRAM: 1=RX TEST 2=TX TEST",A
IF A>2 GOTO 30
C$="TX TEST"
IF A=1 THEN C$="RX TEST"
CHAIN #C$
PRINT"NO COMMAND AFTER CHAIN"
This program (start menu) first requests the user to enter the date
(line 10) and the type of equipment (line 20). The entered replies
are saved in two string variables (A$ and B$). Line 30 offers the
user a choice between receiver and transmitter tests. Depending
on the entry (variable A), the string variable C$ in line 50 or 60 is
assigned the name of the appropriate AUTORUN program, ie
RX TEST or TX TEST (without the .AUT extension). Both programs must (in this example) be on the Memory Card presently in
the slot. The CHAIN command (line 70) loads the required program and starts it automatically. The start menu in main memory
is cleared so that line 80 of the start menu can no longer be
executed.
8-30
CHAIN
BASIC Commands
The newly loaded AUTORUN program can evaluate the contents
of the adopted string variable (A$, B$) and print them out in the test
report for example.
8
8-31
BASIC Commands
CHR$
CHR$
Purpose
Output of control characters to printer.
Syntax
CHR$([list])
[list]
Effect
A number (not a variable) or several numbers separated by commas between 0 and 255 (ASCII
numeric codes)
CHR$ permits, in particular, the output of control characters that
cannot be generated directly with the keyboard (characters with
the ASCII numeric codes 0 to 32). If characters with the numeric
codes 33 to 127 are output, the display field shows the corresponding ASCII characters (standard ASCII characters with a few
exceptions). This output on the display is of no significance however.
Normally the CHR$ command is also responsible for showing
special characters on the display. In STABILOCK 4032 this is
unnecessary because all special characters (eg Ω) can be generated directly with the keyboard (see box).
Example
10 PRINT CHR$(27,38,107,49,83)
20 PRINT "HEADLINE"
30 PRINT CHR$(27,38,107,48,83)
The program outputs with the CHR$ command socalled escape
sequences for the HP-2225 printer (accessory). Line 10 doubles
the print width, so line 20 prints the word H E A D L I N E with
double width. Line 30 switches back to normal print width. You can
find out more about escape sequences in the printer manual.
Special characters
To enter special characters, first strike [FNC/ESC] key and release
again. Then strike key shown in table.
Key
m
Special character µ
8-32
t
u
p
r
d
l
o
∆
↑
Φ
→
↓
←
Ω
CLS
BASIC Commands
CLS
Purpose
Clear display contents, eg to free the display field for new text after
several PRINT commands.
Syntax
CLS
Effect
CLS only clears the contents of the display field; the command has
no effect on the program itself.
Example
10
20
30
40
PRINT "1. LINE"
PRINT "2. LINE": WAIT 1000
CLS
PRINT "3. LINE"
The program shows the texts 1. LINE and 2. LINE for 1 s in the
display field. Then the contents of the display are cleared and only
the text 3. LINE is shown.
8
8-33
BASIC Commands
END
END
Purpose
Terminate program execution.
Syntax
END
Effect
END commands can appear anywhere in the program. Thus
AUTORUN programs can easily be tested section by section by
inserting the command (temporarily) where the next section of a
program begins. END always returns to the AUTORUN mask.
Example
10
20
30
40
50
SETTX
PRINT "COMMAND before END"
WAIT 1000
END
PRINT "COMMAND after END"
The program first calls up the basic TX mask (line 10). Then line
20 enters a text in the display field of the AUTORUN mask. This
text is not visible at first however, because the display still shows
the basic TX mask for 1 s (line 30). Line 40 terminates the program
and returns to the AUTORUN mask, which now shows the text
COMMAND before END. Line 50 is no longer executed.
8-34
END
BASIC Commands
This page is intentionally left blank
8
8-35
BASIC Commands
FOR...NEXT
FOR...NEXT
Purpose
Execute certain program section several times, the number of
repeats being defined.
Syntax
FOR [VAR]=[EXP1] TO [EXP2] STEP [EXP3]
...
program section
...
NEXT [VAR]
[VAR]
Effect
Count variable (A to Z)
[EXP1]
Start value (numeric operand)
[EXP2]
End value (numeric operand)
STEP [EXP3]
Step width (numeric operand) optional
If the BASIC interpreter finds a FOR command, count variable
VAR is assigned the start value EXP1 and then the following
section of the program is executed up to the NEXT command. The
NEXT command increments the value of the count variable by the
value of the defined step width (if STEP [EXP3] is not stated, the
step width is automatically 1). Then the interpreter checks whether
the new value of the count variable is greater than the defined end
value EXP2.
! If so, the FOR...NEXT loop is ended. The program is continued
with the command that follows the NEXT command. The count
variable now has a value equivalent to the sum of the value last
assigned and the step width!
! If not, the section of the program in the FOR...NEXT loop is
executed again.
If the step width EXP3 is negative, this reduces the value of count
variable VAR. In this case the end value EXP2 must be smaller
than the start value EXP1.
"
If the capacity of main memory permits it, as many as 26
FOR...NEXT loops can be nested within one another. Each loop
must be given a differently worded count variable.
FOR...NEXT loops must not overlap. So a subordinate loop must
always be ended with NEXT before the superordinate loop may be
ended.
8-36
FOR...NEXT
Examples
BASIC Commands
10
20
30
40
FOR K=-4 TO 4
BEEP: PRINT K
NEXT K
PRINT "Actual Value for K = ";K
This FOR...NEXT loop is run through nine times; it shows all
values of count variable K (-4 to +4) in the display field. The PRINT
command in line 40, however, reads out the value of the count
variable, last incremented by +1 (step width), as 5.
10 FOR I=1kHz TO 3kHz STEP 0.5kHz
20 PRINT I
30 NEXT I
The operands of a loop may also include one of the permitted
units. The PRINT command adopts the units and here reads out
the values 1.0000 kHz to 3.000 kHz.
10
20
30
40
A=-5:B=5:C=2.5
FOR I=A TO B STEP C
PRINT I
NEXT I
The start and end value as well as the step width of the loop may
also be defined with variables.
10
20
30
40
50
60
FOR K=1 TO 4
PRINT "FIRST LOOP K = ";K
FOR J=1 TO 3
PRINT "SECOND LOOP J = ";J
NEXT J
NEXT K
8
Here one loop is nested in another. The inner loop (variable J) is
executed twelve times (4 × 3), the outer loop (variable K) four
times. What is important is that the inner loop always be ended
before the outer loop.
8-37
BASIC Commands
GET
GET
Purpose
Transfer result of IEEE command to string variable
Syntax
GET ([IEEE command]; [S-VAR])
[IEEE command]
IEEE command that produces result
[S-VAR]
String variable (A$ to Z$)
Effect
After GET the agreed string variable contains the result of the
IEEE command. If the IEEE command produces no result, an error
message is output.
Example
10 GET (PRXFR;A$)
20 PRINT "RX frequency = ";A$
In line 10 the set RX frequency is queried (PRXFR) and transferred
to string variable A$. The PRINT command in line 20 outputs the
string "RX frequency =" and the content of string variable A$
(the RX frequency).
8-38
GOSUB...RETURN
BASIC Commands
GOSUB...RETURN
Purpose
Call up subroutine.
Syntax
GOSUB [branch destination]
...
start of subroutine
...
RETURN
[branch destination] Actually existent line number.
Effect
When a main program finds a GOSUB command, program execution is continued in the line stated as the branch destination (start
of subroutine). When the subroutine reaches the RETURN command, there is a return to the main program. Program execution
continues there with the command following the GOSUB command.
Normally subroutines come at the end of a main program. When
the main program reaches this point, the first subroutine is executed unintentionally before the interpreter can abort with the error
message RETURN WITHOUT GOSUB. An END or GOTO command before the first subroutine prevents this malfunction.
Subroutines may call up further subroutines. Depending on available memory, a maximum of 25 subroutine levels is possible.
RDOUT commands and open FOR...NEXT loops, ie those not yet
completed, reduce this figure. Each subroutine must be terminated
with RETURN.
Examples
10
20
30
40
50
60
8
PRINT "LINE 10"
GOSUB 50
PRINT "LINE 30"
END
PRINT "LINE 50"
RETURN
The main program (lines 10 through 40) calls up in line 20 a
subroutine (lines 50 and 60). So the PRINT command in line 50 is
executed before the PRINT command in line 30. Line 40 prevents
the subroutine from being executed again and causing an error
message.
8-39
BASIC Commands
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
GOSUB...RETURN
PRINT "MAIN PROGRAM"
GOSUB 40
END
PRINT "Subroutine 1"
GOSUB 70
RETURN
PRINT "Subroutine 2"
RETURN
The main program (lines 10 through 30) calls up in line 20 a
subroutine (lines 40 through 60), which in turn calls up subroutine 2 (lines 70 to 80). Line 80 returns to line 60 and this returns to
the main program (line 30).
8-40
GOTO
BASIC Commands
GOTO
Purpose
Program continuation from a defined line number.
Syntax
GOTO [branch destination]
[branch destination] Actually existent line number.
Effect
When the BASIC interpreter finds a GOTO command, execution
of the program is continued in the line stated as the branch
destination.
GOTO in conjunction with the IF...THEN command, for example,
permits a program branch as a function of the value of a measured
result.
GOTO should always be the last command in a line.
Examples
10 BEEP
20 GOTO 10
Once it is started, this program is executed until you halt it with the
[OFF] key.
10
20
30
40
50
FOR I=1 TO 10
PRINT I
IF I=5 THEN GOTO 50
NEXT I
PRINT "END"
The branch to program line 50 is not made until the count variable
I of the FOR...NEXT loop becomes 5.
8-41
8
BASIC Commands
HEX
HEX
Purpose
Convert hexadecimal to decimal.
Syntax
HEX([EXP])
[EXP]
String operand representing a single
Effect
HEX converts hexadecimal numbers (0 to FFFF) into the corresponding decimal numbers 0 to 65535 (from decimal number
9999 onwards, output of large numbers as exponents, eg
1.2345000E+04 instead of 12345). For hexadecimal numbers of
>FFFF the result of conversion is always 0.
Example
10 C$="FC0"
20 B$="STABILOCK "
30 PRINT B$;HEX(C$)
The hexadecimal number FC0 is converted by the HEX command
of line 30 into the decimal number 4032.
8-42
HEX$
BASIC Commands
HEX$
Purpose
Convert decimal figure to hexadecimal
Syntax
HEX$([EXP])
[EXP]
Numeric operand representing decimal number
between 0 and 1048575
Effect
HEX$ converts decimal numbers (0 to 1048575) into a corresponding string with the hexadecimal number (00000 to FFFFF). For
decimal numbers > 1048575 the result of conversion is always
"00000" (the string always contains five characters).
Example
10 C=4032
20 B$="STABILOCK "
30 PRINT B$;HEX$(C)
The decimal number 4032 is converted by the HEX$ command of
line 30 into the string with the hexadecimal number 00FC0.
8
8-43
BASIC Commands
IF...THEN
IF...THEN
Purpose
Program branch depending on result of relational operation.
Syntax
IF [EXP1] [relational operator] [EXP2] THEN [command]
Compare numeric operands (numeric values)
[EXP1] and [EXP2]
Numeric operand.
Relational operator
<
[command]
BASIC or IEEE command.
>
<= >= <> =
Compare string operands (character strings)
[EXP1] and [EXP2]
Effect
String operand.
Relational operator
<> =
[command]
BASIC or IEEE command.
The IF command compares the two operands EXP1 and EXP2
according to the declared relational condition:
! If the relational condition is fulfilled, the command after THEN is
executed.
! If the relational condition is not fulfilled, the command after
THEN is ignored and the program continues with the next line.
The naming of THEN is optional (entry not necessary).
When string operands are compared, a distinction is also made
between upper case and lower case!
"
If numeric operands with units are compared, you must ensure that
both operands have the same units. The dimension of the units
may be different however (eg IF 500 mV < 3V THEN...).
"
If an IEEE command of the type "test job" produces no result
(----), overflow (>>>>) or underflow (<<<<), these results satisfy
every relational condition (command after THEN is executed).
8-44
IF...THEN
Examples
BASIC Commands
10
20
40
50
60
70
FOR K=1 TO 10
IF K <= 8 THEN GOTO 60
PRINT "K>8"
GOTO 70
PRINT "K=";K
NEXT K
As long as the count variable K satisfies the relational condition
<= 8 (line 20), the PRINT command in line 60 outputs the current
value of the count variable. As soon as K is > 8, the PRINT
command in line 40 is valid.
10
20
30
40
INPUT "ENTER STATUS: PASS OR FAIL",A$
IF A$="PASS" THEN GOTO 40
GOTO 10
PRINT "TEST FINISHED": END
If the input request in line 10 is answered with PASS, then TEST
FINISHED is output on the display. Any other entry (even pass)
returns you to line 10.
8
8-45
BASIC Commands
IF OUTLIMIT / IF INLIMIT
IF OUTLIMIT / IF INLIMIT
Purpose
Check whether a measured value is outside or inside a defined
range.
Syntax
IF OUTLIMIT([READ],[EXP1],[EXP2])THEN [command]
or
IF INLIMIT([READ],[EXP1],[EXP2])THEN [command]
Effect
[READ]
Variable or result of IEEE command of type "test job"
[EXP1]
Lower limit (numeric operand)
[EXP2]
Upper limit (numeric operand)
[command]
BASIC or IEEE command
IF OUTLIMIT and IF INLIMIT are special forms of the IF...THEN
command. The commands check whether the value of READ is
outside/inside the range defined by the two limits EXP1 and EXP2.
Depending on the result of the check, either the command after
THEN is executed or it is ignored and the program continues with
the next program line.
The following schematic illustrates for both commands what values READ must have so that the command after THEN is executed:
*)IF INLIMIT...THEN
EXP1
*)IF OUTLIMIT...THEN
defined
value range
EXP2
*)IF OUTLIMIT...THEN
*) Only if READ appears in one of these ranges, is the command
after THEN executed. The two limits EXP1 and EXP2 are only part
of the defined range for IF INLIMIT.
8-46
IF OUTLIMIT / IF INLIMIT
BASIC Commands
The naming of THEN is optional (entry not necessary).
"
If numeric operands with units are compared, you must ensure that
both operands have the same units.
The dimension of the units may be different however (eg IF INLIMIT (M_RMS,200 mV,1.2 V) THEN...).
If an IEEE command of the type "test job" produces no result
(----), overflow (>>>>) or underflow (<<<<), these results satisfy
every relational condition (command after THEN is executed).
Examples
10
20
30
40
50
60
FOR A=1 V TO 7 V
REM Valid values = 1 V and 5 to 7 V
IF OUTLIMIT(A,2V,4V)GOTO 50
PRINT "A=";A:GOTO 60
PRINT "VALID VALUE = ";A
NEXT A
The FOR...NEXT loop (lines 10 through 60) assigns the values 1 V
to 7 V to variable A. In line 30 the OUTLIMIT command checks
whether the condition 2 V < A < 4 V applies (because OUTLIMIT,
without the limits 2 V and 4 V). Only if this is so, is the PRINT
command in line 50 executed.
10
20
30
40
50
60
IF INLIMIT(M_RMS,0.1 V,0.2 V)GOTO 50
C$="MEASURED:"+VAL$(M_RMS)+"...ADJUST!"
PAUSE C$
GOTO 10
PRINT "YOU are the GREATEST"
END
As long as the result of the IEEE test job M_RMS does not fulfil the
condition 0.1 V ≤ M_RMS ≤ 0.2 V (because INLIMIT, including the
limits 0.1 V and 0.2 V), the current measured value and the request ADJUST! are shown on the display (line 30). The program
will not reach line 50 until the AF test signal is within the limits, and
then it rewards you for successful adjustment with the message
YOU are the GREATEST.
8-47
8
BASIC Commands
INPUT
INPUT
Purpose
Request user input.
Syntax
INPUT "[text]",[VAR]
or
INPUT "[text]",[S-VAR]
Effect
[text]
Message to be shown on display (optional).
[VAR]
Variable (A0 to Z9) for taking numeric value.
[S-VAR]
String variable (A$ to Z$) for taking text.
INPUT shows the declared message and expects the entry of a
numeric value or text in a field shown on the display (entry by
keyboard or directly on the test set).
Entry of numeric value: maximum ten places.
! Once the numeric value has been entered, it can be assigned
units with [UNIT/SELECT].
! Incorrect entries can be overwritten until continuation of the
program is triggered with the {CONTINUE} softkey.
Entry of text: maximum 40 characters.
! When entering text from the keyboard, open the entry field by
striking the [ENTER] key on STABILOCK 4032. As soon as the
cursor in the entry field flashes, you can start entry on the
keyboard. Always complete an entry with [RCL/RET].
! When entering text on the test set, strike the [ENTER] key to start.
This assigns the softkeys the letters of the alphabet. Text entry
is just like issuing program names (see section "Calling up
AUTORUN mask"). Always complete an entry with [ENTER].
! Incorrect entries can be overwritten until continuation of the
program is triggered with the {CONTINUE} softkey.
8-48
INPUT
Examples
BASIC Commands
10 INPUT "SERIAL NO ?",A$
20 PRINT A$
Line 10 requires entry of a serial number. The entered numeric
value is saved in string variable A$ and printed out.
10 SETRX
20 INPUT "ENTER FREQUENCY and UNIT",F
30 FREQU #F
Line 20 expects the entry of a frequency including the units (eg
45 MHz). Line 30 enters the value in the RF Frequency field of
the RX mask and tunes the signal generator with it.
10
20
30
40
SETTX
INPUT "ENTER CORRECTION VALUE",K
IF K+MPOWE > 3 W THEN PRINT "FAILURE"
PRINT "POWER = ";MPOWE
The entered correction value K (eg 1 W) is added to the measured
RF power (MPOWE). If the result is greater than 3 W, the measured value is output with the comment FAILURE.
8
8-49
BASIC Commands
KEY
KEY
Purpose
Program branch triggered by softkeys.
Syntax
KEY [softkey number],"[text]",[command]
...
program section (optional)
...
KEY WAIT or KEY
Effect
RUN
[softkey number]
Number (1 to 6) of required softkey (1 = first softkey
from left).
[text]
Softkey designation (max. eight characters; only
left and right softkey max. seven characters).
[command]
BASIC command GOTO, GOSUB or CHAIN.
Initially KEY only assigns the name declared under [text] internally
to a softkey. Then the program is continued until the interpreter
detects KEY WAIT or KEY RUN:
! KEY WAIT stops execution of the program and calls up the
AUTORUN mask. Only here does the softkey have the declared
label. If PRINT commands were issued in the program section
directly before KEY WAIT, the display will show these outputs
(eg user notes). If you now strike a softkey, the program will
execute the declared BASIC command. At the same time the
display again shows the mask that was current before the
interruption.
! KEY RUN also stops execution of the program, not showing the
declared softkeys in the AUTORUN mask however, but in the
current mask instead. Interactive user guidance with PRINT
commands is not possible in this case. However, an instrument
can be observed directly for instance and, depending on the
measured value, a program branch can be made by softkey.
KEY 1 TO 6
If seven or eight characters are not enough for the required softkey
designation, a useful variant of the KEY command can help you out.
The KEY 1 TO 6 command comprises all softkeys into a single softkey and assigns this a designation of up to 51 characters. Otherwise
this command has the same effect as KEY.
Syntax:
8-50
KEY 1 TO 6,"[text]",[command]
KEY
BASIC Commands
"
KEY command with GOSUB branch: after the subroutine has been
worked, the main program is continued in the program line following the KEY WAIT or KEY RUN command.
Examples
10
20
30
40
50
60
CLS
KEY 3,"ENDLESS", GOTO 10
KEY 2,"END", GOTO 60
PRINT "PRESS SOFTKEY"
KEY WAIT
PRINT "END of PROGRAM"
The program stays in an endless loop if the user strikes the
{ENDLESS} softkey. In this case line 10 prevents the display from
gradually being filled with the request PRESS SOFTKEY: the CLS
command clears the preceding message so that the next one
again appears at the upper edge.
10 CLS
20 INPUT "MENU? NO=1 YES=0",A
30 KEY 1,"RXTEST", GOSUB 200
40 KEY 2,"TXTEST", GOSUB 310
50 KEY 3,"SELFCHEK",CHAIN SELFCHECK
60 KEY 4,"SPEC",CHAIN SPECIAL
70 KEY 5,"EXIT",GOTO 120
80 IF A<>0 THEN GOTO 200
90 PRINT "PRESS SOFTKEY to SELECT PROGRAM"
100 KEY WAIT
110 GOTO 10
120 END
200 REM RXTEST
...
300 RETURN
310 REM TXTEST
...
800 RETURN
8
First the program asks whether the "softkey menu" is to be offered
(line 20). Entries other than 0 are understood as no (line 80). Only
if A=0 will the program reach the PRINT command in line 90 and
the following KEY WAIT command. The display now shows the
occupancy of the softkeys declared in lines 30 to 70. Softkey 1
calls up the RXTEST subroutine for example. The return from this
subroutine takes you to line 110, which causes the main program
to start again.
8-51
BASIC Commands
Examples
(continued)
KEY
10 SETTX
20 MODULation
30 FOR I=100 mV TO 1000 mV STEP 20 mV
40 KEY 1 TO 5,"CONTINUE",GOTO 80
50 GENAL #I
60 IF M_RMS > 220 mV GOTO 100
70 KEY RUN
80 NEXT I
90 END
100 PRINT "V > 220 mV !"
Line 10 calls up the basic TX mask, line 20 selects the internal AF
generators as the signal source for the RMS instrument (corresponds to striking the [RX_MOD/MODGEN] key). Then a FOR...NEXT
loop begins. The purpose of this is to increase the output level of
generator GEN in 20-mV increments from 100 mV to 1000 mV
(line 50). Each increase in level must be initiated by the user by
striking the {CONTINUE} softkey. If the level measured by the RMS
instrument exceeds 220 mV (line 60), the FOR...NEXT loop is
aborted by a branch to line 100. The actions of the program are
easy to observe in the TX mask (change of level in Gen line,
display of RMS instrument).
8-52
LEN
BASIC Commands
LEN
Purpose
Determine length of string (number of characters).
Syntax
LEN([S-EXP])
[S-EXP]
String operand.
Effect
The LEN command outputs the length of the examined string as a
decimal number.
Examples
10
20
30
40
A$ = "STABILOCK 4032"
L = LEN(A$)
PRINT L
PRINT LEN("LONGJOHNS")
The number of characters of A$ (14) are assigned to variable L
(line 20) and output (line 30). Line 40 shows that the string operand
must not always be a string variable but can also be a string for
example.
10 INPUT A$
20 PRINT "String Length",LEN(A$)
Line 10 enables the entry of a random string. Its length is determined in line 20 and output.
8
8-53
BASIC Commands
LET
LET
Purpose
Variable assignment (optional).
Syntax
LET [VAR]=[EXP]
or
LET [S-VAR]=[S-EXP]
[VAR]
Variable (A0 to Z9).
[EXP]
Numeric operand.
[S-VAR]
String variable (A$ to Z$).
[S-EXP]
String operand.
Effect
LET is not necessary for a variable assignment (assigning a
variable an operand). The only benefit of the command is the
greater clarity of program listings.
Example
10
20
30
40
50
LET A=5*3
PRINT A-5
C$="Frequency = "
LET B=5 kHz
PRINT C$;B
Whether this listing does not look very "pretty" because of line 40
is purely a matter of taste. At any rate, LET commands have no
effect at all on the functionality of programs.
8-54
ONERROR GOTO
BASIC Commands
ONERROR GOTO
Purpose
Program branch when error messages appear.
Syntax
ONERROR GOTO [branch destination]
[branch destination] Actually existent line number.
Effect
If the BASIC or IEEE interpreter detects an error during the
execution of a program, it will normally be aborted straight away
and an error message is output. ONERROR GOTO prevents an
abort upon error and causes the program to be continued from the
declared branch destination (error routine).
"
Disabling error routine: if the BASIC interpreter only finds ONERROR GOTO (without entry of a line number!), aborting the program with an error message is permitted again from this program
line onwards.
The short form is not permitted for this command.
Example
10
20
30
40
50
ONERROR GOTO 20
INPUT "Frequency 250...300 MHz",F
IF OUTLIMIT(F,250 MHz,300 MHz) GOTO 20
ONERROR GOTO
PRINT F
Line 20 tells you to enter a frequency value, which line 30 checks.
If the wrong units are used in line 20, the program would normally
be aborted. The branch in line 10 prevents this and instead repeats
the request for entry. Line 40 cuts out the error routine.
8
8-55
BASIC Commands
PAUSE
PAUSE
Purpose
Interrupt program execution and wait for user reaction.
Syntax
PAUSE [S-EXP1],[S-EXP2],[S-EXP3]
[S-EXPx]
String operand (max. 30 characters each).
Effect
PAUSE interrupts execution of the program and shows the texts
contained in S-EXPx on the display (between zero and three string
operands can be declared). Strike the {CONTINUE} softkey to continue the program.
Examples
10
20
30
40
50
SETTX
IF MPOWE > 0.5 W GOTO 50
BEEP:BEEP:PAUSE "TRANSMITTER ON"
GOTO 20
PRINT MPOWE
Line 20 contains an IEEE test job for RF power. If the measured
result is less than 0.5 W, the message TRANSMITTER ON accompanied by two beeps tells you to switch on the transmitter of the
test item.
10 A$="TEST PROGRAM"
20 B$="------------"
30 PAUSE A$,B$,"STABILOCK 4032"
This program shows the following three-liner on the display, the
PAUSE command automatically inserting the blank lines:
TEST PROGRAM
-----------STABILOCK 4032
8-56
PRINT
BASIC Commands
PRINT
Purpose
Output numeric values, texts or measured results on display or to
printer.
Syntax
PRINT [output list]
[output list]
Effect
Any number of numeric operands and string operands;
commas and semicolons are permissible as separators between operands.
PRINT outputs every single item of the output list to the display and
simultaneously to a printer. If the display does not show the
AUTORUN mask during program execution, the PRINT outputs
are not visible on the display until after the program has ended (if
there are a lot of PRINT instructions only the last ones, however,
because of the limited number of lines on the display).
Output of numeric values: here there are the following variants:
! IEEE test jobs are output as a numeric value with units. If the
IEEE test job is directly in the PRINT command (eg
PRINT M_RMS), the output will be in the same form as the
particular instrument shows the measured result. If you place
emphasis on well formatted test reports, it is better to assign the
measured result first to a variable and then output its contents
(see examples). In this case the output is as described under
"Numeric values with units". If a test job does not produce a
valid result, the PRINT command will produce "-----" (no test
signal), ">>>>" (overflow) or "<<<<" (underflow).
PRINT M_RMS
→ 123 mV (for example)
A=M_RMS:PRINT A
→ 123.0000 mV
! Numeric values without units: values between 0 and 9999
are shown with maximally four places before and after the point
(fourth place after the point rounded). Larger numeric values
are output in scientific notation with one place before and seven
after the decimal point plus a two-place exponent.
PRINT 1234.1234567 → 1234.1235
PRINT 12
→ 12
PRINT 123456
→ 1.2345600E+05
! Numeric values with units: output with maximally four places
before the decimal point and always four following it (fourth
place after the point rounded). Leading zeroes are replaced by
spaces so that orientation is always on the decimal point. For
numeric values greater than 9999.9999 no value is output but
instead the overflow symbol (>>>>). Remedy: choose the next
biggest dimension.
8-57
8
BASIC Commands
PRINT
PRINT 1234.1234567 kHz → 1234.1235 kHz
PRINT 12 kHz
→ 12.0000 kHz
PRINT 1234567 kHz
→ >>>>
Blank lines: each PRINT command without an output list produces a blank line on the display and in the printout.
Preventing output on printer: PRINT OFF disables print output
for all following PRINT commands (readout on display is kept).
You cancel this with PRINT ON.
Formatting output: the separators in the output list produce a
formatted output:
! Semicolon: places an output immediately after the preceding
one. With positive numeric values a space is left because of the
(invisible) sign.
PRINT "WILL";"TEK" → WILLTEK
PRINT 123;456 → 123 456
! Comma: splits each text line on the display/printer into zones of
eight characters. Consecutive outputs are put at the beginning
of the next zone that can be reached.
PRINT "WILL","TEK" → WILL
TEK
1.
2.
3.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2
W I L L
Examples
T E K
PRINT
PRINT
PRINT
PRINT
PRINT
PRINT
"123456781234567812345678"
10,-20,30;45
-1000,0.2523
"A","B","C"
"A";"B";"C":PRINT
150 MHz,"C"
1 2
1
- 1
A
AB
3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
0
- 2 0
3 0 4 5
0 0 0
0 . 2 5 2 3
B
C
C
MH z
C
Output in lines and columns of display.
8-58
Characters
Display
10
20
30
40
50
60
1 5 0 . 0 0 0 0
Zone
PRINT
Examples
(continued)
BASIC Commands
10 PRINT"LINE A":PRINT:PRINT"LINE B";
20 PRINT"LINE C"
Output on display:
LINE A
LINE BLINE C
As a result of the final semicolon in line 10, the PRINT command
of line 20 adds the text LINE C immediately onto the text output
before (LINE B).
10
20
30
40
50
60
SETTX
PRINT M_RMS
FOR A=1 TO 3
B=M_RMS
PRINT B
NEXT A
Output on display (assumed values):
3.96 V
3.9600 V
3.5600 V
3.2800 V
At the instant of the measurement, the RMS instrument in the
basic TX mask showed 3.96 V. So the IEEE test job M_RMS
directly in the PRINT command (line 20) produces the same output
3.96 V. Such unforeseeable output formats can be avoided if you
assign the result of a test job to a variable and output its contents
first (lines 40 and 50). Then all outputs of measured values have
a format oriented on the decimal point.
8-59
8
BASIC Commands
RDOUT
RDOUT
Purpose
Assign results of IEEE command of type "test job" to variables.
The two results of the IEEE test job MDEMOD (sampling of
modulation meter), for example, can only be further processed
with RDOUT.
Syntax
RDOUT([command];[VAR])
[command]
IEEE command of type "test job".
[VAR]
Single variable (eg A) or list of variables separated
by commas (eg A,B).
Effect
RDOUT adopts the result(s) of an IEEE test job in the declared
variable(s). If there are more measured values than variables, no
error message is produced. But if more variables are declared
than there are measured values, this will trigger an error message.
Examples
10
20
30
40
50
SETRX
MODULation
RXAFM 4 kHZ
RDOUT(MDEMOd;A,B)
PRINT "MOD =";A,,,B
Line 10 calls up the RX mask. Line 20 couples the modulation
meter MOD to the modulator. Line 30 causes the carrier signal of
the signal generator to be modulated with ±4 kHz FM deviation. In
line 40 MDEMOd (IEEE command) takes over the deviation measurement. The resulting measured values (positive and negative
peak deviation) are adopted in variables A and B and then output
(line 50).
8-60
RDXY
BASIC Commands
RDXY
Purpose
Using the RDXY function it is possible to read values and their
units from the screen.
Syntax
RDXY([xx],[yy],[ll])
[xx]
screen line (xx = 01 to 21; 01 = mask header,
21 = softkey line)
[yy]
screen column (yy = 01 to 51; 02 = first column,
50 = last column in mask frame)
[ll]
number of characters in entry field (length of field)
Effect
Entry fields may be accessed but not display fields. The coordinates [xx] and [yy] define the initial position of the field containing the
value. If the coordinates do not correspond to the field, the result
of the function is zero.
Examples
10
20
30
40
SETRX
FREQUENCY 275.250 MHz
PRINT RDXY(03,19,12)
A=RDXY(03,19,12) 50 PRI A
The program reads the value in the RF Frequency field (length
of field is 12). Its initial coordinates are the third screen line and the
19th column. Although RDXY(03,20,12) is in the field, the complete value would not be read (75.250 MHz). Line 40 shows that the
result produced by the function can also be assigned to a variable.
This program can be formulated shorter with the IEEE command
PRXFR.
8
8-61
BASIC Commands
REMARK
REMARK
Purpose
Insert remarks in program listing.
Syntax
REMARK [remark]
[remark]
Effect
Random character sequence.
Program lines starting with a REM command are not executed but
are output in the listing.
GOTO or GOSUB commands may have REM lines as a branch
destination. The program is then continued with the program line
after the REM line.
Example
10
20
30
40
50
REM *******
REM TX-TEST
REM *******
SETTX
FREQUENCY 275.250 MHz: REM Setting
...
...
The REM lines 10 through 30 in the listing make it clear that this
program is to take a good look at the transmitter of a radio set.
Even "proper" program lines like line 50 may have REMarks at the
end (not at the beginning).
8-62
SETUP
BASIC Commands
SETUP
Purpose
Call up a setup stored on Memory Card.
Syntax
SETUP [file name]
or
SETUP #[S-VAR]
Effect
[file name]
Name of required setup.
[S-VAR]
String variable containing name of setup.
The SETUP command calls up stored instrument settings. These
must be held as a SET file on the Memory Card in the slot.
The effect of the SETUP command is the same as in manual callup
of a setup.
Example
10
20
30
40
50
60
REM TX TEST
SETUP TX MODE:GOSUB 100
REM SPECTRAL TEST
A$="ANALYZER"
SETUP #A$:GOSUB 800
END
This program first calls up the "TX MODE.SET" setup file in line 20
and then branches to line 100 (TX test). After this test the "ANALYZER.SET" setup file is called up and the program continues in line
800.
8
8-63
BASIC Commands
TIMEOUT
TIMEOUT
Purpose
Program branch if time overrun
Syntax
TIMEOUT([Time],[Branch destination])
or TIMEOUT
[Time]
Start timer
Stop timer
Time in seconds (0 to 999)
[Branch destination] Actually existent line number
Effect
TIMEOUT([Time],[Branch destination]) starts a timer. The timer
triggers an error if the stated time is exceeded before reaching the
command TIMEOUT (without parameters). The actually valid
command is aborted, the timer reset and there is a jump to the line
declared in the branch destination.
Example
10 TIMEOUT (60,200)
20 SOFT_MOBILE
30 TIMEOUT
200 SOFT_STOP
210 PRINT "Mobile defective, test aborted after
1 minute!"
In line 10 the timer is set to 60 seconds. If the TIMEOUT command
(without parameters) is not reached within this time, there is a jump
to line 200. In line 20 a call to a mobile is started. If the connection
is not set up within 60 seconds, the command is aborted (line 200)
and an error message is output (line 210). If the connection is set
up within time, the timer is reset in line 30.
8-64
TRACE
BASIC Commands
TRACE
Purpose
Troubleshooting in programs.
Syntax
TRACE
Effect
The TRACE command outputs to a printer the number of the
program line that has just been processed during the execution of
a program. The resulting report shows in what sequence the
program lines were processed.
If the contents of the display are not cleared with CLS, the TRACE
report will also be visible on the display (AUTORUN mask). But
there it may be overwritten in part by PRINT commands of the
examined program and thus become useless.
TRACE acts like a switch: repeated issuing of the command
switches the function alternately on and off (acknowledgement
message: Trace On / Trace Off).
TRACE can be used both as a direct command and in programs.
Example
10 SETTX;V_RMS;GENA_TX;MODUL
20 FREQUENCY 10 MHz
21 TRACE
30 FOR I=1 TO 5
40 INPUT "ENTER RMS VALUE",V
50 IF V>=5 V GOTO 90
60 PRI "VALUE =";V
70 NEXT I
80 GOTO 100
90 PRI "ERROR"
100 TRACE
101 END
8
The TRACE command in line 21 documents the following branches and loops in the program. Line 100 switches the function off
again. Without line 100 the function would remain switched on and
would be switched off unintentionally the next time the program is
started (line 21).
8-65
BASIC Commands
VAL
VAL
Purpose
Convert number in string to numeric value.
Syntax
VAL([S-EXP])
[S-EXP]
Effect
String operand containing only a number or beginning with one.
VAL extracts the number contained in the string operand (end
criterion: first character that is no numeral or decimal point). If the
string operand starts with a letter, there will be an error message.
If the number in the string operand is assigned units, these will not
be separated by VAL.
VAL does the opposite of the VAL$ command.
Example
10
20
30
40
50
60
A$="123TEST"
B$="1.24TEST"
C$="5,6"
A=VAL(A$):B=VAL(B$):C=VAL(C$):D=VAL("12 V")
PRINT A,B,C,D
PRINT A+B
Output on display:
123
124.24
8-66
1.24
5
12.0000 V
VAL$
BASIC Commands
VAL$
Purpose
Convert numeric value to string.
Syntax
VAL$([EXP])
[EXP]
Numeric operand
Effect
VAL$ does the opposite of the VAL command.
Example
10
20
30
40
A$="STABILOCK "
B$=VAL$(4032)
C$=A$+B$
PRINT C$
The numeric value 4032 is converted into a string in line 20. Line
30 chains the strings B$ and A$, line 60 outputs the result:
STABILOCK 4032.
8
8-67
BASIC Commands
WAIT
WAIT
Purpose
Stop program execution for a certain time.
Syntax
WAIT [time]
[time]
Queuing time in milliseconds (1 to 9999 ms).
Effect
WAIT stops the execution of a program for the duration of the
declared queuing time.
Example
10
20
30
40
50
SETTX
WAIT 5000
SETRX
WAIT 5000
GOSUB 1000
The program waits 5 s after the TX mask is called up before calling
up the RX mask. This also remains visible for 5 s before the
program continues with line 50.
8-68
The IEEE-488 Bus
IEEE Commands
IEEE Commands
The IEEE-488 Bus
Up to the mid-1960s remotely controllable test equipment featured special-tocompany interfaces for external control of its operation. If you wanted to create a
test system out of units from different producers, you first had to overcome the
incompatibility of these interfaces by using extra interface circuits.
History
In 1965 Hewlett-Packard presented the HP-IB (Hewlett-Packard interface bus) as
a company standard. Within a very short time this interface had been accepted
worldwide. Ten years later it became an industry standard, the IEEE 488. IEEE
488 defines the electrical, mechanical and functional characteristics of a "bus
system". Units fitted with such an interface can be connected to one another
directly and be remotely controlled. The
IEEE-488 standard is known under diffeREMOTE
rent names, like HP-IB or GPIB (geneAs soon as STABILOCK 4032 is reral-purpose interface bus). In Europe the
motely controlled on the IEEE-488
interface is standardized as IEC 625,
bus, the "REMOTE" LED on its
with a slight difference in the definition of
front panel lights up. The keys of the
the subminiature D connector: IEEE 488
Communication Monitor are then
prescribes a 24-way and IEC 625 a 25disabled. Exceptions: [OFF] switway connector. The interface of
ches to manual operation, [RESET]
STABILOCK 4032 is based on the IEEEresets the microcomputer of
488 standard and consequently has a
STABILOCK 4032.
24-way connector.
8
8-69
IEEE Commands
Bus structure
Bus structure
The IEEE-488 bus consists of eight data lines (data bus), three control lines for
data exchange (handshake bus) and five superordinate control lines (control
bus).
IEEE 488
Data Bus
DIO 1...8
Control Bus
IFC,ATN,SRQ,REN,EOI
Handshake Bus
DAV,NRFD,NDAC
Unit 1
(Computer)
Unit 2
(STABILOCK 4032)
Fig. 8.8: Structure of
IEEE-488-Bus.
Unit 3
(Printer)
Units fitted with an IEEE-488 interface always belong to one of the following
groups:
Listener: These are units that only "listen", ie only receive data. Typical members
of this group are printers, like the ink-jet printer offered as an accessory for
STABILOCK 4032.
Talker: These units only "talk" (eg frequency counters or clocks) and have now
become fairly rare.
Talker & Listener: These are units that can talk and listen, ie send and receive
data. STABILOCK 4032 belongs to this group. The received data are measurement jobs, for example, and the sent data can be the measured results.
Controller: Units that can talk, listen and control are called controllers. In most
cases they are computers specially designed for this purpose. Of late more and
more personal computers (PCs) with a built-in IEEE interface card are being
used. A controller regulates the entire measurement procedure, sending measurement jobs, receiving the measured results, calculating values, keeping statistics and lots more besides.
The exchange of data on the eight data lines of the IEEE bus is usually performed
with ASCII-coded characters (ASCII: American standard code for information
interchange). Proper data exchange between talkers and listeners is managed
by the handshake bus with its three control lines. This ensures correct transfer of
every character (data byte) and quite independently of the processing speed of
the units connected to a bus: the slowest device that is involved in the momentary
data exchange determines the rate of data transfer.
8-70
Creating IEEE-488 system
IEEE Commands
Basically the handshake data exchange works as follows. A talker sends a data
byte and signals by the DAV (data valid) line that there is a data byte ready for
collection on the data bus. As soon as a listener has collected the data byte, it
signals reception of the character and its readiness to receive further characters
by the NDAC (not data accepted) line and the NRFD (not ready for data) line. The
procedure is the same when a data byte is intended for several listeners.
The data transmitted on the bus fall into two categories:
Management messages: these decide, before data exchange for example, which
unit is the talker and which unit or units the listener. The resetting of a unit can
also be ordered by a management message.
Device-dependent messages: these include setting commands for individual
units for instance, measurement jobs and measured results.
Creating IEEE-488 system
To integrate STABILOCK 4032 into an existing IEEE-488 system, all you need is
an IEEE cable. Two configurations come into mind for a minimal system:
STABILOCK 4032 and IEEE controller,
STABILOCK 4032 and IEEE printer.
4032 STABILOCK
REMOTE
4032 STABILOCK
MEMORY
UNIVERSAL ANALOG/DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TEST SET
7
LEVEL
4
5
1
2
FM AM OM
0
9
ENTER
6
UNIT/SCROLL
3
.
REMOTE
CARD
OFF
-
STEP
MEMORY
UNIVERSAL ANALOG/DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TEST SET
CARD
8
FREQU
MOD FREQ
+
8
FREQU
7
LEVEL
4
5
MOD FREQ
1
2
FM AM OM
0
9
ENTER
6
UNIT/SCROLL
3
.
OFF
-
STEP
+
INTENS
INTENS
POWER
POWER
ON/OFF
ON/OFF
S4
SCOPE ANALYZER MEMORY
S6
S5
PRINT
AUX
HELP
DUPLEX
dB REL
RX
TX
VOLT
SINAD
CCITT
VOLTM
DEMOD
GEN A
MOD GEN
B/SAT
EXT
DEMOD
AC
EMF
<2 V
MAX
DIST
SINAD
CCITT
VOLTM
DEMOD
GEN A
PRINT
AUX
MOD GEN
B/SAT
EXT
HELP
CLEAR
SCOPE INPUT
POS
600
RF
50
DC
VOLTM
DEMOD
600
600
AC
DC
VOLTM
MOD GEN
MOD GEN
MAX
0,5 W
VOLT
RX MOD
20 dB
RF
DIRECT
600
600
SCOPE ANALYZER MEMORY
S6
S5
BEAT DF
SCOPE INPUT
POS
600
RF
50
dB REL
RX
TX
RX MOD
BEAT DF
DIST
20 dB
S4
CLEAR
DUPLEX
RF
DIRECT
S3
S2
S1
S3
S2
S1
EMF
MAX
30 Hz
<2 V
20 V
30 kHz
600
0...20 kHz
R L > 200
MAX
0,5 W
MAX
8 Vpp
0...20 kHz
1 M
EMF
<2 V
MAX
EMF
MAX
30 Hz
<2 V
20 V
30 kHz
600
0...20 kHz
R L > 200
MAX
8 Vpp
0...20 kHz
1 M
0...20 kHz
0...20 kHz
IEEE 488
IEEE 488
8
Fig. 8.9: IEEE-488 system consisting of
STABILOCK 4032 and controller.
Fig. 8.10: IEEE-488 system consisting of
STABILOCK 4032 and printer.
8-71
IEEE Commands
Creating IEEE-488 system
What settings are necessary ?
An IEEE-488 system requires harmonization of the following parameters for all
units integrated into a system. With STABILOCK 4032 all these parameters can
be set in the status mask (see Chapter 4).
Address: Just like a specific subscriber can be reached by his telephone
number, an IEEE-488 device must also be uniquely identifiable. This is done by
means of addresses. STABILOCK 4032 is set to a standard address of 25, but it
can be set to any other address between 1 and 31 in the status mask.
End of string (EOS): One or two control characters, added by a talker to the end
of each message, tell a listener that this is the end of the message. But this will
only work if the same control characters are set on the talker and listener. In the
course of time the following control characters have become customary for this
purpose: CR (carriage return) and LF (line feed). These control characters are
normally used in the combination CR or CR+LF.
End or identify (EOI): EOI is one of the five superordinate control lines. This line
is set by a talker simultaneously to the transmission of the last character of a
message. EOI permits the transfer of messages if there are EOS characters
contained in the message itself. If STABILOCK 4032 outputs the contents of a
display (mask) for instance, these will be binary data which, depending on the
display contents, can comprise all possible 255 bit combinations from 00h to FFh.
If the combinations for CR (0Dh) and LF (0Ah) are also among them, they could
be mistaken for genuine EOS characters. But by scanning the EOI line, the
listener avoids this error.
Talk & listen: This is the device mode. The "talk & listen" setting should always
be chosen if there is a controller in the IEEE-488 system. The "talk only" setting
is necessary if there is only a printer connected to STABILOCK 4032. The printer
will then be set for "listen always".
8-72
When IEEE and when AUTORUN ?
IEEE Commands
When IEEE and when AUTORUN ?
Remote control by IEEE-488 bus is always necessary if more than one device is
required for automatically testing an item. AUTORUN (see Chapter 9) also loses
out if you want to collect test statistics or a number of test setups want to access
a shared database. An example of this would be the alignment of radios at
different temperatures (climatic chamber) and on different supply voltages (power-supply unit) with simultaneous measurement of their quality (database).
AUTORUN is an advantage if the testing capabilities and possibilities offered by
STABILOCK 4032 for further processing of measured data are quite sufficient for
your test application. It is the ideal way to handle tests that keep recurring.
8
8-73
IEEE Commands
How to create an IEEE program
How to create an IEEE program
The commands that produce the required running of an IEEE program
differ from controller to controller. A
controller can initiate output to the
data bus with the command WRT or
with OUTPUT or with IBWRT. The
command for collecting data can be
RED or ENTER or IBRD. You can find
precise details about this type of
command in the manual to your controller.
The IEEE commands for remotely
controlling STABILOCK 4032 are
quite independent of the controller
that is used. These commands – they
were devised by Willtek – can be
divided into two groups:
IEEE and STABILOCK 4032
IEEE programming of Communication
Test Set STABILOCK 4032 is just as
simple as manual operation. For every
key there is a corresponding IEEE
command and the softkeys are also
operated by an IEEE command. Of
course, you can only operate those
softkeys that are current. Orientation
on manual operation simplifies programming for you. First carry out the
test you want to program manually, and
note down all your actions. At the end
of the test your notes will be a schematic for the IEEE program. All you have
to do is to change key operations into
the appropriate IEEE commands.
Setting commands: These put
STABILOCK 4032 into the operating status required for a particular test.
Test jobs: These tell STABILOCK 4032 to perform a certain test. Test jobs usually
produce measured results. In other words, after issuing a test job the controller
must first collect the result before it can issue further commands.
"
Virtually all IEEE remote-control commands are also permissible for AUTORUN
programs; this is why Chapter 9 describes the IEEE commands that may be used
in AUTORUN programs and in IEEE programs. At the end of this chapter you will
find a list of the few IEEE commands that you can only use in IEEE programs.
The syntax and performance of IEEE remote-control commands are based on
the following needs:
Use of the terms common in RF test engineering.
Relationship between manual operation and IEEE programming.
Commands to enable extension and matching to future demands.
8-74
How to create an IEEE program
IEEE Commands
Programming examples
Set TX frequency:
Set RF level:
Call up TX mode:
OUTPUT 725,"TXFREquency 123.456 MHZ"
OUTPUT 725,"AMPLItude -78.9 DBM"
OUTPUT 725,"SETTX"
The above examples apply to controllers from Hewlett-Packard: OUTPUT produces an output, 7xx says that output is on the IEEE interface and 25 is the IEEE
address of the recipient of the output (in this case STABILOCK 4032).
Here is the same example, but written for a PC with an IEEE card from National
Instruments:
TEXT$ = "TXFREquency 123.456 MHZ" CALL IBWRT (STABI%,TEXT$)
TEXT$ = "AMPLItude -78.9 DBM" CALL IBWRT (STABI%,TEXT$)
TEXT$ = "SETTX" CALL IBWRT (STABI%,TEXT$)
Here STABI% is the device identification including its address.
A number of commands can be comprised into a command string using the
character ";" (reduces programming effort):
Single commands
OUTPUT 725,"SETRX"
OUTPUT 725,"RXFRE 123.4567 MHZ"
OUTPUT 725,"AMPLI -80.0DBM"
Command string
OUTPUT 725,"SETRX;RXFRE 123.4567 MHZ;AMPLI -80.0 DBM"
8
8-75
IEEE Commands
How to create an IEEE program
Tips & tricks
A command string may only contain one
Notation
measurement job. This measurement
Each IEEE command for remote
job must come at the end of the comcontrol consists of at least five
mand string, otherwise the following
characters, further characters may
commands will be ignored.
be added but are not evaluated.
The execution of a command starts
This possibility of adding characstraight after receipt of the end character
ters makes the commands more
EOS or, for a command string, after the
intelligible, is useful for program dosemicolon. Depending on the command,
cumentation and simplifies promore or less time will be required for its
gram housekeeping. The same apcomplete execution. Incorrect measureplies to blanks: they can be inserted
ments can result if a device has not yet
but are unnecessary for correct
executed a setting command completely
execution of a command. Upperand another device already produces a
case or lower-case notation is also
measured result that is dependent on
optional.
this setting. Errors of this kind are avoided by terminating setting commands
with a semicolon. This causes command
execution to be brought forward. After execution the EOS character(s) is(are)
read and only then is the bus enabled.
Example: The following program is continued immediately after arrival of the
setting command for STABILOCK 4032 in case a). The subsequent frequency
measurement can therefore produce an incorrect value. In case b) however the
measurement is not performed until the Communication Monitor has set the
required frequency correctly.
Case a)
OUTPUT 725,"FREQU 123.4567 MHZ"
OUTPUT 703,"Measure_frequency"
ENTER 703,A$
Case b)
OUTPUT 725,"FREQU 123.4567 MHZ;"
OUTPUT 703,"Measure_frequency"
ENTER 703,A$
8-76
IEEE programming conventions
IEEE Commands
IEEE programming conventions
Only the first five characters are relevant for recognizing an IEEE command
(when a command is named, these characters are shown in capitals). To enable
better understanding of a program however, any number of characters can be
added to a command (eg SETDUPLEX instead of setdu). No distinction is made
between upper-case and lower-case letters.
Many IEEE commands require the entry of parameters. These can be numeric
values with and without units, softkey designations or states (on/off). The parameters necessary for a command are stated along with the explanation of the
particular command (terms in brackets, eg [value] [unit]). If different entries
are permissible for a parameter (eg different units), all possible entries are listed
and separated by "|".
In the details of the different parameters the permissible short form is shown by
capitals. For the parameter [state], for example, the following entries are
possible: oN|oFf. In other words, instead of ON you can enter just N. But be careful,
always enter units in full (no short forms).
Masks called up with IEEE commands differ in one point from those that are
called up manually: the instruments are not activated. First you must issue a test
job before the appropriate instrument is polled and briefly activated. The instrument then shows the result on the display until the next test job, producing a new
result.
"
An IEEE command line may be maximally 100 characters in
length.
Basic setting
ERASE
8
Produces the basic setting and erases the RAM. This command
may not appear within a command string but only at the end or
singly.
Note: This command is not available in AUTORUN mode. (Alternative: execute total clear, store this status as a SET file and call
up when needed with the BASIC command SETUP).
8-77
IEEE Commands
DEVICE
CLEAR
Entry of Special Characters
Warm start, cold start or stop function. Depending on what has
been declared in the status mask, the Communication Test Set
executes either a reset or a total reset after a Device Clear
command. Exception: If a {STOP} softkey is displayed, Device Clear
will execute this stop function (this simplifies the termination of
tests).
A pause of at least 500 ms must be maintained between Device
Clear and the following command (not necessary if the stop function is executed). In this time the IEEE device of the Communication Test Set is initialized, ie the IEEE bus is in a non-defined
status.
"
DEVICE CLEAR is a controller command. The notation of the
command depends on the controller that is used.
Entry of Special Characters
Special characters are generally entered by striking ESC and then typing in a
letter.
↑ = ESC U
For entry on controller enter ASCII code 94decimal = ^; eg WRTVA5,^
sets scroll variable Channel no. in GENERAL PARAMETERS mask.
↓ = ESC D
for entry on controller enter ASCII code 124decimal = |.
→ = ESC R
for entry on controller enter >; eg CALL> = CALL --> DECODE
← = ESC L
for entry on controller enter <
Ω =
special character omitted (eg SOFT_50 = SOFT_50Ω)
µ
Eg AMPLI 33 uV = AMPLI 33 µV.
= u
The following special characters can be displayed by the monitor (eg in entry
instructions); these characters are not accepted by the printer however:
Ω
= ESC O
∆
= ESC T
Φ
= ESC P
µ
= ESC M
8-78
Standard Commands
IEEE Commands
Standard Commands
Key
IEEE command
Meaning
[RX]
SETRX
Calls up basic RX mask.
[TX]
SETTX
Calls up basic TX mask.
[DUPL]
SETDUplex
Calls up basic DUPLEX mask.
[SCOPE]
SCOPE
Calls up storage oscilloscope. Start measurement with special command LOCAL.
[MEMORY]
MEMORy
Calls up MEMORY mask.
[AUX]
AUXILiary
Calls up OPTION CARD mask.
[ANALYZER]
ANALZer
Calls up spectrum analyzer. Start measurement with special command LOCAL.
Select mode
Operate softkey
{??????}
Operates declared softkey.
SOFT_[name]
Before a softkey can be operated, the mask
showing the declared softkey must be called up.
[name]
=
designation of softkey
SOFT_FREEZE
SOFT_RF DIR
Only in controller programs permissible.Simplifies the analysis of a controller program if a
submask and not a function is called up.
GOTO_[name]
Set RF parameter
[FREQUENCY]
FREQU [value] [unit] Sets RF frequency in RX and TX modes. Don’t
use command FREQU to set channel numbers
(use TXFRE and RXFRE).
TXFRE [value] [unit] Sets TX frequency in DUPLEX mode (or TX).
RXFRE [value] [unit] Sets RX frequency in DUPLEX mode (or RX).
[value]
[unit]
[LEVEL]
=
=
numeric value
MHz|NoL|NoU
FREQU 75.234 MHz
TXFRE 4 NoL
AMPLI [value] [unit] Sets RF output level.
RFLEVel [state]
[value]
[unit]
[state]
=
=
=
Switches signal generator on/off.
level (numeric)
dBm|dBu|uV|mV
oN|oFf
Examples
AMPLI -60 dBm
RFLEV N or RFLEV F
8-79
8
IEEE Commands
Key
Standard Commands
IEEE command
Meaning
Set modulation (RX or DUPLEX mode)
[FM_AM_ÉM]
RXAFM [value] kHz
RXBFM [value] kHz
FM modulation with GEN A
FM modulation with GEN B
RXAPM [value] Rad
RXBPM [value] Rad
ΦM modulation with GEN A
ΦM modulation with GEN B
RXAAM [value] %
RXBAM [value] %
AM modulation with GEN A
AM modulation with GEN B
[value]
=
modulation (numeric)
RXBFM 2.8 kHz
Set demodulation (TX or DUPLEX mode)
[FM_AM_ÉM]
TX_AM, TX_FM, TX_ΦM
Modulator DC coupled
none
DC_[state]
[state]
=
ON|OFf
DC_ON
General functions
[BEAT]
BEAT_[state]
[state]
=
Cursor
CURUP
CURDOwn
CURLEft
CURRIght
CURHOme
[ENTER]
ENTER
[STEP]
not available
[OFF]
not available
Select BEAT function
oN|oFf
Cursor up
Cursor down
Cursor left
Cursor right
Cursor home
Relay set/reset
none
RELAY [no] [state]
[no]
[state]
=
=
number of relay (1 to 24)
oN|oFf (see also TTL output set/reset)
TTL output set/reset
none
TTLOUt [no] [state]
[no]
[state]
=
=
number of TTL output (1 to 20)
oN|oFf
If a value 99 is entered instead of the actual number of the relay or TTL
output, as many as 24 relays or 20 TTL outputs can be adressed
simultaneously (1 = set, 0 = reset, X = no change).
Example:
TTLOUt 99 10X11
TTL output no. 5
TTL output no. 1 1
8-80
Standard Commands
Key
IEEE Commands
IEEE command
Meaning
Switch AF generators on/off
[GEN_A]
GENA_[state]
Switch generator GEN A on/off.
[B/SAT]
GENB_[state]
Switch generator GEN B on/off.
[EXT]
GENE_[state]
Connect and disconnect signal applied to
EXT MOD socket.
[state]
=
RX|TX|oFf
Examples
GENB_OFF
GENA_RX
Set AF frequency
[MODFREQ]
MODAF [value] kHz
MODBF [value] kHz
[value]
=
Set generator GEN A frequency.
Set generator GEN B frequency.
frequency (numeric)
MODAF 3.8 kHz
Set AF output level (TX or DUPLEX mode)
[FM_AM_ÉM]
GENAL [value] [unit] Level setting GEN A
GENBL [value] [unit] Level setting GEN B
[value]
[unit]
=
=
level (numeric)
mV|V|dBm
Examples
GENAL 120 mV
GENBL -20 dBm
Select AF test signal
[VOLTM]
VOLTMeter
Connects VOLTM input socket to AF signal
analyzer.
[DEMOD]
DEMODulation
Connects demodulated received signal to AF
signal analyzer.
[RXMOD]
MODULation
Connects all AF generators to internal AF
signal analyzer.
8
Call up AF test instruments
[dB_REL]
DBREL
Calls up relative-level meter.
[VOLT]
V_RMS
Calls up RMS meter.
[SINAD]
SINAD
Calls up SINAD meter.
[DIST]
DISTOrtion
Calls up distortion-factor meter.
Switch filters on/off
[CCITT]
CCITT [state]
Select CCITT filter
External
filters
EXTERnal [state]
Select filter on OPTION CARD
[state]
=
oN|oFf
see IEEE command FILTEr
8-81
IEEE Commands
Key
Standard Commands
IEEE command
Fill in any entry fields
none
WRTVA [code],[input]
Enters declared entry [input] in field defined by [code]. Mask must have been
called up first that contains required entry field.
With the WRTVA command you can fill in all entry fields, also those that are
directly accessible with commands like FREQU or AMPLI (fast access).
[code]
=
[input]
=
Identification number of entry field. The identification
number is found as follows: first call up the mask and
immediately afterwards the AUTORUN mask. {HELP_VAR}
shows the mask again. The entry fields are now brightened
up and show the identification numbers required for the
WRTVA command. Alternatively you can directly look to the
identification number by pressing [HELP] in the corresponding mask.
Numeric with/without units or text (depending on entry field).
Examples
WRTVA 25,S/N
The scroll variable S/N is entered in field 25
(sensitivity measurement SINAD or S/N) of the
special SENS of the RX mask.
WRTVA 03,66 uV
Sets RF level (field 3 in RX mask) to 66 µV.
Note: The level input fields of the three AF signal generators have different
identification numbers depending on the operating modes of the Test Set.
Caution: If Mem.Card is selected in AUTORUN mode instead of a printer
and you change during the program with WRTVA to a printer, until then
collected data can be lost. Remedy: store the collected data (before change
to the printer driver) on memory card with the IEEE command CLOSE.
8-82
Standard Commands
Key
IEEE Commands
IEEE command
Fill in ZOOM masks
{ZOOM}
ZOOM_[z],[c],[r]:[text]
Calls up required ZOOM mask and defines center scale plus scale ends. To
continue program, operate one of softkeys.
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
[c]
=
[r]
=
[text]=
[z]
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
RF Power
Modulation
RMS
AF Power
Offset (only for TX or DUPLEX)
DC Voltmeter
DC Ammeter
Center scale (numeric with units)
Scale end (numeric)
Any text (max. 50 characters) to be shown in the
status line. The softkeys have the function {CONTINUE}.
Example:
10 SETTX
20 ZOOM_1,9.00 W,3.00:Adjust RF POWER!
30 L=MPOWER:PRINT L
The program calls up the RF power meter PWR with a defined measurement range in full format (line 20). Adjust RF POWER! tells you to adjust
the transmitted power. Operate any softkey after adjustment and the RF power is measured and its value read out (line 30).
8
8-83
IEEE Commands
Test jobs
Test jobs
IEEE test jobs poll the required test instrument and at the same time produce the
result. This can be evaluated directly (eg PRINT MPOWER) or assigned to a
variable (A=MPOWER).
IEEE command
Measured result
RF frequency
MTXFReq
Frequency of RF signal applied (tuned frequency of test receiver).
10 SETTX
20 A=MTXFReq
30 PRINT A
After callup of the TX mask the frequency of the RF signal is
measured and the result output.
Frequency offset
MTXOFfset
Offset of actual carrier frequency from tuned frequency of test
receiver
10
20
30
40
SETTX
TXFRE 27.205 MHz
B=MTXOFfset
PRINT B
Line 20 tunes the test receiver to 27.205 MHz. Then the offset of
the RF signal applied there is measured and the result output.
RF power (broadband)
MPOWEr
Mean value of applied RF power.
10 SETTX
20 C=MPOWER
30 PRINT C
Caution: In AUTORUN and controller modes in particular, observe
the maximum permissible RF input power because the warning
REDUCE RF-POWER does not appear on screen in these modes.
RF power (test bandwidth 3 MHz)
MSPOWer
8-84
Mean value of applied RF power. Before measurement, test receiver must be tuned to test signal.
Test jobs
IEEE Commands
IEEE command
Measured result
Voltage (RMS)
M_RMS
Root-mean-square value of momentarily connected AF signal.
10 SETRX;MODULation
20 GENA_RX;MODAF 2 kHz;RXAFM 2.4 kHz
30 F=M_RMS:PRINT F
Line 10 calls up the RX mask and connects the AF generators to
the AF signal analyzer. Generator GEN A feeds the signal generator with an AF signal that produces 2.4 kHz FM deviation. The level
of the AF signal is determined by the test job in line 40.
MFRMS
Root-mean-square (rms) figure of the coupled AF signal. Function
like M_RMS but three to four times faster.
Important: only suitable for stable signals not corrupted by noise
AF frequency
MAFFReq
Frequency of momentarily connected AF signal
10
20
30
40
SETTX
GENA_TX;MODAF 2.22 kHz; GENAL 100 mV
MODGEn
K=MAFFReq:PRINT K
Generator GEN A is set to 2.22 kHz in TX mode. Then line 30
connects the internal generators to the AF signal analyzer so that
GEN A feeds the AF frequency counter. The test job in line 40
therefore applies to the signal of the generator (result 2.2200 kHz).
Modulation
MDEMOd
Peak value of modulation, measured with modulation meters
DEMOD (TX mode) or MOD (RX mode)
10 SETTX;TXFRE 27.205 MHz
20 TX_FM
30 D=MDEMOd:PRINT D
8
First the test receiver is tuned and then FM demodulation is set. After
that the peak FM deviation of the RF signal is measured and output.
10
20
30
40
SETRX
GENA_RX;MODAF 2 kHz;RXAFM 2.4 kHz
MODULation
D=MDEMOd:PRINT D
The generator GEN A feeds the signal generator with a 2-kHz
signal that produces FM deviation of 2.4 kHz. As a deviation check,
line 30 connects the modulator to the modulation meter MOD,
which is then polled and transfers the result to the variable D.
8-85
IEEE Commands
Output of Setting Parameters
IEEE command
Measured result
DC measurements
M_DCV
M_DCA
Measurement results of DC voltmeter and DC ammeter (options).
TTL Inputs
MTRIG
Logic signal of the different TTL inputs (see also control interfaces).
VSWR
MVSWR
VSWR measured with option "VSWR Measuring Head".
Display fields (poll contents)
RESULt [number] [number] = identification number of result field
The command outputs the content of special result fields. Applies
to the masks of the software options (see Chapter 10) and to the
DTMF and sequential masks (Chapters 9 and 4).
The descriptions of these options give you the identification numbers of the corresponding result fields.
Output of Setting Parameters
With the following IEEE commands you can output the content of important entry
fields.
Parameter
IEEE command
RF Frequency RX
PRXFRequency
RF Frequency TX
PTXFRequency
RX-RF-Offset
PRXOFfset
RF Level
PRXLEvel
GEN A Frequenz
PGAFRequency
GEN B Frequenz
PGBFRequency
GEN A Level
PGALEvel
GEN B Level
PGBLEvel
CONT RF Level
PCONTinuous
STEP RF Frequency
PSTFRequency
STEP RF Level
PSTLEvel
8-86
Special Commands
IEEE Commands
Special Commands
The following commands can be used in controller programs and in part in
AUTORUN programs too.
Set/reset blanking-screen commands
CRT_CONTROL x
[x]
=
ON or OFF
CRT_CONTROL x only affects the CRT_x commands of a program (blanking of the monitor).
CRT_CONTROL ON: CRT_x commands are effective.
CRT_CONTROL OFF: CRT_x commands are not effective.
CRT_CONTROL OFF is the automatic default, even if the command is not expressly issued. CRT_x commands are only effective
if the command CRT_CONTROL ON is expressly issued.
Application: disabling of all CRT_x commands during program
development so that the entire course of the program can be
followed on the monitor.
Examples of use of command in AUTORUN programs
:
10 CRT_CONTROL ON
20 CRT_OFF
30 SETRX
40 SETTX
50 FREQUENCY 110.0000 MHz
60 CRT_ON
:
Program line 10 causes the following CRT_x commands to be
executed, ie CRT_OFF blanks the screen (line 20). So the callup of
the RX and TX mask as well as the entry in the RF Frequency field
can
:
10 CRT_CONTROL OFF
20 CRT_OFF
30 SETRX
40 SETTX
50 FREQUENCY 110.0000 MHz
60 CRT_ON
:
Here program line 10 prevents execution of the following CRT_x
commands (the line is optional because CRT_CONTROL OFF is
the automatic default anyway). The screen is not blanked and the
actions of the program can all be followed onscreen.
8-87
8
IEEE Commands
Special Commands
Blanking screen
CRT_x
[X]
=
ON or OFF
CRT_OFF blanks the screen until it is brightened up again by
CRT_ON. The blanking is useful when the actions in the program
are unimportant for the user (eg callup of masks, setting of scroll
variables).
Note: CRT_x commands are only executed if the command
CRT_CONTROL ON is issued beforehand. The commands INPUT,
PAUSE, ZOOM and LOCAL always produce blanking of the screen.
Example of use of command in AUTORUN programs
:
10 CRT_CONTROL ON
20 CRT_OFF
30 SETRX
40 SETTX
50 FREQUENCY 110.0000 MHz
60 CRT_ON
:
Program line 10 causes the following CRT_x commands to be
executed. So CRT_OFF initially blanks the screen.
Output of text on screen
DISP_text
text
=
character string to be output (max. 120 characters)
Permits the output of text onscreen (pointer or other message for a
user). The text is shown in three lines of 40 characters each in a
separate mask. Shorter texts are filled out with blanks. Press a
softkey to continue the program.
Example of use of command in controller programs
:
1230 OUTPUT 725; "DISP_Connect mobile!"
:
Note: This command is not available in AUTORUN mode, but it
corresponds to the BASIC command PAUSE.
8-88
Special Commands
IEEE Commands
Placement of text on screen
DISPx,text
[x]
=
text
=
number of line, x = 1–9, A–H;
x = 1 corresponds to line 1,
x = H corresponds to line 17
character string to be output
Permits the placement of text onscreen (pointer or other message
for a user). The text is output in the current mask in line x. If there
is already text in the output line defined by x, it will be overwritten.
In the SCOPE and ANALYZER mask no text should be placed in
the windows because these are overwritten by each measurement
cycle.
Note: Important messages from the Communication Test Set can
be overwritten unintentionally by the DISPx,text command.
Example of use of command in controller programs
:
1250 OUTPUT 725; "DISP3,measurement started"
1260 OUTPUT 725; "DISPB,measurement 1"
:
Example of use of command in AUTORUN programs
:
50 DISP3,measurement started
60 DISPB,measurement 1
:
The text "measurement started" is read out in line 3, the text
"measurement 1" in line 11 of the current mask.
DISP0
Clears the screen.
Switch filter on or off
FILTERabcde
a
b
c
d
e
=
=
=
=
=
Option, 0=out, 1=on
Filter 2, 0=out, 1=on
Filter 1, 0=out, 1=on
Var. notch, 0=out, 1=on
Loop filter into signal path to DEMOD meter,
0=out, 1=on
8
Loops the filter into the signal path (only possible if the
Communication Test Set is fitted with the filter). The command
corresponds to filter selection on the OPTION CARD mask. It is
independent of the mask currently displayed.
Note: After looping in a filter, a command may be necessary to
switch the measurement range (eg MDEMOd).
8-89
IEEE Commands
Special Commands
Printing defined areas of masks
HCOPYaaa,bbb
aaa
bbb
=
=
start line, aaa = 1–255
end line, bbb = 2–256
This command prints a defined area of the current mask. The start
line and the end line are to be entered. These values are pixel lines;
a text line on the screen comprises twelve pixel lines (eg
HCOPY013,024 prints the second text line). The output will be in
the printer format as selected under GENERAL PARAMETERS
(Printer field).
Read out of entered messages
INPUT
8-90
Replaces the status line with an entry field for maximally 40 characters. Digits can be entered with the numeric keypad, letters with
the softkeys. After confirmation with [ENTER] the content of the entry
field is read out on the controller.
Special Commands
IEEE Commands
Check whether a key is stuck
KEYBOard WAIT x x = ON or OFF
The command checks whether a key on the Communication Test
Set is struck and outputs a character assigned to this key to the
controller. The struck key can be identified from the following table.
KEYBOard WAIT ON halts the program until a key is struck on the
Communication Test Set.
KEYBOard WAIT OFF does not halt the program. If no key is struck
at the moment of testing, the "@" character is output to the controller.
Note: This command is not available in AUTORUN mode.
Key
cursor l
cursor u
cursor r
cursor d
+ (Plus)
– (Minus)
. (Punkt)
0...9
S1
S2
S3
S4
S5
S6
TX
RX
DUPLEX
VOLTM
DEMOD
RX MOD/MOD GEN
VOLT/dB REL
GEN A
B/SAT
EXT
Charac.
Space
!
"
#
+
–
.
0...9
:
;
<
=
>
?
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
Key
Charac.
PRINT
OFF
DIST
STEP
Frequency
AMPLITUDE
MOD FREQ
FM AM ΦM
BEAT/SINAD
HELP
CCITT
DIM
SCOPE
ANALYZER
MEMORY
AUX
Spinweel
turned left
Spinweel
turned right
ENTER
K
L
M
O
P
Q
R
S
T
V
W
X
Y
Z
[
\
No key pressed
@
p
q
_
8-91
8
IEEE Commands
Special Commands
Disable LOCAL mode
LOCKK
Disables the [OFF] key in remote mode. The Communication Test
Set can no longer be switched from remote to local mode. LOCKK
is canceled by the LOCAL command or by striking the [CLEAR] key.
Note: This command is not available in AUTORUN mode.
Switch to manual operation
LOCAL:text
text
=
character string to be output
Switches the 4032 to manual operation. The monitor shows the
mask last called up. The text of the LOCAL command appears in
the status line (max. 50 characters). The softkeys have the function
{CONTINUE}, ie the program (IEEE or AUTORUN) is continued as soon
as you strike a softkey.
Example of use of command in controller programs
:
60 OUTPUT 725; "LOCAL:Adjust PWR=5.0 W THEN CONTINUE"
70 OUTPUT 725; "M_POWER"
80 ENTER 725; A$
:
The user is asked to set the radio set to output power of 5.0 W in
the ongoing mask and then strike a softkey.
Label softkeys
NSOFTx,text
x
text
=
=
number of softkey
field label of softkey (max. 51 characters)
Command for labeling softkey fields. The softkey fields 1 and 6 can
hold maximally seven and all others maximally eight characters. If
the text is longer than permitted, the field of the following softkey
will also be occupied without a space. The text across all six softkey
fields may not be more than 51 characters.
Example of use of command in AUTORUN programs
:
40 NSOFT1,RETURN
50 NSOFT4,Connect new mobile to RF
:
Softkey field 1 is labeled with the text {RETURN}, softkey fields 4-6 with
the text {Connect_new_mobile_to_RF}. Softkey fields 2 and 3 remain unaltered.
Note: This command is only useful in combination with IEEE
command KEYBOard WAIT.
8-92
Special Commands
IEEE Commands
Output string to Centronics interface
PAR_Out:text
text
=
character string to be output
length in controller programs: 80 characters
length in AUTORUN programs: 49 characters
minus space for line number and command
This command outputs the character string "text" to the Centronics
interface (option). If the last character of the string is ":", there will
be no line and page feed after text output.
Example of use of command in controller programs
:
1450 OUTPUT 725; "PAR_Out:result"
1460 OUTPUT 725; "PAR_Out:+A$"
:
Example of use of command in AUTORUN programs
:
50 PAR_Out:result
60 PAR_Out:A$
:
First the text result and then the content of the variable A$ is
output on the Centronics interface.
Read content of entry fields
RDXY_xx,yy,ll
xx
yy
ll
=
=
=
start-line coordinate of field
start-column coordinate of field
length of field (1–49)
Reads contents of entry fields only.
Note: This command is not available in AUTORUN mode (but see
BASIC command RDXY).
RESET control
RESET
Query whether a reset or total reset was executed while the program was running on STABILOCK 4032. If so a "Y", otherwise an
"N", is output as the result to the controller. At the same time the
flag queried with the command is reset.
Note: This command is not available in AUTORUN mode.
8-93
8
IEEE Commands
Special Commands
SER_IN with wait function
SER_IN_FT
Modification of the SER_IN command. Reads in a character string
(max. 1000 characters) with the declared communication protocol
on the RS-232 interface (option). The end of the character string
can be seen from the marking that was also declared on the second
page of the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask (normally CR+LF).
Application: for base stations that continuously transmit character
strings terminated with an end marker, the beginning of the next
character string is waited for and this character string is then read
in up to the end marker.
Output string to RS-232 interface
SER_Out:text
text
=
character string to be read out
Produces readout of the character string "text" (max. 50 characters)
on the RS-232 interface (option). The communication protocol
declared on the second page of the GENERAL PARAMETERS
mask will apply for this. A timeout declared under GENERAL
PARAMETERS will prevent blockades if declared handshake characters fail to appear (see special commands WRITE or SLAVE).
Examples of use of command in AUTORUN programs
:
50 SER_O:CHAN053
:
The text "CHAN053" could be a control instruction for a test item,
for example, to set channel 53.
:
50 A$="CHAN"+VAL$(c)
60 B$="TRAFFIC"
70 SER_O:#A$+B$
:
Instead of "text" it is also possible to use a string variable preceded
by a sharp sign (only use # once).
8-94
Special Commands
IEEE Commands
Read string on RS-232 interface
SER_In
Reads in a character string (max. 1000 characters) with the declared communication protocol on the RS 232 interface (option).
The end of the character string can be seen from the marking
(terminator) that was also declared on the second page of the mask
GENERAL PARAMETERS (normally CR+LF). A timeout declared
under GENERAL PARAMETERS will prevent blockades if no terminator is detected (see special commands WRITE or SLAVE).
Only in AUTORUN programs: character strings of max. 49 characters can be loaded into any available string variable. Longer
character strings can only be loaded into the string variable. M$ is
also used as a buffer for measured results however, so it is
advisable to immediately allocate important contents of M$ portion
by portion to other string variables (see Chapter7).
Examples of use of command in AUTORUN programs
:
50 PRINT SER_I
:
The read-in character string has 124 characters for example. The
first 49 characters appear on the screen and all characters are also
output to a printer. Whether this actually prints all the characters will
depend on the particular printer. If the character string is distributed
to a number of string variables in portions of max. 49 characters
each (see following example), the characters 50 through 99 can
also be shown on the screen for instance.
:
50 M$=SER_I
60 A$=M$(1,49):B$=M$(50,98)
70 C$=M$(99,124)
80 PRINT B$
:
The string variable M$ is loaded with 124 characters for example.
Split up in three portions, these characters are allocated to other
string variables.
:
50 B$=SER_I
60 IF B$="OK" PRINT "PASS"
:
The read-in character string is loaded into string variable B$ and
undergoes a comparison operation.
:
10 M$=SER_I
20 C$=M$(80,83)
30 IF C$="1502" PRINT "PASS"
:
The read-in character string is checked to see if it contains the
substring in the 80th through 83rd places.
8-95
8
IEEE Commands
Special Commands
Output and read string on RS-232 interface (full-duplex mode)1)
SEROI:text
text
=
character string to be output
The SEROI command1) puts the RS-232 interface (option) into fullduplex mode. This means that the communication tester can output
a character string and receive another at the same time (max. 1000
characters). This is necessary, for example, when a base station is
being tested that starts to respond on the serial interface while the
communication tester is still sending a character string with instructions to the base station. Reception of a character string is ended as
soon as the communication tester detects the declared Serial
Input Terminator (see GENERAL PARAMETERS mask). So the
duration of readiness to receive does not depend on the length of the
character string to be output. A timeout declared under GENERAL
PARAMETERS will prevent blockades if no terminator is detected or
declared handshake characters fail to appear (see special commands
WRITE or SLAVE).
Note: The character string received by the communication tester is
first buffered by the RS-232 interface. The character string cannot be
evaluated until it is fetched from the interface by the special command
SER_In.
Example of use of command in AUTORUN programs:
:
50 SEROI:A1CCF8...
60 M$=SER_I
:
Line 50 causes the character string A1CCF8... to be output on pin
2 of the serial interface (eg control instructions for a base station).
At the beginning of output, the communication tester is ready to
receive (pin 3 of interface) a character string output by the base
station. The declared serial input terminator determines whether
reception is ended upon detection of the character sequence
CR+LF for instance. The command SER_I loads the received
character string into the string variable M$ (line 60) for further
processing.
Query unit identity
UNIT_
UNITS
UNIT_ always produces the string 4031 as a result (important for
ARE).
UNITS produces the complete identification of the set, ie the model
(4032) and seven-digit serial number (separated by space). Further
internal version information can be called up with the special
IDENTity command from firmware version 6.13 onwards.
8-96
Special Commands
IEEE Commands
Query version information
IDENTity
The special IDENTity command produces a string with the
following information:
Place
Information
01 to 08
Company name (space at end).
09 to 18
STABILOCK (space at end).
19 to 23
403X (space at end).
24 to 31
Serial number of Communication Test Set (space
at end).
32
Character "(" initiates output of version identification
of software-controlled modules. Note comma
(delimiter) at end of each identification. If module is
missing, version identification is replaced by spaces.
33 to 37
HOST-MCU version (firmware).
38 to 42
CRT-MCU version (firmware).
43 to 47
RF/AF-MCU version (firmware).
48 to 52
CELL-ANA version (DATA module).
53 to 57
CELL-GEN version (DATA module).
58 to 62
IFC-MCU version (RS-232/Centronics).
63 to 67
DIG-MCU version (NADC, GSM, DECT, etc).
68 to 72
OPT-MCU version (2nd RF generator).
73 to 87
Name of currently loaded system program
including extension.
88 to 97
Version of currently loaded system program.
98
Character ")" closes output of version identification.
Change RS-232 interface parameters (terminators/handshake)1)
WRITE[300012X]
or
SLAVE300012X
8
setting instruction for following parameters:
– serial input terminator
– serial output terminator
– handshake characters within character string
– handshake characters at end of character string
Normally the declarations made in the GENERAL PARAMETERS
mask apply for the parameters of the RS-232 interface. But the
scroll variables offered there are only good for standard
requirements. Using the commands WRITE and SLAVE1) on the
other hand, the parameters in question can be assigned any values
between 01 and 7F.
X
=
Only use WRITE for controller programs.
Only use SLAVE for AUTORUN programs.
Continuation next page
8-97
IEEE Commands
Continuation
Special Commands
Command syntax for parameter setting:
WRITE[300012AABBCCDD]
SLAVE300012AABBCCDD (no brackets!)
300012 = Control sequence required internally
AA
= Serial input terminator (2 bytes, hexadecimal)
00
BB
= Standard value declared in GENERAL
PARAMETERS mask
01-7F = Permissible values if standard values do
not satisfy requirements
= Serial output terminator (2 bytes, hexadecimal)
00
= Standard value declared in GENERAL
PARAMETERS mask (output terminator =
input terminator)
01-7F = Permissible values if standard values do
not satisfy requirements
80
= No output terminator
CC
= Handshake characters within character string
(2 bytes, hexadecimal)
00
= No handshake characters
01-7F = Permissible handshake characters
80
DD
= Data byte being output is expected back
as handshake characters (echo
handshake)
90
= Any character is accepted as handshake
character
= Handshake characters at end of character string
(2 bytes, hexadecimal)
00
= No handshake characters
01-7F = Permissible handshake characters
80
= Data byte being output is expected back as
handshake characters (echo handshake)
90
= Any character is accepted as handshake
character
Example of use of command in AUTORUN programs:
Control sequence
Serial input terminator = 3A.
Terminator declared in
GENERAL PARAMETERS mask
is no longer valid
50 SLAVE3000123A800000
No serial output terminator
8-98
No handshake
characters
Special Commands
Continuation
IEEE Commands
Command syntax for recalling standard parameters:
WRITE[300013]
SLAVE300013
(no brackets!)
These command sequences make the interface parameters valid
again that were declared in the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask.
The result is the same if you switch the communication tester off
and on again, or if you strike [CLEAR].
Output hexadecimal zero on RS-232 interface2)
WRITE[300014X]
or
SLAVE300014X
X
=
number of hex 0s that should be output
(permissible figures: 00 to 99).
Only use WRITE for controller programs.
Only use SLAVE for AUTORUN programs.
Special applications require output of hex 0 (control character). This
is not possible with the SER_Out command because SER_Out:0
outputs an ASCII zero for example (corresponds to hex 30).
Example: WRITE[30001412] outputs the hex 0 character twelve
times in succession on the RS-232 interface.
Store string on Memory Card
STOREdata
data
=
character string to be stored (max. 100 characters)
The command creates the file RESULT.RES on a Memory Card
and stores the character string in this file. Depending on the
available capacity, 16 or 4 Kbytes are reserved for the file. If there
is already a RESULT.RES file, the character string is added to the
end of the file. If there is no more reserved space available, the
RESULT.RES file is renamed RESULTFULL.RES and a new
RESULT.RES file is created (see also "AUTORUN Test Reports").
If there is no more memory available on Memory Card or no
Memory Card adapted, an error message will appear and the
program is halted.
Note: This command is not available in AUTORUN mode.
8-99
8
IEEE Commands
Output Format
Output Format
The output format of the 4032 offers two different modes of presentation:
PRSTRing
PREXPonential
Decimal format (standard)
Exponential format (IEEE format)
Note: Neither command is available in AUTORUN mode. In some measurements
(eg MDEMO) two values are output (format: value 1 SPACES value 2 CRLF).
">>>>": overflow), "<<<<": underflow, "----": no test signal, "????": measuring
without sense.
Exponential output format
Character 1
Characters 2-11
Character 12
Character 13
Characters 14-15
Characters 16-17
Characters 18-20
Characters 21-22
Sign of mantissa
Mantissa
"E"
Sign of exponent
Exponent
Two Spaces
Dimension (left-justified)
CRLF
Decimal output format
Characters 1-9
Characters 10-11
Characters 12-14
Characters 15-16
Measured value (right-justified, max. 9 places, filled out
with spaces)
Two spaces
Dimension (left-justified)
CRLF
Service Request
The SRQ is enabled by the SMASK command (Set SRQ Mask, not available in
AUTORUN mode). Values between 00 and 3F are legal.
The meaning of the individual bits is as follows:
Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3-5
Bit 6
Bit 7
8-100
Error occurred (message in status line)
Synthesis unsynchronized
Wrong command (syntax error or control character in
string)
Always 0 (reserved for later use)
SRQ bit, always 1
Always 0 (reserved for later use)
Error Messages
IEEE Commands
Error Messages
GENERAL ERRORS
0200: AUTORUN ERROR
0201: FUNCTION NOT AVAILABLE IN IMMEDIATE MODE.
0202: FUNKTION NOT IMPLEMENTED.
0203: USER STOP EXECUTED.
EDIT
0210: LINE TOO LONG.
0211: BAD LINE NUMBER. Legal Range 1..9999.
0212: BAD GOTO/GOSUB STATEMENT. Bad line number ?
0213: PROGRAMM MEMORY FULL.
0214: CORRUPT PROGRAMM. RELOAD.
0215: RENUMBER
INCREMENT FACTOR TOO LARGE.
0216: RENUMBER
UNMATCHED GOTO/GOSUB LINE NUMBERS.
SYNTAX
0220: BAD SEPERATOR.
0221: BAD NUMBER.
0222: BAD STRING. Eg a$..d$,m$
"text" ’string
0223: BAD CONDITIONAL EXPRESSION. (= <> < <= > >=)
0224: DELIMITER EXPECTED.
0225: VARIABLE EXPECTED
0226: EQUAL CHARACTER EXPECTED.
0227: TO EXPECTED. Incorrect FOR syntax.
0228: 0UTLIMIT SYNTAX INCORRECT. out(mmeas,lo,hi)
0229. BAD RDOUT LIST SYNTAX. Eg rdout(mmess;a,b)
0230: KEY SYNTAX INCORRECT. Eg num, ’text’,cmd
0231: KEY WAIT or KEY RUN. NO KEYS PROGRAMMED.
0232: BAD MID SYNTAX. Eg A$(3, 5) is from 3 to 5
0233: BAD NUMBER. Eg B$(start, end). Max is 49.
0234: STRING 0PERAND INVALID. Value not lnteger ?
0235: BAD STRING TYPE. Eg a$..d$ "text" m$(3,4)
0236: SYNTAX ERROR
8
RUN TIME ERROR
0240: RETURN WITHOUT GOSUB.
0241: AUTORUN STACK FULL. Too many gosubs ?
0242: NO MATCHING FOR STATEMENT.
0243: DIMENSION MISMATCH. Eg MHz with uV.
0244: MISSING OR EXCESS BRACKETS.
0245: MATHS ERROR.
0246: RDOUT VARIABLE NOT USED.
0247: UNEXPECTED END. FOR or GOSUB still active.
8-101
IEEE Commands
Error Messages
Error messages with IEEE COMMAND
0011: received IEEE command line too long (max. 100 characters permitted).
0012: received character cannot be shown
(characet number was smaller than 20 hex and no CR of LF).
0013: unknown IEEE command.
The error messages 0011 to 0012 appear in the status line as follows: error number, received IEEE command line (in as much as it can be shown).
0260: BAD IEEE VARIABLE INSERTION SYNTAX.
0261: IEEE SYNTAX ERROR.
0262: COMMAND EXPECTED.
0263: MEASUREMENT EXPECTED.
0264: IEEE KEYWORD EXPECTED. Unknown keyword.
8-102
Hardware Options
and Accessories
9
Introduction
Introduction
Chapter 9 is reserved for describing the hardware options. When you order one
of these hardware options, you will receive the pages that describe its us. You can
then file them under this chapter.
Optionen
Hardware-Option
DATA-Modul
In the list of contents under chapter 9 you will find the hardware options listed.
Cross the appropriate field if you add the description of a hardware option to the
operating instructions.
As a rule the options will be ready installed if you ordered them together with your
STABILOCK 4032. The OPTIONS mask (see chapter 4) shows what options your
4032 contains. Software options (simulation of radio-data systems) are described
in Chapter 10.
9
9-3
Introduction
Extra accessories
Extra accessories
The data sheet will tell you about the many different accessories that are available
for STABILOCK 4032. In addition to these there are various adapters especially
for maintenance and service of the 4032 plug-in stages:
AF service adapter
248 182
RF service adapter
248 183
Power-supply adapter
248 184
9-4
Software Options
10
Introduction
Introduction
Chapter 10 is reserved for the descriptions of the software options. Whenyou
order a software option, the appropriate instruction are supplied with it. Insert
these instructions in this chapter.
Optionen
Software-Option
NMT 900
In the list of contents you will find all the available software options under
chapter 10. Cross the appropriate field if you add a description to the operating
instructions.
10
10-3
General Description
Connection setup
General Description
The available memory cards, containing test software for cellular radios of the
various systems such as NMT 450, NMT 900, AMPS, E-TACS, RC 2000, C-NETZ
FRG, etc, perform the following basic function tests of the corresponding mobile
stations (MS).
a) Mobile initiated call
b) MTX initiated call
c) Handoff to any traffic channel during call in progress
d) Changing Mobile power on traffic channel
Note: In the space provided for this chapter (subdirectory), insert the text that
comes with the software option (Memory Card)
Additional or different test procedures are described in the appropriate system
description. All the tests are started by pressing the corresponding softkey. The
softkey depressed will then be displayed inverted until the test is completed. The
softkey {RETURN} becomes simultaneously the {STOP} key (also inverted display) in
order to interrupt the test procedure in the event of a defective Mobile.
Connection setup
The 4032, upon loading a program, switches to duplex operation mode and
simulates the base station (BS). To establish a connection with the Mobile, the
4032 first starts a system-specific handshake procedure with the Mobile and then
commands the Mobile to the preset traffic channel. When the call procedure is
completed the digital data exchange has successfully been tested and then the
measurement results of frequency offset, deviation and power of the Mobile are
continuously displayed.
Background signaling
Manual switching to the DUPLEX mask takes you out of the test mask, and
further typical radio measurements can then be performed. The signaling is
continued that is necessary to maintain the Mobile-BS call connection. The green
LED of the modulation generator GEN B illuminates to show that the signaling is
generated in the background. The LED also illuminates if GEN B was switched
off beforehand or this modulation generator (option) is not installed.
10-4
Test Setup
General Description
Pressing the [B/SAT] key stops the background signaling. This can be recognized
by the fact that the LED extinguishes and that the message "Data module
generator stopped" appears in the status line of the screen. The absence of the
signaling leads shortly afterwards to termination of the connection between the
4032 and the radio set. How long the connection can be maintained by a radio
set without background signaling depends on the cellular system.
Test Setup
SI 4032 STABILOCK
SCHLUMBERGER
Mobile
radio telephone
REMOTE
UNIVERSAL ANALOG/DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TEST SET
MEMORY
CARD
FREQU
7
8
9
ENTER
LEVEL
4
5
6
UNIT/SCROLL
MOD FREQ
1
2
FM AM OM
0
3
.
OFF
-
STEP
+
INTENS
POWER
ON/OFF
RF
LSP
MIC
DUPLEX
dB REL
RX
TX
S3
S2
S1
VOLT
S4
SCOPE ANALYZER MEMORY
S6
S5
RX MOD
BEAT DF
DIST
SINAD
CCITT
VOLTM
DEMOD
GEN A
MOD GEN
PRINT
AUX
B/SAT
EXT
HELP
CLEAR
SCOPE INPUT
POS
20 dB
600
RF
DIRECT
RF
50
DEMOD
600
600
AC
DC
VOLTM
MOD GEN
MAX
0,5 W
EMF
<2 V
MAX
EMF
MAX
30 Hz
<2 V
20 V
30 k Hz
600
0...20 kHz
RL > 200
MAX
8 Vpp
0...20 k Hz
1 M
0...20 kHz
Fig. 10.1: Cable connections: 4032 (MOD GEN) → microphone input MIC of mobile; for
measuring the modulation characteristics of the mobile transmitter. AF output (LSP) of
mobile → 4032 (VOLTM); for measuring the sensitivity and demodulation characteristics of
the mobile receiver. RF ↔ RF = RF signal path.
10
10-5
General Description
Checking background parameters
Checking background parameters
All system programs that allow the entry of channel numbers use the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask for entering special-to-system values. So you must
expect that, just by calling up a system program, declarations originally made in
the GENERAL PARAMETERS mask will be overwritten. These original declarations are rapidly restored if they are stored as a setup and loaded after working
with the system program.
SAT Loop Measurement
The SAT loop measurement is necessary in cellular-radio systems if they work
with a pilot tone (SAT) (eg NMT systems). The pilot tone (f = 4 kHz) is usually
emitted from the base station with 300 Hz shift, received by the mobile and then
transmitted back to the base station with as little alteration as possible (without
amplification/attenuation). Whether the base station then sends the mobile a
message to increase or reduce transmitting power, for example, will depend on
the shift of the "mirrored" SAT. The procedure requires that the mobile should in
fact "reflect" the SAT unaltered. This can be determined by a SAT loop measurement.
Boundary conditions
•
•
Software option (NMT system or similar) on SYSTEM CARD
OPTION CARD fitted with 4-kHz bandpass filter
Measurement → SAT loop
1. Load system program, fill in entry fields and set up radio connection (by {MTX} or {MOBILE}).
2. Switch to DUPLEX mask.
3. Activate 4-kHz bandpass filter on OPTION CARD and cut into TX-DEMOD signal
path (see also foldout "OPTION CARD").
4. With [RX_MOD/MOD_GEN] and then calling up dBr meter 4032 SAT shift (300 Hz) is set to
0 dB (reference value).
5. With [DEMOD] apply the demodulated SAT shift of the mobile to the dBr meter.
6. dBr meter shows every deviation of the mirrored SAT from the nominal value of 0 dB.
10-6
Training
11
Introduction
Introduction
The purpose of the chapter "Training" is to familiarize you step by step with
elementary operating rules of the 4032. This is best done in close contact with
the instrument itself and will take about three to four hours. Before starting the
course however, first read the sections "Preparations for Startup" and "Notation
Rules" (Chapters 1 and 3).
Do not worry if you feel things are getting on top of you when you are in the middle
of training: you can always turn to the operating rules in Chapter 3 for quick
reference. Chapter 4 provide you with details of the different screen masks. The
course itself is not meant to be a reference source. Just work through it once and
then it has fulfilled its purpose.
11
11-3
Status Mask
Objectives
Status Mask
Objectives
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Familiarization with status mask
Recognizing, opening and closing entry fields
Correcting false entries
Enquiring for permissible entry limits
Moving to further entry fields
Enquiring for scroll variables
Familiarization with softkeys
Callup of status mask
Following startup with [POWER] the monitor of the 4032 very likely does not yet
show the status mask, so you will have to call it up. Press the [OFF] key, keep it
depressed and additionallypress the [CLEAR] key. The 4032 acknowledges this
with a signal tone, clears the mask on its screen and calls the status mask up on
the screen after a brief pause.
If you do not make any entries on the STABILOCK 4032 for a longish period of
time, the mask that is momentarily displayed will be replaced by the screen saver.
In this way the monitor is protected against burns, especially if the display is set
very bright. As soon as you press a key, the monitor will again show the mask that
was originally on the screen. The screen saver can switched off in the GENERAL
PARAMETER mask.
11-4
Messages of status mask
Status Mask
Messages of status mask
The status mask provides you with important information about the current status
of your 4032. After the Mode message TALK & LISTEN indicates the operating
mode of the IEEE bus that is set ex works. CR&LF is likewise a setting ex works
that concerns remotely controlled operation of the 4032 (control command). You
will learn in this lesson how to alter these ex-works settings.
From the message Software-Versions you can see with what software
versions your 4032 is presently fitted. The identifying numbers of the software
follow the brief designations of the associated microprocessors. CRC (cyclic
redundancy check) checksums of the software are also indicated. In the event of
servicing these checksums help to identify an error in the system software.
You do not have to pay any attention yet to the brightened up fields at the bottom
edge of the screen. There is a special reason for these fields that you will learn
about further on in this lesson.
The terms "Mask" and "Entry field"
The status mask is one of several masks (screen pages) that the 4032 - depending on the operating mode - is able to show on its screen. The term "Mask"
indicates that the appearance of the individual screen pages is largely determined by the 4032 (display fields). Certain parts of the mask (entry fields) are left
blank however: these are the only fields that the user may access; the remaining
fields on the screen (text fields) may not be accessed. The 4032 offers you two
different kinds of entry field:
•
•
entry fields for numeric values (numeric fields)
entry fields with given variables (scroll fields)
The vast majority of entry fields are numeric fields. You will soon learn about one
of these fields together with two scroll fields. But first note that there are "pure"
numeric fields, "mixed" numeric fields and "hidden" numeric fields. You will learn
more about these later on when training with the RX mask.
11
11-5
Status Mask
Display of entry fields
Display of entry fields
The status mask shows you how the 4032 presents entry fields: following the text
field IEEE-488 ADR. the IEEE-bus address is displayed on the screen inverted
(dark script on a bright background). This is in the entry field that is currently
active. To be more precise, this is a pure numeric field because it only contains
numerics.
Fig. 11.1: The Mode text field is followed by
four scroll fields TALK & LISTEN, CR&LF ,
EOI and DCL = CLR. The IEEE-488 ADR.
field is inverted here, ie it is the current entry
field.
The 4032 always marks the momentarily valid entry field by showing it inverted
and expects a reaction on your part to this field (exception: the inverted fields at
the bottom edge of the screen are not entry fields). You then have the choice of
"opening" the marked numeric field with an entry or of moving to another entry
field.
Normally a text field is assigned either just a numeric field or just a scroll field, the text
field providing information about the meaning of the particular field. In such cases the
operating instructions refer to both of the fields under the designation of the text field. If
the numeric field IEEE-488 ADR. is being spoken of for example, the numeric field is
meant that follows the text field of the same name. If a text field is followed by several
entry fields however, the latter will have to be named after their content.
11-6
Opening numeric field
Status Mask
Opening numeric field
In the case at hand the field indicates the IEEE-bus address of the 4032 that is
set ex works. You may now alter this address, but first you must open the numeric
field. There are two ways of doing this:
•
•
Opening of numeric field by entering number
Opening of numeric field with [ENTER]
Choose the first method by entering any two-digit value on the keys of the
numerics block.
Correcting entry
Wrong entries can be corrected at any time with the cursor keys as long as a
numeric field is open. An opened numeric field can always be recognized by the
flashing cursor.
If you have entered the first digit of the new bus address incorrectly for instance,
just tap the cursor key pointing to the left so that the cursor marks the wrong digit.
Then you can enter the correct digit. For longish numeric fields there is a
possibility for correction that you will learn to appreciate, namely the auto-repeat
function of the cursor keys: keeping one of the keys depressed produces the
same result as striking it several times.
Within an opened numeric field you can only move the cursor with the key pointing to the
left or to the right.
Closing numeric field
Simply entering the new bus address does not complete the entry procedure. The
entry is not completed until you have decided that the entered value is correct
and transferred it to the 4032 by striking [ENTER]. [ENTER] closes an opened
numeric field. You recognize this by the fact that the flashing cursor disappears.
A closed numeric field can also be opened again with [ENTER] to make a
subsequent correction for example.
Before transferring your entry of the IEEE-bus address to the 4032, correct it to
45. This will help you to follow a demonstration that shows how the 4032 deals
with illegal entries.
11
11-7
Status Mask
Rejecting illegal entries
Rejecting illegal entries
The 4032 reacts to the transfer of the bus address "45" with a warning tone and
ignores it. Reason: the set always checks whether an entered value is within the
permissible range. Legal values are always between the limits (see data sheet)
for which the 4032 is specified.
Every attempt to transfer an illegal value produces a warning tone; at the same time the
numeric field again shows the value that it contained before the illegal entry.
Enquiring for permissible entry limits
If you are now wondering what values are permissible for the bus address, the
Communication Test Set itself will help you. Only the appropriate numeric field
must be open. Then the 4032 automatically assigns the [HELP] key the task of
presenting the permissible entry limits on the screen. Just try it: open the numeric
field for the bus address again with [ENTER] and then strike the [HELP] key. The
4032 will immediately show you at the bottom of the screen, in the socalled
"Notice line", between what valid bus addresses you may select. Now enter the
required value or again choose the address set ex works and close the field with
[ENTER].
11-8
Finding further entry fields
Status Mask
Finding further entry fields
You may not be able to see them yet, but the status mask has three more entry
fields (scroll fields) to offer you. You can reveal these entry fields with [HELP], but
not until the numeric field of the bus address has been properly closed. Because
in this way the 4032 realizes that you are not trying to find out what the
permissible entry limits are.
As long as you have not opened a numeric field, [HELP] will briefly mark all entry fields of
a mask, except for hidden numeric fields.
So tap the [HELP] key again: straight away the 4032 will then briefly mark the Mode
fields by inverting them. These are the scroll fields you are looking for and they
are all assigned to the Mode text field. Consequently these scroll fields are named
after their content. In contrast to numeric fields you cannot enter values in scroll
fields but instead must select one of the several fixed scroll variables.
All entry fields show a number between 0 and 99 after [HELP] for purposes of
identification. This identification is important if the entry fields are assigned new
contents by an AUTORUN program (see Chapter 8) or the controller.
Revealing the entry fields of a mask is an aid to your memory and does not
necessarily have to be done before moving to the next entry field.
11
11-9
Status Mask
Moving to next entry field
Moving to next entry field
The next entry field is to the right of the one that is still active, so the cursor key
pointing to the right takes you to the TALK & LISTEN scroll field. First you must
have closed the numeric field for the bus address. Otherwise the cursor keys, as
already described, would govern the cursor within the numeric field.
With other masks you will find that you have to use the other cursor keys too when
moving to other entry fields. Basically it can be said that every entry field can be
reached with the cursor keys as long as you have not opened a numeric field. The
entry field that is momentarily active can always be recognized by its inverted
display.
Using the vertical cursor keys you can also leave a numeric field if it has not been
closed with [ENTER]. However the numeric field then keeps the value that you last
confirmed with [ENTER].
Enquiring for scroll variables
TALK & LISTEN is the first scroll variable of the scroll field that is set ex works.
This says that the 4032 can transmit and receive data together with external
devices in bus operation. The other scroll variables that the entry field has to offer
are revealed with the [UNIT/SCROLL] key. Strike this key and the 4032 will present
TALK ONLY as the second scroll variable. The 4032 is then exclusively a transmitter of data. Repeated operation of the [UNIT/SCROLL] key produces the scroll
variables in an endless sequence in the scroll field (scrolling). If you try this, you
will see that only the active entry field presents the two variables mentioned. Now
use [UNIT/SCROLL] to select TALK & LISTEN again.
Fig. 11.2: The alternative to scroll variable
EOI is a blank field.
11-10
Familiarization with softkeys
Status Mask
Scroll fields do not have to be opened and then closed again for the selection of
a variable. As soon as you have declared such a field as the active field, the
required scroll variable can be called up immediately with [UNIT/SCROLL]. Afterwards you can exit from the field straight away by moving to another field, for
example, or even by calling up another mask: the selected scroll variable is
preserved.
Perform moving to the other two scroll fields and calling up the scroll variables by
yourself. You will find details about the meaning of the scroll variables in chapter 4.
Familiarization with softkeys
Now it is time to look at the exception mentioned above, ie the inverted fields at
the bottom edge of the screen. These fields show the functions that are momentarily offered for the keys S1 through S6 (softkeys) further below. The name
"softkeys" already indicates that the functions of the keys are determined by the
software of the 4032. And this is done in such a way that the keys always have
the functions that are necessary for the selected operating mode. The appropriate
key simply has to be tapped to call up a function. The softkey functions represent
to a certain extent individual labeling of the keys S1 through S6, so the different
functions are always named in requests to operate softkeys, eg {OPTIONS}. The italics
indicate that a softkey will be operated.
The six softkeys replace a large number of conventional keys. Thus the clear and
straightforward front panel of the 4032, which enables you to work speedily and
minimizes the risk of incorrect operation.
One and the same function can be assigned with equal priority to several
softkeys. In the status mask, for example, each of the functions is assigned to two
keys, it being irrelevant which of the two you strike to call up the function
concerned. The softkeys of the status mask are assigned the following three
functions:
{HW-REVISIONS}
Takes you to a mask that states the development status of
the different stages of the 4032. The codes quickly help to
produce a common basis for understanding if you telephone for advice.
{SELF-CHECK}
Takes you to another mask permitting the start of a selfdiagnosis program. For further details see "SELF-CHECK"
in Chapter 4.
{START}
Calls up the RX mask, ie puts the 4032 into the mode for
receiver measurements.
{OPTIONS}
Calls up a mask that provides closer details of any options
that are incorporated - in particular the OPTION CARD.
11-11
11
Status Mask
What are "default" settings?
If you want to, take a look at the three masks HW-REVISIONS, SELF-CHECK
and OPTIONS and then return to the status mask with {RETURN}. But wait a while
before calling up the RX mask.
Fig. 11.3: The two pages of the OPTIONS mask show what hardware options your 4032
is fitted with. {MORE} takes you from the first page to the second.5)
What are "default" settings?
Default has the meaning of a placeholder or ex-works setting. These placeholders
appear in the 4032 when a setting is possible but you have not yet altered
anything. Default settings are, for example, the contents assigned ex works to the
entry fields. But the functions of the softkeys and the other keys also have default
settings. They all simply serve the purpose of creating a reproducible, initial
operating status for the 4032.
Total Reset
A total reset (master reset) produces all default settings compulsorily ans calls up the
status mask. This deletes irrevocably all settings selected beforehand by the user!
To execute a total reset, press the [OFF] key, keep it depressed and additionally
press the [CLEAR] key for a short time or switch on the STABILOCK 4032 with
[POWER].
Switching on/off
If you only switch the 4032 on and off with [POWER], the settings that you have
selected are preserved. The entries in the entry fields will not be deleted for
example. What is more, the 4032 will immediately present after switch-on the
basic mask that was active before switch-off. Thus an interrupted measuring
routine can quickly be resumed. The operating status is stored by a battery-buffered RAM, so it is possible to continue working straight away even after power
outages.
11-12
Objectives
RX Mask
RX Mask
Objectives
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Familiarization with RX mask
Fast access to entry fields
Working with handwheel
Presetting stepping width for frequency and level
Familiarization with hidden and mixed numeric fields
Correct working with softkeys
First contact with RX Specials
Callup of RX mask
The RX mask is one of the three basic masks of the 4032. The other two basic
masks are the TX mask and the DUPLEX mask that is linked with the optional
duplex FM/M demodulator. Call up the RX mask with {START} or [RX]. This is the
basic mask for all receiver measurements. But to begin with it is only to be your
training partner for getting acquainted with further elementary operating rules.
Once you can master the operating rules of this mask, you will already know most
of the operating rules for working with the TX and DUPLEX mask.
LEDs mark operating status
Calling up the RX mask activates a number of LEDs on the front panel of the
Communication Test Set. Thus the 4032 shows its operating status, which at the
moment is solely determined by default settings. An illuminated LED means that
the function assigned to it has been selected. Certain functions can only be called
up in the RX mode and others only in the TX mode; then there are functions which
are independent of the operating mode. The colours of the LEDs indicate these
relations.
Green:
Red:
Yellow:
function in RX mode
function in TX mode
function independent of mode
At the moment the LEDs signal the following operating status:
11
Key
LED
Meaning
[RX]
(green)
RX mode selected (receiver measurement)
[VOLT]
(yellow)
RMS voltmeter activated
[VOLTM]
(yellow)
VOLTM socket is input of voltmeter
[GEN_A]
(green)
Modulation generator GEN A is activated in RX mode
11-13
RX Mask
Switching GEN A to RX/TX signal path
Switching GEN A to RX/TX signal path
When the RX mask is called up, GEN A can be switched to the RX or TX signal
path by repeatedly striking the key of the same name. When the RX signal path
is switched (green LED illuminates), the modulation signal feeds the modulator
of the 4032 signal generator. In this case the modulation signal can only be
brought out on socket Bu 27 (back panel). If the TX signal path is switched on the
other hand (red LED illuminated), the signal from GEN A appears AC-coupled on
the MOD GEN socket and additionally DC-coupled on socket Bu 29 (back panel).
This RX/TX signal-path switching is also possible if you have called up the
DUPLEX mask (option).
The GEN B (key [B/SAT]) option also reacts like GEN A. If both generators are
switched to the RX signal path, the modulator is fed with the sum signal when the
RX mask is called up. With [EXT] it is also possible to add a signal fed into the EXT
MOD socket. The general rule for the RX and DUPLEX mask is as follows: all
signal sources "switched green" feed the RX signal path, all signal sources
"switched red" feed the TX signal path. By the way, in the TX mask - which you
will learn about in the next lesson - you can switch the three modulation-signal
sources only to the TX signal path, because the 4032 signal generator is then no
longer active.
A voyage of discovery
Now you can go ahead and try out what you have learnt about entry fields with
the status mask: see how many entry fields the RX mask has, move to the
different entry fields, open and close them, enter random values, alter single
digits here and there and have the permissible entry limits displayed to you.
Now call up the RX mask after an total reset to recreate a defined starting point.
11-14
Fast access to entry fields
RX Mask
Fast access to entry fields
Darting backwards and forwards in a mask with the cursor keys to find an entry
field that may then have to be opened is a procedure that may be fun at first but
is too awkward for everyday testing of radio sets. Therefore the 4032 offers the
possibility of fast access to the appropriate entry fields for the more common
settings. Tap the keys [FREQUENCY], [LEVEL], [MOD_FREQ] and [FM_AM_ÉM] at will. This
will immediately lead to opening of the particular entry field:
[FREQUENCY]
opens the RF Frequency field, which is relevant in the RX
mask for the carrier frequency of the signal generator.
[LEVEL]
opens = the Level field, which momentarily determines
the level of the signal generator (–60 dBm into 50 Ω). [OFF]
switches the signal generator off when the Level field is
opened. [LEVEL] causes it to switch on again.
[MOD_FREQ]
opens the AF GEN A field (modulation generator GEN A)
and permits entry of the modulation frequency. [MOD_FREQ]
also compulsorily switches on GEN A.
[FM_AM_ÉM]
opens the Mod. field, which expects entry of the required
frequency deviation (FM is the default setting). The selected type of modulation is shown in the mask header (here:
RX FM). [FM_AM_ÉM] also compulsorily switches on generator
GEN A.
If you type values into the entry fields and transfer them with [ENTER], this
immediately triggers the corresponding reaction: the signal generator and the
modulation generator are set according to the entries. The same applies to all
other entry fields: the transfer of a valid value leads immediately to the corresponding setting on the 4032.
The four keys for fast access require consistent adherence to the operating rule,
namely that entries in numeric fields have to be terminated with [ENTER]. If you
strike the [FREQU] key for instance while the Mod. field is open, the Mod. field is
left and the RF Frequency field is opened. But if the Mod. field was open
because you had begun to enter a value with the numeric keys, this value will be
rejected. Reason: no confirmation with [ENTER].
11
11-15
RX Mask
Access to offset field
Access to offset field
Fast access is also possible to the Offset field. A value entered in this field detunes
the carrier frequency finely as is necessary for determining the IF bandwidth of a
receiver for example. Fast access to the Offset field presumes that the RF Frequency field is currently active. Then it is sufficient to initiate the entry of the offset
value by striking the minus or plus key: the Offset field is opened automatically and
the sign of the offset is entered correctly at the same time.
A frequency offset entered in the Offset field produces no reaction in the RF Frequency field. Here the originally selected carrier frequency is always displayed.
11-16
Handwheel instead of numerics block
RX Mask
Handwheel instead of numerics block
If you prefer to make settings in analog manner with a handwheel, you can still
do so. As a tribute to analog engineering the 4032 offers a quasianalog handwheel for varying entered values. In actual fact however, this is not just a modern
copy of a good old handwheel but a multifunctional control that assumes the tasks
of the numerics block, of the [ENTER] key and in part also those of the [UNIT/SCROLL]
key.
Now declare the RF Frequency field to be the active and opened field. If you
then slowly (!) turn the handwheel, this changes the value of the location marked
by the cursor, carry-overs being allowed for also. The position of the cursor
determines the degree of continuous frequency alteration by the handwheel: if
the cursor is far to the left, the resolution will be coarse, and if it is far to the right,
the resolution will be fine. Try it out just once for yourself, even though it may seem
trivial.
If you were thorough, you will now know that the finest resolution was not more
than 100 Hz. For carrier frequencies below 500 MHz, however, the data sheet
guarantees 50 Hz resolution. This is where the Offset field helps again. You can
open it with [+] (positiv offset) or [-] (negative offset).
"Multifunctional" would be an exaggeration if the quasianalog variation did not
offer a further speciality: variations of numeric values made with the handwheel
are valid immediately. So they require no confirmation with [ENTER], even if the
flashing cursor seems to indicate the opposite. This characteristic of the handwheel is of particular benefit if you wish to observe the effect of continuous variation
of the entry value on a measured result.
With each operation of the handwheel the entry confirmation [ENTER] is implicitly
executed. Striking the [ENTER] key is only necessary if you wish to move to another
entry field in the same line with the cursor keys. With the handwheel you can
access any numeric field that you have declared to be the active field. If the
current field is a scroll field, slow turning of the handwheel (left/right) calls up the
individual scroll variables.
11
11-17
RX Mask
Stepped alteration of frequency
Stepped alteration of frequency
To make your testing routines more rationalized, it would be of advantage if you
could alter the carrier frequency in any stepping width - the currently applicable
channel spacing for instance - simply by striking a key. And this is exactly what
the [STEP] key offers you. But to avoid any operator error, it does not react until the
RF Frequency field has been opened. If you have done this, with [FREQU] for
example, and then strike the [STEP] key, the 4032 will show the new STEP field
with the default value 0 kHz. For the first time you have thus discovered a hidden
numeric field. The flashing cursor indicates as usual that you can make an entry
in the field. So enter 20 for example and close the field:
<20> + [ENTER]
If you now tap the [+] or [-] key several times, the carrier frequency in the RF
Frequency field will increase or decrease by 20 kHz each time. At the same
time the STEP field opens again so that the stepping width could immediately be
changed. The value that was valid before is not replaced, however, until the new
value has been properly transferred with [ENTER].
The STEP mode of the two sign keys is maintained for as long as the STEP field is shown
inverted, ie is active. [HELP] produces no reaction with hidden numeric fields.
When you want to leave the STEP field, you can do so as usual with the cursor
keys but also with the keys for fast access. Just use [STEP] to move back to it. If
you think you will not be needing the STEP field for a longish period, you can
remove it from the mask with [OFF]. When it is called up again, STEP is given the
stepping width that was last valid. To make sure the field is not removed from the
mask by mistake, this can only be done while STEP is open.
Another way of quickly altering the carrier frequency in increments of the channel
spacing is to use channel numbers. The lesson "Training with DUPLEX Mask"
tells you more about this.
Stepped alteration of level
The STEP mode can also be assigned to the Level field for alteration of the
output level with a defined stepping width (in dB). The operating rules described
above apply in the same way. So to call up the STEP field, first the Level field
has to be opened, and then [STEP] will present you with the default value 0 dB.
The hidden numeric field STEP cannot be allocated simultaneously to the RF Frequency and Level fields.
11-18
Mixed numeric fields
RX Mask
Mixed numeric fields
Now it is time to find out about the last type of numeric field: select Level as the
active field and then strike the [UNIT/SCROLL] key several times. This opens the field
and shows in alternating fashion the values 223 µV, –60.0 dBm and
47.0 dBµ: the value of -60 dBm originally selected is converted into dBµ and
dbm units. So you can have the level shown in the units you are accustomed to
using. The selected units are kept until you change them again. Level is a mixed
numeric field, meaning that you can determine both the numeric value and the
units.
If you want to key a numeric value into the Level field, you do not necessarily
have to select the required units µV/mV, dBm or dBµ beforehand with
[UNIT/SCROLL]. It is also possible to call up the matching units with [UNIT/SCROLL] after
the numeric value has been entered. In this case there is no conversion. Conversion is only made as long as you have not yet started to enter a numeric value in
the Level field. This conversion mode, by the way, is an exclusive feature of the
Level field, it is not a general feature of mixed numeric fields.
Mod. is also a mixed numeric field. If you move to it with [FM_AM_ÉM] for example
and then enquire with [UNIT/SCROLL], it will alternately show 2.40 rad, 30.0 %
and 2.40 kHz. These are the default values of phase deviation, modulation
depth and frequency deviation. By selecting the units (radian, percent or kilohertz) you specify the type of modulation that is valid. In the mask header,
corresponding to the units, the abbreviation of the selected modulation (ΦM, AM
or FM) appears after RX. In this field too it is possible to enter the numeric value
first and then to assign the units with [UNIT/SCROLL].
As mentioned before, one of the specialities of the RX and DUPLEX mask is that
you can switch the AF generator to the RX or TX signal path by repeatedly tapping
[GEN_A]. When the TX signal path is switched through, the numeric field Lev.
replaces the Mod. field and now influences the level of GEN A directly (not
indirectly by way of the required modulation). But now the signal generator is no
longer modulated, instead the AF signal is output on the MOD GEN socket (front
panel) and on socket 29 (rear panel). Find out more about the Lev. field in the
next lesson.
If you want to, now try to track down the third mixed numeric field of the RX mask.
All you have to do is to see whether an active field reacts in the typical manner to
[UNIT/SCROLL] by changing its units.
11
11-19
RX Mask
Softkeys of RX mask
No doubt you will soon find out that it is the RF Frequency field, which betrays
itself as a mixed numeric field with the "units" NoL, NoU and MHz. NoL and
NoU have to do with duplex operation of a radio set (communication in both
directions at the same time). The abbreviation NoL indicates a channel in the
Lower band and NoU one in the Upper band. So you can enter a channel spacing
on the 4032 and then (in any basic mask) work with channel numbers instead of
frequency values. Further details of this (see "Training with DUPLEX Mask") are
unimportant at the moment.
Now you know all the different entry fields of the 4032 and most of the controls of the front
panel, so you are well on the way to using the 4032 for your first tests.
Softkeys of RX mask
To restore the STABILOCK 4032 to a defined initial status, it is best if you now
start it up again with a total reset and call up the RX mask. When you change from
the status mask to the RX mask, you can see very easily how the softkeys are
assigned different functions. Reminder: the brightened up fields at the bottom
edge of the screen show the functions of the softkeys that are momentarily
offered. This means that an offered function does not become effective until you
tap the softkey associated with it. This seemingly banal rule of operation is very
important for proper use of the 4032. And an example will show why this is so:
Softkey S1
If you tap softkey S1 several times, the function associated with it will change from
{RF_DIR} to {RF} and back again. At the same time the display in the numeric field
Level changes between, for example, 10 µV and 100 µV. Reason: with S1
you couple in the RF field (front panel) either the RF DIRECT socket or the RF
socket to the RF input/output stage of the 4032. A 20-dB attenuator in the signal
path to the RF socket causes the jump in level that you have observed in the
Level field.
When the RF DIRECT socket is coupled, this is underscored by a LED allocated
to the socket. However, softkey S1 does not present the function {RF_DIR}, but {RF}
instead. This is not a contradiction, because the rule of operation says: ...an
offered function does not become effective until you tap the softkey associated
with it. So if this is not done, the alternative function remains activated: and the
alternative function to {RF} is {RF_DIR}.
11-20
Softkeys of RX mask
RX Mask
Softkey S2
{EMF_CONT} is the default function assigned to softkey S2. If you call this function
up with {EMF_CONT}, the hidden numeric field CONT (default 0 dB) will appear next
to the Level field and at the same time the function of softkey S2 is renamed
{CONT_OFF}. A value can now be entered in the numeric field CONT (max.: 20). After
confirmation of the entry with [ENTER] the level of the signal generator - starting
from the level that is momentarily set - is reduced by the CONT value. What is
special about this level reduction is that interruptions, as normally occur in
mechanical setting of the attenuator set (chain of precision attenuator pads), are
excluded. And that is just what is important when measuring the response of the
squelch in a receiver. {CONT_OFF} cancels the CONT function and the level takes
on its original value. If amplitude modulation is selected (mask header: RX AM),
the CONT field cannot be displayed.
The Level field does not react to the level reduction by the CONT field. The actual output
level of the signal generator is the sum of the values in the fields Level and CONT, eg
–60 dBm + –15 dBm = –75 dBm. If the value in the CONT field is altered with the
handwheel, this will produce continuous variation of level.
Softkey S3
The 4032 indicates the momentary output level of the signal generator either as
an EMF value or as the terminal voltage into 50 Ω (default setting). A glance at
the numeric field Level will show you quite unmistakeably that the default setting
is still valid. The alternative display is Level/EMF. If you now try to call up the
EMF function with {EMF} however, the 4032 will only react with a warning signal.
Reason: the momentary level value is in dBm units. And these units only apply
with reference to a defined load impedance (here 50 Ω). The EMF has no relation
to the load impedance, so it can never be in dBm units. If you choose one of the
other units (eg µV) for the numeric field Level, {EMF} will produce display of the
EMF value. [UNIT/SCROLL] will then no longer offer dBm as the units until the function
{50_Á} is called up again with S3.
11
11-21
RX Mask
Softkeys of RX mask
Softkey S4
If you call up the {SPECIAL} function with S4, you are taken to a mask in which the
softkeys are assigned new functions. {SENS}, {BANDW}, {AF_RESP} and {SQUELCH}
produce entry fields for setting individual test parameters. {RUN} starts a measurement with the set parameters, {RETURN} takes you back to the basic mask.
The SPECIAL functions automatically execute complete measuring sequences.
All necessary settings on the 4032 are produced under programmed control allowing for the individual test parameters. After just a few seconds you can then
read the result of the measurement on the screen. In the testing of receivers the
"Specials" perform the following measurements:
{SENS}
Measurement of input sensitivity
{BANDW.}
Measurement of IF bandwidth and centre-frequency offset
{AF_RESP.}
Measurement of AF response
{SQUELCH}
Measurement of squelch characteristic
First take a look at the individual entry fields for setting the special test parameters. Just tap alternately the softkeys S1 through S4. [HELP] will then reveal the
new entry fields in the bottom half of the RX mask and [UNIT/SCROLL] clarifies
whether they are pure or mixed numeric fields or scroll fields. Then call up the
basic RX mask again with {RETURN}. Practical information about working with the
SPECIAL functions is given in Chapters 4.
Softkey S6
The analog indication of a measured value presents the advantage, compared to
a numeric digital display, that you can immediately recognize any trend in the way
a measured value changes. For this reason the 4032 shows important measured
quantities not only numerically but also on simulated analog meters. The 4032
displays as many as three such analog meters in the bottom half of each basic
mask. Now try to produce a full-format display of one of these meters with {ZOOM}.
First you are taken to the new softkey functions {POWER}, {MOD} and {RMS}. These
are the brief designations of the three meters that you can zoom, ie produce a
magnified display of.
If you call up one of these functions, the 4032 will present the appropriate meter
in large format, and the softkeys again assume different functions with which you
can influence what the meter displays. But do not try this yet, call up the basic RX
mask again with {RETURN}. The lesson "Analog Instruments" goes into the details
of this later on.
11-22
Objectives
TX Mask
TX Mask
Objectives
•
•
•
•
•
Familiarization with TX mask
"Switching" between RX and TX masks
Performing frequency measurements
Familiarization with influence of squelch
Initial contact with "TX Specials"
Callup of TX mask
Start up the 4032 anew with a total reset and - as soon as the status mask
appears - press the [TX] key on the RF field. Now you have called up the TX mask
(with its default settings). From this point on you can change between the RX
mask and the TX mask at any time simply by striking the [RX] or [TX] key on the
RF field.
When you change between the basic masks RX, TX and DUPLEX (option), the
4032 stores important entered values and device settings before each such
change. When a mask is called up again therefore, the Communication Test Set
always takes on the same operating status that was current before the same
mask was exited from.
Indication of operating status
The LEDs on the front panel signal the default settings of the 4032 for transmitter
measurements:
Key
LED
Meaning
[TX]
(red)
TX mode selected (transmitter measurement)
[VOLT]
(yellow)
RMS voltmeter activated
[VOLTM]
(yellow)
VOLTM socket is input of voltmeter
[GEN_A]
(green)
Modulation generator GEN A is activated in TX mode;
signal is on MOD GEN socket (see lines on front panel)
11
11-23
TX Mask
Entry fields of TX mask
Entry fields of TX mask
[HELP]
shows that, as usual, you can access three entry fields in the TX mask:
RF Frequency
This mixed numeric field determines the receive frequency
to which the internal test receiver is tuned. [UNIT/SCROLL]
produces here too a change between MHz, NoU and NoL.
AF GEN A
This pure numeric field is again decisive for the frequency
of the modulation signal (GEN A). The signal of the generator is now output on the MOD GEN socket; it modulates
the carrier signal of the device under test.
Lev.
Your entry in this mixed numeric field determines the level
of the modulation signal (GEN A). [UNIT/SCROLL] permits,
before transfer of the level value with [ENTER], selection
between mV, V or dBm. After transfer of the value (field
closed) [UNIT/SCROLL] can be used to select the type of
demodulation (TX FM, TX ΦM or TX AM).
Just like in the RX mask, the opened RF Frequency field can be assigned the
hidden STEP numeric field. The operating rules are the same.
Offset field of TX mask
In contrast to the RX mask, the Offset field of the TX mask is not an entry field
but a display field. What it displays is the frequency offset of the applied signal
(RF or RF DIRECT socket) referred to the frequency to which the internal test
receiver is tuned (RF Frequency field). The offset field indicates frequency
offsets up to about ±100 kHz with the accuracy stated in the data sheet. If there
is no input signal, as is the case at the moment, the display field will only show
dashes (----).
The following applies to each mask: if a display field or a simulated analog meter indicates
just dashes instead of a measured value, then either the test signal is missing or its level
is too small for correct measurement. The display >>>>>> on the other hand means that
the measurement range is exceeded.
If the RF DIRECT socket is coupled, the test receiver of the 4032 is very sensitive.
When the RF DIRECT socket is open-circuit therefore, completely random values
may be indicated, eg in the offset field.
11-24
RF frequency measurement
TX Mask
RF frequency measurement
The offset field is not the only display field of the TX mask: the numeric field RF
Frequency may also become a display field and show the frequency of the RF
signal applied to the RF socket (see data sheet for specifications of RF frequency
counter). The RF frequency counter is called up with {COUNT}. If COUNT is selected,
you can access the remaining entry fields of the TX mask in the usual manner.
The alternative function to {COUNT} is {OFFSET}; this takes you back to the measurement of offset.
As long as COUNT is activated, the test receiver of the 4032 is automatically
retuned to the measured frequency. When the frequency counter is switched off
with {OFFSET} therefore, the frequency last measured is taken into the numeric field
RF Frequency. In this way you can tune the test receiver precisely to the
frequency of an (unknown) RF input signal. The offset field may afterwards still
show a residual offset of up to ±40 Hz. This residual offset is a result of the
different resolution of the frequency counter compared to the format for frequency
entry in the RF Frequency field.
The risk of the frequency counter indicating the frequency of an harmonic instead
of the frequency of the fundamental is very slight. There is only danger of an
erroneous measurement of this kind if three boundary conditions are simultaneously fulfilled:
1) the input signal contains a lot of harmonics;
2) the frequency of the input signal is an even-numbered fraction of the tuned
frequency of the test receiver;
3) the boundary condition described under 2) does not occur until after the
COUNT function is called up.
Any doubt about the correctness of a frequency measurement can thus be
eliminated with {OFFSET} + {COUNT}. The brief switching off of the frequency counter
means that the third boundary condition for an erroneous measurement is no
longer fulfilled when the measurement is repeated.
Internal squelch
If you have selected the RF socket, an internal squelch is active when the TX FM
or TX ΦM mask (frequency and phase modulation) is called up. The squelch
blocks the input signal if it goes below a level of about -40 dBm (2.23 mV). The
risk of erroneous measurements is thus eliminated and bothersome acoustics
are suppressed. This squelch is not effective in TX AM measurements, and it is
always cut out when you use the RF DIRECT socket.
11-25
11
TX Mask
Softkeys of TX mask
Softkeys of TX mask
You are already acquainted with the softkeys RF DIR and ZOOM because both
have the same effect as in the RX mask. And the function of the COUNT softkey
(S2) has just been dealt with under "RF frequency measurement".
Softkey S3
{PEAKHOLD}
Refers to the DEMOD pointer meter (indicates the modulation deviation or depth of an RF input signal). {PEAKHOLD}
causes the largest value measured to be stored. There are
more details of this in the lesson "Training with Analog
Instruments".
Softkey S4
{SPECIAL}
Takes you, just as in the RX mask, to a submask with new
softkey functions. Two of these functions again enable
complete measuring sequences to be executed under program control:
{SENS}
Measurement of modulation sensitivity
{AF_RESP}
Measurement of modulation frequency response
{SEL.PWR}
Produces the display of an analog meter of the same name
in the submask. This instrument shows in analog and
numeric form the result of a selective, low-power RF measurement. SEL.PWR has the alternative function VSWR,
which displays the voltage standing-wave ratio.
{DC-CAL.}
Produces DC zero adjustment of the FM demodulator in
the 4032. This adjustment is necessary if the zero of the
demodulated signal is of importance. A shift in the zero
means, in the transmission of data telegrams by an NRZ
method (C Net radiotelephones) for example, that the data
bits 1 and 0 can no longer be clearly distinguished.
Softkey S5
{+20_dB}
11-26
Increases the level of modulation generator GEN A by a
factor of 10. {-20_dB} (alternative function) reduces the level
again to its original value. The level indicated in the Lev.
entry field follows both jumps in level. The +20 dB function
simplifies the checking of deviation limiting in transmitter
tests.
Objectives
Analog Instruments
Analog Instruments
Objectives
•
•
•
Specifying display of individual instruments
Feeding instruments with test signals
"Zooming" instruments and selecting measurement ranges
In the top half of each basic mask you primarily make settings on the instrumentation of the 4032. The bottom half of a basic mask on the other hand is reserved
for the presentation of the measured results. Here the 4032 - depending on the
basic mask that is selected - can display as many as three different measured
values simultaneously on simulated pointer meters. The following table shows for
what measured values you can produce a quasianalog indication (in brackets:
instrument designations):
RX mask
AF level
Distortion
Modulation
SINAD
RF power
(RMS/dBr)
(DIST)
(MOD)
(SINAD)
(PWR)
TX mask
AF level
Distortion
Modulation
RF power
Offset
(RMS/dBr)
(DIST)
(DEMOD)
(PWR)
(OFFSET)
DUPLEX mask
AF level
Distortion
Modulation
RF power
Offset
SINAD
(RMS/dBr)
(DIST)
(DEMOD)
(PWR)
(OFFSET)
(SINAD)
You yourself determine for the most part what instruments are displayed in a
mask. Note: each instrument displayed is immediately operative and does not
have to be "switched on" first.
Instruments of RX mask
The RX mask can display three instruments, but after startup with a total reset
only the RMS instrument (dBr is an alternative designation) is shown initially
(default).
RMS/dBr instrument
The RMS meter is one of the AF instruments of the 4032. It indicates the voltage
(RMS value) of the momentary AF test signal (see data sheet for specifications
of voltmeter). The measured value is presented simultaneously in quasianalog
and numeric form by the meter; it also indicates the frequency of the test signal.
11-27
11
Analog Instruments
Instruments of RX mask
In the AF field (front panel) of the 4032 you can determine with the three keys
[VOLTM], [DEMOD] and [RX_MOD/MOD_GEN] what AF test signal goes to the AF meters
RMS/dBr, DIST and SINAD. These interlocked keys are assigned LEDs that show
which of the three signals is being measured at any time:
[VOLTM]
(default setting) selects - independently of the basic mask
(RX, TX or DUPLEX) - the signal that is fed in on the socket
of the same name in the AF field. Normally the VOLTM
socket will be connected to the AF output of a receiver.
[DEMOD]
selects the internally demodulated signal that - in transmitter testing - results from a modulated carrier signal fed in
on the RF or RF DIRECT socket (RF field). So DEMOD
cannot be activated in receiver testing (RX mask).
[RX_MOD/MOD_GEN]
selects the modulation signal of the activated modulationsignal source(s) (GEN A and EXT plus optionally GEN B).
Tap the [RX_MOD/MOD_GEN] key. If an uncomfortably loud 1-kHz signal then sounds,
turn the control in the AF field of the front panel to the left. The RMS meter will
then show the AF level (approx. 335 mV) plus the frequency (1.000 kHz) of
modulation generator GEN A an. Now why are precisely these values displayed?
If you remember, the activation of GEN A is a default setting that is made when
the 4032 is started up with a totel reset. And, because the RX mask with its default
values is currently active, the internal modulator must be fed with this 335 mV
(RMS) so that the 150-MHz carrier (RF Frequency field) is modulated with a
deviation of 2.4 kHz (Mod. field). This means that any alteration of the frequency
deviation will also alter the level of modulation generator GEN A.
Try this out for yourself. Alter the frequency deviation (best with the handwheel)
in the Mod. entry field or the modulation frequency in the AF GEN A entry field:
the RMS meter will respond to this immediately. And it is the same if you operate
the GEN A key in the generator field of the front panel, thus switching off
modulation generator GEN A (LED extinguishes). Operating [GEN_A] again switches the generator back on.
If more than one modulation generator is activated (superimposed modulation), the RMS
voltmeter will show the RMS value of the sum signal.
11-28
Instruments of RX mask
Analog Instruments
Level measurement with reference value
The RMS/dBr meter can declare the displayed level to be the reference value and
display changes in level in dB referred to this value (relative level measurement).
In this way you can very quickly determine the -3-dB point in a level measurement
for instance.
You can declare a displayed level as the reference value simply by striking the
[dB_REL/VOLT] key in the AF field (the request for operation according to the agreed
notation is [dB_REL]). This causes the associated LED to illuminate and the RMS
meter is renamed "dBr". The meter then automatically sets the 0-dB point at about
75 % of the scale length and also displays in numeric form the relative level value
plus the frequency of the test signal. Any change in level of the test signal
compared to the reference value can now be read off in dB. Try it yourself by
declaring modulation generator GEN A to be the signal source with
[RX_MOD/MOD_GEN], switching to relative level measurement with [dB_REL] and then
again altering the level of the modulation generator indirectly by way of the
frequency deviation (Mod. entry field ). In condensed form, according to the
agreed notation, this relatively complex operation is thus as follows:
1.
[RX_MOD/MOD_GEN]
GEN A becomes test-signal source.
2.
[dB_REL]
Switch RMS voltmeter to dBr.
3.
[FM_AM_ÉM]
Mod. field becomes active field and GEN A
is switched on.
4. <value>
Alter frequency deviation in Mod. field, eg
by turning handwheel (then no
confirmation necessary with [ENTER]).
If you alter the frequency deviation by a considerable amount, you can clearly
observe on the dBr meter the automatic range switching of the quasianalog result
display. All analog instruments of the 4032 have this automatic range switching
as a default setting.
[VOLT] changes the name of the dBr meter back to "RMS", the reference level of
the dBr measurement being deleted. This means that if you call up the dBr meter
again with [dB_REL], the level last shown by the RMS meter will be the new
reference value.
Instrument zooming
The 4032 offers expanded display of the simulated analog meters especially for
on-the-job servicing. This can be particularly useful if the Communication Test Set
cannot be set down right next to the device under test because there is not
enough space. The full-format display of the meter that is required at any time can
be read quite accurately from some distance away.
11-29
11
Analog Instruments
Instruments of RX mask
In training with the RX mask it was already mentioned that the magnification of a
meter is initiated with {ZOOM}. Before you start to zoom, make sure that the initial
situation is as follows:
Modulation generator GEN A is the signal source; the RMS voltmeter indicates
approx. 335 mVrms (corresponding to 2.4 kHz frequency deviation). {ZOOM} then
takes you to the new softkey functions {POWER}, {MOD} and {RMS} (or {dBr} if the dBr
meter is called up). {RETURN} is for returning to the softkey functions of the basic
RX mask.
With {POWER}, {MOD} or {RMS} you can now display the appropriate meter in full
format on the screen. But first simply strike {RMS}.
Defining measurement range
The RMS meter now occupies almost the whole screen and the softkeys are
assigned the new functions {RANGE} and {AUTO}. {RETURN}, as usual, takes you back
to the basic mask.
First to the field in the bottom right corner of the zoom display: this is the entry
field that was last active in the basic RX mask. The zoom display adopts this field,
which still permits entries, eg altering values with the handwheel. In this way it is
possible to observe the effect of any change of parameter on the full-format
pointer meter.
If you now call up the {AUTO} function (automatic selection of measurement range)
with {AUTO}, you will not notice any reaction. For good reason, because the
function is the default and therefore already active. The purpose of this is to make
the pointer of the meter always show the value that is actually measured, ie the
pointer never gets stuck at the ends of the scale. Sometimes it is best not to have
automatic range switching however. For example, when the rated value for an
adjustment is better in the middle of the scale. The 4032 satisfies this requirement
with the softkey {RANGE}.
As soon as you call up the RANGE function with {RANGE}, the two numeric fields
Center (mixed numeric field) and Range +/- (pure numeric field) appear in
the top part of the meter. You can access both fields as usual with the cursor keys.
11-30
Instruments of RX mask
Analog Instruments
The value in the Center entry field tells the RMS meter at what level the pointer
is at centre scale. After entry of the numeric value the units V or mV can be
selected with [UNIT/SCROLL]. To start with, enter a value in the CENTER field that is
10 mV larger than the level momentarily displayed in numeric form (entered value
approx. 345 mV). Then confirm this entry with [ENTER]. The pointer of the meter
will immediately go to the lefthand stop.
Reason: in the Range +/- field there is still the default value 1.00. This means
that the RMS meter momentarily has a measurement range of 345 mV ±1.00 mV
(lefthand stop 344 mV, righthand stop 346 mV). So open the Range +/- field to
match the measurement range to the momentary level of approx. 335 mV.
<20> + [ENTER], for example, would be the entry to expand the measurement
range to 325 through 365 mV. The RANGE function thus offers you the possibility
of adapting the resolution of a meter to your requirements at any time.
If you return to the basic mask with {RETURN} on the other hand, the automatic
range switching becomes compulsory again. The defined measurement range is
maintained for the large-format display. You can easily check this by zooming the
RMS meter again. Nor is the measurement range deleted if you subsequently call
up the {AUTO} function, because {RANGE} always restores the old status. The values
can only be deleted by selecting a new measurement range.
Each analog instrument of the 4032 can be shown on the screen in full format (see also
chapter 4). The large-format presentation can always be linked with a measurement
range of your choice. Exception: the OFFSET meter (TX or DUPLEX mask) only offers
automatic range switching.
11
11-31
Analog Instruments
Instruments of RX mask
DIST instrument
The DIST (distortion) meter is displayed in the RX mask in addition to the RMS
meter as soon as you strike the [DIST] key in the AF field of the front panel (the
associated LED illuminates, the VOLT LED extinguishes). The distortion that is
then indicated in analog and numeric form must be clearly below 1 % because
the meter is showing the distortion of the signal from modulation generator GEN
A (according to the data sheet < 1 %). You have already selected this generator
as the signal source for the RMS meter. That means:
The current AF signal source simultaneously feeds all AF instruments displayed by a
basic mask. So you always have - in the RX mask in particular - the major parameters of
an AF signal within view. Regardless of the basic mask the AF instruments have the
designations "RMS/dBr", "DIST" and "SINAD".
The DIST meter measures the distortion (see data sheet for specifications of
distortion meter) referred to a notch frequency of 1 kHz. For this reason the
momentary measurement is correct because, according to the frequency display
on the RMS meter, the signal of the modulation generator (fundamental) is
exactly 1 kHz (defined in the AF GEN A field). Furthermore, the level of approximately 335 mV is clearly above the minimum called for in the data sheet.
Measurement of the distortion is possible at other notch frequencies with the
OPTION CARD (fitted with a variable notch filter).
After {ZOOM} the softkeys change to {POWER}, {MOD} and {DIST} and do not show the
former functions {POWER}, {MOD} and {RMS}. It is obvious that {DIST} enlarges the
meter DIST to full screen size and {RANGE} defines the measuring range. So far
so good - but how can we now zoom the RMS meter having no softkey function
{RMS} available? No problem, because the [VOLT] key will do the job. In the basic
mask the former softkey functions are available after [VOLT] + {ZOOM}.
However, you do not necessarily need to return to the basic mask. If, for instance,
you choose the zoomed display of the DIST meter, [VOLT] will then directly zoom
in the RMS meter. This direct access requires the following condition: One of the
meters dBr, RMS, DIST, or SINAD has to be zoomed in, if another meter needs
to be displayed in zoomed mode using the corresponding keys of the AF section
(front panel).
11-32
Instruments of RX mask
Analog Instruments
SINAD instrument
You have now found out the level, the frequency and the distortion of the "test
signal" produced by generator GEN A. If you next call up the SINAD function
([BEAT/SINAD] key), the 4032 will also present the SINAD ratio of the test signal. The
SINAD (Signal Noise and Distortion) ratio is related to the S/N (Signal to Noise)
ratio but makes special allowance for the distortion of the test signal.
SINAD causes the associated green LED to illuminate because the measurement is only necessary in the RX or DUPLEX mode (the alternative function
BEAT can only be called up in the TX mode). At the same time the yellow LED
associated with DIST extinguishes and the DIST meter is replaced on the screen
by the SINAD meter. The RMS meter is not affected in any way by this change.
You can observe the effect of the distortion on this measurement by gradually
altering the AF frequency (AF GEN A field), which again is best done with the
handwheel. This seems to increase the distortion because the notch frequency
of the now hidden but active distortion meter remains fixed at 1 kHz. You can
check the increase in distortion in between by switching off the SINAD meter and
switching on the DIST meter with [DIST]. Of course the SINAD meter can also be
zoomed in the usual way and a measurement range can be defined with {RANGE}.
The RMS or the dBr meter is always displayed in the basic RX mask. As a second AF
meter you may choose either the DIST or SINAD meter. Other possible combinations are
explained for each basic mask in Chapter 4.
11
11-33
Analog Instruments
Instruments of RX mask
MOD instrument
The MOD meter shows the modulation depth or deviation of the generator signal
depending on the selected modulation (AM, FM, ΦM). The numeric display
indicates the positive and negative peaks, the analog display shows the amounts
of these values. If the modulation is exactly balanced therefore, only one pointer
will be seen on the MOD meter. Unbalanced modulation produces a two-pointer
display.
The sources of the modulation signals are the modulation generators GEN A,
GEN B (option) or an external modulation generator (EXT). These three sources
can also feed the internal modulator simultaneously (superimposed modulation).
The MOD meter then shows the resulting modulation peaks.
Up to now the MOD meter has been rare in the RX mask, simply offering the
softkey function {MOD} every time you called up {ZOOM}. But now zoom the MOD
meter. In large format you will see the value of the momentary peak deviation
(about 2.4 kHz). Actually this is superfluous because this deviation is held as a
setting value anyway in the Mod. entry field of the RX mask. And that is why the
RX mask only shows the MOD meter when the following condition applies:
When the input for an external modulation signal (EXT MOD socket) is activated
with [EXT] (generator field) and therefore the indicated peak value no longer
necessarily corresponds to the set value.
Try it by striking the EXT key. The associated LED will illuminate green and the
MOD meter will move into place. But seeing as there is no external modulation
generator connected, the meter will still show 2.4 kHz deviation because of the
internal modulation generator GEN A.
In receiver measurements (RX mask) you can call up the MOD meter quite
independently of the selected AF signal source, ie also when the signal fed in on
the VOLTM socket is relevant for the AF meters. In this way it is possible to
examine the AF output signal of a radio set together with the - likewise displayed
- modulation of the generator signal.
11-34
Instruments of RX mask
Analog Instruments
[EXT] has - no doubt you have noticed it - caused the new entry field EXT to appear
in the top half of the RX mask (check with [HELP]). This is a scroll field with the
scroll variables DC coupled and AC coupled. So by selecting a scroll
variable you can specify whether the external modulation signal to the modulator
is DC coupled or AC coupled. In the TX mode the EXT MOD socket is always AC
coupled, so the EXT field in this mask is a display field.
The two-pointer display (unbalanced modulation deviation) can be produced despite the very slight unbalance of the internal modulator - by showing the MOD
meter in full format and selecting very fine resolution with {RANGE} (suggested
entries: Center 2.4 kHz; Range 0.10).
11
11-35
Analog Instruments
Instruments of RX mask
PWR instrument
The PWR instrument is an RF power meter (see data sheet for specifications;
maximum permissible power: see Chapter 1). What is displayed is the average value
(in case of AM: peak value) of the power applied to the RF socket (RF field). The meter
measures broadband, ie it is independent of the entry in the RF Frequency field.
The measuring head of the PWR meter directly follows the RF socket; so it does
not detect any signals that are applied to the RF DIRECT socket. For the same
reason the PWR meter still receives the test signal if a switch is made with softkey
S1 to the RF DIRECT socket but the test signal is applied to the RF socket.
Normally no measurement of RF power is necessary in receiver testing (RX
mask). But the 4032 can switch automatically from receiver to transmitter test and
vice versa (AUTO SIMPLEX mode). This is governed by the RF input power on
socket RF: if it exceeds approx. 30 mW the 4032 will switch automatically from
the RX mask to the TX mask (transmitter measurement). Then, as soon as the
input power falls below 20 mW, the RX mask is called up again without any further
ado. So the radio set itself can switch the 4032 to the operating mode that is called
for. You will find out more about this later on.
For checking the switching thresholds, the 4032 also shows the RF input power
in the RX mode. But since this value is very rarely called for in receiver measurements, you can only zoom the PWR meter and not produce it in the basic RX
mask.
When you are specifying a measurement range in the large-format display of the PWR
meter, call up the required units with [UNIT/SCROLL] in the Center entry field.
11-36
Instruments of RX mask
Analog Instruments
Weighting with CCITT filter
The CCITT P53-A filter is responsible for psophometric weighting of an AF signal,
ie it allows for the response of human hearing to different frequencies. The ear is
considerably more sensitive to signals in the range about 1 kHz, for example, than
to signals of say 100 Hz or 10 kHz. The CCITT filter takes this into consideration
by attenuating AF signal components of lower and higher frequency with its
precisely defined filter curve. Interfering signals that fall within the ranges of
attenuation are thus less marked than in an unweighted measurement. A number
of measurement specifications, like those for weighted signal/noise ratio, expressly call for a weighted measurement.
Fig. 11.4: CCITT filter curve:
The P53-A weighting filter
allows for the frequency response of the human ear.
In receiver testing you can, if you wish, perform weighted measurements of level,
SINAD and distortion. All you have to do is to tap the [CCITT] key in the AF field of
the front panel. The yellow LED will then illuminate; the label FLT is added to the
meter designations "RMS" or "dBr", "SINAD" and "DIST" to avoid any confusion
with unweighted measurement. Tapping the [CCITT] key once more cuts the filter
out of the signal path.
Congratulations. You are now working so well with the analog instruments of the RX mask
that the remainder of this lesson is a mere trifle.
11
11-37
Analog Instruments
Instruments of TX mask
Instruments of TX mask
Start up the 4032 anew with a total reset and call up the TX mask with [TX]. This
presents you with the new DEMOD meter in addition to the familiar RMS/dBr and
PWR meters. The ZOOM function is again assigned to softkey S6. This is
reassuring, as is the fact that the keys of the AF and generator fields on the front
panel remain virtually unaltered in what they do. There are just two differences
from the RX mask:
[DEMOD] additionally selects the transmitter signal demodulated in the 4032 as a
test signal for the RMS/dBr and DIST meters. The DEMOD meter, on the other
hand, is always fed with the demodulated transmitter signal, independently of the
signal source that is selected.
Only the BEAT function can now be called up with the [BEAT/SINAD] key. [BEAT]
makes it possible to monitor the beat that results from heterodyning the applied
transmitter signal with the signal of the generator. If the function is not called up,
the test signal switched through to the AF instruments can be monitored on the
loudspeaker. [BEAT] does not produce the display of a meter on the screen.
RMS/dBr instrument
In the TX mask the RMS/dBr meter retains all the functions described before,
including that of weighted measurement (CCITT). If you strike the RX MOD/MOD
GEN key for example, the RMS meter will indicate about 20 mVrms. Reason: in
the TX mask too, modulation generator GEN A is active by default (the red LED
is now illuminated) and with [RX_MOD/MOD_GEN] you have made it the current signal
source. The level of 20 mV is again a default value, defined in the mixed numeric
field Lev. of the TX mask. You can alter the value as usual and observe the
reaction on the meter. Whereas before, in the RX mask, you only altered the level
indirectly by way of the frequency deviation, you can now do it directly.
DIST instrument
The DIST meter removes the RMS meter following [DIST] and measures the
distortion of the AF signal source that is momentarily active (VOLTM, DEMOD or
MOD GEN). [CCITT] permits weighted measurement.
11-38
Instruments of TX mask
Analog Instruments
DEMOD instrument
On this meter you can read the modulation depth or deviation of the applied
transmitter signal (peak values), similarly to the case before with the MOD meter.
Speciality: softkey S3 determines for frequency- and phase-modulated signals
whether the largest peak deviation that is measured is held on the display
({PEAKHOLD} function) or the meter always presents the momentary value that is
measured ({NORM} function). For amplitude-modulated signals there is a small
restriction with {PEAKHOLD}: modulation peaks that come in the pause between two
samplings by the DEMOD meter are not detected.
For {PEAKHOLD} the same applies as before: the offered softkey function does not
become effective until you strike the softkey. If you can read {PEAKHOLD} for
instance, then {NORM} is momentarily selected.
The {PEAKHOLD} function should be called up if modulated signals only appear
briefly, as with the tone sequences in selective calling for instance. You can then
read the peak deviation on the DEMOD meter even though the modulation has
long disappeared.
PWR instrument
The PWR meter has the same function as described before. It only appears on
the screen if the RF socket is chosen as the input.
OFFSET instrument
If the frequency of the applied transmit signal deviates from its rating, this results
in a frequency offset (difference between rated and actual values). The 4032
indicates the frequency offset numerically in the Offset display field. If the
frequency offset is to be set to zero in the course of adjustment, you can also call
up the OFFSET meter with {ZOOM} + {OFFSET}: this shows the offset additionally in
quasianalog form, the zero point being in the centre of the scale.
So far so good. You now know virtually all analog instruments of the 4032 and should
manage fine with the concrete instructions for measurements in chapter 4. But the subject
of analog instruments is by no means finally wrapped up, because you are not yet
acquainted with the special mask GENERAL PARAMETERS. But that will soon be taken
care of by the lesson "Parameter Mask". Then you will also be able to call up the AF POWER
meter.
11
11-39
Training with DUPLEX Mask
Objectives
Training with DUPLEX Mask
Objectives
•
•
•
•
Callup of DUPLEX mask
Callup of AUTO SIMPLEX mode
Familiarization with DUPLEX mode
Operating rules for entering channel numbers
You can only call up the DUPLEX mask if your 4032 is fitted with the optional
DUPLEX FM/ΦM demodulator. If your set does not have this, you should still take
the trouble to work through this lesson. The callup of the AUTO SIMPLEX mode
is not specific to the DUPLEX option. And the operating rules for entering channel
numbers apply - in very much simplified form - to the RX and TX masks as well.
Main feature of DUPLEX mode
Up to now you have only got to know the simplex mode of the 4032. This means
that you could call up manually either the RX mask for receiver testing or the TX
mask for transmitter testing. These permit all measurements to be made on radio
sets that alternately transmit and receive on one and the same channel (simplex
communication).
Duplex radio sets transmit and receive on different channels simultaneously
(duplex communication). This means that the 4032 must also be able to transmit
and receive simultaneously. You select this operating mode of the Communication
Test Set by calling up the DUPLEX mask. The mask is to a certain extent
composed of the major parts of the RX and TX masks and consequently there
are hardly any new operating rules.
Callup of DUPLEX mask
Produce a defined starting situation again with a total reset and, when the status
mask appears, briefly strike the key located between the [RX] and [TX] keys. This
calls up the DUPLEX mask with the dual designation RX FM and TX FM in the
mask header. The yellow (upper) LED "DUPLEX" in the RF field illuminates to
show you have the DUPLEX mask.
11-40
AUTO SIMPLEX mode
Training with DUPLEX Mask
Now you can call up one of the other two basic masks with [TX] or [RX] as usual.
And the DUPLEX mask can simply be called up from the RX or TX mask by just
striking the key in the middle once. But if the DUPLEX mask has already been
called up when you strike the middle key, this will put the 4032 (after a brief pause)
into the AUTO SIMPLEX mode (automatic switching between the RX and TX
masks). This mode is signalled in the RF field by simultaneous illumination of the
lower yellow LED and the RX LED.
Striking the middle key several times calls up the modes DUPLEX, AUTO SIMPLEX,
SIMPLEX one after the other. In the AUTO SIMPLEX mode the lower of the two yellow
LEDs in the RF field will illuminate together with the RX or TX LED.
AUTO SIMPLEX mode
The AUTO SIMPLEX mode was briefly mentioned earlier on in conjunction with
the PWR meter: what triggers the automatic switchover between the RX and TX
masks is the RF input power on the RF socket. If it exceeds about 30 mW, the
4032 switches automatically from receiver to transmitter testing. If you now select
AUTO SIMPLEX, the 4032 will automatically present the RX mask as long as the
appropriate input signal does not appear on the RF input. Even an attempt to call
up the TX mask manually with [TX] will only produce the TX mask briefly before
the 4032 returns to the RX mask.
The AUTO SIMPLEX mode of the 4032 is more convenient, compared to the
SIMPLEX mode, because you can change the Communication Test Set to the
mode you require quite simply with the push-to-talk button of the radio set.
Beforehand, the required settings have to be entered in the RX and TX masks in
SIMPLEX mode and the meters you need have to be called up.
Details of DUPLEX mode
Duplex communication between radio sets (usually a base station and a mobile
station) requires that the use of a frequency pair f1 and f2 be agreed between the
two sets. If the base station transmits on f1 for example, the mobile must receive
on the same frequency and itself transmit on f2, thus making f2 the receive
frequency for the base station. The interval between the two frequencies is what
is called the duplex spacing.
If the radio sets work on several channels, a whole bunch of f1/f2 frequency pairs
is needed, and each frequency pair must maintain the duplex spacing. This
results in what is called a lower band and an upper band: in the lower band you
find all f1 frequencies separated by the channel spacing, and in the upper band
all f2 frequencies. The upper band is always higher in frequency.
11-41
11
Training with DUPLEX Mask
RX/TX operation of modulation generators
Before measurements are made on duplex radio sets, the following questions
have to be clarified:
•
•
•
•
•
What is the channel spacing?
What is the duplex spacing?
What assignment is there between channel number and frequency
(eg C1 → 150 MHz)?
Does the frequency increase with a growing number of channels (normally
the case) or does it decrease?
Does the device under test receive in the lower band or the upper band?
According to the default settings of the DUPLEX mask, the 4032 outputs a
150-MHz signal on the RF socket with a level of –60.0 dBm into 50 Ω (RX part of
mask). The carrier is frequency-modulated with 1 kHz, the frequency deviation is
±2.4 kHz. The test receiver is also operative and set to a receive frequency of 150
MHz (TX part of mask).
In the bottom part of the DUPLEX mask all analog instruments of the RX and TX
masks can be called up. The meanings of the two offset fields have remained the
same, as have those of the softkeys. So you can apply all previous operating rules
to the DUPLEX mask as well. New are some extra rules for switching on the
modulation generators and rules for working with channel numbers.
RX/TX operation of modulation generators
For the generators GEN A and GEN B (option) as well as the external modulation-signal source (EXT) the DUPLEX mask offers selection of the signal path, as
already described for the RX mask: repeated striking of the keys [GEN_A], [B/SAT]
or [EXT] means that the particular modulation signal takes the RX or TX signal
path (green or red LED illuminated). In contrast to the RX mask the RX/TX
switchover is now also enabled for the external modulation-signal source. In this
way it is possible, for instance, to feed the 4032 signal generator with two
superimposed modulation signals (normal test modulation + subaudio signal)
and at the same time to modulate the carrier of the radio set with the third
modulation signal.
11-42
Juggling with channel numbers
Training with DUPLEX Mask
Juggling with channel numbers
The questions about the duplex parameters at the beginning will be answered
provisionally as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
Channel spacing: 20 kHz
Duplex spacing: 10 MHz
C1 → 150 MHz (in 4032)
Frequency increases with channel number
Radio set receives in lower band
You are now ready to fill in the DUPLEX mask. Declare the entry field of the
transmit frequency (RX part) to be the current field and strike the [UNIT/SCROLL] key
once. The 4032 then replaces the display 150.0000 MHz by 1 NoL. Now you
can no longer enter a frequency, only a channel number instead. The frequency
entry field in the RX part has become the entry field for the lower-band receive
channel of the radio set, recognizable by the abbreviation NoL. The 1 display is
simply a proposal on the part of the 4032 to set the signal generator to channel
1 in the lower band.
Accept this proposal for the time being with [ENTER]. In the TX part of the mask the
entry field for the upper-band transmit channel of the radio set responds to this
without any delay, ie the display changes from ----- NoU to 1 NoU. This means
that the test receiver of the 4032 is now tuned to channel 1 in the upper band.
Strike the [UNIT/SCROLL] key twice to check. The frequency entry fields will promptly
show the values 150 MHz and 160 MHz, which is exactly what is specified. The
Communication Test Set is thus set ready for duplex measurement with the given
parameters; it works on channel 1.
If you do not wish to accept the proposal of 1 NoL, because you want to examine
the radio set on channel 12 for instance, it is sufficient to enter <12> + [ENTER] in
the NoL field (RX). The 4032 then transmits on 150.2200 MHz and receives on
160.2200 MHz. Both values result from the agreed channel spacing of 20 kHz
and the agreed assignment C1 → 150 MHz. You will find out how to make these
agreements or declarations and the others in the lesson "Parameter Mask".
If you make a wrong entry, it is best to call up the frequency entry fields, enter 150 MHz
in both and start anew.
While maintaining the other conditions, the radio set is now to transmit not in the
upper band but in the lower band, eg on channel 4. This means that the 4032 must
transmit on channel 4 in the upper band. The entry for the NoU field (RX) is
therefore <4> + [ENTER]. In the TX part of the mask the entry field NoL for the
lower-band transmit channel of the radio set automatically adopts this entry. If you
now call up the frequency entry fields with [UNIT/SCROLL], these will again show the
correct values 160.0600 MHz and 150.0600 MHz.
11-43
11
Training with DUPLEX Mask
Juggling with channel numbers
In the RX part of the DUPLEX mask you can put the receive channel of the radio set in
the upper or lower band. In the TX part, on the other hand, you select the upper or lower
band for the transmit channel of the radio set. In entry it is sufficient to assign either the
transmit or receive channel to just one band; the other channel is assigned to the other
band automatically.
The assignments between channels and frequencies are made by the 4032
automatically according to the declaration (C1 → 150 MHz; 20 kHz channel
spacing) up to the channel number 9999. This means that you can enter channel
numbers without having to worry about the assignment to frequency.
Let us assume that you want to test on channels 400 through 410, according to these
declarations, a radio set that transmits with a duplex spacing of 10 MHz in the lower
band. All that is required is an entry <400> + [ENTER] in the NoU field (RX) or in the
NoL field (TX). When you call up the DUPLEX mask for this purpose, there may still
be some values from previous measurements in the entry fields. Just overwrite the
value in the NoU field (RX) for instance. Following [ENTER] the test receiver is also
correctly tuned, and [UNIT/SCROLL] confirms that the right values are in the frequency
entry fields (RX: 167.98 MHz; TX: 157.98 MHz).
Then call up the entry field for the upper-band transmit channel again and move
the cursor to the last position. Using the handwheel the signal generator and the
test receiver can now be tuned simultaneously to the channels 401 through 410.
[ENTER] is only necessary if you want to leave the channel entry field again to look
at the frequency values for instance.
If an RF Frequency field is active, [UNIT/SCROLL] will alternately show the frequency and
the channel number corresponding to this frequency in the upper and lower band. One
of the channel numbers is thus always the result of a conversion. Dashes instead of a
channel number mean that conversion produced a value smaller than 0 or greater than 9999.
You can also work in the RX and TX masks in the manner described with channel
numbers instead of frequency values. Frequency values, ie channel numbers,
entered in the RX and TX mask are then adopted by the DUPLEX mask (and vice
versa).
11-44
Measuring duplex signal transfer
Training with DUPLEX Mask
Of course it is also possible to enter the values of the RX and TX frequencies
directly in the appropriate fields. Here the 4032 offers the following possibilities:
•
•
•
After the entry of one value, the other value, offset upwards by the duplex
spacing, is automatically entered.
After the entry of one value, the other value, offset downwards by the duplex
spacing, is automatically entered.
Any values can be entered in the fields without there being any connection by
the duplex spacing.
The default setting is the last of these three possibilities. Call up the GENERAL
PARAMETERS mask for making a choice.
Measuring duplex signal transfer
Socalled single-port duplex radio sets use the same antenna for their transmitter
and receiver. A duplexer in the radio isolates the signals from one another but
cannot entirely prevent the transmitter from influencing the receiver.
For measuring this influence the DUPLEX mask offers the Special DESENS
(desensitizing). Similarly to the Specials of the RX and TX masks, DESENS is
again a complete test routine that is started with {RUN}. You measure the degree
to which the transmitter of the radio set reduces the sensitivity of its receiver.
11
11-45
Training with DUPLEX Mask
Selection of input/output
Selection of input/output
If the device under test is a single-port radio set, use the RF socket as the
common input/output. Make sure that the RF output level of the 4032 is at least
60 dB smaller than the transmit level of the radio set (normal case). The duplex
demodulator then receives both signals sufficiently isolated.
With a dual-port radio set connect its transmitter to the RF socket and its receiver
to the RF DIRECT socket. The RF DIRECT socket is coupled with {RF_DIR}! The
RF socket can nevertheless still be used as an input because the duplex
demodulator, like the PWR measuring head, is connected directly behind the RF
socket.
4032 STABILOCK
REMOTE
FREQU
7
8
9
LEVEL
4
5
6
MOD FREQ
1
2
FMAMOM
0
.
4032 STABILOCK
MEMORY
CARD
UNIVERSAL ANALOG/DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TEST SET
REMOTE
3
OFF
-
STEP
MEMORY
CARD
UNIVERSAL ANALOG/DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TEST SET
FREQU
7
8
9
LEVEL
4
5
6
MOD FREQ
1
2
FMAMOM
0
.
STEP
-
+
MEMORY
AUX
PRINT
HELP
ENTER
U N IT/S C R O LL
+
INTENS
ENTER
U N IT/S C R O LL
3
OFF
INTENS
POWER
POWER
ON/OFF
S2
S1
DUPLEX
dB REL
RX
TX
S3
VOLT
S4
SCOPE
S6
S5
RX MOD
BEAT DF
DIST
ANALYZER
SINAD
CCITT
VOLTM
DEMOD
MEMORY
GEN A
MOD GEN
PRINT
AUX
B/SAT
ON/OFF
CLEAR
HELP
S2
S1
DUPLEX
EXT
SCOPE INPUT
dB REL
RX
TX
S3
VOLT
S4
SCOPE
S6
S5
RX MOD
BEAT DF
DIST
ANALYZER
SINAD
CCITT
VOLTM
DEMOD
GEN A
MOD GEN
B/SAT
EXT
CLEAR
SCOPE INPUT
POS
20 dB
600
RF
DEMOD
POS
20 dB
600
600
AC
DC
600
RF
VOLTM
RF
DIRECT
DEMOD
600
600
EMF
<2 V
MAX
<2 V
MAX
20 V
30 Hz
30 kHz
600
0. .. 20 kHz
RL > 200
MOD GEN
MAX
8 Vpp
0. .. 20 kHz
1 M
MAX
0,5 W
0. .. 20 kHz
EMF
MAX
<2 V
EMF
<2 V
MAX
20 V
30 Hz
30 kHz
Antenna
diplexer
600
0. .. 20 kHz
RL > 200
MAX
8 Vpp
0. .. 20 kHz
TX
TX
RX
RX
Dual-Port-Transceiver
20 dB/50 W
to PWR probe
to DUPLEX demodulator
RF DIRECT
1 M
Single-Port-Transceiver
to annenuator
RF
Fig. 11.5: Selection of input/output in the DUPLEX mode.
11-46
DC
50
MOD GEN
EMF
AC
VOLTM
RF
DIRECT
50
MAX
0,5 W
0. .. 20 kHz
Objectives
Parameter Mask
Parameter Mask
Objectives
•
•
•
Callup of parameter mask
Selection of parameters
Learning meaning of parameters
During training with the DUPLEX mask there was often mention of agreements
or declarations like the duplex spacing. Now you can make these declarations
yourself, and others, for the RX and TX masks too.
Callup of parameter mask
The way to the parameter mask is via the [AUX] key (auxiliary) in the field of the
function keys. You can strike the [AUX] key at any time when you need the
parameter mask. [AUX] presents you with the OPTION CARD mask with new
softkey functions, of which only {DEF.PAR} and {RETURN} are of interest at the
moment. {RETURN} has the usual meaning of RETURN, ie it takes you back to the
mask that was active immediately before you called up the OPTION CARD mask.
With {DEF.PAR} you call up the parameter mask (GENERAL PARAMETERS).
Softkeys of parameter mask
The parameter mask (see chapter 4, "GENERAL PARAMETERS") only offers
three softkeys: {STATUS} calls up the status mask, {ETC} pages to the second page
of the parameter mask and {RETURN} takes you back to the OPTION CARD mask.
The parameter mask is a submask of the OPTION CARD mask, which in turn is
a submask of the last basic mask that was active. With {RETURN} you always reach
the next highest mask level, so {RETURN} always takes you back to a basic mask.
Instead of this you can also return directly to the RX, TX or DUPLEX mask with
the keys in the RF field (front panel).
11
11-47
Parameter Mask
Entry fields of parameter mask
Entry fields of parameter mask
There is nothing to worry about in the parameter mask, it only contains pure
numeric fields and scroll fields in which there are as yet no default values entered.
You can access each of these fields with the cursor keys. Entries in numeric fields
are, as usual, to be terminated with [ENTER].
Atotal reset replaces all entries by default values in the parameter mask too!
If you read the text accompaniment in chapter 4, you will find out all about the
entry fields. The questions left unanswered in the two preceding lessons about
the AF power meter and declaration of the duplex parameters are answered here
too.
Your training with the masks of the 4032 is thus completed. You are well prepared
for tackling proper measuring and testing jobs (see Chapter 5). However, you do
not yet know all the measuring capabilities of the 4032: but in Chapter 6 you can
get acquainted with the oscilloscope and spectrum analyzer.
11-48
Appendix
12
Front panel
Front panel
4032 STABILOCK
REMOTE
MEMORY
UNIVERSAL ANALOG/DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TEST SET
CARD
FREQU
7
8
9
ENTER
LEVEL
4
5
6
UNIT/SCROLL
MOD FREQ
1
2
3
OFF
FM AM OM
0
.
-
STEP
+
INTENS
POWER
ON/OFF
S2
S1
DUPLEX
dB REL
RX
TX
S3
VOLT
S4
SCOPE ANALYZER MEMORY
S6
S5
RX MOD
BEAT DF
DIST
SINAD
CCITT
VOLTM
DEMOD
GEN A
MOD GEN
PRINT
AUX
B/SAT
EXT
HELP
CLEAR
SCOPE INPUT
POS
20 dB
600
RF
DIRECT
RF
50
DEMOD
600
600
AC
DC
VOLTM
MOD GEN
MAX
0,5 W
EMF
<2 V
MAX
EMF
MAX
30 Hz
<2 V
20 V
30 k Hz
RF field
AF field
600
0...20 kHz
RL > 200
MAX
8 Vpp
0...20 k Hz
Generator
field
1 M
0...20 kHz
Scope
field
Fig. 12.1: Front panel.
12
12-3
Front panel
4032 STABILOCK
REMOTE
MEMORY
UNIVERSAL ANALOG/DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TEST SET
CARD
FREQU
7
8
9
ENTER
LEVEL
4
5
6
UNIT/SCROLL
MOD FREQ
1
2
FM AM OM
0
3
.
OFF
+
-
STEP
INTENS
POWER
ON/OFF
S2
S1
DUPLEX
dB REL
RX
TX
S4
S3
VOLT
SCOPE ANALYZER MEMORY
S6
S5
RX MOD
BEAT DF
DIST
SINAD
CCITT
VOLTM
DEMOD
GEN A
MOD GEN
B/SAT
CLEAR
HELP
PRINT
AUX
EXT
SCOPE INPUT
POS
20 dB
600
RF
DIRECT
600
600
DEMOD
AC
DC
VOLTM
RF
50
MOD GEN
MAX
0,5 W
EMF
MAX
<2 V
EMF
MAX
30 Hz
<2 V
20 V
30 kHz
600
0...20 kHz
MAX
8 Vpp
RL > 200
0...20 kHz
0...20 kHz
1 M
Fig. 12.2: Keys for chapter 2.
4032 STABILOCK
REMOTE
MEMORY
UNIVERSAL ANALOG/DIGITAL COMMUNICATION TEST SET
CARD
FREQU
7
8
9
ENTER
LEVEL
4
5
6
UNIT/SCROLL
MOD FREQ
1
2
FM AM OM
0
3
.
OFF
-
STEP
+
INTENS
POWER
ON/OFF
S2
S1
DUPLEX
dB REL
RX
TX
S3
VOLT
S4
SCOPE ANALYZER MEMORY
S6
S5
RX MOD
BEAT DF
DIST
SINAD
CCITT
VOLTM
DEMOD
GEN A
MOD GEN
PRINT
AUX
B/SAT
EXT
HELP
CLEAR
SCOPE INPUT
POS
20 dB
600
RF
DIRECT
RF
50
DEMOD
600
600
AC
DC
VOLTM
MOD GEN
MAX
0,5 W
EMF
<2 V
MAX
EMF
MAX
30 Hz
<2 V
20 V
30 kHz
Fig. 12.3: Keys for chapter 2.
12-4
600
0...20 k Hz
RL > 200
MAX
8 Vpp
0...20 kHz
1 M
0...20 k Hz
AF-signal paths
AF-signal paths
Note: The block diagram also shows internal electronic switches which cannot be
activated directly by keys on the front panel. These switches are activated
indirectly by selecting appropriate scroll variables for instance.
Fig. 12.4: Block diagram DATA MODULE and OPTION CARD.
12
12-5
AF-signal paths
Fig. 12.5: Block diagram AF Detector.
12-6
Version status
Version status
Some passages in the text of the manual are marked with number indexes. This
is to indicate that the particular passage is not universally valid but depends on
the software/hardware version of STABILOCK 4032. What the restrictions are can
be seen from the explanations to the number indexes below.
1) IEEE commands SEROI and WRITE/SLAVE 300012 (special commands for
RS-232 interface) will not become available until firmware version ≥ 5.01.
Additionally the driver software on the hardware option "RS-232/Centronics
interface" must have the version number ≥ 1.30 (see STATUS mask, field
IFC-MCU).
2) The IEEE command WRITE/SLAVE 300014 (special command for output of
hex 0 on RS-232 interface) is not available until the STATUS mask shows the
following entries: HOST-MCU ≥ 5.01, IFC-MCU ≥ 1.40.
3) A different kind of memory card has been shipped since the end of 1994. The
new card uses a different type of battery and the battery compartment and
write-protect switch are arranged differently. See Chapter 8 for more details.
4) In firmware versions ≤ 5.02 the message for the D-AMPS module in the
STATUS mask is OPT-MCU. From firmware version 5.03 onwards the
D-AMPS module is indicated by DIG-MCU, the entry OPT-MCU, if present,
now telling you that the RF generator hardware option is connected.
5) In firmware versions ≤ 5.02 the OPTIONS and HW-REVISIONS masks are
only one page each.
6) Onwards from units with serial numbers 1388123 (see STATUS mask),
STABILOCK 4032 has a more powerful power supply, but without a DC input.
A version of the power supply with a DC input (10.5 to 32 V) is available as
an option (ordering code 204 033). The new power supplies make sure the
Communication Test Set works free of any disturbance when it is fitted with
options that draw a lot of power, like the frequency-range extension for
example. So older power supplies (ordering code 204 031) must not be used
in units fitted with options of this kind.
7) Onwards from units with the serial number 1188 (see STATUS mask),
STABILOCK 4032 has a faster memory card interface. This also supports
memory cards of 256 Kbytes. You know the new interface is installed if
MEMORY 2 appears in the title line of the MEMORY mask and hardware
revision 2 is entered under MEMCARD-IFC in the HW-REVISIONS mask.
8) The "Tracking" hardware option (not to be confused with "Fast tracking") can
be used again from firmware version 6.13 onwards. Requirement: Communication Test Set fitted with HOST COMPUTER 250 033. Contact Willtek for
details about enabling the option.
12
12-7
Executing Firmware Update
Executing Firmware Update
A firmware update gives your STABILOCK new features and expands its possibilities of use. Unavoidable small errors are also further eliminated in the new
firmware version. A firmware update can affect
– the basic STABILOCK unit or
– one or more hardware options
or both.
ω
When handling the ICs, be sure to observe the usual safeguards for electronic
components, especially where electrostatic discharge is concerned. The modules 5/6 and 10 contain storage batteries that can discharge over the tracks on the
board, so never place modules on conducting surfaces.
Preserving momentary setup
When it is updated, the Communication Test Set loses the settings last used.
Store these settings if you wish to continue using them. To find out how, refer to
Chapter 7 "Storing and recalling setups".
Fig. 12.6: Backplane of STABILOCK 4032. To change EPROMs, undo the two screws and
pull out the particular board. The backplane may look different depending on the installed
options. Module 5/6 may be split for example.
12-8
Executing Firmware Update
Exchanging EPROMs
An update of STABILOCK 4032 firmware requires the replacement of several
EPROMs on various modules. These may be modules of the basic STABILOCK
unit and/or those of hardware options. First ascertain from Table 12.1 the modules that you have to remove for EPROM replacement. Only take out one module
at a time. The slots of the EPROMs supplied to match your Communication Test
Set (serial number of unit) can be seen from the illustrations.
EPROM designation
Modules of basic STABILOCK unit
Module 7
SLAVE COMPUTER
SP0, SP1
Module 9
MONITOR CONTROL w/o submin D socket
CP0
Module 9
MONITOR CONTROL with submin D socket
P37
Module 10
HOST COMPUTER
HP0, HP1
Modules of hardware options
Module 5/6
D-AMPS
P14, P15, P18, P26
Module 5/6
GSM
P39, P40, P45, P49
Module 6
RS-232/CENTRONICS INTERFACE
Module 8
DATA MODULE
VP0
AP0, GP0, P11
Table 12.1: EPROM designations for identifying modules affected by firmware update
12
12-9
Executing Firmware Update
Procedure
1)
Power off STABILOCK 4032 and remove all leads including power cable.
2)
Undo the two retaining screws of the particular module.
3)
Moving the module gently up and down, withdraw it carefully from
STABILOCK 4032 and place it on a non-conducting surface.
Risk of destruction! Never withdraw a module while the set is powered on!
ω
Only to replace EPROM CP0 (module 9): undo the two Phillips screws. Push
the shielding plate in the direction of the connector strip and remove it.
Only to replace EPROM P26 or P49 (module 5/6, 2nd board): after undoing
the four Phillips screws (spacers), the two boards can be swung apart. They
remain joined by a ribbon cable.
4)
Take one EPROM at a time out of its mount, which is best done with a chip
extractor, and put it on one side (be careful not to confuse the old and the
new EPROM).
Only for EPROM P37 (module 9): carefully lever the EPROM out of its mount
with a pointed object (tweezers). The mount has two notches for this
purpose on the corners.
5)
Are the pin rows of the new EPROM perpendicular to the IC package? If not,
carefully bend the pin rows in the right direction with a clamp or on a flat
surface.
6)
Insert the new EPROM in the mount (observe package markings).
Only for EPROM P37 (module 9): place the EPROM on the mount (observe
package marking: tapered corner) and press it in. Make sure that all pins fit
into the mount and that no pin is bent!
Only to replace EPROM CP0 (module 9): replace the shielding plate.
Only to replace EPROM P26 or P49 (module 5/6, 2nd board): fold the
boards together so that the screw holes are over the spacer pins. Tighten
the four screws.
7)
Slide the module along the rails into its slot. Do not use force - the module
must click into place in its connector simply by applying gentle pressure.
8)
Tighten the two retaining screws.
12-10
Executing Firmware Update
Startup after EPROM replacement
Connect STABILOCK 4032 to the AC outlet again and power it on.
• If the status mask appears, listing the version numbers and checksums of
your new firmware, the set will be ready for use after hitting {START}. Table 12.2 shows the labels assigned to the modules in the status mask.
• If no status mask appears, a total reset is necessary. To do this, press [CLEAR],
keep it depressed and then hit [OFF]. Hit {START} and the Communication Test
Set will be ready for use again.
Fig. 12.7: The status mask shows the current
version numbers of the installed firmware on
the various modules of STABILOCK.
Module designations4)
Version numbers
Basic
unit
Module designation
in status mask
Module
HOST-MCU
HOST COMPUTER
10
CRT-MCU
MONITOR CONTROL
9
RF/AF-MCU
SLAVE COMPUTER
7
Options CELL-GEN, CELL-ANA
Module no.
DATA MODULE
8
IFC-MCU
RS-232/CENTRONICS INTERFACE
6
DIG-MCU4)
D-AMPS or GSM
OPT-MCU4)
(external) RF Generator
5/6
–
Table 12.2: Names of modules in status mask
The "Lifeline" at the end of the manual tells you about all major changes in the
firmware of the basic STABILOCK unit.
Please send the old EPROMs straight back to the Willtek service point from which
you received the new EPROMs. Use the special packing in which the new
EPROMs were supplied.
12
12-11
Executing Firmware Update
Fig. 12.8:
Module no. 5/6 (D-AMPS,
1st board) with EPROMs P14,
P15 and P18.
Direction of insertion
Fig. 12.9:
Module no. 5/6 (D-AMPS,
2nd board) with EPROM
P26.
Direction of insertion
12-12
Executing Firmware Update
Fig. 12.10:
Module no. 5/6 (GSM,
1st board) with EPROMs P39,
P40 and P45.
Direction of insertion
Fig. 12.11:
Module no. 5/6 (GSM,
2nd board) with EPROM P49.
Direction of insertion
12
12-13
Executing Firmware Update
Fig. 12.12:
Module no. 6 (hardware
option RS-232/
CENTRONICS INTERFACE)
with EPROM VP0.
Note direction of insertion!
Direction of insertion
Fig. 12.13:
Module no. 7 (SLAVE
COMPUTER) with EPROMs
SP0 and SP1
Direction of insertion
12-14
Executing Firmware Update
Fig. 12.14:
Module no. 8 (DATA MODULE)
with EPROMs AP0, GP0 and
P11
Direction of insertion
Fig. 12.15:
Module no. 9 (MONITOR
CONTROL without submin D
socket) with EPROM CP0
Direction of insertion
12
12-15
Executing Firmware Update
Fig. 12.16:
Module no. 9 (MONITOR
CONTROL with submin D
socket) with EPROM P37
Direction of insertion
Fig. 12.17:
Module no. 10 (HOST
COMPUTER) with EPROMs
HP0 and HP1
Direction of insertion
12-16
Technical Data
Technical Data
These specifications are valid for STABILOCK 4032 in basic equipment (up to
999.99 MHz). If the FEX option (Frequency Extension) is fitted, please note the
passages marked by a ! and refer to the section "Frequency extension".
Synthesizer
Modulation
Spectral purity
• Phase noise (25-kHz offset)
f < 500 MHz
< –121 dBc/Hz
f ≥ 500 MHz
< –115 dBc/Hz
• Residual FM
f < 500 MHz
4 Hz (rms, CCITT-weighted)
f ≥ 500 MHz
8 Hz (rms, CCITT-weighted)
• Nonharmonic spurious signals
> 500 Hz off carrier
< –55 dBc
• Harmonics
Level < –15.1 dBm
< –25 dBc
Level ≥ –15.1 dBm
< –20 dBc
• Residual AM
< 0.02 % (rms,
CCITT-weighted)
FM (AC-coupled)
• Frequency deviation
• Modulation frequency
(int. and ext.)
• Resolution
• Setting error
fmod = 300 Hz to 3 kHz
fmod = 30 Hz to 20 kHz
• Distortion
dev. < 10 kHz,
fmod = 300 Hz to 3 kHz
• Ext. mod. input
•
•
•
•
•
10-MHz reference oscillator
Warmup time
< 3 min for frequency
error < 5 • 10–7 (T = 20 °C)
< 10 min for frequency error < 10–7
Frequency error
< 1 • 10–7 (T = 5 to 45 °C)
Aging
< 5 ⋅ 10–8/month
Output level
approx. 0.4 V (into 50 Ω)
Synchronization
10 MHz, V > 150 mVrms
(into 200 Ω)
RF Generator
Carrier frequency
• Frequency range !
• Resolution !
f < 500 MHz
f ≥ 500 MHz
• Frequency error
Output level
• RF socket !
•
•
•
•
•
0.4 to 999.9999 MHz
50 Hz
100 Hz
as reference oscillator
–142 to –7 dBm
(max. –13 dBm with AM)
RF DIRECT socket !
–122 to +13 dBm
(max. +7 dBm with AM)
Resolution
0.1 dB
Level error into 50 Ω
RF socket !
Level ≥ –130 dBm
< 1.3 dB
Level > –15.0 dBm
< 2 dB
RF DIRECT socket
Level ≥ –110 dBm
< 1.6 dB
Level > +5.0 dBm
< 2.5 dB
VSWR (50 Ω) RF socket !
< 1.1
EMF setting range without
interruption (not with AM)
0 to 15 dB,
usable to 20 dB
Additional level error
0.1 dB per dB
0 to 40 kHz
30 Hz to 30 kHz
10 Hz
< 5 % + 3 digits
< 10 % + 3 digits
<1%
20 kHz FM =
0.707 Vrms into 600 Ω
FM (external DC-coupled)
• Frequency deviation
0 to 5 kHz
• Modulation frequency
0 to 30 kHz
• Centre-frequency error < 100 Hz + frequency
error of reference oscillator
ΦM
• Phase deviation
• Resolution
• Modulation frequency
• Setting error
fmod = 300 Hz to 3 kHz
• Distortion
fmod = 300 Hz to 3 kHz
• Ext. mod. input
0 to 6 rad
(fmod • rad ≤ 20 kHz)
0.01 rad
200 Hz to 6 kHz
< 6 % + 0.02 rad
<1%
20 rad ΦM =
0.707 Vrms into 600 Ω
AM
Modulation depth
m = 0 to 99.9%
Resolution
0.1 %
Modulation frequency
30 Hz to 10 kHz
Setting error for m ≤ 90 %
< 0.1 • m + 1 digit
fmod = 30 Hz to 10 kHz
• Distortion for m < 50 %
fmod = 300 Hz to 3 kHz
<2%
• Ext. mod. input
50 % AM =
0.707 Vrms into 600 Ω
•
•
•
•
RF Analyzer
Frequency measurement
• Frequency range !
2 to 999.9999 MHz
• Resolution
10 Hz
• Admissible input level
on RF socket
0.1 mW to 125 W
• Measuring accuracy
as reference oscillator
+ 10 Hz
12-17
12
Technical Data
Frequency-offset measurement
• Frequency range
2 to 999.9999 MHz
• Measuring range
0 to ±99.99 kHz
• Resolution
f < 10 kHz
1 Hz
f ≥ 10 kHz
10 Hz
• Admissible input level
on RF socket
2 µW to 125 W
on RF DIRECT socket
1 mV to 1 V
(measuring range: 0 to ±15 kHz)
• Measuring accuracy as reference oscillator + 3 Hz
(+ 1 digit for offset ≥ 10 kHz)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
RF-power measurement, RF socket
(broadband)
Frequency range !
2 to 999.9999 MHz
Measuring range
1 mW to 125 W (average)
Resolution
P<1W
1 mW
P < 10 W
10 mW
P ≥ 10 W
100 mW
Measuring accuracy ! (w/o modulation)
P > 200 mW
10 % + 1 digit
(f = 20 to 500 MHz)
12 % + 1 digit
(f = 6 to 999.9999 MHz)
RF-power measurement
(bandwidth approx. 3 MHz)
Frequency range
2 to 999.9999 MHz
Measuring range
RF socket
–45 to +37 dBm
RF DIRECT socket
–65 to +17 dBm
Measuring accuracy
3 dB
Resolution
0.1 dBm
Modulation measurement
FM measurement, RF socket (broadband)
Frequency range
2 to 999.9999 MHz
Input level
0.1 mW to 125 W
Measuring range
0 to 25 kHz
Resolution
10 Hz
Measuring accuracy (dev. < 10 kHz)
fmod = 300 Hz to 3 kHz
5 % ±1 digit
± peak residual FM
10 % ±1 digit
fmod = 100 Hz to 10 kHz
± peak residual FM
• Demodulation distortion
fmod = 300 Hz to 3 kHz
< 0.5 %
• Peak residual FM
< 50 Hz or
< 10 Hz/100 MHz
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
FM measurement, RF DIRECT socket
(narrowband)
Frequency range
2 to 999.9999 MHz
Input level
–50 to –20 dBm
Measuring range
0 to 10 kHz
(fmod • dev. < 10 kHz)
Modulation frequency
fmod = 0 to 6 kHz
Resolution
10 Hz
Sensitivity
better than 2 µV (3 kHz FM dev.,
10 dB SINAD, CCITT-weighted)
IF bandwidth
30 kHz
12-18
ΦM measurement, RF socket (broadband)
• Frequency range
2 to 999.9999 MHz
• Input level
0.1 mW to 125 W
• Measuring range
0 to 6 rad
(FM dev. < 50 kHz)
• Resolution
0.01 rad
• Measuring accuracy
fmod = 300 Hz to 3 kHz
6 % ±2 digits
10 % ±2 digits
fmod = 200 Hz to 10 kHz
• Demodulation distortion
fmod = 300 Hz to 3 kHz
< 0.5 %
•
•
•
•
•
•
ΦM measurement, RF DIRECT socket
(narrowband)
Frequency range
2 to 999.9999 MHz
Input level
–50 to –20 dBm
Measuring range
0 to 3 rad
(fmod • ΦM dev. < 15 kHz)
Modulation frequency
200 Hz to 6 kHz
Sensitivity
better than 2 µV
(3 rad ΦM dev., 10 dB SINAD,
CCITT-weighted)
IF bandwidth
30 kHz
AM measurement
• Frequency range
2 to 999.9999 MHz
• Measuring range
0 to 100 %
• Input level
RF socket
1 mW to 125 W
RF DIRECT socket
0.01 mW to 0.5 W
• Resolution
0.1 %
• Measuring accuracy (m ≥ 10 %)
10 % ±2 digits
fmod = 200 Hz to 10 kHz
• Demodulation distortion
fmod = 300 Hz to 3 kHz
<1%
• Modulation frequency
DC to 10 kHz
Spurious-modulation measurement
• Input level
RF socket
1 mW to 125 W
RF DIRECT socket
20 mV to 1 V
• Measuring range
0 to –40 dB
(CCITT-weighted)
referred to 3 kHz FM dev.,
3 rad ΦM dev. or 30 % AM
• Measuring accuracy
1 dB
AF Generator
Modulation generator GEN A
• Frequency range
30 Hz to 30 kHz
• Resolution
f < 3 kHz
0.1 Hz
f ≥ 3 kHz
1 Hz
• Frequency error
< 0.01 %
• Level range (EMF)
0.1 mVrms to 5 Vrms
• Resolution
EMF ≤ 5 V
10 mV
EMF ≤ 1 V
1 mV
EMF ≤ 0.1 V
0.1 mV
EMF ≤ 10 mV
10 µV
Technical Data
• Level error
f = 100 Hz to 10 kHz
<3%
f = 30 Hz to 30 kHz
< 10 %
• Distortion
f = 30 Hz to 3 kHz
< 0.5 %
f > 3 kHz
<1%
• Output impedance (balanced)
f = 300 Hz to 3 kHz
< 10 Ω
f = 30 Hz to 30 kHz
< 40 Ω
• Output impedance (unbalanced) 600 Ω ±5 %
• Permissible load impedance
> 200 Ω
AF Analyzer
AF voltmeter
• Frequency range
30 Hz to 30 kHz
or to CCITT P 53A
0.1 mV to 20 V
• Measuring range
• Resolution
Level < 0.1 V
0.1 mV
Level < 1 V
1 mV
Level < 10 V
10 mV
Level < 20 V
100 mV
• Measuring accuracy
f = 300 Hz to 3 kHz
3%
f = 50 Hz to 15 kHz
6%
• Source impedance > 100 kΩ or 600 Ω ±3 %
• Input capacitance
20 pF
AF counter
• Frequency range
• Input level
• Resolution
f < 300 Hz
f < 10 kHz
f ≥ 10 kHz
• Measuring accuracy
•
•
•
•
•
Distortion meter
Input level
Test frequency
Measuring range
Resolution
Measuring accuracy
d = 1 to 90 %
SINAD meter
• Input level
• Measuring range
• Resolution
SINAD < 30 dB
SINAD ≥ 30 dB
• Measuring accuracy
for SINAD < 30 dB
Oscilloscope
• Inputs external
• Inputs internal
•
•
•
•
•
30 Hz to 30 kHz
5 mV to 20 V
0.1 Hz
1 Hz
10 Hz
0.01 % ±1 digit
0.1 to 20 V
1 kHz ±5 Hz
0 to 99 %
0.1 %
•
•
Standard tone sequences
• ZVEI 1, CCIR, VDEW, ZVEI 2, EEA,
NATEL, EIA, EURO, CCITT
User-defined tone sequences
Sequence of up to 30 tones can be stored by
user. Also double tones and underlying continuous tone (with GEN B option).
0.1 to 20 V
1 to 46 dB
0.1 dB
0.5 dB
•
•
0.8 dB ±1 digit
•
2 to 999.9999 MHz
better than 2 %
of sweep width
Zi = 1 MΩ/40 pF (AC/DC)
RX mod, TX demod,
duplex demod, AF voltmeter,
residual distortion
Frequency range
DC (3 Hz) to 20 kHz
Level error
< 10 % + 0.2 div
Grating
6 x 10 div
Horizontal deflection
100 µs/div to
500 ms/div
Vertical deflection
2 mV/div to 10 V/div or
160 Hz/div to 8 kHz/div (FM);
0.16 rad/div to 8 rad/div (ΦM);
0.8 %/div to 40 %/div (AM)
± slope
Trigger
selectable trigger level
Operating modes
auto, norm, one-shot,
freeze, time measurement
(max. resolution 2.5 µs)
Selective-call encoder and decoder
5 % of meas. value
±3 digits
Scope & Analyzer
Spectrum analyzer
• Frequency range
• Frequency accuracy
• Input-level range for measuring accuracy
3 dB in the frequency range 0.5 • fc ≤ f ≤ 2 • fc
RF socket
–70 to +47 dBm
RF DIRECT socket
–90 to +13 dBm
• Sweep width
200 kHz, 2 MHz, 10 MHz
• Sweep time
Sweep width 2 MHz
and 10 MHz
approx. 500 ms
Sweep width 200 kHz
approx. 2 s
• Evaluation bandwidth
Sweep width 2 MHz
and 10 MHz
30 kHz
Sweep width 200 kHz
6 kHz
• Inherent noise
on RF DIRECT socket
Sweep width 2 MHz
and 10 MHz
–95 dBm
Sweep width 200 kHz
–105 dBm
•
Encoder
Operating modes
Single-tone sequence (max. 30 tones)
Double-tone sequence (with GEN B option)
(single-tone and double-tone sequences can
be transmitted continously)
Acknowledgement call (max. 15 double tones)
from response time of < 100 ms acknowledgement call only possible with optional
duplex FM/ΦM stage
Frequency error
1 • 10–4 Hz
12-19
12
Technical Data
Decoder
Decoding of each tone of tone sequences
(max. 30 tones). Continuous decoding can be
set.
General data
• Functions
Frequency extension %
The following specifications apply to the FEX
option:
Dimensions and weight
• HxWxD
230 mm x 375 mm x 486 mm
• Weight
approx. 18.5 kg
RF Generator
Power supply
• AC
Carrier frequency
• Frequency range
• Resolution
• Pmax
94 to 132 V or
187 to 264 V (47 to 450 Hz)
approx. 110 W (incl. options)
Environment
• Operating temperature
• Storage temperature
• Relative humidity
•
•
•
•
5 to 45 °C
–40 to +70 °C
max. 90 %
Mechanical strength
(to DIN 40046)
Shock
25 g
Vibration
5 to 10 Hz for 10 mm amplitude
10 to 60 Hz, 2 g constant
EMC conformity
EN 55022:1995, class B
EN 60801:1994, part 2
test level 1
ENV 50140:1995, test level 2
IEC1000-4-4:1995, test level 3
Safety
EN 61010:1995, part 1
IEEE-bus interface
• Standard
• Connector
12-20
IEEE 488
24-way
AH1, SH1, L2, T1,
SR1, RL1, DC1
1.0 to 2.3 GHz
1 kHz
Output level
• RF socket
–142 to –20 dBm
• RF DIRECT socket
–122 to 0 dBm
• Level error into 50 Ω
(1.0 to 2.0 GHz)
RF socket
1.5 dB
(over range –110 to –20 dBm)
• VSWR (50 Ω) RF socket
< 1.2
RF Analyzer
Frequency measurement
• RF Frequency range
1.0 to 2.3 GHz
• Minimum level
–5 dBm
(over range 1.0 to 2.0 GHz)
RF power measurement, RF socket
(broadband)
• RF Frequeny range
1.0 to 2.0 GHz
• Measurement accuracy
14 % ± 1 Digit
(over range –200 mW to 10 W)
Technical Data
Ordering data
Other available options
STABILOCK 4032
108802
4)
RF-Frequency extension 2.3 GHz (FEX) 248295
GSM/PCN/PCS MS Test Package
incl. STABILOCK 4032
RF-Frequency extension 2.3 GHz
GSM hardware option
Spectrum analyzer
GSM/PCN/PCS test software
248296
DECT Package
incl. STABILOCK 4032
RF-Frequency extension 2.3 GHz
DECT module
DECT FP/PP test software
248255
CDMA BS Test Package
incl. STABILOCK 4032
CDMA module
CDMA 800/1900 MHz test software
248302
IS-136 MS Test Package
incl. STABILOCK 4032
RF-Frequency extension 2.3 GHz
DAMPS module
DATA module
IS-136 test software
248304
TETRA-380 MS Test Package
incl. TETRA module
Duplex und IQ-380 module
TETRA MS test software
248307
TETRA/FEX MS Test Package
incl. TETRA module
RF-Frequency extension 2.3 GHz
TETRA MS test software
248308
BATE AMPS BS Test Package
248198
BATE ETACS BS Test Package
248144
Duplex FM/ΦM stage
Control interface A (8 relays)
Control interface D (24 relays + 20 TTL)
2nd Modulation generator
Tracking
RS-232/Centronics interface
Keyboard
VSWR directional coupler + access.
VSWR bridge + accessories
Data module
Option card
SSB kit
Adjacent channel power meter (ACPM)
ACPM upgrade kit
Spectrum analyzer upgrade kit for 4031
Spectrum analyzer for 4032
2nd RF generator + Fast Tracking4)
Network C expander 1)
DTMF module 1)
DC voltmeter/ammeter 1)
300-Hz highpass filter 1) 2)
300-Hz lowpass filter 1) 2)
3-kHz lowpass filter 1) 2)
4-kHz bandpass filter (NMT) 1) 2)
6-kHz bandpass filter 1) 2)
6-kHz bandstop filter (TACS) 1) 2)
50 Hz to 15 kHz bandpass filter 1) 2)
Variable notch filter (200 to 600 Hz)1)
Variable notch filter (200 to 1200 Hz)1)
Variable notch filter (150 to 600 Hz)1) **)
C-Message filter (CCITT weighting)
Filter Adapter*)
AC/DC power supply (new)
NADC 900 MHz hardware option3)
NADC 450 MHz hardware option 3)
NADC PCM interface (Ericsson BST)
Cable set for Ericsson
digital NADC transceiver
GSM hardware option 3)
NADC-/GSM upgrade kit
(required if serial number < 1188000)
229062
236035
236038
208032
229076
236043
248192
248104
248145
236034
236033
248154
229035
248270
248290
248291
248293
248116
248171
248172
248199
248174
248186
248175
248176
248177
248278
248179
248195
248204
248235
248269
204033
248271
248277
248282
248283
248274
248281
1) requires 1 x option card 236033
2) max. 2 of the filters may be installed at one
time
*) 3 filters with Filter Adapter
**) requires Firmware version ≥ 6.21
3) requires Basic Unit with a
serial number ≥ 1188xxx
4) 2nd RF generator and FEX exclude each
other
Not all options can be fitted into one
STABILOCK.
Some options can only be applied in conjunction
with other options.
12
12-21
Technical Data
Software options
NMT 450i/900 Scandinavia
NMT 450i
NMT France
NMT Benelux
NMT Turkey
NMT 450 Universal
NMT 900 Universal
NMT 450/900 Base-Station Test
NATEL-C (Switzerland)
Network C Austria (NMT 450i)
Network C Portugal
Network C SAPO
Tracking
EAMPS
ETACS UK
TACS Japan (JTACS)
PDC MS Test
NAMPS
NTACS
NADC 900 MHz BS Test
NADC 900 MHz MS Test
NADC 450 MHz BS Test
NADC 450 MHz MS Test
NADC MS Test AUTORUN
GSM/DCS 1800/1900 MS Test
GSM MS Test AUTORUN
GSM BS Test
DECT FP/PP Test
IS-136 MS Test
IS-136 DB (down-banded)
CDMA BS Test 800/1900 MHz
RADIOCOM 2000 HD
FMS
VDEW direct dialing
VDEW digital standard
VDEW digital (Bosch)
ZVEI binary
ZVEI binary (600 baud)
POCSAG (NRZ)
POCSAG (FFSK)
Cityruf (German version of 897080)
DIGI-S (includes VDEW digital)
Trunking (MPT 1327 / PAA 2424)
AT&T Microcell
Combiner Test
US-Signalling Formats
LTR + US Signalling
DSAT/DST (of NAMPS)
ATIS
Fast IEEE
2.1 GHz Analyzer Tracking
Tetra MS Test
Tetra BS Test
ARE AUTORUN Editor
(51⁄4 or 31⁄2 disc)
12-22
Accessories
897911
897916
897925
897920
897901
897915
897902
897905
897930
897910
897062
897063
897806
897950
897940
897945
897909
897903
897904
897072
897073
897908
897907
897917
897912
897078
897076
897803
897926
897807
897805
897970
897082
897086
897090
897095
897084
897085
897080
897081
897083
897097
897089
897096
897985
897092
897093
897094
897098
897802
897928
897808
897942
897100
Accessories supplied
249032
2 miniature fuses 3,15 A
Power cable
2 protective caps, black
TNC/BNC adapter
TNC terminator cap
Protective front-panel cover
Headphones jack plug
1 memory card (blank, 256 KByte)
Operating manual
849037
880606
787095
886255
886247
501350
884123
897053
290288
Recommended extras
Microphone
Telescopic antenna
Carrying bag
Transport container
Protective back-panel cover
19-inch adapter
Connector set
N/BNC adapter
2 x 1 m cable BNC/BNC
1 x 1 m cable N/N
1 x 1 m cable BNC/banana
Memory card (256 KByte)
Carrying grip kit
RF probe
Oscilloscope probe
Service manual
Protective edges
GSM/DCS 1800 SIM Card plug-in
Subject to changes without prior notice.
248170
248120
378258
300692
501350
378257
300690
897053
378256
860108
860148
291288
248190
860188
Technical Data
STABILOCK 4032 Lifeline
The chronical lifeline tells you what modifications have been made to the firmware (FW)
and the operating instructions. After a firmware update the lifeline helps you to find out
quickly about all major changes (see code) in the updated operating instructions that are
supplied.
Code:
FW
C = Correction, IN = Important Note, NF = New Feature
Manual
Version
∆
pages
Changes
5.00 9401-500-A
all
5.01 9407-502-A
8-84
NF New IEEE commands for RS-232-C interface.
no
NF Handling of fast analyzer (option 248 290/291) possible.
5.02 9407-502-A
9409-502-B
5.03 9501-503-A
– First edition.
no
IN No screen saver in AUTORUN or remote mode.
no
C
6-19
NF Description of tracking feature.
1-3
C
6-3
IN Hint to optional analyzer.
4-5
C
RAM test displays no more information onscreen.
4-44
C
Softkey {DTMF} inserted.
7-11
IN Source + destination card must have same capacity.
Bug fixes.
Better position for Notes on Safety.
all
NF First edition in Spanish.
2-16
C
4-4
NF Masks OPTIONS and HW-REVISIONS: now two pages.
7-4
NF New design of Memory Card.
All informations about Hardware Options now in Chapter 9.
8-86
NF Output of hexadecimal 0 possible (RS-232 interface).
12-9
IN Description of Firmware Update.
no
C
Bug fixes.
5.032 9502-5032-A no
C
Bug fixes.
5.031 9502-5032-A
9507-5032-B
1-5
5.032 9507-5032-C 2-16
6.10 9601-610-A
IN New standard power supply.
C
Description of socket 103 (IF stage) added.
12-17
NF Technical data added.
7-12
NF New memory card (256 Kbyte) added.
8-38
NF BASIC command GET added.
8-43
NF BASIC command HEX$ added.
8-64
NF BASIC command TIMEOUT added.
8-69
NF New description of IEEE-488 bus added.
12
12-23
Technical Data
Code:
C = Correction, IN = Important Note, NF = New Feature
Manual
Version
FW
Continue
∆
pages
Changes
8-85
NF IEEE command MFRMS added.
8-89
NF IEEE command FILTErabcd added.
8-96
NF IEEE commands UNIT_ and UNITS added.
8-101
8-102
NF New error messages added.
6.12 9605-612-A
none
6.13 9608-613-A
8-97
C Bug fixes.
NF IEEE command IDENTity added.
12-7
8)
C Tracking (Standard) available again .
none
C Bug fixes.
6.14 9707-614-A
none
NF Only relevant for units with FEX/analyzer (new spans).
6.20 9809-620-A
12-17
to
12-22
IN Technical data and ordering informations updated.
4-4
NF OPTION mask now shows installed software options
separated from hardware options.
6.21 9811-621-A
0112-621-A
0206-621-A
6.22 0209-622-A
12-24
none
–
12-22
–
C New Variable notch filter 248 204 (150 Hz ... 600 Hz)
will be correctly displayed in the AUX mask.
–
New company name Acterna. Update of software
options and accessoires.
C Power cable 880 604 changed to 880 606.
–
New company name Willtek. Update of status screen
and IDENTity response (IEEE command).
Index
Index
A
Accessories, extra.............................................9-4
accessories, standard .......................................1-4
AF frequency response, measurement...........5-24
AF RESP, RX Special.....................................4-34
AF RESP, TX-Special .....................................4-38
Analog instruments .............................. 4-25 - 4-30
Analyzer ............................................................6-3
AUTO SIMPLEX mode .................................11-41
AUTORUN
Deleting program ........................................8-25
Loading program ........................................8-24
Mask callup...................................................8-6
Programs ....................................................8-15
Saving program ..........................................8-23
Stopping .....................................................8-10
B
Back Panel........................................... 2-16 - 2-20
Background signaling......................................10-4
BANDW, Special.............................................4-32
Basic DUPLEX settings ..................................5-34
Basic RX settings............................................5-20
Basic sequential mask ....................................5-39
Basic TX settings ..............................................5-5
BEAT.............................................................11-38
Bus structure (IEEE 488) ................................8-70
C
Carrier frequency, measurement ......................5-6
Carrier keying..................................................5-42
CCITT filter, switching on..............................11-37
Centre-frequency offset, measurement ..........5-27
Centronics control command ..........................8-93
Channel numbers, working with....................11-43
Channel spacing, declaration..........................4-20
Character strings.............................................8-17
Checksums .......................................................4-5
Communication protocol, RS-232 ...................4-22
CONT field, meaning ....................................11-21
Controls.................................................. 2-3 - 2-15
Conversion, level ..........................................11-19
D
Data Output Format ......................................8-100
dBr meter, operation .....................................11-29
DC-CAL, DC calibration ..................................4-39
Default settings, explanation.........................11-12
Delay, declaration ...........................................4-21
Demodulation class, selection ........................4-13
Demodulation distortion, measurement ..........5-26
DESENS, Special ...........................................4-41
Desensitizing.................................................11-45
Deviation limiting, measurement.....................5-18
Deviation measurement, average
indication .........................................................4-23
Direct command................................................8-8
Display field.......................................................8-8
Double-tone sequence, declaring ...................5-44
DUPLEX mask, available instruments ............4-17
DUPLEX mask, description.................. 4-15 - 4-18
Duplex parameters, declaration ......................4-20
DUPLEX Specials ...........................................4-40
DUPLEX, basics ...........................................11-40
DUPLEX, dual-/single-port............................11-46
DUPLEX, selection of input/output................11-46
E
Editing commands ............................... 8-12 - 8-13
Editing line ........................................................8-8
EMF, setting .................................................11-21
Entries, illegal .................................................11-8
Entry values, permissible................................11-8
EOI, control line ..............................................8-72
EOS, control character ...................................8-72
EPROMs, replacement of...............................12-9
Erroneous measurement, RF .......................11-25
EXT, RX/TX signal path................................11-42
F
Fast access ..................................................11-15
Fault diagnosis program ...................................4-6
Files ................................................................7-12
Filter curves, display of ...................................6-19
Filters, connection into signal path .................4-44
Firmware, update............................................12-8
Frequency alteration, stepped ......................11-18
Frequency deviation, average indication ........4-23
Frequency deviation, maximum........................5-3
Frequency measurement, RF...........................5-6
Frequency offset, measurement.......................5-6
Frequency response (AF), measurement.......5-24
Fuses, replacing ...............................................1-6
G
Grounding .........................................................1-3
H
Handwheel, use ............................................11-17
Harmonics submask, description......................6-8
Harmonics, measurement ..............................5-19
HELP ..............................................................11-9
I
IEEE commands, special characters..............8-78
IEEE-488
Bus .............................................................8-69
Commands.................................... 8-69 - 8-100
Settings ......................................................8-72
Test jobs.....................................................8-84
IEEE-bus parameters, setting...........................4-5
IF bandwith, measurement .............................5-27
IF filter curve ...................................................5-28
input power, permissible ...................................1-8
Instrument zooming ......................................11-29
Instruments .......................................... 4-25 - 4-30
intensity of screen display...............................2-13
K
Keyboard, special characters .........................8-32
L
LEDs, colour assignment..............................11-13
Level, conversion..........................................11-19
Limiter characteristic, measurement...............5-32
Lower band, explanation...............................11-41
M
Measurement range, selection .....................11-30
Measurement range, specification..................4-29
MEMORY CARD ................................... 7-4 - 7-10
memory card, files ..........................................7-12
MEMORY CARDs, write protection ................7-18
12-25
12
Index
MEMORY mask ............................................. 7-11
Mobile radiotelephones,
measurements .....................................10-4 - 10-6
Modulation class, selection ............................ 4-10
Modulation distortion, measurement .............. 5-16
Modulation frequency response,
measurement ................................................. 5-12
Modulation overlaying .................................. 11-42
Modulation sensitivity, measurement ............. 5-14
N
Needle damping, setting................................. 4-22
Network analysis ............................................ 6-19
NF-Signalwege.....................................12-5 - 12-6
Notes on Safety................................................ 1-3
NoU/NoL, explanation .................................. 11-43
Numeric field, closing ..................................... 11-7
Numeric field, opening.................................... 11-7
O
Offset field, moving to................................... 11-16
Offset field, TX.............................................. 11-24
Offset TX, residual offset.............................. 11-25
Operands........................................................ 8-19
Operating status ....................11-12 - 11-13, 11-23
Operating status, saving................................. 7-20
Operator ......................................................... 8-19
OPTION CARD, mask.................................... 4-43
Options, overview............................................. 9-3
Oscilloscope ................................................... 6-12
Output formats.............................................. 8-100
Overload, analyzer ......................................... 6-10
Overload, scope ............................................. 6-15
Overranging.................................................. 11-24
P
Parameter mask, basics............................... 11-47
Parameter mask, description................4-19 - 4-24
Pointer meters, needle damping .................... 4-22
POWER........................................................ 11-12
Pre-attenuation............................................... 5-10
Pre-attenuation, allowing for........................... 4-24
Print .................................................................. 2-7
Printer interfacing ........................................... 4-22
R
Radio-data sets, measurements ..........10-4 - 10-6
REDUCE RF-POWER ..................................... 1-8
Reset ................................................................ 2-7
Residual modulation, measurement............... 5-17
RF Input Power, permissible ............................ 1-8
RF level alteration, stepped.......................... 11-18
RF level jump ................................................. 5-21
RF power measurement, selecting units........ 4-21
RF power measurement, zero adjustment ....... 5-8
RF power, broadband measurement ............... 5-8
RF power, selective measurement................. 5-10
RF sockets, selection ....................................... 5-4
RMS meter, operation .................................. 11-27
Rotary Knobs, meaning.................................. 2-13
RS 232 interface............................................. 8-94
RS-232 configuration...................................... 4-22
RX mask, available instruments ..................... 4-11
RX mask, description .............................4-8 - 4-11
RX Specials.................................................... 4-31
RX/TX signal path ......................2-6, 11-14, 11-42
RX/TX switchover, automatic ....................... 11-41
12-26
S
SAT loop measurement ..................................10-6
Scope..............................................................6-12
Screen content, storing ...................................7-22
Scroll variable, enquiring...............................11-11
SEL.PWR........................................................4-39
Selective call ........................................ 5-38 - 5-52
Selective-call sets, testing...............................5-48
SELF-CHECK ...................................................4-6
SENS, RX Special ..........................................4-32
SENS, TX Special...........................................4-36
Sensitivity, measurement................................5-22
Sequential operating modes ...........................5-40
Sequential test parameters .............................5-46
Serial number....................................................4-5
Service Request............................................8-100
Setup...............................................................7-20
Shutdown upon defect ......................................1-3
Signal transfer, measurement.........................5-36
Slide Switches...................................... 2-15 - 2-16
sockets, back panel ............................. 2-16 - 2-20
Sockets, front panel ........................................2-14
Softkeys, explanation....................................11-11
Softkeys, operation .......................................11-20
Software identification .......................................4-5
Software versions ...........................................11-5
Special Characters, entry................................8-78
Special characters, keyboard..........................8-32
Specials ..........................................................4-31
SPECIALs, definition.....................................11-22
Spectrum analyzer ............................................6-3
Squelch measurement, declaration of
delay ...............................................................4-21
Squelch, internal ...........................................11-25
Squelch, measurement ...................................5-29
SQUELCH, Special.........................................4-34
standard accessories ........................................1-4
Status line .........................................................8-9
Status mask, description.......................... 4-3 - 4-5
STEP field, moving to ...................................11-18
String...............................................................8-17
Operand......................................................8-19
Variables.....................................................8-17
SYSTEM CARD ..............................................7-10
SYSTEM CARDs, write protection..................7-18
System programs, loading ..............................7-24
T
Test jobs .........................................................8-84
Test modulation ................................................5-3
Test setup .........................................................5-4
Tone sequences, selecting .............................5-42
Tone-sequence parameters, modifying ..........5-43
Total reset .....................................................11-12
Tracking ..........................................................6-19
Transmitter keying ..........................................5-42
TTL inputs .......................................................4-46
TX mask, available instruments ......................4-14
TX mask, description ........................... 4-12 - 4-14
TX Specials.....................................................4-36
U
Update, firmware.............................................12-8
Upper band, explanation...............................11-41
V
Variables in IEEE commands .........................8-16
Volt/Ammeter, DC ...........................................4-46
Voltage standing-wave ratio............................4-39
VSWR .............................................................4-39
Index
W
Warm start ........................................................4-3
Write protection...............................................7-18
Z
Zero adjustment, power meter ..........................5-8
Zoom display........................................ 4-25 - 4-30
Zoom, introduction ........................................11-29
12
12-27
Index
12-28