Mixxx User Manual
Release 2.0-rc1
The Mixxx Development Team
February 05, 2018
Contents
1
2
3
4
5
Introduction to Mixxx
1.1 Mixxx Features . . . . . .
1.2 New in Mixxx 2.0 . . . .
1.3 System Requirements . .
1.4 About the Mixxx Project .
1.5 About the Mixxx Manual
1.6 Additional Resources . . .
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1
1
1
2
2
3
4
Installing Mixxx
2.1 Installation on Windows . . .
2.2 Installation on Mac OS X . .
2.3 Installation on GNU/Linux . .
2.4 Building Mixxx from Source .
2.5 Where to go from here? . . .
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5
5
6
6
7
7
Hardware Setup
3.1 Laptop Only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 Laptop and Splitter Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 Laptop and External USB Soundcard . . . . . . . .
3.4 Laptop and MIDI or HID Controller . . . . . . . . .
3.5 Laptop, External Hardware Mixer and Vinyl Control
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9
9
10
12
13
14
Mixxx Setup
4.1 Opening Mixxx . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2 Sound Hardware Preferences . . . .
4.3 Audio Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4 Latency, Sample Rate, and Audio API
4.5 Equalizer Preferences . . . . . . . .
4.6 Importing your audio files . . . . . .
4.7 Changing music directories . . . . .
4.8 Removing tracks from the library . .
4.9 BPM and Beat Detection Preferences
4.10 Key Detection Preferences . . . . . .
4.11 Analyze your library . . . . . . . . .
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16
16
16
17
17
19
20
22
22
23
24
24
An Overview of the Mixxx Interface
5.1 The Deck Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2 The Mixer Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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27
35
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i
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
6
7
8
9
The Sampler Section . .
The Effects Section . . .
The Microphone Section
Preview Deck Section .
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40
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The Mixxx Library
6.1 Overview of the Library features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2 Library - View and edit your whole collection . . . . . . . . . .
6.3 Loading Tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4 Finding Tracks (Search) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5 Previewing Tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.6 Edit metadata of audio files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7 Auto DJ - Automate your mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.8 Playlists - Organizing your tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.9 Crates - Working with track collections . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.10 Browse - Loading remote tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.11 Recordings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.12 History - Keep track of your last sessions . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.13 Analyze - Prepare your tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.14 iTunes, Traktor, Rhythmbox, Banshee - Using external libraries
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56
57
Controlling Mixxx
7.1 Using a Mouse and Touchpad . . . . . .
7.2 Using a Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.3 Using MIDI/HID Controllers . . . . . .
7.4 Using Timecode Vinyl Records and CDs
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58
58
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59
61
Vinyl Control
8.1 How does it work? . . . . . . . . . .
8.2 What do I need to use it? . . . . . . .
8.3 Configuring Input and Output devices
8.4 Configuring Vinyl Control . . . . . .
8.5 Enabling Vinyl Control . . . . . . . .
8.6 Single Deck Control . . . . . . . . .
8.7 End-Of-Record Mode . . . . . . . .
8.8 Control Track . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.9 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . .
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62
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68
Live Broadcasting - Start your own Internet radio
9.1 Streaming Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2 Configuring Mixxx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.3 Live Broadcasting Preferences . . . . . . . . .
9.4 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.5 Activate MP3 streaming support . . . . . . . .
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10 DJing With Mixxx
10.1 Setting Your Levels Properly (Gain Staging)
10.2 Beatmatching and Mixing . . . . . . . . . .
10.3 Master Sync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.4 Harmonic Mixing . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.5 Using Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.6 Recording Your Mix . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.7 Using Auto DJ For Automatic Mixing . . . .
11 Advanced Topics
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85
ii
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
Adding support for your MIDI/HID Controller
Making a Custom Keyboard Mapping . . . . .
Additional Effects via external Mixer Mode . .
Deleting Your Library . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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85
87
87
88
12 Contributing to the Project
12.1 As a non-developer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.2 As a software developer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
90
90
90
13 Appendix
13.1 Keyboard mapping table
13.2 Application shortcuts . .
13.3 Command line options .
13.4 Developer tools . . . . .
13.5 Version History . . . . .
92
92
93
94
95
96
14 Glossary of Terms
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98
15 Automatically generated TODO list
103
15.1 TODO items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
16 Guidelines for Mixxx Manual writers
104
16.1 What is the intended outcome of the manual? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
16.2 Technical conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
iii
CHAPTER 1
Introduction to Mixxx
Mixxx allows you to perform live DJ mixes with your digital music collection. It helps you rock the party with DJ
controllers, vinyl turntables, or even just your keyboard.
Mixxx is used by professional DJs and bedroom DJs alike. It is designed by an international team of volunteer DJs who
want to bring the joy of DJing to everyone. The project is non-profit, open-source and community driven. Together
and with your help we aim to build the best DJ software ever created.
Mixxx Features
• 4 Decks: Each deck features a scratchable, scrolling waveform that marks beats and cue points, along with a
whole-song waveform overview for quick seeking.
• Advanced Controls: Change playback with time stretching, and loop beat segments.
• Sampler Decks: Perfect for dropping that vocal sample or airhorn.
• External Library Integration: Use your playlists and songs from iTunes, Traktor, Rhythmbox, and Banshee.
• BPM Detection and Sync: Instantly detect and sync the tempo of your songs.
• DJ Controller Support: Control your DJ mixes with MIDI/HID controllers.
• Timecode Support: Use a real turntable or DJ-CD player as a controller.
• Live Broadcasting: Start a radio station and stream your mixes live over the Internet.
• Powerful Mixing Engine: Supports various file formats, custom EQ shelves, recording, etc.
• Automatic Mixing: Create a quick playlist and let Auto DJ take over.
• Microphone Input: Drop vocals or give shoutouts on the air.
New in Mixxx 2.0
• 4 decks
• Master sync
• Color-coded waveforms showing the frequencies in tracks
• Key detection and pitch shifting (independent of tempo) for harmonic mixing
• Choice of traditional, OpenKey, Lancelot, and custom key notations
1
Mixxx User Manual, Release 2.0-rc1
• 4 effect units with built-in effects
• Controller mapping GUI
• Resizable skins
• Beat jumping and loop move
• Multiple library folders
• Hierarchical library sorting
• Cover/album art support
• Vinyl passthrough mode to switch between control vinyl and music vinyl
• Auxiliary inputs that pass through to the master mix
• Mono output and input support
• Improved support for using multiple sound cards
• MusicBrainz tagging support
• Over 100 other performance, quality and usability improvements
• For a full list of features go to: http://mixxx.org/features/
• For an overview of the new features, go to: http://mixxx.org/whats-new-in-mixxx-2-0
• For a full list of new features and bugfixes, go to: https://launchpad.net/mixxx/2.0.0
See also:
For an overview of previous changes, go to Version History.
System Requirements
Mixxx is available for Windows, Mac OS X and GNU/Linux. Mixxx is designed to use very few system resources,
but the Mixxx Development Team suggests these minimum requirements for having a great experience with Mixxx:
• A 2GHz or faster CPU
• At least 1GB of RAM
• A soundcard with 2 stereo audio outputs (4 mono output channels)
Hint: The EQs can be disabled to save CPU usage. Using this feature, Mixxx can be used with an external mixer and
a less powerful computer such as a netbook.
About the Mixxx Project
Mixxx is designed by an international team of volunteer DJs who want to bring the joy of DJing to everyone. The
project is non-profit, open-source and community driven. Together and with your help we aim to build the best DJ
software ever created.
Mixxx started as an open-source project because of demand for DJing software on Linux, and discontent with proprietary DJ software on Windows and Mac OS X. Today, Mixxx development is driven by the simple idea that together
we can create a better way to DJ, and that has brought Mixxx to the cutting edge.
1.3. System Requirements
2
Mixxx User Manual, Release 2.0-rc1
Mixxx is the only free cross-platform vinyl control software and has the most advanced MIDI/HID controller support
via our innovative JavaScript-based scripting engine. We are continuing to pursue new and exciting features that give
DJs more tools to create better live mixes.
Project History
Mixxx was originally created in 2002 as part of a PhD thesis on new interfaces for DJing by Tue Haste Andersen.
After releasing the project as open source, dozens of contributors began modifying and improving Mixxx.
In 2006, a new development team lead by Adam Davison and Albert Santoni began reorganizing the project to ensure
smooth growth of both the code-base and the number of contributors. A renewed focus on usability and stability has
helped Mixxx grow to become the most popular free DJ software in the world, receiving over 1,000,000 downloads
annually. Our committed team has worked hard to create great DJ software, and this growth is a sign of our success.
In 2011, RJ Ryan took over as Lead Developer to successfully continue the team’s endeavor to make Mixxx a worldclass DJ software.
As our user community grows, so does our development team - Over 150 developers, artists, and translators have
helped create Mixxx!
About the Mixxx Manual
Some effort has been made to present the material in a way that is neither too technical nor too dumbed-down. Take
some time to look through it and you’ll find lots of hints that will enhance both your enjoyment and your productivity.
Through the manual you’ll find text formatted like this:
• Library → Add new Playlist
This is to simplify the business of choosing commands in menus. In this example, the instruction means “Open
the Library menu at the top of the application window and then choose the Add new Playlist command”.
• Apply
This is used to indicate a certain area of the GUI, including button labels, tabs, checkboxes, field names, values
in selection lists etc. .
• STRG + G
This is used to mark a keystroke, or a sequence of keystrokes. In this example, you would have to hold down
the STRG key, then to press G.
• https://www.wikipedia.org//
Links to external websites are marked like this.
Important information in this manual are highlighted like this:
•
Note: For anything that should receive a bit more attention.
•
Hint: For supplementary information that lightens the work load.
• See also:
For references to other documents or websites if they need special attention.
•
Warning: For anything that needs to be done with caution.
1.5. About the Mixxx Manual
3
Mixxx User Manual, Release 2.0-rc1
Improving the Manual
• Send Feedback: If you have comments, corrections or suggestions regarding the manual, write us an email.
• Get the Source Code:
To
https://github.com/mixxxdj/manual
download
the
source
code
for
the
Mixxx
manual,
go
to:
Additional Resources
Got questions? Need more information? Want to contribute ? There are a variety of other resources you can use to
find out more.
• Mixxx Website: For general information and updates, as well as the latest news on Mixxx, go to:
http://mixxx.org
• Mixxx Support Websites: To get support from the Mixxx wiki, IRC channel or Developer mailing list, go to:
http://mixxx.org/support
• Mixxx Community Forums: To search for answers, post your question or answer other DJ’s questions, go to:
http://mixxx.org/forums
• Mixxx Source Code: To download the source code for Mixxx, go to: https://github.com/mixxxdj/mixxx
• Mixxx Bug Tracker: To report a bug or request a feature, go to: https://bugs.launchpad.net/mixxx
• Mixxx Translations:
To translate Mixxx and promote your mother tongue,
https://www.transifex.com/mixxx-dj-software/public/ . Please read the Translation FAQ first.
go
to:
• Social Media: Follow us on Twitter , Facebook , and Google+ .
1.6. Additional Resources
4
CHAPTER 2
Installing Mixxx
This part of the manual provides step-by-step directions for installing Mixxx on your computer.
Installation on Windows
Figure 2.1: Mixxx Installation - Ready to install the application
• Download Mixxx for Windows from http://mixxx.org/download/ .
• Using Windows Explorer browse to the location where the Mixxx download was saved, usually the
Desktop or Downloads folder.
• Double-click the Mixxx installer .EXE to open it up.
• Follow the step-by-step instructions in the installer.
• If the installation is complete, a confirmation screen will appear.
• Close the installer screen.
Mixxx is supported on Windows 10 / 8.1 / 8 / 7 / Vista / XP, with native 32 and 64-bit versions.
Note: If you are not sure about 32-bit versus 64-bit, pick the 32-bit version when downloading the Mixxx installer.
5
Mixxx User Manual, Release 2.0-rc1
Warning: You may encounter a warning message similar to “Security Warning - Publisher could not be verified”.
This is because the Mixxx installer is not digitally signed. Ignore the message and continue the installation. It does
not indicate a security risk, if you can trust the source website such as www.mixxx.org .
Installation on Mac OS X
Figure 2.2: Mixxx Installation - Ready to drop the Mixxx icon to the Applications folder
• Download Mixxx for Mac OS X from http://mixxx.org/download/ .
• Using Finder browse to the location where the Mixxx download was saved, usually the Desktop or
Downloads folder.
• Double-click the Mixxx installer .DMG file, a new Finder window appears.
• Locate the Mixxx icon within this new Finder window. Drag-and-drop it into your Applications folder.
• Eject the Mixxx installation volume from the Finder by clicking on the icon right next to Mixxx volume name.
Mixxx requires an Intel Mac running Mac OS X 10.5 or newer.
Installation on GNU/Linux
Official packages of Mixxx are only offered for Ubuntu Linux. However, Mixxx can build on almost any Linux
distribution.
Installation on Ubuntu
Method A: Personal Package Archive (ppa)
• Open a terminal and type the following commands. Type in your administrator password if asked for.
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:mixxx/mixxx
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install mixxx
• Start Mixxx by simply typing mixxx into the terminal, then hit Return .
Method B: The Ubuntu Software Center
The Ubuntu Software Center provides the easiest and safest way to install software on Ubuntu.
2.2. Installation on Mac OS X
6
Mixxx User Manual, Release 2.0-rc1
Figure 2.3: Mixxx Installation from the Ubuntu Software Center
• Start the Ubuntu Software Center on your computer.
• Search for mixxx in the Software center.
• Select Mixxx and click the Install button.
• Type in your administrator password if asked for.
• Mixxx will be installed and an icon is added to the frequently-used program icons on the launcher.
The Software Center version of Mixxx is under some circumstances out of date, therefore using Method A: Personal
Package Archive (ppa) is preferable.
Installation on Other Distributions
Your distribution may maintain a non-official build that you may use. Alternatively, you can build Mixxx from source.
This should be a pretty straightforward process, and it’s certainly easiest on GNU/Linux. For more information, go to:
• http://mixxx.org/wiki/doku.php/compiling_on_linux
Building Mixxx from Source
If your operating system isn’t listed here, then it’s likely you’re going to have to build Mixxx from the source code.
For more information, go to:
• http://mixxx.org/wiki/doku.php/start#compile_mixxx_from_source_code
Where to go from here?
• Set up your audio devices and controllers
2.4. Building Mixxx from Source
7
Mixxx User Manual, Release 2.0-rc1
• Open Mixxx and start importing your audio files
• Get familiar with the Mixxx user interface
2.5. Where to go from here?
8
CHAPTER 3
Hardware Setup
This chapter describes the most common hardware setups to serve as examples. We will go over the setup of soundcards, controllers, and timecode records/CDs.
Headphone cueing, or just cueing, is a crucial aspect of DJing that separates DJing from merely making a playlist.
Headphone cueing allows you to preview the next track you would like to mix in your headphones. The audience will
not hear what you are cueing in your headphones until you decide to mix it in.
In order to use headphone cueing, you will need at least 2 separate audio outputs, typically provided by a USB
soundcard (also known as an “audio interface”). The headphone jack on most laptops is not a second audio output.
Rather, plugging headphones into the jack simply redirects the laptop’s single stereo output from its speakers to your
headphones. A splitter cable can be used to separate the stereo output of a headphone jack into two separate mono
outputs for headphone cueing, but it is recommended to use a sound card with at least four mono outputs (for two
stereo pairs). Such sound cards tend to be higher quality than those built into laptops and allow your mix to be enjoyed
in stereo by your audience.
Unlike some proprietary DJ systems, Mixxx can use any soundcard and any MIDI or HID controller that your OS has
drivers to use. Mixxx can use multiple audio devices simultaneously. Depending on your budget and application area,
your sound setup and requirements may vary. This section provides useful information for club, hobby, and radio DJs
alike.
See also:
The Mixxx DJ Hardware Guide lists controllers and sound cards with information about their compatibility with
Mixxx and different operating systems. It also has suggestions for what to consider when you are shopping for DJ
equipment.
Laptop Only
There is no need to buy any equipment other than a computer if you do not require headphone cueing. The built-in
soundcard on most computers and laptops comes with a single stereo line-out and a microphone input.
The figure above depicts how the sound configuration might look. The stereo output of your soundcard (channels 1-2)
will be connected to the Master out.
1. Open Preferences → Sound Hardware
2. Select the Output tab
3. From the Master drop-down menu, select your built-in soundcard, then Channels 1-2
4. Depending on your soundcard, you can specify a microphone
(a) Use your built-in microphone or connect a microphone to your computer
9
Mixxx User Manual, Release 2.0-rc1
Figure 3.1: Using Mixxx with your built-in sound card
(b) Check that your microphone is detected by your OS
(c) Open the Input tab
(d) From the Microphone drop-down menu, select the input your microphone is connected to
5. Click Apply to save the changes.
This minimal configuration may be suitable for radio DJs who do not need headphone cueing.
Laptop and Splitter Cable
The cheapest way to DJ and cue with headphones uses a stereo-to-mono DJ splitter cable (also known as a “Y cable”)
plugged into the headphone jack of a laptop or other computer. This cable divides the stereo output from a single jack
into two separate mono singals.
This setup allows you to start DJing without having to invest in expensive equipment. However, your audience will
not be able to enjoy music producers’ artistic use of stereophonic sound (although many club PA systems are wired in
mono anyway). Furthermore, soundcards built into computers are usually low quality.
Using a built-in soundcard and a stereo-to-mono splitter
1. Open Preferences → Sound Hardware
2. Select the Output tab
3. Check that your headphones are plugged into the side of the cable with a headphones symbol and that the
speakers are plugged into the side of the cable with a speaker symbol.
4. From the Master drop-down menu, select your built-in soundcard, then Channel 1
5. From the Headphones drop-down menu, select your built-in soundcard, then Channel 2
6. Click Apply to save the changes.
See also:
See the wiki for a list of DJ splitter cables.
3.2. Laptop and Splitter Cable
10
Mixxx User Manual, Release 2.0-rc1
chapters/../_static/mixxx_setup_splitter_adaptors.png
3.2. Laptop and Splitter Cable
11
Mixxx User Manual, Release 2.0-rc1
Warning: Most splitter cables, particularly those marketed as headphone splitter cables, output the same stereo
signal to two headphone jacks and will not work for this DJ setup. Also, if you use a generic stereo-to-mono splitter
adapter, you may only be able to hear out of one side of your speakers and headphones. DJ splitter cables allow
you to hear the same mono signal on both sides of your headphones and speakers.
Laptop and External USB Soundcard
Figure 3.2: Using Mixxx together with an external soundcard
The most common setup for DJing is a laptop and a soundcard with 2 stereo outputs (4 channels). The first stereo
output (channels 1-2) is used as the master output and supplies the main mix to the audience. With the second stereo
output (channels 3-4) you can cue and preview the next track in your headphones. If your soundcard only has one
stereo output, you can use multiple soundcards to achieve a similar setup. Most DJ controllers above the most basic
models include a soundcard with 2 stereo outputs (see Laptop and MIDI or HID Controller for details).
The configuration depicted above uses two soundcards. This setup is the bare minimum for serious DJing. Without
any extra gear, the DJ can control Mixxx via mouse and keyboard. For more information see Controlling Mixxx.
Using two soundcards (built-in + external)
1. Open Preferences → Sound Hardware
2. Select the Output tab
3. From the Master drop-down menu, select the external soundcard, then Channels 1-2
4. From the Headphones drop-down menu, select the built-in soundcard, then Channels 1-2
5. Click Apply to save the changes.
Using an external multi-channel soundcard
1. Open Preferences → Sound Hardware
2. Select the Output tab
3. From the Master drop-down menu, select the external soundcard, then Channels 1-2
4. From the Headphones drop-down menu, select the external soundcard, then Channels 3-4
5. Click Apply to save the changes.
3.3. Laptop and External USB Soundcard
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Mixxx User Manual, Release 2.0-rc1
Hint: If you have technical difficulties with your external sound card, a splitter cable can be used as a portable,
inexpensive backup.
Note: Soundcards designed and marketed for recording often have a knob that allows you to mix its input directly
with its output. This function can be helpful when recording (to hear the input without the latency of going through
the computer), but the master output level will be low even if there is no sound on the inputs. To get the maximum
output level from these soundcards, you may need to set this knob to only send output from the computer and none
from the input(s).
Laptop and MIDI or HID Controller
Most DJs prefer the tactile and intuitive control provided by DJ MIDI or HID controllers over only a keyboard and
mouse. Mixxx can work with any MIDI or HID controller as long as there is a mapping file to tell Mixxx how to
understand the controller’s signals. Mixxx comes bundled with a number of MIDI and HID mapping presets, which
are listed in the Mixxx DJ Hardware Guide on the wiki. For controllers that Mixxx does not yet support, you can
search the forum to see if anyone has started a mapping. You can also start one yourself using the information in the
Controller Mapping Documentation on the wiki.
Controllers with an integrated soundcard
Many DJ controllers include an integrated multi-channel soundcard. A setup with this kind of controller may look like
the diagram below:
Figure 3.3: Using Mixxx together with a DJ controller and integrated soundcard
Using a controller with an integrated multi-channel soundcard
1. Open Preferences → Sound Hardware
2. Select the Output tab
3.4. Laptop and MIDI or HID Controller
13
Mixxx User Manual, Release 2.0-rc1
3. From the Master drop-down menu, select your controller’s soundcard, then Channels 1-2
4. From the Headphones drop-down menu, select your controller’s soundcard, then Channels 3-4
5. Click Apply to save the changes.
Controllers without an integrated sound card
Controllers without an integrated soundcard can be used together with a USB soundcard as depicted in the diagram
below:
Figure 3.4: Using Mixxx together with a DJ controller and external soundcard
Using a controller without an integrated soundcard
1. Open Preferences → Sound Hardware
2. Select the Output tab
3. From the Master drop-down menu, select the external soundcard, then Channels 1-2
4. From the Headphones drop-down menu, select the built-in soundcard, then Channels 1-2
5. Click Apply to save the changes.
Note: You can connect as many controllers as you have ports on your computer. Just follow the steps in Using
MIDI/HID Controllers for each controller you want to use.
Laptop, External Hardware Mixer and Vinyl Control
This setup allows DJs to use the techniques of DJing with vinyl record turntables combined with the portability and
flexibility of a laptop computer. Instead of carrying crates of records or CDs, DJs can carry their entire music collection
on their laptop. In addition to a laptop and headphones, this setup requires a soundcard with at least two pairs of stereo
inputs and outputs as well as a pair of timecode records.
See also:
3.5. Laptop, External Hardware Mixer and Vinyl Control
14
Mixxx User Manual, Release 2.0-rc1
Figure 3.5: Using Mixxx together with turntables and external mixer
Go to the chapter Vinyl Control for detailed information.
3.5. Laptop, External Hardware Mixer and Vinyl Control
15
CHAPTER 4
Mixxx Setup
Opening Mixxx
Once you’ve installed Mixxx, start by opening Mixxx and importing your music to the Mixxx library.
Windows Double-click the Mixxx icon on the Desktop. Alternatively, browse your Windows start menu and click the
Mixxx icon, or perform a search for Mixxx.exe.
Mac OSX Double-click the Mixxx icon in the Applications folder. Alternatively, drag the Mixxx icon to the
dock and double-click it there or search for “Mixxx” in Spotlight.
GNU/Linux Simply type mixxx into the terminal, then hit Return. With some distributions like Ubuntu you can
also double-click the Mixxx icon in the launcher. Alternatively, perform a search for mixxx.
Sound Hardware Preferences
Figure 4.1: Mixxx Sound Hardware Preferences
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Mixxx User Manual, Release 2.0-rc1
Preferences → Sound Hardware allows you to select the audio inputs and outputs to be used.
• Sound API: Depending on your Operating System, select the API that Mixxx uses to deliver audio to your audio
device. Your choice can drastically affect how well Mixxx performs on your computer.
• Sample Rate: Allows you to manually select the sample rate for the audio input. The sample rate value should
be set to the sample rate of your audio interface. By default, Mixxx tries the system default first, which is most
likely 44.1 kHz. Otherwise, Mixxx will pick a different default.
• Audio buffer: Also known as latency, this is the lag time in milliseconds that it takes for Mixxx to process your
input. Lower latency means Mixxx will be more responsive but on slower computers and cheaper sound cards
it might cause glitches.
• Buffer Underflow Count: Underflows (data is not available when needed) indicate that some of the subsystems
in Mixxx can’t keep up with real-time deadlines imposed by the current audio audio buffer size. This is useful
to tune the latency settings. If the counter increases, then increase your audio buffer size, decrease the sample
rate setting or change the sound API setting if available.
Audio Outputs
Mixxx’s mixing engine can be used in two ways:
Internal Mixer Mode In this mode, Mixxx performs the mixing of the decks, microphone, and samplers in software
and outputs them to a single output. To enable internal mixer mode, assign a valid audio output to the Master
output in Preferences → Sound Hardware → Output.
Internal mode is used in the following configurations:
• Laptop Only
• Laptop and External USB Soundcard
• Laptop and MIDI or HID Controller
External Mixer Mode In this mode, Mixxx outputs the audio from each deck to a separate soundcard output. This
allows you to route the deck outputs through a hardware mixer. To enable external mixer mode, select a valid
audio output for the Deck outputs in Preferences → Sound Hardware → Output.
External mode is used in the following configuration:
• Laptop, External Hardware Mixer and Vinyl Control
Headphone Output
In both internal and external mixer mode, you can choose a headphone output for pre-fader listening or headphone
cueing in Preferences → Sound Hardware → Output → Headphone. This allows you to listen and synchronize the
track you will play next in your headphones before your audience hears the track. See also PFL/Headphone Button.
Latency, Sample Rate, and Audio API
To achieve the best performance with Mixxx it is essential to configure your audio buffer, sample rate, and audio API.
These three factors largely determine Mixxx’s responsiveness and audio quality and the optimal settings will vary
based on your computer and hardware quality.
4.3. Audio Outputs
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Audio Buffer
The audio buffer, also known as latency, is the lag time in milliseconds that it takes for Mixxx to process your input
(turning knobs, sliding the crossfader, etc.). For example, with an audio buffer of 36 ms, it will take approximately
36 milliseconds for Mixxx to stop the audio after you toggle the play button. Additionally, the audio buffer setting
determines how quickly your Operating System expects Mixxx to react. A smaller audio buffer means Mixxx will be
more responsive. On the other hand, setting your audio buffer too low may be too much for your computer and sound
card to handle. In this situation, Mixxx playback will be choppy and very clearly distorted as your computer will not
be able to keep up with how frequently Mixxx is processing audio.
An audio buffer between 36-64 ms is acceptable if you are using Mixxx with a keyboard/mouse or a controller. An
audio buffer below 10 ms is recommended when vinyl control is used because Mixxx will feel unresponsive otherwise.
Keep in mind that lower latencies require better soundcards and faster CPUs and that zero latency DJ software is a
myth (although Mixxx is capable of sub-1ms operation).
Sample Rate
The sample rate setting in Mixxx controls how many samples per second are produced by Mixxx. This determines the
maximum frequency in Mixxx’s signal, which is half the sample rate. Humans can only hear up to 20 kHz, so there is
generally no need to use more than a 44.1 kHz (44100 Hz) sample rate for playback. Most music is published with a
44100 Hz sample rate.
Warning: A sample rate of 96kHz takes Mixxx over twice as long to compute. Keep in mind that increasing the
sample rate will increase CPU usage and likely raise the minimum audio buffer size you can use.
Audio API
The Audio API that Mixxx uses is the method by which Mixxx talks to your Operating System in order to deliver
audio to your soundcard. Your choice of Audio API can drastically affect Mixxx’s performance on your computer.
Therefore it is important to take care to choose the best Audio API available to you. Refer to the following table
of Audio APIs to see what the best choice is for your operating system.
OS / Audio API
Windows / ASIO
Windows / WDM-KS
Windows / WASAPI
Windows / DirectSound
Windows / MME
Mac OS X / CoreAudio
GNU Linux / ALSA
GNU Linux / JACK (Advanced)
GNU Linux / OSS
Quality
Good
Good
Acceptable
Poor
Poor
Good
Good
Good
Acceptable
For low latency on Windows, it is best to use an ASIO driver that bypassses the sound processing of the Windows
kernel. If there is no such ASIO driver available for your soundcard, use the WDM-KS API. There is generally no
advantage to using ASIO4ALL <http://asio4all.com>_, a wrapper around the WDM-KS API.
On GNU/Linux, ALSA is the simplest sound API to configure. Using ALSA will prevent any other programs from
using the sound card(s) that Mixxx is using.
JACK allows you to route audio between JACK-compatible applications in flexible ways and output sound from
multiple programs at the same time. However, JACK can be complicated to set up. To use JACK, start the JACK
daemon before running Mixxx. Otherwise JACK will not appear as a Sound API in the preferences.
4.4. Latency, Sample Rate, and Audio API
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Most modern GNU/Linux distributions use PulseAudio by default. When launched from a GUI menu entry or icon,
Mixxx suspends PulseAudio while it is running so that Mixxx can use ALSA directly. Like JACK, PulseAudio allows
multiple programs to access one sound card, but PulseAudio and JACK have opposite design goals. PulseAudio is
designed to make ordinary computer usage such as watching videos online and listening to music easy whereas JACK
is designed for demanding low latency audio programs like Mixxx. It can be difficult to setup JACK and PulseAudio
to work well together. So, unless you already use JACK, it is easiest to let Mixxx suspend PulseAudio and use ALSA.
If the PulseAudio plugin for alsalibs is installed on GNU/Linux, you can choose the virtual device pulse. This allows
Mixxx to share the default system sound card with other media players. This only works if you start Mixxx without
pasuspender, which you can do by running “mixxx” from a console rather than clicking the launcher icon in a menu
or on your desktop. Since the sound stream is routed from ALSA to Pulse and back to ALSA, this adds an additional
latency of ~2 x the selected audio buffer size.
Equalizer Preferences
chapters/../_static/Mixxx-111-Preferences-Equalizer(TODO).png
Figure 4.2: Equalizer Preferences
Preferences → Equalizer allows you to setup the equalizers.
• Equalizer Rack: The Equalizer Rack is a special effect rack that is connected to the deck’s equalizer and filter
controls.
4.5. Equalizer Preferences
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In this section you can select the equalizers and quick effects that are used with the decks.
• Equalizer Plugin: Here you can select the effect that is used as the mixing EQ in each deck. By default only
built-in equalizers are displayed. Unchecking “Only allow EQ knobs to control EQ specific effects” allows you
to select any other effect.
• Quick Effect: Here you can select the effect that is controlled by the dedicated filter knob in each deck. By
default only built-in filter effects are selected for all decks, but that can be changed as above.
• High/Low Shelf EQ: This slider sets the crossover frequencies of the mixing EQ. It controls which frequency
range is affected by the low, mid, and high channel EQ knobs. By default the low knob controls the bass and
sub bass range up to 246 Hz. The mid knob controls the mid range up to 2.5 kHz. The remaining treble range is
controlled by the high knob.
• Master EQ: This section allows you to setup an EQ that affects the master output.
Mixing Equalizers
Mixxx offers three types of mixing equalizers with a full kill option. These equalizers are “isolators”, adapted from
analog crossover networks. Each EQ is combination of a high shelf filter, a band pass filter, and a low shelf filter. Each
EQ type has a unique sound, so try them out to find out which one you prefer.
The Bessel EQs with Lipshitz and Vanderkooy Mix (LV-Mix) do not alter the sound or take any processing time when
their knobs are in the center position. They activate once you adjust an EQ knob.
The Linkwitz-Riley EQ on the other hand always applies a minimum, natural sounding phase shift to the sound. Their
processing time does not change when you adjust the EQ knobs.
The following table compares some technical parameters:
Type
Bessel4 LV-Mix
Bessel8 LV-Mix
Linkwitz-Riley
cut
soft
medium
sharp
roll-off
-24 db/Oct
-48 db/Oct
-48 db/Oct
phase shift
linear
linear
minimum
bit perfect
yes
yes
no
CPU usage
low
medium
high
cut: the frequency response (curve form) at the cross over frequency.
roll-off: The steepness of the EQ bands.
linear phase: No phase distortion, all frequencies are processed with the same group delay.
minimum phase: A natural phase distortion, the group delay changes by the frequency.
bit perfect: Whether the EQ leaves the original samples untouched when the EQ is at unity.
CPU usage: Processing time needed to calculate the EQ output.
Importing your audio files
Setup the music library The first time you run Mixxx, you are asked to select a directory where your music is stored.
By default, the dialog points to a location where music files are typically held, but you can select any location
on your computer.
Click Select Folder and Mixxx will scan your music library. Depending on the size of your library this could
take some time. All the supported music files Mixxx detects will be listed in the Library - View and edit your
whole collection.
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Figure 4.3: Mixxx running on Windows 8 - Choose music library directory dialog
If you want to refresh your library (for example because you added or moved files), you can do this with Library
→ Rescan Library in the menu. If you want to rescan at every launch, select Preferences → Library → Rescan
on startup.
Warning: On Windows 7 and 8 the import dialog points to your Windows “Music“ Library, a specialpurpose virtual folder. You can not use these virtual folders. Select a regular folder instead, usually “My
Music“, like pictured above.
Compatible files
New in version 2.0: Support for the Opus audio format.
Mixxx supports a variety of audio file formats: Wave (wav), Aiff (aiff, aif), MP3 (mp3), Ogg Vorbis (ogg),
FLAC (flac), Opus (opus), and AAC (aac, m4a) if supported by your OS. DRM protected files, such as
m4p files purchased in the iTunes Store, are not supported.
AAC (M4A) is supported on Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.5 onwards. The Platform Update Supplement is required for Windows Vista.
On Linux, AAC playback is disabled by default due to licensing restrictions. To enable the playback of
AAC files, build Mixxx from source with m4a/AAC files support.
Import external libraries If you have iTunes, Traktor, Rhythmbox, or Banshee installed, Mixxx allows you to access your tracks and playlists in the Mixxx library, see iTunes, Traktor, Rhythmbox, Banshee - Using external
libraries.
Import remote files To import audio files which are not in your music library directory, drag them directly from an
external file manager or from the Browse section to the track list. Importing files into Mixxx does not change
the location of the files on the hard disk.
Note: You can not drag complete folders to the library because currently Mixxx can not recursively scan folders
for compatible music files.
Import playlists You can import existing m3u, pls , m3u8, pls playlist files from products other than Mixxx, see
Playlists - Organizing your tracks.
4.6. Importing your audio files
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Import music from CDs Mixxx can not play music from Audio CDs. Convert the content to compatible files in good
quality and add them to the Mixxx library. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ripping
Changing music directories
New in version 2.0: Handles multiple music library folders and adds an option to move them to another location
without data loss.
You can manually add, relink, and remove Mixxx music directories in Preferences → Library.
Add a new music directory Mixxx handles multiple music library folders. Click Add to browse to a directory where
your music is stored. Mixxx will watch this directory and its subdirectories for new tracks.
If you add a directory that is already in your library, or you are currently rescanning your library, the operation
is canceled.
Directories can also be added from the Browse sidebar item inside the library.
Relink a existing music directory If an existing music directory is moved, Mixxx doesn’t know where to find the
audio files in it. Click Relink to select the music directory in its new location. This will re-establish the links to
the audio files in the Mixxx library.
Remove a music directory Click Remove, and Mixxx will no longer watch a directory and its subdirectories for new
tracks, and asks what would you like to do with the tracks from these directories.
• Select Hide Tracks to hide all tracks from this directory and subdirectories.
• Select Delete Track Metadata to delete all metadata for these tracks from Mixxx permanently
• Select Leave Tracks Unchanged to leave the tracks unchanged in your library.
Hiding tracks saves their metadata in case you re-add them in the future.
Metadata means all track details (artist, title, playcount, etc.) as well as beatgrids, hotcues, and loops. This
choice only affects the Mixxx library. No files on disk will be changed or deleted.
Hint: When changing music directories, you might want to run a library rescan afterwards. Select Library → Rescan
Library in the menu.
Removing tracks from the library
Removing tracks from the Mixxx library will not physically delete them from your drive. However it does delete extra
metadata Mixxx might have (such as hotcues and the beatgrids), and removes links to playlists or crates.
1. Click the Library item in the sidebar.
2. Find and select the tracks you want to remove, perform a right-click on them and select Hide from Library from
the context menu.
3. Expand the Library item in the sidebar and click on the Hidden tracks sub-item. All tracks that were set to be
hidden from the library will appear here.
4. Select the tracks you want to remove, or use the Select All button.
5. To confirm you want to permanently remove these tracks from the library, click Purge.
Hint: If you later decide to add some of the deleted tracks back, import them to the Mixxx library again, see Importing
your audio files.
4.7. Changing music directories
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BPM and Beat Detection Preferences
Todo
Update this section to explain the differences between the beatgrid and beatmap options.
Mixxx uses an ultra-precise BPM and beat detector. Manual adjustments are redundant in many cases because Mixxx
knows where the beats are.
Analyzer Settings
BPM and beat detection is a complex operation. Depending on your computer and the track’s bitrate and duration this
may take some time. By default Mixxx analyzes the complete track. To accelerate beat detection on slower computers,
a “Fast Analysis” option is available. If enabled, the BPM is computed by analyzing the first minute of the track. In
most cases this does not affect the beat detection negatively because most of today’s dance music is written in a 4/4
signature with a fixed tempo.
Figure 4.4: Mixxx preferences - BPM settings
The table below summarizes the beat detection settings:
Option
Enable Fast Analysis
Assume constant tempo
Enable Offset Correction
Re-analyze beats when settings
change or beat detection data is
outdated
Description
If enabled, BPM will be detected by only using the first minute of audio.
If enabled, Mixxx assumes that the distances between the beats are constant.
If disabled, the raw beat grid obtained by the analyzer is presented. The latter
is appropriate for tracks with variable tempo.
Prevents beat markers from being placed incorrectly.
If enabled, Mixxx over-writes old beat grids from prior versions. Moreover, it
will re-analyze the BPM if your beat detection preferences change or BPM
data from 3rd party programs are present.
4.9. BPM and Beat Detection Preferences
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Correcting Beat Grids
There may be situations where BPM and beat detection do not result in a proper beat grid.
Typically, the detected BPM is correct but the analyzer has failed to detect the location of the first beat. Consequently,
the beat markers are shifted, i.e. the beat markers are a fixed distance from the true beat. To adjust the beat grid, cue
the track before a real beat and click the Beat-grid Adjust button in the Deck Options Button Grid.
If the detected BPM is not accurate, the corresponding beat grid will also be inaccurate. A deviation of 0.02 BPM
units from the correct BPM will cause beatgrid alignment issues on long tracks (e.g. a club mix). If this happens, your
beatgrid may look aligned for the few minutes but you will notice a slight drift as the song goes on. Finding the correct
BPM is easy in many cases - just follow the note below.
Note: If the detected BPM value is not sufficiently accurate but very close to an integer value, try to set the BPM
value manually to the integer.
Key Detection Preferences
Mixxx comes with a high precision musical key detector to help you make smooth mixes by ensuring that your tracks
are musically compatible.
Analyzer Settings
Key detection is a complex operation. Depending on your computer and the track’s bitrate and duration this may take
some time. By default Mixxx analyzes the complete track. To accelerate key detection on slower computers, a “Fast
Analysis” option is available. If enabled, the key is computed by analyzing the first minute of the track.
The table below summarizes the Key detection settings:
Option
Enable Fast Analysis
Re-analyze key when settings
change or Key detection data is
outdated
Key Notation
Description
If enabled, the key will be detected by using only the first minute of audio.
If enabled, Mixxx will re-analyse tracks if you select a different key
detection plugin or the key was generated by a program other than Mixxx.
Change the way keys are displayed in the library.
Analyze your library
Mixxx automatically analyzes tracks the first time you load them in a deck, nevertheless it is recommended that
you analyze them before playing live to ensure the beatgrids are correct. Furthermore, track analysis takes considerable
CPU power and might cause skips in the audio — things you surely don’t need while performing.
Once you have configured your music directories and your BPM and key detection settings, press OK on the Preferences window. Go to the Analyze view on the left side panel of the library. This allows you to run beatgrid, key, and
ReplayGain detection on tracks in advance. While analyzing, the progress in percentage and total queue length are
shown.
New in version 2.0: Drag and drop tracks from the library or external file managers onto the analysis view to instantly
analyze these files. The title changes to Analyze (x/y) where x is the number of tracks that have been analyzed so far
and y is the total number of tracks originally in the queue.
4.10. Key Detection Preferences
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chapters/../_static/Mixxx-112-Preferences-Keydetection.png
Figure 4.5: Mixxx preferences - Key settings
4.11. Analyze your library
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Changed in version 2.0: Does not generate waveforms to save disk space.
The Analyze features in detail:
• All / New radio-buttons: Allows you to view a list of either all tracks in the library or tracks added to the library
within the last 7 days.
• Select All button: Selects all tracks in the current view.
• Analyze button: Starts the detection on the selected tracks.
See also:
For more information, go to BPM and Beat Detection Preferences.
4.11. Analyze your library
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CHAPTER 5
An Overview of the Mixxx Interface
Welcome to the Mixxx interface. This is where the magic happens. You are going to want to get very familiar with
this interface because it is the main way to use Mixxx. In this chapter, we present the default interface of Mixxx and
describe its elements, knobs and faders.
Figure 5.1: The Mixxx interface - Deere skin
This is the Deere skin. It is the default skin supplied with Mixxx. There are a variety of others skins included with
Mixxx. You should explore them all to figure out which one you prefer. This section will focus on Deere only.
The Deck Sections
The deck section allows you to control everything relating to a virtual turntable deck. We are going to break this down
into sections.
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Figure 5.2: A deck with a track loaded
Track Information Display
Figure 5.3: The track information section of the deck
New in version 2.0: Parse the title and the artist from the file name when the corresponding metadata is missing.
Track Title The title of the track that was loaded into a deck is displayed on top. This is the same as the title
listed under the Title column heading in the Mixxx library. This information is initially loaded from the track’s
metadata.
Track Artist The artist of the track is listed below. It is the same as listed under the Artist column heading in the
Mixxx library.
BPM (Tempo) The number at the top right is the effective BPM of the track. This is the detected BPM of the track,
adjusted for the playback rate of the track. For example, if the track is normally 100 BPM, and it is playing at
+5%, then the effective BPM will read 105 BPM.
Hint: Click directly on the BPM display and tap with the beat to set the BPM to the speed you are tapping.
You can also use a keyboard shortcut, go to Using a Keyboard for more information.
Time Elapsed/Remaining By default it displays the total elapsed time in the track up to the millisecond. Clicking on
the display switches to the Time Remaining view, which indicates how much time is left before the track reaches
the end. You can change the default in Preferences → Interface → Position Display.
Waveform Displays
The waveform section of a deck allows you to visualize the audio changes that occur throughout the track, you can
basically “see” your music.
Depending on the skin Mixxx displays either parallel waveforms (default) or separate waveforms. Select your preferred appearance in Preferences → Interface → Skin.
With some skins the waveform displays are aligned parallel to each other in order to make beatmatching easier, as it
is possible to beatmatch visually by aligning the beats that appear in each waveform.
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Figure 5.4: The waveform summary and waveform overview of the deck
Figure 5.5: Mixxx default skin (Deere) - Separate waveforms
Figure 5.6: Mixxx alternative skin (Latenight) - Parallel waveforms
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Warning: If you have a slower computer and notice performance issues with Mixxx, try to lower the frame rate
or change the level of detail shown in the waveform in Preferences → Interface → Waveform Display.
Waveform summary The big waveform summary shows the waveform envelope of the track near the current playback position and is updated in real time. The mouse can be used on the waveform to pause, scratch, spin-back
or throw the tracks. Right-clicking on the waveforms allows you to drag with the mouse to make temporary
pitch adjustments.
Hint: You can select from different types of displays for the waveform, which differ primarily in the level of
detail shown in the waveform, in Preferences → Waveforms → Summary type.
Waveform overview
New in version 2.0: Like with the Waveform summary, you can now select from different types of displays
for the overview in Preferences → Waveforms → Overview type.
The smaller, zoomed-out version of the waveform shows the various markers within the track as well as
the waveform envelope of the entire track. This is useful because they allow DJs to see breakdowns far in
advance. Clicking somewhere on the waveform allows you to jump to an arbitrary position in the track.
Vinyl Widget The line on the vinyl widget rotates if the track moves. It is similar to the position marker found on
scratch records. Use the mouse on the vinyl widget to pause, scratch, spin-back or throw tracks - just like a
real record. When performing Loop rolls or right-clicking on the vinyl during playback, a “ghost” marker hints
where the playback will continue. The Vinyl Widget is hidden by default and can be enabled in the Deck Options
Button Grid.
If Vinyl control is enabled, it can optionally display the time-coded vinyl signal quality. Activate the option in
Preferences → Vinyl Control → Show Signal Quality in Skin.
Waveform Zoom Using the mouse-wheel everywhere in the waveform summary will zoom the waveform in or out.
You can choose whether to synchronize the zoom level between the decks in Preferences → Interface → Waveform Display → Synchronize.
Waveform Marker While mixing, various additional markers can appear on the waveforms:
• Position marker: The static vertical line in the center of the waveform summary indicates the playback point
of the deck.
• Beat marker: The regular white lines on the waveform summary indicate the locations of beats in the audio,
also called the beatgrid.
• Cue marker: Indicates the position of the cue point.
• Hotcue marker: Indicate the position and number of a hotcue point if set.
• Loop-in/Out marker: Indicate the beginning and the end of a loop.
• Loop overlay: Is drawn between the Loop-in/Out markers and changes color depending on whether a loop is
activated or not.
• Track ending notification: If the waveform overview flashes red, only 30 seconds are left before the track
reaches the end.
Deck Options Button Grid
The six buttons at the bottom right below the waveform allow you to configure the deck. Starting from the top-left and
moving clockwise the buttons are as follows:
Show/Hide Vinyl Widget Toggles the visibility of the Vinyl Widget in the Waveform Displays.
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Figure 5.7: The Options Button Grid of the deck
Repeat Mode Toggle If enabled, the repeat mode will jump back to the beginning and continue playing when the
track finishes.
Eject Track Button Clicking this button ejects the track from the deck. Alternatively you can use a keyboard shortcut,
go to the chapter Using a Keyboard for more information.
Beat-grid Adjust Button Clicking this button adjusts the track beat-grid so that the current position is marked as a
beat. This is useful if Mixxx was able to accurately detect the track’s BPM but failed to align the beat markers
on the beats. For more information, go to the chapter BPM and Beat Detection Preferences.
Quantize Mode Toggle If enabled, all cues, hotcues, loops, and beatloops will be automatically quantized so that
they begin on a beat.
Keylock Toggle Keylock locks the track’s pitch so that adjustments to its tempo via the rate slider do not affect its
pitch. This is useful if you would like to speed up or slow down a track and avoid the “chipmunk” effect that
speeding up vocals has.
Vinyl Control Mode and Cueing controls
Figure 5.8: The Vinyl Control Mode and Cueing controls of a deck
The control above the waveforms relate to the vinyl control feature in Mixxx and is hidden in the default Mixxx user
interface. Click the VINYL section expansion button in the mixer section, or use the specific Application shortcuts to
show or hide the section.
Abs/Rel/Const button
• Absolute mode: The track position equals needle position and speed.
• Relative mode: The track speed equals needle speed regardless of needle position.
• Constant mode: The track speed equals last known-steady speed regardless of needle input.
Off/One/Hot button
This button determines how cue points are treated in vinyl control relative mode:
• Off: Cue points are ignored.
• One Cue: If the needle is dropped after the cue point, the track will seek to that cue point.
• Hot Cue: The track will seek to nearest previous hotcue point.
See also:
For more information on how to use Vinyl control in your setup, go to the chapter Vinyl Control.
Sync and Rate Controls
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The rate controls allow you to change the rate at which tracks are played. This is very
useful for beatmatching two tracks together in a mix. You can control rate changes also
from your computer’s keyboard, see the chapter Using a Keyboard for more information.
SYNC button
• Left-Click: Changes the rate of the track so that the BPM and phase of the track
matches the other deck.
• Right-Click: Only changes the rate of the track to match the other deck but does
not adjust the phase.
Decks and samplers now pick which sync target to sync to on the fly. Decks can’t sync to
samplers and samplers can only sync to decks. The sync target for samplers is:
• The first deck (in numerical order) that is playing a track with a detected beatgrid,
and has a rate different than zero.
• The first deck (in numerical order) that has a track loaded with a detected beatgrid,
no matter if it is playing or stopped.
So basically, if you sync a sampler and both deck 1 and deck 2 are playing a track with a
beatgrid then deck 1 will win since numerically it is first. The sync targets for decks are
chosen with the new master sync feature, see Master Sync for more information.
Pitch/Rate slider The slider allows you to change the speed of the song, by default up to
10% from the tracks original tempos. The speed will increase as you move the slider
up, opposite to the behavior found on DJ turntables and CDJ. Right-clicking on the
slider will reset the tempo to its original value.
Pitch Rate Display The percent that the track’s rate is sped up or slowed down is noted
here. Is the Pitch/Rate slider positioned at the center, the pitch rate display is at
+0.0%, which indicates no change.
Figure 5.9: Rate controls
Pitch/Rate buttons The plus and minus buttons increase or decrease the tempo in steps
at which a song is played, same as pulling the pitch slider slightly. By right-clicking
the buttons you get even finer adjustments.
Temporary Pitch/Rate buttons (Nudge) Pushing the left and right arrow buttons is like
nudging the metal edge of a turntable, or the outer edge of a CD player. It will
give the track a push or pull forwards or backwards. If the buttons are released the
previous tempo is restored. The buttons can act as either a fixed pitch bend or a
ramping pitch bend.
See also:
To customize the amount by which the buttons alter the pitch of the track, the slider range as well as the direction, go
to Preferences → Interface.
Hint: If the tempo of a track changes, you’ll notice that the tone changes based on the pitch used (e.g. playing at
faster pitch gives a chipmunk sound). You can enable the Keylock feature to maintain a constant tone.
Transport Controls
New in version 2.0: Right-click on the Reverse button activates Reverse Roll (Censor)
Fast-Rewind button As long as the button is pressed, the track will play in reverse with increased speed. Rightclicking on the button will seek the play position to the beginning of the track.
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Figure 5.10: The transport controls of the deck
Fast-Forward button As long as the button is pressed, the track will play with increased speed. Right-clicking on
the button will seek the play position to the end of the track.
Reverse button As the name suggests, this button plays a track backwards. Right-clicking on the button puts a
track into reverse while being held, resumes the track and disables Slip mode when released. Useful to censor
expletives on the fly, or simply as part of your mix.
Loop Controls
Figure 5.11: The beatloop and looping controls of the deck
In this section of the Mixxx interface you can control (beat-)loops and set the loop points of a track.
Beatlooping Buttons
• Instant loop: The numbered buttons represents a different bar length. Clicking on any of that buttons will set
a loop of the defined number of beats from the beat immediately following the current playback position. If a
loop is set, a loop overlay will be drawn on the waveforms.
• Loop roll: Right-click on any of the numbered loop buttons to temporarily setup a rolling loop over the defined
number of beats. Playback will resume where the track would have been if it had not entered the loop.
• Double loop: Clicking on the plus button will double the current loop’s length up to 64 bars. The length of the
loop overlay in the waveform will increase accordingly.
• Halve loop: Clicking on the minus button will halve the current loop’s length down to 1/32 bars. The length of
the loop overlay in the waveform will decrease accordingly.
Loop Buttons
• Loop-In: This button allow you to manually set the start point of a loop. A loop-in marker is placed on the
waveform indicating the position. If clicked when a loop was already set, it moves the start point of a loop to a
new position.
• Loop-Out: This button allow you to manually set the end point of a loop. A loop-out marker is placed on the
waveform indicating the position. If clicked when a loop was already set, it moves the end point of a loop to a
new position.
• Loop: Also dubbed Reloop, this button toggles whether the loop is active or not. This works for manually
placed loops as well as automatic loops set by the beatlooping buttons. Depending on the current status of the
loop, the loop overlay on the waveforms changes color.
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Hint: If you are playing inside a loop and want to move the end point beyond its current position in the track, click
on the Loop button first and when the play position reaches the desired position, click on the Loop-Out button.
See also:
If the Quantize mode is enabled, the loops will automatically snap to the nearest beat. This is disabled by default, click
on the Quantize Mode Toggle to enable it.
Hotcue Controls
Figure 5.12: The hotcue controls of the deck
To jump in between different parts of a track, you can use these numbered buttons. You can also use keyboard
shortcuts, go to Using a Keyboard for more information.
Setting Hotcues
Clicking on a numbered button will set a hotcue at the current play position on the track. A marker with the corresponding number will appear in the waveform and the button will light up to indicate that the hotcue is set.
Playing Hotcues
• While playing: Tap a hotcue button to cause the track to instantly jump to the location of the hotcue and continue
playing. If you are playing inside a loop and tap a hotcue whose position is outside of the loop, then the track
still instantly jumps to the hotcue but the loop will be deactivated.
• While stopped: Tap a hotcue button to cause the track to instantly jump to the location of the hotcue and start
playing as long as the button is pressed. Press the Play keyboard shortcut while the hotcue button is pressed to
continue playback, then release the hotcue button.
Deleting Hotcues
To delete a hotcue, right-click on the numbered button. The marker in the waveform will be deleted as well.
Note: Mixxx supports up to 36 hotcues per deck. By default, only some of them are visible in the user interface. You
can customize your keyboard or controller mappings to use all of them.
See also:
Just as with the loops (see above), if the quantize mode is enabled, the hotcues will automatically snap to the nearest
beat. This is disabled by default, click on the Quantize Mode Toggle to enable it.
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The Mixer Section
Figure 5.13: The mixer section
The mixer section of the Mixxx user interface allows you to control how the different decks and samplers are mixed
together.
Channel Faders and Level Meters
Level meters In the center of the mixer section are 4 level meters. The two outer-most level meters are for each deck,
while the 2 inner-most level meters are the left and right level meters for the master output. These should stay at
the top of the green region, with the loudest parts of the music (transients) briefly going into the yellow region.
They should never be in the red region. Refer to Setting your levels properly (gain staging) for more details.
Line faders The two large faders on either side of the level meters are the deck volume faders, also known as Channelor Line-faders. Adjusting these controls the volume of each deck.
Hint: Some DJ’s prefer to use the line faders over the crossfader for fading between tracks. Try it, you may
like it.
Section Expansion Buttons
Above the level meters in the mixer are the optional section expansion buttons.
If you click on either MIC, SAMPLER, or VINYL then you will enable control sections for interacting with:
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Figure 5.14: The section expansion buttons
• The Microphone Section
• The Sampler Section
• Vinyl Control Mode and Cueing controls
You can also use the specific Application shortcuts.
Headphone and Master Mix Controls
Figure 5.15: The headphone and master mix knobs
Todo
Update section to reflect 1.12 GUI layout.
New in version 2.0: Headphone split cue option
Head-Mix Knob Allows you to control how much of the master output you hear in your headphones. It works like a
crossfader between the stereo Master and stereo Cueing signal. If the knob is set to the left, you only hear the
cueing signal, which is the usual position for prelistening tracks.
Note: Don’t forget to activate the PFL button on the deck you want to listen to in your headphones.
Head-Split Button If activated, two mono signals are sent to the headphone output instead of one stereo signal. The
master signal plays in the right channel, while the cueing signal plays in the left channel. You can still adjust
the Head-Mix Knob to control the mix of the master and cue signals in the left channel.
Balance Knob This knob allows you to adjust the balance (left/right orientation) of the master output.
Gain Knob The Gain Knob controls the gain applied to the Master output signal that Mixxx sends to your sound card,
Internet broadcasting servers, and recorded mixes. Generally, this knob should not be adjusted. To change the
output volume, a gain control should be adjusted as close to the speakers as possible for the best signal-to-noise
ratio throughout your signal chain. Ideally, the volume would only be adjusted by adjusting the gain on the
power amplifier. On active speakers, including computer speakers, studio monitors, and PA systems that do not
require a separate amplifier, this means adjusting the gain on the speakers (which may be labeled “Volume”).
As a DJ, you may not have access to the power amplifier. In that case, adjust the volume by adjusting the gain on
the equipment closest to the power amplifier that you have access to. Typically, this is a DJ mixer. If you are not
going through a mixer, adjust the gain of your sound card. If your sound card does not have any controls on it
(for example, for sound cards built into computers), adjust the sound card settings with your OS mixer program.
The Master Gain Knob in Mixxx should be a last resort for adjusting volume.
Warning: In no case should any part of the signal chain be clipping, indicated by a level meter going
into its red region or an LED labeled “clipping” turning on.
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See also:
For an explanation of why you should set your gains this way, see Setting your levels properly (gain staging).
Head Gain Knob This knob controls the gain applied to the headphone output signal that Mixxx sends to your sound
card. Generally, this knob should not be adjusted. To adjust the volume in your headphones, adjust your sound
card’s gain on the headphone output. Most external sound cards have a gain knob specifically for the headphone
jack. If you use an onboard sound card for your headphones, adjust the gain control in your OS mixer program.
If your sound card only has one gain knob that controls both the main output and the headphone output, then
adjust the Head Gain Knob in Mixxx to control the volume of your headphones without affecting your main
output.
PFL/Headphone Button
Figure 5.16: The headphone buttons of both decks in the mixer
The headphone button is also known as the pre-fader listen or PFL button and allows you to use headphone cueing.
That is, it allows you to hear the track you will play next in your headphones before your audience hears it. This helps
you plan when to start the next track and manipulate it to make it blend better with the currently playing track (for
example, by synchronizing the beats, setting a loop, or using EQs). Pressing the PFL button plays the track on the
headphone output at full volume regardless of the position of the crossfader or the deck’s line fader. To play a track
in your headphones but not have the audience hear it, press the PFL button and move the crossfader all the way to the
opposite side of the deck or turn the deck’s volume fader all the way down.
Note: Headphone cueing is only available if you have configured a Headphone Output in Preferences → Sound
Hardware.
Note: If you use an external hardware mixer, plug your headphones into that rather than your sound card. Use the
headphone buttons on the mixer rather than the buttons in Mixxx.
Equalizers and Gain Knobs
Gain Knob Above these knobs, the gain knob allows you to adjust the gain applied to the deck. Use this to compensate for the differences in recording levels between tracks. In general, you should adjust this knob so that the
track’s level meter stays around the top of the green region with the loudest parts of the track (the transients)
briefly going into the yellow region. Do NOT turn the Gain Knob up so much that the level meter is in the
red region. At this point the track is clipping, which sounds bad and could damage equipment.
Note: By default, Mixxx automatically applies an additional ReplayGain so tracks have approximately equal
loudness at unity gain. Your tracks must be analyzed to take advantage of this feature. When an unanalyzed
track is loaded, Mixxx calculates its ReplayGain value, but will not apply a newly calculated ReplayGain value
to a track after it has already started playing (to avoid a sudden change in the gain of a playing track).
See also:
For an explanation of why you should set your gains this way, see Setting your levels properly (gain staging).
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EQ Knobs The low, mid, and high knobs allow you to change the filters of the audio. This allows you to selectively
reduce or boost certain frequency ranges of the audio.
Warning: Be careful not to raise the EQs so much that the signal clips, indicated by a level meter being in
the red region. See Setting your levels properly (gain staging) for a more detailed explanation.
Kill Switches The small boxes next to each EQ knob are called kills. Hold these buttons to fully remove that frequency
range. Short click on the buttons for latching. When in Latch mode, click again to restore the frequency range.
If the Kill switches do not work as expected, check the high/low shelf EQ settings in the preferences.
See also:
You can customize the EQ settings in Preferences → Equalizer.
Crossfader
Figure 5.18: The crossfader section of the mixer with Play/Pause and Cue buttons
The crossfader determines the actual volume of each deck when moving the slider from
left to right. If both decks are playing and the crossfader is in its default center position,
then you will hear both decks. Right-clicking on the crossfader will reset the slider to its Figure 5.17: EQ Condefault position.
trols
You can reverse the configuration of the crossfader, so that the right deck is on the left
end of the crossfader and vice versa. This is also known as Hamster Style. To adjust the
crossfader to your style of mixing, go to Preferences → Crossfader.
Hint: Using the AutoDJ feature in Mixxx, you can automate the crossfade between the decks.
Play/Pause Button
Clicking the Play/Pause button starts and pauses the playback.
See also:
The actual behavior of the Play/Pause button depends on the selected Cue mode.
Hint: To return to the beginning of the track, right-click on the deck’s Fast-Rewind Button.
Cue Button
If the button is pressed while the track is playing, the play position jumps to the Cue point
on the track and the track is paused. Once the track is paused at the Cue point, you can
preview it by holding the Cue Button. If you have not moved the Cue point yet, the default
point is at the track’s beginning.
See also:
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The actual behavior of the Cue button depends on the selected Cue mode.
Setting Cue points
Every track has a Cue point, by default on its beginning. Unlike with Hotcues, you can’t
delete, but only move Cue points.
The Cue point is moved according to the selected Cue mode, as explained below.
Using Cue Modes
New in version 2.1.0: The Mixxx/Pioneer/Denon/Numark/CUP Cue modes gives users now even more flexibility.
Mixxx supports various Cue modes that adapt to fit other devices in your setup, or your
personal preferences. The actual behavior of the Play, Pause, and Cue buttons depends on
the selected Cue mode. To change the Cue mode, go to Preferences → Interface.
Mixxx mode (default)
• While paused at Cue point (Cue button lit):
– Holding down the Cue button plays the track from the Cue point, as long as the button
is pressed. After releasing the Cue button, the track jumps back to Cue point and pauses
again. Continue playback by pressing the Play/Pause button before releasing the Cue button.
• While paused not at Cue point (Cue button flashing):
– Tapping the Cue button stores the current position as new Cue point.
• While playing:
– Tapping the Cue button causes the track to instantly jump to the location of the Cue point
where it pauses the playback.
– Tapping the Play/Pause button pauses the track at the current position.
Pioneer mode
• It is basically the same as Mixxx mode but the buttons are more flashy like a Pioneer CDJ
player.
• The Play/Pause button flashes once per second when a track is paused.
• The Cue button flashes twice a second when the next push will move the Cue point.
Denon mode
• After track load: Track is paused.
• While paused at Cue point (Cue button lit):
– Holding down the Cue button plays the track from the Cue point, as long as the button
is pressed. After releasing the Cue button, the track jumps back to Cue point and pauses
again. Continue playback by pressing the Play/Pause button before releasing the Cue button.
– Tapping the Play/Pause button starts the track at the current position.
• While paused not at Cue point (Play button flashing):
– Tapping the Cue button moves the track back to Cue point.
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– Tab the Play/Pause button to start playing. The Cue point moves to the position where the
track was started.
• While playing:
– Tapping the Cue button causes the track to instantly jump to the location of the cue point
where it pauses the playback.
– Tapping the Play/Pause button pauses the track at the current position.
Numark mode
• It is basically the same as Denon mode but without a flashing Play/Pause button.
• This mode is useful if you want to implement a custom skin with 3-button decks, featuring
a Cue button, a dedicated Pause button, and a Play/Stutter button.
CUP mode
• While playing:
– Tapping the Cue button causes the track to instantly jump to the location of the cue point.
The track will start playing once the Cue button is released.
• While paused not at Cue point (Cue button flashing):
– Tapping the Cue button stores the current position as new Cue point. The track will start
playing once the Cue button is released.
Hint: Use the Hotcue Controls to place more reference points on a track.
See also:
You can also use keyboard shortcuts for Cueing. Go to Using a Keyboard for more information.
The Sampler Section
Figure 5.19: A sample deck
Samplers are miniature decks. They allow you to play short samples and jingles but also
additional tracks in your mix. They come with a small overview waveform and a limited
number of controls. All controls work just like on the regular decks, see The Deck Sections.
The Sampler section is hidden in the default Mixxx user interface. Click the SAMPLER
button in the mixer section, or use the specific Application shortcuts to show or hide the
section.
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Waveform Display
Waveform overview The waveform shows the various markers within the track as well as the
waveform envelope of the entire track. Clicking somewhere on the waveform allows you
to jump to an arbitrary position in the track.
Waveform Marker While mixing, some additional markers can appear on the waveforms:
• Position marker: A vertical line indicates the playback point of the sample deck.
• Hotcue marker: Indicate the position and number of a hotcue point if set.
Track Information Display
Track Artist/Title The artist and title of the track that was loaded into a sampler deck is displayed here.
BPM (Tempo) The number at the top right is the effective BPM of the track. Tap the BPM to
set the BPM to the speed you are tapping.
Deck Options Button Grid
The buttons grid next to the waveform overview allow you to configure the sampler deck.
Starting from the top-left and moving counterclockwise the buttons are as follows:
Repeat Mode Toggle If enabled, the repeat mode will jump back to the beginning and continue
playing when the track finishes.
Eject Track Button Clicking this button ejects the track from the deck.
Mix Orientation Toggle This control determines the sampler input’s mix orientation.
Keylock Toggle Keylock locks the track’s pitch so that adjustments to its tempo via the rate
slider do not affect its pitch.
Sample Deck Controls
Play/Pause button Clicking the button always starts playback from the cue point. If playback
is already enabled the play position will jump back to the cue point. Right-clicking on the
button will stop playback and seek the play position to the beginning of the sample.
Sync Button Syncs the Sampler deck to a regular deck, as described in Sync and Rate Controls.
• Left-Click: Changes the rate of the track so that the BPM and phase of the track matches
the sync target.
• Right-Click: Only changes the rate of the track to match the sync target but does not
adjust the phase.
Hotcue Controls To jump in between different parts of a sample, you can use these numbered
hotcue buttons.
PFL/Headphone Button If active, the pre-fader listen or PFL button allows you to listen to the
track in your headphones.
Gain Knob Allows you to adjust the gain applied to the track.
Level Meter Shows the level of the signal and can be adjusted with the Gain knob.
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Pitch/Rate slider The slider allows you to change the speed of the sample. Right-clicking on
the slider will reset the tempo to its original value.
The Effects Section
New in version 2.0.
chapters/../_static/Mixxx-112-LateNight-Effects-Deck.png
Figure 5.20: A Effect Chain
Effect chains allow you to apply various effects to your mix. You can either add the effects
to the master-output or individually for each deck.
The Effects section is hidden in the default Mixxx user interface to save room on small
screens. Click the EFFECTS button in the mixer section, or use the specific Application
shortcuts to show or hide the section.
See also:
As an advanced user, you can route your audio signal to external software and then apply
additional effects. Go to Additional Effects via external Mixer Mode for more information.
General Effects Controls
Eject Effect Button Eject the currently loaded effect.
Effect on/off Button Turn the effect on or off.
Select Buttons Select an effect.
Mix Knob Allows to decide how strong the effect should be.
Channel Buttons Select if the effect should be applied to master/pfl or different decks. The
buttons will light up if the effect is applied to a specific deck.
Specific Effect Controls
Each effect provides it’s own set of controls, see the Use Effects section for more information.
The Microphone Section
The microphone section is hidden in the default Mixxx user interface. Click the MIC
button in the mixer section, or use the specific Application shortcuts to show or hide the
section.
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Figure 5.21: The Microphone section
Setup the microphone
New in version 2.0: Microphone can accept stereo or mono input now.
• Most computers have built-in microphones, while some are connected through USB. These
work adequately, but don’t expect them to be high-quality.
• The best solution is to connect a good external microphone to the “Mic” or “Line” input
on your audio device. If available, use the “Gain” knob on the device to adjust the input
signal.
• Select the microphone input in Preference → Sound Hardware → Input → Microphone
and click Apply.
Microphone Controls
Talk Button Hold this button and talk to mix the microphone input into the Mixxx master output. Short click on the button for latching. This is handy for talking for an extended period,
for example when streaming a radio show. When in Latch mode, click again to mute the
microphone input.
Mix Orientation Toggle This control determines the microphone input’s mix orientation. Either to the left side of crossfader, to the right side or to the center (default). Clicking cycles
through all the options.
Microphone Volume Meter This displays the microphone volume input signal strength.
Microphone Gain Knob Use this knob to adjust the gain of the microphone output. Try to keep
the volume at a reasonable level to avoid signal clipping.
Preview Deck Section
Figure 5.22: The Preview Deck with a track loaded
The Preview Deck is a special deck that allows you to pre-listen to tracks in the headphones before using them in your mix. Pre-listening a track does not change the tracks’s
Played state as well as the play counter and is not logged in the History. Press CTRL + 4
(Windows/Linux) or CMD + 4 (Mac) to display the Preview Deck.
The features in detail:
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• Track Artist/Title: The artist and title of the track is displayed here. This is the same
listed under the Track and Title column in the Mixxx library. This information is initially
loaded from the track’s metadata.
• Eject Track: Clicking this button ejects the track from the deck.
• Waveform overview: Shows the various markers (Cues, Hotcues) within the track as well
as the waveform envelope of the entire track. Clicking somewhere on the waveform allows
you to jump to an arbitrary position in the track.
• Gain: Move the slider to adjust the gain of the track.
• VU-Meter: Shows the current volume of the track. If it’s too loud and distorted, a peak
indicator flashes red.
See also:
For more information, go to the chapter Previewing Tracks.
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CHAPTER 6
The Mixxx Library
Overview of the Library features
Figure 6.1: The Mixxx Library
The library manages all of your music files. This is where you can find the tracks you want to play and load them into
a deck or sampler; see Loading Tracks. Mixxx imports your music library automatically when it is run for the first
time, see Importing your audio files for more information.
The sidebar on the left contains different collections of music. The track list view on the right displays the tracks in
those collections.
Sidebar:
• Search: Search for tracks in your Mixxx library.
• Library: View and edit your whole collection.
• Auto DJ: Automatically load and crossfade tracks for unattended mixing.
• Playlists: Organize your tracks in sortable lists.
• Crates: Manage your files in unordered track collections.
• Browse: Browse and load tracks from your file system and connected devices.
• Recordings: Record your mix and view previous recordings.
• History: Browse lists of tracks you played in past mixing sessions.
• Analyze: Prepare your tracks for optimal mixing experience.
• External Libraries: Access your existing iTunes, Traktor, Rhythmbox, and Banshee libraries.
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• Sort: Display and sort track collections by different criteria.
• Load: Drag tracks you want to play to the waveform display.
• Edit: Rate tracks and edit track properties.
Library - View and edit your whole collection
The Library displays a sortable list of all the tracks in your music library.
Customizing the view Move columns by clicking in a column header and dragging it to another position. Right-click
on a column header to show or hide particular columns. Adjust the column width to fit the contents of the rows
by double-clicking on the separator between two column headers.
Sorting Tracks Tracks are automatically sorted by the active column. Click on the active column header to reverse
the sort order. Click on another column header to change the active column.
• Multi-Column sorting
New in version 2.0.
You can sort multiple columns by clicking up to three column headers you wish to sort your tracks by. This
makes searching for tracks in a large list more efficient. Clicking twice on a column header will reverse
the sort order.
Example:
1. Click on the BPM column header -> list is sorted by BPM
2. Click on the Year column header -> list is sorted by year. If year is equal, it is still sorted by the last
sort, e.g. BPM.
3. Click on the Genre column header -> list is sorted by genre. If genre is equal, it is still sorted by year.
If genre and year is equal, then it is sorted by BMP.
Rating tracks Make sure the Rating column is not hidden. Rate tracks by hovering over the rating field and clicking
the stars.
Track Inline editing Mixxx reads metadata from the tracks to fill the columns of the library. Double-click on a field,
edit the data, and hit Enter when you are done. Go to the chapter edit metadata for detailed information.
Loading tracks To load a track into a deck, you can either drag it to the waveform display or use the context menu.
Go to the chapter Loading Tracks for detailed information.
Importing tracks Mixxx imports your music library automatically when it is run for the first time. Go to the chapter
Importing your audio files for detailed information.
Previewing Tracks To pre-listen to tracks in your headphones without loading them to a regular deck, click the
icon in the Preview column. Go to the chapter Previewing Tracks for detailed information.
Cover/Album Art
Mixxx can display any cover art that it finds for a track in the library. The search algorithm will check
locally for available cover art, and chooses the first cover that appears in the following list:
1. The first cover saved in the ID3v2 tags of the track
2. If just one image file exists in the track folder take that.
3. %track-file-base%.jpg in the track directory for %track-file-base%.mp3
4. %album%.jpg
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5. cover.jpg
6. front.jpg
7. album.jpg
8. folder.jpg
Mixxx supports the following image types: jpg, jpeg, png, gif, bmp
Rescan Library If you want to manually refresh your library without exiting (for example because you added or
moved files) you can do this with Library → Rescan Library in the menu on top of the application window. You
can prompt an automatic rescan when Mixxx is started in Preferences → Library → Rescan on startup.
Track list context menu
New in version 2.0: Reload Track Metadata from MusicBrainz, Change BPM context menu options and Cover Art
Changed in version 2.0: All BPM related options are in the BPM Options sub-menu.
Right-clicking on selected tracks in the track list reveals the context menu:
• Add to Auto DJ: Adds the content of the selection to either the bottom or top of the Auto DJ playlist for
automatic mixing.
• Load to Deck/Sampler: Loads a selected file to a Deck, Sampler or Previewdeck. Alternatively simply drag it
to the Waveform Displays. Note that you can’t load multiple files at once.
• Add to playlist/crate: Add selected tracks to the playlists or crates that you have created before. Alternatively,
drag the selection to the playlist or crate in the sidebar.
• BPM Options sub-menu:
– Change BPM: Allows to change the BPM to 50%, 66%, 75% or 200% of the BPM set by Mixxx when
analyzing the tracks. If many of the detected BPM are off from the tracks original tempo, you might want
to adjust the BPM Range in the Analyzer Settings and re-run the analysis.
– Lock/Unlock BPM: Locks/Unlocks the BPM of selected tracks so you can’t edit them in the track properties. The icon next to the track’s BPM in the library row is a toggle. Clicking it will set the status to
“locked”, and the icon changes to .
– Clear BPM and Beatgrid: Removes BPM and beatgrid data of selected tracks from the Mixxx library.
After doing this, we recommended you to analyze the tracks again.
• Reload Track Metadata from File: If the track’s metadata changes, e.g. if you used iTunes to edit them, this
option lets you save the new values for the selected tracks to the Mixxx library, see edit metadata.
• Reload Track Metadata from MusicBrainz: Lookup metadata online by searching the MusicBrainz database,
and apply the search results to your tracks, see edit metadata.
• Cover Art Option sub-menu:
– Choose New Cover: Select an image from the file-browser as new cover.
– Unset Cover: Delete any cover information saved for this track.
– Reload from track/folder: Reload the cover from the tracks ID3v2 tags or a picture in the track folder if
they are not available.
• Hide from Library: Temporarily hides selected tracks from the track list. Hidden tracks are listed in the Hidden
Tracks menu item which is explained below.
• Reset Play Count: Marks selected tracks as not played in the current session and set their play counter to zero.
The icon in the Played column changes.
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• Open in File Browser: Browse for the selected files in your file manager.
• Properties: Similar to inline editing explained above, the properties dialog allows you to view and edit metadata
such as title, artist, album, and view the full file name and path. Note that you can not edit multiple files at once.
Note: Most of the context menu items are available in file lists of other views like Auto DJ, Playlists, and Crates as
well.
Missing Tracks
The Missing Tracks view is accessible by expanding the Library tree item in the sidebar. Any tracks that were previously loaded into your library, but were later detected to be missing from your hard disk by Mixxx will appear
here. Mixxx does not automatically delete records of missing tracks so that extra metadata Mixxx might have (such as
hotcues and the beatgrids) will not be lost if the file is replaced.
The features in detail:
• Select All button: Selects all tracks in the current view.
• Purge button: Purges the selected tracks from the Mixxx library, but does not remove them from your computer.
This will delete all metadata Mixxx has for a track.
Hidden Tracks
The Hidden Tracks view is also accessible by expanding the Library tree item in the sidebar. Any tracks that were
previously loaded into your library, but were later set to be hidden from the library, will appear here. Use the Hide
from Library context menu item in the library view to temporarily hide selected tracks.
The features in detail:
• Select All button: Selects all tracks in the current view.
• Purge Button: Purges the selected tracks from the Mixxx library, but does not remove them from your computer.
This will delete all metadata Mixxx has for a track.
• Unhide Button: Removes the selected tracks from the Hidden Tracks view and makes them available in the
regular track list again. The tracks appear again in every playlist or crate they were listed before they were
hidden.
See also:
To learn how to permanently remove tracks from the Mixxx library using the Hidden Tracks view, see permanently
remove tracks.
Loading Tracks
New in version 2.0: Supports dragging tracks from deck to deck.
Tracks can be loaded into a deck in several ways:
• Right-click the library track table: Right-clicking on a track in the table will present the options Load in Deck
1 and Load in Deck 2, among others. Making either selection will load a track into a deck.
• By Using a Keyboard to load the selected track from library track table.
• Drag-and-drop from library track table: Dragging-and-dropping a track from the track table onto a waveform
display will load a track into a deck.
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• Drag-and-drop from deck to deck: Once you’ve loaded a track to deck, sampler, or preview deck, click on the
track title and drag it to a deck or sampler.
• Drag-and-drop from external file browser: Dragging-and-dropping a track from an external file browser directly
onto a waveform display in Mixxx will load that track. This function also works with some other applications.
For example, on Mac OS X, dragging-and-dropping a track from iTunes onto one of Mixxx’s waveform displays
will load that track into a deck.
Finding Tracks (Search)
The search function filters the current selected list (e.g. a playlist, a crate or even the whole library) for tracks that
match your search query.
• Activate the search input field by pressing CTRL + F (Windows/Linux) or CMD + F (Mac). Alternatively click
into the search box.
• Type your search term. Mixxx filters the tracks and retains only the ones that match the search term. Search
terms can include an artist’s name, a song title, BPM, etc.
• To clear the search string hit ESC or click the clear button right next to the input field.
• Hit TAB to cycle between the search and the list of results in the library. Use the ARROW UP and ARROW DOWN
keys to scroll in the list of results.
Note: If the search input field has focus, the Mixxx keyboard shortcuts are disabled, see Using a Keyboard.
Using search operators
Search operators allow you to form more complex search queries. They allow you to limit certain search terms to
particular properties of your tracks.
New in version 2.0: Adds location, album_artist, and key search keywords. Supports human-readable time suffixes in
time-based search query filters, e.g. 1:30, 1m30s, 1m30, 90, 90s. Supports negative search filters.
Mixxx supports the following filters:
• Text filtering: artist, album, album_artist, genre, title, composer, comment, key, location
• Numeric filtering: year, track, bpm, played, rating, bitrate, duration
• Special filtering:
– Supports fuzzy matching of key searches. The following example list tracks with harmonically compatible
keys to C# minor.
~key:c#m
You can combine operators but there’s no way to do an “OR” search right now. The following example list
all tracks by “Danger” over 3 minutes long that are rated 4 or 5.
artist:Danger duration:>3m rating:>=4
– Negative search filters. Use the - prefix as negation operator. The following example would find “hip-hop“
from any year but 1990.
genre:hip-hop -year:1990
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Examples for text filtering
artist: “com truise”
album:Danger
genre: Trance
title: foo
composer: foo
comment: foo
genre:hip-hop -genre:gangsta
Note it doesn’t matter if you have
space between the colon and the
argument or not. Quotes must be used
for multi-word text arguments.
Examples for numeric filtering
bpm:140
bpm: >140
year: <2010
bpm: >=140
rating: <=4
bpm: 140-150
played: >10
Note that you can put a space
between the colon but currently
there must be no space between
the operator and the number.
Examples for duration filtering
duration:2m10
duration:<2:10
duration:>1m35s
duration:>62
Note that you can put a space
between the colon but currently
there must be no space between
the operator and the number.
Previewing Tracks
icon in the library’s Preview
To pre-listen to a track, activate the Preview column in a library view. Clicking the
column loads the selected track in a special Preview Deck that will only output sound in the headphones channel.
Click the
icon to stop the playback.
Alternatively, select a track from the track list of the Mixxx library, drag the track to the waveform view of the Preview
Deck and click the Play button next to the waveform.
To display the Preview deck, press CTRL + 4 (Windows/Linux) or CMD + 4 (Mac).
Edit metadata of audio files
Mixxx reads relevant metadata from the tracks and displays them in the library columns. You are free to edit most
metadata, and Mixxx offers a number of different ways to do so. Note that some information can not be edited, such
as bitrate, size, length, type, filename, and location.
Note: Mixxx does not support editing the metadata of many tracks at a time (bulk editing).
Warning: Changes to a track’s metadata will be saved to the Mixxx library, but not to the track itself. Mixxx
wont touch your audio files to prevent data loss.
Manual Edit
Track Inline editing: Double-click on a field in the library. If the field is editable, it will become an editable text
box. Enter a value and hit Enter when you are done.
Figure 6.2: Mixxx library - Inline editing
Properties editor: Click on a single track in the library and select Properties to open the editor. Add or change
values in the editable fields, and save your changes as explained below.
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Figure 6.3: Mixxx library - Properties editor
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• OK: Accept the changes and close the editor.
• Apply: Accept the changes you made into the metadata.
• Cancel: Discard the changes and close the editor.
• Previous/Next: Load the previous or next track in the current library view.
• Reload Track Metadata from File: Prompts Mixxx to re-read the metadata of the selected track if you
have modified metadata in 3rd-party software,
• Reload Track Metadata from MusicBrainz: Lookup metadata online by searching the MusicBrainz
database, see below.
Using the MusicBrainz online database
Musicbrainz is an open-source music encyclopedia that collects music metadata and makes it available to the public.
Figure 6.4: Mixxx library - MusicBrainz Wizard
The MusicBrainz wizard in Mixxx allows to search the MusicBrainz database and apply the search results to your
tracks.
Click on a single track in the library and select Get Metadata from MusicBrainz. Mixxx fetches track data from the
MusicBrainz database and displays the search results.
Select the best possible match from the search results by clicking on it in the list.
• Apply: Apply the selected MusicBrainz metadata to the track.
• Close: Close the wizard.
• Previous/Next: Load the previous or next track in the current library view and perform a MusicBrainz lookup
on them as well.
Fetching track metadata from MusicBrainz can possibly fail if Mixxx could not find the requested track in the MusicBrainz database, could not connect to the MusicBrainz servers, or because you are not connected to the Internet.
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Hint: The MusicBrainz service has been designed for identifying full audio files. Is a track less then 2 minutes long,
identifying the file will likely fail. Identifying a layered mix-track or mash-up may produce false positives in the result
list.
Using 3rd-party software
If you have modified file metadata in 3rd-party software, select Library → Rescan Library in the menu on top of the
application window. This prompts Mixxx to re-read the metadata from all tracks in the library.
Popular software to edit metadata of audio files include:
• Mp3tag (Windows)
• Kid3 (Linux)
• Picard (Mac, Windows, Linux)
Auto DJ - Automate your mix
The Auto DJ queue is a special playlist that contains extra controls for automatic mixing. This is useful for
taking a break from live mixing or for using Mixxx as media player.
The Auto DJ features in detail:
• Shuffle button: Shuffles the content of the Auto DJ playlist.
• Add Random button: Add random track from Auto DJ track sources.
• Skip track button: Skips the next track in the Auto DJ playlist.
• Fade now button: Triggers the transition to the next track.
• Transition time spin-box: Determines the duration of the transition. Put a pause between tracks that are
automatically mixed by using a negative value.
• Enable Auto DJ button: Toggles the Auto DJ mode on or off.
The Skip track, Add Random and Fade now buttons are only accessible if the Auto DJ mode is enabled. The Search
field in the upper left corner is disabled in Auto DJ. By default, Auto DJ removes tracks after playing them but if you
want AutoDJ to play the same tracks over and over again, you may activate the Auto DJ Requeue option in Preferences
→ Auto DJ → Re-queue tracks after playback. Auto DJ Crates
New in version 2.0.
It is possible to add random tracks to the bottom of the Auto DJ playlist. The tracks are chosen from a set of crates that
you have set as a source for Auto DJ, or from the standard library. Mixxx will normally try to select tracks that you
haven’t played so far. You can set a amount of tracks that is always supposed to be available for selection no matter
when they where last played in Preferences → Auto DJ → Minimum available tracks in Track Source.
See also:
For more information, go to the chapter Using Auto DJ For Automatic Mixing.
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Playlists - Organizing your tracks
Playlists are ordered lists of tracks that allow you to plan your DJ sets. Some DJs construct playlists before
they perform live, but others prefer to build them on-the-fly.
Playlists are not directly loadable into the decks as Mixxx is primarily intended for live, attended performance use.
However, you can use the Auto DJ explained above.
• Create a playlist: Right-click on the Playlists sidebar item and select New playlist. Name the playlist and click
OK.
• Add Tracks: Add tracks to a previously created playlist by dragging-and-dropping a selection of tracks from
the library or playlists onto the name of a playlist in the sidebar. Alternatively, use the right-click context menu
in the library’s track list.
New in version 2.0: Analyze Playlist option in the context menu. Import playlists by drag-and-dropping them into a
playlist in the sidebar. Import playlist and Export playlist context menu options remember the last selected playlist
directory. Displays the total number of tracks, and the total duration next to the playlist’s name.
Right-click on an existing playlist’s name to access the different features in the context menu:
• Add to Auto DJ: Adds the content of the playlist to the Auto DJ queue for automatic mixing.
• Rename: To rename a playlist, just put in a new playlist name and click OK.
• Duplicate: Sometimes you want to build a playlist based on an existing one. Select the playlist you would like
to duplicate, choose Duplicate Playlist, name the new playlist and click OK.
• Remove: Removes an unlocked playlist. Tracks in the playlist are still available in the library for later use.
• Lock:
This icon indicates a locked playlist. If a playlist is locked, you cannot add tracks, rename or
delete the playlist. Choose Unlock from the context menu to unlock the playlist.
• Analyze entire playlist: Forces the analysis of the playlist in the Analyze view.
• Import playlist: Import tracks from external playlists to a playlist in various file formats. For more information,
go to iTunes, Traktor, Rhythmbox, Banshee - Using external libraries.
• Export playlist: Export a playlist in various file formats, such as m3u, pls, or csv. Ideal for processing the
data in other applications.
Crates - Working with track collections
Crates are unordered collections of tracks, and are similar to playlists. Think of it like a DJ case to organize
your favorite vinyls into.
• Create a crate: Right-click on the Crates sidebar item and select New Crate. Name the crate and click OK.
• Add Tracks: Add tracks to a previously created crate by drag-and-dropping a selection of tracks from the library
or playlists onto the name of a crate in the sidebar. Alternatively use the context menu in the library’s track list.
New in version 2.0: Analyze Crate and Auto DJ Track Source context menu options. Import crate and Export crate
context menu options remember the last selected playlist directory. Displays the total number of tracks, and the total
duration next to the crate’s name.
Right-click on an existing crate’s name to access the different features in the context menu:
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• Rename: To rename a crate, enter the new crate name and click OK.
• Duplicate: Just like playlists you can duplicate an existing crate. Select the crate you would like to duplicate,
choose Duplicate Crate, name the new crate and click OK.
• Remove: Removes an unlocked crate. Tracks in the crate are still available in the library for later use.
• Lock:
This icon indicates a locked crate. If a crate is locked, you cannot add tracks, rename or delete the
crate. Choose Unlock from the context menu to unlock the crate.
• Auto DJ Track Source: Use this crate as a source for random tracks in Auto DJ, see Auto DJ crates .
• Analyze entire crate: Forces the analysis of the crate in the Analyze view.
• Import crate: Import tracks from an external playlist to a crate in various file formats.
• Export crate: Export a crate in various file formats, such as m3u, pls, or csv. Ideal for processing the data in
other applications.
Crates vs. Playlists
Crates are unordered collections of tracks. Unlike playlists, they cannot contain duplicate entries and do not support
drag-and-drop within them.
Playlists serve a limited purpose of keeping an ordered list of tracks. You can right-click a playlist to queue it to Auto
DJ, so in a sense you can “play” it.
Often DJs keep a playlist of favorites or plan a list of tracks they want to play at a party. In these cases they rarely
care about the order since they will likely choose the order at the party based on the dance floor and mood and they
certainly don’t want duplicates. This is where crates come in. You can think of them like labels in GMail or Web 2.0
tags for your music.
On the other hand, if you want to specifically plan out a set and practice the transitions you might want to keep an
ordering of tracks or repeat them (if you plan to mix a track back in later on) so in that situation you could use a
playlist.
Browse - Loading remote tracks
Browse mode works like a file-manager and allows you to load tracks that are not necessarily already in your
Mixxx library.
New in version 2.0: Add music directories directly from the Browse sidebar item.
Click the Browse sidebar item to navigate the computer and find your music. Depending on your operating system,
the music will usually be found in the “My Music” or “Music” folder. Drag the files you want to import to the
Library icon or directly to the Waveform Displays.
Note: Currently you can drag only files but not folders to the Mixxx library.
Right-click on a folder and choose Add to Library to add the folder as new music directory. Mixxx will watch this
directory and its subdirectories for new tracks.
See also:
For more informations, go to Changing music directories.
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Quick Links - Bookmark your favorite folders
Using the Quick Links sub-menu you can bookmark folders for direct access. Click the Browse sidebar item and
navigate to the folder you would like to bookmark. Right-click and choose Add to Quick Links. The folder is now
pinned below the Quick Links. To un-pin that folder, right-click and choose Remove from Quick Links.
Recordings
In this section of the library you can start and stop recordings well as view previous recordings and the dates
they were made.
See also:
For more information, go to Recording Your Mix.
History - Keep track of your last sessions
The history section automatically keeps a list of tracks you play in your DJ sets. This is handy for remembering
what worked in your DJ sets, posting set-lists, or reporting your plays to licensing organizations. Every time you start
Mixxx, a new history section is created. If you don’t play a track during the current session, it will be discarded.
This icon indicates the current session.
Click on the History icon in the sidebar to switch to the History view, then right-click on a sessions name to access the
different features:
New in version 2.0: Create new history playlist context menu option. Export playlist context menu option remember
the last selected playlist directory.
• Add to Auto DJ: Adds the content of the session to the Auto DJ queue for automatic mixing.
• Rename: Rename a session, default is the calendar date (YYYY-MM-DD).
• Remove: Remove a previous session, but not the locked sessions or even the current session.
• Lock: Protect a previous session against accidental merge and deletion. An icon indicates a locked session.
• Create new history playlist: Split off the current history session, and add a new session without having to
restart Mixxx. The current history must contain at least one track for this option to be available.
• Join with previous: Join the current history session with a previous one.
• Export playlist: Export a session in various file formats, ideal for processing the data in other applications.
Analyze - Prepare your tracks
This section allows you to analyze your tracks in advance of loading them into a deck. Analyzing tracks requires
considerably CPU power and may cause skips in the audio while performing, so it helps to have your tracks analyzed
before you play. See Analyze your library for details.
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iTunes, Traktor, Rhythmbox, Banshee - Using external libraries
Supported libraries:
•
iTunes (Windows, Mac OS X)
•
Traktor (Windows, Mac OS X),
•
Rhythmbox (GNU/Linux)
•
Banshee (Windows, Mac OS X, GNU/Linux)
New in version 2.0: Support for Banshee music player
The external library views allow you to use the music libraries you have created in these third party applications.
You can access music and playlists. If available, Mixxx automatically loads the external libraries from their default
locations on your hard drive.
Note: Playing a track from an external library will add it to your Mixxx library.
Right-click on the iTunes icon in the Library tree and select Choose Library to load the iTunes Music
Library.xml from a different location. Select Use Default Library to reset.
• Right-click on a iTunes/Traktor/Rhythmbox/Banshee playlist and choose Import Playlist to import it to be a
regular Mixxx playlist.
• If you have an iTunes configuration file (*.xml) from a Windows or Mac partition mounted in Linux, you can
load it and use your iTunes tracks and playlists.
See also:
You can disable external libraries in Preferences → Library.
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Controlling Mixxx
Mixxx can be controlled with a keyboard, a mouse, MIDI/HID controllers, time-code records/CDs, or a combination
of these. The choice usually depends on your budget or style of DJing.
Using a Mouse and Touchpad
Use your mouse to interact with the controls in the Mixxx User Interface on your computer screen. You can perform
actions by pointing and clicking with your mouse.
• Single Left Click: Performing a left mouse click on buttons triggers the default action for that control. Moreover
if you click on a value in the track list of the Mixxx library, you can change the value. For example the year of
a track.
• Single Right Click: On most buttons, performing a right click triggers a different action than a left click. You
can return any knob or fader to its default value by right-clicking that control.
• Mouse Drag: Click on a knob or fader, hold the left mouse button and move your cursor to change the value of
the control. Use mouse drag to drop tracks from the file list to the decks, crates, playlists, etc.
• Mouse Wheel: Just like Mouse Drag, you can change knob and fader values by placing the cursor over the
control and moving the mouse wheel.
Hint: If you hover with the mouse over a control (e.g the crossfader) in the Mixxx user interface, the tooltip lists the
left- and right-click action respectively.
Hint: On a Macbook or a computer with a touchpad that lacks mouse buttons, a two-finger click gesture is often
treated as a right click.
See also:
Using the Mouse drag/wheel on the waveforms you can adjust zoom and playback rate of the tracks. For more
information, go to Waveform Displays.
Using a Keyboard
Controlling Mixxx with a keyboard is handy. Unlike mouse control, the keyboard allows you to manage things
simultaneously. For example, you can start playing a track on deck 1 whilst stopping deck 2 at the same time.
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Figure 7.1: Mixxx Keyboard shortcuts (for en-us keyboard layout)
Download the image
The default mapping for English keyboards is depicted in the figure above. It is divided into a left-hand side for deck
1 and right-hand side for deck 2. Please note that you can also access the functions through Mixxx’s interface.
For some user groups, like those using controllers or vinyl control, it might be useful to enable/disable the keyboard
mappings at runtime. You can do so by clicking Options → Enable Keyboard Shortcuts.
Hint: If you hover with the mouse over a control (e.g. the crossfader) in the Mixxx user interface, the tooltip lists the
keyboard shortcuts of the control among a description of the control.
See also:
For a list of default shortcuts, go to Keyboard mapping table.
Customizing the keyboard mapping
Mixxx allows you to customize the keyboard control. For more information, go to:
• Making a Custom Keyboard Mapping
Using MIDI/HID Controllers
Mixxx supports MIDI and HID controllers which are external hardware devices used to control audio applications.
Many DJs prefer the hands-on feel of a controller with Mixxx because it can feel similar to using a real mixer and
turntables or CDJ.
Loading a controller preset
Without loading the correct preset, your controller does not work with Mixxx.
1. Connect your controller(s) to your computer
2. Start Mixxx
3. Go to Preferences → Controllers
4. Select your device from the list of available devices on the left, and the right pane will change
5. Activate the Enabled checkbox
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Figure 7.2: Mixxx Preferences - Loading a controller preset
6. Select the mapping for your controller from the Presets drop-down menu
7. Click OK and Mixxx can now be controlled by your controller(s).
8. Repeat step 4-7 for any of the controllers you want to use
Hint: If you do not find a connected device in the list, make sure to install any necessary drivers for that device.
Supported controllers
Mixxx can use any MIDI/HID controller that is recognized by your OS (some may require drivers), as long as there is
a MIDI/HID mapping file to tell Mixxx how to understand it. Mixxx comes bundled with a number of mappings for
various devices. There are two levels of controller mappings:
• Mixxx Certified Mappings: These mappings are verified by the Mixxx Development Team.
• Community Supported Mappings: These mappings are provided and have been verified as working by the
Mixxx community, but the Mixxx Development Team is unable to verify their quality because we don’t have
the devices ourselves. They might have bugs or rough edges.
If you run into issues with any of these mappings, please file a bug report on our Bug Tracker or tell us about it on
our mailing list, forums, or IRC channel. Device support varies for each supported OS, so make sure to consult the
documentation of the device.
Hint: Additional mappings are available in the Controller presets forum.
See also:
Before purchasing a controller to use with Mixxx, consult our Hardware Compatibility wiki page. It contains the most
up-to-date information about which controllers work with Mixxx and the details of each.
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Installing a preset from the forum
To use a controller mapping that did not come bundled with Mixxx, place the controller mapping in your User Presets
folder. This is the folder called “controllers” inside your User Preferences folder. To open your User Presets folder,
go to Preferences → Controllers and click the Open User Preset Folder button. Alternatively, navigate to the folder in
your OS file browser:
• GNU/Linux: /home/<username>/.mixxx/controllers
• OS X: /Users/<username>/Library/Application Support/Mixxx/controllers
• Windows Vista and newer: C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Mixxx\controllers
• Windows XP: C:\Documents and Settings\<username>\AppData\controllers
On Windows, the AppData folder is hidden, so if you have not already, you will need to set Windows Explorer to
show hidden files and folders (how to do this varies with each version of Windows).
If the mapping was posted as a .zip file, first extract the .zip file by right clicking on it in your file browser and
selecting the option for extracting an archive or compressed folder. Copy the .xml file into your User Preset folder.
If there is a .js file, also copy that to your User Preset folder. Restart Mixxx and load the preset.
Map your own your controller
There is no mapping available for your controller or you want to change an existing mapping? You can map your
controller by using the Controller Wizard or take full control with the MIDI Scripting support in Mixxx.
See also:
Go to Adding support for your MIDI/HID Controller for detailed information.
Using Timecode Vinyl Records and CDs
Vinyl control allows a user to manipulate the playback of a track in Mixxx using a turntable or CDJ as an interface.
In effect, it simulates the sound and feel of having your digital music collection on vinyl. Many DJs prefer the tactile
feel of vinyl, and vinyl control allows that feel to be preserved while retaining the benefits of using digital audio.
See also:
Go to Vinyl Control for detailed information.
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Vinyl Control
Vinyl control allows a user to manipulate the playback of a track in Mixxx using a real turntable as a controller. In
effect, it simulates the sound and feel of having your digital music collection on vinyl. Many DJs prefer the tactile feel
of vinyl, and vinyl control allows that feel to be preserved while retaining the benefits of using digital audio.
How does it work?
Vinyl control uses special timecode records or CD’s which are placed on real turntables or CDJ. The audio output
of the turntables is plugged into a soundcard connected to a computer on which Mixxx is running. When a record
is played on one of the attached turntables, Mixxx reads the timecode from the record and uses the information to
manipulate whatever track is loaded.
What do I need to use it?
It is possible to use Mixxx’s vinyl control with a variety of setups. Unlike some proprietary DJ software, Mixxx can
use several types of timecode media and any soundcard that your operating system has drivers to use. Optionally, any
MIDI/HID controller can be used together with timecode control. The basic setups for timecode control are:
Setup 1: Vinyl DJ
2-4 timecode vinyls, 2-4 turntables with phono pre-amplifiers (or line-level output), and 2-4 stereo sound
inputs.
Your sound card inputs must match the turntable outputs. Turntables output very quiet phono-level outputs
that must be amplified for Mixxx to use. You should either find a sound card that has phono pre-amplifiers
built in (one for each deck), use standalone phono pre-amplifiers, or use turntables with built in phono
pre-amplifiers.
You can try skipping the phono pre-amps if you use the software pre-amp in Mixxx on the Vinyl Control
preferences pane. This may not work for everyone. Line-level signals are preferred and recommended.
For turntables a typical setup is depicted in the figure below. First, connect the RCA cables from the
turntables to the inputs on your sound card. Second, connect the outputs of your sound card to the inputs
on your mixer.
Note: Many modern turntables have a Line/Phono select switch. If yours does, make sure it matches the input or
switch setting on your sound card.
Setup 2: CDJ
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Figure 8.1: Using Mixxx together with turntables and external mixer
2-4 timecode CDs, 2-4 CD decks, and 2-4 stereo sound inputs.
Setting up CDJs for use with timecode CDs is similar to setting up turntables. The figure below outlines
a typical configuration. First, connect the RCA cables of the CDJs to inputs of your sound card. Second,
connect the inputs of your mixer to the outputs of your sound card. Make sure the input mode of your
sound card is set to Line.
Sound inputs
• It is recommended to use a proper DJ sound card that has multiple stereo line inputs on it.
• Alternatively you can use multiple sound cards, each with a single stereo line in, but this is strongly discouraged.
Mixxx supports vinyl control input through a single soundcard with at least 4-channels of input (two stereo line-in
jacks), or through multiple separate soundcards which each have 2-channels of input (a single stereo line-in jack).
Vinyl control requires the use of stereo line-in jacks - Mono or microphone inputs will not work.
It is strongly recommended to use a soundcard that comes with native low latency drivers such as ASIO (Windows) or
CoreAudio (Mac). Linux users depend on the quality of the corresponding open source driver.
Note: For best scratch performance with vinyl control, we recommend using a system capable of latencies of 10ms.
With higher latencies the scratch sound will start to become distorted.
Note: An external hardware mixer is not required for using timecode control. You can use a MIDI or HID controller
to mix in software instead.
Supported Timecode media
You can use any of the timecode media supported by Mixxx:
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Figure 8.2: Using Mixxx together with CDJs and external mixer
Type
Serato CV02 Vinyl
Serato CV02 CD
Traktor Scratch MK1 Vinyl
Traktor Scratch MK2 Vinyl
MixVibes DVS V2 Vinyl
Responsiveness
Very high
Very high
Very high
Not supported
Very high
At the present time, Serato records are recommended if you are looking to buy vinyl. If you want to use CDs, you can
download a free copy for personal use from Serato.
Configuring Input and Output devices
Mixxx can be controlled by up to 4 decks with either timecoded vinyl or timecoded CDs.
1. Open Preferences → Sound Hardware
2. Select the Input tab
3. From the Vinyl Control 1 - Vinyl Control 4 drop-down menus, select the soundcard(s) which your decks are
plugged into
4. In the channel selection drop-down menu, select the channel pairs corresponding to the plug on your soundcard
that your deck(s) are plugged into, typically Channels 1-2 and Channels 3-4 etc.
5. Click Apply to save the changes.
6. Select the Output tab
7. Specify Deck 1 - Deck 4 to route Mixxx’s output directly to the external mixer
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Figure 8.3: Mixxx preferences - Setting up Input and Output devices for Vinyl Control
8. Click Apply to save the changes.
Configuring Vinyl Control
You can configure vinyl control in Preferences → Vinyl Control.
Turntable Input Preamp
Many turntables provide unamplified “phono level” output which must be boosted to a “line level” signal. Normally,
a mixer or soundcard provides this amplification, but if you’re plugging a turntable’s phono output directly into a
soundcard that doesn’t support phono input, Mixxx can do the amplification. The Turntable Input Preamp slider
allows you to adjust the level of preamplification applied to your decks’ signal. However it is always preferable to use
a proper phono preamplifier if you have one.
Vinyl Configuration
• Vinyl Type: Several types of timecoded media can be used to control Mixxx. Configure the drop-down menus
to match what type of timecoded media you are using on your decks.
• Deck Vinyl Tempo: Change this if you prefer to scratch with your turntable or CDJ set at 45 RPM, default is
33 RPM.
• Lead-in Time: Allows you to set a dead-zone at the start of your vinyl or CD, where the time code will be
ignored. This is useful in situations where the time code begins very close to the edge of a vinyl which can
make back-cueing over the first beat in a track tricky to do without your turntable’s needle falling off the vinyl.
Setting a lead-in time of 20 seconds or more helps alleviate this by giving you more room on the vinyl to cue
with. It’s also useful when you’ve worn the grooves at the edge of a control record to the point that it no longer
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Figure 8.4: Mixxx preferences - Setting up vinyl control
works reliably: you simply set the lead-in so that the start of the tracks begin in good groove area. You can keep
doing this until you run out of groove area, thereby decreasing your record replacement frequency.
• Show Signal Quality in Skins: If enabled, a circular representation of the incoming timecode signal is displayed
in real-time on the Vinyl Widget in the Mixxx Interface.
Hint: Although not recommended, you can use different kinds of timecode media per deck.
Control Mode
Mixxx has three control modes regardless of which control records you use.
• Absolute Mode: Provides Mixxx with both pitch and position information from the timecode, and allows you
to seek by needle dropping on your vinyl or seeking on your CDJ.
• Relative Mode: Takes the position to be relative to your deck’s starting point, and only controls the pitch in
Mixxx. It is not possible to seek using your deck in relative mode, with one exception. If you drop the needle
in the Lead-in Time area (see Vinyl Configuration), Mixxx will seek back to the beginning of the track. Once
a track is playing in Relative Mode, Mixxx will not allow you to select Absolute mode. Otherwise, the track
would suddenly jump to a new position. Make sure the record is stopped and then you’re free to select Absolute
mode.
• Constant Mode: This special mode is usually only activated when Mixxx needs to keep playing a track even if
the vinyl control signal isn’t present. Constant mode is automatically enabled when the needle reaches the end
of a vinyl control record.
Cueing Modes
Mixxx has two optional cueing modes for vinyl control which only apply to Relative Mode. These modes are useful
for quickly seeking to specific positions in a track without touching the laptop. Turntablists often need to find a break
or a vocal sample, and cueing modes make these easy to find.
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• Cue: In this mode, when you drop the needle on the record after the Cue point, Mixxx will seek to that cue
point.
• Hot Cue: When the needle is dropped Mixxx will seek to the nearest hotcue point, working backwards. So
if you have a hotcue at the one-minute mark, and another at the two-minute mark, you can drop the needle
anywhere between one and two minutes and Mixxx will seek to the one-minute hotcue.
Hint: You can change the Control and Cueing Modes directly in the Mixxx user interface while mixing, go to Vinyl
Control Mode and Cueing controls. Alternatively, use the Application shortcuts.
Signal Quality
A successful vinyl control setup hinges on good signal quality. Many factors can affect signal quality, but the most
important one is ensuring the volume level of your timecode signal is moderate. A signal that is too loud or too quiet
will cause adverse performance, often characterized by a loss of position data causing absolute mode to behave like
relative mode.
Mixxx represents the quality of the timecode signal as a circular graphic coming from the vinyl control audio itself.
The graphs correspond to your active input devices Deck 1 - Deck 4 .
If your vinyl signal is working, you should see a round, green circle drawn with two lines. This vinyl “doughnut”
should be as circular as possible, and the lines should be clear with a minimum amount of fuzz.
Hint: You can display the signal quality in the Mixxx user interface while mixing, see Configuring Input and Output
devices .
Enabling Vinyl Control
For each deck, select Options → Vinyl Control → Enable Vinyl Control, or use the Application shortcuts.
Vinyl Control Status Display
Figure 8.5: The vinyl control status, and signal quality display of the deck
A rectangle provides visual feedback with regards to vinyl control status of a deck.
• Off: Vinyl control disabled on the deck.
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• Green: Vinyl control is enabled on the deck.
• Yellow: The needle has reached End-Of-Record.
Single Deck Control
If you only have one turntable, you can still use Mixxx to play your sets. In the Preferences → Sound Hardware →
Input tab, use the same audio input for both Vinyl Control decks.
When mixing, you’ll have one track playing automatically while the other is controlled by the turntable. Start by
enabling vinyl control on the first deck, and start mixing. When you’re ready to cue up the next record, just disable
vinyl control on the first deck and enable it on the second deck. Playback will continue on the first deck without
interruption. Cue up the second track and mix it in. When you’re ready to cue the first deck again, just toggle the
second deck off and the first deck on again.
Use the Application shortcuts to swap focus from one deck to the other. Alternatively, select Vinyl → Single Deck
mode in the Controller Wizard, to assign the control to a key on your controller.
End-Of-Record Mode
Sometimes the track you are playing is longer than the timecode area on your record. If the needle reaches the end of
the vinyl timecode, Mixxx will enter a special End-Of-Record Mode. When this happens, the vinyl indicator (usually
a green rectangle) will blink yellow as a warning. At the same time, Mixxx will automatically enable Constant Mode
and will ignore the turntable’s pitch. At this point the track will simply continue playing until the end. When you load
a new track, End-Of-Record Mode will be automatically disabled and Constant Mode turned off.
When you’re in End-Of-Record Mode and you want to still use the turntable for pitch control, simply lift the needle
and place it anywhere in the main timecode area. It’s OK, the track won’t stop playing. As soon as Mixxx detects that
the needle has settled, it will automatically switch to Relative Mode.
Control Track
Some vinyl control records have a special portion of grooves near the center of the record for selecting and loading
tracks in the user interface. You can see these grooves because there is a gap between the main timecode area and the
inner circle. Some control records have not been tested with Mixxx, and their control areas are not supported. Serato
CV02 Vinyl and Traktor Vinyl MK1 are known to work. Serato CV02 CDs are known not to work.
Just drop the needle in the control area and let the record play forward or backward. The highlighted row in the library
should move up or down. Simply lift the needle and drop it anywhere in the main timecode area to load the track.
Troubleshooting
Configuration
To complete your setup you must configure Mixxx properly. Make sure you have:
• specified Deck 1 - Deck 4 in Preferences → Sound Hardware to route Mixxx’s output directly to the external
mixer
• specified Vinyl Control 1 - Vinyl Control 4 under Preferences → Sound Hardware → Input
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• selected the correct control type under Preferences → Vinyl Control → Vinyl type in the preferences. See the list
of Supported Timecode media
• enabled vinyl control via the menu under Options -> Vinyl Control → Enable Vinyl Control.
Signal Quality
The graph is displayed in Preferences → Vinyl Control, see Signal Quality.
Signal
Meaning
Troubleshooting
Vinyl control input channels not correctly set up.
Vinyl control will not work.
Open Preferences/ Sound Hardware and set up
the devices you want to use, see Configuring
Input and Output devices
Vinyl control input channels set up correctly.
Waiting for timecode input signal.
Start your turntable or CDJ with the selected
timecode vinyl or CD.
Nearly perfect green doughnut about about half
the width of the graph. Rotating radar sweeps in
the direction your record on the turntable is
spinning.
Everything is OK, nothing to do. Go spin some
beats.
Incorrect choice of vinyl control source.
Doughnut looks good but has a solid red color.
Select the correct vinyl type in the preferences.
E.g. maybe you selected side B of the Serato
Vinyl but your record is on side A.
Input signal is bad. As the vinyl signal gets
worse, you’ll see the color of the doughnut
change from green over orange to red.
Check the wiring / grounding on your turntable /
CDJ. You timecode record / CD might be worn
out or the needle on your turntable is dirty.
Wrong direction. The green doughnut looks good
but the radar sweeps in the opposite direction of
the record on your turntable / CDJ.
You probably have a wiring problem. Try
reversing the left and right inputs on your
turntable. You may also have to rewire the
headshell.
Input signal is no timecode signal. Mixxx
receives a normal audio signal while it expects a
timecode signal.
Start your turntable or CDJ with the selected
timecode vinyl or CD. You may want to check if
the inputs devices are set up correctly in the
preferences.
Left or right channel is missing. Mixxx receives
only a mono signal but needs a stereo timecode
signal to operate.
Check the wiring on your turntable / CDJ and
also the headshell and needle on your turntable.
Timecode signal too loud. Mixxx receives a
signal which has too much amplification.
Lower the amplification, either on your external
Mixer, soundcard or with the Turntable Input
Preamp
Timecode signal too quiet. Mixxx receives a
signal which has not enough amplification.
Boost the amplification, either on your external
Mixer, soundcard or with the Turntable Input
Preamp
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CHAPTER 9
Live Broadcasting - Start your own Internet radio
Live Broadcasting in Mixxx allow you to stream your mix over the Internet to listeners around the world.
Streaming Servers
Remote streaming server Mixxx allows you to feed your audio stream directly to Shoutcast and Icecast streaming
servers. Depending on the number of listeners, streaming audio requires a significant amount of bandwidth.
Streaming servers provide the required bandwidth and broadcast the stream to your listeners. A popular free
streaming service is Caster.fm. A review of several free and paid stream hosts is available at broadcastingworld.net.
Figure 9.1: Mixxx as client-side streaming source broadcasting to an remote streaming server
Internet
Mixxx
Lan
Router
Internet
StreamingServer
Internet
Internet
Listener1
Listener2
Listener3
Local streaming server For experienced users, it may be interesting to set up your own local streaming server. This
turns your personal computer into a radio station and listeners connect directly to your server. Mixxx as a
streaming source does not need to run on the same computer as your streaming server. However, professional
stations often run the streaming source on the same computer as the streaming server for stability and reliability
reasons. Keep in mind that if want to stream audio to a significant number of listeners, you’ll need enough
bandwidth. Read the Shoutcast documentation or Icecast documentation for server setup instructions.
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Figure 9.2: Mixxx as client-side streaming source broadcasting to an local streaming server
Internet
Mixxx
StreamingServer
Lan
Router
Internet
Internet
Listener1
Listener2
Listener3
Configuring Mixxx
Start by supplying Mixxx with all information needed to establish a connection to the streaming server:
• Open Preferences → Live Broadcasting.
• Insert the settings following the descriptions in the Live Broadcasting Preferences
• Click OK
• Go to Options → Enable Live Broadcasting or use the Application shortcuts to start broadcasting.
Live Broadcasting Preferences
Server Connection
• Type: Select the type of streaming server you want to connect with. Shoutcast 1, Icecast 1, and Icecast 2 servers
are supported.
• Host: You can enter the host as either a host name or an IP address.
• Login: As provided by your streaming server provider. Without this, you will not connect successfully to the
server. The default login for Icecast is source while the default login for Shoutcast is admin.
• Mount: A mount point is a unique name identifying a particular stream. For Shoutcast it is not necessary to
specify a mount point. The setting must not be blank if you are using Icecast. Try the default /mount or
/live. If you haven’t been given a specific mount point you can usually make one up. It always begins with a
/ (slash) followed by a text without any special characters in it.
• Port: As provided by your streaming server provider. Most servers use the default port 8000.
• Password: As provided by your streaming server provider, unless you run your own radio server. It is required
to establish the connection to the server and to start the broadcast.
Warning: Do not enter a URL as the host! http://example.com:8000 does not work. Use example.com
in the Host field and 8000 in the Port field instead.
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Figure 9.3: Mixxx preferences - Setting up live broadcasting
Stream Setting
New in version 2.0: Dynamically update Ogg Vorbis metadata option
• Public stream: If enabled, this option adds your radio station to the Shoutcast/Icecast directory.
• Enable UTF-8 metadata: If enabled, this option fixes broken accented and foreign language symbols in metadata, assuming the streaming provider has configured the server to support UTF-8 metadata.
• Dynamically update Ogg Vorbis metadata: Due to flaws in some streaming clients, updating Ogg Vorbis
metadata dynamically can cause listener glitches and disconnections. Check this box to update the metadata
anyway.
• Stream name: So, what’s the name of your show?
• Website: The website you would like your listeners to visit.
• Description: Enter your DJ name and a short tagline.
• Genre: List the main genres you play. This attracts search hits on stream directories. Genre must not be blank.
Encoding
• Bitrate: Selecting a bitrate of 128 or 160 kbps is common and provides sufficient quality to your listeners.
Higher bitrates will use a larger chunk in your Internet connection bandwidth to stream and for your listeners to
receive the stream.
• Format: Mixxx supports streaming to Icecast servers either in MP3 or Ogg Vorbis format, streaming to Shoutcast servers is supported in MP3 format.
Shoutcast metadata format
New in version 2.0.
This allows to set custom metatdata formats for the Shoutcast title field. Previously only artist title was allowed. For example if you were broadcasting as part of a station, you could add the
station’s name or the presenter’s name in the title: MyStation | $artist - $title. Or if you
were doing a live mix with several artists, you could have: Live mix by MyName - currently
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playing: $artist. Or even if you wanted a very unusual format: Hey, I like $artist,
here is $title by $artist.
The changes do not affect the case for the combination of OGG/Icecast2.
Custom metadata
By default, Mixxx broadcasts artist and title information of the files that you play to your listeners. You
can disable this feature and use your own custom metadata.
• Enable custom metadata: Toggles custom metadata on and off.
• Artist: Insert your custom artist metadata here, your DJ name for example.
• Title: Insert your custom title metadata here.
Note: Due to licensing restrictions, MP3 streaming is not enabled by default. For information on how to enable MP3
streaming, go to the chapter Activate MP3 streaming support.
Icecast vs. Shoutcast
Both essentially serve the same purpose. An Icecast server can stream either MP3 or Ogg Vorbis. However, although
Ogg is more efficient and effective (you get higher-fidelity sound than MP3 at lower data rates) not all players can
play Ogg streams. As a result MP3 is probably a safe choice unless you know your listeners can hear an Ogg stream
successfully.
Broadcast directories
Generally your streaming server host adds your radio station to the Shoutcast/Icecast directory, if you enable the Public
Stream option in Preferences → Live Broadcasting → Stream Settings.
• Shoutcast radio directory: www.shoutcast.com
• Icecast radio directory: dir.xiph.org
Often streaming hosts will run their own directories. Check your host’s FAQ to find out. If you want to promote your
streaming radio station even more, register at services like streamfinder.com. An overview of different internet radio
directories is available at shoutcheap.com
Troubleshooting
• If you have trouble connecting to your streaming server, check the configuration in the Live Broadcasting Preferences.
• You may need the LAME libraries to stream in MP3. See Activate MP3 streaming support.
• You may have selected the Ogg Vorbis format that is unsupported by Shoutcast servers.
• You may need to check your firewall settings. Both Icecast and Shoutcast use two ports. If you are streaming
on a port (for example, port 8000) then you need to open up the next port (port 8001) as well.
• You may need to configure port forwarding if you are behind a router or your router will block requests to your
streaming port (for example, port 8000)
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Activate MP3 streaming support
Due to licensing restrictions, MP3 streaming is not enabled by default. In order to enable MP3 streaming you must
install the LAME MP3 codec yourself. The following section explains how you can do that.
Hint: If you have activated MP3 streaming support, you’ll be also able to record your mixes in MP3 format. Go to
the chapter Recording Your Mix for more information.
Activate MP3 streaming support on Windows
To activate MP3 streaming on Windows, follow these steps:
1. Download LAME 3.98.4 binaries from http://www.rarewares.org/mp3-lame-libraries.php.
Hint: The download page includes 32-bit and 64-bit versions. Make sure the version you download matches
the version of Mixxx that you use, not the version of Windows. If you are on 64bit Windows but are using 32bit
Mixxx, you need the 32bit (“x86”) version of the LAME binaries.
2. Unpack the downloaded archive. You need a utility for manipulating archives like the free 7zip.
3. Copy libmp3lame.dll to the location you have installed Mixxx,
Files\Mixxx\.
probably C:\Program
4. Only if you are running Mixxx 1.11 or earlier, you must also rename libmp3lame.dll to lame_enc.dll
in the folder where you have installed Mixxx. Select Help → About to find out your version of Mixxx.
5. Restart Mixxx
Windows Troubleshooting
• Double check that the version of LAME you use (“x86” = 32-bit vs. “x64” = 64-bit) matches the version of
Mixxx you use.
• If you are running Mixxx 1.11 or earlier, did you rename the libmp3lame.dll to lame_enc.dll?
• Make sure you put the correct LAME *.dll file in the same folder that contains the installation of Mixxx you
are using.
Warning: Some websites like Audacity provide lame binaries too. Do not use these versions or Mixxx will show
an error when activating live broadcasting and your stream will fail.
Activate MP3 streaming support on Mac OS X
Method A: Download
To activate MP3 streaming on Mac OS X, follow these steps:
1. Download LAME 3.98.4 Intel (Mac OS X 10.5+ 32-bit & 64-bit)
2. Double-click on the downloaded zip file to unpack the file and you’ll get an installer package file
3. Double-click on the installer package file and follow the step-by-step instructions in the installer
4. Restart Mixxx
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Method B: Package manager
Another easy way to activate MP3 streaming is to use Homebrew or MacPorts, which are package managers like apt
on Debian/Ubuntu Linux. They provide a convenient way to install many Open Source packages. Once Homebrew or
Macports is installed, adding MP3 support to Mixxx is rather simple.
Homebrew:
1. Open a terminal and type the following commands:
brew install lame
2. Restart Mixxx
Macports:
1. Open a terminal and type the following commands:
sudo port install lame
2. Restart Mixxx
Activate MP3 streaming support on Linux
On Ubuntu and GNU/Linux-based operating systems MP3 streams can be activated by installing the package
libmp3lame. Dependent on your Linux distribution the package might be slightly named different such as lame.
1. Open a terminal and type the following commands:
sudo apt-get install libmp3lame0
2. Restart Mixxx
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CHAPTER 10
DJing With Mixxx
Mixxx was designed to be easy to learn for both novice and experienced DJs.
This part of the manual provides you with directions for using Mixxx’s features to create your own mixes.
Setting Your Levels Properly (Gain Staging)
Setting your levels properly, also known as gain staging, is essential for getting the best sound quality out of the
equipment you are using. At every link in your signal chain, from Mixxx’s channel gains to the power amplifier, the
level should be well above the noise floor, but lower than the maximum level before the signal clips. The level meters
should mostly be around the top of their green region. The level meter pictured to the left shows where Mixxx’s level
meters should average at the loudest parts of tracks. The average level should not be in the yellow region. Use the
yellow region to leave headroom, or available level above the average before the signal clips. The loudest parts of the
music (the transients) should briefly go into the yellow region.
Figure 10.1: A waveform at a good level. Note that the example waveforms in this section were made by adjusting
the visual gain of the waveform display in Mixxx to illustrate the concepts. Adjusting the visual gain of the waveform
display does not change the level of the audio.
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If a level meter is in its red region, the signal is clipping and the gain should be turned down. Some equipment
doesn’t have a level meter and only has an LED that turns on when the signal clips. Clipping means that the peaks
of the waveform are flattened because the equipment has reached the maximum level that it can amplify the signal to.
This distorts sound in an unpleasant way and can damage equipment by driving it with more power than it is designed
to handle. Increasing the gain past the point where clipping begins (further into the red on a meter) will distort the
signal more. If you want to make the sound louder when every part of the signal chain is at its maximum without
clipping, use more speakers or use speakers that are more sensitive and convert electrical energy into acoustic energy
more efficiently.
Figure 10.2: A clipping waveform
On the other hand, the signal should not be too low. This is because every audio device generates a little noise at a
level referred to as its noise floor. Additionally, analog signals pick up noise as they travel along wires. The signal
measured by the meter on the left is relatively close to the noise floor. When a device is turned up, the noise floor does
not go up; only the signal does. However, every time the signal is amplified by the gain of another piece of equipment,
both the noise and the signal from previous devices in the signal chain are amplified. For example, if your sound card
is turned down and you turn the gain up on your mixer to compensate, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the sound
card output will be low and the mixer’s gain will amplify the signal and the noise from the sound card, plus the noise
picked up along the wire. The end result will have more noise than if the output of the sound card was turned up before
the signal reached the mixer and the mixer’s gain did not have to be turned up.
Figure 10.3: A waveform that is too close to the noise floor
Note: To adjust the output volume of a sound system while maintaing a high signal-to-noise ratio, the gain should be adjusted as
close to the speakers as possible. Refer to the Gain Knob section for details.
Beatmatching and Mixing
Beatmatching is the process of adjusting the playback rate of a track so that it matches the tempo of another track.
Beatmatching also involves adjusting the phase of the beats in a track so that they are aligned with the beats in the
other track. Matching the tempo and aligning the beats are the two things a DJ must do to beatmatch.
Mixxx can match the tempo and align the beats for you but this requires an accurately detected BPM value and a
correct beat grid for both tracks. To enable this feature, tap the SYNC button. To beatmatch manually, the tempo of
the two tracks must be synchronized by adjusting the playback rate sliders. You can adjust the phase of the beats by
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right-clicking and dragging on either waveform display to temporarily speed up or slow down one of the tracks until
the beats are aligned. The temporary pitch bend buttons can also be used to momentarily adjust the playback rate,
allowing you to “shuffle” the beats in a track forwards or backwards, so they can be aligned with another track. See
the chapter Sync and Rate Controls.
Two tracks are beatmatched once their tempos are matched and their beats are aligned. A “perfect” beatmatch is nearly
impossible - there will always be a tiny difference in the playback rates. A keen DJ will keep his or her ears open and
listen for the beats drifting out of alignment. This has a distinct “double bass kick” sound which is often preceded by
the kick weakening in intensity as the two kicks drift out of phase. When this happens, the beats can be realigned by
simply tapping one of the temporary pitch bend buttons a few times in the appropriate direction.
Master Sync
New in version 2.0.
Master Sync is an intelligent assistant that allows you to leave the beatmatching to Mixxx so you can focus on track
selection, effects manipulation, looping, 4 deck mixing, and other advanced DJing techniques.
To activate Master Sync on a deck, push and hold (or click and hold) the SYNC button. You’ll know Master Sync is
on because the sync button will remain lit. Changing the rate of any deck that has Sync lit will change the rates of all
other decks that also have the Sync button lit. There is no need to set specific decks to be a master or followers. You
can play, stop, eject, load, and queue any track with master sync and it won’t interrupt the playback of the other decks.
However, changing the rate of a stopped deck will change the rate of playing decks.
Master Sync will also notice if one of your tracks is double the BPM of another track and match them correctly. So
if you want to mix a 140 BPM drum & bass track with a 70 bpm dubstep track, Master Sync will make sure they are
lined up properly.
Hint: Usually, Master Sync will only make sure the rate sliders are set correctly. If you also want to make sure your
beats are perfectly in sync, turn on the QUANTIZE button. When activated, Quantize will ensure that the beats are
perfectly lined up as well.
Harmonic Mixing
Harmonic mixing is a technique to mix songs with matching melodies and harmonies. To learn more about harmonic
mixing you might want to check out the mixshare site.
Mixxx has two features to help you with harmonic mixing. The first is a key lock. When it is active changing the speed
of a track won’t affect the key. To enable key lock, click the key lock button in the Deck Options Button Grid. The
second is that Mixxx can automatically detect the key of a track and will display it in the library and the decks. The
notation which is used to display a key can be changed in Key Detection Preferences.
Using Effects
New in version 2.0.
Mixxx comes with a set of native effects.
Flanger
This effect applies a “sweeping” sound to the channel and can add extra depth to a mix when used tactfully.
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Figure 10.4: Flanger controls
FX Button The FX (“Effects”) button enables a built-in flanger effect on the selected channel.
Delay/Depth/LFO Knobs Adjusts the phase delay, intensity and the wavelength of the flange effect.
Hint: For the most noticeable effect, enable the FX button and turn the Depth knob completely to the right.
BitCrusher
chapters/../_static/Mixxx-112-LateNight-Effects-BitCrushe
Figure 10.5: BitCrusher controls
The BitCrusher is an effect that adds quantization noise to the signal by the reduction of the resolution or bandwidth
of the samples.
Bit Depth Adjusts the bit depth of the samples.
Downsampling Adjusts the sample rate to which the signal is downsampled.
Filter
chapters/../_static/Mixxx-112-LateNight-Effects-Filter.pn
Figure 10.6: Filter controls
The filter changes the tone of the music by allowing only high or low frequencies to pass through.
LPF Corner frequency ratio of the low pass filter.
Q Resonance of the filters, default = Flat top.
HPF Corner frequency ratio of the high pass filter.
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chapters/../_static/Mixxx-112-LateNight-Effects-Reverb.pn
Figure 10.7: Reverb controls
Reverb
This is a port of the GPL’ed CAPS Reverb plugin, which has the following description: This is based on some of the
famous Stanford CCRMA reverbs (NRev, KipRev) all based on the Chowning/Moorer/Schroeder reverberators, which
use networks of simple allpass and comb delay filters.
Bandwidth Higher bandwidth values cause more bright (high-frequency) tones to be included.
Damping Higher damping values cause reverberations to die out more quickly.
Note: This effect is not available in the Mac App Store version of Mixxx.
Echo
chapters/../_static/Mixxx-112-LateNight-Effects-Echo.png
Figure 10.8: Echo controls
Simple Echo with pingpong
Send How much of the signal to send into the delay buffer.
Delay Delay time in seconds.
Feedback Amount the echo fades each time it loops.
PingPong As the ping-pong amount increases, increasing amounts of the echoed signal is bounced between the left
and right speakers.
Recording Your Mix
With the integrated recording feature you can record your mix as an audio file and listen to it later, distribute it as
a Podcast or burn it to CD. Mixxx records the master output - the audio you hear from the speakers including the
microphone.
Mixxx can record your mix in various audio formats and quality settings. You can split your recordings, generate cue
files, choose a custom recording directory and even set your own metadata. By default, Mixxx saves your recordings
as lossless wav files to a Mixxx/Recordings sub-folder in the Mixxx music directory. Before you start recording,
we recommend that you adjust the settings in Preferences → Recording.
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Figure 10.9: Mixxx library - Recordings view
If you click on the Recordings icon in the sidebar of the Mixxx library, the track table to the right displays the content
of your recordings directory. New recordings are automatically saved to this directory as well as CUE files if you
choose to create them in the preferences.
Hint: Recording your mixes and listening to them later to critique yourself is a great tool for improving your DJing
skills. Sending your mixes to other DJs for feedback can also be helpful.
Record your mix to disk
New in version 2.0: Displays the duration of the recording.
• Click on the Recordings icon in the sidebar to switch to the Recordings view
• Click the Start Recording button or click Options → Record Mix in the menu on top of the Mixxx application
window.
• The display above the track table shows how much data has already been recorded, as well as the duration of
the recording.
• Perform your mix
• Click the Stop Recording button to stop the recording when the mix has finished.
Hint: You can instantly play your recording as a track in Mixxx. Simply drag-and-drop the track to a deck.
Using Auto DJ For Automatic Mixing
New in version 2.0: Add random tracks from Auto DJ track sources
Auto DJ allows you to automatically load tracks from the Auto DJ playlist when the current track is nearly finished,
and crossfade into it. See Auto DJ - Automate your mix.
Loading tracks into Auto DJ
To play tracks automatically, they must first be loaded into the Auto DJ playlist. The Auto DJ playlist is empty by
default.
There are several ways to load tracks into the Auto DJ playlist:
10.7. Using Auto DJ For Automatic Mixing
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Figure 10.10: Mixxx library - Auto DJ view
Figure 10.11: Mixxx library - Adding a playlist to Auto DJ
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• Select single or multiple tracks from the library, a regular playlist or crate and drag them to the Auto DJ icon on
the left.
• Select a regular playlist or crate, right-click with the mouse and select Add to Auto DJ from the mouse menu.
This adds all tracks to Auto DJ.
• While in the Auto DJ view of the library, drag tracks from external file managers to the Auto DJ icon in the
sidebar or to the Auto DJ track table on the right.
Using Auto DJ crates
Instead of inserting the contents of the crates directly into the Auto DJ playlist, Auto DJ crates are associated crates
that become a source of random track selections.
• Add a crate to the Auto DJ track sources: Expand the Auto DJ item in the sidebar, and right-click on the
Crates sub-item. Select one of the existing crates from the list. This makes the content of the crate available for
random selection into the Auto DJ queue for automatic mixing. The name of the crate is now listed as sub-item
below.
If you do not have any crates available for selection in the list, go and create a crate first and add some tracks,
see Crates - Working with track collections.
• Manually add tracks from track sources to Auto DJ: Click the Auto DJ item in the sidebar and switch to
the Auto DJ view of the library. Click the Add random button to add one track at the time from Auto DJ track
sources to the bottom of the Auto DJ playlist.
Note: If you did not set any crates as an Auto DJ track source, clicking the Add Random button will add a
randomly selected track from the whole library instead.
• Automatically add tracks from track sources to Auto DJ: Mixxx can randomly add tracks to the Auto DJ
playlist from track sources as soon as a specified minumum number of tracks remain. Select Preferences →
Auto DJ → Enable random track addition to queue → On. Set Minimum allowed tracks before addition to
change the minimum number of tracks after which random tracks may be added.
Note: If you did not set any crates as an Auto DJ track source, tracks are selected from the whole library
instead.
• Remove a crate from the Auto DJ track sources: Expand the Auto DJ item in the sidebar, and right-click on
one of the crates listed below the Crates sub-item. Select Remove Crate as Track Source to remove the crate
from the Auto DJ track sources.
Playing tracks in Auto DJ
Now that you have loaded tracks into the Auto DJ playlist, you can activate Auto DJ as follows:
• Click on the Auto DJ icon in the sidebar to switch to the Auto DJ view of the library.
• Click the Enable Auto DJ button.
• The first tracks from your list are loaded into the decks and the playback starts.
• Mixxx will continue to automatically mix until the Auto DJ playlist is empty.
• Click the Disable Auto DJ button to stop the automatic mixing
Hint: You can add a track to the end of the Auto DJ playlist once it is played instead of removing it. Set Preferences
→ Auto DJ → Re-queue tracks after playback → On.
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10.7. Using Auto DJ For Automatic Mixing
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CHAPTER 11
Advanced Topics
Adding support for your MIDI/HID Controller
With several dozens of DJ controllers supported out-of-the-box, Mixxx gives you comprehensive hardware control for
your DJ mixes, see Using MIDI/HID Controllers.
Support for additional devices can be added to Mixxx by creating a new preset file. This file tells Mixxx how to
translate, or map, MIDI/HID messages from a controller into commands that Mixxx understands.
You can download and share custom controller presets in the Mixxx User customizations forums.
Controller Wizard
Figure 11.1: Mixxx Controller Wizard - Mapping a control
By far, the easiest way to create a new MIDI preset is by using the Controller Wizard.
1. Connect your controller(s) to your computer
2. Start Mixxx
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3. Go to Preferences → Controllers
4. Select your device from the list of available devices on the left, and the right pane will change
5. Activate the Enabled checkbox
6. Click on Learning Wizard to open the selection dialog
7. Click any control in the Mixxx GUI
8. Alternatively, click the Choose Control button and choose one from the selection list
9. Push Learn and then move a control or push a button on your controller to map it. You can also move a control
without pushing the Learn button if you are learning many controls.
10. If you are learning a button, just push it once. If you are learning a knob or a slider, try to move it throughout its
range.
11. After Mixxx detects the control, you may click Learn Another or you can click on another button in the Mixxx
GUI to learn another control.
12. When you are finished mapping controls, click Done
There are also some advanced options in the Midi Wizard you may need to use:
• Soft Takeover: Use this option for knobs or sliders to avoid sudden jumps in when the knob in the GUI doesn’t
match the physical knob. If you select this option, you won’t be able to perform super-fast motions as easily.
(Recommended off)
• Invert: Use this option for controls that you want to work backwards from how they were detected.
• Switch Mode: Use this option on controllers that have controls that act like switches and emit one value on the
first press, and a different value on the next press. (Think an actual hardware toggle switch, or a button that
lights up on the first press and turns off on the second press).
• Jog Wheel / Select Knob: Use this for knobs that don’t have a beginning or an end, but spin continuously.
The Controller wizard saves the new preset to the following file paths:
• Linux: /home/<username>/.mixxx/controllers
• Mac OS X: /Users/<username>/Library/ApplicationSupport/Mixxx/controllers
• Windows: %LOCALAPPDATA%\Mixxx\controllers
You can then modify the XML file it creates (or any of the ones that ship with Mixxx) if you’d like to fine-tune it or
add more presets. For more information, go to http://mixxx.org/wiki/doku.php/midi_controller_mapping_file_format.
The Controller Wizard works only for MIDI devices. Currently you can’t map modifier (shift) keys and platter rotations. Use MIDI Scripting instead.
MIDI Scripting
In order to support the advanced features of many MIDI/HID controllers, Mixxx offers what we call MIDI Scripting.
It enables MIDI controls to be mapped to QtScript (aka Javascript/EMCAScript) functions stored in function library
files, freeing Mixxx from a one-to-one MIDI mapping ideology. These user-created functions can then do anything
desired with the MIDI event such as have a single controller button simultaneously affect two or more Mixxx properties
(“controls”), adjust incoming control values to work better with Mixxx (scratching), display a complex LED sequence,
or even send messages to text displays on the controller.
For
more
information,
go
to
http://mixxx.org/wiki/doku.php/hid_mapping_format.
11.1. Adding support for your MIDI/HID Controller
http://mixxx.org/wiki/doku.php/midi_scripting
and
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Making a Custom Keyboard Mapping
The default keyboard mappings are defined in a text file which can be found at the following location:
• Linux: /usr/local/share/mixxx/keyboard/en_US.kbd.cfg
• Mac OS X: /Applications/Mixxx.app/Contents/Resources/keyboard/en_US.kbd.cfg
• Windows: <Mixxx installation directory>\keyboard\en_US.kbd.cfg
Depending on your system’s language settings, Mixxx might use a different file as default, e.g. de_DE.kbd.cfg
for German or es_ES.kbd.cfg for Spanish.
It is not recommended that you modify the system-wide keyboard mapping file because all your changes may be lost
if you uninstall or upgrade Mixxx. Instead, copy the default mapping file to the following location:
• Linux: ~/.mixxx/Custom.kbd.cfg
• Mac OS X: ~/Library/ApplicationSupport/Mixxx/Custom.kbd.cfg
• Windows: %LOCALAPPDATA%\Mixxx\Custom.kbd.cfg
Then edit this file and save the changes. On the next startup, Mixxx will check if Custom.kbd.cfg is present and
load that file instead of the default mapping file. This has the advantage that you can always revert back to the default
mapping by deleting Custom.kbd.cfg.
For a list of controls that can be used in a keyboard mapping, see http://www.mixxx.org/wiki/doku.php/mixxxcontrols.
You can download and share custom keyboard mappings in the Mixxx User customizations forums.
Additional Effects via external Mixer Mode
Mixxx comes with a set of native effects. Additionally, using the external mixer mode you can route each deck directly
to 3rd party effect hosts.
The following examples are only intended to encourage experimentation, they are not definitive guidance.
Effects via AU Lab on Mac OS X
On Mac OS X there is a simple and free way to give Mixxx access to the collection of AU/VST/MAS plugins that are
installed on your system.
• Install the free Soundflower, a system extension for inter-application audio routing.
• Download AU Lab.app standalone from Apple (you will need an free Apple Developer Login though), go to the
Downloads for Developers page and search for “AU Lab” to get it.
In Mixxx
• Go to Preferences → Sound Hardware→ Output
• Select for Deck 1 the Soundflower 16 device with Channel 1-2
• Select for Deck 2 the Soundflower 16 device with Channel 3-4
• Click the Apply button
In AU Lab
• Click on the + button to create a new configuration
• Add 2 stereo input tracks in the Audio Input Tab
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Figure 11.2: The Au Lab routing for external effects on Mac OS X
• Add 2 stereo output tracks in the Audio Output Tab
• Click OK
• Change the audio input device to Soundflower 16
• Change the audio output device for example to Built-in Output
• Click Create document
• In the Output 1 channel, select an effect from the drop-down menu, for example Apple > AUCompressor
The effect should now react if you play a track in Mixxx.
Effects via JACK Rack on GNU/Linux
Use Jack to route each deck directly through JACK Rack effect racks, or for more control you can use Ardour (or
another DAW) using sends for effects. This gives Mixxx access to the extensive collection of LADSPA plugins.
Make sure the correct multichannel sound card has been selected in Jack (Jack settings visible bottom left). Note that
Mixxx possibly labels its Jack ports as “Portaudio”.
Deleting Your Library
The library file is stored in the following places depending on your operating system:
Windows The Mixxx library is stored in the %USERPROFILE%\Local Settings\Application
Data\Mixxx\ folder. To delete your library on Windows, delete the mixxxdb.sqlite file in this
folder.
Mac OS X The Mixxx library is stored in the Library/Application Support/Mixxx folder in your home
directory. To delete your library on Mac OS X type the following command into a terminal:
rm ~/Library/Application\ Support/Mixxx/mixxxdb.sqlite
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Figure 11.3: The Jack routing for external effects on GNU/Linux
GNU/Linux The Mixxx library is stored in the .mixxx folder in your home directory. To delete your library on
GNU/Linux type the following command into a terminal:
rm ~/.mixxx/mixxxdb.sqlite
Warning: Deleting your library will lose all of your metadata. This includes saved hotcues, loops, comments,
ratings, and other library related metadata. Only delete your library if you are fine with losing these.
11.4. Deleting Your Library
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CHAPTER 12
Contributing to the Project
Mixxx is a community-driven project involving many DJs worldwide. Without the contributions from these DJs,
Mixxx would not exist, and we’re constantly looking for more contributors.
We want to make it as easy as possible for people to get involved in Mixxx development. First off, to be clear you
don’t have to be a programmer to contribute.
As a non-developer
• Donate to Mixxx using Paypal to help support and enhance development.
• Make skins
• Make MIDI mappings for your controller
• Report bugs
• Update our Wiki to make sure the information on it is up to date.
• Translate Mixxx using Transifex
• Answer questions on the Troubleshooting Forum and the Launchpad Answers page
• Help promote Mixxx: If you’ve got a blog, write an article about Mixxx. Blog about our new releases when
they come out. Any exposure on the web and in print helps our project grow, and is much appreciated.
• Send us some photos of you using Mixxx at a gig!
As a software developer
• You don’t have to know C++. There are developers who got into Mixxx development while learning C++ along
the way.
• Join our mailing list: mixxx-devel
• Join our IRC channel, #mixxx on Freenode
• Tell us your ideas! Email us, talk on IRC, file wishlist bugs, or post on the forums.
• Register an account on our development platform Github and fork our code. See Using Git for Mixxx Development
• Join the Mixxx Development Team on Launchpad.
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• Get familiar with the code. Pick a bug off of the Easy Bug List
• Get help fixing the bug on IRC, talk to us about the best way to do it.
Contributing to Mixxx in 3 Easy Steps:
1. Pick a bug off of the Easy Bug List
2. Talk to us on IRC for help on how to fix it.
3. Fix it! Done! Your name will now be on the Mixxx contributor list.
12.2. As a software developer
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CHAPTER 13
Appendix
Keyboard mapping table
Shortcuts let you work more efficiently. This table lists the default keyboard shortcuts for accessing Mixxx with an
English keyboard layout. Depending on your language settings the defaults may be different.
New in version 2.0: Passthrough, Vinylcontrol Mode, Vinylcontrol Cueing, and Single Deck Vinylcontrol Toggle shortcuts
Changed in version 2.0: Auto DJ shortcuts, Esc key exit search and leave focus
Function
Mixer
Crossfade Left
Crossfade Right
Small Crossfade Left
Small Crossfade Right
Activate/Disable Effects Unit
Headphone Cue (Pre-fader listen)
Bass Kill
Playback
Load selected track to deck
Unload track from deck
Playback
Seek Backwards
Reverse Playback
Seek Forwards
Tempo Adjust Down
Tempo Adjust Up
Small Tempo Adjust Down
Small Tempo Adjust Up
Temporary Tempo Adjust Down
Temporary Tempo Adjust Up
Small Temporary Tempo Adjust Down
Small Temporary Tempo Adjust Up
Tempo (BPM) Sync
BPM Tap Tempo Adjust
Cue and Loop
Set Cuepoint
Cue
Deck 1
Deck 2
Master
G
H
Shift + G
Shift + H
5
T
B
0
Y
N
Shift + left
Alt + Shift + left
D
A
Shift + A
S
F1
F2
Shift + F1
Shift + F2
F3
F4
Shift + F3
Shift + F4
1
Shift + !
Shift + right
Alt + Shift + right
L
J
Shift + J
K
F5
F6
Shift + F5
Shift + F6
F7
F8
Shift + F7
Shift + F8
6
Shift + ^
Shift + D
F
Shift + L
;
Continued on next page
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Table 13.1 – continued from previous page
Function
Deck 1
Deck 2
Master
Cue Go-to-and-stop
Shift + F
Shift + :
Activate 4 Beat Loop
Q
U
Halve Beat Loop Size
W
I
Double Beat Loop Size
E
O
Set Loop In Point
2
7
Set Loop Out Point (Activates Loop)
3
8
Toggle Loop On/Off
4
9
Set Hot cue 1
Z
M
Set Hot cue 2
X
,
Set Hot cue 3
C
.
Set Hot cue 4
V
/
Clear Hot cue 1
Shift + Z
Shift + M
Clear Hot cue 2
Shift + X
Shift + <
Clear Hot cue 3
Shift + C
Shift + >
Clear Hot cue 4
Shift + V
Shift + ?
Microphone
Microphone Talkover
‘
Auto DJ
Shuffle Auto DJ playlist
Shift + F9
Skip next track in Auto DJ
Shift + F10
Fade to next track in Auto DJ
Shift + F11
Toggle Auto DJ on/Off
Shift + F12
Preview Deck
Load Selected Track And Play
Alt + Return
Start/Stop
Return
Seek Backwards
Alt + Left
Seek Forwards
Alt + Right
Vinyl Control
Passthrough
Ctrl + J
Ctrl + K
Vinylcontrol Mode
Ctrl + Shift + Y
Ctrl + Shift + U
Vinylcontrol Cueing
Ctrl + Alt+ Y
Ctrl + Alt + U
Single Deck Toggle / Swap Decks
Ctrl + T
Ctrl + T
Search bar
Focus
Ctrl + F
Clear input
Ctrl + Back
Exit search and leave focus
ESC
Library
Select all files in current list
Ctrl + A
Select group of files in current list
Click first item, hold Shift key, click last item
See also:
Mixxx allows you to customize the keyboard shortcuts. For more information, and to download a keyboard mapping
image, go to Using a Keyboard.
Application shortcuts
Use these shortcuts to access features available in the menu on top of the application window.
New in version 2.0: Added Show Effect Rack, Maximize Library, and Show Cover Art shortcuts. Added a Developer
Tools option to the Developer menu which provides various useful debugging tools.
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Changed in version 2.0: Shortcuts for Enable Vinyl Control 1-4.
Function
Key
File menu
Load Track to Deck 1
Load Track to Deck 2
Library menu
Add new Playlist
Add new Crate
View menu
Show Samplers
Show Microphone Section
Show Vinyl Control Section
Show Preview Deck
Show Effect Rack
Show Cover Art
Maximize Library
Full Screen (Windows & Linux)
Full Screen (Mac OS X)
Options menu
Enable Vinyl Control 1
Enable Vinyl Control 2
Enable Vinyl Control 3
Enable Vinyl Control 4
Enable Live Broadcasting
Record Mix
Enable Keyboard Shortcuts
Open Preferences (Windows & Linux)
Open Preferences (Mac OS X)
Exit Mixxx
Developer menu
Reload skin
Developer Tools
Stats: Base Bucket
Stats: Experiment Bucket
Debugger Enabled
Ctrl + O
Ctrl + Shift + O
Ctrl + N
Ctrl + Shift + N
Ctrl + 1
Ctrl + 2
Ctrl + 3
Ctrl + 4
Ctrl + 5
Ctrl + 6
Space
F11
Shift + Command + F
Ctrl + T
Ctrl + Y
Ctrl + U
Ctrl + I
Ctrl + L
Ctrl + R
Ctrl + ‘
Ctrl + P
Ctrl + ,
Ctrl + Q
Ctrl + Shift + R
Ctrl + Shift + T
Ctrl + Shift + B
Ctrl + Shift + E
Ctrl + Shift + D
Hint: The Ctrl key on Windows & Linux is equivalent to the Command key on Mac OS X. The Alt key on
Windows & Linux is equivalent to the Option key on Mac OS X. Application shortcuts are not customizable.
Note: The Developer menu is available if Mixxx is started using the Command line options.
Command line options
Mixxx is designed to be as user-friendly as possible. As such, its command line options are only useful for development
or debugging, as they make these tasks easier. Command line options are case-sensitive.
New in version 2.0: Show debug tooltips Provide extra skins when developer mode is enabled. Adds the
debugger during skin parsing in --developer mode Adds “Enable Base” and “Enable Experiment” option
in --developer mode Added --safeMode option.
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Option
[FILE]
–resourcePath PATH
–pluginPath PATH
–settingsPath PATH
–controllerDebug
–developer
–safeMode
–locale LOCALE
-f, –fullScreen
-h, –help
Description
Load the specified music file(s) at start-up. Each file
you specify will be loaded into the next virtual deck.
Supported file types: mp3, ogg, aiff, aif, wav, flac, and
optional unprotected aac (m4a)
Top-level directory where Mixxx should look for its resource files such as MIDI mappings, overriding the default installation location.
Top-level directory where Mixxx should look for sound
source plugins in addition to default locations.
Top-level directory where Mixxx should look for user
settings files such as the library database and preferences
configuration file.
Causes Mixxx to display/log all controller data it receives and script functions it loads.
Enables developer-mode. Includes extra log info, stats
on performance, a Developer tools menu, extra developer skins, and provides useful information for skin
writers in widget tooltips and logs .
Disables risky things at start up. This should help troubleshoot crashes at startup or if Mixxx won’t boot.
• Automatically loads empty waveforms
• Disables spinning vinyl widgets
• Disables synchronization polling
• Doesn’t open controllers by default
Use a custom locale for loading translations (e.g ‘fr’)
Starts Mixxx in full-screen mode
Display this help message and exit
Developer tools
To start Mixxx in Developer mode from a custom resource directory with MIDI and HID logging enabled, type the
following line into the terminal and hit return:
./mixxx --controllerDebug --developer --resourcePath res
Experiment modes for rapid development and testing
New in version 2.0: Adds a static Experiment class with a tri-state mode flag that indicates whether
the experiment mode is OFF, BASE, or EXPERIMENT. Adds Developer→Stats:Experiment Bucket and
Developer→Stats:Base Bucket. Each one toggles between OFF and BASE/EXPERIMENT so you can choose
exactly what time spans you would like to collect in your base and experiment buckets. Updates StatsManager
to segment collected stats into a base and experiment bucket. This allows you to quickly measure the difference
a code change has on relevant counters / timers within the same execution of Mixxx.
This is useful for quickly enabling and disabling a code change without a re-compile/re-run cycle to get an anecdotal
sense of how it “feels” as well as a quantified sense of how it differs in terms of stats Mixxx collects.
All stats collected via the usual Counter/Timer/ScopedTimer/etc. tools are segmented into a BASE STATS and EXPERIMENT STATS section printed to the log on exit.
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Version History
v2.0.0 (2015-12-31)
• 4 Decks with Master Sync
• New Effects Framework with 4 Effect Units and 5 Built-in Effects: * Flanger, Bit Crusher, Reverb, Echo, Filter
* More to come!
• Configurable, Resizeable User Interface with 3 Brand New Skins
• Cover Art Display
• Music Key Detection and Shifting
• Vinyl Audio Pass-Through
• 4 Microphone inputs and 4 Auxiliary inputs
• MIDI Mapping GUI and Improved Learning Wizard
• MusicBrainz metadata fetching
• RGB Musical Waveforms
• Hundreds of Bug Fixes and Improvements
• New Pitch-Independent Algorithm for Better-Sounding Key-lock
For a full list of new features and bugfixes, go to: https://launchpad.net/mixxx/2.0.
v1.11.0 (2013-05-09)
• Completely revamped Waveforms
• Direct HID controller support
• Point & Click Controller Mapping
• Next Generation Beat Detection
• Library History Feature
• Improved AutoDJ
• Beatloop Rolls
• Preview Deck
• Advanced Search
• New and Improved User Manual
• New Controller Support
For a full list of new features and bugfixes, go to: https://launchpad.net/mixxx/1.11.0.
v1.10.1 (2012-06-30)
• Bugfixes
For a full list of bugfixes, go to: https://launchpad.net/mixxx/1.10.1.
v1.10.0 (2011-12-25)
• Rewritten and Improved Vinyl Control Support
• 4 Sampler Decks
• Quantized Loops, Hotcues and Beatloops
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• Phase Synchronization
• Beatgrid Adjust Feature
• Microphone Support
• Spinning Turntable Widgets and Waveform Scratching
• M4A Support for Windows Vista and Windows 7 users
• Brand New and Updated Skins
• Accessibility Improvements
• Limited Support for Internationalization
• Revamped and Rewritten User Manual
• Mixing engine improvements
• Updated MIDI Mappings
For a full list of new features and bugfixes, go to: https://launchpad.net/mixxx/1.10.0.
See also:
For an overview of previous versions, take a look at the timeline.
13.5. Version History
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CHAPTER 14
Glossary of Terms
AAC Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) is a patented audio compression algorithm which uses a form of lossy data
compression. Designed to be the successor to MP3, AAC generally achieves better sound quality at similar bit
rates. While the .aac extension is sometimes used for AAC-encoded files, they are typically saved with an .m4a
file extension.
AcoustID An acoustic fingerprint system built entirely on open-source technology. It aims to create a free database
of user-submitted audio fingerprints with mapping to the MusicBrainz metadata database and provide a web
service for audio file identification using this database. For more information, see‘<https://acoustid.org/>‘_.
AIFF Short for Audio Interchange File Format. High-quality digital audio file format, similar to .wav files. Contains
CD-quality audio stored in a non-compressed, lossless format. AIFF files generally end with a .aiff or .aif
extension.
balance A balance control on a mixer allows you to adjust the balance between the left and right channel. The
balance refers to the relative volume of the corresponding channel in a stereo audio signal.
bar In musical notation, a bar (or measure) is a segment of time defined by a given number of beats. Typically, a
piece consists of several bars of the same length.
beatgrid A series of markers that point to the location of beats within the track. Beatgrids are used for advanced
mixing functions such as track sync, precise effects synchronization, looping and accurate BPM representation.
beatmatching A mixing technique used to establish a similar tempo with two or more tracks, making them sound
like just one track.
binaries Files that contain compiled computer code, which was compiled from source code. Source code, which
is usually a bunch of text files, is processed with a program called a compiler. The compiler then generates a
binary, which is something like an an .exe or a .dll file. By using binaries you are relieved of the task of having
to compile the code by yourself.
bitrate Describe the quality of an audio or video file. For audio data the bitrate is commonly measured in Kbps. For
example, an MP3 audio file that is compressed at 192 Kbps will have a greater dynamic range and may sound
slightly more clear than the same audio file compressed at 128 Kbps.
BPM Beats per minute (BPM) is used as a measure of tempo in music. If you tap your foot to music you are following
the “beat”. If you count how many taps you do in a minute you have calculated the BPM.
bug report Every software has bugs. When you come across a bug in this software, you should submit a report about
it to the developers. They can use this to identify, replicate and fix the issue.
CDJ CDJ is a term originally used to describe a line of CD players from Pioneer Electronics. Today CDJ generally
refers to DJ CD players that work like a record player. They allow analog control of music using CDs, usually
using a touch sensitive emulated vinyl control surface.
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codec Short for compressor/decompressor, a codec is any technology for compressing and decompressing audio and
video data. Some popular codecs for computer audio include MP3 and Ogg Vorbis.
controller An external hardware device that generates and transmits signals to a computer, usually via USB, to
control software with physical controls other than a mouse and keyboard. Controllers have many uses for music
such as controlling DJ programs like Mixxx. They typically send MIDI signals but some controllers use HID
signals. Many DJs prefer to control DJ software using physical knobs, faders, and wheels on controllers instead
of using a computer keyboard and mouse.
crossfader The crossfader is a slider that determines how much each deck of audio contributes to the master output.
cue A Cue or Cue point is a reference point in the track usually placed on the position the DJ wants the track to start
at by default. This is useful to instantly jump to that point without seeking through the track.
cue sheet A cue sheet (or CUE file, CUE sheet, etc.) is a formatted plain text file which is used to provide index
information for a large audio file. For example, it can be used to tell software extra details about the layout of a
CD to burn.
cueing Headphone cueing, or just cueing, is listening to the next track you would like to mix in in your headphones.
The audience will not hear what you are cueing in your headphones. Being able to cue is a crucial aspect to
DJing.
db Short for decibels. A Decibel is a logarithmic measurement of sound level. Whispering is around 25 dB while
unbearable sound such as a jet engine is around 160 db. Rule of thumb: A volume increase of 10 dB is perceived
as twice as loud.
deck A deck is like a virtual vinyl turntable. You can load a track into it and play the track, just like you would put a
record on turntable and play it.
DRM Digital Rights Management (DRM) technologies attempt to control what you can and can’t do with the media
and hardware you’ve purchased. Typically, a DRM system either encrypts the data so that it can only be accessed
in a way authorized by copyright holders or marks content with a digital watermark or similar method so that
the content can not be freely distributed. For information about how you can get involved in activism against
DRM, see Defective by Design.
fast-forward To cause something to advance at quicker than normal speed. In terms of audio software that means if
you press the fast-forward button the audio will play with increased speed as long as the button is pressed. This
is useful to seek through a track.
fast-rewind The opposite of fast-forward. If you press the fast-rewind button the audio will play in reverse with
increased speed as long as the button is pressed.
file manager A computer program that organizes data files into groups and shows you where they are when you need
to find them again. Popular file managers for the operating systems Mixxx supports are Explorer on Windows,
Finder on Mac OS X and Nautilus on GNU/Linux.
FLAC Free Lossless Audio Compression (FLAC), a patent-free audio compression similar to MP3 but lossless (i.e.
there is no loss in audio quality when used). FLAC files generally end with a .flac extension.
flanger A flanger is an effect that mixes the input signal with a delayed copy of itself which leads to interferences in
the signal and creates a comb-filter effect. By routing the output of the effect back into the input (feedback), the
effect is enhanced.
GUI Short for “Graphical User Interface” and is pronounced “gooey”. It refers to a user interface based on graphics
(icons, pictures and menus) instead of text. In Mixxx, it uses a mouse, keyboard, or MIDI / HID controllers as
input devices.
head/mix button The head/mix button is used to control how much you mix the master output into your headphone
output. This can be very useful when cueing a track, because you can test out how it sounds when mixed with
the main mix in your headphones, before letting the audience hear the track.
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headphone button The headphone button is used to indicate whether or not you are pre-listening to a deck or sampler
in your headphones.
headphone output The headphone output is what you hear in your headphones.
HID Short for for Human Interface Device, a part of the USB specification. It specifies a device class (a type
of computer hardware) for human interface devices such as keyboards, mice, game controllers, and some DJ
controllers.
hotcue Similar to the main cue point, a hotcue is a reference point in the track. DJs usually place hotcues at distinctive
positions within a track such as drops, breaks or kicks and snares. Mixxx supports up to 36 hotcues.
HSV HSV stands for hue, saturation, and value, and is also often called HSB (B for brightness). The HSV Color
Model represents color in a way more suited to the human perception of color. For example, the relationships
“stronger than”, “darker than”, and “the opposite of” are easily expressed in HSV. In contrast, the representation
of the hardware-oriented RGB model is close to what most monitors show.
icecast Icecast is free and open-source software that allows digital audio content to be broadcast to and from media
player software, enabling the creation of Internet radio stations. Unlike Shoutcast, the software provides the
ability to stream in free file formats like Ogg Vorbis and run your own directory server.
IRC Internet Relay Chat (IRC) is a an online chat network. The Mixxx IRC channel can be found on the FreeNode
IRC Network in the #mixxx channel.
kbps Short for kilobits per second. Here used to measure the quality of audio data. See bitrate
key lock With key lock enabled, the tempo of the track will change but the pitch remains consistent. When unlocked,
the pitch slider will speed up (or slow down) the track and the pitch will increase (or decrease) along with it.
kill switch A button to turn on and off individual frequency ranges within a channel, i.e. treble, mid and bass. Useful
for effects where the DJ drops a track out for a period or creates room for a transition.
LAME LAME is a free software codec used to encode/compress audio into the lossy MP3 file format.
latency Latency refers to a short period of delay (usually measured in milliseconds) between when an audio signal
enters and when it emerges from a system. Being able to lower the latency as much as possible makes a huge
difference in responsiveness.
level meter The level meter is used to show the average levels of audio signals. The level should average around the
top of the green region, with the loudest parts of the music (the transients) briefly going into the yellow region.
If the level meter is in the red, the signal is clipping and the gain should be turned down.
lossless Used when describing audio compression algorithms, a lossless algorithm is one which results in no loss in
audio quality when used.
lossy Used when describing audio compression algorithms, a lossy algorithm is one which results in a loss in audio
quality when used.
master output The master output is the main audio output. It is what your audience hears.
metadata In general, any piece of information about a music file that Mixxx uses (e.g. title, artist, album, hotcue
locations, loops, etc.). Various file metadata formats allow information such as the title, artist, album, and track
number to be stored in the audio file itself, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ID3 . Mixxx stores additional
metadata about music files in its database, like beatgrid, waveform data, hotcues, playlists, crates, number of
plays, etc.
MIDI Short for for Musical Instrument Digital Interface. A digital communications language and hardware specification enabling compatible electronic instruments, sequencers, computers, etc., to communicate with each other
in a network. Most DJ controllers use MIDI to communicate with computers.
MP3 A patented audio compression algorithm which uses a form of lossy data compression. It is de-facto standard
of digital audio compression for music. MP3 files generally end with a .mp3 extension.
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MusicBrainz A open-source music encyclopedia that collects music metadata and makes it available to the public.
For more information, see http://musicbrainz.org/.
Ogg Vorbis A patent-free audio compression algorithm which uses a form of lossy data compression. It is designed
to provide for efficient streaming and manipulation of high quality digital audio. Ogg Vorbis files generally end
with a .ogg or .oga extension.
open-source Generically, open-source refers to a program for which the source code is available to the public for use
and/or modification from its original design free of charge. Open source code is typically created as a collaborative effort in which programmers improve upon the code and share the changes within the community. Open
source sprouted in the technological community as a response to proprietary software owned by corporations.
For more information, see Wikipedia.
OpenGL An operating system feature used to draw hardware-accelerated graphics. Mixxx uses OpenGL to draw the
waveform displays and spinning vinyl widgets.
operating system Your operating system (OS) is the computing environment on your computer. For example, Windows, Mac OS X, or GNU/Linux are the three operating systems that Mixxx supports.
Opus Opus is a totally open, royalty-free, highly versatile lossy audio codec. The .opus filename extension is recommended.
PFL PFL or “pre-fader listen” is a fancy word for whether or not you are “pre-listening” to a deck in your headphones.
See also: headphone button.
phase The phase of a track is its position relative to another track. If two tracks are sync’d to the same tempo and
in-phase then they should be playing so that their beats are aligned.
pitch bend A technique used by DJs that temporarily bends the rate of a track up or down, usually while a button
is held. This technique is usually used to make micro-adjustments to the synchronization of tracks while beatmatching. Before digital DJing, this was accomplished by dragging one’s finger alongside the turntable to slow
it down or by twisting the record spindle to speed it up.
podcast A podcast is a feed of audio or video files made available for free or for purchase over the Internet. Podcast
clients such as iTunes allow listeners to subscribe to the feed and automatically download content to their
portable audio players as it becomes available.
quantization Quantization is the process of aligning notes and other events like loops or cuepoints so that they start
or finish exactly on beats or fractions of beats.
ramping pitch bend Basically identical to the regular pitch bend with the difference that the pitch changes gradually,
instead of all at once. Often uses for temporary pitch changes. It simulates the effect of touching a turntable to
temporarily slow down or speed up a record.
rate The speed at which a track is played back, usually expressed in terms of a percentage of the speed relative to the
tracks normal rate. Often while mixing, DJs adjust the rates of tracks so that they can play at the same tempo as
other tracks. This allows DJs to beatmix, and is an essential part of DJing.
ReplayGain ReplayGain normalizes audio data in a non-destructive way, so the tracks in your music library don’t
all play at different volumes. Audio files are scanned by a psychoacoustic algorithm to determine the loudness
of the audio data. ReplayGain information is stored as metadata in a digital audio file in order for the sound to
be correctly played at the right level of loudness.
reverse Reverse plays a track backwards.
RGB The RGB color model is an additive color model in which red, green, and blue light are added together in
various ways to reproduce a broad array of colors. The name of the model comes from the initials of the three
additive primary colors, red, green, and blue.
shoutcast Shoutcast is proprietary software that allows digital audio content to be broadcast to and from media player
software, enabling the creation of Internet radio stations.
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soundcard Also known as an audio card, it is an internal computer expansion card or external expansion device
that facilitates the input and output of audio signals to and from a computer. Today DJ-soundcards are usually
connected via USB and have at least 2 stereo audio outputs to support cueing.
sync Sync allows you to automatically adjust a track’s tempo and phase to be in sync with another deck that is
playing.
tempo The speed of a track measured in bpm.
timecode Used here in conjunction with vinyl control. A special audio signal on a control vinyl or control CD (timecode media) that a computer can listen to in order to determine speed, direction and position of the playback.
track A track is another word for a song.
url Uniform Resource Locator. The address that defines the route to a file on an Internet server. URLs are typed into
a Web browser to access Web pages and files, and URLs are embedded within the pages themselves as hypertext
links. One example of a URL is http://www.mixxx.org .
vinyl control A method of controlling DJ applications which simulates the traditional DJing paradigm of two turntables. Using special timecode media, the DJ application analyzes the timecode signal and simulates the sound
and feel of having your music collection on vinyl.
volume A term that refers to the degree of sound intensity or audibility; loudness. Volume is determined by people’s
perception and does not directly correspond to any physical property of sound.
WAV Standard digital audio file format used for storing waveform data; allows audio recordings to be saved with
different sampling rates and bitrates; often saved in a 44.1 KHz, 16-bit, stereo format, which is the standard
format used for CD audio. Wave files are not compressed, and are therefore lossless. Wave files generally end
with a .wav extension.
waveform overview The waveform overview shows the waveform envelope of the entire track, and is useful because
they allow DJs to see breakdowns far in advance.
waveform summary The waveform summary shows the waveform envelope of the track near the current playback
position.
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Automatically generated TODO list
The following list is automatically generated from ..
TODO:: directives in the text.
TODO items
Todo
Update this section to explain the differences between the beatgrid and beatmap options.
(The
original
entry
is
located
in
/home/docs/checkouts/readthedocs.org/user_builds/mixxxmanual/checkouts/latest/source/chapters/configuration.rst, line 463.)
Todo
Example of a todo
(The
original
entry
is
located
in
/home/docs/checkouts/readthedocs.org/user_builds/mixxxmanual/checkouts/latest/source/chapters/quickstart.rst, line 14.)
Todo
Update section to reflect 1.12 GUI layout.
(The
original
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is
located
in
/home/docs/checkouts/readthedocs.org/user_builds/mixxxmanual/checkouts/latest/source/chapters/user_interface.rst, line 618.)
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CHAPTER 16
Guidelines for Mixxx Manual writers
What is the intended outcome of the manual?
A user who doesn’t know Mixxx yet should be able to mix two tracks from its music library in the shortest possible
time. Assuming he will be more motivated to explore the software and get creative.
(Future) characteristics of the Mixxx manual:
User-friendly Easy to use when, where, and how you need it. Examine, how someone else is using the application.
Watch someone else use the manual (preferably someone who has never seen it before). Be consistent with the
instructional design so users can follow a set pattern. Don’t use the terms you use as a developer, try to find the
terminology of the user.
Based on sound learning principles For example users should actually learn from it, not just refer to it. Use the
KISS principle; keep it sweet and simple. Too much information can be overwhelming, so present one concept
at a time. Explain simple features in a matrix.
Motivational Keeps users willing to push forward to higher levels. Present general concepts first to provide a frame
of reference. Then move to more complex topics.
Group problems the user might hit in a particular task right there with the instruction for that task. Do not force a
user to go to a separate “Troubleshooting” section. We can have such separate sections, but as a author you should
duplicate pitfalls and problems and include a solution in the task.
Technical conventions
Line Widths
Please configure your editor to have a max column-width of 80-columns. While it is not a strict requirement, 80column cleanliness makes it easy to tile multiple buffers of code across a laptop screen, which provides significant
efficiency gains to developers.
Screenshots
Use English language settings when creating screen-shots of the Mixxx interface. This might change if we ever have
true i18n. The preferred file format is PNG. Don’t add shadows to application window screen-shots as they are added
automatically to the document with style-sheets.
Always include descriptive alt text and a figure description. The latter will be numbered in the PDF export. That sets
them apart from the text below. Place screen-shots above the context you are going to explain.
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Screenshots should only show the necessary area and not the entire screen where not necessary. Use annotation on the
screenshot if necessary to emphasize elements, use color #FF1F90 if possible for consistency.
.. figure::
Use this directive to place images like Screen-shots. Example markup:
.. figure:: /_static/icons/mixxx-icon.png
:width: 64px
:align: center
:height: 64px
:alt: Alternate text on mouse over
:figclass: pretty-figures
Insert descriptive caption here
Nice screenshot tools with build-in editor for annotations:
• MacOSX: Skitch
• Linux: Shutter
• Windows: PickPic
Alternatively, import your screenshots into Inkscape, add annotations and export as .png to /static. Then save the
original work as .svg to /static as well, so any future contributor can work on your annotations at a later time.
File naming
As the manual grows over the time with new versions of Mixxx and new screenshots, it is important to have files
named consistently. Save files to the /static folder or create a sub-folder in there.
Mixxx-<major><minor>-<where>-<what>.png
This scheme makes it easy to know which version a screenshot was taken from and where it belongs and if it must
replaced, like e.g. Mixxx-111-Preferences-Recording.png
Warning: Do not include any dot in the file names of your screenshots your file name or you wont be able to
generate PDF with LaTeX.
Double quotes
Use curly double quotes (“ ”). Avoid typewriter double quotes (” ”) produced by the convenient quotation mark button
on your keyboard. For details and key combinations, see Wikipedia .
Admonitions
The following admonitions are in use:
.. note::
For anything that should receive a bit more attention. Example markup:
.. note::
a note
.. hint::
For supplementary information that lightens the work load. Example markup:
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.. hint::
a helpful hint
.. seealso::
For references to other documents or websites if they need special attention. References to other documents can
also be included in the text inline. Example markup:
.. seealso::
a reference and inline link `Google <https://google.com>`_
.. warning::
Recommended over note for anything that needs to be done with caution. Example markup:
.. warning::
a warning
.. todo::
Allow inserting todo items into documents and to keep a automatically generated TODO list Example markup:
.. todo::
some task
Substitution
Replacement images or text can be included in the text. They are added through a substitution (aka alias). This may be
appropriate when the replacement image or text is repeated many times throughout one or more documents, especially
if it may need to change later.
All replacements are kept in the file shortcuts.rstext which is included at the beginning of each file in which
a substitution is used.
To use an alias for the Mixxx logo, simply put the definition into shortcuts.rstext.
.. |logo| image:: /_static/icons/mixxx-icon.png
Using this image alias, you can insert it easily in the text with |logo| , like this:
For a text replacement the code looks similar:
.. |longtext| replace:: Loooooooong text is looooooooong
Using this text alias, you can insert it easily with |longtext| , like this: Loooooooong text is looooooooong .
See also:
The substitute section in the docs. Here and also here
Headings
Normally, there are no heading levels assigned to certain characters as the structure is determined from the succession
of headings. However, for the Python documentation, this convention is used which you may follow:
# with overline, for parts
* with overline, for chapters
= for sections
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- for subsections
^ for subsubsections
" for paragraphs
Of course, you are free to use your own marker characters (see the reST documentation), and use a deeper nesting
level, but keep in mind that most target formats (HTML, LaTeX) have a limited supported nesting depth.
Paragraph-level markup
These directives create short paragraphs and can be used inside information units as well as normal text:
.. versionadded:: version
This directive documents the version of the project which added the described feature. Example markup:
.. versionadded:: 2.5 Add feature description.
.. versionchanged:: version
Similar to versionadded, but describes when and what changed in the named feature in some way (new
parameters, changed side effects, etc.).
Other semantic markup
The following roles don’t do anything special except formatting the text in a different style. Nonetheless, use them:
:guilabel:
Any label used in the interface should be marked with this role, including button labels, window titles, field
names, menu and menu selection names, and even values in selection lists. An accelerator key for the GUI label
can be included using an ampersand; this will be stripped and displayed underlined in the output. To include a
literal ampersand, double it. Example markup: Cancel
:guilabel:`&Cancel`
:kbd:
Mark a sequence of keystrokes. Example markup: STRG + G
:kbd:`STRG` + :kbd:`G`
:menuselection:
This is used to mark a complete sequence of menu selections, including selecting submenus and choosing a
specific operation. Example markup: Options → Enable Live Broadcasting
:menuselection:`Options --> Enable Live Broadcasting`
:file:
The name of a file or directory. Example markup: Mixxx/Recordings
:file:`Mixxx/Recordings`
Meta-information markup
.. sectionauthor:: name <email>
Identifies the author of the current section and helps to keep track of contributions. By default, this markup isn’t
reflected in the output in any way. Example markup:
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.. sectionauthor:: Jon Doe <name@domain.tld>
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Index
A
AAC, 98
AcoustID, 98
AIFF, 98
B
balance, 98
bar, 98
beatgrid, 98
beatmatching, 98
binaries, 98
bitrate, 98
BPM, 98
bug report, 98
C
CDJ, 98
codec, 99
controller, 99
crossfader, 99
cue, 99
cue sheet, 99
cueing, 99
D
db, 99
deck, 99
DRM, 99
F
fast-forward, 99
fast-rewind, 99
figure (directive), 105
file (role), 107
file manager, 99
FLAC, 99
flanger, 99
guilabel (role), 107
H
head/mix button, 99
headphone button, 100
headphone output, 100
HID, 100
hint (directive), 105
hotcue, 100
HSV, 100
I
icecast, 100
IRC, 100
K
kbd (role), 107
kbps, 100
key lock, 100
kill switch, 100
L
LAME, 100
latency, 100
level meter, 100
lossless, 100
lossy, 100
M
master output, 100
menuselection (role), 107
metadata, 100
MIDI, 100
MP3, 100
MusicBrainz, 101
N
note (directive), 105
G
O
GUI, 99
Ogg Vorbis, 101
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open-source, 101
OpenGL, 101
operating system, 101
Opus, 101
P
PFL, 101
phase, 101
pitch bend, 101
podcast, 101
Q
quantization, 101
R
ramping pitch bend, 101
rate, 101
ReplayGain, 101
reverse, 101
RGB, 101
S
sectionauthor (directive), 107
seealso (directive), 106
shoutcast, 101
soundcard, 102
sync, 102
T
tempo, 102
timecode, 102
todo (directive), 106
track, 102
U
url, 102
V
versionadded (directive), 107
versionchanged (directive), 107
vinyl control, 102
volume, 102
W
warning (directive), 106
WAV, 102
waveform overview, 102
waveform summary, 102
Index
110