Reference Guide
Lighting Design Software
Manage, Design and Simulate
Reference Guide
Product Release 18.0
November 2006
© Cast Group of Companies Inc., 2002-2006. All rights reserved.
WYSIWYG, Cast Software, WYSIWYG Report, WYSIWYG Perform, WYSIWYG Design and Autofocus are trademarks of the Cast Group
of Companies Incorporated. All other trademarks and logos are the property of their respective owners.
November 2006
Summary of changes
Summary of changes
The following table summarizes the changes included in the Release 18 WYSIWYG
Reference Guide, November 2006.
Change location
Description of change
Chapter 3, pages 29
and 30
Removed Windows ME as valid operating system
Chapter 3, page 33
Updated the WYSIWYG installation procedure
Chapter 3, pages
36—39
Updated section on installing WYSIWYG Network
Chapter 4, page 61
Updated Draw toolbar
Chapter 4, page 64
Updated Tools toolbar
Chapter 5, page 79
Updated list of files you can open with WYSIWYG
Chapter 6, pages 113
and 114
Updated section on opening DWG/DXF files
Chapter 6, pages 115
and 116
Updated section on merging DWG/DXF files
Chapter 6, pages
118—120
Updated section on exporting DWG/DXF files
Chapter 6, page 136
Updated section on drawing spheres
Chapter 6, pages
151—153
Updated section on Light Emission tab
Chapter 6, page 153
Added section on new Quick Light Emission Tool
Chapter 6, pages 154
and 155
Added section on new Sidedness tab
Chapter 6, page 175
Added procedure on new Grid Array feature
Chapter 6, pages 186
and 187
Added procedures on new Distribute and Array
Fixtures feature
Chapter 6, pages
216—220
Added section on new Light Emitting Surface Wizard
Chapter 8, pages
264—273
Updated section on Rendering to include new UI and
references to the new Background Rendering
Manager
Chapter 8, pages
275—283
Added section on the new Background Rendering
Manager
Chapter 10, pages 355
and 356
Added section on new DMX Camera feature
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
v
Summary of changes
vi
Release 18.0
November 2006
Contents
Contents
1
Introduction
2
The WYSIWYG suite of software products
3
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
4
WYSIWYG user interface
5
Managing your WYSIWYG document
6
CAD mode
7
Data mode
9
About this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Welcome to WYSIWYG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
WYSIWYG Report . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WYSIWYG Design . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WYSIWYG Perform . . . . . . . . . . . .
WYSIWYG Perform - Console Edition
WYSIWYG Learn . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WYSIWYG Network . . . . . . . . . . . .
WYSILink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration, activation, and registration
Upgrades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Subscriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navigation and screen set-up .
Shortcut bars . . . . . . . . . . . .
Toolbars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Status bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wireframe views . . . . . . . . . .
Shaded views . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
15
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. 17
. 18
. 20
. 22
. 24
. 26
. 27
29
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. 31
. 40
. 44
. 45
. 47
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. 51
. 55
. 59
. 66
. 68
. 73
49
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
77
File menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Options menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
WYSIWYG Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Layout tabs . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The CAD environment . . . . . .
The Library Browser . . . . . . .
Drawing objects . . . . . . . . . .
Editing objects . . . . . . . . . . .
CAD tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hang structures . . . . . . . . . .
Hanging and focusing fixtures.
Color, gobos, and accessories .
Light Emitting Surface Wizard.
The Flight Case . . . . . . . . . . .
Rendering . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
101
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. 103
. 104
. 122
. 126
. 145
. 167
. 177
. 185
. 210
. 216
. 223
. 226
227
Layout tabs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
vii
Contents
Release 18.0
Spreadsheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
Patch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
8
Design mode
9
Presentation mode
10
Live mode
11
WYSILink - Link mode
A
Using the SuperPro Monitoring Tool
B
Keyboard shortcuts and hot keys
C
Using AutoFocus with the HogPC
Index
viii
249
Layout tabs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Design tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Palettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating looks . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rendering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Background Rendering Manager
Layout tabs
Reports . . .
New Plots . .
Layouts . . .
Images . . .
Worksheets
Pipe tapes .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. 251
. 252
. 258
. 260
. 261
. 264
. 275
285
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Layout tabs . . . . . . . .
Connecting to consoles
AutoPatch . . . . . . . . .
Visualization . . . . . . . .
Autofocus. . . . . . . . . .
Rendering . . . . . . . . .
DMX Camera . . . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Layout tabs . . . . . .
Setting up WYSILink
WYSILink mode . . .
ETCLink functions . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. 287
. 288
. 294
. 310
. 333
. 334
. 335
337
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. 339
. 340
. 347
. 349
. 352
. 354
. 355
357
. 359
. 360
. 361
. 366
373
SuperPro Monitoring Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375
379
Keyboard shortcuts and hot keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381
387
Setting up AutoFocus to work with the HogPC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
393
Chapter 1
Introduction
This chapter introduces you to the WYSIWYG Reference Guide, provides
information for troubleshooting, and lists contact information if you need further
assistance.
In this chapter
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
About this manual
11
Troubleshooting
12
Welcome to WYSIWYG
14
9
Introduction
10
Release 18.0
November 2006
Introduction
About this manual
Introduction
This manual provides instructions for the installation and operation of the different
levels of the WYSIWYG application. WYSIWYG is available at the following levels:
„
WYSIWYG Report
„
WYSIWYG Design
„
WYSIWYG Perform
„
WYSIWYG Perform - Console Edition
„
WYSIWYG Learn
„
WYSIWYG Network
All levels are discussed in this manual. For a detailed description of the levels, refer to
Chapter 2, “The WYSIWYG suite of software products.”
All the levels use the same user interface, described in Chapter 4, “WYSIWYG user
interface.” However, you can perform different tasks in each mode. For example, you
draw in CAD mode and edit in Data mode. These modes may have different features
based on the level of WYSIWYG that you are running.
Text conventions
The following text conventions are used in this manual:
„
„
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Menus and menu commands appear in Arial bold. For example, “from the Edit
menu, choose Layers.”
User interface elements such as buttons, tools, shortcuts, and dialog boxes appear
in Tahoma Oblique. For example, “to draw a riser, click the Riser tool on the Draw
toolbar.”
Keyboard keys are indicated in ALL CAPS. For example, “press TAB to enter the
missing coordinate.”
References to manuals appear in italic font. For example, “for additional
information on working with recorded loads, please refer to your Sensor CEM User
Manual.”
11
Introduction
Release 18.0
Troubleshooting
Introduction
If you have problems using your software, please consult the following resources:
„
the contents of this manual or the online Help available from within WYSIWYG
„
the wysiwyg Web site at www.wysiwygsuite.com
If these resources are insufficient, please contact Technical Support.
Help from Technical Support
For assistance with a problem, contact Technical Support directly at one of the offices
identified below.
When calling for help, please have the following information ready:
„
the level of WYSIWYG that you are using (Report, Design, or Perform)
„
software version (from the Help menu, choose About WYSIWYG)
„
„
the kind of computer that you are using (processor and speed, amount of memory,
graphics card, operating system)
DMX interface type (if applicable)
North America
Cast Software
Technical Support
35 Ripley Avenue, Unit 1
Toronto, ON M6S 3P2
Canada
Phone: +1 877 989 2278
Fax: +1 416 597 9594
E-mail: techsupport@cast-soft.com
Web site: www.cast-soft.com
United Kingdom
A.C. Lighting Ltd.
Technical Sales & Support:
Centauri House
Hillbottom Road
High Wycombe
Bucks, HP12 4HQ
UK
12
November 2006
Introduction
Phone: +44 (0)1494 446000
Fax: +44 (0)1494 461024
E-mail: wysiwyg@aclighting.com
Web site: www.aclighting.com
Germany
ARCUS GmbH
Obermeiers Feld 2-4
33104 Paderborn
Germany
Phone: +49 (0) 5254 93069 0
Fax: +49 (0) 5254 93069 29
E-mail: support@arcus-lighting.com
Web site: www.arcus-lighting.com
Japan
Theater Engineering
Phone: +81 (0) 3 3706 5611
Fax: +81 (0) 3 3706 6766
E-mail: info@thea-eng.co.jp
Web site: www.thea-eng.co.jp
Support for WYSIWYG Perform - Console Edition
For assistance with a problem related to WYSIWYG Perform - Console Edition, contact
the manufacturer of the console to which you are connected. The console manufacturer
is listed on the Welcome page that appears when you launch the application.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
13
Introduction
Release 18.0
Welcome to WYSIWYG
Introduction
The WYSIWYG suite of software products, designed specifically for lighting
professionals, offers a range of solutions to meet the needs of designers, assistants,
electricians, console operators, teachers, and students.
WYSIWYG is the essential tool if you are looking to
„
increase creative freedom
„
save time
„
win more contracts
„
cut costs
Within the WYSIWYG suite of products, any higher level product contains all the
features of a lower level product. WYSIWYG Report, Design, and Perform are the core
products, with WYSIYWG Report offering basic CAD and paperwork solutions, and
WYSIWYG Perform providing an end-to-end solution including CAD, paperwork,
rendering, and pre-visualization.
In less than one day of training, you can begin working with WYSIWYG and see your
lighting design without actually installing any lights. You can even see what a new
lighting fixture can do before you rent, buy, or install it. Once your design is complete,
WYSIWYG handles the logistics; it automatically generates plots, schedules, pipe-tapes,
and color and gobo lists.
For more information on each of the three main levels of WYSIWYG, see the appropriate
section:
14
„
WYSIWYG Report For details, see “WYSIWYG Report” on page 17.
„
WYSIWYG Design For details, see “WYSIWYG Design” on page 18.
„
WYSIWYG Perform For details, see “WYSIWYG Perform” on page 20.
Chapter 2
The WYSIWYG suite of software
products
This chapter describes the different levels of WYSIWYG.
In this chapter
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
WYSIWYG Report
17
WYSIWYG Design
18
WYSIWYG Perform
20
WYSIWYG Perform - Console Edition
22
WYSIWYG Learn
24
WYSIWYG Network
26
WYSILink
27
15
The WYSIWYG suite of software products
16
Release 18.0
November 2006
The WYSIWYG suite of software products
WYSIWYG Report
Introduction
WYSIWYG Report is the basic WYSIWYG package. It allows lighting professionals to
create 2D plans of their productions along with all the necessary paperwork.
WYSIWYG Report is also available in an educational edition. This product, WYSIWYG
Report Educational Edition, is a fully functional version of Report that is available to
students and faculty at a special price.
Note: The following specifications are subject to change.
Software features
„
„
2D plotting of set and lighting designs (plans, sections and elevations)
Comprehensive 3D library of fixtures, accessories, truss, colors, gobos, props, and
so on
„
Extensive CAD tools
„
Excellent zooming and maneuvering abilities
„
Custom layers and scenes for complete control and management of information
„
Loading and exporting of DXF, DWG, Excel, BMP, and JPG
„
Tabular editing of lighting information including channel, dimmer, color, and so on
„
Fully integrated paperwork and 2D CAD systems
„
Error checking of production paperwork and hookups
„
Reports including instrument counts and schedules, patch sheets, and so on
„
Printing of plots and reports up to 36”x 48” / A0
„
Custom report and plot content and layout
„
Ability to print all view types including 2D CAD, reports, spreadsheets, bitmap files,
jpeg files, and logos
„
Multi-monitor support
„
12 months of software and library updates included
Upgrade suggestions
„
„
A faster processor improves responsiveness.
Memory requirements depend on the size of the show. Insufficient memory can
seriously affect performance. Add memory if there is excessive disk activity.
Modes
The following working modes are available in WYSIWYG Report:
„
CAD 2D
„
DATA
„
PRES 2D
Refer to the respective chapters of this guide for detailed explanations about the
features in each mode.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
17
The WYSIWYG suite of software products
Release 18.0
WYSIWYG Design
Introduction
WYSIWYG Design builds on the feature set of Report and adds the ability for lighting
professionals to explore their designs in a 3D environment. 3D CAD tools, shaded and
isometric views, and photo-realistic rendering tools are added, as well as the ability to
create and store images of lighting looks using the integrated design tools.
WYSIWYG Design is also available in an educational edition. This product, WYSIWYG
Design Educational Edition, is a fully functional version of Design that is available to
students and faculty at a special price.
Note: The following specifications are subject to change.
Software features
„
Includes all the features of WYSIWYG Report
„
3D plotting of set and lighting designs
„
Multiple working views including isometric
„
Comprehensive 3D library of fixtures, accessories, truss, colors, gobos, props, and
so on
„
Extended library includes textures and materials
„
Library objects are multi-layered for realistic texturing
„
Objects have variable translucency
„
Fully integrated paperwork and CAD systems
„
Loading and exporting of DXF, DWG, Excel, BMP, and JPG file types
„
Print all view types including 3D views, bitmap files, jpeg files, spreadsheets and
logos
„
Integrated design mode allows creation of static lighting looks without a console
„
Rendering generates a photo-realistic picture of your lighting look
„
Rendering wizard provides options for smoke, shadows, ambient light, and so on
„
Renderings include bounce and reflection from surfaces
„
Background Rendering Manager that enables you to queue up multiple renderings
to run in the background without even requiring WYSIWYG to run
„
OpenGL technology for improved beam simulation
„
Multi-monitor support
„
12 months of software and library updates included
Upgrade suggestions
„
„
„
18
A faster processor improves responsiveness and rendering times.
Memory requirements depend on the size of the show. Insufficient memory can
seriously affect performance. Add memory if there is excessive disk activity.
A high-performance OpenGL accelerator card significantly improves the
performance of real-time simulation.
November 2006
The WYSIWYG suite of software products
Modes
The following working modes are available in WYSIWYG Design:
„
CAD
„
DATA
„
DESIGN
„
PRES
Refer to the respective chapters of this guide for detailed explanations about the
features in each mode.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
19
The WYSIWYG suite of software products
Release 18.0
WYSIWYG Perform
Introduction
WYSIWYG Perform builds on the feature set of Report and Design and adds the ability
for lighting professionals to pre-cue entire shows in real time. Users can create their
productions in 3D along with all the necessary paperwork. A console can then be
connected to the computer and WYSIWYG Perform will simulate the exact effect of the
console’s output in real-time.
Note: The following specifications are subject to change.
Software features
„
Includes all the features of WYSIWYG Report and Design
„
3D plotting of set and lighting designs
„
Multiple working views including front, back, sides, top, bottom, and isometric
„
Comprehensive 3D library of fixtures, accessories, truss, colors, gobos, props, and
so on
„
Fully integrated paperwork and CAD systems
„
Live mode for real-time lighting visualization
„
DMX camera to allow you to dynamically reposition your point of view in Live
mode.
„
Accurate simulation of conventional and automated fixtures
„
OpenGL technology for improved beam simulation
„
Light emitting surfaces allow simulation of lasers, neon, LEDs, projection screens,
and so on
„
Easy hook-up to consoles and other DMX sources
„
Auto Focus protocol lets WYSIWYG send color and focus data to consoles
„
Integrated design mode allows you to create lighting looks without a console
„
Rendering generates a photo-realistic picture of your cue or lighting look
„
Renderings include bounce and reflection from surfaces
„
Background Rendering Manager that enables you to queue up multiple renderings
to run in the background without even requiring WYSIWYG to run
„
Animated renderings available though certified service providers
„
Multi-monitor support
„
12 months of software and library updates included
Upgrade suggestions
„
„
„
20
A faster processor improves responsiveness and rendering times.
Memory requirements depend on the size of the show. Insufficient memory can
seriously affect performance. Add memory if there is excessive disk activity.
A high-performance OpenGL accelerator card significantly improves the
performance of real-time simulation.
November 2006
The WYSIWYG suite of software products
Modes
The following working modes are available in WYSIWYG Perform:
„
CAD
„
DATA
„
DESIGN
„
PRES
„
LIVE
Refer to the respective chapters of this guide for detailed explanations about the
features in each mode.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
21
The WYSIWYG suite of software products
Release 18.0
WYSIWYG Perform - Console Edition
Introduction
WYSIWYG Perform - Console Edition is a version of WYSIWYG Perform intended for
distribution with a specific console or family of consoles. Users purchasing a compatible
console will receive this edition of WYSIWYG Perform to create shows and begin precueing activities. The Console Edition of WYSIWYG Perform includes most of the
functionality of Perform with certain features restricted or removed.
Note: The following specifications are subject to change.
Software features
„
Includes all the features of WYSIWYG Perform, other than printing or exporting in
any format
„
3D plotting of set and lighting designs
„
Multiple working views including front, back, sides, top, bottom, and isometric
„
Comprehensive 3D library of fixtures, accessories, truss, colors, gobos, props, and
so on
„
Fully integrated paperwork and CAD systems
„
Live mode is restricted to visualizing one patch universe at a time
„
Accurate simulation of conventional and automated fixtures
„
OpenGL technology for improved beam simulation
„
Light emitting surfaces allow simulation of lasers, neon, LEDs, projection screens,
and so on
„
AutoPatch transmits the entire show patch regardless of channel count
„
Rendering is available in Design and Live modes but is limited to 76,800 pixels
Upgrade suggestions
„
„
„
A faster processor improves responsiveness and rendering times.
Memory requirements depend on the size of the show. Insufficient memory can
seriously affect performance. Add memory if there is excessive disk activity.
A high-performance OpenGL accelerator card significantly improves the
performance of real-time simulation.
Note: You cannot upgrade from WYSIWYG Report or Design to WYSIWYG Perform Console Edition. You can, however, upgrade from WYSIWYG Perform - Console Edition
to WYSIWYG Perform, removing any console restrictions.
Modes
The following working modes are available in WYSIWYG Perform - Console Edition:
22
„
CAD
„
DATA
„
DESIGN
„
PRES
„
LIVE
November 2006
The WYSIWYG suite of software products
Refer to the respective chapters of this guide for detailed explanations about the
features in each mode.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
23
The WYSIWYG suite of software products
Release 18.0
WYSIWYG Learn
Introduction
WYSIWYG Learn is a special configuration of WYSIWYG that allows an educational
institution to run ten instances of the software on a Local Area Network. The
workstations can be configured to run any combination of WYSIWYG Report or
WYSIWYG Design. In addition, one workstation can run WYSIWYG Perform.
Note: The following specifications are subject to change.
Software features
„
Includes all the features of WYSIWYG Report, Design, or Perform
„
2D and 3D plotting of set and lighting designs
„
Multiple working views including front, back, sides, top, bottom, and isometric
„
Comprehensive 3D library of fixtures, accessories, truss, colors, gobos, props, and
so on
„
Fully integrated paperwork and CAD systems
„
Accurate simulation of conventional and automated fixtures
„
OpenGL technology for improved beam simulation
„
Light emitting surfaces allow simulation of lasers, neon, LEDs, projection screens,
and so on
„
Easy hook-up to consoles and other DMX sources
„
Auto Focus protocol lets WYSIWYG send color and focus data to consoles
„
Rendering generates a photo-realistic picture of your cue or lighting look
„
Renderings include bounce and reflection from surfaces
„
Background Rendering Manager that enables you to queue up multiple renderings
to run in the background without even requiring WYSIWYG to run
„
Animated renderings are available though certified service providers
„
Multi-monitor support
„
12 months of software and library updates included
Upgrade suggestions
„
„
„
A faster processor improves responsiveness and rendering times.
Memory requirements depend on the size of the show. Insufficient memory can
seriously affect performance. Add memory if there is excessive disk activity.
A high-performance OpenGL accelerator card significantly improves the
performance of real-time simulation.
Modes
The following working modes are available in WYSIWYG Learn:
24
„
CAD
„
DATA
„
DESIGN
November 2006
The WYSIWYG suite of software products
„
PRES
„
LIVE
Refer to the respective chapters of this guide for detailed explanations about the
features in each mode.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
25
The WYSIWYG suite of software products
Release 18.0
WYSIWYG Network
Introduction
WYSIWYG Network allows you to run as many licenses of WYSIWYG Report, Design,
and Perform as you want to over a network. The workstations can be configured to run
any combination of these products with the use of a single network dongle.
Note: The following specifications are subject to change.
Software features
„
Includes all the features of WYSIWYG Report, Design, and/or Perform
„
2D and 3D plotting of set and lighting designs
„
Multiple working views including front, back, sides, top, bottom, and isometric
„
Comprehensive 3D library of fixtures, accessories, truss, colors, gobos, props, and
so on
„
Fully integrated paperwork and CAD systems
„
Accurate simulation of conventional and automated fixtures
„
OpenGL technology for improved beam simulation
„
Light emitting surfaces allow simulation of lasers, neon, LEDs, projection screens,
and so on
„
Easy hook-up to consoles and other DMX sources
„
Auto Focus protocol lets WYSIWYG send color and focus data to console
„
Rendering generates a photo-realistic picture of your cue or lighting look
„
Renderings include bounce and reflection from surfaces
„
Background Rendering Manager that enables you to queue up multiple renderings
to run in the background without even requiring WYSIWYG to run
„
Animated renderings available though certified service providers
„
Multi-monitor support
„
12 months of software and library updates included
Upgrade suggestions
„
„
„
A faster processor improves responsiveness and rendering times.
Memory requirements depend on the size of the show. Insufficient memory can
seriously affect performance. Add memory if there is excessive disk activity.
A high-performance OpenGL accelerator card significantly improves the
performance of real-time simulation.
Modes
The working modes available in WYSIWYG Network depend on your product
configuration. Refer to the WYSIWYG Report, Design, or Perform sections accordingly.
Detailed explanations of each of the various modes are included in this guide.
26
November 2006
The WYSIWYG suite of software products
WYSILink
Introduction
WYSILink is an add-on for WYSIWYG Report, Design, or Perform and inserts a mode
button (Link) to the base product when installed. It acts as an interface to ETCLink and
monitors the Sensor line of dimmers. When a problem with a fixture is detected, data
about the fixture is logged in Link mode and the image of the affected fixture is
highlighted on your plot.
Note: The following specifications are subject to change.
Software features
„
Add-on to the features of WYSIWYG Report, Perform, or Design
„
System diagnostic fixture data is written to a Message Log
„
Ability to record and play backup looks
„
Loads can be recorded for specific dimmers
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
27
The WYSIWYG suite of software products
28
Release 18.0
Chapter 3
Installation, configuration,
activation, and registration
This chapter provides instructions on how to install, configure, activate, and
register the WYSIWYG software. You must activate and register the software
before you can start using WYSIWYG.
In this chapter
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Installation
31
Configuration, activation, and registration
40
Upgrades
44
Subscriptions
45
Passwords
47
29
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
30
Release 18.0
November 2006
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
Installation
Introduction
Follow the procedures in this section to install the level of WYSIWYG that you have
purchased.
Minimum hardware requirements for WYSIWYG Report
„
Pentium or compatible processor, 1 GHz or better
„
Windows XP operating system
„
256 MB of RAM
„
NTFS-formatted hard drive
Note: You cannot install WYSIWYG on a hard drive that has been formatted in the
FAT32 file system.
„
400 MB of free disk space
„
1024 x 768 or better resolution
„
free USB port
Minimum hardware requirements for WYSIWYG Design
„
Pentium or compatible processor 1GHz or better
„
Windows XP operating system
„
256 MB of RAM
„
NTFS-formatted hard drive
Note: You cannot install WYSIWYG on a hard drive that has been formatted in the
FAT32 file system.
„
400 MB of free disk space
„
1024 x 768 or better resolution
„
OpenGL - accelerated display adapter with 16 MB video memory
„
Free USB port
Minimum hardware requirements for WYSIWYG Perform
„
Pentium or compatible processor 1GHz or better
„
Windows XP operating system
„
256 MB of RAM (512 MB preferred)
„
NTFS-formatted hard drive
Note: You cannot install WYSIWYG on a hard drive that has been formatted in the
FAT32 file system.
„
400 MB of free disk space
„
1024 x 768 or better resolution
„
OpenGL - accelerated display adapter with 16 MB video memory
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
WYG-it 2 DMX reception device (except when used with certain consoles - contact
the console manufacturer for details)
31
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
„
MIDI output port to use with AutoFocus
„
Free USB port
Release 18.0
Minimum hardware requirements for WYSIWYG Network/WYSIWYG
Learn
„
Pentium III, or compatible processor, 300 MHz or better
„
Windows XP operating system
„
64 MB of RAM
„
NTFS-formatted hard drive
Note: You cannot install WYSIWYG on a hard drive that has been formatted in the
FAT32 file system.
„
2 MB of free disk space
„
Windows XP - USB or ECP parallel port
„
Network interface card running TCP/IP
For WYSIWYG Perform workstations:
„
„
Use a WYG-it 2 or compatible DMX reception device (except when used with
certain consoles - contact the console manufacturer for details)
MIDI output port to use with Autofocus-enabled consoles
Minimum hardware requirements for WYSILink
„
„
Sensor dimmer rack with Control Electronic Module (CEM), software version 3.11
or later
ETCNet2 DMX Node with RFU/Link option, software version 2.1.1 or later
Installing WYSIWYG
The installation procedure for WYSIWYG is the same regardless of the level that you
have purchased.
The WYSIWYG install panel appears when the CD is inserted into your PC’s CD drive or
when you double-click the install file (if you have downloaded the software). This guide
displays buttons for all the installation options:
„
„
32
Install WYSIWYG
Install WYSIWYG Network Server (see “Installing WYSIWYG Learn or WYSIWYG
Network” on page 35)
„
Quick Start Guide
„
Quick Start Tutorials
„
Reference Guide
„
Release Notes
„
Install Adobe Acrobat Reader
November 2006
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
To install WYSIWYG
1
Insert the installation CD into your PC’s CD drive OR double-click the install file (if
you have downloaded the software).
Result: The WYSIWYG Install panel appears.
2
Click INSTALL WYSIWYG to install the software. Follow the steps in the Installation
Wizard as prompted.
Note: If you are installing WYSIWYG on a computer that will act as a combined
Learn/Network Server and Client, after completing the WYSIWYG installation,
simply attach the network dongle to it to activate the Server functionality.
Note: If you have an installation CD and the installation Wizard does not automatically
open when you insert the CD into your computer:
a.
Access the CD-ROM drive of your computer.
b.
Double-click the icon for the Wyginstall program.
c.
Follow the steps in the Installation Wizard.
Installing an In-Place update
If you already have a previous release of WYSIWYG installed on your computer, you can
easily update to the current release by installing an in-place update. This update allows
you to enhance a version of WYSIWYG that is a maximum of two releases back from the
current release. You do not have to uninstall the previous version of WYSIWYG to
perform the update.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
33
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
Release 18.0
To install an in-place update
1
From the WYSIWYG Install window, select Install WYSIWYG.
Result: If you have more than one release installed on your computer, the
following dialog box is displayed. If you have only one release installed, skip to
step 4.
34
2
Select Update the product selected below.
3
From the list of WYSIWYG releases, highlight the release that you want to update,
and then click Next.
4
On the WYSIWYG Update window, select Next.
November 2006
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
5
On the WYSIWYG Update window, click Yes to accept the terms of the license.
Result: The updated files are copied to your computer.
6
After all the files are copied, click FINISH to complete the update.
Installing WYSIWYG Learn or WYSIWYG Network
Software components
The WYSIWYG Network and WYSIWYG Learn systems comprise a computer that acts as
the server and one or more clients. In your network, you need to have only one
computer that acts as the server (the computer with the network dongle attached to it).
The server can be standalone, in which case WYSIWYG is not installed on it, or it can act
as both server and client. In this latter scenario, you install the full WYSIWYG program,
which also includes a server portion with the Sentinel Protection service. This service is
required to detect the WYSIWYG Learn or Network dongle (a list of current services on
a workstation can be viewed under Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services).
The Learn or Network Client enables the software to function over the network. The
Client must be installed on all desired workstations. WYSIWYG Learn can run up to 10
clients. However, the number of clients for WYSIWYG Network is restricted based on the
configuration purchased.
A typical WYSIWYG Network/Learn setup is illustrated on the following page. All
computers running Network/Learn components must be on the same network (and
therefore have the same network ID and subnet mask).
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
35
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
Release 18.0
Network services
Windows XP
Services are supported in Windows XP. Services start running as soon as your computer
is turned on, regardless of whether the user is logged in. The service begins
automatically each time the workstation is restarted, and runs in the background
without any prompting from the user. The service may also be started manually; the
choice is available during the installation process.
Network protocol
WYSIWYG Learn or WYSIWYG Network will run on any LAN that supports TCP/IP
protocol (NetBEUI and IPX/SPX networks are not currently supported).
Detecting the network dongle
If the service is not running, the Clients will not be able to detect the dongle and the
application will terminate. Ensure that the dongle is attached to the workstation that is
acting as the Server.
Installation options
Based on whether your Server computer is a combined Learn/Network Server and
Client or a standalone Server, the installation varies slightly.
„
„
If you intend to run WYSIWYG on the server computer (i.e., you want a combined
Learn/Network Server/Client), then you must install the full WYSIWYG program on
this computer. While this installation includes all required server files, they are only
activated when you attach the network dongle to the Server. For details, see “To
install WYSIWYG” on page 33.
If you do not want to run WYSIWYG on the Server computer (i.e., you want to have
a standalone Learn/Network Server), the installation is condensed. See “To install
the Learn/Network Server (standalone)” below.
To install the Learn/Network Server (standalone)
Perform this installation if you want to configure a standalone Learn/Network Server
(i.e., you do not want to run WYSIWYG on this computer). After the installation, simply
attach the network dongle to it to activate the Server functionality.
36
November 2006
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
Before you begin
„
1
Previous versions of WYSILAB or WYSIWYG Learn/Network must be removed
before beginning the install process (if this step is not completed, the install menu
will offer the option before continuing with the installation). The workstations must
be restarted for the changes to take effect.
Insert the installation CD into your PC’s CD drive OR double-click the install file (if
you have downloaded the software).
Result: The WYSIWYG Install panel appears.
2
Select Install WYSIWYG Network Server.
Note: The Server should only be installed on one computer on the network. This is
the computer to which you will attach the network dongle.
3
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
On the Setup window, click Yes to accept the terms of the license.
37
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
4
Release 18.0
Click Next.
Result: The Choose Destination Location window appears.
5
Select a destination location for the Server files. The default location is C:\Program
Files\WYSIWYG Server.
6
Click Next.
Result: The Select Program Folder window appears.
7
38
Select a program folder for the shortcut. The default is WYSIWYG Server.
November 2006
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
8
Click Next.
Result: The Start Copying Files window appears.
9
Review the installation settings, and then click Next to begin the installation.
10
After all the files are copied, click FINISH to complete the installation.
To install the Network/Learn Client
1
Insert the installation CD into your PC’s CD drive OR double-click the install file (if
you have downloaded the software).
Result: The WYSIWYG Install panel appears.
2
Click Install WYSIWYG.
Result: The CAST license screen appears.
3
If you accept the terms of the license, click Yes to continue. The installation begins.
4
Click FINISH to complete the installation.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
39
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
Release 18.0
Configuration, activation, and registration
Introduction
After installing the product, when you launch WYSIWYG for the first time, the Product
Configuration Wizard appears, enabling you to choose the product level that you want
to run. You can choose from standard product levels (such as Design and Report),
Network products, or you can run the Demo or Viewer versions of WYSIWYG.
Note: To run any of the products listed in the Wizard, you must first have the
appropriate dongle installed on your computer (to run a network product, you must
have a network dongle installed on a computer that is accessible from your PC).
After you proceed through the steps of the Wizard, you are prompted to activate your
product (only if you are upgrading from version 3.X to the latest version), and then you
are prompted to register the software. You must activate and register the WYSIWYG
software before you can start using it. To activate the WYSIWYG software involves
entering an 11-digit activation code. To register the software involves entering a
validation code.
This section is broken down into the following three steps:
„
starting WYSIWYG for the first time and running through the Product Configuration
Wizard
„
activating the software
„
registering the software
To start WYSIWYG for the first time
Note: Before you perform this procedure, ensure that you have the correct dongle
installed on your computer, or that the network dongle is installed on a computer that
you can access from your PC.
1
On your desktop, click the shortcut icon to start WYSIWYG (or click Start > All
Programs > WYSIWYG > WYSIWYG).
Result: The WYSIWYG Product Configuration Wizard appears.
40
November 2006
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
2
To ensure that the Wizard appears the next time you launch WYSIWYG, leave the
check mark in the box beside Show me this wizard next time I run WYSIWYG; to
configure the program so the Wizard does not appear the next time you launch
WYSIWYG, clear this check box.
Note: If you clear this check box, you can always set it again in the Application
Options window. For details, see page 86.
3
Click Next.
Result: The Product Selection window appears, enabling you to choose the
product level that you want to launch.
4
Select the product that you want to launch (you must have the correct dongle
installed to launch the program), and then click Next.
Result: The program verifies that you have the correct dongle attached, and the
Product Configuration Successful window appears:
5
Click Finish.
6
The product that you chose launches and the Activate or Register window appears
(based on the level of product that you have purchased).
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
If you have purchased a new box product containing a new version dongle skip
to the product registration process. For details, see “To register WYSIWYG” on
page 42.
41
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
„
Release 18.0
If you are upgrading from WYSIWYG 3.X, continue with the next procedure,
“To activate WYSIWYG” on page 42.
To activate WYSIWYG
Note: This procedure is only applicable if you are upgrading from WYSIWYG 3.X. If you
are upgrading from a newer release, or if you have just purchased the latest release,
then you can skip directly to the registration process. For details, see “To register
WYSIWYG” on page 42.
1
If you previously owned WYSIWYG 3.X and have just upgraded to the new version
of the product, the first window that appears is the WYSIWYG Upgrade dialog box.
The code that you type in this dialog enables your old dongle to function with the
new version of WYSIWYG.
2
Type your upgrade code, and then click Upgrade.
3
Proceed to “To register WYSIWYG” below.
To register WYSIWYG
1
Once you have gone through the Product Configuration Wizard and you have
successfully activated your product, the Register window appears, prompting you
to register your software.
Note: You can postpone registration for a period of up to 15 days after installation.
42
November 2006
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
To register later, click Register Later. You must register and obtain a Registration
Validation Code to continue using the product after this time. It is recommended
that you register as soon as possible to avoid any restrictions on using the product.
You can register by phone, online, fax, or e-mail.
2
To register by phone, click Phone, and then proceed to step 3.
To register by any of the other methods, select the appropriate button and follow
the instructions as prompted.
When you have obtained your validation code, click I have my validation code, and
then proceed to step 4.
3
If you have chosen to register by phone, the Register by Phone dialog box is
displayed.
Follow the instructions in the dialog. Type your validation code, and then click
Register. A successful registration completes the registration and activation process.
4
If you selected I have my validation code in step 2, the Insert Registration Code dialog
box appears.
5
Type your validation code, and then click OK. A successful registration completes
the registration and activation process.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
43
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
Release 18.0
Upgrades
Introduction
An upgrade code enables you to run the advanced features of a higher level product,
either Design or Perform, using the same dongle that you already own. Contact your
local WYSIWYG dealer to purchase an upgrade. You will be given an upgrade code at the
time of purchase.
To upgrade the level of your WYSIWYG product
1
Start WYSIWYG.
2
From the Help menu, choose Upgrade.
The current level of WYSIWYG installed on your computer is displayed in the
Current Level box. The serial code of your dongle is shown in the Serial Code box.
3
In the Upgrade Code box, type your upgrade code, and then click Upgrade.
4
Exit WYSIWYG, and then restart your computer.
5
Launch WYSIWYG.
Result: The new level of software is displayed in the upper right corner of the
WYSIWYG user interface.
Note: If you would like to purchase an upgrade but are unsure of who to contact,
click More Info to obtain a list of WYSIWYG dealers.
44
November 2006
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
Subscriptions
Introduction
Your subscription to WYSIWYG is valid for a specific period of time. You can easily view
and renew your subscription from within WYSIWYG.
Obtaining subscription details
Details of your subscription are stored within WYSIWYG.
To obtain details
From the Help menu, choose About WYSIWYG.
Result: The month and year that your subscription expires is displayed in the
Subscription Expire Date box.
Renewing your subscription
Your WYSIWYG subscription is valid for a specific period of time. You can continue to
use WYSIWYG beyond your subscription expiry date; however, you will not be able to
access the quarterly software updates until you renew your subscription.
Contact your local WYSIWYG dealer to purchase a renewal for your subscription. Cast
Software provides you with the subscription code that you require.
To renew your subscription
1
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
From the Help menu, choose Renew Subscription.
45
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
Release 18.0
The date when your WYSIWYG subscription expires is displayed in the Subscription
Expire Date box.
2
In the Subscription Code box, type the code. The code is 10 alphanumeric long.
3
Verify that you have entered the correct information.
4
Click Renew.
5
Exit WYSIWYG, and then restart the software for the renewal to take effect.
Note: If you would like to renew your subscription but are unsure of who to
contact, click More Info to obtain a list of WYSIWYG dealers.
46
November 2006
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
Passwords
Introduction
You can set a password in WYSIWYG to password-protect your dongle.
To set a password
1
From the Help menu, choose Password.
Result: The Change Password dialog box appears.
2
In the New password box, type your new password. The password can be any
combination of letters, numbers, and characters. As you type the password,
WYSIWYG displays an asterisk (*) for each character that you type. The length of
the password can be between 6 and 20 characters.
3
In the Confirm password box, re-enter the password.
4
Click OK.
Result: The next time that you launch WYSIWYG on the same computer, you will
be prompted to enter your password. In the Enter password box, type your
password. If you do not want to be prompted to enter a password every time you
launch WYSIWYG, select the Remember for next time check box.
To change a password
1
From the Help menu, choose Password.
Result: The Change Password dialog box is displayed.
2
In the Current password box, type the password that you previously set. You must
type the current password if you want to change the password. As you type the
password, WYSIWYG displays an asterisk (*) for each character you type.
3
In the New password box, type a new password.
4
In the Confirm password box, re-enter the password.
5
Click OK.
Note: If you decide that you do not want to password-protect your dongle, select
the No password check box.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
47
Installation, configuration, activation, and registration
48
Release 18.0
Chapter 4
WYSIWYG user interface
All of the WYSIWYG levels use the same set of screens. The user interface was
designed to facilitate smooth transitions from mode to mode, and to keep the
data organized and easy to find.
In this chapter
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Navigation and screen set-up
51
Shortcut bars
55
Toolbars
59
Status bar
66
Wireframe views
68
Shaded views
73
49
WYSIWYG user interface
50
Release 18.0
November 2006
WYSIWYG user interface
Navigation and screen set-up
Welcome window
When you start WYSIWYG, the Welcome window appears. The application level is shown
in the upper right corner of the window.
From the File menu, you can choose to open an existing file or create a new file. A list of
template files are shown on the left and a list of recently saved files are shown on the
right.
Click a file name to start working with WYSIWYG.
Modes
The mode buttons located along the top of the user interface are used to access the
different working modes available within the WYSIWYG levels.
Click the appropriate mode button to change modes.
CAD mode
CAD mode is where you create your show drawings. This includes drawing your venue,
set pieces, lighting positions, focus positions, and lighting fixtures. CAD mode operates
like many other CAD programs, so many of the concepts will be familiar to those who
have used a computer-aided drafting program before. WYSIWYG adds features that are
specific to the entertainment industry, such as a comprehensive 3D library containing
truss, lighting equipment and accessories, as well as props, musical instruments, and
various human figures.
In WYSIWYG Report, you are limited to 2D views of your plot. In Design and Perform,
3D isometric and shaded views are available.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
51
WYSIWYG user interface
Release 18.0
Data mode
As you draw in CAD mode, all of your show information is compiled into spreadsheets
that you can access in Data mode. In this mode, you can view and edit the data for all
your fixtures. Data mode operates like many other spreadsheet programs, so many of
the concepts will be familiar to those who have used a spreadsheet program. The CAD
and Data modes remain completely interactive and any information modified in either
mode is updated in the other.
Design mode
Design mode was created to provide lighting designers with an avenue for
experimentation. Design mode can be used as a troubleshooting tool or as a creative
tool to help you come up with cue concepts. In Design mode, you can create static
lighting looks using the design tools, and then save and render those looks to output
photo-realistic pictures. You can turn on and control fixtures without having to patch or
connect to a console.
Presentation mode
Presentation (Pres) mode contains all the tools necessary for creating professional
printouts of your show document including reports, plots, and images. As with all other
modes, the contents of the Pres mode are continually updated as you draw, input data,
and modify your show file. In addition to being able to create your own plots, WYSWIYG
provides a series of default plots and reports that are ready for printout. These defaults
can be used as is or customized to suit your preferences.
Live mode
Live mode is used for graphically simulating the output of a lighting control console or
compatible offline editor. This is where you can pre-cue and visualize your show. Live
mode also has rendering ability so that you can create photo-realistic pictures of the
simulated lighting looks. Unlike Design mode, Live mode will display transitions from
cue to cue, allowing you to see the programmed movement of light over time.
Link mode
The WYSILink (Link) mode becomes available when you purchase and install the
WYSILink add-on for WYSIWYG. WYSILink acts as an interface to ETCLink and monitors
the Sensor line of dimmers. When a problem with a fixture is detected, data about the
fixture is logged in Link mode and the image of the affected fixture is highlighted on
your plot. You can also use this mode to record and play backup looks, and view
information on dimmers and dimmer racks in your system.
Availability of modes
The following working modes are available in WYSIWYG Report:
„
CAD 2D
„
DATA
„
PRES 2D
The following working modes are available in WYSIWYG Design:
„
CAD
„
DATA
„
DESIGN
„
PRES
The following working modes are available in WYSIWYG Perform:
„
52
CAD
November 2006
WYSIWYG user interface
„
DATA
„
DESIGN
„
PRES
„
LIVE
Note: Emphasis adds the mode button Emphasis. WYSILink adds the mode button Link.
Layouts
Beneath the work area in each mode is a series of layout tabs. A layout is a
configuration of work views. Views and layouts are mode specific. The layouts are not
editable and there are no options for saving custom layouts. To this end, WYSIWYG
supports pop-out frames and has multi-monitor functionality, thus providing alternative
tools for customizing your work environment. These features are discussed below.
Click the appropriate layout tab to change layouts.
Views
Views are the windows in the work space. The windows are pre-configured on the
screen based on the layout, as discussed above.
The WYSIWYG views include: wireframe, wireframe-selection-only, flight case, shaded,
spreadsheet, patch, error, report, image, plot, and worksheet.
The layouts and views available in each mode are discussed at the beginning of each
chapter.
For more information, see “Wireframe views” on page 68 and “Shaded views” on page
73.
Popup frames
You can place a view in a “popup frame” so that it remains active across modes. For
example, if you place the patch view in a popup frame, it will remain visible even if the
mode is changed from Data to CAD.
To place a view in a popup frame
1
Make the desired window active.
2
From the Options menu, choose Open in Popup Frame.
Tip: Alternatively, click the Frame Popup tool on the View toolbar.
Result: A new window containing a copy of the selected view opens.
Popup frames
„
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
retain all the functionality of the original view so you can work in the popup view if
you want to
are fully integrated with the remaining show document and are continually updated
(and vice versa)
can be resized and moved to any location on the screen or across monitors
53
WYSIWYG user interface
Release 18.0
To display popup frames in full screen mode
1
Make the popup window active.
2
Click the Full Screen button.
Result: The popup is expanded to fill the entire screen with no title bar visible.
Tip: To return the popup frame to normal size, press ESC.
To minimize a popup frame
Double-click the title bar of the popup window.
Result: The title bar only is displayed.
Tip: You can also click the Minimize button.
Multiple main frames
A main frame is defined as the user interface for a given file. WYSIWYG allows multiple
occurrences of the main frame to be opened for a given file. However, at no time may
more than one file be open. Multiple main frames allow you to work on the same file in
multiple modes at the same time.
You can close additional main frames using the Close tool at the top right corner of the
screen. Only the initial main frame triggers a file closure when this button is pressed.
For increased flexibility, WYSIWYG supports multiple monitors. You can carry main
frames and popup frames across monitors.
To open a new main frame
1
From the Options menu, choose New Window.
2
Drag the title bar of the new window to place it where you want it. To make the
window bigger or smaller, use the resize tab in the lower right corner of the window
or the minimize and maximize tools in the top right.
3
Repeat to open more new windows, as required.
While each window or main frame functions independently, all the show drawings and
data are fully integrated.
54
November 2006
WYSIWYG user interface
Shortcut bars
Introduction
Shortcuts are created for quick access to library items and view types, among other
things. The shortcut bars are located on the left side of your screen. Shortcut bars are
mode and layout specific. Each layout has designated shortcut bars.
In general, there are three types of shortcuts:
„
navigation
„
library
„
views/tools
Navigation shortcuts
The first type of shortcut is used for navigation purposes. The navigation shortcuts are:
„
Navigation
„
Views
Navigation shortcuts store the mode and layout destination. For example, you can save
a navigation shortcut to Data mode / Patch layout. The next time you want to go back
to that location, click the shortcut to save you at least one step.
View shortcuts store the plot type and zoom level. View shortcuts only apply to
wireframe views.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
55
WYSIWYG user interface
Release 18.0
Library shortcuts
The second type of shortcut is used in place of browsing the library. The library
shortcuts are:
„
Fixtures
„
Accessories
„
Color
„
Gobo
„
Library
„
Truss
Views/tools shortcuts
The final type of shortcut is used to open and save views and tools. The views/tools
shortcuts are:
„
Columns
„
Patch
„
Errors
„
Worksheets
„
Images
„
Layouts
„
New Plots
„
Legend
„
Key
„
Report
„
Looks
„
Concepts
„
Palettes
„
Render
Working with shortcuts
Generally the procedure for creating, modifying, and working with shortcuts is the same
regardless of the type of shortcut.
To create a new shortcut
1
Right-click in open space on the appropriate shortcut bar, and then choose the
appropriate New option.
Note: For navigation type shortcuts, ensure that the destination is set up, and
then proceed with step 1.
2
Based on the type of shortcut, you are prompted to select the object or type a
name for the new shortcut.
3
Click Insert or OK.
Result: The shortcut is created and added to the bottom of the list on the shortcut
bar that you selected in step 1.
56
November 2006
WYSIWYG user interface
To remove a shortcut
1
Right-click the shortcut icon that you want to remove.
2
Choose Delete.
Result: You are prompted to confirm the deletion.
3
Click OK to confirm.
Result: The selected shortcut is deleted.
To rename a shortcut
1
Right-click the shortcut icon that you want to rename.
2
Choose Rename.
3
Type a new name for the shortcut.
4
Click OK.
Result: The selected shortcut is renamed.
To clone a shortcut
1
Right-click the shortcut icon that you want to clone.
2
Choose Clone Shortcut.
3
Type a name for the copy.
Result: The selected shortcut is cloned and the copy is added to the bottom of the
list.
To arrange shortcuts
You can arrange shortcuts in the shortcut bar area by using drag-and-drop functionality.
1
Click the shortcut that you want to move.
2
While holding down the mouse button, press ALT to move the shortcut to the
desired location.
3
Release the mouse button to place the shortcut.
To set the display size for shortcuts
Right-click in open space on the appropriate shortcut bar, and then choose either Icons
or List (depending on your current setup).
Result: When you choose Icons, all shortcuts are displayed as icons. List will cause the
shortcuts to be listed in the shortcut bar area, thereby allowing you to fit more
shortcuts in the area.
The settings are retained for all shortcuts.
Note: To scroll to the bottom of a long list of shortcuts, use either the scroll button on
your mouse or the scroll bar along the side of the shortcut bar.
To use a shortcut
Click the shortcut icon.
As with all objects in WYSIWYG, all shortcuts have properties that affect the object
being inserted, the view or tool, or the navigation method.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
57
WYSIWYG user interface
Release 18.0
To modify a shortcut’s properties
1
Right-click the shortcut icon that you want to modify.
2
Choose Properties.
Result: The properties dialog box is displayed. The settings modified here affect
the object, view, tool, or navigation destination of the selected shortcut. An
example of the Navigation Shortcut Properties dialog box is shown below; however, the
shortcut properties window varies based on the type of shortcut that you select.
58
3
In the Name box, type the new name of the shortcut.
4
To open the shortcut in a pop-up frame, click the Pop-Up Window check box. For
more information on popup frames, refer to “Popup frames” on page 53.
November 2006
WYSIWYG user interface
Toolbars
The menu bar
The menu bar is located within the WYSIWYG user interface, below the mode buttons
and above the work area. The available menus change when moving from mode to
mode. The individual menus are explained within the context of each mode chapter.
The menu bar is dockable. It has a grab bar on the left that is used to move the menu
bar around the screen. It may be placed on the edges of the work area; top, bottom,
left or right. It may also be dragged off the edge of the work area and into its own
window. This window remains on top of the WYSIWYG screen and may be dragged
anywhere on your display.
Menu commands can be accessed using a mouse, keyboard, or by using hot keys.
To access menu commands using the keyboard
1
Press ALT+n, where n is the underlined letter in the menu name.
Result: The menu will be displayed.
2
Press the key corresponding to the underlined letter in the command that you want
to execute.
Note: Some commands have shortcuts that do not require menu selection. In
those cases, the shortcut keys are listed to the right of the command in the menu.
Example:
To undo the last command, press CTRL+Z.
Toolbars
Toolbars provide button access to most commands. This is in lieu of selecting the
commands through the menus in the menu bar.
Toolbars, like menus, are mode sensitive. However, unlike menus, you can customize
how the toolbars are displayed and which toolbars are open for each mode. Toolbars
that are greyed out in the toolbar selection list are not used in the current mode.
Toolbars are typically found directly under the menu bar and have a grab bar on the left
that is used to move the toolbar around the screen. They can be placed on the edges of
the work area (top, bottom, left or right), and can also be dragged off the edge of the
work area and into their own window. This window remains on top of the WYSIWYG
screen and can be dragged anywhere on your display.
The following toolbars are available (listed in alphabetical order).
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
59
WYSIWYG user interface
CAD Options toolbar
Camera toolbar
ComEdit toolbar
Data toolbar
60
Release 18.0
November 2006
WYSIWYG user interface
Design toolbar
Draw toolbar
Edit toolbar
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
61
WYSIWYG user interface
Edit (Pres) toolbar
Format toolbar
Insert (Pres) toolbar
Layers toolbar
Live toolbar
62
Release 18.0
November 2006
WYSIWYG user interface
Message Log Options toolbar
New Plots Options
New Plots View
Scenes toolbar
Standard toolbar
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
63
WYSIWYG user interface
Tools toolbar
Universes toolbar
View toolbar
WYSILink toolbar
64
Release 18.0
November 2006
WYSIWYG user interface
To hide and display toolbars using the toolbar list
1
Right-click in the toolbar area.
Result: The toolbar list is displayed.
2
Click on the name of the toolbar that you wish to display. A check mark to the left
of the toolbar name indicates it is currently displayed.
3
Repeat to display or hide multiple toolbars.
Tip: From the toolbar list, select Toolbars to open the Application Options dialog box.
In this box, you can choose multiple toolbars and configure other screen options,
such as the status bar and tooltips.
To hide and display toolbars using the Options menu
1
From the Options menu, choose Application Options.
2
Click the Toolbars tab.
3
Select the check boxes of the toolbars that you want to display.
Note: Since toolbars are mode-sensitive, certain toolbars are disabled based on
the mode that you are currently in.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
65
WYSIWYG user interface
Release 18.0
Status bar
Introduction
The status bar is displayed along the bottom of the WYSIWYG screen, below the layout
tabs. The status bar displays the prompt line, the number of unused channels
(WYSIWYG Perform), selected object information, and tracks the status of the snap,
ortho and absolute coordinates commands. It also tracks and displays the coordinates
of the cursor.
The status bar can be turned on or off from the toolbar list. You can also customize the
contents of the status bar from the Application Options window.
For more information on setting the options of your drawing, refer to “Application
Options window” on page 85.
Prompt line
The prompt line displays the current status of a command within your drawing. If you
are currently working with a command that requires multiple steps (the placement of a
pipe, for example), the prompt line displays a message indicating the next step required
to accomplish that task. The prompt line also displays a short description of a command
when you point to it using your mouse.
Selected object
In this display, “O” stands for the number of objects currently selected. The “F” stands
for the number of fixtures selected and the “C” stands for the number of circuits
currently selected.
Unused channels
Although there is never a limitation on how many fixtures can be patched in a file, there
is a limitation on the number of DMX channels that can be simulated in Live mode.
WYSIWYG will not simulate the DMX values being received on channels exceeding the
Perform channel count of your system. WYSIWYG Perform is available in 500, 1000,
2000, 5000 and Unlimited channels. (WYSIWYG Unlimited has 50,000 channels.) The
unused channels displayed on the status bar track the remaining channels for
simulation based on the level of your Perform system. Note that fixtures on layers that
are not visible, or which are not included in the current scene, are not counted.
Absolute coordinates
Absolute coordinates is the default setting, however, you can change this to the Relative
mode. This setting determines how coordinate information is displayed mid-command.
In ABS, which is the default mode, the coordinates display always shows the
coordinates currently under your cursor.
66
November 2006
WYSIWYG user interface
Coordinates
Coordinates are displayed in the order of X, Y and Z. The coordinates display the
position of the cursor as a distance from the origin of the drawing. For more information
on coordinates and setting the origin point, refer to “Coordinate system and origin” on
page 104.
Missing coordinate
Double-click this label to set the missing coordinate. The missing coordinate (X,Y,or Z)
is the coordinate whose value cannot be entered by clicking on the screen. The easiest
way to determine the missing coordinate in a wireframe view is to move the mouse
around and look at the status bar at the bottom of the working area. You will see only
two values changing. The value that is not changing is the missing coordinate for that
view or workplane.
The missing coordinate is dependent on the plot type and the workplane selected. Once
entered this value will affect all subsequent objects inserted in the current view. For
example, if the missing coordinate is set to 5’ in a plan view, all objects will be placed 5’
off the floor (X,Y,5) until the missing coordinate is changed again. Note that the missing
coordinate is not a move tool; objects are not moved to the missing coordinate value.
The missing coordinate only affects subsequent inserts.
Units of measurement
Click this label to toggle between metric and imperial units of measurement.
Snap and Ortho
The snap and ortho entry shows the status of these items. If the indicator is black, a
snap or ortho setting is active. If the indicator is grey, snap and ortho are not active.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
67
WYSIWYG user interface
Release 18.0
Wireframe views
Introduction
When you first create a new show document and enter CAD mode, WYSIWYG defaults
to the Wireframe view. All drawing is done in Wireframe view. Click the Quad tab to
display three Wireframe views and a shaded view of your drawing.
Keyboard and mouse control
To modify the point of view
„
„
„
„
„
„
The arrow keys move you in their respective directions.
The PAGE UP and PAGE DOWN keys zoom you in and out. You can also roll the
middle mouse button up and down to zoom in and out. The zoom action is
centered on the mouse pointer rather than the center of the window.
In a 3D perspective view (isometric or shaded), the CTRL key, in combination with
any of the aforementioned keys, rotates you around your drawing.
Holding down the middle mouse button will allow you to drag the drawing around
the window. Alternatively, the Pan tool on the View toolbar also enables this type of
movement
.
At any time you can use the SHIFT key in combination with any of the movement
keys to move in smaller increments.
In shaded views, the mouse can substitute all key strokes. Click and drag to pan
around and use the mouse wheel for zooming.
Zoom tools
Zoom tools allow you to view smaller or larger sections of a plot or drawing. There are
seven zoom tools available in WYSIWYG.
Note: The zoom tools are not applicable in the Shaded view; to zoom in or out in this
view, use the arrow keys or the roller wheel on your mouse instead.
To access the Zoom tools
1
From the Zoom menu, choose one of the Zoom tools.
Tip: You may also use the Zoom tools on the View toolbar.
Result: The viewpoint is adjusted accordingly.
The Zoom tools that are available are listed in the following table.
68
Zoom tool
Description
Zoom In
Moves your viewpoint closer to
the center of the view.
Zoom Out
Moves your viewpoint farther
away from the center of the
view.
November 2006
WYSIWYG user interface
Zoom tool
Description
Zoom Fit
Adjusts the viewpoint so that the
extremities of the drawing fit into
the current view.
Zoom Fit All (only available on For Quad layout, adjusts the
the Zoom menu)
viewpoint so that the extremities
of the drawing fit into the three
Wireframe views simultaneously.
In Wireframe view, adjusts the
viewpoint so that the extremities
of the drawing fit the window.
Zoom Previous
Resets the view to the previous
pan and zoom settings.
Zoom Next
If you used the Zoom Previous
tool, Zoom Next sets the view to
the next pan and zoom settings.
Zoom Window
Allows you to specify the area of
the drawing to be viewed. For
more information on using this
tool, refer to the procedure
below.
To use the Zoom Window tool
1
In Wireframe view, from the Zoom menu, choose the Zoom Window tool.
2
Click the left mouse button and drag a window around the area into which you
want to zoom.
3
Click the left mouse button again to capture the second point of the window.
Result: The view changes to the area that you have selected.
View shortcuts
View shortcuts record the plot type as well as the zoom and pan settings of a specific
point of view. You can use the shortcut to get back to that exact view point the next
time you need to.
To record a view shortcut
1
Set up the active window for the plot type, zoom, and pan settings you wish to
record.
2
Right-click on the Views shortcut bar, and then choose New View.
3
Type a name for the new shortcut, and then click OK.
Result: The shortcut is recorded and available on the Views shortcut bar.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
69
WYSIWYG user interface
Release 18.0
To modify the properties of a view shortcut
1
Right-click on the Views shortcut icon that you want to modify, and then select
Properties.
Result: The View Shortcut Properties dialog box is displayed.
2
In the Name box, type the new name of the shortcut.
3
To open the shortcut in the current active window, enable the Current Window option
button.
4
To open the shortcut in a pop-up frame, enable the Pop-Up Window option button.
For more information on popup frames, refer to “Popup frames” on page 53.
Modifying wireframe views
The properties of a wireframe view affect how objects are drawn and how much
information is visible. These settings are modified in the View Options.
To modify a wireframe view
1
Ensure the wireframe view that you want to modify is active.
2
From the Options menu, choose View Options.
Result: The View Options window appears.
Tip: You can also use the View Options tool
view options.
70
3
Modify options as desired.
4
Click OK.
on the Standard toolbar to open the
November 2006
WYSIWYG user interface
General tab
Options on the General tab affect the current scene.
„
„
Name: Name of the wireframe view.
Follow User Scene: Select this check box to use the currently selected scene. Click to
clear this check box, and then select the desired scene from the Scenes drop-down
list. To learn more about scenes, refer to “Editing objects” on page 145.
Tip: You can also change the current scene at any time by using the drop-down list
on the Scene toolbar.
Draw Options tab
Options on the Draw Options tab affect the draw defaults. This tab is similar in function
to the Draw Defaults tab available in User Options. For more information on the Draw
Defaults tab, refer to “Draw Defaults tab” on page 96.
„
„
Use User Defaults: Select this check box to reference the options selected on the
Draw Defaults tab of User Options. Click to clear the Use User Defaults check box to
make specific changes for the active view.
Get User Defaults: Retrieves the values set on the Draw Defaults tab of User Options.
View Type tab
Options on the View Type tab affect the plot type of the active view.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
71
WYSIWYG user interface
„
Release 18.0
View Type: The view types available are as discussed in “Plot types” on page 108.
Tip: The view type can be toggled using the tools on the CAD Options toolbar.
„
Scrollbars On: Select this check box to display the scrollbars on the bottom and left
side edges of the wireframe view. Click to clear this check box to turn the
scrollbars off.
Show Details tab
Options on the Show Details tab affect what and how fixture, truss, text, and point
information is displayed. This tab is similar in function to the Show Details tab available in
User Options. For more information on the Show Details tab, refer to “Show Details tab”
on page 98.
„
Use User Details: Select this check box to reference the options selected on the Show
Details tab of User Options. Click to clear the Use User Defaults check box to make
specific changes for the active view.
72
November 2006
WYSIWYG user interface
Shaded views
Introduction
Shaded or open GL views offer a 3D perspective view of your drawing. Surfaces, truss,
and fixtures are “filled-in” or solid, rather than outlined as in wireframe views.
„
Shaded views are not available in WYSIWYG Report.
„
Shaded views will follow Scenes just like any other view.
Keyboard and mouse control
To modify the point of view
„
„
„
„
Use the arrow keys to move the position of the virtual target. PAGE UP/PAGE
DOWN will zoom you in and out.
Holding down CTRL and using the arrow keys or the PAGE UP/PAGE DOWN will
move the position of the virtual camera.
At any time you can use the SHIFT key in combination with any of the movement
keys to move in smaller increments.
The mouse pan tool can be set up to rotate the model or the camera around the
target. You can also use the mouse wheel to zoom in and out. The arrow keys will
continue to move the target position as you do this.
Modifying shaded views
The properties of a shaded view affect the view point, fixture beam quality, and ambient
light. These settings are modified in the View Options.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
73
WYSIWYG user interface
Release 18.0
To modify a shaded view
1
From the Options menu, choose View Options.
Result: The View Options window is displayed.
Tip: You can also use the View Options tool
view options.
2
Modify options as desired.
3
Click OK.
on the Standard toolbar to open the
General tab
Options on the General tab affect the scene that is displayed in the shaded view.
„
Follow User Scene: Select this check box to use the scene that is displayed in the
drop-down list on the Scene toolbar. Click to clear the check box, and then select
the desired scene from the Scene drop-down list. To learn more about scenes, refer
to “Scenes” on page 165.
Tip: You can also change the current scene at any time by using the Scene toolbar.
74
November 2006
WYSIWYG user interface
Options tab
Options on the Options tab affect the view point, beam quality, and ambient light levels.
„
Camera: Select a camera to change the point of view. Click Set to Default to remove
any previous association with a camera and to display the original view point.
Notes:
„
„
„
„
„
This button is enabled only if None is selected in the Camera drop-down list. You
may need to click this button a few times to return the view point to its original
setting. To learn more about cameras, refer to “Drawing cameras” on page
142.
You can also control the camera view point with the camera toolbar. For
details, see “Using the Camera toolbar” on page 143.
Ambient Light: Use the slider to increase or decrease the amount of ambient light
level shown in the shaded view.
Background Color: Modifies the background color used in the shaded view. This color
is visible when you zoom far enough away that you can see beyond the venue.
Beam Simulation Quality: Choose one of the following beam simulation qualities:
Wireframe. An outline of the footprint is shown and the beam is drawn based on the
outline.
Regular. The true footprint is shown, but objects are not illuminated.
Light Up. Objects in the path of the beam are illuminated and a full footprint is
shown.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
75
WYSIWYG user interface
Release 18.0
The figures below illustrate the different levels of beam quality.
„
Display Target: Select the check box to show the focus point of the selected camera
in the shaded view. Choose the color of the displayed target by clicking the Color
box, and then selecting the color from the resulting palette. The target is visible in
shaded views only.
„
„
76
Pan tool moves objects: Select this check box if you want to rotate the model on the
target. Click to clear the check box if you want the pan tool to rotate the camera
around the target.
You can use the right, left, up, and down arrow keys in addition to the mouse
button to pan to the desired location:
Fast Background Rendering: Select this check box if you want to render the beams
and not the background. The background is displayed as a pasted image and the
beams are rendered on top of the background.
Chapter 5
Managing your WYSIWYG
document
This chapter provides information on how to work with your WYSIWYG
document.
In this chapter
File menu
79
Options menu
85
WYSIWYG Viewer
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
100
77
Managing your WYSIWYG document
78
Release 18.0
November 2006
Managing your WYSIWYG document
File menu
Introduction
The File menu contains the basic commands required to manipulate your WYSIWYG
document.
The File menu is the same in all the modes.
New command
The New command creates a new show document. If another show document is
currently open, you will be prompted to save changes to that document before a new
untitled file is created. Only one show document may be open at a time.
To create a new document
From the File menu, choose New.
Tip: You can also use the New tool on the Standard toolbar.
Open command
The Open command opens a previously created show document. If another show
document is currently open, you will be prompted to save changes to that document
before another show document is opened. Only one show document may be open at a
time.
To open an existing document
1
From the File menu, choose Open.
2
Select the file, and then click Open.
You can open the following file types:
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
WYSIWYG files (.wyg)
WYSIWYG template (.wyt)
Vivien files (.vvn)
Vivien template files (.vvt)
WYSIWYG backup files (.bak)
Wysiwygv2 files (.wys)
DWG files (.dwg)
DXF files (.dxf)
LW2 files (.lw2)
DWG/DXF Export
This command exports the current show document to a DWG or DXF formatted file
type. DWG and DXF formats are used to transfer documents to AutoCAD or other
compatible drafting applications.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
79
Managing your WYSIWYG document
Release 18.0
To export to DWG or DXF format
For details, see “To export to DWG/DXF in 2D” on page 118.
Save command
The Save command saves the open document to the same file name and location
(folder, disk, and so on) under which it was previously saved. If you are saving the
document for the first time, this command will perform the Save As function.
To save your document
From the File menu, choose Save.
Tip: You can also use the Save tool on the Standard toolbar.
Save As command
The Save As command is used to save the current document to a new file name, a new
file type, or new destination, such as a floppy disk.
To save the current document
1
From the File menu, choose Save As.
2
In the dialog box that opens, browse to the location where you want to save the
file. Ensure that the destination appears in the Save in box.
3
In the File name box, type a name for the file.
4
In the Save as type box, choose the saved file type. There are a number of choices
available.
5
Click Save.
Note: WYSIWYG allows you to save an object or group of objects contained within
your document as a separate file.
To save an object
1
Ensure the object(s) to be saved are selected.
2
From the File menu, choose Save As.
Result: The following dialog box is displayed.
80
3
Click Full Document to save the current document to a new file name, file type, or
new destination. You are prompted to enter the destination and file name of the
file.
4
Click Selected Objects to save the selected object(s) as a separate WYSIWYG (.wyg)
document.
5
Click Use 0,0,0 as Basepoint to align the incoming drawing at 0,0,0 with the existing
drawing.
November 2006
Managing your WYSIWYG document
6
Click Select Basepoint with mouse to use the mouse to select the basepoint for the
merge of the CAD drawings.
7
Click OK.
Template files
The WYSIWYG Save As command lists a file type called .WYT. WYSIWYG template files
are similar to the type of template file you may use on your word processor to set up
fax cover sheets, memos, or letters. Once you have drawn your venue with all of its
lighting positions and everything else that is common to all shows, save it as a .WYT file
in the \Templates directory. Each time you start a new drawing, that file will be available
as a template to start from.
You can also enter all your lighting equipment inventory into the Flight Case and save
that as a template. When users start their drawings with your template, they will not
have to choose from an endless list of fixtures but rather just what you have in stock.
This is also the ideal option for saving your preferred working settings. Template files
save all the shortcuts including custom reports, plots, and so on. However, toolbar
settings are not saved in template files since they are saved by the application.
A list of most recently opened template files appears under the heading Create New Plot
on the WYSIWYG welcome screen. The more... link will prompt you to open a template
file from the WYSIWYG Templates directory.
To save a template file
1
In an active view, and with no objects selected, from the File menu, choose Save
As.
2
In the dialog box that opens, browse to the location where you want to save the
file. Ensure that the destination appears in the Save in box. To ensure that your
template file is available on the WYSIWYG Welcome screen, save your file to the
WYSIWYG/Templates directory.
3
In the File name box, type a name for the file.
4
In the Save as type box, choose WYSIWYG Template files (*.wyt).
5
Click Save.
Merge command
The Merge command is used to combine multiple show documents into one. All file
types that can be opened directly by WYSIWYG can also be merged. Therefore, an
existing WYSIWYG document can be merged with
„
other WYSIWYG documents
„
DWG/DXF files
„
Lightwright2 files
To merge WYSIWYG documents
1
Open or create the destination document.
2
From the File menu, choose Merge.
3
In the dialog box that opens, choose the source file.
Note: You can change the types of visible files using the File type box.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
81
Managing your WYSIWYG document
4
Release 18.0
Click Open.
Result: The file you selected is merged with the current file.
Note: For information on merging DWG/DXF documents, see “Merging a DWG/DXF
document” on page 115.
Close command
The Close command closes the current show document and returns you to the Welcome
window.
To close a show document
1
From the File menu, choose Close.
2
When prompted to save changes to the current show document, click Yes to save
changes and close the document.
Note: Click No to skip saving and close the document. Click Cancel to skip saving
and keep the document open.
Print command
The Print command varies from mode to mode. In general, this command prints the
active view to the selected printer.
To print a document
From the File menu, choose Print.
Result: Based on the mode you are in, the program may print the document directly or
it may open the following dialog box so that you can set printing options:
Considerations when printing from CAD mode
The Print command opens the Print dialog box.
82
November 2006
Managing your WYSIWYG document
This dialog box displays the printer that is used to print your WYSIWYG document. The
printer shown is the default printer that you have set up in Windows. Click Setup to
change the printer or printer settings.
Select the Print to File check box to print your WYSIWYG document to a file instead of to
a printer. When you print, WYSIWYG prompts you to enter a file name and path.
The Print command prints the active window using the options you specify.
Print What options
„
„
„
„
Extents prints the entire drawing.
View prints the currently displayed view in the active window.
Window allows you to draw a window around the area you wish to print.
Last Window prints the portion contained in the last window you drew for a
Window print. If you have not used or previewed a Window print yet, this option
is unavailable.
Scaling options
„
„
„
Fit will print the drawing to the scale required to fill the available print area
based on the selection in the Print What group box. When you select this check
box, the drawing will print to fit.
If the Fit check box is deselected, you must choose the scale from the dropdown list. Standard scales are displayed in this menu. If the scale you want to
use is not displayed, choose Custom.
When Custom is selected, you must enter the ratio. Type the ratio in the On Paper
and Real World boxes. The value in the On Paper box is the scale ratio that you
want to use on a paper copy of the document. The value in the Real World box is
the “real” measurement for the scale ratio that you specify in the On Paper box.
For example, you may want to use a scaling of one inch in a paper copy of your
document. This one inch measurement translates to a “realistic” measurement
(for example, 3 feet).
The value in the Point Size box is the size at which points are printed.
While it is possible to print your drawing directly from the CAD mode, it is preferable to
print plots from the Presentation mode. Presentation mode includes the ability to lay
out your plot with multiple views, reports, borders, and title blocks. Refer to “Printing
layouts” on page 332 for more information about printing plots.
Print Preview command
Print Preview displays the document as it will look when printed. This allows you to
double-check that the printed output is exactly what you want.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
83
Managing your WYSIWYG document
Release 18.0
Print Setup command
The Print Setup dialog box allows you to choose the print destination, the page
orientation and size, and paper tray (if applicable). The print destination may be a
physical printer, or it may be a file type or fax program, for example. Paper size and
source options will correspond to the printer type selected.
Send command
The Send command allows you to send your document to someone by e-mail. You must
be connected to the Internet to use this feature. WYSIWYG will create a new message
in your default mail program with the current WYSIWYG file attached.
Recent file shortcuts
The list of recent files at the bottom of the File menu gives you quick access to the last
four files opened. This list will continually update as show documents are opened. If the
file you are looking for is not on this list, use the Open command.
To open a recent file
1
From the File menu, choose the file you want to open.
2
If another show document is currently open, you are prompted to save changes to
that document before another show document is opened. Only one show document
may be open at a time.
Exit command
Use the Exit command to exit WYSIWYG. If you have made changes to your document
but have not saved yet, you will be prompted to save your changes before exiting.
To exit WYSIWYG
1
From the File menu, choose Exit.
2
When prompted to save changes to the current show document, click Yes to save
changes and exit WYSIWYG.
Note: Click No to skip saving and exit WYSIWYG. Click Cancel to skip saving and
not exit WYSIWYG.
84
November 2006
Managing your WYSIWYG document
Options menu
Introduction
WYSIWYG offers you many options to customize the functionality of the software. You
can view and set options on the Options menu.
The Options menu is the same in all the modes.
Application Options window
Application Options are general settings for the WYSIWYG software and apply to the
entire application regardless of the show file that you are working on. You might want to
update these settings to display specific toolbars or indicate your file-saving
preferences, for example.
To modify the application options
1
From the Options menu, choose Application Options.
Result: The Application Options dialog box is displayed.
General tab
Options on the General tab affect the pipe tape printer, the numeric separators used in
WYSIWYG, and the properties for the startup wizard.
„
Device: Specify whether or not the pipe tape printer has a tape cutter.
„
Port: Specify which port on your computer the pipe tape printer is connected to.
„
„
Baud: Specify the baud rate at which the pipe tape printer is running. The baud rate
is the rate at which your modem can transmit and receive data.
Flow Control: Select the method of data control between the pipe tape printer and
the machine. Available options are Hardware, Software, and None. The default is
Hardware.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
85
Managing your WYSIWYG document
„
Release 18.0
Use converter: Select this check box to indicate that a USB Serial converter is to be
used.
„
Delay Buffer: Type the buffer size for the USB Serial converter.
„
Decimal: Select the method for separating whole numbers from decimals. Available
options are comma and period. Note that the decimal separator cannot be the
same as the co-ordinate separator.
„
Co-ordinate: Select the method you want to use to separate coordinates in
WYSIWYG. Available options are comma, period, semicolon, colon, or slash. Note
that the co-ordinate separator cannot be the same as the decimal separator.
„
Region profile for new documents: The profile to be used for such items as voltage and
which default lamp should be used in a fixture.
„
„
Look for network dongle: If you have a WYSIWYG Network product installed (for
example, WYSIWYG Learn, Network, AWT, or CSP), you must click this check box
to ensure that the program looks for a network dongle when you launch WYSIWYG.
If you do not have WYSIWYG Network installed, leave this check box deselected.
Note that if you choose “Network product” in WYSIWYG Product Configuration
Wizard, then this check box is automatically selected.
Show WYSIWYG configuration wizard in startup: Click this check box if you want to see
the product configuration wizard each time you launch WYSIWYG. The wizard
enables you to choose the level of WYSIWYG that you want to run (for example, it
gives you the option of launching a standard version of WYSIWYG, such as Report
or Design, or a network version of WYSIWYG). If you leave this check box
deselected, the same level of WYSIWYG that you chose when running the program
for the first time appears by default.
File Options tab
Settings on the File Options tab affect your file saving settings. It is important to save
your work often during your work session. WYSIWYG has an Auto Save function that
will help to keep your data safe; however, it is always a good idea to get in the habit of
saving your show document to an external disk periodically during your work session.
„
86
Auto Recover: Select this check box to save your document at the intervals specified
in the Auto Recover save interval box. If, for some reason, WYSIWYG closes
unexpectedly, such as in the case of a power loss, your document can be
recovered. This recovery will only be up-to-date as of the last Auto Save, so it is
recommended that you do not set this interval to be too long.
November 2006
Managing your WYSIWYG document
„
„
„
Keep backup files: select this check box to save a copy of your document with the
“.bak” extension every time you save the file. The backup copy is one save behind
the saved copy and is saved in the same folder as the original document. Each new
backup copy replaces the previous backup copy. If the main show document
becomes corrupted, you can open the backup file to recover your data.
The default settings for these options are Auto Recover enabled with an interval of
10 minutes and Keep backup files enabled.
Save external textures within the document: Select this check box if you want the jpeg
and/or bitmap used as textures to be saved within your WYSIWYG document. The
textures will “travel” with the document and will be visible regardless of the
computer on which the document is opened.
Reload last document on startup: Select this check box to ensure that the last
document that you have been working on in WYSIWYG is loaded automatically
when you launch WYSIWYG.
„
Default to Read Only: Select this check box to load documents in read-only format.
This format is helpful if you are loading someone else’s document and you do not
want to accidentally make changes to it.
„
Reset DWG import association: Click this button to reset the association of specific
blocks in DWG files with certain pre-selected fixtures. When you import DWG files,
one of the options is to associate a block that is found in a DWG file with a specific
fixture. If you decide to remember this association for future imports, all blocks
with that name will be imported as the chosen fixture.
Direct3D tab
Options on the Direct3D tab affect the setting of the DirectX components to be used for
graphics. You can select these components manually or have them automatically
detected. By default, WYSIWYG uses Open GL graphics technology in all simulation
views. If you want, you can set WYSIWYG to use Direct 3D instead of Open GL, in which
case the following options are available:
„
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Auto Detect: WYSIWYG attempts to find a DirectX driver that corresponds to the
options you have set for Acceleration and Color. The driver that it chooses is
highlighted in the list of available drivers below.
Acceleration: Enables either hardware or software (emulation) acceleration.
Hardware acceleration uses the capabilities of the graphics hardware of the
computer to display graphics. Emulation uses the emulation library or software
components to display graphics.
Color: Enables either full or ramp color.
87
Managing your WYSIWYG document
Release 18.0
Full displays the full color content of the fixture sources and the material of the
object being lit. This is the default option.
Ramp displays only the grey component of each fixture specified in a scene. The
color components of the fixtures are ignored.
You can also manually select a DirectX driver from the list of drivers. The list
changes based on the current video card and mode.
OpenGL tab
Options on the OpenGL tab affect the type of simulation that you want to use.
„
„
Fast Simulation: Enables hardware acceleration. Hardware acceleration uses the
capabilities of the graphics hardware of the computer to display graphics. This is
the default option.
Fast Simulation for Primary Display Only: Enables hardware acceleration for the primary
emulation.
„
Safe Simulation: enables software emulation.
Toolbars tab
Options on the Toolbars tab affect which toolbars and status bar panes you want to
display in WYSIWYG.
88
November 2006
Managing your WYSIWYG document
You can also hide the tooltips that display information about a specific fixture when you
hover over the fixture. Tooltips are displayed by default. For more information on
toolbars, refer to “Toolbars” on page 59.
Compatibility tab
Options on the Compatibility tab affect the processing power for beam simulation.
„
Number of Threads: Select the number of processors that you have available on your
computer for beam simulation. Modify this number only if you upgrade the number
of processors.
Render Options tab
Options on the Render Options tab affect the memory and processing power available for
rendering.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
89
Managing your WYSIWYG document
„
„
Release 18.0
Number of Threads: Select the number of processors available for rendering. Modify
this number only if you upgrade the number of processors on your computer.
Memory Size: Select the amount of memory the renderer can use for temporary
files. Eight MB is the default and should be sufficient for most computers. If you
are running many applications, you may want to decrease this number, or if your
computer has a lot of RAM, you may want to increase this number.
„
Write log files: Select this check box to generate a log file during rendering.
ETC Interface tab
Options on the ETC Interface tab affect the options that will allow you to monitor EDMX
data directly. Direct EDMX reception allows WYSIWYG Perform users to monitor EDMX
data without the need to connect to a console with the Device Manager.
„
ETCNet2Version: Select which ETCNet2 network version you want to monitor. You
can monitor only one version at a time.
„
Allow EDMX reception: Select this check box to enable direct EDMX reception in
WYSIWYG.
„
Show SAF message notification box: Select this check box if you want to receive error
messages in Link mode whenever there are problems with an ETC dimmer rack.
90
November 2006
Managing your WYSIWYG document
Show Options window
Show settings that are specific to the current show file, such as show name, designer,
and venue, are set in the Show Options dialog box. You might want to modify these
settings when you start a new show file. Error conditions and the appearance of certain
objects in your show file are also specified in Show Options. To open the Show Options
dialog box, from the Options menu, click Show Options.
Document Summary tab
Options on the Document Summary tab affect the document information (such as name of
the person who created the document and the name of the person who last modified
the document). The date stamps are not editable, but will track the creation and
modification dates of the file.
Show Info tab
Options on the Show Info tab affect the venue, show, Designer, and Assistant’s names
that are displayed in your show document.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
91
Managing your WYSIWYG document
Release 18.0
Object Defaults tab
Options on the Object Defaults tab affect the default settings for the regional profile. The
profile that you choose determines items such as the type of bulb to use in a particular
fixture. This also sets how points will be displayed (as crosses, dots, squares, or
circles).
„
Point type: Indicates the default point type in your show document. You can choose
to display points as dots, crosses, squares, or circles.
„
„
„
Region profile: The geographical region where the show will be occurring. This
setting establishes the profile for voltage and consequently, what will be used for
such items as light bulbs in a fixture.
Reset Label Layouts: Click to reset all fixture labelling to the default settings.
Set Default Font for Presentation Views: Click to select a default font for presentation
views.
Object Settings tab
Options on the Object Settings tab affect how various objects are placed or drawn in CAD
mode.
92
November 2006
Managing your WYSIWYG document
„
„
AutoUnit: Select this check box to automatically assign a unit number to each fixture
that is hung. This option is available for pipes only. It does not apply to truss.
Snap: Select this check box to enable pipe snap. Pipe snap places fixtures on a pipe
at a specific interval as specified in the Interval box. For information on snaps, refer
to “Pipe snap” on page 188.
„
„
Enforce Spacing: Select this check box to indicate that the spacing you specify in the
Minimum Spacing box is enforced.
Minimum Spacing: Type the minimum spacing between fixtures. This option prevents
you from hanging the fixtures too close to one another. The minimum spacing
cannot be greater than the value you specify in the Interval box.
„
Interval: Type the distance between fixtures. This option is used for pipe snaps.
„
Line up symbols: Select this check box to line up fixture symbols at specific angles,
and then select an increment from the drop-down list. Symbols will shift from their
focused position to the nearest increment of the chosen angle. For example,
symbols will be drawn in one of four directions when the increment is set to 90
degrees. This setting does not affect the focus of the beam; rather it is intended
for the “cleanliness” of the printed plot.
„
Weight: Type the default weight of a line when it is printed or viewed using print
preview.
„
Manu: Type the manufacturer’s code for those fixtures that are autofocuscompatible.
„
Prod: Type the product code for those fixtures that are autofocus-compatible.
„
Facet Splitting: Select this check box to enable facet splitting in shaded views. Facet
splitting splits objects in a plot into small triangles for a smooth beam fallout
during simulation in a shaded view.
„
Facet Resolution: Type the size of the triangles. The more triangles you have the
more realistic the cosine distribution will be. However, this also decreases the
simulation speed. Note that this is applicable to Direct 3D only.
„
Segments: Type the number of segments into which you want to break a cylinder or
sphere.
Report tab
Options on the Report tab affect the default values for empty or non-applicable cells in
spreadsheets.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
93
Managing your WYSIWYG document
Release 18.0
Data Error tab
Options on the Data Error tab control what types of data errors trigger notification boxes
and status bar notifications.
For more information on data errors, refer to “Errors” on page 245.
Regional settings tab
Options on the Regional settings tab set the geographic location of your show. You can
either select the country and city or enter the latitude and longitude of the location.
These settings are primarily used for renderings that use environmental options.
94
November 2006
Managing your WYSIWYG document
„
„
Custom: Select this check box to enter the latitude and longitude values in the
Latitude and Longitude boxes, respectively. Click to clear this check box to select a
country and city from the Country and City drop-down lists, respectively.
Time Zone: After selecting Custom, select the time zone for your show. When you
select a time zone, the current time as set on your computer is displayed in the
Current Time box. The GMT value is also shown.
Note: The values that you enter on this tab are reflected in Step 6 of the Render
Wizard. For more information on the Render Wizard, refer to “Rendering” on page 354.
View Options dialog box
View options set how objects are drawn and displayed in Wireframe and shaded views.
For more information on View options for Wireframe views, refer to “Modifying
wireframe views” on page 70.
For more information on View options for shaded views, refer to “Modifying shaded
views” on page 73.
User Options dialog box
The User Options dialog box enables you to set up your working preferences. You might,
for example, want to specify how the snap operation will work or how much information
will be displayed on your plot. The settings that you choose are in effect for the entire
time that you are working in WYSIWYG regardless of the show file that you are working
on.
To open the User Options dialog box, click Options > User Options.
User tab
Options on the User tab affect the current scene selection, options, pipe drawing mode,
missing co-ordinate, and focus mode settings.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
95
Managing your WYSIWYG document
„
„
„
Release 18.0
Paste Base point: Select this check box to enter a base point before an object is
copied or cut. This will be the object’s reference point for paste commands. Click to
clear this check box to allow the base point to be the insertion point of the object.
Interactive object creation: Select this check box to allow yourself to draw objects
using the mouse instead of entering values in dialog boxes.
Automatically group truss: Select this check box to group truss objects together in a
similar manner to choosing Group from the Edit menu. This option is helpful in that
it treats the truss as a single unit and allows you to perform actions more
effectively on multiple objects. If you want to edit one truss object, you must first
use the Ungroup command on the Edit menu to remove the grouping from the
truss objects.
„
„
Prompt to put deleted fixtures in flight case. Select this check box to be prompted when
you delete a fixture. You will be prompted to delete it completely or send it to the
Flight Case. If you choose to send it to the Flight Case, the fixture is reserved for
you in case you want to reinsert it.
Show fixture notes when inserting. Select this check box to display the fixture notes
when you are hanging fixtures, if applicable to the selected fixture.
„
Pipe drawing mode: Sets the preference for drawing pipes (either from the start or
from the center). For more information on drawing pipes, refer to “Drawing pipes”
on page 137.
„
Missing coordinate: Sets missing coordinate options. For more information on
missing coordinates, refer to “The missing coordinate” on page 106.
„
Focus mode: Allows you to choose to focus a fixture as you hang it in your drawing.
Specify one of the following options to set how a fixture will react after you hang it
in a plot:
„ None. This setting indicates that you can continue to hang fixtures
uninterrupted.
„ Focus after hang. If enabled, you will be prompted to focus each fixture as you
hang it. Once the fixture is focused, you can continue hanging other fixtures.
„ Focus towards origin. If enabled, the fixtures that you hang are automatically
focused towards the user origin as you hang them. You can continue to hang
other fixtures uninterrupted.
Draw Defaults tab
Options on the Draw Defaults tab affect general preferences for snap, grid, and units
settings.
96
November 2006
Managing your WYSIWYG document
„
Snap To: Enables or disables snap. For more information, refer to “Snaps” on page
109. Snap tools can be toggled at any time using the tools on the CAD Options
toolbar.
„
SnapBox Size: Sets the size of the snap box that appears around the cursor when in
snap mode. Consequently, this affects how close the cursor must be to the objects
before the snap is applied.
„
Enable Grip Dragging: Select this check box if you want to be able to resize objects by
clicking and dragging on their markers.
„
Cross Hairs On: Select this check box to set the cursor display to use cross hairs in
plot views. Cross hairs are useful for lining up objects.
„
„
„
Units of measure: For more information on these units, refer to “Metric vs. Imperial”
on page 105. The units can be toggled from metric to imperial at any time by
double-clicking on the units display on the status bar.
Precision: affects the units of drawing precision. For more information on these
units, refer to “Coordinate notation” on page 104. Based on your choice for
measurement units, you can choose to display the drawing precision in
centimeters, millimeters, whole numbers, or fractions.
Background Color: The color that will be used in all wireframe views. Click the box to
choose a different color.
„
„
Interval: Select the spacing between points on the drawing grid. Although the
WYSIWYG drawing grid might not be visible, it exists in the background. The
settings in this group box are important when using the snap to grid tool. For more
information on this tool, refer to “Snaps” on page 109.
Origin: The point of origin. For more information on the origin, refer to “Coordinate
system and origin” on page 104.
„
Angle: Select the angle of rotation for the drawing grid. Although the WYSIWYG
drawing grid might not be visible, it exists in the background. The settings in this
group box are important when using the snap to grid tool. For more information on
this tool, refer to “Snaps” on page 109.
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Visible Grid: Select the On/Off check box if you want to add a grid to your wireframe
view (in every view except isometric). Then click the Grid Color box to choose the
colour for the grid lines. You can also choose the style of the grid by selecting the
appropriate option button. Standard creates a grid with evenly spaced, closed
squares. Open creates a grid with open squares. Point creates a grid of dots. The
lines in the resulting grid are spaced at the interval specified in the Interval box. If
the interval is short, you may have to zoom in on your plot to see the gridlines.
97
Managing your WYSIWYG document
Release 18.0
Show Details tab
Options on the Show Details tab affect the amount of information that is shown on your
drawing. This includes how much data is shown on the plot.
„
Fixture data shown on plot: Indicates the fixture data that you want to display on your
drawing.
„
„
„
Show Text Labels: Select this check box to display text labels.
Enable Tooltips: Displays tooltips on your drawing. Tooltips are the pop-up messages
that display specific information about a fixture when you hover over it. Choose the
information that you want to display in a tooltip by selecting the appropriate check
boxes in the Fixture tooltips group box. Tooltips are often helpful when trying to
locate a specific fixture in a plot.
Draw Symbols: Select this check box to draw fixtures as symbols rather than as 3D
objects. For more information on symbols, refer to “Symbols” on page 205.
„
„
„
Show beams for selected fixtures: Select this check box to automatically turn on beams
when selecting a fixture on your drawing. If you do not select this box, the beam is
not visible when you select a fixture.
Show truss cross-members: Click to clear this check box to hide truss cross members
on your drawing to reduce the clutter or to increase the speed of the display. Select
this check box to see the cross members.
Point Size: Select the default size for all points. You can view a sample of the chosen
size in the box to the right.
Simulation tab
Options on the Simulation tab are only set for WYSIWYG Design and Perform. These
settings determine how detailed simulation views are, and can affect the speed of beam
simulation in simulation views.
98
November 2006
Managing your WYSIWYG document
For more information on simulation options, refer to “Visualization” on page 349.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
99
Managing your WYSIWYG document
Release 18.0
WYSIWYG Viewer
The WYSIWYG Viewer is a separate application that allows non-WYSIWYG users to view
and print your WYSIWYG (.wyg) files. It is beneficial to those individuals who are
interested in viewing or printing a WYSIWYG file but who do not own a licensed copy of
WYSIWYG.
Any file with a .wyg file extension can be viewed and printed from the WYSIWYG
Viewer.
Since Presentation mode is the only mode available in the WYSIWYG Viewer, ensure
that all relevant information is available in this mode before opening your file in the
WYSIWYG Viewer. All functionality except navigation and printing has been disabled.
Users cannot edit files, nor can they insert items into a file. For more information on
preparing your file in Presentation mode, refer to Chapter 9, “Presentation mode.”
You can download the WYSIWYG Viewer from the Cast Software Web site at
www.cast-soft.com.
100
Chapter 6
CAD mode
CAD mode is where you create your show drawings. This includes drawing your
venue, set pieces, lighting positions, focus positions, and lighting fixtures. CAD
mode operates like many other CAD programs, so many of the concepts will be
familiar to those who have used a computer-aided drafting program before.
WYSIWYG adds features that are specific to the entertainment industry, such as
a comprehensive 3D library containing truss, lighting equipment, lighting
accessories, props, musical instruments, and various human figures.
In this chapter
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Layout tabs
103
The CAD environment
104
The Library Browser
122
Drawing objects
126
Editing objects
145
CAD tools
167
Hang structures
177
Hanging and focusing fixtures
185
Color, gobos, and accessories
210
Light Emitting Surface Wizard
216
The Flight Case
223
Rendering
226
101
CAD mode
102
Release 18.0
November 2006
CAD mode
Layout tabs
Beneath the work area in each mode is a series of layout tabs. These layouts provide
various configurations of the views you are working with. To change layouts, click the
tab that corresponds to the layout you wish to use. The CAD mode contains the
following layouts:
„
„
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Wireframe - The work area displays a full-screen wireframe view.
Quad - The work area is divided into quadrants, three of which can be modified to
show plan, front, side, or isometric wireframe views. The lower-right quadrant
contains a shaded view.
Flight Case - The Flight Case is displayed in a section of the work area along with a
wireframe view.
Shaded - The work area displays a full-screen shaded view.
103
CAD mode
Release 18.0
The CAD environment
Scales
When drawing in WYSIWYG, you are drawing in real scale (1:1). When you create a
drawing in CAD, you are generating a virtual representation of your real set-up. If you
were to do this on paper by hand, you would need to draw a scaled-down version of
your space. However, since there are no paper size limitations in CAD mode, you can
draw your venue, sets, pipes, trusses, and lighting fixtures in real scale.
Scaling down for printing purposes is done during print set-up and in the Presentation
mode when creating plots. These settings allow you to print your drawings in whatever
scales are necessary without having to redraw anything.
Coordinate system and origin
When working in CAD you are working in a 3D environment (even in WYSIWYG Report).
Objects are drawn as 3D objects, with width, depth, and height values using the
Cartesian coordinate system of 3 working axes X, Y, and Z. The point where the 3 axes
meet is called the origin and the value of X, Y, and Z is 0 respectively (0,0,0).
By default, the origin is set at the center point of the WYSIWYG venue that you insert.
Inserting venues is discussed in “Drawing a venue” on page 126. You can reset the
origin to another point in your drawing; you can set a user origin so that a different
point will assume the values (0,0,0).
To set the user origin
1
From the Tools menu, choose Set User Origin.
Tip: You can also use the Origin tool on the Tools toolbar.
2
Click a point on your drawing or type in the coordinates (X,Y,Z) that will assume
the values 0,0,0. This point will remain 0,0,0 until you change it again.
To reset the user origin
From the Tools menu, choose Reset User Origin.
Result: This resets the origin back to the WYSIWYG default.
Coordinate notation
When entering coordinates in WYSIWYG, you can specify a location or distance in either
inch fractions (to the sixteenth of an inch) or millimeters. For example, you can specify
a measurement of 1’6”3/16”, which translates to 1 foot, 6 and 3/16 inches.
To set default options
104
1
From the Options menu, choose View Options.
2
Click the Draw Options tab.
November 2006
CAD mode
3
Clear the Use User Defaults check box to modify the default setting for Precision.
4
Based on your choice for measurement units, you can choose to display the
drawing resolution in whole numbers, fractions, centimeters, or millimeters.
„
„
Whole - (Only visible if you choose Imperial units.) Indicates that the
measurements are rounded and displayed to the nearest whole number.
Fraction - Indicates that the measurements are displayed to the nearest
sixteenths of an inch.
„
cm - (Only visible if you choose Metric units.) Indicates that the measurements
are displayed in centimeters.
„
5
mm - Indicates that the measurements are displayed in millimeters.
Click OK.
Metric vs. Imperial
WYSIWYG enables you to use metric or imperial units at any time. You may choose to
set a default type of unit, and you may choose to switch unit type on the fly.
You can also indicate whether you want these units measured in whole numbers,
fractions (to the sixteenth of a inch), centimeters, or millimeters.
To set the default unit type
1
From the Options menu, choose User Options.
2
Click the Draw Defaults tab.
3
Click either Metric or Imperial.
4
Click Whole, Fraction, mm or cm.
Note: These choices vary based on whether you selected Metric or Imperial
in step 3.
To switch unit types on the fly
Double-click the units display on the status bar.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
105
CAD mode
Release 18.0
The missing coordinate
The missing coordinate (X,Y,or Z) is the coordinate whose value cannot be entered by
clicking on the screen. The easy way to determine which coordinate is the missing
coordinate in a wireframe view is to move the mouse around. Look at the status bar at
the bottom of the working area. You will see only two values changing. The value that is
not changing is the missing coordinate for that view or workplane. The missing
coordinate is dependent on the plot type and the workplane selected. In the following
example, Y is the missing coordinate as its value is set at 0’0”.
Once entered, this value affects all subsequent objects inserted in the current view. For
example, if the missing coordinate is set to 5’ in a plan view, all objects are placed 5
feet off the floor (X,Y,5) until the missing coordinate is changed again. Please note that
the missing coordinate is not a move tool. Objects will not be moved to the missing
coordinate value. The missing coordinate only affects subsequent inserts.
To enter a value for the missing coordinate
1
Press TAB on your keyboard or click the Missing Coordinate tool on the CAD Options
toolbar.
2
In the CAD coordinate box, type the value for the CAD coordinate.
3
In the Focus coordinate box, type a value for the focus coordinate if you want to
focus fixtures while inserting objects.
4
If you want to use only the CAD coordinate for focusing and placing/editing
objects, select the Use only one missing coordinate check box.
5
To automatically adjust the missing coordinate with any 3D coordinate value that
you enter on the command line, select the Automatically adjust with command line
check box.
6
Select the Show head height check box to display the coverage of beams at the head
height selected in the Head height box.
7
In the Head height box, type a value to check the light coverage at a certain height
(the height of the performer).
Note: This box is enabled when the Show head height circle check box is selected.
8
When you are finished with your selections, click OK.
Example
106
1
Change to the plan view in your drawing.
2
Press TAB, and then type a value of 0" for the missing CAD coordinate.
3
Insert a few objects on the stage. All of these objects are drawn resting on the
stage.
4
Change the missing CAD coordinate to a height of 10’.
November 2006
CAD mode
5
Insert a riser by clicking the Riser button on the toolbar.
6
Although we are in a plan view the riser has been drawn at the height of 10', as
specified in the missing coordinate dialog box.
7
Change to a side view and you will see that the riser has been placed above the
stage.
Tips:
„
„
You can use separate missing coordinates for focusing fixtures if you enter a
value for the Focus coordinate when pressing TAB. The advantage of this is that
you can be adding pipes and other CAD elements at the specified missing CAD
coordinate, but still focus the fixtures at an elevation of 5 feet, for example.
If you select the Show head height circle check box, and then type a value in the
Head height box, all subsequently focused fixture’s beams will display both the
coverage at the specified head height, as well as the footprint of the beam on
the surface below.
Command line
The command line is an area in WYSIWYG where you can enter coordinates for the
purpose of placing or editing objects in a document. The placement of objects can often
be done quicker and with more precision using the command line.
Generally, coordinates are specified as X, Y, Z. You can, however, insert coordinates
using either two or three values. When using two values, the third value will be
assumed from the missing coordinate. For more information on the missing coordinate,
refer to “The missing coordinate” on page 106.
The values that you specify in imperial mode are assumed to be in feet unless otherwise
specified. Similarly, the values that you specify in metric mode are assumed to be in
metres unless otherwise specified. At any time, you can specify values in both imperial
and metric measurements (for example, 5”, 3 cm, 6’).
The following example illustrates the many different ways of using the command line.
Example
1
In a plan view, from the Draw menu, choose Line.
2
From the sub-menu, choose Solid, Dot, Center, Hidden or Spline.
3
Type 0,0 as the starting point of the line.
Result: When you start typing, the ComEdit toolbar is displayed.
4
Press ENTER to establish the first point of the line at the origin.
5
To set the next point at exactly X=5 and Y=5, type 5,5, and then press ENTER.
Result: A new line segment is drawn and it assumes Z from the missing
coordinate.
6
To place the next point of the line 10 units to the right and 5 units up (in Y) from
the last point, type @10,5, and then press ENTER.
Result: A new line segment is drawn.
7
To place the next point at exactly 5 feet, 3 metres, and 6 inches from the last
point, type 5’, 3m, 6”, and then press ENTER.
Result: A new line segment is drawn.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
107
CAD mode
Release 18.0
8
When you are finished drawing the lines, right-click, and then select Finish Line.
Plot types
All objects occupy three-dimensional space. Different plot view types allow you to see
and work with your drawing from different perspectives.
There are six types of plot views accessible from the CAD Options toolbar. The following
definitions identify the working axes X, Y, and Z and the missing coordinate for each
plot type. The missing coordinate can be defined as the axis for which a value cannot be
set simply by clicking on the work space. For details, see “The missing coordinate” on
page 106.
Plan View
Plan views display the plot from above looking down. This is similar to a plan view
drawing on paper. In plan views the working axes are X and Y and the missing
coordinate is Z.
Left View
Left views display the plot looking from the left side through the venue. This is similar to
a section on paper. In left views the working axes are Y and Z and the missing
coordinate is X.
Right View
Right views display the plot looking from the right side through the venue. This is
similar to a section on paper. In right views the working axes are Y and Z and the
missing coordinate is X.
Front View
Front views display the plot looking from the front side through the venue. This is
similar to an elevation on paper. In front views the working axes are X and Z and the
missing coordinate is Y.
Back View
Back views display the plot looking from the back side through the venue. This is similar
to an elevation on paper. In back views the working axes are X and Z and the missing
coordinate is Y.
Isometric View
An Isometric view is a 3D perspective drawing. Despite this, you are still limited to two
working axes. In isometric views, the working axes and the missing coordinate are
dependent on the workplane selected. The workplanes available are:
108
„
plan
„
side
„
front
November 2006
CAD mode
If a plan workplane is selected, the working axes are X and Y and the missing
coordinate is Z.
If a side workplane is selected, the working axes are Y and Z and the missing coordinate
is X.
If a front workplane is selected, the working axes are X and Z and the missing
coordinate is Y.
The crosshairs of your cursor change to reflect the selected workplane.
Note: Isometric views are not available in WYSIWYG Report.
Ortho
Ortho mode constrains movement and drawing to a direction parallel to the specified
axis. When ortho mode is inactive, objects can be drawn or moved in any direction on
the workplane. You can draw diagonal lines or move objects anywhere in the working
area.
You can activate ortho at any time by clicking the ortho tools on the CAD Options toolbar
or by right-clicking the Ortho label on the status bar. You can also press F8 on the
keyboard or double-click the Ortho label on the status bar to toggle your last recorded
ortho setting on or off.
Notes:
„
„
„
The plot type determines the axes of movement: XY for plan views, YZ for side
views, XZ for front and back views.
To select the axes of movement with the toolbar buttons, click the appropriate two
buttons to select both of them. For example, to choose the XY axis, click the X and
Y buttons.
To deselect any ortho buttons that you have chosen, press F8; to reset the same
ortho selection as that which was previously made, press F8 again.
Snaps
Snaps are used to assist in the drawing and placement of objects. When a snap setting
is active, the cursor will be drawn to the applicable snap point. You can have multiple
snaps active at the same time. Snap selections can be made on the CAD Options toolbar
or from the Tools menu.
All snap tools function as follows: If no command is currently active, you can adjust the
running snap tool. This means that the snap type is always active. If you are in midcommand and you select a snap tool, it becomes a “one time only” snap type. After the
next click, the snap returns to the running snap. At any time you can toggle all snaps on
or off by pressing F9 or double-clicking on the SNAP text in the status bar.
„
Grid snap
Aligns the placement of objects to grid points. You can set the grid interval and angle in
the Draw Options page of the View Options window.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
109
CAD mode
Release 18.0
„
Point snap
Aligns the placement of objects to a point in the drawing.
„
Midpoint snap
Aligns the placement of objects to the mid-point of another line.
„
Endpoint snap
Aligns the placement of objects to the end-point of another line.
Fixture insertion points are considered points. It is therefore possible, using the Point
snap, to align the placement of objects to fixtures (snap to fixtures). This is useful for
dimensioning.
„
Centerpoint snap
Aligns the placement of objects to the center-point of circles, arcs, or cylinders.
„
Assembly snap
Use assembly snap to group multiple truss objects together as you insert them. This
ensures proper structural assembly. Refer to “Using Assembly snap with truss” on page
182 for more details about truss assembly.
„
Pipe snap
Constrains fixtures to placement on a pipe at a specific interval. For more information,
refer to “Pipe snap” on page 188.
„
Focus snap
Orients one or more fixtures to a focus position. When you choose this value, you can
also lock beam dragging to the incremental values of your choice, as specified in the Pan
and Tilt boxes of the Draw Options tab (the defaults are increments of 45 degrees for
pan and increments of 10 degrees for tilt). These are the values to which you want the
fixture's beam to “snap” while manually dragging and focusing it. For example, if you
set a value of 30 degrees, when you drag the fixture's beam, it will snap at 30 degrees,
60 degrees, 90 degrees, and so on. Note that any focus positions that you have set take
precedence over the pan and tilt values (if you drag the beam over the focus position, it
will automatically snap to the focus position instead).
110
November 2006
CAD mode
Interactive mode
Interactive mode is an alternative method for drawing objects. Objects are typically
drawn using a dialog box to set the object’s size (width, depth, and height, for
example). The full-size object is then attached to the cursor so you can place it in the
drawing.
An Interactive button enables you to switch modes. Interactive mode allows you to click
an insertion point for the object first, and then drag to create the scope of the object as
allowed by the view (XY for plan view, XZ for front view, and so on).
Once those dimensions are set, a dialog box may open to allow you to set the third
dimension, if required. Interactive mode works with Risers, Cylinders, Circles, Arcs,
Spheres, and Pipes. There are some special considerations when drawing pipes in
interactive mode, as explained in “Drawing pipes” on page 137.
To set interactive as the default drawing mode
1
From the Options menu, choose User Options.
2
Click the User tab.
3
In the Options area of the window, click the Interactive object creation check box.
To set interactive mode on the fly
Press F11 on your keyboard or click the Interactive tool on the CAD Options toolbar.
Importing DWG/DXF files
When importing a DWG/DXF file into WYSIWYG, you have two options:
„
You can open a DWG/DXF file.
„
You can merge a DWG/DXF file into an existing WYSIWYG document.
If you open a DWG or DXF while another show document is currently open, you are
prompted to save changes to that document before another show document is opened.
Only one show document may be open at a time. When you merge documents, it
enables you to add the contents of the DWG or DXF file to the contents of the current
document.
3D solids contained within an AutoCAD file are automatically placed inside blocks by
AutoCAD. When you import any file that contains a block, WYSIWYG will automatically
explode the blocks in the DXF or DWG files for you if you decide to do this before
opening them in WYSIWYG. AutoCAD files saved as Release 13 or higher generally yield
the best results.
Entities that can be imported
The DWG/DXF entities that can be imported are detailed in the following table. The
resulting WYSIWYG objects are also shown.
DWG/DXF entity
WYSIWYG object
Circle
Circle
Point
Point
Arc
Arc
Line
Line
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
111
CAD mode
Release 18.0
DWG/DXF entity
WYSIWYG object
2D Polyline
Line
3D Polyline
Line
Mline
Line
Spline
Spline
Text
Text
MText
Text
Polyface Mesh (PFACE)
Set piece
Polygon Mesh (3D Surfaces)
Set piece
Face (3D Face)
Surface
Aligned dimension
Dimension
Entities that can be imported as a library item
„
Circle
„
Arc
„
Line
„
2D Polyline
„
3D Polyline
„
Polyline
„
Mline
„
Polyface Mesh (PFACE)
„
Polygon Mesh (3D Surfaces)
„
Face (3D Face)
Limitations
„
Multilines becomes single lines.
„
Multiline text becomes single line text.
„
Segments that are not straight (for example, arcs) become straight line segments.
A spline must contain fit data for it to be imported.
„
Stretched (scaled) blocks are not supported.
„
Blocks to be converted to library items cannot imbed other blocks.
„
Blocks to be replaced by a fixture cannot imbed other blocks.
Tips
„
„
It is recommended that you do not import 2D/3D solids whenever possible.
Instead, use 3D Face and 3D Surface entities.
It is recommended that you explode Polyface Mesh or Polygon Mesh entities in
AutoCAD before importing to WYSIWYG so you can access each face in WYSIWYG.
Opening a DWG/DXF document
Before you begin
112
November 2006
CAD mode
„
„
Clean up the CAD file by removing all unnecessary layers, such as doors, windows,
and architectural details. Generally you want to remove items that you do not need
to see or will not use in the plot.
Use the Purge command in AutoCAD to remove layers, blocks, and so on, that are
not wanted or needed. You may want to do this several times since layers and
blocks are sometimes linked to other parts of the drawing, and the Purge
command might not pick them up the first time. The more unwanted items you can
remove, the smaller the file size will be, and the easier/faster it is to import.
To open a DWG/DXF document
This procedure creates a new WYSIWYG document from the imported DWG/DXF file. If
you are already working in a document, you are prompted to save any changes and
close the document before you import the file into WYSIWYG.
1
From the File menu, choose Open.
2
From the Files of type box, select the DWG or DXF type. Files of this type appear in
the browser window.
3
In the browser, click the file name, and then click Open.
Result: The Select DWG Settings dialog box is displayed.
4
Select the unit type used in the DWG/DXF drawing.
5
Click the Layer tab.
6
Highlight the layers that you want to import. Note that you do not need to import
all the layers at once. Refer to “Importing scenario” on page 117 for suggestions
on how to import the various layers. For each layer that you want to import, ensure
that the Import check box is checked. If you do not want to import a certain layer,
highlight it and deselect this checkbox.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
113
CAD mode
Release 18.0
7
To import a single-sided layer, highlight it and click to place a check mark beside
the Single Sided checkbox.
Note: Single-sided layers use less processor time to display in Shaded views and
to render in the Render Wizard. However, they only appear properly in each of
these views if the faces of the object are drawn facing outward. Unless you know
how the CAD file was drawn, it is recommended that you leave the default double
sided selected when importing the layers so that the object appears correctly.
Note, however, that you will not be able to see “through” the walls of an imported
double-sided venue when you rotate the image around in the Shaded view (unlike
the WYSIWYG venues, which are single sided).
8
If you know how the single-sided object was drawn and you would like to flip its
faces so they are oriented in the opposite direction before you import the object,
click Reversed; otherwise, leave Default selected.
Note: If the imported object does not appear correctly in the Shaded view, you
can change its sidedness by using the Properties window. You can change it from
single sided to double sided, or vice versa. You can also flip the object’s sides if the
wrong side is currently facing outward. For details, see “To change an object’s
sidedness” on page 154.
9
Click OK.
10
If you have blocks in your drawing, you have the option to explode the blocks,
convert them into a library item, or substitute WYSIWYG fixtures for the existing
blocks.
Note: 3D solids are automatically placed inside blocks by AutoCAD, and assigned
an abstract block name (for example, *X1). The number of “blocks” that are found
are dependent upon the number of solids that were in the AutoCAD file. You will be
prompted to determine what action to take for each type of “block.”
Exploding the block
Exploding the block does the same thing as the explode command in AutoCAD,
that is, it breaks the block into its components. You must be careful of blocks that
are made up of other blocks as WYSIWYG will only explode down one level.
Converting blocks into library items
Converting a block into a library item imports the object and creates a duplicate of
it to add to the objects library for future use. Note that the block will only be
available in the library of the current document. To make it available globally, see
“To create a custom library item” on page 125.
Substituting fixtures for blocks
Converting a block into a fixture replaces the DWG/DXF block with a WYSIWYG
fixture of your choice.
If you find that you are always replacing a particular type of block with a specific
fixture, you can set an option in WYSIWYG so that the substitution will
automatically occur each time you import the block. For example, if you have files
in which the ‘PAR64M’ block is always a PAR 64 fixture with an MFL bulb, you have
the option of telling WYSIWYG to automatically import the block in that way. To do
114
November 2006
CAD mode
this, select the Remember for future imports check box in the Library Browser that is
displayed. To change this option, edit the import.lst file that is created in the
Library folder (usually C:\Program Files\WYSIWYG\Library) once the first fixture is
set to be remembered for future imports.
Note: WYSIWYG creates a pipe for every imported fixture since fixtures in
WYSIWYG need to hang on a hang structure. If, however, fixtures are on a straight
pipe represented by a straight line in the CAD file, WYSIWYG will convert the entire
line into a pipe.
11
After you have made your selection, click OK.
12
If you decided to substitute fixtures for blocks in step 9, you are prompted to
select the fixtures from the WYSIWYG library.
Merging a DWG/DXF document
To merge a DWG/DXF document
This procedure inserts the imported DWG/DXF file into an existing WYSIWYG document
in the location of your choice.
1
From the File menu, choose Merge.
2
From the Files of type drop-down list, select the DWG or DXF type. Files of this type
appear in the browser window.
3
Click the file name in the browser, and then click Open.
Result: The Merge dialog box opens.
4
Choose the basepoint.
Result: The Select DWG Settings dialog box is displayed.
5
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Select the unit type used in the DWG/DXF drawing.
115
CAD mode
Release 18.0
6
Click the Layer tab.
7
Highlight the layers that you want to import. Note that you do not need to import
all the layers at once. Refer to “Importing scenario” on page 117 for suggestions
on how to import the various layers. For each layer that you want to import, ensure
that the Import check box is checked. If you do not want to import a certain layer,
highlight it and deselect this checkbox.
8
To import a single-sided layer, highlight it and click to place a check mark beside
the Single Sided checkbox.
Note: Single-sided layers use less processor time to display in Shaded views and
to render in the Render Wizard. However, they only appear properly in each of
these views if the faces of the object are drawn facing outward. Unless you know
how the CAD file was drawn, it is recommended that you leave the default double
sided selected when importing the layers so that the object appears correctly.
Note, however, that you will not be able to see “through” the walls of an imported
double-sided venue when you rotate the image around in the Shaded view (unlike
the WYSIWYG venues, which are single sided).
9
If you know how the single-sided object was drawn and you would like to flip its
faces so they are oriented in the opposite direction before you import the object,
click Reversed; otherwise, leave Default selected.
Note: If the imported object does not appear correctly in the Shaded view, you
can change its sidedness by using the Properties window. You can change it from
single sided to double sided, or vice versa. You can also flip the object’s sides if the
wrong side is currently facing outward. For details, see “To change an object’s
sidedness” on page 154.
10
Click OK.
Result: The Block Load window appears.
11
If you have blocks in your drawing, you have the option of exploding the blocks,
converting them into a library item, or substituting WYSIWYG fixtures for the
existing blocks.
Note: 3D solids are automatically placed inside blocks by AutoCAD, and assigned
an abstract block name (for example, *X1). The number of “blocks” that are found
are dependent upon the number of solids that were in the AutoCAD file. You will be
prompted to determine what action to take for each type of “block.”
116
November 2006
CAD mode
For more information on these options, see “Exploding the block” on page 114.
12
After you have made your selection, click OK.
13
If you decided to substitute fixtures for blocks in step 10, you are prompted to
select the fixtures from the WYSIWYG library.
14
If you chose Select Basepoint with mouse in step 4, click to place the drawing.
Importing scenario
You do not need to import everything in your file at once. You can import items one by
one or separately to ensure accuracy. The following scenario may help you when
importing DWG/DXF files into WYSIWYG:
1.
After choosing to open a DWG/DXF file, switch to the Layers tab on the Select DWG
Settings dialog box. In this tab, you can deselect the layers that you do not want
imported in the first round. For example, you may only want to import the venue
and all the layers related to it. In the case of a 2D CAD drawing, it is easier to
extrude lines into walls and do everything else needed to complete the virtual
venue. It will also be quicker as WYSIWYG will have a lot less objects with which to
work.
2.
Once you have completed working on the venue, you may want to merge in the
hang structures if they exist in the CAD file. Using the Merge command from the
File menu, you can open the same CAD file once again, and choose the appropriate
layer(s) from the Layers tab. When WYSIWYG asks you to pick the insertion point,
make sure you select Use 0,0,0 as Basepoint. This will ensure that everything in the
new layer is placed accurately in the WYSIWYG plot.
3.
Continue in the same manner with fixtures and the other objects. Note that if in
the CAD file the fixtures exist on different layers, you may want to bring these in
separately/one by one as well.
Exporting DWG/DXF files
If you need to send your WYSIWYG drawings to someone using another drafting
program, you can export your file to the DWG or DXF file type. DWG and DXF formats
are used to transfer documents to AutoCAD or other compatible drafting applications.
Entities that can be exported
2D DWG/DXF When you export WYSIWYG objects to a 2D DWG/DXF file, all objects,
including fixture attributes, are converted to lines.
3D DWG/DXF The objects that can be exported to a 3D DWG/DXF file and the
resulting DWG/DXF entities are shown in the following table. Fixture attributes cannot
be exported to 3D DWG/DXF.
WYSIWYG object
DWG/DXF entity
Line
3D Polyline
Spline
Spline
Point
Point
Circle
Circle
Arc
Arc
Text
Text
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
117
CAD mode
Release 18.0
WYSIWYG object
DWG/DXF entity
Pipe
Line
Dimension
Lines and MText
All other objects
PolyFace Mesh
Note: You cannot export truss.
Limitation
„
The slope near the end of two lines may be slightly off.
To export to DWG/DXF in 2D
Note: When you export WYSIWYG objects to a 2D DWG/DXF file, all objects, including
fixture attributes, are converted to lines.
1
From the File menu, choose 2D DWG/DXF Export.
2
In the Export dialog box, navigate to the location where you want to save the
exported file. Ensure that the destination appears in the Save in drop-down box.
3
In the File name box, type the name of the exported file.
4
From the Save as type drop-down box, choose the exported file type. There are a
number of choices available for file type, based on AutoCAD versions.
5
Click Save.
Result: The Select DWG Settings dialog box is displayed.
118
November 2006
CAD mode
6
7
On the Scale tab, click the option button for the units to be used in the DWG/DXF
drawing.
a.
To specify a custom unit of measurement, select the Custom option button.
b.
In the DXF Unit To boxes, specify the mapping of the units of measurement to
use in the exported file.
Click OK.
Note: The current type of the drawing will be used as the point of view in the
exported 2D drawing.
To export to DWG/DXF in 3D
Note: When you export WYSIWYG objects to a 3D DWG/DXF file, the resulting DWG/
DXG entities vary. For details, see the table on page 117.
1
From the File menu, choose DWG/DXF Export.
2
In the Export dialog box, navigate to the location where you want to save the
exported file. Ensure that the destination appears in the Save in drop-down box.
3
In the File name box, type the name of the exported file.
4
From the Save as type drop-down box, choose the exported file type. There are a
number of choices available for file type, based on AutoCAD versions.
5
Click Save.
Result: The Select DXF/DWG Settings for Export dialog box appears.
Note: You cannot export a 3D drawing from WYSIWYG Report.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
119
CAD mode
Release 18.0
6
On the Scale tab, click the option button for the units to be used in the DWG/DXF
drawing.
„
To specify a custom unit of measurement, select the Custom option button, and
then specify the mapping of the units of measurement to use in the exported
file, in the DXF Unit To boxes.
7
Click the Layer tab.
8
Select the layers that you want to include in the DWG/DXF drawing by highlighting
them and ensuring that the Import check box is checked.
9
a.
Click Select All to select all the layers that are listed.
b.
Click Clear All to deselect all layers.
Click OK.
Importing floorplans
If you have an existing floorplan saved in bitmap (.bmp), JPEG (.jpg), or Targa (.tga)
format, you can import it into your drawing, and then continue to customize it within
WYSIWYG.
Note: You can view your imported floorplan on either of the Drawing tabs (Wireframe
or Quad) only in Plan view.
To ensure that your drawing is accurate, when you import the floorplan, you must first
set its scale by measuring one of its components, and then telling WYSIWYG how long
the line you drew really is. WYSIWYG adjusts the size of the floorplan image based on
the measurement that you specify.
To import a floorplan
Note: Before you perform this procedure, you must know the precise dimensions
of at least one of the elements in your imported floorplan. For example, if it
contains a stage, note the width of the stage before you import the graphic into
your drawing.
1
In either the Wireframe or Quad tab, in Plan view, click File > Import Floorplan.
Result: The Open window appears.
120
November 2006
CAD mode
2
Navigate to your floorplan file, select it, and then click Open. You can import
floorplans that are saved in bitmap (.bmp), JPEG (.jpg), or Targa (.tga) format.
Result: The floorplan is placed in your drawing and a window appears, listing
instructions for setting the scale of the drawing.
3
Click OK to close the instruction window.
4
Choose an item in your drawing whose measurements you know, and then click on
one end of the item. For example, if you know the dimensions of the stage, click on
one corner of it.
5
Click on a second end of the item. For example, if you had clicked on one corner of
the stage, click on a second corner of it.
Result: The Import Floorplan window appears, prompting you to enter the length
of the line that you have just drawn.
6
Type the length of the line, and then click OK.
Result: WYSIWYG adjusts the size of the floorplan based on the scale that you
have entered to ensure that your drawing is accurate. The floorplan appears in
your drawing in plan view (the only view in which you can see it).
Tip: Once you import the floorplan, you cannot delete it from your drawing.
However, you can hide it from sight by right-clicking on your drawing and selecting
Hide Floorplan. To show the floorplan again, simply right-click and select Show
Floorplan.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
121
CAD mode
Release 18.0
The Library Browser
Introduction
An essential component of WYSIWYG is its extensive library. You can view the contents
of the library in the Library Browser.
Working with the Library Browser
The Library Browser is dockable, which means that it has a grab bar on the top that is
used to move it around the screen. You can place it on the edges of the work area, at
the top, bottom, left, or right. You can also drag it off the edge of the work area and into
its own window. This window remains on top of the WYSIWYG screen and may be
dragged anywhere on your display.
Note: If you experience difficulty undocking the browser, hold down the Ctrl key while
dragging the grab bar.
To open the Library Browser
1
From the Library menu, choose Browse Library.
Tip: You can also click the Library tools on the Draw toolbar.
Note: You can also access the Library Browser from the Options menu on the
Welcome window when a document is not opened.
2
122
Click any of the tools along the bottom of the browser window to view the contents
of different sections of the library. The library is divided into the following sections:
November 2006
CAD mode
„
Fixtures
„
Accessories
„
Truss
„
Library Items (scenic)
„
Symbols
„
Gel (color)
„
Gobos
„
Lamps
„
Lenses
Library entries are divided into sort criteria. These criteria may be organized
alphabetically, by manufacturer, by type, or by other pertinent classifications. For
example, you can find the ETC Source 4 in the Fixtures section > Manufacturer > EFGH
> ETC > ERS sub-menu.
Based on the library item that you click, you may see a sample image of the item in the
preview pane at the bottom of the browser.
To view the properties of library objects
1
Open the Library Browser.
2
Navigate to and select the desired object.
3
Click the Property tool at the top of the Library Browser.
4
Repeat steps 2-3 to view the properties of multiple objects. You may want to open
the properties of different objects to compare data, such as photometric
information.
Tips:
„
„
You can also hold the ALT key and double-click on the object name.
To view library objects without opening property windows, browse the library
using the shortcut bar. To do this, select the shortcut bar for the type of object
you want to view. Right-click in the shortcut bar, and then choose New <library
item>. The Library Selection dialog box opens with a viewing pane included.
To insert objects from the library
1
Open the Library Browser.
2
Navigate to the desired object.
3
Click the Insert tool at the top of the Library Browser.
Tip: You can also double-click on the object name.
Note: Fixtures may only be placed on hang structures. Please refer to “Hanging
and focusing fixtures” on page 185 for more information.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
123
CAD mode
Release 18.0
4
Click in your drawing to insert the object.
5
Click away from the object to deselect it.
To create a shortcut for a library object
In the Wireframe and Quad views you can create shortcuts for frequently used objects.
Shortcuts are tools found on the various shortcut bars to the left of the working area.
Clicking a shortcut for an object is the same as finding the object in the Library Browser
and using the Insert command.
1
Open the Library Browser.
2
Navigate to the desired object.
3
Click the Create Shortcut tool at the top of the Library Browser.
Result: A shortcut to the object will appear on the appropriate shortcut bar.
Tip: You can also right-click on the object name, and then select Create Shortcut.
To modify a shortcut for a library object
1
Right-click on the shortcut, and then select Properties.
Result: The Properties dialog box appears. An example of the accessories Shortcut
Property dialog box is shown below.
2
In the Name box, type a new name for the shortcut.
The name of the fixture, color, gobo, accessories, library, or truss as listed in the
library, is displayed in the Type box.
3
For fixtures, you can modify the type of lens and lamp associated with the fixture
by selecting the appropriate option from the Lens and Lamp drop-down lists,
respectively.
4
Click Properties to view the properties of the library entry.
5
When you are satisfied with your selections, click OK.
Custom library items
You can create custom library items, custom conventional fixtures, custom gobos, and
custom color and gobo wheels or scrolls.
When creating custom gobos and custom library items, you are given the option to
make the item or gobo available to other documents, in which case the item or gobo is
saved to the application’s library. If you do not choose to make the items available to
other documents, the items are only saved within the one document. In either case, the
items are saved and visible in the document regardless of which computer (or
application) the document is opened in.
Custom conventional fixtures must be created from the WYSIWYG welcome screen and
are saved directly to your application’s library. The new conventional fixture is available
for you to use in all documents created using this application. If used in a show
document, the custom conventional fixture is available in the document regardless of
which computer (or application) the document is opened in.
124
November 2006
CAD mode
Custom color, gobo wheels, and scrolls are only saved in the document and cannot be
saved to the application’s library. They travel with the document, but if you need to use
the same wheel or scroll on another show, you must regenerate it every time.
Note: Once created, custom library items, custom gobos, and custom conventional
fixtures cannot be deleted. The only way to delete them is to delete the appropriate
.cdb file saved in the WYSIWYG library folder. This file is generated for each category of
custom item: it is not generated for each item. When you delete the gobos.cdb file, for
example, you delete all your custom gobos.
To create a custom library item
See “To create a custom library item” on page 144.
To create a custom fixture
See “To create a custom fixture” on page 187.
To create custom color or gobo lists
See “To create a custom color/gobo list” on page 212.
To create a custom gobo
See “To create a custom gobo” on page 214.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
125
CAD mode
Release 18.0
Drawing objects
Introduction
In WYSIWYG, the Draw menu lists the objects that you can draw. Keep the following tips
and aids in mind when you are drawing the various objects.
Drawing tips
„
At any time, instead of clicking points with the mouse, you can type in the desired
coordinates. When you start typing, the Command Line automatically appears in
the lower left-hand corner of the window.
„
Create shortcuts for library objects.
„
Use the missing coordinate.
Drawing aids
Several commands and icons are available to help you when drawing in CAD mode. For
a complete list of these aids, refer to “Keyboard shortcuts and hot keys” on page 381.
Drawing a venue
To begin your drawing, insert a venue.
To insert a venue
1
From the Draw menu, choose Venue.
Result: A sub-menu will appear prompting you to choose the type of venue to be
inserted.
2
Select Black Box, Arena, Proscenium Arch, Frame Tent, or Circus Tent.
Result: A dialog appears in which you can modify the properties of the room. The
Proscenium Arch dialog box is shown below.
3
Accept the defaults, or choose custom properties.
4
Click OK.
Result: The selected venue is inserted into the drawing.
126
November 2006
CAD mode
The venue types are defined as follows:
Proscenium Arch
A proscenium arch venue is a basic theatrical space with a stage, proscenium arch, and
an auditorium. The origin is set at the intersection of the center line and the proscenium
line on the stage floor.
The following entries describe the parts of the proscenium arch.
„
„
„
„
„
„
A: The stage width; the dimension from the extremity of the SR wing to the
extremity of the SL wing. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 90’0”.
B: The stage depth; the dimension from the proscenium line to the back of the
stage space. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 50’0”.
C: The stage height; the dimension from the auditorium floor to the stage deck. In
WYSIWYG, the default value is 4’0”.
D: The thrust depth; the dimension from the edge of the stage to the proscenium
line. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 8’0”.
E: The thrust width; the dimension from the extremity of the SR edge of the thrust
to the SL extremity of the thrust. This dimension cannot be greater than the Arch
width (G). In WYSIWYG, the default value is 35’0”.
F: The Fly height; the dimension from the stage deck to the top of the fly house. In
WYSIWYG, the default value is 60’0”.
„
G: The proscenium arch width. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 40’0”.
„
H: The depth of the proscenium arch wall. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 2’0”.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
127
CAD mode
Release 18.0
„
„
„
„
„
„
I: The height of the proscenium arch; the dimension of the opening of the
proscenium arch. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 20’0”.
J: The back of house (BOH) width; the dimension of the auditorium from the
extremity of house right to the extremity of house left at the back of the house. In
WYSIWYG, the default value is 100’0”.
K: The auditorium depth; the dimension from the proscenium line to the back of
the house. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 100’0”.
L: The auditorium height; the dimension from the ceiling of the auditorium to the
floor of the auditorium at the edge of the stage. In WYSIWYG, the default value is
45’0”.
M: The front of house (FOH) width; the dimension of the auditorium from the
extremity of house right to the extremity of house left at the front of the house. In
WYSIWYG, the default value is 68’0”.
N: The auditorium slope height. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 12’0”.
Black Box
A black box venue is an empty rectangular room. The origin is set at the center of the
room on the floor.
The following entries describe the parts of the black box:
„
A: The width of the room. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 60’0”.
„
B: The depth of the room. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 40’0”.
„
C: The height of the room. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 30’0”.
Arena
An arena venue is a basic stadium space. The following entries describe the parts of the
arena. The origin is set at the center of the venue on the floor or ice rink.
128
November 2006
CAD mode
„
A: The width of the arena. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 170’0”.
„
B: The depth of the arena. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 250’0”.
„
C: The total height of the arena. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 60’0”.
„
D: The width of the floor or ice rink. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 60’0”.
„
E: The depth of the floor or ice rink. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 130’0”.
„
F: The height of the stands or seating; the portion of the total height that is
occupied by seating or stands. In WYSIWYG, the default value is 40’0”.
Tent
There are two types of tents that you can create in WYSIWYG—frame tents and circus
tents.
„
„
Frame tents These tents are square or rectangular in shape and usually have two
center poles. Each wall is made of a single piece of fabric supported by as many
poles as you specify.
Circus tents These tents are styled after the classical “Big Top” of the circus.
They are more rounded in shape than the frame tent, the walls comprising multiple
sections, each supported by as many poles as you specify. The roof is held up by
one center pole.
When drawing either type of tent, you can specify many different properties, including
the number of poles, length, height, or perimeter of the walls, and the color of different
parts of the tent.
You can also choose from different materials and you can choose whether you want to
apply either a custom color or texture to different parts of the tent. When assigning a
texture, you can choose your own texture, such as a company logo or symbol, or you
can choose a texture from the WYSIWYG library.
The origin for both types of tents is at the center of the tent on the floor.
Frame tent
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
129
CAD mode
Release 18.0
The following entries describe the parts of the frame tent:
Description
New Venue - Tent
Field
WYSIWYG
Default Value
A
The height of the tent
walls.
Wall height
20’0”
B
The length of the tent
walls.
Width
80’0”
C
The width the tent walls. Depth
70’0”
D
The height that the
center pole extends
above the height of the
walls.
E
The distance between the Separation
center poles.
Height above walls
10’0”
20’0”
Circus tent
The following entries describe the parts of the circus tent:
Description
130
New Venue - Tent
Field
WYSIWYG
Default Value
A
The number of individual Segments
segments in the tent.
6
B
The height of the tent
walls.
Wall height
20’0”
C
The height that the
center pole extends
above the height of the
walls.
Height above walls
10’0”
D
The diameter of the tent, Diameter
measured from pole to
opposite pole.
70’0”
November 2006
CAD mode
Drawing lines
Lines are 2D objects. Lines are drawn continuously, allowing you to create shapes made
up of multiple vertices.
Lines come in four styles:
„
Solid
„
Center
„
Hidden
„
Dot
Line styles determine how line objects appear on your plot and can be modified at any
time. They look similar to the following.
You can make a multi-vertex line appear as a spline or french curve by selecting the
option in the properties box. You can then drag the markers around to adjust the
curves. Alternatively, you can choose to draw a spline directly. Splines have the same
line style options as regular lines.
Lines can be extruded into surfaces. For more on extruding lines, refer to “Extrude” on
page 172.
To draw a line
1
From the Draw menu, choose Line.
2
From the sub-menu, select Solid, Dot, Center, Dashed, or Spline.
Tip: You can also use the appropriate line tool on the Draw toolbar. The available
line tools are as follows:
„
Solid
„
Dot
„
Center
„
Dashed
„
Spline
3
Click on the drawing at the starting point of the line.
4
Drag the next vertex to its end point and click.
5
Continue to place vertices of the line as needed.
6
To end the line at its last end point, right-click and choose Finish Line. To abort the
line entirely, choose Abort Line. This erases the whole line from the drawing.
Drawing points
Points are identifiers of a specific coordinate in 3D space. Points are inserted as
references or as scenic elements.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
131
CAD mode
Release 18.0
To draw a point
1
From the Draw menu, choose Point.
Tip: You can also use the Point tool on the Draw toolbar.
2
Click on the drawing to place the point.
Note: Points can be drawn as a dot, a cross, a square, or a circle.
To set the point type default
1
From the Options menu, choose Show Options.
2
Click the Object Defaults tab.
3
Select the desired point type.
4
Click OK.
Drawing circles
There are two ways in which you can draw circles:
„
non-interactive mode in which you type the exact radius of the circle
„
interactive mode in which you click and drag to set the radius
To draw a circle in non-interactive mode
1
From the Draw menu, choose Circle.
Tip: You can also use the Circle tool on the Draw toolbar.
Result: The New Circle dialog box appears.
2
In the Radius box, type a radius for the circle, and then click OK. The default value
is 4’0”.
3
Click on the drawing to place the circle.
4
Click elsewhere in the drawing to finish placing the new circle.
To draw a circle in interactive mode
Note: To turn interactive mode on, click the Interactive Mode button on the toolbar.
1
From the Draw menu, choose Circle.
Tip: You can also use the Circle tool on the Draw toolbar.
2
Click to place the center of the circle.
3
Click to set the radius for the circle.
Drawing arcs
There are two ways in which you can draw arcs:
„
„
132
non-interactive mode in which you type the exact radius, start, and end angles of
the arc
interactive mode in which you click and drag to set the arc
November 2006
CAD mode
To draw an arc in non-interactive mode
1
From the Draw menu, choose Arc.
Tip: You can also use the Arc tool on the Draw toolbar.
2
In the Radius box, type a radius for the arc. The default value is 4’0”.
3
In the Start Angle box, type the start angle. The default value is 0.00.
4
In the End Angle box, type the end angle for the arc. The default value is 180.00.
5
Click OK.
6
Click on the drawing to place the arc.
7
Click elsewhere in the drawing to finish placing the arc.
To draw an arc in interactive mode
Note: To turn interactive mode on, click the Interactive Mode button on the toolbar.
1
From the Draw menu, choose Arc.
Tip: You can also use the Arc tool on the Draw toolbar.
2
Click to place the start point of the arc.
3
Click to place the end point of the arc.
4
Click to place the middle point of the arc.
5
Click elsewhere in the drawing to finish placing the arc.
Drawing text labels
To draw a text label
1
From the Draw menu, choose Text Label.
Tip: You can also use the Text Label tool on the Draw toolbar.
2
In the Text box, type the desired text.
3
Type a height for the text. This is similar to selecting a font size. The default value
is 2’0”.
4
Click on the drawing to place the text label.
Note:
„
„
You cannot change the font for text labels in CAD mode.
The insertion point for the text label is at the intersection of the crosshairs.
To set alignment for a text label
1
Select the text label for which you want to change the justification.
2
Right-click, and then choose Properties.
3
Click the Text Label tab.
4
Set the horizontal and vertical justification as desired.
5
Select the Align to View check box to ensure the text label is legible in all view types
(plan, left, right, front, back, and isometric).
6
Click OK.
Result: The text label is relocated around the insertion point, based on the options
selected.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
133
CAD mode
Release 18.0
Drawing dimension lines
Dimension lines are 2D objects. They have a start and end point, and measure and
display the distance covered based on the measurement mode selected. The
measurement modes available are: X, Y, XY, XZ, YZ, and XYZ. The dimension will only
be visible in one view type. The view type is set when the dimension is drawn and is
dependent on the plot type and workplane in which the dimension is drawn.
To draw a dimension
1
From the Draw menu, choose Dimension.
Tip: You can also click the Dimension tool on the Draw toolbar.
2
Click on the drawing to set the dimension start point.
3
Right-click to set the measurement mode.
4
Click on the drawing to set the dimension end point.
5
Click and drag the grab point in the center of the dimension text to drag the text to
the correct side of the object, if required.
6
Click to set the dimension line.
Tip:
Use snaps to connect dimensions directly to other objects.
Drawing surfaces
Surfaces are 2D objects. Surfaces are drawn continuously, stretching out behind the
cursor. Surfaces can be used to create backdrops or other flat objects. Surfaces can be
extruded to create odd shaped risers, or other custom shaped 3D objects. For more
information on extruding, refer to “Extrude” on page 172.
To draw a surface
1
From the Draw menu, choose Surface.
Tip: You can also click the Surface tool on the Draw toolbar.
2
Click on the drawing at the starting point of the surface.
3
Drag to the next point of the surface and click.
4
Continue to place points for the surface as needed.
5
To finish and close the surface, right-click and choose Finish Surface from the submenu. To abort the surface entirely, choose Abort Surface. This erases the whole
surface from the drawing.
Drawing risers
Risers are solid 3D rectangular objects. You can use risers for creating platforms,
square columns, or any other box-shaped objects.
There are two ways in which you can draw risers:
„
„
134
non-interactive mode in which you type the exact width, depth, and height of the
riser
interactive mode in which you click and drag to set the dimensions of the riser
November 2006
CAD mode
To draw a riser in non-interactive mode
1
From the Draw menu, choose Riser.
Tip: You can also click the Riser tool
on the Draw toolbar.
2
In the Width box, type the width for the riser. The default value is 8’0”
3
In the Depth box, type the depth for the riser. The default value is 4’0”.
4
In the Height box, type the height for the riser. The default value is 2’0”.
5
Click OK.
Result: The riser is attached to the cursor.
6
Drag the new riser to its position, and then click to place it in the drawing.
To draw a riser in interactive mode
Note: To turn interactive mode on, click the Interactive Mode button on the toolbar.
1
From the Draw menu, choose Riser.
2
Click the starting point of the riser on the drawing. The insertion point is the lower
left corner of the riser.
3
Drag up and to the right to stretch out the riser’s shape. Click to place the upper
right corner of the riser.
4
In the dialog box that opens, type the missing dimension of the riser.
5
Click OK.
Drawing cylinders
Cylinders are solid 3D objects. Cylinders can be used for creating platforms, columns,
or any other cylinder-shaped objects.
There are two ways in which you can draw cylinders:
„
„
non-interactive mode in which you type the exact height and diameter of the
cylinder
interactive mode in which you click and drag to set the dimensions of the cylinder
To draw a cylinder
1
From the Draw menu, choose Cylinder.
Tip: You can also click the Cylinder tool on the Draw toolbar.
2
In the Height box, type the height for the cylinder. The default value is 8’0”.
3
In the Width box, type the width for the cylinder. The default value is 8’0”.
4
Click OK.
Result: The cylinder is attached to the cursor.
5
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Drag the new cylinder to its position, and then click to place the object in the
drawing.
135
CAD mode
Release 18.0
To draw a cylinder in interactive mode
Note: To turn interactive mode on, click the Interactive Mode button on the toolbar.
1
From the Draw menu, choose Cylinder.
2
Click to place the center of the bottom surface of the cylinder.
3
Click to set the radius for the cylinder.
4
In the dialog box that opens, type the desired height or length for the cylinder.
5
Click OK.
Drawing spheres
Spheres are solid 3D circular or oval objects.
There are two ways in which you can draw spheres:
„
„
non-interactive mode in which you type the exact horizontal and vertical diameter
of the sphere
interactive mode in which you click and drag to set the dimensions of the sphere
To draw a sphere in non-interactive mode
1
From the Draw menu, choose Sphere.
Tip: You can also click the Sphere tool on the Draw toolbar.
2
In the Horizontal Diameter box, type the horizontal diameter for the sphere.
3
In the Vertical Diameter box, type the vertical diameter for the sphere.
4
To ensure that the sphere remains proportionately the same when resized, leave
the Lock ratio check box checked. If you deselect this check box, then you can
manually resize the sphere in any direction, regardless of its original
measurements.
5
Click OK.
Result: The cylinder is attached to the cursor.
6
Click to place the sphere in the drawing.
To draw a sphere in interactive mode
1
From the Draw menu, choose Sphere.
Tip: You can also click the Sphere tool on the Draw toolbar.
2
In the New Sphere window, click Interactive.
3
Accept the default values, and then click and drag out the shape of the sphere in
your drawing. When you have the desired size, click again.
Result: The New Sphere window appears again.
136
4
In the dialog box that opens, type the horizontal and vertical diameter of the new
sphere.
5
To ensure that the sphere remains proportionately the same when resized, leave
the Lock ratio check box checked. If you deselect this check box, then you can
manually resize the sphere in any direction, regardless of its original
measurements.
6
Click OK.
November 2006
CAD mode
7
Click in the drawing to finish placing the new sphere.
Drawing pipes
For details, refer to “Drawing pipes” on page 137.
Drawing masking
Masking, specifically borders and legs, can be automatically attached to pipes using the
border and legs tool.
To draw borders and legs
1
Select the pipes for which you want to attach a border and legs.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Border and Legs.
3
Select the Border check box to add a border to the selected pipes, and then specify
the height of the border.
Note: This is the distance from the pipe to the bottom of the border.
4
Select the Legs check box to add legs to the selected pipes, and then specify the
width and bottom elevation of the legs.
Note: The width is the distance from the extremity of the pipe to the inside edge
of the leg. The bottom elevation is the distance from the floor (z = 0) to the
bottom of the legs.
5
Select the Group to pipe check box to group the border and legs to the pipe. When
this option is selected all the components (border, legs, and pipe) are selected as
one.
Note: If, at a later time, you want to edit a border or leg individually, you must
ungroup the objects.
6
Click OK.
Result: Three surfaces are drawn and attached to the selected pipe.
Drawing focus positions
For details, refer to “Drawing focus positions” on page 191.
Drawing screens
Streaming video enables you to bring a live or pre-recorded video stream into
WYSIWYG and play it back while you set looks in Design mode and while you precue in
Live mode. To do so, you must first use CAD mode to draw the screen upon which the
video will play.
Once you draw the screen, you can leave it blank, assign a static image, or you can
assign a video source to it using the Video Manager. You can select a video file or you
can capture a live video stream from an external source, such as a web cam or a video
capture device that is installed on your computer (provided that you have WYSIWYG
Perform). For video files, you must select one of the following video file formats for
playback:
„
Motion Picture Experts Group (MPEG)
„
Audio-Video Interleaved (AVI)
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
137
CAD mode
Release 18.0
Note: If you cannot view these file types, you may not have the proper decoder
installed on your PC. Install the appropriate decoder, and then try viewing the file again.
For help on installing the decoder, consult the developer of the video file type.
For live video streams, your capture device must be using WDM drivers.
After you draw the screen and attach the video source, you use the Video Designer Tool
in Design mode to start the playback or stream. For more information, see “To use the
Video tool” on page 255. You can view the video in any of the shaded views, using the
controls on the Video designer tool to pause, fast forward, rewind, or stop the video.
You can also patch the control of the video source to a console device. This means that
you can use the console device to control the progress of a live video stream or a video
file by making the video play, pause, or rewind; you cannot use WYSIWYG to change
different aspects of the video itself.
To control the video source, the DMX patch is given three channels. For details on
controlling the video with the console device in Live mode, see “To control a DMX
patched video source with a console” on page 342.
Notes:
„
„
Before you render your drawing, you can either pause the video at the precise
image you want to see in the final rendering, or you can let the video run while the
Render Wizard processes the information in your drawing. In this case, the Render
Wizard captures the video frame that was showing when it processed the screen
information.
If the video control is patched and DMX connected in Live Mode, then you will not
be able to control the video using any of the Video Designer Tool commands in
Design mode. Video sources can only be controlled by a designer tool when the
DMX source is disconnected; therefore, you must first disconnect the applicable
console device from Live Mode before using any of the Video Designer Tool
commands.
To draw a screen
1
From the Draw menu, click Screen.
2
In the appropriate boxes, type the width and height of the screen (or accept the
default width of 8 feet and height of 6 feet).
3
To configure the image that will appear on the screen, click the appropriate option
button:
„
„
„
4
To leave the screen blank, click the Blank Screen option button.
To show a static image on the screen, click the Image File option button, and
then click Browse to locate the graphic. (The image must be saved in either
bitmap or JPEG format.)
To attach a video source to the screen, click the Video Source option button, and
then choose the video source from the drop-down box (or click Create New to
configure a new video source with the Video Manager). For details on creating
a new video source, see “To configure a new video source for streaming video”
below.
Click OK.
To configure a new video source for streaming video
To create a new video source for streaming video, you use the Video Manager. There are
a couple of ways of opening the Video Manager (for example, from the New Screen
window, or from the Tools menu); the following procedure lists one possible way.
138
November 2006
CAD mode
Note: You can only incorporate live video if you have WYSIWYG Perform; you cannot
select a video from a live capture device if you have WYSIWYG Design.
1
Click Tools > Video Manager.
2
Click New.
Result: The Video Source window opens.
3
In the Name box, type a descriptive name for the video.
„
„
To play a video from a file, click the Video File option button, and then click
Browse to locate the file.
To capture a live video stream from an external source, such as a web cam or
a video capture device that is attached to your computer, click Video Capture,
and then use the drop-down arrow to select the appropriate device. (This
option is available only if you have WYSIWYG Perform installed.)
Note: The video capture device must already be configured on your computer and
must be using WDM drivers.
4
To play the video with a DMX control, click DMX Patch, and then use the drop-down
arrow to select the appropriate patch universe to control the video. In the box to
the right of the drop-down list, type the starting DMX address.
Note: You must have a named patch already configured on your computer.
5
To mute the sound of the video, click Mute; to play the sound of the video, ensure
that Play Sound is selected.
6
Click OK.
7
In the Video Manager, ensure that the status of the video source is Connected. If it
is not, then press Connect.
Tip: To ensure that the video source is connected to the console every time you
start WYSIWYG, click to select the check box beside Connect on load.
8
Click OK to save your changes and close the Video Manager.
Notes:
1.
For details on patching the video control in Data mode, see “To patch the control of
a video source” on page 238.
2.
For details on using the Video Designer Tool to play the video in Design mode, see
“To use the Video tool” on page 255.
3.
For details on using a console device to control the video in Live mode, see “To
control a DMX patched video source with a console” on page 342.
Drawing movement axes
For every movement axis that you draw in CAD mode, you can attach one or more
objects to it, and then define the object’s position along the axis. You can attach objects
such as risers, library objects, or custom objects that you have drawn.
To be able to move an object in different planes, you can attach multiple movement
axes to one another. Simply attach the object to one of the axes, and then control the
object’s movement along any of the axes by selecting it with the Moving Scenery
Designer tool. This feature is useful, for example, if you have a set piece that needs to
be able to move in both a vertical and horizontal motion.
Notes:
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
When attaching axes to one another, you cannot create a circular linking pattern.
For example, you can link Axis A to Axis B, and then link Axis B to Axis C, but you
cannot then link Axis C back to Axis A because this creates a circular link.
139
CAD mode
Release 18.0
„
„
You cannot attach fixtures to movement axes; however, you can attach pipes that
hold fixtures to axes.
Currently, you cannot attach focus positions or groups containing focus positions to
movement axes. However, in future releases you will be able to attach either of
these items to movement axes.
You can draw axes either diagonally or straight along any direction of movement—X, Y,
or Z—choosing between the following two main types of axes:
„
„
Linear Choose this type of axis to have an object move in a straight line along the
path that you specify (or in a series of straight segments all joined together at
different vertices to create the path). You can create a linear axis in any length or
shape that you require, as long as it comprises straight line segments; you cannot
draw a curved axis. For example, you could have a person walk across a stage in a
zig zag path, if desired.
When you draw this type of axis, and then attach an object to it, the distance from
the axis to the object does not affect the object’s movement; the object will always
follow the path of the axis regardless of where you have placed the axis or object.
By default, all linear axes have an arrow on one end, signalling the direction in
which the object will move. You can adjust the size of the arrow to suit your needs
by opening the Properties page for the axis.
Rotation Choose this type of axis if you want to have an object rotate in a circular
motion. When you click to place this type of axis in your drawing, a circle with a
center dot appears. The circle acts as a visual cue, telling you the direction in
which the object will rotate; the center dot is the actual axis around which the
object rotates.
The orientation of the object’s rotation changes based on the view in which you
draw the axis (plan, side, or front/back). When placing the object to be rotated in
your drawing, note that its position relative to the center dot of the rotation axis is
important. The distance from the center dot to the object represents the size of the
circle in which it will rotate, with the dot marking the center of the circle. To have
the object rotate in a very tight circle (for example, a dancer doing a pirouette, or
a spinning object), place the object directly on the center dot.
By default, all rotation axes have an arrow on one end, signalling the direction in
which the object will rotate. While you cannot adjust the size of the arrow head
directly, you can click and drag the circle to the desired size, which adjusts the
arrow head proportionately. To change the direction of the object’s rotation, switch
views, and then drag the center point to the new orientation.
To draw a linear movement axis
1
In Wireframe view, select the view in which you want to draw the axis (plan, front,
back, side, or isometric)
2
Click Draw > Axis > Linear Axis.
3
In the window that appears, type a name for the axis, and then click OK.
4
In your drawing, click in the position where you want to start the axis, and then
move your cursor to the next point of the axis and click. To create an axis with
multiple segments, continue clicking at each point (vertex) of the axis.
5
When you are finished creating the axis, right-click and choose Finish Axis.
To draw a rotation movement axis
Note: Unlike linear axes, rotation axes cannot have multiple vertices. Instead, when
you draw one of these axes, the object rotates around the center point.
140
November 2006
CAD mode
1
In Wireframe view, select the view in which you want to draw the axis (plan, front,
back, side, or isometric).
2
Click Draw > Axis > Rotation Axis.
3
In the window that appears, type a name for the axis, and then click OK.
4
In your drawing, click in the position where you want the axis to appear.
Note: The circle that appears when you draw a rotation axis is only a visual cue to
show you the direction in which the object rotates—it does not affect the size of
path on which the object rotates. The circle is given a default size, but you can
change it to suit your needs.
To attach a movement axis to a DMX patch universe
To move the object with a DMX control, you first have to attach the movement axis to a
named DMX patch universe that you have created in Data mode.
Note: For information on creating a patch universe, see “To create a new patch
universe” on page 237.
1
Click to select the axis that you want to attach to the patch universe.
2
Right-click and select Properties.
3
Click the Axis tab.
4
Click the DMX Patch option button.
5
From the Universe drop-down box, select the DMX patch universe to which you want
to attach the axis.
6
In the Address box, type the starting DMX address.
7
Click OK.
To attach a movement axis to a motion patch universe
To move the object with a motion control system, you first have to attach the
movement axis to a named motion control patch universe that you have created in Data
mode.
Note: For information on creating a patch universe, see “To create a new patch
universe” on page 237.
1
Click to select the axis that you want to attach to the patch universe.
2
Right-click and select Properties.
3
Click the Axis tab.
4
Click the Motion Patch option button.
5
From the Universe drop-down box, select the motion control patch universe to
which you want to attach the axis.
6
From the ID drop-down list, select the ID on the motion control system with which
you want to associate this axis.
Note: The motion control system must be connected to your computer for the ID
to appear in this drop-down list. If the system is not currently connected, you can
also type the ID directly into this drop-down list box.
7
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Click OK.
141
CAD mode
Release 18.0
To attach an object to a movement axis
Notes:
„
„
„
You can attach one or more objects to each axis; however, each object can be
attached to only one axis at a time.
When you attach an object to a linear axis, the distance from the axis to the
object does not affect the object’s movement; the object will always follow the
path of the axis regardless of where you have placed the axis or object.
When placing the object to be rotated in your drawing, note that its position
relative to the rotational axis is important. The distance from the central point
of the axis to the object represents the size of the circle in which it will rotate.
To have the object rotate in a very tight circle (for example, a dancer doing a
pirouette, or a spinning object), place the object directly on the center point of
the axis.
1
Place the object that you want to attach to the axis at the appropriate position in
your drawing, either by adding a new object, or moving an existing object to this
location.
2
Select the object, right-click, and then choose Properties.
3
On the General tab, from the Attach to Axis drop-down box, select the axis to which
you want to attach this object.
4
Click OK.
To add a vertex to a linear movement axis
To change the path of an existing linear axis, you can add one or more vertices, and
then drag these vertices to the new position.
1
In your drawing, click on the point of the axis at which you want to add a vertex.
2
Right-click and select Add Vertex.
Result: The vertex is added at the point where you clicked.
Tip: To change the path of the axis, click to select the axis and view all the
vertices. Click the desired vertex, drag it to the new position, and then release the
mouse. Any objects that are attached to the axis will now follow the new path.
Viewing moving scenery
After you create the axes and attach the objects to them, you can watch the objects
move along the axes by using the Looks feature in Design mode. Just as you can
simulate moving lights by cross-fading between one lighting look to the next, you can
also simulate moving scenery by creating Looks that contain movement axes and fading
from one Look to the next. For more information, see “To view moving scenery” on page
263.
You can also patch the axis in Data mode so you can control the movement of the
object with either a DMX console device, such as a Mini Console, or a motion control
system. For details, see “To patch a movement axis to a DMX console device” on page
239 or “To patch a movement axis to a motion control system” on page 239.
Drawing cameras
You can add cameras to the drawing to provide additional view points in shaded views
and renderings.
142
November 2006
CAD mode
To insert a camera
1
From the Draw menu, choose Camera.
2
Type a name for the camera and a value in degrees for the field angle. The default
value for the field angle is 53.13.
3
Click on the drawing to place the camera.
4
Drag the cursor to aim the camera, and then click to place the target.
Result: The camera is inserted into your drawing and available in the camera
selection list for shaded views and renderings.
Tip: Use the missing coordinate tool while placing the camera and target.
Note: The target of your camera is easily identifiable in Wireframe views as
defined by the marker points of the camera drawing. Camera drawings are invisible
in shaded views because you are looking through the camera. For this reason, in
this view you can choose to display the target. For more information on displaying
the target, refer to “Modifying shaded views” on page 73 or see “Using the Camera
toolbar” on page 143.
Using the Camera toolbar
After you have drawn a camera, you can use the Camera toolbar in Shaded views to
view your drawing through the camera of your choice. You can also use this toolbar to
quickly access the camera properties page and change properties, such as the camera
name and field angle.
To use the Camera toolbar
1
In CAD, Design, or Live mode, click the Quad or Shaded tab.
2
Right-click in the toolbar area and select Camera.
Result: The Camera toolbar appears.
3
From the drop-down list, select the camera through which you want to view your
drawing.
Note: To switch back to the default view, click None, and then click the far-right
button to reset the view. To change the camera properties, select the camera from
the drop-down list, and then click the properties button.
Drawing a compass
You can add a compass to a drawing to define the direction that is north. This definition
is important to set the position of the sun and/or moon for renderings that use
environmental options.
Note: There can be only one compass in a file.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
143
CAD mode
Release 18.0
To draw a compass
1
From the Tools menu, choose Define North.
2
Click to place the starting point of the compass.
3
Click to place the end point of the compass. The end point must be directly north of
the start point.
Result: A compass is drawn, centered on the start point and pointing towards the
end point.
Notes:
„
„
To remove the compass from the drawing, choose Clear Direction from the
Tools menu.
To redefine north, repeat steps 1-3. You do not need to remove the compass
from the drawing when redefining north as there can be only one compass in a
file.
Saving custom library items
Custom library items are made of one or more objects including existing library items.
Save a custom library item for a complex object that you have drawn and think you
might want to use again.
Note: You cannot save fixtures, hanging structures, such as pipes and truss, and
splines as components of custom library items.
To create a custom library item
1
Select the objects to be saved as a custom item.
2
From the Library menu, choose Create New Library Item.
Tip: If the menu item is greyed out, one or more of the objects selected cannot be
included in the custom library item.
3
Pick a base point for the item. This will become the insertion point for the item.
Result: The Library Item Wizard opens displaying a rotating shaded view of your
new item.
4
Type a name for the new library item.
5
To make this item available to other documents, check the appropriate box.
6
Click Next.
7
Add or modify the path.
Note: The path is the location in the library where the item will be stored. An item
assigned to the path “Custom/Tables” would be available in the custom section of
the items library in a sub-category named Tables.
8
Click Next.
9
Type all pertinent information including manufacturer, weight, and any notes.
10
Click Next.
11
Type your name.
12
Click Finish.
Result: The custom item is placed in the item library as per the path specified in
step 3.
144
November 2006
CAD mode
Editing objects
Selecting
Before you can manipulate objects, you must select them. Selected objects are easily
identifiable: a white box appears at the insertion point and the lines of the object
become dotted. Fixtures that are selected are filled in green and their beams can be set
to either on or off.
Use the following table to identify the selection method for objects.
Desired action
Selection method
Select a single object.
„
Select multiple objects.
„
„
„
Select all the objects on the
current layer.
Select all the objects on the
screen.
Select all the objects on one or
more layers.
„
„
„
Click on the object.
Press and hold CTRL while clicking on the
desired objects.
Draw a box from left to right to select all
objects fully within the box.
Draw a box from right to left to select all
objects fully within the box, as well as the
objects partially contained in the box.
Press and hold CTRL+SHIFT and type A
or use the Select Current Layer tool on the
Selection toolbar.
Press and hold CTRL and type A or use
the Select All tool on the Selection toolbar.
From the Edit menu, choose Select
Special, and then choose Specify layers to
select. You can also use the Specify Layers
tool on the Selection toolbar.
„
Set beam display for selected
fixtures.
„
To select multiple layers, press and hold
CTRL while selecting the layers.
Set the Show beams for selected fixtures
option. For more information on this
option, refer to the “Show Details tab” on
page 72.
Undo/Redo
If you discover that you have made an error while editing an object, you can easily
reverse the error by using the Undo tool available in WYSIWYG. The name of the Undo
tool changes based on what the last action was (for example, if the last action was a
Paste operation, the Undo tool will be Undo Paste). You can use Undo to reverse the last
series of actions until the tool is greyed out.
If you decide that you did not want to undo an action, use the Redo tool. Similar to the
Undo tool, the name of the Redo tool changes based on what the last undo action was.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
145
CAD mode
Release 18.0
To use the Undo tool
From the Edit menu, choose Undo.
Tip: You may also use the Undo tool on the Edit toolbar.
Result: The last action you performed is reversed.
To use the Redo tool
From the Edit menu, choose Redo.
Tip: You may also use the Redo tool
on the Edit toolbar.
Result: The last undo action you performed is reversed.
Grouping/ungrouping
Grouping objects together ensures that they will always be selected as one. For
example, you may want to group an object and its corresponding focus position. If you
relocate the object in the drawing, the focus position will automatically follow, as will all
the light beams pointing at it, saving you time and work.
To group objects
1
Select the objects to be grouped.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Group.
Tip: You may also use the Group tool on the Tools toolbar.
To ungroup objects
1
Select the grouped objects.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Ungroup.
Tip: You may also use the Ungroup tool on the Tools toolbar.
Note:
You can group together objects located on different layers, but the resulting group
can only exist on one layer.
To change or view the layer of a group
1
Select the object(s) for which you want to view the grouping.
2
Right-click and select Properties.
Tip: At any time, to access an object’s properties, you can click on the Properties
tool on the Edit toolbar.
3
Click the Group tab.
Result: The layers for the objects in the group are listed with the layer for the
group highlighted.
Note: By default, the group assumes the current layer when initially created.
4
To group the objects on a different layer, select the layer from the list.
5
Click OK.
Moving
WYSIWYG supports two types of move commands: relative and absolute.
146
November 2006
CAD mode
„
„
Absolute coordinates are relative to the origin of the drawing. An absolute move is
defined as moving an object from one specific point to another.
A relative move is defined as moving an object to a destination relative to its
original position.
To move an object using the mouse
1
Select the objects to be moved.
2
Hover the cursor over the object until a grey box appears, and then click and hold.
3
Drag the object to the new position, and then release the mouse button to finish
the move.
To move an object using absolute values
1
Select the objects to be moved.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Move.
Tip: You may also use the Move tool on the Tools toolbar.
3
Click to set the base point for the move, or type the coordinates of the base point,
and then press ENTER.
Note: When you start typing, a box appears at the bottom left-hand corner of the
window, showing the value that you enter.
4
Type the new coordinate location for the base point, and then press ENTER.
To move an object using relative values
1
Select the objects to be moved.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Move.
Tip: You may also use the Move tool on the Tools toolbar.
3
Type @, followed by the distances to move the object, and then press ENTER. For
example, to move an object 2’-0” stage right (X axis) and 3’-0” off the floor (Z
axis), type the following, and then press ENTER:
@2’,0,3’
To move an object using distance and direction
1
Select the objects to be moved.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Move.
Tip: You may also use the Move tool on the Tools toolbar.
3
Type @, the distance that you want to move the object, the < sign, and the
direction (as an angle, positive or negative) to move the object, and then press
ENTER. For example, to move an object 3’-6” to the left, type the following, and
then press ENTER:
@3’6”<-180
Rotating
You can rotate objects around a base point to place them on angles in your drawing.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
147
CAD mode
Release 18.0
To rotate an object
1
Select the object(s) to be rotated.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Rotate.
Tip: You may also use the Rotate tool on the Tools toolbar.
3
Click to set the center point for the rotation, or type in the coordinates of the
center point, and then press ENTER.
4
Type the rotation angle, and then press ENTER, or drag the mouse and click to type
the rotation angle. For example, to rotate an object 45 degrees, type 45, and then
press ENTER.
Mirroring
The Mirror command duplicates and reverses an object, inserting it the same distance
from an axis line as the original object.
To insert a mirrored object
1
Select the object(s) to be mirrored.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Mirror.
Tip: You may also use the Mirror tool on the Tools toolbar.
3
Click on the drawing to enter the first axis point.
4
Click on the drawing to set the second axis point.
Result: The mirrored object is copied, reversed from the origin, based on the axis
drawn.
Modifying object shapes
You can change the shape of certain objects after they are drawn. The objects that you
can change include lines, risers, cameras, surfaces, spheres, and arcs. Modifying the
shape changes one or more of the parameters of the object, such as its width, height,
or radius.
Note: If you are changing the shape of a sphere, when you click and drag one of its
vertices, it will be resized proportionately if the Lock ratio checkbox is checked for the
sphere’s properties. (Click Properties > Sphere tab, and then ensure the Lock ratio check
box is checked.) To resize the sphere in a disproportionate manner, deselect this
checkbox, and then click and drag one of its vertices.
To modify the shape of an object
1
Select the object whose shape you want to modify.
Result: You will notice that several white boxes will appear at the vertices of the
object. These boxes are referred to as “markers.”
2
Move your cursor to a vertex.
Result: The cursor changes to an arrow.
Note: If you see a grey dotted box beside your mouse cursor, the object will be
moved instead of reshaped. Move your cursor so that only the arrow appears.
148
3
Left-click to “grip” one of the markers.
4
While holding down the left mouse button, click and drag the object until it reaches
the desired shape.
November 2006
CAD mode
5
Release the mouse button to set the shape.
Tip: As you move the mouse, the current coordinates appear at the bottom of the
screen.
Object properties
All objects in WYSIWYG have properties. Properties are the characteristics or attributes
that shape and define an object. Modifying object properties is a form of editing and is
the only way to make changes to objects once they have been drawn (some exceptions
exist).
To edit object properties
1
Select the objects that you want to edit.
2
Right-click on the object, and then select Properties.
Tip: At any time, to access an object’s properties, you can click on the Properties
tool on the Edit toolbar.
Result: The Properties dialog is displayed.
Note: All objects have general properties that affect the color and layer on which
they are drawn. Objects also have properties that are particular to that type of
object. For example, fixtures have unit numbers but do not have a radius. When an
object is selected and its properties are displayed, a tab appears in the properties
dialog box for that type of object. When you select multiple objects of different
types, tabs appear for each type of object selected.
General object properties
In WYSIWYG, there are three tabs that appear in the properties dialog box for every
object. These three tabs are the General, Appearance, Light Emission, and Sidedness tabs.
For 3D solids and surfaces, the Set Piece tab also appears in the properties dialog box.
All tabs are explained here.
General tab
Options on the General tab affect the layer’s color and line thickness.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
149
CAD mode
Release 18.0
„
Layer list: A list of the layers in your document is displayed. Click on a list item to
change the layer on which the objects will be drawn.
„
„
Use Layer Color: Select this check box to set the object’s color for wireframe views to
be the same as the properties of the layer on which the object resides. For more
information, refer to “Layer properties” on page 164.
Click to clear the check box, and then use the color button to set a specific color for
the object.
Use Layer Line Thickness: Select this check box to set the object’s line thickness to be
the same as the properties of the layer on which the object resides. For more
information, refer to “Layer properties” on page 164.
Click to clear the check box, and then type a thickness in the box below to set a
specific line thickness for the object. The line weight is used to determine how
thick the pen should be when printing a copy of the document.
The applied line thickness is only visible in Print Preview mode and when printed.
„
Attach to Axis: From the drop-down list, select the movement axis to which you want
to attach the selected object or objects. For details on attaching objects to
movement axes, see “To attach an object to a movement axis” on page 142.
Appearance tab
Use this tab to specify the appearance of the different components that make up the
currently selected items. Based on the items that you have selected, the options in this
tab differ.
You can use this tab to customize objects by adding different materials, colors, or
textures to each element of the item. For example, if you have selected a library object,
such as a podium, you can apply different materials, colors, and textures to each part of
it (the body and the top portion).
Note: You can apply textures only to venues, surfaces, risers, and walls. You can apply
transparency to everything. When customizing the selected element, you can choose between
applying a custom color or a custom texture—you cannot choose both. In addition to either color or
texture, you can also apply material.
Choose one of the following options:
„
150
Use Layer Rendering Color: Check this option to set the object(s) color for shaded
views and renderings to the same as the properties of the layer on which the
November 2006
CAD mode
object resides. For more information on layer properties, refer to “Layer
properties” on page 164.
„
Use Custom Color: Click this option and then use the color button to set a specific
color for the object(s).
„
„
Use Texture from Library: Click this option to apply a texture from the library to the
selected object(s). In the resulting window, navigate to and select the desired
texture. You can apply textures to venues, drape lines, surfaces, risers, and walls.
Click the ellipsis button (...) to change the selected texture file.
Use Texture from File: Click this option to apply to the selected object(s) a texture
that you have created and saved in either bitmap or jpeg format. In the resulting
window, navigate to and select the desired file. You can apply textures to venues,
surfaces, risers, and walls. Click the ellipsis button (...) to change the selected
texture file.
If you have chosen a texture option, then you can also set the properties of the texture
as follows:
„
Tile: Click this option button if you want to have the texture repeated over the
selected element in a continuous series of squares or rectangles, and then type the
size of the frame in which you want the texture to appear in the Width and Height
boxes. Based on the size that you enter, WYSIWYG calculates how many times the
texture is repeated (or tiled) to completely cover the selected element.
„
„
Stretch: To have the texture stretch over the entire element surface, click this
option button. Based on the aspect ratio and the rotation angle, WYSIWYG
evaluates the surface with all of its edges and stretches the texture so the best fit
is used.
Texture Rotation: If the texture has text or another recognizable image in it, you
might need to rotate the image to get it right-side up. Type the rotation angle in
this box.
Proceed with the following properties settings:
„
„
Material: Click the ellipsis button (...) to choose a material for the selected
elements. Click Default to remove the selected material from the element and
return to the default material. For more information on materials, refer to
“Materials” on page 161.
Use Material Transparency: All materials in WYSIWYG specify a level of transparency that
varies from one material to the next. For example, glass is more transparent than brick. The
transparency level of the selected material appears beside this option button (with 0% being
completely opaque). If you select Default, the transparency level is set to 0% (opaque). To
customize the transparency level, click the Use Custom Transparency option button, and then
type the desired transparency level in the box provided (or use the arrow to select a value).
„
Use Custom Transparency: Click this option button if you want to set a transparency level for
the color or texture that you have chosen, or if you want to override the default transparency
level of the selected material. Then type the desired transparency level in the box provided (or
use the arrow to select a value).
Light Emission tab
Options on the Light Emission tab affect the light emission properties for the selected
object(s). Light emission is defined as the ability for objects to glow or emit light and
can be used to simulate LEDs, lasers, neon, light boxes, projection screens, and so on.
Note: Instead of using the Properties > Light Emission tab to change the light emission for
the selected object, you can use the Quick Light Emission Tool. For details, see “Quick
Light Emission Tool” on page 153.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
151
CAD mode
Release 18.0
„
„
„
Enable Light Emission: Click this box to enable light emission for the object, and then
choose the light emitting properties.
Color Mode: Component color settings are designed to be used in groups of three,
meaning that you choose the color mode for one of the surfaces and then continue
choosing color modes for the other two surfaces in the triplet, assigning one color
to each surface (either red, green or blue). If you are not selecting colors in a
group of three, choose Full Color Mode in this drop-down box.
Note: This feature is particularly useful to emulate a color-mixing source with
discrete red/green/blue elements, such as fluorescent tubes or LEDs. The color
mode affects how the surface responds to the colors that you assign to it, both
static and dynamic. In Full Color mode, the surface will show the resultant color
mix of the RGB channels controlling it. For example, if you choose white in the
color picker (RGB 255, 255, 255), the surface will be white. However, when you
create a triplet surface using each component color, one for each surface, and then
you choose one of the component colors, such as Component Color - Red, then this
surface will only show the red component of the color.
Color: Click the color box to choose the static light-emitting color for the object. If
you set only this value, and not the Dynamic Color Control, then this is the lightemitting color that the object will have in all shaded views and renderings in all
modes (CAD, Design, Live). However, if you set the dynamic color value as well,
then you can control the light-emitting color of the object in Live mode when
connected to a console. (The static value still applies in Design mode.)
„
Intensity: Choose the static intensity of the light emission for the selected object. If
you set only this value, and not the Dynamic Intensity Control, then this is the
maximum light-emitting intensity that the object will have in all shaded views and
renderings in all modes (CAD, Design, Live). However, if you set the dynamic
intensity value as well, then you can control the light-emitting intensity of the
object in Live mode when connected to a console. (The static value still applies in
Design mode.)
„
152
Dynamic Color Control - Universe: When you select a value from this drop-down box,
the selected object will have light-emitting properties controllable by three DMX
channels (red, blue, green). The object must be patched according to the
WYSIWYG patch notation: universe.DMX address. From the drop-down box, select
the patch universe of the selected object, and then type the starting DMX address
in the Address box below it. If you set this value, it overrides the static color control
that you chose above (if any) in Live mode when you are connected to a console.
November 2006
CAD mode
„
„
Dynamic Color Control - Address: After selecting the patch universe of the selected
object, type the starting DMX address for the patch in this box.
Dynamic Intensity Control - Maximum Intensity: Enables you to set the maximum
intensity of patched objects. Select the intensity from the drop-down box.
Note: The DMX intensity value is treated as a percentage of the dynamic intensity
value. For example, a DMX value of 127 results in 50% of the maximum intensity value
that you set.
„
Dynamic Intensity Control - Universe: When you select a value from this drop-down
box, the selected object will have light emitting properties to a maximum of the
intensity that you specify. The object must be patched according to the WYSIWYG
patch notation: universe.DMX address. From the drop-down box, select the patch
universe of the selected object, and then type the starting DMX address in the
Address box below it.
„
„
Dynamic Intensity Control - Address: After selecting the patch universe of the selected
object, type the starting DMX address in this box.
Spot Number: Assign a spot number for the selected object. This is the spot number
that is used by the console to call the object. Once the object is successfully
patched, you can control it from your console in Live mode as you would a regular
fixture.
Quick Light Emission Tool
Instead of using the Properties > Light Emission tab to change the selected object’s light
emission, you can use the Quick Light Emission Tool. These tools allow you to quickly
assign or change light emission properties for the selected object without opening the
Properties window. You can enter repetitive information, as well as incremental
information for each object as you click on it.
To use the Quick Light Emission Tool
1
From the Tools menu, choose Quick Light Emission Tool.
Tip: You can also click the Quick Light Emission Tool from the Tools toolbar.
2
Select the light emission properties for the selected object. For details on each of
the options, see “Light Emission tab” on page 151. If you want the value to auto
increment for color, make sure you select the Auto Increment check box. WYSIWYG
will assign the next sequential number based on the properties and requirements
of the previous patch.
3
When you have chosen all desired values, click OK.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
153
CAD mode
Release 18.0
Sidedness tab
Options on the Sidedness tab affect how the selected object appears in Shaded views and
Renderings. You cannot change the sidedness of any of the objects that come with
WYSIWYG, either library objects or default venues. By default, all objects in the
WYSIWYG library are double-sided, which means that when you rotate them in Shaded
views, all sides display equally. Conversely, the default venues that come with
WYSIWYG are single sided, which enables you to see “into” the venue when you rotate
it in Shaded views.
You can, however, change the sidedness of objects that you have drawn in another
program and imported into WYSIWYG (i.e., .dwg, .dxf files) or objects that you have
drawn in WYSIWYG, such as custom venues, surfaces or custom objects that you have
added to the library.
For these objects, you can use this tab to change the sidedness from single to double
sided, or vice versa. For example, if you have drawn a venue as double sided, you can
select it and change it to single sided so that it behaves in the same manner as the
default WYSIWYG venues (i.e., you can see into the venue as you rotate it in Shaded
views). If you prefer to have an outside view of the custom venue, then the doublesided option is best as it prevents you from seeing “through” the walls. You can also use
this feature to flip the faces of a custom surface from one direction to the other if you
do not like the way the object appears in the Shaded view.
To change an object’s sidedness
You can use this procedure to change objects from single to double sided and vice
versa. You can also flip the faces of a single-sided object so that they are oriented in the
opposite direction, either inward or outward.
Note: You cannot change the sidedness of any of the objects that come with WYSIWYG,
either library objects or default venues. By default, all objects in the WYSIWYG library
are double-sided, which means that when you rotate them in Shaded views, all sides
display equally. Conversely, the default venues that come with WYSIWYG are single
sided, which allows you to see “into” the venue when you rotate them in Shaded views.
1
Select the object that you want to edit.
2
Right-click on the object, and then select Properties.
Tip: At any time, to access an object’s properties, you can click on the Properties
tool on the Edit toolbar.
Result: The Properties dialog is displayed.
154
3
Click the Sidedness tab.
4
Click the appropriate option button, either Double Sided or Single Sided. To leave the
single-sided object’s faces oriented in the same direction in which they were
drawn, proceed directly to step 6. To change the direction of the faces, see step 5.
5
If you are changing a double-sided object to single sided, and you want to change
the direction in which the object’s faces are oriented (either outward or inward),
click the Flip Normal check box.
6
Click OK.
7
Review your changes in the Shaded tab and make adjustments as required.
November 2006
CAD mode
„
„
Double Sided: Select this option to turn the single-sided object into a double-sided
object. Note that you cannot change WYSIWYG’s default venues from single to
double sided.
Single Sided: Select this option to turn the double-sided object into a single-sided
object. For example, if you have created a custom surface/wall/venue and have
imported it as a double-sided object into WYSIWYG, you can select it and make it
single sided so you can see “into” the venue when you rotate it in Shaded views.
Note that you cannot change any of WYSIWYG’s library objects from double to
single sided.
„
Flip Normal: If you have imported a custom-drawn object or drawn an object in
WYSIWYG and you see in the Shaded view that it appears incorrectly (the “faces”
showing the texture/color are pointing inward), select this check box to flip the
faces in the opposite direction, and then look at the object in the Shaded view
again.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
155
CAD mode
Release 18.0
Set Piece tab
Options on the Set Piece tab affect the facet properties for the selected surfaces or set
pieces and, consequently, how they will respond during simulation in shaded views
when the beam quality is set to “Light up.” Facet Splitting splits surfaces or set pieces
into small triangles for the purposes of smooth beam fallout.
„
Use Document Defaults: Select this check box if you want to reference the object
settings that are saved in Show Options. For more information on object settings,
refer to the “Object Settings tab” on page 92. Deselect this option to set objectspecific facet options.
„
Facet Splitting: Select this check box to ignore the document defaults and set objectspecific facet properties. Specify the size of the triangles in the Facet Resolution box.
The more triangles you have, the more realistic the cosine distribution is. However,
this also decreases the simulation speed.
Object-specific properties
As explained above, objects also have properties that are particular to the type of
object. For example, fixtures have unit numbers but do not have a radius. When an
object is selected and its properties are displayed, a tab appears in the properties dialog
box for that type of object. When you select multiple objects of different types, tabs
appear for each type of object selected. The following objects are defined:
„
points
„
lines
„
text labels
„
dimensions
„
library items
For all other types of objects (venues, circles, arcs, risers, cylinders, spheres, and
cameras), refer to “Drawing objects” on page 126. In these cases, the properties dialog
offers the same options that were given when the object was initially drawn.
Hanging structures properties (pipes, truss, floor mounts, and so on) are fully defined in
“Hang structures” on page 177.
Fixtures and lighting-specific object properties are fully defined in “Hanging and
focusing fixtures” on page 185.
156
November 2006
CAD mode
Point tab
Options on the Point tab affect how the selected point is drawn. The default point type
used in a document is defined on the Object Defaults tab of Show Options. To ignore the
default setting, click to clear the Use Document Defaults check box, and then select the
desired point type.
Line tab
Options on the Line tab affect how the selected line is drawn.
„
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Line Pattern: Choose a line pattern for the selected lines. Refer to “Drawing lines”
on page 131 for an illustration of each type.
Scale: Type a value in this box to change the length and spacing of dots and
dashes for the selected lines. This value is applicable to center, hidden, or dot lines
only.
Closed: Select this check box to quickly connect the first point of a multi-segment
line to the last point of that line.
157
CAD mode
Release 18.0
„
Spline: Select the Spline check box to transform a line into a spline or French curve.
Note: You cannot change a line to a spline or French curve unless the selected line
has more than two vertices.
„
Shade Options: select the Shade check box to have the selected line(s) displayed in
shaded views and renderings, and then type a value for the radius to set its
thickness.
Text label tab
Options on the Text Label tab affect the justification and style of the selected text labels.
„
Text: Type new text to change the label.
„
Height: Type a value for the height to adjust the font size.
„
Italics: Select this check box to make the text appear in italics.
„
„
„
Align to View: Select this check box to set the text labels to be legible regardless of
plot type.
Horizontal Justification: Select the desired option button to set the text label’s
horizontal alignment. The available horizontal alignment options are:
„ Left: Places the selected text label to the left of the insertion point.
„ Center: Horizontally centers the selected text label on the insertion point.
„ Right: Places the selected text label to the right of the insertion point.
Vertical Justification: Select the desired check box to set the text label’s vertical
alignment. The available vertical alignment options are:
„ Top: Places the selected text label below the insertion point.
„ Center: Vertically centers the selected text label on the insertion point.
„ Bottom: Places the selected text label above the insertion point.
Dimension tab
Options on the Dimension tab affect the appearance and measurement mode of the
selected dimension. To change the length of a dimension, it must be stretched in the
drawing.
158
November 2006
CAD mode
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
Length: This box is not editable. It displays the actual length of the line drawn for
the dimension.
Text: Type a height value to change the font size of the dimension label.
Extension: Type a value to change the length of the extension lines for the
dimension. The extension lines mark the extremities of the dimension.
Offset: Type a value to change the offset. The offset is the distance between the
extension lines and the object being measured.
View Type: This box is not editable. It displays the plot type in which the dimension
label is visible, which is determined when the dimension is drawn.
Measurement Mode: Select an option to change the measurement mode.
Measurement modes are explained in “Drawing dimension lines” on page 134.
Measurement Units: Select the Imperial or Metric option buttons to change the
measurement units.
Precision: Select the appropriate option buttons to specify measurement precision
of the dimension line. Based on your choice for measurement units, you can
choose to display the drawing resolution in centimeters, millimeters, whole
numbers, or fractions.
Textures
You can apply textures to different objects, such as venues, surfaces, risers, and walls.
(Surfaces are created using the Surface tool, or by extruding a line.) The textures
provided with WYSIWYG emulate various types of surfaces, such as brick or cloth. You
can also use your own bitmap or jpeg files as textures, to emulate projection screens,
or to cover a surface with a texture specific to your show.
When customizing an object, you can apply either a color or a texture; you cannot apply
both.
Notes:
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
The availability of textures depends on the type of installation performed. Textures
are installed in a “Full” installation from the CD. If you performed a “Typical”
installation, the textures will not be immediately available. Run the installer again
and choose Modify to load the texture files. If you downloaded WYSIWYG from the
Cast Web site, you will need to download and install the textures file separately.
159
CAD mode
Release 18.0
„
The following procedure details how to apply a texture to a surface, but it can also
be used to apply a texture to a venue, riser, or walls by right-clicking, and then
selecting Properties.
To apply a texture to a surface
1
Right-click the surface to which you want to apply a texture, and then choose
Properties.
2
Click the Appearance tab.
3
Select the texture option that you want. The options are:
„
Use Texture from Library: Indicates that the selected surface is a texture from the
WYSIWYG library. The texture name appears in the box provided. Click the
ellipsis button (...) to modify the selected surface.
„
Use Texture from File: The selected surface uses a texture from an external
bitmap or jpeg file on your hard drive rather than one from the WYSIWYG
library. Click the ellipsis button (...) to select the external file to be used as a
texture.
160
4
Click Tile to have the texture repeated over the selected element in a continuous
series of squares or rectangles, and then type the size of the frame in which you
want the texture to appear in the Width and Height boxes. Based on the size that
you enter, WYSIWYG calculates how many times the texture is repeated (or tiled)
to completely cover the selected element.
5
Check Stretch to make the selected texture grow to cover the entire surface. Based
on the aspect ratio and the rotation angle, WYSIWYG evaluates the surface with all
of its edges and stretches the texture so the best fit is used. This option is not
active unless you choose a texture.
6
If the texture has text or another recognizable image in it, you might need to
rotate the image to get it right-side up. Type the rotation angle in the Texture
Rotation box.
7
Click OK.
November 2006
CAD mode
Materials
Materials differ from textures in that they do not affect what the objects or surfaces will
look like, but rather how they interact with light. The result of applying a material is
only apparent in renderings, as shown below:
Objects and surfaces can be assigned both a texture and a material.
You apply materials using the Appearance tab in the Properties dialog box. You can choose
your preferred material from the list of materials provided with WYSIWYG.
To apply a material to an object (surface, object, or venue)
1
Right-click the object to which you want to apply the material, and then choose
Properties.
2
Click the Appearance tab.
3
From the Elements list box, choose the elements to which you want to apply the
material. To choose a custom material for the selected elements (such as metal,
paper, plastic, or fabric) click the ellipsis button (...) beside the Material box.
4
In the resulting dialog, navigate to and highlight the desired material, and then
click OK.
5
Click Apply.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
161
CAD mode
Release 18.0
6
If desired, you can apply a transparency level to the selected element. Based on
the settings that you have chosen for color, texture, and material, the transparency
options vary as follows:
„
Use Material Transparency: All materials in WYSIWYG specify a level of transparency that
varies from one material to the next. For example, glass is more transparent than brick.
The transparency level of the selected material appears beside this option button (with
0% being completely opaque). If you select Default, the transparency level is set to 0%
(opaque). To customize the transparency level, click the Use Custom Transparency option
button, and then type the desired transparency level in the box provided (or use the arrow
to select a value).
„
Use Custom Transparency: Click this option button if you want to set a transparency level
for the color or texture that you have chosen, or if you want to override the default
transparency level of the selected material. Then type the desired transparency level in
the box provided (or use the arrow to select a value).
7
Click Apply.
8
Click OK.
Applying a material to a Library item element
You can apply different materials to each element of Library objects using the
Appearance tab in the Properties dialog box.
To apply a material to a Library item element
1
Right-click the library item to which you want to apply material, and then choose
Properties.
2
Click the Appearance tab.
3
Select an element from the Element list.
4
If a material was chosen previously, it is listed in the Material box. To choose a
different material, or to choose a material for the first time, click the ellipsis (...)
button, and then navigate to the new material.
Note: Click Default to remove your selection and apply the default material to the
element.
5
162
Repeat steps 4 and 5 for each element to which you want to apply materials.
November 2006
CAD mode
6
When finished, click OK.
Layers
Layers are drawing aids intended to help you organize your plot. They are like
transparent acetate sheets upon which you can draw. In the same way that you can
view several transparent sheets at once by placing them on top of each other, you can
hide and unhide layers by choosing which sheets are in the stack. The top sheet is the
layer that new objects are placed on and is called the current layer.
Creating layers
To create new layers
1
From the Edit menu, choose Layers.
Result: The Layer Database dialog box is displayed.
2
To create a new layer, click New.
3
Type a new name for your layer (for example, “Pipes”), and then click OK.
4
To change the color of the layer, click Color Select. It is recommended that you
select different colors for each layer so as to easily identify the layers on the plot.
5
To make a layer and all objects on the layer visible on the plot and in shaded views,
select the Visible check box. If not selected, the layer is not visible and is not,
therefore, editable.
6
To make a layer and all objects on the layer editable on the plot and in shaded
views, select the Editable check box. If not selected, the layer is not editable and is
not, therefore, visible.
Tip: You might want to deselect a layer when you are finished working with it to
avoid possible errors while working on other parts of the plot. This is similar to
freezing in Auto CAD.
7
To view and modify the scenes in which a layer is included, select a layer, and then
click Scenes. For details, see “Scenes” on page 165.
8
To view the properties of a layer (for example, name, color, and inventory of
objects drawn on the layer), click Properties. For more information on these
properties, refer to “Layer properties” on page 164.
9
Before closing the dialog, set your current layer by highlighting it, and then clicking
Set Current.
The current layer is the layer that you are working on at the moment – any object
that you draw is placed on this layer and assumes the layer's default properties
when it is drawn. An asterisk (*) appears beside the name of the current layer.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
163
CAD mode
Release 18.0
10
Click OK to close the Layers dialog.
Note: To quickly sort the layers within the layer database, click the appropriate
column heading in the Layer Database dialog box. For example, click the Editable
column heading to sort the layers by edit setting; that is, those layers marked as
editable appear at the top of the list in alphabetical order.
Layer properties
All layers have properties that describe the appearance of the layer. Objects that reside
on the layer inherit the properties of the layer by default unless you decide to override
the values. For more information on overriding object properties, refer to “General
object properties” on page 149.
General tab
Options on the General tab affect the selected layer’s color, line thickness, and visibility.
„
„
„
Visible: Select this check box to make the selected layer visible on the plot and in
shaded views. If you modify the property here, it is changed on the Layer
Database dialog box.
Editable: select this check box to make the selected layer editable on the plot and in
shaded views. Modifying the property here changes it on the Layer Database dialog
box.
Opaque: Click this check box if you want all objects on the current layer to be
opaque (beams of light will not pass through any of these objects).
„
Plot Color: Sets the layer’s color for wireframe views. This is the color that is used
for objects that reside on the selected layer when printing the document, unless
otherwise modified. To modify the object color, refer to the “General tab” on page
149.
„
Use Document Line Weight: Select this check box to set the layer’s line thickness to
the default value specified in Show Options. For more information, refer to the
“Show Options window” on page 91.
Click to clear the check box, and then type a thickness in the Line Weight box below
to set a specific line thickness for the layer. The value is used as the line thickness
for all the objects that reside on the specified layer, unless otherwise modified. To
modify the line thickness of an object, refer to the “General tab” on page 149.
Note: The applied line thickness is only visible in Print Preview mode and when
printed.
„
Use Plot Color for rendering: select this check box to set the layer’s color for shaded
views and renderings to the same as the plot color specified above. Click to clear
the check box and use the color button to set a specific color for the selected layer.
The chosen color is used for all objects that reside on the selected layer, unless
164
November 2006
CAD mode
otherwise modified. To modify the object color for rendering, refer to the “General
tab” on page 149.
Object Counts tab
Entries on the Object Counts tab indicate the total number of objects that reside on the
selected layer. Values on this tab are read-only.
Deleting layers
You must remove all objects from a layer before you can delete it. You cannot delete the
current layer.
To delete a layer
1
Select all the objects on the layer that you want to delete, and then delete them or
move them to another layer.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Layers.
Result: The Layer Database dialog box is displayed.
3
Ensure that the layer you want to delete is not set as the current layer.
4
Select the layer in the list.
5
Click Delete.
6
Click OK.
Tips:
„
The Layer toolbar gives you quick access to all existing layers and the Layers
database. Click the tool on the left end of the Layer toolbar to access the Layer
database.
„
Use the layer list in the Layer toolbar to quickly set the current layer. If objects
are selected when you do this, those objects are moved to the selected current
layer.
Scenes
Scenes are collections of layers used to organize the plot. A scene may contain one or
more layers.
Hiding a scene hides all the layers assigned to that scene. By organizing the layers and
scenes in your plot, you can quickly perform set changes.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
165
CAD mode
Release 18.0
By default WYSIWYG creates two initial scenes: Current Layer Only and All Layers. You
cannot delete these scenes.
To create a new scene
1
From the Edit menu, choose Scenes.
Result: The Scene Database dialog box is displayed.
2
Click New to create a new scene.
3
Type the name of the new scene, and then click OK.
Result: The layers associated with the scene are displayed in the Layers Out and
Layers In boxes.
4
Select the layers that you want to include in the scene, and then use the arrow
buttons to move the layers accordingly. The layers that are available in a scene can
also be set in the Layers dialog box. For more information, refer to “Layers” on page
163.
Notes:
„
„
„
5
To copy a scene, select the scene, and then click Clone. The copied scene has
the same properties of the selected scene.
To rename a scene, select the scene, and then click Rename.
To remove a scene from the scene database, select the scene, and then click
Delete.
Click Set Current to activate your new scene.
Note: If the current layer is not in the current scene, you will not be able to add
any objects.
6
Click OK.
Tip:
The Scene toolbar gives you quick access to all existing scenes and the Scenes
database. Click the tool on the left end of the Scene toolbar to access the Scene
database.
Note: In order for fixtures to be displayed in scenes, both the layer on which the
fixtures reside and the layer on which the respective hang structure resides (if different)
must be included in the scene. You cannot display fixtures without their hang
structures.
166
November 2006
CAD mode
CAD tools
Break
The Break command allows you to break an object into smaller components.
To break an arc into arcs
1
Select the arc that you want to break.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Break, and then choose Arc into arcs.
3
Type the number of desired break arcs, and then click OK.
Result: The arc is broken equally into the number of arcs specified.
To break an arc into lines
1
Select the arc that you want to break.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Break, and then choose Arc into lines.
3
Type the number of desired break lines, and then click OK.
Result: The arc is broken equally into the number of lines specified.
To break a circle into arcs
1
Select the circle that you want to break.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Break, and then choose Circles into arcs.
3
Type the number of desired break arcs, and then click OK.
Result: The circle is broken equally into the number of arcs specified.
To break a circle into lines
1
Select the circle that you want to break.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Break, and then choose Circles into lines.
3
Type the number of desired break lines, and then click OK.
Result: The circle is broken equally into the number of lines specified.
To break a line at vertices
1
Select the multi-segment line that you want to break.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Break, and then choose Lines At Vertices.
Result: The continuous multi-segment line is broken at the segment intersections.
Each vertex is now an independent line.
To break a line into lines
1
Select the line or multi-segment line that you want to break.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Break, and then choose Lines into lines.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
167
CAD mode
Release 18.0
3
Type the number of desired break lines, and then click OK.
Result: The line is broken equally into the number of lines specified.
To break a set piece into faces
1
Select the 3D solid that you want to break (for example, a riser).
2
From the Tools menu, choose Break, and then choose Set pieces into faces.
Result: Each face of the solid becomes an independent surface.
To break a set piece into lines
1
Select the 3D solid that you want to break, a riser for example.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Break, and then choose Set pieces into lines.
Result: Each segment of the solid becomes an independent line. The 3D solid in no
longer a solid.
Note: Alternatively, to perform a break command, you can use the Break tool on
the Tools toolbar.
This is the same as choosing Specify from the Break sub-
menu.
To break using the Specify dialog
1
Select the object that you want to break.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Break, and then choose Specify.
3
Select the desired break type from the available options by selecting the
appropriate check boxes. Based on the object that you have selected to break,
these options vary.
4
In the boxes at the top right corner, specify the number of break lines or arcs if
appropriate.
5
Select the Delete original objects check box if you want the original object to be
replaced with the new “broken” ones.
6
Select the Put new objects on current layer check box if you want the new “broken”
objects to be placed on the current layer, as opposed to the selected object’s
original layer, if different.
7
Click OK.
Convert
The Convert command turns an object into a different kind of object. For example, you
can convert a circle into a circular surface, you can convert lines into pipes, and vice
versa, and you can convert points into focus positions, and vice versa.
168
November 2006
CAD mode
To convert a circle into an arc
1
Select the circle that you want to convert.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Convert, and then choose Circles into arcs.
Result: The circle is converted into a 360-degree arc. The marker points can be
dragged out to open the arc, if desired.
To convert a circle into a surface
1
Select the circle that you want to convert.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Convert, and then choose Circles into surfaces.
3
Type the number of segments to make up the contour of the surface. You cannot
type the number 1. The higher the number, the more circular the surface.
Result: The circle is converted into a surface.
Notes:
„
If you type 2, the circle is converted into a linear surface.
„
If you type 3, the circle is converted into a triangular surface.
„
If you type 4, the circle is converted to a square surface.
„
This pattern will repeat for each increment in the number of segments.
To convert a line into a pipe
1
Select the line that you want to convert.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Convert, and then choose Lines into pipes.
Result: The line is converted into a pipe, assuming all of the properties and
characteristics of a pipe. You can name it and hang fixtures on it.
To convert a pipe into a line
1
Select the pipe you want to convert.
Note: There cannot be any fixtures hanging on the selected pipe. You must
unhang or delete any fixtures before attempting to convert the pipe into a line.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Convert, and then choose Pipes into lines.
Result: The pipe is converted into a line.
To convert a focus position into a point
1
Select the focus position that you want to convert.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Convert, and then choose Focus positions into points.
Result: The focus position is converted into a point. Any fixtures that were focused
to the initial focus position retain their orientation, but lose the association with
that point.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
169
CAD mode
Release 18.0
To convert a point into a focus position
1
Select the point that you want to convert.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Convert, and then choose Points into focus positions.
Result: The points are converted into a focus position, and are automatically
called “Label.” To change the name for the newly created focus position, refer to
“Focus position properties” on page 191.
Note: Alternatively, to perform a convert command, you can use the Convert tool
on the Tools toolbar.
To convert using the Specify dialog
1
Select the object that you want to convert.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Convert, and then choose Specify.
3
Select the desired conversion type from the available options by selecting the
appropriate option buttons. Select the Don’t convert option button if you do not want
to convert the circle into either an arc or a surface.
Note: For circles, select the Arcs or Surfaces option button, and then type the
number of points as discussed above.
4
Select the Delete original objects check box if you want the original object to be
replaced with the new “converted” one.
5
Select the Put new objects on current layer check box if you want the new “converted”
objects to be placed on the current layer, as opposed to the selected object’s
original layer, if different.
6
Click OK.
Divide
The divide command separates objects into equal parts. The initial object is left intact
(if not deleted), and the parts are identified by newly created objects, such as points or
lines.
To divide an arc into lines
170
1
Select the arc that you want to divide.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Divide, and then choose Arcs into lines.
November 2006
CAD mode
3
Type the number of lines desired.
Result: The arc is divided into equal parts by the number of lines specified. The
lines are automatically drawn from the center of the arc outward, resulting in
something similar to a pie chart.
To divide an arc into points
1
Select the arc that you want to divide.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Divide, and then choose Arcs into points.
3
Type the number of points desired.
Result: The arc is divided into equal parts by the number of points specified. The
points are placed along the arc at the calculated interval.
To divide a circle into lines
1
Select the circle that you want to divide.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Divide, and then choose Circles into lines.
3
Type the number of lines desired.
Result: The circle is divided into equal parts by the number of lines specified. The
lines are automatically drawn from the center of the circle outward, resulting in
something similar to a pie chart.
To divide a circle into points
1
Select the circle that you want to divide.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Divide, and then choose Circles into points.
3
Type the number of points desired.
Result: The circle is divided into equal parts by the number of points specified.
The points are placed along the circle at the calculated interval.
To divide a cylinder into circles
1
Select the cylinder that you want to divide.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Divide, and then choose Cylinders into circles.
3
Type the number of circles desired.
Result: The cylinder is divided into equal parts by the number of circles specified.
The circles are stacked within the cylinder at the calculated interval.
To divide a cylinder into lines
1
Select the cylinder that you want to divide.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Divide, and then choose Cylinder into lines.
3
Type the number of lines desired.
Result: The cylinder is divided into equal parts by the number of lines specified.
The lines follow the same pattern as the cylinder’s existing segments, but at the
calculated interval.
To divide a line into points
1
Select the line that you want to divide.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Divide, and then choose Lines into points.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
171
CAD mode
Release 18.0
3
Type the number of points desired.
Result: The line is divided into equal parts by the number of points specified. The
points are placed along the line at the calculated interval.
Note: Lines may also be divided by adding vertices. In this case, no new objects are
created; the line is simply divided by marker points.
To add a vertex to a line
1
Select the line to be divided.
2
Right-click on the line segment that you want to divide, and then choose Add
Vertex.
Result: The original line remains intact. A marker point is placed at the midpoint
of the line.
Notes:
„
This procedure can be repeated for vertices within a line. The marker points
will always be placed at the mid point of the vertices.
„
Marker points can be dragged out to re-shape the line.
„
If the line is deleted, the marker points are also deleted.
„
Alternatively, to perform a divide command, you can use the Divide tool on the
Tools toolbar.
This is the same as choosing Specify from the Divide submenu.
To divide using the Specify dialog
1
Select the object you want to divide.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Divide, and then choose Specify.
3
Select the desired divide type from the available options by selecting the
appropriate check boxes.
4
Select the Delete original objects check box if you want the original object to be
deleted when the new ones are created.
5
Select the Put new objects on current layer check box if you want the new objects to
be placed on the current layer, as opposed to the selected object’s original layer if
different.
6
Click OK.
Extrude
The Extrude command allows you to turn a 2D object like a line or an arc into a surface,
or turn a surface into an extruded surface or 3D solid.
172
November 2006
CAD mode
To extrude a line
1
Select the line that you want to extrude.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Extrude, and then choose Lines into Surfaces.
3
Type the distance to extrude the line. The extrusion will occur parallel to the axis of
the missing coordinate. For example, a line shown in plan view will extrude
vertically. For splines, you must specify the number of segments for the new
surface in the # of Points box.
To extrude an arc
1
Select the arc that you want to extrude.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Extrude, and then choose Arcs into Surfaces.
3
Type the distance to extrude the line. The extrusion will occur parallel to the axis of
the missing coordinate. For example, an arc shown in plan view will extrude
vertically.
4
Type the number of segments for the new surface. You cannot type the number 1.
The higher the number, the more circular the surface.
To extrude a surface into an extruded surface
1
Select the surface that you want to extrude.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Extrude, and then choose Surface into Extruded
Surface.
3
Type the distance to extrude the surface. The extrusion occurs parallel to the axis
of the missing coordinate. For example, a surface shown in plan view will extrude
vertically.
Tip:
You can also use the Extrude tool on the Tools toolbar.
Fillet
The Fillet command joins two lines sharing the same end point or two apparent
intersecting lines with an arc. A fillet radius must be specified to achieve the desired
fillet angle.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
173
CAD mode
Release 18.0
To set the fillet radius
1
From the Tools menu, choose Fillet, and then choose Specify fillet radius.
2
Type a radius measurement for the resulting fillet.
Note: All subsequent fillet commands will follow this value until it is modified
again.
To fillet two lines
1
Select the lines to be filleted.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Fillet, and then choose Fillet.
Result: The lines are joined by an arc based on the value set for the fillet radius.
Notes:
1.
You must set a fillet radius before you can perform this command.
2.
If the fillet radius is 0, the lines will be extended and joined at their intersection. If
they are already intersecting, nothing occurs.
Array
The Array command is used to make multiple copies of an object distributed evenly
along a line, arc, in a grid pattern, or, in the case of fixtures, along a pipe or straight
length of truss.
Note: For details about array fixtures along a pipe or truss, see “Hanging multiple
fixtures” on page 186.
To perform a linear array
1
Select the object that you want to array.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Array, and then choose Array Linear.
3
Click a point on your drawing or type in coordinates to specify the direction and
interval for the linear array. For example, to place a copy of the selected object
every 5’ at a 45-degree angle, type the following, and then press ENTER:
@5’<45
4
In the dialog box that opens, type the total number of copies desired (this includes
the original object). Adjust the value for the interval, if required.
5
Click OK.
Note: The interval is defined as the distance between the copied objects.
To perform a polar array
174
1
Select the object that you want to array.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Array, and then choose Array Polar.
3
Click a point that will represent the center of the circle around which the objects
will be arrayed.
4
In the dialog box that opens, type the total number of copies desired (this includes
the original object).
5
Specify the total angle in degrees to fill with copied objects.
November 2006
CAD mode
6
Select the Rotate object check box if you want the copied objects to rotate as they
are pasted around the center of the circular array, as shown below:
7
Click OK.
To perform a grid array
Perform this procedure to array the selected object in a grid pattern in the direction and
at the distance that you specify.
1
Select the object that you want to array.
2
From the Tools menu, choose Array, and then choose Array Grid.
Result: The Grid Array window appears.
3
Type the number of columns in the grid.
Note: This value includes the original object(s) as the first “column” of the grid.
For example, if you type 3, the object is copied and pasted twice beside the
original object in the direction and at the distance that you specify.
4
Type the distance between each horizontal object in the grid.
5
Select the direction in which you want the object(s) to be arrayed horizontally in
the grid, either to the right or left of the original object.
6
Type the number of rows in the grid.
Note: This value includes the original object(s) as the first “row” of the grid. For
example, if you type 3, the object is copied and pasted twice above or below the
original object at the distance that you specify.
7
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Type the distance between each vertical object in the grid.
175
CAD mode
Release 18.0
8
Select the direction in which you want the object(s) to be arrayed in the grid
vertically, either above or below the original object.
9
Click OK.
Distance
The distance tool enables you to measure the distance and angle from one point to
another.
To measure a distance
1
From the Tools menu, choose Distance.
Tip: You can also use the Distance tool on the Tools toolbar.
2
Pick the starting point for the measurement.
3
Pick the end point of the measurement.
Result: The length and angle of the specified trajectory is displayed in the bottom
left corner of the status bar.
Tip: When selecting the starting and end points for the measurement use the snap
tools for precision.
176
November 2006
CAD mode
Hang structures
Introduction
Hang structures are a very important part of creating a lighting plot in WYSIWYG. All
fixtures must be placed on a hang structure - either a pipe or a truss. This includes
fixtures on set mounts or floor mounts. Hang structures are not only a place to hang
fixtures, but also a means to organize your paperwork. Some general facts about hang
structures:
„
„
„
Hang structures can be pipes or trusses. Pipes are drawn, trusses are placed from
the truss library. There are many different types of truss pieces in the truss library,
including box, triangle, and curved. Truss includes floor mount, boom, and ladder
positions as well.
AutoUnit will assign and adjust unit numbers for fixtures on a pipe as you add,
move, or delete them.
Hang structures can have the same name, even if they are not connected. For
example, you can use this feature for set mounts, where you have many small
pipes attached to the same piece of scenery.
Position Manager
The Position Manager organizes all the available position names in your show document.
It also sets the sort order of your positions. You can use the Position Manager to change
the sort order of the position names, which is important for printed paperwork like
instrument schedules and other reports that use the Position field. The order of position
names is also used for general sorting in the Data view and the order in which positions
appear in the Flight Case.
The Position Manager is accessible from the Properties window of a hang structure and
from the Positions command in the Edit menu.
To view and edit entries in the Position Manager
1
From the Edit menu, choose Positions.
Note: The ellipsis button [...] on the Hang Structure page of a pipe’s or truss’
properties will also open the Position Manager.
2
Click New.
3
Type the name of the new position, and then click OK.
4
To modify the name of a position, select the position, and then click Rename.
5
Type the new name, and then click OK.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
177
CAD mode
Release 18.0
6
To remove a position name, select the name, and then click Remove. Removing the
position name does not delete the hang structure. Rather the hang structure
removes its association with the position name.
7
To reorder the position names in the list, select the name of the position you want
to move. Click Up or Down to move the name in the list.
8
If you are in a plot view and want to determine what a particular position
references, click Select. If the plot view is open (and the correct layers are marked
editable), the hang structures that use that position name are selected. To select
more than one position, press CTRL, and then click the position.
9
Click OK to close the Position Manager.
Hang structure properties
Options on the Hang Structure tab affect the properties of the selected hang structure(s).
„
„
Name: Select a new name for the hang structure from the Name drop-down list.
Click the ellipsis (...) button to open the Position Manager and create new names.
AutoUnit: Select this check box to automatically assign a number to each fixture
that you hang. Fixtures are automatically renumbered if you add a new fixture into
the middle of a row of fixtures. This option is available for pipes only and does not
apply to truss.
„
„
Snap: Select this check box to hang fixtures on the pipe at a certain interval, as
specified in the Interval box.
Interval: Type the distance between fixtures in this box. This option is used for pipe
snaps.
„
Use Document Defaults: Select this check box to use the interval for pipe snap as
defined on the Object settings tab in Show Options. For more information on this tab,
refer to “Object Settings tab” on page 92.
„
Number of fixtures: The number of fixtures on the hang structure.
„
Fixture weight: The total weight of fixtures on the hang structure. The weight
measurement accounts for fixture weight only and does not consider cable or other
safety ratings.
178
November 2006
CAD mode
Drawing pipes
Pipes are single member hang structures. Pipes can be set to be drawn from the center
or from the start.
The first pipe drawing mode, Draw from Start, requires pipes to be drawn by specifying
the start point and the end point (from one extremity of the pipe to the other).
The second pipe drawing mode, Draw from Center, requires that the pipe be drawn by
specifying the center point and one end point or extremity of the pipe. Although it is
only necessary to enter all points when drawing in interactive mode, the pipe drawing
mode will affect the insertion point of the pipe when drawing using the pipe dialog box.
The drawing mode will also affect how the fixtures are hung when using pipe snap, how
the fixture offset distance is measured, and how pipe tape prints are labelled.
To set the pipe drawing mode
1
From the Options menu, choose User Options.
2
Click the User tab.
3
In the Pipe Drawing Mode section, select Draw from Center or Draw from Start.
Tips:
„
„
You can change the default setting for a pipe in mid-command by right-clicking
and choosing the drawing mode for that pipe just before inserting it into the
drawing.
You can change the pipe mode for a specific pipe at any time in the pipe’s
properties. For more information, refer to “Pipe properties” on page 181.
To draw a pipe
1
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
From the Draw menu, choose Pipe.
179
CAD mode
Release 18.0
2
In the New Pipe dialog box, find the name of the pipe. If you need to create the
name of the pipe, click the ellipsis button [...] to open the Position Manager. Click
New, and then type the name of the pipe.
3
In the Length box, type the length of the pipe, if different from the default. The
default value is 60’0”.
4
In the Trim Height box, type the desired trim height for the pipe. The default value is
20’0”.
Note: Pipes ignore the missing coordinate setting when drawn using this method.
5
Click OK.
Tip:
You may also use the Pipe tool on the Draw toolbar.
To draw a pipe from center in interactive mode
1
From the Draw menu, choose Pipe.
2
Set the height of the pipe that you are about to draw by pressing the TAB key, and
then entering a value for the missing coordinate, if applicable.
3
Click to place the center point of the pipe.
4
Drag it to the proper length, and then click to place the end point of the pipe.
Notice that the pipe extends in both directions - mirrored at center.
5
Right-click on the pipe that you have just drawn, and then click Properties.
6
Click the Hang Structure tab.
7
From the Name drop-down list, select the name for this new pipe. If the name is
not already in the list, use the Position Manager [...] to enter the new name.
8
Repeat to draw more pipes.
9
Click OK.
To draw a pipe from start in interactive mode
180
1
From the Draw menu, choose Pipe.
2
Set the height of the pipe that you are about to draw by pressing the TAB key, and
then entering a value for the missing coordinate, if applicable.
3
Click to place the starting point of the pipe.
4
Drag it to the proper length, and then click to place the end point of the pipe.
Notice that the pipe extends in one direction.
5
Right-click on the pipe that you have just drawn, and then click Properties.
6
Click the Hang Structure tab.
7
From the Name drop-down list, select the name for this new pipe. If the name is
not already in the list, use the Position Manager [...] to enter the new name.
8
Repeat to draw more pipes.
9
Click OK.
November 2006
CAD mode
Pipe properties
Options on the Pipe tab affect the mode, offset, and dimensions of a pipe.
„
Pipe mode: Select the pipe mode for the specific pipe. The available modes are:
„ Start. If enabled, pipes are drawn from one end to the other. When start mode is
„
„
used, offset is measured from the beginning of the pipe in a positive direction.
Centre. If enabled, pipes are drawn from the center out to both ends at the same
time. When center mode is used, offset values are either positive or negative,
measured from the center of the pipe.
Offset Type: Offset is a fixture property that measures where a fixture is hung on a
pipe. The value depends on the pipe mode selected.
Pipes can also base the Offset on a specified coordinate. In this case, a fixture’s
offset value is calculated as the distance on the specified axis from the specified
coordinate. This is handy if you have many small pipes grouped together to form
one hang position, for example the Balcony Rail. If this is the case, choose all the
pipes’ properties to have their Offset based about X=0. Fixtures on the Balcony
Rail will then report where they are relative to the theatre, rather than the
beginning of the pipe.
This offset methodology can be extended to box booms as well. For example, a
boom in the first box (which is 10’ above the deck) can be drawn as a vertical pipe
and have its offset to be based about Z=10’. A fixture’s offset will then tell you how
high (from the bottom of the box) to hang it.
In WYSIWYG, set the offset mode that you want to use. The choices are:
Normal, which indicates that the offset is based on the pipe mode.
„ X, Y, and Z, which calculates the offset based on the specified coordinate.
„
If you have selected an X, Y, or Z offset type, then you must specify a coordinate
on the axis from which offset values will be calculated.
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Length: Type new text to change the length of the selected pipe.
Trim Height: Type new text to change the trim height. If the pipe is vertical, this
value determines the lowest Z value of the pipe.
181
CAD mode
Release 18.0
Hanging truss
Truss is a hang structure with multiple hanging members. Truss differs from pipes in
that it is built from library objects instead of being drawn. WYSIWYG contains an
extensive library of different truss types from many different manufacturers. The truss
library also contains floor mounts, booms, and ladders.
To hang truss
1
Open the Library Browser, and then click the Truss tool.
Tip: You can also click the Truss tool on the Draw toolbar to place truss.
2
Navigate through the library to find the type of truss you want to use.
3
Double-click on the truss name.
Result: A piece of truss attaches to the cursor.
4
Click on the drawing to place the first piece of truss.
5
Continue placing pieces of truss as needed.
Note: To change the truss type, return to the library, double-click on the name of
the new desired truss type and continue placing truss pieces as normal.
Tip: You can also use Truss shortcuts.
6
Right-click and choose Finish Placing Truss.
7
Right-click on the truss that you have just inserted, and then click Properties.
8
Click the Hang Structure tab.
9
From the Name drop-down list, select the name for this new truss. If the name is
not already in the list, use the Position Manager [...] to enter the new name.
10
Click OK.
To insert a shortcut for truss objects
Refer to “To create a new shortcut” on page 56.
Using Assembly snap with truss
Assembly snap assembles truss pieces together as you insert them, ensuring proper
structural assembly. This is especially useful for long or complex structures made up of
many individual pieces of truss.
As with all snap functions (discussed in “Snaps” on page 109), you can select Assembly
snap in mid-command or as a running snap type.
To select Assembly snap as a running snap type
Enable Assembly snap before inserting truss to assemble and group all subsequently
inserted pieces of truss.
To select Assembly snap in mid-command
Enable Assembly snap after inserting the first piece of truss to assemble selectively.
Assembly snap disengages after you place the next piece of truss, assembling only the
first truss (or group of trusses) with the second piece.
182
November 2006
CAD mode
To use Assembly snap
1
From the Tools menu, click Snap, and then choose Assembly.
Tip: You can also click the Assembly snap tool on the CAD Options toolbar.
2
Insert truss as described above. To snap truss pieces together, hover the cursor
over the end of the piece of truss to which you want to attach the next piece and it
will automatically snap into position.
3
Click to insert the piece of truss in the drawing.
Rotating truss
When inserting truss pieces in your drawing, you can rotate them to the desired
position by using the Rotate tool and the rotate hot keys (X and Z). By enabling
Assembly snap, pieces of truss that you drag into the drawing will snap to connect to
the first piece of truss that you inserted, ensuring proper structural assembly.
Notes:
„
When inserting and rotating the first piece of truss in a series, you must use the
„
Rotate tool (
) to rotate it to the desired position; you cannot use the hot
keys (X and Z) to rotate the first piece of truss.
Once you have placed and rotated the first piece of truss, and have enabled
Assembly snap, you can then drag new pieces of truss into the drawing, and use
the hot keys (X and Z) to rotate them to the same position as the first piece of
truss.
To rotate truss
1
Open the Library Browser, and then click the Truss tool.
Tip: You can also click the Truss tool on the Draw toolbar to place truss.
2
Navigate through the library to find the type of truss that you want to use.
3
Double-click the object name.
Result: A piece of truss attaches to the cursor.
4
Click on the drawing to place the first piece of truss.
5
Right-click and choose Finish Placing Truss.
6
Select the piece of truss, and then click the Rotate tool (
7
Click in the drawing to choose the base point around which you want to rotate the
truss.
8
).
Type the rotational value in degrees (for example, 45 degrees), and then press
Enter.
Note: As you type, the value appears in the box in the lower left-hand corner of
the window.
9
When you are finished rotating the truss, click to insert it.
10
From the Tools menu, click Snap, and then choose Assembly.
11
To place the second piece of truss, click the truss name in the library, and then,
without clicking in the drawing, drag the new piece of truss near one of the ends of
an existing piece of truss until it snaps into position.
Note: To change the truss type, return to the library, double-click on the name of
the new desired truss type and continue placing truss pieces.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
183
CAD mode
Release 18.0
12
To rotate this second piece of truss, click X for a clockwise rotation and Z for a
counter-clockwise direction until it aligns with the first piece of truss.
Tip: You can also click S to rotate the truss from one end to the other, based on its
center point.
13
184
When you are satisfied with its position, click to insert the truss into the drawing.
November 2006
CAD mode
Hanging and focusing fixtures
Introduction
Fixtures are objects on the plot and appear in 3D in shaded views. When you insert a
fixture into the plot, it must be hung from a hang structure. WYSIWYG has an extensive
library of fixtures to choose from.
Inserting fixtures into your drawing is as easy as pointing and clicking. You can insert
individual fixtures directly from the Library Browser, or you can create shortcuts to your
favorite fixtures.
To quickly hang multiple fixtures on a pipe or straight truss simultaneously, you can use
the array feature; to arrange multiple fixtures along a pipe/truss, use the distribute
tool. For details, see “Hanging multiple fixtures” on page 186 and “Distributing fixtures”
on page 186.
Hanging fixtures
To insert fixtures
Use this procedure to hang fixtures one by one on lengths of pipe or truss. To hang
multiple fixtures simultaneously, use the Array feature. For details, see “To hang
multiple fixtures” on page 186. After hanging the fixtures, you can arrange them
simultaneously on pipes/truss by using the distribute feature. For details, see
“Distributing fixtures” on page 186.
1
From the Library menu, choose Browse Library.
2
Click the Fixture tool at the bottom of the browser.
3
In the tree menu that is now visible, click on the “+” sign beside Manufacturer to
select fixtures by manufacturer name, Type to select by fixture type, or All to see all
the fixtures in alphabetical order.
4
Double-click on the name of the fixture that you want to insert.
Result: A fixture with default settings for this type attaches to the cursor.
Note: You can change the fixture frame size using the Add Accessory option. For
more information on adding accessories, refer to “To insert an accessory” on page
210.
5
To change the properties of the fixture before inserting, right-click on the fixture
name, and then click Property.
Result: A dialog box opens with a shaded view of the fixture on the left and an
image of its symbol on the right. Use the Photometrics tab to change the lamp and
lens settings for the fixture, if applicable. For more information on the
Photometrics tab, refer to “Photometrics tab” on page 198. Click Insert and the
dialog will close.
6
Move the mouse over a hang structure, and then click to place the fixture.
Continue placing this type of fixture by clicking on the other hang structures as
desired.
7
Finish placing this fixture type by right-clicking, and then choosing Finish placing
fixtures from the resulting menu.
8
To place other fixture types, repeat the above steps for each type.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
185
CAD mode
Release 18.0
Hanging multiple fixtures
Once you hang a single fixture, you can use the Array feature to instantly copy and
paste multiple copies of it along the length of a pipe or straight piece of truss in the
direction that you specify. This feature enables you to hang up to 100 fixtures quickly
and precisely.
To hang multiple fixtures
1
On a pipe or a straight length of truss, hang the fixture of your choice by following
the procedure “To insert fixtures” on page 185.
Note: To hang fixtures along the length of truss or pipe, hang the first fixture at
one end of the pipe/truss and then set the direction in which you want to copy and
paste it.
2
Click the fixture to select it, and then right-click and choose Tools > Array > Along
Pipe.
Result: An arrow attaches to your cursor when you hover over the pipe/truss.
3
Click on the pipe/truss to set the direction in which the fixture will be arrayed,
either to the left or right of the fixture.
4
In the dialog box that opens, type the total number of copies desired (this includes
the original object). Adjust the interval value, if required.
5
Click OK.
Result: The fixtures are placed along the pipe/truss.
Distributing fixtures
You can use the Distribute feature to quickly arrange multiple fixtures evenly over a
pipe or piece of straight truss starting at a specific point.
You can distribute selected fixtures in three ways:
„
between two points that you choose on the pipe/truss
„
in a specific direction from one point that you choose on the pipe/truss
„
centered around a specific point that you choose on the pipe/truss
To distribute fixtures between two points
Use this procedure to select two points on a pipe or length of straight truss and have
WYSIWYG distribute selected fixtures evenly between those points. The spacing is
determined by dividing the selected region of the pipe/truss by the number of fixtures
selected.
1
Click to select the fixtures that you want to distribute on the pipe/truss (to select
multiple fixtures, press Ctrl and then click on each one).
2
From the Tools menu click Distribute > Between two points.
3
Click to set the two points on the pipe/truss.
Result: The selected lights are evenly spaced between the two points.
To distribute fixtures in a direction
Use this procedure to select a point on a pipe or length of straight truss and have
WYSIWYG distribute selected fixtures along the remaining length of the pipe/truss in
the direction that you choose, spaced according to your specifications.
186
November 2006
CAD mode
1
Click to select the fixtures that you want to distribute on the pipe/truss (to select
multiple fixtures, press Ctrl and then click on each one).
2
From the Tools menu click Distribute > In a direction.
3
Click to set the starting point on the pipe/truss from which you want to distribute
the selected fixtures.
4
Click on one side of the point (either to the left or right of it) to choose the
direction in which the fixtures will be distributed.
Result: The Distribute - In a direction window appears.
5
Type the desired distance between each fixture, and then press OK.
Note: The value that you type must allow the selected number of fixtures to be
evenly distributed over the remaining length of the pipe/truss.
Result: The selected lights are evenly spaced between the two points.
To distribute fixtures around a central point
In this procedure you choose a point on the pipe/truss and then distribute selected
fixtures along the pipe/truss, using this point as the center. You specify the spacing of
the fixtures.
1
Click to select the fixtures that you want to distribute on the pipe/truss (to select
multiple fixtures, press Ctrl and then click on each one).
2
From the Tools menu click Distribute > Center.
3
Click on the pipe/truss to set the point around which the selected fixtures will be
centered.
Result: The Distribute - Center window appears.
4
Type the desired distance between each fixture, and then press OK.
Note: The value that you type must allow the selected number of fixtures to be
evenly distributed over the length of the pipe/truss around the point that you have
specified.
Result: The selected lights are evenly spaced around the point.
To replace fixtures
1
Select the fixtures that you want to replace.
2
Right-click and choose Replace Fixture.
3
Select the new type of fixture from the Fixture Selection dialog box.
4
Click Insert.
Result: All the fixtures that you selected in step 1 are replaced with the fixture
type chosen in step 3. Some fixture attributes may be modified as a result of the
replacement.
Custom fixtures
To create a custom fixture
You must create custom fixtures on the WYSIWYG welcome screen with all files closed.
If you are currently working on a document, save and close it.
Note: You do not have to complete all fields. Fill in as much information as you can. You
cannot delete or edit custom fixtures once saved.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
187
CAD mode
Release 18.0
1
On the WYSIWYG welcome screen, from the Options menu, choose Create new
conventional.
Result: The Fixture Wizard opens.
2
Select the type of fixture that you want to create.
3
In the Name box, type a name for the new fixture.
4
Click Next.
5
From the Type drop-down list, select the circuit type. The default, REGDIM, is a
regular dimmer.
6
Click Next.
7
Add or modify the path.
Note: The path is the location in the library where the fixture will be stored. A
fixture assigned to the path “Custom/Fresnels” would be available in the custom
section of the Fixture library in a sub-category named FRESNELS.
8
Click Next.
9
Select the lamp base and default lamp for this fixture.
10
Click Next.
11
Specify the lens system for the fixture.
12
Click Next.
13
Type a value in degrees for the beam angle for this fixture.
14
Type a value in degrees for the field angle for this fixture.
15
Click Next.
16
Select the color frame slot size.
17
Click Next.
18
From the symbol library, select a 2D symbol for this fixture.
19
Click Next.
20
From the shape library, select a 3D symbol for this fixture.
Note: A 10” parcan is shown beside the selected shape in the viewing pane to offer
a relative size measurement.
21
Click Next.
22
Type the manufacturer, weight, and any other information.
23
Click Next.
24
Type your name
25
Click Finish.
Pipe snap
Pipe snap places fixtures on a pipe at a specific interval. Pipe snap does not work for
truss or other hang structures. It allows you to specify a pre-determined distance
between fixtures.
As with all snap functions (refer to “Snaps” on page 109 for more information about
snap tools), you can select Pipe snap in mid-command or as a running snap type.
To select Pipe snap as a running snap type
Enable Pipe snap before inserting fixtures to hang fixtures equidistantly.
188
November 2006
CAD mode
To select Pipe snap mid-command
Enable Pipe snap after inserting the first fixture to enforce the interval selectively. Pipe
snap will disengage after you place the next fixture.
To use pipe snap
1
From the Tools menu, choose Snap, and then choose Pipe Snap.
Tip: You can also click the Pipe snap tool on the CAD Options toolbar.
2
Insert fixtures as described above. With pipe snap active, the fixtures are
automatically hung at the pre-defined interval.
To set the snap interval
1
From the Options menu, choose Show Options.
2
Click the Object Settings tab.
3
Select the Snap check box if it is unchecked, and then type the new value in the
Interval box.
4
Click OK.
To set an interval for a specific pipe
1
Right-click the pipe.
2
Click Properties.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
189
CAD mode
Release 18.0
3
Click the Hang Structure tab.
4
Click to clear the Use Document Defaults check box.
5
Select the Snap check box.
6
In the Interval box, type a new distance. This is the measurement between fixture
insertion points.
7
Click OK.
Focusing fixtures
You can focus the fixtures in your plot in three ways:
„
You can click and drag the beam of a selected fixture.
„
You can type the pan, tilt, and spin values for the fixture in its Properties box.
„
You can assign a focus position to the fixture.
To focus using click and drag
1
Select the fixture that you want to focus.
Result: The fixture’s beam appears.
2
Click on the beam and drag it to its new position. When you are done, release the
mouse button.
Tips:
„
„
190
You can also right-click the fixture, and then click Focus to drag the beam without
having to hold the mouse button down continuously. Click to finish when the beam
is focused where you want it.
Use the missing focus coordinate to set a value on the inactive axis.
November 2006
CAD mode
Drawing focus positions
Focus positions are
„
points at which fixtures can be focused.
„
objects in the drawing.
To insert a focus position
1
From the Draw menu, choose Focus Position.
Tip: You can also click the Focus Position tool on the Draw toolbar to place focus
positions.
2
Type a label for the focus position.
3
Move the mouse so that the intersection of the crosshairs is placed where you want
the focus position.
4
Click to insert the focus position.
5
Repeat these steps to insert all focus positions.
Focus position properties
Options on the Focus Position tab affect the alignment and style of the selected focus
position.
You can modify the justification, height, and presentation of a focus position. For a
description of the justification and presentation-type properties, refer to the “Text label
tab” on page 158.
Focus positions are unique in that you can adjust the focus position coordinates without
actually moving the focus position on the drawing. The X,Y, and Z coordinate is the
coordinate of the location in 3D space where the focus position is to lie.
Quick focus
Quick focus assigns a focus position or Pan and Tilt angle to the selected fixture.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
191
CAD mode
Release 18.0
To assign a focus position
1
From the Tools menu, choose Quick Focus.
Tip: You can also click the Quick Focus tool on the Tools toolbar.
2
Click on the desired focus position. This will set that position as the destination for
the next fixtures you select.
3
Click on each fixture that you want focused to that position.
4
Right-click anywhere in the wireframe view, and then choose Finish Quick Focus.
To assign a pan and tilt angle
Note: For more information on Quick Tools, see “Quick tools” on page 199.
1
From the Tools menu, choose Quick Tools.
2
In the dialog box that opens, check Focus.
3
Type values in degrees for Pan and Tilt.
4
Click OK.
5
Click on each fixture you want oriented to the specified angle.
6
Right-click anywhere in the wireframe view, and then choose Finish Quick Tools.
To focus from the fixture’s properties
1
Select the fixtures that you want to focus.
2
Right-click and choose Properties.
3
Click the Fixture tab.
4
Type values in degrees for Pan, Tilt, and Spin, or select a focus position from the
drop-down list.
Note: For the definitions of these attributes, please refer to “Data fields” on page
230.
5
Click OK.
Fixture-specific focusing tools
All fixture-specific focusing tools such as shuttering, spotting/flooding, and lens
changes are available through the selected fixture’s properties on the Shutter, Lens, and
Fixture pages respectively.
To make shutter cuts
192
1
Select the fixtures for which you want to make shutter cuts.
2
Right-click and choose Properties.
3
Click the Fixture tab.
November 2006
CAD mode
4
Click the Shutters tab.
Note: The POV image is not available when a fixture is zoomable or articulable.
5
Use the sliders along the top, bottom, and the sides to move the shutter blades.
Result: The cuts that you make are visible in the drawing.
6
Click OK when finished.
To adjust the leaves of barndoors
1
Select the fixture with barndoors for which you want to adjust the leaves.
2
Right-click and choose Properties.
3
Click the Fixture tab.
4
From the list on the left side, highlight the barndoor.
5
Click the Leaves tab.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
193
CAD mode
Release 18.0
6
Use the sliders along the top, bottom, and sides to move the barndoor leaves. You
will notice that the movement of the leaves is restricted to left, right, up, and
down.
Result: The cuts are visible in the drawing.
7
Click OK when finished.
To adjust flood or spot
1
Select the fixture(s) for which you want to adjust the flood or spot.
2
Right-click and choose Properties.
3
Click the Fixture tab.
4
Click the Lens tab.
5
Use the slider to adjust the spot and flood.
6
Click OK when finished.
To focus a Par
194
1
Select the PAR fixture that you want to focus.
2
Right-click and choose Properties.
November 2006
CAD mode
3
Click the Fixture tab.
4
From the Lamp drop-down list, select the lamp that you want to focus.
5
In the Angle box for the lamp, type the rotation angle. The angle determines the
degree of rotation of the lamp within the housing.
6
Click OK when finished.
Fixture properties
All fixtures in WYSIWYG have properties. Properties are the characteristics or attributes
that shape and define a fixture.
Fixture properties can be divided into two categories:
„
the properties that are common to all fixtures in WYSIWYG
„
the properties that you define by assigning attributes to a fixture
Fixtures also have many non-visible attributes, some of which can be edited. These
include Alias (found as Type in the reports), Cost, Weight, and AutoFocus codes.
General fixture properties
In WYSIWYG there are five tabs that appear in the properties dialog box for every
fixture:
„
Appearance
„
Version
„
Data
„
Options
„
Photometric
Each tab is explained in this section.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
195
CAD mode
Release 18.0
To view fixture properties that are common to all fixtures
1
From the Library menu, choose Browse Library.
2
Click the Fixture tool at the bottom of the browser.
3
Browse to the desired fixture and highlight it.
4
Right-click on the fixture name, and then click Property.
Tip: You can also click the Property tool at the top of the Library Browser.
Result: The properties window for the selected fixture appears, with a shaded
view and an image of the fixture’s symbol displayed in the two boxes. An example
is shown below:
5
Click Plan, Side, or Front to view the fixture in the different views. The Wireframe
view changes based on the view type that you select.
Version tab
Options on the Version tab are read-only and are set when the fixture is added to the
library.
„
„
„
196
Version: The release number of the fixture.
Status: The status of the fixture. For example, Beta indicates that the fixture is
completed but not verified. Release indicates the fixture has been tested and is
accurate. A status of Preliminary indicates that the fixture has minimal functionality.
Author: The individual or company who constructed the fixture.
November 2006
CAD mode
„
Notes: Any notes that pertain to the fixture. The notes usually pertain to the
simulation capabilities in WYSIWYG.
Data tab
Options on the Data tab are read-only and are set when the fixture is added to the
library. This does not, however, include the Alias, Weight, Cost, Manu, and Prod fields. To
modify these fields, access the desired fixture’s properties from the Library Browser.
„
Manufacturer: The name of the manufacturer of the fixture.
„
Model: The model number of the fixture.
„
Alias: The alternate name for the fixture.
„
Weight: The weight of the fixture.
„
Use default: Select this check box to use the default weight.
„
Cost: The cost of renting or purchasing the fixture. The cost of renting the fixture
can be the price for a day, week, or month. The default value is 0.00.
Notes:
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
If a cost is assigned to a fixture type when a WYSIWYG document is open, the
cost is applied to the current document only.
If a cost is applied to a fixture type when a document is not open, the cost is
used as the default for all documents created on your copy of WYSIWYG.
When opening a document created by someone other than yourself, the cost
entered in that person’s document is used.
The cost entered in this tab is displayed in WYSIWYG reports. For more
information on the display of this data, refer to page 231.
Catalog: The code that is used by the manufacturer to identify the fixture.
Manu: The manufacturer’s code for those fixtures that are Autofocus-compatible.
Conventional fixtures do not have a manufacturer’s code. The default value is 0.
Prod: The product code for those fixtures that are Autofocus-compatible.
Conventional fixtures do not have a product code. The default value is 0.
Use default: Select this check box to indicate that the default settings for Prod and
Manu (0, 0) are to be used.
URL: The internet address of the manufacturer.
Open: If an internet address is shown, click this button to open the Web page of the
manufacturer.
197
CAD mode
Release 18.0
Options tab
The boxes on this tab indicate various options about the selected fixture, such as the
number of channels and the available channels. Based on the fixture selected, the
options shown on this tab vary. For example, if you choose a light like the Vari*Lite VL5,
the options on the left side of the window affect those on the right side. In this case,
based on the options that you select on the left side, the hookup for this fixture may differ.
„
Mode: Select the mode in which you want to configure the fixture. This field is not applicable
for certain fixtures.
„
„
Dimmer: If applicable, select the type of dimmer for this fixture (for example, choose either
Internal or External).
Circuits: Indicates the type of DMX controls for this fixture (for example, Control,
Intensity, RIntensity, Color, and so on).
„
„
Number of Channels: Based on the circuit that you selected above (in addition to the
options selected), this box indicates the number of channels for this fixture.
Available Channels: The names of the channels available for this fixture (based on
the circuit and options that you selected).
Photometrics tab
Options on the Photometrics tab affect the lamp and lens settings for the fixture.
„
„
198
Lamp: Select the lamp to be used in the fixture.
Lens: If applicable, select the lens setting for the fixture. Changing the lens alters
the photometric properties of the fixture.
November 2006
CAD mode
„
View: Select the graphical representation that you want to display in the box to the
left. The choices are as follows:
„ Beam vs. Field. Displays a graphical representation of the beam and field angles
of the fixture.
„ Flood vs. Spot (Beam). Displays a graphical representation of the ratio between
the flood and spot for the fixture’s beam angle.
„ Flood vs. Spot (Field). Displays a graphical representation of the ratio between the
flood and spot for the fixture’s field angle.
„
„
Field: The measurement in degrees from the center of the beam to where the light
level drops off to 10 percent of the peak.
Beam: The measurement in degrees from the center of the beam to where the light
level drops off to 50 percent of the peak.
Quick tools
Quick tools allow you to quickly assign data, accessories, and other attributes to
fixtures without having to switch to the Data mode or open the Properties box for each
individual fixture. Quick tools will enter repetitive information, as well as incremental
information for each fixture as you click on it.
There is also a Quick Light Emission Tool that helps you assign and patch light-emitting
properties for virtually any object in WYSIWYG. For details, see “Quick Light Emission
Tool” on page 153.
To use Quick Tools
1
From the Tools menu, choose Quick Tools.
Tip: You can also click the Quick Tools tool on the Tools toolbar.
2
To activate a tool, select the check box to the left of the tool. You can activate as
many as you want at a time. See below for explanations of the different tools.
3
Type the initial value for the tool in the box to the right of the tool name. If you
want the value to auto increment, as for channels or spot numbers, make sure you
select the Auto Increment check box. WYSIWYG will assign the next sequential
number based on the properties and requirements of the previous fixture.
4
When the dialog box is set up the way you want it, click OK.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
199
CAD mode
Release 18.0
5
The cursor will show a “Q”, indicating that Quick Tools have been activated. Click
on each fixture in the order you want any auto-incrementing values to be assigned.
Note: The attributes to be assigned to the next fixture are logged in the bottom
left hand corner of the status bar.
6
When complete, right-click and choose Finish Quick Tools.
Note: To change the values at any time, right-click and choose Change Options.
Tip: Use the Clear All button to reset all the values and deselect all quick tools.
Quick Tools
„
Quick Spot enters a spot number in the Spot box.
„
Quick Unit enters a unit number in the Unit box.
„
Quick Purpose enters a fixture purpose in the Purpose box.
„
Quick Focus enters a focus position or pan and tilt angle for the selected fixture.
„
Quick Channel enters a channel number in the Channel box.
„
Quick Patch enters a patch universe assignment in the Patch box.
„
Quick Dimmer enters a dimmer number in the Dimmer box.
„
Quick Circuit enters a circuit name and number in the Circuit Name and Num boxes.
„
Quick Color enters a gel color number for the selected fixtures.
„
Quick Gobo enters a gobo number for the selected fixtures.
„
Other enters an accessory type for the selected fixtures.
Notes:
1.
When typing values, type the exact value or use the [...] browse button to open a
selection dialog.
2.
The entry in the patch box must fulfill the requirements of patch notation which is
universe.#. For more information regarding patch notation refer to “Reading the
patch” on page 241.
3.
For more information about the data fields, refer to “Data fields” on page 230.
4.
When using the quick tools to insert a color or gobo, WYSIWYG automatically
inserts a default color frame or gobo holder, which is already defined in the fixture.
Remove the default frame and add a new one using Add Accessory. For information
on adding accessories, refer to “To insert an accessory” on page 210.
5.
When you are applying a color to a multi-source fixture, a dialog appears, listing
the circuit names to which you can apply the Quick Tool color selection. To apply
the same color to multiple circuits listed in this dialog, press CTRL, and then select
the desired circuits. Press Select when you are finished.
Fixture-specific properties
Customize the properties of a fixture by assigning specific attributes, such as point of
view, patch information, and lens type.
200
November 2006
CAD mode
To edit/view fixture attributes
1
Select the fixture that you want to view or edit.
2
Right-click and select Properties.
Tip: At any time, to access an object’s properties, you can click on the Properties
tool on the Edit toolbar.
Result: The Properties dialog box is displayed. Based on the type of fixture that you
have selected, the Properties dialog box varies. An example is shown in the graphic
below.
Fixture tab
Options on the Fixture tab affect the fixture properties and their accessories. On the left
side of the dialog box is a list of the selected fixtures and their accessories. Click on a
list item to obtain further details about the item. Refer to “Data fields” on page 230 for
a description of the fields.
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Edit Layout: click to edit the text label layout for the selected fixture. For more
information on layout refer to “Information layout” on page 207.
201
CAD mode
Release 18.0
Point of view tab
Options on the Point of View sub-tab affect the orientation of the fixture. Use the arrow
keys on your keyboard to pan and tilt the light.
This sub-tab is not available if a fixture is articulable (that is, if any accessories in the
fixture tree have a moving head or moving mirror modifier).
„
Pan: Type a value for the pan and view the result in the window to the left.
„
Tilt: Type a tilt value and view the result in the window to the left.
Patch tab
Options on the Patch sub-tab affect the circuit, channels, and patch universe for the
selected fixture.
„
Control, Circuit, and Patch: Refer to “Data fields” on page 230 for a description of
these boxes.
202
November 2006
CAD mode
„
Use EDMX address: Select this check box to use the EDMX address for the patch
universe. This check box is enabled if you select EDMX from the Universe drop-down
list. EDMX is an Ethernet protocol developed by ETC.
Moving mirror/moving head tab
Options on the Moving Mirror and Moving Head sub-tabs affect the pan and tilt values.
„
Pan offset: Sets the manually adjustable pan angle.
„
Tilt offset: Sets the manually adjustable tilt angle.
„
„
„
„
Reverse Pan: Select this check box only if the real fixtures have an option to reverse
the pan parameter and that option is set to true.
Reverse Tilt: Select this check box only if the real fixtures have an option to reverse
the tilt parameter and that option is set to true.
Swap Axes: Select this check box only if the real fixtures have an option to swap the
control channels for the tilt and pan and that option is set to true.
Pan: (Only visible for certain fixtures.) Displays the manufacturer low, mid and high
pan limit values for the fixture. To change a value, select it, click Change, and then
type the new value.
„
Tilt: (Only visible for certain fixtures.) Displays the manufacturer’s low, mid, and
high tilt limit values for the fixture. To change a value, select it, click Change, and
then type the new value.
Note: The Pan and Tilt limit behavior is defined by the Mode selected on the
Options tab.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
203
CAD mode
Release 18.0
Options tab
Options on this tab affect the mode selection for the fixtures. The options vary
according to the fixture that you have selected.
„
Mode: Sets the mode for the selected fixture.
„
Software: The software version that is loaded on the selected fixture.
„
Slots: The mechanical components that are present in the selected fixture.
„
Control: Simulates the lamp control channel on the selected fixture. Since you can
physically turn a fixture on or off, WYSIWYG enables this action in the software.
Control tab
Options on the Control tab enable you to set the channel, circuit, and patch universe
information for the fixture.
204
„
Channel: Type the channel number for the selected fixture.
„
Dimmer: The dimmer number for the selected fixture.
November 2006
CAD mode
„
Use EDMX address: If checked, the EDMX address is used for the patch universe.
This check box is enabled if either EDMX or Conventionals (for the DMX address) is
selected from the Universe drop-down list.
„
Name: The circuit name for the selected fixture.
„
Number: The circuit number for the selected fixture.
„
Universe: Select a patch universe for the fixture.
„
Address: The starting DMX channel number for the selected fixture.
Fixture notation
Fixture notation affects how fixtures and their properties are displayed on your drawing
and consequently on your plot in Presentation mode. As illustrated below, two
components comprise fixture notation:
„
symbol
„
information layout
Symbols
A symbol is a graphical representation of a fixture in a Wireframe view. In all wireframe
views except isometric, symbols may be used to represent fixtures instead of three
dimensional models. Fixtures are associated with specific symbols by default, but you
can change the symbol to whatever you like.
To turn fixture symbols on or off
1
From the Options menu, choose User Options.
Result: The User Options dialog box is displayed.
2
Select the Show Details tab.
3
Select the Draw Symbols check box.
4
Click OK.
To change the symbol for a fixture type
The following procedure changes the symbol for all instances of the selected fixture
type in the document. Similar procedures change the symbol at an application level.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
205
CAD mode
Release 18.0
Notes:
„
„
To change fixtures at an application level, see “To change the symbol for a fixture
at the application level” below.
For fixtures with interchangeable lenses (or lamps in the case of PARs), you must
change the symbol for the lamp or lens instead of the fixture.
1
From the Library menu, choose Browse Library.
2
Select the Fixtures library.
3
Navigate through the library, and then select the fixture type for which you wish to
change the symbol.
4
Click the Property tool.
Result: The properties dialog for fixture type opens.
5
Click Change Symbol.
Result: The symbol selection window is displayed.
6
Select the new symbol.
7
Click Select.
8
Close the fixture property box.
To change the symbol for a fixture at the application level
Perform this procedure if you want to modify fixture symbols universally so that when
you create new files, the symbols that you want are displayed for fixtures (instead of
the default symbols).
1
Start WYSIWYG and from the welcome window, select Options > Browse
Library.
2
Click the Fixtures tab.
3
Navigate through the library, and then select the fixture type for which you wish to
change the symbol.
4
Right-click the Fixture name, and then select Properties.
Result: The properties dialog for fixture type opens.
5
Click the view that you want to change.
6
Click Change Symbol.
Note: When the same symbol is used for two view types, the Change Symbol button
is disabled for one of the view types. Click either of the other two view types to
choose a new symbol.
Result: The symbol selection window is displayed.
7
Select the new symbol, and then click Select.
8
Close the fixture property box.
Note: Your changes are stored in the file Default.ldb, which is stored in the
WYSIWYG\Library folder (in the location where you installed WYSIWYG). If you
need to upgrade or reinstall WYSIWYG and you want to keep the changes you have
made to symbols, first make a backup of Default.ldb file. Then, once the upgrade
or reinstallation is complete, paste the backed up copy of the Default.ldb file into
the WYSIWYG\Library folder, replacing the existing file.
206
November 2006
CAD mode
Information layout
You can place the following attributes around fixture symbols in WYSIWYG: focus, lamp,
lens, notes, position, purpose, spot, unit, channel, circuit, color, gobo, patch, and
dimmer.
The position, visibility, color, and justification of these attributes can be set by editing
the Label Layout.
Just like symbols, label layouts can be edited at an application level, document level, or
selected-fixture-only level.
To change the Label Layout
The following procedure changes the label layout for all instances of the selected fixture
type in the document. Similar procedures change the symbol at an application level or
selected-fixture-only level.
1
From the Library menu, choose Browse Library.
Notes:
„
„
To change the label layout at an application level, you must browse the library
from the WYSIWYG Welcome window. The information is stored in the
Default.ldb file in the WYSIWYG\Library folder. If you need to reinstall
WYSIWYG, make a backup of Default.ldb and replace the installed file with the
backup to ensure your changes are not lost.
To change the label layout for the selected fixture only, select the fixture, open
its properties, and then skip to step 5. If more than one fixture type is
selected, the edit layout option is not available.
2
Select the Fixtures library.
3
Navigate through the library, and then select the fixture type for which you wish to
change the label layout.
4
Click the Property tool.
Result: The properties dialog box for that fixture type is displayed.
5
Click Edit Layout.
Result: The Label Layout window is displayed.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
207
CAD mode
Release 18.0
6
From the list on the left, select the attribute that you want to edit.
Note: To make the controls active, you may have to deselect the Use Defaults check
box.
7
Modify the individual properties.
Note: When you make a change to an attribute, the results are previewed in the
box on the right.
a.
Select the Visible check box if you want the attribute to be displayed around the
fixture symbol in your plot.
b.
Select the Use Body Color check box if you want the attribute label to use the
same font color as the fixture symbol. Leave the box unchecked and choose a
color to set a specific color for that attribute.
c.
Adjust the line weight to increase or decrease the density of the label font.
d.
Select the Italics check box to italicize the label font. Note there are no options
to change the font.
e.
Select the Position with fixture check box if you want the attribute’s label to
maintain its position in relation to the fixture symbol regardless of where the
fixture is focused.
f.
Select the Rotate with fixture check box if you want the attribute’s label to
maintain its alignment in relation to the fixture symbol regardless of where the
fixture is focused.
Note: This option is only available if Position with fixture is selected.
8
g.
Set the horizontal and vertical justification for the text. This is in relation to the
insertion point or shape.
h.
Increase or decrease the height to modify the font size.
i.
Set the angle to specify the label alignment in relationship to the fixture
symbol.
j.
Select a shape to be associated with this attribute, if desired. You can choose
from: none, circle, square, octagon, or diamond.
k.
Increase or decrease the size of the shape, as desired.
Set the position of the label by clicking and dragging on the label in the preview
window. To drag a label, you must click on the small square that appears in the
middle of it when you select it.
Note: The preview window shows the fixture symbol and layout in two orientations
for your reference. This is to give you a visual for the fixture in its unfocused and
focused positions.
9
Repeat the procedure for all attributes.
Tip:
The copy and paste buttons allow you to apply the same label layout to other fixture
types.
Inserting symbols
You can also insert symbols that are not associated with fixtures. This allows you to
represent the fixtures when you draw a key or want to show the position of a boom in a
plan view. Symbols are not fixtures and, therefore, are not counted in reports. Standard
symbols, such as the United States Institute for Theatre Technology (USITT) symbols,
are available from the library for your use.
208
November 2006
CAD mode
To insert symbols
Refer to “The Library Browser” on page 122. For information on inserting objects from
the library, see “To insert objects from the library” on page 123.
Symbol properties
Options on the Symbol tab affect the fill color and hatch style of a symbol.
„
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Change Symbol: Click to select a different symbol.
Hatch Style: The style to use for the hatch. If the Hatch style is None the symbol is
transparent. If it is Background, the symbol is filled with the color of the background
and is not transparent.
Fill Color: The color with which you want the symbol to be filled. If the hatch style is
None or Background, the fill color is not enabled.
209
CAD mode
Release 18.0
Color, gobos, and accessories
Introduction
You can add to fixtures accessories such as barndoors, tophats, color scrollers, dousers,
and so on. Accessories have their own section in the Library Browser and can be
inserted just like other objects. You must insert accessories onto existing fixtures and
can only insert them onto compatible fixtures.
Mountable yokes
Note the following before working with mountable yokes:
„
„
„
„
„
„
While mountable yokes are considered accessories, they differ from other
accessories in that you need to add them before you add the fixtures (you cannot
insert a fixture, and then select Add Accessory to add a mountable yoke).
You cannot use the Add Accessory option to add a fixture on a recently inserted
mountable yoke. Instead, you must add the fixture either by using a shortcut or by
selecting it from the library browser. Then you can use the Add Accessory option to
add an accessory to the fixture.
Once you hang a fixture on a pipe, you cannot drag it onto a mountable yoke.
To remove a fixture from a mountable yoke, right-click the fixture, and then select
Remove Accessory. In the resulting tree menu, you can either remove the accessory
from the fixture, or remove the fixture from the mountable yoke.
If you insert a fixture onto a yoke by using a shortcut, and then you insert another
fixture onto a pipe using the same shortcut, when you right-click, the option Finish
Placing Accessories appears (instead of Finish Placing Fixtures).
When you insert a fixture on a mountable yoke in CAD mode, you can no longer
focus the beam by dragging it in CAD mode. Additionally, the beam direction might
not point straight down.
To insert an accessory
1
Open the Library Browser.
2
Click on the Accessory section tool.
3
Find the accessory that you want to insert.
4
Double-click the accessory name.
5
Click on the fixtures to insert the accessory.
Tips:
„
„
„
210
To place an accessory on a selected fixture, right-click on the fixture, and then
click Add Accessory. Use the browser to find the accessory you want to insert.
Follow this procedure in Data mode and only those accessories that can be
applied to the selected fixture will be available.
To place an accessory on a group of selected fixtures, use the Accessory library.
With the fixtures selected, find the accessory in the Library Browser. Right-click
on the accessory name, and then click Insert.
You can add the correct frame size to a fixture using Add Accessory.
November 2006
CAD mode
To create a new shortcut to an accessory
Refer to “To create a new shortcut” on page 56.
Placing color and gobos
You can drop color and gobos onto fixtures by using the Library Browser or the Quick
Tools method. Colors and gobos from many manufacturers are included in the library.
You can preview the color or gobo by double-clicking on the name.
Note: For more information on Quick Tools, see “Quick tools” on page 199.
To insert colors and gobos using the Library Browser
1
Open the Library Browser.
2
Click the Color or Gobo section tool.
3
Find the color or gobo that you want to insert.
4
Right-click the color/gobo name, and then click Insert.
Result: The cursor shows a “Q”, the symbol denoting that Quick Tools have been
enabled.
5
Click on the fixtures to which you want to add the color or gobo.
6
Right-click, and then select Finish Quick Tools to finish placing the color or gobo.
To insert colors and gobos using the Quick Tools
1
Click Tools > Quick Tools.
Result: The Quick Fixture Tool appears.
2
Under the Accessories heading at the bottom of the window, click the ellipsis
button (...) beside the feature that you want to add (either color or gobo), and
then choose the color or gobo in the resulting window.
3
Click OK.
Result: The cursor shows a “Q”, the symbol denoting that Quick Tools have been
enabled.
4
Click on the fixtures to which you want to add the color or gobo.
Note: If you want to apply color to a multi-source light that has multiple circuits
(such as the 528 Borderlight 6’ 4” Circuit), the following window appears,
prompting you to select the circuit to which you want to apply the color:
In this case, select the circuit, and then click Select. To choose multiple circuits,
press CTRL, and then select the desired circuits. Click Select when you are finished.
5
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Right-click, and then select Finish Quick Tools to finish placing the color or gobo.
211
CAD mode
Release 18.0
To create a new shortcut to a color or gobo
1
Click the Col/Gobo shortcut bar.
2
Right-click in the open space on the bar, and then choose New Shortcut.
Result: The Color Select or Gobo Select dialog box is displayed.
3
Select a color or gobo from the tree menu on the left side.
Result: The color or gobo is displayed on the right side.
4
Click Select.
Color/gobo lists
Color and gobo lists are required for automated lighting fixtures and scrollers. By
default, when inserted, automated fixtures and scrollers are set to use the
manufacturer default color or gobo list. WYSIWYG contains a library of “stock” color and
gobo lists provided by the fixture manufacturers. If you are using a custom set of colors
or gobos, or want to generate a scroll for a color scroller, you will need to create a
custom color or gobo list.
To view an existing library list
1
From the Library menu, choose Edit Color/Gobo Lists.
2
In the Show section, click Stock.
3
Scroll to find the list you want to view.
4
Click on the list name. A list of slots and the color or gobo for each slot is displayed
in the slot window. If OPEN appears in the Name column for a slot, the color, gobo,
or prism has not been assigned or is intentionally left OPEN.
5
Click on a slot to see the preview of that color or gobo in the box below the slot
window.
6
Click Close when you are done.
To create a custom color/gobo list
212
1
From the Library menu, choose Edit Color/Gobo Lists.
2
In the Show section, click Custom.
3
Click Add.
4
Type the name of the new list.
5
Type the number of slots on the wheel or scroll.
6
Click OK.
November 2006
CAD mode
7
Click on the slot you wish to edit.
8
Click Insert Color, or Insert Gobo, or Insert Prism. Make sure if you are inserting
different types of media into the same list that this is actually possible for that
fixture or accessory.
9
Click on the item you want to insert, and then click Select.
10
Repeat for the remaining slots.
11
To reorder the items in the slots, click on the slot, and then click Up or Down to
move that item to a new position.
12
To erase a color or gobo selection from a slot, click Remove. The slot returns to the
default selection of OPEN.
13
Click Close when you are done creating lists.
Tip: It is recommended to clone the stock wheel or list associated with the
fixture(s) and edit the cloned list. The cloned list inherits the properties of the
original list.
To clone a stock color/gobo list
1
From the Library menu, choose Edit Color/Gobo Lists.
2
In the Show section, click Stock.
3
Scroll to find the list you want to clone.
4
Click Clone.
5
Type a name for the cloned list, and then click OK.
Result: The cloned list appears in the custom lists.
To rename a color/gobo list
1
From the Library menu, choose Edit Color/Gobo Lists.
2
In the Show section, click Custom.
3
Select the color/gobo list that you want to rename.
4
Click Rename.
5
Type the new name for the list, and then click OK.
Result: The list is renamed.
To delete a color/gobo list
1
From the Library menu, choose Edit Color/Gobo Lists.
2
In the Show section, click Custom.
3
Select the color/gobo list that you want to remove.
4
Click Delete.
Result: The list is removed from the color/gobo list.
To insert custom scrolls into scrollers
1
Select the fixtures with scrollers for which you want to assign a custom scroll.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Object Properties.
3
Select the Fixture tab.
4
In the fixture list, highlight the scroller.
5
Select the Scroll tab.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
213
CAD mode
Release 18.0
6
Select the desired list from the pull-down list.
Note: Only custom lists that have the appropriate number of slots and media type
are available.
7
Click OK.
To insert custom wheels into automated fixtures
1
Select the fixtures for which you want to assign a custom wheel.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Object Properties.
3
Select the Fixture tab.
4
Select the appropriate tab (for example, Color 1, Gobo, <Gobo>).
5
From the drop-down list, select the desired list.
Note: Only custom lists that have the appropriate number of slots and media type
are available.
6
Click OK.
Custom gobos
You can generate custom gobos if you have the artwork in either bitmap or jpeg format.
The Gobo Wizard walks you through the steps of making a custom gobo. Custom gobos
are stored in the gobo library under the Custom category.
Custom gobos require an association with an existing WYSIWYG gobo to be visible in
wireframe views. The associated gobo is used in lieu of the bitmap or jpeg image. In
shaded views and renderings, only the custom gobo footprint is visible. Custom gobos
do not break up the cone of light.
To create a custom gobo
1
From the Library menu, choose Gobo Wizard.
2
Type the custom gobo name.
3
Add or modify the path.
Note: The path is the location in the library where the gobo will be stored. A gobo
assigned to the path “Custom/Corporate_Logos” would be available in the custom
section of the gobo library in a sub-category named Corporate Logos.
4
214
To make this gobo available to other documents, check the appropriate box.
November 2006
CAD mode
5
Click Next.
6
Type the path to the custom artwork file or use the browser [...] to open the
image. The image file must be in either bitmap or jpeg format.
Result: A preview of the image appears in the pane on the right and the image’s
attributes are recorded in the box on the left.
7
Click Next.
Result: A short description of the next step appears. You will need to choose an
existing library gobo to be displayed when the custom artwork cannot be
displayed.
8
Click Next.
9
Navigate the library to find a suitable association gobo.
Note: Generic association gobos are stored in the Proxy category.
10
Select the desired gobo.
11
Click Finish.
Result: The custom gobo is placed in the gobo library as per the path specified in
step 3.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
215
CAD mode
Release 18.0
Light Emitting Surface Wizard
Introduction
This Wizard enables you to quickly create a grid of light-emitting surfaces. If desired,
you can then patch the surfaces and control their color and intensity with a lighting
console. By patching the color and intensity of the surfaces separately, you will be able
to control both properties independently or together with lighting consoles and media or
video servers.
Based on the settings that you choose, the Wizard enables you to simulate lighting
effects such as neon tubes, LED webs, LED tubes, star cloth and video curtains.
To use the Light Emitting Surface Wizard
1
From the Draw menu, choose Light Emitting Surface.
Result: The Light Emitting Surface Wizard appears.
216
November 2006
CAD mode
2
Click Next.
3
Under Style, choose the type of surface that you want to show in the light-emitting
grid:
„
Single: Choose this option to create a single surface that combines the three
colors (green/red/blue).
„
4
Triplet: Choose this option to create a surface comprised of 3 separate
elements, each with a different color—green, red and blue.
Under the Shape heading, choose the shape of the individual surfaces (either a
single round / square surface, or 3 round / square surfaces) and then specify the
size of each surface.
„
Round: Click this option if you want the single surface or each element of a
triplet surface to be round, and then type the diameter of each surface (or
accept the default value of 1”).
„
Rectangular: Click this option if you want the single surface or each element of a
triplet surface to be rectangular, and then type the width and height of each
element.
5
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Click Next.
217
CAD mode
Release 18.0
6
Define the layout of the light-emitting grid by typing the number of rows and
columns of single or triplet surfaces, and then specifying the space between them.
Tip: You can use these values to make a uniform or non-uniform grid of LED
emitting surfaces. For example, if you set the number of rows to a high value and
the number of columns to a low value, you can create a long, narrow, lightemitting surface that resembles a neon tube.
„
Number of rows: Type the number of rows in the grid.
„
Number of columns: Type the number of columns in the grid.
„
„
„
Distance between rows: Type the separation between the rows of the grid. This
value must be positive. This distance is from the center to center of each of the
surfaces, both rectangular and circular. This value is disabled if you have
chosen to create only one row.
Distance between columns: Type the separation between the columns of the grid.
This value must be positive. This distance is from the center to center of each
of the surfaces, both rectangular and circular. This value is disabled if you have
chosen to create only one column.
Offset rows: Click this check box if you want to stagger alternating rows of
surfaces in the grid. If you leave this box unchecked, all surfaces are aligned in
each consecutive row.
218
7
Click Next.
8
Under Static Color and Intensity, click the color box to choose the static color of the
surface or group of surfaces for viewing in Design mode. Note that if you do not
enable dynamic color control, the static color is valid in both Design and Live
modes.
9
Under Static Color and Intensity, select the static intensity of the surface or group of
surfaces for viewing in Design mode. Note that if you do not enable dynamic
intensity control, the static intensity is valid in both Design and Live modes.
10
To set dynamic values for color and intensity, proceed to the next step. If you do
not want to set Dynamic values, click Next, and then skip to step 21.
11
To control color and intensity independently with a console device in Live mode,
choose the appropriate dynamic color and intensity settings.
November 2006
CAD mode
„
Enable Dynamic Color: Click this check box to control the color of the light-
emitting surface in Live Mode when connected to a console. Then choose the
patch properties below.
Note: If you enable dynamic color, you override ONLY in Live mode the static color
settings that you chose.
„
„
Single Patch: Select this value to apply a single address that controls the grid
as a whole. For example, if you choose red on your console, every surface in
the entire grid will be red. You could use this setting to create a string of
holiday lights with the same color, and then control the intensity of the
lights as one string to turn them all on or off simultaneously.
Multi Patch: Select this value if you want to choose different addresses for
each individual element in the grid. By choosing multiple addresses, you can
make the grid multicolored by using different channels on your console,
each with a different color.
„
Enable Dynamic Intensity: Click this check box to control the intensity of the lightemitting surface in Live Mode when connected to a console. Then choose the
patch properties below.
„
Maximum Intensity: Select the maximum intensity value of the light-emitting
surface when connected to a console and viewed in Live mode, with 100%
being the brightest possible intensity. This value enables you to control the
scale of the intensity over a series of light-emitting surfaces. (When you
disconnect from the console, the intensity is fixed at the static value.)
Note: The DMX intensity value is treated as a percentage of the dynamic intensity
value. For example, a DMX value of 127 results in 50% of the maximum intensity value
that you set.
„
Single Patch: Select this value to apply a single address that controls the
intensity of the surface as a whole.
„
Multi Patch: Select this value if you want to choose different addresses for
each individual element in the grid. With multiple addresses, you can make
different parts of the grid have varying intensity levels.
12
Click Next. Based on your patch settings, a different window appears. Consult the
appropriate procedure below.
Single Patch DMX Address
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
219
CAD mode
Release 18.0
a.
Type or select the single patch addresses to control both color and intensity,
and then click Next.
„
„
Dynamic Color Control Patch: Type the patch address that you want to use for
controlling color in the format DomainName.StartAddress, or click the
ellipses button (...) and then choose the address in the window that
appears.
Dynamic Intensity Control Patch: Type the patch address that you want to use
for controlling intensity in the format DomainName.StartAddress, or click
the ellipses button (...) and then choose the address in the window that
appears.
b.
If you have chosen single patches for both color and intensity, skip to step 17.
If you have chosen Multi Patch for either color or intensity, proceed to the Multi
Patch DMX Addresses window below.
Multi Patch DMX Addresses
Type or select the multiple patch addresses to control both color and intensity. The
number of addresses required depends on the number of elements in your grid and
the type of patch (intensity/color): intensity requires one channel per surface,
color requires 3 channels per surface. This window offers you three choices for
entering multiple DMX addresses:
„
„
„
Type them manually in the box. For details, see “Type the addresses
manually” on page 221.
Click the Auto Insert icon
to have WYSIWYG automatically create all
the addresses that you need for the grid. For details, see “Use Auto Insert to
create the addresses automatically” on page 221.
Click the New icon
and then enter the address in the box that appears.
For details, see “Select the addresses from a list” on page 221.
Notes:
„
„
220
Before typing addresses, consult the figures shown under Addresses required
and Addresses in pool for an up-to-date listing of the number that you will
need for your grid and the number that you have already provided.
Create the patch domain in the address pool box, following the format
DomainName.StartAddress-EndAddress (for example, a.1-169).
November 2006
CAD mode
„
„
„
You can type multiple patch domains (for example, a.1-160 and b.1-20). If
you assign more domains than are required, the extra domains are ignored.
Use the arrow buttons to adjust the order of the patches (the order in which
they appear is the order in which they are populated).
If you require more than 512 addresses (the standard DMX universe), then
you must add additional patch domains to meet your requirement. The
addresses can be split over universes.
Type the addresses manually
a.
In the box provided, type the required addresses in the format
DomainName.StartAddress-EndAddress (for example, a.1-169).
b.
Use the arrow buttons to adjust the order of the patches (the order in which
they appear is the order in which they are populated).
c.
Click Next, and then proceed to step 13.
Use Auto Insert to create the addresses automatically
a.
Click the Auto Insert icon to automatically create the domain with the proper
number of addresses that you need for your grid. In the resulting Auto Insert
window, type the Patch Domain Prefix (for example, a).
b.
In the Number of Channels Per Domain box, accept the default value or type a new
value based on the number of channels that you can control.
c.
In the Start Address box, type the start address for the patch domain.
d.
Click OK to have WYSIWYG populate the End Address (based on the number of
channels required).
e.
Click Next, and then proceed to step 13.
Select the addresses from a list
a.
If you do not want to manually type the addresses, click the New icon, and
then click ellipses button (...). The Patch Universe window appears.
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
To create a new patch domain, click Create New, and then type the domain in
the Domain Name box (for example, a).
To choose a patch domain from those that you have saved with your current
WYSIWYG file, click Select From List, and then highlight the domain name.
b.
Type the Start and End addresses for this patch universe.
c.
Click OK.
d.
Click Next, and then proceed to step 13.
221
CAD mode
Release 18.0
13
The Multi Patch Numbering window enables you to specify how you want to number
the surfaces in your grid. From the Start from drop-down list, choose where you
want to start the numbering of the surfaces in your grid.
14
From the Number along drop-down list, select the direction of the numbering, either
along the rows or columns of the grid.
15
To have the numbering progress in a serpentine pattern throughout the grid, click
to enable the checkbox beside Alternate direction for each row/column. Otherwise,
proceed directly to the next step.
16
Click Next.
17
Click Finish.
Result: The light-emitting surface attaches to your cursor.
18
222
Click to place it in your drawing in the desired location.
November 2006
CAD mode
The Flight Case
Introduction
The Flight Case is a special view used to hold unhung fixtures, hang structures, and
focus positions created or inserted in Data mode but not yet placed on the drawing. This
is an ideal way to work from a set inventory as you can add all of your fixtures in Data
mode, and then click and drag the fixtures out of the Flight Case until you have
exhausted your stock.
To open the Flight Case
1
From the Tools menu, choose Flight Case.
Note: You can open the Flight Case only in a wireframe view.
Tip: The Flight Case layout is preconfigured with the flight case and a wireframe
view.
How objects get into the Flight Case
As you enter fixtures in the Data mode spreadsheets, they appear in the Flight Case
under the Unassigned Fixtures branch. When you type position names in the Position
Manager, the individual positions appear under the Position branch. As you assign
fixtures to those positions, they will move from the Unassigned branch to under the
proper position. All fixtures that appear in the Flight Case are unhung fixtures, which
means they are not in your drawing (regardless of whether they have been assigned a
position or not).
If you create focus positions in the Data mode by typing labels in the focus box of the
spreadsheet, those focus positions will appear under the Focus Positions branch of the
Flight Case. Unhung fixtures assigned to those focus positions will appear under their
respective Flight Case headings.
To learn more about inserting objects in Data mode, please refer to Chapter 7, “Data
mode.”
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
223
CAD mode
Release 18.0
Entering and modifying objects in the Flight Case
„
„
„
You can insert fixtures and focus positions directly into the Flight Case using the
Library, Draw menu, or appropriate tools on the Draw toolbar.
You can change a fixture’s assigned position by selecting the fixture in the Flight
Case and dragging it to another position within the Flight Case.
You can change a fixture’s assigned focus position by selecting the fixture and
dragging it between Focus Positions within the Flight Case.
Transferring objects from the Flight Case to the drawing
The items that appear in the Flight Case can be transferred to your drawing by clicking
and dragging.
To hang fixtures from the Flight Case
1
Open the Flight Case.
2
Click and hold on the desired fixture.
3
Drag the fixture into the wireframe view and place it on a hang structure.
Note: If a fixture appears in the flight case under a position branch, that fixture
must be hung on that position. Fixtures with no position or unassigned fixtures
may be hung on any hang structure.
4
Release the mouse button.
5
Repeat for the remaining fixtures.
Tip: You can hang all the fixtures on one position by dragging the entire position
out of the Flight Case.
Selecting a fixture in your drawing and pressing the Backspace key will return the
fixture to the Flight Case. The fixture will retain the position assignment.
To insert a hang structure from the Flight Case
If you drag a position from the Flight Case, you will create a pipe.
1
Expand the Positions branch to see all the hang structures.
2
Click and hold on the position that you want to insert.
3
Drag the pipe onto the drawing.
4
Release the mouse button.
5
Use the pop up dialog box to answer the questions about the trim height and
length of the pipe, or use the Interactive button to draw the pipe in interactive
mode.
Result: If you do not choose interactive mode, the pipe is inserted centered on the
origin at the trim height specified.
Note: Multiple positions can have the same name.
For more information about inserting pipes please refer to “Drawing pipes” on page
137.
To insert a focus position from the Flight Case
224
1
Expand the Focus Positions branch in the flight case to see all the Focus positions
that have not yet been placed in the drawing.
2
Click and hold on the focus position that you want to insert into the drawing.
3
Drag the Focus position onto the drawing.
November 2006
CAD mode
4
Release the mouse button to place the focus position.
Flight Case properties
The Flight Case properties affect which fixture attributes are shown.
To modify the Flight Case properties
1
From the Options menu, choose View Options.
Tip: You can also use the View Options tool on the Standard toolbar.
2
Click the Show Details tab.
3
Select the fixture attributes that you want displayed in the Flight Case.
Note: The Unit Number is displayed by default, however, you can select all the
attributes if you want.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
225
CAD mode
Release 18.0
Rendering
Introduction
At any time in CAD mode, you can generate a rendering of your set. Note that
renderings in CAD mode are primarily intended for rendering your set with
environmental lighting, but without theatrical lighting. However, if there are any fixtures
selected on your plot, they are displayed in your rendering.
Note: To queue your render jobs and process them independently, you can use the
Background Rendering Manager (all levels of WYSIWYG except Report and Perform Console Edition). For details on this feature, see “Background Rendering Manager” on
page 275.
To render a lighting look
1
In the working area of the screen, display the lighting look that you want to render.
2
From the Design menu, choose Render.
Tip: You can also click the Render Wizard tool in the Design toolbar.
Result: The Render Wizard opens and guides you through a series of options. Click
Next and Back to navigate through the Render Wizard.
3
Click Finish.
Result: WYSIWYG generates the rendering of your lighting look or cue. If the
rendering is saved internally, it is available as an image in Presentation mode.
Note: For more information, see “Rendering” on page 264.
226
Chapter 7
Data mode
Data mode enables you to view and edit the data for all your fixtures. Data mode
operates like many other spreadsheet programs, so many of the concepts will be
familiar to those who have used a spreadsheet program.
In this chapter
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Layout tabs
229
Spreadsheets
230
Patch
237
Errors
245
227
Data mode
228
Release 18.0
November 2006
Data mode
Layout tabs
Beneath the work area in each mode is a series of layout tabs. These layouts provide
various configurations of the views you are working with. To change layouts, click the
tab that corresponds to the layout you wish to use. The Data mode contains the
following layouts:
„
„
„
„
„
Spreadsheet - The work area contains a spreadsheet of data currently in the show
database.
H Select - The work area is split horizontally, with a wireframe view above and a
spreadsheet view below.
V Select - The work area is split vertically, with a wireframe view on the left and a
spreadsheet view on the right.
Patch - The work area is split, with a wireframe view above and the patch window
below.
Errors - The work area contains a spreadsheet displaying fixtures with errors.
Note: The wireframe views in Data mode are used for fixture selection only. Any
selections made in the spreadsheet are visible on the CAD drawing and vice versa.
However, to make any drawing modifications, you must return to CAD mode.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
229
Data mode
Release 18.0
Spreadsheets
Introduction
The Data mode displays your fixture information in spreadsheet format. WYSIWYG
compiles many spreadsheets that are accessible from the columns shortcut bar. All of
these spreadsheets contain the same information, but are sorted and filtered
differently. Each column in the spreadsheet represents one fixture attribute. The
following information is compiled.
Data fields
Note: Data fields identified with an asterisk (*) are non-editable fields.
„
„
„
„
Channel - This is the assigned control channel number you will use at your control
console to control the fixture. For moving lights, the channel number recorded in
WYSIWYG is the starting channel number.
Position - This is the hanging position for the fixture. Positions must be entered in
the Position Manager.
Unit - The unit number identifies the fixture’s location on its respective hanging
position.
„
Type - This is the fixture name.
„
Lens - This is the lens type.
„
„
*Hookup - This identifies the component of a multi-circuit fixture or other device,
such as a scroller (for example, intensity, control).
Purpose - The purpose is a custom note that is most commonly used to describe
how this fixture is being used in your show. For example, “SL Side”, “Diagonal
Backs”. Purpose is an attribute of the fixture. It is not possible to assign multiple
purposes for multi-circuit fixtures.
„
Color - This is the assigned gel color number or scroller identification.
„
Gobo - This is the assigned gobo number.
„
Focus - This is the fixture’s focus position.
„
Patch - This is the fixture’s assigned DMX channel number. This field is mandatory
for simulation activity in Live mode. One show can have multiple DMX universes. A
patch entry must be notated universe.#, where universe is a letter, number, or
other label identifying the universe or output and # is the DMX channel number.
For example, “A.1” or “Dim.26”.
„
Circuit Name - This is an identifier note for the circuit box or multi-cable.
„
Circuit Number - This is the assigned circuit or multi-cable tail number.
„
Dimmer - This is the assigned dimmer number.
„
„
„
230
Spot - This is an assigned identifier number usually used for automated fixtures. A
spot number is required for automated fixtures when using AutoFocus.
*Offset - This field identifies the fixture’s location on the hanging structure. It is a
distance measurement referencing the pipe’s end or center point or another point
as specified.
Pan - A focus attribute measured in degrees, defining the positioning of the
fixtures yoke.
Tilt - A focus attribute measured in degrees, defining the positioning of the fixture
within the yoke.
November 2006
Data mode
„
„
Spin - A focus attribute measured in degrees, defining the fixture’s yoke
positioning in relation to the hang structure where 0 is down-hung, 90 is sidehung, and 180 is over-hung for example.
*Weight - This is the fixture’s weight. A fixture’s weight can only be modified
through the Library Browser.
„
Lamp Type - This is the lamp type.
„
Notes - This is a custom notes field.
„
*Footnotes - This feature is currently disabled.
„
*# of Data Channels - This is the total number of DMX channels required by the
fixture.
„
*# of Color Frames - This is the number of color frame slots that the fixture has.
„
*# of Lamps - This is the number of lamps required by the fixture.
„
*Circuit Type - This describes what type of device the unit should be plugged
into, for example, regular dimmer, scroller power supply.
„
*Wattage - This is the wattage in watts of the lamp.
„
*Model - This is the fixture type.
„
„
„
„
„
„
*Cost - This is the fixture’s cost or rental cost. This field is used to estimate a
show budget. A fixture’s cost can only be modified through the Library Browser. For
more information on setting costs, refer to page 197.
*Status - This is the fixture’s status relative to your drawing. If the fixture is
HUNG it is in your drawing. If a fixture is UNHUNG, it is in the flight case. In fixture
count reports, all fixtures are counted regardless of their status (unless a filter is
applied).
*Console - This identifies which console is controlling the fixture. This field
references the binding settings in the device manager in Live mode.
Layer - This field indicates which layer the fixture is drawn on.
*Tag - This is an internal code used for importing and exporting data to/from third
party programs.
*Owner - This feature is currently disabled.
Working in the spreadsheet
Data may be entered in a number of ways within the WYSIWYG file. The plot can be
created, and then edited, or the data may be entered in a spreadsheet, and then placed
on the plot. Any entries or changes are reciprocated throughout the file; changes made
in Data mode will be updated in CAD mode and visa versa.
To add or modify data
Type the desired value in the appropriate cell.
Tip: You can add or modify chunks of information at the same time by selecting a series
of cells and typing.
If you are entering sequential numerical values for a field such as patch, you can use
incremental data entry to facilitate your work. WYSIWYG will calculate the next
available value based on the number of required channels for the previous fixture.
To input sequential numerical data
1
Type the first value in the appropriate cell.
2
Press and hold ALT and press the down-arrow for each incremental entry you want
to make.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
231
Data mode
Release 18.0
To choose a new value
1
Select the appropriate cell.
2
Right-click and choose Pick value from the list.
Result: This action opens a dialog with a drop-down menu listing all of the values
currently used in your file for you to choose from.
3
To make a new selection, click Library to open the appropriate library.
Note: This feature is only available in certain fields.
Tip: This feature is especially useful for fields such as color, gobo, or other
parameters that reference library items for which you do not know the exact value.
Find and replace tool
The find and replace tools are used for locating and modifying data, and are column
specific. The tools only search for data in the column where the tool was activated and
not throughout the entire spreadsheet.
To use the find tool
1
Select a cell in the column in which you want to use the Find tool.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Find.
Tip: You can also use the Find tool on the Data toolbar.
3
Type your search criteria.
„
„
4
Select the Match whole word only check box to search for data matching exactly
what you have typed as opposed to data containing parts or all of what you
have typed.
Select the Match case check box to enable a case sensitive search where
uppercase and lowercase letters will affect the results.
Click Find Next.
Result: Cells that match your search criteria are highlighted with the first match
active.
To use the replace tool
1
Select a cell in the column in which you want to use the Find and Replace tool.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Replace.
Tip: You can also use the Replace tool on the Data toolbar.
3
Type your search criteria. Enter a value to find and a value to replace it with.
„
„
4
Select the Match whole word only check box to search for data matching exactly
what you have typed as opposed to data containing parts or all of what you
have typed.
Select the Match case check box to enable a case sensitive search where
uppercase and lowercase letters will affect the results.
Click Find Next, Replace, or Replace All.
Result:
„
„
232
If you click Find Next, cells that match your search criteria are highlighted with
the first match active.
If you click Replace, cells that match your search criteria are highlighted and
the first match is replaced with the value specified in step 3. You can continue
clicking Replace to replace each match in turn.
November 2006
Data mode
„
If you click Replace All, all matches are replaced with the value specified in step
3 and no cells are highlighted.
Inserting fixtures in Data mode
Any fixtures inserted in Data mode are assigned the status “unhung” and are placed in
the Flight Case. The Flight Case allows you to drag and drop “unhung” fixtures onto
your drawing. For more information about the Flight Case, refer to “The Flight Case” on
page 223.
To insert fixtures in Data mode
1
Click the Fixture tool
on the Data toolbar.
2
Navigate to the desired fixture.
3
In the Multiple box, type the number of fixtures of that type required.
4
Click Insert.
Result: The fixtures are inserted below the last entry in the spreadsheet.
Tip: If you have a shortcut created for the desired fixture, you can right-click on
the shortcut and choose Insert or Insert Multiple.
Inserting focus positions in Data mode
If you type a new value into the focus field of a fixture, you are essentially creating a
focus position. That focus position is now available in the Flight Case for you to drag and
drop into your drawing.
For more information on the Flight Case, refer to “The Flight Case” on page 223.
Inserting positions in Data mode
If you type a new value into the position field of a fixture, the Pick a value from the list
dialog box is automatically displayed. This is because a position cannot exist in
WYSIWYG unless it is recorded in the Position Manager. You can select from the list of
positions that already exist or you can click Manager to open the Position Manager to
create a new position.
If you are making this change to a fixture that was previously hung on a different
position, that fixture will by unhung and sent to the Flight Case under its new position
field. From there, you can drag it back onto the drawing.
If the position does not yet exist in the drawing, you must draw a hang structure and
assign it the appropriate position name before you will be able to hang the fixture
again. For more information on drawing hang structures, refer to “Hang structures” on
page 177
For more information on drawing items from the Flight Case, refer to “Entering and
modifying objects in the Flight Case” on page 224.
Inserting color in Data mode
To insert color in Data mode
1
Click in the color field of the fixture for which you want to assign color.
2
Right-click and choose Pick value from the list.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
233
Data mode
Release 18.0
3
Use the pull-down menu to select a color among those you have already used in
your plot, or click Library to open the color library.
Tip: You can bypass steps 2-3 and type in the value if you already know the color
that you want to assign (for example, R54, L112, and so on)
WYSIWYG accommodates multiple color entries for one fixture as follows:
„
„
„
“Color1 & Color2” yields two color frames with one gel in each.
“Color1 + Color2” yields one color frame with two gels in it.
“Color1 / Color2” yields one color frame with one split gel in it.
Data filters
Data filters are used for locating or isolating selective blocks of information. When a
data filter is applied to a spreadsheet, only the units that met the filter criteria are
displayed. Filters are applied to columns of data.
To apply a data filter
1
In the spreadsheet, right-click on the column heading you want to filter.
2
Choose Add Data Filter.
Result: A dialog box is displayed, showing the column name and the available
filters.
3
Select the value that you want to filter. You can also type in a value and choose
whether you want to filter that specific text, or filter for entries that contain that
text.
Result: The spreadsheet refreshes, displaying only fixtures that meet the filter
criteria.
To remove data filters
1
Right-click on a column heading.
2
Choose Remove Data Filter.
Result: The spreadsheet returns to its unfiltered state.
Customizing spreadsheets
There are different ways to sort and view your data. First, consider the different
spreadsheets available on the Columns shortcut bar.
Alternatively you can modify a spreadsheet to suit your needs. Customizing a view
allows you to change how the data is displayed and sorted.
234
November 2006
Data mode
To modify a data sheet
1
From the Options menu, choose View Options.
2
You can also click the View Options tool on the Standard toolbar.
3
Click the Data View Options tab.
4
To adjust a column’s location in the spreadsheet, highlight the appropriate column
heading in the Columns box, and then click the Up or Down button to relocate it in
the data view.
5
To hide a column in your view, deselect the check box beside it.
6
To specify how entries should be sorted, choose the desired column headings in the
Key 1, Key 2, and Key 3 drop-down lists. When fixtures have the same value in the
first sort key, the spreadsheet is then sorted by the values of the second sort key.
7
Click Ascend or Descend to sort the criteria in ascending or descending order,
respectively.
8
Select the Show Selection Always check box to ensure that any fixtures selected in a
plot view will automatically be selected in a data view.
9
Select the Enable Heading Click Sort check box to enable the ability to sort the
spreadsheet by clicking on the column headings while working in the spreadsheet.
10
The Show Only Selected option will filter the spreadsheet to display only the fixtures
that are selected in the Wireframe view.
11
Select the Show Gridlines check box to display the columns in tabular format, with
lines separating the data.
12
Select the Word Wrap check box to view all the text on a line in the spreadsheet.
13
Select the Show Edit Bar check box to display the edit bar at the top of the
spreadsheet.
14
The Filter section has the same functionality as the data filters discussed in “Data
filters” on page 234.
15
Select the Group By check box to divide the spreadsheet into sections/pages, one
section/page for each value in the Key 1 field.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
235
Data mode
Release 18.0
Creating a new spreadsheet
To create a new sheet
1
In the shortcut bar, click the Columns tab.
2
Right-click in the shortcut bar and choose New Spreadsheet.
3
Type a name for the new spreadsheet, and then click OK.
4
Scroll to the bottom of the list of Column shortcuts. Your new spreadsheet name
should be at the bottom of the list. Click on the shortcut to view your spreadsheet.
Note: It may be easier to clone an existing spreadsheet and modify it than to start
a new one from scratch. See “To clone a shortcut” on page 57 for more details.
236
November 2006
Data mode
Patch
Introduction
The Patch view is a graphical representation of the patch field. It is used for two
purposes:
„
„
to create and/or edit a patch for the lights, video, or moving scenery in your
drawing
to monitor incoming DMX levels when using WYSIWYG Perform for simulation
Working in the patch view
You can view one patch universe at a time. As you add new patch universes in either a
spreadsheet view or a CAD drawing (using Quick Tools), their shortcuts are created
automatically. You can also create new patch universes directly from the shortcut bar.
To create a new patch universe
1
Click the Patch layout tab.
2
Right-click in the patch shortcut area and choose New Patch.
Result: A dialog box is displayed, prompting for the type of universe that you want
to create, and the name of the new universe.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
237
Data mode
Release 18.0
3
Type the name of the patch universe. Patch universes can be named anything. For
example, “A”, “Dimmers”, “Dim”, “Movers”, “Scrollers”, and so on.
4
Select the type of patch universe based on the type of console or system that you
are using, either a DMX console, or a motion control system.
5
Click OK.
Result: The patch shortcut appears in the Patch tab.
Notes:
„
„
To change, delete, or modify a patch universe, right-click the shortcut icon for
the universe that you want to change. Click on the command that you want to
perform.
To display the contents of a patch universe, click on the appropriate shortcut
icon. The name of the universe is displayed at the top left corner of the
Wireframe view.
To patch fixtures in the patch view
1
Click and hold the desired fixture in the Wireframe view.
2
Drag the fixture to the desired patch location.
3
For re-patching, repeat the above steps, or click and drag the fixture’s patch
information to the new location.
To unpatch fixtures in the patch view
1
Select the fixture by clicking on the first channel (start cell) for that fixture. It
should become highlighted.
2
Right-click and choose Unpatch.
Result: The fixture is unpatched; the value in the patch field for that fixture is
deleted.
To patch the control of a video source
In WYSIWYG, you patch the control of a video source, not the actual video. This means
that you can use the console device to control the progress of a live video stream or a
video file by making the video play, pause, or rewind; you cannot use WYSIWYG to
change different aspects of the video itself.
To control the video source, the DMX patch is allocated three channels. For details on
controlling the video with the console device in Live mode, see “To control a DMX
patched video source with a console” on page 342.
1
In the shortcut area, click the Patch tab.
2
Click the patch shortcut to which you have linked control of the video source.
Result: The video patch appears in the patch universe.
238
3
Open the console device that you have connected to the video DMX patch.
4
Using the console controls, set the appropriate levels for the three channels. For
details, see “To control a DMX patched video source with a console” on page 342.
5
Save your settings.
6
In the Shaded tab of Live mode, you can now use the console device to control the
progress of the video. For details, see “To control a DMX patched video source with
a console” on page 342.
November 2006
Data mode
To patch a movement axis to a DMX console device
In WYSIWYG, you can patch a movement axis to which one or more objects has been
attached, and then use a console device or a motion control system to control the
progress of the objects along the axis.
You have the choice of patching the axis to either a DMX patch universe or a motion
control universe, based on the type of console or system you will be using to move the
objects. For details on patching the axis to a motion control universe, see “To patch a
movement axis to a motion control system” on page 239.
To control the object’s movement with a DMX console device, the DMX patch is allocated
two channels, one each for coarse and fine movement. The DMX value represents the
object’s percentage of movement. For example, if it is at 0, then the object is at 0% of
its range of motion; if it is at 100, then the object has moved 100% of its range of
motion. For details on controlling the object with the console device in Live mode, see
“To control a DMX patched movement axis with a console” on page 343.
Note: Before performing the following procedure, the movement axis must already be
linked to the patch universe. For details, see “To attach a movement axis to a DMX
patch universe” on page 141.
1
In the shortcut area, click the Patch tab.
2
Click the patch shortcut to which you have linked control of the moving object.
Result: The moving scenery patch appears in the patch universe.
3
Open the console device that you have connected to the DMX patch (for example,
the Mini Console).
4
Using the console controls, move the slider of the first or second channel to
advance the object to the desired position on the movement axis.
Note: The first channel is for coarse movement and can be used to advance the
object quickly to any position along the entire path, from start to finish. The
second channel is for fine movement. Its movement range is very slight and
depends on the position that you have set on the first channel. For details, see “To
control a DMX patched movement axis with a console” on page 343.
5
In the Shaded tab of Live mode, you can now use the console device to control the
object’s movement along the axis. For details, see “To control a DMX patched
movement axis with a console” on page 343.
To patch a movement axis to a motion control system
In WYSIWYG, you can patch a movement axis to which one or more objects has been
attached, and then use a console device or a motion control system to control the
progress of the objects along the axis.
You have the choice of patching the axis to either a DMX patch universe or a motion
control universe, based on the type of console or system you will be using to move the
objects. For details on patching the axis to a DMX patch universe, see “To patch a
movement axis to a DMX console device” on page 239.
When controlling the object’s movement with a motion control system, the patch
indicates the ID on the motion control system that corresponds to the WYSIWYG axis
ID, the axis name, and the position of the object on its path. When connected to a
system (or to WYSIWYG’s Motion Control Console), you can watch the object’s position
change in patch view as it moves along its path.
Note: Before performing this procedure, the movement axis must already be linked to
the patch universe. For details, see “To attach a movement axis to a motion patch
universe” on page 141.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
239
Data mode
Release 18.0
1
In the shortcut area, click the Patch tab.
2
Click the patch shortcut to which you have linked control of the moving object.
Result: The motion control patch appears in the patch universe.
3
Open the console device or motion control system that you have connected to the
motion control patch (for example, the Motion Control Console, shown below).
4
If you are using WYSIWYG’S Motion Control Console, in the ID box, type the
motion control ID that you selected when configuring the axis.
Note: If you do not know the ID, right-click on the axis, and then click Properties.
Click the Axis tab. The ID appears below the Motion Patch option button.
5
In the Travel box, type the distance (in meters for linear axes, in degrees for
rotational axes) that you want the object to travel along or around the axis. This
can be the full length/angle of the axis, or only a portion of it if you do not want the
object to travel along/around the full path. For linear axes, if you type a value that
is longer than the actual axis, the object stops at the end of the physical axis.
6
Click the Linear or Rotational option button according to the type of movement axis
that you are patching.
7
In the Mode area, select the type of movement for the object:
„
„
„
„
240
Static Select this option if you want to specify the precise location of a static
object on the movement axis. You can then use the position slider at the
bottom of the window to adjust the position and control the movement of the
object manually.
Bounce Select this option if you want the object to move forward and
backward in a continuous loop along the movement axis.
Forward Select this option if you want the object to move forward along the
axis from start to finish, and then start over again at the beginning in a
continuous forward loop.
Backward Select this option if you want the object to move backwards along
the axis from finish to start, and then begin over again in a continuous
backwards loop.
8
If you have chosen any moving Mode value (that is, any value except Static), you
can specify the length of time (in seconds) over which you want the full range of
motion to take place. Type this value in the Duration box. The larger the number
you type in this box, the slower the object moves.
9
Click New Axis to add the axis information to the axis list box.
November 2006
Data mode
10
Click Save to save your settings.
Note: If you make any changes to the axis settings and save the changes, you
can revert to the previous settings by clicking Load.
11
To see the object moving along the axis, you must first ensure that the Motion
Control Console or the motion control system that you are using is connected and
that the patched axis is bound. For details, see “To connect to a console” on page
340 and “To control a motion-control patched movement axis with a motion control
system” on page 344.
Reading the patch
Each box in the patch universe represents one DMX channel. Fixtures are represented
by colored bumps or bars that span the number of required DMX channels. The color of
the bar is the same as the fixture’s CAD layer.
The number in the top left corner is the DMX address.
The spot number and fixture type are identified across the bottom of the box(es).
The fixture parameter controlled by each channel is identified in the center of the box.
If you are connected to a console and are receiving DMX signals, the incoming DMX
levels are displayed in the top right corner of each box.
Reading the patch for streaming video sources
If you have patched a live video source or file, the patch appears as shown below:
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
241
Data mode
Release 18.0
Reading the patch for moving scenery
If you have patched a movement axis, the patch appears as shown below:
„
„
„
For linear movement axes, the position of the object is reported in either metric or
imperial units (for example, 16m).
For rotational axes, the value is shown in degrees (for example, 42°).
If the axis is unrecognized by the motion controller, then the object position is
shown as a question mark (?).
Note: If the axis type is mismatched between that which you have drawn and the type
that you choose in the Motion Control Console (for example, if the actual axis is linear,
but you choose rotational in the Motion Control Console), then the cell in patch view
turns to red.
Patch view properties
You can view and modify patch universe properties such as the name, display details,
and tooltip information that is displayed in a patch universe.
To view the properties of a patch universe
1
Right-click on the patch icon, and then select View Options.
Result: The View Options dialog box is displayed.
Universe tab
Options on the Universe tab affect the binding/unbinding of the patch universe to a
specific console or device output.
„
ID: The name of the patch universe shortcut.
„
Name: The full name of the patch universe or port ID.
„
„
242
Source: The lighting control console or device and port to which the patch universe
is bound.
Bind: Associates the patch universe to a console or device output. This applies only
when a console or device has been inserted in the Device Manager.
November 2006
Data mode
„
Unbind: Removes the association of the patch universe with the specified source.
Tip: You can open the Device Manager without having to change to Live mode by
double-clicking on the AF shortcut on the status bar.
Display tab
Options on the Display tab set properties such as the color of a patch universe.
„
Updates per second: The frequency of updates from the console to the patch
universe.
„
Enable Tooltips: Select this check box to display information about the patch and the
fixture when you hover over the start cell.
„
UnPatched Color: The color of a cell in the patch universe that is not patched.
„
Background Color: The color of the background of the patch view.
„
Text Color: The color of the text that is displayed in the patch universe.
„
Selected Color: The highlighted color of a selected fixture in the patch universe.
„
Column Width Size: Adjust the slider to resize the patch universe cells to the desired width.
To change the width of the patch cells
You can adjust the width of the cells in DMX and Motion Control patch universes.
1
Right-click anywhere in the patch universe and choose View Options.
2
Click the Display tab.
3
Adjust the Column Width Slider to the preferred size.
4
Click OK.
Show Details tab
Options on the Show Details tab define the information to be shown in the tooltips when
tooltips are enabled.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
243
Data mode
Release 18.0
„
244
Use User Details: Select this check box to reference the settings in User Options
(under the Options menu). Click to clear the check box and specify the tooltips that
you want displayed.
November 2006
Data mode
Errors
Introduction
WYSIWYG sports an “on the fly” error checking engine. This means that as you are
putting your lighting design together, WYSIWYG is continually checking for data errors
such as multiple dimmers in one circuit, multiple channels in one dimmer, and various
missing information.
At any time, you can view the error reports that are available on the Errors shortcut bar.
Error reports that have errors displayed will have an exclamation mark (!) after their
name. You can edit/fix these errors on the spot; editing data on the error reports works
the same way as the data spreadsheets explained in the previous section. As soon as
you fix an error in an error spreadsheet, the entries are disabled to show that it has
been fixed.
An indicator on the status bar signals you when your document contains errors. This
feature can be turned on or off. WYSIWYG is also set up to trigger an error notification
when errors are detected. Error notifications can be turned on or off.
Errors
WYSIWYG checks for the following errors:
Error
Definition
Dimmers > Circuit
Fixtures assigned to the same circuit have
been assigned different dimmer numbers.
Patches > Circuit
Fixtures assigned to the same circuit have
been assigned different patch addresses.
Channels > Circuit
Fixtures assigned to the same circuit have
been assigned different channel numbers.
Patches > Dimmer
Fixtures assigned to the same dimmer have
been assigned different patch addresses.
Channels > Dimmer
Fixtures assigned to the same dimmer have
been assigned different channel numbers.
Channels > Patch
Fixtures assigned to the same patch
address have been assigned different
channel numbers.
Spots > Patch
Fixtures assigned to the same patch
address have been assigned different spot
numbers.
Missing Position
The position field is empty.
Missing Unit
The unit field is empty.
Missing Circuit Name
The circuit name field is empty.
Missing Circuit #
The circuit number field is empty.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
245
Data mode
Release 18.0
Error
Definition
Missing Dimmer
The dimmer field is empty.
Missing Patch
The patch field is empty.
Missing Channel
The channel field is empty.
Missing Spot
The spot field is empty.
Missing Color
The color field is empty.
Missing Gobo
The gobo field is empty.
Error notifications
Error notifications occur when WYSIWYG detects an error for which an error notification
trigger has been set.
To set error triggers
1
From the Options menu, choose Show Options.
2
Click the Data Error tab.
3
Select the errors for which you want to trigger an error notification and/or signal.
4
Click OK.
To manage error triggers
246
1
When an error notification is triggered, the following dialog box appears:
2
From this dialog box, you can perform one of the following actions:
November 2006
Data mode
a.
Acknowledge the error, and then click OK to close the notification.
b.
Acknowledge the error, and then click Show Me to open a new window that
automatically navigates you to the appropriate error report.
c.
Acknowledge the error, and then click Options to reset the error notification
triggers as described above.
Error spreadsheet properties
Error spreadsheets may be sorted and modified in a similar manner as other
spreadsheet views.
To modify an error sheet
1
Click the Errors layout tab.
2
From the Options menu, choose View Options.
Result: The View Options dialog box is displayed.
For information on the General and Data View Options tab, refer to “Customizing
spreadsheets” on page 234.
On the Data Error Options tab, set triggers for the error that is displayed in the Name
box on the General tab. For more information on triggers, refer to “To set error
triggers” on page 246.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
247
Data mode
248
Release 18.0
Chapter 8
Design mode
Design mode was created to provide lighting designers with an avenue for
experimentation. Use it as a troubleshooting tool or as a creative tool to help you
come up with cue concepts. In Design mode, you can create static lighting looks
using the design tools, and then save and render those looks to output
photorealistic pictures.
In this chapter
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Layout tabs
251
Design tools
252
Concepts
258
Palettes
260
Creating looks
261
Rendering
264
Background Rendering Manager
275
249
Design mode
250
Release 18.0
November 2006
Design mode
Layout tabs
Introduction
Beneath the work area in each mode is a series of layout tabs. These layouts provide
various configurations of the views you are working with. To change layouts, click the
tab that corresponds to the layout you wish to use. The Design mode contains the
following layout tabs:
„
„
„
Wireframe - The work area displays a full-screen wireframe view.
Quad - The work area is divided into quadrants, three of which can be modified to
show plan, front, side, or isometric views. The lower-right quadrant contains a
shaded view.
Shaded - The work area displays a full-screen shaded view.
Note: The wireframe views in Data mode are used for fixture selection only. To make
any drawing modifications, you must return to CAD mode.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
251
Design mode
Release 18.0
Design tools
Introduction
The design tools are available in the Design and Live modes. You must have your venue,
scenery and fixtures drawn in order to use the design tools; however, you do not need
to have all the data entered for the fixtures in Design mode. Design mode is intended so
you do not need channel numbers or a patch. The design tools allow you to create
virtual lighting looks without an external control console. You can rough-in static looks
and render them for design presentations.
Though the Design mode looks a lot like the CAD mode, you cannot draw anything
within the Design mode. If you need to make changes to your drawing, you need to
switch over to the CAD mode.
You can see the output of fixtures in the wireframe and shaded views within the Design
mode. However, you can only select fixtures within the wireframe views, unless you use
Concept shortcuts as discussed in the next section.
The design tools are individual toolbars that enable you to control certain parameters
for selected fixtures. Currently there are nine design tools:
„
Intensity
„
Focus
„
Iris
„
Zoom
„
Color
„
Gobo
„
Prism
„
Video
„
Moving Scenery
To turn the design tools on
1
From the Design menu, choose the tool name to activate or deactivate the desired
design tool.
2
You can also toggle the tools on the Design toolbar.
Note: Design tools have the same properties as other toolbars and can be
rearranged on the screen to improve the layout of the working area. You can also
resize design tools by stacking them into columns so that they take up less space
on the screen.
252
November 2006
Design mode
To rearrange and resize design tools
1
Open the desired design tools using the steps above.
2
Click and drag one tool on top of another. When you release the mouse, the
selected design tool lines up under the other.
3
Repeat step 2 for as many tools as will fit in a column.
4
If you overlay tools so that they are not completely visible, click on the triangle in
the tools title bar. This expands or contracts the tool’s window.
5
If you click and drag a tool’s title bar off the column, it expands into its own
window.
Using the Design tools
Begin by selecting the desired fixtures.
To select fixtures
Select a fixture (or fixtures). You can select multiple fixtures by holding the CTRL key
while clicking on the fixture symbols. You can also use concepts as described in
“Concepts” on page 258.
Tip: You can also right-click and drag a box around a section of your drawing to select
fixtures. This displays a context-sensitive menu displaying all the fixture types
contained within that box. You can then easily select “All Mac500,” for example.
Result: The selected fixtures are highlighted in green.
Intensity tool
To use the intensity tool
The intensity tool provides many options for setting intensity levels.
Click the buttons for the extreme settings of intensity: Full (100%) and Off (0%). Use
the dial to achieve any of the settings in between. To use the dial, click and hold the dial
while you move the mouse up or down. The chosen intensity level is displayed in the
Intensity box as you move the mouse.
Alternatively, you can enter a specific percentage by typing the number in the Intensity
box, and then clicking Apply. If multiple fixtures are selected, the intensity level entered
is assigned to all fixtures. If you select multiple fixtures that have varying intensity
levels, “N/A” appears in the Intensity box.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
253
Design mode
Release 18.0
Zoom and iris tools
To use the zoom and iris tools
The zoom and iris design tools both work the same way. Use the buttons for the
extreme settings of tight or wide. Use the dial to achieve any of the settings in between.
To use the dial, click and hold the dial while you move the mouse up or down.
Gobo and prism tools
To use the gobo and prism tools
The gobo and prism tools work the same way. Specify the fixture type (if you have more
than one selected), or the specific wheel to control (if that fixture type has multiple
wheels) using the drop-down menu. Note that only fixtures with gobo or prism
parameters appear on the list. Use the gobo/prism wheel scroll arrows to select the
desired gobo/prism from the wheel. If no gobo/prism is desired, leave the wheel in the
open slot.The dial will rotate this gobo if a rotating gobo is selected.
Color tool
To use the color tool
The color tool offers many options for color selection.
Click the custom color box or use the greyscale arrow to adjust your selection. The
fixture's output depends on its capabilities. If the fixture has CMY or color mixing
capabilities, the output is the exact color you selected. If the fixture is only equipped
with a color wheel or a non-mixing scroller, the fixture will output the closest color to
that selected, based on the available colors on the wheel.
The same principal works if you select a color from the library by clicking the Library
button. The wheel/scroller selection drop-down list is as discussed for the gobo wheel.
All of the available colors are displayed in the order in which they appear on the wheel
or scroll.
254
November 2006
Design mode
Focus tool
The focus tool works with fixtures that have variable pan and tilt parameters. You must
focus conventional fixtures in CAD mode.
To use the focus tool
In the focus trackpad, click, hold, and drag the mouse to control the position of the light
beam. The Home button resets the fixture to pan = 50% and tilt = 50%.
To send the fixture's beam to a specific location, click the Focus button, and then click in
your wireframe drawing. Use the focus position drop-down list to focus the beams of
light toward one of the focus positions that you created in CAD mode.
Note: The Focus tool does not take into account the current viewing position or fixture
settings. In one orientation, dragging to the right on the trackpad results in the beam
moving left, but rotating the fixture 180 degrees and dragging to the right should cause
the beam to move to the right. This effect occurs with both moving mirror and moving
head fixtures.
Video tool
Streaming video enables you to bring a live or pre-recorded video stream into
WYSIWYG and play it back while you set looks in Design mode and while you precue in
Live mode. To do so, you must first use CAD mode to draw the screen upon which the
video will play.
Note: You can only incorporate live video if you have WYSIWYG Perform; you cannot
select a video from a live capture device if you have WYSIWYG Design.
After you draw the screen and attach the video source, you use the Video designer tool
in Design mode to start the playback or stream. You can view the video in any of the
shaded views, using the controls on the Video designer tool to pause, fast forward,
rewind, or stop the video.
To use the Video tool
Once you have the video source attached to the screen, you must use the Video
designer tool to control it. For more information on attaching the video source to the
screen, see “To draw a screen” on page 138 and “To configure a new video source for
streaming video” on page 138.
Note: If the video control is patched and DMX connected in Live Mode, then you will not
be able to control the video using any of the Video designer tool commands in Design
mode. Video sources can only be controlled by a designer tool when the DMX source is
disconnected; therefore, you must first disconnect the applicable console device from
within Live Mode before using any of the Video Designer Tool commands.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
255
Design mode
Release 18.0
1
Click the Shaded tab to view the video screen(s) that you have drawn.
2
Click the Video designer tool icon to open the tool window.
3
From the drop-down list, select the video source.
4
Use the controls shown in the graphic above to play, pause, or stop the video. You
can also use the slider to manually advance or rewind the video at your desired
speed.
Note: When you press the Pause button, the frame of the video that is playing at
the time is held on the video screen; when you press the Stop button, the video
stops playing and the screen goes blank.
Moving Scenery tool
After drawing movement axes and attaching objects to them, you can use the Moving
Scenery Designer tool to make the object “move” along each axis.
You can simulate moving scenery by setting up looks containing movement axes in
Design mode. Once you create the look and specify its fade time, use the Moving
Scenery Designer tool to customize the look by selecting the appropriate movement
axis and the object’s starting position on it. Then create a second look, repeating the
same procedure to set the object’s starting position on either the same axis, or a
different one (if there is more than one axis attached together).
When you switch from one look to the next, you can see the object move from the
starting point of the first look, to the starting point of the second look within the time
period that you define as the “fade time.”
To use the Moving Scenery tool
After drawing movement axes and attaching objects to them, you can use the Moving
Scenery Designer tool to make the object “move” along each axis. For details on
drawing axes, see “Drawing movement axes” on page 139. For information on attaching
objects, see “To attach an object to a movement axis” on page 142.
256
November 2006
Design mode
1
In Design mode, click the Moving Scenery Designer tool icon to open the tool.
Note: You can also open the tool by clicking Design > Moving Scenery tool.
2
From the drop-down list, select the appropriate movement axis.
3
To move the object on the axis, you have three choices:
„
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Use the slider to move the object back and forth along the axis.
Click Start or End to move the object immediately to either the start or end of
the movement axis.
For very precise positioning, in the box provided, type the object’s position as
a percentage of its total range of movement. For example, if you want to see
the object at the exact half-way mark, type 50 in this box, and then click Apply.
257
Design mode
Release 18.0
Concepts
Introduction
Concepts are custom groups of fixtures. You can create concepts in CAD, Data, Design,
or Live mode in any view that allows fixture selection.
Creating concepts
Creating a concept allows you to select a group of fixtures at the same time.
Concept shortcuts also enhance working with design tools in shaded views. Since design
tools work with the current fixture selection, opening multiple concept shortcuts allow
you to change different groups of fixtures, rather than having to select them individually
in the Wireframe view.
Note: Concepts are saved on the Concept shortcut bar.
To create a new concept
1
Select the fixtures that you want to group. If you are unfamiliar with selecting
objects, refer to “Selecting” on page 145.
2
Click the Concepts shortcut bar.
3
Right-click on the Concept shortcut bar, and then choose New Concept.
4
Type the name of the concept, and then click OK.
Result: The concept is saved on the Concept shortcut bar.
Updating concepts
You can modify a Concept shortcut by adding or removing fixtures as required.
To update concepts
1
Select the set of fixtures that you want to include in the concept.
2
Right-click on the Concept shortcut that you want to update, and then choose
Update.
Result: The Concept shortcut is modified to include only the fixtures that you
selected.
Working with concepts
When you select a Concept shortcut, any currently selected objects are deselected, and
the Concept set is selected instead.
If you press the CTRL key while selecting concepts, the concept is added to the current
selection set.
If you press the CTRL and SHIFT keys while selecting concepts, the concept is removed
from the current selection set.
258
November 2006
Design mode
Notes:
1.
In a Concept shortcut, multi-cell fixtures, such as cyc lights, can be selected either
by cell or fixture. If the concept was created in Design mode using cells, the entire
fixture is selected in the other modes. If the concept was created using fixtures, all
cells are selected when in Design mode.
2.
When you replace a multi-cell fixture that is selected by circuit with a different
multi-cell fixture that has a different number of circuits, the replacement fixture is
selected by fixture and not by circuit.
3.
When you delete a fixture, the fixture is removed from all concepts that include
that fixture.
4.
When you replace a fixture using the Replace Fixtures menu option, any concepts
referring to that fixture are updated to refer to the fixture replacement.
5.
Any fixture added to a document will not initially be part of any concept.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
259
Design mode
Release 18.0
Palettes
Introduction
You can create palettes of color to facilitate color selection. A palette is a reference to a
specific color and can be used on all color-changing fixtures and scrollers.
Creating palettes
Creating a Palette shortcut is helpful if you want to save your favourite CMY color mixes
for later use.
Note: You can create palettes in Design mode only.
To create a palette
1
Select the fixture from which you want to capture the color.
Note: You can create a palette from only one fixture.
2
Right-click on the Palette shortcut bar, and then choose New Palette.
3
Type the name of the palette, and then click OK.
Result: The CMY value is saved as a palette in the Palette shortcut bar. This value
can be a CMY mix, a color from the color wheel or scroll, or a combination of color
sources.
Updating palettes
You can modify a Palette shortcut by modifying or replacing colors as required.
To update a palette
1
Select the fixtures from which you would like to record the palette.
2
Right-click on the Palette shortcut that you want to modify, and then choose Update.
Result: The Palette shortcut is updated with the new CMY values.
To apply a palette
Applying a color palette is the equivalent of setting up color parameters for the selected
fixtures, except it is much faster.
1
Select the fixtures for which you want to assign the specific color value.
2
Click on the desired palette shortcut.
Result: The fixtures are assigned the recorded copy value. If the fixture has CMY
or color mixing capabilities, the output is the exact color that you selected. If the
fixture is only equipped with a color wheel or a non-mixing scroller, the fixture
outputs the closest color to that selected, based on the available colors on the
wheel.
260
November 2006
Design mode
Creating looks
Saving lighting looks
Changes that you make with the design tools update the currently selected look. The
name of the currently selected look is displayed at the top of the working area. Before
making changes, always check that the currently selected look is the one that you want
to modify.
To create a new lighting look
1
In the shortcuts bar, click Looks.
2
In the Looks shortcut area, right-click, and then select New Look.
3
In the Name box, type the name of the new look.
4
In the Fade time box, type the fade time in seconds for this look. This is the amount
of time that it takes to “fade” to this look when you click on it from another look in
the shortcut bar. For more information, see “Cross-fading between lighting looks”
below.
5
Click OK.
6
Scroll to the bottom of the Looks shortcuts list.
7
Click on the shortcut for your new look.
8
Use the design tools to create your new lighting look.
Tip: To build on an existing look without losing it, clone the look shortcut and work
from the copy of the shortcut. For more information on cloning shortcuts, refer to
“To clone a shortcut” on page 57.
Cross-fading between lighting looks
You can use the Looks shortcut bar to quickly set up and run timed transitions between
lighting looks without the need of a lighting console. When you create a lighting look,
you can specify its fade time in seconds. This is the amount of time that it takes to
“fade” to this look when you click on it from another look in the shortcut bar. You can
create multiple looks and specify different fade times for each of them.
Once you create the look and specify the fade time, you can use the design tools to
customize the look. For example, you can add color, gobos, and intensity to lighting,
and set the position of moving lights. When you switch from one look to the next, you
can see the movement of the lights from one position to the next, along with any
changes you have made between looks, such as color, intensity, and so on.
To cross-fade between looks
1
In Design mode, in the shortcuts bar, click Looks.
2
In the Looks shortcut area, right-click, and then select New Look.
3
In the Name box, type the name of the new look.
4
In the Fade time box, type the fade time in seconds for this look.
5
Click OK.
6
Scroll to the bottom of the Looks shortcuts list.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
261
Design mode
Release 18.0
7
Click on the shortcut for your new look.
8
Use the design tools to create your new lighting look. You can set the color,
intensity, zoom, iris, and add gobos. If you are using moving lights, you can also
set the position of the lights.
9
To create the next look, in the Looks shortcut area, right-click, and then select New
Look.
10
In the Name box, type the name of the new look.
11
In the Fade time box, type the fade time in seconds for this look.
12
Click OK.
13
Scroll to the bottom of the Looks shortcuts list.
14
Click on the shortcut for your new look.
15
Use the design tools to create your new lighting look. You can set the color,
intensity, zoom, iris, and add gobos. If you are using moving lights, you can also
set the position of the lights.
16
Ensure that the Fade looks button is enabled so the look fades instead of jumping
directly to the next look.
Tip: If the button is not enabled, then you can “jump” from one look to the next by
clicking the look shortcuts in the shortcut bar. Even if the button is enabled, you
can always jump to the next look by right-clicking the look shortcut, and selecting
Jump to.
17
To watch the “fade” from the first look to the second look, click the shortcut for the
second look. The image fades over the period of time that you specified for the
second look.
Tips:
„
For a more realistic view of the fading between looks, click the Shaded tab.
„
To jump directly to a specific look, right-click the look, and then select Jump to.
Viewing moving scenery
You can use the Looks shortcut bar to quickly set up and run timed transitions between
looks to simulate moving scenery.
When you create a look, you can specify its fade time in seconds. This is the amount of
time that it takes to “fade” to this look when you click on it from another look in the
shortcut bar. You can create multiple looks and specify different fade times for each of
them.
Just as you can specify the fade time to watch the transition between lighting looks, so
too can you use the fade time to simulate moving scenery. In the latter case, however,
your Look must contain at least one movement axis with at least one object attached to
it.
Note: You can also combine Looks to simulate both moving lights and moving scenery
in one “fade”.
Once you create the look and specify its fade time, use the Moving Scenery Designer
tool to customize the look by selecting the appropriate movement axis and the object’s
starting position on it. Then create a second look, repeating the same procedure to set
the object’s starting position on either the same axis, or a different one (if there is more
than one axis attached together).
When you switch from one look to the next, you can see the object move from the
starting point of the first look, to the starting point of the second look.
262
November 2006
Design mode
To view moving scenery
Note: Before you perform this procedure, you must have drawn at least one movement
axis and attached at least one object to it. For details, see “Drawing movement axes” on
page 139.
1
In Design mode, in the shortcuts bar, click Looks.
2
In the Looks shortcut area, right-click, and then select New Look.
3
In the Name box, type the name of the new look.
4
In the Fade time box, type the fade time in seconds for this look.
5
Click OK.
6
Scroll to the bottom of the Looks shortcuts list.
7
Click on the shortcut for your new look.
8
Click the Moving Scenery Designer Tool icon (
9
From the drop-down list in the Scenery window, select the appropriate movement
axis.
10
Click the slider to advance the object to the position where you want it to start on
the selected axis.
).
Note: You can also use the Start box to type the object’s position as a percentage
of its full range of movement. For example, to show the object at the exact halfway mark on the movement axis, type 50.
11
To create the next look, in the Looks shortcut area, right-click, and then select New
Look.
12
In the Name box, type the name of the new look.
13
In the Fade time box, type the fade time in seconds for this look.
14
Click OK.
15
Scroll to the bottom of the Looks shortcuts list.
16
Click on the shortcut for your new look.
17
From the drop-down list in the Scenery window, select the appropriate movement
axis.
18
Click the slider to advance the object to the position where you want it to start on
the selected axis.
19
Ensure that the Fade looks button is enabled so the look fades instead of jumping
directly to the next look.
Tip: If the button is not enabled, then you can “jump” from one look to the next by
clicking the look shortcuts in the shortcut bar. Even if the button is enabled, you
can always jump to the next look by right-clicking the look shortcut, and selecting
Jump to.
20
To watch the “fade” from the first look to the second look, click the shortcut for the
second look. The object moves from the starting point of the first look to the
starting point of the second look over the period of time that you specified as the
fade time for the second look.
Tips:
„
For a more realistic view of the fading between looks, click the Shaded tab.
„
To jump directly to a specific look, right-click the look, and then select Jump to.
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
For details on controlling the object’s movement with a console device, such as
the Mini Console, see “To control a DMX patched movement axis with a
console” on page 343.
263
Design mode
Release 18.0
Rendering
Introduction
In WYSIWYG, you can render lighting looks to produce high quality images of your set
and lighting. Rendering uses a full range of effects, including depth of field, motion blur,
soft shadows, and antialiasing settings to produce a photorealistic image.
Based on the product level that you are running, when you are creating a rendering,
you have two choices:
„
„
Render Wizard (all product levels except Report) You can use the interactive
editing and advanced visual effects of the Render Wizard to set up the look that
you want to render, and then create the rendering. In this case, you must leave
WYSIWYG running while the Render Wizard finishes the image. You have the
choice of saving the image to an external folder that you specify or within
WYSIWYG on the Images tab.
Background Rendering Manager (all product levels except Report and Perform Console Edition) You can use the Render Wizard to set up the look that you want
to render, and then send the render job to the Background Rendering Manager to
create the rendering.
This feature lets you use the Windows taskbar to queue render jobs that will
execute in the background without requiring WYSIWYG to run, letting you do other
tasks while the Render Engine works independently. You can also pause and
resume renderings without losing your render, and shut down/restart your
computer without losing your rendering progress. For details on this feature, see
“Background Rendering Manager” on page 275.
To render a lighting look
1
In the working area of the screen, display the lighting look that you want to render.
2
From the Design menu, choose Render.
Tip: You can also click the Render Wizard icon in the Design toolbar.
Result: The Render Wizard opens and guides you through a series of options.
264
November 2006
Design mode
Step 1 - Set Output Destination and Image Size
Click in the right pane to arrange the image that you want to render. You can click and drag the
image around, zoom in and out with the mouse wheel (or PAGE UP / PAGE DOWN keys), or set
up your shot accurately using a camera.
Note: Make sure you use the appropriate aspect ratio (height vs. width) for the
output device that you will be using to present the pictures. For example, TV is 4x3
(normally 640x480), HDTV is 16x9.
a.
Dimensions: Type a value in pixels for the width and height of the final image.
b.
Destination: Choose where you want to save the final image and whether you
want to use the Background Rendering Manager to create it.
Internal Image View: Select this option to have the Render Wizard create the
image and store it on the Images tab in Presentation mode.
„ External Image: Select this option to have the Render Wizard create the image
and store it in the location that you specify. Then type the file name for the
image and click Browse to choose the folder where it will be saved. If desired,
choose the file type, either .bmp or .jpg. If you do not make a selection, the
image is stored as a .bmp image.
„ Background Rendering Manager: Choose this option to send the render job to the
Background Rendering Manager when you finish setting up your image in the
Render Wizard. Type the file name for the image, ensuring that it is a unique
name, and then click Next. For details, see “Background Rendering Manager”
on page 275.
Note: If this is the first time you are using the Background Rendering Manager,
you must configure it before the rendering process will begin. Upon clicking Finish
in the Render Wizard, the Configuration Wizard appears, enabling you to configure
settings such as the Network Port, the default folder for storing rendering files, and
other Manager settings. For details, see “To configure the Background Rendering
Manager” on page 276.
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
265
Design mode
Release 18.0
Step 1b - Configure Background Rendering Manager
This step appears only if you chose to create and save the rendering with the
Background Rendering Manager. If you chose to save the image internally or
externally, proceed directly to Step 2 - Set Camera and Simulation Type.
266
a.
Connect to Local Host: Leave this check box selected to use the default values
b.
Server Name: Type the name of the server in your network that is running the
Background Rendering Manager where you want the Render Wizard to send all
render jobs. The server must be running WYSIWYG Release 18 (or higher) and
have a dongle attached.
c.
Server Port: Type the port number that the WYSIWYG Render Wizard will use to
and have the Render Wizard send all jobs to the Background Rendering
Manager that is running on your computer. To send render jobs to another
computer in your network that is running the Background Rendering Manager,
deselect this check box and then type the server name and port number in the
boxes provided. Note that when you send render jobs to a network computer,
the Background Rendering Manager must be open and running on this
destination computer; in this case, the act of sending a job from the Render
Wizard does not launch the Background Rendering Manager.
send render jobs to the Background Rendering Manager, or accept the default
port number shown. It must be a value between 1025 and 65,535. For proper
communication, this number must match the port number that is configured in
the Background Rendering Manager on the destination computer; therefore, if
you change this value, you must also change it in the Background Rendering
Manager on the destination computer. For details, see “To configure the
Background Rendering Manager” on page 276.
November 2006
Design mode
Step 2 - Set Camera and Simulation Type
Options in Step 2 affect the composition of your image.
a.
Scene: Select a scene for the rendering. Scenes are groupings of layers used to
organize a plot. For more information on scenes, refer to “Scenes” on page
165.
b.
Camera: Select the camera for the rendering. Cameras are set up in CAD mode.
For more information on cameras, refer to “Drawing cameras” on page 142.
If you select a camera, you can adjust its aperture. This adjustment changes
the depth of field of the final image. The larger the aperture, the “fuzzier” the
rendering. The focus point is always the target of the camera.
Camera target: By default, the red lines of the target are visible. This is to aid
in the composition of the image. It will not, however, be visible in your final
rendering. To turn the target off (that is, set to not visible), right-click in the
preview pane, and then choose View Options. For more information on shaded
views, refer to “Modifying shaded views” on page 73.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
c.
Ambient Light: Use the slider to set the ambient light level. This adjusts the
d.
Simulation Type: Simulation type does not affect the outcome of your rendering.
e.
Pan tool moves objects: The Pan tool does not affect the outcome of your
rendering. Rather the tool rotates the model on the target (if checked) or
rotates the camera around the target (if unchecked). Both settings help you to
compose your image.
overall light level, where 0% is complete black and 100% is a bright room.
This does not affect the intensity of the fixtures in your lighting look.
Rather, it allows you to set your beam quality preference as you work through
the Render Wizard.
267
Design mode
Release 18.0
Step 3 - Add Atmospheric Effects to Your Rendering
Options in Step 3 affect the atmospheric conditions in your rendering.
a.
Atmospheric Options: The options that you set here affect the atmospheric
conditions that are visible in your final rendering. To simulate atmospheric dust
or fog, select Haze. For additional opacity, select Smoke.
b.
Density: Use the slider to set the visibility of the haze particles. A setting of 0%
c.
Granularity: Use the slider to set the granularity of the smoke. This setting
indicates that the particles cannot be seen.
affects how fine smoke particles are. This option is available only if you choose
Smoke under Atmospheric Options.
Step 4 - Select How Shadows Will Be Simulated
Options in Step 4 affect the projection of shadows in your rendering.
a.
268
Shadows: Select how you want shadows to be projected in the final rendering.
If you choose None, then no shadows are calculated by WYSIWYG; that is,
November 2006
Design mode
objects in the path of the light beam do not create shadows. Instead, all
objects in the path of the virtual beam are illuminated, even if an object would
normally block the beam from reaching another. As illustrated in the rendering
below, all three surfaces are illuminated and the beam continues into infinity.
To calculate which objects the beam of light will hit and which objects it will not
hit, select Objects. Objects in the path of the virtual beam will not be
illuminated by the beam if the beam has already been blocked by another
object. However, WYSIWYG still does not calculate where the beam stops. As
illustrated in the rendering below, the first surface is illuminated, but the beam
is still continuing into infinity.
Select Atmospheric to calculate which objects the beam of light will hit and
where the beam of light will end. This is a true representation of how light
behaves. As illustrated in the rendering below, the first surface is illuminated
and the beam also stops there.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
269
Design mode
Release 18.0
b.
Presence: Use the Presence slider to change the relative brightness of fixture
beams. When set to Subtle, WYSIWYG accounts for all variations in lamp
output, including gel transmission, color temperature, fixture efficiency, and
lamp. When set to Bold, all fixture beams are rendered at the same general
intensity.
Step 5 - Define How Light Reflection Will Be Simulated
Options in Step 5 affect the radiosity level. Radiosity is defined as the combined
processes of emission, transmission, and absorption of rays or reflecting beams of
light. When using Radiosity, it is not necessary to use ambient lighting.
a.
270
Radiosity: To generate a rendering that uses radiosity, select the Radiosity check
box, and then choose from the available radiosity options. Fast radiosity results
in a rendering with constant, flat lighting. Each subsequent option shows more
calculated lighting. The number of bounces determines how many levels of
reflection are permitted.
November 2006
Design mode
b.
Disable Ambient Light: Select the Disable Ambient Light check box to ignore the
ambient light settings from step 1.
Step 6 - Add Environmental or Outdoor Lighting to Your Rendering
Options in Step 6 affect the presence and quality of environmental or outdoor
lighting. Note that for environmental lighting to have an effect, your show must not
be contained within a venue.
a.
Environmental Lighting: To generate a rendering that considers outdoor lighting
conditions, select the Environmental Lighting check box.
b.
Date and Time: The date and time of the rendering determines the position of
c.
Light Quality: The amount of light available determines the brightness of the
resulting rendering. Use the Light Quality slider to adjust the quality of light.
d.
Soft Shadow: Click the Enable soft shadow check box, and then use the slider to
set the softness of shadows that are created by sunlight. The softer the
shadow, the less sharp the resulting shadow.
the sun and/or moon and the resulting amount of light available. The position
of the sun is also determined by the geographic settings that are configured in
Show Options and the north direction that is set in CAD mode. For more
information on regional settings, refer to “Regional settings tab” on page 94.
For more information on setting the direction that is north, refer to “Drawing a
compass” on page 143.
PREVIEW
When you click Next in Step 6, the Render Wizard calculates a small preview of the
rendering and shows it in the right-hand view. It will always zoom to fit the full size of
the rendered view first, but you can click in the view and zoom in and out using the
PAGE UP/PAGE DOWN keys. Use the preview to fix any glaring errors in your rendering
before you continue on to the final rendering.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
271
Design mode
Release 18.0
Step 7 - Make Final Picture Adjustments
Options in Step 7 affect the quality of your final image.
a.
Saturation: This is comparable to the exposure on a camera; it determines
which pixels are represented as pure white.
b.
Brightness: This slider adjusts all pixels equally.
Step 8 - Use Anti-Aliasing to Smooth or Sharpen Rough Edges
Options in Step 8 affect the antialiasing settings. Antialiasing is a method of
smoothing out and sharpening rough or jagged edges of images to produce a more
polished result. This method subsamples the pixel area and averages the results of
neighboring samples to reduce the areas of high contrast (edges).
a.
Antialiasing Options: Choose how you want edges to appear in your final
rendering. The Fast method samples the pixels quickly, but does not produce
the highest quality.
272
November 2006
Design mode
When you click Finish, the real rendering takes place. The total rendering time
depends on the options that you selected and the complexity of the scenery and
lighting. Based on the location where you chose to save the completed rendering in
Step 1, your options vary upon clicking Finish:
„
„
Internal and External Images If you chose to save the rendering internally
or externally, then you can minimize the Render Wizard window and continue
working on other parts of your document as it renders. You can use the arrow
keys, PAGE UP/PAGE DOWN, mouse or scroll bars to explore the picture as it is
being produced. The final image is saved to the destination you specified in
step 1.
Background Rendering Manager Images If you sent the render job to the
Background Rendering Manager, then a status window appears, showing the
progress as the render job is sent to the Background Rendering Manager on
the destination computer (either your own or another server in the network).
When the job has been sent successfully, you can open the Background
Rendering Manager to check its progress. You can close the Render Wizard and
WYSIWYG, queue jobs, pause and resume them, and shut down/restart your
computer without losing the rendering progress. For details, see “To use the
Background Rendering Manager” on page 279.
Note: If this is the first time you are using the Background Rendering Manager,
you must first configure it before the rendering process will begin. Upon clicking
Finish in the Render Wizard, the Configuration Wizard appears, enabling you to
configure settings such as the Network Port, the default folder for storing rendering
files, and other Manager settings. For details, see “To configure the Background
Rendering Manager” on page 276.
Saving render settings
You can save the options that you set in the Render Wizard as a shortcut for quick
access to these settings at a future time. There are two ways of saving a Render
shortcut:
„
from the Render Wizard
„
from the Render shortcut bar, in a similar manner as other shortcuts
The Render shortcut bar is prepopulated with two shortcuts: Quick Render and Full
Render. Quick Render shortcuts provide settings for a small, lower-quality render, while
Full Render shortcuts provide settings for a larger, high-quality rendering.
To create a shortcut from the Render Wizard
1
2
From the Design menu, choose Render.
While working through the steps in the Render Wizard, you can, at any time, click
Add Shortcut to save the current settings as a shortcut.
3
Type a name for the shortcut.
4
Click OK.
Result: The shortcut is added to the Render shortcut bar.
To create a shortcut from the Render shortcut bar
1
Right-click in the open space on the Render shortcut bar, and then choose New
Render.
2
Type a name for the new render.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
273
Design mode
Release 18.0
3
Click OK.
Result: The Render shortcut is saved on the Render shortcut bar. The shortcut is
preconfigured with the default values for each of the eight steps. These defaults
are the same values that are used when you choose Render from the menu bar or
the toolbar.
To modify a Render shortcut
1
Double-click on the Render shortcut that you want to modify.
Result: The Render Wizard opens, with the values that are saved in the shortcut.
2
Modify the options as required.
Result: The settings are recorded in the shortcut and are available the next time
that you select the shortcut.
274
November 2006
Design mode
Background Rendering Manager
Introduction
Once you have used the Render Wizard to set up the look that you want to render, you
can send the render job to the Background Rendering Manager to create the actual
rendering. You can send multiple jobs to the Background Rendering Manager queue and
then arrange the order of the queue or remove jobs from it. While you can send
multiple jobs, the Background Rendering Manager processes only one job at a time, the
job at the top of the queue. Once this job is finished, it will then automatically proceed
to the next queued job, and so on.
If you manually move a job in progress from the top of the queue down, you pause the
rendering and start processing the next job in the queue. However, you do not lose the
progress of any rendering jobs that have been started. When they reach the top of the
queue, the Background Rendering Manager resumes rendering the image where it last
left off.
The Background Rendering Manager processes render jobs independently without
requiring WYSIWYG to run. This feature lets you work on other tasks while the
renderings in the queue are processed in the order you arranged. You can work on new
WYSIWYG files, or you can close WYSIWYG altogether and perform other tasks. You can
even shut down your computer and restart later without losing the rendering progress.
When setting up renderings in the Render Wizard, you can send jobs to the Background
Rendering Manager that resides on the same computer, or to another computer in your
network that is also running the Background Rendering Manager (and has a dongle
attached). By sending all rendering jobs to another computer, you free up CPU capacity
on your own computer.
Configuring the Background Rendering Manager
When you open the Background Rendering Manager for the first time, the Configuration
Wizard appears, prompting you to choose settings, such as the network port, the
startup options, and the folder where all renderings are stored.
This Wizard appears automatically when:
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
You click Start > All Programs > WYSIWYG > WYSIWYG Background Rendering
Manager to open the program for the first time.
You click Finish in the Render Wizard after setting up a rendering and choosing to
send it to the Background Rendering Manager for the first time.
275
Design mode
Release 18.0
To configure the Background Rendering Manager
1
Click Start > All Programs > WYSIWYG > WYSIWYG Background Rendering Manager.
2
In the Welcome window, click Next.
3
Select whether you want the program to use the default settings or custom
settings that you specify.
„
„
276
Typical Click this option to configure the program with the default working
directory and network port settings.
Advanced Click this option to specify the working directory and network port
settings for the program.
4
Click Next. If you chose Typical in the previous step, proceed directly to step 9. If
you chose Advanced, the following window appears:
5
The working directory is used to store files that the render engine requires to
generate renderings. To change the default working directory shown (for example,
if you have run out of space on the default drive), type the path and new folder
name in the box provided, or click Browse to locate the folder. It is recommended
that the folder be new and empty.
November 2006
Design mode
6
Click Next.
7
Type the incoming Network Port that the Background Rendering Manager will
monitor for rendering jobs sent from WYSIWYG.
Notes:
„
„
If you change this default port, you must also change the outbound port
configured in the Render Wizard for sending jobs to this Background Rendering
Manager. These two ports must match.
When you choose the network port, Windows Firewall will automatically be
configured to enable network communication. If you are using a different
firewall, then you must configure its settings manually.
8
Click Next.
9
Choose the startup mode for the Background Rendering Manager. You can choose
one option or both.
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Run at Windows Startup Select this option to have the Background
Rendering Manager automatically start every time Windows starts up. With
this option, the application immediately begins rendering submitted jobs as
soon as you start up your computer, unless it was paused on last exit.
Start Minimized Select this option to have the Background Rendering
Manager appear as a minimized taskbar icon every time it starts. Double-click
the icon to manually restore the application to its full size. If you select only
this option, the Background Rendering Manager starts when you send a render
job to it from a Render Wizard that is installed on this same computer.
However, if you are sending render jobs from a different computer, then you
277
Design mode
Release 18.0
will have to manually open the Background Rendering Manager on this
computer before it will accept render jobs.
10
Click Next.
11
Click Finish.
Result: The Background Rendering Manager is now ready to use.
Tip: To change these settings at any time, you can run the Configuration Wizard
again by clicking Tools > Configuration Wizard. You can also click Tools > Options to
change these settings on one window.
Background Rendering Manager taskbar icons
Based on the settings that you chose when configuring the Background Rendering
Manager, when the program is started, it appears either as a maximized window or a
minimized icon on the right side of the Windows taskbar. The icon changes according to
the current state of the program. Double-click the taskbar icon to open the program.
Icon Status
When this icon appears, the program is idle. Either it has not been configured
yet, or no jobs have been sent to it.
When this icon appears, the program is currently processing a job in the
queue.
When this icon appears, the program is paused.
When this icon appears, the program has completed all jobs in the queue.
Background Rendering Manager window
When you open the Background Rendering Manager (either by sending a render job to
it, or double-clicking the taskbar icon), the main window appears, showing you the
status of all rendering jobs.
278
November 2006
Design mode
Job pane
The Job pane shows you all jobs that have been successfully sent to the Background
Rendering Manager. While you can send multiple jobs, the Background Rendering
Manager processes only one job at a time, the job at the top of the queue. Once this job
is finished, it will then automatically proceed to the next queued job, and so on. For tips
on managing the jobs listed, see “Managing jobs in the Background Rendering Manager
queue” on page 280.
Preview pane
This window shows you a visual representation of the rendering progress. Note that the
final image is scaled to fit this pane and is not indicative of the quality of the actual
rendering. To view the final rendering, you must export the image as a graphic file. For
details, see “To export rendered images from the Background Rendering Manager” on
page 283.
Log window
Check the messages in the log window for an up-to-date status as the rendering job is
processed. You can change and resize the font in this window by using the drop-down
boxes provided.
Using the Background Rendering Manager
Once you have configured the Background Rendering Manager, it is ready to accept
render jobs from WYSIWYG.
To use the Background Rendering Manager
1
In WYSIWYG, open the Render Wizard and set up the rendering that you want to
create, choosing Background Rendering Manager in Step 1.
2
Proceed through the steps of the Render Wizard, and then click Finish.
Result: The Submitting Render Job window appears, showing the progress as the job
is sent to the Background Rendering Manager.
3
When the job is successfully sent, a WYSIWYG message box notifies you. The next
step differs based on where you sent the job (either to your own computer, or
another computer on the network):
„
„
4
Background Rendering Manager residing on your computer If you have
sent the job to the Background Rendering Manager residing on the same
computer as the Render Wizard, it automatically starts processing the
rendering if there are no jobs currently being rendered (if it is currently
processing a job, the new job is placed in the active queue).
Background Rendering Manager residing on a network computer If you
have sent the job to the Background Rendering Manager residing a network
computer, you must first ensure that the Background Rendering Manager is
started before it will process the job. The act of sending a rendering job does
not start the Background Rendering Manager when it is installed on a network
computer.
Open the Background Rendering Manager to check the progress of the rendering
and arrange the rendering queue. For details, see “Managing jobs in the
Background Rendering Manager queue” on page 280.
Note: You can shut down your computer while the Background Rendering Manager
is processing the job without losing the rendering progress. You can also pause and
resume the program. When you restart your computer or resume the program, the
rendering continues where it last left off. (You might need to open the Background
Rendering Manager manually before it will resume rendering.)
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
279
Design mode
Release 18.0
Managing jobs in the Background Rendering Manager queue
The Job pane shows you all jobs that have been successfully sent to the Background
Rendering Manager. While you can send multiple jobs, the Background Rendering
Manager processes only one job at a time, the job at the top of the queue. Once this job
is finished, it will then automatically proceed to the next queued job, and so on.
As shown in the Status column in the following graphic, rendering jobs can have one of
four statuses:
„
„
„
„
Rendering This is the job that is currently being processed. Only one job can
have this status at any given time. The values in the Progress and Time Left columns
indicate when the job will be finished.
Queued Jobs with this status are waiting to be processed. These can be new jobs
or those that have already started, but have been interrupted by moving them
down in the queue. In this latter case, when the job is moved back to the top of
the queue, the rendering automatically resumes where it left off.
Stopped Jobs with this status have been manually dequeued. This means that
they will not automatically move up in the queue as jobs are completed. To process
jobs with this status, you have to highlight them and click Queue to move them
back into the active queue (or click Render Job Now to start rendering the job
immediately).
Completed These are jobs that have been processed successfully. However, the
actual rendering image still resides in the Background Rendering Manager. To
export the image to a folder of your choice, highlight the completed job, and then
click Save Rendering.
Background Rendering Manager buttons
The table below contains descriptions of the Background Rendering Manager buttons.
Use these descriptions as a guideline when managing the jobs in the queue.
Button Explanation
Resume Rendering: This button is enabled when you have paused all jobs
in the Background Rendering Manager. Click this button to resume the
rendering process, starting with the first job in the queue. The rendering
continues where it last left off.
Pause Rendering: This button is enabled when the Background Rendering
Manager is currently processing a render job. Click this button to pause all
rendering activity in the Background Rendering Manager.
Show Log Window: Click this button to show or hide the log window, listing
all status and error messages of the Background Rendering Manager.
Show Render Window: Click this button to show or hide the window that
shows the progress of the rendering.
280
November 2006
Design mode
Button Explanation
Render Job Now: When you have multiple render jobs in the queue waiting
to be processed, highlight any rendering job with the Queued status and press
this button to move the job to the top of the queue. The current rendering is
paused and moved down one position and the new render job starts
immediately.
Queue Job: This button is enabled only when you have selected a dequeued
job (it is stopped, but its rendering progress is retained). Highlight the
stopped job and then click this button to move it back into the queue. If
there is a job being processed, the newly queued job is placed below it.
Dequeue Job: Highlight a job with the Queued status and then press this
button to give the job the Stopped status. You can dequeue any job in the
queue, those that are waiting to be processed as well as the job that is
currently being rendered. When you dequeue a job, the Background
Rendering Manager retains its rendering progress and resumes the rendering
when you move the job back up to the top of the queue.
Move Job Up: This button enables you to move jobs up within their current
status level when you have multiple jobs that are either Stopped or Queued.
You cannot use this button to move a stopped job into the active queue.
However, you can click the bottom job in the Queued status area and use this
button to move it all the way to the top of the queue so that it starts being
processed (click Render Job Now as a shortcut). You can also click the bottom
job in the Stopped status area and move it up within this same area, if
desired.
Move Job Down: This button enables you to move jobs down within their
current status level when you have multiple jobs that are either Stopped or
Queued. You cannot use this button to move a queued job into the Stopped
status. However, you can click the top job in the Queued status area (the job
that is currently being processed) and use this button to move it all the way
to the bottom of the queue. You can also click the top job in the Stopped
status area and move it down within this same area, if desired.
Delete Job: Highlight any job in the Job pane—those with the Rendering,
Queued, Stopped, or Completed status—and press this button to delete the
job and all supporting files from the Background Rendering Manager. Note
that when you delete jobs, you cannot recover them and there will be no
record of them.
Save Rendering: Highlight a Completed job that you want to save, and then
click this button to export the rendering as a graphic file to the folder of your
choice. You are then prompted to choose the location for the file and the file
type (.bmp, .jpg, .tif, or .gif).
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
281
Design mode
Release 18.0
To pause and resume all jobs in the Background Rendering Manager
To free up some CPU capacity on your computer (for example, if you are going to run
another program), you can pause the Background Rendering Manager and the job that
is currently in progress. When you click Resume, the job at the top of the queue
continues rendering where it left off.
1
In the Background Rendering Manager window, click the Pause button.
2
Click Resume when you want to resume rendering the job at the top of the queue.
To move a render job to the top of the queue
When you move a Queued job to the top of the queue, the Background Rendering
Manager automatically starts to process it. The current job is moved down one step in
the queue to a paused status (any progress that had been made in the rendering is
saved with the job).
1
In the Background Rendering Manager window, highlight the Queued job that you
want to start rendering.
2
Press the Move Job Up button until the job is at the top of the queue.
Result: The job starts rendering.
Tip: If you have many jobs in the queue, click the Render Job Now button to move a
job from the bottom of the queue to the top and start rendering it immediately.
To remove a render job from the queue
When you remove a job from the queue, it will not automatically move up in the queue
as jobs are completed. Instead, to process jobs with this status, you have to highlight
them and click Queue to move them back into the active queue.
1
In the Background Rendering Manager window, highlight the Rendering or Queued
job that you want to remove from the queue.
2
Press the Dequeue button.
Result: The job is moved out of the queue and given the Stopped status.
To move a stopped render job back into the queue
When you dequeue a job, you cannot use the Move Job Up button to move it back into
the active queue; instead, you must use the Queue button to place the job back into the
queue. The job will be processed when it reaches the top of the queue.
1
In the Background Rendering Manager window, highlight the Stopped job that you
want to move back into the queue.
2
Press the Queue button.
Result: The job moves to the active queue.
To move render jobs up or down in the queue
When you have multiple jobs that are either Queued or Stopped, you can move jobs up
or down within their current status level. For example, you can use this feature to
arrange the order in which the Background Rendering Manager will process queued
jobs, or you can move a queued job to the top of the queue so that it is processed
immediately.
282
November 2006
Design mode
1
In the Background Rendering Manager window, highlight the Queued or Stopped
job that you want to move.
2
Press the Move Job Up or Move Job Down button repeatedly until the desired position
is reached in the queue.
To export rendered images from the Background Rendering Manager
To use the rendered images that you create with the Background Rendering Manager,
you must export them to a folder of your choice, in a graphic format like .bmp, .jpg, or
.gif.
1
In the Background Rendering Manager window, highlight the Completed job that
you want to export.
2
Click the Save Rendering button.
3
Browse to the location where you want to save the rendered image.
4
In the File name box, type the name of the file.
5
From the Save as type drop-down box, choose a graphic format (.bmp, .jpg, .tif or
.gif).
6
Click Save.
To delete render jobs from the Background Rendering Manager
You can delete any job—those with the Rendering, Queued, Stopped, or Completed
status—and all of its supporting files from the Background Rendering Manager. Note
that when you delete jobs, you cannot recover them and there will be no record of
them.
1
In the Background Rendering Manager window, highlight the job that you want to
delete.
2
Press the Delete button. A message box asks you to confirm your choice.
3
Click Yes.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
283
Design mode
284
Release 18.0
Chapter 9
Presentation mode
Presentation (Pres) mode contains all the necessary tools for creating
professional printouts of your show document, including reports, plots, and
images.
In this chapter
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Layout tabs
287
Reports
288
New Plots
294
Layouts
310
Images
333
Worksheets
334
Pipe tapes
335
285
Presentation mode
286
Release 18.0
November 2006
Presentation mode
Layout tabs
Introduction
Beneath the work area in each mode is a series of layout tabs. These tabs provide
various configurations of the views that you are working with. To change layouts, click
the tab that corresponds to the layout that you want to use. Presentation mode contains
the following layout tabs:
„
Reports - The work area displays reports formatted for printing.
„
New Plots - The work area displays plots
„
Layouts - The work area displays layouts formatted for printing.
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Images - The work area displays bitmap or jpeg images that are stored with the
show file.
Worksheet - The work area contains spreadsheets that the user can edit.
287
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
Reports
Introduction
The Reports layout tab opens a series of pre-formatted reports that are generated by
WYSIWYG, containing all data entered in CAD and Data modes. These reports are
available for you to use as is, or to modify to suit your needs. Unlike the spreadsheets in
Data mode, you cannot edit fixture data here. Reports are designed to be printed
documents. You can, however, modify their setup and layout.
Working with reports
To modify a report
1
From the Options menu, choose View Options.
Result: The View Options window is displayed.
Tip: You can use the View Options tool on the Standard toolbar.
2
Modify options as desired.
3
Click OK.
General tab
Options on the General tab affect the scene that is displayed in the report.
„
Follow User Scene: Select this check box to filter the report according to the current
scene. The current scene is displayed in the drop-down list on the Scene toolbar
and in the Scene Database dialog box (from the File menu, choose Scenes).
To filter your show information based on the scene selected, click to clear the
check box, and then select the desired scene from the Scene drop-down list. Only
fixtures on the active layers (or layers in the scene) are displayed in the report.
Tip: You can change the current scene at any time by using either the Scene
toolbar or the Scene Database dialog box. For more information on scenes, refer to
“Scenes” on page 165.
288
November 2006
Presentation mode
Report tab
Options on the Report tab affect the appearance of the report.
„
„
Group By: Select a data field for grouping the data. These groups appear as
separate tabs/pages at the bottom of a report. In the case of an Instrument
Schedule, fixtures are grouped by hanging position. Each position appears on a
separate page.
Columns: Displays the columns available for inclusion or exclusion in a report. You
can display the columns in any order by arranging the order in this list. The top of
the list represents the left-hand column on the page and the bottom of the list
represents the right-hand column. To move a column up or down in the list, click
its name, and then use the Up and Down buttons.
Note: There is a special column in the Columns list called Count. The Count column
displays the total of all fixtures that meet the unique requirements of all the filters
applied to all columns.
„
„
„
Filters: Contains settings for the column that you selected from the Columns list. You
can use filters to extract specific information from reports. For example, you can
create a report that displays all the fixtures that have notes. To do so, select the
Notes column and the Visible check box, and then select the filter Not Empty. You will
also have to make Position, Unit, and Channel visible so that you know which fixtures
have these notes.
Sums: After you select either the Count or Status column from the list, select one of
the following types of sums to be displayed on the report:
„ Report Total: Select if you want to include the total for the report.
„ Group Total: Select if you want to report totals for all groups.
„ Duplicate Lines: (Only available if you have selected the Status column.) Select if
you want to report the total of all duplicate lines.
Sort By: Contains the settings for how the report will be sorted. The keys sort
fixtures in alphabetical or numeric order. When fixtures have the same value in the
first sort key, the report is then sorted by the values of the second sort key, and so
on for the third sort key. For example, the standard Instrument Schedule sorts
fixtures by position as Key 1, and unit number as Key 2. When a column is selected
as a key, the visible option will be checked and greyed out. Columns that are sort
keys must be visible.
„
Detail Level: Specify how many rows each fixture spans. For example, if you select
Fixtures, a three-cell cyc light will take up one row. If you select Circuits, that same
fixture will take up three rows, one for each cell/circuit. To issue a report for truss,
select Truss in the Detail Level box.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
289
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
„
Word Wrap: Select if you want to see all the text on a line.
To create a new report
1
Click the Reports shortcut tab.
2
Right-click in the reports shortcut area, and then choose New Report.
3
Type the name of your new report.
4
Click OK.
Result: Your report shortcut is placed at the bottom of the list.
Tip: It is recommended that you clone an existing report and modify it rather than
creating a new report.
Redesigning headings
You can customize the fonts, styles, and layouts used in the headings and text of your
reports. These settings can be applied to the headings of all reports in your document
as desired.
To change the heading format
1
Right-click the report and choose Redesign headings.
Result: The Report headings editor dialog box is displayed, showing the headings,
variables, and a new menu and toolbar for formatting text.
2
From the Format menu, use the alignment, font, border, edit, and color controls to
customize the heading text.
3
Modify or add variables as required.
4
Save your changes and close the window.
Result: You are prompted to apply the headings to all the reports in the
document.
5
290
Click Yes to indicate that all reports will be modified. Click No to change only the
chosen report.
November 2006
Presentation mode
Using variables in reports
Variables can be used in reports and worksheets to ensure that the same type of
information is displayed in each report. These variables are found in the report headings
of each report and can be globally shared among all the reports in your document.
The variables you can use and the information they store are described in the following
table.
Variable
Definition
Source
%Title%
The name of the report.
The name of the report as defined in the
shortcut bar (for example, Instrument
Count).
%Venue%
The venue for the show.
The venue defined on the Show Info tab
in Show Options.
For more information on this tab, refer
to “Show information” on page 293.
%Designer%
The lighting designer for
the show.
The designer defined on the Show Info
tab in Show Options.
For more information on this tab, refer
to “Show information” on page 293.
%Show%
The name of the show.
The show defined on the Show Info tab in
Show Options.
For more information on this tab, refer
to “Show information” on page 293.
%Assistant%
The assistant lighting
designer for the show.
The assistant defined on the Show Info
tab in Show Options.
For more information on this tab, refer
to “Show information” on page 293.
%Headings%
The column headings
The columns defined on the Report tab in
that comprise the report. View Options.
For more information on choosing these
columns, refer to “Report tab” on page
289.
%Data%
The data that comprises
the report.
Information that is available in Data
mode.
%Scene%
The scene chosen for the The Scene defined on the General tab in
report.
View Options.
%Group%
The name of the group.
The Group By parameter chosen on the
Report tab in View Options. For more
information on this option, refer to
“Report tab” on page 289.
You should include this variable when
Group By has been enabled for a report
so that the group name is displayed on
the report pages.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
291
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
Variable
Definition
Source
%File%
The name of your
WYSIWYG file.
The name you chose when saving your
document using either the Save or Save
As command from the File menu. The
name of your WYSIWYG file is displayed
at the top left of the WYSIWYG window.
For more information on setting the
name of your file, refer to “File menu” on
page 79.
=NOW()
The current date and
time.
System settings in Windows.
Note: If you will be applying the report heading globally, it is important that you include
the Group variable in the heading. This ensures that the page numbers are not lost in
those reports in which Group By has been enabled. Those reports that are not “grouped
by” will be unaffected and will display a blank cell.
Saving heading files
Heading files are separate from the reports themselves and can be saved outside of the
show document in Excel format. This saved heading file can in turn be applied globally
to all reports. This is a great tool for using the same header across multiple documents.
To save a heading file
1
Redesign the headings of the selected report as described above.
2
Before closing the Report Headings Editor, from the File menu choose Save as.
3
In the File Name box, type a name for the Excel format heading file.
4
Click Save.
5
Close the Report Headings Editor.
Result: The heading file is saved in the WYSIWYG library folder unless otherwise
specified.
6
You are prompted to load the new heading file name. Click Yes.
7
You are prompted to apply the headings to all the reports in the document. Click
Yes to indicate that all reports will be modified. Click No to change only the chosen
report.
Note: Since these files are saved outside of the show document, they can be applied to
reports in any WYSIWYG show files.
To apply a heading file
1
Select the report for which you want to apply the heading file.
2
Right-click and choose Redesign headings.
Result: The Report Headings Editor opens.
3
From the File menu, choose Open.
Result: You are prompted to save changes.
4
Click No.
Result: The Load heading file dialog box is displayed.
5
292
Browse to find the heading file that you want to apply.
November 2006
Presentation mode
6
Click Open.
Result: The saved heading file is applied.
7
Save and close the Report Headings Editor.
8
You are prompted to load the new heading file name. Click Yes.
9
You are prompted to apply the headings to all the reports in the document. Click
Yes to apply the change to all reports. Click No to change only the chosen report.
Column widths
You can change the column widths in the report. A double-headed arrow appears when
you float the cursor between the column separations at the top of the report. Doubleclick the column headings to have the column resize to fit (auto-fit) the contents.
Show information
The edit fields in the show info window are venue, show, designer, and assistant. The
entries in these fields appear in the headings of all reports and in the WYSIWYG default
title block (for plots).
To input show info
1
From the Options menu, choose Show Options.
2
Click the Show Info tab.
3
Type all the pertinent information in the boxes.
4
Click OK.
Result: All reports are updated.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
293
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
New Plots
Introduction
New Plots views were introduced so that you could more effectively manipulate a
drawing developed in CAD mode to create a lighting plot or “schematic” for printing.
In the New Plots view you can:
„
manipulate the objects in a plot without affecting the objects in the original CAD
drawing/model.
„
notate your plot using objects such as circles, lines, and text labels.
„
rotate the position of vertical hang structures to better illustrate mounted fixtures.
„
move, rotate, or manipulate the layout of fixture attributes easily and quickly.
Working in the New Plots view
Working in a New Plots view is similar in some respects to working with a drawing in a
CAD wireframe view. You can use your keyboard and mouse to navigate around the plot
easily and quickly. A command line interface is available to help you when entering
coordinates.
Note: Changes made to a drawing in CAD mode are not automatically reflected in the
New Plots view. You must update plots manually to see the changes. For details, see
“Updating plots” on page 295.
Keyboard and mouse control
Navigating in a New Plots view is similar to navigating in CAD mode. The arrow keys are
available to help you move in the direction that is noted on the key. As well, scroll bars
along the side and bottom of the window will move you horizontally and vertically along
the window.
For a complete list of the navigation tools that are available, refer to “Keyboard and
mouse control” on page 68.
Command line
The ComEdit toolbar is available to help you enter coordinates when placing objects
such as lines in a New Plots view. For more information on command line, refer to
“Command line” on page 107.
Creating a new plot
Plots are 2D schematics of your CAD model for printout. You can generate as many
plots as you like. Once generated, the “view type” of the New Plot or schematic is set
and cannot be changed. There are five plot types available.
294
Plot Type
Description
Plan Plot
Generates the schematic from
above looking down.
November 2006
Presentation mode
Plot Type
Description
Left Section Plot
Generates the schematic looking
from the left side through the
venue.
Right Section Plot
Generates the schematic looking
from the right side through the
venue.
Front Elevation Plot
Generates the schematic looking
from the front side through the
venue.
Back Elevation Plot
Generates the schematic looking
from the back side through the
venue.
To create a new plot type
1
Click the New Plots shortcut tab.
2
Right-click in the New Plots shortcut area and choose the type of plot that you want
to create.
3
Type the name of the plot.
4
Click OK.
Result: The type of plot that you chose is created and a shortcut to your new plot
is added to the New Plots shortcut bar. For information on working with shortcuts,
refer to “Working with shortcuts” on page 56.
Note: The plot is created with a specific set of default properties, but you can
modify these settings as required. For more information on the settings, refer to
“Modifying the properties of a plot” below.
Updating plots
Changes made to a drawing in CAD mode are not automatically reflected in the New
Plots view. You must update plots manually.
To update a plot
1
Select the plot that you want to update.
2
From the Options menu, choose Update New Plot.
Note: If the New Plots view already reflects the current CAD drawing, the option is
disabled.
Modifying the properties of a plot
You can modify the border thickness, paper size, or scaling of a plot.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
295
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
To modify plot properties
1
Select the plot for which you want to modify the settings.
2
From the Options menu, choose View Options.
Tip: You can also use the View Options tool on the Standard toolbar.
Result: The View Options dialog box appears.
New Plot View Properties tab
Options on the New Plot View Properties tab affect the appearance of the plot.
„
Name: The name of the plot.
„
Grid On: Select this check box if you want gridlines to appear on the plot view.
Gridlines are for reference only; they assist with the layout of plot items on the
page. Gridlines do not appear in the printed output.
„
„
„
Point Size: The size at which points are printed.
Paper Size: Choose the desired paper size from the drop-down menu. If you do not
find the size you want, choose Custom, and then specify the width and height as
desired. The default values are 24.0” X 36.0” (imperial measurement) or A1
(metric measurement).
Landscape: Select this check box if you want the page to be set up in landscape
format.
„
Margins: The margins for the plot. The default values are 1/2” (imperial
measurement) or 1cm (metric measurement).
„
Border Thickness: The thickness of the plot’s border. The border is drawn at the
margins defined above. The default values are 1/16” (imperial measurement) or
1mm (metric measurement).
„
Scale: The scale at which the plot is drawn. If the scale you want to use for printing
is not displayed, select Custom. The default values are 1/4”=1’0” (imperial
measurement) or 1:50 (metric measurement).
„
„
On paper: The scale ratio that you want to use on a paper copy of the plot view.
Real World: The “real” measurement for the scale ratio that you specify in the On
paper box. For example, you may want to use a scaling of one inch in a paper copy
of your plot. This one-inch measurement translates to a “realistic” measurement
(for example, 3 feet).
„
296
Follow User Scene: Select this check box to use the scene that is displayed in the
drop-down list on the Scene toolbar. Click to clear the check box, and then select
November 2006
Presentation mode
the desired scene from the Scene drop-down list. For more information on scenes,
refer to “Scenes” on page 165.
„
„
Units: The units of measurement for the plot. The coordinates at the bottom of the
plot change according to the selection. This setting does not affect the printed
output.
Print in Black and White: Select this check box if you want the plot to be displayed
and printed in black and white.
Tile Printing tab
Options on the Tile Printing tab affect the printout of the plot.
„
Show page guides: Select this check box if you want the printable outlines to be
displayed on each sheet of paper that comprises the plot. The solid outline is the
chosen printer’s paper size and orientation.
„
„
Show page number: Select this check box if you want the page numbers of the plot to
be displayed in the center of each page. The page numbers are for reference only
and do not appear in the printed output.
Tile options: Click the appropriate option button to enable one of the following:
„ Top-Left Click to place the top-left corner of the plot in the top-left corner of the
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
first page, and then arrange the remaining pages accordingly.
Center Click to place the center of the plot at the center of a page, and then
arrange the remaining pages accordingly.
Split Center Click to place the center of the plot at the corner of four pages, and
then arrange the remaining pages accordingly.
297
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
Fixture Details tab
Options on the Fixture Details tab affect the fixture data that is displayed on the plot.
„
Use User Details: Click to clear this check box if you do not want the currently
selected fixture data displayed on the plot. The default fixture data is defined on
the Show Details tab in User Options. For more information on this option, refer to
“Show Details tab” on page 72.
Moving the page
You can move the page around to capture the parts of the schematic that you want
plotted or printed.
To move the page
1
Select the plot that you want to adjust.
2
Right-click and choose Move Page.
Result: A hand similar to the Pan tool is displayed.
3
Hold down the left mouse button and drag to move the page until the area of the
schematic that you want on the page is contained within.
4
When you are finished, right-click and select Finish Move Page.
Objects in New Plots
Objects that are contained in the drawing in CAD mode are transposed to the New Plot
representation. This representation is a 2D presentation of the drawing, and as such,
certain objects are displayed differently than they are in the 3D CAD mode drawing.
A specific number of objects are used to represent the objects in the CAD drawing.
These objects are listed in the following table.
298
Object in CAD mode
Resulting object in New Plots
Fixtures
Representative symbols
Accessories
Representative symbols
Riser
Riser
November 2006
Presentation mode
Object in CAD mode
Resulting object in New Plots
Text
Text
Arc
Arc
Ellipse
Ellipse
Circle
Circle
Notes:
„
„
Beams are not represented in the New Plots view.
Some objects may not be visible if they are on a layer that is not in the current
scene.
Relationship between objects in CAD mode and New Plots
Objects are transposed to a New Plots view from CAD mode and can be manipulated
independently of the original object in CAD. This means that in a New Plots view,
objects can be deleted, copied, moved, and have their properties modified without
affecting the original object in CAD mode. For example, moving a pipe does not cause
the same pipe to also move in CAD mode. You can easily create your lighting plot in a
New Plots view independently of the drawing or “model” in CAD mode.
In contrast, changes made to the original “model” in CAD mode are reflected in all New
Plots views. Objects that are deleted in CAD mode are also deleted from all New Plots
views. Similarly, objects added in CAD mode are also added to all New Plots views,
provided the layer they are on is visible. The same logic applies to objects that are
moved in CAD mode: moving an object causes the object to also move in all New Plots
views as long as the relationship between the object in CAD mode and New Plots is
intact.
To achieve a relationship between objects in CAD mode and objects in New Plots views,
various types of links are available. These links track the position and properties of the
original CAD object in New Plots, and are referred to as the positional and properties
links, respectively. For more information on these links and how they work, refer to
“Links” on page 299.
Relationship between objects in Data mode and New Plots
You cannot modify data, such as fixture attributes, directly in a New Plots view; instead,
you must edit this data in Data mode. Data that is modified in the spreadsheet view in
Data mode is also updated in CAD mode and in all New Plots views.
Links
There are three types of links in the New Plots view: positional, properties, and
attributes.
The position link tracks the movement of objects that are brought in from the original
CAD drawing. By default, this link is in place until one of the objects from the original
CAD drawing is moved relative to its origin.
The properties link tracks the changes to properties for objects that are brought in from
the original CAD drawing. These properties include the layer line color and line thickness
of an object. By default, this link is in place until you modify one or more of these
properties.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
299
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
The attribute link tracks the changes to the attribute layout of fixtures. By default, this
link is in place until you move, rotate, or otherwise manipulate the layout of a fixture
attribute. For more information on attribute layout, refer to “Attribute layout” on page
301.
When a link to an object is broken, all subsequent changes that are made to that object
in CAD or Data mode will not be reflected in a New Plots view. You must reestablish the
relationship or link to ensure that changes made in CAD or Data mode are reflected in a
New Plots view.
Reestablishing the link returns the object to its original state before the link was broken.
For example, reestablishing the link of a fixture that has been moved off a pipe moves
the fixture back to its original position on the pipe.
To reestablish links
1
Select the object for which you want to reestablish a link.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Restore Links.
Result: The Links dialog box is displayed.
Note: The Position Link check box is deselected. This means that an action occurred
that broke that link.
3
To reestablish the link, select the Position Link check box.
4
Click OK.
Result: The positional link is reestablished.
Vertical hang structures
In the New Plots view, non-horizontal hang structures, such as booms and ladders can
be rotated around their base to show all mounted fixtures. The rotation can be top,
bottom, left, or right.
To rotate the position of a vertical hang structure
1
Select the hang structures that you wish to rotate.
2
Right-click and choose Rotate Position.
Result: The Rotate Position dialog box is displayed.
300
November 2006
Presentation mode
3
Select the direction in which you want to rotate the hang structure.
4
In the Rotation Angle box, type the angle by which you want to rotate the hang
structure.
5
Click OK.
Result: The hang structure is rotated on the plot.
As an example, you may have three booms on your plot that you want to rotate.
After you rotate the hang structures 90 degrees to the right, the following is
displayed.
Attribute layout
You can easily modify the layout of fixture attributes in a New Plots view by simply
moving, rotating, or otherwise manipulating the appearance of the attribute. In a New
Plots view, you can only manipulate the layout; you cannot modify the data contained
within the attribute. To modify the data, you will need to go to CAD or Data mode and
make the modifications.
Fixture attribute values that are changed in CAD or Data mode are reflected in all New
Plots views.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
301
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
The attributes that are displayed in a New Plots view are determined by the options you
set on the Fixture Details tab. For more information, refer to “Fixture Details tab” on page
298.
To manipulate the attribute layout for an individual symbol
1
Select the attribute whose layout you want to manipulate.
2
Drag the attribute to the desired location on the page, and then release the mouse
button.
Note: This action breaks the attribute link.
As an example, you may wish to move the channel attribute (the red “2”) shown
on the plot below.
After you select and drag the attribute to the desired location, the following is
displayed.
302
November 2006
Presentation mode
Drawing objects
You can add objects to the plot for notation. Objects that you can draw include lines,
arcs, circles, and text labels. You can also insert symbols from the Library Browser.
Drawing circles
Drawing circles in a New Plots view is similar to drawing circles in CAD mode. You can
access the Circle tool from the Draw menu or from the New Plot Options toolbar
. For
more information on drawing circles, refer to “Drawing circles” on page 132.
Note: When you add objects such as circles to your plot, they are not added to your
drawing in CAD mode.
Drawing arcs
Drawing arcs in a New Plots view is similar to drawing arcs in CAD mode. You can access
the Arc tool from the Draw menu or from the New Plot Options toolbar
. For more
information, refer to “Drawing arcs” on page 132.
After you have drawn an arc, you can choose to add arrows to one or both ends of the
arc. The default is none. For more information on adding arrows, refer to page 309.
Drawing lines
Drawing lines in a New Plots view is similar to drawing lines in CAD mode. For more
information, refer to “Drawing lines” on page 131.
You can also use the appropriate line tool from the Draw menu or the New Plot Options
toolbar. The available line tools are as follows:
„
Solid
„
Dot
„
Center
„
Dash
You can create a double line from a single line by modifying the properties of a line. For
more information on creating double lines, refer to page 308.
After you have drawn a line, you can choose to add arrows to one or both ends of the
line. The default is none. For more information on adding arrows, refer to page 309.
Note: When you add objects such as lines to your plot, they are not added to your
drawing in CAD mode.
Drawing text
Drawing text in a New Plots view is similar to drawing text in CAD mode. You can access
the Text tool from the Draw menu or on the New Plot Options toolbar
. For more
information, refer to “Drawing text labels” on page 133.
Notes:
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
When you add an object such as text to your plot, it is not added to your drawing
in CAD mode.
True type fonts are not supported in New Plots.
303
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
Inserting symbols
You can insert symbols that are not associated with any object in CAD mode. This allows
you to represent the fixtures when you draw a key or want to show the position of a
boom in a plan view, for example. You can access the Symbol tool from the Draw menu
or from the New Plot Options toolbar
.
To learn how to insert symbols, see “To insert objects from the library” on page 123. In
the New Plots view, the Library Browser contains only the Symbol library.
Editing objects
A number of tools are available in the New Plots view to help you manipulate objects.
Note: Orthographic mode is available in New Plots from the Edit menu and also from
the New Plots Options toolbar. When ortho mode is active, you can manipulate objects
either vertically or horizontally. For more information on this mode, refer to “Ortho” on
page 109.
Selecting objects
Objects are transposed from CAD mode and can, therefore, be selected independently
of that mode (for example, moving a pipe in New Plots will not cause it to also move in
CAD mode).
Fixture symbols are grouped with the hang structure to which they are mounted.
Selecting and moving the hang structure will also move the mounted fixture symbols.
Similarly, accessories are grouped with the fixture symbols to which they are attached
and will also move with the fixture symbols. You can also select an individual fixture
symbol separately from the hang structure if you want to move or modify it
independently.
The methods for selecting an object are similar to those for selecting an object in CAD
mode. For more information on these methods, refer to “Selecting” on page 145.
Copy
When you copy and paste an object in a New Plots view, a second representation of that
same object is created. If you subsequently update the data for this object in either
CAD or Data mode (for example, gel color or channel number), all representations of
that object in all New Plots views are updated.
Copied objects are not added to the drawing in CAD mode nor to the spreadsheet in
Data mode.
You can copy and paste objects between New Plots views.
To copy an object
1
Select the object to be copied.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Copy.
3
From the Edit menu, choose Paste.
4
Click in the plot where you want to place the object.
Cut
When you cut an object in a New Plots view it is not removed from CAD mode. However,
cutting an object in CAD mode removes it from all New Plots views.
304
November 2006
Presentation mode
Cutting an object adds it to the clipboard. You can subsequently paste the object into a
New Plots view.
You can cut and paste objects between New Plots views.
To cut an object
1
Select the object to be cut.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Cut.
3
From the Edit menu, choose Paste.
4
Click in the plot where you want to place the object.
Delete
Deleting an object in a New Plots view does not delete the original object in CAD mode.
However, deleting an object in CAD mode does delete the representation of that object
in all New Plots views.
To delete an object
1
Select the object to be deleted.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Delete.
Result: The object is removed from all New Plots views.
Note: If you accidentally deleted an object, you can recover it by choosing Undo
Delete from the Edit menu.
Move
The Move command in the New Plots view supports both absolute and relative moves in
a manner similar to CAD mode. For more information on this command, refer to
“Moving” on page 146.
When you move a pipe, you also move all its attached fixtures and accessories. You also
break the positional link between the pipe in CAD mode and the pipe in the New Plots
view. All fixtures and accessories that are attached to that pipe still maintain their link
to the original objects in CAD mode, even though they have also moved.
When you move a fixture off of a hang structure, you fix its location in relation to the
hang structure. For example, if you move a fixture off a pipe, and then move the pipe
10 feet, the fixture also moves with the pipe. This action breaks the positional link of
the fixture to the hang structure.
Note: You can “nudge” objects up, down, left, or right a certain distance by using
specific key combinations. Use the ALT+arrow keys to “nudge” an object a specific
distance; use the ALT+SHIFT+arrow keys to “nudge” an object a tenth of that distance.
Rotate
The Rotate command in a New Plots view works in a similar manner as it does in CAD
mode. For more information on this command, refer to “Rotating” on page 147.
Note: Rotating an object breaks its positional link.
Fillet
The Fillet command in a New Plots view works in a similar manner as it does in CAD
mode. For more information on this command, refer to “Fillet” on page 173.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
305
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
Object properties
In a New Plots view, object properties are inherited from the original object in CAD
mode but can be manipulated independently of that mode. For example, manipulating
the properties of an object that is brought into a New Plots view does not affect the
object’s properties in CAD mode. It does however, break the properties link for the
modified object.
Objects can also be drawn in a New Plots view. These objects inherit the properties of
the layer on which they are drawn. You can modify these properties as required. Since
these objects are not added to the drawing in any other mode, modifying the properties
in a New Plots view has no external affect.
Objects that are brought into New Plots from CAD mode
There are general properties for each object that is brought into a New Plots view from
CAD mode. You can modify these general properties as required.
General tab
Options on the General tab affect the selected object’s color and line thickness
properties.
„
Layer: A list of the layers in your document is displayed. Click on a list item to
change the layer on which the object will be drawn.
„
Use Layer Color: Select this check box to set the object’s color for wireframe views to
be the same as the properties of the layer on which the object resides. For more
information, refer to “Layer properties” on page 164.
Click to clear the check box, and then use the color button to set a specific color for
the object.
„
Use Layer Line Thickness: Select this check box to set the object’s line thickness to be
the same as the properties of the layer on which the object resides. For more
information, refer to “Layer properties” on page 164.
Click to clear the check box, and then type a thickness in the box below to set a
specific line thickness for the object. The line weight is used to determine how
thick the pen should be when printing a copy of the document. The applied line
thickness is only visible in Print Preview mode and when printed.
306
November 2006
Presentation mode
Objects that are drawn in New Plots
Objects such as lines, arcs, symbols, circles, and text that are drawn in a New Plots
view have general properties that are inherited from the layer on which they are drawn.
Along with the general properties, a tab appears in the properties dialog box for each
type of object that is selected. When you select multiple objects of different types, tabs
appear for each type of object selected.
For more information, refer to “Drawing objects” on page 126.
New Plot Object tab
Options on the New Plot Object tab affect the selected object’s color and line thickness
properties.
For a detailed description of the options available on this dialog box, refer to the
“General tab” on page 306.
Object-specific properties
Similar to objects in CAD mode, objects that are drawn in a New Plots view have
properties that are specific to that object.
„
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Text label - For a description of text label properties, refer to the “Text label tab”
on page 158.
Symbol - For a description of symbol properties, refer to “Symbol properties” on
page 209.
Line - Options on the Line tab affect how the line is drawn.
307
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
„
„
„
Line Pattern: Choose a pattern for the selected line. Refer to “Drawing lines” on
page 131 for an illustration of each type.
Scale: Type a value in this box to change the length and spacing of dots and
dashes for the selected line. This value is applicable to center, dashed, or dotted
lines only.
Arrows: Select where you would like to add arrows on the line. You can specify a
width and length for the arrows by entering values in the H and V boxes,
respectively.
„
Double Line: Select this check box to change the selected line to a double line.
Indicate how far apart you want the double lines to be by entering a value in the
Distance box.
Circle - The properties are the same as when the object was originally drawn. For more
information, refer to “Drawing circles” on page 132.
Arc - The radius and angle properties are the same as when the object was originally
drawn. The only property that is different is the addition of arrows to either side of the
selected arc.
308
November 2006
Presentation mode
„
Arrows: Select where on the arc you would like to add arrows. You can specify a
width and length for the arrows by entering values in the H and V boxes,
respectively.
Inserting New Plots into layouts
Once you create your New Plot, you can insert it into the Layouts view. For example,
you might want to insert it into a Layouts view so that you can add a legend, key, or
report to your plot.
For more information on inserting a New Plot, see “To insert New Plot items onto the
layout” on page 316.
Printing New Plots
If you have a large plot you can “tile print” the plot across multiple smaller sheets of
paper. To set up how you want the plot arranged on the sheets of paper, refer to the
“Tile Printing tab” on page 297.
You can print your complete plot or specific pages of your plot based on the settings
that you choose.
Note: Objects outside the border are not printed, even if they are within the margins of
the page. To adjust the margins, refer to “Modifying the properties of a plot” on page
295.
To print your plot
1
From the File menu, choose Print.
Result: The Print dialog box is displayed.
2
From the Name drop-down list, choose the printer (or plotter) that you want to use.
WYSIWYG records the name that you choose for future reference and displays it as
the default printer for plots.
3
To print all pages of a plot, select All.
4
To print select pages of a plot, select Pages, and then enter the range in the from
and to boxes.
5
To print multiple copies of the pages, select the value from the Number of copies list
box.
6
Click OK.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
309
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
Layouts
Introduction
The Layouts tab opens the layout design and storage area. Layouts are created by
arranging various CAD, report, image, and other items on a defined paper size.
There are two default layouts included in the layouts shortcuts. The Micro Layouts,
which is designed to print on an 8.5” x 11” piece of paper, and the Big Layouts, which is
designed to be plotted on a 36” x 48” sheet of paper. You can use either of these layouts
as is, modify them to suit your needs, or create new layouts from scratch.
Creating a new layout
To create a new layout
1
Click the Layouts shortcut tab.
2
Right-click in the Layouts shortcut area, and then choose New Layout.
3
Type the name of the new layout.
4
Click OK.
Result: An empty layout is created. A shortcut to your new layout is added to the
Layouts shortcut bar.
Note: By default, empty layouts are set up to use 8.5” x 11” sheets of paper.
310
November 2006
Presentation mode
Working with layouts
To modify layout settings
1
Select the layout for which you want to modify the settings.
2
From the Options menu, choose View Options.
Tip: You can also use the View Options tool on the Standard toolbar.
Result: The View Options dialog box is displayed.
Presentation tab
Options on the Presentation tab affect the appearance and printout of the layout.
„
Name: The name of the layout.
„
Background Color: Sets the background color of the layout view. This does not affect
your printed copy.
„
Grid On: Select this check box if you want gridlines to appear on the layout.
Gridlines are for reference only; they assist with the design of items on the page.
Gridlines do not appear in the printed output.
„
„
Color: Sets the color of the gridlines.
Show placeholders only: Select this check box to display only the placeholders for the
various items in the layout. If unchecked, both the placeholders and contents of
the items in the layout are displayed. This is to facilitate the layout setup and does
not affect the printout.
„
Snap: Select this check box to snap the items in the layout to the gridlines.
„
Interval: Specify the interval between the points on the grid.
„
„
„
Units: The units of measurement for the layout. The coordinates at the bottom of
the layout change according to the selection. This does not affect the printed
output.
Paper Size: Choose the desired paper size from the drop-down menu. If you do not
find the size you want, choose Custom, and then specify the width and height as
desired.
Landscape: Select this check box if you want the page to be set up in landscape
format.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
311
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
„
Show page guides: Select this check box if you want the printable outline to be
displayed on each sheet of paper that comprises the layout. The solid outline is the
chosen printer’s paper size and orientation.
„
Show page number: Select this check box if you want the page numbers of the layout
to be displayed in the center of each page. The page numbers are for reference
only and do not appear in the printed output.
„
Tile options: Select one of the following option buttons:
„ Top-Left Places the top-left corner of the layout in the top-left corner of the first
page, and then arranges the remaining pages accordingly.
„
„
Center Places the center of the layout at the center of a page, and then arranges
the remaining pages accordingly.
Split Center Places the center of the layout at the corner of four pages, and then
arranges the remaining pages accordingly.
Arranging items on layouts
Objects can be inserted from the following categories:
„
basic shapes (lines, rectangles, ellipses, polygons, and text)
„
images (bitmap and jpeg)
„
CAD items
„
data items
„
report items
„
worksheet items (includes the default Title Block)
„
legend items
„
key items
„
new plot items
To insert a line onto the layout
1
From the Insert menu, choose Line.
Tip: You can also use the Line tool from the Layout Pres Insert toolbar.
2
Click on the page where you want to start drawing the line and, holding the mouse
button down, drag it to the end point of the line. Release the mouse button when
you have the desired shape.
3
Click anywhere in the drawing to finish placing the line.
Result: The line is placed on the layout.
To insert a rectangle onto the layout
1
From the Insert menu, choose Rectangle.
Tip: You can also use the Rectangle tool from the Layout Pres Insert toolbar.
2
Click on the page at the starting point of the rectangle and, holding the mouse
button down, drag out the shape of the rectangle. Release the mouse button when
you have the desired shape.
3
Click anywhere in the drawing to finish placing the rectangle.
Result: The rectangle is placed on the layout.
312
November 2006
Presentation mode
To insert a rounded rectangle onto the layout
1
From the Insert menu, choose Round Rectangle.
Tip: You can also use the Round Rectangle tool from the Layout Pres Insert toolbar.
2
Click on the page at the starting point of the rectangle and, holding the mouse
button down, drag out the shape of the rectangle. Release the mouse button when
you have the desired shape.
3
Click anywhere in the drawing to finish placing the rectangle.
Result: The round rectangle is placed on the layout.
Note: You can only see the rounded corners of the rectangle if you zoom in on the
drawing.
To insert an ellipse onto the layout
1
From the Insert menu, choose Ellipse.
Tip: You can also use the Ellipse tool from the Layout Pres Insert toolbar.
2
Click on the page at the starting point of the ellipse and, holding the mouse button
down, drag out the shape of the ellipse. Release the mouse button when you have
the desired shape.
3
Click anywhere in the drawing to finish placing the ellipse.
Result: The ellipse is placed on the layout.
To insert a polygon onto the layout
1
From the Insert menu, choose Polygon.
Tip: You can also use the Polygon tool from the Layout Pres Insert toolbar.
2
Click on the page at the starting point of the polygon and, holding the mouse
button down, drag out the shape of the polygon. Release the mouse button when
you have the desired shape.
3
Click anywhere in the drawing to finish placing the polygon.
Result: The polygon is placed on the layout.
To insert text onto the layout
1
From the Insert menu, choose Text.
Tip: You can also use the Text tool from the Layout Pres Insert toolbar.
2
Click on the page at the starting point of the text box and, holding the mouse
button down, drag out the shape of the box. Release the mouse button when you
have the desired shape.
3
Click anywhere in the drawing to finish placing the box.
Result: The text box is placed on the layout.
4
To type text in the new box, double-click the box, and then delete the default text.
5
Type your custom text.
6
Click anywhere in the drawing to finish adding the text.
To insert image items onto the layout
1
From the Insert menu, choose Image.
Tip: You can also use the Image tool from the Layout Pres Insert toolbar.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
313
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
2
Click and drag a window (placeholder) on the page where you want the item to
appear.
Result: The Select Image View to be referenced dialog box appears.
3
Select the image that you want to add to the layout, and then click Select.
Result: The image appears within the placeholder as drawn.
To insert CAD items onto the layout
1
From the Insert menu, choose CAD.
Tip: You can also use the CAD item tool from the Layout Pres Insert toolbar.
2
Click and drag a window (placeholder) on the “page” where you want the item to
appear.
Result: The CAD item, which is referenced from CAD mode, appears within the
placeholder as drawn. By default, CAD items appear in plan view and at a scale of
1/16”=1’.
To insert data items onto the layout
1
From the Insert menu, choose Data.
Tip: You can also use the Data tool from the Layout Pres Insert toolbar.
2
Click and drag a window (placeholder) on the “page” where you want the item to
appear.
Result: The Select Data View to be referenced dialog box appears.
3
Select the data item that you want to add to the layout, and then click OK.
Result: The selected data sheet (referenced from Data mode) appears within the
placeholder as drawn.
To insert report items onto the layout
1
From the Insert menu, choose Report.
Tip: You can also use the Report tool from the Layout Pres Insert toolbar.
314
November 2006
Presentation mode
2
Click and drag a window (placeholder) on the “page” where you want the item to
appear.
Result: The Select Report to be referenced dialog box appears.
3
Select the report item that you want to add to the layout, and then click OK.
Result: The selected report (referenced from Pres mode) appears within the
placeholder as drawn.
Note: If the Group By option has been set for a report, the report cannot be added
to a layout. Setting the Group By option creates page breaks within the report and
layouts do not support reports with page breaks. For more information on this
option, refer to “Report tab” on page 289.
To insert worksheet items onto the layout
1
From the Insert menu, choose Worksheet.
Tip: You can also use the Worksheet tool from the Layout Pres Insert toolbar.
2
Click and drag a window (placeholder) on the “page” where you want the item to
appear.
Result: The Select Spreadsheet to be referenced dialog box appears.
3
Select the worksheet that you want to add to the layout, and then click OK.
Result: The selected worksheet (referenced from Pres mode) appears within the
placeholder as drawn.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
315
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
To insert New Plot items onto the layout
1
From the Insert menu, choose New Plot.
2
Click and drag a window (placeholder) on the “page” where you want the item to
appear.
Result: The Select New Plot to be referenced dialog box appears.
3
Select the New Plot item that you want to add to the layout, and then click OK.
Result: The selected New Plot item (referenced from Pres mode) appears within
the placeholder as drawn. To adjust the contents that are displayed within the
placeholder, refer to “Adjusting the contents” on page 320 for further details.
Content and Item properties
As with all objects in WYSIWYG, the objects that you have placed on your page have
unique properties. There are two types of properties:
„
Content Properties
„
Item Properties
Content Properties
Content Properties affect the content of the presentation item. When you open these
properties, you open a similar or identical dialog box to the View Options dialog box that
appears when you are working on the original item in CAD, Data, or Pres mode. In this
dialog, you can modify the information to be displayed and control how it is displayed.
To modify content properties
1
Select the presentation item that you want to modify.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Content Properties.
Tip: You can also click the Content Properties tool on the Edit toolbar.
Result: The View Options dialog box is displayed.
Note: Content properties for CAD items are discussed in “CAD items” on page 317.
Item Properties
Item Properties affect the placeholders and the scaling of the contents. Options here
include the outline’s weight and color, and various printing options for the contents,
such as scale.
316
November 2006
Presentation mode
To modify item properties
1
Select the presentation item you want to modify.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Item Properties.
Tip: You can also click the Item Properties tool on the Edit toolbar.
Result: The Properties dialog box is displayed.
Note: The first page of the properties dialog is identical regardless of the type of
presentation item. Options here affect the outline and fill color of the placeholder.
CAD items
You can modify or edit CAD items to meet printing requirements. Their content
properties are detailed below.
To modify content properties of CAD items
1
Select the CAD item, right-click, and then choose Content Properties or click the
appropriate tool on the Layout Edit toolbar.
Result: The View Options dialog box is displayed.
2
Modify options as desired.
3
When finished, click OK.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
317
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
General tab
Options on the General tab affect the scene that is displayed in the CAD item. Only
fixtures and objects on the active layers are displayed in the layout.
„
Follow User Scene: Select this check box to use the scene that is displayed in the
drop-down list on the Scene toolbar. Click to clear the check box, and then select
the desired scene from the Scene drop-down list. For more information on scenes,
refer to “Scenes” on page 165.
CAD Rotation tab
Options on the CAD Rotation tab affect the angle at which the CAD item is printed.
„
Angle: Type an angle value in degrees if you want the drawing in the CAD item to be
printed on an angle. This feature is helpful for printing booms.
CAD Printing tab
Options on the CAD Printing tab affect the scale for the drawing.
„
„
Fit: If you select this option, the entire CAD drawing is scaled to fit inside the
placeholder.
Fixed: If you select this option, the CAD item is printed at the specified scale. To
determine which portion of the CAD item is displayed inside the placeholder,
choose Open Contents. Inside this view, you can move around a white rectangle
318
November 2006
Presentation mode
that represents the placeholder. See “Adjusting the contents” on page 320 for
details on the functionality available with Open Contents.
„
Variable: If you select this option, when you “open contents” you will be able to
change the size of the white rectangle without affecting the original placeholder.
The portion of the drawing contained within the white rectangle is scaled to fit in
the placeholder. See “Adjusting the contents” on page 320 for details on the
functionality available with Open Contents.
„
„
On paper: The scale ratio that you want to use on a paper copy of the layout.
Real World: The “real” measurement for the scale ratio that you specify in the On
paper box. For example, you may want to use a scaling of one inch in a paper copy
of your layout. This one-inch measurement translates to a “realistic” measurement
(for example, 3 feet).
„
„
Point Size: The size at which points are printed.
Hide Zero Intensity Fixture: Select this check box to hide any fixtures with an Intensity
set to zero so they do not print.
View type tab
Options on the View type tab affect the view type of the CAD item.
„
„
View Type: The view types available are those discussed in “Plot types” on page
108.
WorkPlane: The workplanes available are those discussed in “Plot types” on page
108.
„
Scrollbars: Select this check box to display the scrollbars on the bottom and left
side edges of the layout. Click to clear this check box to turn the scrollbars off.
Show Details tab
Options on the Show Details tab affect the amount of fixture information that is shown in
the CAD item.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
319
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
„
Fixture data shown on plot: Select the attributes that you want displayed around the
fixture symbols in the CAD item. To modify how the attributes are laid out, refer to
Fixture Notation and Information Layout in “Fixture notation” on page 205.
„
„
„
Show Text Labels: Select this check box to display text labels.
Tooltips: Displays tooltips on the CAD item. Tooltips are the pop-up messages that
display specific information about a fixture when you hover over it. Choose the
information that you want to display in a tooltip by selecting the appropriate check
boxes in the Fixture tooltips group box. Tooltips are often helpful when trying to
locate a specific fixture in a plot.
Draw Symbols: Select this check box to draw fixtures as symbols instead of 3D
objects. For more information on symbols, refer to “Symbols” on page 205.
„
„
Show truss cross members: Deselect this check box to hide truss cross members in
the CAD item to reduce the clutter or increase the speed of the display. Select this
check box to see the cross members.
Point size: Set the default size for all points. You can view a sample of the chosen size
in the box to the right.
Adjusting the contents
If you chose fixed or variable scaling on the CAD Printing tab or if you inserted a New
Plots item, you can further set up how the item will appear within the placeholder by
modifying the open contents.
320
November 2006
Presentation mode
To adjust the contents
1
With the item selected, from the Edit menu, choose Open Contents.
Tip: You can also click the Open Contents tool on the Layout Pres Edit toolbar.
Result: A new window opens, displaying your drawing and the item placeholder.
2
Adjust the positioning of the placeholder as desired.
3
Close the window.
New Plot items
New Plot items are inserted into your layout using the options specified when you
created the item. You might want to modify these options if you wish to display or print
the New Plot item in black and white, for example.
To modify content properties of New Plot items
1
Select the New Plot item on the layout.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Content Properties.
Tip: You can also click the Content Properties tool on the Layout Pres Edit toolbar.
Result: The View Options dialog box is displayed.
For an explanation of the options that are available, refer to “Modifying the
properties of a plot” on page 295.
Note: Any options that you modify here are also updated in the New Plots view
that you inserted.
Image items
Special considerations should be given to printing images on layouts. To maintain the
integrity of the image, WYSIWYG can maintain the aspect ratio of the image so as not
to distort it.
To maintain aspect ratio
1
Select the image item on the layout.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Item Properties.
Tip: You can also click the Item Properties tool on the Layout Pres Edit toolbar.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
321
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
3
Click the Image tab.
4
Select the Keep Aspect Ratio check box.
Result: When this box is checked, the height versus width relationship of the
original image is maintained regardless of how you resize the placeholder.
Worksheet, Report, and Spreadsheet items
Worksheet, Report, and Spreadsheet items are inserted into your layout at a set scale
(100%) regardless of the paper size. For readability purposes, you can readjust this
value.
To adjust the scale of Worksheet, Report, and Spreadsheet items
1
Select the worksheet, report, or spreadsheet item on the layout.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Item Properties.
Tip: You can also click the Item Properties tool on the Layout Pres Edit toolbar.
3
Click the Worksheet, Report, or Spreadsheet tab as appropriate.
4
In the Scale box, type a percentage value to increase or decrease the size of the
contents.
Legends
You may want to add a legend to your layout to provide a definition of the symbols used
in the layout. To add a legend to a layout, you must first use the Legend Wizard to
create the legend. The legend that you create can consist of the symbol name, wattage,
count, and any other special notes. You can create multiple legends per layout.
To create legend items
1
Right-click in the Wizards shortcut bar, and then select New Legend.
Result: The Enter new Legend name dialog box is displayed.
322
November 2006
Presentation mode
2
Type a name for the legend, and then click OK.
Result: The legend shortcut is stored in the shortcut bar and the Legend Wizard
opens.
Step 1 - Legend Layout
Options in Step 1 affect the layout of your legend.
a.
Title: Select the Display Title check box if you want to display the name of the
legend. Type a title in the Title box if you want a title other than the default
name to be displayed.
b.
Columns: Select the Display column headings check box if you want columns to be
displayed in the legend. Choose the columns that you want displayed by
selecting the appropriate columns from the list. The Symbol and Name columns
are displayed by default. Order the display of columns by clicking the Up and
Down buttons.
Step 2 - Legend Symbols Editor
Each symbol type that exists in your CAD drawing is displayed for possible
inclusion in the legend. The counts of each symbol type are updated automatically
as fixtures with the same symbol type are added or deleted from the CAD drawing.
Options in Step 2 affect the symbol information that is displayed in the legend.
a.
Show this symbol in legend: By default all symbols are displayed in the legend.
Click to deselect this check box if you do not want the highlighted symbol in
the table to be displayed in the legend.
Order the display of symbols by clicking the Move Up and Move Down buttons.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
323
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
b.
Rotate symbol: Select this check box if you want the symbol to be rotated in the
legend. The symbol will be rotated 90 degrees.
c.
Edit Symbol: Click if you want to make modifications to the symbol information
that is displayed (name, wattage, count, or notes). Follow the steps in “Editing
Symbols” to perform the modifications.
Editing symbols
When you click Edit Symbol, the following dialog box appears:
a.
Use custom name: By default, the name displayed in the Symbol Name box is
used, unless otherwise modified. To enter an alternative name, select the Use
custom name check box, and then type the name.
3
b.
Wattage: The wattage in volts for the lamp.
c.
Use custom count: By default, the value displayed in the Count box is used,
unless otherwise modified. This value includes only hung fixtures in your show
file. To enter an alternate count, select the Use custom count check box, and
then type the value.
d.
Notes: Type any pertinent notes for the symbol.
When you are finished editing the symbol information, click OK.
Result: The Legend Symbols Editor dialog box is redisplayed.
4
Finish entering all relevant information, and then click Finish.
Result: The Wizard shortcut is stored in the shortcut bar with the name you
specified in the Title box.
Editing a legend
To make changes to the information that is displayed in the legend, open the Legend
Wizard by double-clicking on the legend shortcut, and then make any necessary
modifications.
Once a legend has been defined, it does not change until you make modifications to its
settings. If any new fixtures with different symbol types are added to the file since you
last made changes, these additions will be available in Step 2 of the Wizard, but will
remain deselected until you specify whether they should be displayed in the legend. The
counts of symbol types that were already in the legend are updated (unless you opted
to use a custom count).
To rename, delete, or clone the shortcut, follow the steps defined in “Working with
shortcuts” on page 56.
324
November 2006
Presentation mode
Inserting a legend onto the layout
Once the legend has been created using the Legend Wizard, you can place it onto the
layout.
To insert a legend onto a layout
1
From the Insert menu, choose Legend.
Tip: You can also click the Legend tool in the Layout Pres Insert toolbar.
2
Click and drag a window (placeholder) on the page where you want the item to
appear.
Result: The Select Legend to be referenced dialog box is displayed.
3
Select the legend that you want to add to the page, and then click OK.
Result: The legend is added to the page at the position where you inserted the
placeholder.
Modifying the properties of a legend
To modify the properties of a legend
1
On the layout, select the legend that you want to modify.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Item Properties.
Tip: You can also click the Item Properties tool on the Layout Pres Edit toolbar.
Result: The Properties dialog box is displayed.
The General tab is similar for all items. For more information on this tab, see “To
modify item properties” on page 317.
Legend tab
Options on the Legend tab affect the scaling and content of the placeholder.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
325
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
„
Legend: Select the legend that you want to be displayed on the layout. A list of all
the legends you have created is displayed in the drop-down list.
„
„
„
Print Options: The scale ratio in inches and feet at which the legend should be
printed. If the scale that you want to use for printing is not displayed, select
Custom.
On paper: The scale ratio that you want to use on a paper copy of the layout.
Real World: The “real” measurement for the scale ratio that you specify in the On
paper box. For example, you might want to use a scaling of one inch in a paper
copy of your layout. However, this one-inch measurement translates to a more
“realistic” measurement (for example, 3 feet).
Keys
You may want to add a key to your layout to provide a definition for the fixture notation
used in the layout. To add a key to a layout, you must first use the Key Wizard to create
the key. The key you create consists of the symbol of one given fixture and identifiers
for the various attributes notated around the symbol. You can create multiple keys per
layout.
To create key items
1
Right-click in the Wizards shortcut bar, and then select New Key.
Result: The Enter new Key name dialog box is displayed.
2
Type a name for the key, and then click OK.
Result: The key shortcut is stored in the shortcut bar and the Key Wizard opens.
326
November 2006
Presentation mode
Step 1 - Key Symbol Selection
Options in Step 1 allow you to choose the symbol that will represent the fixture or
accessory in the key.
„
„
„
List of symbols: Select the symbols you want to use. You can choose up to one
fixture symbol and one accessories symbol. The symbols available in this list are
the default WYSIWYG symbols for each fixture or accessory type. When you
selecting a symbol, it appears in the preview window to the right.
Title: Select the Display Title check box if you want the name of the symbol to be
displayed in the key. Type a title in the Title box if you want a title other than the
default name to be displayed.
Change Symbol: Enables you to choose a different symbol from the more extensive
symbols library which includes the USITT standards, among others. Follow the
steps in “Changing Symbols” to perform the modifications.
„
Delete Symbol: Click this button to remove the selected symbol from the preview
window.
Changing symbols
From the list of items in the window to the right of the preview window, select the
symbol. To change the symbol, click the Change Symbol button. The following dialog
box appears:
From the list on the left side, choose the new symbol. When you are finished
making your choice, click Select.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
327
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
Step 2 - Symbol Layout
For each attribute there are two entries in the list box. One is for the attribute
itself; the other is to label the attribute. The label is distinguishable by the qualifier
“Key” (for example, the attribute Focus and the label Key - Focus). An extension line
is drawn between the label and the attribute. For each attribute and its label you
must decide whether you want to display it in the key. If yes, you can further
specify how it will be displayed using the various formatting options (including text
size and color, shape size and color, and justification).
You can also edit all the text, choose to give examples of attribute values, and
provide custom definitions for the labels.
Options in Step 2 allow you to choose the attributes and notation to be displayed
around the chosen symbols.
Note: To make the controls active, you may have to click to clear the Use Defaults
check box.
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
328
Visible: Select this check box if you want the attribute or label to be displayed
around the symbol in your key.
Use Body Color: Select this check box if you want the attribute or label to use the
same font color as the symbol. To set a specific color for the attribute or label,
leave the box unchecked and click the color box to choose a custom color.
Line weight: Adjust this value to increase or decrease the density of the label or
attribute font.
Text: Type the text that you want displayed for the attribute or label.
Italics: Select this check box to italicize the attribute or label font. Note there are
no options to change the font.
Horizontal and vertical justification: Choose the justification for the text. This is in
relation to the insertion point or shape.
Height: Increase or decrease to modify the font size.
Angle: Specifies the attribute or label alignment in relation to the fixture symbol.
Shape: Associate a shape with the label or attribute, if desired. You can choose
from: none, circle, square, octagon, or diamond.
Size: Increase or decrease the size of the shape as desired.
November 2006
Presentation mode
3
Set the position of the attribute or label by clicking and dragging on the label or
attribute in the preview window. You can also select an attribute by clicking on it in
the preview window.
4
The key as it will be drawn on the layout is displayed in the preview window. Once
all the attributes are set as desired, click Finish.
Result: The Wizard shortcut is stored in the shortcut bar with the name you
specified in the Title box.
Editing a key
To make changes to the information that is displayed in the key, open the Key Wizard by
double-clicking on the key shortcut, and then make any necessary modifications. Once
a key has been defined, it does not change until you make modifications to its settings.
To rename, delete, or clone the shortcut, follow the steps defined in “Working with
shortcuts” on page 56.
Inserting a key into a layout
Once the key has been created using the Key Wizard, you can place it on the page.
To insert a key into a layout
1
From the Insert menu, choose Key item.
Tip: You can also click the Key tool in the Pres Layout Insert toolbar.
2
Click and drag a window (placeholder) on the “page” where you want the item to
appear.
Result: The Select Key to be referenced dialog box is displayed.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
329
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
3
Select the key that you want to add to the layout, and then click OK.
Result: Your key appears within the placeholder as drawn. By default key items
are set to a scale of 1/16” = 1’.
Modifying the properties of a key
To modify the properties of a key
1
On the layout, select the key that you want to modify.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Item Properties.
Tip: You can also click the Item Properties tool on the Pres Layout Edit toolbar.
Result: The Properties dialog box is displayed.
The General tab is similar for all items. For more information on this tab, see “To
modify item properties” on page 317.
Key tab
Options on the Key tab affect the scaling and content of the placeholder.
330
November 2006
Presentation mode
„
„
„
„
Key: Select the key that you want to be displayed on the layout. A list of all the
keys that you have created is displayed in the drop-down list.
Scale: The scale ratio in inches and feet at which the key should be printed. If the
scale that you want to use for printing is not displayed, select Custom.
On paper: The scale ratio that you want to use on a paper copy of the layout.
Real World: The “real” measurement for the scale ratio that you specify in the On
paper box. For example, you might want to use a scaling of one inch in a paper
copy of your layout. However, this one-inch measurement translates to a “realistic”
measurement (for example, 3 feet).
Layout Tools
Placeholders
You can move and resize placeholders at any time.
To resize a placeholder
1
Click to select the presentation item.
2
Click and drag the marker points of the placeholder to resize it.
Note: Resizing a placeholder affects the content that is displayed. You might have
to edit the scale of the contents or revisit open contents.
To move a placeholder
1
Click to select the presentation item.
2
When a small grey rectangle appears on your cursor, click and hold the left mouse
button and drag the placeholder to the desired location.
3
Release the mouse button.
Tip: Use the gridlines of the presentation view to line up placeholders.
To copy a placeholder and its contents
1
Click to select the presentation item.
2
When a small grey rectangle appears on your cursor, press and hold the CTRL key.
3
Click and hold the left mouse button and drag the copied item to the desired
location.
4
Release the mouse button.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
331
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
Ordering
To facilitate overlaying and underlaying placeholders, use the Bring to Front and Send to
Back tools. Think of placeholders as being piled on top of each other. Bring to Front moves
the selected placeholder and its contents to the top of the pile. Send to Back moves the
selected placeholder and its contents behind all of the others.
To overlay a placeholder
1
Click to select the presentation item.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Bring to Front.
Tip: You can also use the Bring to Front tool on the Pres Layout Edit toolbar
To underlay a placeholder
1
Click to select the presentation item.
2
From the Edit menu, choose Send to Back.
Tip: You can also use the Send to Back tool on the Pres Layout Edit toolbar.
Printing layouts
If you have a large layout you can “tile print” the layout across multiple smaller sheets
of paper. To set up how you want the layout arranged on the sheets of paper, see
“Working with layouts” on page 311.
You can print a complete layout or specific pages of a layout based on the settings that
you choose when printing.
To print a layout
1
From the File menu, choose Print.
Result: The Print dialog box is displayed.
2
From the Name drop-down list, choose the printer (or plotter) that you want to use.
WYSIWYG records the name that you choose for future reference and thereafter
displays it as the default printer for layouts.
3
To print all pages of a layout, select All.
4
To print select pages of a layout, click Pages, and then enter the range in the from
and to boxes.
5
6
332
If you want to print multiple copies of the pages, select the value from the Number
of copies list box.
Click OK.
November 2006
Presentation mode
Images
Introduction
Images such as renderings and logos are stored in the Images tab of Presentation mode.
Renderings are automatically saved here when you select “internal” in the Output
Properties/Step 2 of the Render Wizard. Any other image files (bitmap or jpeg format)
may be imported.
To import a bitmap or a jpeg
1
Right-click on the Images shortcut tab, and then choose New Image.
2
Type the name of your image.
3
Click OK.
4
Click on the shortcut for your new image. The text “No Image Available” appears in
the working area of the screen.
5
From the File menu, choose Import.
6
Use the browser to find the image file that you want to import.
7
Click Open.
To export a bitmap or a jpeg
1
Select the image that you want to export.
2
From the File menu, choose Export.
3
Use the browser to select a destination and a name for the image file that you want
to export. Ensure that either bitmap (.bmp) or jpeg (.jpg) is selected in the Save As
Type box.
4
Click Save.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
333
Presentation mode
Release 18.0
Worksheets
Introduction
The Worksheet tab contains a spreadsheet much like many other spreadsheet
programs. You can enter data and create mathematical functions here, as well as
import and export data to other spreadsheet programs. This functionality is useful when
you are creating spreadsheets for crew requirements, schedules, budgets, or any other
show-specific data.
For more information on using variables in worksheets, refer to “Using variables in
reports” on page 291.
To import data
1
Right-click on the Worksheets shortcut tab, and then choose New Worksheet.
2
Type the name of your worksheet.
3
Click OK.
4
From the File menu, choose Import.
5
Use the browser to find the file containing the data that you want to import.
6
Click Open.
To export data
334
1
Select the worksheet that you want to export.
2
From the File menu, choose Export.
3
Use the browser to select a destination and a name for the worksheet file that you
want to export. Ensure that the desired export file type is selected in the Save As
Type box.
4
Click Save.
November 2006
Presentation mode
Pipe tapes
Introduction
WYSIWYG enable you to make “Pipe Tapes,” which are attached to a pipe at the
beginning of a hang. The pipe tape indicates to the electricians where to hang the
fixtures and displays pertinent information about the fixtures, such as circuit number,
dimmer number, gel color, and so on, as specified by the user. This tool significantly
increases the accuracy between the WYSIWYG plot and the real installation.
Note: Pipe tape printers are sold separately and are available through Cast Group.
To print a pipe tape
1
Connect the pipe tape printer to your computer through the serial port.
2
In CAD mode, select the pipe for which you want to generate a pipe tape.
3
From the Tools menu, choose Print Pipe Tape.
Result: The Print Pipe Tape Setup dialog box is displayed.
4
In the Fixture details group box, select the data fields that you want printed on the
pipe tape for each fixture.
5
To print show information such as venue, lighting designer, and show name, select
the Show Info check box. Show information is entered in Show options, as described
in “Show information” on page 293.
6
To display a graphic in the header and/or footer, type a file name in the Bitmap File
box or use the file browser to locate the file. To display correctly, the graphics
selected must be monochrome bitmaps.
7
To print a total count of the fixtures on the selected pipe, select the Fixture Count
check box. The total count is broken down by fixture type.
8
To print a total count of the circuits used by the fixtures, select the Circuit Count
check box.
9
To display text in the footer and/or header of the pipe tape, type a text file name in
the Text File box.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
335
Presentation mode
336
Release 18.0
10
To print a total count of the number of lenses mounted in the fixtures, select the
Lens Count check box. The total count is broken down by fixture type.
11
To print the weight of the fixtures on the pipe, select the Weight check box.
12
To display tick marks on the pipe tape, select the Show Tick Marks check box. Tick
marks are placed every foot or half meter, based on the unit of measurement
(imperial or metric). The tick marks are for reference purposes only.
13
When you have finished making your selections, click Print to send the print job to
the pipe tape printer.
14
Click Save and Exit if you want to save the settings but do not want to print the pipe
tape at this time.
Chapter 10
Live mode
Live mode is used for graphically simulating the output of a lighting control
console or compatible offline editor. Live mode also has rendering ability,
enabling you to create photo-realistic pictures of the simulated lighting looks.
Unlike Design mode, Live mode displays transitions from cue to cue, allowing you
to see the programmed movement of light over time. If you have configured a
patched video source, you can use Live mode to control the progress of your
video with the console device.
Live mode is available only in WYSIWYG Perform.
In this chapter
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Layout tabs
339
Connecting to consoles
340
AutoPatch
347
Visualization
349
Autofocus
352
Rendering
354
DMX Camera
355
337
Live mode
338
Release 18.0
November 2006
Live mode
Layout tabs
Introduction
Beneath the work area in each mode is a series of layout tabs. These tabs provide
various configurations of the views that you are working with. To change layouts, click
the appropriate tab.
Live mode contains the following layout tabs:
„
„
„
Wireframe - The work area displays a full-screen wireframe view.
Quad - The work area is divided into quadrants, three of which can be modified to
show plan, front, or side views. The lower-right quadrant contains a shaded view.
Shaded - The work area displays a full-screen shaded view.
Note: The wireframe views in Live mode are used for fixture selection only. To make
any drawing modifications, you must return to CAD mode.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
339
Live mode
Release 18.0
Connecting to consoles
Introduction
To use Live mode, you need to insert and connect to a control console or compatible
offline editor. If you use a DMX console, you require a DMX interface device to connect
to WYSIWYG.
You must ensure that the patch you have created in WYSIWYG and the patch in your
console are exactly the same for simulation to work properly.
Connecting to a console
To connect to a console
1
Connect the console to the computer with the appropriate hardware.
2
From the Live menu, choose Device Manager.
Result: The Device Manager dialog box is displayed.
3
Click New.
Result: The console library is displayed.
4
Navigate through the console library until you find the console or device that you
are connecting to. Click the console name to highlight it.
Note: If you are connecting to a console with a Wyg-it or Wyg-it2, you can select
either the console or the Wyg-it device. The Address box discussed below must
contain the name of the Wyg-it.
5
Click Insert.
Result: The console appears in the Device Manager.
340
November 2006
Live mode
6
With the console name still selected, click Properties.
Result: The Properties dialog box is displayed.
7
From the Protocol drop-down list, select the protocol used by the console. For
example, DMX, SandNet.
Result: The console model is displayed in the Model box. The name of the console
is displayed in the Name box.
8
In the Address box, type the designated address of the console, if applicable.
9
A list of the output ports from the console appears in the Ports list. You must bind
these outputs to WYSIWYG patch universes. Click the appropriate port to highlight
it.
Note: Motion control systems have a single port named “Motion.”
10
Click Bind.
Note: If you are working with a motion control system, then you can bind only to
motion universes; if you are working with a DMX console then you can bind only to
DMX universes.
Result: The Patch Universe Select dialog box is displayed.
11
Select the desired Patch Universe, and then click Select.
12
Repeat the above steps to bind all ports to their appropriate patch universes.
Note: You cannot control a channel count exceeding that of the WYSIWYG Perform
package that you purchased - 500, 1000, 2000, 5000, and so on.
13
Click OK to close the Properties box.
14
Click Connect.
Result: The status of the console changes to “connected.”
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
341
Live mode
Release 18.0
15
Click OK to exit the Device Manager.
Note: Once the console is running and connected to the WYSIWYG drawing,
operate the console as you would in the live venue. Run up channels and record
cues using the console. Remember that WYSIWYG does not store or save cues—
this is done in your console’s memory. Once the console information is set up, you
can set WYSIWYG to automatically connect to the console every time the file is
opened.
Working with a console
To set the console to connect on load
1
From the Live menu, choose Device Manager.
Result: The Device Manager dialog box is displayed.
2
Select the console.
3
Select the Connect on load check box.
4
Click OK to close the Device Manager.
To edit the patch binding settings
1
From the Live menu, choose Device Manager.
Result: The Device Manager dialog box is displayed.
2
Select the console.
3
Click Properties.
4
Select the port for which you want to change the patch binding.
5
Click Unbind.
6
Rebind as desired (follow steps 9 through 12 in “To connect to a console” on page
340).
To remove a console from the Device Manager
1
From the Live menu, choose Device Manager.
Result: The Device Manager dialog box is displayed.
2
Select the console that you want to remove.
3
Click Delete.
Result: The console is removed and all patch binding information is lost.
To control a DMX patched video source with a console
Note: If the video control is patched and DMX connected in Live Mode, then you will not
be able to control the video using any of the Video Designer Tool commands in Design
mode. Video sources can only be controlled by a designer tool when the DMX source is
disconnected; therefore, you must first disconnect the applicable console device from
Live Mode before using any of the Video Designer Tool commands.
After you have patched the control of a video source in Data mode, you can use the
applicable console device to control the progress of the video in Live mode.
In WYSIWYG, you patch the control of a video source, not the actual video. This means
that you can use the console device to control the progress of a live video stream or a
video file by making the video play, pause, or rewind; you cannot use WYSIWYG to
change different aspects of the video itself.
342
November 2006
Live mode
To control the video source, the DMX patch is allocated three channels with the
following controls:
„
„
„
1
First channel (Intensity): The video is off if the value is set between 1—128
(below 50%), it is on if the value is between 128—255 (above 50%).
Second channel (Control): The video is controlled by the position that you set
on the third channel if the value is set between 1—84 (between 1% and 33%), it is
paused if the value is set between 85—169 (between 33% and 66%), and it plays
if the value is set between 170—255 (between 66% and 100%).
Third channel (Position): If you have set a value within the bottom third level
of the second channel (between 1% and 33%), then you can use the third channel
like a slider, advancing the video either backward or forward to the exact position
that you want to see. If the value on the second channel is set to any level above
84 (between 33% and 100%), then the third channel is disabled.
Ensure that the console device is connected to the patched video source. For
details on connecting a console, see “To connect to a console” on page 340.
„
To play the video from start to finish, perform the following steps:
a.
Set the first channel to a value between 128—255 (above 50%).
b.
Set the second channel to a value between 255—170 (between 100% and
66%).
„
To pause the video, perform the following steps:
a.
Set the first channel to a value between 128—255 (above 50%).
b.
Set the second channel to a value between 255—170 (between 100% and
66%) and play the video to the spot where you want to pause it. Then move
the second channel to a value between 169—85 (between 66% and 33%) to
pause the video at this spot.
„
To control the progress of the video manually, perform the following steps:
a.
Set the first channel to a value between 128—255 (above 50%).
b.
Set the second channel to a value between 84—1 (between 33% and 1%).
c.
Slide the third channel up and down to control the progress of the video,
forward and backward.
To control a DMX patched movement axis with a console
After you have patched a movement axis in Data mode, you can use the applicable
console device in Live mode to control the movement of any objects that are attached
to the axis.
To control the object, the DMX patch is allocated two channels with the following
controls:
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
First channel (Move): The first channel is for coarse movement and can be used
to advance the object quickly to any position along the entire path, from start to
finish.
Second channel (Move Fine): The second channel is used for further refining
the object’s position that you set with the first channel. Adjust the slider on the
second channel to move the object very slightly either forward or back from its
current position. The movement achieved with this channel is so fine, that it is best
viewed on linear axes that are quite long. Note that for rotation axes, the
movement is so slight, that you may not be able to see it.
343
Live mode
Release 18.0
1
Ensure that the console device is connected to the patched movement axis. For
details on connecting a console, see “To connect to a console” on page 340.
2
To move the object quickly along the movement axis, adjust the slider on the first
channel, stopping at the position where you want to leave the object.
3
To move the object in fine increments either forward or back from its current
position, adjust the slider on the second channel.
Tip: To view fine movement, the object must be attached to a very long linear
axis, or be set to rotate in a very wide arc. It is also a good idea to zoom in quite
close to the object before moving it.
To control a motion-control patched movement axis with a motion
control system
After you have patched a movement axis in Data mode, you can use the applicable
motion control system in Live mode to control the movement of any objects that are
attached to the axis.
Based on the type of system that you are using, you can control the object in different
ways. The following procedure outlines how to control the object(s) with WYSIWYG’s
Motion Control Console.
1
Launch the Motion Control Console.
2
Ensure that the Motion Control Console (or the motion control system if you are
using one) is connected to the patched movement axis. You connect the Motion
Control Console (and motion control systems) in much the same way as you
connect consoles. For details, see “To connect to a console” on page 340.
3
To change the settings of a patched movement axis, highlight the axis in the left
pane, and then choose from the following settings:
„
„
344
ID box: To change the ID of the movement axis, type the new motion control
ID.
Travel box: Type the distance (in meters for linear axes, in degrees for
rotational axes) that you want the object to travel along or around the axis.
This can be the full length/angle of the axis, or only a portion of it if you do not
want the object to travel along/around the full path. For linear axes, if you type
November 2006
Live mode
a value that is longer than the actual axis, the object stops at the end of the
physical axis.
„
„
Type: If you change the axis type so that it does not match the axis that you
have drawn (for example, if the actual axis is linear, but you choose rotational
here), the cell in patch view turns to red.
In the Mode area, select the type of movement for the object:
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
Static Select this option if you want to specify the precise location of a
static object on the movement axis. You can then use the position slider at
the bottom of the window to adjust the position and control the movement
of the object manually.
Bounce Select this option if you want the object to move forward and
backward in a continuous loop along the movement axis.
Forward Select this option if you want the object to move forward along
the axis from start to finish, and then start over again at the beginning in
a continuous forward loop.
Backward Select this option if you want the object to move backwards
along the axis from finish to start, and then begin over again in a
continuous backwards loop.
Duration box: If you have chosen any moving Mode value (that is, any value
except Static), you can specify the length of time (in seconds) over which you
want the full range of motion to take place. The larger the number you type in
this box, the slower the object moves.
Position slider: For all moving modes (bounce, forward, backward), the slider
indicates the position of the object when the console is sending data to
WYSIWYG. For the static mode, while the console is started, drag the slider to
to adjust the position of the object on its axis. The position value changes in
the box in the left pane.
Position box: While the console is sending data to WYSIWYG, for all moving
modes, this box shows the progress of the object’s movement along its axis;
for the axes in the static mode, you can type the precise location of the object
on the axis.
4
Click Update Axis to view your new settings.
5
Click Save to save the changes.
Note: If you make any changes to the axis settings and save the changes, you
can revert to the previous settings by clicking Load.
Connecting with a Wyg-it 2
WYG-it 2 is Cast Software’s DMX interface device. You require a DMX interface to
connect a DMX console to WYSIWYG. Each WYG-it 2 has 2 DMX inputs that enable you
to visualize up to 1024 channels of DMX. The WYG-it 2 also has 2 DMX through ports
that allow you to connect the console both to WYSIWYG and to the physical lighting
equipment at the same time. WYG-it 2 is equipped with the necessary outputs to send
Autofocus commands.
You can connect the WYG-it 2 to your computer by inserting the WYG-it 2 USB cable
into an available USB port. Once connected to your computer, the WYG-it 2 does not
need an external power supply.
Note: When WYG-it 2 is installed, the WYG-it DMX Interface configuration panel is
accessible in the Control Panel of your computer. The WYG-it 2 name recorded in this
configuration panel is the value that you must type in the Address box of the Device
Manager Properties window.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
345
Live mode
Release 18.0
Mini Console
WYSIWYG contains an application that simulates a small console, called the Mini
Console. You can use this application in lieu of a real console. To use the Mini Console,
run the Mini Console application, found in the WYSIWYG section of the Windows Start
menu. Connect as if you are using an external console.
The Mini Console gives you control of the first 25 channels on a single DMX universe but
does not record or playback cues.
346
November 2006
Live mode
AutoPatch
Introduction
AutoPatch is a protocol by which WYSIWYG can transfer the patch hookup to a
compatible console. AutoPatch is only available in WYSIWYG Perform.
You must be connected to a compatible console for this feature to be enabled. All ports
for which you want the patch information to be transferred must be properly bound.
Only the hookup information in patch universes bound to the console’s outputs will
transfer.
The patch information is transferred over Ethernet.
To perform an AutoPatch
1
Connect to the console as described in “To connect to a console” on page 340.
2
From the Live menu, choose AutoPatch.
Result: The AutoPatch dialog opens.
3
Click Send Patch.
Result: WYSIWYG assembles the patch information for all the fixtures in the plot
and then attempts to send the relevant patch information to each connected
AutoPatch-capable device.
Notes:
„
„
„
4
A fixture’s patch information is transmitted to a console only if the following
conditions are met:
„
the fixture has at least one part that is patched to a patch universe
„
the patch universe is bound to the console
„
the console is connected to WYSIWYG through the Device Manager
Some fixtures might have parts patched to two (or more) different consoles. In
this situation, both consoles will receive the patch information for that fixture,
but the port numbers given for each part will be set appropriately for each
console.
It is recommended that you click Clear Patch prior to sending the patch to clear
out the existing patch.
Click Close.
To clear the patch
1
Connect to the console as described in “To connect to a console” on page 340.
2
From the Live menu, choose AutoPatch.
Result: The AutoPatch dialog opens.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
347
Live mode
Release 18.0
3
Click Clear Patch.
Result: WYSIWYG prompts each AutoPatch-capable device to clear the patch for
each port that is bound to a WYSIWYG patch universe.
4
348
Click Close.
November 2006
Live mode
Visualization
Introduction
There is a limitation on the number of DMX channels that can be simulated in Live
mode. This limitation is based on the level of WYSIWYG Perform that you have installed
on your computer.
WYSIWYG Perform is available in 500, 1000, 2000, 5000 and Unlimited channel
variants. With each of these variants, the following channels of simulation are available:
„
WYSIWYG Perform 500=512 channels
„
WYSIWYG Perform 1000=1024 channels
„
WYSIWYG Perform 2000=2048 channels
„
WYSIWYG Perform 5000=5120 channels
„
WYSIWYG Perform Unlimited=51,200 channels
In Live mode, WYSIWYG will not simulate the DMX values being received on channels
that exceed the Perform channel count of your system. The unused channels display on
the status bar tracks the remaining channels for simulation, based on the level of your
Perform system.
Note: Fixtures on layers that are not visible or not included in the current scene are not
counted.
For more information on the status bar, refer to “Status bar” on page 66.
Simulation options
The Simulation options affect how fixtures respond in Live mode and how the beams are
displayed in shaded views. Turning options off will yield faster simulation performance
while compromising aesthetics. For optimal results, increase the processing power of
your computer.
To change the simulation options
1
From the Options menu, choose User Options.
Result: The User Options dialog box is displayed.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
349
Live mode
350
Release 18.0
2
Click the Simulation tab.
3
Make your selections, and then click OK to exit.
a.
The smoke level affects the density of the cones of light.
b.
The cone resolution affects the shape of the footprint. The higher the number,
the more elliptical the footprint; the lower the number, the more square the
footprint. Five is the fastest while 40 is a near perfect circle or ellipsis.
c.
Select the StickBeams check box to draw the center of the light beam for each
fixture. This is the quickest way to simulate moving lights with the least beam
clutter.
d.
Deselect the Colors check box to ignore color settings and have all beams
displayed as open-white.
e.
Select the Focus check box to set the image in focus as the brightest in
Wireframe views. In shaded views, the hard or soft edge can be seen when the
focus parameter is set.
f.
Select the Footprint check box to draw hard lines depicting where the light hits
the set.
g.
Select the Shaded Beams check box to produce soft edge beam footprints on the
set, showing you the cosine distribution of your lights in shaded views. The
objects comprising the set must have their facets split. To enable this setting,
select Facet Splitting on the Object Settings tab of Show Options. For more
information on this tab, refer to “Object Settings tab” on page 92.
h.
Select the Crossfades check box to show the physical limitations of the motors
of the fixtures or electronic accessories. This will be evident for devices such as
moving heads or scrollers, which might not be able to move as fast as the rate
at which the console is changing values. Crossfades also show you which
fixtures use internal timing on a separate speed channel.
i.
Select the Gobos check box to simulate gobo details. Gobo wheels often take a
lot of processing power and can slow down the refresh rate of other fixtures’
updates unnecessarily. If you are concerned about cue timing, set the scene
first with gobos, and then turn off this option to obtain a faster refresh rate.
j.
Select the Convex gobos check box to simulate convex gobo fixtures. Some
complex gobos that include shapes similar to a “C” have to be pre-processed
to make them appear correctly. This can often reduce the refresh rate.
November 2006
Live mode
k.
Select the Complex gobos check box to simulate complex gobo fixtures. Most
gobos are drawn in a complex and a simplified form. The complex forms are
far too slow for real time simulation and should only be used in rendering.
l.
To simulate gobo rotation, select the Gobo Rotation check box. This option can
slow down the refresh rate substantially as gobos can be rotating even when
the fixture’s intensity is at zero.
m. To simulate effects such as prisms, select the Effects check box. This might
increase the number of lines that WYSIWYG has to draw, thus slowing down
processing power.
n.
Select the Center check box to draw a point from the fixture to the point on the
stage where the center of the beam hits. If the fixture has CMY color mixing,
the line will change color to match the output from the console.
o.
Select the Continuous Wheels check box to show you automated wheels rotating
into place as they would on the real fixtures. The effect of the wheel rotating
360 degrees rather than snapping in steps will be shown.
p.
Select the Spin Wheels check box to simulate spin wheel fixtures. Some
automated fixtures have wheels that spin continuously. Gobo wheels often
take a lot of processing power and can slow down the refresh rate of other
fixture’s updates unnecessarily.
q.
Select the Beam Angles check box to display the photometrics of the fixture’s
beam angle instead of the field angle. The angle that is displayed is the
measurement in degrees from the center of the beam to where the light level
drops off to 50% of the peak. For more information on photometrics, refer to
“Photometrics tab” on page 198.
r.
Select the Bitmap Gobos check box to simulate bitmap gobo fixtures. Custom
gobos that have a bitmap image attached will be simulated. This selection
provides a realistic simulation.
Note: Also noteworthy are the properties of shaded views. These are discussed in
“Shaded views” on page 73.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
351
Live mode
Release 18.0
Autofocus
Introduction
Autofocus is the protocol that WYSIWYG uses to “talk back” to a compatible console.
Using the mouse in a Wireframe view or using the concept shortcuts and design tools at
any time, you can direct the console to select fixtures, set focus, and control intensity,
iris, and color. Autofocus is connected through MIDI, Serial, or Ethernet.
The following consoles are compatible with the Autofocus protocol:
„
ETC Expression and Impression consoles
„
Flying Pig WholeHog II and III
„
Jands Hog 250, 500, 600, and 1000 consoles
„
Compulite’s Animator 48C, Animator 72C, Sabre, and Spark Top consoles
„
Avab’s Pronto, Panther, Jaguar, and Safari consoles
„
Leprecon LP-X24 console
„
Transtechnik’s Prisma NT and Focus NT consoles
„
Rosco Horizon software
For detailed instructions on setting up AutoFocus to work with the HogII, refer to
“Setting up AutoFocus to work with the HogPC” on page 389.
To bind Autofocus to the console
1
Follow steps 1 through 14 of “To connect to a console” on page 340.
2
Click Bind Autofocus.
Note: The Bind Autofocus button is only available when a compatible console is
selected in the Device Manager.
Result: The autofocus icon
Device Manager.
352
appears beside the name of the console in the
3
Click Connect.
4
Click OK to close the Device Manager.
November 2006
Live mode
Autofocus tools and menu commands
To select fixtures
The procedure for selecting fixtures in Live mode is the same as selecting fixtures in
Design mode using the design tools. For more information, refer to “Using the Design
tools” on page 253.
To use the Autofocus tools
The procedure for using the autofocus tools is the same as using the design tools. For
more information, refer to “Using the Design tools” on page 253.
To use the Autofocus menu commands
Right-click on a selected fixture or fixtures to open a menu with the following Autofocus
commands:
„
„
„
„
„
At Level and Focus: Sets the intensity of the selected lights on the connected
Autofocus-compatible console to the level last specified by the Intensity
command, and then launches the Focus command.
Focus: When you click in a Wireframe view, the selected automated fixtures will
focus (if they can) to that point. Click and drag to position them in real-time.
Change the missing focus coordinate to alter the height at which you want to
focus the fixtures.
Intensity: Reveals a sub-menu where you can specify the level to set the
intensity for the selected fixtures. The first option in the list is the last level you
specified and by default is set to Full. You can also set the level to half and out.
Iris: Sets the iris to either tight or wide. There is also a Specify option where you
can set the iris to any percentage. The Specify value is retained for the session.
Color: Fixtures that can mix color can be directed to either a palette color or an
approximation of a manufacturer’s gel color. You can specify and save palette
colors using the custom color creator or Palette shortcuts.
Tips:
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
You can repeat Autofocus commands by touching the Space bar. This way, you
can select one fixture, adjust it, select another, and then press the Space bar to
perform the same operation repeatedly.
Alter the missing focus coordinate to focus fixtures at different heights.
When focusing fixtures, you can click and drag in the wireframe view. If you are
using WYSIWYG in the theatre, launch this command, and then look to the
stage to position your lights.
Working in an Isometric view, you can use the snap tools to focus fixtures to
points on your set pieces.
If you set the intensity to a specific value, the right-click menu option At Full
and Focus changes to At ##% and Focus where ## is the specific value that
you set.
Select multiple fixtures by dragging a window around them. If you drag the
window from right to left across projected beams, you can select the fixtures
that produced the beams.
To select fixtures by type, draw a box using the right mouse button. You will be
prompted to isolate one or more types of fixtures.
Use the Concept shortcuts to create and select groups of fixtures.
Use the Palette shortcuts to save and send color commands.
353
Live mode
Release 18.0
Rendering
Introduction
At any time in Live mode you can generate a rendering of a lighting cue or static look.
The Render Wizard calculates the rendering based on the DMX values being received at
the moment when you click Finish.
To render a lighting look
1
In the working area of the screen, display the lighting look that you want to render.
2
From the Design menu, choose Render.
Tip: You can also click the Render Wizard tool in the Design toolbar.
Result: The Render Wizard opens and guides you through a series of options. Click
Next and Back to navigate through the Render Wizard.
3
Click Finish.
Result: WYSIWYG generates the rendering of your lighting look or cue. If the
rendering is saved internally, it is available as an image in Presentation mode.
Note: For more information, see “Rendering” on page 264.
354
November 2006
Live mode
DMX Camera
Introduction
With the DMX Camera utility, the camera's orientation (position and target), zooming,
and roll features can all be manipulated and recorded to create a realistic rendering of a
professional, fully edited film clip.
It is important to distinguish between DMX Camera and cameras drawn in the CAD
mode of WYSIWYG. Drawn cameras provide a single viewpoint; the camera can be
moved, but only by one parameter at a time and there is no possibility to track or
record camera movements. DMX Camera is not drawn in your plot and is completely
maneuverable; each attribute is patched to a DMX channel and controlled through the
console of your choice. Changes can be recorded on a separate cue list, if the console
allows it; alternatively, camera changes can be recorded directly into previously created
cues. The result is a recorded camera track that runs simultaneously with your show.
To use DMX Camera
1
From the Live drop-down menu, select DMX Camera Patch.
2
In the Enter DMX Camera Patch window, enter a new patch (for example, type
Camera.1, where the "1" indicates the first channel number that the camera
attributes will patch into).
3
In the Device Manager, bind the appropriate output of your selected console with
the camera's patch universe, and then connect to the console.
4
In Live mode, click the Shaded tab.
Result: The position and focus point coordinates and roll and zoom angles of the
camera display on the status bar.
5
From the Options menu, choose View Options.
6
Select the Options tab.
7
From the Camera drop-down menu, select DMX control.
8
Click OK.
Result: You should now have direct control over the DMX camera. It may be
helpful to record the camera patch as a pop-up frame in data to view the attributes
that you are modifying.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
355
Live mode
Release 18.0
To provide a fairly neutral starting point, it is recommended that the majority of the
sixteen DMX Camera channels initially be set at a level of 50 per cent. The exceptions
are "camera Y coarse", which should be set at 40 per cent, and "target Y coarse", which
should be set at 60 per cent. Adjusting these two attributes will ensure that the camera
and the target are not occupying the same point in three-dimensional space.
"Personalities" may be created to reflect this.
The camera's initial position will be dictated by the document origin (not to be confused
with the user origin, which can be altered at any time).
The 16 camera parameters are as follows:
1.
camera X coarse
2.
camera X fine
3.
camera Y coarse
4.
camera Y fine
5.
camera Z coarse
6.
camera Z fine
7.
target X coarse
8.
target X fine
9.
target Y coarse
10. target Y fine
11. target Z coarse
12. target Z fine
13. roll coarse
14. roll fine
15. zoom coarse
16. zoom fine
Notes:
„
„
356
The "coarse" parameter is defined as 100 metres/256 steps, or 0.39 metres per
step.
The "fine" parameter is defined as 100 metres/65536 steps, or 0.0015 metres per
step.
„
The zoom function of the DMX camera has a range of 5° to 100°.
„
The "coarse" zoom parameter is defined as 95°/ 256 steps, or 0.37° per step.
„
The "fine" zoom parameter is defined as 95°/ 65536 steps, or 0.00145° per step.
Chapter 11
WYSILink - Link mode
WYSILink (Link) mode becomes available when you purchase and install the
WYSILink add-on for WYSIWYG. WYSILink acts as an interface to ETCLink. For
further details on ETCLink, refer to your Sensor CEM User Manual.
In this mode you can view diagnostic information about the fixtures in your
system. You can also record and play back backup looks and view dimmer and
dimmer rack information.
In this chapter
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Layout tabs
359
Setting up WYSILink
360
WYSILink mode
361
ETCLink functions
366
357
WYSILink - Link mode
358
Release 18.0
November 2006
WYSILink - Link mode
Layout tabs
Introduction
Beneath the work area in each mode is a series of layout tabs. These tabs provide
various configurations of the views in which you are working. To change layouts, click
the appropriate tab. Link mode contains the following layout tab:
„
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Message Log - The work area displays a spreadsheet of ETCLink error messages.
359
WYSILink - Link mode
Release 18.0
Setting up WYSILink
Introduction
WYSILink combines WYSIWYG visualization software with ETC’s Sensor Advanced
Features to perform system diagnostics. When Sensor detects a problem, WYSILink
logs it, posts a detailed alert and highlights the image of the affected fixture, along with
lamp and dimmer data.
WYSILink highlights affected fixtures in Data and Wireframe views in CAD, Data, and
Live modes, giving you the most complete information about the problem. You can also
use the message log to track problems by fixture over time.
WYSILink resides on a PC connected to an ETCNet2 network and gives you access to all
ETCLink features. You can record and play backup looks, view which console is
controlling which dimmers, and obtain information from any dimmer or dimmer rack in
your system.
Hardware requirements
WYSILink requires a few additional pieces of hardware to perform system diagnostics.
For more information on hardware requirements, refer to “Installation” on page 31.
Upgrading to WYSILink
WYSILink is an optional feature set for WYSIWYG. You can upgrade your dongle for
WYSILink operation by calling your WYSIWYG dealer. Once you have purchased the
upgrade, you will be provided with an upgrade code. To learn how to upgrade to
WYSILink, refer to “Upgrades” on page 44.
ETCNet2 compatibility
WYSILink supports ETCNet2 version 2.1.1 and version 3.0.0 networks. WYSILink can
only monitor one ETCNet2 version at a time. By default, WYSILink will monitor an
ETCNet2 version 2.0.0 network.
To set the version that is monitored, refer to “ETC Interface tab” on page 90.
360
November 2006
WYSILink - Link mode
WYSILink mode
Introduction
WYSILink mode is accessed through the LINK mode button at the top of the WYSIWYG
screen. You can view the WYSILink Message Log and configure your WYSILink settings
from LINK mode.
Note: If you cannot see the LINK mode button, then you are not running WYSIWYG with
a WYSILink-enabled dongle. Contact your dealer or Cast Software Technical Support for
further information.
Message Log
The Message Log provides a spreadsheet view of ETCLink error messages. As error
states occur, messages are logged in the Message Log, and classified as either
“Pending” or “Cleared”.
„
Pending messages are generated at the time of the error.
„
Cleared messages are generated when an error has been corrected.
Pending and Cleared messages are paired, so that when an error state has been
corrected, the appropriate Pending message is cancelled. You have the option of
viewing all Pending and Cleared messages, or only Pending messages (for error states
that have not been corrected).
Note: WYSILink defaults to displaying only Pending Messages. To change this setting,
refer to “Message Log options” on page 362.
Special circumstances arise when errors are generated when WYSILink is offline. If an
error is generated and corrected while WYSILink is offline, these messages will not
appear in the Message Log. If an error has been generated when WYSILink is offline,
and the message is not cleared, the Pending message will appear in the Message Log
when WYSILink comes online.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
361
WYSILink - Link mode
Release 18.0
Errors are indicated not only in the Message Log, but also in the Wireframe and Data
views. Fixtures assigned to dimmers that have an error are highlighted in red in the
spreadsheet, and by a red symbol in Wireframe views.
Message Log options
Message log options affect how messages are processed and received.
To access message log options
1
From the WYSILink menu, choose Message Log Options.
Tip: You can also use the Message Log Options tool on the Message Log Options toolbar.
Result: The Properties dialog box is displayed.
2
Click the Message Log Options tab.
Use the Message Log Options to configure the Message Log:
„
„
„
362
Use the Delete settings to determine how long messages are held in the Message
Log and to delete messages currently in the Message Log.
Use the Show settings to switch between displaying all messages (Pending and
Cleared) or only Pending messages.
Use the Auto Save settings to determine how often the Message Log is backed up to
disk.
November 2006
WYSILink - Link mode
„
Use the notification settings to set up how you want to be notified of new message
arrival. You can choose to have a notification box pop up, and/or have a sound play
as new messages arrive.
Display Log Options tab
The display log options affect how columns are ordered and how the messages are
sorted.
To set column visibility and order
1
Click the Display Log Options tool on the Message Log Options toolbar.
2
Click the Display Log Options tab.
3
Click the Column Manager tab.
4
Click the name of the column that you want to move, and then click Down or Up to
reposition it in the listing.
5
Click the box to the left of the column name to set its visibility. A check indicates
that the column is currently visible.
Note: You cannot make the column labeled Message Data Sequence Number invisible.
6
Click OK.
To sort messages
1
Click the Display Log Options tool on the Message Log Options toolbar.
2
Click the Display Log Options tab.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
363
WYSILink - Link mode
Release 18.0
3
Click the Sort tab.
4
In each Key position, select the column by which you want to sort, and then click
Ascending or Descending to set the sort order.
5
Click OK.
Result: The Message Log will refresh with the newly sorted data.
To filter messages
1
Click the Display Log Options tool on the Message Log Options toolbar.
2
Click the Display Log Options tab.
3
Click the Filter tab.
4
Select the column that you want to filter.
5
Set the type of filter using the options.
6
Click OK.
Result: The Message Log will refresh with the newly filtered data.
364
November 2006
WYSILink - Link mode
Exporting the Message Log
You can export the Message Log to a comma-delimited text file that you can view in
most spreadsheet applications. This feature is useful if you are having system problems
and need to get the Message Log to Cast Software Technical Services.
To export the Message Log
1
Click the Export Message Log tool on the Message Log Options toolbar.
2
Use the browser to set the name and destination of the exported file, and then
click Save.
Note: The file must have the “.log” extension.
Printing the Message Log
To print the message log
From the File menu, choose Print.
Tip: You can also use the Print tool on the Message Log Options toolbar.
To print preview the message log
From the File menu, choose Print Preview.
Tip: You can also use the Print Preview tool on the Message Log Options toolbar.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
365
WYSILink - Link mode
Release 18.0
ETCLink functions
Introduction
WYSILink enables you to use many of the ETCLink features commonly found on ETC
consoles. These features allow you to get information about your Sensor dimming
system. You can access information about individual dimmers and about entire dimmer
racks. You can also record dimmer loads and record and playback backup looks from
within WYSILink.
The WYSILink toolbar
The WYSILink toolbar provides quick access to the ETCLink functions described below:
„
Error Mode toggles between the currently selected node and all connected nodes.
„
Node Selection enables you to view only the channels owned by that node.
„
Node Manager (refer to “Node Manager” on page 368).
„
About Dimmer (see “About Dimmer” below).
„
About Dimmer Rack (see “About Dimmer Rack” on page 367).
About Dimmer
The About Dimmer dialog box provides specific information about an individual dimmer,
such as the rack number, slot number, and type of dimmer. The name of the connected
node, EDMX source, and the source for setting the level are also displayed.
366
November 2006
WYSILink - Link mode
To access dimmer information
1
From the WYSILink menu, choose About Dimmer.
Tip: You can also use the About Dimmer tool on the WYSILink toolbar.
Result: The About Dimmer dialog box is displayed.
2
To obtain dimmer information, type or select the dimmer number, and then click
About Dimmer.
Tip: You can also access the About Dimmer command in CAD, Data, and Live
modes by right-clicking on a fixture symbol. This will open a slightly different
dialog box.
Note: The Ownership box lists all network devices (such as consoles and nodes)
that are attempting to control the specified dimmer.
About Dimmer Rack
The About Dimmer Rack dialog box allows you to choose a specific dimmer rack on a
specific ETCNet2 DMX node. The status of the input ports (A and B), number of dimmer
modules on the rack, and the dimmer type are displayed on this dialog box.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
367
WYSILink - Link mode
Release 18.0
To access rack information
1
From the WYSILink menu, choose About Rack.
Tip: You can also use the About Rack tool on the WYSILink toolbar.
Result: The About Dimmer Rack dialog box is displayed.
2
Select a node, the rack number, and then click About.
Node Manager
In Live mode, WYSILink includes the Node Manager tab on the Device Manager dialog
box. In this dialog box, you need to “discover” connected nodes before other functions
will work.
To access the Node Manager
1
From the WYSILink menu, choose Node Manager.
Tip: You can also use the Node Manager tool on the WYSILink toolbar.
Result: The Node Manager dialog box is displayed.
2
Click the Discover button to view the nodes that are currently online and to set a
color for the display of channels that are “owned” by each node.
3
To set the color for a node, double-click the color box to the right of the node’s
name, or click the node’s name, and then click Color Select.
4
To remove an entry from the list, click Hide.
You can use the Node Manager to reconcile the configurations between your show
document and the actual ETCNet2 Nodes that are connected to your ETCNet2 network.
368
November 2006
WYSILink - Link mode
To reconcile nodes
1
In the Node Manager dialog box, click Reconcile.
Result: The Reconcile Options dialog box is displayed.
2
Select whether you want to reconcile all nodes, or only currently selected nodes.
Use CTRL+Click to select multiple nodes in the Node Manager.
3
Select whether you will use Media Access Control (MAC) addresses or Internet
Protocol (IP) addresses.
4
Click OK.
Backup looks
You can record, play back, stop, and clear backup looks from within WYSILink. For more
information on backup looks, refer to your Sensor CEM User Manual.
To record a backup look
1
From the WYSILink menu, choose Backup Looks, and then choose Record.
Result: The Record Backup Look dialog box is displayed.
2
In the Look Number box, type a number for the backup look that you want to record.
3
Select the nodes for which you want to record the backup look. Click Specify to
select the node from the Node list. All indicates that the backup look will be
recorded for all connected nodes.
4
When recording a backup look, you have the option of recording the output level of
all dimmers in the selected dimmer rack (Snapshot of dimmers option) or only those
that have been set using the dimmer rack control panel (All manually set dimmers
option).
5
When finished, click OK.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
369
WYSILink - Link mode
Release 18.0
To play back a backup look
1
From the WYSILink menu, choose Backup Looks, and then choose Play.
Result: The Play BackUp Look dialog box is displayed.
2
In the Look Number box, type the number of the backup look that you want to play.
3
Select the nodes for which you want to play the backup look. Click Specify to select
the node from the Node list. All indicates that the backup look will be played for all
connected nodes.
4
When finished, click OK.
To stop a playback look
1
From the WYSILink menu, choose Backup Looks, and then choose Stop.
Result: The Stop Active Backup Look dialog box is displayed.
2
In the Look Number box, type the number of the backup look that you want to stop.
3
Select the nodes for which you want to stop the backup look. Click Specify to select
the node from the Node list. All indicates that the backup look will be stopped for all
connected nodes.
4
When finished, click OK.
To clear a backup look
Perform this procedure if you want to permanently erase a backup look from a dimmer
rack.
370
November 2006
WYSILink - Link mode
1
From the WYSILink menu, choose Backup Looks, and then choose Clear.
Result: The Select BackUp Look to Clear dialog box is displayed.
2
In the Look Number box, type the number of the backup look that you want to clear.
3
Select the nodes for which you want to clear the backup look. Click Specify to select
the node from the Node list. All indicates that the backup look will be cleared for all
connected nodes.
4
When finished, click OK.
To obtain a backup look status
1
From the WYSILink menu, choose Backup Looks, and then choose Status.
Result: The BackUp Looks Status dialog box is displayed.
2
View which ETCLink-enabled DMX nodes have backup looks associated with them
and if the looks are currently active.
Note: Changes to backup looks will not be immediately visible. You may need to
wait up to 30 seconds for the change to take effect.
Load recording
To record a load
1
From the WYSILink menu, choose Load Recording, and then choose Record.
Result: The Dimmer Loads dialog box is displayed.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
371
WYSILink - Link mode
Release 18.0
2
Specify the dimmer for which you want to record a load or specify all non-zero
level dimmers.
Note: Recording the load on a dimmer enables WYSILink to notify you when the
dimmer’s load has changed, such as when a lamp fails.
3
When finished, click OK.
To check or clear a load
1
From the WYSILink menu, choose Load Recording, and then choose Check or Clear.
Result: The Check Loads or Clear Loads dialog box is displayed.
Check Loads dialog box
Clear Loads dialog box
2
Type the number of the dimmers to check or clear. You can specify a range of
number using a dash (for example, 23-47). Use commas to separate the entries.
For all dimmers specify “all”. White space and capitalization is ignored.
„
„
If you are checking a load, a query is performed for the specific dimmer or
dimmers and a comparison between the recorded load and the actual load is
conducted.
If you are clearing a load, the recorded load information is cleared for the
selected dimmers.
Note: For additional information on working with recorded loads, please refer to
your Sensor CEM User Manual.
372
Appendix A
Using the SuperPro Monitoring
Tool
The Sentinel SuperPro Monitoring Tool is automatically installed with WYSIWYG.
Using this tool, you can view and track license distribution information for the
dongles on your network.
In this appendix
SuperPro Monitoring Tool
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
375
373
Using the SuperPro Monitoring Tool
374
Release 18.0
November 2006
Using the SuperPro Monitoring Tool
SuperPro Monitoring Tool
Introduction
As part of the WYSIWYG installation, a Sentinel SuperPro Monitoring Tool is included
that enables you to view and track information about the dongles on your network.
With this tool you can:
„
„
„
„
keep track of how many licenses are in use on your network.
view the maximum number of licenses that can be obtained from each dongle and,
therefore, the maximum number of users (both local and on the network) that can
access WYSIWYG Learn or WYSIWYG Network.
view the Sentinel Protection Servers that are currently installed and running on
your network.
view the addresses and version information for each Sentinel Protection Server.
The Monitoring tool is a convenient tool to use to keep track of license activity on your
network. For example, you can use the Monitoring Tool to determine whether you have
purchased enough licenses, based on license demand.
Note: The SuperPro Monitoring Tool is designed for use only with SuperPro-protected
applications, such as WYSIWYG Learn or WYSIWYG Network, that are being run on a
network.
To launch the Monitoring Tool
1
Navigate to the folder where you installed WYSIWYG (for example, C:\Program
Files\WYSIWYG).
2
Open the Bin\Sentinel folder.
3
Double-click the monitor application.
Result: The Monitoring Tool is launched, and you are prompted to set a protocol.
The Monitoring Tool can monitor servers on the network that use any of the
following protocols:
4
„
TCP/IP
„
NETBEUI
„
IPX/SPX
„
SAP
Select TCP/IP, and then click OK.
Result: Servers using the selected protocol are displayed in the Monitoring Tool.
WYSIWYG products run on TCP/IP networks only.
Changing the protocol
When you launch the SuperPro Monitoring Tool, you are prompted to set a protocol.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
375
Using the SuperPro Monitoring Tool
Release 18.0
To modify the selected protocol
1
From the File menu, choose Set Protocol.
2
Select the protocol that you want to use.
3
Click OK.
Result: Servers using the selected protocol are displayed in the Monitoring Tool.
Viewing servers on the network
When you launch the SuperPro Monitoring Tool, all Sentinel Protection Servers running
on the network appear in the server list on the left. Click a server in the list to display
the following information in the right pane:
„
server name
„
server’s protocol
„
server’s address (for TCP/IP or IPX/SPX protocols)
„
server’s version
„
key information for the dongle that is connected to the server
Key information
Information about each key (or dongle) connected to a server running on the network
appears in the right pane when you select a server from the server list. Click on a key to
obtain the following information:
„
„
key’s hard limit (that is, the maximum number of licenses that can be obtained
from the dongle and, therefore, the maximum number of users that can access
WYSIWYG Learn or WYSIWYG Network)
„
number of licenses currently in use on the dongle
„
highest number of licenses issued from this dongle
„
376
key number (a label used only for identification purposes)
number of time-outs recorded by the Server for Clients using licenses from the
dongle
November 2006
Using the SuperPro Monitoring Tool
Searching for a server
If a server does not appear in the list, you can search for it on the network.
To search for a server
1
From the View menu, choose Find.
Result: The Find Server dialog box is displayed.
2
In the Server Name box, type the host name or IP address of the server that you are
looking for.
3
Click Add Server to add the server to the list of servers to find.
4
Click Find Server to search for the server. If the server is found, it appears in the
server list in the left pane.
Note: Once a server has been added to the list of servers to search for, it remains
on the list until you remove it. To remove a server from the list, select the server,
and then click Delete Server.
Refreshing the server list
You can either manually or automatically refresh the server list using the Monitoring
Tool.
To manually refresh the server list
From the View menu, choose Refresh.
To automatically refresh the server list
1
From the View menu, choose Refresh Rate.
2
In the Refresh After box, type the refresh rate in minutes.
3
Click OK.
Result: The server list is automatically refreshed at the rate that you specify.
Additional help
For further assistance in using the Sentinel SuperPro Monitoring Tool, refer to the online
Help available with the product.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
377
Using the SuperPro Monitoring Tool
378
Release 18.0
Appendix B
Keyboard shortcuts and hot keys
Keyboard shortcuts and hot keys help you to access commonly used commands
more quickly.
In this appendix
Keyboard shortcuts and hot keys
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
381
379
Keyboard shortcuts and hot keys
380
Release 18.0
November 2006
Keyboard shortcuts and hot keys
Keyboard shortcuts and hot keys
Keyboard shortcuts
There are many keyboard shortcuts that can save you time when using WYSIWYG.
Standardized WYSIWYG keyboard shortcuts are defined below.
Keyboard shortcut
Description
F1
Help
Shift + F1
Displays context-sensitive help
F4
Repeat last command
F5
Refresh current view
F6
Relative or absolute coordinate
toggle
F8
Ortho toggle
F9
Snap toggle
F10
Crosshairs toggle
F11
Interactive object creation toggle
Space
Repeat last command
Ctrl+A
Select all
Ctrl+Shift+A
Select current layer
Ctrl+C
Copy
Ctrl+F
Find
Ctrl+G
Group
Ctrl+H
Replace
Ctrl+M
Move
Ctrl+N
New document
Ctrl+O
Open document
Ctrl+P
Print current view
Ctrl+R
Rotate
Ctrl+S
Save current document
Ctrl+U
Ungroup
Ctrl+V
Paste
Ctrl+X
Cut
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
381
Keyboard shortcuts and hot keys
Release 18.0
Keyboard shortcut
Description
Ctrl+Y
Redo
Ctrl+Z
Undo
Ctrl+Click
Add to or remove from selection
list
Ctrl+Drag
Copy selected objects
Alt+Drag
Rotate selected objects
Alt+Arrow keys
Nudges selected objects in 10’
increments
Alt+Shift+Arrow keys
Nudges selected objects in 1’
increments
Alt+Enter
Displays properties of selected
object
Arrow keys
Move target
Ctrl+arrow keys
Rotates around the drawing (in
isometric view only)
Page Up/Page Down
Zoom in and out
Del
Erases selected object
Esc
Abort command
Hot keys
Hot keys are keyboard shortcuts that act as commands entered from menus or
toolbars. They are categorized according to the view and timing of usage. For example,
certain hot keys are only operational in plot views and only in the midst of performing
an operation.
Default hot keys available in Plot Views
The following default hot keys are useful when working in CAD mode.
382
November 2006
Keyboard shortcuts and hot keys
Start Operations
Description
Hot Key
Insert line
L
Insert riser
R
Insert cylinder
C
Insert pipe
P
Insert truss
T
Insert text label
B
Insert fixture
F
Snap to grid
G
Snap to midpoints
M
Snap to endpoints
E
Zoom window
Z
Modify view
V
ToolTips on/off
Y
Insert dimension
D
Mid Operations
Description
Hot Key
Abort mode
A
Finish mode
F
Close line
C
Quick increase
I
Quick decrease
D
Snap to grid
G
Snap to midpoints
M
Snap to endpoints
E
Previous zoom
P
Next zoom
N
Rotate truss counter-clockwise Z
Rotate truss clockwise
X
Truss rotate from one end to
the other end
S
ToolTips on/off
Y
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
383
Keyboard shortcuts and hot keys
Release 18.0
Default hot keys available in Simulation Views
The following default hot keys are helpful when working in Design and Live modes.
Start Operations
Description
Hot Key
At last and focus
L
Focus
F
At full intensity
1
At 50% intensity
5
Intensity off
0
Intensity specify
S
Iris wide
W
Iris tight
T
Iris specify
I
Zoom window
Z
Zoom fit
M
Modify view
V
ToolTips on/off
Y
Mid Operations
384
Description
Hot Key
Abort mode
A
Finish mode
F
ToolTips on/off
Y
November 2006
Keyboard shortcuts and hot keys
Default hot keys available in Presentation Views
The following default hot keys are helpful when working in Presentation mode - Plots.
Start Operations
Description
Hot Key
Insert line
L
Insert rectangle
N
Insert round rectangle
U
Insert ellipse
E
Insert polygon
G
Insert text
T
Insert bitmap
B
Insert plot view
P
Insert data view
D
Insert report view
R
Insert spreadsheet
X
Open bound view
O
Bound view properties
S
Move to front
J
Move to back
K
Placeholders only
H
Print preview
W
Zoom window
Z
Zoom fit
M
Modify view
V
Mid Operations
Description
Hot Key
Abort mode
A
Finish mode
F
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
385
Keyboard shortcuts and hot keys
Release 18.0
Default hot keys available in Patch Views
The following default hot keys are helpful when working in Data mode - Patch.
Start Operations
Description
Hot Key
Console modify
C
Unpatch
U
Modify view
V
ToolTips on/off
Y
Mid Operations
386
Description
Hot Key
Abort mode
A
ToolTips on/off
Y
Appendix C
Using AutoFocus with the HogPC
AutoFocus is the protocol that WYSIWYG uses to “talk back” to a compatible
console. One of the consoles that is compatible with this protocol is the HogII.
The offline editor for the HogII, HogPC, is also compatible with the AutoFocus
protocol, although it requires additional setup.
Normally AutoFocus is enabled through the WYG-it2 or other hardware interface.
However, since the HogPC operates internally, you can establish a connection
through software.
Note: HogPC and WYSIWYG must be running on the same computer to enable
the connection.
In this appendix
Setting up AutoFocus to work with the HogPC
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
389
387
Using AutoFocus with the HogPC
388
Release 18.0
November 2006
Using AutoFocus with the HogPC
Setting up AutoFocus to work with the HogPC
Introduction
To establish a connection between AutoFocus in WYSIWYG and the HogPC, you must
install and configure two additional pieces of software called MIDI YOKE and MIDI-OX.
After this software has been configured, you can set up the HogPC and WYSIWYG to
work with the new software.
Additional software
WYSIWYG can only send out MIDI data streams through the MIDI device set up in the
Windows Sound Devices Control Panel. Similarly, HogPC can only listen to MIDI data
streams that are fed into the computer through the MIDI device assigned by the same
Control Panel. To establish a connection between WYSIWYG and HogPC, you must set
up a third-party method.
One solution would be to use an external/physical device that can ‘loop’ the MIDI signal
through it. That is, the device would take the signal coming from the computer on one
port, and feed it back into the computer on another port.
A second solution would be to use a software driver that emulates the MIDI signal’s
‘looping’ (the MIDI drivers that come with Windows do not support this feature.) This
driver is called MIDI YOKE.
MIDI YOKE is a MIDI patch cable driver that enables you to establish a connection
between applications that output MIDI data streams and those that receive MIDI data
streams without the need for an external MIDI device. To obtain additional information
on MIDI YOKE, refer to http://www.midiox.com/myoke.htm.
MIDI-OX is the application used to configure the MIDI YOKE port mappings/
assignments. It is also used to monitor MIDI data that passes through the MIDI YOKE
driver. In the case of WYSIWYG, this is the MIDI data coming from WYSIWYG into the
MIDI YOKE driver and out to the HogPC. To obtain additional information on MIDI-OX,
refer to http://www.midiox.com.
Installing and configuring the additional software
MIDI YOKE
To install MIDI YOKE
1
Based on your operating system, download the MIDI Yoke installer from the
appropriate link at the following Web site:
„
Windows ME/XP: http://www.midiox.com/zip/myokent.exe
Follow the instructions at http://www.midiox.com/midiyoke_instxp.htm to install
MIDI YOKE in a Windows XP Home environment. For all other operating systems,
refer to the Installation section of the main MIDI YOKE Web page, http://
www.midiox.com/myoke.htm.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
389
Using AutoFocus with the HogPC
Release 18.0
Notes:
1.
Do not change any of the settings in the configuration window that appears after
installation is complete.
2.
You must restart your computer to finalize the installation.
To configure MIDI YOKE
Once your computer has restarted, from the Start menu, choose Settings, and then
choose Control Panel. Click the Audio Devices icon (or its equivalent name in your
operating system), and then click the Audio tab. Select MIDI Yoke NT: 1 as your MIDI
Music Playback default device.
MIDI-OX
To install MIDI-OX
1
Download MIDI-OX by clicking http://www.midiox.com/zip/midioxse.exe.
2
To install MIDI-OX, double-click on the downloaded file and follow the instructions.
To configure MIDI-OX
1
Once the software has been installed, launch the application by double-clicking on
the MIDI-OX icon located on your Desktop.
2
From the Options menu, select Devices.
3
Select MIDI Yoke NT: 1 as your MIDI Input Device and MIDI Yoke NT: 2 as your MIDI
Output Device.
4
Click OK.
Setting up the HogPC
Note: For proper functionality, install the HogPC software on your computer after you
install WYSIWYG. If the HogPC software was already installed before you installed
WYSIWYG, repair the installation using the HogPC installer or the Add/Remove
Programs utility in the Windows Control Panel.
To set up the HogPC
1
Launch HogPC.
2
Load the show for which you want to use AutoFocus to cue.
3
Right-click in the HogPC panel, and then choose Config….
4
Select MIDI Yoke NT: 2 for Input, and MIDI Yoke NT: 3 for Output, and then click OK.
5
In the HogPC panel, click Setup (next to the Pig button).
Result: The display changes in the first ‘monitor’ window.
6
Click Input Panel, and then click MIDI In at the top. (You can now close the Input
Panel setup window, if desired.)
Setting up WYSIWYG
Due to some incompatibilities with certain motherboards, MIDI Drivers are not installed
with WYSIWYG, even when you perform a full installation. Therefore, you must install
them manually.
390
November 2006
Using AutoFocus with the HogPC
Note: Close WYSIWYG before starting the installation.
To install MIDI drivers
1
From the Start menu, choose Settings, and then choose Control Panel. Click the Add/
Remove Programs icon.
2
Scroll down to WYSIWYG, and then click the Change/Remove button.
3
Once the installer launches, click the Modify option button, and then click Next.
4
From the Select Components window, select the MIDI Drivers check box.
5
Click Next.
Result: Based on your method of installation, you are prompted for the installer
file.
a.
If you installed WYSIWYG from a CD, you must place the WYSIWYG CD in your
CD-ROM drive.
b.
If you downloaded the WYSIWYG installer from the Web, the install file must
be present on your hard drive for the installation to complete.
Please note that you will only be able to install the MIDI drivers from the
installer that you originally used (for example, if you used the Web installer,
you will not be able to install the drivers using the CD, and vice-versa).
6
Click Finish when the installation is complete.
To set up MIDI drivers
1
Launch WYSIWYG.
2
Load the file with which you want to use AutoFocus.
3
Switch to LIVE Mode, add the HogII in the Device Manager, and then bind the ports
as you would normally.
4
Before closing the Device Manager, click New, and then select Standard MIDI from
the Devices > All or from the Devices > Manufacturer > Generic tree.
5
Click Insert.
Note: The Standard MIDI device appears in the list even if the drivers are not
installed. Therefore, it is important that you follow the steps outlined above to
ensure that the drivers are installed.
6
You now need to unbind AutoFocus from the HogPC, and then bind it to the
Standard MIDI device. To do so, with Standard MIDI still selected, click the Bind
AutoFocus button at the bottom of the Device Manager Window.
Testing the connection
Before performing this procedure, ensure that all three applications (MIDI-OX, HogPC,
and WYSIWYG) are open.
To test the connection
1
In the Device Manager, select the Hog II, and then click Connect. The status
changes to Connected.
2
Repeat step 1 for the standard MIDI device, and then close the Device Manager.
3
Resize your WYSIWYG window so that you can see at least part of the MIDI-OX
window.
4
From the Live menu in Live mode, open all the Designer tools: Intensity, Focus,
Color, Gobo, Prism, Zoom, and Iris.
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
391
Using AutoFocus with the HogPC
5
Release 18.0
In WYSIWYG, select at least one of the fixtures in your show, and then click Full in
the Intensity tool.
Result: The selected fixture’s intensity is displayed. In addition, HogPC’s first
monitor window should display Intensity: Full in the bottom left-hand corner.
Note: Even before you click Full, you should see various codes (MIDI data)
displayed in MIDI-OX’s Output Monitor if everything was set up according to the
instructions above.
6
392
You can now minimize (not close) MIDI-OX, and start programming your show
using WYSIWYG’s AutoFocus features.
November 2006
Index
Index
Symbols
%Assistant% variable, 291
%Data% variable, 291
%Designer% variable, 291
%File% variable, 292
%Group% variable, 291
%Headings% variable, 291
%Scene% variable, 291
%Show% variable, 291
%Title% variable, 291
%Venue% variable, 291
=NOW() variable, 292
A
Absolute coordinates, 67, 146
Acceleration, 87
Accessory, 210
Activating WYSIWYG, 42
Activation, 44
Adding
floorplans, 120
Aiming fixtures, 190
Alias definition, 197
Ambient light, 75
Antialiasing options, 272
Aperture, 267
Application Options, 85
Arc, 132
Arcs, 303
Arena, 128
Arranging shortcuts, 57
Array, 174
Grid pattern, 175
Using to hang fixtures, 186
Aspect ratio, 322
Assembly Snap, 110, 182
Atmospheric options, 268
Attribute layout, 301
Attributes (Data fields), 230
Auto load, 86
Auto save, 86
Autofocus, 352, 389
Auto-increment, 199
AutoPatch, 347
AutoUnit, 93, 177, 178
Axes
drawing, 139
B
Back view, 108
Background Rendering Manager
About, 275
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Buttons, 280
Configuring, 275
Deleting jobs from, 283
Exporting images from, 283
Moving dequeued jobs back into queue, 282
Moving jobs to top of queue, 282
Moving jobs up or down in queue, 282
Pausing, 282
Removing jobs from queue, 282
Resuming, 282
Taskbar icons, 278
Backup files, 86
Backup looks, 369
Barndoors, 210
Baud rate, 85
Beam angle, 199, 351
Beam simulation quality, 75
Beams, 98
Big Layouts, 310
Bind
to console, 340
Bitmaps, 333
Black Box, 128
Blocks
Custom library items, 144
Groups, 146
Booms, 182
Borders and legs, 137
Break tool, 168
Budget
Cost, 197, 231
Bulb
Lamp, 198, 231
C
CAD environment, 104
CAD items, 317
CAD Options toolbar, 60
Camera, 75, 142
Camera toolbar
using, 143
Center line, 131
Channel count, 66
Channels
Simulation, 66
Circle, 132
Circles, 303
Circuit Name data field, 230
Circuit Number data field, 230
Circuit Type data field, 231
Circus tents, 129
Close the show document, 82
Color
Inserting, 211
Inserting multiple, 233
393
Index
Color data field, 230
Color Mode, 152
Color wheel, 254
Column Width Size, 243
Columns in Data mode, 230
ComEdit toolbar, 60
Compass, 143
Concept shortcuts, 258
Connecting, 340
console, 340
Console data field, 231
Consoles
connecting, 340
Content properties, 316
Convert tool, 168
Co-ordinate display, 86
Coordinate notation, 104
Coordinates, 67, 104
Copy, 304
Cost data field, 231
Count column, 289
Creating a new DMX universe, 237
Creating a new spreadsheet, 236
Cross-fading between lighting looks, 261
Current
Set current layer, 163
Custom, 214
Custom color scroll, 212
Custom color wheels, 212
Custom fixtures, 187
Custom gobo wheels, 212
Custom gobos, 214
Custom library items, 124, 144
Custom settings, 85
Customizing spreadsheet views, 231
Cut, 304
Cylinders, 135
D
Data error tab, 94
Data fields, 230
Data filters, 234
Data toolbar, 60
Decimal display, 86
Delay buffer, 86
Delete, 305
Design toolbar, 61
Design tools, 252
Designer’s Remote, 353
Detail level, 289
Device Manager, 340
Dimension line, 134
Dimmer data field, 230
Dimmer information, 366
Dimmer rack information, 367
Direct 3D tab, 87
Display Log, 363
Distance tool, 176
Distributing fixtures, 186
Divide tool, 170
DMX, 340, 346
394
Release 18.0
Document summary, 91
Dot line, 131
Draw defaults, 96
Draw toolbar, 61
Drawing
movement axes, 139
Drawing aids, 126
Drawing pipes, 179
Drawing tips, 126
DWG, 79
DWG/DXF files
importing, 111
DXF, 79
DXF/DWG files, 111
E
Edit (Pres) toolbar, 62
Edit toolbar, 61
Editing a key, 329
Editing a legend, 324
Editing objects, 145
Editing symbols, 324
EDMX, 90
EDMX address, 203
Entering data in the spreadsheet, 231
Environmental options, 271
Errors, 245
ETC interface tab, 90
ETCLink, 366
ETCLink functions, 366
Ethernet, 352
Exit WYSIWYG, 84
Export to DWG/DXF, 117
Exporting
to 2D DWG/DXF, 117, 118
to 3D DWG/DXF, 117
Extrude, 172
F
Facet resolution, 93
Facet splitting, 93
Fading between lighting looks, 261
Field angle, 199
File menu, 79
Fillet, 173
Filter
Data filter, 234
Find tool, 232
Fixture Details tab, 298
Fixture layout, 205
Fixture notation, 205
Fixture properties
Photometrics, 198
Fixture snap, 110
Fixtures, 185
Distribute and array feature, 186, 187
Distributing along pipes/truss, 186
Distributing between two points on pipes/truss, 186
Distributing from the center of pipes/truss, 187
November 2006
Distributing in a direction on pipes/truss, 186
Hanging multiple, 186
Inserting in CAD mode, 185
Using Array feature to hang, 186
Flight Case, 223
Floor mount, 177, 182
Floorplans
adding, 120
Hiding after importing, 121
Flow control, 85
Focus
Design tool, 255
Focus data field, 230
Focus position, 209
Focusing fixtures, 190
Footnotes data field, 231
Frame size, 210
Frame tents, 129
French curve, 131
Front view, 108
Full screen mode, 54
G
Gels, 254
Inserting, 211
Inserting multiple, 233
General object properties, 149
Gobo data field, 230
Gobo wheels
Custom, 212
Gobos
Custom, 214
Design tool, 254
Inserting, 211
Graphics, 333
Grid array, 175
Grid options, 97
Group By option, 291
Group tab, 146
Grouping, 146
H
Hang structure, 177, 190
Hanging, 185
Hanging fixtures, 185
Hanging multiple fixtures, 186
Hanging truss, 182
Hardware acceleration, 87
Hatch style, 209
Header
Report, 290
Hidden line, 131
Hide Floorplan, 121
HogPC
Connecting Autofocus to, 389
Hookup data field, 230
Hot keys, 382
Patch views, 386
Presentation views, 385
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
Index
Simulation, 384
I
Image items, 321
Images, 333, 361
Imperial units, 105
Importing
DWG/DXF files, 111
Importing DWG/DXF files, 113, 115
In-Place update, 33
Insert (Pres) toolbar, 62
Inserting
Color in Data mode, 233
Fixtures in CAD mode, 185
Fixtures in Data mode, 233
Focus positions in Data mode, 233
Items into layouts, 312
Positions in Data mode, 233
Installing
In-Place update, 33
WYSIWYG, 32
WYSIWYG Learn, 35
WYSIWYG Network, 35
Installing WYSIWYG, 33
Intensity design tool, 253
Interactive mode, 96, 111
Isometric view, 108
Item properties, 316
J
jpeg file, 215, 268, 312, 333
K
Key
Instrument labels, 205
Keyboard and mouse control, 68
Keyboard shortcuts, 381
Keys, 326
L
Label layout, 207
Ladders, 177, 182
Lamp Type data field, 231
Lamps, 123
Latitude, 95
Layer data field, 231
Layers, 163
Layers toolbar, 62
Layout
fixture data, 205
Layout tabs
CAD, 103
Data, 229
Design, 251
Link, 359
395
Index
Live, 339
Pres, 287
Layouts (Pres mode), 310
LED, 216
Left view, 108
Legend items, 322
LES Wizard, 216
Library Browser, 122
Library shortcuts, 56
Light emission, 151
Light Emitting Surface Wizard, 216
Line
Drawing lines, 131
Line color, 164
Line weight, 164
Linear axis, 140
Lines, 303
Live toolbar, 62
Load recording, 371
Location setup, 94, 143
Longitude, 95
Looks
and moving scenery, 262
M
Mainframe, 54
Marker grips, 148
Masking, 137
Materials, 151, 161
Measurement mode, 134
Menu bar, 59
Merge, 81
Merging documents, 81
Message Log, 361
Message Log Options toolbar, 63
Metric units, 105
Micro Layouts, 310
MIDI, 352
Mirror tool, 148
Mirroring, 148
Missing coordinate, 106
Model data field, 231
Modes, 51
Modifying wireframe views, 70
Motion control system
moving objects with, 344
Mountable yokes, 210
Move, 305
Move Page, 298
Move tool, 146
Movement axes
drawing, 139
Movement axis
adding vertex to linear, 142
attaching objects to, 142
attaching to a DMX patch, 141
attaching to a motion patch, 141
changing path of, 142
drawing linear, 140
drawing rotation, 140
moving objects on with a console device, 343
396
Release 18.0
moving objects on with a motion control system,
344
patching to DMX console device, 239
patching to motion control system, 239
Moving head, 203
Moving mirror, 203
Moving scenery
reading the patch for, 242
viewing, 262, 263
Moving Scenery tool, 256
using, 256
Multi-source fixtures
applying color to, 200
Multi-source light
applying color to with Quick Tools, 211
N
Navigation shortcuts, 55
New Back Elevation Plot, 295
New Front Elevation Plot, 295
New Left Section Plot, 295
New Plan Plot, 294
New Plot View Properties tab, 296
New Plots, 294
Attribute layout, 301
Creating a new plot type, 294
Drawing objects, 303
Editing objects, 304
Inserting into layouts, 316, 321
Manipulating object properties, 306
Modifying properties of a plot, 295
Objects, 298
Objects drawn in New Plots, 307
Printing, 309
Reestablish links, 299
Relationship with objects in CAD, 299
Relationship with objects in Data, 299
Selecting objects, 304
Updating, 295
Working in, 294
New Right Section Plot, 295
New Show, 79
Node Manager, 368
Number of color frames data field, 231
Number of data channels data field, 231
Number of lamps data field, 231
O
Object representation in New Plots, 298
Object-specific properties, 156
Offset, 181
Offset data field, 230
Open a show document, 79
Open GL tab, 88
Opening a new window, 54
Options, 85
Origin, 97, 104
Ortho, 67, 109
Owner data field, 231
November 2006
Index
P
Q
Palette shortcuts, 260
Pan data field, 230
Paperwork, 288
Passwords, 47
Patch, 237
changing width of cells in, 243
Patch data field, 230
Patch universe, 237
Patch views
Hot keys, 386
Patching
movement axes (DMX), 239
movement axes (motion control system), 239
Patching fixtures, 238
Photo quality pictures, 264
Photometrics, 185, 198
Pipe, 137, 188
Pipe snap, 110
Pipe tape, 335
Pipes
Distributing multiple fixtures on, 186, 187
Plan view, 108
Plot type, 108
Points, 131
Popup frames, 53
Ports
console, 340
Position, 177
Position data field, 230
Position Manager, 177
POV (Point of View), 202
Precision, 97, 159
Presence option, 268
Presentation items, 312
Presentation views
Hot keys, 385
Print, 82
Printing layouts, 332
Processors, 89
Product Configuration Wizard, 40
Properties
Dimension, 158
Errors, 247
Focus position, 191
General, 149
Layouts, 311
Legend, 325, 330
Library item, 124
Line, 157
Patch universe, 242
Pipe, 181
Point, 157
Report, 288
Spreadsheet, 235
Symbol, 209
Text label, 158
Wireframe view, 70
Proscenium Arch, 127
Purpose data field, 230
Quick focus, 191
Quick Light Emission Tools, 153
Quick Tools
using to apply color to multi-source fixtures, 200
Quick tools, 199, 200
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
R
Radiosity, 270
Reading the patch, 241
Redesigning, 290
Redesigning headings, 290
Redo, 145
Regional profile, 86
Regional settings, 94
Relative, 147
Relative coordinates, 67
Rename fixture type, 197
Render options, 89
Render shortcuts, 273
Rendering, 226, 264, 354
Replace tool, 232
Replacing fixtures, 187
Report headings, 290
Reports, 288
Reset origin, 104
Resizing
Spheres, 148
Right view, 108
Riser, 134
Rotate, 305
Rotate tool, 147
Rotating, 147
Rotation axis, 140
S
Saturation, 272
Save, 80
Save As, 80
Saving a lighting look, 261
Scenes, 165
Scenes toolbar, 63
Schedules, 288
Screen layout, 51
Screens
drawing, 137
Scrollbars, 72
Scrollers, 213, 254
Scrolls, 212
Selecting objects, 145
Send the show document through e-mail, 84
Set Piece tab, 156
Setting display size for shortcuts, 57
Settings
regional, 94
Shaded views, 73
Shortcut, 55
Shortcut bar
397
Index
Create Shortcuts
Concepts, 258
Images, 333
Layouts, 310
Library Objects, 124
Lighting looks, 261
Palette, 260
Patch Universes, 237
Render, 273
Reports, 290
Spreadsheets, 236
Worksheets, 334
Shortcuts, 55
arranging, 57
delete, 56
new, 56
ordering, 56
setting display size, 57
Show details, 98
Show information, 293
Shutter cuts, 192
Side view, 108
Sidedness
Changing for an object, 154
Sidedness tab, 154
Simulation
Channels, 66
Simulation options, 98, 226, 354
Simulation views
Hot keys, 384
Snap, 67, 97, 109
Soft goods, 137
Soft shadow, 271
Solid line, 131
Sphere, 136
Spheres
Resizing, 148
Spin data field, 231
Spline, 131
Split gels, 233
Spot, 153
Spot data field, 230
Spreadsheets, 230
Standard toolbar, 63
Status bar, 66
Status data field, 231
Stock, 212
Streaming video
reading the patch for, 241
Subscriptions, 45
Surfaces, 134
Symbols, 93, 98, 205, 304, 320
T
Tag data field, 231
Tape printer, 335
Template, 81
Tents, 129
Text label, 133, 303
Textures, 87, 159
398
Release 18.0
Tile printing, 297, 312
Tile Printing tab, 297
Tilt data field, 230
Time zones, 95
Title block, 293, 312
Toolbars, 59, 88
Tools
CAD, 167
Design, 252
Tools toolbar, 64
Tooltips, 98, 320
Tophats, 210
Troubleshooting, 12
Truss
Distributing multiple fixtures on, 186, 187
Hanging truss, 182
Rotating truss, 183
Truss cross members, 98, 320
Truss snap, 110, 182
Type data field, 230
U
Undo, 145
Ungrouping, 146
Unit data field, 230
Universe
Patch, 237
Universes toolbar, 64
Unused channels, 66
Upgrades, 31, 44
USB serial converter, 86
USITT symbols, 208
V
Variables in reports, 291
Vertex, 167, 172
adding to a linear axis, 142
Vertical hang structures, 300
Vertical justification of a line, 158
Video
patching in the patch view, 238
Video source
configuring new, 138
controlling with a console device, 342
Video tool, 255
View - full screen, 54
View Options
Error, 247
Flight Case, 225
Layouts, 311
Patch universe, 242
Report, 288
Shaded views, 74
Spreadsheet, 235
Wireframe views, 70
View shortcuts, 69
View toolbar, 64
Viewer, 100
Viewing
November 2006
Index
moving scenery, 262, 263
Views/tools shortcuts, 56
W
Wattage data field, 231
Weight data field, 231
Welcome window, 51
Wheels, 213, 254
Window
New, 54
Wireframe views, 68
Workplane, 108
WYSILink, 360
WYSILink toolbar, 64, 366
WYSIWYG
activating, 42
Design, 18
Installing, 33
Perform, 20, 24, 27
Report, 13, 17
starting for the first time, 40
WYSIWYG Learn, 24, 35
WYSIWYG Network, 26
WYSIWYG Perform - Console Edition, 13, 22
WYSIWYG Viewer, 100
Y
Yokes
mountable, 210
Z
Zoom, 252
Zooming, 69
Zoom tools, 68
WYSIWYG Reference Guide
399