sampling and analysis plan savage municipal water supply

SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PLAN
SAVAGE MUNICIPAL WATER SUPPLY
SUPERFUND SITE OU-3
621 ELM STREET
MILFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE
NHDES SITE NO. 198505002
Prepared for:
THE HAZARDOUS WASTE REMEDIATION BUREAU (HWRB)
WASTE MANAGEMENT DIVISION
NEW HAMPSHIRE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES
29 Hazen Drive
Concord, New Hampshire 03301
Prepared by
WESTON SOLUTIONS, INC.
45 Constitution Avenue, Suite 100
Concord, New Hampshire 03301
October 2012
Work Order No. 20118.016.001
Bette L.
Nowack
Digitally signed by Bette L.
Nowack
DN: cn=Bette L. Nowack,
o=Weston Solutions, Inc.,
ou=MNH,
email=Bette.Nowack@westonsolu
tions.com, c=US
Date: 2012.12.10 16:13:43 -05'00'
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section
1. Page
INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................... 1-1 1.1 SITE DESCRIPTION AND HISTORY .............................................................. 1-1 1.2 CURRENT INVESTIGATION ........................................................................... 1-3 1.3 CONTAMINANTS OF CONCERN, INTERIM CLEANUP LEVELS,
AND AMBIENT GROUNDWATER QUALITY STANDARDS...................... 1-4 1.4 DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES ....................................................................... 1-6 2. PROJECT ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES ..................................... 2-1 3. TASK DESCRIPTIONS - FIELD MONITORING AND SAMPLING
PROTOCOL ................................................................................................................... 3-1 4. 5. 6. 3.1 BEDROCK MONITORING WELL INSTALLATION ..................................... 3-1 3.2 MONITORING WELL BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICAL LOGGING ................. 3-2 3.3 SAMPLE IDENTIFICATION ............................................................................. 3-2 3.4 SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS........................................................................... 3-3 3.5 GROUNDWATER SAMPLING ......................................................................... 3-4 QUALITY CONTROL.................................................................................................. 4-1 4.1 EQUIPMENT CALIBRATION AND MAINTENANCE .................................. 4-1 4.2 FIELD QUALITY CONTROL............................................................................ 4-5 4.3 DATA VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION .................................................. 4-5 DOCUMENTATION ..................................................................................................... 5-1 5.1 FIELD DATA MANAGEMENT ........................................................................ 5-1 5.2 CHAIN-OF-CUSTODY PROCEDURES ........................................................... 5-2 5.3 REPORTS ............................................................................................................ 5-3 5.3.1 Quality Assurance/Quality Control Section of Report ......................... 5-4 REFERENCES............................................................................................................... 6-1 G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
iii
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
LIST OF APPENDICES
APPENDIX A
ORGANIZATIONAL CHART
APPENDIX B
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
1.)
Calibration of Field Instruments
Standard Operating Procedures
-
2.)
Savage Calibration Log
Chain-of-Custody, Sample Handling, and Shipping
Standard Operating Procedures
-
NHDPHS Chain-of-Custody Form
3.)
Decontamination Standard Operating Procedures
4.)
Field Screening of Water and Soil
Standard Operating Procedures
- Savage PID FID Calibration Log
5.)
Hager-Richter Geoscience, Inc. Borehole Geophysical
Logging Standard Operating Procedures
6.)
Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling
Standard Operating Procedures
-
Figure SOP-1 Sampling Equipment Setup Diagram
-
Packer Test Sampling Information Form
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
iv
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
LIST OF FIGURES
Title
Figure 1
Site Location Map
Figure 2
Site Plan
LIST OF TABLES
Title
Table 1
Contaminants of Concern, Analytes, Associated ICLs, NHDES Standards
and Laboratory Criteria
Table 2
Bedrock Well Sampling Locations and Analytical Parameters
Table 3
Media, Analysis, Test Methods, Containers/Sample Volume, Preservation,
and Hold Time
Table 4
Bedrock Monitoring Well Data
Table 5
Summary of Quality Assurance Samples
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
v
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
LIST OF ACRONYMS
AGQS
Ambient Groundwater Quality Standard
AS
air sparging
bgs
below ground surface
CoC
contaminants of concern
COC
chain-of-custody
EMD
Environmental Monitoring Database
EPA
United States Environmental Protection Agency
ft
feet
HWRB
Hazardous Waste Remediation Bureau
ICL
Interim Cleanup Levels
ID
identification
IDW
investigation derived waste
ISCO
in situ chemical oxidation
NHDES
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services
NHDPHS
New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Laboratory
OU
operable unit
PID
photoionization detector
ppm
parts per million
PRP
potentially responsible party
QA
quality assurance
QAPP
Quality Assurance Project Plan
QC
quality control
RDL
Reporting Detection Limits
ROD
Record of Decision
SAP
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Site
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site OU-3
SVE
soil vapor extraction
SOP
Standard Operating Procedure
trans-1,2-DCE
trans-1,2-dichloroethene
VOC
volatile organic compounds
WESTON
®
Weston Solutions, Inc.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
vi
29 October 2012
SECTION 1
INTRODUCTION
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
1.
INTRODUCTION
Weston Solutions, Inc. (WESTON®) is pleased to present the following Sampling and Analysis
Plan (SAP) for the purpose of installing new bedrock monitoring wells and subsequently
conducting borehole geophysics and bedrock borehole packer testing at the Savage Municipal
Water Supply Well Superfund Site (Site), the New Hampshire Department of Environmental
Services (NHDES) Site No. 198505002, located at 621 Elm Street in Milford, New Hampshire.
The tasks outlined in this SAP are to be performed in accordance with the current NHDES
Hazardous Waste Remediation Bureau (HWRB) Master Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP)
EQA RFA #08036, located on NHDES Website at:
http://des.nh.gov/organization/divisions/waste/hwrb/documents/hwrb_master_qapp.pdf.
The specific tasks associated with the groundwater monitoring program are described in the
sections that follow. Any deviations from the procedures contained within this SAP shall be
approved by NHDES in advance, following concurrence with the United States Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA).
1.1
SITE DESCRIPTION AND HISTORY
The Site is located in the western portion of the Town of Milford, New Hampshire,
approximately 2 miles west of the center of town. The Site encompasses a plume of
contaminated groundwater that extends approximately 6,000 feet (ft) eastward from the
intersection of Route 101 and Elm Street. It is roughly bounded on the north by North River
Road, east by the Souhegan River, and on the south by Elm Street and Tucker Brook. The Site
lies within the floodplain of the Souhegan River. The dominant groundwater flow direction is to
the east.
The Site has been divided by EPA into three operable units (OU), two fund-lead OUs, and a
potentially responsible party (PRP)-lead OU. The first fund-lead OU (OU-1) is known as the
OK Tool Source Area OU and is being administered by NHDES, Waste Management Division.
The PRP-lead OU (OU-2) is known as the Extended Plume OU. The second fund-lead OU
(OU-3) is known as the Bedrock Groundwater Plume. This SAP is associated with the
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
1-1
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
fund-lead OU-3. The location of the Site is shown on Figure 1. The boundary of OU-1 and the
property boundaries of lots within OU-1 and in the surrounding area (as derived from the Town
of Milford Tax Maps) are shown on Figure 2. Figure 2 also shows all bedrock monitoring wells
present at the Site.
First developed in 1950, the Savage Municipal Water Supply well provided potable drinking
water to approximately 10,000 residents in the Town of Milford, New Hampshire. In
February 1983, as part of the first routine sampling of water supplies for organic compounds, the
New Hampshire Water Supply and Pollution Control Commission found volatile organic
compounds (VOC) above drinking water standards in water from the Savage Municipal
Water Supply well. The VOCs found included 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethene,
trans-1,2-dichloroethene
(trans-1,2-DCE),
tetrachloroethene,
and
1,1-dichloroethane.
Tetrachloroethene and trans-1,2-DCE were also found in water sampled from the well supplying
the nearby Milford mobile home trailer park. The Site was added to the EPA National Priorities
List on 1 September 1984.
A Remedial Investigation was completed in June 1991 and resulted in EPA issuing a Record of
Decision (ROD) identifying two portions of the contaminated plume that needed to be
remediated: a concentrated plume near the OK Tool and Hitchiner Facilities and the extended
plume. Division of the remedy into two OUs occurred by Consent Decree after issuance of the
ROD.
The final remedy selected for OU-1 was modified (from the ROD) as explained in the
Explanation of Significant Differences issued by EPA in December 1996. Elements of this
remedy included institutional controls, a subsurface barrier (slurry) wall, four groundwater
extraction wells (two inside the barrier), soil vapor extraction (SVE) via six wells screened in the
vadose zone, air sparging (AS) via two wells screened beneath the SVE wells, and groundwater
monitoring. The remedy, as designed, involved treatment of extracted groundwater by air
stripping and discharge of the treated water to the unconsolidated aquifer via a recharge chamber
and three reinjection wells (two inside the barrier). Vapors from the air stripping system were
treated by passage through granular-activated carbon prior to discharge to the atmosphere. The
design of the OU-1 remedy was completed in March 1996, and its construction was completed in
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
1-2
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
August 1998. Operation of the groundwater extraction system began in April 1999. The
treatment plant has operated continuously since 1999 with several periods of extended downtime
for maintenance or research purposes. The SVE system was last operated in March 2008.
In September 2008, the SVE/AS system was decommissioned and the boilers used for
regeneration of the carbon were replaced with smaller boilers sized for building heat only.
Beginning in May 2009, with approval of the NHDES Air Resources Division, vapor discharge
from the tray aerators was vented directly to the atmosphere. Vapor emissions from the aerators
can be redirected through the carbon vessels, if necessary, but regeneration of carbon will now
need to be performed off-site.
In addition to the pump and treat method already implemented at the Site, a large scale in situ
chemical oxidation (ISCO) treatment was conducted by WESTON in the deep overburden during
the fall of 2008. A second and third treatment were performed during fall 2009 and spring 2010
targeting till layers and geological lenses on the western portion of the Site.
1.2
CURRENT INVESTIGATION
Between 2010 and 2011, nine bedrock monitoring wells (BR-1, BR-2, BR-3, BR-4, BR-5, BR-6,
BR-7, BR-8, and BR-9) were installed and existing monitoring wells MW-16R and MW-30 were
deepened to evaluate the vertical extent of contamination within the boundary of OU-1. This
investigation identified the presence of elevated levels of site contaminants of concern (CoC)
within the deep bedrock aquifer. The discovery of elevated levels of CoCs in the deep bedrock
aquifer beneath OU-1 resulted in the development of OU-3, as mitigating contamination within a
fractured bedrock aquifer may warrant the use of different remedial alternatives than in the
transmissive overburden aquifer that has historically been targeted by the remedial systems in
both OU-1 and OU-2.
This investigation for OU-3 is being conducted to further evaluate the extent of impact to the
bedrock aquifer in the vicinity of, and downgradient of, the former source area and to evaluate
potential contaminant migration pathways between the source area and potential receptors,
including the residences located north of the Souhegan River. As part of this investigation, seven
new bedrock monitoring wells will be installed. Following the completion of each monitoring
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
1-3
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
well, borehole geophysics and packer interval sampling will be conducted to locate and
characterize water bearing fractures within the formation.
1.3
CONTAMINANTS OF CONCERN, INTERIM CLEANUP LEVELS,
AND AMBIENT GROUNDWATER QUALITY STANDARDS
The two groundwater quality criteria applicable to the Site include the Interim Cleanup Levels
(ICL) derived for the ROD and Ambient Groundwater Quality Standards (AGQS) adopted by the
state. The AGQS values were developed subsequent to the ICLs and in most cases are more
restrictive than the ICLs. The current clean-up criteria are the more restrictive of the two values.
Only two compounds have ICLs lower than the AGQS values, antimony and beryllium.
Interim cleanup levels are the result of a quantitative evaluation of analytical data that was
performed during the development of the ROD. Interim cleanup levels have been set based on
the Applicable and/or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (e.g., Drinking Water Maximum
Contaminant Level Goals and Maximum Contaminant Levels) if available, or other suitable
criteria.
When all of the ICLs have been attained, a risk assessment will be performed on residual
groundwater contamination to determine whether the remedial action is protective. Remedial
actions shall continue until protective concentrations of residual contamination have been
achieved or until the remedy is otherwise deemed protective. These protective residual levels
shall constitute the final cleanup levels for this ROD and shall be considered performance
standards for any remedial action.
The ROD states that arsenic, beryllium, chromium, lead, antimony, and nickel may be
naturally-occurring elements in the Savage Municipal Water Supply well aquifer. The cleanup
levels will be the ICLs/AGQS or background, whichever is higher.
Refer to the table below for a summary of the COC and the associated ICLs and AGQS for
groundwater.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
1-4
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
Contaminants of Concern and Associated Interim Cleanup Levels
and Ambient Groundwater Quality Standard Criteria
Contaminants of Concern
ROD ICLs
(µg/L)
CAS No.
NHDES AGQS
(µg/L)
Benzene
71-43-2
5
5
1,1-Dichloroethylene
75-35-4
7
7
Trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene
156-60-5
100
100
Tetrachloroethylene (Tetrachloroethene) (PCE)
127-18-4
5
5
1,1,1-Trichloroethane
71-55-6
200
200
Trichloroethylene (Trichloroethene) (TCE)
79-01-6
5
5
1,1-Dichloroethane
75-34-3
3500
81
Methylene Chloride (Dichloromethane)
75-09-2
5
5
7440-36-0
3
6
74440-38-2
50
10
7440-41-7
1
4
Chromium
7440-47-3
100
100
Lead
7439-92-1
15
15
Nickel
7440-02-0
100
100
156-59-2
NS
70
75-01-4
NS
2
Antimony
1
Arsenic 2
Beryllium
1
Contaminants of Interest
Cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene 3
Vinyl Chloride
3
Notes:
µg/L = micrograms per liter
NS = not specified
1
Only two compounds have Interim Cleanup Levels (ICLs) lower than the Ambient Groundwater
Quality Standard (AGQS) values, antimony and beryllium; highlighted and bolded above.
2
The arsenic standard was changed from 50 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 ppb by the United States
Environmental Protection Agency in 2001. New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services
(NHDES) has also changed the AGQS to 10 ppb per RSA 485 C:6 (AGQS) and Env-Ws 316.01.
3
Cis-1,2-dichloroethylene is a contaminant of interest in running the treatment plant.
Cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and vinyl chloride were not identified in the Record of Decision (ROD) as
contaminants of concern. However, each has been observed in groundwater at concentrations greater
than the AGQS.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
1-5
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
1.4
DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES
The primary data quality objectives are as follows:

Confirm water quality in compliance wells.

Evaluate the risk to human health and the environment.

Establish long-term trends in contaminant levels to support future site management
decisions.

Evaluate the progress of remediation and attenuation of groundwater contaminants
due to the operation of the groundwater treatment plant and the implementation of
ISCO.

Ensure site groundwater is ultimately restored to safe drinking water levels.

Identify screening quality data from isolated fractures and fracture zones within the
bedrock aquifer at the Site.
The specific objectives of bedrock investigations described in this document are:

Evaluate the extent of contamination in the bedrock.

Develop potentiometric surface maps for the bedrock aquifer.

Identify bedrock fracture orientations.

Identify the locations and approximate yields of water bearing fractures.

Evaluate water quality in discrete fracture zones.

Identify potential contaminant migration pathways between the source area and
potential receptors.

Identify evidence of permanganate in bedrock.
Consistent with the current Master QAPP (NHDES/HWRB), Subsection 1.4, for data generated
by the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Laboratory
(NHDPHS), the Reporting Detection Limits (RDL) and the acceptance limits for accuracy and
precision have been accepted for use on this project. Table 1 includes a summary of the test
methods being performed and the associated RDLs.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
1-6
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
Comparability is the extent to which data from one data set can be compared directly to similar
or related data sets and/or decision-making standards. Data comparability will be achieved by
continuity of laboratory practices, method analysis, sample collection procedures, and sample
handling.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
1-7
29 October 2012
SECTION 2
PROJECT ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
2.
PROJECT ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES
WESTON has been retained by NHDES to provide site sampling and remedial consulting
services at the Site for both OU-1 and OU-3. Within WESTON, the Project Manager will be
responsible for the overall contract management ensuring that established protocols and
procedures are used, and the management of day-to-day activities, staff scheduling, and assuring
that the technical objectives are achieved. The Quality Assurance (QA) Officer for the project
will oversee all QA aspects of the project including, but not limited to, modifications of all
subsequent SAPs, confirming that data quality documentation is appropriate, and that QA goals
have been met. It is also their responsibility to ensure that all procedures and techniques are
conducted in accordance with this SAP and the current Master QAPP (NHDES/HWRB).
The organizational chart in Appendix A illustrates the roles and responsibilities of those
individuals involved in the project and their different organizations. The Field Operations Lead is
on-site for all field activities, responsible for coordinating sampling efforts, performing sampling
management, quality control (QC), sampling, and performing oversight of work conducted by
subcontractors. Refer to Appendix A of the current Master QAPP, Program Organization and
Responsibilities for more details.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
2-1
29 October 2012
SECTION 3
TASK DESCRIPTIONS - FIELD MONITORING
AND SAMPLING PROTOCOL
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
3.
TASK DESCRIPTIONS - FIELD MONITORING
AND SAMPLING PROTOCOL
The following subsections discuss general methodology for performing sampling and analysis as
part of the overall field activities including specific sampling procedures and data management
requirements that will be implemented during the monitoring program. Field activities will be
conducted in accordance with this SAP, unless site conditions require modifications. All
equipment and any modifications shall be approved by NHDES in advance, following
concurrence with EPA.
All
non-dedicated
sampling
equipment
shall
be
decontaminated
according
to
the
Decontamination Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) in Appendix B.
3.1
BEDROCK MONITORING WELL INSTALLATION
The current investigation will include the drilling of seven new 6-inch-diameter bedrock
monitoring wells beyond the confines of the slurry wall. It is likely that four wells will be
installed within the boundary of OU-1 and three wells will be installed within the boundary of
OU-2. The OU-1 portion of the drilling program includes a monitoring well northwest of the
slurry wall, a monitoring well north of the Souhegan River near the MW-2 well cluster, a
monitoring well in the area near the PW-13 well cluster adjacent to the OU-1/OU-2 boundary,
and a monitoring well near MI-31 along the OU-1/OU-2 boundary. The OU-2 portion of the
drilling program includes one monitoring well near a fish hatchery water supply well, one well
near the MW-120 well cluster, and one well along the western boundary of the drive-in movie
theater parking lot. The preliminary proposed locations for the seven new bedrock wells are
illustrated on Figure 2.
All drilling operations will be conducted by drillers licensed to operate in the State of
New Hampshire and will have completed all necessary safety training to conduct work at the
Site. Drilling will be performed by Tri-State Drilling and Boring, Inc. of West Burke, Vermont
and all activities will comply with all pertinent rules and regulations applicable to water well
installation in the State of New Hampshire.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
3-1
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
Overburden soil drilling will be conducted using a truck-mounted drill rig equipped with dual
rotary drilling technology. Rock drilling will be conducted using a truck-mounted air-hammer.
All soil, rock, and water investigation derived waste (IDW) will be screened in accordance with
the Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP included in Appendix B of this SAP.
Screening will be conducted to segregate IDW. All solid IDW which exhibits photoionization
detector (PID) readings less than 10 parts per million (ppm) will be spread on the ground surface
in the vicinity of the monitoring well. Solid IDW which exhibits PID readings greater than
10 ppm will be stockpiled on and covered with polyethylene sheets for later disposal and/or
treatment. Liquid IDW during rock drilling will be transferred to a settling tank and subsequently
transferred to the groundwater treatment plant for treatment.
3.2
MONITORING WELL BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICAL LOGGING
Borehole geophysical logging, including caliper, gamma, fluid temperature/resistivity, optical
and acoustic televiewer, and heat pulse flow meter will be performed in the new bedrock wells to
characterize the bedrock formation. Borehole geophysical logging will be performed at BR-10,
BR-11, BR-12, BR-13, BR-14, BR-15, and BR-16. All geophysical services will be provided by
Hager-Richter Geoscience, Inc. and will be logged in accordance with the Borehole Geophysical
Logging SOP included in Appendix B.
3.3
SAMPLE IDENTIFICATION
In order to properly transfer sample results into the NHDES Environmental Monitoring Database
(EMD), samples must be identified using the designated NHDES station identification (ID).

All sample ID’s must have OKT_ as a prefix. This includes any samples going to
outside laboratories, so that later this data may be uploaded into the NHDES EMD.

The sample ID has to be 15 characters or less, including the “OKT_”.

During packer test sampling, each sample represents an interval between the packers
which will be identified in the sample ID by six characters. For instance, if the packer
setup is positioned from 310 ft below ground surface (bgs) to 320 ft bgs in BR-9, the
sample ID will be “OKT_BR-9-310320”. The actual sample depths will be
determined in the field after evaluating the borehole geophysics report and the length
of the packer zone. NOTE: Monitoring wells that are numbered BR-10 and greater
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
3-2
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
will exceed the 15 character maximum following this sample ID scheme. For wells
BR-10 through BR-16 the sample ID will not include a “-“ after the “BR”. For
example, if the packer setup is positioned from 310 to 320 ft bgs in BR-10, the
sample ID will be “OKT_BR10-310320”.
3.4

Trip blanks must be labeled “TRIP BLANK” without any other designation. Only
one Trip Blank per chain-of-custody (COC) per cooler is acceptable.

Sample duplicates are identified by adding “DUP” to the end of the Station ID. The
duplicate sample must be labeled “DUP” not “Dup” and there must be one space
between the sample ID and DUP (example “OKT_BR10-depth DUP”). Blind
duplicates are not allowed. The space and “DUP” will not count toward the
15 character maximum.

New sample identification numbers shall be approved by the NHDES Project
Manager and the QA Coordinator.
SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS
Sampling at the Site includes sampling of bedrock groundwater. The tables refer to the following
sample types to be collected at the Site:

Table 1 lists the summary of all CoC analytes, associated ICLs (ROD), AGQS (EnvOr 600), and the associated Laboratory RDLs.

Table 2 lists the bedrock monitoring wells to be sampled and analytical parameters to
be analyzed.

Table 3 lists the analytes, analytical methods, containers, sample volumes,
preservation, and holding times for bedrock groundwater.

Table 4 provides information regarding the locations and construction of the bedrock
monitoring wells.

Table 5 is a summary of the required QA samples for bedrock groundwater.
Analysis of groundwater will be submitted to NHDPHS using the COC form found at the end of
the Chain-of-Custody, Sample Handling, and Shipping SOP. The WESTON Project Manager
and Field Operations Lead will coordinate sample pick-up/delivery arrangements with the
laboratory.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
3-3
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
3.5
GROUNDWATER SAMPLING
Monitoring well samples collected under this SAP will be collected using an inflatable packer
system within open bedrock boreholes using a 2-inch Grundfos pump. Monitoring wells will be
sampled in accordance with the SOP for Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling. A copy of the SOP
is included in Appendix B. Figure SOP-1, attached to the Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling
SOP, is a diagram illustrating the borehole packer sampling equipment setup. Refer to Table 2
for specific locations and parameters to be sampled.
WESTON shall include a list of all sampling equipment currently being used in each of the SOPs
and specify that all sampling equipment must be approved by the NHDES Project Manager and
QA Coordinator in advance. WESTON will include a record of the specific equipment to be
used, including make and model numbers.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
3-4
29 October 2012
SECTION 4
QUALITY CONTROL
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
4.
QUALITY CONTROL
The following describes the QC steps used to demonstrate reliability and confidence in the
monitoring data collected for this project and includes field equipment maintenance and
calibration, field QC sample collection, and data verification and validation.
It will be the responsibility of the WESTON QA Officer to ensure that all procedures and
techniques are conducted in accordance with this SAP and the current Master QAPP
(NHDES/HWRB).
4.1
EQUIPMENT CALIBRATION AND MAINTENANCE
To ensure the proper functioning of field equipment, the following tables provide the preventive
maintenance steps for the typical equipment anticipated for the types of monitoring and sampling
activities addressed by this SAP. The multi-parameter, turbidity, and organic vapor monitor
meters must meet the calibration requirements included in Calibration of Field Instruments SOP
to be suitable for use on this project. In the case of field equipment failure, backup equipment
will be shipped to the WESTON Concord, New Hampshire office and delivered to the Site or
shipped directly to the Site. In addition, all instruments requiring calibration will be calibrated
and checked in the WESTON office before field activities commence to ensure all of the correct
standards are available and that equipment is working properly.
In general, all instrumentation necessary for field monitoring and health and safety purposes
shall be maintained, tested, and inspected according to the manufacturer's instructions. All field
instruments shall be calibrated, and have a calibration check, in the office prior to the field event
(within 1 week) to ensure that the equipment is working properly and meets the QA criteria. For
this project, once the equipment is calibrated, and checked, prior to the sampling event, it is not
necessary to recalibrate the instrument at the beginning of each sampling day. Instead, only a
calibration check shall be performed at the beginning of each sampling day to ensure the
instruments have remained in calibration. All calibration and check values shall be documented.
If one or more parameters are not within the appropriate range during the beginning of the day
calibration check, only those parameters shall be calibrated and the calibration shall be checked
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
4-1
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
again, to ensure the instrument was calibrated properly. If that calibration check is not within the
acceptable range for any parameter, the instrument shall be recalibrated using all the standards
for that parameter and the calibration shall be checked again. The calibration shall be checked
again at the end of the day of use to ensure that the instruments have remained in calibration
throughout the day. In addition, should any erratic or illogical readings occur between
calibrations, the instrument shall be recalibrated in order to ensure that representative
measurements are obtained. Refer to the Calibration of Field Instruments SOP in Appendix B for
specific calibration procedures.
Field Equipment - Preventive Maintenance
Instrument
Activity
Frequency
Calibration and Calibration Check –
pre-sampling event
Once Prior to
Sampling Event
Battery Check
Inspect Dissolved Oxygen Membrane
Calibration Check – beginning of day
Calibration Check – end of day
Daily
Calibration and Calibration Check –
pre-sampling event
Once Prior to
Sampling Event
Battery Check
Calibration Check– beginning of day
Calibration Check – end of day
Daily
Battery Check
Daily
Calibration and Calibration Check –
pre-sampling event
Once Prior to
Sampling Event
Battery Check
Calibration – beginning of day
Calibration Check – beginning of day
Calibration Check – end of day
Daily
Grundfos Redi-Flo2
2-inch Submersible Pump
Check electrical cords, pump lead, and
connections
Daily
Honda EU2000i Generator
Check gasoline and oil level
Daily
YSI models 600XL or 6820
Multi-Parameter Water
Quality Meter
Hach 2100 P Turbidity
Meter
Solinst Electronic Water
Level Indicator
MultiRae Plus
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
4-2
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
The following table provides performance requirements of applicable field equipment and the
required corrective actions should equipment fail.
Field Equipment - Calibration and Corrective Action
Parameter
Calibration
Standards
Acceptance
Criteria For
The Daily
Calibration
Checks 1
Calibration
Frequency2
Corrective
Action
Multi-parameter Meters: YSI Models 600XL or 6820
Dissolved Oxygen
(DO) and
Temperature
Oxidation
Reduction Potential
Specific
Conductance
pH
2100P Hach
Turbidity Meter
Calibrated to 100%
Water Saturated Air
0.0-0.5 mg/L for
the 0 mg/L
Use 0 mg/L DO
solution to check
Daily
Calibration
Check at the
beginning of
the day
Zobell Solution
Is used to calibrate
and check
718 µS/cm to
calibrate
1413 µS/cm as a
check 3
7, 4, 10 units
Use pH 7 to check
< 0.1, 20, 100, 800
NTUs 4
Use the 20 NTU
standard to check
+/- 5%
Calibration
Check at the
end of the day
+/- 5%
Daily Calibration
Check
If outside the criteria at
the beginning of the
day, recalibrate the
instrument with new
standards.
If it is still outside the
acceptance criteria
then replace with a
different unit.
+/- 5%
+/- 5%
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
4-3
If outside the criteria at
the end of the day, the
data will be qualified
by WESTON.
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
Field Equipment - Calibration and Corrective Action (Concluded)
Parameter
Calibration
Standards
Acceptance
Criteria For
The Daily
Calibration
Checks 1
Calibration
Frequency2
Daily
Calibration at
the beginning
of the day
MultiRae Plus
Zero air, 100 ppm
isobutylene span gas
+/- 2.5%
Calibration
Check at the
beginning of
the day after
calibration
Calibration
Check at the
end of the day
Corrective
Action
Morning Calibration
Check– If outside the
criteria during the
morning check,
recalibrate. If
recalibration is
unsuccessful, replace the
unit.
End of the day
Calibration Check – If
outside the criteria at the
end of the day, the data
will be qualified by
WESTON.
Notes:
1
The checks are a check of the instrument against the calibration standards and is performed in the
“measurement or run” mode. This is not recalibration, but rather a check.
2
Each instrument requiring calibration by Weston Solutions, Inc. (WESTON®) must be
calibrated in the office prior to field event to ensure that the equipment can meet the quality
assurance criteria.
3
It is permissible to calibrate with either of the specific conductivity standards and use the
other standard to check the calibration.
4
Use StablCal® Formazin Primary Turbidity Standards.
mg/L = milligrams per liter
NTU = nephelometric turbidity unit
µS/cm = microsiemens per centimeter
ppm = parts per million
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
4-4
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
4.2
FIELD QUALITY CONTROL
The following provides a general description of the field QC sampling that will occur for the
project. See Table 5, Summary of QA Samples to be collected for specific details.
Field Quality Control Requirements
QC Sample
Frequency
One duplicate per batch 20 samples;
per matrix; per parameter.
Duplicate
A minimum of one duplicate for each
sampling method shall be collected per
matrix, per analysis.
See Table 5 for analysis.
VOC Trip Blank
Equipment Blank
One per cooler containing VOC
samples.
The data collected as part of this
investigation is considered screening
level quality and therefore, no
equipment blank samples will be
collected.
Acceptance Criteria
Corrective Action
Duplicate
concentrations are
within +/- 30% for
aqueous samples and
50% for solid
samples.
Flag in project
report
No contaminants are
detected.
Flag in project
reports
N/A
N/A
Notes:
Duplicate samples are not intended to be blind duplicate samples. They will be designated with a “DUP” after the
well designation (i.e., OKT_BR10-depth DUP).
Trip blanks will be prepared by the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services Public Health
Laboratory and maintained at all times with the sample containers. The trip blank(s) will be designated “TRIP
BLANK”.
N/A = Not Applicable
QC = quality control
VOC = volatile organic compound
4.3
DATA VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION
The WESTON QA Manager will perform data review, which includes an in-house examination
to ensure data have been recorded, transmitted, and processed correctly. The WESTON
QA Manager will also perform data verification, which includes the evaluation of completeness,
correctness, and conformance/compliance of a specific data set. The data review and verification
will be performed at the end of each sampling event.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
4-5
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
Field screening of water quality data collected will be reviewed by WESTON’s QA Manager.
Review will generally consist of the following: (1) review of calibration data and end of the day
check; and (2) review of raw data and field notes for outliers or inconsistencies that may indicate
a problem with the equipment or sampling procedure.
All laboratory data generated by NHDPHS will be reviewed by NHDPHS personnel and will not
require third-party validation.
The NHDPHS Laboratory will evaluate Field QC samples analyzed by the NHDPHS
Laboratory and will flag any data that does not meet the acceptance criteria under Field QC
Requirements listed in Subsection 4.2 above.
The NHDPHS Laboratory report will consist of the following:

Data Qualifier Description Page.

Sample Summary Page: includes Laboratory IDs, Corresponding Client Sample IDs,
Matrix, Date/Time Collected, and Date Received.

Analytical Report Comments and Qualifiers Page.

Analytical Results Pages: Method Citation, Results, Units, RDL, Prep Date, Analyzed
Date, CAS# Regulatory Limit if Applicable, and Qualifier Code.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
4-6
29 October 2012
SECTION 5
DOCUMENTATION
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
5.
DOCUMENTATION
In order to comply with Waste Management Division Submittal Guidelines, located at
http://des.nh.gov/organization/divisions/waste/orcb/documents/electronic_submittal_guidelines.pdf,
reports
must
be
submitted
electronically
through
OneStop
at
https://www2.des.state.nh.us/OnestopDataProviders/DESLogin.aspx. You
this
may
web
all
address:
also
call
Brett Rand at 271-7379 for assistance. NHDES also requests one hardcopy of all reports labeled
“PM Copy.” All field forms and charts to be used are attached at the end of the appropriate SOPs
(refer to the Table of Contents).
5.1
FIELD DATA MANAGEMENT
Documentation of field activities is required. Field personnel shall use field logbooks and/or
pre-printed field worksheets to accurately document all field activities: on-site conditions, field
measurements, sample collection information, field instrument and calibration information, and
other pertinent site-related information during monitoring activities. All information shall be
recorded in permanent ink.
The field notes shall include a description of field conditions that includes, as a minimum and
where applicable:

Site location.

Date, start, and finish times of the work and weather conditions.

Name and initials of person making entry.

Names of other personnel present, if any.

Names of visitors, if any.

Purpose and summary of proposed work effort.

Details of any deviation from the Field Operations Plan or SOP, including who
authorized the deviation.

Field observations, including the presence of permanganate.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
5-1
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire

Sampling equipment used (including make model and serial number) and equipment
calibration documentation.

Field screening methods, if used, and a description of screening locations.

Field screening results, and identify samples with both field and fixed laboratory
analyses.

Fixed laboratory sample identification number, sample type (composite, grab), time
of sampling, sample analysis, and sample locations shown on a near-scale map
relative to a fixed landmark.

Sample handling, packaging, labeling, and shipping information (including
destination).

Location, description, and unique identifier for all photographs taken in association
with the field activity.

Any other pertinent information.
Any corrections to the logbook or other written documentation shall be initialed and dated. All
corrections shall be shown as a single line through the original text. The unused bottom portion
of each page shall be lined-out, initialed, and dated.
5.2
CHAIN-OF-CUSTODY PROCEDURES
Samples shall remain in the sample collector's view at all times, unless locked in a vehicle or
other secure place in accordance with the Chain-of-Custody, Sample Handling, and Shipping
SOP included in Appendix B. It is the sampler's responsibility to ensure that the samples are not
tampered with prior to their delivery to the analytical laboratory. The Field Operations Leader
will review the COCs at the end of each day to ensure all data has been entered properly. The
COC form shall be completed to provide documentation tracing, sample possession, and
handling from the time of collection through delivery to the analytical laboratory, and shall
accompany the samples at all times. The COC is a legal document that may be used for litigation
purposes.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
5-2
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
5.3
REPORTS
NHDES/NHDPHS will provide the analytical result reports along with a copy of the pertinent
QC data. All field reports will be provided to the WESTON Project Manager. WESTON will
prepare a technical report at the conclusion of all site work included during this investigation.
This report will include, but may not be limited to, the following information:

Transmittal page.

Summary of sampling activities.

A copy of the complete laboratory report, including the COC forms and applicable
data validation reports.

A list of equipment used, including make, models, and serial numbers.

All calibration information including calibration standards used, lots numbers,
expiration dates, calibration checks, calibration log, etc.

A copy of all field sampling sheets and logs.

A table of the groundwater levels and elevations at each well including past data.

Site map.

Data summary tables of the CoCs detected at each sampling location during the
current sampling event, highlighting any compounds that exceed cleanup goals.

Data summary tables showing the history of the CoCs detected at each sampling
location, highlighting any compounds that exceed cleanup goals with graphs of the
same.

Groundwater Potentiometric Surface Map.

Figure illustrating the distribution of site CoCs.

A QA/QC section. See below for specifics.

A table of wells showing permanganate concentrations.

Recommendations for future modifications to the current monitoring program or to
this SAP, if appropriate.

Recommendations for appropriate remedial action based on current and historical
analytical results and trends.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
5-3
29 October 2012
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
5.3.1
Quality Assurance/Quality Control Section of Report
This section should include general statements summarizing whether or not the QC criteria in
this SAP and the current Master QAPP (NHDES/HWRB) were met in the field and in the
laboratory. List any QA/QC problems and how they were resolved. Please note anything unusual
that will affect the quality or usability of the data.
If the QC criteria were not met:




How does that affect the usability of the data?
Can we use the data? If not, why not?
Was any corrective action needed and what, if any, measures were taken?
What changes are recommended for the future?
Examples of possible issues:



Were any samples broken in transport to the laboratory?
Did the laboratory report any difficulties, issues?
Were the sample tags mixed up in the field if the results look abnormal?
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
5-4
29 October 2012
SECTION 6
REFERENCES
Sampling and Analysis Plan
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
6.
REFERENCES
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, Hazardous Waste Remediation
Bureau.. Current Master Quality Assurance Project Plan, EQA RFA# 08036.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). 1991. Record of Decision Savage
Municipal Water Supply OU-1, Milford, New Hampshire. 27 September.
EPA. 1996. EPA Superfund Explanation of Significant Differences: Savage Municipal Water
Supply, EPA ID: NHD980671002, OU 01, Milford, NH. 19 December.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012.doc
6-1
29 October 2012
FIGURES
2
TABLES
Table 1
Contaminants of Concern, Analytes, Associated ICLs,
NHDES Standards, and Laboratory Criteria
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
Groundwater Test Methods / Analytes
ROD ICLs
NHDES AGQS
(Env-Or 600)
NHDPHS
Laboratory
RDLs
(µg/L)
(µg/L)
(µg/L)
Analysis by NHDPHS Laboratory in Concord New Hampshire
"VOCs" consist of the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) full list of volatile
organic compounds analyzed by EPA Method 8260B.
Contaminants of Concern
Benzene
1,1-Dichloroethylene
Trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene
Tetrachloroethylene (Tetrachloroethene) (PCE)
1,1,1-Trichloroethane
Trichloroethylene (Trichloroethene) (TCE)
1,1-Dichloroethane
5
7
100
5
200
5
3500
5
7
100
5
200
5
81
5
5
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
N/A
70
2
N/A
2
2
Methylene Chloride (Dichloromethane)
Contaminant of Interest
Cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene 1
Vinyl Chloride
1
Notes:
1
Cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and vinyl chloride were not identified in the Record of Decision (ROD ) as contaminants of
concern. However, each has been observed in groundwater at concentrations greater than the Ambient Groundwater Quality
Standard (AGQS).
NHDPHS = New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services
µg/L = micrograms per liter
VOC = volatile organic compounds
N/A = Not Applicable
ICL = Interim Cleanup Levels
RDL = Reporting Detection Limits
10/29/2012
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Tables\NHDES Table 1 - RDLs.xls
1 of 1
Table 2
Bedrock Well Sampling Locations and Analytical Parameters
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
BEDROCK GROUNDWATER
Well ID
Duplicates
2
Well Type
OKT_BR-10
8260B
Deep Bedrock
OKT_BR-11
8260B
Deep Bedrock
OKT_BR-12
8260B
Deep Bedrock
OKT_BR-13
OKT_BR-14
OKT_BR-15
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
OKT_BR-16
Deep Bedrock
OKT_BR-1
OKT_BR-2
OKT_BR-3
OKT_BR-4
OKT_BR-5
OKT_BR-6
OKT_BR-7
OKT_BR-8
OKT_BR-9
OKT_MI-19
OKT_MI-22
OKT_MW-2R
MW-4B
MW-4R
MW-11R
OKT_MW-16R
MW-19C
OKT_MW-30
MW-31R
MW-116R
OKT_PW-2R
OKT_PW-5R
OKT_PW-6R
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
N/A
OKT_PW-12R
Analysis
Packer Testing 1
Lab Analysis: EPA Method 8260B
(NHDES VOC Full List)
Field Parameters: pH, temperature, specific
conductance, dissolved oxygen (DO), Oxidation
Reduction Potential (ORP) and turbidity.
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Water Levels
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Notes:
EPA = United States Environmental Protection Agency
NHDES = New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services
VOC = volatile organic compounds
N/A = Not Applicable
1 - Multiple intervals will be sampled from each well using the packer assembly. The exact sample on intervals will be determined based on
borehole geophysical logs and/or determined based on field conditions.
2. The duplicate will be taken at the fracture where the most contamination is likely to be based on borehole geophysical logs.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Tables\NHDES Table 2 - Sampling Locations & Parameters.xls
1 of 1
10/29/2012
Table 3
Media, Analysis, Test Methods, Containers/Sample Volume,
Preservation, and Hold Time
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
Analytes
Number of Samples
(including field QC)1
Analytical Method
Containers
(Type and Size)
Preservation
Requirements 1
Maximum
Holding Time
4˚C +/- 2˚C
HCL
14 days
NHDPHS Laboratory - Concord, New Hampshire
VOCs
Approximately 21-56 field
samples, (packer testing
3-8 samples at each of
7 wells) 2-3 duplicates,
0 equipment blanks,
trip blanks
NHDES VOC Full List
(NHDES Lab’s 8260B)
(3) 40-mL VOA 2
Field Parameters for Packer Testing Sampling
Temperature, ORP,
DO, Specific
Conductivity, pH
One set of readings for each
packer testing fracture
Turbidity
YSI 600XL or 6820
Multi- Parameter Water
Quality Meter
N/A
N/A
N/A
Hach 2100P Turbidity Meter
N/A
N/A
N/A
8-oz jar
N/A
N/A
Field Parameters for Drilling
VOC Field Screening
Minimum of 7 screenings
MultiRae Plus PID
Notes:
1
The pH requirement for all acid preserved samples is less than 2 units; for all base preserved samples is greater than 12.
2
Hydrochloric acid preserved trip blanks will be included in each cooler containing volatile organic compound (VOC)
samples (2 volatile organic vials each). There will be one temperature blank per cooler.
N/A - Not Applicable
mL = milliliters
˚C = degree Celsius
NHDES = New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services
NHDPHS = New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services
VOA = volatile organic analysis
HCL = hydrogen chloride
ORP = oxidation-reduction potential
DO = dissolved oxygen
PID = photoionization detector
oz = ounce
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Tables\NHDES Table 3 - Media.xls
11/2/2012
1 of 1
Table 4
Bedrock Well Monitoring Well Data
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
BEDROCK GROUNDWATER
Well ID
OKT_BR-10
OKT_BR-11
OKT_BR-12
OKT_BR-13
OKT_BR-14
OKT_BR-15
OKT_BR-16
OKT_BR-1
OKT_BR-2
OKT_BR-3
OKT_BR-4
OKT_BR-5
OKT_BR-6
OKT_BR-7
OKT_BR-8
OKT_BR-9
OKT_MI-19
OKT_MI-22
OKT_MW-2R
MW-4B
MW-4R
MW-11R
Well
Depth
(in feet from
Top of PVC
or TOC1
375
440
425
465
445
395
445
403.5
404.4
505
424.9
364
605
500
500
380
80.52
116
164
~55
~98
~115
Length
of Screen
in feet
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
293
260
370
285
290
495
390
390
294
15
15
28
10
34
45
Screen
Depth
(feet below
ground
surface)
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
107-400
144-404
135-505
140-425
75-365
110-605
110-500
90-480
86-380
65-80
99-114
136-164
45-55
64-98
70-115
Samping
Depth
(in feet from
TOC)
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
X-Coordinates
(easting)
Packer Testing
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
1 of 2
MP Elevation
(ft amsl)
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
125094
124988
125218
126709
124896
125003
126009
125597
124745
124870
125124
125588
123584
123582
125882
269.14
274.00
274.71
268.64
276.60
280.25
270.62
271.45
274.08
277.46
278.72
268.95
268.73
268.25
262.47
161-(-131)
131-(-126)
142-(-230)
131-(-131)
199-(-91)
170-(-320)
159-(-231)
180-(-230)
186-(-108)
210-197
257-234
130-102
227-217
208-174
186-141
Comments
2,3
Water Levels Only 2
975595
975249
975076
975059
974873
975019
975022
Water Levels
974792
Only
974984
974416
975054
975145
975304
975300
976435
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Tables\NHDES Table 4 - Well Info.xlsx
Y-Coordinates
(northing)
Screen/
Open Hole
Elevation
(ft amsl)
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
10/29/2012
Table 4
Bedrock Well Monitoring Well Data
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
BEDROCK GROUNDWATER
Well ID
OKT_MW-16R
MW-19B
OKT_MW-30
MW-31R
MW-116R
OKT_PW-2R
OKT_PW-5R
OKT_PW-6R
OKT_PW-12R
Well
Depth
(in feet from
Top of PVC
or TOC1
390
51
440
~273
219
136.38
136.59
113.23
136.24
Length
of Screen
in feet
290
10
280
213
10
20
10
10
20
Screen
Depth
(feet below
ground
surface)
100-390
39-49
160-440
60-273
209-219
113-133
119-129
94-104
114-134
Samping
Depth
(in feet from
TOC)
Water Levels
Only
(Concluded)
X-Coordinates
(easting)
975671
977237
975229
978979
978198
975255
975207
975016
975438
Y-Coordinates
(northing)
124875
124123
125893
126192
124855
124974
124959
124934
125268
MP Elevation
(ft amsl)
269.12
263.88
270.39
249.68
258.35
273.27
275.31
279.08
267.92
Screen/
Open Hole
Elevation
(ft amsl)
169-(-121)
230-220
112-(-168)
190-(-23)
54-44
157-137
152-142
175-165
151-131
Comments
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Deep Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Shallow Bedrock
Notes:
ft amsl - feet above mean sea level
MP - monitoring point
TOC - Top of Casing
TBD - To be determined. Final information will be updated after this investigation is completed.
1 - Depth is from top of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) or top of casing if there is no PVC.
2 - All water levels shall be collected from the top of the PVC or top of casing if there is no PVC.
3 - Multiple intervals will be sampled from each well using the packer assembly. The exact sample intervals will be determined based on borehole geophysical logs and/or
determined based on field conditions.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Tables\NHDES Table 4 - Well Info.xlsx
2 of 2
10/29/2012
Table 5
Summary of Quality Assurance Samples
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Milford, New Hampshire
BEDROCK GROUNDWATER & DRINKING WATER
Media
Associated
Sampling
Equipment
Sample ID
Designated NOTE to be
used on Chain-of-Custody
Analyses
EQUIPMENT BLANK SAMPLES
The data to be collected as part of this investigation is for screening purposes and therefore it is not necessary to
collect equipment blank samples.
DUPLICATE SAMPLES
Bedrock
Groundwater
Bedrock
Groundwater
Bedrock
Groundwater
Grundfos Redi-Flo
OKT_BR10 (Depth ) 1
Submersible Pump
DUP
and WSP system
Grundfos Redi-Flo
OKT_BR11 (Depth )
Submersible Pump
DUP
and WSP system
Grundfos Redi-Flo
OKT_BR12 (Depth )
Submersible Pump
DUP
and WSP system
Depth of duplicate sample
VOCs (8260B)
Depth of duplicate sample
VOCs (8260B)
Depth of duplicate sample
VOCs (8260B)
TRIP BLANK/TEMPERATURE BLANK SAMPLES
1 per cooler with
aqueous VOCs
samples
N/A
TRIP BLANK
One trip blank per chain of
custody form, per cooler.
VOCs (8260B)
Temperature
Blank
N/A
TEMP BLANK
Check box when a
temperature blank has been
included in the cooler
Temperature
Notes:
1. The depth for the duplicates will be determined in the field depending on the results of the Borehole Geophysical
Logging and recorded on the Chain-of-Custody in the comments section (e.g., 300 feet). Three
duplicates are based on collecting approximately 56 samples (7 wells x 8 fractures each)
VOCs = volatile organic compounds (United States Environmental Protection Agency Method 8260 New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services VOC Full List)
ID = Identification
N/A = not applicable
WSP = wireline straddle packer
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Tables\NHDES Table 5 - QC Samples.xls
1 of 1
10/29/2012
APPENDIX A
ORGANIZATIONAL CHART
Organizational Chart
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
United States Environmental Protection Agency Region I Remedial Project Manager Richard Hull 617‐918‐1882 New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services Project Manager Robin Mongeon, PE 603‐271‐7378 New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services Quality Assurance Coordinator Sharon Perkins 603‐271‐6805 WESTON Principal‐in‐Charge Bette Nowack 603‐656‐5400 Concord Office 603‐656‐5410 Direct Line WESTON Project QA Officer Diane Quigley 603‐656‐5434 WESTON Health and Safety Manager Ted Blackburn 603‐656‐5442 WESTON Technical Staff Project Manager: Bette Nowack (603‐656‐5410) Field Operations Lead: Andrew Fuller (603‐656‐5431) Field Sampling Team: Andrew Klappholz (603‐656‐5450), Owen Friend‐Gray (603‐656‐5403), David Kammer (603‐
656‐5490), Lisa Kammer (603‐656‐5457)
Subcontractor Analytical Services DHHS Public Health Laboratories Lou Barinelli 603‐271‐2994 Subcontractor Borehole Geophysics Services Hagar‐Richter Geoscience, Inc. Dorothy Richter 603‐893‐9944
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\Appendix A_OrganizationalChart.doc
Subcontractor Drilling Services Tri‐State Drilling and Boring Neal Faulkner 802‐467‐3123 29 October 2012
APPENDIX B
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
CALIBRATION OF FIELD INSTRUMENTS
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
Savage Calibration of YSI Hach Field Instruments SOP
September 2012
Page 1 of 12
CALIBRATION OF YSI AND HACH FIELD INSTRUMENTS
PURPOSE
This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) Calibration of YSI and Hach Field Instruments Standard
Operating Procedure provides a general framework for calibrating field instruments used to
measure water quality parameters for groundwater and surface water at the Savage Municipal
Water Supply Superfund Site in Milford, New Hampshire. Water quality parameters include
temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), specific conductance, Oxidation Reduction Potential
(ORP), and turbidity.
This SOP is written for instruments where the probe readings for pH, DO, and specific
conductance are automatically corrected for temperature (YSI Models 600XL/XLM). The pH
meters must be calibrated using three pH standards (4, 7, and 10 pH units). Turbidity must be
taken with a separate meter (Hach 2100P).
This SOP was developed using the “Calibration of Field Instruments SOP” included in the
current New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) Hazardous Waste
Remediation Bureau (HWRB) Master Quality Assurance Project Plan (Master QAPP),
EQA RFA#08036. Any modifications to this SOP shall be approved by NHDES in consultation
with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in advance, documented in the
site logbook, and presented in the final report.
For ground water monitoring, the instrument must be equipped with a clear flow-through-cell
with a maximum capacity of 250 milliliters and the display/logger or computer display screen
needs to be large enough to simultaneously contain the readouts of each probe in the instrument.
Turbidity must be taken at a point before the flow-through cell and from a meter separate from
the flow through cell apparatus. A three way stopcock is recommended to divert sample flow for
the turbidity reading. Turbidity cannot be measured in a flow-through-cell because the
flow-through-cell acts as a sediment trap. This procedure is applicable for use with the current
Low Flow Groundwater Purging and Sampling SOPs in the Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP).
HEALTH AND SAFETY WARNINGS
Read all labels on the standards and note any warnings on the labels. Wear appropriate personal
protection equipment (e.g., gloves, eye shields, etc.) when handling the standards. If necessary,
consult the Material Safety Data Sheets for additional safety information on the chemicals in the
standards.
CALIBRATION ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA
All field instruments shall be calibrated, and have a calibration check, in the office prior to
the field event (within 1 week) to ensure that the equipment is working properly and meets
the quality assurance (QA) criteria.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Calibration SOP\Calibration of YSI and Hach Field Instruments SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Calibration of YSI Hach Field Instruments SOP
September 2012
Page 2 of 12
For this project, once the equipment is calibrated, and checked, prior to the sampling event, it is
not necessary to recalibrate the instruments at the beginning of each sampling day. Instead, only
a calibration check shall be performed at the beginning of each sampling day to ensure the
instruments have remained in calibration.
If one or more parameters are not within the appropriate range during the beginning of the day
calibration check, only those parameters shall be calibrated and the calibration shall be checked
again, to ensure the instrument was calibrated properly. If that calibration check is not within the
acceptable range for any parameter, the instrument shall be recalibrated using all the standards
for that parameter and the calibration shall be checked again. See individual parameters for
specific instructions. If problems with the instrument continue, backup instruments shall be
calibrated and used in place of the inoperable unit.
The calibration shall be checked again at the end of the day of use to ensure that the instruments
have remained in calibration throughout the day. In addition, should any erratic or illogical
readings occur between calibrations, the instrument shall be recalibrated in order to ensure that
representative measurements are obtained. All calibration and check values shall be documented
on the calibration log maintained by each user (see attached log).
If a calibration check at the end of the day is not within the acceptable range for that parameter,
the data collected that day for that parameter shall be qualified in its use. This qualification shall
be documented on the calibration log and the field sheets/logs for the appropriate sampling
locations. For example: pH measurements are collected as part of the low flow sampling
procedure. If the afternoon pH calibration check was not within the acceptable range that day,
the pH data collected by that instrument on that day would be qualified as useful only for
determining stabilization and not as representative pH measurements of the water being sampled.
That qualification would then be documented on the calibration log and the sampling sheet for
each of those locations.
COLD WEATHER CONDITIONS
Given the temperature sensitivity of the calibration solutions in very cold (or very hot) weather
conditions, the NHDES Project Manager may approve performing the morning calibration and
calibration check in the office, or other facility, just prior to going into the field and the end of
the day calibration check upon returning to that facility. Careful thought must be given before
approval. On one hand this may avoid delays and budget increases due to weather calibration
issues in the field. On the other hand, not being able to check the calibration or re-calibrate in the
field may result in the qualification or loss of data if there are problems with the equipment that
day. In each case, this deviation to the normal procedure must be approved by the NHDES
Project Manager in advance. If approved, it must be documented on each Calibration Log and in
all site sampling reports (e.g., Annual Report, Monitoring Data Report, etc.) that the calibration
and checks for that day were performed off-site due to very cold (or very hot) weather
conditions, including where they were performed and that it was approved in advance by the
NHDES Project Manager. See Page 2 of the attached Calibration Log.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Calibration SOP\Calibration of YSI and Hach Field Instruments SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Calibration of YSI Hach Field Instruments SOP
September 2012
Page 3 of 12
EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS
The following is a list of equipment and materials typically used during calibration:

Multi-meter sonde and handheld meter (YSI 600XL/XLM)

Calibration solutions:
-
“Zero” (0) milligrams per liter (mg/L) DO check standard
-
pH buffers 4, 7, and 10 (plus additional pH 4 for overnight storage of YSI probes)
-
Two standards for specific conductance, one for calibration and one for checking the
calibration: 1,413 micro Siemens per centimeter (µS/cm) and 718 µS/cm
-
Zobell Solution for ORP

Small wet sponge or paper towel for DO 100% saturation calibration

Separate Turbidimeter (Hach 2100P Turbidity meter) w/calibration standards: <0.1, 20,
100, 800 Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTUs)

Calibration cup with cap

Cooler (for storage of calibration solutions)

Distilled water

Paper towels

Kimwipes

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) certified thermometer, degrees
Celsius (˚C) (if the vendor has not verified the accuracy of the instrument temperature
sensor)

Ring stand with clamp

Calibration log
GENERAL INFORMATION
In general, all instrumentation necessary for field monitoring and health and safety purposes
shall be maintained, tested, and inspected according to the manufacturer's instructions.
It is assumed that most of this equipment will be rented and is not owned by the contractor. Any
reference made to a vendor applies to the owner/renter of the equipment.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Calibration SOP\Calibration of YSI and Hach Field Instruments SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Calibration of YSI Hach Field Instruments SOP
September 2012
Page 4 of 12
Prior to calibration, all instrument probes must be cleaned in accordance with the manufacturer's
instructions, preferably by the vendor if the unit is rented. Failure to perform this proper
maintenance step can lead to erratic measurements. The vendor is required to provide written
documentation (which will be included in sampling reports) that indicates the equipment was
cleaned, by who, and dated.
Calibration standard values, check results, temperature and barometer checks, and maintenance
for each piece of equipment shall be documented on the calibration logs and included in the
reports. This information includes dates, personnel, calibration standards expiration dates, etc.
A calibration log is provided at the end of this SOP.
This SOP requires that the manufacturer’s instruction manuals (including the instrument
specifications) accompany the instruments into the field.
Turn on the instrument and allow it to warm up according to the manufactures instructions.
Program the multi-probe instrument so that the following parameters to be measured will be
displayed: temperature in ˚C; pH, DO in % for calibration and mg/L for measurements; specific
conductance in µS/cm; and ORP in millivolts (mV).
All calibration solutions shall be placed into the calibration cup to calibrate the instrument and to
check the calibration. The probes shall not be put directly into the bottles of calibration solutions
from the vendor. The volume of the calibration solutions must be sufficient to cover both the
probe and temperature sensor. See manufacturer’s instructions for additional information.
While calibrating or measuring, make sure there are no air bubbles lodged between the probe and
the probe guard.
Mark the “date opened” on each new bottle of calibration solution. Record the lot number and
expiration date on the calibration log.
All calibration solutions shall be stored in the dark and stored at cool/stable temperatures.
Storage of calibration solutions in an insulated cooler kept in the shade will help to maintain
calibration solution integrity.
CALIBRATION PROCEDURES
TEMPERATURE (not to be done in the field)
For instrument probes that rely on the temperature sensor, each temperature sensor must be
checked for accuracy against a thermometer that is traceable to the NIST prior to the sampling
event. A temperature check is required once a year for each instrument at a minimum.
This procedure is not to be done in the field.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Calibration SOP\Calibration of YSI and Hach Field Instruments SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Calibration of YSI Hach Field Instruments SOP
September 2012
Page 5 of 12
The temperature check shall be performed prior to the field event, preferably via the vendor if
the unit is rented. If the check is not performed by the vendor it must be performed by field
personal prior to using the unit. Verification and documentation, including accuracy, dates, and
personnel of this procedure is required. The documentation shall be recorded on the calibration
log and included in any sampling reports.
Temperature Sensory Accuracy Procedure
1. Allow a container filled with water to come to room temperature.
2. Place a NIST thermometer and the instrument’s temperature sensor into the water and wait
for both temperature readings to stabilize.
3. Compare the two measurements. The instrument’s temperature sensor must agree with the
reference thermometer measurement within the accuracy of the sensor (typically ±0.15°C or
±0.2°C). Check the manual that came with the instrument. If the measurements do not agree,
the instrument may not be working properly and the vendor/manufacturer needs to be
consulted and the unit replaced.
DISSOLVED OXYGEN
Dissolved oxygen content in water is measured using a membrane electrode.
The DO probe’s membrane and electrolyte solution shall be replaced prior to the sampling event
and replaced as needed thereafter. Failure to perform this step may lead to erratic measurements.
If the vendor changes the membrane and electrolyte solution they must send the appropriate
documentation with each unit. If there is no documentation with the unit, the field personnel will
have to replace the membrane and electrolyte solution before the sampling event begins.
Documentation shall be noted on the calibration log. Dissolved Oxygen Calibration/Calibration Check Procedure
1. Gently dry the temperature sensor according to manufacturer’s instructions and inspect the
DO membrane for air bubbles and nicks.
2. Place a wet sponge or a wet paper towel on the bottom of the DO calibration container to
create a 100% water-saturated air environment.
3. Loosely fit the DO probe into the calibration container to prevent the escape of moisture
evaporating from the sponge or paper towel while maintaining ambient pressure
(see manufacturer’s instructions on attaching the calibration container to the instrument). Do
not allow the probe to come in contact with the wet sponge or paper towel.
4. Allow the confined air to become saturated with water vapor (saturation occurs in
approximately 10 to 15 minutes). During this time, turn on the instrument to allow the DO
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Calibration SOP\Calibration of YSI and Hach Field Instruments SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Calibration of YSI Hach Field Instruments SOP
September 2012
Page 6 of 12
probe to warm-up according the manufactures directions. Make sure that both the DO
reading and the temperature have stabilized before starting the calibration sequence.
5. Select calibration mode; then select “DO %”.
6. Enter the local barometric pressure (usually in mm of mercury) for the sampling location into
the instrument using an on-site hand held barometer, unless the instrument already has a
temperature-compensated barometer.
7. Record the barometric pressure on the calibration log.
8. The instrument should indicate that the calibration is in progress. Observe the readings for
percent DO and temperature. When they show no significant change for approximately
30 seconds press enter. After calibration, the instrument should display DO in mg/L (% DO
is only used for calibration).
9. Record the initial DO reading in mg/L and temperature reading in ˚C on the calibration log
immediately after calibration.
10. To check the calibration in the run/measurement mode (on a run/measurement screen),
remove the probe from the container and place it into a 0.0 (zero) mg/L DO standard. Do not
put the DO probe back into the storage cup (w/sponge), prior to performing the zero check.
11. Wait until the “mg/L DO” and temperature readings have stabilized. Record the 0 mg/L DO
reading on the calibration log. The instrument must read 0 to 0.5 mg/L DO. If the instrument
cannot reach this value, it will be necessary to clean the probe, and change the membrane and
electrolyte solution. If this is unsuccessful, use a new 0.0 mg/L DO standard. If these
measures are still unsuccessful, consult the manufacturer/vendor or replace the unit.
12. Remove probe from the zero DO standard, rinse with distilled water, and gently blot dry.
pH (electrometric)
The pH of a sample is determined electrometrically using a glass electrode. Three standards are
needed for the calibration: 4, 7, and 10.
pH Calibration/Calibration Check Procedure
1. Allow the buffered standards to equilibrate to the ambient temperature.
2. Fill calibration containers with the buffered standards so each standard will cover the pH
probe and temperature sensor.
3. Remove probe from its storage container, rinse with distilled water, and gently blot dry with
a Kimwipe. Use caution during drying that the DO probe membrane is not disturbed.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Calibration SOP\Calibration of YSI and Hach Field Instruments SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Calibration of YSI Hach Field Instruments SOP
September 2012
Page 7 of 12
4. Select the calibration mode for a three point pH calibration.
5. Immerse probe into the initial standard, pH 7. Enter the buffered standard value (pH 7) into
instrument. Wait until temperature and pH readings stabilize. If the readings do not change
within 30 seconds, press enter to accept the calibration.
6. Remove probe from the initial standard, rinse with distilled water, and gently blot dry.
7. Immerse probe into the second standard (pH 4). Repeat step 5.
8. Remove probe from the second standard, rinse with distilled water, and gently blot dry.
9. Immerse probe in third buffered standard (pH-10) and repeat step 5.
10. Remove probe from the third standard, rinse with distilled water, and gently blot dry.
11. To check the calibration in the run/measurement mode (on a run/measurement screen),
immerse the probe into the pH 7 buffer solution. Wait for the temperature and pH readings to
stabilize. Record the pH value on the calibration log. The value must be pH 7 +/-5%
(pH 6.65-7.35). If the calibration check failed re-calibrate the instrument using fresh
standards for all three values and check it again. If re-calibration fails, clean the pH probe,
consult the manufacture/vendor or replace the unit.
12. Remove probe from the pH 7 check standard, rinse with distilled water, and gently blot dry.
SPECIFIC CONDUCTANCE
Conductivity is used to measure the ability of an aqueous solution to carry an electrical current.
Specific conductance is the conductivity value corrected to 25°C. When monitoring
groundwater, surface water or pore water use the specific conductance readings and record in
µS/cm.
Most instruments are calibrated against a single standard which is near, (above or below) the
specific conductance of the environmental samples. A second standard is used to check the
linearity of the instrument in the range of measurements. Specific conductivity standards
concentrations are generally dependent on expected field conditions and availability. However,
there have been some issues with the stability of some of the standards in the field. Unless
specified in a site-specific SAP, NHDES and EPA have agreed that specific conductivity is, in
general, a non-critical measurement and it is more important to use standards that are stable in
the field even though they may be above or below the actual field conditions.
The following standards have been field tested, are readily available from most vendors, and are
acceptable for use by NHDES and EPA: a 1,413 µS/cm standard and a 718 µS/cm standard. It is
acceptable to use either one of the standards to calibrate and the other to check the calibration.
In general, the 1,413 µS/cm standard will be used to calibrate and a 718 µS/cm standard to check
the calibration.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Calibration SOP\Calibration of YSI and Hach Field Instruments SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Calibration of YSI Hach Field Instruments SOP
September 2012
Page 8 of 12
Specific Conductance Calibration/Calibration Check Procedure
1. Allow the calibration standards to equilibrate to the ambient temperature.
2. Remove the probe from its storage container, rinse the probe with a small amount of the first
(1,413 µS/cm) specific conductance standard (discard the rinsate), and place the probe into
the standard. Be sure that the temperature sensor and the probe’s vent hole are immersed in
the standard. Gently move the sonde up and down to dislodge any air bubbles from the
conductivity cell.
3. Allow at least one minute for temperature equilibrium before proceeding.
4. Select the calibration mode for specific conductance. Enter the calibration value of the
standard being used (1,413 µS/cm). Allow the temperature and specific conductance to
stabilize. If the reading does not change within 30 seconds, press enter to accept the
calibration.
5. To check the calibration, select the monitoring/run mode (a run/measurement screen).
Remove the probe from the first standard, rinse the probe with distilled water and then a
small amount of the second, standard (discard the rinsate), and place the probe into the
second (718 µS/cm) standard. The second standard will serve to verify the linearity of the
instrument. Read the specific conductance value from the instrument. Record the value on
the calibration log, and compare the value to the standard. The value must be +/-5%.
(682 to 754 µS/cm for the 718 µS/cm standard and 1,342 to 1,484 µS/cm for the 1,413
µS/cm standard). If not, recalibrate using new standards and check again. If the re-calibration
does not correct the problem, clean the probe, consult the manufacturer/vendor or replace the
unit.
6. Remove probe from the specific conductance check standard, rinse with distilled water, and
gently blot dry.
OXIDATION/REDUCTION POTENTIAL
The oxidation/reduction potential is the electrometric difference measured in a solution between
an inert indicator electrode and a suitable reference electrode. The electrometric difference is
measured in mV and is temperature dependent. A Zobell solution is required to calibrate ORP.
Read the warning on the label before use.
Oxidation Reduction Potential Calibration/Calibration Check Procedure
1. Allow the Zobell solution calibration standard to equilibrate to ambient temperature.
2. Remove the probe from its storage container, rinse the probe with distilled water, gently blot
dry with a Kimwipe and place it into the standard.
3. Select monitoring/run mode.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Calibration SOP\Calibration of YSI and Hach Field Instruments SOP.doc
30 October 2012
September 2012
Page 9 of 12
Savage Calibration of YSI Hach Field Instruments SOP
4. Wait for the probe temperature to stabilize, and then read the temperature. Record the
temperature reading on the calibration log.
5. Look up the mV value at this temperature from the temperature / millivolt chart found below
and on the calibration log. These values have been rounded to the nearest whole number.
Record this value on the calibration log.
Zobell Solution Millivolt Values Based on Temperature for
Oxidation Reduction Potential Calibration
Calibration Check Range Values (+/- 5%)
Temp.
ºC
-3
-2
-1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
ORP
Zobell
Solution
mV
Value
267
266
265
264
262
261
260
258
257
256
254
253
252
Calibration
Check
Range
Values
+/- 5%
254-280
253-279
252-278
251-277
249-275
248-274
247-273
245-271
244-270
243-269
241-267
240-266
239-265
Temp.
ºC
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
ORP
Zobell
Solution
mV
Value
251
249
248
247
245
244
243
241
240
239
238
236
235
Calibration
Check
Range
Values
+/- 5%
238-264
237-261
236-260
235-259
233-257
232-256
231-255
229-253
228-252
227-251
226-250
224-248
223-247
Temp.
ºC
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
ORP
Zobell
Solution
mV
Value
234
232
231
230
228
227
226
225
223
222
221
219
218
Calibration
Check
Range
Values
+/- 5%
222-246
220-244
219-243
219-242
217-239
216-238
215-237
214-236
212-234
211-233
210-232
208-230
207-229
6. Select the calibration mode for ORP. Enter the temperature-corrected ORP value into the
instrument. Once the temperature and ORP values stabilize, press enter to accept the
calibration.
7. To check the calibration in the monitoring/run mode (on a run/measurement screen),
immerse the probe in the Zobell solution, read the ORP on the instrument. Record the check
value on the calibration log, and compare the value to the ORP value of the standard in
step 5. The instrument value must be +/- 5% of the calibration value. See the chart above for
the check range. If it is not within +/- 5%, recalibrate using a new Zobell solution. If the
re-calibration is not successful, consult the manufacture/vendor or replace the unit. For the
afternoon calibration check, the instrument must be within +/- 5% of the mV value for the
current temperature.
8. Remove the probe from the ORP check standard, rinse with distilled water, and gently blot
dry.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Calibration SOP\Calibration of YSI and Hach Field Instruments SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Calibration of YSI Hach Field Instruments SOP
September 2012
Page 10 of 12
TURBIDITY
The turbidity method is based upon a comparison of intensity of light scattered by a sample
under defined conditions with the intensity of light scattered by a standard reference suspension.
A turbidimeter is a nephelometer with a visible light source for illuminating the sample and one
or more photo-electric detectors placed ninety degrees to the path of the light source.
The HWRB low flow procedure requires that the turbidity meter shall have a calibration range
from 0.00 to 800 (1,000) NTUs.
Condensation (fogging):
Condensation may occur on the outside of the sample cell when measuring a cold sample in a
warm, humid environment. Condensation interferes with turbidity measurement, so all moisture
must be thoroughly wiped off the sample cell before measurement. If fogging recurs, let the
sample warm slightly by standing at ambient temperature or immersing in a container of ambient
temperature water for a short period. After warming, gently invert the sample cell to thoroughly
mix the contents before measurement.
This procedure is based on the use of the Hach 2100P Turbidimeter and the commercially
available StablCal® Formazin Primary Turbidity Standards.
Calibration/Calibration Check Procedures for the Hach 2100P Turbidity Meter
1. Use the commercially available StablCal® Formazin Primary Turbidity Standards.
2. Before performing the calibration procedure, make sure the cells are not scratched. If the cell
is scratched, the standard must be replaced.
3. Allow the calibration standards to equilibrate at the ambient temperature.
4. Turn on the meter.
5. The meter should be in the Auto Range. “Auto Rng” and 0.00 NTUs should show on the
display. If not press the range key until it is in the auto range and reading to two (2) decimal
points (e.g.. 0.00).
6. Gently invert the standards to thoroughly mix the contents. (DO NOT SHAKE)
7. Wipe the standards with a soft, lint free cloth or Kimwipe to make sure the outside surfaces
are dry, free from fingerprints and dust.
8. Insert the standard into the cell compartment by aligning the orientation mark on the cell with
the mark on the front of the cell compartment.
9. Insert the first (blank) standard, <0.1 NTU, into the cell compartment and close the lid.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Calibration SOP\Calibration of YSI and Hach Field Instruments SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Calibration of YSI Hach Field Instruments SOP
September 2012
Page 11 of 12
10. Press CAL. The “CAL” and “S0” icons will be displayed (the “0” will flash).
11. Press READ. The instrument will count down from 60 to 0, read the blank and use it to
calculate a correction factor for the second, 20 NTU standard. The display will automatically
increment to the next standard. The display will now show “S1” (with the 1 flashing) and
“20 NTU”, the value of the second standard. Remove the <0.1 NTU standard from the
compartment.
12. Insert the second, 20 NTU, standard into the cell compartment and close the lid.
13. Press READ. The instrument will count down from 60 to 0, measure the turbidity and store
the value. The display will automatically increment to the next standard with the display
showing “S2” (with the 2 flashing) and “100 NTU”, the value of the third standard. Remove
the 20 NTU standard from the compartment.
14. Insert the third, 100 NTU, standard into the cell compartment and close the lid.
15. Press READ. The instrument will count down from 60 to 0, measure the turbidity and store
the value. The display will automatically increment to the next standard. The display will
show the “S3” (with the 3 flashing) and the 800 NTU standard, the value of the fourth
standard. Remove the 100 NTU standard from the compartment.
16. Insert the fourth and last, 800 NTU, standard into the cell compartment and close the lid.
17. Press READ. The instrument will count down from 60 to 0, measure the turbidity and store
the value. Then the display will increment back to the S0 display. Remove the 800 NTU
standard from the compartment and close the lid.
18. Press CAL to accept the calibration. The instrument will return to the measurement mode
automatically.
19. To check the calibration (in run mode), insert the 20 NTU standard into the cell compartment
and close the lid.
20. Press READ. The meter will display a lamp symbol (which looks like a light bulb) indicating
that the reading is in progress. The lamp turns off and the measurement value is displayed.
Record the turbidity reading on the calibration log. The calibration check must be +/- 5%
(19-21 NTUs). If not, recalibrate using all standards. If re-calibration is unsuccessful, use
new standards, consult the manufacture/vendor or replace the unit.
21. Remove the 20 NTU check standard from the compartment and close the lid.
DATA MANAGEMENT AND RECORDS MANAGEMENT
All calibration information must be documented on the attached calibration log, including the
instrument manufacturer, model number and identification number; standards used to calibrate
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Calibration SOP\Calibration of YSI and Hach Field Instruments SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Calibration of YSI Hach Field Instruments SOP
September 2012
Page 12 of 12
the instruments (including source, lot numbers and expiration dates); date; personnel; the
instrument readings, barometer reading, DO membrane inspection, changed DO membrane and
solution, etc. Each daily calibration log shall be dated and signed by the user.
REFERENCES
Calibration of Field Instruments SOP included in the current Hazardous Waste Remediation
Bureau Master Quality Assurance Project Plan (HWRB Master QAPP), EQA RFA#08036.
Hach Model 2100P Portable Turbidity Instruction Manual.
ATTACHMENTS
Calibration Log
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Calibration SOP\Calibration of YSI and Hach Field Instruments SOP.doc
30 October 2012
SAVAGE INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION / MAINTENANCE LOG
Date:
Time:
Field Personnel:
Meter: (circle one) YSI: Model 600XL, Model 600XLM
Multimeter Serial Number:
Rental Company:
Probe Pre-cleaned Certification Provided By: Personnel
Date:
Temperature Calibration: Personnel:
Date:
Manufactures Accuracy Range of Sensor (e.g. +/- 0.2˚C):
Temperature check results:
BEGINNING CALIBRATION CHECK
Date:
Time:
Calibration Check
Zero DO check (mg/l)
pH 7 check
Personnel:
Value of
Standard
Check
Results
0
7
Acceptable
Range
Within
Range
(yes/no)
Lot #
Expiration
Date
+/- 5%
Specific Conductance (µS/cm)
Range 6.65 - 7.35 pH
Range 682 - 754 µS/cm (718)
+/- 5%
Second standard used for check
Range 1342 - 1484 µS/cm (1413)
See Chart on Page 2 for ORP Zobell
Solution mV Value Based on
Temperature
+/- 5%
ORP check - Zobell (mV)
Zobell Solution _______ ˚C
Turbidity 2nd Standard (NTU)
Notes:
Comments
0 to 0.5 mg/L
20
+/- 5%
Range 19.0 - 21.0 NTU
1) If the post calibration check is not within the acceptable range the meter must be recalibrated.
2) All calibration checks must be made in the run mode (on a run/measurement screen), not the calibration mode.
3) If the lot numbers and expiration dates are the same as the initial calibration place a check mark ü in the appropriate box.
4) Either standard (718 or 1413 µS/cm) maybe used to calibrate specific conductance, the second standard is used to check it.
Calibration Check Performed by: ________________________________(Print)__________________________________ (Sign)
END OF DAY INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION CHECK
Calibration Check
Date:
Value of
Standard
Time:
Check
Results
Acceptable
Range
Within
Range
(yes/no)
Expiration
Date
Comments
Personnel:
Zero DO check (mg/l)
0
0 to 0.5 mg/L
pH 7 check
7
+/- 5%
Specific Conductance (µS/cm)
+/- 5%
Second standard used for check
+/- 5%
ORP check - Zobell (mV)
Zobell Solution _______ ˚C
Turbidity 2nd Standard (NTU)
Notes:
Lot #
20
+/- 5%
Range 6.65 - 7.35 pH
Range 682 - 754 µS/cm (718)
Range 1342 - 1484 µS/cm (1413)
See Chart below for ORP Zobell
Solution mV Value Based on
Temperature
Range 19.0 - 21.0 NTU
1) If the end of the day calibration check is not within the acceptable range the data collected that day for that parameter shall be qualified in it's use.
2) All calibration checks must be made in the run mode (on a run/measurement screen), not the calibration mode.
3) If the lot numbers and expiration dates are the same as the initial calibration place a check mark  in the appropriate box.
4) Either standard (718 or 1413 µS/cm) maybe used to calibrate specific conductance, the second standard is used to check it.
Calibration Check Performed by: ________________________________(Print)__________________________________ (Sign)
Weather Conditions:
If the calibration/calibration check was performed off-site (e.g. in the office, etc) due to weather conditions, check (√) here:______
Where off-site was the calibration/calibration check performed? _____________________________________________________________
List wells sampled using this equipment on this day if data needs to be qualified
Page 1 of 2
INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION
YSI Multimeter Calibration
Value of
Standard
Check as
Completed
Lot #
Expiration
Date
100%
DO (% saturation)
Comments
Allow time for stabilization per manufacture
DO mg/L reading
Record these values immediately after calibration
DO Temp. (˚C) reading
7
pH 1st Standard
2nd Standard
4
3rd Standard
10
Specific Conductance
(µS/cm)
One standard is used to calibrate, second one to check
ORP using Zobell Solution
See Chart on Page 2 for ORP Zobell Solution mV Value
Based on Temperature
Zobell Solution _______ ˚C
Additional Information for Dissolved Oxygen Calibration
Barometric Pressure of Meter: ____________ mm Hg
[BP inches _______ x 25.4 + BP ________ mm Hg]
Dissolved Oxygen Charge (YSI Meters): __________ (Acceptable Range: 25 to 75) You MUST change the membrane if charge is out of range.
Inspected DO membrane for nicks or bubbles (check as completed) _______
Personnel:______________________________________
Changed Dissolved Oxygen Membrane and Electrolyte Solution (circle one)
HACH 2100P Turbidimeter
Calibration
Value of
Standard
Turbidity 1st Standard (blank)
<0.1 NTU
2nd Standard
20 NTU
3rd Standard
100 NTU
4th Standard
800 NTU
Check as
Completed
Lot #
YES or NO
Expiration
Date
Comments
Calibrate w/ StablCal® Formazin Primary Turbidity Standards
HACH Serial Number:
Rental Company:
Calibration Performed by ___________________________________
Print Name
________________________________________
Signature
Zobell Solution mV Value Based on Temperature for ORP Calibration
Calibration Check Range Values (+/- 5%)
Calibration
ORP
Check
Calibration
Zobell
ORP
Range
Check Range
Solution
Zobell
ORP Zobell
Values
Values
mV
Solution
Solution mV
+/- 5%
+/- 5%
Temp. ºC mV Value
Temp. ºC
Temp. ºC Value
Value
-3
267
254-280
10
251
238-264
Calibration Check
Range Values
+/- 5%
23
234
222-246
-2
266
253-279
11
249
237-261
24
232
220-244
-1
265
252-278
12
248
236-260
25
231
219-243
0
264
251-277
13
247
235-259
26
230
219-242
1
262
249-275
14
245
233-257
27
228
217-239
2
261
248-274
15
244
232-256
28
227
216-238
3
260
247-273
16
243
231-255
29
226
215-237
4
258
245-271
17
241
229-253
30
225
214-236
5
257
244-270
18
240
228-252
31
223
212-234
6
256
243-269
19
239
227-251
32
222
211-233
7
254
241-267
20
238
226-250
33
221
210-232
8
253
240-266
21
236
224-248
34
219
208-230
9
252
239-265
22
235
223-247
35
218
207-229
Page 2 of 2
CHAIN-OF-CUSTODY, SAMPLE HANDLING, AND SHIPPING
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
Savage Chain-of-Custody, Sample Packaging and Shipment Procedures
April 2012
Page 1 of 4
CHAIN-OF-CUSTODY, SAMPLE PACKAGING AND SHIPMENT
PROCEDURES
PURPOSE
This Standard Operating Procedure Chain-of-Custody, Sample Packaging and Shipment Procedures
has been established to provide for sample integrity in addition to proper sample labeling and
completion of chain-of-custody (COC) forms; and proper sample packaging and shipment for the
Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site in Milford, New Hampshire.
A COC is a legal document designed to track persons who are responsible for the preparation of the
sample container, sample collection, sample delivery, sample storage, and sample analysis. The field
sampler is personally responsible for the care and custody of the samples until they are transferred or
properly dispatched. As few people as possible should handle the samples. A sample including
empty sample containers, samples, and coolers are under a person's custody if it meets the following
requirements:




It is in the person's possession.
It is in the person's view, after being in the person's possession.
It was in the person's possession and it was placed in a secured location.
It is in a designated secure area.
****Never leave samples including un-used sample containers unattended unless they are
secured in a locked vehicle or building to which no one else has access****
All samples submitted to a laboratory shall be accompanied by a properly completed COC form, be
packaged and shipped as appropriate. Always check with the selected laboratory-specific
requirements regarding COCs.
For this project, all samples will be analyzed by the New Hampshire Department of Health and
Human Services, Division of Public Health Services (NHDPHS) Laboratory in Concord,
New Hampshire. The NHDPHS COC is attached.
EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS
The following is a list of equipment and material commonly used for labeling, packaging, and
shipping samples:







COC forms/seals
Bubble wrap or air cushions
Re-sealable plastic bags
Permanent waterproof ink marker
Black ink pen
Loose ice
Shipping coolers
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Chain of Custody SOP\Chain of Custody SOP.DOC
30 October 2012
Savage Chain-of-Custody, Sample Packaging and Shipment Procedures



April 2012
Page 2 of 4
Sample labels
Packing
Tape
CUSTODY PROCEDURES
1.
2.
The field sampler will review the Sampling and Analysis Plan provided by the Project
Manager for specific COC record-keeping requirements. Note the following key COC
related items:

Quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) data package requirements (i.e., level
A, B, or C) for project-specific data validation needs.

Laboratory reporting options required (i.e., preliminary results requested or
electronic deliverable options needed).

Standard or rush turn-around-time required.

Special laboratory requirements required (i.e., lower detection limits).

Short hold time issues.

Sample volume issues.
The field sampler will label all sample bottles with the following: sample ID, sampler name,
date and time sample was collected, laboratory analysis and test method requested,
preservative used, site name/location, and project number. Sample tags should be filled out
using waterproof ink for each sample.
Note: If soil volatile organic analysis samples are collected, no additional labels or
tape should be used as these are pre-weighed by the laboratory.
3.
Prior to leaving the site, the field sampler will verify that all pertinent data is on both the
sample label and the COC form. Check for errors on the label and COC form.
4.
The NHDPHS Laboratory COC will be filled out and include the following: unique
sample ID, the NHDES site number, time and date of collection, matrix type (i.e., soil,
groundwater, surface water), laboratory test and method requested, the preservative used,
the number of containers, names and phone numbers of the project contact persons, specific
requirements such as specific Reporting Detection Limits, and any special notes. The COC
should also include any QA/QC samples and associated information
(i.e., duplicate, trip blank, temperature blank, and equipment blanks).
Either one of the field samplers or the on-site QA Officer/Field Team Leader will prepare
the COCs. The names and phone numbers of all the field samplers and the QA
Officer/Field Team Leader must be listed on the COC.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Chain of Custody SOP\Chain of Custody SOP.DOC
30 October 2012
Savage Chain-of-Custody, Sample Packaging and Shipment Procedures
5.
April 2012
Page 3 of 4
When transferring the possession of samples, the individuals relinquishing and receiving
will sign, date, and note the time on the record. This record documents transfer of
custody of samples from the sampler to another person, to a mobile laboratory, to the
permanent laboratory, or to/from a secure storage area.
Only one of the field samplers signs the first “relinquished by” line. The person who
receives the samples at the laboratory signs the COC last in the “received by” line. In
case there are additional steps in the process requiring another person or persons to take
custody of the sample, the form has additional lines for signatures. All signatures must be
in ballpoint pen and are followed by a date and time that the COC was signed. The line at
the bottom of the page is provided for personnel from the laboratory to sign for receiving
the sample. If the samples are taken to the lab via courier the sampler will relinquish the
samples to “NHDPHS Laboratory via courier”.
Note: Any errors must be lined out and initialed, and the correction written in.
6.
If the samples are shipped by public courier (i.e., Federal Express, UPS, etc.) the airbill
generally serves as the COC record for that portion of the trip and will be retained by the
field sampler (and provided to the Project Manager) as part of the permanent
documentation.
7.
The Field Team Leader or QA Officer will review the COC to evaluate completeness;
holding time or sample volume issues that may impact the validity of the results.
SAMPLE PACKAGING PROCEDURES
Sample containers are generally packaged in insulated coolers for shipment or pickup by the
laboratory courier. Appropriate packing materials include bubble wrap and air cushions. Sample
containers are packed tightly so minimize movement during shipment that may cause breakage.
1.
To eliminate the chance of breakage during shipment, approximately 1 inch of inert material
shall be placed in the bottom of the cooler.
2.
Place each sample container, or sample site set of containers that have been bubble wrapped
tightly inside a plastic bag and seal, as a precaution against cross-contamination due to
leakage or brakeage.
3.
Place all containers in an upright position in the cooler and place all glass containers in such
a way that they do not come into contact with each other during shipment.
4.
After samples have been packed, loose ice will be added to the cooler to ensure temperature
preservative is achieved (temperature 4 +/-2 degrees Celsius).
5.
Include a completed COC in a sealed Ziploc® bag within each cooler being shipped to or
picked up by the laboratory.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Chain of Custody SOP\Chain of Custody SOP.DOC
30 October 2012
Savage Chain-of-Custody, Sample Packaging and Shipment Procedures
April 2012
Page 4 of 4
6.
Coolers being shipped (not couriered) will be secured with strapping tape in at least two
locations for shipment to the laboratory and include a custody seal.
7.
Prior to any cooler being shipped that contains environmental samples, you are required
to evaluate if the samples/sample containers being shipped are considered
hazardous. Consult appropriate trained office personnel for proper packaging and
labeling requirements.
SAMPLE PICKUP/SHIPPING PROCEDURES
Samples will be properly packaged for shipment, and a separate signed COC record will be
enclosed in each sample cooler if more than one is used. Shipping containers will be secured
with strapping tape and a custody seal in at least two locations for shipment to the laboratory.
When samples are transported via courier, strapping tape and custody seals are not required.
Samples will be transported to the NHDPHS Laboratory in such a manner as to preserve their
integrity and will be delivered at least every other day and if possible, no samples should be held
over the weekend. The receiving laboratory shall be given advance notice by the field sampler no
later than 48 hours before sample shipment.
If Friday sampling is unavoidable and Saturday delivery is not possible, samples shall be
properly stored (custody and sample preservation must be maintained) over the weekend in
Weston Solutions Inc.’s office sample refrigerator. If prompt shipping and laboratory receipt of
samples cannot be guaranteed, the samplers will be responsible for proper storage of samples
until adequate transportation arrangements can be made or sample collection schedules can be
modified by the Project Manager. If holding times would be exceeded by storing the samples,
alternative arrangements must be made by the Project Manager for sample collection and
shipment or pickup.
DOCUMENTATION
The original COC record will accompany the cooler and a copy will be retained by the sampler
for return to the Project Manager.
REFERENCES
The Chain of Custody Sample Handling and Shipping found in the current version of the
Hazardous Waste Remediation Bureau Master Quality Assurance Project Plan (HWRB Master
QAPP), EQA RFA# 08036.
ATTACHMENTS
NHDPHS COC
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Chain of Custody SOP\Chain of Custody SOP.DOC
30 October 2012
NHDPHS LABORATORY SERVICES LOGIN AND CUSTODY SHEET
(Laboratory Policy: Samples not meeting method requirements will be analyzed at the discretion of the NH DPHS, PHL Laboratory.)
Samples must be delivered in a cooler with ice or ice packs.
* LAB ACCOUNTS (Billing) State (OU-1)
#04-0001501
Federal (OU-3) #04-0001505
Description Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site
Comments:
8260
Date/Time
Sampled
Matrix
Sample Location /ID
# of Containers
One Stop (PROJECT) ID# SUPERFND
DES Site Number 198505002
Temp. 0 C. ____
Town: Milford, NH
NHDES Contacts: Robin Mongeon 271-7378, Sharon Perkins (603) 271- 6805
Weston Contact: Bette Nowak (603) 656-5400
Collected By & Phone#: Andrew Fuller 656‐5431, Andrew
Klappholz 656-5450, David Kammer 656-5490, Lisa Kammer 656-5457,
Justin Warrington 656-5452, Owen Friend-Gray 656-5403,
(Robin Mongeon 271-7378, Sharon Perkins 271-6805)
* You Must Check Off The Correct Lab Account Above: State or Federal (Only One Lab Account Per COC)
Comments
Lab ID #
( For Lab Use Only)
Preservation: Aqueous VOCs – HCL/4°C +/-2°C;
Relinquished By_____________________________________Date and Time____________________Received By_____________________
Temperature Blank Included in Cooler
Matrix: A= Air, S= Soil, SED=Sediments, AQ=Aqueous, Other=____
Relinquished By_____________________________________Date and Time____________________Received By_____________________
Relinquished By_____________________________________Date and Time____________________ Received For Laboratory By_______________
Page ______ of _______
Data Reviewed By__________________________________________ Date_______________
Section No.: 22.0
Revision No.: 7 (HWRB)
Date: July 2011
Page 1 of 1
DECONTAMINATION
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
Savage Decontamination Procedure SOP
August 2010
Page 1 of 3
DECONTAMINATION PROCEDURE
PURPOSE
The purpose of this Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) is to provide a procedure for preventing,
minimizing, or limiting cross-contamination of environmental samples at the Savage Municipal
Water Supply Superfund Site in Milford, New Hampshire. This SOP focuses on equipment
decontamination [e.g., water level meters, wireline straddle packer systems (WSP), submersible
pumps, etc.]. Removing or neutralizing contaminants from equipment not only minimizes the
likelihood of sample cross-contamination, but reduces or eliminates transfer of contaminants to
clean areas and prevents the mixing of incompatible substances. Any modifications to this SOP
shall be approved in advance by the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services
Project Manager and Quality Assurance Coordinator, in consultation with the United States
Environmental Protection Agency.
EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS
The following is a list of equipment and material generally used for decontamination:

Non-phosphate detergent (alconox)

Tap water

Distilled or deionized water

Brushes

Plastic buckets

Plastic sheeting

Paper towels

Steam sprayers

Spray bottles and/or pressurized sprayers

Appropriate personal protective equipment (i.e., safety glasses, appropriate gloves,
boots, etc.)
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Decon SOP\Savage Decontamination SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Decontamination Procedure SOP
August 2010
Page 2 of 3
DECONTAMINATION PROCEDURE
The decontamination procedure is summarized as follows:
1. Remove gross contamination from the equipment by brushing and then rinsing with
tap water mixed with alconox as needed.
2. Rinse the equipment with a steam sprayer, if needed.
3. Rinse the equipment with tap water.
4. Rinse the equipment with distilled/deionized water.
5. Air dry equipment.
6. Secure clean equipment.
SPECIAL NOTES
Weston Solutions, Inc. (WESTON®) will decontaminate the water level indicator probe and the
submersible pump using alconox and water after each monitoring well and at a minimum, the
length of tape or reel, used in that well in accordance with the above described methods. The
WSP testing contractor will decontaminate the entire packer assembly using alconox and a steam
sprayer in accordance with the above described methods. WESTON will oversee the
decontamination methods employed by the WSP contractor.
With instruments such as multi-parameter meters and turbidity meters, the probes, flow through
cells, and turbidity vials shall be thoroughly rinsed with distilled water. It may be necessary to
wash equipment with a non-phosphate detergent and tap water or steam if gross contamination
cannot be removed by brushing and distilled water alone. Great care shall be taken not to
damage the instrument.
Sensitive equipment that is not water proof should be wiped down with a damp cloth.
It is anticipated that the levels of contamination of the contaminated rinse liquids are sufficiently
low and containerizing and disposal at a hazardous waste facility is not necessary.
DOCUMENTATION
Decontamination procedures shall be documented in the field log book and the report which
documents the sampling activities.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Decon SOP\Savage Decontamination SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Decontamination Procedure SOP
August 2010
Page 3 of 3
QUALITY ASSURANCE/QUALITY CONTROL (QA/QC)
Equipment blanks are normally collected to ensure that decontamination procedures are meeting
the data quality objectives of the project (e.g., removing detectable levels of contamination). The
data collected as part of this investigation are for screening purposes and therefore it is not
necessary to collect equipment blank samples.
REFERENCES
The NHDES HWRB SOP, No. HWRB-15, Decontamination Procedures found in the current
version of the Hazardous Waste Remediation Bureau Master Quality Assurance Project Plan
(HWRB Master QAPP), EQA RFA# 08036.
US DHHS, 1985. Occupational Safety and Health Guidance Manual for Hazardous Waste Site
Activities. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C.
US EPA, 1984. Standard Operating Safety Guides. Office of Emergency and Remedial
Response, Washington, D.C.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Decon SOP\Savage Decontamination SOP.doc
30 October 2012
FIELD SCREENING OF WATER AND SOIL
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
September 2012
Page 1 of 21
FIELD SCREENING OF WATER AND SOIL
PURPOSE
The purpose of this standard operating procedure (SOP) is to provide general guidance for
conducting field measurement of organic and inorganic vapors/gases utilizing a photoionization
detector (PID) or flame ionization detector (FID) at the Savage Municipal Water Supply
Superfund Site in Milford, New Hampshire.
This procedure covers the screening of environmental media (water, soil, sediment, and air
monitoring) utilizing the following instruments:
1. Thermo Environmental Instruments, Inc., Organic Vapor Meter (OVM), Model 580B
2. MiniRae 2000 Portable Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Monitor (Model PGM-7600)
3. MiniRae 3000 Portable VOC Monitor (Model PGM-7320)
4. MultiRae Plus (Model PGM-50-5P)
5. Foxboro Toxic Vapor Analyzer (Model TVA-1000A), which offers both PID and FID
detection
This SOP includes calibration/operation procedures for the aforementioned detectors as well as
procedures for field screening of environmental media and air. In addition to this SOP,
manufacturer specific instruction manuals should also be consulted prior to detector usage.
The selection of an appropriate detector, detector lamp, calibration gas standard, correction
factor/response factor, screening mode, alarm limits, etc., shall be determined prior to site
mobilization and defined in the Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP)/Quality Assurance Project Plan
(QAPP), and/or site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP).
The MultiRae Plus (Model PGM-50-5P) instrument has been selected for this project. The
MultiRae Plus is a programmable multiple-gas monitor designed to provide continuous exposure
monitoring of toxic organic and inorganic gases, oxygen and combustible gases for workers in
hazardous environments. However, the use and calibration procedures described in this SOP
are for the VOC sensor only. In addition to this SOP, manufacturer specific instruction manuals
shall be on-site during each sampling event. Any modifications to this SOP shall be approved by
the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services in consultation with the United
States Environmental Protection Agency in advance, documented in the site logbook, and
presented in the final report.
EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS

PID or FID, including probe assembly and hydrophobic filter (water trap) assembly.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
I.
September 2012
Page 2 of 21

Spare batteries and/or battery charger.

Detector lamp [selection based on the ionization potential (IP) of the site
contaminants of concern (COCs)].

Calibration gas [100 parts per million (ppm) isobutylene-in-air and zero air]; with
regulator Note: The calibration standard must be valid within the expiration date.

Tedlar® Sampling Bag (minimum 1 L capacity). Note: 1 bag per calibration standard
is required.

Teflon tubing (0.25”OD x 0.17”ID) for connections to the Tedlar® Sampling Bag/

Masterflex® Silicon Tubing L/S 15 (0.39”OD x 0.19”ID) or equivalent for
connections to the Tedlar® Sampling Bag.

Tubing cutters.

Tools (including sparkless, adjustable wrench).

Field screening containers (i.e., 8-ounce or 16-ounce glass “driller” jars with screw
caps, quart-size or smaller polyethylene Ziploc® bags).

Aluminum foil.
CALIBRATION/OPERATION
Regardless of the make and model of the selected PID or FID, the detector should be fully
charged and calibrated on-site, prior to the start of daily field activities. During precipitation
events and/or extreme heat/cold, the detector may be calibrated at an off-site location or site
vehicle as long as the exhaust of all running vehicles is directed away from the area where the
detector is being calibrated. At the end of the field day, the detector should be checked against
the calibration standard(s) to confirm that calibration has been maintained throughout the day. In
the event that the detector readings appear to be irregular or drifting while in use, the instrument
should be checked against the calibration standard and/or recalibrated prior to collection of
additional field measurements.
For ease of calibration, refer to the below applicable calibration procedures for the selected field
detector. The Special Notes section at the end of this document and the manufacturer specific
instruction manual provide additional details regarding lamp selection, instrument calibration,
correction factors/response factors, ionization potentials, etc. Additional information such as
setting alarm limits, maintenance, troubleshooting, etc. may also be found in the instruction
manual. Manufacturer specific instruction manuals for the specific instruments used shall be
on-site during each sampling event.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
September 2012
Page 3 of 21
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
1. Thermo Environmental Instruments, Inc., Organic Vapor Meter, Model 580B
A.
B.
Preparation for Calibration and Use
1.
Allow the temperature of the unit to equilibrate to its surroundings. This could
take up to 15 minutes depending on the difference between the temperature of the
environment where the detector was stored prior to use and the temperature
on-site. Note: The range of operating temperatures for this instrument is 32
degrees Fahrenheit (°F) to 105°F.
2.
Attach probe tip and hydrophobic (water trap) filter by screwing it to the detector
inlet. Ensure that the probe tube, filter, and detector inlet fittings are tight.
Note: Do not operate the 580-B without a water trap filter installed. Operating
without it could cause the pump to strain and/or be damaged, and could prevent
the sample from reaching the unit. The filter should be replaced when clogged,
visibly dirty, and after high field measurements.
3.
Insert the three-pronged shorting (power) plug into the RUN/CHG port located on
the back of the unit. Align the red marks on the plug and socket. The nub should
be on the top of the plug. Warning: If the plug is inserted improperly, or twisted,
the fuses in the unit could burn out, rendering the unit inoperable. With the power
plug inserted, the LCD screen should indicate “Lamp Out.”
4.
Turn on the detector by depressing the ON/OFF button. Continue depressing the
ON/OFF button until the pump is activated. This will also activate the Ultra
Violet lamp. Once the lamp is lit, the display will show the concentration of what
is being drawn into the detector. Measurements will be displayed as parts per
million (ppm).
5.
Allow the instrument to “warm up” prior to calibrating, by running it for
~ 5 minutes. During this time, fill the Tedlar® Sampling Bag with the calibration
reference standard.
Calibration
1.
Press the MODE/STORE button.
2.
The display will read “LOG THIS VALUE? MAX PPM =.” Press -/CRSR.
3.
The display will
Press -/CRSR.
4.
The display will read “CONC. METER, MAX HOLD.” Press -/CRSR.
5.
The display will read “FREE SPACE =.” Press -/CRSR.
read
“R/COM,
-/PARAM,
+/ACCESS,
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
S/CLOCK.”
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
September 2012
Page 4 of 21
6.
The display will read “RESET TO CALIBRATE.” Press RESET.
7.
The display will read “RESTORE BACKUP + = YES.” Press -/CRSR.
8.
The display will read “ZERO GAS RESET WHEN READY.” Ensure that the
unit is drawing clean ambient air or from a zero air source. Press RESET.
9.
The unit will read, “MODEL 580 ZEROING.” When it has finished zeroing it
will read “SPAN PPM = 0100 ‘+’ TO CONTINUE.”
10.
Frequently rental units will come from the vendor set for 100 ppm isobutylene-inair standard. If you are utilizing this standard, skip the next two steps. If your
calibration gas is not 100 ppm isobutylene-in-air standard, conduct the
following:
a. Hold down the RESET button with one finger. Use another finger to move the
cursor with the -/CRSR button. While still holding down the RESET button,
use the +/INC button to increase each digit (Note: That there is no decrease
button. When you get to nine, the next push of the button will return the unit
back to zero).
b. Match the number to the concentration on your gas cylinder.
11.
Press the +/INC button.
12.
The screen will read “SPAN GAS, RESET WHEN READY.” Connect the probe
tip to a FULL Tedlar® Sampling Bag of 100 ppm isobutylene-in-air standard.
Press the RESET button. If the pump sounds like its restricted, the bag is not open
enough.
13.
The display will read, “MODEL 580 CALIBRATING,” followed by “RESET TO
CALIBRATE.” Press the MODE/STORE button to return to the run mode.
14.
While in the run mode, the instrument should read 100 ppm. Remove the gas
source and the instrument should read 0 ppm. These measurements serve as “postcalibration” checks. In the event that the unit does not read within +/- 5% of the
standard concentration or ambient air concentration of 0 ppm, recalibrate. If the
detector cannot be recalibrated to measure within 5% of the calibration
standard(s), the instrument should be taken out of service and replaced with a
properly functioning unit. All calibration information should be documented on
the attached PID/FID Daily Calibration Field Sheet.
15.
The unit is now ready for use. Refer to Section V. and VI. for guidance relative to
field screening of environmental media and air quality monitoring.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
C.
September 2012
Page 5 of 21
Post Use Calibration Check and Shut Down
1.
Complete an end-of-the-day calibration check. While the instrument is in the run
mode, connect the probe tip to a FULL Tedlar® Sampling Bag of 100 ppm
isobutylene-in-air standard. Note: Use a fresh bag of cal gas for the calibration
check. A bag filled in the morning may not be accurate in the afternoon,
especially if the bag was exposed to sunlight. Record this measurement on the
attached PID/FID Daily Calibration Field Sheet. If the measurement does not fall
within 5% of the calibration standard, the field data will need to be qualified. For
multiple days of field use, if the instrument fails the end-of-the-day check on two
consecutive days, the unit should be replaced.
2.
Turn off the detector by depressing the ON/OFF button. Continue depressing the
ON/OFF button until the pump shuts off.
3.
Remove the power plug from the RUN/CHG port.
4.
Remove the probe tip and water trap filter by unscrewing it from the detector
inlet.
5.
If recharging is required, attach the battery charger plug into the RUN/CHG port.
Plug the associated AC adapter into a wall outlet.
2. MiniRae 2000 Portable Volatile Organic Compound Monitor (Model PGM-7600)
[Note: That this instrument is not waterproof or water resistant. Do not use it
during precipitation events without proper protection from the elements.]
A.
Preparation for Calibration and Use
1.
Allow the temperature of the unit to equilibrate to its surroundings. This could
take up to 15 minutes depending on the difference between the temperature of the
environment where the detector was stored prior to use and the temperature
on-site. Note: The range of operating temperatures for this instrument is 14°F to
104°F.
2.
Attach probe tip and hydrophobic (water trap) filter by screwing it to the detector
inlet. Ensure that the probe tube, filter, and detector inlet fittings are tight.
Note: Do not operate the MiniRae 2000 without a water trap filter installed.
Operating without it could cause the pump to strain and/or be damaged, and could
prevent the sample from reaching the unit. The filter should be replaced when
clogged, visibly dirty, and after high measurements.
3.
Turn on the detector by depressing the MODE button.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
B.
September 2012
Page 6 of 21
4.
Allow the instrument to “warm up” prior to calibrating, by running it for
~ 5 to10 minutes. During this time the unit will display its setting during the warm
up sequence. When it has finished its warm up, readings will be in ppm.
5.
Fill the Tedlar® Sampling Bag with the calibration reference standard.
Calibration
1.
To enter the calibration mode, simultaneously press the MODE and N/- buttons
until the screen displays “Calibrate/select Gas”?
2.
Press the Y/+ button.
3.
Ensure that the unit is drawing clean ambient air or from a zero air source.
4.
“Fresh air cal”? is displayed. Press Y/+.
5.
The unit will display “zero in progress” followed by “wait” and a 15 second
countdown.
6.
When the unit is finished zeroing it will display “zeroed! reading 0.0 ppm”.
7.
Press the MODE button once.
8.
Frequently rental units will come from the vendor set for 100 ppm isobutylene-inair standard. If you are utilizing this standard, skip the next four steps. If your
calibration gas is not 100 ppm isobutylene-in-air standard, change the span value
by conducting the following:
a. From the “Span cal” screen, press the N/- button twice or until the screen
reads “Change span value”. Press Y/+.
b. The screen will read “Cal gas = isobutylene, Span value = 0100.0”. Press the
MODE button to move the cursor, and the Y/+ and N/- buttons to
increase/decrease the span value to match the concentration of the calibration
gas standard.
c. When finished changing the value, press and hold the MODE button.
d. The screen will read “Save”? Press the Y/+ button to save. The screen will
read “Saved”.
9.
Press the MODE button again until “Span cal” is displayed.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
C.
September 2012
Page 7 of 21
10.
Press Y/+. The screen will read “Cal gas = Isobutylene, Span value = 0100.0,
Apply gas now”!
11.
Open and connect a FULL Tedlar® Sampling Bag of 100 ppm isobutylene-in-air
standard to the probe tip. The unit will recognize the gas and start to span. The
screen will read “Wait….” while it counts down from 30 seconds. Some newer
units will display “Update data” after the countdown. If the pump sounds like its
restricted, the bag is not open enough.
12.
When the countdown is finished the screen will read “cal’ed reading = 100 ppm”.
It should read within a few ppm of the span value.
13.
Press MODE once. The screen will read “cal done turn off gas”. Press the MODE
button twice to return to the run mode.
14.
While in the run mode, the instrument should read 100 ppm. Remove the gas
source and the instrument should read 0 ppm. These measurements serve as “postcalibration” checks. In the event that the unit does not read within +/- 5% of the
standard concentration or ambient air concentration of 0 ppm, recalibrate. If the
detector cannot be recalibrated to measure within 5% of the calibration standards,
the instrument should be taken out of service and replaced with a properly
functioning unit. All calibration information should be documented on the
attached PID/FID Daily Calibration Field Sheet.
15.
The unit is now ready for use. Refer to Section V. and VI. for guidance relative to
field screening of environmental media and air quality monitoring.
Post Use Calibration Check and Shut Down
1.
Complete an end-of-the-day calibration check. While the instrument is in the run
mode, connect the probe tip to a FULL Tedlar® Sampling Bag of 100 ppm
isobutylene-in-air standard. Note: Use a fresh bag of cal gas for the calibration
check. A bag filled in the morning may not be accurate in the afternoon,
especially if the bag was exposed to sunlight. Record this measurement on the
attached PID/FID Daily Calibration Field Sheet. If the measurement does not fall
within 5% of the calibration standard, the field data will need to be qualified. For
multiple days of field use, if the instrument fails the end-of-the-day check on two
consecutive days, the unit should be replaced.
2.
Turn off the detector by depressing the MODE button for 5 seconds. The unit will
beep once per second during the power-down sequence with a countdown timer
showing the number of seconds remaining. The message “Off!... flashes on the
LCD display and then the display will go blank indicating that the monitor is
turned off.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
September 2012
Page 8 of 21
3.
Remove the probe tip and water trap filter by unscrewing it from the detector
inlet.
4.
If recharging is required, attach the battery charger plug into the DC jack on the
instrument. Plug the associated AC adapter into a wall outlet. The unit will turn
on and display the message “Deep discharge”?. This message will be displayed
three times. If a deep discharge is not applied, the unit will move directly onto the
charge mode.
3. MiniRae 3000 Portable Volatile Organic Compound Monitor (Model PGM-7320)
[Note: That this instrument is not waterproof or water resistant. Do not use it
during precipitation events without proper protection from the elements.]
A.
Preparation for Calibration and Use
1.
Allow the temperature of the unit to equilibrate to its surroundings. This could
take up to 15 minutes depending on the difference between the temperature of the
environment where the detector was stored prior to use and the temperature on
site. Note: The range of operating temperatures for this instrument is -4°F to
122°F.
2.
Attach probe tip and hydrophobic (water trap) filter by screwing it to the detector
inlet. Ensure that the probe tube, filter, and detector inlet fittings are tight.
Note: Do not operate the MiniRae 3000 without a water trap filter installed.
Operating without it could cause the pump to strain and/or be damaged, and could
prevent the sample from reaching the unit. The filter should be replaced when
clogged, visibly dirty, and after high measurements.
3.
Turn on the detector by depressing the Φ (MODE) button.
4.
Allow the instrument to “warm up” prior to calibrating, by allowing it to run for
~ 5 minutes. During this time the unit will display its setting during the warm up
sequence. When it has finished its warm up, readings will be in ppm.
5.
Test the pump by blocking the pump flow. The alarm should sound and the pump
icon should flash. Push the Y/+ button to the clear the alarm. Note: Do not use a
unit that does not pass the pump test.
6.
Fill the Tedlar® Sampling Bag with the calibration reference standard.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
B.
September 2012
Page 9 of 21
Calibration
Zero (Fresh Air) Cal
1.
To enter the calibration mode, simultaneously press the Φ button and N/- buttons
until the screen displays “Calibrate/select Gas”?
2.
Press the Y/+ button to select the cylinder icon/calibration.
3.
Ensure that the unit is drawing clean ambient air or from a zero air source.
4.
Select “Zero Calib” and press the Y/+ button.
5.
The screen will read “Apply zero gas……” If using zero air, apply it now.
6.
Press Y/+ to select “Start”.
7.
The unit will display “Zeroing…” for 30 seconds.
8.
When it is finished, the screen will display “Zero is done! Reading = #.#”.
Note: If the reading is >0.3 ppm, ensure that the air is clean and zero the unit
again. If the reading remains >0.3 ppm ensure that the filter is clean and re-zero.
9.
The screen will return to the Calibration screen.
Span Cal
1.
Select the “Span Calib” and press the Y/+ button.
2.
The screen will read; C. Gas = Isobutylene, Span = 100 ppm, Change? Note: If
the span value on the screen is different from the isobutylene in the Tedlar®
Sampling Bag, adjust it now.
3.
If the gas is 100 ppm isobutylene-in-air, press the N/- button.
4.
Open and connect a FULL Tedlar® Sampling Bag of 100 ppm isobutylene-in-air
standard to the probe tip and then press the Y/+ button.
5.
The screen will read, “Calibrating….” with a 30 second countdown.
6.
When the span calibration is finished, the screen will read; “Span 1 is done
Reading=100.0 ppm”. Note: The reading should range between 95 and 105
(within 5% of the calibration standard). If it differs from this, recalibrate. If after
two attempts, the detector cannot be recalibrated to fall within this range, the
instrument should be taken out of service and replaced with a properly
functioning unit. All calibration information should be documented on the
attached PID/FID Daily Calibration Field Sheet.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
7.
C.
September 2012
Page 10 of 21
The unit is now ready for use. Refer to Section V. and VI. for guidance relative to
field screening of environmental media and air quality monitoring.
Post Use Calibration Check and Shut Down
1.
Complete an end-of-the-day calibration check. While the instrument is in the run
mode, connect the probe tip to a FULL Tedlar® Sampling Bag of 100 ppm
isobutylene-in-air standard. Note: Use a fresh bag of cal gas for the calibration
check. A bag filled in the morning may not be accurate in the afternoon,
especially if the bag was exposed to sunlight. Record this measurement on the
attached PID/FID Daily Calibration Field Sheet. If the measurement is not
between 95 and 105 ppm, the field data will need to be qualified. For multiple
days of field use, if the instrument fails the end-of-the-day check on two
consecutive days, the unit should be replaced.
2.
Turn off the detector by depressing the Φ button for 3 seconds. A 5-second
countdown to shutoff begins. Once the countdown stops, the instrument is off.
Release the Mode key. When you see “Unit off...” release your finger from the
[MODE] key. The instrument is now off. Note: You must hold your finger on the
key for the entire shutoff process. If you remove your finger from the key during
the countdown, the shutoff operation is canceled and the instrument continues
normal operation.
3.
Remove the probe tip and water trap filter by unscrewing it from the detector
inlet.
4.
If recharging is required, plug the AC/DC adapter’s barrel connector into the
instrument’s cradle and plug the AC/DC adapter into the wall outlet. Place the
instrument into the cradle, press down, and lean it back. The instrument locks in
place and the LED in the cradle glows. The instrument begins charging
automatically and the “Primary” LED in the cradle blinks green to indicate
charging. During charging, the diagonal lines in the battery icon on the
instrument’s display are animated and you see the message “Charging...” When
the instrument’s battery is fully charged, the battery icon is no longer animated
and shows a full battery. The message “Fully charged”! is shown. The cradle’s
LED glows continuously green.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
September 2012
Page 11 of 21
4. MultiRae Plus Multiple Gas Monitor (Model PGM-50-5P) (Volatile Organic
Compound Sensor only)
[Note: That this instrument is not waterproof or water resistant. Do not use it
during precipitation events without proper protection from the elements.]
A. Preparation for Calibration and Use
B.
1.
Allow the temperature of the unit to equilibrate to its surroundings. This could
take up to 15 minutes depending on the difference between the temperature of the
environment where the detector was stored prior to use and the temperature
on-site. Note: The range of operating temperatures for this instrument is -4°F to
113°F.
2.
Attach probe tip and hydrophobic (water trap) filter by screwing it to the detector
inlet. Ensure that the probe tube, filter, and detector inlet fittings are tight.
Note: Do not operate the MultiRae Plus without a water trap filter installed.
Operating without it could cause the pump to strain and/or be damaged, and could
prevent the sample from reaching the unit. The filter should be replaced when
clogged, visibly dirty, and after high measurements.
3.
Turn on the detector by depressing the MODE button.
4.
Allow the instrument to “warm up” prior to calibrating, by running it for
~ 5 to 10 minutes. During this time the unit will display its setting during the
warm up sequence. When it has finished its warm up, readings will be in ppm.
5.
Fill the Tedlar® Sampling Bag with the calibration reference standard.
Calibration
1.
To enter the calibration mode, simultaneously press the MODE and N/- buttons. If
the monitor is in Text of Display Mode, you will prompted for a password. Use
Y/+ to change the number. Use MODE to move on to the next digit. The default
password is “0000”. Press and hold MODE to submit the password.
2.
The unit will display “Calibrate Monitor”?.
3.
Press the Y/+ button.
4.
Ensure that the unit is drawing clean ambient air or from a zero air source.
5.
“Fresh Air Calibration”? is displayed. Press Y/+.
6.
The unit will display “zero in progress” followed by “wait” and a 15 second
countdown.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
C.
September 2012
Page 12 of 21
7.
When the unit is finished zeroing it will display “Zero Cal Complete”!
8.
The unit will then display “Multiple Sensor Calibration”?. Press the N/- button
once.
9.
The unit will then display “Single Sensor Calibration”?. Press the Y/+ button.
When the installed sensors appear on the display use MODE to move from sensor
to sensor.
10.
Highlight “VOC” and press Y/+ to select and start calibration.
11.
The unit will display “Apply Span Gas = Isobutylene”. Open and connect a FULL
Tedlar® Sampling Bag of 100 ppm isolbutylene-in-air standard to the probe tip.
The unit will recognize the gas and start to span. If the pump sounds like its
restricted, the bag is not open enough.
12.
Calibration will occur for 60 seconds and is complete when the sensor name and
its span value appear, the unit will display “Span Cal Done! Turn Off Gas”. The
readings should be within a few ppm of the span gas value.
13.
Press MODE twice to exit calibration mode and return to the main display.
14.
While in the run mode, the instrument should read 100 ppm. Remove the gas
source and the instrument should read 0 ppm. These measurements serve as “postcalibration” checks. In the event that the unit does not read within +/- 5% of the
standard concentration or ambient air concentration of 0 ppm, recalibrate. If the
detector cannot be recalibrated to measure within 5% of the calibration standards,
the instrument should be taken out of service and replaced with a properly
functioning unit. All calibration information should be documented on the
attached PID/FID Daily Calibration Field Sheet.
15.
The unit is now ready for use. Refer to Section V. and VI. for guidance relative to
field screening of environmental media and air quality monitoring.
Post Use Calibration Check and Shut Down
5.
Complete an end-of-the-day calibration check. While the instrument is in the run
mode, connect the probe tip to a FULL Tedlar® Sampling Bag of 100 ppm
isobutylene-in-air standard. Note: Use a fresh bag of cal gas for the calibration
check. A bag filled in the morning may not be accurate in the afternoon,
especially if the bag was exposed to sunlight. Record this measurement on the
attached PID/FID Daily Calibration Field Sheet. If the measurement does not fall
within 5% of the calibration standard, the field data will need to be qualified. For
multiple days of field use, if the instrument fails the end-of-the-day check on two
consecutive days, the unit should be replaced.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
September 2012
Page 13 of 21
6.
Turn off the detector by depressing the MODE button for 5 seconds. The unit will
beep once per second during the power-down sequence with a countdown timer
showing the number of seconds remaining. The message “Off!... flashes on the
LCD display and then the display will go blank indicating that the monitor is
turned off.
7.
Remove the probe tip and water trap filter by unscrewing it from the detector
inlet.
8.
If recharging is required, attach the battery charger plug into the DC jack on the
instrument. Plug the associated AC adapter into a wall outlet. The unit will turn
on and display the message “Deep Discharge”?. The message will be displayed
three times. If the deep discharge is not applied, the unit will move directly onto
the charge mode.
5. Foxboro Toxic Vapor Analyzer, Model TVA-1000A (Flame Ionization Detector
only)
A.
Preparation for Calibration and Use
1.
Allow the temperature of the unit to equilibrate to its surroundings. This could
take up to 15 minutes depending on the difference between the temperature of the
environment where the detector was stored prior to use and the temperature
on-site. Note: The range of operating temperatures for this instrument is 32°F to
122°F.
2.
Connect the close area sampler (contains water trap or charcoal filter) to the
sample probe nut and sleeve. Manually turn the probe nut until tight. Connect the
data transfer cable to the FID via the swage lock fitting adjacent to the hydrogen
(H2) valve.
3.
Ensure the H2 tank contains enough H2 to complete the intended work scope. The
detector uses approximately 150 pounds per square inch (psi) per hour of
operation. Refill the H2 tank with H2, if necessary using the refill plumbing and
sparkless wrench. If the TVA H2 cylinder must be refilled, heed the following
warnings:

Hydrogen gas is a fire and explosion hazard when exposed to heat or flames.
The lower explosive limit is 4%.

Always use ultra-high purity grade H2 (99.999% pure). It’s also referred to as
Grade 5 or zero grade.

DO NOT fill the H2 cylinder near the unit while it is on or charging.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
September 2012
Page 14 of 21

DO NOT connect or disconnect any electrical device to the instrument in a
hazardous location.

DO NOT attempt to fill the internal cylinder without the supplied H2-filling
adapter.

DO NOT fill the internal H2 tank in a hazardous location.

DO NOT exceed 2,500 psi on the TVA cylinder pressure gauge. Internal
damage may occur.

DO NOT leave the H2 filling adapter attached to the H2 tank. Put it back in
the case when not in use.

Replace the H2 cylinder cap when the cylinder is not in use.

When the TVA H2 cylinder is full, ALWAYS purge the H2 filling adapter to
atmosphere prior to disconnecting it from the supply tank. To purge, rotate the
red knob to the fill position until no gas is heard exiting the fill adapter.
4.
Check the pressure in the small TVA H2 cylinder. It has a gauge on one end. It is shipped
disconnected from the unit. If it has less than 500 psi, it should be filled.
5.
If the H2 cylinder does not need to be refilled proceed to step f. If the H2 needs to
be filled, complete the following:
a. Connect the H2 filling-adapter to a H2 supply cylinder. Do not use Teflon tape.
Use an adjustable or 1 1/8” sparkless wrench. Note: that the threads are
reversed (counterclockwise to tighten).
b. Open the H2 cylinder knob.
c. Turn the red knob on the fill adapter to the “Fill” position. A steady flow of
gas will be heard coming from the end of the adapter. This is to purge the
adapter of any impurities.
d. Turn the red adapter knob so it is in the “Off” position.
e. Connect the small TVA H2 tank to the filling adapter. It is also reverse
threaded.
f. Put the red knob on the fill adapter in the “Fill” position.
g. Observe the pressure gauge on the end of the small TVA cylinder. When the
gauge reads 2,500 psi, turn the red knob to the “Off” position.
h. Turn off the H2 supply cylinder knob.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
September 2012
Page 15 of 21
i. Remove the small TVA H2 cylinder from the fill adapter.
j. Vent the fill adapter before removing it from the supply tank.
1) Put the red knob in the “Fill” position.
2) Observe the pressure gauge.
3) Disconnect the adapter once the fill adapter gauge reads zero.
Note: Do not leave the H2 filling adapter attached to the H2 tank. Put it back in
the case when not in use. Replace the H2 cylinder cap when the cylinder is not
in use.
B.
6.
Screw the H2 cylinder into the analyzer sidepack.
7.
Turn the red H2 supply knob on the back of the unit to the “On” position and wait
4 or 5 minutes. This is to allow the H2 to fill the internal lines. Note: that the unit
might not light if a start-up is attempted immediately after the H2 is turned on.
8.
Press the ON button. The unit will perform self test diagnostics for ~ 15 seconds
and then the main menu will be displayed.
9.
Press the CONTROL button. The menu on the screen will read “CONTROL
MENU” at the top of the screen.
10.
Press 1 (1 = Turn Pump On). The screen will read “MAIN MENU”.
11.
Press the CONTROL button again.
12.
Press 2 (2=ignite). The pump will start to run followed by the muffled “pop” of
the flame starting. The screen will read “MAIN MENU”.
13.
Press 1 (1=Run).
14.
The screen will read “Please wait…” It will then display the FID readings in ppm.
Let the unit warm up for approximately 30 minutes prior to calibration. Note: This
is a good time to fill one Tedlar® Sampling Bag with methane. A second bag
should be filled with zero grade air if a reliable zero can’t be performed in
ambient air.
15.
Once the unit has warmed up in the run mode, press EXIT.
Calibration (Flame Ionization Detector only)
1.
The screen will read “MAIN MENU”. Press 2 (2=Setup). Press 5
(5=OthrSetting). Press 4 (4=UserOptions). Press 3 (3=CalMode). Select AUTO or
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
September 2012
Page 16 of 21
MANUAL. Note: If AUTO (factory setting) is selected, the instrument analyzes
the calibration gas and automatically accepts the value when it is stable. If
MANUAL is selected, the operator manually accepts the value once the gas
measurements (in counts) are stable. Press EXIT repeatedly to return to the
“SETUP MENU”.
2.
The screen will read “SETUP MENU”. Press 1 (1=Calib).
3.
The screen will read “CALIBRATION MENU”. Press 4 (4=GasConc).
4.
The screen will display the set span concentration. Verify that the concentration
of the calibration gas being used matches the displayed concentration. If the value
differs, conduct the following:
a. Press Enter to change the gas concentration to a new value.
b. Use the up and down keys to adjust the concentration.
c. Press Enter (Enter=Accept) once the correct span concentration has been
entered. The screen will read “Accepted”. Press EXIT to return to the
CALIBRATION MENU.
5.
The screen will read “CALIBRATION MENU”. Press 5 (5=Response Factor).
Note: The Response Factor should be set to 1.0 if the instrument is to be used to
measure the same gas it was calibrated with. If the gas to be measured is NOT the
same compound for which the instrument was calibrated against, the Response
Factor may not be 1.0. Refer to the TVA-1000 Series Instruction Manual
Response Factors Part Number 50039, dated January 28, 2009 (attached) and
adjust accordingly. If the value differs, conduct the following:
a. Press Enter to change the response factor to a new value.
b. Type in the appropriate response factor.
c. Press Enter (Enter=Accept) to store the value. The screen will read
“Accepted”. Press EXIT to return to the CALIBRATION MENU.
6.
Press 1 (1=Zero) if zero gas is to be used for calibrating zero or press 2
(2=Backgrnd) if clean ambient air is to be used for zero. Select one or the other.
Press Enter (Enter=Accept).
7.
The screen will read “Apply zero gas FID.” If in a clean ambient air environment,
press Enter (Enter=Start). The screen will read “Calibrating….FID”. Note: If
ambient air is questionable (i.e., landfill) apply a Tedlar® Sampling Bag filled
with zero air before pressing Enter.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
C.
September 2012
Page 17 of 21
8.
The screen will read “Calibrating FID….” Followed by “Accepted” and then
return to the CALIBRATION MENU. The zero reference is stored. If setting a
span reference point, which is the same as setting the zero reference except that a
span gas is used rather than a zero gas, Press 3 (3=Span).
9.
The screen will display “Span Cal”. Press Enter (Enter=Start).
10.
The screen will read “Apply span gas FID”. Verify that the set span value
matches the gas being used. Apply the span gas by opening and connecting a
FULL Tedlar® Sampling Bag of the span gas to the probe tip. Press Enter
(Enter=Start).
11.
The screen will read “Calibrating… FID” followed by “Accepted” and the return
to the CALIBRATION MENU. The span reference is stored.
12.
When finished with the calibration, return to the MAIN MENU by pressing EXIT
twice and press 1 (1=run). Prior to field screening, verify the calibration accuracy.
Check the zero in ambient air and the span gas that was used for calibration. In
the event that the unit does not read within +/- 5% of the standard concentrations,
recalibrate. If the detector cannot be recalibrated to measure within 5% of the
calibration standards, the instrument should be taken out of service and replaced
with a properly functioning unit. All calibration information should be
documented on the attached PID/FID Daily Calibration Field Sheet.
13.
The unit is now ready for use. Refer to Section V. and VI. for guidance relative to
field screening of environmental media and air quality monitoring.
Post Use Calibration Check and Shut Down
1.
Complete an end-of-the-day calibration check. While the instrument is in the run
mode, connect the probe tip to a FULL Tedlar® Sampling Bag of scan standard.
Note: Use a fresh bag of cal gas for the calibration check. A bag filled in the
morning may not be accurate in the afternoon, especially if the bag was exposed
to sunlight. Record this measurement on the attached PID/FID Daily Calibration
Field Sheet. If the measurement is not between 95 and 105 ppm, the field data
will need to be qualified. For multiple days of field use, if the instrument fails the
end-of-the-day check on two consecutive days, the unit should be replaced.
2.
Press “ON” then “CONTROL” to open the main menu. Press “1” to turn off
the pump.
3.
Turn off the detector by depressing the “OFF” button.
4.
Close the H2 tank valve.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
September 2012
Page 18 of 21
5.
Unscrew the H2 cylinder. Note: Leaving the cylinder in the detector will result in a
slow leak of H2 not realized until the detector’s next use.
6.
Remove the close area sampler and sample probe. Disconnect the data transfer
cable from the detector.
7.
If recharging is required, plug the output of the charger into the mating
connector marked CHRG in the instrument. Then, insert the charger plug into
the appropriate wall outlet. A green power indicator is ON when the charger is
operating. A yellow indicator is activated when the charger is connected to the
instrument and the instrument is ON. Normal charge time for a fully
discharged battery is approximately 16 hours, or 2 hours of charge for every
hour of use.
II. FIELD SCREENING
A.
Soil/Sediment Screening for Volatile Organic Compounds
1.
Screen environmental media following sample collection. Ideally the samples
should be screened immediately following collection but there may be
circumstances which result in a delay. Note: If samples are to be collected for
laboratory analysis, keep these samples separate from media that will be field
screened.
2.
Fill a glass drillers jar or Ziploc® bag.
a. If using glass jars:
1) Fill the jars half way.
2) Cut two (2) aluminum foil squares (approximately 3-inch by 3-inch).
3) Seal the top of the jar with aluminum foil and secure the lid.
b. If using Ziploc® bag:
1) Half fill the Ziploc® bag.
2) Secure the bag by zipping it closed or using a zip tie.
3.
Vigorously shake the sample jar or bag for ~ 30 seconds, 1 to 2 times during a
10 to 15 minute period to allow inorganic/organic vapors to be transferred from
the media to the air space above it (headspace).
4.
Minimize the duration that the screening containers containing soil/sediment are
exposed to direct sunlight. Note: If ambient temperatures are below 40°F, the
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
September 2012
Page 19 of 21
samples should be moved into heated space, either building or field vehicle and
allowed to warm prior to screening.
5.
Prior to screening environmental media, measure the ambient air or background
concentrations. Record this information in/on the boring log, field book, as or
other appropriate field data collection sheet.
6.
Use the FID/PID probe to screen the media.
a. If using glass jars, remove the cover and insert the probe tip through the
aluminum foil.
b. If using Ziploc® bags, unzip the corner of the bag (1 to 2”) or insert the probe
tip directly through the bag.
B.
8.
Record the maximum reading, which generally occurs within 2 to 5 seconds.
Note: The probe should not make contact soil/sediment or liquid contained in the
sample container. Record the maximum concentration measured by the detector
onto a boring log, test pit log, or appropriate field data collection sheet as ppm
above background.
9.
If screening of media shall be performed directly on soil or sediment cores, record
the measurements along the length of the core starting at the top of the sample run
and progressing in one (1) foot intervals the entire length of the core, as well as
additional zones where staining or strong odors are observed. If the media is
contained within plastic liners, use a knife or screw driver to poke a hole though
the liner, to facilitate field screening. Note: The probe tip should not be used to
puncture the core liner as it could damage the probe. In addition, soil/sediment
could be forced into the probe tip, resulting in the unit being inoperable.
Air Quality Monitoring for Volatile Organic Compounds
1.
Use the FID/PID probe to measure the ambient air or background concentrations
around the perimeter of the work area. Record this information in/on the boring
log, field book, as or other appropriate field data collection sheet.
2.
Once background concentrations have been established, begin collecting
measurements within the work area which may include the source area, and
breathing zone. The detector should be operated as close to the area being
monitored as technically feasible. Record this information in a field book, or other
appropriate field data collection sheet.
3.
If the air quality measurements are being collected in the “breathing zone” of the
work area, compare field measurements to the range of concentrations included
HASP to confirm that a hazardous atmosphere does not exist. If safe breathing
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
September 2012
Page 20 of 21
zone concentrations are not being maintained, the use of additional personal
protective equipment or termination of work activities may be required.
III.
RECORDS AND DOCUMENTATION
Calibration as well as the detector lamp energy, calibration standard, and correction
factor/response factors, maintenance for each piece of equipment, etc. will be documented on the
calibration logs and included in the reports. A calibration log is provided at the end of this SOP.
Field screening measurements shall be recorded on applicable data collection sheets, boring logs
and/or field book, unless otherwise specified in the approved SAP/QAPP or project specific
work plan.
IV.
SPECIAL NOTES
1.
For site COCs, which include VOCs and semi-volatile organic compounds, knowing the
IP is critical in determining the appropriate detector and lamp for field screening.
Note: That a single detector and lamp combination does not exist for all potential site
COCs. The manufacturer’s instruction manual and/or additional outside references must
be consulted in order to assist with proper instrument and lamp selection.
2.
An appropriately selected detector will consist of a lamp with energy greater than the
highest IP identified for the site COCs. As a general rule of thumb, if site COC have IPs
less than 11.8 electron volts (eV), it is possible to use a PID for field screening. If the IP
is greater than 11.8 and/or if methane may also be screened on-site, a FID is required.
Confirm with the Project Manager and/or Health and Safety Officer that the detector and
lamp that has been selected is appropriate for the site COCs.
3.
The detectors included in this SOP are capable of utilizing a range of lamp energies
(i.e., 9.8eV, 10.0 eV, 10.6 eV, 11.7 eV, and 11.8 eV). Note: That lower energy lamps are
more sensitive and “see” fewer compounds than high energy lamps. The higher energy
lamps (11.7 eV and 11.8 eV) should be used only when COCs with IPs greater than 10.6
eV are anticipated. Refer to Appendix F (attached) from the Thermo Environmental
Instruments, Inc., Organic Vapor Meter (OVM), Model 580B, instruction manual dated
January 9, 1996, for the IPs of common organic solvents and gases.
4.
The Correction Factor (CR) or Response Factor (RF) are synonymous and are utilized to
adjust the sensitivity of a PID/FID to directly measure a particular gas compared to the
calibration gas. The lower the CR/RF is, the more sensitive a PID/FID is to a gas or
vapor. The greater the toxicity of the gas or vapor, the greater the sensitivity the meter
needs to be. CRs/RFs permit the calibration of the instrument to one gas while directly
reading the concentration of another. This eliminates the need for multiple calibration
gases. A 100 ppm isobutylene-in-air standard is frequently used to calibrate PIDs/FIDs
since it approximately the midpoint of the range of the instrument sensitivities. It is
non- toxic, and non-flammable at a concentration of 100 ppm. Historically PIDs were
calibrated with benzene but with the health risks associate with exposure to benzene, the
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP
September 2012
Page 21 of 21
use of this as a calibration standard has been phased out. Any ionizable gas may be used
for calibration. Note: That the CRs/RFs tend to be detector and/or manufacturer specific.
Refer to the manufacturer’s instruction manual when selecting the CR/RF and calibration
gas. Refer to the Thermo Environmental Instruments, Inc., TVA-1000 Series Instruction
Manual Response Factors Part Number 50039, dated January 28, 2009 for RFs.
5.
Photoionization Detector/FID sensor and lamp cleaning is not required on a regular basis
however it should be considered routine maintenance and conducted in accordance with
the manufacturer’s instruction manual. Indications that a sensor and lamp may need to be
cleaned could include the inability to calibrate successfully or a detector which is very
sensitive to moisture. If liquid of any sort has been drawn into the instrument, the lamp
and sensor should be cleaned immediately. The use of the water trap will help prevent
accidental drawing of liquid into the sensor.
V. REFERENCES
Thermo Environmental Instruments, Inc., TVA-1000 Series Instruction Manual Response Factors
Part Number 50039, dated January 28, 2009.
Note: The following references are the manufacture instruction manuals. The appropriate
manual for the instrument(s) being used shall be on site during each sampling event.
Thermo Environmental Instruments, Inc., Organic Vapor Meter (OVM), Model 580B, instruction
manual dated January 9, 1996.
MiniRae 2000 Portable VOC Monitor, Model PGM-7600, instruction manual (Revision E) dated
May, 2005.
MiniRae 3000 Portable VOC Monitor, Model PGM-7320, instruction manual (Revision C) dated
August, 2010.
MultiRae Plus Multiple-Gas Monitor, Model PGM-50-5P, instruction manual (Revision B1
dated November, 2003.
Foxboro Portable Toxic Vapor Analyzer, Model TVA-1000A, instruction manual dated September
1994.
VI.
ATTACHMENTS
PID/FID Daily Calibration Log
Appendix F – Common Organic Solvents and Gases Data Sheet from the Thermo Environmental
Instruments, Inc., Organic Vapor Meter (OVM), Model 580B, instruction manual dated
January 9, 1996,
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Field Screening SOP\Savage Field Screening of Water and Soil SOP.doc
30 October 2012
SAVAGE PID/FID DAILY CALIBRATION LOG
Site Name:
Date:
Location:
Time:
Job Number:
Field Personnel:
Detector (Make & Model):
Weather:
Serial Number:
Rental ID (if applicable):
Rental Company:
Detector Calibration/Maintentance Certification Provided By (Personnel):
Date:
Beginning of Day Detector Calibration
Detector Calibration
Ambient air or zero air standard (circle one)
Value of
Standard
(ppm)
Reading
(ppm)
Lot #
Expiration
Date
Comments
0
Calibration Standard #1
Note: When calibrating a FID, the default for calibration standard
#1 is isobutylene and standard #2 is methane.
Calibration Standard #2 (if applicable)
Additional Information
Range of Ionization Potentials for Site COCs (eV)_____________________ Detector Lamp (eV): ____________Correction Factor/Response Factor________________
Battery fully charged (Yes/No): ______________________
Water trap installed (Yes/No): ______________________
Post Calibration Check
Date:
Field Personnel:
Time:
Calibration Check
Ambient air or zero air standard (circle one)
Value of
Standard
(ppm)
Check
Results
(ppm)
Acceptable
Range (+/- 5%)
(ppm)
0
Within
Range
(yes/no)
Lot #
Expiration
Date
Comments
0-5
Calibration Standard #1
Calibration Standard #2 (if applicable)
Notes:
1.) All calibration checks must be made in the run mode, not the calibration mode.
2.) If the calibration check is performed with the standards utilized during calibration, write down "same" under the Lot # and expiration date columns.
3.) If the post calibration check is not within the acceptable range the meter must be recalibrated. If recalibration is attempted twice without success, replace the unit.
Calibration & Post Calibration Check Performed by: ________________________________(Print)__________________________________ (Sign)
END OF DAY CALIBRATION CHECK
Calibration Check
Date:
Value of
Standard
(ppm)
Time:
Ambient air (zero air)
Check
Results
(ppm)
Acceptable
Range (+/- 5%)
(ppm)
Within
Range
(yes/no)
Lot #
Expiration
Date
Comments
Field Personnel:
0
0-5
Calibration Standard #1
Calibration Standard #2 (if applicable)
Notes:
1.) All calibration checks must be made in the run mode, not the calibration mode.
2.) If the calibration check is performed with the standards utilized during calibration, write down "same" under the Lot # and expiration date columns.
3.) If the end of the day calibration check is not within the acceptable range, the data collected that day for that parameter shall be qualified in it's use.
4.) If data needs to be qualified, list the applicable sampling locations below.
5.) If the end of the day calibration fails to be within the acceptable range for two consecutive days, replace the unit.
Calibration Check by ___________________________________
Print Name
Sampling Locations:
Sampling Locations:
________________________________________
Signature
Sampling Locations:
.
BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICAL LOGGING
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
Hager-Richter Geoscience, Inc.
Borehole Geophysical Logging SOP
August 2010
Page 1 of 6
HAGER-RICHTER GEOSCIENCE, INC.
BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICAL LOGGING
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
EQUIPMENT
General. A Mount Sopris Matrix or MGX-II portable digital logging system is used with
a 4MXA-1000 winch for the borehole geophysical logging. Data are recorded along with depth
in digital format using a PC. Data are displayed in real time in the field and are processed in the
field and in the office using WellCAD v4.3, commercially licensed software.
Optical Televiewer. An ALT OBI-40 optical televiewer (OTV) probe is used. The OTV
acquires a high resolution, effectively continuous, magnetically oriented, 360° image of the
borehole wall. The image can be used to detect bedrock structures such as fractures, foliation,
and bedding planes and to provide information about lithology. The probe includes a 3-axis
magnetometer and three accelerometers to orient the image and to provide borehole deviation
data that are used to correct structure orientations from apparent to true orientations.
Acoustic Televiewer and Acoustic Caliper. An ALT ABI-40 acoustic televiewer (ATV)
probe is used. The ATV acquires a high resolution, effectively continuous, magnetically
oriented, 360° image of the borehole wall using the reflected signal of sound waves in the
ultrasonic frequency range. Both amplitude and travel time of the reflected signal are displayed
and can be used to detect bedrock structures such as fractures, foliation, and bedding planes. The
probe includes a 3-axis magnetometer and three accelerometers to orient the image and to
provide borehole deviation data that are used to correct structure orientations from apparent to
true orientations.
Acoustic televiewer travel time data can also be used to calculate an acoustic caliper log.
The acoustic caliper log measures the average borehole diameter as a function of depth. The
acoustic caliper log is derived from the travel time data and the velocity of the acoustic signal in
water. The acoustic caliper log is used to locate possible fractures and to aid in the interpretation
of other borehole geophysical logs.
Natural Gamma Ray. A Mount Sopris 2PGA-1000 poly-gamma probe is used for the
natural gamma ray logging. The probe uses a sodium iodide crystal that produces a pulse of light
when struck by a gamma ray. The variation of radioactivity naturally occurring in rocks and
sediments makes the natural gamma ray log an excellent indicator of changes in lithology.
Radioactive minerals tend to accumulate in clays with the practical result that layers with higher
clay content are commonly expressed in the natural gamma ray log as relatively higher counts
per second. Clean sands, which are normally low in radioactivity, produce low count rates.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Geophysics SOP\Borehole Geophysical Logging SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Hager-Richter Geoscience, Inc.
Borehole Geophysical Logging SOP
August 2010
Page 2 of 6
Normal Resistivity, SP, and SPR. A Mount Sopris 2PEA-1000 poly-electric probe
attached to a 2PGA-1000 poly-gamma probe is used for the normal resistivity (8", 16", and 32"
electrode spacing), SP, and SPR logging. The normal resistivity, SP, and SPR logs are all types
of electric logs. The electric logs are calculated from combinations of voltage and current
measurements made with various combinations of a fixed electrode at the surface and one or
more electrodes mounted on a downhole probe.
Resistivity is the physical property that relates electric current density to potential
gradient and is defined as:
ρ = (A / L) * (V / I)
where:
ρ
A
L
V
I
Eq 1
is resistivity
is cross-sectional area of a homogeneous tube
is length of the tube
is potential
is current
The normal resistivity data are measured by applying an electric current and measuring
the voltage between a pair of current and voltage downhole electrode arrays. The electrode
spacing determines the effective distance of the measurement from the borehole wall. The
effective sample interval for each pair of electrode spacings (8", 16", and 32") is usually
considered to be a sphere with a diameter about two times the electrode spacing. Normal
resistivity logs provide information about lithology and bed thickness in the surrounding
material.
The SP measures the voltage that occurs between the borehole fluid and the surrounding
materials. Spontaneous potentials occur in the earth due to chemical and physical differences
between rock types and saturating fluids. The SP data are the difference in potential (or voltage)
between a fixed electrode at the surface and a single moving electrode in the borehole. The SP
logs are commonly used to identify changes in lithology, bed thickness, and salinity of formation
fluid under some conditions.
The SPR measures the electric resistance of the material surrounding the borehole and
saturating fluid with depth. The SPR measurement is made by passing an alternating current
between a surface electrode and an electrode on the probe. The resistance is calculated using the
voltage between the two electrodes and Ohms Law, which is defined as:
R=E/I
where:
R
E
I
Eq 2
is resistance
is potential
is current
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Geophysics SOP\Borehole Geophysical Logging SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Hager-Richter Geoscience, Inc.
Borehole Geophysical Logging SOP
August 2010
Page 3 of 6
The SPR data are useful in the determination of qualitative lithologic information, water
quality, and location of fractures/fracture zones. The SPR values increase with increasing grain
size and decrease with increasing borehole diameter, fracture density, and with higher
concentrations of dissolved solids in the borehole fluid.
EM Induction Conductivity/Resistivity. A Mount Sopris 2PIA-1000 poly-induction probe
is used for the EM induction conductivity/resistivity log. The 2PIA-1000 uses a Geonics EM-39
induction tool that makes conductivity measurements by using a magnetic field to induce an
electric field, which in turn produces electric eddy currents in the surrounding material. The
magnitude of the electric eddy currents is proportional to the conductivity of the surrounding
material, and the tool measures the magnetic field generated by the induced electric eddy
currents. The EM induction conductivity is the reciprocal of EM induction resistivity. Therefore,
the conductivity data are inverted to calculate the resistivity data.
Physical properties (porosity, permeability, clay content, etc.) of material surrounding the
borehole, of the saturating fluid, and of the borehole fluid affect the EM conductivity/resistivity
data. Since the probe was designed to minimize the effects of borehole fluid, changes in EM
conductivity/resistivity.
Fluid Temperature. A Mount Sopris 2SFB-1000 fluid resistivity/temperature probe is
used for the temperature logging. The temperature sensor is a semiconductor device for which
the voltage output is linearly related to temperature. Temperature logs record the temperature of
the borehole fluid with depth and are useful for detecting flow into and out of a borehole.
Fluid Resistivity. A Mount Sopris 2SFB-1000 fluid resistivity/temperature probe is used
for the fluid resistivity logging. Resistivity is the physical property that relates electric current
density to potential gradient and is defined in Equation 1. The probe uses an electrically shielded
Wenner array to measure the capacity of the borehole fluid to transmit electric current with depth
and can be an indicator of salinity and water quality. If fluid resistivity contrasts are present
between the borehole fluid and individual fractures and fracture zones, the fluid resistivity logs
are also useful indicators of flow into and out of a borehole.
Heat Pulse Flow Meter. A Mount Sopris HFP-2293 heat pulse flow meter (HPFM) is
used for the HPFM logging. The HPFM measures the vertical rate and direction of fluid flow in a
borehole at discrete depths and is designed to be used for boreholes with flow rates less than one
gallon per minute (gpm). A heating grid heats a thin sheet of water in a short time interval (less
than 0.05 seconds), and, if vertical flow is present, the sheet of water moves along the borehole
in the direction of flow. Temperature sensors located at known distances above and below the
heating grid monitor the differential temperature of the borehole fluid. The time required for the
sheet of heated water to reach one of the sensors is measured, and, based on factory calibrations,
the time is used to calculate the vertical flow rate. The HPFM measurements can be made under
ambient or stressed (injected or pumped) conditions.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Geophysics SOP\Borehole Geophysical Logging SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Hager-Richter Geoscience, Inc.
Borehole Geophysical Logging SOP
August 2010
Page 4 of 6
The HPFM measurement depths are selected based on information provided by other
borehole geophysical data such as OTV, ATV, fluid temperature, and fluid resistivity. The
HPFM test depths are selected above and below the depths of possible transmissive fractures
identified on the basis of the OTV, ATV, fluid temperature, and fluid conductivity logs. To make
a measurement, the probe is positioned at a selected depth, borehole fluid is diverted into the
probe, and the probe is stabilized by the friction between the centralizers and diverters on the
probe and the borehole wall. When the borehole fluid has stabilized, after the disturbance caused
by the probe being moved to the measurement depth, the heating grid is fired, and a
measurement cycle starts.
BOREHOLE GEOPHYSICAL LOGGING FIELD PROCEDURES
Data Acquisition. Standard data acquisition parameters are as follows:
Data Acquisition Parameters
Log
Sampling Interval
Logging Speed
Logging Direction
(Initial and Repeat)
OTV
0.01 feet
5 feet per minute
down
ATV and Acoustic
Caliper
0.01 feet
6 to 8 feet per minute
down and up
Natural Gamma Ray
0.10 feet
7 to 10 feet per minute
down and up
Normal Resistivity,
SP, and SPR
0.10 feet
7 to 10 feet per minute
down and up
EM Induction
Conductivity/Resistivity
0.10 feet
7 to 10 feet per minute
down and up
Fluid Temperature
and Fluid Resistivity
0.10 feet
7 to 10 feet per minute
down and up
HPFM
HPFM data are acquired at discrete depths under ambient and injected
conditions.
Equipment Decontamination. The downhole equipment is decontaminated prior to first
use and after logging each borehole. The cables and downhole probes are washed with alconox
and rinsed with water, followed by a distilled or deionized water rinse.
Equipment Calibration and Standardization. Depth Encoder. Adequate tension is
maintained with the logging cable during the borehole geophysical logging and the depth
encoder is cleaned after each logging run in order to maintain accurate depth measurements.
Repeat sections for each log are acquired to verify depth consistency. In addition, at the
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Geophysics SOP\Borehole Geophysical Logging SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Hager-Richter Geoscience, Inc.
Borehole Geophysical Logging SOP
August 2010
Page 5 of 6
beginning and end of a logging run, a fiducial depth (top of casing) is measured and checked for
consistency. Recorded depths of fixed features in the borehole (i.e., reported casing lengths and
reported borehole depths) are also checked for depth consistency. Based on the repeat log
sections, comparing different logs for each borehole, and comparing fiducial depths, the depth
error due to slippage is typically less than 0.1 feet.
Optical Televiewer and Acoustic Televiewer. The orientation sensors, which provide
azimuth and tilt data, in the OTV and ATV probes, are checked using a compass and a
calibration tube at the office. According to manufacturer’s specifications, recalibration is
unnecessary for the OTV and ATV probes. To verify consistency of the ATV data, logs are
acquired while logging down and up the full length of each borehole. In addition, the borehole
orientation data from the OTV and ATV are compared for consistency. Acoustic caliper data are
compared with known casing and borehole diameters to verify consistency.
Natural Gamma Ray. To verify consistency, logs are acquired while logging down and
up the full length of each borehole. Natural gamma ray readings for interfaces in the boreholes
(cased to open-hole, water-filled to air-filled) are monitored to evaluate the performance of the
probe and probe sensors. Where possible, natural gamma ray data are compared to normal
resistivity, SP, and SPR data to check for consistent observations of lithologic variation.
Normal Resistivity, SP, and SPR. To verify consistency, logs are acquired while logging
down and up the full length of each borehole. Normal resistivity, SP, and SPR readings for
interfaces in the boreholes (cased to open-hole, water-filled to air-filled) are monitored to
evaluate the performance of the probe and probe sensors. Normal resistivity, SP, and SPR data
are compared to natural gamma ray data to check for consistent observations of lithologic
variation. In addition, the normal resistivity, SP, and SPR probe’s factory calibrations are
checked at the office using a Mount Sopris 4RSP-1000 calibration box.
Electromagnetic Induction. To verify consistency, logs are acquired while logging down
and up the full length of each borehole. Prior to acquiring data at each borehole, the probe is
nulled in air at a sufficient distance from surface metal. In addition, a second reference point is
set based on the free air reading and manufacturer’s specifications.
Fluid Temperature and Fluid Resistivity. To verify consistency, logs are acquired while
logging down and up the full length of each borehole. The temperature sensor is checked in the
field in a bucket of test water measured with the logging probe compared to the temperature of
the test water measured using an infrared temperature device. Performance tests are also
conducted on the fluid resistivity sensor by observing the response of the fluid resistivity
measurements in tap water and in a salt water solution.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Geophysics SOP\Borehole Geophysical Logging SOP.doc
30 October 2012
Hager-Richter Geoscience, Inc.
Borehole Geophysical Logging SOP
August 2010
Page 6 of 6
Heat Pulse Flow Meter. To verify consistency, a minimum of three measurements and
typically five, are made at each sample depth. The HPFM was factory calibrated. Multiple
performance checks on the heating grid are conducted during data acquisition at each borehole.
In addition, the HPFM factory calibrations are checked at the office in a flow calibrations tube.
To ensure reliable HPFM measurements, the borehole water level is monitored and
recorded throughout the HPFM testing in each borehole. During HPFM logging under stressed
conditions, the water pumping/injection rates are monitored to ensure consistent stressed
conditions. In addition, HPFM measurements are not started until a stable rate is achieved and
the borehole water level is stabilized. The water level typically stabilizes about 30 minutes to an
hour after pumping/injection is started. The pumping/injection rates are varied from
approximately 0.1 to 1.0 gpm depending on the conditions in the subject borehole.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Geophysics SOP\Borehole Geophysical Logging SOP.doc
30 October 2012
BEDROCK BOREHOLE PACKER SAMPLING
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
Savage Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling SOP
September 2012
Page 1 of 7
BEDROCK BOREHOLE PACKER SAMPLING
PURPOSE
This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) establishes the methodologies for bedrock
borehole packer sampling for the Savage Municipal Water Supply Superfund Site in Milford,
New Hampshire. This procedure includes the minimum required steps and quality checks that
employees and subcontractors are to follow when sampling using this technique. This SOP
addresses technical requirements and required documentation to be completed during bedrock
borehole packer sampling.
INTRODUCTION
Bedrock borehole packer sampling methods are used to test the bedrock groundwater quality and
the hydrogeologic characteristics of one or more individual fractures or fracture zones within an
open bedrock borehole. Packer sampling is often used in conjuncture with borehole geophysics
to develop an understanding of groundwater flow and contaminant pathways within the fractured
bedrock aquifer.
Water bearing fractures or fracture zones are identified within the bedrock borehole using
bedrock borehole geophysical techniques or during the drilling of the borehole. The packer
assembly is used to isolate specific borehole zones for sample collection. In straddle packer
sampling, one packer is located above the fracture and one packer is located below the fracture,
creating an isolated zone that straddles the desired fracture. The packer assembly may also
employ a single packer to isolate a zone from the bottom of the packer to the borehole bottom or
from the top of the packer to the water table. A section of perforated pipe (well screen) connects
the two packers. The perforated pipe is attached to threaded polyvinyl chloride (PVC) or steel
riser pipe which extends to the ground surface and provides isolated access to the target fracture
zone. Testing and sample collection may then be completed on the sealed zone.
EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS
The following list provides a summary of the minimum required equipment and supplies:

Site Sampling and Analysis Plan and Health and Safety Plan.

Appropriate health and safety gear.

Generator for pumps (as needed).

Grundfos Redi Flow 2 submersible pump.

Polyethylene sample tubing (3/8-inch ID).

Pharmaceutical or surgical grade silicon tubing for connections: thick walled tubing
No. 15 (3/16” x 3/8” x 3/32”).
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Packer Test SOP\SOP Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling SOP
September 2012
Page 2 of 7

Packer assembly and associated 2-inch PVC or stainless steel riser pipe.

Air compressor or compressed gas for packer inflation.

MiniRae 2000 detector; or MiniRae 3000 detector; or TEI Model 580B
photoionization detector (PID).

YSI 600XL/XLM Multiparameter unit with a probe guard, capable of measuring pH
(units), Oxidation Reduction Potential (ORP) in millivolt, dissolved oxygen (DO) in
milligrams per liter (mg/L) (100% saturation for calibration), specific conductance in
micro Siemens per centimeter (µS/cm) and temperature (degrees Celsius).

Hach 2100 P Turbidity Meter.

Appropriate calibration solutions for the YSI and Hach meters including: 0 mg/L DO
for DO; Zobell solution for ORP; two different specific conductance standards to
calibrate and check calibration (e.g., 718 and 1,413 µS/cm); 4, 7, and 10 units pH; and
< 0.1, 20, 100, and 800 nephelometric turbidity units for turbidity. Extra DO
membranes in case of breakage.

Small wet sponge or paper towel for DO 100% saturation calibration.

A three way stop cock to divert sample flow (before the multi-parameter meter) to
collect turbidity samples.

Two electronic water level indicators capable of measuring to one-hundredth of 1 foot
(ft) (0.01’) accuracy.

Graduated measuring cylinders and beakers sized according to the flow rate and
stopwatch.

Graduated buckets for purge water.

Sample bottles, preserved as necessary and labels.

Sample cooler with loose ice and packing materials.

Calculator, field data sheets, chain-of-custody forms, and logbook.

Well constructed data and geophysical logs.

Fiberglass engineers tape.

6-ft folding rule.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Packer Test SOP\SOP Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling SOP
September 2012
Page 3 of 7

Wire ties.

Decontamination equipment (sprayers, soap, water, brushes) as required by the
Decontamination SOP.
PROCEDURES
Overview
The packer assembly consists of two rubber pneumatic packers separated by a zone consisting of
a perforated 2-inch steel pipe of varying length. Figure SOP-1 is a diagram of the packer
assembly. The length of the perforated zone can be adjusted based on the size of the fracture or
fracture zone that will be targeted for sampling. A 2-inch PVC riser connects the top of the
packer assembly with the surface. The packers are inflated using pressurized nitrogen via a
high-pressure airline from the surface. The packer assembly is attached to a disposable cord by
which it is lowered into the well from a tripod assembly at the surface. The PVC riser is
assembled in 10-ft sections as the packer assembly is lowered into the boring. An electric
cathead, or cable winch, is used to pull the packer assembly back out of the hole after sampling is
completed.
Once the packer assembly is lowered to the desired sample depth, the packers are inflated to a
pressure sufficient to isolate the sample zone (typically 200 to 400 pounds per square inch). After
the zone is sealed, purging and sampling of the zone is accomplished using a submersible
Grundfos Redi-Flow 2 pump. During sampling, water levels are monitored inside and outside the
packer riser to monitor drawdown and test the effectiveness of the packer seal.
Calibration and Equipment
1.
In general, all instrumentation necessary for field monitoring and health and safety
purposes shall be maintained, tested, and inspected according to the manufacturer's
instructions. The manufacturer’s instruction manuals for field equipment shall be
brought to the site for each sampling event.
2.
All field instruments shall be calibrated, and have a calibration check in the
office prior to the field event (within 1 week) to ensure that the equipment is
working properly and meets the QA criteria.
Refer to the Calibration of YSI and Hach Field Instruments SOP in the SAP for
specific calibration procedures.
3.
For this project, calibration checks, made in the run mode, shall be performed at the
beginning of each sampling day to ensure the equipment is in calibration and again at
the end of the day of use to ensure that the instruments have remained in calibration
throughout the day.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Packer Test SOP\SOP Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling SOP
September 2012
Page 4 of 7
4.
If a calibration check at the end of the day is not within the acceptable range for any
parameter, the data collected that day for that parameter shall be qualified in its use.
This qualification shall be documented on the calibration log and the field sheets/logs
for the appropriate sampling locations. For example: pH measurements are collected
as part of the low flow sampling procedure. If the afternoon pH calibration check was
not within the acceptable range that day, the pH data collected by that instrument on
that day would be qualified as useful only for determining stabilization and not as
representative pH measurements of the water being sampled. That qualification
would then be documented on the calibration log and the sampling sheet for each of
those locations.
5.
In addition, should any erratic or illogical readings occur between calibrations, the
instrument shall be recalibrated in order to ensure that representative measurements
are obtained. All calibration and check values shall be documented on the calibration
log maintained by each user.
Preliminary Procedures
1.
Set up equipment according to the attached Equipment Setup Diagram.
2.
Affix the pump lead to the tubing approximately every 50 feet (ft) using wire ties for
safety measures.
3.
Calculate the volume of water needed to remove three packer zone volumes from
each sample interval. When sampling a 6-inch open borehole with a packer interval of
10 ft, the volume of the packer zone interval is calculated by multiplying the total
length of the packer interval (i.e., 10 ft) by 1.488 gallons/ft to determine one packer
zone volume in gallons. (Factors for other borehole diameters are provided on the
Packer Test Sampling Worksheet.)
Detailed Field Procedures
1.
Remove well cap and immediately measure volatile organic compound (VOC)
concentrations at the wellhead with a PID.
2.
Collect a static water level measurement before the installation of the packer
assembly using the top of the well casing as the reference point. All water level
measurements collected during the packer sampling activities should be referenced
and documented to the top of the well casing.
3.
The packer assembly is lowered in the borehole with the rope, while simultaneously
threading sections of 2-inch ID PVC or stainless steel riser pipe to the packer
assembly. As the packer assembly is lowered, pressurized gas lines (for packer
inflation) and a surveying tape (for precise depth measurements) will be secured to
the riser with plastic wire ties. The dimensions of the packer assembly (i.e., screen
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Packer Test SOP\SOP Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling SOP
September 2012
Page 5 of 7
length and diameter of packers) should be measured and recorded on the field
worksheet. Packer sampling must start at the bottommost interval and proceed
vertically to the uppermost.
4.
Once the target depth is reached, the packers are inflated with a compressed gas at a
pressure appropriate for the target depth. The appropriate pressure of compressed gas
is determined compensating for hydrostatic pressure. In new boreholes (i.e., first
sampling round subsequent to installation), a static head test (see below) is conducted.
5.
Care should be taken not to over-inflate the packer and not to install the packers in
areas where jagged bedrock has the potential to rupture or perforate the packer
material. Packer rupture can cause disturbances within the borehole and create
potentially hazardous situations. Although not a strict requirement of this SOP, this
determination is advisable and can be made by reviewing the borehole caliper logs
(if available) or by using a down-hole camera. As a general guideline, it is
recommended not to inflate the packer to within 10% of its maximum designed
inflation pressure.
6.
Static Head Test: A static head test is conducted by collecting water levels
(referenced to the top of the steel casing) from inside the 2-inch packer riser and
within the annulus at 5-minute intervals for a duration of 25 minutes or until the water
levels in the riser and the annulus have stabilized. If, after the 25 minutes have
elapsed, the water level inside the riser has not stabilized, the test is terminated and
the circumstances are documented in the logbook.
7.
Upon completion of the static head test, lower the Grundfos Redi Flow 2 pump
through the 2-inch packer riser so that the pump intake is located at the mid-point of
the saturated packer assembly screen. The discharge line should be secured to
minimize movement of the pump during sampling activities. Then assemble pump,
tubing, and pump control box. Attach power supply to the pump.
8.
Calculate the volume of water needed to remove three packer zone volumes from the
sample interval (see Preliminary Procedures).
9.
Start the pump. Initial pumping rates should be approximately 1 gallon per minute.
Monitor water level. Do not allow the pump to run without flow. If the pumping rate
exceeds the well recharge rate, decrease the pumping rate and continue pumping.
Purge the well until either the maximum purge volume (three purge volumes) or the
2 hour time limit has been reached.
10.
Collect field parameters, including temperature, pH, specific conductivity, ORP, DO,
and turbidity after each packer zone volume has been purged and record the readings
on the Packer Test Sampling Worksheet.
Note: The parameter readings are collected from the 5-gallon bucket. Any
parameter affected by exposure to air may require qualification.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Packer Test SOP\SOP Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling SOP
11.
September 2012
Page 6 of 7
After the specified volume of water has been purged from the sample interval, fill all
the necessary sample containers in the following order:
VOCs
Metals
Other parameters (as required)
The VOC samples should be collected first and directly into pre-preserved sample
containers, ensuring that there are no air bubbles in the vial by turning the vial upside
down and tapping it lightly. All sample containers should be filled by allowing the
discharge to flow gently down the inside of the container with minimal turbulence.
Sample containers should be wiped dry. Refer to Table 2 for proper containers,
preservatives, and holding times. Refer to the Chain-of-Custody, Sample Handling
and Shipping SOP for proper sample labeling.
QUALITY ASSURANCE/QUALITY CONTROL (QA/QC)
Refer to Table 4 for all QA/quality control requirements. Field duplicate samples shall be
collected by filling a separate container for each analysis immediately following the actual field
sample collection.
DOCUMENTATION
The following items represent the minimum required information to be documented in the field.
Each individual shall document, in the field log book, or the Packer Test Sampling Worksheet,
the following appropriate level of detail for each sampling location prior to setting up on the next
exploration location:

Page number, job number, well ID, and date at the top of each page.

Clock time of all water level measurements in reference to the steel casing.

Clock time of packer inflation.

Calculation for one purge volume and the total volume purged.

Clock time purging initiated.

All purging rate adjustments and clock time adjustments made.

All in-line water quality readings (i.e., pH, temperature, specific conductance, DO,
redox potential, and turbidity) recorded after each packer volume is purged.

Drawdown measurements.

Analytical parameters collected and associated volumes.
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Packer Test SOP\SOP Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling.doc
30 October 2012
Savage Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling SOP

Assigned sample identification.

Decontamination of submersible pump.

Brief description of any problems or occurrences.

Time of completion.

Sign and date each page of the log book.
September 2012
Page 7 of 7
ATTACHMENTS
Equipment Setup Diagram
Packer Test Sampling Worksheet
G:\PROJECTS\20118016\Bedrock Investigations\SAP_2012\Final_SAP_2012\SOPs\Packer Test SOP\SOP Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling.doc
30 October 2012
Packer Test Sampling Information Form
WELL ID: _________________________
Site Name: ______________________________
Date: _____________________________
Sampling Team: _________________________
Weather: _________________________
Sample Time: ___________________________
Measuring Point:__________________
Stickup or Flush Mount (circle one)
PACKER ASSEMBLY DIMENSIONS: (Screen Length & Diameter) ____________________________
PACKER INTERVAL DEPTH: _____________________________
PACKER INFLATION PRESSURE: ________________________
DEPTH TO WATER (IN/OUT): _____________________________
WATER COLUMN (IN PACKER): __________________________
WELL DIAMETER FACTOR: ______________________________(1.5”=0.1, 2”=0.16, 4”=0.65, 5.75”=1.35, 6”=1.47, 8”=2.51)
ONE PACKER VOLUME: _________________________
VOLUME FACTOR (1 2 3): ________________________
VOLUME TO PURGE: ____________________________
ACTUAL VOLUME PURGED: _____________________
PURGE METHOD: _______________________________
PURGE DATA
1st Volume
2nd Volume
3rd Volume
TIME
__________________
__________________
__________________
GPM
__________________
__________________
__________________
WATER LEVEL (IN/OUT)
__________________
__________________
__________________
TEMP (celcius)
__________________
__________________
__________________
pH (su)
__________________
__________________
__________________
Spec. Cond (uS/cm)
__________________
__________________
__________________
DO (mg/L)
__________________
__________________
__________________
ORP (mv)
__________________
__________________
__________________
Turbidity (NTU)
__________________
__________________
__________________
ODOR (Y/N)
__________________
__________________
__________________
APPROXIMATE NaMnO4 (PPM) _________________
__________________
__________________
GAL. PURGED
__________________
__________________
__________________
Notes:
NO SAMPLE WILL BE COLLECTED IF THE PERMANAGNATE IS OVER 10 PPM
Samples with NaMnO4 (Permanganate) need special preservatives; see Bedrock Borehole Packer Sampling SOP for specific
details.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________