Designing IP Contact Centers: Resources, Servers, and

Designing IP Contact Centers:
Resources, Servers, and Bandwidth
Provisioning
Vincent Zebraitis
Consulting Systems Engineer
Americas International, LATAM
Session Number
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
1
Recuerde siempre:
§ Apagar su teléfono móvil/pager, o usar el modo
“silencioso”.
§ Completar la evaluación de esta sesión y entregarla a los
asistentes de sala.
§ Ser puntual para asistir a todas las actividades de
entrenamiento, almuerzos y eventos sociales para un
desarrollo óptimo de la agenda.
§Completar la evaluación general incluida en su mochila y
entregarla el miércoles 8 de Junio en los mostradores de
registración. Al entregarla recibirá un regalo recordatorio del
evento.
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
2
Contact Center
Executive Overview
Presentation_ID
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Inc. All
All rights
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reserved.
3
Demystifying the Traditional
PBX
C.O. Trunks
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
4
Traditional PBX/ACD Functions
Queuing
ACD
(Reporting,
etc.)
Switching
(Line Connections)
Call Processing
Decision
PSTN Trunk
Connections
C.O. Trunks
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
5
Traditional PBX/ACD Functions
Queuing
ACD
(Reporting,
etc.)
Switching
(Line Connections)
Call Processing
Decision
PSTN Trunk
Connections
C.O. Trunks
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
6
Deconstructing PBX Functionality
ACD
(Reporting,
etc.)
Queuing
Switching
(Line Connections)
Call Processing
Decision
PSTN Trunk
Connections
C.O. Trunks
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
7
Distributed IP Based Technology
Queuing
ACD
CVP or IP IVR
ICM or CRS
Switching
Connection
(LineIn-Line
Power s)
Ethernet Switch
IP Phones
Call Processing
Call Manager
PSTN Trunk
Connections
C.O. Trunks
Presentation_ID
Voice Gateway / Router
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
8
The CISCO IPCC
Call Manager
CVP or IP IVR
In-Line Power
Ethernet Switch
IP Phones
ICM or CRS
C.O. Trunks
Presentation_ID
Voice Gateway
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
9
The CISCO IPCC
CVP / IP IVR
IPCC Agents
ICM / CRS
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
10
More General Information?
http://www.cisco.com/go/cc
• Product information
• Success Stories
• Relevant products
• Documentation
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
11
Session Agenda
• Call Center Resource Provisioning
Sizing: Gateway Ports/Trunks—IVR Ports—Agents
• IPCC Server Provisioning
Cisco CallManager Servers/Clusters
IPCC Application Servers
• IPCC WAN Provisioning (Bandwidth and QoS)
WAN QoS Basics
IPCC WAN Provisioning Examples
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
12
Call Center Resource Provisioning –
Traffic Models
Presentation_ID
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2005 Cisco
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reserved.
13
Call Center Resource Sizing
Gateway Ports: IVR Ports: Agents
IPCC
IVR
How Many IVR Ports Do I Need
for Call Treatment and Queuing
Before Connecting to Agents
PSTN
CallManager Cluster
How Many Gateway Ports or
PSTN Trunks Do I Need to
Handle Incoming Calls
Contact Center
Agents
How Many Agents Do I Need to
Answer Incoming Calls
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
14
Inbound Call Timeline
Ring
IVR
Answers
Network
Agent
Answers
Treatment/Queue Delay
Agent
Hangs-up
Agent Talk Time
Agent
Ready
Wrap-Up Time
Time Trunk Is Occupied
Time IVR Is Occupied
Time Agent Is Occupied
Ring Delay (Delay before Answer) Time Must Be
Included in Total Trunk Occupancy (Holding Time)
When Calculating Trunks
Trunk Is Not Occupied During Agent “Wrap-Up” Time
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
15
The Erlang Traffic Models
(A.K. Erlang, a Danish Scientist)
Erlang-C
• Used when sizing call centers agents where calls are
Queued If no agents are available
• The Model Assumes:
Calls are presented randomly to the servers
Callers finding all agents busy will be Queued, not blocked
Erlang-B
• Used for sizing IVR ports and GW ports (PSTN Trunks)
• The Model Assumes:
Calls are presented randomly
A percentage of calls are lost or Blocked, not queued
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
16
Erlang Calculators
Reference slide
Available on The Web: Few Samples
Erlang-C Calculator: http://www.erlang.co.uk/ccc.htm
Erlang-B Calculators: http://www.erlang.com/calculator/erlb/
http://mmc.et.tudelft.nl/~frits/Erlang.htm
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
17
Reference slide
Call Center Sizing: Using Erlang Tools
AGENT SIZING
TRUNK SIZING
Input
BHT (All Calls)
(14400 X 196)/3600 = 784
Output
0.01
784
810
Total PSTN Trunks = 810 + 32
= 842
46 % Queued Calls to IVR
BHCA for IVR = 46% x 14400 = 6624
Sizing IVR-Q
Q-Time for IVR Calls = 12 Sec
Busy Hour Traffic =
(6624 x 12)/3600 = 22 Erlangs
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
22
32
0.01
IVR-Q Ports
=
32
18
Cisco IPC Resource Calculator
• Automates the sizing of ALL call
center resources
• Inbound Call Center
• Self Service Applications
• Outbound Call Center
Inputs: Call volume, service level, call
hold times, etc.
Outputs: # of agents, trunks, IVR ports,
call data, etc.
• Available to IPCC Specialized Partners
• Access (CCO login required):
Steps to Success:
http://www.cisco.com/partner/WWChann
els/technologies/
Direct Link:
http://tools.cisco.com/partner/ipccal/inde
x.htm
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
19
Basic Traffic Terminology
IPC Resource Calculator Input: What You Need To Know
Busy Hour Call Attempts (BHCA)
•
Number of calls attempted during the busiest interval. This could be any interval such as
the “Busy Hour”, a half hour interval or any other interval
•
Service level goal (SLG)
•
Percentage of calls to be answered within a number of seconds (e.g. 90% answered
within 30 sec)
•
Includes calls answered immediately if agents are available and a portion of calls queued
if no agents are available
•
Average Call Talk Time
•
Average number of seconds a caller is on line after an agent answers the call Includes
time talking and time on hold by agent until the call is terminated
Average Work Time (AWT)
•
Average agent wrap up time after caller hangs up
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
20
Basic Traffic Terminology
IPC Resource Calculator Input: What You Need To Know
IVR Call Treatment (Prompt & Collect)
•
Average time a call spends in the IVR before an attempt is made to send the
call to an agent
•
Includes greetings/announcements, collecting and entering digits to route
the call. It does not include queuing time if no agents are available
Wait Before Abandon (Tolerance)
•
The amount of time the Contact Center expects callers to wait in queue
(tolerance) for an agent before they abandon the queue (hang up)
% Blockage (Grade Of Service)
Presentation_ID
•
Percent of calls that will receive busy tone during the busy hour
•
For a 1 % blockage, this means 99 % of all calls attempts from the PSTN will
be received at the GW to be answered or queued in the Call Center.
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
21
Basic Traffic Terminology
IPC Resource Calculator Output: What You Want To Know
Recommended Agents
• Required number of agents calculated using Erlang-C to staff the Call
Center during the Busy Hour (or busy interval)
•Calls Completed (BHCC)
• Busy Hour Call Completions (BHCC), the number of expected calls
completed during the Busy Hour
• Blocked calls are also shown
Calls Answered Within Target SLG
• Percent of calls that are answered within the set target time in the
Service Level Goal
• Includes number of calls answered immediately if agents are available
and portion of calls queued if no agents are available.
•
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
22
Basic Traffic Terminology
IPC Resource Calculator Output: What You Want To Know
Calls Answered Beyond SLG
• Percent of calls answered beyond the set target time entered in the
Service Level Goal
• e.g. If SLG is 90% answered within 30 seconds, this would be 10%
Queued calls
• Percent of all calls queued (in the IVR) if no agents are available
during the Busy Hour
• Includes calls queued and then answered within Service Level Goal
and calls queued beyond the SLG
Calls answered immediately
• Percent of calls answered immediately by an agent after they
received treatment (if implemented) in the IVR
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
23
Basic Traffic Terminology
IPC Resource Calculator Output: What You Want To Know
Average Queue Time (AQT)
•
The average amount of time Queued calls will spend in queue during
the interval waiting for an available agent
Average Speed of Answer (ASA)
•
The average speed of answer for ALL calls during the interval
•
Includes queued calls and calls answered immediately
Average Call Duration
•
The amount of time calls will be in the system tying up resources
•
Includes IVR Call Treatment, Queue Time and Talk Time
Agent Utilization
•
Presentation_ID
Percent of agent time engaged in handling call traffic
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
24
Basic Traffic Terminology
IPC Resource Calculator Output: What You Want To Know
Calls Exceeding Abandon Tolerance
•
The percentage of calls that will abandon during the interval. And the
number of calls represented by the percentage.
PSTN Trunk Utilization
•
The occupancy rate of the PSTN trunks. Calculated by dividing the
offered load (Erlangs) by the number of trunks.
Voice Trunks Required
•
The number of PSTN/GW trunks required during the busy interval
based on Erlang-B using the number of answered calls and average
hold time of a trunk
•
Includes call treatment in IVR, queuing if no agents are available and
agent talk time
•
Assumes all trunks are grouped in one large group. If several smaller
trunk groups are used then additional trunks would be required
(smaller groups are less efficient)
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
25
Basic Traffic Terminology
IPC Resource Calculator Output: What You Want To Know
IVR Ports Required for Queuing
•
The number of IVR ports required to hold calls in queue while the caller
waits for an agent to become available
•
IVR Ports Required for Call Treatment
•
The number of IVR ports required for calls being treated in the IVR
Sum of Required IVR Ports (for both call treatment &
Queuing)
•
Total number of IVR ports required, if both calls treated and queued by
the same pool of IVR ports.
•
Pooling the ports for treatment and queuing results in a more efficient
use of the ports. Less ports are required, for the same amount of traffic
offered, than separate IVR port groups
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
26
Call Center Resource
Provisioning – Examples
Presentation_ID
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27
Call Center Example: 1
Enterprise Widgets Inc.
Customer Requirements (Input):
• Busy Hour Call Attempts (BHCA)
= 14,545
• Average Talk Time (ATT)
• No After Call Work Time
• Service level goal
= 3 min 16 sec (196 sec)
= 0 sec
= 90 % of calls answered
within 20 seconds
• Grade of service (% blockage)
= 1 % = 1 in 100 (0.01)
• No self service IVR applications and no call treatment
• Calls answered directly If agents are available
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
28
IPC Resource Calculator: Input
http://tools.cisco.com/partner/ipccal/index.htm
BHCA = 14545
SL Goal = 90/20
ATT = 196 Sec
Blockage = 1%
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
29
IPC Resource Calculator: Output
http://tools.cisco.com/partner/ipccal/index.htm
Agents = 800
SL Goal = 91% / 20 Sec
Delayed Calls = 9%
Queued Calls = 46%
Answered Imm. = 54%
Trunks = 845
IVR Ports = 34
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
30
Service Level vs. Calls Queued
At 800 Agents
SERVICE LEVEL VS. CALLS QUEUED
Service Level
= 91%
100%
Service Level
Percent
80%
60%
40%
Call Queued
Calls Queued
= 46%
20%
0%
795
796
797
798
799
800
801
802
803
804
805
AGENTS
With Fewer Agents:
This Means:
Presentation_ID
Service Level Decreases
% Queued Calls and Queue Time Increases
More IVR Ports and Trunks Would Be Needed
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
31
Number of Agents vs. Service Level
% OF QUEUED CALLS = 46%
AT 800 AGENTS:
Calls Queued Beyond 20 sec
100%
=9%
CALLS
80%
Calls Queued Within 20 sec
= 46 % - 9 % = 37 %
60%
Answered Immediately
= 54%
40%
Total Calls Answered
Within 20 sec
= 37 % + 54 % = 91 %
20%
0
795 796 797 798 799 800 801 802 803 804 805
AGENTS
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
32
Call Treatment: Example 2
Sizing Impact On Resources
Example -1
WITHOUT CALL TREATMENT
Example -2
WITH CALL TREATMENT
• BHCA
= 14545
• BHCA
= 14545
• Av talk time
= 3:16 min
• Av talk time
= 3:16 min
• No call treatment
= 0 sec
• Call treatment
= 25 sec
SIZING RESULTS:
SIZING IMPACT:
Agents
= 800
Additional IVR Ports and Trunks:
IVR-Q Ports
= 34
IVR Ports
= ? (Call Treatment)
Trunks
= 845
Trunks
= ? (Call Treatment)
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
33
Call Treatment: Example 2
IPC Resource Calculator: Input
All Input
Unchanged
Except
Call treatment =
25 sec
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
34
Call Treatment: Example 2
IPC Resource Calculator: Output
Agents = 800
SL Goal = 91%/20 Sec
Delayed Calls = 9%
Queued Calls = 46%
Answered Imm. = 54%
Unchanged
Trunks = 946
IVR Ports = 152
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
35
Call Treatment: Example 2
Sizing Results
----- What Savings???
Example - 1
WITHOUT CALL TREATMENT
Example - 2
WITH CALL TREATMENT
• BHCA
= 14545
• BHCA
= 14545
• Av talk time
= 3:16 min
• Av talk time
= 3:16 min
• No call treatment
= 0 sec
• Call treatment
= 25 sec
SIZING RESULTS:
SIZING RESULTS:
Agents
= 800
Agents
= 800
IVR-Q Ports
= 34
Total IVR Ports
= 152
Trunks
= 845
Total Trunks
= 946
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
36
CTI Savings Calculation
http://tools.cisco.com/partner/ipccal/index.htm
Example - 3
WITH CTI
Example - 2
WITH CALL TREATMENT
• BHCA
= 14545
• BHCA
= 14545
• Av talk time
= 3:16 min
• Av talk time
= 2:51 min
• Call treatment
= 25 sec
• Call treatment
= 25 sec
SIZING RESULTS:
SIZING RESULTS:
Agents
= 800
Agents
= 698
Total IVR Ports
= 152
Total IVR Ports
= 154
Total Trunks
= 946
Total Trunks
= 946
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
37
Agent Staffing Considerations
Agent Shrinkage Factor: Example
• Agent staffing requirements:
A final adjustment needs to be made to factor in all the activities and situations that
make agents “unproductive or unavailable”
• Agent shrinkage:
Any time for which agents are not available to handle calls; includes: breaks, unplanned absence, non-adherence to schedule and general unproductive time
• Agent shrinkage percentage:
This will vary and needs to be calculated for each call center—in most call centers it
ranges from 20–35% (Assume 20% for the this example)
• Agents required:
This is the number based on Erlang-C results for specific call load (BHCA) and
service levels (800 agents from previous example)
• Agents staffed:
Productive Agent % = 100 – Agent shrinkage % = 100 – 20 = 80%
Agent Shrinkage Factor = 1 / Agent Productive % = 1/0.8 = 1.25
Agent Staffing = Agents Required x Shrinkage Factor = 800 x 1.25 = 1000 Agents
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
38
Inbound Call Center Performance Metrics
http://www.benchmarkportal.com
Inbound Call Center Statistics
Average
Best Practices
80% Calls Answered in ? (Seconds)
36.7
18.3
Average Speed of Answer (Seconds)
34.6
21.2
Average Talk Time (Minutes)
6.1
3.3
Average after Call Work Time (Minutes)
6.6
2.8
Average Calls Abandoned
5.5%
3.7%
Average Time in Queue (Seconds)
45.3
28.1
Average Number of Calls Closed on First Contact
70.5%
86.8%
Average TSR Occupancy
75.1%
84.3%
Average Time before Abandoning (Seconds)
66.2
31.2
Average Adherence to Schedule
86.3%
87.9%
Percentage Attendance
86.8%
94.7%
eBusiness Best Practices for All Industries 2001, Special Executive Summary
Principal Investigator, Dr. Jon Anton, Purdue University, Center for Customer-Driven Quality
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
39
Call Center Provisioning Considerations
(“Burst” rates for the data folks…)
• When sizing Call Center IVR ports and PSTN trunks,
it is better to over provision; cost of extra capacity is much
cheaper than lost revenue, bad service or legal risk of not
meeting SLA (If under provisioned)
• Consider the seasonal busy hour versus average busy
hour; multiple versus single trunk groups; marketing
campaigns where calls bunch up
• Agent staffing, availability, attendance, adherence to
schedule, occupancy, different agent shifts, different time
zone, reuse of facilities
• Provision extra IVR and GW ports for growth and
unforeseen fluctuations—reserve about 20% extra capacity
(reality will be different than modeling)
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
40
Where to Go for More on Sizing
Call Center Resources
REFERENCE SLIDE
• Glossary of Call Center terms (also, see glossary at the end of this
presentation)
http://www.thecallcenterschool.com/glossary.html#A
http://www.ctiforum.com/technology/design/tcs/glossary.pdf
• Cisco IPC Resource Calculator (Customized Erlang-C and Erlang-B)
Steps to Success:
http://www.cisco.com/partner/WWChannels/technologies/
http://tools.cisco.com/partner/ipccal/index.htm
• Erlang-B and C calculators
http://www.erlang.com/calculator/ (contains useful tutorials)
• Traffic Analysis for VoIP (Cisco)
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/cisintwk/intsolns/voipsol/ta_isd.htm#25672
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
41
Agenda
• Call Center Resource Provisioning
Sizing: Gateway Ports/Trunks—IVR Ports—Agents
• IPCC Server Provisioning
Cisco CallManager Servers/Clusters
IPCC Application Servers
• IPCC WAN Provisioning (Bandwidth and QoS)
WAN QoS Basics
IPCC WAN Provisioning Examples
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
42
IPCC Server Provisioning –
CallManager Servers/Clusters
Presentation_ID
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43
Cisco CallManager Sizing/Provisioning
How Many Cisco CallManager
Servers Do I Need?
FACTORS
INCLUDE:
• Number of IP
phones/devices
Applications
IPCC, IPIVR…
Cisco
CallManager
IP WAN
• Number of
gateways
Router/GW
• Applications
Cisco
IP Phones
PSTN
IPCC Agents
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
• Level of
redundancy
• Server model
44
Cisco CallManager Sizing/Provisioning
Device Types and CCM Server Resources
Conf
Web
Attendant
Xcode
Gateway
Voice Mail CTI
Server
IPIVR
IPCC
TAPI
SoftPhone
IP Phone
IPCC
Agent
• Server Resources Are Defined By Server Model Type:
CPU speed—Memory—Disk I/O—
Each device that registers with CCM consumes a portion of server resources
• Server resource consumption depends on:
Device type—Device utilization—Call rate (BHCA)—Dial plan complexity
• Cisco CallManager server capacity is based on server model type
• MCS-7845-H1 high-performance server—30,000 phones or 2000 IPCC
Agents per CCM cluster (today)
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
45
IPCC Agent Capacities:
Single Cisco CallManager Server
Cisco MCS-7845-H1
With BBWC* Kit
Installed
(Ordered Separately)
Cisco MCS-7845H-2400
Without BBWC Kit Installed
Cisco MCSMCS-7835
7835-- H1
Without BBWC Kit Installed
With BBWC*
Cisco MCSMCS-7825H
7825H--3000
Cisco
MCS--7815
MCS
7815-- I1
Not Supported
100
125
250
500
Agent Capacities Are Based On CCM Release 3.3.x and above
* BBWC = Battery Backed Write Cache – Enabler Kit
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
46
Cisco CallManager Sizing/Provisioning
CallManager Server Platforms for IPCC Enterprise
Platform
Characteristics
Maximum
IPCC Agents
per
Server
per
Cluster
MCS-7845-H1
Dual Intel Xeon 3.4 GHz
500*
2000
MCS-7835-H1
Intel Xeon 3.4 GHz
250
1000
MCS-7835-I1
Intel Xeon 3.4 GHz
250
1000
MCS-7825-H1
Pentium 4 3.4 GHz
100**
100
* 500 IPCC Agents with CCM 3.3.x Release and above; 250 IPCC agents with CCM 3.2
** The Maximum Number of IPCC Agents Supported on a Single Non-Redundant Platform Is 50
With a Redundant Server Configuration This Caveat Is Eliminated
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
47
Cisco CallManager Scalability
1:1 vs. 2:1 Basic Redundancy Scheme
2:1 REDUNDANCY SCHEME
1:1 REDUNDANCY SCHEME
Primary
Backup
1 to
500
Backup
251 to
500
Primary
• Cost-efficient redundancy
• Degraded service
during upgrades
• Not Recommended For IPCC
Presentation_ID
1 to
250
Backup
501 to
1000
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
Primary
Primary
751 to
1000
501 to
750
• High availability during
upgrades
• Simplified configuration
• Load sharing
• Faster failover
48
Cisco CallManager 3.3+ Scalability
1:1 Redundancy (High Performance Servers)
IPCC Agent
Primary/Backup
• Balance agents and devices equally
amongst servers
Backup/Primary
500 IPCC AGENTS
1000 IPCC AGENTS
Publisher and
TFTP Server(s)
Publisher and
TFTP Server(s)
1 to 250: Primary
251 to 500: Backup
251 to
500
1 to
250
251 to 500: Primary
1 to 250: Backup
751 to
1000
501to
750
Presentation_ID
2000 IPCC AGENTS
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
Publisher and
TFTP Server(s)
251 to
500
1 to
250
751 to
1000
501 to
750
1250 to
1500
1001 to
1250
1750 to
2000
1501 to
1750
49
Cisco CallManager 3.3+ Scalability
1:1Redundancy: Mixed Cluster (High Performance Servers)
IPCC Agent
Primary/Backup
• Balance agents and phones equally
amongst servers
Backup/Primary
• Keep IPCC agents in separate servers
250 IPCC AGENTS AND
3750 PHONES
500 IPCC AGENTS AND
7500 PHONES
Publisher and
TFTP Server(s)
Publisher and
TFTP Server(s)
IPCC Agents
250 Agents: Primary
3750 Phones: Backup
Phones
3750 Phones: Primary
250 Agents: Backup
Presentation_ID
IPCC Agents
251 to
500
1 to
250
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
Publisher and
TFTP Server(s)
IPCC Agents
251 to
1 to
500
250
751 to
1000
501 to
750
Phones
Phones
3751 to
7500
1000 IPCC AGENTS AND
15000 PHONES
1 to
3750
3751 to
7500
1 to
3750
11251to
15000
7501 to
11250
50
IPCC Server Provisioning –
IPCC Express
IPCC Enterprise
Application servers
Presentation_ID
©
© 2003,
2005 Cisco
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rights reserved.
reserved.
51
IP Contact Center Product Models
Supported Agents
Queue Options
IPCC Express
IPCC Enterprise
Up to 200* Agents
6,000 Agents
IP-IVR (up to 300 Ports)
IP-IVR
CVP-Customer Voice Portal
Cisco Agent Desktop
Agent CTI
Desktop Options
Cisco Agent Desktop
CTI Toolkit/CTI-OS
CRM Integrated
Supported
Deployment Models
Single Site
Single Site
Multi-Site Centralized
Multi-Site Centralized
Cluster over WAN
Multi-Site Distributed
*300 Agents with upcoming release 4.0
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
52
IPCC Express Edition:
Component Detail
• CRS Engine
Call processing engine (ACD brain)
Database, configuration
CTI (Interface to desktop/CTI client)
IVR
CRS Engine
Expansion Servers
• Expansion Servers
IPCC Express
Server
ASR (Automatic Speech Recognition)
TTS (Text To Speech)
MR (Monitoring and Recording)
HR (Historical Reporting)
IPCC Express
Server
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
53
IPCC Enterprise Edition:
Component Detail
• ICM Central Controller
Router Logger
Router—Call processing engine (ACD brain)
Logger—database, configuration,
call records
Rogger
• ICM Peripheral Gateway (PG)
ICM
ICM
Cisco
CallManager
IP-Queue
Platform
Cisco Outbound
Option
E-Mail Manager
Option
Web
Collaboration Option
DMZ
PG
PG— Interface to CCM, IP/IVR, TDM PBX,
e-mail and web collaboration servers
CTI Server
• CTI Server/CTI-OS/CAD
Interface to desktop/CTI client
Progger
• ICM Admin Workstation (AW) tools
Configuration, script editor, monitor
• Historical Data Server/WebView server
AW/HDS
Reporting
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
54
IPCC Enterprise Edition:
Component Detail
Logger
• Outbound Option
PG
Campaign Manager—Runs on ICM Logger Server
Dialer—Software-based SCCP Phones for CCM
Campaign
Can be Co-loaded on PG Platform
Dialer Manager
Can have multiple Dialers ~ 200 Agents/Dialer
•• E-Mail
E-Mail Manager
Manager Option
Option
ICM
ICM
Cisco
CallManager
IP-Queue
Platform
Cisco Outbound
Option
E-Mail Manager
Option
Web
Collaboration Option
DMZ
Presentation_ID
Small—Co-Loaded
Small—Co-Loaded UI,
UI, Database,
Database, E-Mail
E-Mail
Medium/Distributed—Multiple
Medium/Distributed—Multiple UI
UI Servers
Servers
Large/Distributed—Separate
Large/Distributed—Separate Database
Database
and
and HDS
HDS
E-Mail
Manager
UI
Server
• Web Collaboration Option
Collaboration Server—In DMZ with
Web Servers ~ 250 Agents per Server
Dynamic Content Adaptor—in DMZ to
mirror generated content
Media Blender—Inside Firewall, query
Collaboration Server —one per
“Peripheral”
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
PG
Media
Blender
DB/
HDS
Collab
Server
DCA
55
IPCC Express Server Sizing
IPCC Agents
“Good
Morning!”
IVR/CTI
Ports
Database
Queries
Historical
Real-Time
Reporting
Mydoc
.txt
Text To Speech
Automatic Speech
Recognition
• IPCC Express server resources are defined by server model type:
CPU speed—memory—Disk I/O—
Devices and applications configured consume a portion of server resources
• Server resource consumption depends on:
Device type/quantity—Application type/sessions
• IPCC Express server capacity is based on server model type
• MCS-7845H-3.0 CC1 high-performance server—200 IPCC Express
agents per server (today)—
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
56
IPCC Express Configuration Tool
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/products/sw/custcosw/ps1846/prod_how_to_order.html
• IPCC Express and IPIVR 3.5(1) configuration
and ordering tool V 2.7
• 60 agents
• 5 supervisors
• 30 IVR ports
• 1 historical reporting
session
• 2600 available server
points (MCS-7845H-3.0CC1)
• 775 Configured
• 1825 Remaining
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
57
IPCC Enterprise Server Sizing
How Many Servers Do I Need?
• Applications
IPCC Application
servers
Cisco
CallManager
IP WAN
Router/GW
Cisco
IP Phones
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
• Number of
IPCC locations
• Level of
redundancy
PSTN
IPCC Agents
Presentation_ID
FACTORS
INCLUDE:
• Server Model
• Number of
IPCC agents
and traffic load
58
IPCC Enterprise Server Sizing
IPCC Server
Configuration (S/W)
MCS Server or
3rd Party Server
# of CPU
Maximum
Agents
Progger (PG and CTIOS,
Router, Logger,)
MCS-7845-H1-CC1
Dual
250
Rogger
(Router and Logger)
MCS-7845-H1-CC1
Dual
1,500
MCS-7845-H1-CC1
Dual
5,000
3rd Party Quad Server
Quad
6,000
MCS-7845-H1-CC1
Dual
5,000
3rd Party Quad Server
Quad
6,000
MCS-7845-H1-CC1
Dual
500
ICM Router
ICM Logger
Agent PG
(IPIVR/CM/CTI/CTIOS)
Capacities Will Vary Based on applications complexity, Server and S/W Versions; Check CCO
for Latest
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
59
REFERENCE SLIDE
Where to Go for More on IPCC
and IP Telephony Design Guidance
• IPCC Design Guides on CCO
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/custcosw/ps1844/
products_implementation_design_guides_list.html
• Cisco IPCC Enterprise/Express Documentation
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/icm/icme
ntpr/icm60doc/index.htm
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/products/sw/custcosw
/ps1846/prod_how_to_order.html
• IP Telephony Design Guides on CCO
http://www.cisco.com/go/srnd/
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
60
IPCC WAN Provisioning –
Bandwidth And QoS Basics
Presentation_ID
©
© 2003,
2005 Cisco
Cisco Systems,
Systems, Inc.
Inc. All
All rights
rights reserved.
reserved.
61
Traffic Profiles And Requirements
Provisioning for Voice
VOICE
• Latency = 150 ms
• Jitter = 30 ms
One-Way
Requirements
• Loss = 1%
• Bandwidth per call depends
on codec, sampling-rate,
and Layer 2 media
• Smooth
• Benign
• Drop Sensitive
• Delay Sensitive
• Call Admission Control must
be enabled
• UDP Priority
Deploying QoS to Protect Voice, Video and Critical Data: Session:
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
62
Traffic Profiles And Requirements
Provisioning for Data
DATA
• Bursty
• Greedy
• Drop Insensitive
• Delay Insensitive/Sensitive
• TCP Retransmits
• Different applications
have different traffic
characteristics
• Different versions of
the same application can
have different traffic
characteristics
• Classify data into four/five
data classes model:
Mission-Critical Apps
Transactional/Interactive Apps
Bulk Data Apps
Best Effort Apps
Optional: Scavenger Apps
Deploying QoS to Protect Voice, Video and Critical Data: Session:
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
63
Enabling QoS in the Network
Cisco’s Approach to QoS
Classification: Mark the Packets with a Specific Priority Denoting a
Requirement for Class of Service from the Network
Trust Boundary: Define and Enforce a Trust Boundary at the Network Edge
Scheduling: Assign Packets to One of Multiple Queues (Based on
Classification) for Expedited Treatment through the Network
Provisioning: Accurately Calculate the Required Bandwidth
for All Applications Plus Element Overh ead
IPCC
CallManager
Cluster
PSTN
SRST
Router
IP WAN
Campus
Presentation_ID
Branch Office
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
64
Classification and Marking
QoS Baseline Marking Recommendations
IPCC Application?
Application
Routing
L3 Classification
L2
IPP
PHB
DSCP
CoS
Routing
6
CS6
48
6
?
Voice
5
EF
46
5
Video Conferencing
Video Conferencing
4
AF41
34
4
Streaming Video
Streaming Video
4
CS4
32
4
?
Mission-Critical Data
3
AF31
26
3
?
Call Signaling
3
CS3
24
3
?
Transactional Data
2
AF21
18
2
2
CS2
16
2
Network Management Network Management
?
Bulk Data
1
AF11
10
1
Scavenger
Scavenger
1
CS1
8
1
Best Effort
Best Effort
0
BE
0
0
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
65
REFERENCE SLIDE
WAN Edge Bandwidth Allocation Models
Five-Class WAN Edge Model
Best Effort
25%
Voice
33%
Scavenger
1%
Call Signaling
5%
Critical Data
36%
Deploying QoS to Protect Voice, Video and Critical Data: Session: NMS-2T30
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
66
REFERENCE SLIDE
WAN Edge Bandwidth Allocation Models
Five-Class WAN Edge Model Configuration Example
!
class-map match-all VOICE
match ip dscp ef
class-map match-any CALL-SIGNALING
match ip dscp cs3
match ip dscp af31
class-map match-any CRITICAL-DATA
match ip dscp cs6
match ip dscp af21 af22
match ip dscp cs2
class-map match-all SCAVENGER
match ip dscp cs1
!
!
policy-map WAN-EDGE
class VOICE
priority percent 33
class CALL-SIGNALING
bandwidth percent 5
class CRITICAL-DATA
bandwidth percent 36
random-detect dscp-based
class SCAVENGER
bandwidth percent 1
class class-default
bandwidth percent 25
random-detect
!
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
! IP Phones mark Voice to EF
! Future Call-Signaling marking
! Current Call-Signaling marking
! Routers mark Routing traffic to CS6
! Recommended markings for Transactional-Data
! Recommended marking for Network Management
! Scavenger marking
! Voice gets 33% of LLQ
! Minimal BW guarantee for Call-Signaling
! Critical Data class gets min 36% BW
! Enables DSCP-WRED for Critical-Data class
! Scavenger is throttled
! Default class gets a 25% BW guarantee
! Enables WRED for class-default
67
Enabling QoS in the Network
WAN VoIP Bandwidth Provisioning
CODEC
Sampling
Rate
Voice Payload
in Bytes
Packets per
Second
Bandwidth per
Conversion
G.711
20 msec
160
50
80 kbps
G.711
30 msec
240
33
74 kbps
G.729A
20 msec
20
50
24 kbps
G.729A
30 msec
30
33
18 kbps
A More Accurate Method for Provisioning Is to Include
the Layer 2 Headers into the Bandwidth Calculations:
CODEC
Ethernet
14 Bytes of Header
PPP
6 Bytes of Header
ATM
53 Bytes Cells with
a 48 Byte Payload
Frame Relay
4 Bytes of Header
G.711 at 50 pps
85.6 kbps
82.4 kbps
106 kbps
81.6 kbps
G.711 at 33 pps
77.6 kbps
75.5 kbps
84 kbps
75 kbps
G.729A at 50 pps
29.6 kbps
26.4 kbps
42.4 kbps
25.6 kbps
G.729A at 33 pps
22.2 kbps
20 kbps
28 kbps
19.5 kbps
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
68
Enabling QoS in the Network
WAN Signaling/Call Control Bandwidth Provisioning
IPCC Express
CallManager
Cluster
IP Voice
TDM Voice
Call Control
and CTI Data
CAD/CTI
Server
Cisco Agent Desktops
(CAD)
IP WAN
PSTN
Remote Branch Call Center Agents
Headquarters Data Center
Voice Signaling Bandwidth
IPCC Express CTI/Call Control Bandwidth
# of IP
Phones
10 Calls
20 Calls
30 Calls
# of IP
Phones
10 Calls
20 Calls
30 Calls
1 to 10
3 kbps*
5 Kbps*
7 kbps*
1 to 10
1.5 kbps*
3 Kbps*
4.5 kbps*
20
6 kbps*
10 Kbps
14 kbps
20
3 kbps*
6 kbps*
9 kbps
30
8 kbps
15 kbps
21 kbps
30
4.5 kbps*
9 kbps
14 kbps
50
14 kbps
24 Kbps
35 kbps
50
7.5 kbps*
15 Kbps
23 kbps
*Minimum Queue BW = 8 kbps
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
Based on 15bps per phone per call (CTI Server/CAD
Desktop)
69
IPCC WAN Provisioning –
Examples
Presentation_ID
©
© 2003,
2005 Cisco
Cisco Systems,
Systems, Inc.
Inc. All
All rights
rights reserved.
reserved.
70
The Big Picture
IPCC Deployment Models
IPCC Application Servers
IPIVR / PG / ICM
IPCC Application Servers
ICM / PG / IPIVR
IP Voice
TDM Voice
Call Control
CTI Data
Broadband –DSL/Cable
CallManager
cluster
CallManager
cluster
IP WAN
PSTN
Headquarters Call Center
TDM IVR
V3PN
Internet
Small Branch Call Center
Presentation_ID
Large Call Center
Legacy
ACD/PBX
Home Agent
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
Rest of the World
TDM Call Center
71
IPCC Deployment Example 1
Multi-Site Centralized: Remote Branch Agents
IPCC
IP Voice
TDM Voice
Call Control
and CTI Data
CAD/CTI
Server
CallManager
Cluster
Cisco Agent Desktops
(CAD)
IP WAN
PSTN
Headquarters Data Center
•
•
•
•
•
Remote Branch Call Center Agents
Single Call Center
Centralized Voice Gateways
IP-IVR Located at Data Center (Centralized Queuing)
IPCC and CTI Servers and CallManager Located at Data Center
IPCC Agents and Cisco Agent Desktop (CAD) Located at
Remote Branch
WT-2013
9836_05_2004_c2
Presentation_ID
© 2004
2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
72
IPCC Deployment Example 1
WAN Bandwidth Provisioning: Traffic Flows
IPCC
IP Voice
TDM Voice
Call Control
and CTI Data
CAD/CTI
Server
CallManager
cluster
Cisco Agent Desktops
(CAD)
IP WAN
PSTN
Headquarters Data Center
Remote Branch Call Center Agents
Main Types of Traffic Flows
• Voice Traffic – RTP (classification = EF)
• Voice Call Signaling (classification = CS3)
• CTI Call Control Data Between Desktop/CTI Server
(classification = CS3)
WT-2013
9836_05_2004_c2
Presentation_ID
© 2004
2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
73
IPCC Deployment Example 1
WAN Bandwidth Provisioning: CAD/CTI Server
IP-IVR/ICM
IP Voice
TDM Voice
Call Control
and CTI Data
PG/CTI
Server
CallManager
cluster
Cisco Agent
Desktops (CAD)
IP WAN
PSTN
Headquarters/Data Center
Remote Branch Call Center
Agents
Number of Agents in Branch
= 10 Agents
Number of Calls per Agent per Hour (BHCA)
= 30 Calls
Voice Traffic – RTP (EF)
BW for 10 Simultaneous Calls (G.729a) = 10 x 24 Kbps
= 240 Kbps
Voice Signaling Traffic – (CS3)
BW for Voice signaling per 10 phones and 30 calls
= 7 Kbps
CTI and Call Control Traffic (CS3)
BW for CTI/Call Control per 10 Agents and 30 Calls
= 4.5 Kbps
Total L3 BW for IPCC (Voice + CTI) = 240 + 7 + 4.5
= 251.5 Kbps
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
74
Classification and Marking
QoS Baseline Marking Recommendations
IPCC Application
Data?
Voice
CTI/Call Control
Presentation_ID
Application
L3 Classification
L2
IPP
PHB
DSCP
CoS
Routing
6
CS6
48
6
Voice
5
EF
46
5
Video Conferencing
4
AF41
34
4
Streaming Video
4
CS4
32
4
Mission-Critical Data
3
AF31
26
3
Call Signaling
3
CS3
24
3
Transactional Data
2
AF21
18
2
Network Management
2
CS2
16
2
Bulk Data
1
AF11
10
1
Scavenger
1
CS1
8
1
Best Effort
0
0
0
0
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
75
IPCC Express Deployment Example 1
WAN Bandwidth Provisioning: Additional Traffic
IPCC Express
CAD/CTI
Server
IP Voice
TDM Voice
Call Control
and CTI Data
Cisco Agent Desktops
(CAD)
IP WAN
PSTN
Headquarters Data Center
Remote Branch Call Center Agents
• Voice and CTI data may not be only traffic traversing WAN
• Other data traffic traversing this link may include:
Additional voice traffic (RTP) for remote monitoring and recording
Agent skill group statistics
Pop screen application/web traffic
Email and FTP traffic
WT-2013
9836_05_2004_c2
Presentation_ID
© 2004
2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
76
The Big Picture
IPCC Deployment Models
IPCC Application Servers
IPIVR / PG / ICM
IPCC Application Servers
ICM / PG / IPIVR
IP Voice
TDM Voice
Call Control
CTI Data
Broadband –DSL/Cable
CallManager
cluster
CallManager
cluster
IP WAN
PSTN
Headquarters Call Center
TDM IVR
V3PN
Internet
Small Branch Call Center
Presentation_ID
Large Call Center
Legacy
ACD/PBX
Home Agent
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
Rest of the World
TDM Call Center
77
IPCC Deployment Model
Cluster over WAN (CWAN) Call Processing
IPCC Application Servers
ICM / IPIVR / CVP
CallManager
cluster
IP Voice
TDM Voice
Call Control
CTI Data
IP WAN
PSTN
Large Call Center
Data Center / Call Center
• Single Virtual Call Center With High Availability
• Redundant IPCC Servers Split Over The WAN At Each Location
• Single Redundant CCM Cluster Split Over The WAN In Both Locations
Distributed VG And Queuing with IPIVR/CVP
Gatekeeper-Based Call Admission Control (CAC)
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
78
IPCC Deployment Models
Cluster over WAN Call Processing
IPCC Application Servers
ICM / IPIVR / CVP
CallManager
cluster
IP Voice
TDM Voice
Call Control
CTI Data
Redundant IPCC Servers
ICM / IPIVR / CVP
CallManager
cluster
IP WAN
PSTN
Large Call Center
Data Center / Call Center
• Single Virtual Call Center With High Availability
• Redundant IPCC Servers Split Over The WAN At Each Location
• Single Redundant CCM Cluster Split Over The WAN In Both Locations
Distributed VG And Queuing with IPIVR/CVP
Gatekeeper-Based Call Admission Control (CAC)
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
79
IPCC Deployment Models
Cluster over WAN Call Processing
IPCC Application Servers
ICM / IPIVR / CVP
CallManager
cluster
IP Voice
TDM Voice
Call Control
CTI Data
Redundant IPCC Servers
ICM / IPIVR / CVP
CallManager
cluster
ICM Private Link
IP WAN
PSTN
Large Call Center
Data Center / Call Center
• Single Virtual Call Center With High Availability
• Redundant IPCC Servers Split Over The WAN At Each Location
• Single Redundant CCM Cluster Split Over The WAN In Both Locations
• Distributed VG And Queuing With IPIVR/CVP
• ICM Requires Separate, Dedicated Private Links Over The WAN
• Remote sites stay up in the event of a failure (no SRST required) Small Branch Call Center
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
80
Why Do We Want to Have IPCC CWAN as a
Deployment Model?
High availability and resiliency…to have a redundant contact
center that is not dependent on any single location or on any
single point of failure, even if that single point is an entire
central site.
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
81
CWAN Deployment Model
Highly Available and Dedicated Private WAN Link(s)
Site 1
Site 2
PG 2B
PG 2A
IVR 1
RGR A
HA WAN
1
2
IVR 2
RGR B
3
PG 1A
44
5
PG 1B
CTIOS 1A
CTIOS 1B
WAN
PSTN
PSTN
Remote
Site
Remote Agent
Agent Site
ICC
ICM Public
ICM Private
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
• HA WAN: A redundant
connection between
site 1 and site 2. Ex.
SONET ring or dual
gigabit links
• Private WAN:
Dedicated link(s) for
the private
communications
between redundant
Roggers and between
redundant PGs
• Separate links or one
converged private link
can be used
• This Example shows
separate links
• A converged private
link would be more
common
82
CWAN Deployment Model
Site-to-Site HA WAN Requirements
• Must be redundant with no single point of failure
• Must meet current CM ICC latency requirements of
20ms one way (40ms round trip) maximum latency
• Bandwith must be provisioned and reserved for
the following:
PG to ICM Central Controller (CC)
PG to PG public
Cisco CallManager ICC
CTIOS to CTIServer
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
83
Site-to-Site HA WAN Requirements
Effective BHCA
• Effective BHCA Effective load on all similar
components that are split across the WAN
•Call Manager ICC All calls that come through Call Manager
controlled ICM Route Points and/or are ultimately transferred
to Agents.
•This assumes that each call comes into a route point and is
eventually sent to an agent.
•14,400 BHCA ingress calls coming into a route point and
being transferred to agents with 10% conference/transfer
would be 15,840 effective BHCA
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
84
CWAN Deployment Model
Site-to-Site HA WAN Requirements (Cont.)
• PG to ICM Central Controller (ICM-CC)
Partner Tools exists to compute bandwidth needed
http://www.cisco.com/partner/WWChannels/technologies/resources/IPCC_resources.html
• PG to PG Public
Minimal, heartbeats/keepalives only
• Cisco CallManager ICC
Effective BHCA * 200 = bps
[Approximately 2,800kbps (2.8Mb) per 15,840 Effective BHCA]
• CTIOS Server <-> CTI Server
BHCA * (20 +((#Variables * Average Variable Length)/40)) =
bps
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
85
Site-to-Site HA WAN Requirements
Example
14,400 BHCA (15,840 Effective BHCA)
HA WAN
PG to ICM Central Controller (ICM-CC)
PG to PG
CallManager ICC
CTIOS to CTIServer (+20 variables at 40 char)
TOTAL HA WAN
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
~ 286 kbps
~ 10 kbps
3,168 kbps
576 kbps
4,040 kbps
86
Site-to-Site Private Bandwidth Requirements
PG-PG And ICM CC-ICM CC
Site 1
Site 2
Site 1
Site 2
ICM-CC
A
ICM-CC
B
ICM-CC
A
ICM-CC
B
PGA
PGB
PGA
PGB
IVR/CVP/CM PG(s) and ICM-CC private links
Minimum link size is 1.5Mbps
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
87
Site-to-Site Private Bandwidth
Requirements (ICM-CC)
ICM-CC (A) to ICM-CC (B) Private Bandwidth
Characteristics
• High priority
Small amount of Rogger private load
Consistent
• Low priority
Majority of Rogger private load
Bursty during half hour updates and state transfer
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
88
Site-to-Site Private
Bandwidth Requirements (PG)
PG to PG Private
Bandwidth Characteristics
• High priority
Majority of PG private load
Consistent during steady state
Bursty during state transfer
• Low priority
Only significant traffic during state transfer
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
89
Site-to-Site Private Bandwidth Requirements
Private Bandwidth Calculator Example
Component
Effective
BHCA
Multiply Factor
Recommended
Link
Multiply
Factor
ICM-CC
X 30
X 0.8
Call
Manager PG
X 100
X 0.9
IP-IVR PG
X 60
X 0.9
CVP PG
X 120
X 0.9
IP-IVR/CVP
* Variables
X ((#Variables * Average
Variable Length) / 40)
X 0.9
Total Link Size
Recommended
Queue
Total ICM-CC
High Queue
Size
Add these
three numbers
together and
total in the
Green box
below to get
PG High
Queue total
Total PG
High Queue
Size
* Additional Traffic on the IPIVR/CVP PG if call variables are used
Presentation_ID
© 2005 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
90
Site-to-Site Private Bandwidth Requirements
Private Bandwidth Calculator Eye Chart
• Effective BHCA Effective load on all similar components that are split
across the WAN
Router + Logger Total BHCA on the call center including conferences and
transfers. (14,400 BHCA ingress with 10% conference/transfer would be
15,840 Effective BHCA)
Call Manager PG All calls that come through Call Manager controlled ICM
Route Points and/or are ultimately transferred to Agents. This assumes that
each call comes into a route point and is eventually sent to an agent.
(14,400 BHCA ingress calls coming into a route point and being transferred
to agents with 10% conference/transfer would be 15,840 effective BHCA)
IP-IVR PG Total BHCA for call treatment and queuing. (14,400 BHCA ingress
calls all receiving treated with 46% of them queuing would be 21,024
effective BHCA)
CVP PG Total BHCA for call treatment and queuing coming through CVP.
100% treatment is assumed in the calculation. (14,400 BHCA ingress calls all
receiving treated with 46% of them queuing would be 21,024 effective BHCA)
IP-IVR/CVP Variables Call and ECC variables and variable lengths associated
with all calls routed through IP-IVR or CVP, whichever technology is used in
the implementation.
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Site-to-Site Private Bandwidth Requirements
Private Bandwidth Example
• BHCA coming into the contact center is 14,400
• 100% of calls are treated by IP-IVR and 46% are queued
• All calls are sent to agents unless abandoned
• 10% of calls to agents are transfers or conferences
• There are four IP-IVRs used to treat and queue the calls
with one PG pair supporting them
• There is one CM PG pair for a total of 800 agents
• Calls have Ten 40 byte Call Variables and Ten 40 byte
ECC variables
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Site-to-Site Private Bandwidth Requirements
Private Bandwidth Calculator Example
Effective
BHCA
Multiply Factor
Recommended
Link *
Multiply
Factor
Recommended
Queue
Router +
Logger
15,840
X 30
475,200
X 0.8
380,160
Call
Manager PG
15,840
X 100
1,584,000
X 0.9
1,425,600
IP-IVR PG
21,024
X 60
1,261,440
X 0.9
1,135,296
CVP PG
0
X 120
0
X 0.9
0
IP-IVR/CVP
Variables
21,024
X ((#Variables * Average
Variable Length) / 40)
420,480
X 0.9
378,432
Component
Total Link Size
3,741,120
2,939,328
Total ICMCC High
Queue Size
Add these
three
numbers
together and
total in the
Green box
below to get
PG High
Queue total
Total PG
High Queue
Size
* Minimum link size is 1.5Mbps
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Agenda
• Call Center Resource Provisioning
Sizing: Gateway Ports/Trunks—IVR Ports—Agents
• IPCC Server Provisioning
Cisco CallManager Servers/Clusters
IPCC Application Servers
• IPCC WAN Provisioning (Bandwidth and QoS)
WAN QoS Basics
IPCC WAN Provisioning Examples
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Q and A
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2005 Cisco
Cisco Systems,
Systems, Inc.
Inc. All
All rights
rights reserved.
reserved.
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Designing IP Contact Centers: Resources,
Servers, and Bandwidth Provisioning
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97
Appendix: Glossary of Terms
The following terms have been used in this presentation and are defined as follows:
ACD—Automatic Call Distributor. A computerized telephone system used to distribute calls to agents in a
contact center using specific selection and queuing rules.
Adherence. The term used to describe how well agents stick to their planned work schedules. May also be
referred to as compliance
After Call Work (ACW). Work immediately following an inbound call or transaction. If work must be completed
before agent can handle next contact, then ACW is factored into average handle time. Work may involve keying
activity codes, updating database, filling out forms, or placing an outbound contact.
AFxy. AF PHB (Assured Forwarding Per-Hop Behavior—RFC 2597) gives domains the ability to offer different
levels of traffic forwarding assurance. x = 4 AF classes are defined (AF1y-AF4y). y = 3 drop
preferences/probabilities per class
Agent. The person that handles calls in a contact center. Also referred to as a telephone service representative
(TSR) or customer service representative (CSR).
Agent Occupancy. Generally a percent of logged in time that an agent spends in active contact handling states
(i.e., on incoming calls, in wrap-up activity, on outbound calls).
Average Hold Time (AHT). Average duration of a call for IVR treatment, queuing, and agent
talk time (Hold time of a trunk/port)
Benchmarking. The process of measuring performance against some set standard. Benchmarking in the
contact center industry refers to comparing demographics, processes, and service with other organizations to
identify strengths, weaknesses, and improvement opportunities in one's own organization.
Busy Hour. The two consecutive half-hour periods of a day in which the largest number of calls/contacts are
offered.
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Appendix: Glossary of Terms
The Following Terms Have Been Used in This Presentation and Are Defined as Follows:
BHCA—Busy Hour Call Attempts. The number of calls that will be made during the peak or busiest hour of
the day.
Blocked Call. A call that cannot be completed because of a busy condition.
Blocking. The inability to complete a connection between two points because of a busy condition in the
pathway.
Call Center. An operation with two or more persons handling incoming or outgoing calls. Call centers may be
help desks, customer service centers, catalog sales centers, reservations centers, or telemarketing/collections
operations
CRS—Customer Response System. The overall product name for the Cisco IP-IVR, IP QueueManager, and IPCC
Express software features.
CTI—Computer Telephony Integration. Used in broad context to describe any data that can be presented at an
agent desktop about the caller who is being sent to or serviced by the agent.
CTI Ports. A device in the CallManager that is used like an IP Phone to terminate the actual call voice media to
a session on the IP-IVR. These ports are also defined in “port groups” in the IP-IVR and IPCC Express Server to
connect callers to services on the IP-IVR and IPCC Express Server.
CTI Server—An ICM Server component, typically co-loaded on the IPCC Enterprise Peripheral Gateway Server
that provides a socket interface for 3rd party applications to both observe CSTA-type messages (call ringing,
call answered, call diverted, etc.) as well as to provide “3rd party call control” to allow the application to
function as a “soft phone” and handle tasks like conference, transfer, answer, hang-up.
CTI-OS—CTI Object Server. An ICM Server component that is a client to the CTI Server and provides additional
supervisor controls and functions to the standard CTI desktop for IPCC Enterprise.
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Appendix: Glossary of Terms
The Following Terms Have Been Used in This Presentation and Are Defined as Follows:
DSCP. Differentiated Services Code Point: Six Most Significant Bits of ToS byte are called DiffServ Code Point.
remaining two bits used for flow control. DSCP is backward-compatible with IP Precedence
Dialer—An IPCC Outbound Option Server used to emulate a “bank” of phones used to place calls to customers
from the Campaign Manager’s calling list. The Dialer for IPCC Enterprise is a “software-only” product and
require no additional hardware.
Erlang. A measurement of telecommunication traffic usage. One Erlang equals 3600 seconds of usage in a one
hour period of time.
Erlang Models. A set of traffic engineering techniques utilized to determine numbers of facilities required in
various telecommunications scenarios. Developed by Danish mathematician A.K.Erlang in early 1900s.
Erlang B is used to determine required facilities in an "all calls cleared/blocked" situation such as automatic
route selection in a PBX.
Erlang C assumes blocked calls will wait in queue and is therefore the Erlang technique used to determine
staffing needs in a typical "hold for the next agent" contact center scenario.
EF PHB (Expedited Forwarding Per-Hop Behavior—RFC 2598) can be used to build a low loss, lowlatency, low jitter, assured bandwidth, end-to-end service “Virtual leased-line”
Grade Of Service. The definition of service on telecommunications transmission facilities. Grade of service is
typically defined as a "P" factor - the probability of encountering a busy signal on a trunk or group of trunks.
For example, a P01 grade of service means that one percent of calls will encounter a busy signal.
Hybrid Peripheral Gateway—An ICM/IPCC Enterprise Server that is “co-loaded” with software modules to
interface with a peripheral like CallManager or IP-IVR (PG) and the CTI Server for that peripheral. For some
implementations this can be an effective way to reduce the number of servers required to support the solution.
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Appendix: Glossary of Terms
The Following Terms Have Been Used in This Presentation and Are Defined as Follows:
Intelligent Contact Management (ICM). Is a set of software running on one or more servers that provides
enterprise-wide distribution of multi-channel contacts (inbound/outbound telephone calls, Web collaboration
requests, e-mail messages, chat requests) across geographically separated contact centers.
ICM Central Controller. A software component of ICM which include one or more computers that runs the Call
Management process which makes the actual routing decisions and a central database that stores information
about the entire system.
IPCC Express Application. An IPCC Express Configuration object that ties the CTI Route Point (JTAPI trigger in
IPCC Express) to the specific workflow script to run and any specific parameters that need to be used to run
that script.
ISN—Internet Service Node. An IP-Based call switching and treatment platform that uses VXML (voice x-tended
mark-up language) in Cisco Voice Gateways to provide caller treatment with interactive voice applications
(IVR). ISN uses the ICM to manage the workflow for the call and does not require CallManager to provide call
handling with the H.323 protocol
IVR—Interactive Voice Response. A computer system that has a telephony interface to play specific messages
to callers and perform specific functions—like a self-service banking application to provide customer service
without an agent.
JTAPI—Java Telephony Application Programming Interface. An industry standard messaging protocol for call
control and data messaging about specific call events that uses Java programming objects to communicate to
telephony devices like the CallManager, IP-IVR and IPCC.
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Appendix: Glossary of Terms
The Following Terms Have Been Used in This Presentation and Are Defined as Follows:
Logger—ICM Database Server. An ICM/IPCC Server that is used to manage the configuration, scripting, and
historical databases for the system. This server can be “co-loaded” with the ICM Call Router to reduce the
number of servers required with a “Rogger” configured server platform, also if a Peripheral Gateway is added,
it is also known as a “Progger.”
MCGP—Media Control Gateway Protocol. An industry-standard signaling protocol used by Cisco Voice
Gateways for call setup and control of IP Voice calls on a Voice over IP (VoIP) network.
Occupancy. Generally a percent of logged in time that an agent spends in active contact handling (i.e., on
incoming calls, in wrap up, on outbound calls).
Off-Peak. Periods of time other than the call center's busiest periods. Off-peak times are used to accomplish
non-phone work in most centers. Term also used to refer to discount time periods by telecommunications
carriers.
Peak Traffic. The highest volume load of traffic offered to a telecommunications system
Peripheral Gateway—PG. An ICM/IPCC Enterprise Server that is used to communicate with external resources
like a PBX, IVR or CallManager cluster. The Peripheral Gateway manages all communications between the
peripheral and the ICM/IPCC Call Router and external CTI interfaces.
PIM—Peripheral Interface Manager. A software module that runs on the Peripheral Gateway server that handles
the specific messaging layer communications to the local peripheral.
Predictive Dialer. A device used to automate the method of making outbound calls and directing them to an
agent when a live person answers. Using mathematical algorithms, the dialer takes into account the number of
available agents, the number of lines, talk time and the probability of call results to determine how many calls
need to be made to increase agent productivity.
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Appendix: Glossary of Terms
The Following Terms Have Been Used in This Presentation and Are Defined as Follows:
Preview Dialer. A device that presents the account information and phone number on the screen to allow the
agent to "preview" the information before instructing the dialer to dial (or not dial) the call.
PROGGER is a configuration in which all of the ICM software and processes except the AW/HDS are on a
single server, and it is subject to the following restrictions: single site only, maximum of six Peripheral
Interface Managers (PIMs); Cisco Agent Desktop requires a separate server; CTI OS maximum of five skill
groups; Historical Data Server (HDS) must be on a separate AW (no reports run on PROGGER); Logger
database is limited to 14 days. This configuration requires dual (and separate) private network NICs in addition
to a visible network NIC.
Progressive Dialer. A device that presents the account information and phone number on the screen after the
number is dialed. This dialer allows a customer to configure fixed number of calls to be dialed per agent.
PSTN—Public Switched Telephone Network. The voice telephone system/network that provides typical voice
services (dial tone, call waiting, caller ID, etc.) to homes and businesses.
QoS—Quality of Service. A method of managing traffic flows using network switches and routers to ensure
certain traffic flows are given their appropriate treatment—for example, that Voice traffic always get a higher
quality of service than HTTP or e-mail traffic.
Queue Point. In an IPCC solution, the location or device that is used to hold calls while agents are busy
assisting other customers. This can be the IP-IVR for IPCC Express and Enterprise or ISN for IPCC
Enterprise Edition.
Abandoned. This column shows the percentage of calls that will have to wait longer than the maximum wait
time and will therefore hang up.
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Appendix: Glossary of Terms
The Following Terms Have Been Used in This Presentation and Are Defined as Follows:
Queue Time or Delay. The time callers remain in queue waiting for an agent to become free. May include the
time listening to the delay announcements, but does not include the time spent going through an automated
attendant menu system selecting choices that result in direction of the call to a specific resource or agent
group.
Random Call Arrivals. The normal way in which calls arrive in a call center. In statistical terms, the Variance to
Mean Ration equals 1.
Real-Time Adherence. Measurement of how closely agents stick to their planned work schedule.
Ring Delay (Delay Before Answer). A setting that can be made on the ACD-PBX that adjusts the number of
rings before the system automatically answers the call. When calculating trunk-holding time this delay time
must be included for a true total trunk holding time
Rogger. An ICM Server that combines the ICM Call Router and Logger/Database Server into a single hardware
platform. (or redundant if required).
Schedule. A record that specifies when an employee is supposed be on duty to handle contacts. The complete
definition of a schedule is the days of week worked, start time, break times and durations (as well as
paid/unpaid status), and stop time
Service Level. Percentage of calls to be answered within some number of seconds (e.g., 80 percent of call
answered within 30 seconds).
TDM—Time Division Multiplexing. A broadly used term to describe any voice system that uses circuit switched
or traditional voice circuits to provide services as compared to any voice system using IP to deliver services.
Talk Time. The elapsed time from when an agent answers a call until the agent disconnects.
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Appendix: Glossary of Terms
The Following Terms Have Been Used in This Presentation and Are Defined as Follows:
Traffic Engineering. The art and science of designing facilities and resources to meet user requirements
Traffic Study. A study to determine the levels of traffic that a system is presently handling. It consists of a
count of contacts classified by types (incoming, outgoing, local, long distance,). The data obtained is used to
forecast future traffic, which, in turn, is used in determining new system requirements.
Trunk. A single transmission channel between two points, both of which are either switching centers or nodes,
or both.
Trunk Group. Several trunks provided as a group by the local telephone company or other carrier. Generally,
all trunks in the group will be in use before a busy signal is returned to the caller.
Trunk Hold Time. The total length of time that a trunk is occupied by a particular call, from the moment the
ringing is detected by the ACD to the moment the call is disconnected.
Wrap-Up Time. The time required by an ACD agent after a conversation is ended, to complete work that is
directly associated with the calls just completed. Does not include time for any other activities such as
meetings, breaks, correspondence, etc.
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Appendix: Glossary of Terms
The following terms have been used in this presentation and are defined as follows:
ACD—Automatic Call Distributor. A computerized telephone system used to distribute calls to agents in a
contact center using specific selection and queuing rules.
Admin Script. An ICM work flow that runs in the “background” on a particular scheduled interval (every
minute, once a day, etc.) usually to perform variable calculation or set script variables for use in call-by-call
routing scripts.
Admin Workstation (AW). An ICM Server that is used to configure applications, write scripts and host
WebView Reporting service.
BHCA—Busy Hour Call Attempts. The number of calls that will be made during the peak or busiest hour of
the day.
CAD—Cisco Agent Desktop. Software product used in both IPCC Express and IPCC Enterprise Editions for the
user (agent) to log into the system, handle and process calls and caller information, and provide supervisor
(Cisco Supervisor Desktop) functions.
Call Admission Control (CAC). The process by which the IP Voice system controls the number of calls that will
be attempted over a particular network (typically WAN) connection to avoid “oversubscribing” a connection
and degrading all the IP voice conversations carried on that link.
Campaign Manager—ICM Outbound Option software that is loaded on the ICM Logger platform and used to
control the calling lists for an outbound campaign.
CRS—Customer Response System. The overall product name for the Cisco IP-IVR, IP QueueManager, and
IPCC Express software features. CRSJTAPI (user). A user defined in the CallManager for use with the IPCC
Express system. All CTI Route Points and Ports used by the IPCC Express must be associated with this user in
CallManager Administration.
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Appendix: Glossary of Terms
The following terms have been used in this presentation and are defined as follows:
CSQ (Contact Service Queue). An IPCC Express configuration object that is used to select a resource (agent)
associated with the CSQ to handle the contact.
CTI—Computer Telephony Integration. Used in broad context to describe any data that can be presented at an
agent desktop about the caller who is being sent to or serviced by the agent.
CTI Ports. A device in the CallManager that is used like an IP Phone to terminate the actual call voice media to
a session on the IP-IVR. These ports are also defined in “port groups” in the IP-IVR and IPCC Express Server to
connect callers to services on the IP-IVR and IPCC Express Server.
CTI Route Point. A configuration object in the CallManager that is used to ask an external data source (IPCC
Express or Enterprise for example) for a destination to terminate the caller voice stream. A CTI Route Point can
have multiple dialed numbers or line appearances associated with it depending upon the BHCA being handled
by the CTI Route Point.
CTI Server—An ICM Server component, typically co-loaded on the IPCC Enterprise Peripheral Gateway Server
that provides a socket interface for 3rd party applications to both observe CSTA-type messages (call ringing,
call answered, call diverted, etc.) as well as to provide “3rd party call control” to allow the application to
function as a “soft phone” and handle tasks like conference, transfer, answer, hang-up.
CTI-OS—CTI Object Server. An ICM Server component that is a client to the CTI Server and provides additional
supervisor controls and functions to the standard CTI desktop for IPCC Enterprise.
CVP – Customer Voice Portal. Formerly called Internet Service Node. See ISN
DCA—Dynamic Content Adaptor. An optional software module for the IPCC Enterprise Collaboration Server
Option to allow agents and callers to “co-browse” and “share” web pages that are generated with cgi and other
scripts rather than static HTML pages. Typically deployed in the customer DMZ with the corporate and
Collaboration web servers.
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Appendix: Glossary of Terms
The following terms have been used in this presentation and are defined as follows:
Dialer—An IPCC Outbound Option Server used to emulate a “bank” of phones used to place calls to customers
from the Campaign Manager’s calling list. The Dialer for IPCC Enterprise is a “software-only” product and
require no additional hardware.
DMZ—De-Militarized Zone. A part of a network that is isolated from the corporate trusted network and the
Internet, typically with firewall products to prevent access from the untrusted Internet into the corporate
network while still allowing these same users to access corporate web server resources deployed in this part
of the network. The Collaboration Server is installed in this part of the network as is the Dynamic Content
Adaptor (DCA) if required.
DSP Resources—Digital Signal Processor. A chipset installed typically in a voice gateway or high-end IP
Router that provides a resource to handle IP voice calls and convert them to a common codec or sampling rate.
This is also called transcoding.
Gatekeeper—A feature of the Cisco IOS software that is used on WAN connections to monitor the use of
bandwidth for IP Voice calls and can be used to determine if there is sufficient bandwidth available to accept
another call onto a WAN link. Gatekeepers can also be used for address resolution—mapping dial plan
numbers to gateway IP addresses in a lookup call as well.
GED-125—Cisco Enterprise IVR Interface Specification. A generic engineering document that describes the
Cisco defined messaging protocol for the ICM and IPCC Enterprise Edition software products to accept data
and direct calls in an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) unit.
GED-188—Cisco CTI Server Messaging Specification. A generic engineering document that describes the ICM
and IPCC Express CTI message set and protocol for 3rd party applications and desktop products to both
monitor and control telephony events over a TCP-IP socket interface.
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Appendix: Glossary of Terms
The following terms have been used in this presentation and are defined as follows:
H.323—An industry-standard voice gateway signaling protocol used in Voice over IP (VoIP) networks for call
control and setup/delivery. H.323 can be used generically without the use of Cisco CallManager on a VoIP
network and is seen used with the Internet Service Node (ISN) and other voice applications that do not require
CallManager functions.
HDS—Historical Database Server. An option for the ICM/IPCC Admin Workstation to provide long term storage
of call and event data from the system for reporting and analysis purposes.
Hybrid Peripheral Gateway—An ICM/IPCC Enterprise Server that is “co-loaded” with software modules to
interface with a peripheral like CallManager or IP-IVR (PG) and the CTI Server for that peripheral. For some
implementations this can be an effective way to reduce the number of servers required to support the solution.
Inter-Cluster Trunks. A CallManager configuration object that allows two CallManager Clusters to set up a
virtual connection between them for call transfers, conference, etc. similar to a “tie line” in a traditional PBX
environment.
IOS—Internetworking Operating System. The core Cisco software product that runs in all Cisco IP Routers and
IOS-based Gateways, switches and other network components. IOS provides the core routing and switching
logic in these devices.
IPCC Express Application. An IPCC Express Configuration object that ties the CTI Route Point (JTAPI trigger in
IPCC Express) to the specific workflow script to run and any specific parameters that need to be used to run
that script.
ISN—Internet Service Node. An IP-Based call switching and treatment platform that uses VXML (voice x-tended
mark-up language) in Cisco Voice Gateways to provide caller treatment with interactive voice applications
(IVR). ISN uses the ICM to manage the workflow for the call and does not require CallManager to provide call
handling with the H.323 protocol
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Appendix: Glossary of Terms
The following terms have been used in this presentation and are defined as follows:
IVR—Interactive Voice Response. A computer system that has a telephony interface to play specific messages
to callers and perform specific functions—like a self-service banking application to provide customer service
without an agent.
JTAPI—Java Telephony Application Programming Interface. An industry standard messaging protocol for call
control and data messaging about specific call events that uses Java programming objects to communicate to
telephony devices like the CallManager, IP-IVR and IPCC.
JTAPI Trigger. A configuration object in the IPCC Express that is mapped to a CTI Route Point in the
CallManager and used to start an application in the IPCC Express workflow engine to provide treatment to
the call.
Logger—ICM Database Server. An ICM/IPCC Server that is used to manage the configuration, scripting, and
historical databases for the system. This server can be “co-loaded” with the ICM Call Router to reduce the
number of servers required with a “Rogger” configured server platform, also if a Peripheral Gateway is added,
it is also known as a “Progger.”
MCGP—Media Control Gateway Protocol. An industry-standard signaling protocol used by Cisco Voice
Gateways for call setup and control of IP Voice calls on a Voice over IP (VoIP) network.
Media Blender—An ICM/IPCC Enterprise Server used in conjunction with multi-media functions to blend voice
and web chat and collaboration sessions.
MOH—Music On Hold. A service provided by the CallManager to play a streaming media source to callers while
they are on-hold in the CallManager. This service can also be leveraged by the IPCC Express and Enterprise
editions to use this same music source for callers while they are in queue for an agent.
OCCI – Open Customer Contact Interface. Messaging interface for CallManager ACD for 3 rd party integration.
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Appendix: Glossary of Terms
The following terms have been used in this presentation and are defined as follows:
PBX—Private Branch X-change. A local phone system or switch that is typically installed at a customer
location to provide “private” or local call control and switching. CallManager is an example of an IP PBX.
Peripheral Gateway—PG. An ICM/IPCC Enterprise Server that is used to communicate with external resources
like a PBX, IVR or CallManager cluster. The Peripheral Gateway manages all communications between the
peripheral and the ICM/IPCC Call Router and external CTI interfaces.
PIM—Peripheral Interface Manager. A software module that runs on the Peripheral Gateway server that handles
the specific messaging layer communications to the local peripheral.
Progger. An ICM Server that combines the ICM Call Router, Logger/Database Server, and Peripheral Gateway
onto a single hardware platform. (or redundant if required).
PSTN—Public Switched Telephone Network. The voice telephone system/network that provides typical voice
services (dial tone, call waiting, caller ID, etc.) to homes and businesses.
QoS—Quality of Service. A method of managing traffic flows using network switches and routers to ensure
certain traffic flows are given their appropriate treatment—for example, that Voice traffic always get a higher
quality of service than HTTP or e-mail traffic.
Queue Point. In an IPCC solution, the location or device that is used to hold calls while agents are busy
assisting other customers. This can be the IP-IVR for IPCC Express and Enterprise or ISN for IPCC
Enterprise Edition.
RMJTAPI (user). A CallManager user account that is set up specifically to monitor and manage the resources
(agents and their associated phones) for use with the IPCC Express.
Rogger. An ICM Server that combines the ICM Call Router and Logger/Database Server into a single hardware
platform. (or redundant if required).
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Appendix: Glossary of Terms
The following terms have been used in this presentation and are defined as follows:
Survivable Remote Site Telephony—(SRST). An optional feature of IOS-based voice gateways to allow the local
voice gateway to remain functional if the WAN connection is lost to the central site where the CallManager
cluster is located.
Task/Task Routing. An ICM/IPCC Enterprise concept where any activity in the system is considered a “task”
that is under the control of the ICM Call Router—including non-voice activity like e-mail, text chat and
collaboration sessions.
TDM—Time Division Multiplexing. A broadly used term to describe any voice system that uses circuit switched
or traditional voice circuits to provide services as compared to any voice system using IP to deliver services.
UI Server. An ICM/IPCC Enterprise Server that is used with the E-Mail Manager option to provide “User
Interface” or UI functions to agents at a local site for large scale implementations and offloads these userdriven requests from the main E-Mail Manager Server. (optional)
Universal Queue. A concept of ICM/IPCC Enterprise that allows any media type to be handled by a single
routing engine (ICM) and manage contacts across media types in a single workflow or call routing script.
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Bullet Slide/Initial Cap/Size 30
Subtitle: Size 28, Left Justified
• Arial Bold—Only font used in presentation
• Body copy uses sentence capital letters only,
size 24, left justified
Sub-bullets are size 20 and indented
Hyperlink: www.cisco.com
• Use ALL CAPS and/or color when emphasizing
words
Source: Placeholder for Notes is 14 points
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