RTX™ Secure IR User Manual

RTX™ Secure IR User Manual
Models Covered:
RTX Secure 610-IR
RTX Secure 810-IR
RTX
TM
• Hardware-based AES 256-bit Encryption – Offers affordable military-grade AES 256-bit data protection
that encrypts the entire hard drive–including boot sector, OS, temp, and swap files.
• Meets Industry Standards – All CRU Secure 256-bit product architecture and encryption engine
designs meet FIPS140-2, level 3 per certification number 1471, and all CRU AES 256-bit security chips
are NIST & CSE validated (FIPS PUB 197).
• Easy-to-Use Security – One physical Security Key is used for all bays and the Security Key can be
stored separately from the unit to make the RTX Secure less vulnerable to attack if the unit is lost or
stolen. No PINs or passwords are needed.
• TrayFree™ Trayless Technology for RTX – TrayFree bays make installing drives a breeze. It really is as
easy as opening the door, sliding the drive in, and closing the door. No screws, no trays, it just works.
A7-680-0001 Revision: 1.1
Table of Contents
1. Default GUI Login Information
3
2. Pre-Installation Steps
8.5 System Configuration (cont.)
8.5.4 Mail Settings
14
8.5.5 Notification Settings
14
2.1 Accessories
3
2.2 Identifying Parts of the RTX Secure
3
8.6 iSCSI Configuration
15
2.3 Warnings and Notices
3
8.6.1 Entity Property
15
2.4 Terminology
4
8.6.2 NIC
15
8.6.3 Node
15
8.6.4 Session
16
8.6.5 CHAP Account
16
8.7 Volume Configuration
16
3. Introduction to RAID
3.1 Summary of RAID Levels
4
4. Introduction to iSCSI
4.1 What is iSCSI?
5
4.2 What is the Benefit of iSCSI?
5
8.7.1 Volume Creation Wizard
17
4.3 What is iSCSI Not?
5
8.7.2 Physical Disk
17
8.7.3 RAID Group
18
5. Installation Steps
2.1 Hard Drive Installation
5
8.7.4 Virtual Disk
19
2.2 Setting the Encryption Mode
6
8.7.5 Logical Unit
20
2.3 Operating the RTX Secure
6
6. Other Configuration Options
8.8 Enclosure Management
20
8.8.1 SES Configuration
20
20
21
6.1 Missing Security Key Notification
6
8.8.2 Hardware Monitor
6.2 Hot Swapping Encrypted Hard Drives
7
8.8.3 S. M. A. R. T.
6.3 Recovering From a Failed RAID
7
8.9 Maintenance
21
8.9.1 System Information
21
8.9.2 Upgrade
21
8.9.3 Reset to Factory Default
21
7
8.9.4 Import & Export
21
7.2.1 Navigating the LCD Menu
7
8.9.5 Event Log
21
7.2.2 LCD Functions
7
8.9.6 Reboot and Shutdown
21
7.2.3 RTX Secure LCD Menu Diagram
7
7.2.4 Instructions for Different
8
7. Network Configuration
7.1 Connecting the RTX Secure to Your
7
Network or Computer
7.2 Using the LCD to Configure GUI Access
8.10 Online Support
21
8.11 Logout
21
9. iSCSI Initiator Software
Network Connection Types
8. Using the GUI
8.1 GUI Indicators
9
8.2 GUI Menu Structure
10
8.3 Manually Creating a RAID Set
10
8.3.1 Creating a RAID Group
10
8.3.2 Creating a Virtual Disk
11
8.3.3 Attaching a Logical Unit
12
8.4 Quick Installation
12
8.5 System Configuration
12
8.5.1 System Settings
12
8.5.2 IP Address
13
8.5.3 Login Settings
13
9.1 Software Installation
22
9.2 Access the RTX Secure Using iSCSI Initiator Software
22
10. Usage with Windows and Mac Operating Systems
23
11. RAID Is Not A Backup
25
12. Encryption
25
13. Event Notifications
25
14. Working With Volumes Larger Than 2 TB in Size
28
15. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
29
16. Technical Specifications
31
Page 2
1. Default GUI Login Information
Front of the RTX Secure*
The following login and password information can be used to easily log
into the GUI (See Section 8 for instructions on how to log in to and use
the GUI).
Administrator Account
This account has read and write privileges.
Username: admin
Password: 1234
*RTX Secure 610-IR
model shown here.
Number of bays
available will be
different depending on
the specific model.
Key Lock
Drive Bay
Drive Power and
Activity LEDs
User Account
This account has read-only privileges.
Username: user
Password: 1234
Back of the RTX Secure
2. Pre-Installation Steps
Security Key Port
2.1 Check the Accessories with Your RTX Secure
Please contact CRU-DataPort if any items are missing or damaged.
The box should contain the following items:
Accessories
Quantity
RTX Secure Unit
1
ProSoft Data Backup CD*
1
Power cord
1
Ethernet Cable
2
Security Keys
3
Lanyards for Security Keys
3
Security Key ID Tag
3
Security Key Labels
6
Packet of Keys
1
Down Button
Encryption Switch
iSCSI Ethernet Ports
Power Switch
Power
Supply
2.3 Warnings and Notices
Please read the following before beginning installation.
General Care
Take a moment to familiarize yourself with the parts of RTX Secure.
This will help you to better understand the remaining instructions.
Escape Button
Common/Unique
Switch
Config GUI Port
2.2 Identifying Parts
Up Button
Encryption Status
LED Array
Cooling Fan
*Only packaged with SKUs that include hard drives
LCD Display
Cooling Fan
Power LED
Enter Button Access LED
Alarm LED
• The main circuit boards of the HDD carriers are susceptible to
static electricity. Proper grounding is strongly recommended
to prevent electrical damage to the enclosure or other
connected devices, including the computer host. Avoid all
dramatic movement, tapping on the unit, and vibration.
• Avoid placing the HDD carriers close to magnetic devices,
high voltage devices, or near a heat source. This includes any
place where the product will be subject to direct sunlight. Do
NOT allow water to make contact with the carrier or receiving
frame.
• Before starting any type of hardware installation, please
ensure that all power switches have been turned off and all
power cords have been disconnected to prevent personal injury
and damage to the hardware.
Page 3
• To avoid overheating, the RTX Secure should be operated in a
well-ventilated area and in such a way that sufficient airflow is
maintained across the controller chips.
• Remove the drives before transporting the RTX Secure to
prevent damage to the drive interfaces.
RAID
• Use only hard drives that are in perfect condition. Avoid using
drives that have ever developed bad sectors during previous
usage. This could lead to possible device failure or loss of data.
• The RTX Secure supports SATA hard drives of various
specifications and different capacities. However, we
recommend using drives of the same brand and type for
optimal performance. If drives of different capacities are used
in a RAID, the capacity of the smallest drive will determine
how much of each drive is used. The additional capacity on the
larger drives will not be used by the RAID.
• RAID level 0 will allow you to use the full combined capacity of
the drives, and offers the best data transfer speeds. However,
RAID 0 offers no protection for the data. If one drive fails in a
RAID 0, the data on all of the drives is irretrievably lost. Before
creating a RAID, investigate the various RAID types and choose
the one that is best for your needs.
• Always back up data before switching RAID types. Switching
RAID types will destroy current data. You must reformat
your drives afterwards.
Encryption
• Though the Security Key port is mechanically identical to the
standard Mini-USB port, inserting Security Keys into any other
Mini-USB port will damage the keys and render them useless.
Please only use Security Keys in RTX Secure products.
Likewise, inserting a Mini-USB cable or other device into the
RTX Secure Security Key port on the carrier can cause internal
damage and potentially lead to loss of data.
• Any time power is cycled on the RTX Secure, the Security Key
should be installed prior to recycling the power in order to
access the data on the drive.
2.4 Terminology
RAID
A
redundant array of independent hard disks. There are
different RAID levels with different degrees of data
protection, data availability, and performance.
JBOD
All disks act as independent drives. JBOD needs at least
one hard drive.
Physical Disk (PD)
Belongs to the member disk of one specific RAID group.
RAID Group (RG)
A collection of removable media. One RG consists of a set
of VDs and owns one RAID level attribute.
Virtual Disk (VD)
Each RG can be divided into several VDs. The VDs from
one RG have the same RAID level, but may have different
volume capacity.
Logical Unit Number
(LUN)
A unique identifier for a SCSI device which enables computers to differentiate among separate SCSI devices.
GUI
Graphical User Interface.
RAID cell
The number of subgroups of PDs in an RG.
Dedicated Spare
(DS)
A spare disk dedicated to one specific RG and is used
when another disk in the RG fails.
Global Spare (GS)
A spare disk that is shared among all RGs and is used
when another disk in an RG fails.
World Wide Name
(WWN)
A unique identifier that identifies a particular PD.
Challenge Handshake Authentication
Protocol (CHAP)
An optional security mechanism to control access to the
RTX Secure through its iSCSI data ports.
Internet
Storage Name
Service (iSNS)
This protocol allows automated discovery, management,
and configuration of iSCSI devices on a TCP/IP network.
3. Introduction to RAID
A RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) is an array of multiple
hard drives that are combined in a way that provides faster performance
and/or data safety. Your RTX unit is capable of creating and managing
several different varieties of RAID. You may choose your preferred RAID
level based on factors such as disk capacity, desired data safety, and
desired performance.
3.1 Summary of RAID Levels
The RTX Secure supports RAID Levels 0, 1, 3, 5, 6, 0+1, 10, 30, 50, 60,
& JBOD. RAID Level 5 is most commonly used by those seeking an
optimal balance of speed and data safety.
RAID
Level
Description
Min.
Drives
Data
Redundancy
Data
Transfer
Rate
0
Also known as striping. Data distributed across multiple drives in
the array. There is no data protection.
2
No data
protection
Very high
1
Also known as mirroring. All data
replicated on two separate disks.
This is a high availability solution,
but due to the 100% duplication,
only half the total disk capacity is
available for data storage.
2
1 drive
Reads
higher
than a
single
disk;
Writes
similar to
a single
disk
Page 4
RAID
Level
Data
Redundancy
Data
Transfer
Rate
3
Also known as Bit-Interleaved Parity. Data and parity information is
subdivided and distributed across
all disks. Parity must be equal to
the smallest disk capacity in the
array. Parity information normally
stored on a dedicated parity disk.
3
1 drive
Reads
are
similar to
RAID 0
5
Also known as Block-Interleaved
Distributed Parity. Data and parity information is subdivided and
distributed across all disks. Can
withstand the failure of one drive.
The total capacity of all but one
of the drives is available for data
storage.
3
1 drive
Reads
are
similar to
RAID 0
6
Two parity bits are used to create
double redundancy. Can withstand
the failure of two drives. The total capacity of all but two of the
drives is available for data storage.
4
2 drives
Slightly
less than
RAID 5
0+1
Also known as a mirror of striped
drives. Data and parity information is subdivided and distributed
across all disks. Parity must be
equal to the smallest disk capacity in the array. Parity information
normally stored on a dedicated
parity disk.
4
1 drives*
Transfer
rates are
similar to
RAID 0
Also known as a stripe of mirrors.
Data is striped across two separate disks and mirrored to another
disk pair.
4
30
Also known as a Striping Dedi­
cated Parity Array. RAID 30 breaks
up data into smaller blocks, and
then stripes the blocks of data to
each RAID 3 RAID set.
6
2 drives**
Transfer
rates are
similar to
RAID 0
50
RAID 50 combines the straight
block-level striping of RAID 0 with
the distributed parity of RAID 5
6
2 drives**
Transfer
rates are
similar to
RAID 0
60
RAID 60 combines the straight
block-level striping of RAID 0 with
the distributed double parity of
RAID 6
8
4 drives***
Transfer
rates are
similar to
RAID 0
JBOD
Just A Bunch of Disks. This is not
an actual RAID level because each
disk is treated as its own entity.
1
No data
protection
Very high
10
*
Description
Min.
Drives
1 drives*
Transfer
rates are
similar to
RAID 0
O
ne drive from each the RAID 0 and RAID 1 sets can fail without loss of data. If both
drives in either the RAID 0 or RAID 1 set fail, then the entire RAID will fail.
** O
ne drive from each of the striped RAID sets could fail without loss of data. If two
drives in the same striped RAID set fail, then the entire RAID will fail.
*** Two disks from each of the RAID 6 sets could fail without loss of data. If three disks
in the same striped RAID 6 set fail, then the entire RAID will fail.
4. Introduction to iSCSI
4.1 What is iSCSI?
iSCSI is a technology that allows a data storage device to be
accessed over a TCP/IP network using SCSI protocols. When your
computer’s OS receives a request for data access, it generates a SCSI
command and then sends an IP packet across a network or direct
Ethernet connection. A software utility known as an iSCSI initiator is
used to generate the SCSI commands. Such a utility must be installed
on the computer before it can access an iSCSI storage device (See
Section 9 for installation instructions).
4.2 What is the Benefit of iSCSI?
An iSCSI storage device can be placed anywhere throughout a
network, so the device can reside at a great distance from the
computer which accesses it. It is also a very fast connection when
used on a gigabit network, achieving speeds of 100 megabytes (MB)/
sec or more. The connection it uses (RJ45—standard Ethernet port)
is commonly found on desktop and laptop computers, so there is no
need to purchase potentially expensive host bus adapters to provide
a connection.
4.3 What is iSCSI Not?
iSCSI storage devices are not Network Attached Storage (NAS)
devices. They have no built-in server capabilities and therefore
cannot be accessed by more than one computer at a time. Multiple
computers can only access the data if the iSCSI device is first
attached to a single computer which is then set up as a server.
5 Installation Steps
5.1 Hard Drive Installation
a. Pull the ejection
handle on the
TrayFree bay to
open the bay
door.
b. Insert a bare
SATA hard drive
into the bay.
Make sure it is
label-side up with the SATA connection on the drive inserted first.
c. Shut the bay door.
d. You can optionally secure each bay door by inserting an RTX Key
into its key lock and turning it 90 degrees clockwise. Locking the
bay doors is not necessary to operate the RTX Secure.
Sticker Card
Use the stickers on the provided sticker card to label each drive if you
plan to use Unique Encrypted Mode (see Section 5.2). This will prevent
the drives from getting mixed up when they are removed from the bays.
Page 5
5.2 Setting the Encryption Mode
The RTX Secure has three modes that determine how it handles
Security Keys. The status of the mode is determined at power up.
After the unit has been successfully mounted by the system, the
Security Key may be removed and stored in a safe location. Changing
the position of the switches on the bottom of the RTX after the unit
has successfully been mounted will also not change the mode used
at power up.
NOTE: Always ensure that the correct encryption mode is
selected before powering on the RTX Secure. Failure to do so
may result in a failed RAID alarm. But don’t worry, your data will
remain intact and will be accessible once the correct encryption
mode is set.
Unique Encrypted Mode
This is the most secure mode of operation. A Security Key is required
to access data, and each bay is loaded with its own unique 256-bit
security value from the Security Key. These security values are all
stored in one Security Key. Flip the left switch on the bottom panel
down to “Unique” and the right switch down to “Encrypted.”
Common Encrypted Mode
This mode allows hard drives to be located in different bays within
the unit after the array is formatted. A Security Key is required to
access data. Each bay uses the same security value from the Security
Key. Flip the left switch on the bottom panel up to “Common” and
the right switch down to “Encrypted.” The Common Key LED will
illuminate.
Bypass Mode
A Security Key is not required to access data. This option cannot be
used with encrypted hard drives. Flip the right switch on the bottom
panel to “Bypass.” This option disables the Common/Unique switch.
The Bypass LED will illuminate and the drive bay Encryption Status
LEDs will remain off.
NOTE: When switching the encryption mode, the RAID
controller will still see a valid volume even when it shouldn’t.
You must rebuild the RAID whenever you change the encryption
mode. Failure to do so will not result in the loss of data, but will
result in the inability to see some or all established RAID sets.
b. If you haven’t yet set up network access, connect another Ethernet
cable into the “Config GUI” port.
c. Connect the RTX Secure to a power outlet with the included
power cord.
d. Install the hard drives into the RTX Secure (See Section 5.1).
e. Set the desired encryption mode (See Section 5.2).
f. Insert the Security Key into the Mini-USB Security Key Port on
the bottom of the RTX Secure if the drives being used in the RTX
Secure are encrypted or intended to be encrypted.
g. Flip the power switch on the rear of the unit to turn on the RTX
Secure.
h. When using the Unique or Common Encrypted Modes, wait for
each LED along the bottom panel of the RTX Secure to light green.
These encryption status LEDs correspond to one of the TrayFree
Bays above them with the leftmost LED representing the top bay
and the rightmost LED representing the bottom bay. When all
encryption status LEDs that correspond to a bay with a drive inside
are lit green, encryption is activated and the Security Key may be
removed and stored in a safe location.
i. Configure the RTX Secure for network access by following the
appropriate setup instructions in Section 7.
j. Configure your drives with at least one RAID set. Follow the
appropriate setup instructions in Section 8. CRU DataPort
recommends manually creating the RAID set (Section 8.3) or using
the Volume Creation Wizard (Section 8.7.1).
k. Configure the RTX Secure for access using the instructions in
Section 9 for setting up an iSCSI initiator.
Once a RAID set has been created and the user connects to the
RTX Secure through an iSCSI initiator, it will show up as a blank,
unallocated volume and you’ll need to format it in the RTX Secure
before you can use it. Note that formatting a volume or creating
a RAID set will erase all data on the volume, so be sure to
back up your data before installing the hard drives into this
enclosure and before beginning this operation. See Section 10
for instructions on how to format the volume with Mac or Windows
operating systems.
6 Other Configuration Options
5.3 Operating RTX Secure
a. Connect the RTX Secure to a computer or network using the
included Ethernet cables. Plug one cable into the “CH-1” port. You
can optionally plug a second cable into the “CH-2” port if having a
redundant connection or increased performance is needed.
6.1 Missing Security Key Notification
After the RTX Secure performs its power-on self-test and there is
no Security Key inserted, there is a five-second period where the
encryption status LEDs will blink red and orange. During this period
of time, a Security Key can still be inserted. When the RTX Secure
detects the key’s insertion, it will continue its power on sequence.
Page 6
6.2 Hot Swapping Encrypted Hard Drives
Hot swapping of hard drives is supported by the RTX Secure as a
default feature. Make sure the correct Security Key is installed when
hot swapping an encrypted hard drive. If the Security Key is not
installed or an incorrect Security Key is detected, the bay will not
power up and the bay’s Encryption Status LED will flash orange.
6.3 Recovering from a Failed RAID
If one hard drive of a RAID set with data redundancy has failed
or has been unplugged or removed, then the status of the RAID
Group will report that the RAID is degraded and the RTX Secure will
automatically search for a spare disk to rebuild the RAID. The RTX
Secure will first search for a dedicated spare disk, then a global spare
disk, and finally, if neither is found, it will wait for the user to remove
the failed hard drive and insert a working replacement.
The Security Key must be present when any failed drives are
replaced. If the Security Key is not installed or an incorrect Security
Key is detected, the bay will not power up and the bay’s Encryption
Status LED will flash orange, preventing the RAID from rebuilding.
NOTE: Always ensure that the correct encryption mode is
selected before powering on the RTX Secure. Failure to do so
may result in a failed RAID alarm. But don’t worry, your data will
remain intact and will be accessible once the correct encryption
mode is set.
7.2.1 Navigating the LCD menu
Use the four function keys, ▲(Up), ▼(Down), ESC (Escape) and
ENT (Enter) to manipulate the LCD interface. After pressing ENT
(Enter) key, you can use the ▲(Up) and ▼(Down) keys to select a
function. If there is an alarm or error message, the LCD will display
the related information.
7.2.2 LCD Functions
System Info
Displays the details of RAM and firmware.
Alarm Mute
Turns off the alarm sound when an error occurs.
Reset/Shutdown
Resets or shuts down the controller.
Quick Install
T o use “Quick Install” to set up a volume by three steps.
CRU-DataPort does not recommend using the Quick
Install option to set up your RTX Secure. For quick setup of a RAID, refer to Section 8.6.1.
Volume Wizard
Smart steps to create a volume. Please refer to Section
8.6.1 for detailed operation steps in the web GUI.
View IP Setting
Display the current IP address, subnet mask, and
gateway.
Change IP Config
Sets the IP address, subnet mask, and gateway. You can
choose to use DHCP server (for IP address allocation) or
manually specify the IP address.
Reset to Default
Restores factory defaults:
Default Administrator Name: admin
Default Administrator Password: 1234
Default User Name: user
Default User Password: 1234
Default IP address: 192.168.0.1
Default subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
Default gateway: 192.168.0.254
7 Network Configuration
7.1 Connecting the RTX Secure to Your Network or
Computer
a. Plug an Ethernet cable into the “Config GUI” port on the rear of the
RTX Secure.
b. Connect the other end of the Ethernet cable to your network.
This usually means plugging it into a router or hub. In an office
environment, you may have a network jack built into your office
wall. If a network connection is not available, you can connect the
Ethernet cable directly to an RJ45 (Ethernet) port on your computer.
7.2.3 RTX Secure LCD Menu Diagram
Use the following chart for reference when following the
instructions in Section 7.2.4 for setting up the RTX Secure
according to your network type.
1st
Menu
Screen
c. Connect the power cable to the rear of the RTX Secure and to a
grounded electrical outlet.
d. Turn on the RTX Secure’s power using the switch on the rear
panel.
7.2 Using the LCD to Configure the Config GUI Port
RTX has both an LCD interface and a GUI. The LCD interface has only
basic functionality and is mainly used to configure the IP address of
the Config GUI port. Once the Config GUI has been configured, the
GUI can be used to fully configure the RTX Secure.
2nd
Menu
Screen
[System
Info.]
CRUDataPort
RTX
[Alarm
Mute]
[Reset/
Shutdown]
3rd
Menu
Screen
4th
Menu
Screen
5th
Menu
Screen
6th
Menu
Screen
[Firmware
Version
x.x.x]
[RAM Size
xxx MB]
[ENT:OK
ESC: Back]
[Reboot]
[ENT:OK
ESC: Back]
[Shutdown]
[ENT:OK
ESC: Back]
Page 7
1st
Menu
Screen
2nd
Menu
Screen
3rd
Menu
Screen
4th
Menu
Screen
5th
Menu
Screen
[Quick
Install]
RAID 0
RAID 1
RAID 3
RAID 5
RAID 6
RAID 0+1
xxx GB
[Apply The
Config]
[ENT:OK
ESC: Back]
[Local]
RAID 0
RAID 1
RAID 3
RAID 5
RAID 6
RAID 0+1
[Use
default
algorithm]
[Volume
Wizard]
[Volume
Size] xxx
GB
6th
Menu
Screen
[Apply The
Config]
[ENT:OK
ESC: Back]
[IP Config]
[Static IP]
[IP Address]
[DHCP IP]
CRUDataPort
RTX
[View IP
Setting]
[IP Subnet
Mask]
[255.255.
255.0]
[Change IP
Config]
[Reset to
Default]
Static Network
a. Check your computer’s IP address, subnet mask, and gateway.
Mac users can find this information in System Preferences →
Network.
To do this in Windows, open Network and Sharing Center in the
Control Panel (Also called “View Network Status and Tasks”
under the “Network and Internet” category). On the left pane,
select “Change adapter settings”. Right-click on your network
(likely called Local Area Connection) and select Properties. On
the new window that opens, select “Internet Protocol Version 4
(TCP/IPv4)” and click the Properties button. Your computer’s IP
address, subnet mask, and gateway will be displayed.
b. On the RTX Secure’s LCD interface, press ENT and then scroll up
or down to “Change IP Setting”. Press ENT.
[IP Gateway]
[192.168.
010.254]
[DHCP]
NOTE: Not sure what type of network you have? If the
IP address displayed on the LCD starts with 169.254, this
indicates that the network is probably not DHCP-enabled.
Use the instructions for a static network.
c. Scroll up or down to find “Static”. Press ENT.
d. Change the IP address to closely match what your computer
is using. Or, if you are on a business network, have your IT
administrator assign you an IP address.
[ENT:OK
ESC: Back]
[IP Address]
Adjust IP
address
[IP Subnet
Mask]
Adjust
Submask
IP
[IP Gateway]
Adjust
Gateway
IP
[Apply IP
Setting]
[ENT:OK
ESC: Back]
[Static IP]
[ENT:OK
ESC: Back]
7.2.4 Instructions for Differing Network Connection Types
DHCP-Enabled Network
On DHCP networks, a new IP address is dynamically assigned to
RTX’s Config GUI port as soon as the network detects it. You can
determine this address by checking the LCD interface on the front
of the RTX Secure. It will appear in this format: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.
Simply type this IP address into a web browser on your computer.
This will access the RTX Secure’s GUI, which you will use to
configure the unit.
NOTE: The IP address you select must NOT be in use by
another device.
For example, if your computer’s IP address is 192.168.0.9,
you might change the RTX Secure’s IP to 192.168.0.7. On
smaller networks, each of the first three octets must
be the identical to your computer’s IP address! When
changing the IP address you’ll notice that a box flashes over
the digit to be changed. While the digit is selected, press
▲(Up) or ▼(Down) to change it. Press ENT to move to the
next digit.
e. After the IP address is set, enter the subnet mask address
exactly as it is shown on your computer’s TCP/IP settings.
f. Next, enter the gateway address exactly as it is shown on your
computer’s TCP/IP settings.
g. Confirm the settings change. To confirm, press ▲(Up) for “Yes”
and then press ENT again.
Page 8
h. Type the RTX Secure’s new IP address into a web browser on
your computer. This will access the RTX Secure’s GUI, which you
will use to configure the unit.
Direct Connection to a Computer
The instructions are similar to those for a static network (see
above), except that your computer will not have an IP address
assigned if it’s not a part of a network. Since the RTX Secure and
your computer must have similar IP addresses, you will assign an
IP address to your computer based upon the default IP address of
the RTX Secure.
The tables below show example settings. The first table shows the
type of settings that will appear by default. The next table shows
how the settings might look after you’ve made changes.
Before Making Changes
RTX Secure
IP Address
169.254.12.62
(Blank)
Mask
255.255.000.000
(Blank)
Gateway
000.000.000.000
(Blank)
a. Check the RTX Secure’s LCD to find out the IP address of the
Config GUI configuration port. It will appear in this format: xxx.
xxx.xxx.xxx.
b. Next, change your computer’s IP address so that all but the
last three digits match the RTX Secure’s address. For example,
if the RTX Secure’s IP address is 169.254.12.62, you might
assign your computer the number 169.254.12.63 (assuming no
other computer on the network is already using that number).
The process of changing your computer’s IP address varies
depending on its operating system.
Mac users can go to System Preferences → Network.
For modern Windows operating systems, open Network and
Sharing Center in the Control Panel (Also called “View Network
Status and Tasks” under the “Network and Internet” category).
On the left pane, select “Change adapter settings”. Rightclick on your network (likely called Local Area Connection)
and select Properties. On the new window that opens, select
“Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4)” and click the Properties
button. By default, your computer is probably set to receive a
new IP address automatically. Change the setting to manual
configuration and then type in the IP address.
c. Using the same process as the previous step, change the
computer’s Subnet Mask setting to match the RTX Secure’s
Subnet Mask setting.
Computer
After Making Changes
RTX Secure
Computer
IP Address
169.254.12.62
169.254.12.63
Mask
255.255.000.000
255.255.000.000
Gateway
169.254.12.63
(Blank)
Connecting From Home to Office
The RTX Secure can also be used over the Internet. If you are
connecting to an RTX Secure at your office from home, you will
need to contact your IT administrator to set up a VPN client in
order to log in to the office network. Once you have logged in to
the office network, you can access the RTX Secure just as if you
were actually at your office (see instructions for DHCP-enabled
Network, Static Network, or Direct Connection to a Computer,
depending on how your office network is configured).
8 Using the GUI
You will use the web browser-based GUI to set up a RAID and create
logical volumes on RTX. After setting up access to the GUI and accessing it through a web browser (see Section 7.2 for instructions), the
GUI’s main page should load, displaying a picture of RTX with several
options to the left. When you click on any option, you will be prompted
for a username and password. The default administrator username is
“admin” and the default password is “1234”.
d. Finally, use the RTX Secure’s LCD interface to change the
RTX Secure’s Gateway setting. It should match the IP address
you assigned to your computer. When changing the gateway
address you’ll notice that a box flashes over the digit to be
changed. While the digit is selected, press ▲(Up) or ▼(Down)
to change it. Press ENT to move to the next digit. After the
gateway address is set, press ENT all the way to the end and
confirm the settings change. To confirm, press ▲(Up) for “yes”
and then press ENT again.
e. Launch a web browser and type the RTX Secure’s IP address
into the URL bar, as if it were a website. This will access the
RTX Secure’s GUI, which you will use to configure the unit (See
Section 8).
8.1 GUI Indicators
The top right hand corner of the GUI window displays several
indicators.
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RAID Light
Green indicates that the RAID is working properly. Red
indicates a RAID error. If no RAID is set up, the light will
remain green.
Temperature Light
Green indicates normal. Red indicates abnormal system
temperature and probable overheating.
Voltage Light
Green indicates normal. Red indicates abnormal voltage
status like a power surge or a bad power supply.
Fan Light
Green indicates that the fan is working properly. Red
indicates a malfunctioning fan that needs to be replaced.
• Reset to factory default
• Import and export
• Event log
• Reboot and shutdown
• Online support
• Product Information and Specs
• FAQ and Downloads
• Logout
8.3 Manually Creating a RAID Set
Use these sets of instructions to create a RAID set. To quickly create
a RAID 0, 1, 3, 5, 6, or 0+1 set using the Volume Creation Wizard, see
Section 8.6.1.
8.3.1 Creating a RAID Group
To manually create a RAID set, you will first need to create a new
RAID Group.
8.2 GUI Menu Structure
• Quick installation
• System configuration
• System settings
• IP address
• Login settings
• Mail settings
• Notification settings
• iSCSI configuration
• Entity property
• NIC
• Node
• Session
• CHAP account
• Volume configuration
• Volume creation wizard
• Physical disk
• RAID group
• Virtual disk
• Logical unit
• Enclosure management
• SES configuration
• Hardware monitor
• S.M.A.R.T.
• Maintenance
• System information
• Upgrade
a. Click the “Create” button at the bottom of the page to open the
RAID Group creation screen.
b. Enter a name for the new RAID Group in the first field, and then
select your desired RAID type or JBOD from the dropdown box.
CRU-DataPort recommends RAID 5 for maximum performance,
capacity, and security. For more information on RAID, see
Section 3. Click “Select PD” to select the drives that will be
added to the RAID Group.
NOTE: Drives must be marked as Free Disks before they
can be added to a RAID Group. To set drives to Free Disks,
see Section 8.7.2, subsection “Modifying Physical Disks”.
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c. All available Free Disks will be displayed. Check the drives that
you wish to add to the RAID Group, then click “Confirm”.
Virtual Disks. You must create at least one Virtual Disk to access
the drives of the RTX Secure with a computer.
a. Click the “Create” button at the bottom of the page to open the
Virtual Disk creation screen.
b. You will see the screen below. Fill in the information and then
click “Confirm”. Each field is explained below the picture.
d. The selected Physical Disks will now be displayed in the
RAID Group creation screen. Enable or Disable Write Cache,
Standby, Readahead, and Command Queuing based on
your needs. Most RAID Groups will be fine with the default
settings. Then click “Next” to proceed to the confirmation
screen.
Name
Enter a name for the Virtual Disk.
e. On the confirmation screen, verify that the RAID level is correct
and all of the disks you selected are displayed under “RAID PD
slot”, then click “Confirm” to create the RAID Group.
f. The RAID Group will now display on the main RAID Group
screen. To finish manually creating a RAID set, a Virtual Disk
still must be created and a Logical Unit must be attached. Go to
the next section, “Creating a Virtual Disk”.
If you opted to create JBOD drives, skip to Section 8.3.3,
“Manually Attaching a Logical Unit” as Virtual Disks have
already been created for each JBOD drive.
8.3.2 Creating A Virtual Disk
After a RAID Group has been created, you can create associated
RG Name
Choose the RAID Group to which the Virtual Disk will be added
Capacity
Enter the capacity of the Virtual Disk. The default uses the
maximum capacity of the associated RAID Group. If you wish
to create multiple Virtual Disks on the selected RAID Group,
you will need to reduce the capacity below the maximum so
that there is space left on the RAID Group for additional Virtual
Disks.
Stripe Height (KB)
Determines how the RTX Secure organizes the RAID. Normally
the default option is preferred.
Block Size
Determines the minimum file size for files that will be stored
on the Virtual Disk. Higher block sizes can result in more
wasted space if many small files are saved to the drive, but
are necessary to take advantage of high capacity RAIDs. If
you are creating a Virtual Disk over 2TB in size for use
with MacOS 10.4.x or older, or for use with Windows
XP, you must increase the block size to 4096KB to take
advantage of the full capacity of the Virtual Disk. For
more information, see Section 14.
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Read/Write
Allows selection of cache type. Normally the default option is
preferred.
default setting on this is acceptable. Finally, select the
permissions that hosts accessing this Logical Unit will have.
Then click “Confirm”.
Priority
Determines the priority that the RTX Secure will give to RAID
activities (rebuild and initialization) versus priority given to
file transfers. “High priority” will result in slower file transfers
during initialization, but provide for faster initialization.
BG Rate
Background Task Priority. The higher the number, the more
priority will be given to background input/output.
Readahead
Choose whether file prefetching should be enabled.
Erase
Wipes out the original data in the Virtual Disk to prevent the OS
from recognizing it. The options are “None”, “First 1GB”, and
“Full Disk.”
c. The Virtual Disk will now display on the main Virtual Disk
screen. If you have enabled an Erase option, do not shut down
or reboot the RTX Secure while the Virtual Disk is initializing or
the erase process will stop.
To finish manually creating a RAID set, at least one Logical Unit
must be attached. Go to the next section, “Manually Attaching
a Logical Unit”.
8.3.3 Attaching a Logical Unit
c. The main Logical Unit Screen will now display the Logical Unit
you have just created. If you’ve been following the instructions
for manually creating a RAID set, you have now completed
setup. Once the RAID set has finished initializing, you will be
able to access it through iSCSI initiator software (see Section 9
for installation and connection instructions).
8.4 Quick Installation
CRU-DataPort does not recommend using the Quick Installation
option to set up your RTX Secure. For quickly setting up a RAID, refer
to Section 8.7.1.
Quick Install uses all physical disks in the RTX Secure and the
maximum amount of space they contain to create a RAID Group using
one Virtual Disk. There will be no space set aside for spares. If some
disks are used in other RAID Groups, Quick Install cannot be run.
8.5 System Configuration
The System Configuration menu gives access to a number of options
used to configure the RTX Secure system properties. Click on “System
Configuration” to access the following menu options: System
Settings, IP Address, Login Settings, Mail Settings, and Notification
Settings.
You will need to attach at least one Logical Unit to a Virtual Disk
to access its RAID Group, although multiple Logical Units can be
attached to the same Virtual Disk.
a. Click the “Attach” button to attach a Logical Unit to a Virtual
Disk.
b. You will see the screen below. Fill in the information. Select the
Virtual Disk to which you wish to attach a Logical Unit. The Host
name can remain as an asterisk if you want any host to access
the Virtual Disk. Otherwise, change the field to limit access to
specific hosts. Then select the LUN that will be used. The
8.5.1 System Settings
System Settings allows you to view and change the system name,
change the date and time, and turn the System Indication LED on
or off.
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System Name
The default system name is “RTX-IR” . To change the system name,
simply click in the box displaying the system name and highlight or
delete the part of the name you wish to change, then type the new
name and click the “Confirm” button at the bottom of the page.
Date and Time
The Date and Time option allows you to change the date and time
settings of the RTX Secure. To change the date or time, check
the “Change date and time” check box and then click in the field
that you wish to change. Highlight or delete the information, then
type in the new information and click the “Confirm” button at the
bottom of the page.
will appear verifying that changes have been made. To reverse this
action, press the “Confirm” button again.
8.5.2 IP Address
The IP Address option lists the RTX Secure’s MAC address and
allows you to view and modify the IP information of the Config
GUI port on the RTX Secure. This option does not allow the
administrator to configure the IP address of the individual data
ports. This must be done using the LCD interface on the front of
the RTX Secure (see Section 7.2).
To change the time zone, click the drop down box and then scroll
up or down until you reach the correct time zone. Then choose that
time zone and click the “Confirm” button at the bottom of the page.
After confirming, a dialog box will appear verifying that changes
have been made.
Alternatively, an NTP (Network Time Provider) can be used to sync
the RTX Secure’s time information with that of a standardized
server. To use an NTP, click the NTP check box, then input the
server information in the server field.
An RTX Secure configured for DHCP.
8.5.3 Login Settings
The Login Settings page allows you to configure the Auto Logout
and Login Lock features, as well as change the administrator
account and user passwords.
Login Configuration
• Auto Logout will automatically log the user out of the system
after a set period of 5 minutes, 30 minutes, or 1 hour of
inactivity.
Click the “Confirm” button at the bottom of the page to update
the time settings. A dialog box will appear to inform you that the
changes have been made. The updated settings will reflect the
time settings of the NTP.
• Login Lock prevents multiple users from using the GUI
simultaneously. Both features are disabled by default. To
enable a feature, click on the dropdown menu associated,
select the new option, and click the “Confirm” button.
System Indication
To turn the System Indication LED on or off, select the “Confirm”
button in the System Indication box. After confirming, a dialog box
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Admin Password
The Admin Password option allows you to change the password
for the administrator account, which is used to access and modify
the settings in the GUI. The default username is ‘admin’ and
the password is ‘1234’. To change the password, click on the
“Change admin password” check box. Then enter the old password
in the first field. Type the new password in the second and third
field and finally click the “Confirm” button at the bottom of the
page.
User Password
The User password option allows you to change the password
for the user account, which is used to view, but not modify the
settings in the GUI. The default username is ‘user’ and the
password is ‘1234’. To change the password, click on the
“Change user password” check box. Then enter the old password
in the first field. Type the new password in the second and third
field and finally click the “Confirm” button at the bottom of the
page.
8.5.5 Notification Settings
Notification Settings allows you to configure the Simple Network
Management Protocol (SNMP), Windows Messenger events, the
System Log server, Event Log filters, and enable or disable the
internal buzzer.
SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol)
SNMP can be configured to send trap messages to up to three
different addresses on the network. To add an address, simply
enter the IP address of the receiving server or computer, then
click the “Confirm” button at the bottom of the page. Note: The
receiving server must be configured to receive SNMP messages.
For more information on SNMP, you may wish to consult the third
party website: www.systemdisc.com/snmp
Messenger
The RTX Secure can be configured to send instant messages to up
to 3 addresses when events, warnings, or errors occur.
8.5.4 Mail Settings
The RTX Secure can be configured to send email to up to 3
addresses when events, warnings, and errors occur. Contact your
IT administrator to set up an email address for the RTX Secure and
to input the proper SMTP settings.
Syslog Server (System Log Server)
The Syslog Server option allows configuration for error, warning,
and information reporting via a port on the server. Enter the server
IP under Server IP/hostname and the port used in the UDP Port
line (the default port is 514). The Facility can be changed between
“User”, “Kern”, and “Local1” through “Local7” using the dropdown
box. Select the check boxes for “Info”, “Error”, and “Warning” that
pertain to the information that you want to have reported.
Event Log Filter
The Event Log Filter allows you to display event messages. To
configure what types of messages are displayed, select the
check boxes for “Info”, “Error”, and “Warning” that pertain to the
information that you want to have reported. The options for Pop
Up Events will display those events as a pop-up notification in your
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browser. The options for Show on LCM will display the selected
events in the RTX Secure IR’s LCD screen.
Buzzer
To disable the buzzer, place a checkmark next to “Always disable
buzzer,” and click the “Confirm” button at the bottom of the page.
8.6 iSCSI Configuration
The iSCSI configuration menu options are generally used to modify
the connection properties of the RTX Secure. Click on “iSCSI
configuration” to access the following menu options: Entity Property,
NIC, Node, Session, and CHAP Account.
LAG
Displays whether Link Aggregation is enabled or
disabled.
LAG NO
Displays the LAG number.
DHCP
Shows whether the channel has DHCP enabled.
IP Address
Displays the IP address currently in use by the channel.
Netmask
Displays the subnet mask being used by the channel.
Gateway
Displays the IP gateway. In a DHCP network, it will
display the IP of the router to which the RTX Secure is
connected.
Jumbo Frame
Displays whether jumbo frames are enabled or disabled. The maximum jumbo frame size is 3900 bytes.
MAC Address
Displays the MAC address of each channel.
Link
Displays the status of each channel. If an Ethernet cable
is connecting the RTX Secure to a network or computer,
the Link will display “Up”.
Hover your mouse cursor over the appropriate button in the
“Name” column to reveal a menu of configurable options.
IP Settings for iSCSI Ports
Click on this option in order to enable DHCP or to manually set
up a channel’s IP Address, Netmask, and Gateway. Fill in the
appropriate information and then click the “Confirm” button.
8.6.1 Entity Property
The Entity Property option allows you to add an Internet Storage
Name Service (iSNS) server IP address to the iSNS server group, to
which the iSCSI initiator can send queries. Simply enter the iSNS
IP address in the iSNS IP field and click “Confirm”. Note: Setting an
iSNS is not necessary to use the RTX Secure.
Set the Default Gateway
Sets the selected channel as the default gateway for the RTX
Secure. To disable the default gateway, hover your mouse cursor
over the appropriate button in the “Name” column again and select
the “Disable default gateway” option. Only one channel can be the
default gateway.
Enable Jumbo Frames
Enables jumbo frames for the associated channel. To disable jumbo
frames, hover your mouse cursor over the appropriate button in
the “Name” column again and select the “Disable jumbo frames”
option. The maximum jumbo frame size is 3900 bytes.
Ping Host
Opens a dialog box in which the user can input the host’s IP
address to initiate a ping test.
8.6.2 NIC
Click on “NIC” to view the IP settings of the two gigabit Ethernet
data ports. You will see the following information:
8.6.3 Node
The Node option displays the RTX Secure’s entity name, which
will be seen by the iSCSI initiator, and allows you to toggle CHAP
(Challenge Handshake Authorization Protocol) on or off.
Name
NIC Column Descriptions
L AN1 corresponds to the port labeled CH-1 (Channel 1)
on the back of the RTX Secure, while LAN2 corresponds
to the port labeled CH-2 (Channel 2).
CHAP is disabled by default. To turn on CHAP, click the
“Authenticate” button. This will bring up a screen with a dropdown
box. Click the dropdown box and select “CHAP”, then click the
“Confirm” button.
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c. The new CHAP account will appear on the main CHAP account
screen:
After turning on CHAP authentication, you must set up at least one
CHAP account (see Section 8.6.5).
8.6.4 Session
The session function allows you to view information on a session
initiated by an iSCSI initiator application (see Section 9), including
Initiator Name, TPGT, Error Recovery Level, and Error Recovery
Count.
Hover your mouse over the button in the “No.” column and click on
“List connection.” It will list all the connections of the session.
8.6.5 CHAP Account
CHAP (Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol) is a common
iSCSI authentication method. When CHAP is enabled, the RTX
Secure will require authentication at login through an iSCSI
initiator (see Section 9). Authentication also occurs at various
times during the connection, by way of transferring the username,
initiator password (also called “initiator secret”), and target
password (also called “target secret”). The RTX Secure uses
the same value for initiator secret and target secret. For added
security, the authentication information is hashed and a token is
sent instead of the information itself.
Modifying the CHAP Account
Hover your mouse cursor underneath the username to bring
up a menu. Select “Modify user information” to change the
username and password, or select “Delete” to remove the user. A
confirmation box will appear. Click “OK” and the username will be
deleted from the RTX Secure.
8.7 Volume Configuration
The Volume Configuration menu provides the options you will use to
set up one or RAID volumes of varying levels on the RTX Secure. Click
on Volume Configuration to view the following menu options: Volume
Creation Wizard, Physical Disk, Volume Group, User Data Volume,
Cache Volume, and Logical Unit.
a. To use CHAP, you will need to turn on CHAP authentication (see
Section 8.6.3) and then follow the steps there to set up a CHAP
account.
b. After clicking on the “CHAP Account” option, you will see the
following screen:
The following diagram describes the relationship of RAID
components in the RTX Secure.
Click “Create” to create a new user. This brings up a screen
with fields for User, Secret, and Confirm. Enter a user name in
the first field, and a 12-16 character password to use as the
secret in the second and third fields. Click the “Confirm” button.
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Each RAID Group can be divided into several Virtual Disks. The Virtual
Disks in one RAID Group share the same RAID level, but may have
different volume capacity. All Virtual Disks share the Cache Volume
to execute a data transfers. A Logical Unit Number (LUN) is a unique
identifier that the computer uses to distinguish and access SCSI
devices.
fine, click “Confirm.” The GUI will navigate to the Virtual Disk
page which now shows a new Virtual Disk with the name
similar to “QUICK#####”. Your Virtual Disk is now initializing
and may take several hours to complete.
8.7.1 Volume Creation Wizard
Click on the “Volume Creation Wizard” option to easily set up your
RTX Secure with a RAID 0, 1, 3, 5, 6, or 0+1 set. For using higher
RAID types or configuring the drives for JBOD access, see Section
8.3.
If any disks are not assigned to a Virtual Disk, it will walk you
through a series of steps to create a RAID set. If there are previous
RAID Group or Virtual Disk configurations present, the wizard may
limit the choices you can select in the following steps.
8.7.2 Physical Disk
Click the Physical Disk option to view and modify the status of the
drives installed in the RTX Secure.
a. Select your desired RAID Level from the drop-down box, then
click the “Next” button. The drop-down box displays the drive
capacity next the RAID Level.
b. Choose how many disks you wish to use in the new RAID
Group. The default algorithm uses all of the disks not already
assigned to a RAID Group. Or you can choose how many
disks you want the new RAID Group to use by selecting the
“Customization” radio button and then using the drop-down box
to select the number of disks. The drop-down box displays the
drive capacity next the number of disks.
c. On the next screen, fill in the size in MB for how large you want
the new RAID Group to be, then click the “Next” button. The
maximum size is filled in by the wizard automatically, so in most
cases you simply need to click the “Next” button.
d. Step 4 summarizes the choices you have made. If anything is
incorrect, select the “Back” button and navigate backwards
through the steps to change your options. If everything looks
Physical Disk Column Descriptions
Slot
The slot number of the hard drive. “1” corresponds to the
top bay of the RTX Secure, “8” to the bottom bay. Hover
your mouse cursor over the button below the slot number
to bring up configuration options for that particular hard
drive, which are detailed below.
Size
The logical capacity of the drive. Can be displayed in
megabytes (MB) or gigabytes (GB).
RG Name
The name of the RAID Group to which the drive is assigned, if any.
Status
Displays the operational status of the disk.
•
Online → The hard drive is online.
•
Rebuilding → The hard drive is being rebuilt.
•
Transitioning → The hard drive is being migrated
or is being replaced by another disk during rebuilding.
•
Scrubbing → The hard drive is being scrubbed.
Health
Displays general operational health of the disk.
•
Good → The hard drive is good.
•
Failed → The hard drive has failed.
•
Error Alert → The hard drive’s S.M.A.R.T. monitoring system is reporting an error.
•
Read Errors → The hard drive has unrecoverable
read errors.
Usage
Displays how the disk is currently being used.
•
RAID Disk (RD) → The hard drive has been assigned to a RAID Group.
•
Free Disk (FD) → The hard drive is free for use.
•
Dedicated Spare (DS) → The hard drive has been
set as a dedicated spare of a RAID Group.
•
Global Spare (GS) → The hard drive has been set
as a global spare of all RAID Groups.
Vendor
Displays the manufacturer of the hard drive.
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Serial
Displays the serial number of the hard drive.
Rate
Displays the transfer speed of the hard drive.
•
SATA 1.5Gb/s → SATA1 disk
•
SATA 3.0Gb/s → SATA2 or SATA3 disk
Write Cache
The hard drive’s write cache is enabled or disabled. The
default setting is Enabled.
Standby
The hard drive will automatically spin down to save
power. The default setting is Disabled.
Readahead
The hard drive has file prefetching enabled. The default
setting is Enabled.
Command Queuing
Newer hard drives can queue multiple commands and
handle them one by one. The default setting is Enabled.
Modifying Physical Disks
Hover your mouse cursor over the button below the slot number to
bring up a series of options for that particular hard drive.
Set Free Disk
Frees the disk from the RAID Group it is attached to and makes
it free for use. If the disk is not currently attached to a RAID
Group, this option is grayed out.
The RAID Group screen displays the following information:
RAID Group Column Descriptions
No.
The RAID Group number. Hover your mouse cursor over
the button below the RAID Group number for configuration options.
Name
The name of the RAID Group.
Total
The total capacity of the RAID Group. The drop-down box
allows the user to view the capacity in either MB or GB.
Free
The capacity of the RAID Group that hasn’t yet been
assigned to a Virtual Disk. The drop-down box allows the
user to view the capacity in either MB or GB.
#PD
The number of hard drives in the RAID Group.
#VD
The number of Virtual Disks that have been created as
part of the RAID Group.
Status
The status of the RAID Group.
•
Online → The RAID Group is online.
•
Offline → The RAID Group is offline.
•
Rebuild → The RAID Group is currently being
rebuilt.
•
Migrate → The RAID Group is currently being
migrated.
•
Scrubbing → The RAID Group is being scrubbed.
•
Parity Checking → The RAID Group’s parity is
being checked.
Health
The health of the RAID Group.
•
Good → The RAID Group is good.
•
Failed → The RAID Group has failed.
•
Degraded → The RAID Group is not healthy and
incomplete, due either to a removed hard drive or a
failed drive.
RAID
The RAID level of the RAID Group.
Set Global Spare
Sets the disk as a spare disk for all existing RAID Groups.
Set Dedicated Spare
Opens a page that allows the administrator to attach the disk as
a spare to a specific RAID Group.
Disk Scrub
Scrubs the disk with specific data patterns to securely erase its
data.
Upgrade
Opens a page that allows the administrator to upgrade the hard
drive firmware. The administrator may simultaneously upgrade
all the hard drives in the RTX Secure that are identical to the
one selected.
Turn on Indication LED
Turns on the indication LED for the bay in which the physical
disk resides.
More information
Displays more details about the hard drive.
8.7.3 RAID Group
The RAID Group screen displays information about all existing
RAID Groups. For instructions on how to create a RAID Group, see
Section 8.3.1.
Modifying RAID Groups
Hover your mouse cursor over the button below the RAID Group
number to bring up a series of options for that particular RAID
Group.
Migrate
Allows the administrator to change the RAID Group’s RAID level
or add disks to the RAID without data loss. The total size of the
new RAID Group must be larger or equal to the original RAID
Group or the action will trigger an “Invalid RG config” error.
Move
Allows the administrator to change which disks on which the
RAID Group exists without losing data. The total size of the new
RAID Group must be larger or equal to the original RAID Group
or the action will trigger an “Invalid RG config” error.
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Activate
Activate RAID Group disk roaming. This option can only be
executed when the RAID Group status is offline.
Status
The status of the Virtual Disk.
•
Online → The Virtual Disk is online.
•
Offline → The Virtual Disk is offline.
•
Initiating → The Virtual Disk is being initialized.
•
Rebuild → The Virtual Disk is being rebuilt.
•
Migrate → The Virtual Disk is being migrated.
•
Rollback → The Virtual Disk is being rolled back.
•
Parity Checking → The Virtual Disk is undergoing
a parity check.
Type
Indicates that the Virtual Disk is part of a RAID Group.
Health
The health of the Virtual Disk.
•
Optimal → The Virtual Disk is working well and
there is no failed physical disk within the RAID
Group.
•
Degraded → At least one disk from the RAID
Group that the Virtual Disk belongs to is failed or
removed from the RTX Secure.
•
Failed → The RAID Group that the Virtual Disk
belongs to has failed and cannot recover from data
loss.
•
Partially Optimal → The Virtual Disk has experienced recoverable read errors. After passing a parity check, the health status will change to Optimal.
R%
Shows the percentage completed of an initialization or
RAID rebuild.
RAID
Displays the RAID level.
#LUN
The number of Logical Unit Numbers that are attached to
the Virtual Disk.
RG Name
The name of the RAID Group to which the Virtual Disk
belongs.
Deactivate
Deactivate the RAID Group disk roaming. This option can only be
executed when the RAID Group is online.
Confirm Parity Check
Regenerates parity for the RAID Group. This option allows
the administrator to regenerate parity when a parity/data
inconsistency is found, or to check parity/data consistency only.
Only applies to RAID sets with parity.
Delete
Deletes the RAID Group.
Set Disk Property
Enable or disable write caching, standby, readahead, and
command queuing.
More Information
Displays more details about the RAID Group.
8.7.4 Virtual Disk
The Virtual Disk screen displays any existing Virtual Disks and
allows you to create and delete Virtual Disks. For instructions on
how to create a Virtual Disk, see Section 8.3.2.
The following information is displayed:
Virtual Disk Column Descriptions
No.
The Virtual Disk number. Hover your mouse cursor over
the button below the Virtual Disk number for configuration
options.
Name
The name of the Virtual Disk.
Total
The total capacity of the Virtual Disk. Can be displayed in
MB or GB.
Write
The write status of the Virtual Disk.
•
WT → Write Through
•
WB → Write Back
•
RO → Read Only
Priority
Displays the priority that the RTX Secure will give to RAID
activities (rebuild, initialization) versus priority given to
file transfers.
•
HI → High Priority
•
MD → Medium Priority
•
LO → Low Priority
BG Rate
Background Task Priority. 4 / 3 / 2 / 1 / 0 → The default
value is 4. The higher the number, the more priority will be
given to background input/output.
Modifying Virtual Disks
Hover your mouse cursor over the button below the Virtual Disk
number to bring up a series of options for that particular Virtual
Disk.
Extend
Extend the Virtual Disk capacity.
Confirm Parity Check
Regenerates parity for the RAID Group. This option allows
the administrator to regenerate parity when a parity/data
inconsistency is found, or to check parity/data consistency only.
Only applies to RAID sets with parity.
Delete
Deletes the Virtual Disk.
Set Property
Allows the administrator to change the Virtual Disk name,
change the write status, priority, background task priority, and
enable or disable Readahead.
Attach LUN
Attach a Logical Unit Number to the Virtual Disk.
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Detach LUN
Detach a Logical Unit Number from the Virtual Disk.
List LUN
Lists all Logical Unit Numbers attached to the Virtual Disk.
More Information
Displays more details about the Virtual Disk, including the LUNs
that have been attached to it.
8.7.5 Logical Unit
8.8.1 SES Configuration
The Logical Unit is what your computer will use to access and
manage SCSI devices. For instructions on how to attach a Logical
Unit to a Virtual Disk, see Section 8.3.3.
The following information is displayed:
Logical Unit Column Descriptions
Host
The host address which can access the attached Virtual
Disk. An asterisk indicates that any host may access the
attached Virtual Disk. Hover your mouse cursor over the
button below the Host for configuration options.
LUN
The Logical Unit Number (LUN).
Permission
Displays the permissions given to hosts accessing the
RAID set through this Logical Unit.
•
Read-Write → Has permissions to read and write
to the disks.
•
Read-Only → Has permission to read but not
write to the disks.
VD Name
The name of the associated Virtual Disk.
#Session
The number of host sessions currently accessing the
Logical Unit.
SCSI Enclosure Services, or SES, is a command set that is used
to manage and sense the state of the power supplies, cooling
devices, displays, indicators, and individual drives of a SCSI
device. The RTX Secure is an SES compliant enclosure. However,
in order to use manage the RTX Secure using SES you must have
the appropriate software installed on your computer. An example
is SMARTMon, a S.M.A.R.T. disk monitor, offered by Santools at
www.santools.com.
To enable SES on the RTX Secure, you must have a Virtual Disk set
up and a Logical Unit attached. Once you have done this, navigate
to SES Configuration and simply click the “Enable” button, then
click “Confirm”. The SES-enabled LUN will show up on the main
SES screen.
8.8.2 Hardware Monitor
The Hardware Monitor displays information about the voltages and
temperatures of the RTX Secure.
Modifying Logical Units
Hover your mouse cursor over the button below the Host to bring
up a series of options for that particular Logical Unit.
Detach
Detaches the Logical Unit from a Virtual Disk and deletes it.
8.8 Enclosure Management
Enclosure management gives access to the following menu options:
SES Configuration, Hardware Monitor, and S.M.A.R.T.
Auto Shutdown
When this checkbox is enabled, the RTX Secure will automatically
shut down if any of each items’ voltage or temperature strays
outside of the minimum or maximum displayed values. Auto
shutdown is enabled by default to protect the hardware of the
RTX Secure.
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8.8.3 S.M.A.R.T.
S.M.A.R.T. (Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology)
is a diagnostic tool for hard drives that gives advanced warning
in some cases of hard drive failure. S.M.A.R.T. measures various
attributes of a hard drive at all times to detect if certain values
have moved outside of a certain range. The S.M.A.R.T. option
allows you to view the S.M.A.R.T. status of all of your hard drives.
RTX Secure’s S.M.A.R.T. technology only supports SATA drives.
SAS drives do not have this function and will display “N/A” in the
GUI.
8.9 Maintenance
The Maintenance screen gives access to the firmware and
configuration functions: System Information, Upgrade, Reset to
Factory Default, Import and Export, Event Log, and Reboot and
Shutdown.
SPECIFIC INSTRUCTION FROM CRU-DATAPORT TECHNICAL
SUPPORT. Doing so could result in malfunction of your RTX
Secure.
8.9.3 Reset to Factory Default
The Reset to Factory Default option allows you to restore settings
to the factory defaults. Click on the “Confirm” button to verify.
8.9.4 Import & Export
The Import & Export function allows you to import or export a
firmware configuration file. DO NOT USE THIS FUNCTION
WITHOUT SPECIFIC INSTRUCTION FROM CRU-DATAPORT
TECHNICAL SUPPORT. Doing so could result in malfunction of
your RTX Secure.
8.9.5 Event Log
The Event Log allows you to view event messages. Check or
uncheck the checkboxes of “Info”, “Warning”, and “Error” filter the
events displayed. Click the “Download” button to save the entire
event log as a text file. Click the “Clear” button to clear all event
logs. Click the “Mute” button to stop the alarm if it is engaged.
8.9.1 System Information
Click on System Information to display the RTX Secure’s hardware
profile information.
8.9.6 Reboot and Shutdown
The Reboot and Shutdown feature allows you to reboot or
shutdown the RTX Secure’s RAID and LCD controllers. Note:
Choosing “Shutdown” will not shut down the physical components
of the RTX Secure (fans, drives, power supply). However, it
will flush data from the cache to the physical drives, which is
recommended to prevent data corruption before physically shutting
down using the power switch on the back of the unit.
8.10 Online Support
8.9.2 Upgrade
The upgrade function allows you to upgrade the firmware of the
RTX Secure. DO NOT USE THIS FUNCTION WITHOUT
This screen contains helpful links to cru-dataport.com, including one
for the “Product Information and Specs” of your unit and one for
“FAQs and Downloads”.
8.11 Logout
This screen allows you to log out of and exit the GUI.
Page 21
9 iSCSI Initiator Software
9.1 Software Installation
This is a required step. Any computer must have initiator software
installed before it can connect to an iSCSI device such as the
RTX Secure. Both freeware and commercial software utilities are
available for this purpose.
Note: Initiator software is not required for additional computers
that share files with the host computer attached to the RTX Secure.
In such a scenario, the host computer acts as a server to the other
computers. Only the computer directly accessing the RTX Secure
needs initiator software.
NOTE: Initiator software is not required for additional computers
that share files with the host computer. In such a scenario, the
host computer acts as a server to the other computers. Only
the computer directly accessing the RTX Secure needs initiator
software.
9.1.1 Windows
Users can download free Microsoft iSCSI Initiator software at the
following URL:
www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=18986
Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, and Windows
Server 2008 R2 users already have the Microsoft iSCSI Initiator
installed by default, which can be launched by double-clicking on
the iSCSI Initiator icon in the Administrative Tools folder in the
Control Panel.
9.1.2 MacOS X
Studio Network Solutions makes globalSAN iSCSI initiator, a freeto-try utility for MacOS X, available here:
www.studionetworksolutions.com/support/faq.php?pi=11&fi=51
ATTO Technologies also makes a commercial iSCSI initiator for
MacOS X:
www.attotech.com/xtend.html
9.2 A
ccess the RTX Secure Using iSCSI Initiator
Software
9.2.1 Basic Access Instructions
The process for using initiator software to access the RTX Secure
varies depending on the software used. Read the documentation
accompanying the software for details. However, the general steps
are as follows:
a. Launch the initiator application.
b. Type in the IP address of the CH-1 or CH-2 connection on the
RTX Secure (depending which connection link is shown as “Up”
on the NIC screen (this as well as the address is determined in
Section 8.6.2). This will be a different IP address than the one
used to access the GUI.
c. The RTX Secure volume will mount to your computer and appear
as an internal SCSI drive. Newly-created volumes will need to
be formatted before they can be used. If you purchased the RTX
Secure with drives preinstalled by CRU-DataPort, the volume(s)
will already have been created and formatted appropriately for
your computer.
Below are additional instructions for two common iSCSI Initiator
utilities:
9.2.2 Microsoft iSCSI Initiator for Windows
This software can by launched by double-clicking on the iSCSI
Initiator icon in the Administrative Tools folder in the Control Panel.
Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows Server 2008
a. If you have set up CHAP in the RTX Secure GUI (Section 8.6.5),
input the proper information by clicking on “General” tab and
then clicking on the “Secret” button.
b. Select the “Discovery” tab. Under Target Portals, click the
“Add” or “Add Portal…” button and enter the IP address for the
RTX Secure’s CH-1 or CH-2 port (depending which connection
link is shown as “Up” on the NIC screen in the GUI (this as well
as the address is determined in Section 8.6.2).
c. Next, select the “Targets” tab. You should see the RTX Secure
in the list of available targets.
9.1.3 Linux
d. Select the RTX Secure target and click “Log on.” Leave the
default settings alone and click “OK”.
Open-iSCSI initiator software is available for Linux users to
download.
If the log-on is successful you’ll now be able to use the RTX Secure
just like any other disk attached to your computer.
Website: www.open-iscsi.org/
Readme: www.open-iscsi.org/docs/README
Page 22
Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2
10.1.2 Formatting a Drive
a. After you launch the initiator, input the IP address for the RTX
Secure’s CH-1 or CH-2 port (depending which connection link is
shown as “Up” on the NIC screen in the GUI (this as well as the
address is determined in Section 8.6.2).
When you first mount a drive to a Windows operating system, a
pop-up window will ask you if you would like to format it. Click
“Format Disk” and skip to Step F. If the prompt does not pop up,
use the Disk Management utility by following these steps:
b. Click on the “Quick Connect…” button.
a. Right-click on the My Computer icon on the desktop (Windows
XP) or the Computer button in the Start Menu (Windows Vista,
7, Server 2008, Server 2008 R2), then select “Manage”. The
Computer Management window will open.
If the log-on is successful you’ll now be able to use the RTX
Secure just like any other disk attached to your computer.
NOTE: The Quick Connect feature does not support
advanced connection types like CHAP. For instructions on
connecting to an iSCSI target using advanced settings,
visit the following URL:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/
ee338480(v=ws.10).aspx#BKMK_ConnectAdvanced
9.2.3 GlobalSAN iSCSI Initiator for MacOS
This software can be launched by double-clicking on the
globalSAN iSCSI icon in System Preferences.
a. After you launch the initiator you’ll see the globalSAN window
pop up. Press the Add button (“+”) and choose Portal from the
dropdown menu to add a new portal.
b. On the Add Portal dialog box, enter the IP address for the RTX
Secure’s CH-1 or CH-2 port depending which connection link is
shown as “Up” on the NIC screen (this as well as the address is
determined in Section 8.6.2), and then click OK.
b. In the left pane of this window, left-click on Disk Management
(labeled ‘B’ in the picture below).
c. The volume should appear in the list of Disks in the lower
middle/right pane. You may need to scroll down to see it. If the
volume is already formatted, you can identify it easily by its
volume name. If it’s unformatted, the Drive Properties Box will
say “Unallocated” and you’ll need to initialize the volume
before formatting it.
Initialize the volume by right-clicking the Device Properties Box
(labeled ‘C’ in the picture below) and selecting “Initialize Disk”.
If you are prompted to select a partition type, select MBR for
volumes 2TB or smaller, or GPT for volumes larger than 2TB.
NOTE: Windows XP does not support GPT or volumes
larger than 2TB.
d. To format the volume, right-click the Drive Properties Box
(labeled ‘D’ in the picture below) and select “New Partition…”
(Windows XP) or “New Simple Volume...” (Windows Vista, 7,
Server 2008, Server 2008 R2).
c. If you have set up CHAP in the RTX Secure GUI (Section 8.6.5),
input the proper information by clicking on the “Authentication
Settings” button.
d. Select the new target in the list to the left, then select the
appropriate connection from the list that opens up on the right
side and click the “Connect” button.
If the log-on is successful you’ll now be able to use the RTX Secure
just like any other disk attached to your computer.
10 Usage with Mac and Windows Operating Systems
10.2 Usage with Windows Operating Systems
10.1.1 Compatibility
The RTX Secure supports 3.5” SATA hard drives.
e. Unless you wish to customize the settings in these dialog
prompts, Click “Next” on the Select Partition Type (shows up in
Page 23
Windows XP only), Specify Volume/Partition Size, and Assign
Drive Letter or Path dialog prompts, leaving the default settings.
f. You will now see a window that allows selection of a file
system. Choose NTFS and enter a name for the new volume.
Be sure to check the box labeled “Quick Format” unless you
want to completely erase any data on the volume and have time
to wait. A quick format should take less than a minute, while
standard formatting may take several hours.
c. Select the format type. Most users prefer Mac OS Extended
with Journaling (HFS+), which is required for compatibility with
Time Machine (OS 10.5 or newer). If you need to use the RTX
Secure with both Mac and Windows computers, select MS-DOS
File System instead.
d. Enter a name for the new volume and then click “Erase” to start
the process.
g. Click “Next” and then “Finish” to start the format process.
When the format is complete, the Drive Properties Box will
update to show the new volume name. The new volume can
now be found by double-clicking on the My Computer icon
on the desktop (Windows XP) or by clicking on the Computer
button in the Start Menu (Windows Vista, 7, Server 2008,
Server 2008 R2).
10.1.3 Mounting and Unmounting Volumes
Mounting Volumes
First ensure that you have established a connection to the RTX
Secure using iSCSI initiator software (See Section 9). Then, if the
hard drives inside of the RTX Secure are already formatted with
the correct Security Key inserted into the Mini-USB Security Key
Port, you can begin using the volume right away. When the RTX
Secure is properly connected and turned on, a window may open
to allow you access to the volume. If no window appears, find the
volume by double-clicking on the My Computer icon on the desktop
(Windows XP) or by clicking the Computer button in the Start Menu
(Windows Vista, 7, Server 2008, Server 2008 R2).
Unmounting Volumes
Log off the volume using your iSCSI initiator software. In the
Microsoft iSCSI Initiator, you can log off from the “Targets” tab.
On Windows XP and Windows Server 2008, select the target and
click the Details button. Select the target identifier and then click
Log Off.
For Windows Vista, Windows 7, and Windows Server 2008 R2,
select the target and then click on the Disconnect button.
10.1 Usage with Mac OS X
10.1.1 Compatibility
The RTX Secure supports 3.5” SATA hard drives.
10.1.2 Formatting a Drive
To format, use Disk Utility (pictured below), which can be found in
the Applications folder.
a. Click on the volume in the window to the left.
b. Click the Erase tab in the window to the right.
10.1.3 Mounting and Unmounting Volumes
Mounting Volumes
If the hard drives installed in the RTX Secure are already formatted
with the correct Security Key inserted into the Mini-USB Security
Key Port, an icon representing the RTX Secure’s volume will appear
(mount) on the desktop. You can begin using the volume right
away. If the volume is unformatted, a message will appear on the
desktop saying that the disk is unreadable. Use OS X’s Disk Utility
to easily format the volume (see section above).
Unmounting Volumes
First, eject the data volume by
dragging the volume’s icon to the
trash bin, or by selecting the icon
then pressing Command-E. Next,
log off the volume in your iSCSI
initiator software. If you are using
the GlobalSAN Initiator, select
“Log Off” from the “Targets” tab.
Disconnecting in this way allows you to reconnect quickly later.
Another way of preventing delays is to keep your iSCSI initiator
software open at all times. You can minimize it and allow it to
run in the background. Closing the software and then reopening
it can cause a lengthy delay before access to the RTX Secure is
reestablished.
Page 24
12 Encryption
• The RTX Secure uses full disk hardware encryption to
encrypt the entire contents of the drive—including the boot
sector, operating system and all files—without performance
degradation.
NOTE: It is strongly suggested that you disable automatic sleep
mode on your Mac. You can still put the Mac to sleep manually
at any time as long as you follow the above procedures. This
will prevent reconnection difficulties.
• The encryption key must be installed prior to powering on the
RTX Secure for the data to be accessed on the drive. If the key
is externally connected to the Mini-USB Security Key Port and
is not internally installed, then once it has been accepted, it
may be removed and stored in a safe location. Always store
Security Keys apart from the data so that in the event that the
drive is lost or stolen, the data is protected.
10.1.4 Creating a Boot Drive
To activate this feature, you must first install OS X on the hard
drive in your carrier. The easiest way to do this is to clone an
existing system drive using a utility such as Carbon Copy Cloner
or Super Duper. Next, go to System Preferences → Startup Disk. A
window will list the available bootable volumes. Select the volume
from which you wish to boot. Another method is to hold down the
Option key during boot up. A screen should appear that allows you
to select the volume you wish to use. This is useful if you wish to
boot from the RTX Secure hard drive only some of the time.
11 RAID Is Not A Backup
Because the RTX Secure features redundant RAID modes which protect
against a hard drive mechanical failure, it is an excellent part of any
backup strategy. However, a RAID is not, in itself, a complete backup
strategy. Many things besides hard drive failure can damage or erase
your data:
• Corruption caused by unexpected disconnection during data
access (e.g. a cable is unplugged during a data transfer, or the
computer crashes or loses power while writing to the drives)
• Corruption or destruction caused by viruses or other malware
• When a drive is formatted using an encryption key, the same
or a duplicate key must be used in order to access the data.
There is no “back door” to access the data; lost keys make data
recovery virtually impossible.
13 Event Notifications
Physical Disk Events
Level
Type
Description
Info
PD inserted
Disk <slot> is inserted into system
Warning
Disk removed
Disk <slot> is removed from system
Error
HDD read error
Disk <slot> read block error
Error
HDD write error
Disk <slot> write block error
Error
HDD error
Disk <slot> is disabled
Error
HDD IO timeout
Disk <slot> gets no response
Info
PD upgrade started
PD [<string>] starts upgrading firmware
process
Info
PD upgrade finished
PD [<string>] finished upgrading firmware
process
Warning
PD upgrade failed
PD [<string>] upgrade firmware failed
• Sabotage by a disgruntled employee or acquaintance
• Theft of your RTX Secure
• Natural disasters such as fire, flooding, etc.
Considering these possibilities, any single copy of your important data
must always be considered at risk. That’s why backing up is so important. Follow the 3-2-1 backup rule. Data should exist in three different
places on two different storage media and at least one of those copies
should be maintained offsite.
Without an effective backup strategy, recovering data may be impossible, or the cost of data recovery may be quite expensive. The CRU
warranty does not cover costs associated with data loss (nor do the
warranties of other hard drive manufacturers).
Plan accordingly and backup data to minimize downtime!
Physical HW Events
Level
Type
Description
Warning
ECC single
Single-bit ECC error is detected at <address>
Error
ECC multiple
Multi-bit ECC error is detected at <address>
Info
ECC dimm
ECC Memory is installed
Info
ECC none
Non-ECC Memory is installed
Info
SCSI bus reset
Received SCSI Bus Reset event at the SCSI
Bus <number>
Error
SCSI host error
SCSI Host allocation failed
Page 25
Level
Type
Level
Description
Type
Description
Error
SATA enable device fail
Failed to enable the SATA PCI device
Error
Voltage level 2
System voltages(<string>) failed!!!
Error
SATA EDMA mem fail
Failed to allocate memory for SATA EDMA
Error
Voltage level 2 shutdown
Error
SATA remap mem fail
Failed to remap SATA memory IO space
System voltages(<string>) failed!!! The
system will autho shutdown immediately.
Error
SATA PRD mem fail
Failed ot initialize SATA PRD memory
manager
Error
Voltage level 2 CTR
shutdown
The controller will auto shutdown immediately, reason [ Voltage abnormal(<string>)
].
Error
SATA revision ID fail
Failed to get SATA revision ID
Info
UPS OK
Successfully detect UPS
Error
SATA reg fail
Failed to set SATA register
Warning
UPS fail
Failed to detect UPS
Error
SATA init fail
Core failed to initialize the SATA adapter
Error
UPS AC loss
AC loss for system detected
Error
SATA diag fail
SATA Adapter diagnostics failed
Error
UPS power low
Error
Mode ID fail
SATA Mode ID failed
UPS Power Low!!! The system will autoshutdown immediately.
Error
SATA chip count error
SATA chip count error
Warning
SMART T.E.C.
Disk <slot> S.M.A.R.T. Threshold Exceed
Condition occurred for attribute <string>
Info
SAS port reply error
SAS HBA port <number> reply terminated
abnormally
Warning
SMART fail
Disk <slot>: Failure to get S.M.A.R.T.
information
Info
SAS unknown port reply
error
SAS frontend reply terminated abnormally
Warning
RedBoot failover
RedBoot failover event occurred
Info
FC port reply error
FC HBA port <number> reply terminated
abnormally
Warning
Watchdog shutdown
Watchdog timeout shutdown occurred
Warning
Watchdog reset
Watchdog timeout reset occurred
Info
Console Login
<username> login from <IP or serial
console> via Console UI
Info
Console Logout
<username> logout from <IP or serial
console> via Console UI
Info
Web Login
<username> login from <IP> via Web UI
Info
FC unknown port reply
error
FC frontend reply terminated abnormally
EMS Events
Level
Type
Description
Info
Power install
Power(<string>) is installed
Info
Web Logout
<username logout from <IP> via Web UI
Error
Power absent
Power(<string>) is absent
Info
Log clear
All event logs are cleared
Info
Power restore
Power(<string>) is restored to work
Warning
Send mail fail
Failed to send event to <email>
Error
Power fail
Power(<string>) is not functioning
Warning
Power detect
PSU signal detection(<string>)
Info
Fan restore
Fan(<string>) is restored to work
Error
Fan fail
Fan(<string>) is not functioning
Info
Fan install
Fan(<string>) is installed
Error
Fan not present
Fan(<string>) is not present
Error
Fan over speed
Fan(<string>) is over speed
Warning
Thermal level 1
System temperature(<string>) is higher
Error
Thermal level 2
System overheated(<string>)!!!
Error
Thermal level 2 shutdown
System overheated(<string>)!!! The system will auto-shutdown immediately.
Error
Thermal level 2 CTR
shutdown
The controller will auto shutdown immediately, reason [ Overheated(<string>) ].
Thermal ignore value
Unable to update thermal value on
<string>
Warning
Warning
Voltage level 1
System voltage(<string>) is higher/lower.
LVM Events
Level
Type
Description
Info
RG create OK
RG <name> has been created
Info
RG create fail
Failed to create RG <name>
Info
RG delete
RG <name> has been deleted
Info
RG rename
RG <name> has been renamed as <name>
Info
VD create OK
VD <name> has been created.
Info
VD create fail
Failed to create VD <name>
Info
VD delete
VD <name> has been deleted
Info
VD rename
The name of VD <name> has been
renamed to <name>
Info
VD read only
Cache policy of VD <name> has been set
as read only
Info
VD write back
Cache policy of VD <name> has been set
as write-back
Page 26
Level
Type
Description
Info
VD write through
Cache policy of VD <name> has been set
as write-through
Info
VD extend
Size of VD <name> extends
Info
VD attach LUN OK
VD <name> has been LUN-attached
Info
VD attach LUN fail
Failed to attach LUN to VD <name>
Info
VD detach LUN OK
Info
Level
Type
Description
Warning
VD degraded
VD <name> is in degraded mode
Error
RG failed
RG <name> is failed
Error
VD failed
VD <name> is failed
Error
VD IO fault
I/O failure for stripe number <address> in
VD <name>
VD <name> has been detached
Warning
Recoverable read error
VD detach LUN fail
Failed to detach LUN from bus <number>
SCSI ID <number>, LUN <number>
Recoverable read error occurred at LBA
<address> - <address> of VD <name>
Warning
Recoverable write error
Info
VD init started
VD <name> starts initialization
Recoverable write error occurred at LBA
<address> - <address> of VD <name>
Info
VD init finished
VD <name> completes initialization
Error
Unrecoverable read error
Unrecoverable read error occurred at LBA
<address> - <address> of VD <name>
Warning
VD init failed
Failed to complete initialization of VD
<name>
Error
Unrecoverable write error
Unrecoverable write error occurred at LBA
<address> - <address> of VD <name>
Info
VD rebuild started
VD <name> starts rebuilding
Error
Config read rail
Info
VD rebuild finished
VD <name> completes rebuilding
Config read failed at LBA <address> - <address> of PD <slot>
Warning
VD rebuild failed
Failed to complete rebuild of VD <name>
Error
Config write fail
Config write failed at LBA <address> - <address> of PD <slot>
Info
VD migrate started
VD <name> starts migration
Error
CV boot error adjust global
Failed to change size of the global cache
Info
VD migrate finished
VD <name> completes migration
Info
CV boot global
The global cache is OK
Error
VD migrate failed
Failed to complete migration of VD
<name>
Error
CV boot error reate global
Failed to create the global cache
Info
VD scrub started
Parity checking on VD <name> starts
Info
PD dedicated spare
Assign PD <slot> to be dedicated spare
disk of RG <name>
Info
VD scrub finished
Parity checking on VD <name> completes
with <address> parity/data inconsistency
found
Info
PD global spare
Assign PD <slot> to Global Spare Disks
Warning
PD read error
Read error occurred at LBA <address> <address> of PD <slot>
Warning
PD write error
Write error occurted at LBA <address> <address> of PD <slot>
Warning
Scrub wrong parity
The parity/data inconsistency is found at
LBA <address> - <address> when checking
parity on VD <name>
Warning
Scrub data recovered
The data at LBA <address> - <address>
is recovered when checking parity on VD
<name>
Info
VD scrub aborted
Parity checking on VD <name> stops with
<address> parity/data inconsistency found
Info
RG migrate started
RG <name> starts migration
Info
RG migrate finished
RG <name> completes migration
Info
RG move started
RG <name> starts move
Info
RG move finished
RG <name> completes move
Info
VD move started
VD <name> starts move
Info
VD move finished
VD <name> completes move
Info
PD freed
PD <slot> has been freed from RG <name>
Error
VD move failed
Failed to complete move of VD <name>
Info
RG imported
Info
RG activated
RG <name> has been manually activated
Configuration of RG <name> has been
imported
Info
RG deactivated
RG <name> has been manually deactivated
Info
RG restored
Configuration of RG <name> has been
restored
Info
VD rewrite started
Rewrite at LBA <address> of VD <name>
starts
Info
VD restored
Configuration of VD <name> has been
restored
Info
VD rewrite finished
Rewrite at LBA <address> of VD <name>
completes
Info
PD scrub started
PD <slot> starts disk scrubbing process
Info
Disk scrub finished
Warning
VD rewrite failed
Rewrite at LBA <address> of VD <name>
failed
PD <slot> completed disk scrubbing
process
Info
Large RG created
Warning
RG degraded
RG <name> is in degraded mode
A large RG <name> with <number> disks
included is created
Page 27
Level
Type
Description
Level
Type
Description
Info
Weak RG created
A RG <name> made up disks across
<number> chassis is created
Info
Failback complete
All volumes in controller <number> completed failback process
Info
RG size shrunk
The total size of RG <name> shrunk
Info
CTR inserted
Info
VD erase finished
VD <name> finished erasing process
Controller <number> is inserted into
system
Warning
VD erase failed
The erasing process of VD <name> failed
Error
CTR removed
Controller <number> is removed from
system
Info
VD erase started
VD <name> starts erasing process
Error
CTR timeout
Controller <number> gets no response
Error
CTR lockdown
Controller <number> is locked down
Error
CTR memory NG
Memory size mismatch
iSCSI Events
Level
Type
Description
Error
CTR firmware NG
Firmware version mismatch
Info
iSCSI login accepted
iSCSI login from <IP> succeeds
Error
CTR lowspeed NG
Low speed inter link is down
Info
iSCSI login rejected
ISCSI login from <IP> was rejected, reason
[<string>]
Error
CTR highspeed NG
High speed inter link is down
Info
iSCSI logout recvd
iSCSI logout from <IP> was received,
reason [<string>]
Error
CTR backend NG
SAS expander is down
Error
CTR frontend NG
FC IO controller is down
Info
CTR reboot FW sync
Controller reboot, reason [Firmware
synchronization completed]
System Maintenance Events
Level
Type
Description
Info
System shutdown
System shutdown
Info
System reboot
System reboot
Info
System console shutdown
System shutdown from <string> via
Console UI
Info
System web shutdown
System shutdown from <string> via Web
UI
Info
System button shutdown
System shutdown via power button
Info
System LCM shutdown
System shutdown via LCM
Info
FW upgrade start
System firmware upgrade starts
Info
FW upgrade success
System firmware upgrade succeeds
Warning
FW upgrade failure
System firmware upgrade is failed
Error
IPC FW upgrade timeout
System firmware upgrade timeout on
another controller
Info
Config imported
<string> config imported
HAC Events
Level
Type
Description
Info
RG owner changed
The preferred owner of RG <name> has
been changed to controller <number>
Info
Force CTR write through
Controller <number> forced to adopt writethrough mode on failover
Info
Restore CTR cache mode
Controller <number> restored to previous
caching mode on failback
Info
Failover complete
All volumes in controller <number> completed failover process
14 Working With Volumes Larger Than 2TB in Size
Although the RTX Secure can create data volumes larger than 2TB,
some older operating systems cannot access such volumes. This is
because they support only 32-bit LBA (Logical Block Addressing).
Newer operating systems (Windows Server 2003, Vista, Windows 7,
Mac OS 10.5.x and higher) should be able to use 2TB+ volumes without
difficulty. You will simply need to do one of the following two things
while creating a Virtual Disk:
• Change the LBA to 64-bit
• Increase the block size to 4096
Windows
Windows XP can only use 2TB+ volumes by increasing the block size
to 4096. Neither of the options above will work for operating systems
older than Windows XP. You will need to make more than one Virtual
Disk, each less than 2TB in size. Each Virtual Disk also needs a different
LUN.
Mac OS
Although Mac OS 10.4.x supports only 32-bit LBA, increasing the block
size to 4096 will allow you to create a 2TB+ volume that is usable by
the OS.
Linux
Versions of Linux vary, but using one of the above methods may allow
you to create a 2TB+ volume that your distribution can use.
Page 28
15 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
Q: I created one volume, but my computer sees two of them.
Why?
A: T here may be two Logical Unit Numbers (LUN) assigned to that
volume. To check this, use the GUI. Navigate to “Volume
Configuration” and then “Logical Unit”. If there are two Logical
Units for the same volume, hover your mouse over the button for
one of them in the “Host” column and click on “Detach.”
NOTE: You may still see two volumes until you restart your
computer.
Q: I ’ve connected the RTX to my DHCP-enabled network
through the Config GUI port, but the LCD displays an IP
address that is not on my network and I cannot connect
to the GUI control panel using that IP address in my web
browser.
A: T his may occur if you plugged in your cable into the Config GUI
port after the RTX Secure has already started up and initialized, or
if you previously configured the RTX Secure for a static network
or direct connection. The solution is to use the LCD interface
to obtain a DHCP address. Press “ENT”, then use the ▲(Up) or
▼(Down) arrows to scroll to the option “Change IP Config”. Press
“ENT”. The screen will say “DHCP”. Press “ENT”, then press the
▲(Up) arrow to select “Yes”. Press “ENT”. RTX will now attempt
to acquire a DHCP address. This new address will be displayed on
the main screen of the LCD.
Q: W
hen I try to log on to the RTX Secure using the IP address
under the iSCSI configuration menu, nothing happens.
A: S ometimes when you first set up the RTX Secure you’ll need to
reattach the Logical Unit if it doesn’t work the first time.
Q: H
ow many computers can connect to one data volume on
the iSCSI unit?
A: T he short answer is one computer to one volume. This is the
safest and suggested usage of the RTX Secure. If two people
are accessing files on the same volume at the same time, there
is a very high chance that data corruption will occur. There are a
few file systems that can handle different users manipulating the
same volume, but they are not supported by Mac OS or Windows.
However, if the users connected to the volume have read-only
access, then corruption will not be an issue.
Q: W
hen I make more than one volume, I still see all volumes
when connecting to the iSCSI IP address. How am I
supposed to allow only one person per volume if that’s
the case?
A: W
hen you attach a Logical Unit to a Virtual Disk you’ll probably
notice a “Host” field with an asterisk as the default selection.
This means that any iSCSI Initiator will be able to connect to
that volume through that Virtual Disk. All iSCSI Initiators have
a unique name. You can use this name to restrict access to only
certain computers. For example, if my initiator is assigned the
name iqn.1991-05.com.microsoft:username01.crudataport.local,
and if I put that name into the host field when attaching a Logical
Unit, then only my specific computer will be able to connect to
that volume. You can use this to give one person read access and
everyone else write access by attaching two Logical Units to one
Virtual Disk.
Q: I f I connect one computer to the RTX Secure and then
share the files from that computer, can more than one
computer access the files? Would the other computers
need iSCSI initiators installed on them?
A: O
ne computer at a time can directly access the RTX Secure, but
files on the RTX Secure can be shared from that computer to other
computers. In such a scenario, the computer attached to the RTX
Secure acts as a server. Only the server computer requires an
iSCSI initiator. The other computers do not need special software.
Q: W
hat is the difference between iSCSI and NAS (Network
Attached Storage)?
A: T he difference between iSCSI and NAS is that a NAS does not
need a computer to act as a server.
Q: I put my computer to sleep, and now it’s having trouble
reconnecting to RTX. How can I prevent this?
A: T o prevent difficulties such as this, follow the shutdown procedure documented in the LCD menu diagram in Section 7.2.3. CRUDataPort also suggests that you disable automatic sleep on your
computer so it does not go into sleep mode without preparing the
RTX Secure for disconnection.
Q: I s there a way to use Bypass Mode on certain bays and use
an encryption mode on others?
A: T here is no way to bypass individual bays and set others to use an
encryption key.
Q: T he RTX is complaining that my RAID is degraded or failed,
and replacing disks does not solve the issue. Why?
A: C heck the encryption mode to make sure that Unique Encrypted
Mode is selected. When the drives are encrypted with unique
encryption keys, but the RTX Secure is set to Common Encrypted
Page 29
Mode, only the top bay drive will mount, and consequently the
RTX Secure will complain that the RAID has degraded or failed.
But don’t worry, your data will remain intact and will be
accessible once the correct encryption mode is set. This
is because the Security Key can hold a unique 256-bit security
value for up to 8 bays and only the first value on the Security Key
is used when the RTX Secure is set to use Common Encrypted
Mode. As a result, the first bay will be accessible, but all other
bays will fail the encryption check since the first security value
will not match the security values used to encrypt the other
drives.
Q: I used to see all of the drives in the RTX Secure mount on
my computer, but now only the top bay drive mounts. Why?
A: C heck the encryption mode to make sure that Unique Encrypted
Mode is selected. When the drives are encrypted with unique
encryption keys, but the RTX Secure is set to Common Encrypted
Mode, only the top bay drive will mount, and consequently the
RTX Secure will complain that the RAID has degraded or failed.
But don’t worry, your data will remain intact and will be
accessible once the correct encryption mode is set. This
is because the Security Key can hold a unique 256-bit security
value for up to 8 bays and only the first value on the Security Key
is used when the RTX Secure is set to use Common Encrypted
Mode. As a result, the first bay will be accessible, but all other
bays will fail the encryption check since the first security value
will not match the security values used to encrypt the other
drives.
Q: Why won’t my hard drives mount on my computer?
A: If the drives are encrypted, make sure that Bypass Mode is not
engaged at power up. If it is, set the encryption mode to the
appropriate mode and then recycle power on the enclosure. If the
drives are not encrypted, then make sure that Bypass mode is
engaged, or the drives will not mount.
If the encryption mode is correct, check to make sure you are
using the correct Security Key. Then refer to Section 5.3 for the
proper procedure on starting up the RTX Secure with a Security
Key.
If none of these solutions work, try removing each drive from the
RTX Secure and reseating them in their TrayFree Bays.
Q: T here is a problem with one bay’s encryption status, but all
other drives’ statuses are fine.
A: Individual encryption errors indicate an encryption engine failure.
If you experience this issue, please contact Technical Support.
Contacting Technical Support
Still need help? Please contact our Technical Support team at
www.cru-dataport.com/support or call us toll free at (800) 260-9800.
Page 30
16. Technical Specifications
RTX and TrayFree are trademarks of CRU Acquisitions Group, LLC. Other marks are the property of their respective owners. © 2008, 2010 CRU Acquisitions Group, LLC.
Product
Models
RTX Secure 610-IR and RTX Secure 810-IR
Limited Product Warranty
CRU-DataPort (CRU) warrants this product to be free of significant defects in material and workmanship for a period of
two years from the original date of purchase. CRU’s warranty is nontransferable and is limited to the original purchaser.
RAID Levels Supported
RAID 0, 1, 3, 5, 6, 0+1, 10, 30, 50, 60, & JBOD
Host Interfaces
Dual Gigabit Ethernet
Data Interface Speeds
Up to 200MB/s (network dependent)
Drive Types Supported
3.5-inch SATA (Serial-ATA) hard disk drives
Online Auto-Rebuild
Yes
Limitation of Liability
The warranties set forth in this agreement replace all other warranties. CRU expressly disclaims all other warranties,
including but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose and noninfringement of third-party rights with respect to the documentation and hardware. No CRU dealer, agent, or employee
is authorized to make any modification, extension, or addition to this warranty. In no event will CRU or its suppliers be
liable for any costs of procurement of substitute products or services, lost profits, loss of information or data, computer
malfunction, or any other special, indirect, consequential, or incidental damages arising in any way out of the sale of,
use of, or inability to use any CRU product or service, even if CRU has been advised of the possibility of such damages.
In no case shall CRU’s liability exceed the actual money paid for the products at issue. CRU reserves the right to make
modifications and additions to this product without notice or taking on additional liability.
TrayFree Technology
Yes
TrayFree Shock
Absorbing Bays
Yes
LED Indicators
•
•
•
FCC Compliance Statement: “This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following
two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference
received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.”
Alarm Indicator
Power Indicator
Access Indicator
Security
Separate key lock for each HDD (RTX Secure 610-IR only)
Controller Display
LCD screen with yellow backlight/control panel
Operating System
Requirements
•
•
•
Operating Temperature
50 – 85° Fahrenheit (10 – 30° Celsius)
Operating Humidity
5% to 95%, non-condensing
Power Switch
2 position: On / Off
Power Supply
•
•
Cooling Fan
Two 8cm Ball Bearing Fans
Compliance
EMI Standard: FCC Part 15 Class A, CE
EMC Standard: EN55022, EN55024
FIPS: FIPS 140-2, FIPS PUB 197
External Case Material
Aluminum alloy
Shipping Weights
•
•
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15
of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the
equipment is operated in a home or commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio
frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
In the event that you experience Radio Frequency Interference, you should take the following steps to resolve the
problem:
1) Ensure that the case of your attached drive is grounded.
2) Use a data cable with RFI reducing ferrites on each end.
3) Use a power supply with an RFI reducing ferrite approximately 5 inches from the DC plug.
4) Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7
Mac OS X 10.2.6 or later
Linux distributions using Kernel version 2.4 or above
FOR OFFICE OR COMMERCIAL USE
Input: 100-240VAC
Output: 220 Watts (4-bay model), 350 Watts (6-bay
and 8-bay models)
RTX Secure 610-IR: 28 lbs. without drives,
40 lbs. with drives
RTX Secure 810-IR: 33 lbs. without drives,
45 lbs. with drives
Dimensions
6.97” X 10.63” X 14.57” (177mm x 270mm x 370mm)
Technical Support
We don’t expect anything to go wrong with your CRU
product. But if it does, Tech Support is standing by and
ready to help.
Contact us at www.cru-dataport.com/support. We also
offer phone support at (800) 260-9800.
Page 31