User’s Guide
FileFixer™
Fix any MicroStation® file automatically!
Version 7.8i
Axiom
1805 Drew Street
Clearwater, Florida 33765
+1-727-442-7774 voice
+1-727-442-8344 fax
axiomint@axiomint.com
www.axiomint.com
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FileFixer
Copyright © 1989-2003 Axiom.
All rights reserved.
This document was last modified on 26 April 2003 7:39 PM.
This software and manual are provided “as is” without warranty of any kind, either
expressed or implied, including, but not limited to the implied warranties of
merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. The entire risk as to the quality and
performance of this program is with you. You are advised to test the program thoroughly
before you rely on it. Should the program prove defective, you (and not the seller nor
manufacturer) assume the entire cost of all necessary servicing, repair or correction. Any
liability of seller or manufacturer of this software will be limited exclusively to product
replacement or refund of the purchase price. Venue for the resolution of any dispute
related to this license or the use of this product shall be Pinellas County, Florida.
Windows® is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
Intergraph® is a registered trademark of Intergraph Corporation.
MicroStation® and MDL® are registered trademarks of Bentley Systems, Incorporated.
Intergraph Raster File Formats – Copyright  – 1994 Intergraph Corporation.
Used with permission.
FileFixer, Design File Manager, Problem Element Viewer, SafetyCheck and AutoCheck
are trademarks of Axiom.
Table of Contents
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Table of Contents
Chapter 1 — Introduction ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 9
The need for FileFixer ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 9
The FileFixer advantage ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 9
Summary of features and benefits ------------------------------------------------------------------- 10
Problem Element Viewer ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 10
Recovering elements after the end-of-design marker -------------------------------------------- 11
Prevent MicroStation users from causing further damage to problem design files -------- 11
Automatic element range adjustment --------------------------------------------------------------- 12
Replacing the Design File Header Elements ------------------------------------------------------ 13
Replacing the Cell Library Header ------------------------------------------------------------------ 14
System administrator control over Search and Repair options--------------------------------- 14
Chapter 2 — Installation ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 15
Preparing for installation ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 15
Installation from CD ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 15
Network installation from the server---------------------------------------------------------------- 16
Environment variable ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 16
Chapter 3 — Uninstalling--------------------------------------------------------------------- 17
Why you might uninstall an Axiom product------------------------------------------------------- 17
How to do it ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 17
Stop MicroStation from running an Axiom product --------------------------------------------- 17
Identifying your Axiom Base Directory ------------------------------------------------------------ 17
Removing products from the Axiom menu -------------------------------------------------------- 18
Removing the Axiom menu--------------------------------------------------------------------------- 19
Removing files from your hard-disk ---------------------------------------------------------------- 19
Axiom.cfg file and axiom_user.ucf file------------------------------------------------------------- 20
End-of-file missing message-------------------------------------------------------------------------- 20
Chapter 4 — Quick Start ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 21
QuickStart Objectives---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 21
Prerequisites --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 21
Demonstration Version--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 21
QuickStart Step 1 — The Basics--------------------------------------------------------------------- 21
When should I use FileFixer?------------------------------------------------------------------ 21
Factory Defaults ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 22
QuickStart Step 2 — Automatic Design File Repair--------------------------------------------- 23
QuickStart Step 3 — FileFixer’s Report ----------------------------------------------------------- 25
QuickStart Step 4 — What to do when MicroStation cannot open a severely damaged file26
QuickStart Step 5 — Searching for Problems----------------------------------------------------- 28
QuickStart Step 6 — What’s Next? ----------------------------------------------------------------- 30
Problem Element Viewer ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 30
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FileFixer
Chapter 5 — Running FileFixer ------------------------------------------------------------ 31
Getting started with FileFixer ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 31
The main dialog box ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 31
The File menu ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 32
Settings file ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 32
Load Settings -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 32
Save Settings -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 32
Save Settings As… ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 32
Sample Settings Files ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 33
System Manager Overrides --------------------------------------------------------------------- 33
Upgrades ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 33
The Options menu -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 34
Help | Contents ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 34
Help | About… ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 34
Mode ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 34
Which Files? --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 35
Report File ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 35
<Start> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 36
<Display/Print Report> -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 36
Chapter 6 — Enhanced Recovery Options--------------------------------------------- 37
Enhanced Recovery Options dialog box ----------------------------------------------------------- 37
Chapter 7 — General FileFixer Options ------------------------------------------------- 39
General FileFixer Options dialog box -------------------------------------------------------------- 39
Intermediate files directory --------------------------------------------------------------------- 39
Initialize “Which Files” field on startup with… -------------------------------------------- 39
Chapter 8 — Factory Defaults -------------------------------------------------------------- 40
Options | Load Factory Defaults… ------------------------------------------------------------------ 40
Chapter 9 — MicroStation Application Options -------------------------------------- 41
MicroStation Application Options dialog box----------------------------------------------------- 41
Modeler options----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 41
TriForma options --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 43
Chapter 10 — Repair Options--------------------------------------------------------------- 44
Categories of repair options--------------------------------------------------------------------------- 44
Repair option factory defaults ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 45
Arc/Ellipse ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 45
B-spline --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 46
Cell -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 47
Complex -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 50
Design File ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 54
Dimension ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 57
Element --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 58
Enhanced Recovery ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 62
What data should we utilize from the back-up data:--------------------------------------- 62
Enter-Data-Fields --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 63
Table of Contents
Headers --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 65
Linkage --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 68
Pattern----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 72
Range------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 73
Raster------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 74
Reference File ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 75
Tag --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 83
Text -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 84
Type 66 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 86
Vertices---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 87
WTF/WID ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 88
Chapter 11 — Report File Options… ----------------------------------------------------- 92
Report File Options dialog box ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 92
Report file format: -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 92
Report file extension: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 93
Combine reports? --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 93
Report file content: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 96
Program to display and print the ASCII report file:---------------------------------------- 98
Factory defaults ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 99
The default report file name and path are as follows: ------------------------------------- 99
Other report default values-------------------------------------------------------------------- 100
Chapter 12 — Search Options------------------------------------------------------------ 101
Search Options categories--------------------------------------------------------------------------- 101
Arc/Ellipse --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 102
AutoCheck --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 103
B-spline ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 104
Cell ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 105
Complex ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 108
Design File --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 112
Dimension ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 115
Element ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 116
Enter Data Fields-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 120
Headers ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 122
Linkage ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 125
Pattern--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 129
Range---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 130
Raster---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 135
Reference File ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 136
Tag ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 140
Text ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 142
Type/Level --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 145
Vertices-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 147
WTF/WID ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 149
Chapter 13 — Design File Diagnosis--------------------------------------------------- 152
Search for Problems mode -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 152
Basic design file diagnosis -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 152
Advanced design file diagnosis -------------------------------------------------------------------- 153
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Detecting element range problems ---------------------------------------------------------- 155
Chapter 14 — Immunize -------------------------------------------------------------------- 157
Description of “Immunize” mode ----------------------------------------------------------------- 157
Chapter 15 — Design File Repair -------------------------------------------------------- 158
“Automatic Design File” Repair mode ----------------------------------------------------------- 158
Using yesterday’s backup --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 158
Basic design file repair ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 159
Advanced repair of “EOF Not Found” and “I/O” errors -------------------------------------- 159
Setting the filter factor ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 161
Enabling Backscanning------------------------------------------------------------------------ 161
Additional data about automatic repair----------------------------------------------------- 162
Summary of rules on fixing words-to-follow errors: ------------------------------------ 162
How to recover elements after the end-of-design mark --------------------------------------- 163
How to fix complex bit errors ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 163
How to fix element range errors ------------------------------------------------------------------- 164
How to fix FIT problems ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 165
How to fix words-in-description errors----------------------------------------------------------- 165
Using Enhanced Recovery -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 166
The steps of manual file fixing--------------------------------------------------------------------- 168
Chapter 16 — Reports ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 169
Report Summary -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 169
Element Number -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 169
The FileFixer Error Message and Error Number----------------------------------------- 170
Chapter 17 — Which error messages are generated by which option? --- 171
Adjusting the types of errors to be reported on ------------------------------------------------- 171
Search-type error messages sorted by category------------------------------------------------- 171
Repair-type error messages sorted by category ------------------------------------------------- 178
Chapter 18 — Preventive Maintenance------------------------------------------------ 183
AutoCheck --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 183
Nightly FileFixer maintenance -------------------------------------------------------------- 183
Setting up a typical nightly FileFixer maintenance run --------------------------------------- 183
Scheduling --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 184
Create the settings file for nightly FileFixer run ----------------------------------------- 184
Set up the Windows scheduler --------------------------------------------------------------- 185
Set up the FileFixer MSBATCH command ----------------------------------------------- 187
Chapter 19 — Batch Mode ----------------------------------------------------------------- 188
What do we mean by “batch mode?”------------------------------------------------------------- 188
When you should use batch mode ----------------------------------------------------------------- 188
How to run FileFixer in batch mode -------------------------------------------------------------- 188
Using the “AT” command under Windows NT 4.0 -------------------------------------------- 190
Chapter 20 — SafetyCheck ---------------------------------------------------------------- 192
Table of Contents
Ensure your design files meet FileFixer’s standards!------------------------------------------ 192
SafetyCheck dialog box ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 192
The FileFixer Seal-of-Approval ------------------------------------------------------------------- 192
How to test SafetyCheck----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 193
What SafetyCheck is used for----------------------------------------------------------------------- 193
Disclaimer ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 194
Chapter 21 — AutoCheck ------------------------------------------------------------------ 195
What is AutoCheck? ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 195
Chapter 22 — Corruption Data ----------------------------------------------------------- 196
Everything you always wanted to know about corruption------------------------------------ 196
What FileFixer won’t do ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 198
Don’t kill the messenger----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 199
Chapter 23 — Error Messages ----------------------------------------------------------- 201
Operational errors and messages------------------------------------------------------------------- 201
Suspicious Conditions — Usually not Important----------------------------------------------- 204
Minor Errors — Usually Won’t Cause Problems ----------------------------------------------- 219
Future Problems — File is in Danger ------------------------------------------------------------- 234
Serious Errors — Problems are Very Possible -------------------------------------------------- 240
Fatal Errors — File is Probably Unusable ------------------------------------------------------- 256
Chapter 24 — The File List Editor ------------------------------------------------------- 259
The File List Editor Dialog Box ------------------------------------------------------------------- 259
The List menu ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 259
File list only (text) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 260
All data (binary) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 260
List | Import -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 260
List | Export-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 261
Navigation Section ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 261
File List Editing Section----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 262
The “Selected Files” list----------------------------------------------------------------------- 262
Extended File List Specifications ----------------------------------------------------------- 262
<OK>---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 264
<Cancel> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 264
Select files by date range ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 264
Earliest date-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 264
Latest date---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 265
Messages ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 265
“xxx” is not currently accessible.------------------------------------------------------------ 265
Chapter 25 — Troubleshooting ---------------------------------------------------------- 266
Adding a design file header (type 9) element --------------------------------------------------- 266
EdG element number does not correspond to FileFixer report ------------------------------ 266
When FileFixer fails to handle the error --------------------------------------------------------- 266
Recovery from power failure ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 266
Handling design files that behave erratically---------------------------------------------------- 267
Fixed file is smaller than original file------------------------------------------------------------- 267
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Addendum to fixing cell libraries------------------------------------------------------------------ 267
Emergency scanning --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 267
Losing fill ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 268
MDL abort in VIEWCTRL ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 268
Give Us Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Corrupted... --------------------------------------------- 268
Chapter 26 — Element Numbers and Types ----------------------------------------- 269
Table of Element Numbers and Types ------------------------------------------------------------ 269
Chapter 27 — Glossary --------------------------------------------------------------------- 273
Table of common terms------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 273
Chapter 28 — New Features and Fixes------------------------------------------------ 281
7.8i — 25 April 2003--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 281
7.8h — 6 March 2003-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 281
New Settings File Format: Plain Text ------------------------------------------------------ 281
Updated Sample Settings Files--------------------------------------------------------------- 281
Report Enhancements-------------------------------------------------------------------------- 282
Severity of Errors to be Reported ----------------------------------------------------------- 282
TriForma Enhancements ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 283
Remove all OLE files and OLE application elements----------------------------------- 283
Miscellaneous Enhancements ---------------------------------------------------------------- 283
7.8g — 9 September 2002 -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 284
7.8f — 19 July 2002---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 284
7.8e — 27 May 2002--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 284
7.8d — 19 March 2002 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 285
7.8c — 22 January 2002----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 286
7.8b — 30 July 2001 (Certified in version 7.8c) ----------------------------------------------- 287
7.8a — 17 April 2001 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 287
Chapter 1 — Introduction
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Chapter 1 — Introduct ion
The need for FileFixer
MicroStation users are fortunate. MicroStation is perhaps the most robust CAD package
ever developed. The fact that MicroStation ordinarily saves its working data to disk as it
works, spares the MicroStation user from the drawing size limitations and unreliability
well known to the users of other CAD packages.
But even the most reliable CAD package in the world sometimes needs a little help. A
hardware problem, a network glitch, an untimely power failure or an error in your
favorite programmer’s latest MDL application can easily destroy an important design file.
Far less dramatic, but no less annoying, are the minor problems that can crop up in a
design file — the element that can’t be deleted, the element that displays oddly as you
zoom in on it, elements that seem to magically disappear, the element that just can’t be
highlighted no matter how hard you try.
MicroStation/J (and earlier) comes with a utility called EdG that can be used to repair
damaged design files. The problem with using EdG for design file repair is fourfold:
1. To be used effectively EdG requires considerable skill and an intimate knowledge of
the structure of MicroStation design files.
2. Using EdG to repair a design file, even for a skilled user, can take a considerable
amount of time.
3. No matter how skilled the operator, EdG is not capable of detecting all of the things
that can be wrong with a design file.
4. EdG in semi-skilled hands can cause extraordinary damage.
FileFixer embodies Axiom’s hard-won knowledge about MicroStation file corruption.
Read on to see how you can benefit from owning and using FileFixer.
The FileFixer advantage
File corruption (both the obvious kind and the subtle kind) affects nearly every
MicroStation user. No MicroStation shop of any size can afford to ignore it. Since 1987,
MicroStation users worldwide have relied on FileFixer to repair design file and cell
library corruption automatically at the push of a button.
Today, FileFixer stands alone as a preventive solution to MicroStation file corruption.
Simply set up AutoCheck to run FileFixer automatically every time a design file is
closed, or use the Windows™ scheduler to set up FileFixer to search your directories for
corrupt files every night. Set it and forget it, and never have another corrupt file sitting in
your archives waiting for the disastrous day when you decide to open it.
Summary of features and benefits
With FileFixer you can:
•
Immediately perform emergency repair on vital project files.
•
Quickly and easily fix multiple design files and cell libraries with the click of a
button.
•
Fix “End-of-file missing” errors (more about this follows – keep reading!).
•
Fix “phantom elements” (elements that show up only in certain views or that
appear only when zooming in or only show up in plots, etc.).
•
Verify the integrity of design files and cell libraries before submitting them to a
client or a colleague.
•
Eliminate “dormant” corruption which is likely to damage your files in the
future.
•
Save time by automatically resolving problems which would be tedious, timeconsuming and error prone (or impossible) to fix with EdG.
•
Recover critical elements from back-up elements created by FileFixer or from a
compatible back-up file.
•
Automatically recover elements after an improperly placed end-of-design
marker.
•
Automatically eliminate the cause of MicroStation’s notorious “HRESULT”
error message in all of your project files.
•
Handle elements with orphan database linkages [an element which has a database
linkage that no longer exists in the database — either the table or a row in the
table has been deleted.]
The first day you use it, FileFixer can eliminate the hassles and delays lurking in enough
corrupted design files and cell libraries to pay back your entire investment.
And that’s just the beginning — read on!
Problem Element Viewer
Problem Element Viewer is an important companion for FileFixer.
FileFixer tells you which elements have problems. Problem Element Viewer shows you
what those elements look like.
Example:
Let’s say FileFixer tells you that element #259 is a line string that has too many
vertices. This element looks okay on the screen, but when you plot it, you get
“zingers”. You might be tempted to delete this element, but it might be an important
part of your design file.
Chapter 1 — Introduction
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Here’s the solution: Bring up the design file in MicroStation, run Problem Element
Viewer and enter 259. Problem Element Viewer will zoom in on element #259 so you
can see what it looks like. Now you can make an informed decision about whether to
redraw the element or just delete it.
Deleting an element without knowing what it looks like is dangerous. Problem Element
Viewer gives you the information you need to make a safe, informed decision.
Recovering elements after the end-of-design marker
The end-of-design marker is a sequence of bits which MicroStation uses to indicate the
end of all the elements in a V7 design file. In a healthy file, the last element should be
followed immediately by an end-of-design marker.
Sometimes elements in a design file will seem to disappear. Many times the missing
elements are still there in the design file, but an unwanted end-of-design marker was
somehow inserted into the middle of the file. Any elements after the end-of-design
marker are “hidden” from MicroStation, so those elements become permanently lost.
The repair of this error requires scanning past the unwanted end-of-design marker,
finding all the valid elements and then placing a new end-of-design marker at the end of
the last non-corrupt element. This method retains as many non-corrupt elements as
possible. FileFixer handles all of this automatically.
Prevent MicroStation users from causing further damage to
problem design files
The end-of-design marker (described above) can also be missing.
When earlier versions of MicroStation detected a design file with severe damage, the
following Alert dialog was normally displayed:
If the user selects “No” and then repairs the file with FileFixer, everything is okay —
FileFixer will be able to recover all or most of the damaged design file.
If, however, an inexperienced user answers “Yes”, data in the design file may become
unrecoverable by any process!
If you select “Yes”, MicroStation “fixes” this problem by inserting an end-of-design
marker before the first corrupted element it finds. If the end-of-design marker is inserted
only 10% into the file, you will lose 90% of your work!
There is no longer any reason to worry about this. The above dialog box is now
automatically replaced by the following when you install FileFixer:
When you or a co-worker attempt to open a file with this type of corruption, only one
option will be offered: repair the damaged file with FileFixer.
Later versions of MicroStation do not offer the “attempt repair” option, but the problem
remains — MicroStation cannot open the file. Use FileFixer to fix files which
MicroStation cannot open.
Automatic element range adjustment
The range of an element is given by the lower-left and upper-right coordinates of the
smallest box that will contain the element. Element range errors can cause elements not
to display or be selectable. Elements with this type of error may be accidentally left out
of plots and fence manipulation commands. Some programs handle text and text node
ranges in a way that causes range errors. For example, with most fonts a “W” character
takes up more space than an “i”. FileFixer uses this information to set the range of your
text elements as precisely as possible. By opening and analyzing the user’s font library,
FileFixer determines the size and spacing of each individual character in text elements
and uses this information to correct the element ranges.
Chapter 1 — Introduction
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Replacing the Design File Header Elements
The design file header (type 9) element is the first element in a MicroStation design file.
It stores a variety of vital information, such as the largest graphic group number in the
file and the highest text node number in the file.
Unfortunately, most MicroStation users at one time or another have encountered a
“weird” design file. A “weird” design file can be described as one whose elements get
rotated, mirrored or disappear altogether when a user zooms in. Other weird files have
regular line segments turn into infinite length lines. Still others have views that display
nothing, no matter what is done. Such oddities (and a variety of other problems) are
typically caused by an error in the type 9 element of the design file.
In the past, some of the more experienced MicroStation users have realized this and have
attempted to “transplant” a design file header from a healthy design file into an ailing
design file. If not done properly, this can have disastrous consequences. The real danger
is that such a remedy will appear to have worked. Unfortunately, this may have
introduced a new and much more serious problem that won’t show up until weeks or
months later.
For example, let’s say that the “donor” design file has fewer graphic groups than the
“recipient” design file. If the graphic group number counter (GRAFIC) in the
transplanted file is not properly updated, the recipient design file may appear to be
perfectly cured. But the next time you try to create a new graphic group, instead of
creating a new group you will just be adding elements to a graphic group that already
exists. Usually, you won’t know this is happening.
These are called “cross-linked graphic groups”. This means two or more graphic groups
share the same graphic group number. The two (ill-fated) graphic groups will be
manipulated simultaneously whenever the graphic group lock is on. Since they may be
widely separated in the design file, it is easy to unintentionally delete or alter one group,
off screen, while only meaning to manipulate the elements in the group which are visible
on screen.
When FileFixer “transplants” a design file header, it always scans the recipient design
file looking for the highest graphic group number and the highest text node number. This
information is then transferred to the “transplanted” design file header, allowing it to
operate in harmony with its new host.
Replacing the Cell Library Header
With FileFixer (version 6.4b or later) you have the ability to replace the cell library
header. Previously if the cell library header got corrupted you would have to copy the
cells from the corrupted cell library to a new cell library, otherwise, you couldn’t use it.
System administrator control over Search and Repair options
It is possible to allow only the System Administrator to change users’ FileFixer settings.
For instructions on how to do this, please contact Axiom Technical Support.
Chapter 2 — Installation
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Chapter 2 — Installatio n
Preparing for installation
Installation of Axiom products is quick and easy.
Your computer must have MicroStation up and running. Be sure that the MicroStation
version that you are using is the only MicroStation that is running.
You should have received a license file for the product(s) you are about to install and
know the location of that file. Usually this will be on a floppy disk or a file that you
received by email and saved to a temporary location on your drive.
Installation from CD
1. Insert the CD into your drive.
2. In MicroStation, enter the following:
MDL LOAD X:\USTN\V?\INSTALL
Note: In these instructions, replace the “X” with your CD drive letter. The question
mark in “V?” must be replaced with “8” for installing MicroStation V8 products, and
“7” for installing all other MicroStation products (MicroStation 95, SE and J).
3. When you see the “Licenses” dialog, enter the location of your Axiom license file.
For example: A:\AXIOM.LIC (If you are not sure where it is, use the <Browse>
button to find it. If you are installing a demo version, click <Ignore>.)
4. You will see a dialog box containing the available products to install. The products
that match your license file will already be highlighted. You can install all of these by
clicking the <OK> button, or you can make some other selection with Ctrl + click.
Note: You can install all of the products listed. For the ones not licensed, you can
obtain a demonstration license from your Axiom MicroStation Consultant.
Tip: A readme.txt file on the CD contains the answers to frequently asked questions
about installation.
Network installation from the server
If you want to install Axiom products on a network, you can copy the CD onto a server
drive and let each user install from the server. Use the instructions for installing from CD,
but use the path to the directory on the server rather than your CD drive.
Environment variable
A MicroStation environment variable, MS_NOEOF_MSGFILE will be installed
automatically. When MicroStation encounters a corrupt design file a message will be
displayed:
MicroStation cannot open this damaged file. The file must be repaired with FileFixer.
Open a healthy file, then repair the damaged file with FileFixer.
Chapter 3 — Uninstalling
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Chapter 3 — Uninstalli ng
Why you might uninstall an Axiom product
There are a few reasons you may want to uninstall an Axiom product:
1. You have run a demo and want to remove it from your computer.
2. You have moved the product to another computer and need to remove the product
from the original computer.
3. You have a site or corporate license and want your users to have access to only some
of the many Axiom products that you have already installed on their computers.
There may be other reasons.
How to do it
There are three basic stages to uninstalling an Axiom product:
1. Stopping MicroStation from trying to automatically run the Axiom product.
2. Removing the Axiom product from MicroStation’s Axiom menu or entirely
removing the Axiom menu from MicroStation’s menu bar.
3. Removing the Axiom files from your hard disk.
Stop MicroStation from running an Axiom product
Some Axiom products such as Version Manager and Microsoft Office Importer may be
set up to run automatically whenever MicroStation is started.
You can stop this from happening by going into MicroStation | Workspace |
Configuration and looking for the variable MS_DGNAPPS. Edit the value of this
variable and remove any references to the Axiom product that you no longer want to run
automatically, when running MicroStation. Exit MicroStation and re-start, then check
that the MS_DGNAPPS variable is clear of the Axiom product you no longer want to
start when MicroStation is started.
Identifying your Axiom Base Directory
You will need to locate your Axiom Base Directory.
Open the MicroStation | Workspace | Configuration dialog box and look for the “AXI”
configuration variable. The Expansion field of the AXI variable points to your Axiom
Base Directory. It is usually something like “c:\program files\axiom\V7\axiom\” or
“c:\program files\axiom\V8\axiom\”.
Removing products from the Axiom menu
This is an optional step. If you want to skip this step, go on to the “Removing the Axiom
menu” section.
This step is included here because some customers wanted to be able to “customize” their
Axiom menu to exclude some programs from some of their computers. The Axiom menu
is found on the MicroStation menu bar and looks like this:
To remove a product from the Axiom menu, edit the file “aximenu.txt” (found in the
Axiom Base Directory) and remove the number sign (“#”) from the beginning of the line
that refers to the product you want to remove from the Axiom menu.
A small sample from the “aximenu.txt” file looks like this:
#~CellManager
cellmgr
#D~GnCompare
Compare
#~Duplicate Element Remover
remover
and a sample of the same file now modified to show only CellManager is:
#~CellManager
cellmgr
D~GnCompare
Compare
~Duplicate Element Remover
remover
If you have multiple Axiom products and you only want one product to be removed, you
don’t have to remove this product’s name from the Axiom menu. Just remove the
program’s files from your disk (see section titled “Removing files from your hard-disk”)
Chapter 3 — Uninstalling
Page 19
leaving the entry on the Axiom menu. When you select the program from the Axiom
menu, you will get a text-style dialog box, which will describe the product. You will not
get any errors or failures.
Removing the Axiom menu
If you intend to remove all Axiom products from your computer, you would want to do
this step.
The “Axiom menu” is actually a program that is run whenever MicroStation is started up.
You can stop this menu from appearing in MicroStation by going into MicroStation |
Workspace | Configuration and looking for the variable MS_DGNAPPS. Edit the value
of this variable and remove the entry “aximenu.ma”. When you have done this, next time
you start MicroStation the menu bar will look like this:
Notice that the word “Axiom” no longer appears to the right of “Help”.
Removing files from your hard-disk
If you are removing an Axiom product, you’ll probably want to delete that product’s files
from your hard-disk drive.
Go to your Axiom Base Directory by using Windows Explorer or File Manager or DOS
or something similar. Each Axiom product is in its own directory under the Axiom Base
Directory.
For example, CellManager is in the “cellmgr” subdirectory, and Cell Randomizer is in
the “cellrand” subdirectory. To delete the files of an individual Axiom product, just
delete its specific subdirectory. To delete all the files of all Axiom products, delete the
entire Axiom Base Directory and all of its product subdirectories.
If you have other Axiom products but are removing one product, you don’t need to
remove this product’s name from the Axiom menu. If you remove that program’s
directory of files from your disk but leave the entry on the Axiom menu, and a user
selects that program from the Axiom menu, they will get a text-style dialog box which
will describe the product. You will not get any errors or failures.
Axiom.cfg file and axiom_user.ucf file
If you are removing all Axiom products from your computer, you should also delete the
file “axiom.cfg” from MicroStation’s ...\config\appl\ directory. This step will also delete
the MicroStation AXI configuration variable.
Check for the existence of an axiom_user.ucf file in the same directory and delete this file
also if it exists.
End-of-file missing message
When uninstalling FileFixer, you will want to remove the MicroStation environment
variable, MS_NOEOF_MSGFILE. To do this delete the following line from your
axiom.cfg file:
#------ Axiom installed variable
MS_NOEOF_MSGFILE > $(AXI)noeofmsg.txt
------#
Chapter 4 — Quick Start
Page 21
Chapter 4 — Quick Sta rt
QuickStart Objectives
The purpose of this QuickStart is to introduce you to the basic features of FileFixer so
that you can immediately use the program.
This QuickStart should take less than 30 minutes.
Prerequisites
1. MicroStation SE or J.
2. FileFixer must be installed on your computer. You can verify this by selecting the
Axiom menu from MicroStation’s main menu bar, then select FileFixer. If FileFixer
does not appear in the Axiom menu, follow the instructions in the Installation
chapter of this User Guide.
3. You will need some non-production design files to practice with. The sample files
which are delivered with FileFixer are suitable:
...\Axiom\V7\Fixer\sample\*.dgn
Alternatively, you can use the sample files delivered with MicroStation:
...\Workspace\Projects\Examples\General\dgn\*.dgn
Note: You must have “write” permission so that you can modify your practice files.
Demonstration Version
When processing files, which are greater than 100KB with a demonstration version of
FileFixer only about half of the problems found will be reported.
Licensed versions of FileFixer do not have these restrictions.
QuickStart Step 1 — The Basics
When should I use FileFixer?
FileFixer is most commonly used to:
•
Automatically repair problem files.
•
Search for problems as preventative maintenance (to avoid future problems) or to
confirm files are “healthy” and problem-free.
FileFixer has two modes of operation to accommodate these common uses:
When you select Automatic Design File Repair mode, FileFixer searches for problems
and automatically fixes them.
When you select Search for Problems mode, FileFixer searches for problems and
reports what is found.
This QuickStart will introduce you to these common uses of FileFixer.
Factory Defaults
FileFixer has many options which you can change to fine-tune the way it processes your
files. Factory Defaults will work in most cases, so we won’t cover FileFixer’s options in
detail in this QuickStart.
However, just in case someone experimented with FileFixer’s options before you began
this QuickStart, let’s reset FileFixer to Factory Defaults.
Here’s your first assignment:
1. Select FileFixer’s Options menu, then select Load Factory Defaults…
A confirmation dialog box will display:
2. Click <OK>. This restores the Factory Defaults.
3. Select FileFixer’s File menu and then select Save Settings.
Chapter 4 — Quick Start
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Selecting this saves the Factory Defaults to fixer.ini.
Note: FileFixer saves your search and repair options in .ini files. They are in ASCII
format and can be modified with a text editor.
4. Close (unload) FileFixer to prepare for the next QuickStart step.
The remainder of this QuickStart requires Factory Defaults.
As you learn more about FileFixer, you can tweak its various options and save them
using the File menu as illustrated above.
QuickStart Step 2 — Automatic Design File Repair
Use FileFixer’s Automatic Design File Repair feature whenever you experience odd
problems with your design file or cell library.
Let’s walk through the steps:
1. Use MicroStation’s File menu to open any non-production design file or cell library.
For the purposes of this QuickStart, you can practice with any non-production design
file or cell library. For example, you can select one of the sample files that were
delivered with FileFixer:
...\Axiom\Fixer\v7\sample\*.dgn
or one of the sample files delivered with MicroStation:
...\Workspace\Projects\Examples\General\dgn\*.dgn
Even if FileFixer does not find any problems in the selected file, the following steps
will nevertheless introduce you to the procedure for Automatic Design File Repair.
Note: Some of the sample files delivered with FileFixer are so corrupt that
MicroStation cannot open them. If you happen to choose a file which MicroStation
cannot open, just select another one to use for this step of the Quick Start.
2. Select FileFixer from the Axiom menu.
3. The active design file appears in the “Which Files?” field by default. For example:
4. Press the <Start> button:
It’s that simple. But what just happened?
The file you selected was not modified — FileFixer created a copy. For example, if you
selected BikeFrame.dgn, FileFixer created a copy named BikeFrame.fix.
FileFixer analyzed the copy and automatically repaired problems found.
FileFixer created a detailed report of its findings and repair actions (more about reports in
the next QuickStart section).
You can open the repaired .fix file with MicroStation and get to back work! Use
MicroStation’s File | SaveAs to rename the .fix copy (replacing the original file).
Chapter 4 — Quick Start
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Congratulations — you have used FileFixer to perform automatic design file repair!
QuickStart Step 3 — FileFixer’s Report
FileFixer’s Automatic Design File Repair feature automatically repairs your files most of
the time, so you won’t always need to examine the report.
However, if a design file continues to misbehave after using Automatic Design File
Repair, the report will provide clues for fine-tuning FileFixer’s options so that
Automatic Design File Repair eradicates the problems.
Let’s highlight the primary “landmarks” in a FileFixer report file.
1. Display the report created in the previous QuickStart step by pressing the
<Display/Print Report> button:
2. Find the Report Summary near the top of your report file. The Report Summary will
look something like the following:
REPORT SUMMARY
2 -- Text element doesn't contain any visible characters. [146].
1 -- Element range doesn't match the min-max of its vertices.
[305].
4 -- A component is a different graphic group than its header.
[341].
The number on the left indicates how many of each kind of error were
found. Errors may be reported for an element more than once (in
different repair steps).
Note: Depending on the sample files you selected, your Report Summary might just
contain “No errors found”. The remainder of this QuickStart assumes at least one
problem is found in the selected practice file.
The left-most number in the Report Summary represents how many times the error
was found. In this example, there are 2 instances of text elements which contain no
visible characters.
The remainder of each line consists of a description of the error and the FileFixer
error code (in square brackets).
The higher the error code, the more severe the error (error 702 is more severe than
144).
Note: If your file continues to misbehave after Automatic Design File Repair, it is an
effective strategy to look more closely at the highest errors first.
3. Identify the highest error code in your Report Summary. If your Report Summary
indicates “No errors found.”, use the Report Summary example above to complete
this QuickStart.
4. Use FileFixer’s on-line help to find the Help passage, which describes that error
code. Select Help | Contents…:
For the purposes of this QuickStart, just locate the relevant help passage by typing in
the error number (as indicated below), then click on the displayed line to view the
details.
That’s a brief introduction to FileFixer report files and FileFixer’s on-line help so
you’re prepared to use them when the time comes to repair a file for real.
QuickStart Step 4 — What to do when MicroStation cannot
open a severely damaged file
FileFixer can fix severely corrupted design files that MicroStation cannot open. This
QuickStart step demonstrates how to handle a severely corrupted file.
We will start by attempting to open a severely corrupted sample file which is delivered
with FileFixer.
1. Close the currently open design file.
2. From the MicroStation Manager dialog, select the sample file OpenFails.dgn.
This file is delivered with FileFixer — default installation copies it to:
C:\Program Files\Axiom\V7\fixer\sample\OpenFails.dgn
3. Attempt to open OpenFails.dgn. The following dialog box should display:
Chapter 4 — Quick Start
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MicroStation is not able to open this file. Fortunately, you’ve got FileFixer!
4. Click <OK>. The MicroStation Manager dialog should reappear.
5. Next we need to open a file which is not severely corrupted. For your convenience,
the healthy file OpenOK.dgn. is delivered in the same directory which contains
OpenFails.dgn. Select and open OpenOK.dgn.
Note: You can open any healthy file, or you can create a new file from seed.
6. Select FileFixer from the Axiom menu.
7. Select OpenFails.dgn as the file to process.
8. Select Automatic Design File Repair mode.
9. Press <Start>.
FileFixer will automatically save a repaired version of the file with the name
OpenFails.fix in the same directory containing OpenFails.dgn.
10. Now, close the currently open file and select OpenFails.fix from MicroStation
Manager. Open OpenFails.fix.
Congratulations! You have just repaired a file which was so severely corrupted,
MicroStation could not open it.
Note: If your view’s background color is white, you will need to uncheck
MicroStation’s Workspace|Preferences|View Windows|Black Background->White option
to see the results.
QuickStart Step 5 — Searching for Problems
Use FileFixer’s Search for Problems mode to detect hidden problems before they impact
your projects or to confirm your files are “healthy” and problem-free.
Advantages of Search for Problems mode:
•
Search for Problems is faster than Automatic Design File Repair processing. Many
FileFixer owners run Search for Problems overnight to search hundreds or thousands
of files for the most severe problems. Then they use Automatic Design File Repair to
fix just the most severely corrupted files. Very efficient.
•
Search for Problems report does not require much hard drive space. In contrast,
Automatic Design File Repair creates a copy of every file processed (by default).
Search for Problems mode is also commonly used to verify file integrity before:
•
submitting files to a client
•
accepting files from a sub-contractor
•
archiving a project.
Let’s get started.
1. Change FileFixer’s mode to “Search for Problems”:
2. In the “Which Files” field, enter the name of any design file that you want to analyze.
You can also specify a wildcard, as in the following example
Chapter 4 — Quick Start
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The <Select> button offers a flexible way to select multiple files for processing. We
are not going to delve into <Select> in this QuickStart — for more information, see
the File List Editor chapter.
3. To search for problems, press the <Start> button:
4. When processing is complete, click the <Display/Print Report> button:
5. By default, FileFixer adds a seal-of-approval to files processed in Search for
Problems mode:
File: c:\project\perfect.dgn
*** -- Seal-of-approval was found:
License: Site License.
Version: FileFixer 7.8h
Date:
Time:
30 November 2002
7:24:44 pm
0 errors found. This file meets all FileFixer standards.
*** -- End of seal-of-approval information.
FileFixer, with the settings you've chosen, found no anomalies in this file.
The seal-of-approval records any problems found, if any, or none as in the above
example.
If FileFixer reports errors, you know what to do — just follow the steps you learned
earlier in QuickStart Step 2.
That’s all it takes to search for problems in any design file!
Follow the above procedure:
•
Prior to submitting files to a client.
•
Before accepting files from a contractor or sub-contractor.
•
Periodically to perform preventive maintenance.
•
Before archiving a project.
•
Whenever a design file or cell library misbehaves.
QuickStart Step 6 — What’s Next?
Go ahead and try using FileFixer on your files. Remember, by default, FileFixer always
backs up your original file, so you can experiment freely.
As you need to know more, use FileFixer’s help to learn more about the error messages
reported.
Problem Element Viewer
FileFixer’s companion application, Problem Element Viewer, allows you to view the
problem elements reported by FileFixer.
Problem Element Viewer also allows you to examine your files, element by element.
Don’t hesitate to contact us if you have a question or need additional help.
Chapter 5 — Running FileFixer
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Chapter 5 — Running FileFixer
Getting started with FileFixer
Once FileFixer has been installed as described above, then select FileFixer from the
Axiom pulldown menu on the MicroStation menu bar.
FileFixer is so easy to use you’ll probably be able to diagnose and repair design files
without even reading the rest of this documentation. You will, however, find that
FileFixer is more valuable to you if you have a greater understanding of the features it
offers. When you get a chance, please take the time to read this documentation
thoroughly.
The main dialog box
This is FileFixer’s main dialog box. You will see more options depending on your
selection from the “Mode:’ drop down menu. The image above shows FileFixer in
Automatic Design File Repair Mode.
The File menu
Settings file
By default, FileFixer saves its active settings to fixer.ini (located in the directory
containing fixer.ma).
You can change and save FileFixer’s default search and repair options at any time using
FileFixer’s File menu.
The currently active settings file name is displayed at the top of the File menu.
Load Settings
By default, FileFixer saves its active settings to fixer.ini (located in the directory
containing fixer.ma). You can load other settings files by selecting Load Settings.
Save Settings
Use “Save Settings” to save the current search and repair options to the active settings
file. The active settings file is displayed on the file menu. For example:
Settings file: C:\Program Files\Axiom\V7\Fixer\Fixer.ini
Change the active settings file name using Save Settings As…
Save Settings As…
Use “Save Settings As…” to save the current search and repair options to a filename of
your choice. The file name you select becomes the active settings file and will be
remembered the next time FileFixer starts.
Chapter 5 — Running FileFixer
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Sample Settings Files
FileFixer’s Factory Default search and repair options are appropriate for most situations,
but there are times when some of FileFixer’s special options are required. But where do
you start?
To help you get started, three sample settings files are shipped with FileFixer:
•
Danger.ini — reports future danger (500 level) errors and worse. Lower priority
error messages are suppressed.
•
Diagnose.ini — most search options are turned on and all of FileFixer’s
default repair options are activated.
•
Fixable.ini — reports those errors that FileFixer can fix automatically.
These settings file samples are a good place to start for both experienced and new
FileFixer users — just use Load Settings… to load the settings file name which most
closely matches your need.
System Manager Overrides
You can override fixer.ini using the FIXER_INI configuration variable.
You can assign FIXER_INI the name of an alternate directory which contains fixer.ini.
For example, if you define:
FIXER_INI = N:\MyProject\
FileFixer will use the settings in N:\MyProject\fixer.ini (if it exists).
Or, you can assign FIXER_INI the full path to an alternate settings file name. For
example, if you define:
FIXER_INI = N:\MyProject\MySettings.ini
FileFixer will use the settings in N:\MyProject\MySettings.ini.
Note: When FIXER_INI is defined the Load, Save and Save Settings As menu options
are disabled. This allows a System Manager to define one FileFixer settings file to be
used project-wide.
Upgrades
Search and repair settings are now saved in FileFixer “settings” files in ASCII format.
The default settings file, fixer.ini, is created the first time you run FileFixer and
saved (by default) in the same directory as fixer.ma.
The Options menu
In most cases, you can successfully repair design files and cell libraries using FileFixer’s
default settings. For those cases that require a bit of extra tweaking, the “Options” Menu
allows you to access several high-powered functions.
Help | Contents
The “Help | Contents” option opens the FileFixer User’s Guide.
Help | About…
The “Help | About” option displays the FileFixer product, company, and license
information.
Mode
Chapter 5 — Running FileFixer
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Use the “Mode” menu to select FileFixer’s current mode of operation. The default and
most common mode is “Automatic Design File Repair”.
Which Files?
Which files do you want FileFixer to process? You can type in a file name as in the
image above.
You can use the <Edit List…> button to select one or more files or a list of files to
process. For detailed information on the File List Editor dialog box that will appear, see
the section of this guide called “The File List Editor”.
To select a single design file, just enter that file’s name. You can also select groups of
files using wildcards. If you add /S after a filename wildcard, the subdirectories under the
specified directory will also be searched for matching filenames. For example D:\*.DGN
/S would analyze every design file on disk D:. You can also enter an “at” sign (“@”)
followed by the name of a file that contains a list of design file names, one file name per
line.
@C:\AXIOM\LISTFILE.LIS
If you entered the above in the “Which files?” field on the FileFixer dialog box, all the
file names specified in the C:\AXIOM\LISTFILE.LIS file would be processed.
Report File
Tell FileFixer where to save its report about the file or files processed.
The “Report File:” <Select…> button opens a dialog box that allows you to select a
report file directory and name.
Tip: The “Options | Report File Options” dialog box gives you many selections for
changing the default format and content of the report file.
<Start>
Press the <Start> button when you have selected all of your options and are ready to have
FileFixer process your file(s).
<Display/Print Report>
Press the <Display/Print Report> button to display FileFixer’s report file.
The report file can be a simple ASCII file or an HTML file. If the report file was built as
an HTML file then the file is displayed in your default web browser. If the report file was
built as an ASCII file then it will be displayed with Notepad. Notepad is the default
viewer for displaying an ASCII file, but it can be changed to any viewer you want.
The “Options | Search… | Report File | Create report file in HTML format, instead of
ASCII format” search option controls how the report file is built.
Note: When you are creating more than one report file, the <Display/Print Report> button
displays the index file containing summaries from all reports.
Chapter 6 — Enhanced Recovery Options
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Chapter 6 — Enhanced Recovery Options
Enhanced Recovery Options dialog box
What should we save in the back-up elements
Words-to-follow (WTF) and critical elements can be stored in a back-up element. Refer
to the Enhanced Recovery section in this guide for an understanding of FileFixer’s backup elements.
By pressing the <Select Critical Elements> button the following dialog box will be
displayed:
On the “Back-up Critical Elements” dialog box, you can specify which critical elements
you want FileFixer to back-up.
Other critical elements
Use this field to enter any additional element types that you want to store as backup. (e.g.
3,5,9-13)
Build back-up elements based on the above two options in “Automatic
Design File Repair” mode.
Back-up elements are created in “Immunize” mode by default. By using this option you
can have FileFixer also create the back-up elements in “Automatic Design File Repair”
mode.
Chapter 7 — General FileFixer Options
Page 39
Chapter 7 — General F ileFixer Options
General FileFixer Options dialog box
Intermediate files directory
FileFixer creates a number of intermediate files while it is repairing a design file or cell
library. FileFixer uses the directory where the design files or cell libraries are located as
the default. However, this doesn’t work very well if the files are, for example, located on
a CD-R disc. In the “Intermediate files directory:” field, you can specify a different
directory for these temporary files.
Initialize “Which Files” field on startup with…
You use these options to specify how the “Which Files” field is filled whenever FileFixer
is started. Use the “Currently loaded design file” option when you want FileFixer to be
initialized with the design file currently loaded in MicroStation. Use the “File name that
was in the field when last terminated” option when you want FileFixer to initialize the
“Which Files” field to what it was when you last quit FileFixer.
Note: When you are using a demonstration license, FileFixer always initializes the
“Which files” field to the axiom/fixer/sample directory *.dgn and *.cel files.
Chapter 8 — Factory D efaults
Options | Load Factory Defaults…
Select “Load Factory Defaults” to reset all of FileFixer’s options back to “factory
default” values. These are the options that your FileFixer came with when you first
installed it. This is useful if you have been changing several options and want to start
fresh.
Chapter 9 — MicroStation Application Options
Page 41
Chapter 9 — MicroStat ion Application
Options
MicroStation Application Options dialog box
Special options exist for handling files containing Modeler or TriForma linkages.
Modeler options
Handling Modeler’s .brp files
Modeler has a problem when the linkage information in a design file is looking at bad
locations in the .brp file. If the .brp file is missing, then Modeler will rebuild it.
This option allows you to delete the Modeler’s .brp files. There isn’t much difference
between the first two options “Always delete Modeler .brp files” and “Delete Modeler
.brp files if it seems necessary”. If the “always delete” option is set then FileFixer will
always try to delete the .brp file. If the “seems necessary” option is set then FileFixer will
try to delete the .brp file only if the design file contains modeler linkages and the .brp file
exists.
Override FileFixer’s “Options | Repair… | Linkage” maximum words in
linkage area repair options with:
The “Override…” option has no effect unless the design file being processed contains
Modeler linkages.
Modeler has a tendency to create elements with very large linkage data.
In the “Options | Repair... | Linkage” dialog box there are some settings for maximum
linkage size. (See image below.)
These Modeler options allow FileFixer to automatically override these Linkage settings
when processing Modeler files.
Chapter 9 — MicroStation Application Options
Page 43
TriForma options
Do not check for locked elements
This option has no effect unless the design file being processed contains TriForma
linkages.
TriForma normally locks its elements so that no other MDL application can modify them.
Normally in a design file there are zero or very few locked elements, so FileFixer checks
and reports any locked elements it finds. This option overrides FileFixer’s search option
“Options | Search... | Element | Element is locked” setting, so locked elements are not
reported.
Do not check for a cell nested within itself when the cell name is blank
TriForma can create a lot of cells nested within itself when the cell name is blank. For
TriForma design files this isn’t a corruption.
Chapter 10 — Repair Op tions
Categories of repair options
The “Repair Options” categories allow you to tailor adjustments to your files. Each
category has its own specific options that you will see on the right side of the dialog box
as you move through the category list.
The recommended method to repair files is to run FileFixer on the files using the factory
default options. In most cases the factory default options will handle any problem with
the files.
As you look at the report file generated by FileFixer, you will see that each error noted
has an identifying error number. You can use this number to find out more information
about the error in the “Error Messages” section of this guide. There you will find a
description of the problem, its cause and its solution.
In most cases, the problem is fixed automatically and so noted in the report. In other
cases of “suspicious” elements, this guide suggests some optional handling including
setting some of the repair options to their non default values and rerunning FileFixer on
the original or the fixed file.
Chapter 10 — Repair Options
Page 45
Repair option factory defaults
While much care goes into making FileFixer’s default settings “everything to everyone,”
we recognize that it is sometimes necessary to change a default setting in order to resolve
a specific problem. We simply recommend that you understand an option before you
change its default setting and remember that it was set that way for a reason. If you have
any questions whatsoever, you can contact Axiom’s Technical Support at
support@axiomint.com. They will be glad to help you make an informed decision on
those uncommon occasions where you need to change a FileFixer setting from its default
state.
Arc/Ellipse
Fix or delete arc/ellipse whose origin is off the design plane
FileFixer can only fix an arc or ellipse if that element is on one of the three planes X, Y,
or Z and the origin is bad for that plane. For example; X high = 100, X low = 100, and X
origin > 2,147,483,647. When FileFixer can’t fix the origin then it deletes the arc or
ellipse.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Arc/Ellipse | Arc or
ellipse origin is off the design plane”.
The error number reported is 118.
B-spline
Delete b-splines with illegal component counts
FileFixer will delete a b-spline complex chain if it has one of the following errors:
•
A b-spline curve (type 27 header) has more than one b-spline knot element (type 26).
•
A b-spline curve (type 27 header) has more than one weight factor element (type 28).
•
A b-spline curve (type 27 header) does not have exactly one pole element (type 21).
•
A b-spline surface (type 24 header) has no pole elements type 21).
•
A b-spline surface (type 24 header) has neither zero weight factor elements nor the same
number of weight factor elements (type 28) as pole elements (type 21).
•
A b-spline surface (type 24 header) has more than one b-spline knot element (type 26).
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | B-spline | B-spline has
illegal number of one type of component”.
The error number reported is 731.
Open the closed b-spline that has duplicate b-spline poles
A b-spline pole element (type 21) normally doesn’t have duplicated first and/or last poles,
and its first and last poles normally don’t match. Only under MicroStation SE does this
Chapter 10 — Repair Options
Page 47
become a problem when the b-spline pole element is part of a closed b-spline. It causes
an MDL abort. The solution is to change the closed b-spline to an open b-spline.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Vertices | Duplicate bspline poles detected in a closed b-spline”.
The error number reported is 905.
Cell
Adjust non-shared cell level mask or class map
This option corrects the list of occupied levels in the cell header element (type 1 or type
2) so that it includes all the levels in the component elements. It also corrects the list of
classes (which is stored in the cell header element) used by elements in the cell so that it
includes all the actual classes used by elements in the cell.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Cell | Non-shared cell
level or class map is incorrect”.
The error number that is reported when the cell levels mask needs adjusting is 716.
The error number that is reported when the class map needs adjusting is 717.
Automatic cell level mask repair
Every cell has, as part of its definition, a list of the levels on which the cell has elements.
This list is called the “cell level mask”. If this list gets out of sync with the actual
elements in the cell, serious problems can result. For example, if the cell level mask
shows elements on levels 6 and 9, but the cell actually has elements on levels 6 and 15,
the elements on level 15 might not display, or they might not plot, or they might not be
selectable. FileFixer can scan design files and cell libraries for cells with this problem
and automatically regenerate the cell level mask for those cells that need it.
Adjust shared cell level mask or class map
Corrects the level mask of an absolute shared cell (type 35) so that it matches the level
mask of its definition element (type 36).
Corrects the class mask of an absolute shared cell (type 35) so that it matches the class
mask of its definition element (type 36).
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Cell | Shared cell level or
class mask is incorrect”.
The error number that is reported when the shared cell levels mask needs adjusting is
769.
The error number that is reported when the shared cell class map needs adjusting is 770.
Create dummy shared cell definition for missing definitions
When a shared cell instance is found with no corresponding shared cell definition, then
use this repair option to create a dummy shared cell definition. The only component
element that is created as part of the dummy shared cell is a text element with the name
of the shared cell definition as the text string.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Cell | Shared cell instance
has no shared cell definition”.
The error number reported is 768.
Correct null cell names (type 2s only) by setting the H-bit
FileFixer will make an orphan cell out of a cell with a null cell name when it is found in a
cell library. Setting the H-bit makes it an orphan cell.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Cell | Null name in cell
library”.
The error number reported is 570.
Delete cell nested within itself
Use this option to delete any cell nested within itself. All duplicate nested cells will be
deleted.
Chapter 10 — Repair Options
Page 49
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Cell | Cell is nested
within itself”.
The error number that is reported when the nested cell is in a design file is 383.
The error number that is reported when the nested cell is in a cell library is 783.
Delete duplicate shared cell or library cell definitions
FileFixer deletes the duplicate shared cells in a design file. FileFixer deletes the duplicate
library cell definitions in a cell library. Only first occurrence of the duplicate shared cell
or library cell definition is left in the file.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Cell | Duplicate shared
cell or library cell definition”.
The error number reported is 766.
Delete shared cell definition with no shared cell instances
Delete the shared cell definition that has no shared cell instance. This happens quite often
when converting AutoCAD drawing files to MicroStation.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Cell | Shared cell
definition with no shared cell instance”.
The error number reported is 303.
Move non-shared cell headers back to level 0
Corrects the level of a non-shared cell by setting it to 0 (zero). All non-shared cells must
be on level 0 (zero).
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Cell | Non-shared cell
header is not on level 0”.
The error number reported is 741.
Move shared cell instance to definition level
Change the level of a shared cell instance to match the level of the shared cell definition.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Cell | Shared instance
level doesn’t match definition”.
The error number reported is 171.
Remove stray elements from between library cells (type 1s)
A cell library should consist of only a cell library header and library cells. There should
not be any elements between library (type 1) cells, before the first library cell or after the
last library cell. FileFixer will delete these stray elements.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Cell | Stray elements
between library cells (type 1s) in cell library”.
The error number reported is 355.
Set H-bit (orphan flag) in orphan cell
Set the orphan (H-bit) property flag in a cell (type 2) that is nested within a library cell
(type 1) when the cell contains its own elements.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Cell | H-bit (orphan flag)
not set in orphan cell”.
The error number reported is 572.
Complex
Add missing line string to bridge gap in complex chain
When creating a complex chain from several line strings that are not connected
MicroStation will not create a line string component element for connecting the line
strings. MicroStation will automatically display a line string between the original line
strings, but no element was actually created. Use this repair option to create the missing
line strings.
Chapter 10 — Repair Options
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The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Complex | Line string is
missing from complex chain”.
The error number reported is 555.
Correct complex bit errors
FileFixer clears the complex bit for an element that is not a component of a complex
element but does have the complex bit set. The error number reported for this error is
702.
FileFixer sets the complex bit for an element that is a component of a complex element
but does not have its complex bit set. The error number reported for this error is 703.
The search options that detect these errors are “Options | Search... | Complex | Complex
bit is on for a non-component element” and “Options | Search... | Complex | Complex bit
is off for a component element”.
Correct number-of-component problems
Some complex header elements, such as type 7s and type 12s, specify the number of
component elements that are embedded within them. For dependability reasons many
programs have been modified so as not to rely on this information. Nonetheless, an
accurate number-of-components word is part of the definition of an “ANSI standard”
design file, so errors in this word are flagged. Use this repair option to correctly set the
number-of-components.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Complex | Incorrect
number-of-components in complex header”.
The error number reported is 322.
Delete complex elements with no components
The main purpose of a complex header element is to group together other types of
elements. The complex header element whose EdG element number is listed in
parentheses has no component elements and therefore serves no purpose. (There are
situations where a complex header element has meaning even when it has no
components. FileFixer knows about these situations and does not report them as an
error.) Use this repair option to delete the complex headers that have no component
elements.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Complex | Zero
components in complex element”.
The error number reported is 328.
Move components to same level as complex header
Use this repair option to move the component element to the same level as the complex
header.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Complex | Component on
different level than its header”.
The error number reported is 336.
Set graphic group of component to match its header
FileFixer changes the graphic group number of the component element to match the
header.
This error is not reported on component elements that are part of cells (type 1 or type 2),
shared cell definitions (type 34) and raster headers (type 87 or type 90).
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Complex | Component
graphic group doesn’t match header”.
The error number reported is 341.
Set symbology of components to match its header
Set the component element’s color, line style and/or weight to match the color, line style
and weight of its complex header.
These errors are not reported on component elements that are part of cells (type 1 or type
2), shared cell definitions (type 34) and raster headers (type 87 or type 90).
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Complex | Component
symbology doesn’t match header”.
Error number 337 is reported when the colors don’t match.
Error number 338 is reported when the weights don’t match.
Error number 339 is reported when the line styles don’t match.
Handle illegal components in complex element
You have the option in FileFixer to either drop status on a complex header or squeeze out
the illegal component element in a complex header.
The repair option for a nested shared cell definition (type 34) in a shared cell definition is
to “Don’t do anything”, “Delete the nested definition if neither it nor its parent is being
used”, “Delete the nested definition if it isn’t being used” or “Always delete the nested
cell”. You won’t want to automatically delete the nested shared cell if it is being
referenced by a shared cell instance (type 35) or is being used as a pattern. In this case
you would want to convert the outer shared cell definition to a cell. The default is to not
do anything.
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The following table shows which elements are valid within a complex header:
Header
Valid element types
1
Any valid element type
2
Any displayable element type
7
17
12
3, 4, 11, 13, 16, 26, 27, 28
14
3, 4, 11, 13, 16, 26, 27, 28
18
3, 4, 6, 11, 13, 15, 16, 21, 23, 25, 26,
27, 28
19
3, 4, 6, 11, 13, 15, 16, 21, 23, 25, 26,
27, 28
24
21, 25, 26, 28
27
21, 25, 26, 28
34
Any displayable element type
87
88
90
90
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Complex | Complex
element contains disallowed element type”.
The error number reported is 721. The search option also reports error numbers 86and
323, but the only error repaired is a 721 error.
Design File
Backup/repaired file name
FileFixer has the option to work on the original design file while first backing up the
design file, or to work on a copy of the original design file while leaving the original
unchanged. Using either feature you have the ability to specify the final extension and
directory where the backup file or repaired file will be placed.
After specifying whether to work on the original design file or to work on a copy of the
original design file you will be prompted for the extension name and the directory where
to place the backup file or repaired file.
When specifying the extension FileFixer will use, there are a couple of special symbols,
asterisk “*” and question mark “?”.
Note: When using FileFixer in Demo Mode with the Backup file option set, design files
(.dgn’s) that are larger than the Demo limit of 102,400 bytes are not restored. However a
backup of the design file is made.
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Asterisk “*”
The asterisk is a way of copying any character of the original file extension to the backup
file extension or the repaired file extension. For example:
Original design file name: axiom.dgn
Backup or repaired file extension: *kp
Final backup or repaired file name: axiom.dkp
Question mark “?”
This allows you to create a variable extension. A variable extension is defined as an
extension that can change depending upon which files already are created. Let’s say you
have two design files that have the same name but have a different extension,
“axiom.f01” and “axiom.f02”. If you had a fixed backup extension, say “bkp” then you
would only have the backup file “axiom.bkp” after both files were backup. The file
“axiom.f01” would backup to “axiom.bkp”, and the file “axiom.f02” would also backup
to “axiom.bkp”. This means that the backup file for “axiom.f02” would overlay on top of
the backup file for “axiom.f01” and you would lose the backup file for “axiom.f01”.
The backup extension can have a special character “?” (question mark) at the end of it,
which would be converted into an integer digit when the backup extension is created.
Lets again look at our earlier example of two files, “axiom.f01” and “axiom.f02”, being
backed up, but this time the backup extension is “bk?”. The backup files would now be
named “axiom.bk1” and “axiom.bk2”. If these files were again backed up then they
would be named “axiom.bk3” and “axiom.bk4”, as the “axiom.bk1” and “axiom.bk2”
files already exist. Once the file “axiom.bk9” was created then you would get an error
message telling you that no more valid backup extensions are available.
File extension limitations
You can use up to three question marks in the extension “???”. This would allow up to
999 backup files.
The backup file extension is limited to three characters on all platforms.
The only other restriction is that the question marks must be at the end of the extension.
This means that the extension “b?k” is not valid as a variable extension.
Add on the repair file extension instead of replacing it
Using this repair option the repair file extension will be added onto the end of the design
file or cell library instead of replacing the extension. For example, when creating a fix
file, the repair file extension “fix” will be adding onto the end of the design file
“axiom.dgn” making the fixed file name “axiom.dgn.fix”.
Correct the design file range (DFRANG)
Use this repair option to correct the design file high and low ranges (DFRANG) saved in
the TCB (terminal control block) that don’t match the range of the graphical elements in
the design file.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Design File | Design file
range doesn’t match the range of the graphical elements”.
The error number reported is 111.
Fix problem with dynamic fence not displaying in a saved view
Use this repair option to correct a fence that isn’t dynamically displaying in a saved view.
There is a flag in the named view element (type 5, level 3) that stops the fence from
dynamically displayed when it is being drawn.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search… | Design File | Dynamic
fence displaying is not working in a saved view”.
The error number reported is 164.
Set modification date and time of .fix file to that of the original file
Use this option when you want the date and time stamp of the fixed file to be the same as
the design file or cell library being repaired, otherwise, the date and time of the fixed file
will be the date and time the file was repaired.
Skip design files which haven’t changed since seal-of-approval was
written and no serious errors
When this repair option is turned on then the seal-of-approval is checked before repairing
this file. If the seal-of-approval has no serious errors (less than 300) and no elements have
been added to the design file since the seal-of-approval was written, then this file will be
skipped.
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Dimension
Handle the x, y or z range of a cell being used as a dimension element’s
terminator symbol by:
This option allows you to correct a zero x, y or z range of a dimension element terminator
symbol.
There are three possible handlings:
1. Change the range of the offending shared cell header by increment the high range
value of the x, y or z range that is zero by one UOR. This is the default handling.
2. Change the terminator symbol in the dimension element from “cell” to “default”.
3. Deleting the dimension element.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search… | Dimension | X, y or z
range of cell being used as dimension element’s terminator symbol is zero”.
The error number reported is 742.
Remove dimension element with no data points or associative points.
Remove the dimension element that doesn’t have at least one data point or associative
point. An associative point is a point that ties this dimension element to another element
in the design file.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Dimension | Dimension
element with no data points or associative points”.
The error number reported is 722.
Element
Correct rotation angle (2D only) from 360 to 0
Change the rotation angle of a text element from 360 degrees to 0 degrees. This only
occurs in a 2D design file.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Text | Rotation angle (2D
only) is 360 degrees”.
The error number reported is 175.
Fix reserved bit by clearing it – SAY “NO” IF USING 127 LEVELS?
With this repair option FileFixer will turn off the reserved bit.
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The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Element | Reserved bit is
set”.
The error number reported is 103.
Recover elements past the end of design marker
When you turn this repair option on, FileFixer will look for valid elements past the endof-design marker.
The error number reported is 79.
Remove elements with too few vertices
With this repair option FileFixer will remove any element with too few vertices.
Error number 788 is reported when a b-spline pole has less than two poles.
Error number 789 is reported when elements with vertices, points, etc., do not have a
minimum number of these.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Vertices | Too few
vertices on line string, shape, curve, etc.”.
Remove illegal element types (0, 20 and 127)
FileFixer will delete type 1 elements found in a design file. The error number reported is
302.
FileFixer will delete illegal element types detected, such as type 0, 20 and 127). The error
number reported is 380.
FileFixer will delete types 8, 9 and 10 when they are found in a cell library. The error
number reported is 382.
FileFixer will delete 2D elements found in 3D design files. The error number reported is
762.
FileFixer will delete 3D only elements found in 2D design files. The error number
reported is 776.
Error numbers 302, 380 and 382 are detected by the search option “Options | Search... |
Type/Level | Illegal element type (0, 20, 127, etc.)”.
Error number 762 is detected by the search options “Options | Search... | Element | 2D
element found in 3D file”.
Error number 776 is detected by the search options “Options | Search... | Element | 3D
element found in 2D file”.
Re-sequence text node numbers
User has requested that FileFixer re-sequence the text node numbers.
The error number reported is 137.
Re-sequence graphic group numbers
User has requested that FileFixer re-sequence the graphic group numbers.
The error number reported is 136.
Set illegal class to
Set the illegal class (greater than 6) to the class you have specified.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Element | Element class is
illegal (must be less than 7)”.
The error number reported is 333.
Turn off illegal A-bits
Turn off the attribute bit (A-bit) of this element.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Linkage | A-bit is turned
on, but there’s no attribute linkage.”
The error number reported is 369.
Turn off illegal H-bits
Turn off the hole bit (H-bit) of this element.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Element | H-bit is set
when it shouldn’t be”.
The error number reported is 304.
Unlock elements
Turn off the L-Bit (lock) of this element. If this file has TriForma data in it then there is
an override on the TriForma application dialog box that allows you to skip locked
elements. TriForma normally locks elements that it creates.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Element | Element is
locked”.
The error number reported 120.
Keep deleted element types
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By default, no deleted elements are written to the fixed file, but you can get FileFixer to
run without removing deleted elements.
You can select deleted element types to retain in the fixed file. For example, you can
enter “12,14” to keep deleted complex strings and complex shapes. However, FileFixer
will not keep deleted elements whose “words-to-follow” is greater than 780.
<Keep All Deleted Elements.>
Click <Keep all Deleted Elements> to enter 1-127 in the field as in the example above.
Move elements on unacceptable levels to level:
When an element is found to contain a level number that is not a valid level, the
correction will be to change the level number to a valid level number. The default is “1”.
Delete problem elements based on the error they generate.
This option is provided for user convenience. If you decide to delete one or more problem
elements based on the error number they generate, use this option.
Example:
You can enter a series of error numbers separated by commas.
The <Select> button allows you to select from a list of error numbers and their
descriptions.
FileFixer will delete all elements with matching error numbers.
Note: If the element that generated the error is a complex header element, that element
will be deleted, but the entire complex element will not be deleted. Use Problem Element
Viewer to delete complex elements.
Enhanced Recovery
What data should we utilize from the back-up data:
Words-to-follow (WTF) and critical elements can be recovered from either a back-up
element or from a compatible back-up file. Refer to the Using Enhanced Recover section
in this guide for an understanding of FileFixer’s back-up elements.
You have the following choice about where FileFixer should look for the information it
needs to recover the words-to-follow or critical elements:
The default is “Whichever source FileFixer believes best”. When this is chosen then
FileFixer will get the words-to-follow or critical elements from whichever has a newer
date. The back-up elements contain a date and time stamp that is updated whenever
FileFixer stores information in them.
Include graphic elements from the compatible back-up file
Include graphic elements when copying elements from the compatible back-up file to the
design file to repair an area of garbage in the design file.
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Compatible back-up file path
Here is where you need to specify a potential compatible back-up file. Whatever parts of
the filename are stored in this path will overwrite the full specification of the design file
name to produce the name of a new file.
For example:
Design file name
Partial compatible
back-up file path
Resulting
compatible back-up
file name
c:\work\xyz.dgn
.dgb
c:\work\xyz.dgb
c:\work\xyz.dgn
n:\backupdir\
n:\backupdir\xyz.dgn
c:\work\xyz.dgn
n:\backupdir\.dgb
n:\backupdir\xyz.dgb
Enter-Data-Fields
Change zero-length EDF to length 1
FileFixer changes the zero-length Enter Data Field to a length of 1.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | EDF | An EDF has a
length of zero”.
The error number reported is 350.
Correct EDFs which overlap or are out of sequence
FileFixer tries to do the following in the following sequence to fix the EDF that overlaps
or is out of sequence:
1. Shorten the length of the EDF.
2. Move the starting position of the EDF.
3. Move the starting position and shorten the length of the EDF.
4. Set the previous EDF length to 1, and move the starting position and shorten the
length of the overlapping EDF.
FileFixer will only do enough to correct the problem.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | EDF | One EDF overlaps
another”.
The error number reported is 349.
Correct EDF justification by setting it to the text element’s justification
FileFixer changes the Enter-Data-Field justification to the justification of the text
element.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | EDF | An EDF has an
unrecognized justification”.
The error number reported is 346.
Correct EDF/text length mismatches.
FileFixer deletes EDFs when there are more than 20 and when they exceed the length of
the element.
FileFixer extends the text string when there are 20 or fewer EDFs and they don’t exceed
the element’s length so that the largest Enter-Data-Field completes within the text string.
The search option that detects the 191 error is “Options | Search… | EDF | Text element
has more EDFs than characters”.
The search option that detects the 347 error is “Options | Search... | EDF | An EDF
extends past the end of the text string”.
The error number reported is 191 or 347.
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Headers
Correct 2D/3D dimension bits in the file header
Correctly set the dimension bits in the type 9 (design file header) or type 5 (cell library
header) depending upon the design file or cell library being a 2D or 3D file. The complex
and reserve bits will be cleared if this is a 2D file. They will be set if it is a 3D file.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Headers | Error in type 9
header element (on wrong level or GRAFIC is zero)”.
The error number reported is 701.
Delete extra design file headers
This will delete the extra design file headers.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Headers | Extra design
file header (type 9 level 8)”.
The error number reported is 170.
Recover deleted vital elements (like type 9, 8 or 10)
This will recover a deleted type 9, 8 or 10 element from the design file.
The search option that detects these errors is “Options | Search... | Headers | Missing vital
element (like type 9, 8 or 10)”.
Error number 902 is reported when a type 9 is missing.
Error number 713 is reported when a type 8 is missing.
Error number 714 is reported when a type 10 is missing.
Set active angle to
Set the active angle that is location in the design file header (type 9 level 8) to a specific
value.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Headers | Active angle is
invalid”.
The error number report is 163.
Set CANODE to one more than the largest text-node number
The type 9 of a design file contains a word called CANODE. The next text node placed in
the design file will have CANODE as its text node number. CANODE is incremented
after each text node is placed. FileFixer scanned this entire design file looking for the
highest text node number. It found that CANODE is not set to the highest text node
number plus one (as it should be). Using this repair option FileFixer will correctly set
CANODE to the highest text node number plus one.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Headers | CANODE not
equal to highest text node number plus 1”.
Error number 135 is reported when CANODE is higher than it should have been.
Error number 535 is reported when CANODE is lower than it should have been.
Set Graphic to one more than the largest graphic group number
The type 9 of a design file contains a word called GRAFIC. The next graphic group
placed in the design file will have GRAFIC as its graphic group number. GRAFIC is
incremented after each graphic group is placed. FileFixer scanned this entire design file
looking for the highest graphic group number. It found that GRAFIC is not set to the
highest graphic group number plus one (as it should be). Using this repair option
FileFixer will correctly set GRAFIC to the highest graphic group number plus one.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Headers | GRAFIC is not
equal to highest graphic group plus 1”.
Error number 134 is reported when GRAFIC was higher than it should have been.
Error number 534 is reported when GRAFIC was lower than it should have been.
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Set incorrect NNBASE to zero
The NNBASE (text node base number) is greater than CANODE (next text node
number). This means that the next text node number you use will be less than the text
node base number.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search… | Headers | NNBASE (text
node base number) is greater than CANODE.”
The error number reported is 154.
Replace type 9 (design file header) element of design file
Specify the 2D and 3D donor files here. They are used when replacing the type 9 (design
file header) element when running in “Automatic Design File Repair”mode. FileFixer
will use the right donor file by checking the dimension of the destination file. If the
correct dimension can’t be determined then FileFixer will prompt the user for the correct
dimension.
When replacing the type 9 (design file header) element how do you want
the working units updated if they don’t match?
This repair option allows you to specify how the working units are set when the donor
file’s working units are different then the destination file’s working units. You can select
to always use the donor file’s working units, the destination file’s working units, to be
always prompted for your choose, or to not replace the type 9 when they are different.
Linkage
Delete user linkages which are not a multiple of 4 words
The user linkages which are not a multiple of 4 words are deleted and the rest of the
linkages are retained.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search… | Linkage | User linkage is
not a multiple of 4 words.”
The error number reported is 365.
Fix incorrect count of enhanced precision points or vertices
Use this option to repair the count of the enhanced precision points or vertices. In each
enhanced precision linkage there is a count of the number of points or vertices in this
linkage. When this count is too high you can get MDL aborts in MicroStation when you
try to snap to or select this element.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search… | Linkage | Incorrect count
of enhanced precision points or vertices”.
The error number reported is 726.
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Fix ITA errors
Use this repair option to correct the ITA (index-to-attributes) value. The ITA points to the
first word of linkage or if no linkage then to the first word of the next element.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Linkage | Index-toattributes error”.
This corruption is reported by the error numbers 301, 510, 512, 513, 514 and 515. Please
refer to the search option “Options | Search... | Linkage | Index-to-attributes error” for an
explanation of each error number.
Maximum words in linkage area if everything else is perfect: 128
This value (default is 128) is used by FileFixer when determining if the linkage area is
too long. When the number of linkage words is greater than 128 (default value) FileFixer
is suspicious that the linkage area is corrupted. 600 is the largest value that can be
specified here.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Linkage | Linkage area is
suspiciously long”.
The error numbers reported for this error are 161 and 761. The difference between them
is that a 761 error also means that the words-to-follow of this element points to a location
in the design file that doesn’t appear to be a valid element.
Maximum words in linkage area after linkage is modified: 128
FileFixer uses this value when truncating the linkage area. FileFixer quits truncating
once the linkage area gets down to this size. 600 is the largest value that can be specified
here.
Note: Modeler will correctly create linkage area greater than this size On the Modeler
application dialog box there is an override for this value. Its default value is 400. This
should allow FileFixer to not try to truncate Modeler data.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Linkage | Linkage area is
suspiciously long”.
The error numbers reported for this error are 161 and 761. The difference between them
is that a 761 error also means that the words-to-follow of this element points to a location
in the design file that doesn’t appear to be a valid element.
Remove all OLE files and OLE application elements
The OLE (Object Linking and Embedding) application element is a type 66, level 20
element. The application element ID is 45086. When opening a design file with OLE
elements and you get the MicroStation error “hresult = (some number value) Invalid or
corrupt file. The operation completed successfully.” or “hresult = (some number value)
Can’t open file. Class not registered” then you need to run FileFixer with this repair
option turned on. You will also need to turn on the search option “Options | Search… |
Linkage | OLE application element detected.”
Both this repair option and the search option are default off. The reason for this is
because there isn’t a way to determine when the OLE application elements are corrupted,
and so you only want to delete these elements when you receive the “hresult =…” errors
when opening the design file in MicroStation.
After you repair your design files you may need to delete some “.ole” extension files in
the MicroStation temporary directory. FileFixer does its best to delete these files, but
MicroStation may have one or two of them locked which stops FileFixer from deleting
them. When this happens FileFixer will display a message telling you that you need to do
this and where the “.ole” files are located.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search… | Linkage | OLE
application element detected”.
The error number reported is 775.
Remove null filled linkages
Remove the null filled linkage that is not required in making the element the minimum
length.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Linkage | Null filled
linkage”.
The error number reported is 165.
Remove multiple instances of line style linkage
When you remove the multiple instances of line style linkage, the first occurrence of line
style linkage is retained.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Linkage | Multiple
instances of line style linkage”.
The error number reported is 139.
Remove orphan database linkage
Remove the orphan database linkages.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search… | Linkage | Orphan
database linkage”.
The error number reported is 178.
Remove the following database linkages
There is no corresponding search option for this repair option. The reason is there really
isn’t any corruption here. This is a special FileFixer feature that allows you to quickly
remove your database linkages.
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You have the option to delete any one of the following database types: DMRS,
INFORMIX, Ingres, ODBC, Oracle, RIS, Sybase and XBASE/DB3. There is no limit to
the number of different database types you can select to be deleted in one run of
FileFixer.
The error number reported is 37.
Remove the following attribute linkages
There is no corresponding search option for this repair option. The reason is there really
isn’t any corruption here. This is a special FileFixer feature that allows you to quickly
remove your attribute linkages.
You have the option to delete any one of the following attribute linkage types: enhanced
precision, patterning (hatching, cross-hatching, etc.), line style and tag/association
dimensioning. There is no limit to the number of different attribute linkage types you can
select to be deleted in one run of FileFixer.
The error number reported is 37.
Remove these user linkages
There is no corresponding search option for this repair option. Again this is just a special
FileFixer feature that allows you to quickly remove user linkages.
You have the option to specify one or more user linkage IDs. This option cannot be
combined with the next search option (“Remove all user linkages except”).
The error number reported is 37.
Remove all user linkages except
There is no corresponding search option for this repair option. Again this is just a special
FileFixer feature that allows you to quickly remove user linkages.
You have the option to delete all user linkages except for the user linkage IDs specified.
This search option cannot be combined with the previous search option (“Remove these
user linkages”).
The error number reported is 37.
Remove database or attribute linkage of component elements
This repair option is only used if you are deleting database or attribute linkages.
This repair option gives you the ability to delete the database or attribute linkages from
component elements.
Set cross-linked associative ID to next highest number
Set the cross-linked associative ID to the next highest available associative ID number.
For example, if the design file is current using associative ID from 1 to 47 and associative
ID number 11 is cross-linked, then FileFixer will set the cross-linked associative ID
number to 48.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Linkage | Cross-linked
associative ID”.
The error number reported is 308.
Pattern
Set pattern scale to one when it is zero
Set the pattern scale to one in the pattern element (type 66 level 9).
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Pattern | Pattern scale is
zero”.
The error number is 375.
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Range
Repair diagonal of cell header
Subtracting the origin point from the cell high and low range values sets the diagonal
values. For example: X low diagonal = X low – X origin
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Range | Cell header’s
diagonal is invalid”.
The error number is 367.
Repair range of complex header elements
Sets the range block of the complex header to be the union of the range blocks of the
component elements.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Range | Complex header
range doesn’t match components’ range”.
The error numbers reported are 320 and 720. Error number 320 is generated when the
range is off by more than the user specified tolerance, but within the tolerance –70% and
900%.
Repair range of displayable elements
Use this repair option to correct the range of displayable elements.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Range | Range of graphic
element is wrong”.
The error numbers are 305, 306, 307, 309, 312, 324, 325, 327, 330, 705, 706, 707, 709,
712, 724, 725, 727, 730 and 912. Please refer to the search option “Options | Search... |
Range | Range of graphic element is wrong” for more information on each of these error
numbers.
Raster
Handle raster pixels that overflows the element’s length
A raster data element contains a number of pixels and the count of the number of pixels.
This will be repaired if the count of the number of pixels is larger than the number of
pixels that will fit in the raster data element. For this type of corruption there are three
possible handlings:
1. Delete the raster data element.
2. Delete the complex raster chain the raster data element is part of.
3. Correct the number of pixels so that it doesn’t overflow the element’s length.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Raster | Raster pixels
overflow the element’s length”.
The error number reported is 735.
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Reference File
Change slightly the duplicate reference file logical name.
FileFixer changes the last letter of one duplicate logical name to an exclamation point (!).
Correct the “2D file referenced to 3D file” flag
Sets or clear the “2D file referenced to 3D file” flag. This flag has to be set when a 2D
reference file is attached to a 3D design file, otherwise, the reference file isn’t displayed
correctly. You may even get an MDL abort while trying to display the design file.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Reference File | ‘2D file
referenced to 3D file’ flag isn’t set”.
The error number is 711.
Correct the length of the file name, logical or description
Associated with the file name, logical and description strings is a corresponding “number
of characters” field. The “number of characters” field contains the number of characters
in each string field. Whenever the number of characters is larger or smaller than the
physical size of its corresponding string field then MicroStation will abort when trying to
load the design file. With this repair option FileFixer will correct the number of character
fields, which will allow MicroStation to load the design file.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Reference File | File
name, logical or description strings underflow/overflow their fields”.
The error number is 388.
Correct the raster reference file component’s class
There are a total of six raster reference file attachment classes, but only five of them are
used for the raster reference file components, the other one is used by the raster reference
file attachment header. FileFixer uses information in the component element to determine
the class component.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Raster |Raster reference
file component has an invalid class component”.
The error number is 708.
Intergraph Corporation copyrighted the raster file formats.
The raster reference file class components are:
Type
Description
0
Header Component
1
Binary Raster Class Component
2
Continuous Tone Raster Class Component
3
RGB Raster Class Component
4
Clip Polygon Optional Component
5
Color Table Optional Component
6-255
Reserved
Header Component
The Header contains type, level, range, index-to-attribute linkage, properties, and
symbology information.
Since a Raster Element by Reference is plot and view rotation independent, the range of
the header element is the cube containing the sphere formed by rotating the raster about
its origin in all possible directions. The range of the components is the same as the range
of the header element.
The symbology (color, weight, and line style) is ignored.
Binary Raster Class Component
The binary, or bi-level class component includes the RGB (red, green, blue) color values
for both the foreground and the background pixels in the image. A bit in the flags item
indicates that the RGB colors in the component are either direct color intensities, or
indices into the color table, where the exact RGB components can be found. In addition,
two bits in the flag item indicate the transparency of the foreground and background
pixels.
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Continuous Tone Raster Class Component
For continuous tone raster, a single digital value is used to identify a single transparent
color. There is a flag that is used to indicate if the transparency is enabled.
RGB Raster Class Component
A specific RGB triplet can be identified if a transparent color is identified for the RGB
Raster. There is a flag that is used to indicate that transparency is enabled for the raster
component.
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Clip Polygon Optional Component
The optional clip polygon component identifies a polygon in the design space that is used
to clip the raster during plotting and display. This is an optional component, if it is not
present, the entire raster is displayed or plotted.
The component contains a list of vertices of the polygon in design file UOR coordinates.
These UORs are relative to the raster origin (lower left corner of the raster) and are
aligned with the raster plane. The range of these UORs is from 0 to width -1 and from 0
to height-1. The first point of the polygon is repeated as the last element.
Plotting does not have a multi-point polygon-clipping element implemented, and during
the plot process, the minimum enclosing rectangle of the clip polygon will be calculated
and used to clip the raster data.
If the Optional Clip Polygon component is not present, the view extents are used to clip
the raster data. If the clip polygon is present, but reaches outside the view, the raster data
is still clipped to the view extents.
Color Table Optional Component
The plotting software uses the color table stored in the first Type 5, Level 4 element to
determine the vector color table during plotting. This color table will also be used if there
is no color table in the type 90 element.
The color table consists of a standard header and a starting slot number, followed by a list
of RGB color values. Because of limitations on the length of the element, the number of
RGB triplets is limited to 249 in any single color table component. Multiple color table
components can be used to specify color tables longer than 249. There is no limit to the
number of color table components that can be included in the type 90.
Each color table list of triplets begins with the specified slot number, and each
succeeding triplet populates the next contiguous slot number.
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Delete duplicate reference file attachments
Delete the duplicate reference file attachment.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Reference File | Duplicate
reference file attachment encountered”.
The error number is 158.
Delete reference file attachments with blank file names
Delete reference file attachments with blank file names.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Reference File | Blank
file name”.
The error number is 387.
Delete V8 format reference file attachment
Select this option to delete reference file attachments that involve V8 format files.
You can also repair this problem by replacing V8 format files with the V7 originals. For
this reason, the “Delete V8 format reference file attachment” option defaults to “Off”.
Fix raster reference file attachment width to height ratio by
Raster reference file attachments keep track of image files that are being displayed in
MicroStation. MicroStation supports many types of image files, such as TIFF, Windows
BMP, Intergraph CIT, etc.
An image file has a width value and a height value. Whenever an image file is made
larger or smaller the width and height values are adjusted the same. For example, if you
double the size of an image file then the width and height values are doubled. You don’t
adjust one more than the other. Saved in the raster reference file attachment is the
adjusted width and height values for how the image file is displayed in MicroStation. If
these values in the raster reference file attachment are not in the same ratio as what is
saved in the image file then MicroStation will abort. This ratio is what FileFixer is
checking.
FileFixer will only fix a raster reference file attachment width to height ratio if it is for a
TIFF file.
You can correct the raster reference file attachment by adjusting the width, adjusting the
height or deleting the raster reference file attachment.
The search option that detects this error “Options | Search… | Reference File | Raster
reference file attachment width to height ratio is illegal”.
The error number is 723.
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Tag
There are three pieces to any tag:
1. Tag set element (type 66 level 24) — this element holds the tag set information you
defined in MicroStation.
2. Tag element (type 37) — this is the information you have tagged to an element.
3. Tagged element (any displayable MicroStation element) — this is the element that
you have tagged information to. The element uses attribute linkage information to
know, which tag elements are associated with itself.
Delete tags that are not associated with any element
Removes any tag elements not associated with any elements in the design file.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Tag | Tag element not
associated with any element”.
The error number is 140.
Delete unused tag sets
Remove any tag set elements that aren’t being used.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Tag | Tag set not used”.
The error number is 141.
Remove tag linkage from elements with no associated tag elements
Remove the tag attribute linkage information when there is no tag element associated
with this tagged element.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Tag | Element has tag
linkage but no matching tag element (type 37) was found”.
The error number is 142.
Warning: GeoPAK uses the tag ID, without creating a tag, to create a link to their own
data. If you are using GeoPAK, do not turn this option on, as it will remove the link to its
data.
Update tag element from tag set
Update the tag element with the different information in the tag set element. You may
have changed the tag information in the tag set since this tag element was created, and
now you want the tag element updated to reflect the new tag set information.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Tag | Tag element is
different from its definition in the tag set”.
The error number is 143.
Text
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Correct the number of characters field in text element
Set the number of characters to the number of characters that actually exist.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Text | Text string
overflows the element’s length”.
The error number is 560.
Fix duplicate text node number
Sets the duplicate text node number to the next available text node number.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search… | Text | Duplicate text
node number.”
The error number is 167.
Handle zero text height or width multipliers
When the text height or width multipliers are 0 (zero) then you won’t be able to see the
text element. The text element will most likely be displayed as a line or a point.
There are three possible handlings for this problem and they are:
1. Delete the text element.
2. Change the text multiplier to a default value. The default value can be specified in
master units, sub units or positional units.
3. Change the text multiplier to the average of all the text multipliers in the file. If there
are no other text elements in the file then FileFixer will change the multiplier to the
default value specified in 2 above.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Text | Text element has
zero height or width multipliers”.
The error number is 326.
Set text rotation to match its text node
Change the text rotation to match its text node text rotation.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | Text | Text rotation does
not match its text node”.
The error number is 356.
Type 66
Remove type 66s on the following levels:
Type 66 elements created with one version of MicroStation sometimes cause odd
behavior on another.
There is no search option that is associated with this repair option
The error number reported is 124.
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Vertices
Fix curve’s slope points that are off the edge of the design plane
The curve’s beginning or ending slope points are dangerously close to the edge of the
design plane.
The search option that detects this problem is “Options | Search... | Element | Element is
too close to edge of design plane”.
The error number reported is 119.
WTF/WID
Fully automatic repair of words-to-follow (WTF) errors
The most serious kind of design file error is a words-to-follow error. In computerese, a
“word” is not a collection of letters, but rather a fixed number of bits of information. In
the case of a MicroStation element, a word is 16 bits. In MicroStation, words-to-follow is
the number of words to the next element in the design file. It can be thought of as a
“distance”. When an element has a words-to-follow error, the “distance” to the next
element is wrong. When FileFixer encounters an element with an incorrect words-tofollow value, it uses an artificial intelligence algorithm to determine the right distance to
the next valid element. Like a complex chess-playing program, FileFixer examines
thousands of potential fixes and, using its unique internal scoring system, chooses the one
that produces the most optimum result. A words-to-follow error is the most serious kind
of MicroStation file error. Such errors, until repaired, can leave a design file useless.
Until the condition is corrected, the design file cannot even be viewed. For each repaired
file, FileFixer produces a report of exactly what was wrong with the file and what it did
to correct the problem.
Fully automatic repair of words-in-description (WID) errors
A complex element header is a non-displayable element that groups displayable elements
together. All complex element headers have a words-in-description. Just as words-tofollow describes how long an individual element is, words-in-description tells how long
the entire complex element is (the header element and all its components). When the
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words-in-description of a complex element header is wrong, you can get individual
elements left out of cell and complex shape manipulations. Words-in-description
problems can be tricky. Days, weeks, or months can go by without the words-indescription error causing a problem. Then one day, unaware of the problem, the user
manipulates the element containing the error. Suddenly his or her entire design file is
gone. Fixing words-in-description errors, even for those experts who know how, is very
tedious and time-consuming. FileFixer can automatically repair words-in-description
errors without user intervention.
Correct words-in-description problems
FileFixer corrects the following words-in-description problems:
•
Error number 505 — In a multiple nested complex element (nested more than one level
deep), an “inner” complex element ends after an “outer” complex element.
•
Error number 520 — The words-in-description word of a complex header element (like a cell,
a connected string, or a text node) points to a location that is not the start of a new element.
This is detected by scanning through the element using two different methods, 1) using words
to follow and 2) using words-in-description. If these two techniques don’t lead to the same
design file block/byte offset, something is wrong.
•
Error number 522 — The words-in-description word of a complex header element indicates
that the next element after the entire complex element (not just the header element) starts
after the end-of-design marker. Another way of saying this is we have encountered the endof-design marker before we encountered the end of this complex element.
The search option that detects these errors is “Options | Search... | WTF/WID | Words-indescription error”.
Do byte search when you have a WTF problem
Elements in a design file or cell library are aligned on a word boundary. In this case, a
word is always 16 bits or 2 bytes. With this is mind you would think that whenever you
are searching for the beginning of the next element you would look at the beginning of
the next word past the last valid element. This is correct in most cases, however, we have
occasionally seen where one byte (8 bits) was missing from the middle of an element. If
you did a word search in this case you would miss the beginning of the next element, and
if no other element had a byte missing then you would miss the rest of the elements in the
design file. That is the reason why we give you the capability to do a byte search for the
beginning of the next element. Normally this is not needed and it is much slower than
doing a word search so it is off by default. You should use it whenever you have lost a lot
of elements from a design file or cell library.
Enable backscanning to find valid elements (WTF repairs only)
See the “Enabling Backscanning” section for information on this repair option.
Filter factor (this is used only when repairing WTF errors): 85
See the “Setting the filter factor” section for information on this repair option.
Fix severe WTF errors (EOF not found)
FileFixer fixes the following WTF errors:
•
Error number 700 — FileFixer uses a new algorithm which analyzes more than 20 element
characteristics in various combinations to determine the “trustworthiness” of an element’s
WTF. Error number 700 means there are numerous element, design file, and program
variables in combination which tell FileFixer the WTF is untrustworthy. The full explanation
of how FileFixer identifies an “untrustworthy” WTF is considered either proprietary and/or
beyond the intended scope of this documentation.
•
Error number 750 — words-to-follow exceeds 65533. This is a problem because adding 2 to
a number larger than this (to get the total element length) will cause a 16-bit register
overflow. This has been known to crash MicroStation.
•
Error number 754 —The words-to-follow of this element appears to be incorrect.
Furthermore, words-to-follow points to a location in the design file that does not appear to be
a valid element.
•
Error number 756 — Many applications allocate a 768 word buffer to store elements.
Attempting to read an element with a WTF larger than 768 can cause severe problems.
•
Error number 758— Siamese element Words-to-follow is too small. This element and the one
following it share disk space. The end of this element and the beginning of the next are using
the same disk space. Words-to-follow of this element is too small.
The search option that detects this error is “Options | Search... | WTF/WID | Words-tofollow error”.
Fix WTF warnings
FileFixer fixes the following errors:
•
Error number 364 — The attribute linkage extends beyond the end of the element it is
attached. That means this linkage and the element following are sharing file space.
•
Error number 365 — The user linkage mentioned is not a multiple of four words in length.
Note that this error is different from error 301 in that this error refers to the size of a
particular attribute linkage as determined by analyzing words-to-follow of the user linkage
itself (not words-to-follow of the element). Error 301 refers to the size of the linkage area.
The linkage area is that part of the element after the graphic part of the element. The attribute
area of an element may contain several individual attribute linkages. This condition is only
handled this way if the “Options | Repair… | Linkages | Fix user linkages which are not a
multiple of 4 words” is not set.
The search options that detect this error are “Options | Search... | Linkage | Siamese
attributes linkage (linkage overlaying the next element)” and “Options | Search... |
Linkage | User linkage is not a multiple of 4 words”.
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The error numbers reported are 364 and 365.
OK to fix WTF warnings by removing link area when A-bit is off
FileFixer will fix the WTF warning by removing the attribute linkage area when the Abit (attribute) is off.
OK to fix WTF warnings by removing link area when A-bit is on
FileFixer will fix the WTF warning by removing the attribute linkage area when the Abit (attribute) is on. FileFixer will also turn off the A-bit.
OK to fix WTF warnings by rounding up size of linkage area
FileFixer will fix the WTF warning by rounding up a bad link to a multiple of 4 words.
OK to fix WTF warnings by turning off A-bit
FileFixer will fix the WTF warning by turning off the A-bit (attribute).
OK to fix WTF warnings by turning on A-bit
FileFixer will fix the WTF warning by turning on the A-bit (attribute).
Chapter 11 — Report Fi le Options…
Report File Options dialog box
Over the years our clients have requested a variety of report options, all of which are
available to you.
You may find it convenient to set up a specific directory for FileFixer reports.
You may want individual reports for each design file or cell library with a master index
that links to these reports.
You may prefer a different extension or filename.
You may prefer to create a brief report with summary information only, or you may want
to tailor report content in other ways.
The “Report File Options” dialog box allows you to set up these scenarios, and you can
preserve your preferences when you save FileFixer settings.
Report file format:
You can select ASCII or HTML format.
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When you select “HTML” and use .htm extension, reports will display in a browser
window.
Report file extension:
When you select ASCII format the “Report file extension:” field defaults to “rep”. When
you select “HTML” the extension defaults to “htm”. However, you can enter any
extension you want.
Combine reports?
When you run FileFixer on a large number of files, the default format of “Everything in
one report file” may be inconvenient. FileFixer gives you the ability to create one report
file for each file processed with an index containing a summary of all errors found and
links to the individual reports.
Everything in one report file
When you select this option, FileFixer builds a single report file for all design files and
cell libraries processed. This is the default. The report file will be in the directory of the
active file and be named “fixer.rep” or “fixer.htm”
One report file per MicroStation file
When you select “One report file per MicroStation file.”, FileFixer builds one report file
for each design file and cell library processed. It also creates an “index” file containing a
summary for each file processed.
Index file output directory
When you build one report file per MicroStation file, FileFixer creates an index file
containing a copy of the report summary for each design file processed. (See image
below.) When you use HTML format, the index file will also include a hyperlink to each
individual, detailed report file.
If index file already exists
If the index file already exists then you have three options, (1) append the new report
summaries at the end of the index file, (2) increment the index file number, or (3)
overwrite the old index file with the new one.
The format for the index file name is “index9999.rep” or “index9999.htm” when you are
incrementing the index file number, otherwise, it is just “index.rep” or “index.htm”.
FileFixer allows up to 9,999 index files when you are incrementing the index file
number.
Directory for individual reports
When you select “One report file per MicroStation file”, the report files can be placed in
one of the following locations:
Chapter 11 — Report File Options…
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Your selections under Options | Repair Options | Design File determine when the above
options are enabled or disabled.
If one of these options is specified, then the “Report file:” <Select…> button on the main
FileFixer dialog box will be disabled. For example:
Put reports in the specified directory.
If you select “Put reports in the specified directory.” And then click <OK> on the
“Report File Options…” dialog box, a dialog box opens and allows you to specify a
directory. The main FileFixer dialog box “Report File:” field shows the selected
directory followed by a *.rep or *.htm.
Report file content:
Brief format (only report the number of occurrences of each error per
file)
Only report the number of occurrences of each error per file, instead of listing each error
per element. See the example below:
c:\axiom\dev\fixer\dgn\al.dgn
1 ~~ 1st element is not active type 9 (design file header) or type 5 (cell
library header). [902].
2 -- 2nd element of design file is not active type 8 (digitizer). [713].
3 ~~ 3rd element of design file is not active type 10 (level symbology).
[714].
24 -- Linear patterned element detected with no pattern components. [148].
1 -- Working units must be non-zero. [156].
*** -- Seal-of-approval showing 5 errors added/updated.
This file originally had 4585 elements. FileFixer found 5 errors in it.
1 of the 1 files analyzed are in danger.
List report options.
When selected, the state (on or off) of each search and repair option is included in the
report file.
Put report summary information at the beginning
Put the following report summary information at the beginning of the report file or after
all the errors for the last design file or cell library:
Report Summary -- The number on the left indicates how many of each kind of
error were found in this report:
1 -- File size is not a multiple of 512 bytes (1 block). [108].
4 -- Design file range (DFRANG) is incorrect. [111].
1 -- CANODE is suspiciously high. [126].
1 -- GRAFIC is suspiciously high. [128].
4 -- CANODE is higher than it should be. [135].
1 -- A deleted element was found within a complex element. [323].
5 -- Range of text element is incorrect. [325].
1 -- GRAFIC should never be 0. [329].
3 -- More than 20 Enter-Data-Fields. [335].
10 -- Words-to-follow warning. [354].
12 -- Possible 2D element in 3D file or vice versa. [362].
1 -- Illegal element type detected. [380].
6 -- Text element has zero characters. [390].
1 -- Complex element doesn't end on element boundary. [520].
3 -- GRAFIC is dangerously low. [534].
1 -- Can't tell if file is 2D or 3D. [701].
1 -- Second element of design file is not an active type 8 (digitizer).
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[713].
1 -- Third element of design file is not an active type 10 (level
symbology).
[714].
1 -- Words-to-follow error. [754].
1 -- Siamese element. Words-to-follow is too small. [758].
1 -- 3D only element found in 2D file. [776].
1 -- Fatal error. File ended before element did. [997].
Report new seal-of-approval summary
The seal-of-approval contains the following information: error numbers found, date and
time when FileFixer was run on the file, and the level of error reporting that was done
(e.g. “Fatal error only”, “Errors and fatal errors”, etc.).
Report previous seal-of-approval information
If the file being processed contains a FileFixer seal-of-approval from a previous “Search
for Problems” run, you can use this option to display a summary of information found in
that run..
Report the number of problems
FileFixer will add the following messages to the end of the report files:
999 problems found
999 elements modified
The number of problems found and the number of elements modified will only be the
count for those design files and cell libraries specified in the report file. If you are using
the option to have one report file per design file then these counts will only be for the one
file, not for all the files you are processing (if more than one).
Write a message for files with no anomalies
If a design file or cell library has no errors in it then the name of the design file or cell
library is not printed in the report file. The report file will normally contain the names of
the design files and cell libraries that have some kind of corruption in them. This search
option is provided so you can see the names of all the design files and cell libraries that
were searched and/or repaired by FileFixer even if they had no errors in them.
Write report file explanation notes
This search option gives you the ability to add the following summary statistics to the end
of the report file:
What the first digit of the error number [in square brackets] means:
9xx -- Fatal error -- It is unlikely that MicroStation or MDL applications
will be able to process this file without a severe error.
7xx -- Serious error -- There is a significant possibility that the elements
involved will manifest problems of some kind.
5xx -- Future danger -- Continued use of this file without handling this
problem will probably eventually cause a severe corruption problem.
3xx -- Warning -- This element does not appear to be constructed properly
and may eventually cause problems.
1xx -- Suspicious -- This element may not violate any "official"
MicroStation rules, but something about it doesn't look quite right.
0xx -- User error -- This message concerns something the user or programmer
did wrong. It does not reflect upon the design file being processed.
More information about each listed error can be found in the FileFixer
User's Guide.
If the punctuation at the very end of a message is an exclamation mark ("!"),
rather than a period ("."), FileFixer considers the words-to-follow of this
element to be less than 100% trustworthy. Note: it is possible for FileFixer
to consider the words-to-follow of an element questionable for reasons other
than the one reported.
Deleted elements can be spotted by the fact that tildes ("~") separate the EdG
element number from the error message instead of dashes.
Special
[] -<> -() -the
* --
symbols used in this report include:
FileFixer error numbers are shown in square brackets.
Element types are shown in angle brackets.
The EdG element number of the earlier element that is really causing
problem is shown in parentheses.
Option not set to its default value.
Abbreviations used in this report include:
EDF -- Enter-Data-Field
EOD -- end-of-design marker
EOF -- physical end-of-file
ITA -- index-to-attributes
MS -- MicroStation
NOC -- number-of-components
VI -- View Independent
WID -- words-in-description
WTF -- words-to-follow
Program to display and print the ASCII report file:
This field defaults to notepad.exe, but you can use the <Select…> button to choose a
different text editor.
Note: When you select HTML output, the report displays in a browser window and the
contents of this field are ignored.
Chapter 11 — Report File Options…
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Factory defaults
FileFixer generates one or more reports each time you run it. The dialog box above
shows the factory default report options. When you use these defaults you get a single
report in ASCII file format from each FileFixer run.
The default report file name and path are as follows:
When processing a single file:
The report will be created in the directory with the design file and have the same name as
the design file. The default extension is “.rep”, or “.htm” (when you select html as
your output mode).
When processing multiple files:
When you process multiple files in an “Edited File List” or by using a wildcard, FileFixer
creates a single report file with information about all files processed. By default, the
report will be created in the directory of the active file and be named “fixer.rep.”
Overriding the report file path and name
On the FileFixer main dialog box, you can type in a report file path and name to override
the default, or use the <Select…> button to navigate to an existing directory and file
name. The Report Options dialog gives you other ways to override the default report file
path and name.
Other report default values
By default, FileFixer creates a single report file with information about all files processed
and includes a summary of errors found at the top of the report.
The information from any previously existing seal-of-approval displays on the report.
If you are running in “Search for Problems” mode, a new seal-of-approval is created, and
the information written to it is also displayed.
FileFixer generates a list of all selected options and some report explanation notes at the
bottom of the report. This can be helpful in determining what you were running when
looking at an old report.
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Chapter 12 — Search O ptions
Search Options categories
The “Search Options” categories allow you to set search-specific options. Each category
has its own options that you will see on the right side of the dialog box as you move
through the category list.
In most cases, factory default settings will handle the problem. The ability to change the
defaults is provided for the rare case when a different handling is desired.
Each error reported in the FileFixer report is associated with an error number. As you
look through the following search options, you can see that each one is associated with
one or more error numbers. The “Error Messages” section of this guide describes each
error by number and will direct you to the recommended handling for any problem not
handled automatically by FileFixer default options.
Arc/Ellipse
Arc or ellipse is too long
An axis of an arc or ellipse is so long that it might cause MicroStation to fatally abort. It
is interesting that the condition for which FileFixer searches does not actually violate any
official MicroStation element construction rules. We have added this feature to FileFixer
only because some versions of MicroStation terminally abort upon encountering this
condition. FileFixer determines an axis is too long when the absolute value of the
primary or secondary axis is greater then 2147483647
The error number reported is 117.
Arc or ellipse origin is off the design plane
The way the origin is determined to be off the design plane is if the X, Y or Z origin
values are greater than 2147483647 or lesser than -2147483647.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Arc/Ellipse | Fix or delete
arc/ellipse whose origin is off the design plane”.
The error number reported is 118.
Arc’s sweep angle is invalid
The arc’s sweep angle should always be between –360 and 360 degrees.
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The error number reported is 318.
AutoCheck
Append the extension on the report name rather than overwriting the
existing extension
When AutoCheck runs FileFixer, FileFixer creates a separate report file for each design
file. The report file is created in the same directory as the design file. The report file name
is created by using the design file name with “rep” as the extension. This option gives
you the ability to either append the “rep” extension or overwrite the extension. The
default is overwriting the extension.
Display FileFixer’s dialog box after checking closed file if errors are
____ or higher
Once FileFixer is done checking the design file, it will exit unless there is a “serious”
error of 300 or higher by default. This option allows you to set the “serious” error level to
whatever level you want or no level.
B-spline
B-spline has illegal number of one type of component
FileFixer checks for one of the following errors:
•
A b-spline curve (type 27 header) has more than one b-spline knot element (type 26).
•
A b-spline curve (type 27 header) has more than one weight factor element (type 28).
•
A b-spline curve (type 27 header) does not have exactly one pole element (type 21).
•
A b-spline surface (type 24 header) has no pole elements type 21).
•
A b-spline surface (type 24 header) has neither zero weight factor elements nor the same
number of weight factor elements (type 28) as pole elements (type 21).
•
A b-spline surface (type 24 header) has more than one b-spline knot element (type 26).
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | B-spline | Delete bsplines with illegal component counts”.
The error number that is reported is 731.
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Elements in b-spline are in wrong sequence
There are many rules concerning the sequence of elements in a b-spline header. The
components of a b-spline must be in a very exact sequence. This element would violate
one of these rules.
The error number reported is 784.
Cell
Cell is nested within itself.
Use this option to locate duplicate nested cells.
The repair option that corrects this problem is “Options | Repair... | Cell | Delete cell
nested within itself”.
The error number that is reported when the nested cell is in a design file is 383.
The error number that is reported when the nested cell is in a cell library is 783.
Duplicate shared cell or library cell definition
A duplicate shared cell or duplicate library cell definition is found in a design file or cell
library. The first occurrence of either is technically not a duplicate but FileFixer still
reports it. This way you do know where the first one is.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Cell | Delete duplicate
shared cell or library cell definitions”.
The error number reported is 766.
H-bit (orphan flag) not set in orphan cell.
A cell (type 2) is nested within a library cell (type 1) and has its own elements, but
doesn’t have the orphan property flag (H-bit) set. If a cell has its own elements then it
must have the orphan property flag set.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Cell | Set H-bit (orphan
flag) in orphan cell”.
The error number reported is 572.
Nesting level is too deep (greater than 12).
The nesting level of this cells is greater than 12. Most likely the words in description is
bad.
The error number reported is 565.
Non-shared cell header is not on level 0.
A non-shared cell (type 1 or type 2) is not on level 0 (zero).
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Cell | Move non-shared
cell headers back to level 0”.
The error number reported is 741.
Non-shared cell level or class map is incorrect.
Error number 716 is reported when the list of occupied levels in the cell header element
(type 1 or type 2) doesn’t include all the levels in the component elements.
Error number 717 is reported when the list of classes (which is stored in the cell header
element) used by elements in the cell doesn’t include all the actual classes used by
elements in the cell.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Cell | Adjust non-shared
cell level mask or class map”.
Non-shared cell class map is incorrect.
Error number 717 is reported when the list of classes (which is stored in the cell header
element) used by elements in the cell doesn’t include all the actual classes used by
elements in the cell.
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The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Cell | Adjust non-shared
cell class map”.
Null name in cell library
A cell with a null cell name is found in a cell library.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Cell | Correct null cell
names (type 2s only) by setting the H-bit”.
The error number reported is 570.
Shared cell definition with no shared cell instance
A shared cell definition has been found and there is no shared cell instance that uses this
definition. This happens quite often when converting AutoCAD drawing files to
MicroStation.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Cell |Delete shared cell
definition with no shared cell instances”.
The error number reported is 303.
Shared cell instance has no shared cell definition
A shared cell instance is found with no corresponding shared cell definition.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Cell | Create dummy
shared cell definition for missing definitions.”.
The error number reported is 768.
Shared cell level or class mask is incorrect
Error number 769 is reported when the level mask of an absolute shared cell (type 35)
doesn’t match the level mask of its definition element (type 36).
Error number 770 is reported when the class mask of an absolute shared cell (type 35)
doesn’t match the class mask of its definition element (type 36).
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Cell | Adjust shared cell
level mask or class map”.
Shared instance level doesn’t match definition
The level of a shared cell instance doesn’t match the level of the shared cell definition.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Cell | Move shared cell
instance to definition level”.
The error number reported is 171.
Stray elements between library cells (type 1s) in cell library
A cell library should consist of only a cell library header and library cells. There should
not be any elements between library (type 1) cells, before the first library cell or after the
last library cell.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Cell | Remove stray
elements from between library cells (type 1s)”.
The error number reported is 355.
Type 2 in cell library is not part of a library cell (type 1).
A cell (type 2) must always be nested within a cell library header (type 1) when in a cell
library. The library cell header’s words-in-description is most likely bad.
The error number reported is 571.
Complex
Complex bit is on for a non-component element
An element that is not a component of a complex element does have the complex bit set.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Complex | Correct
complex bit errors”.
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The error number reported is 702.
Complex bit is on for an element with database linkage
The complex bit being turned on for an element means that the element is a component of
a complex element. Component elements should never have database linkages. (They can
have non-database linkages like the linkage that control whether an element is filled
when it is displayed.) Only the header element of a complex element should ever have a
database linkage. If an element has a database linkage, its complex bit is turned on.
The error number reported is 138.
Complex bit is off for a component element
An element that is a component of a complex element does not have its complex bit set.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Complex | Correct
complex bit errors”.
The error number reported is 703.
Complex element contains disallowed element type
There are four error numbers reported for this search option, and they are:
•
Error number 86 — Internal error in j_valnest (a program function) involving complex header
elements.
•
Error number 323 — Complex elements should not contain deleted elements.
•
Error number 721 — Each type of complex element (like cells and text nodes) can only
contain certain types of elements. For example, a text node (type 7) can contain only text
elements (type 17s). A connected string (type 12) can contain only linear elements such as
lines (type 3s), line strings (type 4s), arcs (type 16s), etc. The element just read in cannot
legally be contained in the complex element header mentioned near the end of the message.
The following table shows which elements are valid within a complex header:
Header
Valid element types
1
Any valid element type
2
Any displayable element type
7
17
12
3, 4, 11, 13, 16, 26, 27, 28
14
3, 4, 11, 13, 16, 26, 27, 28
18
3, 4, 6, 11, 13, 15, 16, 21, 23, 25,
26, 28
19
3, 4, 6, 11, 13, 15, 16, 21, 23, 25,
Header
Valid element types
26, 28
24
21. 25. 26. 28
27
21. 25. 26. 28
34
Any displayable element type
87
88
90
90
The repair option that corrects error number 721 is “Options | Repair... | Complex |Handle
illegal components in complex header”.
Component on different level than its header
The indicated element is part of a complex element and is on a different level than its
parent element.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Complex | Move
components to same level as complex header”.
The error number reported is 336.
Component graphic group graphic group doesn’t match header
All component elements must have the same graphic group number as the complex
header.
This error is not reported on component elements that are part of cells (type 1 or type 2),
shared cell definitions (type 34) and raster headers (type 87 or type 90).
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Complex | Set graphic
group of component to match its header”.
The error number reported is 341.
Component symbology doesn’t match header
The error number 337 is reported when a component element of one color is part of a
complex header of another color.
The error number 338 is reported when a component element of one line weight is part of
a complex header of another line weight.
The error number 339 is reported when a component element of one line style is part of a
complex header of another line style.
These errors are not reported on component elements that are part of cells (type 1 or type
2), shared cell definitions (type 34) and raster headers (type 87 or type 90).
The repair option that corrects these errors is “Options | Repair... | Complex | Set
symbology of components to match its header”.
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Curves and conics within complex shapes and curves
This is a legal construct, but causes MicroStation PC 3.00 and possibly other versions of
MicroStation to crash.
Zooming in on such an element may crash the system requiring a reboot.
The error number reported is 131.
Curve or conic with consecutive identical vertices
A curve or a conic that has two visible vertices (six vertices counting the two invisible
vertices at the beginning and the end of the curve) has two vertices in a row that are
exactly the same.
The error number reported is 190.
Element must be nested in complex
One of the following errors was found:
•
B-spline components are allowed only as part of a complex b-spline element. This b-spline
component was found all by itself.
•
Raster data elements (type 88) are allowed only as part of a complex raster element. This
raster data component was found all by itself.
The error number reported is 719.
Incorrect number-of-components in complex header
Some complex header elements, such as type 7s and type 12s, specify the number of
component elements that are embedded within the complex element. For dependability
reasons few programs use this data anymore. Nonetheless, an accurate “number-ofcomponents word" is part of the definition of an “ANSI standard” design file, so errors in
this word are flagged. The error number reported is 322.
The repair option that corrects a 322 error is “Options | Repair... | Complex | Correct
number-of-component problems”.
If the number-of-components in a complex element is greater than 3640 than a 334 error
is reported. Currently there is no FileFixer repair option that will fix a 334 error.
Line string is missing from complex chain
When creating a complex chain from several line strings that are not connected
MicroStation will not create a line string component element for connecting the line
strings. MicroStation will automatically display a line string between the original line
strings, but no element will actually be created.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Complex | Add missing
line string to bridge gap in complex chain”. The repair option is currently disabled.
The error number reported is 555.
Zero components in complex element
The main purpose of a complex header element is to group together other types of
elements. The complex header element whose EdG element number is listed in
parentheses has no component elements and therefore serves no purpose. (There are
situations where a complex header element has meaning even when it has no
components. FileFixer knows about these situations and does not report them as an
error.)
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Complex | Delete
complex elements with no components”.
The error number reported is 328.
Design File
Design file range doesn’t match the range of the graphical elements
The design file high and low ranges (DFRANG) saved in the TCB (terminal control
block) doesn’t match the range of the graphical elements in the design file.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Design File | Correct the
design file range (DFRANG)”.
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The error number reported is 111.
“Dynamic fence displaying” is not working in a saved view
Use this search option to detect a fence that isn’t dynamically displaying in a saved view.
There is a flag in the named (saved) view element (type 5, level 3) that stops the fence
from dynamically displayed when it is being drawn.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair… | Design File | Fix
problem with dynamic fence not displaying in a saved view”.
The error number reported is 164.
File size is not a multiple of 512 bytes
The number of bytes in the file (including the free space after the end-of-design marker)
is not evenly divisible by 512 bytes.
FileFixer will automatically make the fixed file evenly divisible by 512 bytes.
The error number reported is 108.
Kinds of errors to be reported on:
This search option gives you the ability to report only certain errors. FileFixer can be
selected to report only the following errors:
•
Fatal errors only (900 level errors only)
•
Errors and fatal errors (700 level errors and above)
•
Future danger and worse (500 level errors and above)
•
Minor errors and worse (300 level errors and above)
•
Suspicious conditions and worse (all errors) — this is the default.
Build a list containing the names of the design files with _______
Depending upon which “Kind of errors to be report on” FileFixer can create a list file of
the files that have these types of errors in them. The “Kinds of errors to be reported on”
are:
•
Fatal errors only
•
Errors and fatal errors
•
Future dangers and worse
•
Minor errors and worse
•
Suspicious conditions and worse
Where “_________” is the “Kind of errors to be reported on”. For example: “Build a list
containing the names of the design files with minor errors and worse”.
The list will only get created when running in “Search for Problems” mode or
“Immunize” mode.
MicroStation is using 127 levels?
Normally there are only 64 levels available MicroStation, but you can set it up to use 127
levels. When this is the case, then MicroStation uses the reserved bit for those levels
greater than 63. When you set this search option then FileFixer won’t report an error
when the reserved bit is set.
Skip checking the file in “Search” mode if there is a seal-of-approval
If FileFixer discovers that the design file already contains a seal-of-approval, you can opt
to skip checking the file. When you are processing a large number of files, this may speed
up the run.
Skip checking the file if the first element is not a valid element
If the first element in a design file is not a design file header (type 9 level 8) or the first
element in a cell library is that a cell library header (type 5) then skip processing this file.
This gives you the ability to skip processing non-MicroStation files when processing all
the files in a directory.
Write seal-of-approval information to the design file
FileFixer has the ability to add the seal-of-approval information to your design file when
running in “Search for Problems” mode. The seal-of-approval information contains the
error numbers that were found in the design file.
When not writing the seal-of-approval information then FileFixer gives you the ability to
delete any seal-of-approval information currently in the design file.
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Dimension
All data points and/or associative points are the same
A dimension element should have at least two unique points. If it doesn’t then
MicroStation may not display the dimension element.
The error number reported is 321.
Dimension element with no data points or associative points
A dimension element must have at least one data or associative point. An associative
point is a point that ties this dimension element to another element in the design file.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Dimension | Remove
dimension element with no data points or associative points”.
The error number reported is 722.
X, y or z range of cell being used as dimension element’s terminator
symbol is zero
A cell being used as a terminator symbol must have a non-zero range on all dimensions
(x, y and z). MicroStation may abort if one of the ranges is zero.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair… | Dimension | Handle the
x, y or z range of cell being used as dimension element’s terminator symbol”.
The error number reported is 742.
If the cell being used as the terminator symbol is missing, then a 310 error is reported.
Element
2D element found in 3D file
Analysis of the number of vertices, database linkages, points, characters, Enter-DataFields, poles, boundaries, knots, etc. might indicate that what is a 2D element might be in
a 3D file or vice versa. Words-to-follow in this element, point to a design file location
that is unlikely to be the start of a valid element. The error numbers reported are 362 and
762. A 762 means that the next element is most likely corrupted.
Error number 762 is corrected by the repair option “Options | Repair... | Element |
Remove illegal element types (0, 20 and 127)”.
3D element found in 2D file
Analysis of the number of vertices, database linkages, points, characters, Enter-DataFields, poles, boundaries, knots, etc. might indicate that what is a 3D element might be in
a 2D file or vice versa. Words-to-follow in this element point to a design file location that
is unlikely to be the start of a valid element. The error numbers reported are 362 and 762.
A 762 means that the next element is most likely corrupted.
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An element type that is only found in 3D files was found in a 2D file. The error number
reported is 776.
Error numbers 762 and 776 are corrected by the repair option “Options | Repair... |
Element | Remove illegal element types (0, 20 and 127)”.
Deleted phantom element detected
This will be reported if it finds a deleted element that has its complex bit set and is not
part of a complex.
This element does not violate any MicroStation design file construction rules, but is noted
simply because it may be an indicator of other types of corruption in the area.
The error number reported is 147.
Element class is illegal (must be less than 7)
The class of this element is undefined (greater than 6).
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Element | Set illegal class
to ___”.
The error number reported is 333.
Element is locked
The L-Bit (lock) of this element is set. If this file has TriForma data in it then there is an
override on the TriForma application dialog box that allows you to skip locked elements.
TriForma normally locks elements that it creates.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Element | Unlock
elements”.
The error number reported 120.
Graphic group number equals or exceeds GRAFIC
The type 9 of a design file contains a word called GRAFIC. The next graphic group
placed in the design file will have GRAFIC as its graphic group number. GRAFIC is
incremented after each graphic group is placed. The graphic group number of this
element is greater than or equal to GRAFIC. This means that sooner or later another
graphic group with this same graphic group number will be placed. Following the
instructions given by VAX-EdG for replacing the type 9 of a design file instead of using
the FileFixer Replace Type 9 command is one way that GRAFIC can get messed up. The
MERGE command, under certain circumstances, can also leave GRAFIC errors in a
design file. If, in the history of this design file it ever had an enormous number of graphic
groups or if, for any other reason, GRAFIC was allowed to recycle past 65535 back to 1,
this situation (graphic group numbers exceeding GRAFIC) can occur.
The error number reported is 531.
H-bit is set when it shouldn’t be
(Note: The H-Bit is called the H-Bit because for several element types it indicates a hole
element. It means different things for different element types.) According to the strictest
rules of element construction, the only elements whose H-Bit should ever be set are cells
(type 2), lines (type 3), shapes (type 6), complex shapes (type 14), ellipses (type 15), and
element types 21 through 28. This element was not one of these types, yet its H-Bit was
set. Since current versions of MicroStation ignore the H-Bit for element types that
generate this message, this error will not cause any problems with current versions of
MicroStation. It might, however, cause problems with future versions of MicroStation
related software. This error is very common.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Element | Turn off illegal
H-bits”.
The error number reported is 304.
Orphan linear patterning element detected (Pattern component elements
are deleted)
Linear patterning elements (class 5) are detected that no longer have any existing pattern
elements (class 1). Pattern elements are used to define the linear patterning.
The error number reported is 148.
You can delete these linear patterning elements by added error number 148 to the repair
option “Options | Repair… | Element | Remove elements with the following error
numbers”.
Reserved bit is set
There is an unused bit in MicroStation elements called the reserved bit. It was intended to
allow future enhancement of the element format, but was never used. This bit should be
clear (set to 0). If it is not, this message is generated. Technically this is not an error
because there are no known programs that rely on this bit in any way. However, when
trying to pick up the trail of a valid element chain, the sophisticated algorithm FileFixer
uses to automatically repair corrupted design files and cell libraries will make note of the
fact that a potentially valid element has a set reserved bit and severely downgrade the
likelihood that this element is part of a valid element chain.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Element | Fix reserved bit
by clearing it – SAY’NO’ IF USING 127 LEVELS”.
The error number reported is 103.
Reserved nibble is non-zero
The property word of every graphic element and complex header contains four bits (a
nibble) which are not used for anything and which should always be zero. The reserved
nibble is composed of bits 4:7 of the property word.
The error number reported is 132.
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Text node number equals or exceeds CANODE
The type 9 of a design file contains a word called CANODE. The next text node placed in
the design file will have CANODE as its text node number. CANODE is incremented
after each text node is placed. The text node number of this text node is greater than or
equal to CANODE. Following the instructions given by VAX-EdG for replacing the type
9 of a design file instead of using the FileFixer Replace Type 9 command is one way that
CANODE can get messed up. The MERGE command, under certain circumstances, can
also leave CANODE errors in a design file.
The error number reported is 530.
Treat deleted elements with RLIDs as though active
RLIDs are a special type of attribute linkage used by the old VAX product DGS.
FileFixer supports DGS users by providing this search option that treats deleted elements
with RLIDs as though they were active (non-deleted) elements.
Element is too close to edge of design plane
According to its range block or the curve’s beginning or ending slope points, this element
is located dangerously close to the edge of the design plane (or design cube).
If the curve’s slope points are to close to the edge of the design plane, then the repair
option for correcting this problem is “Options | Repair... | Vertices | Fix curve’s slope
points that are too close to the edge of the design plane”.
The error number reported is 119.
Enter Data Fields
An EDF extends past the end of the text string
The Enter-Data-Field completes outside the text string. It expects the text string to be
larger.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | EDF | Correct EDF/text
length mismatches”.
The error number reported is 347.
An EDF has a length of zero
An Enter-Data-Field doesn’t have a length greater than zero.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | EDF | Change zerolength EDF to length 1”.
The error number is 350.
An EDF has an unrecognized justification
The Enter-Data-Field justification can only be left (-1), center (0) or right (1).
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | EDF | Correct EDFs
justification by setting it to the text element’s justification”.
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The error number reported is 346.
An EDF is out of sequence
Enter-data-fields are not sorted.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | EDF | Correct EDFs
which overlap or are out of sequence”.
The error number reported is 348.
One EDF overlaps another
The Enter-Data-Field position or length is wrong so that it overlaps the next Enter-DataField.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | EDF | Correct EDFs
which overlap or are out of sequence”.
The error number reported is 349.
Text element has more EDFs than characters
A text element with more EDFs (Enter-Data-Fields) than characters has been
encountered.
The error number reported is 191.
Too many Enter-Data-Fields (more than 20)
Text elements can have up to, but no more than, 20 Enter-Data-Fields.
The error number reported is 335.
Headers
Active angle is invalid
The active angle saved in the design file header (type 9 level 8) is out of range. The
active angle must be greater than or equal to –360 degrees and less than or equal to 360
degrees.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Headers | Set active angle
to ___”.
The error number reported is 163.
Active level is out of range (greater than 63)
Any new elements will not be placed on the correct level.
The error number reported is 155.
CANODE not equal to highest text node number plus 1
The type 9 of a design file contains a word called CANODE. The next text node placed in
the design file will have CANODE as its text node number. CANODE is incremented
after each text node is placed. FileFixer scanned this entire design file looking for the
highest text node number. It found that CANODE is not set to the highest text node
number plus one (as it should be).
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The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Headers | Set CANODE
to one more than the largest text node number”.
Error number 135 is reported when CANODE was higher than it should have been.
Error number 535 is reported when CANODE was lower than it should have been.
Cell library header length must be 23 words
The length of the cell library header is not correct. MicroStation will not consider this file
a cell library, and will not attach it.
The error number reported is 159.
Deleted type 9, 8 or 10 detected
A deleted type 9, 8, or 10 element was found. Type 9, 8 and 10 elements are not usually
deleted from a design file. This doesn’t violate any basic rule of design file construction.
It is noted because it is unusual and could be a sign of other problems.
The error number reported is 101.
Design file header length must be 766 words
The length of the design file header is not correct. MicroStation might not consider this
file a design file. MicroStation might be able to load this design file.
The error number reported is 157.
Error in type 9 header element (on wrong level or GRAFIC is zero)
The dimension of cell libraries and design files are represented by two bits in their type 5
and type 9 element (respectively). These bits have illegal values which do not correctly
represent a “2D” or “3D” file.
This file has neither a valid design file header (type 9) nor a cell library header (type 5).
For type 5 errors FileFixer currently will not replace the header.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Headers |Correct
dimension bits in the file header”.
The error number reported is 701.
Extra design file header (type 9 level 8)
Multiple design file headers have been found in a design file.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Headers | Delete extra
design file headers”.
The error number reported is 170.
GGBASE (graphic group base number) is greater than GRAFIC
The GGBASE (graphic group base number) is greater than GRAFIC (next graphic group
number). This means that the next graphic group number you use will be less than the
graphic group base number.
The error number reported is 153.
GRAFIC is not equal to highest graphic group plus 1
The type 9 of a design file contains a word called GRAFIC. The next graphic group
placed in the design file will have GRAFIC as its graphic group number. GRAFIC is
incremented after each graphic group is placed. FileFixer scanned this entire design file
looking for the highest graphic group number. It found that GRAFIC is not set to the
highest graphic group number plus one (as it should be).
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Headers | Set GRAFIC to
one more than the largest graphic group number”.
Error number 134 is reported when GRAFIC was higher than it should have been.
Error number 534 is reported when GRAFIC was lower than it should have been.
Missing vital element (like type 9, 8 or 10)
Check for missing vital elements.
The repair option that corrects these errors is “Options | Repair... | Headers | Recover
deleted vital elements (like type 9, 8 or 10)”. There currently is no repair option for error
number 710.
Error number 902 is reported when the first element might be a deleted type 9.
Error number 713 is reported when the second element might be a deleted type 8.
Error number 714 is reported when the third element might be a deleted type 10.
Error number 710 is reported when the first element of what appears to be a cell library
was a type 5, but it wasn’t on level 8.
NNBASE (text node base number) is greater than CANODE
The NNBASE (text node base number) is greater than CANODE (next text node
number). This means that the next text node number you use will be less than the text
node base number.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair… | Headers | Set incorrect
NNBASE to zero.”
The error number reported is 154.
Working units must be non-zero
Elements placed may not display correctly.
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Dimension elements created for any elements when the working units are zero will have
bad dimension values.
The error number reported is 156.
Linkage
A-bit is turned on, but there’s no attribute linkage
The attribute bit of this element is turned on, but the index-to-attribute pointer of the
elements points to a location beyond the end of the element.
Some database related processes may think part of the next element is the attribute
linkage to this element. The result will be erroneous data base access at best or possibly
even a crashed design file.
The repair option that corrects this problem is “Options | Repair... | WTF/WID | OK to fix
WTF warnings by turning off A-bit”.
The error number reported is 369.
Cross-linked associative ID
The element’s associative ID is the same as another element’s associative ID earlier in
the design file. The associative ID is a way of linking two elements together. For
example, this is how a dimension element can be associated to another element. When the
associated element changes in some way (moves to another location, changes shape, etc.)
then the dimension element can be automatically updated by MicroStation to reflect the
change. This associative ID must be unique.
The repair option that corrects this problem is “Options | Repair… | Linkage | Set crosslinked associative ID to the next highest number”.
Database linkage (entity-MSLink) unique for all files being checked
This option checks to see if the entity-MSLink or entity-occur is unique in all the files
being processed. Entity-MSLink or entity-occur are the values that are used to specify a
specific record in a table in a database. Entity-occur values are reported for a DMRS
database. Entity-MSLink values are reported for all other databases (ODBC, Oracle,
Informix, etc.). It will print out an error to the report file whenever a duplicate database
linkage is found.
The error number reported is 177.
Database linkage (entity-MSLink) unique for each file
This option checks to see if the entity-MSLink or entity-occur is unique for each file.
Entity-MSLink or entity-occur are the values that are used to specify a specific record in
a table in a database. Entity-occur values are reported for a DMRS database. EntityMSLink values are reported for all other databases (ODBC, Oracle, Informix, etc.). It will
print out an error to the report file whenever a duplicate database linkage is found.
The error number reported is 177.
Incorrect count of enhanced precision points or vertices
This option checks to see if the number of points or vertices in an enhanced precision
linkage is correct. If the count is greater than the number of enhanced precision values
saved, then MicroStation will abort when you try to snap on the element.
The error number reported is 726.
Index-to-attributes error
There are a number of index-to-attributes errors. Following is a list of them beginning
with the error number FileFixer will report for that type of error:
•
Error number 301 — Per the rules, database linkages should always be created in multiples of
4 words. The number of words in the linkage area of this element is not a multiple of 4.
•
Error number 510 — The index-to-attribute word of an element should point to where in the
element the database linkage starts (if it has a linkage) or where in the element it would start
(if it doesn’t have a linkage). When there are no database linkages the difference between
words-to-follow and index-to-attributes should be 14.
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•
Error number 512 — The index-to-attributes word of the element was such that the total
length of the element would exceed 768 if a database linkage were present.
•
Error number 513 — The index-to-attributes word of the element was such that the basic part
of the element (without any database linkages) is too short.
•
Error number 514 — Except with deleted complex header elements, the index-to-attributes
(ITA) word of an element tells us the element’s size (not counting attribute linkages).
FileFixer was able to calculate this element’s size exactly, but the index-to-attribute word
was not what FileFixer expected.
•
Error number 515 — The index-to-attribute word of an element should point to where in the
element the database linkage starts (if it has a linkage) or where in the element it would start
(if it doesn’t have a linkage). When there are no database linkages, the difference between
words-to-follow and index-to-attributes should be 14. When there is a database linkage the
difference must be at least 18 (14 plus at least 4 words for the linkage).
The repair option that corrects these errors is “Options | Repair... | Linkage | Fix ITA
errors”.
Linkage area is suspiciously long
The difference between the expected WTF of this element and its actual size indicates
that either WTF is wrong or that the element has an attribute linkage area that is
suspiciously long (more than 128 words).
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Linkage | Maximum
words in linkage area after linkage is modified: ___”.
The error numbers reported for this error are 161 and 761. The difference between the
error number is that a 761 error also means that the words-to-follow of this element
points to a location in the design file that doesn’t appear to be a valid element.
MicroStation application (Modeler, TriForma) attribute linkage found
FileFixer will report the first element it finds with Modeler or TriForma attribute
linkages. It is not reporting on any corruption here. It just means that the application
options for Modeler or TriForma will be used when processing this design file or cell
library. It only displays this message for the first element that has Modeler or TriForma
attribute linkage.
The error number reported is 162.
Multiple instances of line style linkage
Somehow the element had more than one occurrence of the line style linkage. This is a
minor error.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Linkage | Remove
multiple instances of line style linkage”.
The error number reported is 139.
Null filled linkage
Null filled linkage, which is not required to make the element the minimum length,
increases the size of the design file.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Linkage | Remove null
filled linkages”.
The error number reported is 165.
OLE application element detected
The OLE (Object Linking and Embedding) application element is a type 66, level 20
element. The application element ID is 45086. When opening a design file with OLE
elements and you get the MicroStation error “hresult = (some number value) Invalid or
corrupt file. The operation completed successfully.” or “hresult = (some number value)
Can’t open file. Class not registered” then you need to run FileFixer with this search
option turned on. You will also need to turn on the repair option “Options | Repair… |
Linkage | Remove all OLE files and OLE application elements.”
Both this search option and the repair option are default off. The reason for this is
because there isn’t a way to determine when the OLE application elements are corrupted,
and so you only want to delete these elements when you receive the “hresult=…” errors
when opening the design file in MicroStation.
After you repair your design files you may need to delete some “.ole” extension files in
the MicroStation temporary directory. FileFixer does its best to delete these files, but
MicroStation may have one or two of them locked which stops FileFixer from deleting
them. When this happens FileFixer will display a message telling you that you need to do
this and where the “.ole” files are located.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair… | Linkage | Remove all
OLE files and OLE application elements”.
The error number reported is 775.
Orphan database linkage
You will need to have the database connected. If it isn’t connected then FileFixer will
ignore this new linkage search option.
This element has a database linkage that no longer exists in the database. Either the table
or the row in a table has been deleted.
The error number reported is 178.
Siamese attributes linkage (linkage overlaying the next element)
The attribute linkage extends beyond the end of the element it is attached to. That means
that this linkage and the next element are sharing file space.
Since the shared file space can’t correctly contain both the attribute linkage and the start
of the next element, one of them must be corrupt. Chances are it is the attribute linkage. If
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it is the attribute linkage, then accessing the database using this linkage will, at best, yield
erroneous results and, at worse, cause MicroStation to crash.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | WTF/WID | Fix WTF
warnings”.
The error number reported is 364.
User linkage is not a multiple of 4 words
The user linkage mentioned is not a multiple of four words in length. Note that this error
is different from error 301 in that this error refers to the size of a particular attribute
linkage as determined by analyzing words-to-follow of the user linkage itself (not wordsto-follow of the element). Error 301 refers to the size of the linkage area. The linkage
area is that part of the element after the graphic part of the element. The attribute area of
an element may contain several individual attribute linkages.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Linkage | Delete user
linkages which are not a multiple of 4 words”.
The error number reported is 365.
Pattern
Pattern scale is zero
In MicroStation 4.0 certain seed files were delivered with the active pattern scale set to 0.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Pattern | Set pattern scale
to one when it is zero”.
The error number is 375.
Range
Cell header’s diagonal is invalid
The cell header’s diagonal values are invalid. One of the low ranges (X, Y, or Z) is higher
than its corresponding high range.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Range | Repair diagonal
of cell header”.
The error number is 367.
Complex header range doesn’t match components’ range
The union of the range blocks of the components of the complex element header does not
match the range block of the complex header element itself. The percentage is determined
by dividing the deviation from perfection as calculated by FileFixer (in UORs) by the
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size of the element (in UORs). This test is performed on the x, y, and (for 3D files) z
axes. The worst (largest) of the error percentages is the one reported. Note that if the size
of the element (along the z-axis as an example) is very small (lets say 1 UOR as an
example), then a relatively small deviation from the ideal Z-High or Z-Low (lets say 50
UORs) would result in a large sounding percentage deviation (in this example 5000%). If
all this sounds confusing just remember this — to make sure that no range errors are
missed, FileFixer calculates the error using a method that sometimes generates large
sounding percentages. Don’t worry about it. Just use the repair option to adjust the
problem elements.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Range | Repair range of
complex header elements”.
The error numbers reported are 320 and 720. Error number 320 is generated when the
range is off by more than the user specified tolerance, but within the tolerance –70% and
900%.
Element size, excluding lines and line strings, is zero in all dimensions
The size of the element in all dimensions is zero. You will not be able to see this element
in any view.
To have FileFixer delete such elements, add this error number (185) to the “Options |
Repair… | Element | Remove elements with the following error numbers” list.
The error number reported is 185.
Low range greater than high range
The x-low value is greater than the x-high value, the y-low value is greater than the yhigh value, or the z-low value is greater than the z-high value. The z-range is checked for
3D files only.
Such elements may be ignored by plotting software and fence contents commands. They
usually will not be displayed by MicroStation.
The error number reported is 704.
Range of graphic element is causing a fit problem
Refer to the “How to fix FIT problems” section for information on this search option.
The error number reported is 107.
Range of graphic element is wrong
This option tests ranges of many types of graphic elements and therefore can generate
many different error codes.
“Acceptable element range of tolerance:” applies to all range tests and can be changed.
The image above shows the default.
The following error numbers are reported:
•
305 — This error is essentially similar to error 705, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance,
but within the tolerance -70% and 900%.
•
306 — This error is essentially similar to error 706, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance,
but within the tolerance -70% and 900%.
•
307 — This error is essentially similar to error 707, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance,
but within the tolerance -70% and 900%. See error 707 for more information.
•
309 — This error is essentially similar to error 709, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance,
but within the tolerance -70% and 900%.
•
312 — This error is essentially similar to error 712, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance,
but within the tolerance -70% and 900%.
•
324 — This error is essentially similar to error 724, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance,
but within the tolerance -70% and 900%.
•
325 — This error is essentially similar to error 725, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance,
but within the tolerance -70% and 900%. See error 725 for important information
about this error.
•
327 — This error is essentially similar to error 325. This error is generated for text
nodes that have no component elements if the range is off by more than the userspecified tolerance, but within the tolerance -70% and 900%..
•
330 — This error is essentially similar to error 730, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance,
but within the tolerance -70% and 900%.
•
705 — The range of an element with vertices, points, poles, etc. is incorrect. The
element range and the min-max of the vertices, points, poles, etc. that make up the
element doesn’t fall within the user specified tolerance.
•
706 — Types 26 and 28 elements should have the exact same range as their parent
header element. The range of this element doesn’t match its parent. The range of the
element needs to be corrected.
•
707 — The range of a b-spline pole element is incorrect. MicroStation sets the range
of this element type to the range of its type 24 b-spline surface header. The range of
this element does not match the range of its type 24 b-spline surface header.
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•
709 — All type 25 and type 21 that are components of b-spline curves should have
the exact same range as their parent header element. The range of this element
doesn’t match its parent. The range of the parent header element needs to be
corrected.
•
712 — FileFixer calculates the range of right circular truncated cones based on the
locations of their centers, radii, and quaternions. The range calculated by FileFixer
for this element doesn’t match the range stored in its element header.
•
724 —FileFixer calculates the range of arcs and ellipses based on the length of their
axes, angle of rotation, origin, start angle and sweep angle. The range calculated by
FileFixer for this element doesn’t match the range stored in its element header.
Note: EdG handles range calculations for flat arcs incorrectly and gives an
incorrect warning. Additionally, making a correction to the range of a flat arc
with EdG makes the element very difficult to select. Complex elements
containing such an arc can carry this problem.
For this reason, there may appear to be a discrepancy between EdG and
FileFixer. The MicroStation fix range utility and FileFixer do handle the range
of this type of element the same.
•
725 — The following errors are reported under this error number:
•
The range of this text element is incorrect.
•
FileFixer calculates the range of 2D and 3D text elements based on their origin,
number of characters, rotation or quaternions, length multiplier, and height
multiplier. As of version 4.0 of FileFixer, the font and the size of EACH
INDIVIDUAL CHARACTER is taken into account in determining the size of the
text element. This requires FileFixer to open and thoroughly analyze your font
library. The size of each character for each font is different. Therefore, You must
tell FileFixer to use the same font library that was used to create the text
elements. IF YOU TELL FileFixer TO USE THE WRONG FONT LIBRARY,
YOU MAY GET MANY TEXT RANGE ERRORS.
•
Some MicroStation versions before 4.0 appear to handle some fonts with word
size vectors (“Word size vectors” means that the width of each character is stored
in a word rather than a byte.) incorrectly. FileFixer correctly calculates the
position and range of text with such fonts, as do all versions of MicroStation after
4.0. To determine the vector size of a particular font, run the flib program that
comes with MicroStation on the font library. Example:
•
FLIB SPECIAL.FLB -LIST -FULL
•
The view independent bit of the property word may be set incorrectly. If the text
range appears to be correct, but FileFixer reports the text range as being widely
off, this is something you should suspect.
•
Version 4.02 (and probably other versions of MicroStation) set the range box of
view independent text non-optimally. FileFixer will set the range of view
independent text so that the range box encompasses the element no matter what
orientation a view containing the element is rotated to. The range box
surrounding view independent text should appear roughly twice as big as the text
itself. The anomaly in MicroStation is apparent mainly on very short (one or two
character) text strings. A few customers have asked why EdG sometimes reports
an error on an element where FileFixer doesn’t and vice versa. There are two
reasons for this: 1) FileFixer opens your font library and looks up the width of
each individual character in determining the correct range of a text element. EdG
does not; it uses an approximation of the text width. Therefore, FileFixer’s text
range calculations are more accurate than EdG’s. 2) By default FileFixer’s range
tolerance is (-10,30). We have determined by extensive study that if the range of
an element is no more than 10% too small or 30% too large, no problems will be
encountered in the use of that element. EdG reports range errors, which (in our
opinion) are not significant. If, however, you want to clean up every single range
error, no matter how small, just set FileFixer’s range tolerance to (-.001,.001)
and run the “Automatic Design File Repair”command.
If you wish to verify that FileFixer’s text range calculations are correct, do the
following test. 1) Find a text element in which you suspect FileFixer has set the
range incorrectly. 2) Use EdG to copy that element to its own file (after a type 9,
8, and 10). 3) Set FileFixer’s range tolerance to (-.001,.001). 4) Run FileFixer’s
“Automatic Design File Repair” command on the new (tiny) file. 5) Bring up
MicroStation with the output (.fix) file created by FileFixer. 6) Do a FIT
command. 7) Key-in SET RANGE. 8) Update the view. 9) You should see a box
surrounding the element. This is the range of the element. If the text in question
is View Independent, the box should be about twice as large as the text and the
text will not be centered in the box. If the text in question is not View
Independent, the box should fit (more or less) neatly around the element.
We don’t claim that FileFixer’s range calculations are perfect. We, however, are
not aware of any product or program (including MicroStation itself) that can
calculate ranges more accurately than FileFixer. If, after performing the test
described in the above paragraph, you find any instance where FileFixer worsens
the range of an element or, based on the test described above, any program
appears to adjust the range of an element better than FileFixer, please contact us
immediately.
•
727 — This error is essentially similar to error 725. This error is generated when
finding an incorrect range on a text node that has no component elements.
•
730 — FileFixer calculates the range of a shared cell instance based on the size of
the shared cell definition. The range calculated by FileFixer for this element doesn’t
match the range stored in its element header.
•
912 — Part of an element stored in VAX D floating point format contains an illegal
value. Under MS-DOS and CLIX, this error indicates that the value stored in the
element could not be converted to a valid IEEE format floating point value.
FileFixer Step Four
By default FileFixer doesn’t check for range errors on dimension elements, multi-line
elements, shared cell instances and tag elements. The reason for this is that to correctly
calculate the range of these elements the design file has to be loaded. If there are certain
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types of corruptions (e.g. words-to-follow errors) in the design file, then MicroStation
can’t load the design file. When an MDL application tells MicroStation to load a design
file and MicroStation can’t, then MicroStation will terminate all MDL applications
currently running. Which means FileFixer will be unloaded. So once you know you can
load the design file and you want to check for range errors on these types of elements,
you can turn off one or more of the following search options:
•
Skip dimension element range validation.
•
Skip mutli-line element range validation.
•
Skip shared cell instance element range validation.
•
Skip tag element range validation.
The search option “Skip text range validation” is used if you don’t way to test for range
errors on text elements. This is useful when you don’t have the font library or font
resource file.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Range | Repair range of
displayable elements”.
Raster
Raster pixels overflow the element’s length
A raster data element contains a number of pixels and the number of pixels count. This
will be reported if the number of pixels count is larger than the number of pixels that will
fit in this raster data element.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Raster | Handle raster
pixels that overflows the element’s length”.
The error number reported is 735.
Reference File
“2D file referenced to 3D” file flag isn’t set
If a 2D reference file is attached to a 3D design file then the 2D file referenced to a 3D
file flag must be set. If it isn’t then you will you strange results. You may get an MDL
abort when trying to load the file, or you may get zingers.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair… | Reference File | Set the
‘2D file referenced to 3D file’ flag”.
The error number reported is 711.
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Blank file name
A reference file attachment has been found with the number of characters in the file name
equal to zero.
The repair option that detects this error is “Options | Repair... | Reference File | Delete
reference file attachments with blank file names”.
The error number is 387.
Duplicate reference file attachment encountered
If more than one reference file attachment has the same file name and logical name, then
they are consider to be duplicates. MicroStation will only display the first occurrence of
the reference file.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Reference File | Delete
duplicate reference file attachments”.
The error number is 158.
Duplicate reference file logical name encountered
This element is a reference file attachment whose logical name matches a previous
reference file attachment in this design file.
One or the other of the reference file attachments may not display.
One or the other of the reference file attachments may not plot.
The error number reported is 342.
File name, logical or description strings underflow/overflow their fields
Associated with the file name, logical and description strings is a corresponding “number
of characters” field. The “number of characters” field holds the number of characters in
each string field. Whenever the number of characters is larger or smaller than the
physical size of its corresponding string field then MicroStation will abort when trying to
load the design file.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Reference File | Correct
the file name, logical or description strings from overflowing or underflowing their
fields”.
The error number is 388.
___ layers of reference files should be processed
This search option allows you to search for errors in and repair reference file attachments.
For example, let's say you set FileFixer to process two layers of reference files. Then if
design file “abc.dgn” has a reference file of “xyz.dgn” and “xyz.dgn”, itself, has a
reference file of “ghi.dgn”, all three files will be processed when you select design file
“abc.dgn” to be processed.
Missing reference file
The reference file may have been deleted.
The reference file may have been moved.
The missing reference file will not be displayed.
The missing reference file attachment will not plot.
The error number reported is 343.
Orphan raster reference attachment
A raster reference file attachment is composed of at least two raster reference file
attachment elements (type 90). The first type 90 is the header element, and the second
and subsequent elements (type 90) are component elements. Refer to the “Correct the
raster reference file component’s class” section in the section title “Raster Repair
Options” for a full description of the different types of raster reference file attachment
(type 90) elements.
The error numbers reported are 370 and 718 Error number 370 is reported when this is a
type 90 component element and the previous element is not a type 90 header element.
Error number 718 is reported when this is a type 90 component element without the
complex bit set, and the previous element is a type 90 header element that doesn’t include
this type 90 component element as part of its definition.
The repair option that corrects error number 718 is “Options | Repair… | WTF/WID |
Correct words-in-description problems”.
Raster reference file attachment width to height ratio is bad
Raster reference file attachments keep track of image files that are being displayed in
MicroStation. MicroStation supports many types of image files, such as TIFF, Windows
BMP, Intergraph CIT, etc.
An image file has a width value and a height value. Whenever an image file is made
larger or smaller the width and height values are adjusted the same. For example, if you
double the size of an image file then the width and height values are doubled. You don’t
adjust one more than the other. Saved in the raster reference file attachment is the
adjusted width and height values for how the image file is displayed in MicroStation. If
these values in the raster reference file attachment are not in the same ratio as what is
saved in the image file then MicroStation will abort. This ratio is what FileFixer is
checking.
FileFixer will only check a raster reference file attachment width to height ratio if it is for
a TIFF file.
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The repair option that corrects this error “Options | Repair… | Reference File | Fix raster
reference file attachment width to height ratio by…”.
The error number is 723.
Raster reference file component has an invalid class component
This search option checks to see if the class of a raster reference file attachment
component element is correct. It should be between 1 and 6. For a full description of the
classes of the raster reference file attachment elements refer to the section “Correct the
raster reference file component’s class” in the section “Raster Repair Options” in this
chapter.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair… | Raster | Correct the
raster reference file component’s class”.
The error number reported is 708.
V8 format reference file encountered
This search option checks for v8 files attached as references. This can happen when a V7
reference file is accidentally migrated to V8 format. After this, the file may not display in
the reference dialog, but the attachment data will still exist in the V7 master file.
With this option, you can identify the extent of any problem and arrange to replace V8
format files with V7 format files to correct the problem.
The error number reported is 149
Tag
There are three pieces to any tag:
1. Tag set element (type 66 level 24) — this element holds the tag set information you
defined in MicroStation.
2. Tag element (type 37) — this is the information you have tagged to an element.
3. Tagged element (any displayable MicroStation element) — this is the element that
you have tagged information to. The element uses attribute linkage information to
know which tag elements are associated with itself.
Element has tag linkage but no matching tag element (type 37) was
found
This element has tag attribute linkage, but there are no tag elements associated with this
element.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Tag | Remove tag linkage
from elements with no associated tag elements”.
The error number is 142.
Note: Some GeoPAK files use the tag ID value for intelligence. For this reason, this
option is off by default.
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Tag element is different from its definition in the tag set
The tag element is different than the information saved in the tag set element. You may
have changed how this tag is defined since the element was tagged.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Tag | Update tag element
from tag set”.
The error number is 143.
Tag element not associated with any element
This tag element is not associated with any displayable element.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Tag | Delete tags that are
not associated with any element”.
The error number is 140.
Tag set missing
The tag set element used to create tag elements is missing from this file. You may have
deleted it after using it to tag elements.
There is no repair option associated with this search option.
The error number reported is 160. It is reported when the tag set is missing from a design
file.
Tag set not used
This tag set is not used in this design file.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Tag | Delete unused tag
sets”.
The error number is 141.
Text
Duplicate text node number
This option checks for duplicate text node numbers in text node elements.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair… | Text | Fix duplicate text
node number.”
The error number reported is 167.
Rotation angle (2D only) is 360 degrees
When text elements are rotated from one angle to an angle of 0 degrees, it assigns an
angle of 360 degrees. This only occurs in a 2D design file.
The error number reported is 175.
Text element doesn’t contain any visible characters
This option checks to see if there are no visible characters in text elements. This includes
text elements that only have spaces in them. By default FileFixer will skip any text
elements that have enter-data-fields. If you turn on the “Treat empty enter-data-fields as
visible characters” then FileFixer won’t skip text elements that also have enter-datafields.
The error number reported is 146.
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Text element has zero characters
A text element with zero characters has been encountered.
The error number reported is 390.
Text element has zero height or width multipliers
Text elements should not have a zero width or height multiplier. These text elements
won’t be displayed correctly. They normally show up as a line or a point.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Text | Handle zero text
height or width multipliers”.
The error number is 326.
Text element uses non-existent character-font combination
The font library MicroStation is currently using does not contain the specified character
in the font used by this text element. If the character string shown in quotes is more than
one character long and ends with a lower case “x”, the bad character is an unprintable
character. What is shown in quotes is the hexadecimal representation of the character.
FileFixer currently doesn’t make this check.
The error number reported is 145.
Text element uses non-existent font
The font library MicroStation is currently using does not contain the font used by this text
element.
MicroStation will display this element using its default font.
The error number reported is 144.
Text rotation does not match its text node
All the text inside a text node should be parallel. This text element has a different rotation
than its parent text node.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Search... | Text | Set text rotation to
match its text node”.
The error number is 356.
Text string overflows the element’s length
The number of characters is incorrect. It says there are more characters than actually
exist.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Search... | Text | Correct the number
of characters field in text element”.
The error number is 560.
Text height or width too large or too small
The text height or width is either larger or smaller than normal. You have the ability to
specify the minimum and maximum sizes of the text multipliers in master units, sub-units
or positional units.
If the text height or width is too small than it might not be displayable in MicroStation.
If the text height or width is too large than it might cover up other elements when
displayed.
The error number reported is 150.
Bad text height to width or width to height ratio
The text height to width ratio is too large or the width to height ratio is large.
The text will not display correctly. The text will either be tall and narrow or wide and
short.
The error number reported is 152.
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Type/Level
Application element types:
Specify the application element types here. This way FileFixer won’t consider these
illegal element types.
Never used element types:
Specify the element types that you never use. This way FileFixer will consider these
illegal element types.
Element of this type should never have its A-bit set
This type of element can only be a component of a complex element. There it should
never have its A-Bit (attribute bit) set. This element does anyway.
This situation violates the rules of standard MicroStation file create, but causes no known
problems.
The error number reported is 316.
Illegal element type (0, 20, 127, etc.)
FileFixer found a type 1 element in a design file. The error number reported is 302.
FileFixer detected illegal element types, such as type 0, 20 and 127). The error number
reported is 380.
FileFixer detected types 8, 9 and 10 in a cell library. The error number reported is 382.
The repair option that corrects these errors is “Options | Repair... | Element | Remove
illegal element types (0, 20 and 127)”.
Questionable (not recognized) element type
This element’s type is not defined by MicroStation. It is either an application element
whose type the user failed to add (options screen) to the list of valid application elements,
or it is a corrupt element (garbage).
The element will either be ignored or treated as an application element.
The error number reported is 180.
Bad element type-level combination
Error number 115 is reported when an element is found on a level the user designated as
unacceptable. (The level indicated was not listed among the acceptable levels on the
options screen.)
Error number 715 is reported when an element that is not a type 2 element is found on
level “0”. Level 0 is not considered a valid MicroStation level except for type 2 cell
elements.
The repair option that corrects this error is “Options | Repair... | Element | Move elements
on unacceptable levels to level: _____”.
Chapter 12 — Search Options
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Vertices
Duplicate b-spline poles detected in a closed b-spline
A b-spline pole element (type 24) normally doesn’t have duplicated first and/or last poles,
and its first and last poles normally don’t match. Only under MicroStation SE does this
become a problem when the b-spline pole element is part of a closed b-spline. It causes
an MDL abort. The solution is to change the closed b-spline to an open b-spline.
The repair option that corrects this problem is “Options | Repair... | B-spline | Open the
closed b-spline that has duplicate b-spline poles”.
The error number reported is 905.
First and last vertex of type 6 shapes don’t match
The first and last vertex of a shape must always have the same location; otherwise the
shape is not closed.
If you have many of these, you should suspect that the header of this file is of the wrong
dimension.
The error number reported is 385.
Too few vertices on line string, shape, curve, etc.
Error number 788 is reported when a type 21 (b-spline pole) element has less than two
poles.
Error number 789 is reported when elements with vertices, points, etc. do not have a
minimum number of these.
Note that the number of visible vertices on a curve (type 11) and a conic (type 13) is
actually 4 less than that reported by EdG. The first and last two “vertices” are not
displayed, but are used only for determining the shape of the element near the end-points.
FileFixer reports the correct number of visible vertices. EdG intentionally reports the
total number of vertices the way EdG does for consistency. Therefore, a curve that EdG
reports as having 5 vertices actually has only 1 real (visible) vertex. FileFixer would flag
such an element. The minimum number of (visible) vertices for a shape (type 6) is 4.
Shapes with less than 4 vertices will be flagged with this error.
The repair option that detects error 789 is “Options | Repair... | Element | Remove
elements with too few vertices”.
Too many vertices on line string, shape, curve, etc.
Element types with vertices, points, etc. can have only so many of these.
Different programs have different tolerances to this problem. Some have problems if
there is even one too many vertices. Some don’t have problems until there are 20 or 30 or
more vertices more than there should be. Any program, however, given enough extra
vertices, will behave incorrectly. Note that the number of visible vertices on a curve (type
11) and a conic (type 13) is actually 4 less than that reported by EdG. The first and last
two “vertices” are not displayed, but are used only for determining the shape of the
element near the endpoints. Therefore, a curve that EdG reports as having 102 vertices
actually has 98 visible vertices. Such an element would be flagged by FileFixer. That is
why the number of vertices reported by EdG and FileFixer do not agree for these element
types. FileFixer reports the correct number of visible vertices. EdG intentionally reports
the total number vertices the way EdG does for the sake of consistency.
The error number reported is 787.
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WTF/WID
Dangerous element (WTF may be unreliable)
FileFixer uses a new algorithm that analyzes more than 20 element characteristics in
various combinations to determine the “trustworthiness” of an element’s WTF. Error
number 700 means there are numerous element, design file, and program variables in
combination which tell FileFixer the WTF is untrustworthy. The full explanation of how
FileFixer identifies an “untrustworthy” WTF is considered either proprietary and/or
beyond the intended scope of this documentation.
The repair option that corrects this problem is “Options | Repair... | WTF/WID | Fix
severe WTF errors (EOF not found)”.
The error number reported is 700.
Words-in-description error
FileFixer detects the following words-in-description problems:
•
Error number 505 — In a multiple nested complex element (nested more than one level
deep), an “inner” complex element ends after an “outer” complex element.
•
Error number 520 — The words-in-description word of a complex header element (like a cell,
a connected string, or a text node) points to a location that is not the start of a new element.
This is detected by scanning through the element using two different methods, 1) using
words-to-follow and 2) using words-in-description. If these two techniques don’t lead to the
same design file block/byte offset, something is wrong.
•
Error number 522 — The words-in-description word of a complex header element indicates
that the next element after the entire complex element (not just the header element) starts
after the end-of-designer marker. Another way of saying this is that we encountered the endof-design marker before we encountered the end of this complex element.
•
Error number 550 — This is a complex header with a one word words-in-description. The
words-in-description of this element exceeds 65516.
The repair option that corrects these errors is “Options | Repair... | WTF/WID | Correct
words-in-description problems”. Currently FileFixer doesn’t fix the error associated with
error number 550.
Words-to-follow does not match words-to-follow from back-up element
The words-to-follow saved in FileFixer’s WTF Cache Back-up Element does not match
the words-to-follow in the element. This is only a warning. The words-to-follow may be
corrupted and you can’t easily tell if this is true or not.
For example, the element’s words-to-follow is twice as big as it should be. The corrupted
element’s WTF is 60 words. The stored WTF in the back-up element is 30 words. The
element following the corrupted element is 30 words. Because of the corrupted WTF in
the element, MicroStation now doesn’t see the element following the corrupted element.
It just skips over it.
The error number reported is 179.
Words-to-follow error
FileFixer detects the following errors:
•
Error number 353 — The words-to-follow of this element is larger than expected. The next
element in the file shows a reasonable possibility of being a valid element. If not for the fact
that the A-Bit is turned off, the element’s index-to-attribute word would point to the expected
location of the linkage. The difference between the expected and the actual WTF is a multiple
of 4, and the difference between the expected and actual sizes indicates that the cause of this
anomaly could be the A-Bit of the element being turned off when there are indeed attribute
linkages.
•
Error number 354 — The words-to-follow of this element is larger than expected.
Nonetheless, the next element in the file shows a reasonable possibility of being a valid
element. One explanation for this is that the words-to-follow of the element is correct, but
some other part of the element that affects words-to-follow (such as number of vertices,
number of characters, number of Enter-Data-Fields, the A-Bit, etc.) is incorrect.
•
Error number 750 — Words-to-follow exceeds 65533. This is a problem because adding 2 to
a number larger than this (to get the total element length) will cause a 16 bit register
overflow. This will crash most MicroStation and MDL processors.
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•
Error number 754 —The words-to-follow of this element appears to be incorrect.
Furthermore, words-to-follow points to a location in the design file that does not appear to be
a valid element.
•
Error number 756 — Many applications allocate a 768 word buffer to store elements.
Attempting to read an element with a WTF larger than 768 can cause severe problems.
•
Error number 758— Siamese element. Words-to-follow is too small. This element and the
one following it share disk space. The end of this element and the beginning of the next are
using the same disk space. Words-to-follow of this element is too small.
The repair option that corrects these errors is “Options | Repair... | WTF/WID | Fix severe
WTF errors (EOF not found)”.
Chapter 13 — Design Fi le Diagnosis
Search for Problems mode
The next several sections of this document describe FileFixer’s “Search for Problems”
mode.
There are two situations in which you will probably run FileFixer in “Search for
Problems” mode. One situation might be called “PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE”
mode. In this mode you have FileFixer scan a large group of design files looking for
anything that might cause subtle (or not so subtle) problems with your design files. You
could then correct these problems before your operators encountered them and wasted a
lot of time trying to figure out what was going on.
When a file is undisplayable, not making it through some translator or plotting software,
or is behaving oddly you would use FileFixer in “EMERGENCY” mode. The intention
here would be to quickly discover what is wrong with this one file so that it can be
repaired on an immediate basis.
Basic design file diagnosis
When someone tells you he spent 4 hours repairing a design file with EdG, he’s actually
told a lie of sorts. The truth is, usually, that he spent 3 hours and 59 minutes using EdG to
figure out what was wrong with his design file, and 1 minute with the modify command
actually fixing it!
Chapter 13 — Design File Diagnosis
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The “Search for Problems” command addresses the real problem with using EdG to
repair design files: finding the bug. Using the report generated by FileFixer’s “Search for
Problems” command, most design file problems can be corrected in very little time.
The purpose of FileFixer’s “Search for Problems” command is to detect the following
broad categories of errors:
•
FATAL ERRORS. These are errors that completely prevent the design file from being
displayed at all.
•
FUTURE ERRORS. Design files don’t always get “sick” all of a sudden. Certain conditions
in a design file can indicate that its “resistance” is down or that it is susceptible to future
corruption. The “Search for Problems” command can detect such conditions so you can
correct the file before the problem becomes more serious.
•
COMPATIBILITY ERRORS. It is not uncommon for a design file to work correctly with one
piece of software (such as MicroStation), yet have problems with another piece of software
(such as a translator). The “Search for Problems” command can tell you when a design file is
not “ANSI standard” or that certain programs may have problems reading this design file.
Advanced C programmers might note a similarity between FileFixer’s “Search for
Problems” command and the “lint” utility that locates errors in C programs. (Now if we
could only get “lint” to automatically repair our C programs the way FileFixer repairs our
design files, we’d have it made.)
Advanced design file diagnosis
Many users will never need to use the advanced customizable analysis features of
FileFixer. But for those expert users who want greater control over exactly what errors
FileFixer searches for, FileFixer provides some special controls. These are accessed
under the Options menu by selecting “Search…”.
Tip: Note that these settings also affect the “Automatic Design File Repair” command.
Under certain circumstances, elements that fail the tests established by these settings,
may be omitted from the repaired version of the design file. This may or may not be what
you want.
Telling FileFixer what types of application elements you use
This feature is found at “Options | Search… | Type/Level”. FileFixer contains an internal
table telling it how common each application element type is. For example, type 51s
(APDP elements) are relatively common, while type 101s (unassigned) are nearly nonexistent. The table uses broad averages, taking into account all MicroStation users as a
whole. The application element type(s) used in your design files may have a very low
frequency value. This could cause three problems:
1. FileFixer’s “Search for Problems” command may list these elements with warnings
or errors.
2. These elements may be left out of your repaired files.
3. FileFixer will be able to fix words-to-follow errors more accurately if it knows more
specifically what element types to expect at your site, instead of relying entirely on
its internal table.
Any application elements you use, even if they are fairly common ones, should be listed
with this question.
Telling FileFixer what types of elements you NEVER use
This feature is found at “Options | Search… | Type/Level”. Telling FileFixer which
element types it should never find in a design file at your site will:
1. enable FileFixer to flag such unwanted elements with warnings, and
2. help FileFixer perform better repairs of your design file.
Telling FileFixer what level displayable elements can appear on
This feature is found at “Options | Search… | Type/Level”. You can also tell FileFixer on
which levels you allow displayable elements. Whenever FileFixer finds a displayable
element on a level you haven’t listed, it writes a message to its report file.
Assume MicroStation is using 127 levels?
This feature is found at “Options | Search… | Design File”. Versions of MicroStation
after 4.0 support up to 127 levels. (As of October 1991, this is an undocumented feature
used principally in electronics applications.) This is accomplished using the previously
unassigned Reserved-Bit in the first word of the element.
Turning this option ON does the following:
1. turns off Reserved-Bit checking, and
2. uses the Reserved-Bit as part of the levels indicator.
Don’t forget that if you want elements above level 63 not to be flagged as errors, you
must also change the “acceptable levels” field on the “Type/Level” screen.
Kind of errors to be reported on
Chapter 13 — Design File Diagnosis
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This feature is found at “Options | Search… | Design File”. FileFixer assigns a severity
level to each error it detects. The most severe errors are called “Fatal Errors”. The least
severe are called “Suspicious Conditions”. By default, all possible errors (suspicious
conditions and worse) are reported. If you want FileFixer to ignore the less serious error
conditions, modify this option. Valid selections are:
Setting the minimum unused (empty) design file border
This feature is found at “Options | Search… | Element”. Some plotting software has been
shown to be problematic when plotting design files with elements near the edge of the
design plane. FileFixer can help you detect elements that are near the edge of the design
plane. The Minimum Unused Border setting is used to determine how close an element
must be to the edge of the design plane before it is flagged as a possible problem by
FileFixer. A Minimum Unused Border of 1% means that if an element comes within 1%
(of the entire size of the design plane) to the edge of the design plane, it will be flagged
with a warning in the FileFixer output report file.
Detecting element range problems
FileFixer can detect errors in the range block of all displayable element types. In fact,
FileFixer’s ability to detect element range errors is more sensitive than MicroStation’s
ability to set the element range.
The range of an element (X-High, X-Low, Y-High, Y-Low, Z-High, and Z-Low) can be
either too small or too large. The range block being too large is a relatively minor error.
MicroStation will run less efficiently, but in most cases no serious errors will occur. The
range of an element being too small, however, is a more serious problem. In this case,
elements may become unselectable or undisplayable, and may be improperly omitted
from plots and fence manipulation commands.
Needless to say each part of the range block (X-High, X-Low, Y-High and Y-Low) can
be off by a lot or off by a little. FileFixer measures the amount of error with a fraction
expressed as a percentage. The numerator of the fraction is the number of UORs the
range block component is off by. The denominator is the correct size of the range block
in the specified dimension. Example:
Let’s say the range block should be for (0, 10) in the x direction and (20, 40) in the y
direction. The range stored in the element is (-1, 8) in the x direction and (21, 40) in the y
direction. The percentage errors for each range block component would be:
X-Low
+10% (position of X-Low makes the box too big)
X-High
-20% (position of X-High makes the box too small)
Y-Low
-5% (position of X-Low makes the box too small)
Y-High
0% (Y-High is exactly what it should be)
For the purposes of determining the error percentage, the minimum range block size is
assumed to be 1 UOR. This adjustment is needed so that zero area/volume elements such
as points do not generate divide by zero errors.
Element ranges are used primarily as a filter by design file scanning hardware and
software. They help the system quickly weed out elements that are nowhere near the area
of interest. (For example, when trying to snap to “Chicago” on a map of the USA, there
would be no reason to do a detailed analysis of whether “New York” should be
highlighted.) Once an element passes the “filter”, it still must undergo additional tests
before it is snapped to or included in a fence content manipulation command. These
additional tests are why absolutely precise element range blocks are not vital.
Although FileFixer will let you verify element ranges down to a tolerance of 0 UORs,
doing so is not recommended. Too many elements that are functionally normal will be
flagged as problem elements. The lowest you should ever set FileFixer’s element range
tolerance is .0001 (and even that’s EXTREME). Only when the element range is 20% or
more too small are you likely to encounter any problems with an element.
At present, FileFixer does not detect or correct the range of type 7 (text node) elements
when they contain no text elements. The range of other type 7 elements are verified and
corrected. Range errors in (raster header) elements are also not detected or corrected.
Chapter 14 — Immunize
Page 157
Chapter 14 — Immunize
Description of “Immunize” mode
Immunize mode is identical to “Search for Problems” mode except:
•
In “Immunize” mode, FileFixer can create its Enhanced Recovery back-up elements.
These elements are not created in “Search for Problems” mode.
•
In “Search for Problems” mode, the user can have FileFixer only report a certain
number of errors. In “Immunize” mode, there is no such restriction.
These elements can only be created in “Automatic Design File Repair” and “Immunize”
modes. Refer to the Enhanced Recovery section for a description of the back-up
elements.
Chapter 15 — Design Fi le Repair
“Automatic Design File” Repair mode
The following sections discuss the types of problems FileFixer can repair automatically
and how to use FileFixer to make such repairs.
Using yesterday’s backup
Probably the most common method of “repairing” design files in use in the world today
is deleting the damaged file and reloading yesterday’s backup.
The most obvious problem with this “technique” is that you can lose up to a full day’s
worth of work. With a day’s worth of operator and workstation time costing between
$100 and $600 a day, clearly this should be a last resort.
But there is a more important reason for not going back to yesterday’s backup. The error
that caused your file to become corrupted today might be dormant in yesterday’s backup.
Design files don’t always die a sudden death. A design file can be infected with a hidden
illness that won’t manifest itself until a later date. Likewise, if the graphic group counter
(GRAFIC) in the type 9 header element is set incorrectly (too low), every time the user
tries to create a new graphic group, MicroStation, instead of creating a new graphic
group, will append elements to an existing graphic group. These “crossed linked” graphic
groups can later cause elements to “mysteriously” disappear and manifest other problems.
Chapter 15 — Design File Repair
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The salient fact is this — you don’t know if the cause of today’s disaster was dormant in
yesterday’s backup. The safest solution is to analyze crashed design files, and fully repair
them whenever possible.
Basic design file repair
Even if you know absolutely nothing about MicroStation file structure you can still use
FileFixer to repair corrupted design files. Just start the program, select “Automatic
Design File Repair”, enter the name of the file you want to repair, and press the Start
button. Most design file I/O Errors and END OF FILE NOT FOUND errors would be
corrected automatically.
RULE — Don’t try to fix words-to-follow errors unless you are getting a “DESIGN
FILE I/O ERROR” or an “EOF NOT FOUND” error. Repairing a words-to-follow error
(a VERY serious error) sometimes leaves complex bit and words-in-description errors in
the design file (a relatively minor error). The tradeoff is worth it. But there is no point in
creating minor errors if you’re not eliminating more serious errors in return.
URGENT NOTE — Because no program that automatically repairs design files will ever
be totally perfect, it is important to create a backup copy of a design file before repairing
it with FileFixer. There are two reasons for this.
1. If anything non-optimal is later discovered about the fixed file, you will still have the
original file to work with. Although FileFixer generally does a good job of repairing
design files, the user is still the final judge as to whether the “fixed” file is truly
superior to the original file.
2. Only if we receive a copy of the original (unfixed) design file can our technical
support staff determine what, if anything, went wrong with a fix.
Advanced repair of “EOF Not Found” and “I/O” errors
Even though FileFixer can repair the majority of words-to-follow errors all by itself,
there are times when a little human help can go a long way. In order for you to be able to
provide that help, it is necessary to have at least a rudimentary idea of how FileFixer
repairs words-to-follow errors.
Every element in a valid design file (or cell library) contains a pointer to the beginning of
the next element. When an element has a words-to-follow error, this pointer is considered
to be unreliable and unusable. Therefore some other method must be used to figure out
where the next element starts.
When FileFixer encounters an element whose words-to-follow it believes to be in error, it
tries every possible block/byte offset looking for the start of a valid element chain (two or
more sequential, valid MicroStation elements). FileFixer uses a statistical method to
determine if each starting point could be the start of a valid element chain. The algorithm
can take any random string of bits and bytes and assign a statistical likelihood that this
sequence of binary data is a valid MicroStation element. After each potential element
starting point is analyzed, the algorithm adjudicates that (1) this is definitely not the start
of a valid element,(2) this probably is the start of a valid element chain or (3) we don’t
have enough information to decide (in which case it will scan ahead looking for more
information).
Depending on the statistical probability of each block/byte offset encountered being the
start of a valid MicroStation element, FileFixer will scan up to 2560 blocks beyond the
original block/byte offset to help it determine if the original candidate block/byte offset is
the start of a valid element. Discovery of even one well-tested, high certainty element
(like a type 17 - text element) may be all that is needed to recover from a words-to-follow
error. But even 10, apparently valid, low certainty elements, (like types 39, 65, and 82) in
a row might not be considered enough to constitute a valid element chain.
Telling FileFixer What Types of Application Elements You Use or Don’t Use — The
element types from 1 to 28 as well as some of the application elements are well
standardized and well known. This makes it fairly easy for FileFixer to determine if a
certain location in a design file is the start of a valid instance of one of these element
types. But for many non-graphic element types very little is known. This can make it very
difficult for FileFixer to determine if these elements are valid. You can specify the
application element types on the “Options | Search... |Type/Level” dialog box.
As an example, it’s very easy to determine if a type 17 element (text) is valid. FileFixer
can compare the number of characters, Enter-Data-Fields, attribute linkages, element
range, text height, text width, property bits, and other information to determine if the
element is valid. If a type 17 passes all of these tests, we can be pretty well sure it’s a
valid element.
But we know almost nothing about a type 39. There are some tests we can do (checking
the reserve bit for example) to determine if a type 39 is valid, but even when a type 39
passes the limited tests we do have, we can’t be very certain that it is a valid element.
When you specify which element types you use and don’t use, FileFixer is greatly
assisted. You are providing information regarding elements about which we know the
least.
In general it is highly recommended that the search option “Options | Search... | Element |
Illegal element type (0, 20, 127, etc.)” be selected whenever you are attempting to repair
words-to-follow errors. Type 0 (and possibly other illegal elements) will likely be found
in the output (.fix) file, if this is not done.
Telling FileFixer which element types are and aren’t acceptable can help FileFixer
maximize the number of valid elements and minimize the number of invalid elements
that are recovered from a damaged design file.
See the documentation section ADVANCED DESIGN FILE DIAGNOSIS for more
information about how FileFixer uses the information about legal and illegal element
types.
Telling FileFixer What Levels Displayable Elements Can Appear On — Telling
FileFixer on which levels displayable elements can validly exist helps it recover desired
elements and weed out invalid elements.
Chapter 15 — Design File Repair
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Setting the filter factor
In most cases the default Filter Factor does a fairly good job. Since the default Filter
Factor works so well, changing the Filter Factor has only a relatively small chance
improving the repair of a design file. But for some design files, experimenting with the
Filter Factor might just save the day.
The Filter Factor determines how selective FileFixer is in determining when it has
encountered a valid element chain. If the Filter Factor is too low, FileFixer may think it
has encountered a valid element chain when it has not. If the Filter Factor is too high,
FileFixer might ignore a valid element chain.
Basically, the Filter Factor is how many “points” a chain must score before it is
considered “valid”.
Setting the Filter Factor too low usually results in invalid elements being added to the
repaired version of the design file. It can also (less frequently) cause recoverable
elements to be left out of the repaired design file.
Setting the Filter Factor too high can result in recoverable elements being left out of the
repaired design file.
The more accurately you set the list of valid element types and levels, the lower the Filter
Factor that can be tolerated.
This repair option is found at “Options | Repair... | WTF/WID”.
Enabling Backscanning
This is found at “Options | Repair... | WTF/WID”.
It’s one thing to miss your exit on the freeway, it’s another thing entirely to not turn
around and go back when you realize your error. FileFixer does a pretty good job at
detecting words-to-follow errors. But, some words-to-follow errors are difficult or
impossible to detect. For example, determining the accuracy of the words-to-follow of a
deleted complex element header is next to impossible. Sometimes, despite the best
intentions of its author, FileFixer will pass a words-to-follow error and find itself lost in
the middle of a corrupted design file uncertain whether it has already gone past valid,
recoverable elements. Backscanning gives FileFixer the ability to retrace its steps, get
back on the road, and continue its mission of repairing your design file or cell library.
If backscanning is enabled and FileFixer cannot find a valid end of design marker, endof-design marker at the end of a design file (and under certain other circumstances),
FileFixer assumes it has done something wrong (like let an undetectable words-to-follow
error slip by). It then goes back to the point in the design file where it was POSITIVE it
had a good element and scans forward (very carefully and slowly) looking for valid
elements it might have missed. This helps ensure that no stone is left unturned in
recovering valid elements from your damaged design file.
Question: If backscanning is so good, why is it just an option? Why isn’t it enabled all
the time?
Answer: Backscanning can recover unwanted elements. The components of deleted
complex elements (whose delete bits are not set) are particularly prone to being brought
back to life by the backscanning option.
Only occasionally will backscanning recover additional, desired elements. But if you find
that FileFixer hasn’t recovered all the elements you expected, give it a try.
Note: Backscanning may recover unwanted elements. The components of deleted
complex elements (whose delete bits are not set) are particularly prone to being brought
back to life by the backscanning option. However, if you find that FileFixer hasn't
recovered all the elements you expected, try this option.
Additional data about automatic repair
Sometimes the .fix file created by FileFixer will have fewer elements than the original
.dgn file. Why is this? When FileFixer is trying to determine where the next valid
element starts after encountering an element with a corrupt words-to-follow, it makes
very certain not to include any elements that are not COMPLETELY valid. In actual fact,
you may want to include elements that are slightly corrupted. At this time FileFixer does
not, when trying to find the first valid element after a corrupt words-to-follow,
differentiate between slightly corrupt elements and very corrupt elements. This still
requires human intelligence. If there are certain types of minor corruption you don’t mind
having in your design file, turn off the validation check that checks for that type of
corruption. Future versions of FileFixer will address this issue in a more automated
fashion.
Summary of rules on fixing words-to-follow errors:
1. If a design file produces an “EOF not found” or a “Design file I/O error”, fix this
problem first. Turn off all other types of repair and press the Start button.
2. If step 1 produces a valid design file, but many elements seem to be missing, turn on
the backscanning option and repeat step 1.
3. If many elements are still missing from the file, additionally select the “Options |
Repair... | Element | Recover elements after the End-of-Design marker” repair option
and repeat step 1.
4. If many elements are still missing, reduce the Filter Factor option to 50 or so. With
these settings FileFixer should recover nearly all recoverable elements (but also some
“elements” that are either not completely valid or that you don’t want). Repeat step 1.
5. If you’re still missing lots of elements, try turning off some of the validation rules,
you don’t mind your elements violating. For example, you may not care if your
elements have H-Bit or Complex bit errors in them. Repeat step 1.
Chapter 15 — Design File Repair
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6. If you’re still missing lots of elements, you can be certain that a good portion of the
file cannot be salvaged — even by FileFixer. Retrieve the most recent backup copy
of the file you can use.
Tip: It may be possible that an earlier copy, even if corrupt, is less corrupt than your
current file and FileFixer may succeed in repairing that one.
How to recover elements after the end-of-design mark
Sometimes an end-of-design marker will get written right into the middle of your design
file. When that happens, all the elements after the misplaced end-of-design marker will
disappear. It is even possible for more than one end-of-design marker to get written to the
middle of a design file.
To recover elements after a misplaced end-of-design marker, follow these instructions:
•
Select FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” menu.
•
Turn on the toggle for the repair option “Recover elements past the end-of-design
marker” (found at “Options | Repair... | Element”). Note that when you do this, the
“Fix EOF Not Found’” option will automatically be turned on. This is because when
you recover elements after an end-of-design marker, you must also clean up all the
words-to-follow errors that are generated in doing so.
•
Press the START button.
FileFixer will read past a maximum of 1000 end-of-design markers looking for additional
valid elements. A new design file with a .fix extension will be created containing all the
valid elements encountered.
Note: Because this command will also read past the “real” end-of-design marker, it may
recover more elements than you bargained for. If this happens, just use Problem Element
Viewer to delete the elements you don’t want.
How to fix complex bit errors
FileFixer now has the ability to repair complex bit errors automatically. To repair
complex bit errors, use the “Automatic Design File Repair” command of FileFixer. Turn
on the “Correct complex bit errors” repair option. Click on OK and then click on the Start
button. FileFixer will take care of the rest.
This option is found at “Options | Repair… | Complex”.
Note: FileFixer uses the information stored in the words-in-description of complex
header elements in the design file being repaired. If the design file being repaired also has
words-in-description errors, it is much better to repair these before repairing complex
bits. Otherwise, you might create more complex bit errors than you eliminate.
How to fix element range errors
FileFixer can detect and eliminate element range errors. By default, this type of repair is
performed. Below you will see that the “Repair range of complex header elements” and
“Repair range of displayable elements” repair options are on.
These options are found at “Options | Repair… | Range”.
When repairing element ranges, FileFixer will:
•
Determine if the X-Low, X-High, Y-Low, Y-High, Z-Low, or Z-High need to be adjusted.
You tell FileFixer how accurate each of these range components must be when you specify
the ELEMENT RANGE TOLERANCE on the Search Options dialog box (at “Options |
Search… | Range”).
•
If any of the above need to be adjusted, just that one component is adjusted; the others are
unchanged.
Example:
The element range tolerance is set to (-30, 90), the default. X-Low is 35% CLOSER to XHigh than it should be. X-High is 50% FURTHER from X-Low than it should be. Y-Low
is 10% CLOSER to Y-High than it should be. Y-High is 110% FURTHER from Y-Low
than it should be. (I realize this may be a bit confusing. Suffice it to say that X-Low and
Y-High are sufficiently inaccurate to alert FileFixer.) In this case, X-Low and Y-High
would be adjusted, but not the other two components of the range. (We’re assuming this
is a 2D element).
Basically, this is another way of saying: FileFixer plays it safe. It changes only those
parts of the element that really need changing. If you want FileFixer to set all the element
ranges to their theoretical ideals, you can set the element range tolerance to (-0, 0). But
for most practical purposes the default element range tolerance should prove adequate
and effective.
See the section called DETECTING ELEMENT RANGE PROBLEMS in the section
“DESIGN FILE DIAGNOSIS” for more information about the element range tolerance.
Chapter 15 — Design File Repair
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How to fix FIT problems
There are a couple of reasons why the MicroStation FIT command doesn't work properly.
They are:
•
Range of an element is bad.
•
You have one or more elements that are a large distance away from the rest of the elements.
Running FileFixer in “Automatic Design File Repair” mode solves the first problem.
This will fix the ranges of all displayable elements.
The second problem is not easily solved. FileFixer has a RANGE OF GRAPHIC
ELEMENT IS CAUSING A FIT PROBLEM search option. What FileFixer does is
compute a rectangle around 95% or more of the displayable elements, and then checks to
see if there are any elements some distance away from that rectangle. This distance away
is determined by the percentage you specify in the ACCEPTABLE ELEMENT RANGE
TOLERANCE field. The default is 300%. Normally you won't need to increase this
percentage, but you may need to lower it. By trial and error you can keep changing this
percentage until you get a couple of elements that show up in the report file with an error
code of 107. You can use Problem Element Viewer to look at these elements and
determine if they are valid or not. If they are not valid, then you should delete them. FIT
may work fine now. If not, you may need to use this procedure a couple of times to find
all the elements that are causing FIT to display incorrectly.
How to fix words-in-description errors
All complex header elements have a words-in-description word. Just as words-to-follow
describes how long an individual element is, words-in-description tells how long the
entire complex element (usually made up of many individual elements) is. When the
words-in-description of a complex header element is wrong, you can get complex bit
errors and elements can be left out of cell and complex shape manipulations. Worst of all,
under certain circumstances, deleting an element with a words-in-description problem
can corrupt your entire design file! Words-in-description problems are not good things to
leave around in your design file.
Here’s how you fix words-in-description problems.
•
If the file has words-to-follow errors, fix this first. Do this using the Repair Options
“Fix severe WTF errors (EOF not found)” and “Fix WTF warnings” and the
“Automatic Design File Repair” command.
•
After you have fixed all words-to-follow errors, get back into the “Automatic Design
File Repair” command.
•
Name the previous output (.fix) file as the design file you want to repair.
•
Turn off all Repair Options except “Correct words-in-description” errors.
•
Press the Start button.
FileFixer should fix about 97% of the words-in-description errors it encounters. Whether
a particular words-in-description error is fixed depends upon the following:
A. Word-in-description problems are the only things wrong with this file.
B. The complex header element to be fixed is not itself a component of another
(bigger) complex.
If A and B are both true, then the chances of FileFixer correctly fixing the words-indescription is nearly 100%. Even when A and B are not both true, FileFixer has an
excellent chance of correctly fixing the words-in-description. This is because FileFixer
analyzes up to six different characteristics of complex elements and determines which of
a number of possible words-in-description values yield the greatest likelihood of
producing a correctly nested complex element which violates the fewest rules of
MicroStation element construction.
Even in those few instances when FileFixer fails to recreate the original words-indescription value, the value it does generate should always (in theory, anyway) be at least
as good or better than the erroneous words-in-description it replaces. Even in the worst
case, when FileFixer finishes its job, deleting the complex element with the repaired
words-in-description will no longer cause the entire design file to get corrupted.
After repairing words-in-description errors, you may need to run the “Automatic Design
File Repair” command again with only “Correct complex bit” repair option turned on to
correct any complex bit errors that might have been created while fixing (the more
serious) words-in-description errors.
You can learn more about words-in-description problems by studying FileFixer error
numbers 505, 520, and 522 in the “Error Messages” section of this guide.
Using Enhanced Recovery
Beginning with version 7.7d, FileFixer builds back-up elements so that words-to-follow
data and critical (non-graphic) elements can be recovered. The back-up elements are
created automatically in “Immunize” mode. They can also be created in “Automatic
Design File Repair” mode by turning on Options | Enhanced Recovery Options | “Build
back-up elements based on the above two options in “Automatic Design File Repair”
mode.” FileFixer has the ability to create two types of back-up elements:
•
The first back-up element type is called the WTF Cache Back-up Element. It
contains a copy of the words-to-follow and the first byte (containing the deletion bit
and element type) of every element in the design file.
•
The second back-up element type is called the Critical Elements Cache Element. The
loss of certain MicroStation element types results in catastrophic, unrecoverable data
loss. Each MicroStation application has the potential to create its own such elements.
FileFixer's new Critical Elements Cache contains a copy of user-specified critical
elements along with their offset in the design file. The following dialog box shows
you which critical elements you can choose to back up:
Chapter 15 — Design File Repair
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FileFixer will create one or more of each back-up element type. Usually there will be just
one of each, but there can be up to ten depending on the size of the design file and certain
other factors. The first back-up element will always be the fourth element in the design
file. Back-up elements will always be stored as deleted elements.
When FileFixer encounters an element that has a words-to-follow error and it wasn’t able
to compute the words-to-follow value, it used to just delete the element and skip to the
next location where it could find a valid element. Now FileFixer can try inserting the
words-to-follow value saved in the WTF Cache Back-up Element and see if that fixes the
problem. If it doesn’t then it can try recovering the element from the Critical Elements
Back-up Element (if that is one of the elements that the user instructed FileFixer to
backup).
The back-up elements are created as deleted elements, so whenever you compress your
design files they will be deleted (compressed out). The sizes of the back-up elements are
quite large. The size of both the WTF Cache Back-up Elements and the Critical Elements
Back-up Elements are 63,024 words (126,048 bytes; approximately 124KB). Each WTF
Cache Back-up Element can hold enough information for 42,000 elements. Each Critical
Elements Back-up Element can hold enough information for about 2,033 elements if their
average size is 30 words.
The steps of manual file fixing
The steps of file fixing can be summarized as follows:
1. All types of repair that might remove elements or pieces of elements from the design
file. This includes fixing words-to-follow errors and removing unwanted elements.
2. Words-in-description repairs.
3. All other repairs.
Each step requires its own run of the Manual Design File Repair command. Never
combine a repair from one step with a repair from another. Unneeded steps can be
skipped, but don’t do any steps out of sequence.
Note that the “Automatic Design File Repair” command takes care of all of these
problems for you automatically. The Manual Design File Repair command is more or less
obsolete. The “Automatic Design File Repair” command should be used in most cases.
Manual Design File Repair command is useful when you only want to do a couple of
repair types (e.g. words-to-follow and words-in-description, etc.). By default most Repair
Options are turned off, this way you only need to turn on the Repair Options you need.
Chapter 16 — Reports
Page 169
Chapter 16 — Reports
Report Summary
The first “landmark” to check in a report file is the Report Summary. By default, this
summary is at the top of the report.
Your Report Summary might look like this:
Report Summary
No errors were found.
If so, you’re done!
Otherwise, your Report Summary indicates what is reported in the remainder of the
report file. The number on the left in the “Report Summary” section is the number of
times that an element with this type of error was encountered and is the total for all files
that were processed in that run:
Report Summary
...5 -- Text element doesn't contain any visible characters.
[146].
...4 -- Duplicate text node number was found. [167].
...9 -- Complex header range is incorrect. [320].
2 -- Range of arc or ellipse is incorrect.
[324].
Usually the best strategy is to find the highest (most severe) error number and use the
Edit | Find feature of NotePad or your Browser to locate instances of the most severe
error in your report. Such a search will usually jump to the detail portion of the report
file. Here’s an excerpt from an actual report:
3 -- Phantom element. Complex bit set for non-component. [702]
9 -- Cell "10". Cell header's diagonal is invalid. [367]
25 -- Text string doesn't contain any visible characters.
[146]
61 -- Arc or ellipse range is off by -52.8%. [324]
As in the above excerpt, each detail line in your reports will contain the following:
Element number -- Error message. [Error number].
Each of these three parts is described below.
Element Number
The leftmost number is the sequential number of the element in the file and is unique for
each element in the file.
The FileFixer Error Message and Error Number
In each detail line of a FileFixer report (as in the above example), the element number is
followed by a FileFixer error message and an error number in square brackets.
The “Error Messages” section of this guide describes each error by number and will
direct you to the recommended handling for any problem not handled automatically by
FileFixer default options. You can access this information most easily via the Help |
Contents menu on the FileFixer dialog box. Go to the report index, where you will see a
list of error numbers to select from.
Chapter 17 — Which error messages are generated by which option?
Page 171
Chapter 17 — Which err or messages are
generated by which option?
Adjusting the types of errors to be reported on
Sometimes you may not want FileFixer to report all the corruption it finds.
For example, you receive a design file from a contractor but he didn’t send the font
resource file he used. Well if you don’t have a font resource file with that font number,
then FileFixer will report a lot of errors telling you that that font doesn’t exist. Since you
know about this problem and you will be receiving the font resource file soon, then you
could turn off the option that tells FileFixer to check for fonts that don’t exist. This will
stop you from searching through a lot of errors, which really aren’t errors, and you can
see the errors that need to be addressed.
The following four tables show you which possible error messages occur for which
Search or Repair options, sorted by category then sorted by error number.
Under the “Repair-type error messages sorted by category” section below you will find
which step each repair option is repaired on. This includes all three steps, Step 1 (WTFwords to follow problems), Step 2 (WID-words in description problems and Step 3 all
other problems.
Search-type error messages sorted by category
Category
Search Options Description
Default
Value
Error
Messages
ARC/Ellipse
Arc or ellipse axis is too long.
On
117
Arc or ellipse origin is off the design
plane.
On
118
Arc’s sweep angle is invalid.
On
318
B-spline has illegal number of one type
of component.
On
731
Elements in b-spline are in wrong
sequence.
On
784
Cell is nested within itself.
On
383, 783
Duplicate shared cell or library cell
definition.
On
766
B-spline
Cell
Category
Complex
Default
Value
Error
Messages
H-bit (orphan flag) not set in orphan
cell.
On
572
Nesting level is too deep (greater than
12).
On
565
Non-shared cell is not on level 0.
On
741
Non-shared cell level or class map is
incorrect.
On
716, 717
Null name in cell library.
On
570
Shared cell instance has no shared cell
definition.
On
768
Shared cell level or class mask is
incorrect.
On
769, 770
Shared cell definition with no shared
cell instance.
On
303
Shared instance level doesn’t match
definition.
Off
171
Stray elements between library cells
(type 1s) in cell library.
On
355
Type 2 in cell library is not part of a
library cell (type 1).
On
571
Complex bit is on for a non-component
element.
On
702
Complex bit is on for an element with
database linkage.
Off
138
Complex bit is off for a component
element.
On
703
Complex element contains disallowed
element type.
On
86, 323, 721
Component on different level than its
header.
On
336
Component graphic group doesn’t
match header.
On
341
Component symbology doesn’t match
header.
On
337, 338, 339
Search Options Description
Chapter 17 — Which error messages are generated by which option?
Category
Design File
Dimension
Element
Page 173
Default
Value
Error
Messages
Curves and conics within complex
shapes and curves.
Off
131
Curve or conic with consecutive
identical vertices.
On
190
Element must be nested in complex.
On
719
Incorrect number-of-components in
complex header.
On
322, 334
Line string is missing from complex
chain.
Off
555
Zero components in complex element.
On
328
Design file range doesn’t match the
range of the graphical elements.
On
111
Dynamic fence displaying not working
in saved view.
On
164
File size is not a multiple of 512 bytes.
On
108
All data points and/or associative
points are the same.
Off
321
Dimension element with no data points
or associative points.
On
722
X, y or z range of cell being used as
dimension element’s terminator
symbol is zero.
On
310, 742
2D element found in 3D file.
On
362, 762
3D element found in 2D file.
On
362, 762, 776
Deleted phantom element detected.
Complex bit set but not part of a
complex element.)
Off
147
Element class is illegal (must be less
than 7).
On
333
Element is locked.
On
120
Graphic group number equals or
exceeds GRAFIC.
Off
531
H-bit is set when it shouldn’t be.
On
304
Orphan linear patterned element
detected. (Pattern component elements
Off
148
Search Options Description
Category
Default
Value
Error
Messages
Reserved bit is set.
On
103
Reserved nibble is non-zero.
On
132
Text node number equals or exceeds
CANODE.
Off
530
Element is too close to edge of design
plane.
On
119
An EDF extends past the end of the
text string.
On
347
An EDF has a length of zero.
On
350
An EDF has an unrecognized
justification.
On
346
An EDF is out of sequence.
On
348
One EDF overlaps another.
On
349
Text element has more EDFs than
characters.
On
191
Too many Enter-Data-Fields (more
than 20).
on
335
Active angle is invalid.
On
163
Active level is out of range (greater
than 63).
On
155
CANODE not equal to highest text
node number plus 1.
On
135, 535
Cell library header must be 23 words.
On
159
Deleted type 9, 8 or 10 detected.
On
101
Design file header length must be 766
words.
On
157
Error in type 9 header element (on
wrong level or GRAFIC is zero).
On
109, 126,
128, 311,
526, 528,
701, 329
Extra design file header (type 9 level
8).
On
170
GGBASE (graphic group base number) On
is greater than GRAFIC.
153
Search Options Description
are deleted.)
Enter-DataFields
Headers
Chapter 17 — Which error messages are generated by which option?
Page 175
Default
Value
Error
Messages
GRAFIC is not equal to highest
graphic group plus 1.
On
134, 534
Missing vital element (like type 9, 8 or
10).
On
710, 713,
714, 902
NNBASE (text node base number) is
greater than CANODE.
On
154
Working units must be non-zero.
On
156
A-bit is turned on, but there’s no
attribute linkage.
On
369
Cross-linked associative ID.
On
308
Database linkage (entity-MSLink)
unique for all files being checked.
Off
177
Database linkage (entity-MSLink)
unique for each file.
Off
177
Incorrect count of enhanced precision
points or vertices
On
726
Index-to-attributes error.
On
301, 510,
512, 513,
514, 515
Linkage area is suspiciously long.
Off
161, 761
MicroStation application (Modeler,
TriForma) attribute linkage found.
On
162
Multiple instances of line style linkage.
On
139
Null filled linkage.
On
165
OLE application element detected.
Off
775
Orphan database linkage.
On
178
Siamese attributes linkage (linkage
overlaying the next element).
On
364
User linkage is not a multiple of 4
words.
On
365
Pattern
Pattern scale is zero.
On
375
Range
Cell header’s diagonal is invalid.
On
367
Complex header range doesn’t match
components’ range.
On
320, 720
Element size, excluding lines and line
On
185
Category
Linkage
Search Options Description
Default
Value
Error
Messages
Low range greater than high range.
On
704
Range of graphic element is causing a
fit problem
On
107
Range of graphic element is wrong.
On
305, 306,
307, 309,
312, 324,
325, 327,
330, 705,
706, 707,
709, 712,
724, 725,
727, 730, 912
Raster
Raster pixels overflow the element’s
length.
On
735
Reference
File
‘2D file reference to 3D file’ flag isn’t
set correctly.
On
711
Blank file name.
Off
387
Duplicate reference file attachment
encountered.
On
158
Duplicate reference file logical name
encountered.
On
342
File name, logical or description strings On
overflow their fields.
388
Missing reference files.
On
343
Orphan raster reference attachment.
On
370, 718
Raster reference file attachment width
to height ratio is illegal.
On
723
Raster reference file component has an
invalid class.
On
708
Element has tag linkage but no
matching tag element (type 37) was
found.
Off
142
Tag element is different from its
definition in the tag set.
Off
143
Tag element not associated with any
On
140
Category
Search Options Description
strings, is zero in all dimensions
Tag
Chapter 17 — Which error messages are generated by which option?
Category
Page 177
Default
Value
Error
Messages
Tag set missing.
On
160
Tag set not used.
Off
141
Duplicate text node number.
On
167
Rotation angle (2d only) is 360
degrees.
Off
175
Text element doesn’t contain any
visible characters.
On
146
Text element has zero characters.
On
390
Text element has zero width or height
multiplier.
On
326
Text element uses non-existent
character-font combination.
On
145
Text element uses non-existent font.
On
144
Text rotation does not match its text
node.
On
356
Text string overflows the element
length.
On
560
Text height or width is too large or too
small.
Off
150
Text height to width or width to height
ratio is bad.
Off
152
Bad element type-level combination.
On
115, 715
Element of this type should never have
its a-bit set.
On
316
Illegal element type (0, 20, 127, etc.).
On
302, 380, 382
Questionable (not recognized) element
type.
On
180
Duplicate b-spline poles detected in a
closed b-spline.
On
905
First and last vertex of type 6 (shape)
doesn’t match.
On
385
Too few vertices on line string, shape,
curve, etc.
On
788, 789
Search Options Description
element.
Text
Type/Level
Vertices
Category
WTF/WID
Default
Value
Error
Messages
Too many vertices on line string,
shape, curve, etc.
On
787
Dangerous element (WTF may be
unreliable).
On
700
Words-in-description error.
On
505, 520,
522, 550
Search Options Description
On
Words-to-follow does not match
words-to-follow from back-up element.
179
Words-to-follow error.
353, 354,
754, 756, 758
on
Repair-type error messages sorted by category
Default
Value
Error
Step
Messages Repaired On
Category
Repair Option Description
ARC/Ellipse
Fix or delete arc/ellipse whose
origin is off the design plane.
Off
118
3
B-spline
B-splines with illegal component
counts.
On
731
3
Open the closed b-spline that has
duplicate b-spline poles.
On
905
3
Adjust non-shared cell level mask or
class map.
On
716, 717
3
Adjust shared cell level mask or
class map.
On
769, 770
3
Create dummy shared cell definition
for missing definition.
Off
768
3
Correct null cell names (type 2s
only) by setting the H-bit.
On
570
1
Delete cell nested within itself.
Off
383, 783
1
Delete duplicate shared cell
definitions.
Off
766
3
Delete shared cell definition with no
shared cell instance.
Off
303
3
Move non-shared cell headers back
On
741
1
Cell
Chapter 17 — Which error messages are generated by which option?
Page 179
Default
Value
Error
Step
Messages Repaired On
Move shared instance to definition
level.
Off
171
2, 3
Remove stray elements from
between library cells (type 1s).
On
355
3
Set H-bit (orphan flag) in orphan
cell.
On
572
1
Add missing line string to bridge
gap in complex chain.
Off
555
3
Correct complex bit errors.
On
702, 703
3
Correct number-of-component
problems.
On
322
3
Delete complex elements with no
components.
On
328
3
Move components to same level as
complex header.
On
336
3
Set graphic group of component to
match its header.
Off
341
3
Set symbology of components to
match its header.
on
337, 338,
339
3
Complex
Handle illegal components in
complex element.
On
Design File
Correct the design file range
(DFRANG).
Off
111
3
Fix problem with dynamic fence not
displaying in a saved view.
On
164
3
Handle the x, y or z range of a cell
being used as a dimension element’s
terminator symbol by
On
742
3
Remove dimension element with no
data points or associative points.
On
722
3
Correct rotation angle (2d only)
from 360 to 0.
On
175
1
Fix reserved bit by clearing it -SAY ‘NO’ IF USING 127
LEVELS?
Off
103
3
Recover elements past the end-of-
Off
79
1
Category
Complex
Dimension
Element
Repair Option Description
to level 0.
Category
Enter-DataFields
Headers
Linkage
Default
Value
Error
Step
Messages Repaired On
Remove elements with too few
vertices.
On
789
1
Remove illegal element types (0, 20
and 127).
On
302, 380,
382, 762,
776
1
Re-sequence text node numbers.
Off
137
3
Re-sequence graphic group
numbers.
Off
136
3
Set illegal class to ____.
Off
333
3
Turn off illegal a-bits.
On
369
3
Turn off illegal h-bits.
On
304
3
Unlock Element.
Off
120
3
Change zero-length EDF to length 1. On
350
1
Correct EDFs which overlap or are
out of sequence.
On
349
1
Correct EDFs justification by setting
it to the text element’s justification.
On
346
3
Correct EDF/text length
mismatches.
On
191, 335,
347
1
Correct 2D/3D dimension bits in the
file header.
On
701
1
Delete duplicate design file header.
On
170
3
Recover deleted vital elements (like
type 9, 8 or 10).
On
713, 714,
902
1
Set active angle to ____.
Off
163
3
Set GRAFIC to one more than the
largest graphic group number.
On
134, 534
3
Set CANODE to one more than the
largest text node number.
On
135, 535
3
Set incorrect NNBASE to zero.
Off
154
1
Delete user linkages which are not a
multiple of 4 words.
On
365
1,3
Fix incorrect count of enhanced
precision points or vertices
On
726
3
Repair Option Description
design marker.
Chapter 17 — Which error messages are generated by which option?
Page 181
Default
Value
Error
Step
Messages Repaired On
Remove all OLE files and OLE
application elements.
Off
775
3
Remove multiple instances of line
style linkage.
Off
139
3
Remove null filled linkages.
On
165
3
Remove orphan database linkage.
Off
178
3
Remove the following database
linkages:
Off
37
3
Remove the following attribute
linkages:
Off
37
3
Remove these user linkages:
Off
37
3
Remove all user linkages except:
Off
37
3
Set cross-linked associative ID to
the next highest number.
0ff
308
3
Pattern
Set pattern scale to one when it is
zero.
On
375
1
Range
Repair diagonal of cell header.
Off
367
3
Repair range of complex header
element.
On
320, 720
3
Repair range of displayable
elements.
On
305, 306,
307, 309,
312, 324,
325, 330,
705, 706,
707, 709,
712, 724,
725, 730
1, 2, 3, 4
Raster
Handle raster pixels that overflow
the element’s length.
Off
735
3
Reference
File
Change slightly the duplicate
reference file logical name.
On
342
3
Correct the length of the file name,
logical or description.
On
388
Correct the raster reference file
component’s class.
On
708
3
Delete duplicate reference file
attachments.
On
158
3
Category
Repair Option Description
Default
Value
Error
Step
Messages Repaired On
Delete reference file attachments
with blank file names.
Off
387
3
Fix raster reference file attachment
width to height ratio.
On
723
3
Set the ‘2D file referenced to 3D
file’ flag.
On
711
3
Delete tags that are not associated
with any element.
Off
140
3
Delete unused tag sets.
Off
141
3
Remove tag linkage from elements
with no associated tag elements.
Off
142
3
Update tag element from tag set.
Off
143
3
Correct number of characters field in On
text element.
560
1
Fix duplicate text node number.
On
167
3
Handle zero text height or width
multipliers.
Off
326
3
Set text rotation to match its text
node.
On
356
3
Vertices
Fix curve’s slope points that are off
the edge of the design plane.
On
119
3
WTF/WID
Correct words-in-description
problems.
On
505, 520,
522
2
Fix severe WTF errors (EOF not
found).
On
700, 750,
754, 756,
758
1
Fix WTF warnings.
On
364, 365
1, 3
Category
Tag
Text
Repair Option Description
Chapter 18 — Preventive Maintenance
Page 183
Chapter 18 — Preventiv e Maintenance
AutoCheck
One of the easiest ways to set up preventive maintenance on your system is to have
AutoCheck run FileFixer automatically (in “Search for Problems” or “Immunize” mode)
every time a design file is closed or a new file is opened.
By “immunizing” your files on a regular basis using AutoCheck you greatly improve your
future chances of recovering elements after they have fallen prey to certain types of
corruption.
See the AutoCheck section in this User’s Guide for instructions on using AutoCheck.
Nightly FileFixer maintenance
Some problems, left unnoticed and unhandled, can get worse. This is true of certain types
of design file corruption. Some design file corruption can be prevented by fixing your
files before the corruption becomes obvious. FileFixer’s 500-level errors are examples of
such design file corruption time bombs.
This is why some FileFixer users schedule FileFixer to repair all their design files on a
regular basis.
By having FileFixer regularly repair your design files before they manifest fatal errors,
you can prevent certain types of existing corruption from becoming fatal.
Important: When using the option to create Critical Element Cache backup elements, be
sure to run FileFixer after running any file compression. Since FileFixer’s backup
elements are stored as deleted elements, they can be compressed out of your design files.
Setting up a typical nightly FileFixer maintenance run
In this section, you will see how to set up FileFixer to run automatically in batch mode
using the Windows 98 scheduler.
By running FileFixer in “Search for Problems” mode, you can create a report on files that
contain serious corruption as well as a list of corrupt files. FileFixer can later be used to
repair only those files in the list of corrupted files.
For even greater protection, run FileFixer in “Immunize” mode. “Immunize” mode will
produce the same result as “Search for Problems” mode, plus it can create special backup elements. Unlike “Search for Problems” mode, however, “Immunize” mode is not
limited to reporting only a certain number of errors.
Scheduling
For best results when using “Immunize” mode, schedule FileFixer after any file
compression and before nightly backup.
Create the settings file for nightly FileFixer run
Start by opening FileFixer in graphic mode and set up the options (repair and search) the
way you want FileFixer to work.
•
If you want to create critical element backups, select those options now from the “Options |
Enhanced Recovery” menu. In the example below, a “Words-to-follow” cache will be created
which allows recovery of any element later found with a “Words-to-follow” error.
Additionally, you may want to have FileFixer backup certain critical, non-graphic elements
by turning on the “Critical elements” checkbox and selecting the types of critical elements
you want to backup via the <Select Critical Elements…> button.
•
In the “Back-up Critical Elements” box, every critical element checkbox is turned on by
default, but you may chose to backup only those critical elements that are important to you.
•
You will probably want your nightly run to produce a list of corrupt files, which FileFixer
can later use to repair only those files that are seriously corrupted. Having FileFixer only
repair those files which are seriously corrupted can save you processing time, especially
valuable when you have large amounts of files to maintain. In the example below, we first
selected “Future dangers and worse”. This ensures that our list will only contain the names of
files with errors of level 5 or higher. We also entered a name for the output list of corrupt
files.
•
When you are done making your selections, press <OK> to return to the main FileFixer
dialog box.
•
Save your settings using the “File | Save Resource File As…” function from the main
FileFixer dialog box. Give the settings file a unique name, “nightly.ini” for example, because
you may only want to use these particular settings when running FileFixer at night.
Note: Those familiar with the Windows scheduler or using some other method can
proceed to the next section to see how to set up the MSBATCH command.
Chapter 18 — Preventive Maintenance
Page 185
Set up the Windows scheduler
•
Open the Windows scheduler by selecting “Start | Programs | Accessories | System Tools |
Scheduled Tasks” in Windows. The following box should appear:
•
If you do not have the “Scheduled Tasks” feature installed on your computer, please see your
System Administrator about getting this feature installed.
•
Double-click “Add scheduled task”.
•
Click <Next> on the Scheduled Task Wizard box that appears.
•
In the next window, <Browse> to your MicroStation directory to find the MSBATCH.BAT
file and select it.
•
Enter a name for the task in the next Wizard window (such as “FileFixer”), select “Daily” as
in the image below and press <Next>.
•
On the next screen you can select the time and day you want this task to start. Make your
choices and press <Next>.
•
On the last screen, be sure to check the “Open advanced properties for this task when I click
Finish” option. Then click <Finish>.
•
A Properties box for this task will appear. This box will have whatever name you gave your
task, such as “FileFixer”.
Chapter 18 — Preventive Maintenance
Page 187
Set up the FileFixer MSBATCH command
•
You will need four parameters in the “Run” box after “…\MSBATCH.BAT\”:
1. The path to the FileFixer executable program.
2. The code “-zb” tells FileFixer that the mode will be “Immunize” and tells
msbatch to run it in batch mode. To omit immunizing files, use “-sb” to indicate
“Search for Problems” mode.
3.
A path to the saved settings file.
4. A path to the design files to be processed or to a list of files. Options for this path
are described in detail in the section on “Batch Mode”.
Example:
C:\MS\se\MSBATCH.BAT c:\ms\se\axiom\fixer\fixer.ma –zb
C:\MS\se\axiom\nightly.ini c:\ms\se\dgnfiles\*.dgn/s
•
When you click <OK> on this dialog box, your setup is complete.
Tip: For a detailed description of these fields and of other options available in batch
mode, see the “Batch Mode” section of this guide.
Chapter 19 — Batch Mo de
What do we mean by “batch mode?”
“Batch mode” means starting FileFixer directly from the operating system command line
(instead of from within graphics mode). For example, if you were working on a personal
computer running MS-DOS you would enter the following DOS command:
msbatch c:\win32app\axiom\fixer\fixer.ma -ab n:\*.dgn
FileFixer will now run in non-graphic, alphanumeric, batch mode. It will execute using
the settings that were in effect the last time you executed FileFixer. The preceding
example assumes that you are running MicroStation 95 or SE with a default installation
of both MicroStation and FileFixer.
When you should use batch mode
You may run FileFixer in batch mode when you have any or all of the following
conditions:
1. You want to schedule timed execution of FileFixer, especially after normal
business hours.
2. Your server contains a large number of design files and it would be inconvenient
to move them to a graphics workstation for processing.
3. You can’t tie-up network resources during normal business hours and need
FileFixer to run at a specified time, unattended.
4. Your server can’t run MicroStation normally because it has no graphics terminals
connected.
5. Your server is not accessible via NFS.
6. Your server has MicroStation loaded on it despite having no graphics terminal.
How to run FileFixer in batch mode
To run FileFixer in batch mode follow these steps:
1. Run FileFixer in graphics mode on a workstation that has a graphics screen.
2. Set up the options (repair and search) the way you want FileFixer to work.
3. Run MicroStation in batch mode. The syntax of the command you enter at the
operating system command line is:
Chapter 19 — Batch Mode
Page 189
<path1>msbatch <path2>fixer.ma options
design_file_wildcard
<path1> is the location of the file “MSBATCH.BAT”. By default for
MicroStation 95 and MicroStation SE this path is “c:\win32app\ustation\”. The
default path under MicroStation J is “c:\bentley\program\microstation\”. (This
may vary depending on your individual installation.)
<path2> is the location of the file “FIXER.MA”. By default for MicroStation 95
and MicroStation SE this path is “c:\win32app\axiom\fixer\”. The default path
under MicroStation J is “c:\bently\program\axiom\fixer\”. (This may vary
depending on your individual installation.)
design_file_wildcard is any legal MicroStation filename and path – also see the
use of @list in “The File List Editor” section of this guide.
Note: You’ll be able to override the design filename wildcard and the mode on the
operating system command line when you start FileFixer in batch mode. If you set *.rep
as the report file on the FileFixer dialog box before running in batch mode then a
separate report file will be generated for each design file processed. The report(s) will be
put into the same directory as the design file.
Preferably, run MSBATCH.BAT from its home directory and not enter <path1>.
Valid options are:
-2 File is 2D - Assume files with unknown dimensions are
2D. Use this option when the dimension of the design
file is unknown yet you are certain it is a 2D file.
-3 File is 3D - Assume files with unknown dimensions are
3D. Use this option when the dimension of the design
file is unknown yet you are certain it is a 3D file.
-a Automatic Design File Repair - This option will use
the automatic repair options when repairing the file.
-b Batch Mode - This option is required when running in
batch mode.
-c Reserved for AutoCheck.
-d Reload design file – Reload the currently loaded
design file once the files have been checked.
-f
Report File Name - The name of the report file. Use
this option when you don’t want to use the report file
name you had last use when running FileFixer from
within MicroStation.
-i List File - The name of the list file you want to build
in search mode for design files that have serious
errors (300 or higher).
-m Manual Design File Repair - Use the manual repair
options when repairing the file.
-o Repaired Design File Directory. Specify the directory
where the repaired files will be placed.
-r Resource File Name - Specify which FileFixer resource
file to use for the search and repair options.
-s Search Mode - Analyze, but do not repair files.
-u 999 Updated since – Only process those files that have
been updated in the last 999 days. You can specify any
number of days back, up to 999 days.
-z Immunize Mode – Analyze and build the back-up
elements. Do not repair the files.
Examples:
msbatch c:\axiom\fixer\fixer.ma -ab axiom.dgn
msbatch c:\axiom\fixer\fixer.ma -s -b "*.dgn, *.cel"
msbatch c:\axiom\fixer\fixer.ma –sb -f f:\axiom\fixer.rep
*.dgn
msbatch c:\axiom\fixer\fixer.ma –ab -r f:\axiom\fixer.ini
*.dgn
msbatch c:\axiom\fixer\fixer.ma –ab -o f:\axiom\output -f
f:\axiom\fixer.rep *.dgn
msbatch c:\axiom\fixer\fixer.ma –sb –i f:\axiom\fixer.lst
*.dgn
msbatch c:\axiom\fixer\fixer.ma –ab @fixer.lst
msbatch c:\axiom\fixer\fixer.ma –sb –u 10 *.dgn
Note: DOS has a limit of 132 characters at the command prompt. Putting
many switch options or specifying too many options in one batch command
may leave you with a resource file or report name left out of your batch
process.
You can use the “–“ switch or the “/” switch interchangeably. You will need to
specify the full path to the design files and to FIXER.MA.
You are required to specify the “-b” option. This tells FileFixer that it is being run in
batch mode. Otherwise, FileFixer will try to start its dialog box, causing
MicroStation to abort.
If you need to delete the OLE elements and OLE files to fix the “HRESULT=…”
from batch mode, then set the configuration variable “FIXER_OLE” to “y”. When
this configuration variable is set and you use the “-a” option, FileFixer will delete the
OLE information.
.
Using the “AT” command under Windows NT 4.0
The “at” command allows you to run a task at a specified time. The format for the
“at” command is:
Chapter 19 — Batch Mode
Page 191
at <time> /interactive cmd /c <program>
Where <time> can be specified as a 24-hour clock (military time) or a 12-hour clock.
Examples: 18:20 or 6:20pm.
Where <program> is the full path of the program to be run.
To use the “at” command you need to build a batch file, which will run FileFixer.
The following is an example of a batch file used to run FileFixer in MSBATCH
mode:
c:
cd \bentley\program\microstation
msbatch c:\bentley\program\axiom\fixer\fixer.ma /sb "e:\dgn\a*.dgn"
This batch file “c:\axiom\fixer.bat” will change the current working directory to the
MicroStation root directory and then run MSBATCH. It will run FileFixer in search
mode on the design file starting with the letter “a” in the directory “e:\dgn”.
To run this batch file using the “at” command at 5:10pm:
at 5:10pm /interactive cmd /c "c:\axiom\fixer.bat"
Chapter 20 — SafetyCh eck
Ensure your design files meet FileFixer’s standards!
The “Good Housekeeping Seal-of-Approval” tells you that a consumer product has been
tested, that it meets certain standards and that it can be trusted to perform as expected.
The “FileFixer Seal-of-Approval” tells you the same thing about a MicroStation design
file.
SafetyCheck is an MDL application from Axiom. SafetyCheck tells you whether or not
any corruption was found the last time FileFixer was run on a MicroStation design file. If
FileFixer didn’t find any corruption, that file is considered to have the FileFixer Seal-ofApproval. If, on the other hand, FileFixer found corruption the last time it was run on
that file, SafetyCheck reports the exact types of errors that were found.
SafetyCheck is distributed by Axiom at no charge to qualified MicroStation users whether
they own FileFixer or not.
SafetyCheck dialog box
The FileFixer Seal-of-Approval
A wax seal is sometimes placed on an envelope containing legal documents. As long as
the seal remains unbroken, one knows that the envelope has not been opened and that its
contents have not been modified.
The FileFixer Seal-of-Approval works like a wax seal. When FileFixer is done testing a
design file, it writes a special code immediately following the file’s end-of-design
marker. As long as no new elements are added to the file, the seal remains undisturbed.
But when new elements are added to the design file, the seal is overwritten.
SafetyCheck reports the presence or absence of the seal. If the seal is present and shows
zero errors, this design file merits FileFixer’s Seal-of-Approval. That file is likely to
Chapter 20 — SafetyCheck
Page 193
behave civilly, likely to translate to AutoCAD gracefully and unlikely to become corrupt
or have plotting problems.
If the seal is present, but indicates that FileFixer found errors when it was run on this file,
SafetyCheck tells you about the errors that were found.
If SafetyCheck reports that the seal is absent, you know that the person who sent you this
file either didn’t run FileFixer on it, or that the file was modified after they did. You can
then take your own measures to ensure that the file is properly validated.
FileFixer’s Seal-of-Approval is displayed in SafetyCheck’s dialog box when the currently
loaded design file has been certified by FileFixer to have no errors greater than 299.
How to test SafetyCheck
1. Make sure the FileFixer option that writes the seal is not turned off. (Seal writing is
on by default.) This can be found at “Options | Search… | Report file”.
2. Run FileFixer in Search Mode on any design file.
3. Run SafetyCheck on the same design file. SafetyCheck will either verify that
FileFixer previously found no errors or it will report a summary of the errors that
FileFixer found.
4. Add a single element, say an ellipse, to the design file. Doing so overwrites
FileFixer’s “wax seal.”
5. Now run SafetyCheck again. SafetyCheck will now report that an element has been
added since the last check.
Note: The seal-of-approval stamp is only placed at the end of the file when FileFixer is
run in “search” mode. It does not get placed when FileFixer is run is “repair” mode.
What SafetyCheck is used for
More and more organizations are insisting that outside contractors who create design files
for them submit only design files that have been validated by FileFixer as being free
from corruption. SafetyCheck makes it possible to quickly verify that the design files
being submitted have been properly validated without having to run FileFixer again on
the same set of design files.
SafetyCheck is also useful when archiving design files. Let’s say a design file is archived
to magnetic media with a zero-error Seal-of-Approval, compliments of FileFixer. A year
later the file is retrieved and is now found to have certain corruption’s in it. The presence
of the seal in the file indicates that the file was okay when it was archived and that any
flaw in the file was introduced later — the result of a flawed read head in the tape drive,
perhaps. The person who originally did the archiving is thus vindicated from any
accusation of having archived a corrupted file.
Disclaimer
The FileFixer Seal-of-Approval indicates that MicroStation design files comply in most,
if not all, respects with standards originally published by Intergraph and subsequently
extended by Bentley Systems, Incorporated to include additional element types.
The exact types of design file corruption that FileFixer attempts to detect and repair are
defined in the FileFixer document.
The FileFixer Seal-of-Approval does not guarantee a MicroStation design file will be
appropriate for a particular purpose. The seal does not guarantee that your design file will
be trouble-free in all applications.
Chapter 21 — AutoCheck
Page 195
Chapter 21 — AutoChec k
What is AutoCheck?
AutoCheck is an application that will automatically run FileFixer on your active design
file every time you close it.
AutoCheck automatically displays FileFixer’s processing screen when it is searching the
design file for corruption. After FileFixer is done processing the design file it will exit,
unless a “serious” error has been found. In this case, FileFixer will stay open so that you
can display the report file. The default value for a “serious” error is any 100 level error or
higher. This can be changed on the AutoCheck search option screen in FileFixer.
AutoCheck can run FileFixer in “Search for Problems” mode or “Immunize” mode. The
default mode is “Search for Problems”. If you want to have AutoCheck run FileFixer in
“Immunize” mode then you need to define the MicroStation configuration variable
AUTOCHK_IMMUNIZE. This configuration variable can be set to any value. As long as
it is defined FileFixer will run in “Immunize” mode. If you have any questions about
how to define a new MicroStation configuration variable, see your System Administrator.
AutoCheck automatically creates the report file in the same directory as the design file. It
has the same name as the design file, but with a “rep” extension. On the AutoCheck
search option screen in FileFixer you can change this so that the “rep” extension is
appended on the design file name rather than overwriting the existing extension.
Use the configuration variable AUTOCHK_RESOURCE_FILE to define the resource
file you want FileFixer to use. If you do not specify a resource file in this way, FileFixer
will be run with the settings that it was last saved with.
There are two ways to run AutoCheck:
1. To start up AutoCheck one time enter the following in the MicroStation key-in field:
MDL LOAD <FULL_PATH>AUTOCHK.MA
Note that AutoCheck will not run FileFixer immediately. Once loaded, AutoCheck
waits until you close your active design file before running FileFixer on it.
Tip: If you don’t want to specify the full path to AUTOCHK.MA every time you
run it, add the definition “$(AXI)fixer\” (without the quotes) to the definition of
the MS_MDL configuration variable in MicroStation. After doing so, you can
run AutoCheck by simply keying in “MDL LOAD AUTOCHK.MA” (without
having to type the path).
2. If you want AutoCheck to start every time you start up MicroStation, simply add
“$(AXI)\fixer\autochk.ma” to the definition of the MS_DGNAPPS configuration
variable via the Workspace|Configuration… menu in MicroStation.
Chapter 22 — Corruptio n Data
Everything you always wanted to know about corruption
Following is a list of some of the types of corruption FileFixer can detect and report:
•
Words-to-follow exceeds 65,533. This is a problem because adding 2 to a number
larger than this (to get the total element length) will cause a 16 bit register overflow.
(This is a problem for any software that stores the total length of a MicroStation
element in a sixteen-bit word.)
•
Analysis of the number of database linkages, the dimension of the design file (2D or
3D), and the number of vertices on a type 4, 6, 11 or 13 element indicates a wordsto-follow error.
•
Analysis of the number of poles, knots, rule lines, database linkages, and boundaries
of 2D and 3D b-spline curves and surfaces indicates a words-to-follow error.
•
Words-to-follow is too small to indicate a valid element.
•
Words-to-follow of an active element exceeds 766. Attempting to read in more
words than can fit in the reserved buffer space can cause severe problems.
•
Complex bits are not set when they should be. (Uses words-in-description to track
the element nesting level.)
•
Analysis of the vertices, points, or poles of a line, line string, curve, conic, point
string, b-spline surface, or b-spline curve indicates an element range block error.
•
Phantom elements. These are elements that are displayed, but cannot be selected or
manipulated in any way. This problem comes about when an element that is not part
of complex element, such as a cell or a text node, has its complex bit incorrectly set.
•
Analysis of the number of database linkages, characters, and Enter-Data-Fields in a
text element indicates a words-to-follow error.
•
Complex header element range doesn’t match components’ range. (Track the
element nesting level. The x and y min and max of each component element must be
tracked simultaneously, yet separately for each individual nesting level as each
component is read in.) This error can cause serious problems because of the way
current versions of MicroStation handle cell placement.
•
Analysis of the origin, number of characters, character size multiplier, rotation,
and/or quaternions of a 2D or 3D text element indicates an element range error.
•
3D element found in 2D file. This involves two types of checks. 1) Some element
types (such as surfaces and circular truncated cones) exist in 3D files only. Detecting
these in a 2D file is easy. 2) When an element type can exist in either a 2D or a 3D
file, we compare the number of characters, number of vertices, number of Enter-
Chapter 22 — Corruption Data
Page 197
Data-Fields, number of poles, boundaries, ruler lines, knots, and words-to-follow
against each other to determine whether we have the 2D or the 3D form of the
element and report accordingly.
•
2D element found in 3D file. Same as above except that there are no element types
that can exist in a 2D, but not in a 3D design file.
•
Displayable element on invalid level. The first version of FileFixer could only detect
displayable elements on level 0. The current version lets the user specify which
levels should be considered invalid. Specifying which levels should be considered
valid greatly improves the ability of the program to repair words-to-follow errors
without losing any elements and without including any bad elements.
•
Analysis of the origin, major and minor axes, start angle, sweep angle, rotation, and
quaternions of a 2D or 3D arc or ellipse indicates an element range block error.
•
Incorrect number-of-components in complex header. For dependability reasons
many MDL applications have been modified so as not to rely on this information.
Nonetheless, an accurate number-of-components word is part of the definition of an
“ANSI standard” design file, so errors in this word are flagged.
•
The first version of FileFixer flagged only type 0 elements as erroneous. The current
version lets the user specify which element types should be considered invalid. This
improvement greatly improves the ability of the program to repair words-to-follow
errors without losing any elements and without including any bad elements. By
default, type 0, 20, and 127 elements are considered invalid.
•
Low range block value is greater than high range block value. The x, y, and (for a
3D file) z range block coordinates are examined in pairs.
•
Displayable element has its reserved bit set. Technically this is not an error because
there are no known programs that rely on this bit in any way. However, when trying
to pick up the trail of a valid element chain, the sophisticated algorithm FileFixer
uses to automatically repair corrupted design files will make note of the fact that a
potentially valid element has a set reserved bit and severely downgrade the
likelihood that this portion of the design file is part of a valid element chain. (Note
that as of MicroStation version 4.0, the reserved bit may be used to store element
levels from 64 to 127. When the “127 LEVELS” option is turned on, FileFixer is
aware of this use of the reserved bit and won’t flag reserved bit errors.)
•
Too many vertices on a line string, shape, curve, etc. Different programs have
different tolerances for this problem. Some have problems if there is even one too
many vertex. Some don’t have problems until there are 20 or 30 or vertices more
than there should be. Almost any program, however, given enough extra vertices,
will behave incorrectly.
•
Analysis of the centers, radii, and quaternions of a right circular truncated cone
indicate a range block error.
•
A variation of the above error is if the words-in-description of an element points to a
location which is later discovered to be past the end of the design file.
•
Even if a complex element ends at the start of a valid element you can still have a
words-in-description problem. In a multiply nested complex element (nested more
than one level deep), it is possible for an “inner” complex element to end after an
“outer” complex element. This is not as serious as the above mentioned types of
words-in-description errors because deletion of such an element will not corrupt the
entire design file. Deleting an element with this kind of problem will, however,
delete more elements than the one intended. It can also cause the complex (nested
element) status to be erroneously dropped for later elements and leave complex bit
errors in the design file.
•
Missing end-of-design marker.
•
File dimension bits not set to legal values (not 2D or 3D). The dimension of cell
libraries and design files is indicated by bits in their type 5 and type 9 elements. If
the bit values are illegal, some programs will treat the file as 2D, others as 3D.
FileFixer can determine the actual file dimension by analysis of the elements
themselves, so this is easily remedied.
•
Deleted type 8, 9, or 10 detected. Not necessarily an error, but something to be
suspicious about.
•
Type 1 element detected in design file. Type 1 elements should be found only in a
cell library. (Note that the list of element types FileFixer considers invalid is
automatically modified based on whether the file being analyzed is 2D or 3D or a
design file or cell library.)
•
Type 9 element that is not on level 8 or 1 detected.
•
The number of words of attribute data is not a multiple of 4.
•
Index-to-attributes is too small.
•
Index-to-attributes is too large. Index-to-attributes errors can cause severe database
problems.
•
Cell levels mask is incorrect. This problem occurs when the list of occupied levels in
a cell header element (type 1 or 2) does not match the actual levels used by the cell.
When MicroStation displays a design file with cell level mask errors, the following
problems can occur: 1) Cell components disappear, 2) Cell components are visible
after multi-view updates, but not after single view updates, and 3) Cells cannot be
selected or manipulated. Note that FileFixer has the ability to repair this type of
problem automatically.
•
Missing vital element (such as type 9, 8, or 10). FileFixer can be used to repair this
kind of problem.
What FileFixer won’t do
With all the things FileFixer does well, it’s easy to believe that it can do things it can’t
really do. We feel it’s important for the user to understand the limitations of FileFixer.
The list below describes some of the things that FileFixer can’t do:
Chapter 22 — Corruption Data
Page 199
•
FileFixer works by analyzing each design file element it encounters. It can detect
when an element violates certain basic rules of MicroStation element construction.
Although FileFixer can tell when a rule is violated, it cannot completely predict
what consequences that violation will have. Many violations won’t cause any
noticeable operational difficulties. So don’t be alarmed when FileFixer finds errors
in a design file you are not having problems with. Do be aware, however, that if you
ever do start having problems with that file, the error found by FileFixer may be the
culprit. Experience will teach you which errors are important and which are
unimportant.
•
FileFixer repairs the types of errors that are listed on the “Automatic Design File
Repair” command. These are the only error types that FileFixer can repair
automatically. To repair other types of errors, follow the directions that go with each
error number. What each error number means and how to correct that type of error is
listed elsewhere in this document.
•
FileFixer won’t find every possible error in every design file. There is only one way
a design file can be constructed correctly. There are an infinite number of ways and
combinations of ways that one can be constructed incorrectly. FileFixer currently
detects 50 to 100 of the problems we consider the most important or the most
common. We are in the process of implementing 50 to 100 more checks. By sending
us the design files you encounter that FileFixer doesn’t fully diagnose, you help
ensure that FileFixer will eventually be able to detect the special kinds of problems
that are common at your specific site.
•
We know that FileFixer isn’t perfect. We are working hard to make it better. We
appreciate your help in helping us do our job better.
Don’t kill the messenger
When you first run FileFixer on a design file (or cell library), you may discover more
errors than you bargained for! Design files that seem to work perfectly normally, may
generate dozens (perhaps hundreds) of messages. Why is this?
FileFixer works by detecting elements and combinations of elements that violate a basic
rule of MicroStation design file construction. There are hundreds of these rules. The rules
tend to fall into three certain categories:
1. Rules that affect only one element. Examples of such rules are:
•
The element range must be set correctly.
•
Words-to-follow must be within a certain range.
•
Planar elements must have their P-Bit (Planar Bit) set.
2. Rules that affect small groups of elements. Examples are:
•
Complex bits must be turned on for the components of complex elements.
•
The words-in-description of a complex header must point to the first element
after the complex group.
•
Snap bits within complex groups must be set a certain way.
3. Rules that affect the design file as a whole. Examples:
•
The first element of a design file must be a type 9.
•
GRAFIC in the type 9 must be greater than any graphic group number used
in the design file.
•
The last “element” of a design file must be an end-of-design marker.
When FileFixer reports something wrong with a design file, there is nearly always
something wrong. The question is — how serious is it? The documentation that comes
with FileFixer goes a long way toward helping you determine how serious each error is.
As you gain more experience with FileFixer, and MicroStation design files in general,
you will become more and more skillful at determining how serious each type of
corruption is and what to do about it.
If you’re tired of seeing mountains of error messages that indicate problems you aren’t
worried about, just turn off the unwanted error messages. Use the search options to turn
off reporting of the types of errors you are not concerned about. The other errors, the ones
that you are concerned about, will stand out much more readily by doing so.
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
Page 201
Chapter 23 — Error Mes sages
Operational errors and messages
Operational errors are reported with numbers in the 000 to 099 series. These messages
usually concern something the user did or environmental constraints such as limited
permissions to a file or directory.
003 — Error creating output design file or cell library.
Cause — You don’t have the privilege to create files in the directory you specified.
Cause — The directory you specified does not exist.
Cause — You are out of disk space on the specified disk.
Cause — There is something wrong with the computer or its file system. For example,
there may already be too many files open. Or the file system is corrupted.
Solution — Have your system manager find out why the file couldn’t be created and
handle.
004 — Process aborted by user.
Cause — User pressed the <Esc> key while FileFixer was processing a file.
005 — Too many errors have already been reported for this file.
Cause — The “Search for Problems” command screen lets you control the maximum
number of errors that can reported for each file. This design file had more than that
number of errors.
Solution — Increase the maximum number of errors that can be reported.
006 — Deleted element detected.
Cause — This error is used internally and should never be reported to the user.
Solution — Contact Axiom Support by phone or by e-mailing support@axiomint.com.
007 — Could not rename temporary output design file to .fix file.
Cause — You don’t have the privilege to delete the old .fix file.
Cause — You don’t have privilege to make changes to the directory containing the
design file being processed.
Cause — There is something wrong with the computer or its file system. For example,
there may already be too many files open. Or the file system is corrupted.
Solution — Have your system manager find out why the file couldn’t be created and
handle.
010 — (Informational message)
Cause — This is an informational message only. It is not an error message. It does not
mean that anything is wrong. FileFixer is simply giving you some extra data about what
it is doing.
017 — Unable to open file.
Cause — You do not have the privileges needed to open this file.
Cause — Someone else or another process has the file open at the moment.
Cause — There is something wrong with the computer or file system. For example, there
may already be too many files open.
Effect — This file cannot be processed by FileFixer until the problem is corrected.
Solution — Have your system manager determine why the file cannot even be opened.
021 — This element is a type 9 (design file header) the user asked to
replace.
Cause — You have asked the “Automatic Design File Repair” command to replace the
header element (the first element in the file) with a type 9 from another design file. This
element is the one you asked to replace.
Effect — The type 9 from the donor file you specified using the REPAIR OPTIONS
screen will replace this element. Note that FileFixer is smart enough to make sure that
both files (this file and the donor file) have the same number of dimensions and that the
WTF of the type 9 we are replacing is 766 before attempting this action. Note also that
FileFixer forces on the SET GRAFIC TO ONE MORE THAN THE LARGEST
GRAFIC GROUP NUMBER and CANODE options to ensure that the donor type 9 is
fully compatible with the design file it is copied to.
029 — Backup file already exists.
Cause — You are in WORK ON ORIGINAL mode. You’ve told FileFixer to make a
backup of your file and to make changes to the original file. A .bkp version of this file
already exists. To make sure that running FileFixer on the same design file more than
once cannot delete the original version of the file (now stored in the .bkp file), FileFixer
will not overwrite a .bkp file that already exists.
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
Page 203
Effect — You won’t be able to repair this file in WORK ON ORIGINAL mode until the
situation is remedied.
Solution — Rename the existing .bkp file.
Solution — Move the existing .bkp file.
Solution — Use wildcards in the backup file extension (as in “BK?” rather than “BKP”).
Solution — Turn WORK ON ORIGINAL mode off. That way you’ll be creating a .fix
file instead of modifying the original file and creating a backup copy.
Solution — If you are absolutely certain that the existing backup file will never be
needed, you can delete it.
037 — Element has unwanted attribute linkage.
Cause — You have asked FileFixer to remove all attribute linkages and this element has
one.
Effect — FileFixer will remove the attribute linkage as you requested.
Solution — FileFixer will remove the attribute linkage as you requested. Note that
FileFixer will not shrink an element to less than 22 words because some processes have
problems with elements smaller than that.
050 — Error writing element to output (.fix) design file.
Cause — In most cases this error is caused by insufficient disk space on the disk to
which FileFixer is writing the output design file.
Cause — If the words-to-follow of this element is greater than 780 you can also get this
error. (Words-to-follow should never exceed 766.)
Effect — The output design file will not be complete.
Solution — Copy the design file you want to repair to a disk with more disk space.
Solution — Free up some room on the disk in question by deleting unnecessary files.
Solution — If the above doesn’t solve this, contact Axiom Support for help at
support@axiomint.com.
079 — Unwanted end-of-design marker detected.
Cause — You have asked FileFixer to recover elements past the end-of-design marker,
therefore FileFixer must ignore any end-of-design markers it encounters.
Effect — FileFixer will search for elements after the end-of-design marker.
Effect — FileFixer is simply reporting every end-of-design marker it encounters. There
is nothing to worry about.
086 — Internal error in j_valnest involving complex header element.
Cause — Used internally only.
Solution — Call Axiom.
088 — Fatal error detected with BackScanning in effect.
Cause — Used internally only.
Solution — Call Axiom.
Suspicious Conditions — Usually not Important
Suspicious conditions are reported with numbers in the 100 to 199 series. The flagged
elements may not violate any "official" MicroStation rules, but something about them
doesn't look quite right.
101 — Deleted type 9 (design file header), 8 (digitizer) or 10 (level
symbology) element detected.
Cause — Type 9, 8, and 10 elements are not usually deleted from a design file.
Effect — A deleted type 9, 8, or 10 element doesn’t violate any basic rule of design file
construction. It is noted because it is unusual and could be a sign of other problems.
Effect — If the first type 9 in a design file is deleted, MicroStation will most likely be
unable to open that file at all and will produce a “Not a design file” error.
Solution — In Automatic Design File Repair mode, FileFixer will undelete the element
if it is a type 9, often allowing the file to be opened again in MicroStation.
103 — Reserved bit is set.
Cause — There is an unused bit in every MicroStation element called the reserved bit. It
was intended to allow future enhancement of the element format, but was never formally
used. This bit should be clear (set to 0). If it is not, this message is generated. Technically
this is not an error because there are no known programs that rely on this bit in any way.
Advanced Technical Tip: When trying to pick up the trail of a valid element chain,
the sophisticated algorithm FileFixer uses to automatically repair corrupted design files
and cell libraries will make note of the fact that a potentially valid element has a set
reserved bit (set to 1) and severely downgrade the likelihood that this element is part of a
valid element chain.
Cause — As of version 4.0 of MicroStation, it is possible for a design file to use up to
127 levels. If this is such a design file, if this element is on a level above 63, and if the
“127 LEVELS” option of FileFixer is not turned on, you may get this error. If this design
file uses more than 127 levels, turn on the “MicroStation is using 127 levels” option of
FileFixer and you will no longer receive this message.
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
Page 205
Effect — None at this time, but should Bentley Systems, Inc. decide to use this bit for
something or if some application decides to use this bit for something (not
recommended), the fact that this bit is set could cause problems.
Effect — If you ever decide to start using 127 levels, this element will suddenly be
moved to the wrong level.
Solution — None required at this time.
105 — Type 21 (b-spline pole) range doesn’t match the min-max of its
poles.
Cause — The range of a type 21 is incorrect. The element’s range and the min-max of its
poles don’t fall within the user-specified tolerance.
Cause — MicroStation sets the range of type 21 elements in a manner different from the
written specifications for a type 21. The written specification calls for the range of a type
21 to be set to the min-max of the poles for that particular type 21. MicroStation sets the
range of a 21 to the min-max of all the poles in the b-spline element of which this type 21
is part.
Effect — The scanning software of some processors may run slightly slower due to the
range of these elements being somewhat larger than necessary.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type
of problem automatically.
Solution — This error is so minor it can usually be ignored.
106 — EOD found too early in design file.
Cause — A bad EOD (end-of-design) marker has been written to the middle of a design
file. This error will only be displayed if the design file is larger than 1KB and the EOD
marker is found earlier than the middle of the design file. For example: the design file
size is 10,128 bytes, then this error will be displayed if the EOD marker is found before
byte 5,064.
Effect — The elements after the EOD marker will not be displayed in MicroStation.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the repair
option “Recover elements beyond the end-of-design marker” turned on to recover
elements beyond the EOD marker.
107 — Element’s range may cause FIT problems
Cause — If all the displayable elements in a design file aren’t somewhat close together
then when you do a FIT VIEW most of the view is blank. The elements look like a dot in
the view. FileFixer will check to see if several elements are some distance away from the
rest of the elements. This distance away is user definable.. This search option is turned
off by default.
Effect — When you do a FIT VIEW the elements look like a dot in the selected view.
Solution — Use Problem Element Viewer to view and delete the elements.
Solution — Add “107” to the “Delete elements with the following error numbers” list
under Options | Repair… | Element to have FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair”
command delete such elements.
108 — File size is not a multiple of 512 bytes (1 block).
Cause — The number of bytes in the file (including the free space after the end-of-design
marker) is not evenly divisible by 512 bytes.
Effect — The file may be difficult (or impossible) to transfer using FMU, KERMIT, or
other file transfer utilities.
109 — Unusual type 9 (design file header) element detected.
Cause — A type 9 element was found on a level other than level 1 or 8.
Effect — The element will most likely be ignored unless it is the first element in a design
file.
Solution — Add “109” to the “Delete elements with the following error numbers” list
under Options | Repair… | Element to have FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair”
command delete such elements.
111 — Design file range is _________ should be _____________.
Cause — MicroStation is not updating these TCB values.
Effect — This will sometimes cause a FIT VIEW problem.
Solution — Use the FileFixer Repair option “Correct the design file range (DFRANG)”,
under Design File to correct the low and high range values.
115 — Type ___ (________) element found on level ___.
Cause — An element was found on a level the user designated as unacceptable. (The
level indicated was not listed among the acceptable levels on the options screen.)
Effect — This error will not cause MicroStation any trouble. This level is considered
illegal only because the user has so designated it. Note that error 311 is identical, except
that the element is on level 0 which does violate MicroStation element construction rules
and has more serious repercussions.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command “Move elements
on unacceptable levels to level: ____” to correct this problem. FileFixer will move the
elements to level 1 by default. You can change this level from the “Options | Repair... |
Elements” dialog box.
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
Page 207
117 — Arc or ellipse axis may be too long.
Cause — An axis of an arc or ellipse is so long that it might cause MicroStation to fatally
abort. It is interesting that the condition for which FileFixer searches does not actually
violate any official rules of MicroStation element construction. Nonetheless, some
versions of MicroStation terminally abort upon encountering this condition.
Effect — MicroStation-PC sometimes fails with a “floating point” error when such
elements are manipulated.
Solution — Add “117” to the “Delete elements with the following error numbers” list
under Options | Repair… | Element to have FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair”
command delete such elements.
118 — Arc or ellipse origin is off the design plane.
Cause — The origin of an arc or ellipse is off the design plane. The condition for which
FileFixer searches does not actually violate any official MicroStation element
construction rules. Nonetheless, some versions of MicroStation terminally abort upon
encountering this condition.
Effect — MicroStation-PC sometimes fails when such elements are manipulated.
Effect — MicroStation sometimes gives the error “System fault: floating point error.
MDL abort in VIEWCTRL” when doing a FIT VIEW in such a file.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the “Fix or
delete arc/ellipse whose origin is off the design plane” option turned on.
Technical Note: The only case where the origin can be corrected is when the high and
low range values are equal and that origin value is corrupted; otherwise the element will
be deleted. For example: X high = 32689, X low = 32689 and X origin = 556890000000000.
119 — Element is too close to design file edge.
Cause — According to its range block, this element is located dangerously close to the
edge of the design plane (or design cube).
Cause — The curve’s beginning and ending slope points are too close to the edge of the
design plane.
Effect —MicroStation should have no problems with such an element. However, some
auxiliary processes (InterPlot, for example) have been reported to fail if an element is too
close to the edge of the design file.
Solution — If the problem is that the curve’s beginning an ending slope points are too
close to the edge of the design file, then run FileFixer in “Automatic Design File Repair”
mode with the repair option “Options | Repair… | Vertices | Fix curve’s slope points that
are too close to the edge of the design plane” turned on.
Solution — Use Problem Element Viewer to see what this element looks like and where
it is located. If this is a stray, unwanted element and is actually causing plotting (or other)
problems, then use Problem Element Viewer to delete it.
Solution — If you are experiencing problems (particularly InterPlot problems) with this
element, FENCE MOVE the entire design file towards the center of the design file.
Change the global origin to readjust the coordinates of each element back to what they
originally were.
Solution — Add “119” to the “Delete elements with the following error numbers” list
under “Options | Repair… | Element” to have FileFixer delete such elements in
“Automatic Design File Repair” mode.
Solution — If you are not encountering any difficulties with files that harbor this
condition, consider turning off the FileFixer Search option that detects it.
120 — This element is locked.
Cause — The L-Bit (locked bit) of this element is set.
Effect —MicroStation will be unable to select this element. You will not be able to delete
or modify this element. (The element behaves like a phantom element.)
Solution — Use the FileFixer Repair option Unlock element, under Element to turn off
the L-Bit of the locked elements in a design file.
Technical Note: By default, FileFixer will automatically ignore locked elements in
TriForma design files as TriForma is known to intentionally lock some elements.
124 — Unwanted type 66 (MicroStation) element encountered.
Cause — The user selected the “Remove type 66 elements.” option on the “Automatic
Design File Repair” menu and this element is a type 66.
<the “Automatic Desigin File Repair” menu? What’s that?>
Effect —Type 66 elements created under on one platform sometimes cause odd behavior
on another.
Solution — This message is generated only when FileFixer is omitting type 66 elements
from the output design file. No further solution is necessary. FileFixer will effectively
delete the elements by simply not including them in the fixed version of the file.
126 — CANODE is suspiciously high.
Cause — CANODE (a value in the design file header element) is greater than 65000.
This does not violate any MicroStation rules, but it is unusual—and potentially
dangerous—for CANODE to get this high.
Effect — There is room for less than 600 new text node numbers in this file. After that,
CANODE will recycle back to 1 and you will be in danger of creating cross-linked text
nodes (two different text nodes sharing the same text node number). See error 530 for
more information about how an incorrect CANODE can affect a design file.
Solution — See error 530.
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
Page 209
128 — GRAFIC is suspiciously high.
Cause — GRAFIC (a value in the design file header element) is greater than 65000. This
does not violate any MicroStation rules, but it is unusual—and potentially dangerous—
for GRAFIC to get this high.
Effect — There is room for less than 600 new graphic groups. After that, GRAFIC will
recycle back to 1 and you will be in danger of creating cross-linked graphic groups (two
different graphic groups sharing the same graphic group number). See error 531 for more
information about how an incorrect GRAFIC can affect a design file.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the SET
GRAFIC TO ONE MORE THAN THE LARGEST GRAPHIC GROUP NUMBER
option turned on.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the RESEQUENCE GRAPHIC GROUP NUMBERS turned on.
131 — Curve or conic found in complex string or shape.
Cause — This is a legal construct, but causes MicroStation PC 3.00 and possibly other
versions of MicroStation to crash.
Effect — Zooming in on such an element may crash the system requiring a reboot.
Solution — Drop status on the problem elements. Use Problem Element Viewer to delete
the offending complex headers. Then use FileFixer’s “Correct complex bit errors”
command to correct the resultant complex bit errors.
132 — Reserved nibble is non-zero.
Cause — The property word of every graphic element and complex header contains four
bits (a nibble) which are not used for anything and which should always be set to zero.
The reserved nibble is composed of bits 4:7 of the properties word.
Effect —MicroStation does not use this information yet, so this error should not cause
any difficulties. However, the possibility exists that future enhancements to MicroStation
(or other software applications) could start using this information, in which case, the nonzero status of this information could cause unpredictable problems.
Solution — None needed at this time. If you encounter a problem related to this error,
please report it to Axiom Support at support@axiomint.com.
134 — GRAFIC is ___, but it should be ___.
Cause — This error is essentially similar to error 534, except that GRAFIC is higher than
it should be instead of lower. This design file will run out of usable graphic group
numbers earlier than it would if this error weren’t present. This is a very minor error.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the SET
GRAFIC TO ONE MORE THAN THE LARGEST GRAPHIC GROUP NUMBER
option turned on.
135 — CANODE is ___, but it should be ___.
Cause — This error is essentially similar to error 535, except that CANODE is higher
than it should be instead of lower. This design file will run out of usable text node
numbers earlier than it would if this error weren’t present. This is a very minor condition.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the SET
CANODE TO ONE MORE THAN THE LARGEST TEXT NODE NUMBER option
turned on.
136 — Graphic group should be re-sequenced from ___ to ___.
Cause — User has requested that FileFixer re-sequence this file’s graphic group
numbers.
Effect — FileFixer will resequence this file’s graphic group numbers, making every
possible graphic group number available to MicroStation again.
137 — Text node number should be re-sequenced from ___ to ___.
Cause — User has requested that FileFixer re-sequence this file’s text node numbers.
Effect — FileFixer will resequence this file’s text node numbers, making every possible
text node number available to MicroStation again.
138 — Element with database linkage has complex bit turned on.
Cause — The complex bit being turned on for an element means that the element is a
component of a complex element.
Strictly speaking, component elements should never have their own database linkages.
(They can have non-database linkages like the linkage that specifies that a text element is
underlined.) Only the header element of a complex element should ever have a database
linkage. This element has a database linkage and its complex bit is turned on.
Effect — This problem by itself should cause no problems. As long as everything else
about this element is correct, this problem should not be noticeable.
Solution — If the element is not truly part of a complex element, FileFixer’s “Automatic
Design File Repair” command will automatically turn the complex bit off for you.
139 — Multiple instances of line style linkage.
Cause — Somehow this element had more than one occurrence of a line style linkage.
Effect — This doesn’t seem to cause MicroStation any problem. It’s just taking up
(wasting) space in the design file. Therefore, this is considered a minor error.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the
REMOVE MULTIPLE INSTANCES OF LINE STYLE LINKAGE option turned on.
This will remove all the line style linkages from the element, except for the first instance.
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140 — Tag ID ____ not associated with any element.
Cause — Somehow the element this tag element was associated with has been deleted or
the tag linkage on that element has been deleted. This is a minor error.
Effect — This doesn’t seem to cause MicroStation any problem. It’s just an unused
element by MicroStation taking up space. These tags won’t be displayed.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the
DELETE TAGS THAT ARE NOT ASSOCIATED WITH ANY ELEMENT option
turned on.
141 — Tag set _____ is unused.
Cause — Tag set you created but never used. This is a very minor error; it is not causing
any problem.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the
DELETE UNUSED TAG SETS option turned on.
142 — Element has tagged linkage but there are no tag elements.
Cause — Any tag elements previously associated with this element are missing but the
displayable element still is flagged as having tags.
Effect — MicroStation seems to handle this case without aborting.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the
REMOVE TAG LINKAGE FROM ELEMENTS WITH NO ASSOCIATED TAG
ELEMENTS option turned on. This option will delete the tag linkage from the
displayable element.
143 — Tag element string _____ is different than definition ____.
Tag element integer ______ is different than definition ________.
Tag element real _________is different than definition ________.
Tag element type ________ is different than definition
Cause — You have changed the tag set definition since this tag was created. The tag type
(string, integer or real) has been changed to a different type or the value has been
changed.
Effect — When the tag is displayed it won’t be the same as you have currently defined in
the tag set.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the
UPDATE TAG ELEMENT FROM TAG SET option turned on.
144 — This font library does not contain font ____.
Cause — The font library MicroStation is currently using does not contain the font used
by this text element. Either this element is corrupt or the font library MicroStation is
using is corrupted. Or you simply aren’t using the correct font library.
Effect — MicroStation will display this element using its default font.
Solution — Change the font of this element to one that you do have in your font library.
Solution — Use the correct font library.
145 — This font library has no character ____ in font ____.
Cause — The font library MicroStation is currently using does not contain the specified
character in the font used by this text element. Either this element is corrupt or
MicroStation is using a different font library than was used to create this element. If the
character string shown in quotes is more than one character long and ends with a lower
case “x”, the bad character is an unprintable character. What is shown in quotes is the
hexadecimal representation of the character.
Effect — MicroStation will display a blank for this character.
Solution — Change the font of this element to one that supports the characters used in
this text element.
146 — Text element doesn't contain any visible characters.
Cause — This element doesn’t contain any visible characters. It may contain only
spaces, or it may be corrupt.
Effect — This element does not violate any MicroStation design file construction rules
and are usually invisible. While such elements usually do not display in MicroStation,
they often cause FIT VIEW problems.
Solution — Enter “146” (without the quotes) into the list of error numbers in the text
field for the “Options | Repair… | Elements | Remove elements with the following error
numbers” repair option, and then use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair”
command to delete this element.
Enter-data-fields tip: By default, FileFixer excludes elements containing enter-datafields from this check. This is particularly important for those that use empty enter-datafields in their title blocks. Such elements are waiting to be populated and have good
reason to be blank—they are waiting to be populated. To have FileFixer include text
elements with enter-data-fields in this check, turn off the option
“Options|Search|Text|Treat empty enter-data-fields as visible characters.”
147 — Deleted phantom element encountered.
Cause — This element is deleted, has its complex bit set and is not part of a complex
element.
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
Page 213
Effect — This element does not violate any MicroStation design file construction rules,
but is noted simply because it may be an indicator of other types of corruption in the area.
Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command will compress this
element out of your file automatically.
148 — Linear patterned element detected with no pattern components.
Cause — The elements that are supposed to make up this pattern are missing.
Effect — The linear pattern will not display. The default style will be displayed instead.
Solution — Recreate the pattern.
149 — V8 format reference file encountered.
Cause — An attached reference file has been converted to V8 format and can no longer
be loaded.
Effect — The reference file information will not display or will not display properly.
Solution — Replace the reference files with the original V7 format files. Also you can
delete the reference file attachements by selecting the repair option “Reference File |
Delete V8 reference file attachment.
150 — Text height _________ size is larger than _____________.
Text height ____________ size is smaller than ______________.
Text width ____________ size is larger than ________________.
Text width _____________size is smaller than ______________.
Cause — The text height or width is either larger or smaller than normal.
Effect — If the text height or width is too small than it might not be displayable in
MicroStation.
Effect — If the text height or width is too large than it might cover up other elements
when displayed.
Solution — Use MicroStation to adjust the text height or width.
152 — Text height __________ to width ___________ is bad.
Text width ________ to height _________ is bad.
Cause — The text height to width ratio is too large or the width to height ratio is large.
Effect — The text will not display correctly. The text will either be tall and narrow or
wide and short.
Solution — Use MicroStation to adjust the text.
153 — GGBASE ___ is greater than GRAFIC ___.
Cause — The GGBASE (graphic group base number) is greater than GRAFIC (next
graphic group number). This means that the next graphic group number you use will be
less than the graphic group base number.
Solution — Use EdG to change the GGBASE (graphic group base number) or GRAFIC
(next graphic group number).
154 — NNBASE ___ is greater than CANODE ___.
Cause — The NNBASE (text node base number) is greater than CANODE (next text
node number). This means that the next text node number you use will be less than the
text node base number.
Effect — merge and other operations may create duplicate text node numbers.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” mode with the “Set
incorrect NNBASE to zero” repair option on to automatically set the NNBASE back to
zero.
155 — Active level ___ is out of range (not between 1 and 63).
Cause — The active level is set to an illegal value.
Solution — Use MicroStation to select a legal active level.
156 — Working units must be non-zero.
Cause — Any new elements placed may not display correctly.
Effect — Dimension elements created for any elements when the working units are zero
will have bad dimension values.
Effect — You may expect other erratic behavior with this file.
Solution — Use MicroStation to adjust the working units of this design file.
157 — Design file header length must be 766 words.
Cause — The length of the design file header is not correct. The design file header is
always supposed to be exactly 766 words long (1532 bytes).
Effect — MicroStation will not consider this file a design file, and will not be able to
open it.
Solution — Use FileFixer to replace the design file header of this file.
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
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158 — Duplicate reference file attachment encountered.
Cause — When a file is referenced to another file more than once, each reference
attachment must have a unique Logical name to differentiate them. When this is not the
case, MicroStation will only display the first occurrence of this duplicated reference file.
Effect — Only the first occurrence of this reference file will be displayed by
MicroStation.
Effect — When you delete the visible (first) reference attachment from the
“File|Reference” box in MicroStation, it will appear to reappear later. What is in fact
happening is the next duplicate attachment in line keeps becoming the “first,” so it
suddenly displays. Users that encounter this problem often report that they “can’t delete a
reference file attachment.”
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the
DELETE DUPLICATE REFERENCE FILE ATTACHMENTS option turned on.
159 — Cell library header length must be 23 words.
Cause — The length of the cell library header is not correct. Every cell library header is
supposed to be exactly 23 words long (46 bytes).
Effect — MicroStation will not consider this file a cell library, and will not be able to
attach it to a design file, rendering it useless until this condition is corrected.
Solution — Fix this cell library with FileFixer in Replace Cell Library Header mode.
160 — Tag set ID ______ is missing.
Cause —The tag set referred to cannot be found and has probably been deleted.This error
(160) only occurs in a design file.
Effect — The original tag set data cannot be accessed.
Solution — Use MicroStation to recreate the tag set.
161 — Linkage area {____ words} is suspiciously long.
Cause — The difference between the expected WTF of this element and its actual size
indicates that either WTF is wrong or that the element has an attribute linkage area that is
suspiciously long (more than 128 words).
Effect — This might be a rather long (but legitimate) user data linkage. Or it could be a
regular data base linkage with 11 informational linkages. It might also be some
combination of both of these. These possibilities are legal, though unlikely. What’s most
likely is that some part of the element such as number of vertices, text characters, EditData-Fields, etc. is incorrect.
Solution — Use Problem Element Viewer to determine what this element looks like (if
possible) so that you can redraw it. Use Problem Element Viewer to delete this element.
162 — This is the first element indicating that this file contains ______
attribute linkage.
Cause — This design file has either Modeler or TriForma attribute linkage in it. This is
not a corruption. FileFixer is just letting you know that the Modeler or TriForma
application options are being used when processing this file.
163 — The active angle _____ is out of range.
Cause — The active angle saved in the design file header (type 9 level 8) is out of range.
Legal values are between -360 and 360 degrees.
Effect — Elements you place using the active angle won’t be placed correctly.
Solution — Use the MicroStation “active angle” keyin command to correct the active
angle.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the “Set
Active Angle to ____” repair option turned on and a valid new active angle specified.
164 —Dynamic fence won’t display in saved view.
Cause —There is a flag in the named (saved) view (type 5, level 3) element that cause
the dynamic fence to not display.
Effect — You can’t see the fence while you are building it. After you finish building it, it
will then be displayed.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the “Fix
problem with dynamic fence not displaying in a saved view” repair option turned on.
165 — Null filled linkage found.
Cause —Null filled linkage, which are not required in make the element the minimum
length, increase the size of the design file.
Effect — MicroStation seems to work fine with this problem. It does however make the
design file larger.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the
REMOVE NULL FILLED LINKAGES option turned on.
167 — Duplicate text node number
Cause — Duplicate text node numbers in text node elements.
Effect —This should cause no serious problems for MicroStation proper. There are,
however, processors that rely on text node numbers to identify specific text nodes (BITS
is one such processor). These could have problems if more than one text node shared the
same text node number.
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
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Solution — Use FileFixer to set the duplicate text node number to the next available text
node number.
170 — Duplicate type 9, level 8 (design file header) found.
Cause — Multiple design file headers.
Effect — May not be able to display all the elements.
Effect — May not be able to display any elements.
Solution — Use FileFixer to delete the duplicate header.
171 — Shared instance level should be {___} not {___}.
Cause — The level of a shared cell instance should be the same as the shared cell
definition.
Solution — Use the FileFixer to set the level to the same as the shared cell definition.
175 — Text element rotation angle is set to 360 degrees.
Cause — When text elements are rotated from one angle to an angle of 0 degrees, it
assigns an angle of 360 degrees. This only occurs in a 2D design file.
Effect — Unknown.
Solution — Use FileFixer to set the angle to 0 degrees.
177 — Entity-MSLink (___-___) matches element ____.
Entity-MSLink (___-___) matches element ____ in __________.
Entity-Occur (___-___) matches element ____.
Entity-Occur (___-___) matches element ____ in ________.
Cause — The database linkage (entity-MSLink or entity-Occur) is not unique. These
values are used by MicroStation to relate to a specific record in a table in a database.
Entity-Occur is used in a DMRS database. Entity-MSLink is used in all other databases.
Effect — MicroStation doesn’t have any problem with more than one element looking at
the same database record. It is just being reported as a convenience to the user who may
want to address it as a linkage problem.
178 — Orphan database linkage (type = ____, entity = ___, MSLink = ___)
found.
Cause — The database linkage doesn’t exist. The “type” displayed in the message will
be one of the following: Ingres, ODBC, Oracle, INFORMIX, RIS, Sybase, XBASE/DB3,
DMRS.
Solution — Recreate the database table and/or database row.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Remove orphan database linkage” repair option to delete
the orphan database linkage.
179 — WTF (___) does not match the WTF (___) from the back-up
element.
Cause — This element’s WTF doesn’t match what is stored in FileFixer’s WTF Cache
back-up element.
Effect — The element’s WTF is most likely corrupted.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” mode to set the words-tofollow to what was in the back-up element.
180 — Questionable element type detected.
Cause — This element’s type is not defined by MicroStation. It is either an application
element whose type the user failed to add (options screen) to the list of valid application
elements, or it is a corrupt element (garbage).
Effect — The element will either be ignored or treated as an application element.
Solution — If the element is not a valid application element, it should be deleted.
(FileFixer does not do detailed validation testing on application elements at this time, so
it is up to the user to determine whether this is an application element.)
185 — Element size is zero in all dimensions.
Cause — The low range is equal to the high range in all dimensions.
Effect — You can’t see this element in any view. When this element isn’t close to the
rest of the elements in the design file then the FIT command won’t seem to work
properly.
Solution — You can delete such elements by adding error number 185 to the “Options |
Repair… | Element | Remove elements with the following error numbers” list.
190 — Type 11 (curve) or type 13 (conic) with two visible vertices has a
repeating vertex.
Cause — A curve or a conic that has two visible vertices (six vertices counting the two
invisible vertices at the beginning and the end of the curve) has two vertices in a row that
are exactly the same.
Effect — DXF translation will sometimes crash on such elements.
Effect — Other processors may crash.
Effect — The element may display or plot intermittently (sometimes there, sometimes
not).
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
Page 219
Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command will delete this
element automatically by default.
191 — Text element has more EDFs than characters.
Cause — A text element with more EDFs (Enter-Data-Fields) than characters has been
encountered.
Effect — Unknown.
Solution — Use Problem Element Viewer to find out what this element looks like. Delete
it. Redraw it.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the Options
| Repair... | EDF | Correct EDF/text length mismatches repair option turned on to repair
the element.
Minor Errors — Usually Won’t Cause Problems
Minor errors are reported with numbers in the 300 to 399 series. The flagged elements
violate some rule of MicroStation file construction and may eventually cause problems.
301 — The number of words of attribute data is not a multiple of 4.
Cause — Per the rules, database linkages should always be created in multiples of 4
words. The number of words in the linkage area of this element is not a multiple of 4.
Effect — Since a DMRS database linkage utilizes all 4 words of a linkage, access to the
proper database occurrence will probably be prevented.
Effect — For a user linkage, whether this situation will cause problems depends on the
type of user linkage involved.
Solution — Use Problem Element Viewer to delete this element. Then use MicroStation
to recreate it.
302 — Type 1 (cell library header) elements are not allowed in design
files.
Cause — Type 1 elements are library cell headers that should only be found in cell
libraries.
Effect —MicroStation ignores type 1 elements in design files.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the
“Remove illegal element types.” option turned on. Be alert for other types of corruption
in the vicinity of this element. If FileFixer fails to delete this element because it detected
a higher priority corruption first, then turn off all search options except “2D element
found in 3D file.”, “3D element found in 2D file.” and “Illegal element type detected.”
Then run FileFixer again.
303 — Shared cell definition with no shared cell instance.
Cause — A shared cell definition has been found, but there is no shared cell instance that
uses that definition. This happens quite often when converting AutoCAD drawing files to
MicroStation.
Effect —MicroStation will ignore this shared cell definition.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the ‘Delete
shared cell definition with no shared cell instances” option turned on. This option is off
by default.
304 — H-Bit should not be set for this element.
Cause — (Note: The H-Bit is called the H-Bit because for several element types it
indicates a hole element. It means different things for different element types.) According
to the strictest rules of MicroStation element construction, the only elements whose H-Bit
should ever be set are cells (type 2), lines (type 3), shapes (type 6), complex shapes (type
14), ellipses (type 15), and element types 21 through 28. This element was not one of
these types, yet its H-Bit was set. Since current versions of MicroStation ignore the H-Bit
for element types that generate this message, this error will not cause any problems with
current versions of MicroStation. It might, however, cause problems with future versions
of MicroStation related software. This error is very common.
Effect — The situation causes no known problems with current versions of MicroStation
related software.
Solution — This is an unimportant error. It is okay to ignore this error.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the TURN
OFF ILLEGAL H-BITS option turned on to repair this element.
305 — Element range doesn’t match the min-max of its vertices.
Cause — This error is essentially similar to error 705, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance, but
within the tolerance -70% and 900%. See Error number 705 below for more information.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” to repair this element.
306 — Type ___ misses its parent by ____%.
Cause — This error is essentially similar to error 706, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance, but
within the tolerance -70% and 900%.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” to repair this element.
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
Page 221
307 — B-spline pole element doesn’t match the min-max of its poles nor
its b-spline surface header.
Cause — This error is essentially similar to error 707, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance, but
within the tolerance -70% and 900%. See Error number 707 below for more information.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” to repair this element.
308 — Associative ID ___ is cross-linked with element ____..
Cause — The associative ID for this element is being used by another element earlier in
the design file.
Effect — An element using this associative ID won’t know which element it is associated
with. This will most likely cause it to not be displayed correctly.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” to repair this element’s
associative ID. FileFixer will set the cross-linked associative ID to the next highest
available associative ID. For example, if associative IDs 1 through 47 are being used, and
associative ID 11 is cross-linked, then FileFixer will set the cross-linked associative ID to
48.
309 — Type __ header misses type __ component by __ %.
Cause — This error is essentially similar to error 709, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance, but
within the tolerance -70% and 900%. See Error number 709 below for more information.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” to repair this element.
310 — Cell being used as dimension element’s terminator symbol is
missing.
Cause — The cell or shared cell being used as the dimension element’s terminator
symbol is missing.
Effect — The terminator symbol will not be displayed.
Solution — Recreate the cell or delete the dimension element.
311 — Design file header is not on level 8.
Cause — The design file type 9 header element should be on level 8. If the level is less
than 8, this might be a very old design file (before IGDS version 8.0).
Cause — This is not and never was a design file.
Cause — This is a design file that has been damaged.
Effect — If this is not a design file then, of course, MicroStation won’t be able to do
anything with it.
Solution — If this is a design file, use FileFixer to repair more severe errors first. If the
file continues to cause trouble, use FileFixer’s “Replace type 9” command to handle error
311.
312 — Range of right circular truncated cone is incorrect.
Cause — This error is essentially similar to error 712, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance, but
within the tolerance -70% and 900%. See Error number 712 below for more information.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” to repair this element.
316 — An element type that should never have its A-Bit set but has it
set.
Cause — This type of element can only be a component of a complex element. In that
situation it should never have its A-Bit (attribute bit) set. When this error occurs, the
element has it’s a-Bit set anyway.
Effect — This situation violates the rules of standard MicroStation file create, but causes
no known problems.
Solution — If the element doesn’t really have an attribute linkage, FileFixer’s
“Automatic Design File Repair” command will turn off the A-Bit.
Solution — Since it doesn’t cause any known problem, you may want to ignore this
error. You can turn off searching for this error using one of FileFixer’s options screens.
318 — Arc’s sweep angle ______ is invalid.
Cause — The arc’s sweep angle should always be between –360 and 360 degrees.
Effect — The arc may not display correctly.
Solution — The following procedure to modify the sweep angle of an arc is from the
MicroStation 95 help system:
1. With AccuDraw active, select the Modify Element tool.
2. Identify the arc.
3. From the Method option menu in the Tool Settings window, choose Angle.
The drawing plane origin moves to the center of the arc, and the coordinate system aligns
its x-axis with the start of the arc's sweep.
4. (Optional) Rotate the drawing plane axes.
5. (Optional) Preview the modifications by keying in desired changes in the AccuDraw
window.
6. Enter a data point to complete the modification.
Note: You can adjust the arc sweep by either complement of the angle (180° either way).
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
Page 223
320 — Complex header range is off by ___%.
Cause — This error is essentially similar to error 720, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance, but
within the tolerance -70% and 900%. See Error number 720 below for more information.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” to repair this element.
321 — All the points are the same in this dimension element, it may not
display.
Cause — There is more than one point in this dimension element, but there aren’t at least
two unique points in the dimension element.
Effect — MicroStation will display this dimension element as a dot. You will not be able
to see it.
Solution — Run FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” after adding error number
321 to “Options | Repair… | Element | Remove elements with the following errors”. Then
use MicroStation to recreate the dimension element.
322 — Number-of-components in complex header element is incorrect.
Cause — Some complex header elements, such as type 7s and type 12s, specify the
number of component elements that are embedded within them. For dependability
reasons many MDL programs have been modified so as not to rely on this information.
Nonetheless, an accurate number-of-components word is part of the definition of an
“ANSI standard” design file, so errors in this word are flagged.
Effect — Most, but probably not all, MicroStation and MDL applicationsignore this
information. It should have little effect on most programs.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to correct the
number-of-components.
323 — A deleted element was found within a complex element.
Cause — Complex elements should not contain deleted elements.
Cause — The complex header element mentioned contains a words-in-description error
that causes it to think it contains elements that really should be after its end.
Effect — Some combinations of elements can cause MicroStation to crash.
Solution — Run FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the
HANDLE ILLEGAL COMPONENTS IN COMPLEX ELEMENT option turned on.
With this option turned on you have the choice of dropping status on the complex header
or squeezing out the deleted elements.
Solution — Run the FileFixer Manual Design File Repair command with all options
turned off. This will remove all deleted elements from the file. Then run the Manual
Design File Repair command with “Correct words-in-description” turned on. This will
readjust the words-in-description of the complex element’s header.
Solution — If FileFixer sets words-in-description for the element incorrectly or if the
above solution fails for any other reason, delete and redraw the complex elements
involved. Axiom product, Problem Element Viewer, will help you find and display the
element you want to redraw.
324 — Range of arc or ellipse is incorrect.
Cause — This error is essentially similar to error 724, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance, but
within the tolerance -70% and 900%. See Error number 724 below for more information.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” to repair this element.
325 — Range of text element is incorrect.
Cause — This error is essentially similar to error 725, but is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance, but
within the tolerance -70% and 900%. See error 725 for important information about this
error.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” to repair this element. Be
sure you have the correct font library specified in MicroStation.
326 — Text element has zero width or height multiplier.
Cause — Text elements should not have a zero width or height multiplier.
Effect — If both of the multipliers are zero then MicroStation will display this text
element as a tiny dot.
Effect — If only one of the multipliers is zero then MicroStation will display this text
element as a line, either vertical or horizontal depending upon which multiplier is zero.
Solution — Use MicroStation to delete and recreate the text element.
327 — Range of text element is incorrect.
Cause — This error is essentially similar to error 727, but it is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance, but
within the tolerance –70% and 900%.
Effect — Possible element snapping, selection, and fence manipulation problems.
Solution — Turn off the Search option: “Skip shared cell instance range validation.” and
then use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type of
problem automatically.
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328 — Complex element has zero components.
Cause — The main purpose of a complex header element is to group together other types
of elements. The complex header element whose EdG element number is listed in
parentheses has no component elements and therefore serves no purpose. (There are
situations where a complex header element has meaning even when it has no
components. FileFixer knows about these situations and does not report them as an
error.)
Effect — This element may be the source of words-in-description errors and nesting
errors.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the repair
option DELETE COMPLEX ELEMENT WITH NO COMPONENTS turned on to delete
the complex element.
329 — GRAFIC should never be 0.
Cause — The type 9 of a design file contains a word called GRAFIC. The next graphic
group placed in the design file should get GRAFIC as its graphic group number.
GRAFIC is incremented after each graphic group is placed. GRAFIC in this design file is
0.
Effect — The next graphic group you attempt to place in this design file will not be
treated as a graphic group.
Effect — The ADD GROUP command will fail if you try to create a new graphic group.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the SET
GRAFIC TO ONE MORE THAN THE LARGEST GRAPHIC GROUP NUMBER
option turned on.
330 — Range of shared cell instance is incorrect.
Cause — This error is essentially similar to error 730, but it is less severe in nature. This
error is generated when the range is off by more than the user-specified tolerance, but
within the tolerance –70% and 900%.
Effect — Possible element snapping, selection, and fence manipulation problems.
Effect — File may not fit view correctly.
Solution — Turn off the Search option: “Skip shared cell instance range validation.” and
then use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type of
problem automatically.
333 — Class of element is illegal.
Cause — The class of this element is undefined (greater than 6).
Effect — This element may fail to display, may fail to plot, or may be left out of some
fence operations.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to set the class to
a legal value. Remember to turn on the “Options | Repair... | Element | Set illegal class to
___” repair option as it is off by default.
334 — Number-of-Components exceeds legal maximum.
Cause — The maximum legal number-of-components for elements that store this
information is 3641. This element has a number-of-components word that is greater than
3641.
Effect —MicroStation and most, but possibly not all, MDL applications ignore this
information. It should have little effect on most programs.
Solution — Use EdG to count the number of components in the element. Use the
MODIFY ELEMENT (20) command to set the correct number-of-components.
335 — Text element has too many Enter-Data-Fields.
Cause — Text elements can have up to, but no more than, 20 Enter-Data-Fields. This
text element has more than 20 Enter-Data-Fields.
Effect — This element may display incorrectly.
Effect — This element may not display at all.
Effect — MicroStation or other processes may crash upon encountering this element.
Solution — FileFixer deletes the EDFs.
336 — A component element is on a different level than its complex
header.
Cause — The indicated element is part of a complex element and is on a different level
than its parent element.
Effect — Depending on what levels are being displayed, part of the element may be
visible while other parts are invisible.
Effect — Some processes may ignore the fact that parts of the element are on different
levels and treat the entire element as though it were on the level indicated by the header.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the repair
option MOVE COMPONENTS TO SAME LEVEL AS COMPLEX HEADER turned on
to move the component to the same level as its parent.
337 — A component element of one color is part of a complex header of
another color.
Cause — The indicated element is part of a complex element and is a different color than
its parent element.
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Effect — Some processes will treat this element as though it were the color indicated
within the element itself and some processes will treat this element as though it were the
color indicated by the header element.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the SET
SYMBOLOGY OF COMPONENTS TO MATCH ITS HEADER repair option turned on
to repair this element.
338 — A component element of one line weight is part of a complex
header of another line weight.
Cause — The indicated element is part of a complex element and has a different line
weight than its parent element.
Effect — Some processes will treat this element as though it were the line weight
indicated within the element itself and some processes will treat this element as though it
were the line weight indicated by the header element.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the SET
SYMBOLOGY OF COMPONENTS TO MATCH ITS HEADER repair option turned on
to repair this element.
339 — A component element of one line style is part of a complex
header of another line style.
Cause — The indicated element is part of a complex element and is a different line style
than its parent element.
Effect — Some processes will treat this element as though it were the line style indicated
within the element itself and some processes will treat this element as though it were the
line style indicated by the header element.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the SET
SYMBOLOGY OF COMPONENTS TO MATCH ITS HEADER repair option turned on
to repair this element.
341 — A component is a different graphic group than its header.
Cause — All component elements must have the same graphic group number as the
complex header.
Effect — Unknown.
Solution — Select Repair Options | Complex | “Set graphic group of component to match
its header” to instruct FileFixer to change the graphic group number of the component
element to match the header.
342 — Duplicate reference file logical name encountered.
Cause — This element is a reference file attachment whose logical name matches a
previous reference file attachment in this design file.
Effect — One or the other of the reference file attachments may not display.
Effect — One or the other of the reference file attachments may not plot.
Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the repair option
“Change slightly the duplicate reference file logical name” handles this bug by default.
343 — Reference file <________> is missing.
Cause — The reference file may have been deleted.
Cause — The reference file may have been moved.
Effect — The missing reference file will not be displayed.
Effect — The missing reference file attachment will not plot.
Solution — Delete the unwanted attachment using MicroStation’s File-Reference
command.
Solution — Correct the path of the reference file attachment using Axiom’s RefManager.
346 — An Enter-Data-Field has an unrecognized justification.
Cause — The Enter-Data-Field justification can only be left (-1), center (0) or right (1).
Effect — This element may display incorrectly.
Solution — FileFixer changes the Enter-Data-Field justification to match the text
justification of the text element.
347 — An Enter-Data-Field completes outside the text string.
Cause — The Enter-Data-Field completes outside the text string. The Enter-Data-Field
expects the text string to be larger.
Effect — This element may display incorrectly.
Effect — This element may not display at all.
Solution — If the calculated WTF is greater than the WTF stored in the element,
FileFixer deletes the EDFs; otherwise, if the number of EDFs is 20 or less, then FileFixer
extends the text string with spaces and changes the “number of text characters” field to
the size of the longest EDF.
348 — An Enter-Data-Field are not in order.
Cause — Enter-data-fields are not sorted.
Effect — This element may display incorrectly.
Effect — This element may not display at all.
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Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the “Correct
EDFs which overlap or are out of sequence” repair option turned on to sort the EnterData-Fields.
349 — An Enter-Data-Field overlaps another Enter-Data-Field.
Cause — The Enter-Data-Field position or length is wrong so that it overlaps the next
Enter-Data-Field.
Effect — This element may display incorrectly.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the “Correct
EDFs which overlap or are out of sequence” repair option turned on to adjust the position
and/or length.
350 — An Enter-Data-Field has a length of zero.
Cause — An Enter-Data-Field must have a length greater than zero.
Effect — This element may display incorrectly.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the
CHANGE ZERO-LENGTH EDF TO LENGTH TO 1 repair option turned on to repair
this element.
353 — A-Bit is incorrectly turned off or WTF should be ____.
Cause — The words-to-follow of this element is larger than expected. The next element
in the file shows a reasonable possibility of being a valid element. If not for the fact that
the A-Bit is turned off, the element’s index-to-attribute word would point to the expected
location of the linkage. The difference between the expected and the actual WTF is a
multiple of 4, and the difference between the expected and actual sizes indicates that the
cause of this anomaly could be the A-Bit of the element being turned off when there are
indeed attribute linkages.
Effect — One of the parts of the element that affects words-to-follow is incorrect. The
effect of this error is dependent on what part of the element is actually incorrect.
Solution — Try turning on the A-Bit, but be prepared to turn it off again if you are
getting data base or linkage errors.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this error.
Solution — See error 354 for additional solutions.
354 — Words-to-follow warning.
Cause — The words-to-follow of this element is larger than expected. Nonetheless, the
next element in the file shows a reasonable possibility of being a valid element. One
explanation for this is that the words-to-follow of the element is correct, but some other
part of the element that affects words-to-follow (such as number of vertices, number of
characters, number of Enter-Data-Fields, the A-Bit, etc.) is incorrect.
Effect — One of the parts of the element that affects words-to-follow is incorrect. The
effect of this error is dependent on what part of the element is actually incorrect.
Solution — Use Problem Element Viewer to see what this element looks like. If the
element displays properly, it may be okay to leave it in the file.
Solution — If Problem Element Viewer displays the element incorrectly, delete the
element and redraw it.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this error.
355 — Stray element found outside of a cell in a cell library.
Cause — A cell library should consist of only a cell library header and library cells.
There should not be any elements between library (type 1) cells, before the first library
cell or after the last library cell.
Effect — MicroStation may be unable to find and place cells after this cell in the library.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to automatically
remove this element.
356 — Rotation of text element does not match the rotation of the text
node it is in.
Cause — All the text inside a text node should be parallel. This text element has a
different rotation than its parent text node.
Effect — Some of the text elements belonging to the text node may be omitted from the
display or from plots.
Effect — Some of the text elements belonging to the text node may be displayed at a
different rotation angle than the other text elements in the node.
Effect — The text may plot at a different angle than the angle at which it is displayed on
the screen.
Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command can automatically set
the text rotation to match the rotation of its text node.
Solution — Drop status on the text node.
362 — Possible 2D element in 3D file or vice versa.
Cause — Analysis of the number of vertices, database linkages, points, characters, EnterData-Fields, poles, boundaries, knots, etc. indicates that what might be a 2D element is in
a 3D file or vice versa. Words-to-follow in this element points to a design file location
which appears to be the start of a valid element. Using EdG to copy an element into a
design file of the wrong dimension is one possible way the error can be generated.
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
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Cause — If you have an enormous number of these elements, you may have a 2D type 9
at the top of a 3D design file or vice versa. Use the Replace Type 9 command to replace
the type 9 of this design file with one of the proper dimension.
Effect — File corruption is likely. MicroStation may display very strange results for
these elements. Other programs are likely to have problems also.
Solution — If you’re sure the type 9 (or type 5 for a cell library) of this file is of the
correct dimension, then use Problem Element Viewer to delete this element.
Solution — If you’re not sure of the dimension of the header, replace the header with one
of the correct dimension.
364 — Siamese attribute linkage detected.
Cause — The attribute linkage extends beyond the end of the element it is attached. That
means this linkage and the element following are sharing file space.
Effect — Since the shared file space can’t correctly contain both the attribute linkage and
the start of the next element, one of them must be corrupt. Chances are it is the attribute
linkage. If it is the attribute linkage, then accessing the database using this linkage will, at
best, yield erroneous results and, at worse, cause MicroStation to crash.
Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command can automatically
remove the attribute linkage area of this element and adjust the graphic part of the
element so that no visual information is lost.
365 — Size of linkage is not a multiple of four.
Cause — The user linkage mentioned is not a multiple of four words in length. Note that
this error is different from error 301 in that this error refers to the size of a particular
attribute linkage as determined by analyzing words-to-follow of the user linkage itself
(not words-to-follow of the element). Error 301 refers to the size of the linkage area. The
linkage area is that part of the element after the graphic part of the element. The attribute
area of an element may contain several individual attribute linkages.
Effect — The same effects that can be cause by error 301 can be caused by error 365.
Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the “Options |
Repair… | Linkage | Delete user linkages which are not a multiple of 4 words” set can
automatically remove the user linkages that are not a multiple of four words while
retaining the rest of the linkages.
Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command without the “Options |
Repair… | Linkage | Delete user linkages which are not a multiple of 4 words” set and
with the “Fix WTF warnings” set can automatically remove the attribute linkage area of
this element and adjust the graphic part of the element so that no visual information is
lost. (Make sure that “Linkage area is suspiciously long” is turned on in Search | Options |
Linkage.)
367 — Cell header’s diagonal is invalid.
Cause — The cell header’s diagonal values are invalid. One of the low ranges (X, Y, or
Z) is higher than its corresponding high range.
Effect — The cell may not rotate.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” range option “Repair
diagonal of cell header” to fix the diagonal.
369 — A-Bit is turned on even though there appears to be no attribute
linkage.
Cause — The attribute bit of this element is turned on, but the index-to-attribute pointer
of the elements points to a location beyond the end of the element.
Effect — Some database related processes may think part of the next element is the
attribute linkage to this element. The result will be erroneous data base access at best or
possibly even a crashed design file.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this error.
370 — Orphan raster reference attachment (type 90) found.
Cause — Raster reference file attachment must have at least two type 90 elements. One
type 90 as the header, and at least one type 90 as the component element. The type 90
element found is a component type 90 element and there is no type 90 header element.
Refer to the “Correct the raster reference file component’s class” section in the section
title “Raster Repair Options” in the The Options Menu | Repair options section for a full
description of the different types of raster reference file attachment (type 90) elements.
Effect — This raster reference file attachment will not be displayed by MicroStation, and
you may get garbage in the File Name field in the MicroStation Reference Files dialog
box.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to delete this
element.
375 — Active pattern scale set to zero in Extended TCB element.
Cause — In MicroStation 4.0 certain seed files were delivered with the active pattern
scale set to 0.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command “Set pattern scale
to one when it is zero” to fix this error.
380 — Illegal element type detected.
Cause — An element type, which should never exist (type 0, 20, and 127), was detected.
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Effect — The element will probably be ignored. It is illegal for such elements to exist
and is probably an indicator of some other type of corruption. There is an excellent
chance that there is an earlier words-to-follow error in the design file, which could make
the design file undisplayable.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the
“Remove illegal element types” option turned on. Be alert for other types of corruption in
the vicinity of this element. If FileFixer fails to delete this element because it detected a
higher priority corruption first, then turn off all search options except “2D element found
in 3D file”, “3D element found in 2D file” and “Illegal element type detected”, and try
again.
382 — Type 8 (design file header), 9 (digitizer) or 10 (level symbology)
found in cell library.
Cause — Type 8, 9 and 10 elements should be found only in design files. One of these
was found in a cell library.
Effect — The element will probably be ignored. It is illegal for such elements to exist
and is probably an indicator of some other type of corruption.
Solution — Use the FileFixer "Remove illegal element types" repair option to delete
these elements. Be alert for other types of corruption in the vicinity of this element. If
FileFixer fails to delete this element because it detected a higher priority corruption first,
then turn off all search options except “2D element found in 3D file”, “3D element found
in 2D file” and “Illegal element type detected”, and try again.
383 — Cell in a design file is nested within itself.
Cause — This element is a cell that is nested within a cell of the same name.
Effect — The element will probably display and plot okay. But if you try to create a new
(type 1) cell using this (type 2) cell, the elements in the redundantly named (innermost)
cell will be missing from the (type 1) cell. That is because MicroStation will leave out the
second (innermost) instance of the cell in order to prevent cell level nesting problems in
the cell library.
Solution — Use the FileFixer "Delete cell nested within itself" repair option to delete
occurrences of a cell that is nested within a cell of the same name. This option is off by
default.
385 — First and last vertex of type 6 shapes don’t match.
Cause — The first and last vertex of a shape must always have the same location;
otherwise the shape is not closed.
Cause — If you have many of these, you should suspect that the header of this file is of
the wrong dimension.
Effect — Polygon, patterning, shading and hidden line processing software may produce
erroneous results due to the element not being closed as expected.
Solution — Delete the element and redraw. To see which element needs to be redrawn
before deleting element use Axiom product Problem Element Viewer.
Solution — If the header of this file is of the wrong dimension, replace the header with
FileFixer’s Replace Type 9 command.
387 — Reference file attachment field name is blank.
Cause — A reference file attachment has been found with the number of characters in
the file name equal to zero.
Effect — MicroStation will not be able to display the reference file.
Effect — You will not be able modify this reference file attachment in MicroStation.
Solution — Use the FileFixer "Delete reference file attachments with blank file names"
repair option to delete this reference file attachment. This repair option is off by default.
You will need to turn it on before it will delete these reference file attachments.
388 — Reference file name overflows its field.
Reference file logical name overflows its field.
Reference file description overflows its field.
Cause — The number of characters in the file name, logical name or description string is
larger than its field.
Effect — MicroStation may abort when loading this design file.
Effect — EdG may exit when opening this design file.
Solution — Use the FileFixer "Correct the file name, logical or description strings from
overflowing" repair option to fix the string from overflowing.
390 — Text element has zero characters.
Cause — A text element with zero characters has been encountered.
Effect — MicroStation will ignore this element.
Solution — Delete this element.
Future Problems — File is in Danger
Future problems are reported with numbers in the 500 to 599 series. Continued use of the
file without handling these problems will probably eventually cause a severe corruption
problem.
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
Page 235
505 — WID error. Complex component exceeds length of parent.
Cause — In a multiply nested complex element (nested more than one level deep), an
“inner” complex element ends after an “outer” complex element.
Effect — This is not as serious as other types of words-in-description errors because
deleting this element will not corrupt the entire design file. Deleting an element with this
kind of problem will, however, delete more elements than the one intended. It can also
cause an erroneous dropping of complex status of a later element and leave complex bit
errors in the design file.
Solution — See error 520.
510 — Element with A-Bit off, WTF minus ITA is not equal to 14.
Cause — The index-to-attribute word of an element should point to where in the element
the database linkage starts (if it has a linkage) or where in the element it would start (if it
doesn’t have a linkage). When there are no database linkages the difference between
words-to-follow and index-to-attributes should be 14.
Effect — If a database linkage is added to this element, the entire design file may
become corrupted.
Solution — Use EdG to change the index-to-attribute word of this element to 14 less
than the element’s Words-to-Follow. The EdG command is MODIFY ELEMENT (16) =
wtf-14. Of course, you don’t type in wtf-14; you enter the number that is fourteen less
than the words-to-follow of the element.
512 — Index-to-attributes exceeds 752.
Cause — The index-to-attributes word of the element was such that the total length of
the element would exceed 768 if a database linkage were present.
Effect — If the element already has a database linkage, it will be inaccessible due to this
error. Trying to add a database linkage to this element is likely to cause file corruption.
Solution — If the element has no database linkages, set the index-to-attribute word of the
element to 14 less than words-to-follow. If the element does have linkages, subtract 14
from the words-to-follow and then subtract the total length of all database linkages. Set
the index-to-attribute word to the resultant value. If this sounds too hard or if all else
fails, simply delete the element. Before deleting the element, it may be possible to see
what the element looks like (so you can redraw it) using Problem Element Viewer.
513 — Index-to-attributes is too small.
Cause — The index-to-attributes word of the element was such that the basic part of the
element (without any database linkages) is too short.
Effect — If the element already has a database linkage, it may be inaccessible due to this
error. Trying to add a database linkage to this element will likely cause file corruption.
Solution — If the element has no database linkages, set the index-to-attribute word of the
element to 14 less than words-to-follow. If the element does have linkages, subtract 14
from the words-to-follow and then subtract the total length of all database linkages. Set
the index-to-attributes word to the resultant value. If this sounds too hard or if all else
fails, simply delete the element. If words-to-follow of the element is less than 16, delete
this element. Before deleting the element, it may be possible to see what the element
looks like (so you can redraw it) using Problem Element Viewer.
514 — Index-to-attributes should be ___.
Cause — Except with deleted complex header elements, the index-to-attributes (ITA)
word of an element tells us the element’s size (not counting attribute linkages). FileFixer
was able to calculate this element’s size exactly, but the index-to-attribute word was not
what FileFixer expected.
Effect — If the element already has a database linkage, it will be inaccessible due to this
error. Trying to add a database linkage to this element is likely to cause file corruption.
Solution — Use EdG to set the index-to-attributes word to the value reported by
FileFixer. The command would be: MODIFY ELEMENT (16) = (whatever FileFixer
said ITA should be).
515 — Element with linkages, WTF minus ITA is less than 18.
Cause — The index-to-attribute word of an element should point to where in the element
the database linkage starts (if it has a linkage) or where in the element it would start (if it
doesn’t have a linkage). When there are no database linkages, the difference between
words-to-follow and index-to-attributes should be 14. When there is a database linkage
the difference must be at least 18 (14 plus at least 4 words for the linkage).
Effect — If a database linkage is added to this element, the entire design file may
become corrupted.
Solution — Delete the element and redraw it.
520 — Complex element doesn’t end on element boundary.
Cause — The words-in-description value of a complex header element (like a cell, a
connected string, or a text node) points to a location that is not the start of a new element.
This is detected by scanning through the element using two different methods, 1) using
words-to-follow and 2) using words-in-description. If these two techniques don’t lead to
the same design file block/byte offset, something is wrong.
Effect — If this complex element is deleted the entire design file may become corrupted.
Some versions of MicroStation will crash trying to place a type 1 cell with this problem.
Solution — Use the FileFixer "Correct words-in-description" repair option to
automatically correct the words-in-description of this element.
Solution — If FileFixer cannot correct this element then you will need to delete it using
Problem Element Viewer.
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522 — Complex element doesn’t end before end-of-file.
Cause — The words-in-description word of a complex header element indicates that the
next element after the entire complex element (not just the header element) starts after the
end-of-design marker. Another way of saying this is that we encountered the end-ofdesign marker before we encountered the end of this complex element.
Effect — Deleting this complex element may corrupt the entire design file.
Solution — See error 520.
526 — Running out of text node numbers.
Cause — CANODE (in the type 9 of the design file) is greater than 65525. This does not
violate any MicroStation rules, but it is somewhat unusual for CANODE to get this high.
Effect — There is room for less than 10 new text node numbers. After that CANODE
will recycle back to 1 and you will be in danger of creating cross-linked text nodes (two
different text nodes sharing the same text node number). See error 530 for more
information about how an incorrect CANODE can affect a design file.
Solution — See error 530.
528 — Running out of graphic group numbers.
Cause — GRAFIC (in the type 9 of the design file) is greater than 65525. This does not
violate any MicroStation rules, but it is somewhat unusual for GRAFIC to get this high.
Effect — There is room for less than 10 new graphic groups. After that GRAFIC will
recycle back to 1 and you will be in danger of creating cross-linked graphic groups (two
different graphic groups sharing the same graphic group number). See error 531 for more
information about how an incorrect GRAFIC can affect a design file.
Solution — See error 531.
530 — Text node number equals or exceeds CANODE.
Cause — The type 9 of a design file contains a word called CANODE. The next text
node placed in the design file will have CANODE as its text node number. CANODE is
incremented after each text node is placed. The text node number of this text node is
greater than or equal to CANODE. Following the instructions given by VAX-EdG for
replacing the type 9 of a design file instead of using the FileFixer Replace Type 9
command is one way that CANODE can get messed up. The MERGE command, under
certain circumstances, can also leave CANODE errors in a design file.
Effect — Sooner or later this design file will develop “cross-linked text nodes”. This
means two or more text nodes sharing the same text node number. This should cause no
serious problems for MicroStation proper. There are, however, processors that rely on
text node numbers to identify specific text nodes (BITS is one such processor). These
could have problems if more than one text node shared the same text node number.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the SET
CANODE TO ONE MORE THAN THE LARGEST TEXT NODE NUMBER option
turned on.
531 — Graphic group number equals or exceeds GRAFIC.
Cause — The type 9 of a design file contains a word called GRAFIC. The next graphic
group placed in the design file will have GRAFIC as its graphic group number. GRAFIC
is incremented after each graphic group is placed. The graphic group number of this
element is greater than or equal to GRAFIC. This means that sooner or later another
graphic group with this same graphic group number will be placed. Following the
instructions given by VAX-EdG for replacing the type 9 of a design file instead of using
the FileFixer Replace Type 9 command is one way that GRAFIC can get messed up. The
MERGE command, under certain circumstances, can also leave GRAFIC errors in a
design file. If, in the history of this design file it ever had an enormous number of graphic
groups or if, for any other reason, GRAFIC was allowed to recycle past 65535 back to 1,
this situation (graphic group numbers exceeding GRAFIC) can occur.
Effect — Sooner or later this design file will develop “cross-linked graphic groups”. This
means two or more graphic groups share the same graphic group number. Since the two
(ill-fated) graphic groups will be manipulated simultaneously whenever the graphic group
lock is on, and since they may be widely separated in the design file, it then becomes
quite easy to unintentionally delete or otherwise mess up one group (which is off the
screen) while manipulating the other (which is on the screen).
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the SET
GRAFIC TO ONE MORE THAN THE LARGEST GRAPHIC GROUP NUMBER
option turned on.
534 — GRAFIC is ___, but it should be ___.
Cause — The type 9 of a design file contains a word called GRAFIC. The next graphic
group placed in the design file will have GRAFIC as its graphic group number. GRAFIC
is incremented after each graphic group is placed. FileFixer scanned this entire design
file looking for the highest graphic group number. It found that GRAFIC is not set to the
highest graphic group number plus one (as it should be).
Effect — GRAFIC is too small. The design file will eventually develop cross-linked
graphic groups (see error 531).
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the SET
GRAFIC TO ONE MORE THAN THE LARGEST GRAPHIC GROUP NUMBER
option turned on. To find out exactly which elements have graphic group numbers that
exceed (or are equal to) GRAFIC, run the “Search for Problems” command on this file
with the GRAPHIC GROUP NUMBER EQUALS OR EXCEEDS GRAFIC option
turned on.
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535 — CANODE is ___, but it should be ___.
Cause — The type 9 of a design file contains a word called CANODE. The next text
node placed in the design file will have CANODE as its text node number. CANODE is
incremented after each text node is placed. FileFixer scanned this entire design file
looking for the highest text node number. It found that CANODE is not set to the highest
text node number plus one (as it should be).
Effect — CANODE is too small. The design file will eventually develop cross-linked
text nodes (see error 530).
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the SET
CANODE TO ONE MORE THAN THE LARGEST TEXT NODE NUMBER option
turned on. To find out exactly which elements have text node numbers that exceed (or are
equal to) CANODE, run the “Search for Problems” command on this file with the TEXT
NODE NUMBER EQUALS OR EXCEEDS CANODE option turned on.
550 — Words-in-description exceeds 65516.
Cause — This is a complex header with a one word words-in-description. The words-indescription of this element exceeds 65516.
Effect — When this element is deleted the entire design file will probably get corrupted.
Effect — Any effort to manipulate this element is likely to produce unpredictable results.
For example, it is likely that an operation on this element will result in the same operation
being performed on the other elements, even if those other elements are not visible on the
screen when the operation takes place.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to repair this
error automatically nearly all the time.
555 — A complex chain is missing a line string.
Cause — When creating a complex chain from several line strings that are not connected
MicroStation will not create a line string component element for connecting the line
strings. MicroStation will automatically display a line string between the original line
strings, but no element was actually created.
Effect — When you drop status of the complex chain the line string MicroStation
automatically displays between the line strings will be erased.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the ADD
MISSING LINE STRING TO BRIDGE GAP IN COMPLEX CHAIN option turned on.
FileFixer will only create a line string to fill in the gap between two line strings (type 3 or
4), not between a line string and any other type of element (like arc, conics, and b-spline).
Currently this repair option is disabled. It will be implemented in the next release.
560 — Text string overflows element length.
Cause — The number of characters is incorrect. It says there are more characters than
actually exist.
Effect — Eventually the design file will become corrupted. A phantom element may get
created.
Solution — Use FileFixer to correct the number of characters.
565 — Nesting level cannot be deeper than 12.
Cause — The nesting level of cells is greater than 12. Most likely the words in
description is bad.
Effect — Elements may not be displayed.
Effect — All elements may not be plotted.
Effect — May not be able to snap to an element.
Solution — Use Problem Element Viewer to delete the cell.
570 — Null cell name in cell library or design file.
Cause — The cell name is null in a cell (type 2).
Solution — Use FileFixer to set this cell to an orphan cell. The repair option is "Correct
null cell names (type 2s only) by setting the H-bit." This option is on by default.
571 — Cell (type 2) must be nested in cell library.
Cause — A cell (type 2) must always be nested when in a cell library. The library cell
header’s words in description is most likely bad.
Solution — Use Problem Element Viewer to delete the cell.
572 — Orphan cell definition without orphan flag.
Cause — A cell (type 2) is nested within a library cell (type 1) contains its own elements,
but doesn’t have the orphan property set.
Solution — Use FileFixer to set the orphan flag.
Serious Errors — Problems are Very Possible
Serious errors are reported with numbers in the 700 to 799 series. There is a significant
possibility that the elements involved will manifest problems of some kind.
700 — WTF suspected for unspecified reasons.
Cause — FileFixer uses a new algorithm that analyzes more than 20 element
characteristics in various combinations to determine the “trustworthiness” of an element’s
WTF. Error number 700 means there are numerous element, design file, and program
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
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variables in combination which tell FileFixer the WTF is untrustworthy. The full
explanation of how FileFixer identifies an “untrustworthy” WTF is considered either
proprietary and/or beyond the intended scope of this documentation.
Effect — There is a fairly good chance that a fatal words-to-follow error is lurking within
this element or an element very nearby (in either direction).
Solution — Let FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command handle this error
for you.
701 — Can’t tell if file is 2D or 3D. Assuming 2D.
Cause — The dimension of cell libraries and design files is represented by two bits in
their type 5 and type 9 elements respectively. These bits have illegal values which do not
correctly represent “2D” or “3D”.
Cause — This file has neither a valid design file header (type 9) nor cell library header
(type 5). For type 5 errors FileFixer currently will not replace the header.
Effect — If the file has a (mostly) valid design file or cell library header, some programs
will try to treat the file as 2D and others as 3D. Those that “guess” right will have no
discernible trouble. The others will fail miserably.
Solution — If you specified the “-3” option on the FileFixer command line, FileFixer
assumes this file is 3D. Otherwise FileFixer assumes the file is 2D. If FileFixer has
assumed the wrong dimension for the file, you will get a lot of error messages indicating
2D element in 3D file or vice versa. If you don’t get a lot of error messages of that type,
FileFixer assumed the correct dimension. Use the FileFixer Replace Type 9 command to
replace the current type 9 element with a good type 9 of the appropriate dimension.
702 — Phantom element. Complex bit is set for a non-component
element.
Cause — An element that is not a component of a complex element has its complex bit
set.
Effect — The element will not be selected nor manipulated.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type of
corruption automatically.
703 — Complex bit is not set for a component element.
Cause — An element that is a component of a complex element does not have its
complex bit set.
Effect —When deleting most complex elements, MicroStation scans for the first element
whose complex bit is not set and resets the words-to-follow of the deleted complex
header to point there. Therefore, when component element complex bits are not properly
set, file corruption can occur when a complex element is deleted.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type of
corruption automatically.
704 — Low range is greater than high range.
Cause — The x-low value is greater than the x-high value, the y-low value is greater than
the y-high value, or the z-low value is greater than the z-high value. The z-range is
checked for 3D files only.
Effect — Such elements may be ignored by plotting software and fence contents
commands. They usually will not be displayed by MicroStation.
Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File” repair typically handles this error. If
not, use Problem Element Viewer to locate the element. Delete and redraw.
705 — Element range doesn’t match the min-max of its vertices.
Cause — The range of an element with vertices, points, poles, etc. is incorrect. The
element range and the min-max of the vertices, points, poles, etc. that make up the
element don’t fall within the user-specified tolerance.
Effect — This element may be improperly ignored by fence contents manipulation
commands.
Effect — It may be impossible to snap to or select this element for manipulation.
Effect — If the element range is not wildly off, this error will probably cause little or no
problem.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type of
problem automatically.
706 — Type 28 (b-spline weight factor) range doesn’t match range of its
associated type 21 (b-spline pole).
Cause — Types 26 and 28 elements should have the exact same range as their parent
header element. The range of this element doesn’t match its parent.
Effect — Possible element snapping, selection, and fence manipulation problems.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type of
problem automatically.
707 — B-spline pole element range doesn’t match the min-max of its
poles or the range of its b-spline surface header.
Cause — The range of a b-spline pole element does not match the range of its type 24 bspline header.
Effect — This element may be improperly ignored by fence contents manipulation
commands.
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Page 243
Effect — It may be impossible to snap to or select this element for manipulation.
Effect — If the element range is not wildly off, this error will probably cause little or no
problem.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type of
problem automatically.
708 —Raster reference file component has an invalid class.
Cause — There are six classes for a raster reference file element. Class 0 (zero) is for the
raster reference file header element, and class 1-5 are used for the raster reference file
component elements. This raster reference file component’s class is greater than 5.
Effect — The raster reference file may not display correctly or at all.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type of
problem automatically.
709 — Type __ header misses type __ component by __%.
Cause — All type 25 and type 21 elements that are components of b-spline curves should
have the exact same range as their parent header element. The range of this element
didn’t match its parent.
Effect — Possible element select, snapping, and fence manipulation problems.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type of
problem automatically.
710 — Cell library header is not on level 8.
Cause — The first element of what appears to be a cell library was a type 5, but it wasn’t
on level 8.
Effect — Some MicroStation and MDL applications may not recognize this file as a cell
library.
Solution — If, indeed, this is a cell library, use EdG to change the level of the first
element (the type 5) to level 8.
711 — “2D file referenced to 3D file” flag isn't set correctly.
Cause — The flag in the reference file attachment element that tells MicroStation to
disregard the z values in a 2D reference file when the design file is 3D isn’t set or is set
when it shouldn’t be.
Effect — MicroStation may give you MDL abort when loading the design file.
Effect — You may see zingers.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type of
problem automatically.
712 — Range of right circular truncated cone is incorrect.
Cause — FileFixer calculates the range of right circular truncated cones based on the
locations of their centers, radii, and quaternions. The range calculated by FileFixer for
this element doesn’t match the range stored in its element header.
Effect — Possible element snapping, selection, and fence manipulation problems.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type of
problem automatically.
713 — Second element of design file is not an active type 8 (digitizer).
Cause — The second element might be a deleted type 8.
Cause — The second element of the design file is not a type 8 at all.
Effect — A few programs may process this file without problems. Many won’t. Many
user commands expect the first word of the fifth block of the design file (usually the first
word after the type 9, 8, and 10 elements) to be a valid element. If this is not the case, this
design file could become totally corrupted (if it isn’t already).
Solution — Use the Replace Type 9 command of FileFixer to transplant a type 8 element
from another design file.
714 — Third element of design file is not an active type 10 (level
symbology).
Cause — The third element might be a deleted type 10.
Cause — The third element of the design file is not a type 10 at all.
Effect — A few programs may process this file without problems. Even with the
programs that succeed to some degree, if level symbology is turned on, you are likely to
see some very strange results. Many user commands expect the first word of the fifth
block of the design file (usually the first word after the type 9, 8, and 10 elements) to be a
valid element. If this is not the case, this design file could become totally corrupted (if it
isn’t already).
Solution — Use the Replace Type 9 command of FileFixer to transplant a type 10
element from another design file.
715 — Type ___ (___________) element found on level 0.
Cause — An element was found on level “0”. Level 0 is not considered a valid
MicroStation level.
Effect — This element may be left out of fence manipulation commands and plots. It
may display improperly. It may be unselectable. It may be impossible to turn off the
display of this element regardless of which levels are turned off. This element may be
improperly included or improperly omitted from plots.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command “Move elements
on unacceptable levels to level: ____” to correct this problem. FileFixer will move the
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
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elements to level 1 by default. Use can change the default on the “Options | Repair... |
Elements” dialog box.
716 — Cell level mask is incorrect.
Cause — This problem occurs when the list of occupied levels in the cell header element
(type 1 or 2) does not match the actual levels used by the cell.
Effect — Displaying a design file with cell level mask errors using MicroStation can
cause the following problems: 1) Cell components disappearing, 2) Cell components are
visible after multi-view updates, but not after single view updates, and 3) Cell cannot be
selected or manipulated.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to correct this
problem automatically.
717 — Cell class map is incorrect.
Cause — This problem occurs when the list of classes used by elements in the cell
(which is stored in the cell header element) does not match the actual classes used by
elements in the cell.
Effect — Cells with this problem may be unselectable (phantom elements).
Effect — Cells with this problem may be ignored by the FIT command. These problems
are much more likely to occur if a bit in the class map is incorrectly turned off. Bits that
are incorrectly turned on may cause no problem.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to correct this
problem automatically.
718 — Orphan raster reference attachment (type 90) found.
Cause — Raster reference file attachment must have at least two type 90 elements, one
type 90 as the header element, and at least one type 90 as the component element. The
type 90 element found is a component type 90 element and there is a type 90 header
element, but the complex bit isn’t set on this type 90 component element and the WID of
the type 90 header element doesn’t include this type 90 component element.
Refer to the “Correct the raster reference file component’s class” section in the section
title “Raster Repair Options” for a full description of the different types of raster
reference file attachment (type 90) elements.
Effect — This raster reference file attachment may be displayed by MicroStation, and
you may get garbage in the File Name field in the MicroStation Reference Files dialog
box.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to correct the
complex bit in this type 90 component element and to correct the WID of the type 90
header element.
719 — Element type ___ (________) must be nested in a complex.
Cause — B-spline components are allowed only as part of a complex b-spline element.
This b-spline component was found all by itself.
Cause — Raster data elements (type 88) are allowed only as part of a complex raster
element. This raster data component was found all by itself.
Effect — Some versions of MicroStation crash when such elements are encountered.
Solution — By default FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command will delete
elements such as these automatically.
720 — Complex header range is off by ___%.
Cause — The union of the range blocks of the components of the complex element
header does not match the range block of the complex header element itself. The
percentage is determined by dividing the deviation from perfection as calculated by
FileFixer (in UORs) by the size of the element (in UORs). This test is performed on the
x, y, and (for 3D files) z axes. The worst (largest) of the error percentages is the one
reported. Note that if the size of the element (along the z-axis as an example) is very
small (lets say 1 UOR as an example), then a relatively small deviation from the ideal ZHigh or Z-Low (lets say 50 UORs) would result in a large sounding percentage deviation
(in this example 5000%). If all this sounds confusing just remember this — to make sure
that no range errors are missed, FileFixer calculates the error using a method that
sometimes generates large sounding percentages. Don’t worry about it. Just use the
“Automatic Design File Repair” command to adjust the problem elements.
Effect — This can be a serious problem in a cell library because some versions of
MicroStation rely on the cell range when placing cells. Also, the complex element may
be improperly excluded from fence manipulation and plotting commands.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type of
problem automatically.
721 — An element of this type cannot be a component of a complex
header of the specified type.
Cause — Each type of complex element (like cells and text nodes) can only contain
certain types of elements. For example, a text node (type 7) can contain only text
elements (type 17s). A connected string (type 12) can contain only linear elements such
as lines (type 3s), line strings (type 4s), arcs (type 16s), etc. The element just read in
cannot legally be contained in the complex element header mentioned near the end of the
message.
Cause — The complex header element mentioned contains a words-in-description error
that causes it to think it contains elements that really should be after its end.
Effect — Some combinations of elements can cause MicroStation to crash.
Solution — Use Problem Element Viewer to view both the complex element as a whole
and the unwanted component, so you know what is going on. Best bet is to delete and
redraw the complex element(s) involved.
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722 — Dimension element with no data points or associative points.
Cause — A dimension element must have at least one data or associative point.
Effect — Sometimes you will get an MDL abort in MicroStation when you select a cell
that has a dimension element, which has no data or associative point.
Effect — When you place a cell that has a dimension element, which has no data or
associative point, the dimension will always be placed at the same location in the design
file. It will be placed with the origin of the dimension element at x=0, y=0, z=0.
Solution — Use FileFixer's "Remove dimension element with no data points or
associative points" repair option to delete the bad dimension element. You will then need
to recreate the dimension element.
723 — Raster reference file attachment width to height ratio is illegal.
Cause — Raster reference file attachments keep track of image files that are being
displayed in MicroStation. MicroStation supports many types of image files, such as
TIFF, Windows BMP, Intergraph CIT, etc.
An image file has a width value and a height value. Whenever an image file is made
larger or smaller the width and height values are adjusted the same. For example, if you
double the size of an image file then the width and height values are doubled. You don’t
adjust one more than the other. Saved in the raster reference file attachment is the
adjusted width and height values for how the image file is displayed in MicroStation. The
width and height values saved in the image file are not in the same ratio as what is saved
in the image file.
FileFixer will only fix a raster reference file attachment width to height ratio if it is for a
TIFF file.
Effect — When the ratio is off far enough you will get MicroStation to abort. For
example:
System fault: bad memory access.
MDL abort in REF
MDL abort in VIEWCTRL
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Options | Repair…| Reference File | Fix raster reference file
attachment width to height ratio by…” repair option to fix or delete the bad raster
reference file attachment. You can fix the ratio by adjusting the width or adjusting the
height. The default is to adjust the height.
724 — Range of arc or ellipse is incorrect.
Cause — FileFixer calculates the range of arcs and ellipses based on the length of their
axes, angle of rotation, origin, start angle and sweep angle. The range calculated by
FileFixer for this element doesn’t match the range stored in its element header.
Effect — Possible element snapping, selection, and fence manipulation problems.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type of
problem automatically.
725 — Range of text element is incorrect.
Cause — The range of this text element is incorrect.
Cause — FileFixer calculates the range of 2D and 3D text elements based on their
origin, number of characters, rotation or quaternions, length multiplier, and height
multiplier. As of version 4.0 of FileFixer, the font and the size of EACH INDIVIDUAL
CHARACTER is taken into account in determining the size of the text element. This
requires FileFixer to open and thoroughly analyze your font library. The size of each
character for each font is different. Therefore, You must tell FileFixer to use the same
font library that was used to create the text elements. IF YOU TELL FileFixer TO USE
THE WRONG FONT LIBRARY, YOU MAY GET MANY TEXT RANGE ERRORS.
Cause — Some MicroStation versions before 4.0 appear to handle some fonts with word
size vectors (“Word size vectors” means that the width of each character is store in a
word rather than a byte.) incorrectly. FileFixer correctly calculates the position and range
of text with such fonts, as do all versions of MicroStation after 4.0. To determine the
vector size of a particular font, run the flib program that comes with MicroStation on the
font library. Example:
FLIB SPECIAL.FLB -LIST -FULL
Cause — The view independent bit of the property word may be set incorrectly. If the
text range appears to be correct, but FileFixer reports the text range as being widely off,
this is something you should suspect.
Cause — Version 4.02 (and probably other versions of MicroStation) set the range box
of view independent text non-optimally. FileFixer will set the range of view independent
text so that the range box encompasses the element no matter what orientation a view
containing the element is rotated to. The range box surrounding view independent text
should appear roughly twice as big as the text itself. The anomaly in MicroStation is
apparent mainly on very short (one or two character) text strings.
Effect — Possible element snapping, selection, and fence manipulation problems. If the
range is too small the element may be improperly omitted from certain operations. If the
range is too large, the MicroStation scanning software will not run as efficiently.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type of
problem automatically.
726 — Count of enhanced precision points or vertices in linkage is
incorrect.
Cause —The count of the number of points or vertices in an enhanced precision linkage
is greater than the number of points or vertices allowed by MicroStation.
Effect —MicroStation may abort when you try to snap on this element.
Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command will correct the count.
727 — Range of text node is incorrect.
Cause — FileFixer has calculated that the range of an empty text node is incorrect.
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
Page 249
Effect — Possible element snapping, selection, and fence manipulation problems.
Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command will correct the count.
730 — Range of shared cell instance is incorrect.
Cause — calculates the range of a shared cell instance based on the size of the shared
cell definition. The range calculated by FileFixer for this element doesn’t match the
range stored in its element header.
Effect — Possible element snapping, selection, and fence manipulation problems.
Effect — File may not fit view correctly.
Solution — Turn off the Search option: “Skip shared cell instance range validation.” and
then use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to fix this type of
problem automatically.
731 — B-spline curve or surface has an illegal number of a certain type
of component.
Cause — A b-spline element is made up of many different kinds of components. The bspline header indicated in parentheses had an illegal number of a certain type of
component. One of the following illegal conditions was found:
•
A b-spline curve (type 27 header) had more than one b-spline knot element (type
26).
•
A b-spline curve (type 27 header) had more than one weight factor element (type
28).
•
A b-spline curve (type 27 header) did not have exactly one pole element (type 21).
•
A b-spline surface (type 24 header) had no pole elements type 21).
•
A b-spline surface (type 24 header) had neither zero weight factor elements nor the
same number of weight factor elements (type 28) as pole elements (type 21).
•
A b-spline surface (type 24 header) had more than one b-spline knot element (type
26).
Effect — A design file with this problem will frequently crash MicroStation.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to delete this
element automatically.
735 — Raster pixels overflow element length
Cause — A raster data element contains a number of pixels and the count of the number
of pixels. The count of the number of pixels is larger than the number of pixels that will
fit in the raster data element.
Effect — A design file with this problem will frequently crash MicroStation.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to either delete
the raster data element, delete the complex raster chain, or correct the number of pixels.
741 — Non-shared cell must be on level 0.
Cause — Type 1 and type 2 cells must be on level 0. This one is on some other level.
Effect — If this is a type 2 cell, you may have plotting problems with this cell. For
example, this cell may be omitted from plots.
Effect — If this is a type 1, placing this cell will propagate the error described above to
every design file in which it is placed.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to correct this
problem automatically.
742 — X-range of cell “____” being used as dimension element’s
terminator symbol is zero.
Y-range of cell “____” being used as dimension element’s
terminator symbol is zero.
Z-range of cell “____” being used as dimension element’s
terminator symbol is zero.
Cause — The high range minus the low range of the cell being used as the dimension
element’s terminator symbol is equal to zero.
Effect — MicroStation may abort.
Effect — The terminator symbol may not display correctly.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to correct this
problem automatically. The repair option is “Options | Repair… | Dimension | Handle the
x, y or z range of a cell being used as a dimension element’s terminator symbol”.
750 — Words-to-follow exceeds 65533.
Effect — This is a problem because adding 2 to a number larger than this (to get the total
element length) will cause a 16 bit register overflow. This will crash most MicroStation
and MDL applications.
Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command will delete this
element and recover as many elements after it as possible.
754 — Words-to-follow error.
Cause — The words-to-follow of this element appears to be incorrect. Furthermore,
words-to-follow points to a location in the design file that does not appear to be a valid
element.
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Effect — There is a good chance that this design file is undisplayable due to an “EOF not
found” or a “Design file I/O Error”. It is also possible that this design file will display,
but that large pieces of it will be missing.
Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command will first attempt to
set the words-to-follow to the correct value. If this can’t be done, then it will delete this
element and recover as many elements after it as possible. Before repairing the file, if it is
possible to bring it up in graphics (unlikely), use Problem Element Viewer to see what
this element looks like so that it can be redrawn.
756 — Words-to-follow of active element exceeds 766.
Cause — Many applications reserve a buffer space of 768 words to store an element.
Attempting to read in more words than this can cause severe problems.
Effect — Some programs may allocate an element buffer larger than 766 (or 780 when
alignment requirements are taken into consideration). Most don’t. File corruption and/or
other problems due to overwritten memory are likely.
Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command will delete this
element and recover as many elements after it as possible. If it is possible to bring up this
design file in graphics before repairing it (unlikely), use Problem Element Viewer to see
what this element looks like so that it can be redrawn.
758— Siamese element. Words-to-follow is too small.
Cause — This element and the one following it share disk space. The end of this element
and the beginning of the next are using the same disk space. Words-to-follow of this
element is too small.
Effect — Some processes (MicroStation-32 in particular) are prone to crashing when
they encounter Siamese elements. Severe file corruption is possible.
Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command will first attempt to
set the words-to-follow to the correct value. If this can’t be done then it will delete this
element and recover as many elements after it as possible. If it is possible to bring up this
design file in graphics before repairing it (unlikely), use Problem Element Viewer to see
what this element looks like so that it can be redrawn.
761 — Linkage area suspiciously long. Probably WTF error.
Cause — The difference between the expected WTF of this element and its actual size
indicates that either WTF is wrong or that the element has an attribute linkage area that is
suspiciously long (more than 60 words). Words-to-follow of this element points to a
location in the design file that does not appear to be a valid element.
Effect — There’s a good chance that this design file is totally corrupted.
Solution — If you can bring up this design file in graphics, use Problem Element Viewer
to see what the element looks like so that you can redraw it. Use Problem Element
Viewer to delete this element.
762 — Possible 2D element in 3D file or vice versa.
Cause — Analysis of the number of vertices, database linkages, points, characters, EnterData-Fields, poles, boundaries, knots, etc. indicates that what might be a 2D element is in
a 3D file or vice versa. Words-to-follow in this element points to a design file location
that is unlikely to be the start of a valid element.
Effect — File corruption is likely. MicroStation may display very strange results for
these elements. Other programs are likely to have problems also.
Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command should delete this
element and recover as many elements after it as possible.
766 — Duplicate shared cell definition matches element ___.
Duplicate library cell definition matches element ___.
Cause — This shared cell definition has the exact same cell name as the specified shared
cell definition, or this library cell definition has the exact same cell name as the specified
library cell definition. The match is sensitive to trailing blanks and is case sensitive. For
example, if one cell name is “X” and the other is “x” this message will not be generated.
Effect — If the two shared cell definition elements with the same name are exactly the
same, you’re simply wasting a bit of space in your design file.
Effect — If the two shared cell definitions with the same name are different, then you
may be displaying all the instances of this shared cell incorrectly.
Effect — If there are two library cells with the same name then only the first one will be
found when that cell library is attached.
Solution — Turn on the option "Delete duplicate shared cell or library cell definitions"
and run Automatic Design File Repair mode. This option is off by default.
Solution — Use EdG to delete the library cell that you don’t want to keep.
768 — Shared cell instance has no matching shared cell definition.
Cause — Whenever there is a shared cell instance (type 35) in a design file, there must
also be a shared cell definition element (type 34) with the same name in the design file.
The type 34 contains the instructions on how to draw the type 35. This design file has a
type 35 with no corresponding type 34. The shared cell definition element must have the
EXACT same name. The match is sensitive to trailing blanks and is case sensitive. For
example, if the type 35 name is “X”, then a type 34 name of “X” will not match as a type
34 name of “x” will not match.
Effect — This cell will not be displayable (invisible).
Solution — Find (or create) a cell library that contains a cell of the specified name.
Attach that cell library. Place that cell as a shared cell. Delete the instance you just
placed. Do a FIT. The original cell (and all other shared cell instances with the same
name) should now be visible. Use Axiom product Problem Element Viewer to zoom in on
the repaired cell if you don’t know where it is located.
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Solution — FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the "Create
dummy shared cell definition for missing definition". This option will create a dummy
shared cell definition. What this option does is create a shared cell definition element
with a text element as its only component. The text element is created with the name of
the shared cell as the text string.
Solution — If the above solutions do not cause the specified cell to become visible, or if
the cell displays incorrectly, you should use Problem Element Viewer to delete the type
34 and type 35 and use MicroStation to replace the cell from the cell library. Even if the
cell is displaying incorrectly, Problem Element Viewer may be able to at least show
where in the design file, the problem cell is located.
769 — Level mask {_____} contradicts its def {______}.
Cause — The level mask of an absolute shared cell must match the level mask of its
definition element. The level mask of this absolute shared cell doesn’t match its
definition element.
Effect — This cell may not be displayable (invisible).
Effect — Some levels of the cell may not be displayable.
Effect — Elements on some levels of the cell may plot intermittently.
Effect — The cell may not be able to be snapped to and/or deleted.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command to repair this
problem automatically.
Solution — Delete and redraw the cell. Even if the cell is displaying incorrectly,
Axiom’s Problem Element Viewer product may be able to at least show where in the
design file, the problem cell is located, so you can see which cell needs to be redone.
770 — Shared class mask {____} contradicts its def {____}.
Cause — The class mask of an absolute shared cell must match the class mask of its
definition element. The class mask of this absolute shared cell does not match its
definition element.
Effect — This cell may not be displayable (invisible).
Effect — Some classes of the cell may not be displayable.
Effect — The cell may not be able to be snapped to and/or able to be deleted.
Solution — Find (or create) a cell library that contains a cell of the specified name.
Attach that cell library. Place that cell as a shared cell. Delete the instance you just
placed. Do a FIT. The original cell (and all other shared cell instances with the same
name) should now be visible. Use Axiom product Problem Element Viewer to zoom in on
the repaired cell if you don’t know where it is located.
Solution — Use FileFixer to correct the class mask to correct the shared cell instance
class mask.
775 — OLE application element found.
Cause — A corruption OLE application element (type 66, level 20, ID = 45086) is in the
design file.
According to Bentley’s technical support there was a bug in an early version of
MicroStation SE that was placing corrupted OLE application elements in a design file.
Effect — When opening a design file with corrupted OLE elements you will get the
MicroStation error “hresult = (some number value) Invalid or corrupt file. The operation
completed successfully.” or “hresult = (some number value) Can’t open file. Class not
registered”.
Any design files you open after opening the corrupted one will have these corrupted OLE
application elements added to it.
Solution — Turn on FileFixer’s “Options | Search… | Linkage | OLE application
element detected” search option and FileFixer’s “Options | Repair… | Linkage | Remove
all OLE files and OLE application elements” repair option to fix the corrupted design
file.
You may have to exit MicroStation and delete a couple of the OLE files (‘.ole’
extension). Sometimes MicroStation will lock a couple of these files, which stops
FileFixer from deleting them. Whenever FileFixer cannot delete all the OLE files in will
display a message telling you so, and will tell which directories they reside in.
There is not a simple fix for this problem because every time you open a design file in
MicroStation it will copy the corrupted OLE application elements to it. This includes
FileFixer’s temporary design file (fixerdgn.sys). So you must do the following:
1. Exit MicroStation, if you are currently in it.
2. Start MicroStation, but use FileFixer’s temporary file (fixerdgn.sys) as the design file
to open.
3. Run FileFixer—with the search and repair options specified above turned on—on all
your corrupted design files.
4. Exit MicroStation.
5. If FileFixer told you to delete OLE files then do so now.
6. Delete FileFixer’s temporary design file (fixerdgn.sys). It is in FileFixer’s installed
directory.
776 — 3D only element <type ___ (_________)> in 2D file.
Cause — An element type that is only found in 3D files was found in a 2D file.
Effect — Some programs will ignore the element. Some will get very confused.
Solution — Use FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” command with the
REMOVE ILLEGAL ELEMENT TYPES option turned on. Be alert for other types of
corruption in the vicinity of this element. If FileFixer fails to delete this element because
it detected a higher priority corruption first, then turn off all search options except 2D
Chapter 23 — Error Messages
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ELEMENT FOUND IN 3D FILE, 3D ELEMENT FOUND IN 2D FILE and ILLEGAL
ELEMENT TYPE DETECTED, and try again.
783 — Cell in a cell library is nested within itself.
Cause — The current element is a cell that is nested within a cell of the same name.
Effect — If you try to place this cell in a design file, MicroStation won’t crash, but it will
place the cell incorrectly.
Solution — Delete cell and recreate.
784 — A type ___ (______) cannot follow a type ___ in a b-spline curve.
Cause — There are many rules concerning the sequence of elements in a b-spline header.
The components of a b-spline must be in a very exact sequence. This element violates
one of these rules.
Effect — Depending on the exact sequence MicroStation and/or other processors such as
plotting may crash.
Effect — The element may display incorrectly.
Effect — The element may not display at all.
Solution — Use Problem Element Viewer to delete the b-spline this element is a part of.
The first type 27 preceding this element is the one to delete.
787 — Element has too many vertices, points, poles, boundaries, etc.
Cause — Element types with vertices, points, etc. can have only so many of these.
Effect — Different programs have different tolerances to this problem. Some have
problems if there is even one too many vertices. Some don’t have problems until there are
20 or 30 or more vertices more than there should be. Any program, however, given
enough extra vertices, will behave incorrectly. Note that the number of visible vertices on
a curve (type 11) and a conic (type 13) is actually 4 less than that reported by EdG. The
first and last two “vertices” are not displayed, but are used only for determining the shape
of the element near the endpoints. Therefore, a curve that EdG reports as having 102
vertices, actually has 98 visible vertices. FileFixer would flag such an element. That is
why the number of vertices reported by EdG, and FileFixer do not agree for these
element types. FileFixer reports the correct number of visible vertices. EdG intentionally
reports the total number vertices the way EdG does for the sake of consistency.
Solution — Use Problem Element Viewer to delete the affected element. You will then
need to redraw the element.
788 — B-spline pole element (__) has too few poles.
Cause — This type 21 element has less than two poles.
Effect — MicroStation and other software may display an infinite length line for this
element.
Effect — Displaying this file may cause MicroStation to crash.
Solution — Delete the parent complex header of this element. The element number of
the parent is shown in parentheses.
789 — Element has too few vertices, points, boundaries, etc.
Cause — Elements with vertices, points, etc. must have a minimum number of these.
This element did not have enough.
Note that the number of visible vertices on a curve (type 11) and a conic (type 13) is
actually 4 less than that reported by EdG. The first and last two “vertices” are not
displayed, but are used only for determining the shape of the element near the end-points.
FileFixer reports the correct number of visible vertices. EdG intentionally reports the
total number of vertices the way EdG does for consistency. Therefore, a curve that EdG
reports as having 5 vertices actually has only 1 real (visible) vertex. FileFixer would flag
such an element. The minimum number of (visible) vertices for a shape (type 6) is 4.
Shapes with less than 4 vertices will be flagged with this error.
Effect — Some plotting software has been reported to fail if a line string, curve, or
similar element has fewer than 2 vertices.
Solution — Select the REMOVE ELEMENTS WITH TOO FEW VERTICES option on
FileFixer’s “Automatic Design File Repair” menu to automatically remove these
elements from the design file. Optionally, you can use Axiom’s Problem Element Viewer
program to determine if the erroneous element is displayable. If the element is
displayable, Problem Element Viewer will show you what the element looks like. You
may want to redraw the element before deleting it.
Fatal Errors — File is Probably Unusable
Fatal errors are reported with numbers in the 900 to 999 series. It is unlikely that any
MicroStation or MDL application will process the file in its entirety without a severe
error.
902 — First element of file is not an active type 9 (design file header) or
type 5 (cell library header).
Cause — This is not a design file or cell library and never was.
Cause — This is a design file or cell library whose first element has been deleted or
badly damaged.
Effect — Most MicroStation and MDL applications will fail trying to process this file.
Solution — This serious problem can be easily fixed by running FileFixer in Replace
Design File Header Elements mode or Replace Cell Library Header mode, as appropriate.
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905 — Duplicate b-spline poles in a closed b-spline have been found.
Cause — A b-spline pole element (type 24) has duplicate first and/or last poles in a
closed b-spline. MicroStation normally doesn’t create b-spline poles in this manner.
Converting files from DWG to DGN sometimes does this.
Effect — You will get MDL aborts when loading this design file in MicroStation SE.
This file will load fine under MicroStation 95 and MicroStation/J.
Solution — Use FileFixer to change the b-spline from closed to open. This will solve the
MDL aborts in MicroStation SE.
912 — Illegal floating point value encountered.
Cause — Part of an element stored in VAX D floating point format contains an illegal
value. Under MS-DOS and CLIX, this error indicates that the value stored in the element
could not be converted to a valid IEEE format floating point value.
Effect — Most programs will abort trying to display or plot this element.
Solution — Use Problem Element Viewer to delete the affected element.
995 — Fatal error attempting to read past physical end-of file.
Cause — Words-to-follow of the previous element points to a block/byte location
beyond the physical end-of-file.
Effect — It is very unlikely that any MicroStation software will be able to read this file
in its entirety.
Solution — Use the “Automatic Design File Repair” command of FileFixer. This will
recover as many elements from the file as possible.
996 — Fatal error. End-of-design marker was not found.
Cause — The physical end-of-file was reached without encountering an end-of-design
marker.
Effect — There are some MicroStation and MDL applications that will be able to process
this file without error. Most, however, won’t.
Solution — Use the “Automatic Design File Repair” command of FileFixer. It will add
an end-of-design marker after the last valid element.
997 — Fatal error. File ended before element did.
Cause — Words-to-follow of the specified element was larger than the number of words
remaining in the physical file.
Effect — It is very unlikely that any MicroStation or MDL applications will be able to
read this file in its entirety.
Solution — Use the “Automatic Design File Repair” command of FileFixer. This will
recover as many elements from file as possible.
999 — Fatal error attempting to read element.
Cause — An unspecified error occurred attempting to read in an element.
Effect — It is very unlikely that any MicroStation or MDL applications will be able to
read this file in its entirety.
Solution — Use the “Automatic Design File Repair” command of FileFixer. This will
recover as many elements from file as possible.
Free analysis of problem design files is a limited time offer. Magnetic media cannot be
returned. Confidential or proprietary design files and cell libraries must be noted in
writing.
Chapter 24 — The File List Editor
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Chapter 24 — The File L ist Editor
The File List Editor Dialog Box
Use the File List Editor dialog box to create a list of files to be processed.
The List menu
The List menu lets you create, save, and re-use different lists of files. There are several
applications that can make use of these lists of files. So lists can be imported and
exported between applications.
Tip: Although there are some similarities between this menu and a standard “File” menu,
the differences are significant. When you Import or Export from this menu, the files do
not remain “open”, you are not “editing a file”, and no files are “updated”. Effectively,
these are “one shot copy” operations where an entire set of data is copied from the dialog
box to a file, or from a file to the dialog box.
There are two possible file formats, each having different advantages and disadvantages.
File list only (text)
This format is a simple text file, with each line in the file containing a fully qualified,
unambiguous file specification. No other data is saved.
Definition: “fully qualified, unambiguous file specification” means “including a drive
letter, a complete path starting from the root, a filename, and optionally an extension, all
with no wildcard characters.” An example of this would be “c:\temp\tempfile.tmp”.
Files of this format can be edited using any text editor. Notepad is an example of a simple
text editor.
The image below shows an example of a list saved with the “Export” option that can later
re-opened with the “Import” option:
This format is handy for using as a basis for an “@listfile” (see below). Or even for
generating a list of files for any application that uses a list of files for input.
The default extension for this format is .lst, which stands for “list”.
All data (binary)
In this format, all the important data displayed in the dialog box is saved. This includes
not only the “selected” files list, but the earliest and latest date fields and the Extended
File Specification string.
The data is saved in a specific format which cannot be safely modified by any program
other than the File List Editor dialog box.
The default extension for this format is .efl, which stands for “Edited File List”.
List | Import
Use this option to restore a list of files from a saved file.
All data (binary) — Select this option to restore the complete state of the dialog box
from a file. If the file selected is not of the proper format, no changes will be made to the
state of the dialog box.
File list only (text) — Select this option if you want only the list of files to be restored.
When this option is used, nothing in the dialog box changes except the “selected” files
list.
Chapter 24 — The File List Editor
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Note: This option will attempt to import any file. Everything from the beginning of the
file up to the point where the file no longer contains text, will be imported and displayed
in the “selected” files list.
List | Export
Use this option to save a list of files to a file.
All data (binary) — Select this option to save the complete state of the dialog box.
File list only (text) — Select this option to save just the list of files.
Navigation Section
This section of the dialog box works just like the “File | Open” dialog box in
MicroStation and other Windows programs. You can select a drive by choosing from the
available drives on the “Drive:” option button, or by entering the drive in the “Filter:”
field. You can move up or down the directory tree structure by double clicking on one of
the directory names, or by typing in any valid directory path in the “Filter:” field. You
can display specific file types in the “Files:” list by specifying wildcards in the “Filter:”
field. The “Filter:” field will recognize any valid combination of device, directory and/or
filename, including UNC specifiers.
As you make changes to any of these fields, the other fields and lists will be
automatically updated.
File List Editing Section
This section of the dialog box is used to add and remove individual filenames from the
list of selected files.
The “Selected Files” list
This displays the files that have been selected for processing, and the files in the current
directory. To remove a file from the list, simply double-click on it, or highlight it and
press the <Del> key, or highlight it and click the “Remove” button or press <Alt-R> on
the keyboard. To remove multiple files from the list at once, select all the desired files,
and click the “Remove” button or press <Alt-R> or <Del> on the keyboard. To clear the
entire list, click the “Clear” button. To add a file to the list, double click the filename in
the “Files:” list. To add multiple files to the list, selected all the desired files from the
“Files:” list and click the “Add” button.
As you add and remove files from the “selected” list, the “Number of Files Selected:”
field will keep track of the total number of tiles in the list.
Files in the “selected” list which are also in the “available” list, will be displayed in gray
in the “available” list. Since these files are already in the “selected” list, they cannot be
added again.
Extended File List Specifications
An extended file specification is based on a simple wildcard, such as
“C:\DESIGNS\*.DGN, with added options and parameters that are defined below.
To add the specified files to the “Selected Files:” list, click the “Add” button, or press
<Alt-d> on the keyboard. To remove all files fitting the extended specification from the
“Selected Files:” list, click the “Remove” button, or press <Alt-m> on the keyboard.
Chapter 24 — The File List Editor
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/s – include sub directories
“/s” includes all matching files in all subdirectories of the one specified in the preceding
file specification.
c:\dgnfiles\*.dgn /s
/fedate – earliest date
“/fe1-1-1992” includes files with dates that fall in a range beginning on January 1, 1992
/fldate – latest date
“/fl12-31-2002” includes files with dates that fall in a range ending on December 31,
2002
/fodate – on date
“/fo1-1-2002” includes only files modified on January 1t, 2002.
/ft – today
“/ft” includes only files with dates matching the current system date.
Note: Since the forward slash is used to indicate an option, and the backward slash is
used to separate directory names, neither can be used for separating month, day and year
in dates. Use either periods (12.31.92) or dashes (12-31-92) instead of slashes.
Tip: “/fldate” and “/fedate” may be combined to restrict file dates to a specific range, as
in “c:\dgnfiles\*.dgn /fe7-1-1997 /fl8-1-2002 /s”
semicolon
Multiple extended file specifications may be strung together by separating them with
semicolons “ ; ”. For example:
c:\dgnfiles\*.dgn /s; d:\dgnfiles\*.dgn /s
@
“@” prefixed to a file specification indicates a list file. A “list file” is a flat text file
containing lines composed of file specifications as defined above. That is, each line can
be a simple file specification, a wildcard file specification, a list file specification, a
single extended file specification, or multiple file specifications of any of theses types,
separated by semicolons. The contents of a list file might look something like this:
e:\reffiles\border.dgn
e:\reffiles\ref1.dgn
e:\reffiles\ref2.dgn
e:\reffiles\ref3.dgn
e:\reffiles\ref4.dgn
e:\reffiles\ref5.dgn
c:\dgnfiles\*.dgn /s /ft
d:\dgnfiles\*.cel /s /ft
@c:\filelists\project1.lst
@c:\filelists\project2.lst
<OK>
Use this pushbutton to save the list in the “selected” files listbox and exit the dialog box.
<Cancel>
Use this pushbutton to cancel any changes made to the list in the “selected” files listbox
and exit the dialog box.
Select files by date range
To add the files which fall within the date range specified from the “Files:” list to the
“Selected Files:” list, click the “Add” button. To delete the files in the “Selected Files:”
list which fall within the date range specified , click the “Remove” button.
Earliest date
Use this field to enter a beginning “cutoff” date for a range of files to be added to the
“selected” files listbox. Files whose last modification date is before this date will not be
added to the “selected” files listbox when the <Add by dates> pushbutton is clicked or
removed from the “selected” files listbox when the <Remove by dates> pushbutton is
clicked.
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Latest date
Use this field to enter an ending “cutoff” date for a range of files to be added to the
“selected” files listbox. Files whose last modification date is after this date will not be
added to the “selected” files listbox when the <Add by dates> pushbutton is clicked or
removed from the “selected” files listbox when the <Remove by dates> pushbutton is
clicked.
Note: The “Filter:” is combined with the dates when adding files to the “selected” files
list. In other words, only those files which fall within the specified date range, and which
are displayed in the “available” files list, are added to the “selected” files list when the
“Add” button is clicked.
Messages
“xxx” is not currently accessible.
This message indicates one of two things:
1. A file specification was entered into the “Files:” field, but it does not correspond to
any resource accessible to the system. This usually just ends up being a mis-typed or
mis-remembered directory name or UNC path.
2. A resource is truly not accessible to your system. Some likely reasons for this are: a)
you do not have, or no longer have, access permissions for the resource, b) the
resource’s name has changed, c) a resource is down, offline, or inaccessible for some
other “mechanical” reason, d) drive letter mappings have been changed on your
computer, e) a directory has been deleted or moved.
If you get this message and have checked your entry, contact your systems administrator
to determine why the resource is not accessible.
Note: The term “resource” is borrowed from the UNC definition "\\<servername>\<resource-name>\". In our context we mean “a specified device/directory
combination in either DOS or UNC format”. This specifically excludes the filename and
extension. Examples of this might be “c:\dgn_files\” and “\\server\drive_c\dgn_files\”.
Chapter 25 — Troublesh ooting
Adding a design file header (type 9) element
If you are having trouble adding a design file header (type 9) element to a design file that
doesn’t have one, the donor file you are specifying may be of a different dimension (2D
or 3D) than the recipient file. If this is the case, try a donor file of the other dimension.
EdG element number does not correspond to FileFixer report
The EdG element numbers listed in FileFixer’s report file (fixer.rep by default)
correspond to elements in the input file (the file being fixed or analyzed). When repairing
words-to-follow errors some partially corrupted elements in the input file may be
skipped. In this situation the element numbers listed in the report file may not correspond
with the element numbers reported by EdG. When you are only analyzing files and when
you are not trying to repair words-to-follow problems, the element numbers given in the
report file should correspond to EdG element numbers exactly.
When FileFixer fails to handle the error
When an element contains more than one error, FileFixer will report on the error it
considers the most serious.
FileFixer makes as many repairs as possible during its three steps. FileFixer does many
fixes during step 3. However, once FileFixer has found something to correct during step
three it will do it, but it will not continue looking for other corruption within that element.
This means that you may want to check for more errors in the fixed file—by running
FileFixer again—before deciding that the design file is corruption-free.
A particular error may be obscured by an error FileFixer considers more serious.
Therefore, if FileFixer fails to fix a certain problem, try running FileFixer again on the
fixed file. An error that was obscured by a more serious corruption the first time through
may be revealed once the more serious problem has been corrected.
Recovery from power failure
If you experience a power failure while using FileFixer, you may find a file with the
extension “.A__”. This file lists the design files you were planning to process. Such files
can be deleted.
Chapter 25 — Troubleshooting
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If you experience a power failure while you are repairing a design file, you may discover
a file that starts with the letters “ff” or “FF”. This is a temporary version of the design file
you were in the middle of repairing. Such files can be deleted.
Handling design files that behave erratically
If a design file is acting oddly (crashes randomly, elements appear and disappear as you
zoom in and out on them, etc.), you should (1) use the FileFixer Replace Type 9
command to replace the type 9s and the type 8 and type 10 of the file and (2) use the
FileFixer Manual Design File Repair command to remove the type 66 elements from the
design file. (This advice may take up but a few lines of this document, but it is one of the
most important data in it.)
Fixed file is smaller than original file
You may note that output (.fix) files are frequently smaller than the input (.dgn) files they
come from. Some users have expressed concern that this means FileFixer is not
recovering as many elements as it could, even though this is not usually the case. Most of
the file size reduction stems from the fact that FileFixer leaves deleted elements out of
the output (.fix) file, in essence doing a compress as it works, not because it is losing
desirable elements.
Addendum to fixing cell libraries
After fixing a cell library, you should recreate the cell library index file (the file with an
extension of .CDX), if it had one. Use the MicroStation index keyin command to do so.
Emergency scanning
FileFixer has a mode called “emergency scanning”. FileFixer uses emergency scanning
when the words-to-follow of an element does not point to the beginning of the next
element. FileFixer uses emergency scanning to find the next element without using
words-to-follow. While in emergency scanning mode FileFixer writes a message to the
bottom of the dialog box to let the user know what’s going on. Frequently FileFixer can
figure out where the next element starts so quickly that this message flashes for only an
instant, perhaps too quickly even to read. So if you were wondering what that bright flash
across the bottom of the screen was while fixing a file, that’s what it was.
Losing fill
If your design file uses filled elements, turn off the REMOVE TYPE 66 ELEMENTS
option and re-run FileFixer on the original file.
MDL abort in VIEWCTRL
The cause of an MDL abort in VIEWCTRL is often a corrupt custom line style resource
file or font resource file. This can easily be checked by turning off line styles and/or text
in the View Attributes. If the problem goes away, you’ve found the source of the
problem.
Give Us Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Corrupted...
You should never be satisfied with less than 100% perfect performance from this product.
If you find any files that FileFixer cannot diagnose and/or repair or if FileFixer reports
on something that doesn’t appear to be an error, send the file along with a description of
the problem to us. We will do our best to find out what is wrong with your file and modify
FileFixer to handle that kind of corruption in the future.
If you find so much as a comma out of place with this product or its documentation, we
are interested.
Contact Axiom Support at support@axiomint.com to obtain instructions for uploading
problem files to our ftp site.
Be sure you have read the section of this documentation entitled “What FileFixer won’t
do” before submitting problem files.
Note: All files must be submitted with a report that explains exactly what operational
difficulty you are having with the file(s) in question and everything that needs to be done
for us to reproduce the difficulty. We can analyze only those problems we can reproduce.
If you encounter errors not covered in this manual, send a detailed email to
support@axiomint.com. Please include as much information about your operating
system, the problem that you are experiencing and exactly what you did when this
problem occurred. Also make sure to include the version number of MicroStation and
FileFixer that you are running.
Chapter 26 — Element Numbers and Types
Page 269
Chapter 26 — Element N umbers and Types
Table of Element Numbers and Types
Numbers Type
Description
1
Library Cell
Library Cell elements contain information needed to
create a cell in a design file. They are found only in cell
libraries.
2
Cell Header
Cell header elements in a cell library begins a nested
cell definition. Cell header elements in a design file
begins a cell.
3
Line
Line elements define a line with two end points.
4
Line String
Line string elements define a line string with many
points.
5
Group Data
Group data elements store non-graphic data such as
reference file attachments and named views. The
different group data elements are distinguished by the
level:
level 0 — Pattern element
level 1 — Color table element
level 2 — Font library data
level 3 — Named view element
level 4 — plotting
level 6 — SDI stereoplotter
level 8 — Cell library header
level 9 — Reference file attachment element
level 10 — IGES
level 11 — InterPro Window
6
Shape
Shape elements differ from line strings in that they start
and end at the same location.
7
Text Node
Text node elements are a complex header element for
groups of text elements.
8
Digitizer
The second element in a design file.
9
Design File Header
The first element in a design file. This element contains
Numbers Type
Description
a lot of the information about the design file (i.e.
working units, which views are on, if level symbology is
on or not, etc.).
10
Level Symbology
The level symbology element defines the color, weight
and style used on each level.
11
Curve
Curve elements are a parametric spline curve defined by
a set of points.
12
Complex Chain
Complex chain elements are a complex element formed
from a series of elements (lines, line strings, arcs,
curves, etc.).
13
Conic
Conic elements are not supported by MicroStation.
14
Complex Shape
Complex shape elements are a complex element formed
from a series of elements (lines, line strings, arcs,
curves, etc.).
15
Ellipse
Ellipse elements are specified with a center, rotation
angle, and major and minor axes. A circle is an ellipse
with the major and minor axes equal.
16
Arc
Arc elements are defined by the center, the rotation,
start, and sweep angles, and the major and minor axes.
17
Text
Text elements store one line of text.
18
Surface Header
A surface header is a complex 3D element that is
projected or rotated from a planar boundary element
(line, line string, curve, arc or ellipse). The surface
header precedes an ordered set of primitive elements
that define boundaries, cross sections and rule lines. A
surface is not capped on the ends — it encloses no
volume.
19
Solid or Capped
Surface
A solid header is a complex 3D element that is projected
or rotated from a planar boundary element (line, line
string, curve, arc or ellipse). The solid header precedes
an ordered set of primitive elements that define
boundaries, cross sections and rule lines.
A solid is capped on the ends — it encloses a volume.
20
Subfigure
Not supported in MicroStation.
21
B-spline pole
A B-spline pole element store rows of poles for a Bspline surface.
22
Point String
A point string element consists of a number of vertices
with orientation defined at each vertex.
23
Truncated Cone
A circular truncated cone is described by two circles
Chapter 26 — Element Numbers and Types
Page 271
Numbers Type
Description
lying in parallel planes in a 3D design file. If the radius
of both circles is identical then the cone represents a
cylinder.
24
B-spline Surface
Header
A B-spline surface header begins the definition of a Bspline surface and defines parameters describing the
surface.
25
B-spline Surface
Boundary
B-spline surface boundary elements define the
boundaries of a B-spline surface.
26
B-spline Knot
B-spline knot elements are used in both B-spline
surfaces and B-spline curves when the surface or curve
in non-uniform.
27
B-spline Curve Header
A B-spline curve header begins the definition of a B-spline
curve and defines parameters describing the curve.
28
B-spline Weight Factor
Each B-spline pole element (type 21) is followed by a Bspine weight element giving the weights of that role of poles.
29 - 32
Reserved
Reserved by MicroStation.
33
Dimension
A dimension element specifies the dimension points. The
dimension points can be associated with another element in
the design file. In this case, whenever that element changes in
any way then the dimension point will be automatically
modified to match the associated element.
34
Shared Cell Definition
The shared cell definition element is a complex header
element that begins the definition of a shared cell. The
component elements follow this header element to fully
define the shared cell.
35
Shared Cell Instance
The shared cell instance element defines the location of each
instance of a shared cell.
36
Multi-line
The multi-line element defines the multi-line.
37
Tag Data
The tag data element defines the tag. This tag can be a text
string, integer value or decimal value. These elements are
associated with another element in the design file.
38 - 48
Reserved
Reserved by MicroStation.
49 - 65
Application Elements
These application elements are used by different applications.
66
MicroStation
This element is also called a type 66 element. They are many
type 66 elements and like the type 5 element they are
distinguished by the level. Some of these elements are:
level 1 — MicroStation dimension data
level 2 — MicroStation level name data
level 5 — Reference file attachment element
Numbers Type
Description
level 7 — MicroStation view data
level 8 — MicroStation digitizer element
level 9 — MicroStation extended TCB element
level 10 — Application startup element (this element is used
to automatically start an application)
level 20 — Application data element
level 22 — MicroStation multi-line data
level 23 — MicroStation style name data
level 24 — Tag set definition element
67 - 86
Application Elements
These elements are used by various applications.
87
Complex Raster Header
Raster data consists of a complex raster header followed by
scan line data in raster data elements (type 88). This header
element contains the orientation of the image in the design
file as well as data format information.
88
Raster Data
The raster data element contains the pixel information for all
or part of a single scan line of raster data.
89
Application element
These elements are used by various applications.
90
Raster reference file
attachment
This element is similar to the type 5 level 9 (original
reference file attachment) and type 66
89 - 125
Application Elements
These elements are used by various applications.
126
User Defined
Reserved for use by Intergraph customers.
127
Reserved
Reserved by MicroStation.
Chapter 27 — Glossary
Page 273
Chapter 27 — Glossary
Table of common terms
A-bit
Indicates whether attribute data is present:
0 = not present, 1 = present
ANSI
American National Standards Institute. An organization
that acts as a national coordinator for voluntary standards in
the United States.
Attribute Linkage
Any element may optionally contain attribute data or
attribute linkage data. This data may consist of a link to an
associated database or any other information that pertains to
the element.
Attribute data that is not associated with DMRS or a
MicroStation supported database is referred to as a user data
linkage. A user linkage may coexist with a database linkage
or other user linkages. MicroStation makes no attempt to
interpret user linkages; these linkages are maintained when
MicroStation modifies an element.
Bit
Stands for binary digit (0 or 1), the smallest unit of
information on a machine. Eight bits make up a byte (or one
character).
CAD
Acronym for Computer-Aided Design. A CAD system is a
combination of hardware and software that enables
engineers and architects to design everything from furniture
to airplanes.
CAD systems allow an engineer to view a design from any
angle with the push of a button and to zoom in or out for
close-ups and long-distance views. In addition, the computer
keeps track of design dependencies so that when the
engineer changes one value, all other values that depend on
it are automatically changed accordingly.
CANODE
Current Active Node This is the next text node number. The
next text node that is placed in the design file will have a
CANODE as its text node number. CANODE is
incremented after each text node is placed.
Cell Level Mask
In MicroStation it’s an area of a file that is not displayed.
Every cell has, as part of its definition, a list of the levels on
which the cell has displayable elements. This display, which
lists all the levels cells are displayed on, allows each level to
be on (displayed) or off (not displayed).
Class
Number identifying the class of the element.
0 – Primary
1 – Pattern component
2 – Construction element
3 – Dimensioning element
4 – Primary rule element
5 – Linear patterned element
6 – Construction rule element
Complex Bit
When the bit is cleared (Clearing a variable means to
remove whatever data is currently stored in the variable so
that is it set to zero.), this indicates that the element is a
simple (non-complex) element. When the bit is set (turned
on with a value of 1) the element is considered a component
of a complex element. The only exception to this is the file
header element (the first type-9 element in a design file or
type-5 element in a cell library); the complex bit for the file
header element is used to indicate that the file is a 3D file.
Complex Element
A “Complex Element” is a set of elements that are,
logically, formed from single component elements (entities),
such as lines, arcs, etc ‘linked’ together to form a single
complex element. A “complex element” is a group of two or
more elements that are manipulated as a single entity.
Complex Header Element
A “Complex Header Element” is a single element and is the
first element of a “Complex Element”. This is an element
that serves to “introduce” or group a collection of elements.
For example, a cell begins with a cell header, followed by
the graphical component elements of that cell. Complex
headers are not displayable elements.
DMRS
This is Intergraph’s Data Management Retrieval System.
Linkages between design elements and a database can be of
different types of databases. One type is the DMRS which is
a database interface that was provided by MicroStation. You
can set a configuration variable, MS_LINKTYPE, so that
MicroStation’s database interface software will recognize
DMRS linkage types.
EdG
Element Chain
Stands for Edit Graphics. A utility which comes with
MicroStation to edit graphical elements.
All the elements in a design file or cell library are linked
together, in a special way, as an element chain. They are
linked together by the WTF (words-to-follow) values. The
WTF is a pointer to where the next element starts (see
words-to-follow definition).
Chapter 27 — Glossary
Element Types
End-of-Design marker
End-of-File
Page 275
(See the section “Element Numbers and Types”)
A series of bits in a design file which mark the end of all the
elements. If the end-of-design marker is erroneously
inserted, say, in the middle of the file, MicroStation will not
“see” the elements between the end-of-design marker and
the physical end-of-file.
The physical end of the file.
Enter-Data-Fields (EDF)
These fields allow a MicroStation user to break up a text
string into smaller pieces that are then easily modified.
Specifically, an Enter Data Field is a one-or-more-character
placeholders for future text input. You can insert empty
“enter data fields” in a text element and fill in the actual text
later. Enter Data Field’s are particularly useful for variable
text such as part numbers or detail numbers.
Extended TCB Elements
An Extended TCB Element is a type 66 element on level 9
that is used to store certain TCB (Terminal Control Block)
variables that are specific to MicroStation (not supported by
earlier VAX-based systems). See “TCB” entry for more
information.
Floating-Point Number
(value)
A real number which can contain a fractional part. The term
floating point is derived from the fact that, in calculating,
there is no fixed number of digits before and after the
decimal point and the decimal point can float.
Graphic Group
Graphic Group Number
GRAFIC
A graphic group is a permanent grouping of elements
(primitive or complex). An element can be a member of
only one graphic group at a time.
The Graphic Group Number is used to locate all the
elements of a graphic group when performing graphic group
manipulations. If this value is zero, the element has no
graphic group affiliation. If the value is not zero, the element
is included in a graphic group with all other elements having
the same graphic group number.
Next graphic group number.
H-bit
Stands for the Hole bit and is used for closed element types
such as shape (6), complex shape (14), ellipse (15), cone
(23), b-spline surface header (24), and closed b-spline curve
header (27). The Hole-bit indicates whether the element is a
solid or a hole depending upon how it is set.
0 = solid, 1 = hole.
For a cell header (type 2) the Hole-bit indicates:
0 = regular cell
1 = orphan cell (created by “group selection” or
application)
For a line (type 3), the Hole-bit indicates:
0 = regular line segment
1 = infinite-length line
For a point string (type 22), the Hole-bit indicates:
0 = continuous
1 = disjointed
Header
In MicroStation all elements in the design file start with a
header containing the element type, level, words-to-follow
in the element and range information. Header elements are
non-displayable elements used to group other displayable
elements.
IGES
Acronym for Initial Graphics Exchange Specification, an
ANSI graphics file format for three-dimensional wire-frame
models.
IGDS
Stands for Interactive Graphics Design Software. This
software runs on VAX-based CAD systems and works on
files with the same format that is used by MicroStation V7
(any version prior to V8).
Index-to-attribute linkage
The Index-to-attribute (ITA) linkage defines the number of
words between this word (exclusively) and the first word of
the attribute linkage data, or the next element if no linkage
data exists.
Word 16 (ITA) defines the number of words existing
between (excluding) itself and the first word of the attribute
linkage data. The attribute linkage is optional and may or
may not be present, but the index must point to the location
for the first word of the data whether or not it exists. This
word essentially describes the numbers of words of elementtype data following word 16.
L-bit
When set (turned on with a value of 1), indicates the element
is locked.
Chapter 27 — Glossary
Page 277
M-bit
When set (turned on with a value of 1), indicates the element
has been modified.
Mask
A filter that selectively includes or excludes certain values.
For example, when defining a database field, it is possible to
assign a mask that indicates what sort of value the field
should hold. Values that do not conform to the mask cannot
be entered.
In MicroStation, it is an area of a reference file that is not
displayed.
N-bit
When set (turned on with a value of 1), indicates the element
is new.
Nesting and Nesting Level
A single component element that is part of a complex
element is considered to be nested in that complex element.
Complex elements can be nested within other complex
elements. Each time a component element is nested within a
complex header its nesting level would increase by 1.
For example, cell ‘GASKET’ is part of cell ‘FITTING’,
which is part of cell ‘FAUCET’. The component elements
that make up the cell ‘GASKET’ are also nested in other
cells, so therefore its nesting level is 3.
NFS (Network File System)
Nibble
OLE
NFS was originally designed by Sun Microsystems which
allows you access to disks on other computer systems as if
they were your local disk drive.
A nibble is four binary digits (bits), half a byte (a byte being
eight bits).
Stands for Object Linking and Embedding which enables
you to create objects with one application and then link or
embed them in a different application. Embedded objects
retain their original format and links to the application that
created them.
In MicroStation you can send views to other applications,
such as Microsoft Word or Excel.
For more information on this please search for OLE in
MicroStation help system.
P-bit
Indicates whether or not the element is planar:
0 = planar, 1 = non-planar
Phantom Element
These are elements that are displayed, but cannot be selected
or manipulated in any way. This problem comes about when
an element that is not part of complex element (such as a
cell or a text node) has its complex bit incorrectly set.
Property Bits
Describes various properties of an element. See A bit, H bit,
L bit, M bit, N bit, P bit, R bit and S bit.
Quaternion
In 3D design files, the orientation of an element is composed
of 9 numbers. This information can be compressed
mathematically and represented by only 4 numbers, called
quaternions. Quaternions are used in some elements to save
space. For more, see Transformation Matrix.
Range Block
This is the range of “words” 3 through 14 of an element that
define the absolute UOR (units of resolution) range of each
element.
R-bit
This indicates whether the element is oriented relative to the
screen or relative to the database:
0 = relative to database (view dependent)
1 = relative to screen (view independent)
Register
A, special, high-speed storage area within the CPU. All data
must be represented in a register before it can be processed.
For example, if two numbers are to be multiplied, both
numbers must be in registers, and the result is also placed in
a register. The register can contain the address of a memory
location where data is stored rather than the actual data
itself.
S-bit
The setting of the S-bit indicates whether or not the element
is snappable or not.
0 = snappable
1 = non-snappable
Siamese Attribute Linkage
When the attribute linkage extends beyond the end of the
element it is attached to it is called a Siamese Attribute
Linkage. This means the linkage and the element following
are sharing file space.
TCB
Terminal Control Block (TCB). A global data area of
memory where MicroStation stores all settings, such as
working units, view information, global origin, and other
data that describes its status. There are TCB variables for
view configuration, active settings such as color and lock
status, and the last data point or tentative point entered. This
information is used when a file is loaded. The TCB data is
saved as type 9’s and type 66’s under File | Save Settings off
the MicroStation main menu.
Text Node
This element is a complex header element for groups of text
elements.
Text Height & Width
Multipliers
These multipliers (which are floating point values/numbers)
are used to scale a text element against the normal character
size to determine the true size of the text element.
Transformation Matrix
A matrix is an arrangement of numbers, analogous to a
table. For example:
Chapter 27 — Glossary
Page 279
100
010
001
A matrix is used to represent the orientation of an element—
are we viewing it from the top, front, right? Let's say the
above example represents the top view of an element. If we
change the element's matrix, the element will be displayed
differently. For example, to turn the element upside down
and display the bottom view of an element, the matrix might
be:
-1 0 0
010
001
Or, we can change the matrix to increase the size (scale) of
an element. The following matrix would double the
displayed size of the element in the first example:
200
020
002
A change in size or rotation is called a transformation. The
matrix used to define such changes is called a
transformation matrix.
A 3D transformation matrix is composed of 9 numbers, as in
the above examples. This information can be compressed
mathematically and represented by only 4 numbers, called
quaternions. Quaternions are used in some elements to save
space.
Words
Words-in-description
Words are special units of data storage for element
information and contain 16 bits or 2 bytes each. For
example, the first word in an element contains information
about the type, level, complex status and deleted status of
that element. An element can be up to 768 words in size.
Words-in-description (WID) describes how long the entire
complex element is and only exists in complex element
headers (types 1, 2, 7, 12, 14, 18, 19, 24, 27, 34, 90). All
complex element headers have a Words-in-description
‘word’. It is equal to the sum of the lengths of all component
elements plus the number of ‘words’ existing in the header
element after this word. Or you could say, its value includes
the number of words following it in the complex header, as
well as the sum of all word lengths (number of words to
follow plus 2) for all nested elements in the complex
element.
Note – types 12 and 14, complex chains and shapes, are
complex headers that group lines, line strings, curves and
arcs in any combination to form a connected chain or shape.
Words-to-follow
This Words-to-follow (WTF) is a ‘word’ that indicates
where the element ends and is the pointer to the beginning
of the next element in a design file or cell library. This is the
second ‘word’ in the header and contains the word count of
the location of the next element in the design file. This value
equates to the length of the element excluding the element
header and this word. For complex elements, this word
defines the length of the header element only and does not
include component elements.
(Additional data) All active (non-deleted) elements must
have a Words-to-follow of at least 16, which will encompass
the standard element header, and not greater than 766. In
reality no active element should ever have a Words-tofollow of less than 22. That is why complex-shapes and
connected-strings always have a dummy attribute linkage
appended.
Zinger
1) An illegitimate, usually long, straight line that starts
mid-screen or mid-plot and terminates at the extreme
edge of the screen or plot.
2) Any erroneous or undesirable element.
Chapter 28 — New Features and Fixes
Page 281
Chapter 28 — New Feat ures and Fixes
7.8i — 25 April 2003
Optimized analysis of tag elements, reducing the amount of memory consumed.
Improved detection and handling of full or write-protected output disks.
"Replace design file header elements" mode now works properly with "Work on original
file. Create a backup".
Handled unusual case where error 905 was not handled.
Handled unusual case where bad floating point value was not handled.
7.8h — 6 March 2003
This is a significant new release of FileFixer for V7. In the past, this version of FileFixer
would have been numbered “7.9a”, but we are conserving numbers below 8.0 to avoid
confusion between the V7 and V8 versions of FileFixer. (The first V8 version of
FileFixer was numbered 8.0a.)
The enhancements in FileFixer 7.8h are described below.
New Settings File Format: Plain Text
For many years FileFixer settings were saved in standard MicroStation resource files.
Unfortunately, we were not able to make those resource files upwardly compatible with
future versions of FileFixer. As a result, customized FileFixer settings (changes from
Factory Defaults) would have to be manually updated and saved each time a new version
of FileFixer was installed. This was not ideal — we wanted to do something about it.
We are pleased to announce that FileFixer’s settings are now stored in a plain text file
named fixer.ini. FileFixer settings files will hereafter be upwardly compatible.
If you use customized settings (changes from the Factory Defaults), you will need to
update your settings one more time when you install 7.8h — but this is the last time!
Updated Sample Settings Files
FileFixer’s Factory Default options are appropriate for most situations, but there are
times when some of FileFixer’s special options are required. But where do you start?
To help you get started, three sample settings files are shipped with FileFixer:
•
Danger.ini — reports future danger (500 level) errors and worse. Other error
messages are suppressed.
•
Diagnose.ini — most search options are turned on and all of FileFixer’s default
repair options are activated.
•
Fixable.ini — reports those errors that FileFixer can fix automatically.
These settings file samples are a good place to start for both experienced and new
FileFixer users — just load the settings file name which most closely matches your need
by selecting File|Load Settings…
These .ini settings files are plain text replacements for the .rsc settings files shipped with
previous versions of FileFixer.
Report Enhancements
•
Report file options are now grouped in a single dialog selectable from Options|Report
File Options…
•
FileFixer now includes the name of the .fix or backup file in the output report. This
documents the exact location and name of your files before and after repair.
•
FileFixer now includes the MicroStation version at the end of each report to
automatically document the version of MicroStation you are using with FileFixer. This is
handy when clients send us files for analysis.
•
When processing a single file, FileFixer’s report file name now defaults to the directory
and base name of the selected design file. When processing multiple files, the report file
name now defaults to the active file’s directory and the name “fixer.rep”.
•
In the process of updating FileFixer for V8’s reports, we enhanced and clarified its V7
reports as well. This is particularly noticeable in FileFixer’s HTML reports.
•
Some FileFixer-Lite reviewers couldn’t believe the quantity of problems found in their
files. Don’t shoot the messenger! FileFixer-Lite now, by default, reports Dangerous
conditions (error numbers 500) and above. Of course, FileFixer-Lite’s settings can be
changed to report all errors. (FileFixer-Lite does not perform repair.)
Severity of Errors to be Reported
For clarity and consistency between the V7 and V8 versions of FileFixer, “Severity of
Errors to be Reported” is now selectable by description and number, not just description:
Chapter 28 — New Features and Fixes
Page 283
TriForma Enhancements
•
FileFixer now accepts type 27 b-splines as components of type 18 surfaces and type
19 solids. These combinations of elements are normal constructs in TriForma files.
•
A new TriForma option was added to accommodate unnamed cells nested within
other unnamed cells. This option is selectable from Options|MicroStation
Applications|TriForma. This option is ON by default. FileFixer automatically applies
this option to TriForma files when TriForma element linkages are detected.
Remove all OLE files and OLE application elements
FileFixer offers the repair option “Remove all OLE files and OLE application elements”.
This option is typically used once and then turned OFF. To ensure the option is not
inadvertently left ON, FileFixer turns this option OFF when it unloads. However, if you
define the configuration variable FIXER_OLE = “Y”, FileFixer will allow you to force
this option to stay ON. This is very unusual, but sometimes handy when using FileFixer
to process files with MSBATCH. So, FileFixer allows you to permanently turn ON
“Remove all OLE Files and OLE application elements”, but the following notification is
displayed to keep you fully briefed on the pros and cons:
For more information, see the “Remove all OLE files and OLE application elements” and
“Batch Mode” sections.
Miscellaneous Enhancements
•
Miscellaneous GUI refinements.
•
•
Some customers sent us V7 files which had V8 reference files attached. This is quite
unusual, but when it does occur it is impossible to fix with MicroStation/J alone. The V7
version of FileFixer can now detect and detach V8 reference files attached to V7 design
files.
•
FileFixer now correctly calculates the WTF for a file fence element (type 5, level 0, class
0).
•
FileFixer now correctly checks for error 383 when cells have a Words-in-description
greater than 900.
FileFixer now only reports error 905 for b-spline poles when they are components of a
complex header. Error 719 will now be reported for b-spline poles which are not components
of a complex header. These error number re-assignments initiate the most optimum repair for
each scenario.Improved FileFixer’s handling of raster reference file attachments (type 90)
when the Words-in-description (WID) was off by 1. FileFixer now repairs the WID value.
7.8g — 9 September 2002
FileFixer-Lite was re-introduced. FileFixer-Lite processes files in “Search for Problems”
mode and generates a summary of errors (no details). FileFixer-Lite does not perform
repair.
7.8f — 19 July 2002
We fixed a problem with the V7 version of FileFixer recognizing V8 format files. V8
files are now identified correctly in FileFixer reports.
Error number [709] now reports an error on a type 26 (b-spline weight) element as well
as a type 28 (b-spline knot) element.
A CANODE error was incorrectly being reported on some files. This was fixed.
We identified a corruption caused by user linkages with the user ID of 22078. Use this
new version of FileFixer to delete that user ID (22078).
FileFixer was not creating a new Seal-of-Approval if one existed already. This was fixed.
7.8e — 27 May 2002
Error number [709] (b-spline range error) was reported and modified incorrectly in the
last version (7.8d). This has been handled.
The function to replace header elements sometimes created a problem with group data.
This was fixed.
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Page 285
FileFixer now checks for type 38 (Smart Geometry) elements in a cell header's class and
level mask.
One user had a file with many phantom elements (error [702]). When processing this file,
the reference file attachment data was not copied to the fixed file. This problem has been
handled.
7.8d — 19 March 2002
This version contains additional search and repair options for some of the rarer
corruptions that our customers have experienced.
To handle corrupt linkage data, we added the linkage repair option “Delete user linkages
which are not a multiple of 4 words.” This option will delete user linkages that are not a
multiple of four words while retaining all other linkages.
We added the “Duplicate text node number” text search option to find duplicate text node
numbers. The new error number is 167. We also added a “Fix duplicate text node
number” text repair option that will set the duplicate text number to the next available
text node number.
You can now repair the text node base number setting (NNBASE) when it is greater than
the next text node number setting (CANODE) in the design file header with the “Options
| Repair… | Headers | Set incorrect NNBASE to zero” repair option.
MicroStation versions 95, SE, and J will not recognize a file that has been converted to
MicroStation V8 format. This file may look like a corrupt file to these versions of
MicroStation. FileFixer will notify you if a design file is in V8 format and will
(correctly) ignore such files.
FileFixer now automatically clears complex bits incorrectly set on non-displayable
elements.
We added the ability to repair index-to-attribute errors on the MicroStation TCB element
(type 66, level 9).
We enhanced the ability to fix some words-to-follow errors by setting them to the correct
value. Previous versions of FileFixer would delete elements with this error.
FileFixer now checks to make sure that the levels entered in the “Remove Type 66’s on
the following levels” field are not greater than 127.
The options to check for and delete reference file attachments with blank file names are
now turned off by default.
We changed the wording of the “Write summary statistics [to the report file]” search
option to “Write report file explanation notes”.
Loading factory defaults now resets Report file options.
We added a <Select> button to allow you to browse to the directory in which to place
backup or fixed files.
We made several changes to the FileFixer report functionality including the following:
FileFixer now builds an index file when configured for creating one report file per
MicroStation file. This index file contains a copy of the report summaries from all the
report files. The <Display/Print Report> button displays the index file. The HTML
version of the index file contains a hyperlink to each of the report files.
We added a line for the number of deleted elements compressed out of the design file
during the repair.
We fixed a problem with FileFixer not being able to build the report file. This only
occurred after restoring factory defaults before pressing the <Start> button.
We changed the default location of the report file “fixer.rep” from the current
working directory to “c:\fixer.rep”.
FileFixer is now able to read the Windows Registry when it is write-protected in order to
determine the default browser.
Fixed a problem with the wrong report file name being reported by FileFixer in
MSBATCH mode.
7.8c — 22 January 2002
FileFixer can now validate the range of shared cell instances. The error number reported
is [330].
MicroStation limits you to a maximum of 20 EDFs. FileFixer will now delete excess
EDFs. The error number reported is [347].
FileFixer will now detect and report elements whose size is zero in all dimensions. The
error number reported is [185].
FileFixer can now correct the count of enhanced precision points or vertices in elements
with enhanced precision. Such corruption, left unfixed, could cause MicroStation to abort
when snapping to or selecting such an element. The error number reported is [726].
FileFixer calculates the size of elements and reports an error when the size of the element
(as reported by the WTF) is different from the calculated size of the element. In the past
FileFixer would simply delete the bad element. Now FileFixer uses a more intelligent
algorithm to determine the cause of the discrepancy and, if possible, recover the element
and any valid element incorrectly combined with it.
When a cell library contained cells using custom line styles, earlier versions of FileFixer
would find and delete the type 66, level 23 (custom line style name map data) for the
custom line styles because they were actually located outside the cells in the library (error
[355]). Now the custom line style name map data element will not be deleted.
A new version of the 0text.dgn sample file is now being delivered.
Chapter 28 — New Features and Fixes
Page 287
7.8b — 30 July 2001 (Certified in version 7.8c)
We added the ability to fix the “HRESULT=…” error when running FileFixer via
MSBATCH. When you run FileFixer via MSBATCH with the “-a” option set (for
automatic repair) and the configuration variable “FIXER_OLE” set to ‘Y’ FileFixer will
delete the OLE elements and OLE files.
We fixed the problem in FileFixer that was causing an MDL abort in valele.mc at line
2127. This abort would happen when FileFixer was validating a raster reference file
attachment’s height to width ratio. If it was zero (0), FileFixer would abort.
The date and time stamp of the design file is no longer changed in “Search for Problems”
mode when the seal-of-approval is created or updated.
When the “Skip design files which haven’t changed since seal-of-approval was written
and no serious errors” repair option was selected, FileFixer was not closing the design
file that was being skipped. After approximately 20 design file were skipped, FileFixer
could not open any more files and you would get error [017] logged in the report file for
every subsequent design file. This problem has been fixed.
We experienced a problem when running FileFixer in “Search for Problems” mode via
MSBATCH.BAT. This has been fixed.
You can set the configuration variable FIXER_RSC to the location of the FileFixer
resource file. FileFixer will use it instead of looking for the fixer.ini file in the same
directory as the FileFixer MDL application (fixer.ma).
Several range error problems were handled.
We experienced sporadic problems related to file locking when running FileFixer on
Novell NetWare systems. This problem has been handled.
7.8a — 17 April 2001
FileFixer’s changes
The Enhanced Recovery search options now have their own Enhanced Recovery options
screen.
FileFixer is now able to recover a number of elements in a row from the compatible
back-up file when an area of garbage is found in the design file.
The back-up elements are no longer created automatically in “Automatic Design File
Repair” mode. The option to enable creation of the back-up elements in “Automatic
Design File Repair” mode is on the Enhanced Recovery option screen.
The default state for the option that creates the critical elements back-up elements has
been changed to “on”.
Fixed a problem with FileFixer incorrectly reporting a problem with the slope points
being too close to the edge of the design cube for a 3D curve element.
Fixed an occasional problem with FileFixer incorrectly reporting a duplicate logical
name in a reference file attachment.
Fixed a situation where FileFixer incorrectly reported a DFRANG problem.
FileFixer had a problem calculating the correct Words in Description for a type 90
(Raster reference file attachment) element. This situation was fixed.
When CANODE was zero, there was a problem with the repair option to “Set CANODE
to one more than the largest text node number.” This repair option was fixed.
AutoCheck’s changes
When AutoCheck runs FileFixer, FileFixer displays its processing screen while searching
the design file for corruption. Once FileFixer is done checking the design file it will exit,
unless there is a “serious” error. By default a “serious” error is a 100 level error or higher.
This can be changed on the AutoCheck search option screen in FileFixer.
FileFixer will create a separate report file for each design file. The report file is created in
the same directory as the design file. The report file name is created by using the design
file name with “rep” as the extension. You have the option to either append the “rep”
extension or overwrite the extension. Overwriting the extension is the default.