poh cessna t206h - BLUE SKY AVIATION

URAD PRO Cl VILNi LETECTVi
CTVIL AVIATION AUTIIORJTY
CES.KA. REPUBLIKA
CZECH REPUBLIC
PAGE OF ACCEPTANCE
CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY OF THE CZECH REPUBLIC ACCEPTS THIS Pilot·s
Operating llandbook DOC.No 206HPHUS05 APPROVED ORlGlNALL Y BY FAA
FOR THE AIRCRAFT TYPE : Cessna T 206H
WITH THESE LlMITATIONS: No additional limitations
LO this Flight Manual
NATIONALITY OR COMMON MARK AND REGISTRATION MARK
OK-MCP
'
-
AIRPLANE SERIAL NUMBER : 1'20608172
nns M~"IUAL MUST BE MAINTAINED IN ACCORDANCE WITH
REVJSION SERVICE OF THE MANUFACTURER
;f
19-12-2005
Datum vydani • Dote of issue
(dd·mm-rrrr) • (dd·mm-yyyy)
CM ~~n-ooJ.J 98
(Ing.Blaha)
Podpis -Signature
Pilot's Operating Handbook
and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
THIS DOCUMENT MUST BE
CARRIED IN THE AIRPLANE
AT ALL TIMES.
The Cessna Aircraft
Company
Model T206H
Serial No.I ~ o!o
o~rt2
Registration No. _ _
_
This publication inctudes the material required to be furnished to the pilot by FAR Part
23 and constitutes the FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual.
FAA APPROVAL
'AA APPROVl:O UNDER FAA 21 SUBPAAT J
~;~=:.:_
lhe Cessna Akcraft CO
COPYRIGHT© 1998
The Cessna Aircraft Company
Wichita. Kansas USA
Dale: 19 llf!cember 1998
--
f)
Member of GAMA
Original Issue - 9 November 1998
__------,__,....,,..,-----------------------
THIS MANUAL WAS PROVIDED FOR THE
AIRPLANE IDENTIFIED ON THE TITLE
ON
PAGE
SUBSEQUENT REVISIONS SUPPLIED BY
I
CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY MUST BE
PROPERLY INSERTED.
I
Cessna Aircraft Company, Aircraft Division
PUBLICATION PART NUMBER
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Pilot's Operating Handbook
and
FM Approved Airplane Flight Manual
Model T206H Serials T20608001 and On
Original Issue - 9 November 1998
Revision 6 - 12 January 2004
PART NUMBER: T206HPHUS06
Revision 6
I
I
i/ii
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CONGRATULATIONS
CONGRATULATIONS ....
Congratulations on your purchase and welcome to Cessna ownership! Your
Cessna has been designed and constructed to give you the most in performance,
value and comfort.
This Pilot's Operating Handbook has been prepared as a guide to help you get
the most utility from your airplane. It contains information about your airplane's
equipment, operating procedures, performance and suggested service and care.
Please study It carefully and use it as a reference.
The worldwide Cessna Organization and Cessna Customer Service are
prepared to serve you. The following services are offered by each Cessna
Service Station:
THE CESSNA AIRPLANE WARRANTIES, which provide coverage for parts and
labor, are upheld through Cessna Service Stations worldwide.
Warranty
provisions and other important information are contained in the Customer Care
Program Handbook supplied with your airplane. The Customer Care Card
assigned to you at delivery will establish your eligibility under warranty and
should be presented to your local Cessna Service Station at the time of
warranty service.
FACTORY TRAINED PERSONNEL to provide you with courteous, expert
service.
FACTORY APPROVED SERVICE EQUIPMENT to provide you efficient and
accurate workmanship.
A STOCK OF GENUINE CESSNA SERVICE PARTS are avauable when you
need them.
THE LATEST AUTHORITATIVE INFORMATION FOR SERVICING CESSNA
AIRPLANES. Cessna Service Stations have all of the current Maintenance
Manuals, Illustrated Parts Catalogs and various other support publications
produced by Cessna Aircraft Company.
A current Cessna Service Station Directory accompanies your new airplane.
The Directory is revised frequently, and a current copy can be obtained from your
nearest Cessna Service Station.
We urge all Cessna owners/operators to utilize the benefits available within the
Cessna Organization.
Nov 9/98
iii
PERFORMANCESPECIFICATIONS
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
PERFORMANCE - SPECIFICATIONS
~
SPEED
Maximum at 17,000 Ft. . . . . . . .......... . . .
Cruise, 75% Power at 20,000 Ft . .... ... . . .
Cruise, 75% Power at 10,000 Ft. . . . ... .. .. .
CRUISE:
I
178 KNOTS
164 KNOTS
150 KNOTS
Recommended lean mixture with fuel allowance for
engine start, taxi, takeoff, climb and 45 minutes
reserve.
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361:
75% Power at 20,000 Ft. . . . ........
88 Gallons Usable Fuel
75% Power at 10,000 Ft. .. ' ... .. . ..
88 Gallons Usable Fuel
Maximum Range at 20,000 Ft.
88 Gallons Usable Fuel
Maximum Range at 10,000 Ft.
88 Gallons Usable Fuel
Range
Time
Range
Time
Range
Time
Range
Time
568NM
3.7 HRS
541 NM
3.7 HRS
692NM
6.1 HRS
713NM
6.4 HRS
Serials T20608362 and on:
75% Power at 20,000 Ft. .... ... ' . ..
87 Gallons Usable Fuel
75% Power at 10,000 Ft. .. . . .. . .. .. .
87 Gallons Usable Fuel
Maximum Range at 20,000 Ft.
87 Gallons Usable Fuel
Maximum Range at 10,000 Ft.
87 Gallons Usable Fuel
Range
Time
Range
Time
Range
Time
Range
Time
559 NM
3.6 HRS
533 NM
3.6 HRS
682NM
6.0 HRS
703 NM
6.3 HRS
RATE OF CLIMB AT SEA LEVEL
1050 FPM
SERVICE CEILING
27,000 FT
. . . . .. ... . ........ . . . .. . . . .
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CONGRATULATIONS
PERFORMANCE-SPECIFICATIONS
(Continued)
TAKEOFF PERFORMANCE:
Ground Roll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total Distance Over 50 Ft. Obstacle . . . . . . . . . • • .
910 FT
1740 FT
LANDING PERFORMANCE:
Ground Roll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total Distance Over 50 Ft. Obstacle . . . . . . . . . . . .
735 FT
1395 FT
STALL SPEED (KCAS):
Flaps Up, Power Off
. ..... . .... . ... . . . .....
62 KCAS
.. ... .. . . . . . . .... . .. '
54 KCAS
Ramp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Takeoff or Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3617 LBS
3600 LBS
Flaps Down, Power Off
MAXIMUM WEIGHT:
.__,,-
STANDARD EMPTY WEIGHT:
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361
Serials T20608362 and on
2304LBS
2299 LBS
MAXIMUM USEFUL LOAD:
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361
Serials T20608362 and on ••• •. .•.•••••••.•
1313 LBS
1318 LBS
...... ........ ...
BAGGAGE ALLOWANCE
. . . .... •. . . . . . . .. ... .. .
180 LBS
.........••..... ..... ..
20.7
POWER LOADING Lbs./HP . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.6
WING LOADING: Lbs./Sq. Ft.
Revision 5
I
I
PERFORMANCESPECIFICATIONS
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
PERFORMANCE-SPECIFICATIONS
(Continued)
FUEL CAPACITY
92GAL
OIL CAPACITY . ......... .... . ... . ... ..... .. . . .
11 QTS
ENGINE: Textron Lycoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . .
TIO-540-AJ1A
310 BHP at 2500 RPM
PROPELLER: Diameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
79 IN.
The above performance figures are based on the indicated
weights, standard atmospheric conditions, level, hard-surface dry
runways and no wind. They are calculated values derived from
lflight tests conducted by Cessna Aircraft Company under carefully
documented conditions and will vary with individual airplanes and
numerous factors affecting flight performance.
• Speed performance and range are shown for an airplane
equipped with the standard wheel and brake fairings. These
fairings increase the speeds approximately 3 knots over an
airplane without the fairings. Heavy duty wheels, tires and
brakes are available and when installed with the appropriate
wheel and brake fairings result in no significant change in
performance.
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CONGRATULATIONS
COVERAGE
thel
The Pilot's Operating Handbook located in the airplane at
time of delivery from Cessna Aircraft Company contains information
applicable to the Model T206H airplane by serial number and
registration number shown on the Title Page. This handbook is
applicable to airplane serial number T20608001 and On. All
information is based on data available at the time of publication.
This handbook is comprised of nine sections that cover all
operational aspects of a standard-equipped airplane. Following
Section 8 are the Supplements, Section 9, which provide expanded
operational procedures for the avionics equipment (both standard
and optional), and provides information on special operations.
Supplements are individual documents, and may be issued or
revised without regard to revision dates which apply to the POH
itself. These supplements contain a Log of Effective Pages, which
should be used to determine the status of each supplement.
ORIGINAL ISSUE AND REVISIONS
"---../'
This Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual is comprised of the original issue and any
subsequent revisions. To ensure that information in this manual is
current, the revisions must be incorporated as they are issued. This
manual was originally issued on November 9, 1998. As revisions
are issued, they will be noted in the Log of Effective Pages table.
The part number of this manual has also been designed to
further aid the owner/operator in determining the revision level of
any POH. Refer to the example below for a breakdown:
T206H PHUS
00
TL..=
T
Revision Level (Revision 0, Original Issue)
Manual (Pilot's Operating Handbook, U.S.)
,..__ _ _ _ _ Airplane Model (T206H)
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
PERFORMANCESPECIFICATIONS
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ORIGINAL ISSUE AND REVISIONS
(Continued)
It is the responsibility of the owner to maintain this handbook in a
current status when it is being used for operational purposes.
Owners should contact their Cessna Service Station whenever the
revision status of their handbook is in question.
Revisions are distributed to owners of U.S. Registered aircraft
according to FAA records at the time of revision issuance, and to
Internationally Registered aircraft according to Cessna Owner
Advisory records at the time of issuance. Revisions should be read
carefully upon receipt and incorporated in this POH.
REVISION FILING INSTRUCTIONS
REGULAR REVISIONS
Pages to be removed or inserted in the Pilots' Operating
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual are
determined by the Log of Effective Pages located in this section.
IThis log contains the page number and date of issue/revision level
for each page within the POH. At original issue, all pages will
contain the same date. As revisions to the POH occur, these
ldates/revision levels will change on effected pages. When two
pages display the same page number, the page with the latest
date/revision level shall be inserted into the POH. The date/revision
level on the Log of Effective Pages shall also agree with the latest
date/revision level of the page in question.
l
TEMPORARY REVISIONS
Under limited circumstances, temporary revisions to the POH
may be issued. These temporary revisions are to be filed in the
applicable section in accordance with filing instructions appearing
on the first page of the temporary revision.
The recession of a temporary revision is accomplished by
incorporation into the POH at revision time or by a superseding
temporary revision. In order to accurately track the status of
temporary revisions as they pertain to a POH, a Temporary Revision
List will be located previous to this section when required. This list
will indicate the date the temporary revision was incorporated into
the POH, thus authorizing the recession of the temporary revision.
lviii
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CONGRATULATIONS
IDENTIFYING REVISED MATERIAL
Additions or revisions to the text in an existing section will be
identified by a vertical line (revision bar) adjacent to the applicable
revised area on the outer margin of the page.
When technical changes cause unchanged text to appear on a
different page, a revision bar will be placed in the outer lower
margin of the page, opposite the page number and date/revisionl
level of the page. These pages will display the current date/revision
level as found in the Original Issue and Revisions paragraph of this
section.
When extensive technical changes are made to text in an
existing section that requires extensive revision, revision bars will
appear the full length of text.
New or existing art that is revised or added to an existing sectionl
will be identified by a single pointing hand indicator adjacent to the
figure title and figure number. Some existing art which
previously revised will have pointing hand(s) adjacent to the portion
of the art which has changed.
wasl
-..._,,,
WARNINGS, CAUTIONS AND NOTES
Throughout the text, warnings, cautions and notes pertaining to
airplane handling and operations are utilized. These adjuncts to the
text are used to highlight or emphasize important points.
WARNING • Calls attention to use of methods, procedures or
limits which must be followed precisely to avoid injury or death to
persons.
CAUTION • Calls attention to methods, procedures or limits
which must be followed to avoid damage to equipment.
NOTE - Calls attention to additional procedures or information
pertaining to the text.
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
LOG OF EFFECTIVE PAGES
LOG OF EFFECTIVE PAGES
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in the
POH. Pages which are affected by the current revision will carry the
date of that revision.
Revision
Date
0 (Original Issue)
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MODEL T206H
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MODEL T206H
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CESSNA
MODEL T206H
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xiv
pJ.lz-D4
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
LOG OF EFFECTIVE PAGES
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION
GENERAL . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . .... . . . . ..
1
LIMITATIONS
2
..........................
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
NORMAL PROCEDURES
4
.................
PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
WEIGHT & BALANCE/EQUIPMENT LIST . . . . . .
6
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION . . . . . . .
7
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE . . . . . .
8
SUPPLEMENTS
9
Revision 5
........................
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 1
GENERAL
SECTION 1
GENERAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Three View - Normal Ground Attitude
Introduction . .. ....... . .. . ... . . ... . . . . . ... ... . . .. .
Descriptive Data ..... . . ... ....... . .... . . . . ..... •. .
Eng ine . .. . .. . ........ ... .. ... . . .. . .... ... ... .
Propeller ... . . . ... .• .......... . . . ••. ••.... .. . ..
Fuel ................... .. ...... . .... . . . . . ... .
Oil . ...... .......... . . .. ......... . ... ... .... .
Maximum Certificated Weights ...... . .. . ...... . ... .
Standard Airplane Weights ......... . . ... •. ...•....
Ca bin and Entry Dimensions ... ..... .... ..... .. ... .
Baggage Space and Entry Dimensions . .. .. . . . . . . .. . .
Specific Loadings . . . . . . . . . . . .. ... .. . .. ..... .. .. .
Symbols, A bbreviations and Term inology . .. .. .... ... ... .
General Airspeed Terminology and Symbols ... .. . ... . .
Meteorological Terminology ....................... .
Engine Power Terminology .•.. .. ..... . .... .. ......
A irplane Performance a nd Flight Planning Terminology
Weight and Balance Terminology ... ... ....... ... . .
Metric/lmperiaVU.S . Conversion Charts .... . .... .. .... .
Weight Conversions .............. ... ... . .. . .. . .
Le ngth Conversions ... . . . . . ... . ... .. .. ... .. ... .
Distance Conversions ..... . .... .... . .... .... . .. .
Volume Conversions ... .. ........ .... .. ... .... . .
T emperature Conversions .. ... .. .... . . . ....... .. .
Vo lume to Weight Conversions . . .... ... ......... . .
Quick Conversions ..... .. .• ............ .. .. .. ..
Revision 5
Page
1-2
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-41
1-6
1-7
1-7
1-7
1-7
1-7
1-8
1-8
1-9
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1-10
1-11
1-13
1-14
1-16
1-20
1-21
1-24
1-25
1-26
1-1
SECTION 1
GENERAL
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
D
1210Tt002
12"10T1002
Figure 1-1. Three View - Normal Ground Attitude (Sheet 1 of 2)
1-2
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 1
GENERAL
-------·2:a·-3·-- - - - - - . . i
NOTE 1:
WING SPAN SHOWN WITH STROBE LIGHTS
INSTALLED.
NOTE 2:
WHEEL BASE LENGTH IS 69 1/4".
NOTE 3:
PROPELLER GROUND CLEARANCE IS 12".
NOTE 4:
WING AREA IS 174 SQUARE FEET.
NOTE 5:
MINIMUM TURNING RADIUS (* PIVOT POINT TO
OUTBOARD W ING TIP) IS 26'-3".
NOTE 6:
NORMAL GROUND ATTITUDE IS SHOWN WITH
NOSE STRUT SHOWING APPROXIMATELY 2" OF
STRUT, AND WINGS LEVEL.
1210T101s
Figure 1-1 . Three View - Normal Ground Attitude (Sheet 2 of 2)
May 30/01
1-3
SECTION 1
GENERAL
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
INTRODUCTION
This handbook contains 9 sections, and includes the material
required to be furnished to the pilot by FAR Part 23. It also
I contains supplemental data supplied by Cessna Aircraft Company.
Section 1 provides basic data and information of general interest.
It also contains definitions or explanations of symbols,
abbreviations, and terminology commonly used.
DESCRIPTIVE DATA
ENGINE
Number of Engines: 1.
Engine Manufacturer: Textron Lycoming.
Engine Model Number: TIO-540-AJ1A.
Engine Type: Turbo charged, direct drive, air-cooled,
horizontally opposed, fuel injected. six cylinder
engine with 541 .5 cu. in. displacement.
Horsepower Rating and
Engine Speed: 310 rated BHP at 39 inches Hg. and 2500 RPM.
PROPELLER
Propeller Manufacturer: McCauley Propeller Systems.
Propeller Model Number. B3D36C432/80VSA-1.
Number of Blades: 3.
Propeller Diameter: 79 inches.
Propeller Type: Constant speed and hydraulically actuated, with a
low pitch setting of 16.9° and a high pitch setting of
33.8° (30 inch station).
FUEL
A WARNING
USE OF UNAPPROVED FUELS MAY RESULT IN
DAMAGE TO THE ENGINE AND FUEL SYSTEM
COMPONENTS,
RES ULTING
IN
POSSIBLE
ENGINE FAILURE.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 1
GENERAL
DESCRIPTIVE DATA (Continued)
I
FUEL (Continued)
I
Approved Fuel Grades (and Colors):
100LL Grade Aviation Fuel (Blue).
100 Grade Aviation Fuel (Green).
NOTE
lsopropyl alcohol or diethylene glycol monomethyl
ether (DiEGME) may be added to the fuel supply.
Additive concentrations shall not exceed 1% for
isopropyl alcohol or 0.10% to 0.15% for DiEGME.
Refer to Section 8 for additional information.
Fuel Capacity
Serials 20608001 thru 20608361:
Total Capacity:
92.0 U.S. gallons.
Total Usable:
88.0 U.S. gallons.
Total Capacity Each Tank: 46.0 U.S. gallons.
Total Usable Each Tank:
44.0 U.S. gallons.
I
Serials 20608362 and on:
Total Capacity:
92.0 U.S.
Total Usable:
87.0 U.S.
Total Capacity Each Tank: 46.0 U.S.
Total Usable Each Tank:
43.5 U.S.
I
gallons.
gallons.
gallons.
gallons.
NOTE
To ensure maximum fuel capacity and mmIm1ze
cross-feeding when refueling, always park the
airplane in a wings-level, normal ground attitude and
place the fuel selector in the Left or Right position.
Refer to Figure 1-1 for normal ground attitude
dimensions.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
SECTION 1
GENERAL
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
OIL
Oil Specification:
IOil:MIL-L-22851
or SAE J1899 Aviation Grade Ashless Dispersant
Oil conforming to Textron Lycoming Service Instruction No.
1014, and all revisions and supplements thereto, must be used.
Recommended Viscosity for Temperature Range:
I
MIL-L-22851
or SAE J1899
Ashless Dispersant Oil
SAE Grade
Temperature
Above 27°C (80°f)
60
Above 16°C (60°F)
40or 50
-1°C (30°F) to 32°C (90°F)
40
-1s c (0°F) to 21°c (70°F)
30, 40 or 20W-40
0
Below-12°C (10°F)
30or 20W-30
- 18°C (0°F) to 32°C (90°F)
20W-50OR 15W-50
All Temperatures
1 SW-50 or 20W-50
NOTE
When operating temperatures overlap, use the lighter grade
oil.
Oil Capacity:
Sump: 11 U.S. Quarts
Total: 12 U.S. Quarts
I
1-6
Jan 18/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 1
GENERAL
DESCRIPTIVE DATA
I
(Continued)
MAXIMUM CERTIFICATED WEIGHTS
Ramp Weight :
Takeoff Weight:
Landing Weight:
3617 lbs.
3600 lbs.
3600 lbs.
Weight in Baggage Compartment (Station 109 to 145): 180 lbs.
maximum.
NOTE
Refer to Section 6 of this handbook for loading
arrangements with one or more seats removed for
cargo accommodations.
STANDARD AIRPLANE WEIGHTS
-"---'
Serials 120608001 thru 120608361:
Standard Empty Weight:
Maximum Useful Load, Normal Category:
2304 lbs.
1313 lbs.
Serials 1 20608362 and on:
Standard Empty Weight:
Maximum Useful Load, Normal Category:
2299 lbs.
13181bs
I
I
CABIN AND ENTRY DIMENSIONS
Detailed dimensions of the cabin interior and entry door openings
are illustrated in Section 6.
BAGGAGE SPACE AND ENTRY DIMENSIONS
Dimensions of the baggage/car-go area and cargo door opening
are illustrated in detail in Section 6.
SPECIFIC LOADINGS
Wing Loading:
Power Loading:
Revision 5
20.7 lbs./sq. ft
11 .6 lbs./hp.
1-7
SECTION 1
GENERAL
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SYMBOLS, ABBREVIATIONS AND TERMINOLOGY
GENERAL AIRSPEED TERMINOLOGY AND SYMBOLS
KCAS
Knots Calibrated Airspeed is indicated airspeed
corrected for position and instrument error and
expressed in knots. Knots calibrated airspeed is equal
to KTAS in standard atmosphere at sea level.
KIAS
Knots Indicated Airspeed is the speed shown on the
airspeed indicator and expressed in knots.
KTAS
Knots True Airspeed is the airspeed expressed in
knots relative to undisturbed air which is KCAS
corrected for altitude and temperature.
Maneuvering Speed is the maximum speed at
which full or abrupt control movements may be used.
Maximum Flap Extended Speed is the highest
speed permissible with wing flaps in a prescribed
extended position.
Maximum Structural Cruising Speed is the speed
that should not be exceeded except in smooth air,
then only with caution.
Never Exceed Speed is the speed limit that may not
be exceeded at any time.
Vs
Stalling Speed or the minimum steady flight
speed is the minimum speed at which the airplane is
controllable.
Vso
Stalling Speed or the minimum steady flight
speed is the minimum speed at which the airplane is
controllable in the landing configuration at the most
forward center of gravity.
1-8
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 1
GENERAL
Vx
Beat Angle-of-Climb Speed is the speed which results in tfle greatest gain of altitude in a given horizontal distance.
Vy
Best Rate-of-Climb Speed is the speed which
results in the greatest gain in altitude in a given time.
METEOROLOGICAL TERMINOLOGY
OAT
Outside Air Temperature is the free air static
temperature, It may be expressed in either degrees
Celsius or degrees Fahrenheit.
Standard
Temperature
Standard Temperature is 15°C at sea level
pressure altitude and decreases by 2·c for each
1000 feet of altitude.
Pressure
Altitude
Pressure Altitude is the altitude read from an
altimeter when the altimeter's barometric scale has
been set to 29.92 inches of mercury (1013 mb).
ENGINE POWER TERMINOLOGY
BHP
Brake Horsepower is the power developed by the
engine.
RPM
Revolutions Per Minute is engine speed.
Static
RPM
StaUc RPM is engine speed attained during a full
throttle engine runup when the airplane is on the
ground and stationary.
MP
Manifold Pressure is a pressure measured in the
engine's induction system and is expressed in
inches of mercury (in Hg).
Nov9/98
1-9
SECTION 1
GENERAL
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
AIRPLANE PERFORMANCE AND FLIGHT PLANNING
TERMINOLOGY
Demonstrated
Crosswind
Velocity
Demonstrated Crosswind Velocity is the velocity
of the crosswind component for which adequate
control of the airplane during takeoff and landing
was actually demonstrated during certification tests.
The value shown is not considered to be limiting.
Usable Fuel
Usable Fuel is the fuel available for flight planning.
Unusable
Fuel
Unusable Fuel is the quantity offuel that can not be
safely used in flight.
GPH
Gallons Per Hour is the amount of fuel consumed
per hour.
NMPG
Nautical Miles Per Gallon is the distance which can
be expected per gallon of fuel consumed at a
specific engine power setting and/or flight
configuration.
g
g is acceleration due to gravity.
Course
Datum
1-10
Course Datum is the compass reference used by the
autopilot, along with course deviation, to provide
lateral control when tracking a navigation signal.
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
--
....__..
SECTION 1
GENERAL
WEIGHT AND BALANCE TERMINOLOGY
Reference
Datum
Reference Datum is an imaginary vertical plane from
which all horizontal distances are measured for
balance purposes.
Station
Station is a location along the airplane fuselage given
in terms of the distance from the reference datum.
Arm
Arm is the horizontal distance from the reference
datum to the center of gravity (C.G.) of an item.
Moment
Moment is the product of the weight of an item
multiplied by its anTI. (Moment divided by the constant
1000 is used in this handbook to simplify balance
calculations by reducing the number of digits.)
Center of
Gravity
(C.G.)
Center of Gravity is the point at which an airplane, or
equipment, would balance if suspended. Its distance
from the reference datum is found by dividing the
total moment by the total weight of the airplane.
C.G.
Center of Gravity Arm is the arm obtained by
adding the airplane's individual moments and dividing
the sum by the total weight.
Arm
C.G.
Limits
Center of Gravity Limits are the extreme center of
gravity locations within which the airplane must be
operated at a given weight.
Standard
Empty
Weight
Standard Empty Weight is the weight of a standard
airplane, including unusable fuel, full operating fluids
and full engine oil.
Basic Empty
Weight
Basic Empty Weight is the standard empty weight
plus the weight of optional equipment.
Useful Load
Useful Load is the difference between ramp weight
and the basic empty weight.
MAC
MAC (Mean Aerodynamic Chord) is the chord of an
imaginary rectangular airfoil having the same pitching
moments throughout the flight range as that of the
actual wing.
'--"
Nov 9/98
1-11
SECTION 1
GENERAL
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Maximum
Ramp
Weight
Maximum Ramp Weight is the maximum weight
approved for ground maneuver, and includes the
weight of fuel used for start, taxi and runup.
Maximum
Takeoff
Weight
Maximum Takeoff Weight is the maximum weight
approved for the start of the takeoff roll.
Maximum
Landing
Weight
Maximum Landing Weight is the maximum weight
approved for the landing touchdown.
Tare
Tare is the weight of chocks, blocks, stands, etc.
used when weighing an airplane, and is included in
the scale readings. Tare is deducted from the scale
reading to obtain the actual (net) airplane weight.
1-12
Nov9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
'--_,,
SECTION 1
GENERAL
METRIC / IMPERIAL/ U.S. CONVERSION CHARTS
The following charts have been provided to help international
operators convert U.S. measurement supplied with the Pilot's
Operating Handbook into metric and imperial measurements.
The standard followed for measurement units shown, is the
National Institute of Standards Technology (NIST), Publication 811,
"Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI}."
Please refer to the following pages for these charts.
May 30/01
1-13
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 1
GENERAL
(Pounds x .454 = Kilograms)
(Kilograms x 2.205 = Pounds)
KILOGRAMS TO POUNDS
KILOGRAMMES EN LIVRES
kg
1
0
3
2
5
4
8
7
6
9
lb.
lb.
lb.
lb.
lb.
lb.
lb.
lb.
lb.
lb.
0
10
20
30
40
22.046
44.093
66.139
88.185
2.205
24.251
46.297
68.343
90.390
4.409
26.456
48.502
70.548
92.594
6.614
28.660
50.706
72.753
94.799
8.819
30.866
52.911
74.957
97.003
11.023
33.069
55.116
TT.162
89.208
13.228
35.274
57.320
79.366
101 .41
15.432
37.479
59.525
81 .571
103.62
17.637
39.683
61 .729
83.776
105.82
19.842
41.888
63.934
85.980
108.03
50
60
70
80
90
11 0.23
132.28
154.32
176.37
198.42
112.44
134.48
156.53
178.57
200.62
114.64
136.69
158.73
180.78
202.83
116.85
138.89
160.94
182.98
205.03
119.05
141.10
163.14
185.19
207.24
121.25
143.30
165.35
187.39
209.44
123.46
145.51
167.55
189.60
211.64
125.66
147.71
169.76
191.80
213.85
127.87
149.91
171.9S
194.01
216.05
130.07
152.12
174.17
196.21
218.26
100 220.46 222.67 224.87 227.08 229.28 231.49 233.69 235.90 238.10 240.30
POUNDS TO KILOGRAMS
LIVRES EN KILOGRAMMES
lb.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
8
kg
kg
kg
kg
kg
kg
kg
kg
kg
1.814 2.268 2.722 3.175 3.629
0
0.454 0.907 1.361
10 4.536 4.990 5.443 5.897 6.350 6.804 7.257 7.711 8.165
20 9.072 9.525 9.979 10.433 10.886 11.340 11.793 12.247 12.701
30 13.608 14.061 14.515 14.969 15.422 15.876 16.329 16.783 17.237
40 18.144 18.597 19.051 19.504 19.958 20.412 20.865 21 .319 2 1.772
kg
4.082
8.618
13.154
17.690
22.226
26.303
30.844
36.380
39.916
44.452
26.762
31.298
35.834
40.370
44.906
100 45.359 45.813 46.266 46.720 47.174 47.627 48.081 48.534 48.988
49.442
50
60
70
80
90
22.680
27.216
31 .752
36.287
40.823
23.133
27.669
32.205
36.741
41 .277
23.587
28.123
32.659
37.195
41.731
24.040
28.576
33.112
37.648
42.184
24.494
29.030
33.566
38.1 02
42.638
24.948
29.484
34.019
38.555
43.091
25.401
29.937
34.473
39.009
43.545
25.855
30.391
34.927
39.463
43.999
Figure 1-2. Weight Conversions (Sheet 1 of 2)
1- 14
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
-~
(Kilograms x 2.205
SECTION 1
GENERAL
=Pounds)
POUNDS
(Pounds x .454
KILOGRAMS
220
100
210
95
200
90
190
85
180
170
=Kilograms)
80
75
160
150
140
70
65
130
60
120
55
110
50
100
45
90
40
80
35
70
60
50
40
30
30
25
20
15
20
10
10
5
0
0
Units x 10, 100, etc.
0585T1027
Figure 1-2 . Weight Conversions (Sheet 2 of 2)
~
Nov 9/98
1-15
SECTION 1
GENERAL
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
(Meters x 3.281
= Feet)
(Feet x .305 = Meters)
METERS TO FEET
METRES EN PIEDS
m
0
1
2
3
feet
feet
feet
feet
feet
13.123
45.932
78.740
111.55
144.36
177.16
209.97
242.78
275.59
308.40
180.-45
21325
246.06
278.87
311 .68
6
7
feet
feet
feet
feet
16.404
49.212
82.021
114.83
147.64
19.685
52.493
85.302
11811
150.92
22.956
55.774
88.582
121.39
154.20
26.247
59.055
91 .863
124.67
157.48
29.528
62.336
95.144
127.95
160.76
183.73
216.53
249.34
282.15
314.96
187.01
219.82
252.62
285.43
318.24
190.29
223.10
255.90
288.71
321.52
193.57
226.38
259.19
291.58
324.80
100 328.08 331.36 334.64 337.93 341.21 344.49 347.77 351.05 354.33
357.61
0
10
20
30
40
--.
6.562
4
32.808
65.617
98.425
131.23
3.281
36.089
68.897
101.71
134.51
39.370
72.178
104.99
137.79
9.642
42.851
75.459
108..27
141.08
164.04
195.85
229.66
262.47
90 295.27
167.32
200.13
232.94
265.75
298.56
170.60
203.41
236.22
269.03
301 .84
173.86
206.69
239.50
272.31
305.12
50
60
70
80
5
9
8
feet
FEET TO METERS
PIEDS EN METRES
ft
1
0
m
-. .
2
m
3
m
5
4
m
m
7
6
m
m
8
9
m
m
m
0.305 0.610 0.914 1219 1.524 1.829 2.134 2.-438
3.353 3.658 3.962 4267 4.572 4.877 5.182 5.486
6.401 6.706 7.010 7.315 7.620 7.925 8.230 8.534
9.449 9.754 10.058 10.363 10.668 10.973 11.278 11.582
12.497 12.802 13.106 13.411 13.716 14.021 14.326 14.630
2.743
5.791
8.839
11.887
14.935
50 15240 15.545 15.850 16.154 16.459 16.754 17.069 17.374 17.678
20.726
23.774
26.822
29.870
17.983
21 .031
24.079
27.127
30.175
100 30.480 30.785 31.090 31.39' 31.699 32,004 32.309 32.614 32.918
33.223
0
10
20
30
3.048
6.096
9.14-4
40 12.192
60
70
80
90
18.288
21 .336
24.384
27.432
18.593
21.641
24.689
27.737
18.898 19.202 19.507
21 .946 22.250 22.55s
24.994 25.298 25.603
28.042 28.346 28.651
19.812
22.860
25.908
28.956
20.117
23.165
28.213
29.261
20.422
23.470
26.518
29.566
Figure 1-3. Length Conversions (Sheet 1 of 2)
1-16
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
--
SECTION 1
GENERAL
(Meters x 3.281 = Feet)
(Feet x .305 = Meters)
FEET
METERS
100
320
95
300
90
280
85
260
80
240
75
70
2.20
65
200
60
180
55
160
50
45
140
120
40
35
100
30
80
25
60
20
15
40
10
20
5
0
0
Units x 10, 100, etc.
Figure 1-3 . Length Conversions (Sheet 2 of 2)
Nov 9/98
1-17
SECTION 1
GENERAL
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
(Centimeters x .394
= Inches)
(Inches x 2.54 = Centimeters)
CENTIMETERS TO INCHES
CENTIMETRES EN POUCES
cm
0
1
in.
2
In.
4
3
In.
5
In.
in.
6
in.
7
In.
8
in.
9
in.
in.
. .. 0.394 0.787 1.181 1.575 1.869 2.362 2.756 3.150
0
10 3.937 4.331 4.724 5.118 S.512 5.906 6.299 6.693 7.087
20 7.874 6.266 8661 9.055 9.449 9.843 10.236 10.630 11 ,024
30 11.811 12205 12.598 12.992 13.386 13.780 14.173 14.567 14.961
40 15.748 16.1<12 18.535 18.929 17.323 17.717 18.110 18.504 18,898
3.543
7.480
11.417
15.354
19.291
19.685 20,079 20.472 20.666
23.622 24.016 24.409 24.803
27.559 27.953 28.346 28.740
31.496 31 .890 32283 32.677
90 35.433 35.827 38220 36.614
22.835
26.772
30.709
34646
38.583
23.228
27.184
31 .102
35.039
38.976
100 39.370 39.764 40.157 40.551 40.945 41.339 41 ,732 42.126 42.520
42.913
50
60
70
80
21.260
25.197
29.134
33.071
37.008
21.654
25.591
29.528
33.465
37.402
22.047
25.984
29.921
3U58
37.795
22.441
26.378
30.315
34252
38.189
-
INCHES TO CENTIMETERS
POUCES EN CENTIMETRES
in.
1
0
0
10
20
30
cm
cm
...
2.54
25.40 27.94
50.80 53.34
76.20 78.74
40 101.60 104.14
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
cm
cm
cm
cm
cm
cm
cm
9
5.08
7.62 10.16 12.70 15 .24 17.78 20.32
30.48 33.02 35.56 38.10 40.64 43.18 45.72
55.88 58.42 60.96 63.50 66.04 66.56 71 .12
81.28 63.82 86.36 88.90 91 .44 93,98 96.52
106.68 109.22 111.76 114.30 116.84 119.38 121.92
50 127.00 129.54 132.08 134.62 137.16 139.70 142.2~
144.78 147.32
60
70
80
90
170.18
195.58
220.96
246.38
cm
22.98
48.26
73.66
99.06
124,46
172.72
198.12
223.52
248.92
149.86
175.26
200.66
226.06
251 .46
100 254.00 256.54 259.08 261.62 264.16 266.70 269.24 271 .78 274,32
276.86
152.40
177.80
203.20
228.60
154.94
160.34
205.74
231 .14
157.48
182.88
208.28
233.68
160.02
185.42
210.82
236.22
162.56
187.96
213.36
238.76
165.10
190.50
215.90
241 .30
167.64
193.04
218.44
243.84
Figure 1-4. Length Conversions (Sheet 1 of 2)
1-18
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 1
GENERAL
(Centimeters x .394 = Inches)
INCHES
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
(Inches x 2.54 = Centimeters)
CENTIMETERS
25
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
3
8
7
6
2
5
4
Units x 10, 100, etc.
3
2
1
0585T1028
0
Figure 1-4. Length Conversions (Sheet 2 of 2)
Nov 9/98
1-19
SECTION 1
GENERAL
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
(Statute MIies ><1 .609=Kilometers)
(Statute Miles ><.869=Nautical Miles)
(Nautical Miles x 1.652=Kilometers)
STATUTE
MILES
115
110
105
100
95
90
85
80
75
70
65
60
55
50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
(Kilometers ><.622=Statute Miles)
(Nautical Miles ><1.15=Statute Miles)
{Kilometers ><.54=NauticaJ Miles)
NAUTICAL
MILES
100
100
95
95
KILOMETERS
180
90
90
170
85
85
160
80
75
80
150
75
140
70
70
130
65
65
120
60
60
110
55
55
100
50
45
50
45
90
40
40
35
35
30
25
30
25
50
20
20
40
15
15
30
10
10
20
5
5
10
0
0
0
80
70
60
Units x
10, 100, etc.
0585T1029
Figure 1-5. Distance Conversions
1-20
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 1
GENERAL
(Imperial Gallons x 4.546 = Liters)
(Liters x .22 = Imperial Gallons)
LITERS TO IMPERIAL GALLONS
LITERS EN GALLONS IMPERIAL
Lt
0
10
20
30
40
2
1
0
4
3
5
IG
IG
IG
IG
IG
-- -
0.220
2.420
4.620
6.819
9.019
0.440
2.640
4.840
7.039
9.239
0.660
2.860
5.059
7.259
9.459
0.880
3.080
5.279
7.479
9.679
2.200
4.400
6.599
8.799
7
6
IG
IG
9
8
IG
IG
1.100 1.320 1.540 1.760
3.300 3.520 3.740 3.960
5.499 5.719 5.939 6.159
7.699 7.919 8.139 8.359
9.899 10.119 10.339 10.559
IG
1.980
4.180
6.379
8.579
10.ns
so 10.999 11.219 11 ,439 11.659 11.879 12.099 12.319 12.539 12.759 12.979
60
70
80
90
13.199
15.398
17.598
19.798
13.419
15.618
17.816
20.018
13.639
15.838
18.038
20.238
13.859
16.058
18.258
20.458
14.078
16.278
18.478
20.678
14.298
16.498
18.698
20.898
14.518
16.7 18
18.9 18
21.118
14,738
16.938
19.138
21.338
14.958
17.158
19.358
2 1.558
15.178
17.378
19.578
21 .778
100 21.998 22.218 22,438 22.658 22.878 23.098 23.318 23.537 23.757
23.9n
IMPERIAL GALLONS TO LITERS
GALLONS IMPERIAL EN LITERS
IG
0
10
20
30
40
50
6-0
70
80
90
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
--
7
8
9
Lt
Lt
Lt
Lt
Lt
Lt
Lt
Lt
Lt
--45.460
90.919
136.38
181 .84
4.546
50.006
95.465
140.93
186.38
9.092
54.552
100.01
145.47
190.93
13.638
59.097
104.56
150.02
195.48
18.184
63.643
109.10
154.56
200.02
22.730
68.189
113.65
159.11
204.57
27.276
72.735
118.20
163.66
209.11
31 .822
TT.281
122.74
168.20
213.66
36.368
81 .827
127.29
172.75
218.21
227.30
272.76
318.22
363.68
409.14
231 .84
2n.Jo
322.76
368.22
413.68
236.39
281.85
327.31
372.77
418.23
240.94
286.40
331.86
377.32
422.77
245.48
290.94
336.40
381.86
427.32
250.03
295.49
340.95
386.41
431 .87
254.57
300.03
345.49
390.95
436.41
259.12
304.58
350.04
395.50
440.96
263.67 268.21
309.13 313.67
354.59 359.13
400.04 404.59
445.50 450.05
100 454.60 459.14 463.69 468.23 472.78 477.33 481.87 486.42 490.96
Lt
40.914
86.373
131.83
177.29
2.22.75
495.51
Figure 1-6. Volume Conversions (Sheet 1 of 3)
May 30/01
1-21
SECTION 1
GENERAL
,
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
=
Liters)
(Imperial Gallons x 4.4546
Imperial Gallons)
(Liters x .22
=
100
IMPERIAL
GALLONS
95
90
440
85
380
80
360
340
75
70
65
60
55
50
32·0
300
280
260
240
22-0
45
200
40
180
35
30
160
140
25
120
5
100
80
60
40
20
0
0
20
15
10
LITERS-..
420
400
Units x 10, 100, etc.
0585T1032
Figure 1-6. Volume Conversions (Sheet 2 of 3)
1-22
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 1
GENERAL
(Imperial Gallons x 1.2 = U.S. Gallons)
(U.S. Gallons)( .833 = Imperial Gallons)
(U.S. Gallons x 3.785 = Liters).._
_.. (Liters x .264 = U.S. Gallons)
IMPERIAL
U.S.
LITERS
GALLONS
GALLONS
100
100 380
80 95
95 360
75 90
90 340
85
85
320
80
80
300
75
75
280
70
70
55
260
65
65
240
50
60
60
45
55
55
50
50
45
45
40
40
30
35
35
25
30
30
20
25
25
100
20
20
80
15
15
60
70
65
60
40
35
15
10
~
220
200
180
160
140
120
10
10
40
5
5
5
20
0
0
0
0
Units x 10, 100, etc.
0585T1033
Figure 1-6. Volume Conversions (Sheet 3 of 3)
-----
May 30/01
1-23
SECTION 1
GENERAL
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
TEMPERATURE CONVERSIONS
(° F-32) x 5/9 = 0
·1tc
c
°CX9/5+32= °F
·c
160
-40
-30
-2 - 30
-40
180
·:r
200
10
10
20
30
O
40
50
10
60
10-½20
80
so
90
100
40
110
120
50
220
240
260
280
300
320
340
0
360
720
380
'I
" "'
780
800
820
84
420
440
8:t-460
8 -E
900
480
92
290
300
310
320
500
140
520
150
540
160
560
0585T1034
Figure 1-7. Temperature Conversions
1-24
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 1
GENERAL
AVGAS Specific Gravity
= .72
(Liters x 1.58 = Pounds) (Pounds x .633 = Liters)
(Liters x .72
Kilograms) (Kilograms x 1.389
Liters)
=
POUNDS
150
140
130
=
LITERS
100
95
90
85
LITERS
KILOGRAMS
100
70
95
65
90
AVGAS FUEL
85
60
80
80
120
75
75
110
70
70
55
50
65
65
60
60
55
55
40
80
50
50
35
70
45
45
40
40
35
35
100
90
60
50
45
30
25
30
30
40
25
25
30
20
20
15
15
15
10
10
10
10
5
5
0
0
20
Units x 10, 100, etc.
0
'
20
5
0
0585T1030
Figure 1-8. Volume to Weight Conversion
'-May 30/01
1-25
SECTION 1
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
GENERAL
AV GAS
SPECIFIC
GRAVITY
0.72
058511031
Figure 1-9. Quick Conversions
1-26
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction .... . .. . . . . .. ... .................. • ...
Airspeed Limitations ......... ..... . . ... . .... ...... .
Airspeed Indicator Markings . .. .. .................. . . .
Powerplant Limitations . ..... . ...... .. .... . .. .. ..... .
Powerplant Instrument Markings .. . ......... . ........ .
Weight Limits . . .. .. . .. . .......... . .. . ...... .. ... .
Center of Gravity Limits . . . . . . . . . ............. . . . . .. .
Maneuver Limits .......... .... .. .. .. . . ..... . . .. .. .
Flight Load Factor Limits .. . ................. . . . . .. . .
Kinds of Operation Limits ... .. .. . . . . . . . . .. . .. ... . .• .
Fuel Limitations ..... . ................ .. .. ...... . . .
Other Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ................ . .
Flap Limitations . . . . • . . . . . ..... . .......... . ... . .
Placards . .. . ..... .. • .......... . . ............. . .
Revision 5
Page
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-7
2-8
2-8
2-8
2-81
2-9
2-9
2-10
2-1/2-2
SECTION2
LIMITATIONS
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
INTRODUCTION
Section 2 includes operating limitations, instrument markings,
and basic placards necessary for the safe operation of the airplane,
its engine, standard systems and standard equipment. The
limitations included in this section and in Section 9 have beerl
approved by the Federal Aviation Administration. Observance of'
these operating limitations is required by Federal Aviation
Regulations.
NOTE
Refer to
Operating
operating
necessary
options.
the Supplements, Section 9, of this Pilot©s
Handbook for amended operating limitations,
procedures, performance data and other
information for airplanes equipped with specific
I
NOTE
The airspeeds listed in the Airspeed Limitations chart
(Figure 2-1) and the Airspeed Indicator Markings chart
(Figure 2-2) are based on Airspeed Calibration data shown
in Section 5 with the normal static source. If the alternate
static source is being used, ample margins should be
observed to allow for the airspeed calibration variations
between the normal and alternate static sources as shown
in Section 5.
I
The Cessna Model T206H is certificated under FAA Type
Certificate No. A4CE.
May 30/01
2-3
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION2
LIMITATIONS
AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS
Airspeed limitations and their operational significance are shown
in Figure 2-1 .
SYMBOL
SPEED
KCAS 11KIAS
VNE Never Exceed Speed 179 182
VNo
VA
Maximum Structural
Cruising Speed
Maneuvering Speed:
3600 Pounds
2950 Pounds
2300 Pounds
147
123
118
104
VFE
Maximum Flap
Extended Speed:
0° to 10° Flaps
1 to 40° Flaps
o·
---
Maximum
Window Open
Speed
139
100
179
REMARKS
Do not exceed this
speed in any
operation.
149 Do not exceed this
speed except in
smooth air, and then
only with caution.
Do not make full or
125 abrupt control
120 movements above
106 this speed.
Do not exceed this
140 speed with given flap
100 settings.
182 Do not exceed this
speed with windows
open.
Figure 2-1 . Airspeed Limitations
2-4
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
AIRSPEED INDICATOR MARKINGS
Airspeed indicator markings and their color code significance are
shown in Figure 2-2.
KIAS
MARKING
VALUE
SIGNIFICANCE
OR RANGE
White Arc
47-100
Full Flap Operating Range. Lower
limit is maximum weight Vs 0 in
landing configuration. Upper limit is
maximum speed permissible with
f laps extended.
Green Arc
59-149
Normal Operating Range. Lower l imit
is maximum weight Vs at most
forward C.G. with flaps retracted .
Upper limit is maximum st ructural
cruising speed.
Yellow Arc
149-182
Operations must be conducted with
caution and only in smooth air.
Red Line
182
Maximum speed fo r all operations.
Figure 2-2. Airspeed Indicator Markings
POWERPLANT LIMITATIONS
Engine Manufacturer: Textron Lycoming.
Engine Model Number: TIO-540-AJ1A.
Maximum Power: 310 BHP rating.
Engine Operating Limits for Takeoff and Continuous Operations:
Maximum Continuous Power: 310 rated BHP at 39 inches Hg.
and 2500 RPM.
Maximum Cylinder Head Temperature: 480°F (249° C).
Maximum Oil Temperature: 245°F (118° C).
Oil Pressure, Minimum: 20 PSI
Maximum: 115 PSI
NOTE
For manifold pressure limitations above 17,000 feet, refer to
minimum fuel flows placard in this section.
Nov 9/98
2-5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
Fuel Grade: See Fuel Limitations.
Oil Grade (Specification):
MIL-L-22851 or SAE J1899 Ashless Dispersant Oil: Oil
conforming to Textron Lycoming Service Instruction No. 1014
and all revisions and supplements thereto, must be used.
Propeller Manufacturer: McCauley Propeller Systems.
Propeller Model Number: B3036C432/80VSA-1 .
IPropeller Diameter Maximum: 79.0 inches.
Minimum: 77.5 inches.
Propeller Blade Angle at 30 Inch Station:
Low Pitch:
16.9°
High Pitch:
33.8°
Propeller Operating Limits: Avoid continuous operation at or below
2000 RPM above 28 in. Hg. of manifold
pressure.
I
POWERPLANT INSTRUMENT MARKINGS
Powerplant instrument markings and their color code significance
are shown in Figure 2-3.
INSTRUMENT
RED LINE (MINIMUM)
Tachometer
(RPM):
--
Manifold
Pressure (in. Hg.)
GREEN ARC
(NORMAL
OPERATING)
RED
LINE
(MAX)
2000 to 2400
2500
-
15 - 30
39
Cylinder Head
Temperature (°F)
-
200-480
480
011 Temperature
("F)
-
100 to 245
245
Oil Pressure (PSI)
20
50 to 90
115
Fuel Quantity
(Gal.)
0
(2 Unusable Each Tank)
-
Fuel Flow (GPH)
.......
5 to20
Vacuum (In. Hg.)
--
4.5-5.5
Turbine Inlet
Temperature
IT.l.T.l / 0 Fl
-
1350 -1675
-34
1675
Figure 2-3. Powerplant Instrument Markings
2-6
Jan 18/02
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
WEIGHT LIMITS
Maximum Ramp Weight: 3617 lbs.
Maximum Takeoff Weight: 3600 lbs.
Maximum Landing Weight: 3600 lbs.
Maximum Weight in Baggage Compartment - Station 109 to 145:
180 lbs. See note below.
NOTE
Refer to Section 6 of this handbook for loading
arrangements with one or more seats removed for cargo
accommodation.
CENTER OF GRAVITY LIMITS
Center of Gravity Range:
Forward:
33.0 inches aft of datum at 2500 lbs. or less, with
straight line variation to 42.5 inches aft of datum at
3600 lbs.
Aft:
49.7 inches aft of datum at all weights.
Reference Datum: Front face of lower firewall.
Nov 9/98
2-7
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
MANEUVER LIMITS
This airplane is certificated in the normal category. The normal
category is applicable to aircraft intended for non-aerobatic
ope·rations. These include any maneuvers incidental to normal
flying, stalls (except whip stalls), lazy eights, chandelles, and steep
turns in which the angle of bank is not more than 60°.
Aerobatic maneuvers, including spins, are not approved.
FLIGHT LOAD FACTOR LIMITS
Flight Load Factors:
·Flaps Up .. .. .... . . . ...... ... .. .
·Flaps Down .. .. ...... ... .. . . . .. .
+3.8g, -1.52g
+2.0g
*The design load factors are 150% of the above, and in all cases,
the structure meets or exceeds design loads.
KINDS OF OPERATION LIMITS
The airplane as delivered is equipped for day, night, VFR and
IFR operations. FAR Part 91 establishes the minimum required
instrumentation and equipment for these operations. The reference
to types of flight operations on the operating limitations placard
reflects equipment installed at the time of Airworthiness Certificate
Issuance.
Flight into known icing conditions is prohibited.
FUEL LIMITATIONS
ISerials T20608001 thru T20608361:
I
Total Fuel:
92 U.S. Gallons (46.0 Gallons each tank}.
Usable Fuel:
88.0 U.S. Gallons.
Unusable Fuel: 4.0 U.S. Gallons (2.0 Gallons each tank).
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
TEMPORARY REVISION FOR CESSNA PILOT'S OPERATING HANDBOOK
AND FM APPROVED AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
Publication Affected:
Model T206H Nav 1/Nav II T20608001 and On basic
Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved
Airplane Flight Manual, Revision 6, dated 12 January
2004.
Airplane Serial Numbers Affected:
Airplanes
T20608001
thru
T20608681
and
T20608683 thru T20608704 equipped with the Nav
I/Nav II avionics option.
Description of Change:
Section 2, Operating Limitations, Other Limitations,
Flap Limitations, page 2·9 add information to the Flap
Limitations.
Filing Instructions:
Insert this temporary revision in the Model T206H
Nav 1/Nav II T20608001 and On basic Pilot's
Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual adjacent to page 2-9.
Removal Instructions:
This temporary revision must be removed and
discarded when Revision 7 has been collated Into the
basic Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved
Airplane Flight Manual.
In Section 2, Operating Limitations, Other Limitations, Flap Limitations, page
2-9 add following information to the existing Flap Limitations:
OTHER LIMITATIONS
FLAP LIMITATIONS
Approaches with flaps UP throughout descent to Decision Height (DH) or
Minimum Descent Altitude (MDA) should be avoided in Instrument
Meteorological Conditions (IMC).
If flap UP approaches are required, add 60 feet to Decision Height (DH) or
Minimum Descent Altitude (MDA) when operating in Instrument Meteorological
Conditions (IMC).
APPROVED BY
£d
lx John Bouma, Lead ODA Administrator
Cessna Aircraft Company
Organization Delegation Authorization O_D,0.-100129-CE
FAA Approved Under 14 CFR Part 183 Subpart D
DATE OF APPROVAL ~'} Afftk7,,0lt
FM APPROVED
T206HPHUS-06 TR01
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
I
FUEL LIMITATIONS (Continued)
Serials T20608362 and on:
Total Fuel:
92 U.S. Gallons (46.0 Gallons each tank).
Usable Fuel:
87.0 U.S. Gallons.
Unusable Fuel:
5.0 U.S. Gallons (2.5 Gallons each tank).
NOTE
To ensure maximum fuel capacity and min1mIze
cross-feeding when refueling, always park the
airplane in a wings-level, nonnal ground attitude and
place the fuel selector in the LEFT or RIGHT
position. Refer to Figure 1-1 for normal ground
attitude definition.
Takeoff and land with the fuel selector valve handle in the BOTH
position.
-
Operation on either LEFT or RIGHT tank limited to level flight
only.
With 1/4 tank or less, prolonged uncoordinated flight is prohibited
when operating on either left or right tank.
When switching from dry tank, turn auxiliary fuel pump on
momentarily.
Approved Fuel Grades (and Colors):
100LL Grade Aviation Fuel (Blue).
100 Grade Aviation Fuel (Green).
OTHER LIMITATIONS
FLAP LIMITATIONS
Approved Takeoff Range:
Approved Landing Range:
Revision 5
0° to 20°
0° to 40°
2-91
SECTION2
LIMITATIONS
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
PLACARDS
The following information must be displayed in the form of composite or individual placards.
1. In full view of the pilot: (The "DAY-NIGHT-VFR-IFR" entry,
shown on the example below, will vary as the airplane is
equippeq).
The markings and placards installed in this airplane contain
operating limitations which must be complied with when operating
this airplane in the Normal Category. Other operating limitations
which must be complied with when operating this airplane in this
category are contained In the Pilot©s Operating Handbook and FAA
Approved Airplane Flight Manual.
No acrobatic maneuvers, including spins, approved.
Flight into known icing conditions prohibited.
This airplane is certified for the following flight operations as of
date of original airworthiness certificate:
DAY-NIGHT-VFR-IFR
2. On control lock flag:
CAUTION
CONTROL LOCK
REMOVE BEFORE STARTING ENGINE
3. On aft baggage wall:
EMERGENCY LOCATOR TRANSMITTER
INSTALLED AFT OF THIS PARTITION.
MUST BE SERVICED IN ACCORDANCE
WITH FAR PART91 .207
(Continued Next Page)
2-10
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
PLACARDS (Continued)
I
4. On the fuel selector valve:
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361:
0
0
BOTH
88.0911
TAK£0Ff
LANDING
AU FLIGHT ATTllllOES
FUEL
SELECTOR
LEFT
RIGHT
ONtY
44.0911
l!V!lFUGIIT
ONLY
44.0u,I
t.MLIUWIT
0
Serials T20608362 and on:
0
BOTH
87.0gll
TAICEOFF lAHDl'IG
All FUGIIT ATTITUDES
FUEL
SELECTOR
0
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
2-11
I
CESSNA
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
MODEL T206H
I PLACARDS {Continued)
5. At the fuel filler ports:
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361:
FUEL
100U./ 100 MIN. GRADE AVIATION GASOu.E
CAP. 44.0 U.S. GAL USABLE
CAP. 32.5 U.S. GAL USABLE TO BOTTOM
OF FILLER INDICAliORTAB.
Serials T20608362 and on:
.....
FUEL
100LL/100 MIN. GRADE AVIAllON GASOLINE
CAP, 43.5 U.S. GAL (164 LITERS) USABLE
CAP. 32.0 U.S. GAL (121 LITERS) USABLE TO BOTTOM
OF FILLER INDICATOR TAB.
6. Near manifold pressure/fuel flow indicator:
MINIMUM FUEL FLOWS
MAXIMUM CONTINUOUS POWER 2500 RPM
ALT (FT.)
MP (IN. Hg.)
FF (GPH)
SL-17,000
18,000
20,000
22,000
24,000
26,000
28,000
30,000
39
33
34.0
30.5
28.5
26.5
31
24.5
29
23.0
21 .0
19.0
37
35
27
25
AVOID CONTINUOUS OPERATION
AT OR BELOW 2000 RPM ABOVE 28 In. Hg. OF
MANIFOLD PRESSURE
(Continued Next Page)
12-12
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
..__
SECTION2
LIMITATIONS
I
PLACARDS (Continued)
7. On flap control indicator:
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361:
0° to 10°
140 KIAS
(Partial flap range with blue color
code; also mechanical detent of 10°)
10° to 20
to40°
100 KIAS
(White color code; indices as noted;
also mechanical detent at 20°)
I
Serials T20608362 and on:
--
0° lo 10°
140 KIAS
(Initial flap range with Dark Blue color
code; mechanical detent at 10°
position)
10° to 20°
120 KIAS
(Intermediate flap range with Light
Blue color code; mechanical detent at
20° position)
20° to FULL
100 KIAS
(Full flap range with White color code;
mechanical stop at FULL position
(40°))
8. On aft cargo door:
BAGGAGE NET 180 LBS. MAXIMUM CAPACITY
REFER TO WEIGHT AND BALANCE DATA
FOR BAGGAGE AND CARGO LOADING
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
PLACARDS (Continued)
9. In RED on forward cargo door:
I Serials 120608001 thru 120608437:
EMERGENCY EXIT OPERATION
1. ROTATE FORWARD CARGO DOOR HANDLE FULL
FORWARD THEN FULL AFT.
2. OPEN FORWARD CARGO DOOR AS FAR AS POSSIBLE.
3. ROTATE RED LEVER IN REAR CARGO DOOR
FORWARD.
4. FORCE REAR CARGO DOOR FULL OPEN.
Serials T20608438 and On:
REAR CARGO DOOR EMERGENCY EXIT
1. OPEN FRONT CARGO DOOR AS FAR AS IT WILL GO
2. PUSH REAR DOOR HANDLE FORWARD AND FORCE
DOOR OPEN.
10. A calibration card must be provided to indicate the
accuracy of the magnetic compass.
11.
On the oil filler cap:
11
12.
OIL
QTS
Near airspeed indicator:
MANEUVERING SPEED -125 KIAS
13.
On the pedestal cover near the fuel selector handle:
WHEN SWITCHING FROM DRY TANK TURN
AUX FUEL PUMP "ON" MOMENTARILY
(Continued Next Page)
12-14
Revision 6
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
-
PLACARDS
(Continued)
14. On the upper right instrument panel:
SMOKING PROHIBITED
15.
Near the auxiliary electrical power supply plug:
CAUTION
24 VOLTS D.C.
THIS AIRCRAFT IS EQUIPPED WITH ALTERNATOR AND A
NEGATIVE GROUND SYSTEM. OBSERVE PROPER POLARITY.
REVERSE POLARITY WILL DAMAGE ELECTRICAL
COMPONENTS.
Revision 6
2-15/2-161
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
Page
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction
. .. . . . .. ... . . ... ... . .... .... . .. .. .. ...
3-4
AIRSPEEDS
Airspeeds For Emergency Operation
... ..... ...........
3-4
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES CHECKLIST
Engine Failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Engine Failure During Takeoff Roll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Engine Failure Immediately After Takeoff . . . . . . . . . . • . . .
Engine Failure During Flight (Restart Procedures)
Forced Landings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emergency Landing Without Engine Power . . . . . . . . . . . .
Precautionary Landing With Engine Power
............
Ditching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . .
During Start On Ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Engine Fire In Flight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrical Fire In Flight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cabin Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wing Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Icing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . .
Inadvertent Icing Encounter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Static Source Blockage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Excessive Fuel Vapor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •
Fuel Flow Stabilization Procedures . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . .
Nov 9/98
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-6
3-6
3-6
3-7
3-8
3-8
3-9
3-9
3-10
3-10
3-10
3-10
3-12
3-12
3- 12
3-1
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
Page
3-12
Landing With A Flat Main Tire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Landing With A Flat Nose Tire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-13
Electrical Power Supply System Malfunctions . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13
Ammeter Shows Excessive Rate of Charge
(Full Scale Deflection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-13
Low Voltage Annunciator (VOLTS) Illuminates During Flight
(Ammeter Indicates Discharge) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-13
Emergency Descent Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-14
Smooth Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . .
3-14
3-14
Rough Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vacuum System Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-15
AMPLIFIED EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
Engine Failure . . .. . . . .. ... . . . .. . . .. . ....... . . . . .
Forced Landings . . .. .......... . .. • ......... . .. . .
Landing Without Elevator Control .. . ..... . ... .. . . ... .
Fires . . . . . . . ............ .. . .. . .. .. . . .. . .. . ... .
Emergency Operation In Clouds (Vacuum System Failure)
Executing A 180° Turn In Clouds
.... . .... .. . . ... .
Emergency Descent Through Clouds .............. .
Recovery From Spiral Dive In The Clouds . .. . . . ... . .
Inadvertent Flight Into Icing Conditions . .... . .... . . . .. .
Static Source Blocked . . . . .. . . ................. .
Spins .. .. . .... . ........ . ...... . .. . .. . . . . .. . . .
Rough Engine Operation Or Loss Of Power . . . . . . .... . .
Spark Plug Fouling .... . ..... . ... .... . . •.. . . .. .
Magneto Malfunction ... .. .... . .. . . • ..... . ......
Engine Driven Fuel Pump Failure .. . . ... . .. .. . . .. .
Excessive Fuel Vapor Indications . . . . ...... ...... .
Low Oil Pressure .. . . . . . ....... . ...... . ...... .
I
I
3-2
3-16
3-18
3-18
3-19
3-19
3-20
3-20
3-21
3-21
3-21
3-22
3-22
3-22
3-23
3-23
3-23
3-24
Jan 18/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
Page
Electrical Power Supply System Malfunctions . . .. . ... . . .
Excessive Rate of Charge . . . .. ... . ... . ...... .. . .
Insufficient Rate Of Charge . . . ... .. •. . . . ... . • .. . .
Cargo Door Emergency Exit ... . . • .. . . .... . . . . ... . .
Other Emergencies . . . .. .. . .. . . .. . . . . . . . ... . . ... .
Windshield Damage . ... . . .. . . .. . . . . .. . .... . .. .
Jan 18/02
3-24
3-25
I
3-251
3-26
3-26
3-26
3-3
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
INTRODUCTION
Section 3 provides checklist and amplified procedures for coping
with emergencies that may occur. Emergencies caused by airplane
or engine malfunctions are extremely rare if proper preflight
inspections and maintenance are practiced. Enroute weather
emergencies can be minimized or eliminated by careful flight
planning and good judgment when unexpected weather is
encountered. However, should an emergency arise, the basic
guidelines described in this section should be considered and
applied as necessary to correct the problem. Emergency procedures
associated with ELT, standard avionics and any other optional
lsystems can be found in the Supplements, Section 9.
AIRSPEEDS FOR EMERGENCY OPERATION
Engine Failure After Takeoff:
Wing Flaps Up ... . .. . ...... .. . . . . .. ... . . .. .
Wing Flaps Down . ..... . . .... . . . .. .. . ... . .. .
Maneuvering Speed:
3600 Lbs ... .. ... . . .. .. .. . . . ... . . . ... ... .
2950 Lbs . ... .. .... . . .. . . .... . . ... .... .. .
2300 Lbs ... .. . . ... . . ... . . .. . ... . ..... . . .
Maximum Glide:
3600 Lbs ... . .... ... .... . . . .... .. . .. . . . .. .
3200 Lbs . .. . .. . . . . . .... .. .... .. . . .. . . . . . .
2800 Lbs . . . . . ... . . . . . ..... .. ......... ... .
Precautionary Landing With Engine Power , . ...... . . .
Landing Without Engine Power:
Wing Flaps Up . ... . .. . .. ... . . . . . . .. ... .. . . ,
Wing Flaps Down .. . . . ..... .. . . . . . .. ....... .
Emergency Descent:
Smooth Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . .. ... . . . , .
Rough Air:
3600 Lbs: ..... . . .... . . . .. . . . .. .. ... ... .
2950 Lbs: . . .. ... . .. ....... .. .. .. . ... .. .
2300 Lbs: .. .. . . . , . .. .. . . . . .. .. . . .. . . .. .
3-4
85 KIAS
75 KIAS
125 KIAS
120 KIAS
106 KIAS
80 KIAS
75 KIAS
70 KIAS
75 KIAS
85 KIAS
75 KIAS
182 KIAS
125 KIAS
120 KIAS
106 KIAS
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES CHECKLIST
Procedures in the Emergency Procedures Checklist portion of
this section shown in bold faced type are immediate action items
which should be committed to memory.
ENGINE FAILURES
ENGINE FAILURE DURING TAKEOFF ROLL
1. Throttle - IDLE.
2. Brakes - APPLY.
3. Wing Flaps -- RETRACT.
4. Mixture -- IDLE CUT OFF.
5. Ignition Switch - OFF.
6. Master Switch - OFF.
ENGINE FAILURE IMMEDIATELY AFTER TAKEOFF
1. Airspeed - 85 KIAS (flaps UP).
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
75 KIAS (flaps DOWN).
Mixture -- IDLE CUT OFF.
Fuel Selector Valve·· PUSH DOWN and ROTATE to OFF.
Ignition Switch -- OFF.
Wing Flaps - AS REQUIRED (40° recommended).
Master Switch - OFF.
Cabin Door - UNLATCH.
Land - STRAIGHT AHEAD.
I
ENGINE FAILURE DURING FLIGHT (Restart Procedures)
1. Airspeed - 80 KIAS.
2. Fuel Selector Valve - BOTH.
3. Auxiliary Fuel Pump Switch -- ON.
4. Engine Power -- RESTORED.
5. Mixture -- RICH (if restart does not occur).
Jan 18/02
3-5
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
6. Ignition Switch -- CHECK BOTH (or START if propeller is
stopped).
NOTE
If propeller is windmilling, engine will restart automatically
within a few seconds. If propeller has stopped (possible at
low speeds), turn ignition switch to START, advance throttle
slowly from idle, and lean the mixture from full rich as
required to obtain smooth operation.
I
7. Auxiliary Fuel Pump Switch - OFF.
NOTE
If the fuel flow indication immediately drops to zero,
signifying an engine-driven fuel pump failure, return the
auxiliary fuel pump switch to ON.
I
FORCED LANDINGS
EMERGENCY LANDING WITHOUT ENGINE POWER
1. Passenger Seats - AS FAR FORWARD AS PRACTICAL.
2. Passenger Seat Backs - MOST UPRIGHT POSITION.
3. Seats and Seat Belts - SECURE.
4. Airspeed - 85 KIAS (flaps UP).
75 KIAS (flaps DOWN).
Mixture - IDLE CUT OFF.
Fuel Selector Valve -- PUSH DOWN and ROTATE to OFF.
Ignition Switch - OFF.
Wing Flaps - AS REQUIRED (40° recommended).
Master Switch - OFF when landing is assured.
10. Doors - UNLATCH PRIOR TO TOUCHDOWN.
11. Touchdown - SLIGHTLY TAIL LOW.
12. Brakes --APPLY HEAVILY.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
PRECAUTIONARY LANDING WITH ENGINE POWER
1. Passenger Seats - AS FAR FORWARD AS PRACTICAL.
2. Passenger Seat Backs - MOST UPRIGHT POSITION.
3-6
Jan 18/02
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
-.../
3. Seats and Seat Belts - SECURE.
4. Airspeed - 85 KIA$.
5. Wing Flaps - 20°.
6. Selected Field •• FLY OVER, noting terrain and obstructions,
then retract flaps upon reaching a safe altitude and airspeed.
7. Avionics Master Switch and Electrical Switches - OFF.
8. Wing Flaps -40° (on final approach).
9. Airspeed - 75 KIAS.
10. Master Switch - OFF.
11 . Doors - UNLATCH PRIOR TO TOUCHDOWN.
12. Touchdown - SLIGHTLY TAIL LOW.
13. Ignition Switch- OFF.
14. Mixture - IDLE CUT OFF.
15. Brakes -- APPLY HEAVILY.
I
DITCHING
1. Radio - TRANSMIT MAYDAY on 121.5 MHz, giving location
and intentions and SQUAWK 7700.
2. Heavy Objects (in baggage area) - SECURE OR JETTISON
(if possible).
3. Passenger Seats - AS FAR FORWARD AS PRACTICAL.
4. Passenger Seat Backs - MOST UPRIGHT POSITION.
5. Seats and Seat Belts - SECURE.
6. Wing Flaps - 40°.
7. Power-· ESTABLISH 300 FT/MIN DESCENT AT 70 KIAS.
NOTE
If no power is available, approach at 85 KIAS with flaps up
or at 80 KIAS with 10° flaps.
8. Approach - High Winds, Heavy Seas -- INTO THE WIND.
Light Winds, Heavy Swells - PARALLEL TO
SWELLS.
Jan 18/02
3-7
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
9. Cabin Doors -- UNLATCH.
10. Touchdown - LEVEL ATTITUDE AT 300 FT/MIN DESCENT.
11 . Face - CUSHION at touchdown with folded coat.
12. ELT - Activate.
13. Airplane - EVACUATE through cabin doors. If necessary,
open window and flood cabin to equalize pressure so doors
can be opened.
14. Life Vests and Raft- INFLATE WHEN CLEAR OF A IRPLANE.
FIRES
DURING START ON GROUND
1. Ignition Switch - START (continue cranking to get a start
which would suck the flames and accumulated fuel into the
engine).
If engine starts:
2. Power -- 1800 RPM for a few minutes.
3. Engine - SHUTDOWN and inspect for damage.
If engine fails to start:
Ignition Switch -- START (continue cranking).
Throttle - FULL OPEN.
Mixture - IDLE CUT OFF.
Fuel Selector Valve - PUSH DOWN and ROTATE to OFF.
Auxiliary Fuel Pump Switch - OFF.
Fire Extinguisher - OBTAIN (have ground attendants obtain, if
not installed).
10. Engine - SECURE.
a. Master Switch - OFF.
b. Ignition Switch - OFF.
11. Parking Brake - RELEASE.
12. Airplane --EVACUATE.
13. Fire - EXTINGUISH using fire extinguisher, wool blanket, or
dirt.
14. Fire Damage - INSPECT, repair damage or replace damaged
components or wiring before conducting another flight.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
3-8
Jan 18/02
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
I
FIRES (Continued)
ENGINE FIRE IN FLIGHT
1. Mixture - IDLE CUT OFF.
2. Fuel Selector Valve - PUSH DOWN and ROTATE to OFF.
3. Auxiliary Fuel Pump Switch - OFF.
4. Master Switch - OFF.
5. Cabin Heat and Air -- OFF (except overhead vents).
6. Airspeed - 110 KIAS (If fire is not extinguished, increase
glide speed to find an airspeed - within airspeed limitations which will provide an incombustible mixture).
7. Forced Landing - EXECUTE (as described in Emergency
Landing Without Engine Power).
ELECTRICAL FIRE IN FLIGHT
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Master Switch - OFF.
Vents/Cabin Air/Heat - CLOSED.
Fire Extinguisher -· ACTIVATE.
Avionics Master Switch -OFF.
All Other Switches (except ignition switch}- OFF.
.&WARNING
AFTER DISCHARGING FIRE EXTINGUISHER AND
ASCERTAINING
THAT
FIRE
HAS
BEEN
EXTINGUISHEO, VENTILATE THE CABIN.
6. Vents/Cabin Air •• OPEN when it is ascertained that fire is
completely extinguished.
If fire has been extinguished and electrical power is necessary
for continuance of flight to nearest suitable airport or landing area:
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Master Switch-· ON.
Circuit Breakers - CHECK for faulty circuit, do not reset.
Radio Switches - OFF.
Avionics Master Switch -- ON.
Radio/Electrical Switches - ON (minimum needed) one at a
time, with delay after each until short circuit is localized or
necessary equipment is energized.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
3-9
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
IFIRES (Continued)
CABIN FIRE
1. Master Switch -- OFF.
2 . Vents/Cabin Air/Heat -CLOSED (to avoid drafts).
3. Fire Extinguisher - ACTIVATE.
Ji.WARNING
AFTER DISCHARGING FIRE EXTINGUISHER AND
ASCERTAINING
THAT
FIRE
HAS
BEEN
EXTINGUISHED, VENTILATE THE CABIN.
I
4. Vents/Cabin Air - OPEN when it is ascertained that fire is
completely extinguished.
5. Land the airplane as soon as possible to inspect for damage.
WING FIRE
1. Landing/Taxi Light Switches --OFF.
2. Navigation Light Switch - OFF.
3. Strobe Light Switch·· OFF.
4. Pitot Heat Switch - OFF.
NOTE
Perform a sideslip to keep the flames away from the
fuel tank and cabin. Land as soon as possible using
flaps only as required for final approach and
touchdown.
ICING
INADVERTENT ICING ENCOUNTER
1. Turn pitot heat switch ON.
2. Turn back or change altitude to obtain an outside air
temperature that is less conducive to icing.
3. Pull cabin heat and defrost controls full out to obtain
maximum w indshield defroster airflow.
(Continued Next Page)
3-10
Revision 5
CESSNA
SECTION 3
MODEL T206H
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
4. Increase engine speed to minimize ice build-up on propeller
blades. If excessive vibration is noted, momentarily reduce
engine speed to 2200 RPM with the propeller control, and
then rapidly move the control full forward.
NOTE
Cycling the RPM flexes the propeller blades and high
RPM increases centrifugal force, causing ice to shed
more readily.
5. Watch for signs of induction air filter icing and regain manifold
pressure by increasing the throttle setting.
NOTE
If ice accumulates on the intake filter (causing alternate
air door to open), decreases of up to 15 in. Hg. in full
throttle manifold pressure can be experienced, above
8000 feet.
6. Plan a landing at the nearest airport. With an extremely rapid
ice build up, select a suitable "off airport'' landing site.
7. With an ice accumulation of 1/4 inch or more on the wing
leading edges, be prepared for significantly higher power
requirement, higher approach and stall speeds and a longer
landing roll.
8. Open left window and, if practical, scrape ice from a portion of
the windshield for visibility in the landing approach.
9. Use a 10°-20• landing flap setting for ice accumulations of 1
inch or less. With heavier ice accumulations, approach with
flaps retracted to ensure adequate elevator effectiveness in
the approach and landing.
10. Approach at 95-100 KIAS with 20• flaps and 110-120 KIAS
with 0° - 10° flaps, depending upon the amount of ice
If ice accumulation is unusually large,
accumulation.
decelerate to the planned approach speed while in the
approach configuration at a high enough altitude which would
permit recovery in the event that a stall buffet is encountered.
11. Land on the main wheels first, avoiding the slow and high type
of flare-out.
Nov 9/98
3-11
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
12. Missed approaches should be avoided whenever possible
because of severely reduced climb capability. However, if a
go-around is mandatory, make the decision much earlier in the
approach than normal. Apply maximum power and maintain
100 KIAS while retracting the flaps slowly in 10° increments.
STATIC SOURCE BLOCKAGE
(Erroneous Instrument Reading Suspected)
I
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Static Pressure Alternate Source Valve - PULL ON.
Heat and Air Valves - PULL ON.
Vents - CLOSED.
Airspeed - Consult appropriate calibration tables in Section 5.
Altitude - Consult appropriate ca[ibration tables in Section 5.
EXCESSIVE FUEL VAPOR
FUEL FLOW STABILIZATION PROCEDURES
(If Fuel Flow Fluctuations of 1 GPH Or More Or Power Surges
Occur)
1. Auxiliary Fuel Pump Switch - ON.
2. Mixture - RESET as required.
3. Fuel Selector Valve - SELECT OPPOSITE TANK if vapor
symptoms continue.
4. Auxiliary Fuel Pump Switch -- OFF after fuel flow has
stabilized.
LANDING WITH A FLAT MAIN TIRE
I
1. Approach -- NORMAL.
2 . Wing Flaps - AS DESIRED. (0° - 10° below 140 KIAS,
10° - 40° below 100 KIAS).
3 . Touchdown - GOOD MAIN TIRE FIRST, hold airplane off flat
tire as long as possible with aileron control.
4. Directional Control - MAINTAIN using brake on good wheel as
required.
3-12
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
-...-
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
LANDING WITH A FLAT NOSE TIRE
1. Approach - NORMAL.
2. Flaps - AS REQUIRED.
3. Touchdown - ON MAINS, hold nose wheel off the ground as
long as possible.
4. When nose wheel touches down, maintain full up elevator as
airplane slows to stop.
ELECTRICAL POWER SUPPLY SYSTEM
MALFUNCTIONS
AMMETER SHOWS EXCESSIVE RATE OF CHARGE
(Full Scale Deflection)
1. Alternator - OFF.
AcAUTION
WITH THE ALTERNATOR SIDE OF THE MASTER
SWITCH OFF, COMPASS DEVIATIONS OF AS
MUCH AS 25° MAY OCCUR.
2. Nonessential Electrical Equipment - OFF.
3. Flight - TERM INATE as soon as practical.
LOW VOLTAGE ANNUNCIATOR (VOLTS)
DURING FLIGHT (Ammeter Indicates Discharge)
ILLUMINATES
I
NOTE
Illumination of "VOLTS" on the annunciator panel may
occur during low RPM conditions with an electrical load on
the system such as during a low RPM taxi. Under these
conditions, the annunciator will go out at higher RPM. The
master switch need not be recycled since an overvoltage
condition has not occurred to deactivate the alternator
system.
Jan 18/02
3-13
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
1. Avionics Master Switch -- OFF.
2. Alternator Circuit Breaker (ALT FLO)- CHECK IN.
3. Master Switch -- OFF (both sides).
4. Master Switch - ON.
5. Low Voltage Annunciator (VOLTS) -- CHECK OFF.
6. Avionics Master Switch -- ON.
If low voltage annunciator (VOLTS) illuminates again:
7. Alternator- OFF.
I
AcAur10N
WITH THE ALTERNA TOR SIDE OF THE MASTER
SWITCH OFF, COMPASS DEVIATIONS OF AS
MUCH AS 25• MAY OCCUR.
8. Nonessential Radio and Electrical Equipment - OFF.
9. Flight -- TERMINATE as soon as practical.
EMERGENCY DESCENT PROCEDURES
SMOOTH AIR
1. Seats and Seat Belts - SECURE.
2. Throttle - IDLE.
3. Propeller -- HIGH RPM.
4. Mixture - FULL RICH.
5. Wing Flaps - UP.
6. Airspeed --182 KIAS.
ROUGH AIR
I
1. Seats and Seat Belts - SECURE.
2. Throttle - IDLE.
3. Propeller - HIGH RPM.
4. Mixture - FULL RICH.
5 . Wing Flaps - UP.
6. Weights and Airspeeds:
3600 Lbs -- 125 KIAS.
2950 Lbs - 120 KIAS.
2300 Lbs -106 KIAS.
3-14
Jan 18/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
VACUUM SYSTEM FAILURE
left Vacuum Annunciator (L VAC) or Right Vacuum Annunciator
l(:,/AC
R) Illuminates.
A,CAUTION
I
IF VACUUM
IS NOT WITHIN NORMAL
OPERATING
LIMITS,
A
FAILURE
HAS
OCCURRED IN THE VACUUM SYSTEM AND
PARTIAL PANEL PROCEDURES MAY BE
REQUIRED FOR CONTINUED FLIGHT.
1. Vacuum Gauge - CHECK to ensure vacuum within normal
operating limits.
May 30/01
3-15
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
AMPLIFIED
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
The following Amplified Emergency Procedures elaborate upon
information contained in the Emergency Procedures Checklists
portion of this section. These procedures also include information
not readily adaptable to a checklist format, and material to which a
pilot could not be expected to refer in resolution of a specific
emergency. This information should be reviewed in detail prior to
flying the airplane, as well as reviewed on a regular basis to keep
pilot's knowledge of procedures fresh.
ENGINE FAILURE
If an engine failure occurs during the takeoff roll, the most
important thing to do is stop the airplane on the remaining runway.
Those extra items on the checklist will provide added safety after a
failure of this type.
Prompt lowering of the nose to maintain airspeed and establish a
glide attitude is the first response to an engine failure after takeoff.
In most cases, the landing should be planned straight ahead with
only small changes in direction to avoid obstructions. Altitude and
airspeed are seldom sufficient to execute a 180° gliding tum
necessary to return to the runway. The checklist procedures assume
that adequate time exists to secure the fuel and ignition systems
prior to touchdown.
3-16
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
After an engine failure in flight, the most important course of
action is to continue flying the airplane. Best glide speed as shown
in Figure 3-1 should be established as quickly as possible. While
gliding toward a suitable landing area, an effort should be made to
identify the cause of the failure. If time permits, an engine restart
should be attempted as shown in the checklist. If the engine cannot
be restarted, a forced landing without power must be completed.
t: 14,000
i 12,000
a:
~ 10,0001------1---
w
>
~
......
~
- 1 - - - ~ ~ - - - - + - -- -1---1
/.~'1/
,.~f"'
a,ooo--------1-........
' " ; , : : - - - 1 - - - - - 4 - - -....
~
4----1
w
i;
w s,oooa----, ---:#~"t----t--::==::±======±:=:;--t
;_%f/
BEST GUDE SPEED
:c:
;:.///
WEIGHT (LBS)
KIAS
4,0001----+..,P..--l---+--C:~~
=!.i--=:::.._H
~,..
;/f"
3600
80
3200
75
70
2800
0
5
10
15
20
25
GROUND DISTANCE • NAUTICAL MILES
Figure 3- 1. Maximum Glide
Nov 9/98
3-17
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
FORCED LANDINGS
If all attempts to restart the engine fail and a forced landing is
imminent, select a suitable field and prepare for the landing as
discussed under the Emergency Landing Without Engine Power
checklist. Transmit Mayday message on 121.5 MHz giving location
and intentions and squawk 7700.
Before attempting an "off airport'' landing with engine power
available, one should fly over the landing area at a safe but low
altitude to inspect the terrain for obstructions and surface
conditions, proceeding as discussed under the Precautionary
Landing With Engine Power checklist.
Prepare for ditching by securing or jettisoning heavy objects
located in the baggage area and collect folded coats for protection
of occupants' face at touchdown. Transmit Mayday message on
121.5 MHz giving location and intentions and squawk 7700. Avoid
a landing flare because of difficulty in judging height over a water
surface. The checklist assumes the availability of power to make a
precautionary water landing. If power is not available, use of the
airspeeds noted with minimum flap extension will provide a more
favorable attitude for a power off ditching.
I
In a forced landing situation, do not tum off the AVIONICS
MASTER switch or the MASTER switch until a landing is assured.
Premature deactivation of the switches will disable the airplane
electrical systems.
Before performing a forced landing, especially in remote and
mountainous areas, activate the ELT transmitter by positioning the
cockpit-mounted switch to the ON position.
For complete
information on ELT operation, refer to the Supplements, Section 9.
l
LANDING WITHOUT ELEVATOR CONTROL
Trim for horiz.ontal flight with an airspeed of approximately 90
KIAS by using throttle and elevator trim controls. Then do not
change the elevator trim control setting; control the glide angle
by adjusting power exclusively.
3-18
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
At flare out, the nose down moment resulting from power reduction is an adverse factor and the airplane may hit on the nose
wheel. Consequently, at flareout, the elevator trim control should be
adjusted toward the full nose-up position and the power adjusted so
that the airplane will rotate to the horizontal attitude for touchdown.
Close the throttle at touchdown.
FIRES
Improper starting procedures involving the excessive use of
auxiliary fuel pump operation can cause engine flooding and
subsequent collection of fuel on the parking ramp as the excess fuel
drains overboard from the intake manifolds. This is sometimes
experienced in difficult starts in cold weather where engine preheat
service is not available. If this occurs, the airplane should be
pushed away from the fuel puddle before another engine start is
attempted.
Otherwise, there is a possibility of raw fuel
accumulations in the exhaust system igniting during an engine start,
causing a long flame from the tailpipe, and possibly igniting the
collected fuel on the pavement. If a fire occurs, proceed according
to the checklist.
Although engine fires are extremely rare ;n flight, the steps of the
appropriate checklist should be followed if one is encountered. After
completion of this procedure, execute a forced landing. Do not
attempt to restart the engine.
The initial indication of an electrical fire is usually the odor of
burning insulation. The checklist for this problem should result in
elimination of the fire.
EMERGENCY OPERATION IN CLOUDS
(Total Vacuum System Failure)
If both the vacuum pumps fail in flight, the directional indicator
and attitude indicator will be disabled, and the pilot will have to rely
on the turn coordinator if he inadvertently flies into clouds. If an
autopilot is installed, it too may be affected. Refe.r to Section 9,
Supplements, for additional details concerning autopilot operation.
The following instructions assume that only the electrically powered
turn coordinator is operative, and that the pilot is not completely
proficient in instrument flying.
I
May 30/01
3-19
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
EXECUTING A 180° TURN IN. CLOUDS
Upon inadvertently entering the clouds, an immediate plan
should be made to turn back as follows:
1. Note the compass heading.
2. Using the clock, initiate a standard rate left turn, holding the
turn coordinator symbolic airplane wing opposite the lower left
index mark for 60 seconds. Then roll back to level flight by
leveling the miniature airplane.
3. Check accuracy of the turn by observing the compass heading
which should be the reciprocal of the original heading.
4. If necessary, adjust heading primarily with skidding motions
rather than rolling motions so that the compass will read more
accurately.
5. Maintain altitude and airspeed by cautious application of
elevator control. Avoid over controlling by keeping the hands
off the control wheel as much as possible and steering only
with rudder.
EMERGENCY DESCENT THROUGH CLOUDS
If conditions preclude reestablishment of VFR flight by a 180°
turn, a descent through a cloud deck to VFR conditions may be
appropriate. If possible, obtain radio clearance for an emergency
descent through clouds. To guard against a spiral dive, choose an
easterly or westerly heading to minimize compass card swings due
to changing bank angles. In addition, keep hands off the control
wheel and steer a straight course with rudder control by monitoring
the turn coordinator. Occasionally check the compass heading and
make minor corrections to hold an approximate course. Before
descending into the clouds, set up a stabilized letdown condition as
follows:
1. Apply full rich mixture or adjust mi.xture for smooth operation.
2. Reduce power to set up a 500 to 800 ft/min rate of descent.
3. Adjust the elevator trim and rudder trim for a stabilized
descent at 100 KIAS.
4 . Keep hands off the control wheel.
5. Monitor turn coordinator and make corrections by rudder
alone.
6. Adjust rudder trim to relieve unbalanced rudder force, if
present.
3-20
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
7. Check trend of compass card movement and make cautious
corrections with rudder to stop the turn.
8. Upon breaking out of clouds, resume normal cruising flight.
RECOVERY FROM SPIRAL DIVE IN THE CLOUDS
If a spiral is encountered in the clouds, proceed as follows:
1. Retard throttle to idle position.
2. Stop the turn by using coordinated aileron and rudder control
to align the symbolic airplane in the turn coordinator with the
horizon reference line.
3. Cautiously apply elevator back pressure to slowly reduce the
airspeed to 100 KIAS.
4. Adjust the elevator trim control to maintain a 100 KIAS glide.
5. Keep hands off the control wheel, using rudder control to hold
a straight heading. Adjust rudder trim to relieve unbalanced
rudder force.
6. Clear engine occasionally, but avoid using enough power to
disturb the trimmed glide.
7. Upon breaking out of clouds, resume normal cruising flight.
INADVERTENT FLIGHT INTO ICING CONDITIONS
Flight into known icing conditions is prohibited and can be
extremely dangerous. An inadvertent encounter with these
conditions can best be handled using the checklist procedures. The
best procedure, of course, is to turn back or change altitude to
escape icing conditions.
STATIC SOURCE BLOCKED
If erroneous readings of the static source instruments (airspeed,.
altimeter and vertical speed) are suspected, the static pressure
alternate source valve should be pulled on (out), thereby supplying
static pressure to these instruments from the cabin.
With the alternate static source on, refer to the Alternate Static
Source Airspeed Calibration and Altimeter Correction tables in Section 5 for additional details.
Jan 18/02
3-21
I
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
Maximum airspeed and altimeter variation from normal is 5 knots
and 70 feet over the normal operating range with the window(s)
closed. See Section 5 tables for airspeed and altimeter calibration
data.
SPINS
Intentional spins are prohibited in this airplane. Should an
inadvertent spin occur, the following recovery procedure should be
used:
1. RETARD THROTTLE TO IDLE POSITION.
2. PLACE AILERONS IN NEUTRAL POSITION.
3. APPLY ANO HOLD FULL RUDDER OPPOSITE TO THE
DIRECTION OF ROTATION.
4 . JUST AFTER THE RUDDER REACHES THE STOP, MOVE
THE CONTROL WHEEL BRISKLY FORWARD FAR ENOUGH
TO BREAK THE STALL. (Full down elevator may be required
at aft center of gravity loadings to assure optimum recoveries.)
5. HOLD THESE CONTROL INPUTS UNTIL ROTATION
STOPS. Premature relaxation of the control inputs may extend
the recovery.
6. AS ROTATION STOPS, NEUTRALIZE RUDDER, AND MAKE
A SMOOTH RECOVERY FROM THE RES ULTING DIVE.
NOTE
If disorientation precludes a visual determination of the
direction of rotation, the symbolic airplane in the turn
coordinator may be referred to for this information.
ROUGH ENGINE OPERATION
OR LOSS OF POWER
SPARK PLUG FOULING
A slight engine roughness in flight may be caused by one or
more spark plugs becoming fouled by carbon or lead deposits. This
may be verified by turning the ignition switch momentarily from
BOTH to either L or R position. An obvious power loss in single
ignition operation is evidence of spark plug or magneto trouble.
Jan 18/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
._
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
Assuming that spark plugs are the more likely cause, lean the mixture to the recommended lean setting for cruising flight. If the problem does not clear up in several minutes, determine if a richer mixture setting will produce smoother operation. If not, proceed to the
nearest airport for repairs using the BOTH position of the Ignition
switch unless extreme roughness dictates the use of a single ignition position.
MAGNETO MALFUNCTION
A sudden engine roughness or misfiring is usually evidence of
magneto problems. Switching from BOTH to either L or R Ignition
switch position will identify which magneto is malfunctioning. Select
different power settings and enrichen the mixture to determine if
continued operation on BOTH magnetos is practicable. If not, switch
to the good magneto and proceed to the nearest airport for repairs.
ENGINE DRIVEN FUEL PUMP FAILURE
I
al
Failure of the engine driven fuel pump will be evidenced by
sudden reduction in the fuel flow indication immediately prior to a
loss of power, while operating from a fuel tank containing adequate
fuel.
In the event of an engine driven fuel pump failure, immediatelyl
turn the auxiliary fuel pump switch ON to restore engine power. In
this event, the flight should be terminated when practical and the
fuel pump repaired.
EXCESSIVE FUEL VAPOR INDICATIONS
Excessive fuel vapor indications are most likely to occur on the
ground typically during prolonged taxi operations, when operating at
higher altitudes and/or in unusually warm temperatures.
An Indication of excessive fuel vapor accumulation is fuel flowl
gage fluctuations greater than 1 gal./hr. This condition with leanerl
mixtures or with larger fluctuations may result in power surges, and
if not corrected, may cause power loss.
Jan 18/02
3-23
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
To eliminate vapor and stabilize fuel flow on the ground or in the
air, turn the auxiliary fuel pump on and reset the mixture as
required. If vapor symptoms persist, select the opposite fuel tank.
When fuel flow stabilizes, turn off the auxiliary fuel pump and reset
the mixture as desired.
LOW OIL PRESSURE
If the low oil pressure annunciator (OIL PRESS) illuminates,
check the oil pressure gage to confirm low oil pressure condition. If
gage oil pressure and oil temperature remains normal, it is possible
the oil pressure sending unit or relief valve is malfunctioning.
However, land at the nearest airport to inspect the source of trouble.
If a total loss of oil pressure is accompanied by a rise in oil
temperature, there is good reason to suspect an engine failure is
imminent. Reduce engine power immediately and select a suitable
forced landing field. Use only the minimum power required to reach
the desired touchdown spot.
ELECTRICAL POWER SUPPLY
SYSTEM MALFUNCTIONS
Malfunctions in the electrical power supply system can be
detected by periodic monitoring of the ammeter and low voltage
annunciator (VOLTS); however, the cause of these malfunctions is
usually difficult to determine. A broken alternator drive belt or wiring
is most likely the cause of alternator failures, although other factors
could cause the problem. A defective alternator control unit can also
cause malfunctions. Problems of this nature constitute an electrical
emergency and should be dealt with immediately. Electrical power
malfunctions usually fall into two categories: excessive rate of
charge and insufficient rate of charge. The following paragraphs
describe the recommended remedy for each situation.
13-24
Jan 18/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
EXCESSIVE RATE OF CHARGE
After engine starting and heavy electrical usage at low engine
speeds (such as extended taxiing) the battery condition will be low
enough to accept above normal charging during the initial part of a
flight. However, after thirty minutes of cruising flight, the ammeter
should be indicating less than two needle widths of charging
current. ff the charging rate were to remain above this value on a
long flight, the battery would overheat and evaporate the electrolyte
at an excessive rate.
Electronic components in the electrical system can be adversely
affected by higher than normal voltage. The alternator control unit
includes an overvoltage sensor which normally will automatically
shut down the alternator tf the charge voltage reaches
approximately 31 .75 volts. If the overvoltage sensor malfunctions, as
evidenced by an excessive rate of charge shown on the ammeter,
the alternator should be turned off, nonessential electrical
equipment turned off and the flight terminated as soon as practical.
INSUFFICIENT RATE OF CHARGE
NOTE
Illumination of the low voltage annunciator (VOLTS) and
ammeter discharge indications may occur during low RPM
conditions with an electrical load on the system, such as
during a low RPM taxi. Under these conditions, the light will
go out at higher RPM.
If the overvoltage sensor should shut down the alternator and trip
the alternator circuit breaker (ALT FLO), or if the alternator output is
low, a discharge rate will be shown on the ammeter followed by
illumination of the low voltage annunciator (VOLTS). Since this may
be a "nuisance" trip out, an attempt should be made to reactivate
the alternator system. To reactivate, turn the avionics master switch
off, check that the alternator circuit breaker (ALT FLO} is in, then
turn both sides of the master switch off and then on again. If the
problem no longer exists, normal alternator charging will resume
and the low voltage annunciator (VOLTS) will go off. The avionics
master switch may then be turned back on.
Jan 18/02
3-251
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
If the annunciator illuminates again, a malfunction is confirmed.
In this event, the flight should be terminated and/or the current drain
on the battery minimized because the battery can supply the
electrical system for only a limited period of time. Battery power
must be conserved for later operation of the wing flaps and, if the
emergency occurs at night, for possible use of the landing lights
during landing.
CARGO DOOR EMERGENCY EXIT
If it is necessary to use the cargo doors as an emergency exit
and the wing flaps are not extended, open the doors and exit. If the
wing flaps are extended, open the doors in accordance with the
instructions shown on the red placard which is mounted on the
forward cargo door. Here the forward door must be opened far
enough to allow access to the aft door latch. After unlatching the aft
door, release the latch lever and push the aft door full open. These
placarded instructions may also be found in Section 2.
OTHER EMERGENCIES
WINDSHIELD DAMAGE
If a bird strike or other incident should damage the windshield in
flight to the point of creating an opening, a significant loss in
performance may be expected. This loss may be minimized in some
cases (depending on amount of damage, altitude, etc.) by opening
the side windows while the airplane is maneuvered for a landing at
the nearest airport. If airplane performance or other adverse
conditions preclude landing at an airport, prepare for an "off airport"
landing in accordance w ith the Precautionary Landing Wrth Engine
Power or Ditching checklists.
13-26
Jan 18/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction
'
Page
... . . .. . . . .... ... . . . ... . . ...... . .... .
4-5
AIRSPEEDS
Airspeeds For Normal Operation
........... ...........
4-5
CHECKLIST PROCEDURES
Preflight Inspection .... . ... . ... ... . ... . . . . .. .. . .. . .
Cabin ... . . .. . ... .. . . ... .. .. ... . .. • . ... . ... . . .
Empennage . ... . . . ... . . .. . ....... . ... .. ... . . . .
Right Wing, Trailing Edge . • ... . . . .. . .... . . .. . ... . .
Right Wing . . . .. . . .. .. .. . ..... . . ... . .. . .. . . . . . .
Nose . . ... .. . • . . . .... . .. ..... .. .. .... . ... . • •
Left Wing .... ... .... .. . . . . .. ... ..... . . . .. ... .
Left Wing, Leading Edge . .. ... . .. ... .. . ......... .
Left Wing, Trailing Edge .. ... ... . • .... .... . . .. . • .
Before Starting Engine .. . . . . . .. . .. . . .... . . .. . . . . . .
Starting Engine (With Battery) . ........ . . ... .. . • . ....
Starting Engine (With External Power) .. . . . .. . .... • ... .
Before Taxiing . ... .. .. .. . . . .... ... . . .. . . .. .... . . .
Before Takeoff . . .. . . .. . . . . .. . . .. .... .... ..... . . . .
Takeoff ... .. .. . ..... .. ...• . . ... . .• . . . . . . . .. . .. .
Normal Takeoff .. . . .. ... . ... .. .... . . . . ...... .. .
Short Field Takeoff ..... ......... . .... .. . . . . . .. .
Enroute Climb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Normal Climb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maximum Performance Climb . . . . . . . . . . • . . .
Apr 12/00
4-7
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-9
4-10
4-11
4-11
4-11
4-12
4-12
4-13
4-141
4-14
4-15
4-15
4-15
4-15
4-15
4-16
4-1
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
TABLE OF CONTENTS (ConUnued)
Page
Cruise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Descent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Before Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Normal Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Short Field Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Balked Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
After Landing
.................. ...............
Securing Airplane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . .
4-17
4-17
4-18
4- 18
4-18
4-19
4-19
4-19
4-19
AMPLIFIED PROCEDURES
Preflight Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-20
Starting Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-21
Taxiing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-22
Before Takeoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . .
4-24
Warm Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . .
4-24
Magneto Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-24
Alternator Check . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-24
Landing Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-25
Takeoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . .
4-25
Power Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-25
Wing Flap Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-25
Crosswind Takeoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-26
Enroute Climb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-26
Cruise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-27
Leaning With the T.I.T. Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-29
Fuel Savings Procedures for Normal Flight Operations . . . 4-31
Fuel Vapor Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-31
Jan 18/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
Page
Stalls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Descent . .. ... ........ .. . . .. . __. . . .... _. . . . . . . .
Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Normal Landing . . .. . ..... . . ... . .. . . , , , , , , , , , , ,
Short Field Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crosswind Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Balked Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . .
Cold Weather Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hot Weather Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Noise Characteristics And Noise Reduction . . . . . . . . . • . . .
Jan 18/02
4-32
4-33
4-33
4-33
4-34
4-34
4--34
4-35
4-35'
4-37
4-37
4-3/(4-4 blank)
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
INTRODUCTION
Section 4 provides checklist and amplified procedures for the
conduct of normal operation. Normal procedures associated with
loptional systems can be found in Supplements, Section 9.
AIRSPEEDS
AIRSPEEDS FOR NORMAL OPERATION
Unless otherwise noted, the following speeds are based on a
maximum weight of 3600 pounds and may be used for any lesser
weight. However, to achieve the performance specified in Section 5
for takeoff distance and climb performance the speed appropriate to
the particular weight must be used.
Takeoff:
Normal Climb Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
75-85 KIAS
Short Field Takeoff, Flaps 20°, Speed at 50 Feet . .. . 74 KIAS
Enroute Climb, Flaps Up:
Normal ...... ... . . . . . ....... . . .... . . . . ... .
95 KIAS
Best Rate of Climb, Sea Level to 17,000 feet ...... . 89 KIAS
Best Rate of Climb, 24,000 feet ... . .... ... ... . . .
79 KIAS
Best Angle of Climb, Sea Level ... .... . .... . ... .
69 KIAS
Best Angle of Climb, 10,000 Feet ....... . . . . .. . .
72 KIAS
Landing Approach:
Normal Approach, Flaps Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .
80-90 KIAS
Normal Approach, Flaps 40° . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
70-80 KIAS
67 KIAS
Short Field Approach, Flaps 40° . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Balked Landing:
... . . . ... .. . ... . . . .
Maximum Power, Flaps 20°
85 KIAS
Maximum Recommended Turbulent Air Penetration Speed:
3600 Lbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
125 KIAS
2950 Lbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
120 KIAS
2300 Lbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
106 KIAS
Maximum Demonstrated Crosswind Velocity:
Takeoff or Landing ... . .. ... . .. .. ...... ... .
20 KNOTS
May 30/01
4-5
CESSNA
SECTION4
MODEL T206H
NORMAL PROCEDURES
NOTE
I
I
Visually check airplane for general condition during walk-around
Inspection. Airplane should be parl<ed in a normal ground attitude
(refer to Figure 1-1) to ensure that fuel drain valves allow for
accurate sampling. Use of the refueling steps and assist handles
will simplify access to the upper wing surfaces for visual checks
and refueling operations. In cold weather, remove even small
accumulations of frost, ice or snow from wing, tail and control
surfaces. Also, make sure that control surfaces contain no internal
accumulations of ice or debris. Prior to flight, check that pilot heater
is warm to touch within 30 seconds with battery and pitot switches
on. If a night flight is planned, check operation of all lights, and
make sure a flashlight is available.
Figure 4-1 . Preflight Inspection
4-6
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
PREFLIGHT INSPECTION
WCABIN
1. Pitot Tube Cover - REMOVE. Check for pitot blockage.
2. Pilot's Operating Handbook - AVAILABLE IN THE
AIRPLANE.
3. Cargo Door Locking Pin (Airplane Serial Number
T20608438 and On) - REMOVE and STOW.
4. Airplane Weight and Balance - CHECKED.
5. Parking Brake -- SET.
6. Control Wheel Lock - REMOVE.
7. Ignition Switch - OFF
8. Avionics Master Switch - OFF.
AwARNING
WHEN TURNING ON THE MASTER SWITCH,
USING AN EXTERNAL POWER SOURCE, OR
PULLING THE PROPELLER THROUGH BY HAND,
TREAT THE PROPELLER AS IF THE IGNITION
SWITCH WERE ON. DO NOT STAND, NOR
ALLOW ANYONE ELSE TO STANO, WITHIN THE
ARC OF THE PROPELLER, SINCE A LOOSE OR
BROKEN
WIRE
OR
A
COMPONENT
MALFUNCTION COULD CAUSE THE PROPELLER
TO ROTATE.
9. Master Switch - ON.
10. Fuel Quantity Indicators - CHECK QUANTITY and ENSURE
LOW FUEL ANNUNCIATORS (L LOW FUEL R) ARE
EXTINGUISHED.
11. Avionics Master Switch - ON.
CHECK AUDIBLY FOR
12. Avionics Cooling Fan OPERATION.
13. Avionics Master Switch - OFF.
14. Static Pressure Alternate Source Valve - OFF.
15. Annunciator Panel Switch - PLACE AND HOLD IN TST
POSITION and ensure all annunciators illuminate.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 6
4-7
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
PREFLIGHT INSPECTION (Continued)
G) CABIN (Continued)
I
16. Annunciator Panel Test $wit~h - RELE/\SE. Check that
appropriate annunciators remain on.
NOTE
When master switch is turned ON, some
annunciators will flash for approximately 10 seconds
before illuminating steadily. When panel TST switch
is toggled up and held in position, all remaining
lights will flash until the switch is released.
17. Fuel Selector Valve - BOTH.
18. Flaps - EXTEND.
19. Pitot Heat - ON. (Carefully check that pitot tube is warm to
the touch within 30 seconds.)
20. Pitot Heat- OFF.
21 . Master Switch - OFF.
22. Trim Controls - NEUTRAL
23. Oxygen Supply Pressure - CHECK.
24. Oxygen Masks - CHECK.
(»EMPENNAGE
1. Rudder Gust Lock (if installed) -- REMOVE.
2. Tail Tie-Down -- DISCONNECT.
3. Control Surfaces - CHECK freedom of movement and
security.
4. Trim Tab - CHECK security.
5. Check that cargo doors are securely latched (right side
only). If cargo load will not permit access to the front cargo
door inside handle, lock the door from the outside by pulling
the handle from its recess, pulling outboard on the vertical
tab behind the handle and pushing the handle back into its
recess. Door locking can be verified by observing that the
inside door handle has rotated toward the locked position.
The outside handle can then be, locked using the key.
(Continued Next Page)
4-8
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
NOTE
The cargo doors must be fully closed and latched before
operating the electric wing flaps. A switch in the upper door
sill of the front cargo door interrupts the wing flap electrical
circuit when the front door is opened or removed, thus
preventing the flaps from being lowered with possible
damage to the cargo door or wing flaps when the cargo
door is open.
6. Antennas - CHECK for security of attachment and general
condition.
G) RIGHT WING Trailing Edge
1. Flap - CHECK for security and condition.
2. Aileron - CHECK freedom of movement and security.
@RIGHTWING
1. Wing Tie-Down -- DISCONNECT.
2. Fuel Tank Vent Opening -- CHECK for stoppage.
3. Main Wheel Tire - CHECK for proper inflation and general
condition (weather checks, tread depth and wear, etc... ).
4. Fuel Tank Sump Quick Drain Valves - DRAIN at least a
cupful of fuel (using sampler cup) from each sump location to
check for water, sediment, and proper fuel grade before each
flight and after each refueling. If water is observed, take
further samples until clear and then gently rock wings and
lower tail to the ground to move any additional contaminants
to the sampling points. Take repeated samples from all fuel
drain points until all contamination has been removed.
contaminants are still present, refer to WARNING below and
do not fly airplane.
lfl
A WARNING
IF, AFTER REPEATED SAMPLING, EVIDENCE OF
CONTAMINATION STILL EXISTS, THE AIRPLANE
SHOULD NOT BE FLOWN. TANKS SHOULD BE
DRAINED AND SYSTEM PURGED BY QUALIFIED
MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL. ALL EVIDENCE OF
CONTAMINATION MUST BE REMOVED BEFORE
FURTHER FLIGHT.
May 30/01
4-9
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
5. Fuel Quantity - CHECK VISUALLY for desired level.
6. Fuel Filler Cap - SECURE and VENT UNOBSTRUCTED.
WNOSE
I
1. Static Source Opening (right side of fuselage) - CHECK for
blockage.
2. Fuel Strainer Quick Drain Valve (Located on bottom of
fuselage) - DRAIN at least a cupful of fuel (using sampler
cup) from valve to check for water, sediment, and proper fuel
grade before each flight and after each refueling. If water is
observed, take further samples until clear and then gently rock
wings and lower tail to the ground to move any additional
contaminants to the sampling points. Take repeated samples
from all fuel drain points, including the fuel reservoirs and the
fuel selector, until all contamination has been removed. If
contaminants are still present. refer to WARNING on page 4-9
and do not fly airplane.
3. Engine Oil Dip Stick/Filler Cap -- CHECK oil level, then check
dipstick SECURE. Do not operate with less than 6 quarts. Fill
to 11 quarts for extended flight.
4. Engine Cooling Air Inlets -- CHECK left and right upper inlets
clear of obstructions. Also, CHECK lower left oil cooling air
inlet clear of obstructions.
5 . Propeller and Spinner -- CHECK for nicks and security.
6. Engine Induction Air Filter - CHECK for restrictions by dust or
other foreign matter.
7. Nose Wheel Strut and Tire - CHECK for proper inflation of
strut and general condition (weather checks, tread depth and
wear, etc... ) of tire.
8. Static Source Opening (left side of fuselage}- CHECK for
blockage.
4-10
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
-../
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
@ LEFT WING
1. Fuel Quantity -- CHECK VISUALLY for desired level.
2. Fuel Filler Cap - SECURE AND VENT UNOBSTRUCTED.
3. Fuel Tank Sump Quick Drain Valves - DRAIN at least a
cupful of fuel (using sampler cup) from each sump location to
check for water, sediment, and proper fuel grade before each
flight and after each refueling. If water is observed, take
further samples until clear and then gently rock wings and
lower tail to the ground to move any additional contaminants
to the sampling points. Take repeated samples from all fuel
drain points until all contamination has been removed. If
contaminants are still present, refer to WARNING on page 4-9
and do not fly airplane.
4. Main Wheel Tire -- CHECK for proper inflation and general
condition (weather checks, tread depth and wear, etc.).
(j)
LEFT WING Leading Edge
I
1. Fuel Tank Vent Opening - CHECK for blockage.
2. Stall Warning Vane -- CHECK for freedom of movement. To
check the system, place the vane upward; a sound from the
warning horn will confirm system operation.
3. Wing Tie-Down - DISCONNECT.
4 . Landing/Taxi Light(s) - CHECK for condition and cleanliness
of cover.
Ci) LEFT WING Trailing Edge
1. Aileron - CHECK for freedom of movement and security.
2. Flap -- CHECK for security and condition.
Jan 18/02
4-11
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
BEFORE STARTING ENGINE
1. Preflight Inspection - COMPLETE.
2. Passenger Briefing - COMPLETE.
3. Seats and Seat Belts - ADJUST and LOCK. Ensure inertia
reel locking.
4. Brakes - TEST and SET.
5. Circuit Breakers - CHECK IN.
6. Electrical Equipment - OFF.
I
AcAUTION
THE AVIONICS MASTER SWITCH MUST BE OFF
DURING
ENGINE
START
TO
PREVENT
POSSIBLE DAMAGE TO AVIONICS.
7. Avionics Master Switch - OFF.
8. Cowl Flaps - OPEN.
9. Fu~I Selector Valve - BOTH.
10. Avionics Circuit Breakers -- CHECK IN.
STARTING ENGINE (With Battery)
1. Throttle -- OPEN 1/4 INCH.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Propeller - HIGH RPM.
Mixture - IDLE CUT OFF.
Propeller Area -- CLEAR.
Master Switch - ON.
NOTE
If engine is warm. omit priming procedure of step 6, 7, and
8 below.
6. Auxiliary Fuel Pump Switch - ON.
7. Mixture - ADVANCE to full rich until the fuel flow just starts to
rise, then return to IDLE CUT OFF position.
8. Auxiliary Fuel Pump Switch - OFF.
4-12
Jan 18/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
---
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
9. Ignition Switch - START (release when engine starts).
10. Mixture - ADVANCE smoothly to RICH when engine fires.
NOTE
If engine floods, turn off auxiliary fuel pump, place mixture
in idle cut off, open throttle 11/2 to full, and crank engine.
When engine fires, advance mixture to full rich and retard
throttle promptly.
11 . Oil Pressure - CHECK.
12. Flashing Beacon and Navigation Lights - ON as required.
13. Avionics Master Switch - ON.
14. Radios - ON.
STARTING ENGINE (With External Power)
1. Throttle - OPEN 1/4 INCH.
2. Propeller - HIGH RPM.
3. Mixture -- IDLE CUT OFF.
4. Propeller Area - CLEAR.
5. External Power - CONNECT to airplane receptacle.
6. Master Switch - ON.
NOTE
If engine is warm, omit priming procedure of step 7, 8, and
9 below.
7. Auxiliary Fuel Pump Switch - ON.
8. Mixture - ADVANCE to full rich until the fuel flow just starts to
rise, then return to IDLE CUT OFF position.
...
9. Auxiliary Fuel Pump Switch - OFF.
10. Ignition Switch - START (release when engine starts).
11. Mixture -ADVANCE smoothly to RICH when engine fires.
NOTE
If engine floods, turn off auxiliary fuel pump, place mixture
in idle cut off, open thrott.le 1/2 to full, and crank engine.
When engine fires, advance mixture to full rich and retard
throttle promptly.
Jan 18/02
4-13
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
12. Oil Pressure - CHECK.
13. External Power -- DISCONNECT from airplane receptacle.
Secure external power door.
14. Ammeter -- CHECK (see checklist. Section 7, Ground Service
Plug Receptacle).
15. Flashing Beacon and Navigation Lights - ON as required.
16. Avionics Master Switch - ON.
17. Radios -- ON.
BEFORE TAXIING
1. Windows, vents and heater - ADJUST as desired.
2. Mixture -AS REQUIRED. Preferably LEANED at 1200 RPM.
3. Throttle - AS REQUIRED or 1800 RPM to 2000 RPM as
required by fuel vapor conditions.
4. Auxiliary Fuel Pump - OFF (ON, if fuel vapor conditions
exist).
5. Parking Brake - RELEASE.
BEFORE TAKEOFF
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11 .
12.
13.
I
14.
15.
4-14
Parking Brake - SET.
Passenger Seats -AS FAR FORWARD AS PRACTICAL.
Passenger Seat Backs - MOST UPRIGHT POSITION.
Seats and Seat Belts -- CHECK SECURE.
Cabin Doors - CLOSED and LOCKED.
Cargo Door (Airplane Serial Numbers T20608438 and On) CHECK (Locking Pin removed and stowed).
Flight Controls - FREE and CORRECT.
Flight Instruments - CHECK and SET.
Fuel Quantity - CHECK.
Auxiliary Fuel Pump- OFF.
Mixture - RICH.
Fuel Selector Valve - RECHECK BOTH.
Throttle -- 1800 RPM.
a. Magnetos - CHECK (RPM drop should not exceed 150
RPM on either magneto or 50 RPM differential between
magnetos}.
b. Propeller -- CYCLE from high to low RPM; return to high
RPM (full in).
c. Vacuum Gage - CHECK.
d. Engine Instruments and Ammeter -- CHECK.
e. Annunciator Panel - Ensure no annunciators are
illuminated.
Throttle -- CHECK IDLE.
Throttle - 1000 RPM.
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
..-
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
Throttle Friction Lock -- ADJUST.
Strobe Lights - AS DESIRED.
Electric Trim (if installed) - PREFLIGHT TEST.
Radios and Avionics - SET.
NAV/GPS Switch (if installed)- SET.
Autopilot (if installed) - OFF.
Elevator Trim and Rudder Trim - SET for takeoff.
Cowl Flaps - OPEN.
Wing Flaps - SET for takeoff (0° TO 20°).
Brakes - RELEASE.
TAKEOFF
NORMAL TAKEOFF
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Wing Flaps - 0° - 20•.
Power - 39 INCHES Hg. and 2500 RPM.
Mixture - ADJUST to 34 GPH fuel flow.
Elevator Control - LIFT NOSE WHEEL at 55 KIAS.
Climb Speed -- 75 - 85 KIAS (flaps 20°}.
Wing Flaps - RETRACT (after obstacles are cleared}.
SHORT FIELD TAKEOFF
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Wing Flaps - 20°.
Brakes - APPLY.
Power - 39 INCHES Hg. and 2500 RPM.
Mixture - Adjust to 34 GPH fuel flow.
Brakes -- RELEASE.
Elevator Control - MAINTAIN SLIGHTLY TAIL LOW
ATTITUDE.
7. Climb Speed - 74 KIAS (until all obstacles are cleared).
8. Wing Flaps - RETRACT slowly after reaching 90 KIAS.
NOTE
Do not reduce power until wing flaps have been retracted.
ENROUTE CLIMB
NORMAL CLIMB
1. Airspeed -- 95-105 KIAS.
2. Power - 30 in. Hg. and 2400 RPM.
Revision 6
4-15
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
3. Mixture - LEAN to 20 GPH fuel flow.
4. Fuel Selector Valve - BOTH.
5. Cowl Flaps - OPEN as required.
MAXIMUM PERFORMANCE CLIMB
1. Airspeed -- 89 KIAS.
NOTE
Some optional equipment items require the use of higher
indicated airspeed for maximum performance climbs. This
information is included in the Supplements section for
applicable installed options.
2. Power -- 39 in. Hg. and 2500 RPM.
3. Mixture -ADJUST to 34 GPH fuel flow.
NOTE
See Minimum Fuel Flow placard for maximum continuous
power manifold pressure and fuel flow above 17,000 feet.
NOTE
On hot days at higher altitudes, be alert for possible fuel
vapor indications. If fuel flow fluctuations are observed or if
desired fuel flows cannot be maintained, turn the auxiliary
fuel pump ON and reset the mixture as required.
4. Fuel Selector Valve -- BOTH.
5. Cowl Flaps - FULL OPEN.
14-16
Jan 18/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
'-
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CRUISE
1. Power - 15 - 30 in. Hg., 2000 - 2400 RPM (no more than
75%).
2. Mixture - LEAN for cruise fuel flow using the T.I.T. gage or
the Cruise Data in Section 5.
3. Elevator and Rudder Trim --ADJUST.
4. Cowl Flaps - AS REQUIRED.
NOTE
Turn auxiliary fuel pump on momentarily when
switching tanks in cruise.
DESCENT
I
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361:
"---
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Power -AS DESIRED.
Mixture - ENRICHEN as required.
Cowl Flaps -- CLOSED.
Altimeter - SET.
Nav/GPS Switch - SET.
Fuel Selector Valve -- BOTH.
Wing Flaps -- AS DESIRED (0°-10° below 140 KIAS; 10° 40° below 100 KIAS).
Serials T20608362 and on:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Power -- AS DESIRED.
Mixture - ENRICHEN as required.
Cowl Flaps -- CLOSED.
Altimeter - SET.
Nav/GPS Switch - SET.
Fuel Selector Valve -- BOTH.
Wing Flaps -- AS DESIRED (0°-10° below 140 KIAS; 10°20" below 120 KIAS; 20° - 40° below 100 KIAS).
Revision 5
4-17
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
_.,
BEFORE LANDING
1. Passenger Seats --AS FAR FORWARD AS PRACTICAL.
2. Pilot and Passenger Seat Backs -- MOST UPRIGHT
POSITION.
3. Seats and Seat Belts -- SECURED and LOCKED.
4. Fuel Selector Valve - BOTH.
5. Mixture -- RICH.
6. Propeller -- HIGH RPM.
7. Landingrraxi Lights -- ON.
8. Autopilot (if installed) - OFF,
LANDING
NORMAL LANDING
lserials T20608001 thru T20608361 :
1. Airspeed - 80 - 90 KJAS (flaps UP).
2. Wing Flaps - AS DESIRED {0°-10° below 140 KIAS; 10° 40° below 100 KIAS).
3. Airspeed - 70 - 80 KIAS (flaps DOWN).
4. Trim - ADJUST as desired.
5. Touchdown -- MAIN WHEELS FIRST.
6. Landing Roll - LOWER NOSE WHEEL GENTLY.
7. Braking - MINIMUM REQUI RED.
Serials T20608362 and on:
1. Airspeed -- 80 - 90 KlAS (flaps UP).
2. Wing Flaps - AS DESIRED (0°-10° below 140 KIA$; 10°200 below 120 KIAS; 20° - 40° below 100 KIAS).
3. Airspeed - 70 - 80 KIAS (flaps DOWN).
4. Trim - ADJUST as desired.
5. Touchdown - MAIN WHEELS FIRST.
6 . Landing Roll -- LOWER NOSE WHEEL GENTLY.
7. Braking - MINIMUM REQUIRED..
(Continued Next Page)
4- 18
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
SHORT FIELD LANDING
1. Airspeed -- 80-90 KIAS (flaps UP).
2. Wing Flaps - FULL (below 100 KIAS).
3. Airspeed- MAINTAIN 67 KIAS.
4. Power - REDUCE TO IDLE as obstacle is cleared.
5. Trim - ADJUST.
6. Touchdown -- MAIN WHEELS FIRST.
7. Brakes - APPLY HEAVILY.
8. Wing Flaps - RETRACT for maximum brake effectiveness.
BALKED LANDING
1. Power - 39 in. Hg and 2500 RPM.
2. Mixture - ADJUST to 34 GPH fuel flow.
3. Wing Flaps -- RETRACT TO 20°.
4. Climb Speed - 85 KIAS.
5. Wing Flaps - RETRACT slowly.
6. Cowl Flaps - OPEN.
AFTER LANDING
....__
1. Wing Flaps -- RETRACT.
2. Cowl Flaps -- OPEN.
SECURING AIRPLANE
1. Parking Brake -- SET.
2. Throttle - IDLE.
3. Electrical Equipment, Avionics Master Switch, Autopilot (if
installed) - OFF.
4. Mixture - IDLE CUT-OFF (pulled full out).
5. Ignition Switch - OFF.
6. Master Switch -OFF.
7. Control Lock - INSTALL.
8. Fuel Selector Valve -- LEFT or RIGHT to prevent cross
feeding.
9. Cowl Flaps -- Closed.
10. Cargo Door Locking Pin (Airplane Serial Numbers'
T20608438 and On)-- INSTALL.
Revision 6
4-19
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
AMPLIFIED PROCEDURES
PREFLIGHT INSPECTION
The Preflight Inspection, described in Figure 4-1 and adjacent
checklist, is recommended prior to each flight. If the airplane has
been in extended storage, has had recent major maintenance, or
has been operated from marginal airports, a more extensive exterior
inspection is recommended.
After major maintenance has been performed, the flight and trim
tab controls should be double checked for free and correct
movement and security. The security of all inspection plates on the
airplane should be checked following periodic inspections. If the
airplane has been waxed or polished, check the external static
pressure source hole for stoppage.
If the airplane has been exposed to a great deal of ground
handling in a crowded hangar, it should be checked for dents and
scratches on wings, fuselage, and tail surfaces, damage to
navigation and anti- collision lights, damage to nose wheel as a
result of exceeding tow limits, and avionics antennas.
Outside storage for long periods may result in dust and dirt
accumulation on the induction air filter, obstructions in airspeed
system lines, water contamination in fuel tanks and bird/rodent
nests in any opening. If any water is detected in the fuel system, the
fuel tank sump quick drain valves, fuel reservoir quick drain valve,
and fuel strainer quick drain valve should all be thoroughly drained.
Then, the wings should be gently rocked and the tail lowered to the
ground to move any further contaminants to the sampling points.
Repeated samples should then be taken at all quick drain points
until all contamination has been removed. If, after repeated
sampling, evidence of contamination still exists, the fuel tanks
should be completely drained and the fuel system cleaned.
Additionally, if the
gusty areas, or tied
attention should be
brackets to detect the
4-20
airplane has been stored outside in windy or
down adjacent to taxiing airplanes, special
paid to control surface stops, hinges, and
presence of potential wind damage.
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
If the airplane has been operated from muddy fields or in snow or
slush, check the main and nose gear wheel fairings for obstructions
and cleanliness. Operation from a gravel or cinder field will require
extra attention to propeller tips and abrasion on leading edges of the
horizontal tail. Stone damage to the propeller can seriously reduce
the fatigue life of the blades.
Airplanes that are operated from rough fields, especially at high
altitudes, are subjected to abnormal landing gear abuse. Frequently
check all components of the landing gear, shock strut, tires, and
brakes. If the shock strut is insufficiently extended, undue landing
and taxi loads will be subjected on the airplane structure.
To prevent loss of fuel in flight, make sure the fuel tank filler caps
are tightly sealed after any fuel system check or servicing. Fuel
system vents should also be inspected for obstructions, ice or water,
especially after exposure to cold, wet weather.
Prior to flight, check to be sure that there is an adequate oxygen
supply for the trip, by noting the oxygen pressure gage reading, and
referring to the Oxygen Duration Chart of the Pilot's Operating
Handbook.
Also check that the face masks and hoses are
accessible and in good condition.
STARTING ENGINE
In cooler weather, the engine compartment temperature drops off
rapidly following engine shutdown and the injector nozzle lines
remain nearly full of fuel.
However, in warmer weather, engine compartment temperatures
may increase rapidly following engine shutdown, and fuel in the
lines will vaporize and escape into the intake manifold. Hot weather
starting procedures depend considerably on how soon the next
engine start is attempted. Within the first 20 to 30 minutes after
shutdown, the fuel manifold is adequately primed and the empty
Injector nozzle lines will fill before the engine dies. However, after
approximately 30 minutes, the vaporized fuel in the manifold will
have nearly dissipated and some "priming• could be required to
refill the nozzle lines and keep the engine running after the initial
start. Starting a hot engine is facilitated by advancing the mixture
control promptly to 1/3 open when the engine fires, and then
smoothly to full rich as power develops.
Jan 18/02
4-21
I
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Should the engine tend to die after starting, turn on the auxiliary
fuel pump temporarily and adjust the throttle and/or mixture as
necessary to keep the engine running. In the event of over priming
or flooding, turn off the auxiliary fuel pump, open the throttle from
1/2 to full open, and continue cranking with the mixture full lean.
When the engine fires, smoothly advance the mixture control to full
rich and retard the throttle to desired idle speed.
If the engine is under primed (most likely in cold weather with a
cold engine) it will not fire at all, and additional priming will be
necessary.
I
After starting, if the oil pressure does not begin to indicate
pressure within 30 seconds in the summer and approximately one
minute in very cold weather, stop the engine and investigate. Lack
of oil pressure can cause serious engine damage.
NOTE
Additional details concerning cold weather starting and
operation may be found under COLD WEATHER
OPERATION paragraphs in this section.
Recommended starter duty-cycle:
Crank the starter for 1O
seconds followed by a 20 second cool-down period. This cycle can
be repeated two additional times, followed by a ten minute cooldown period before resuming cranking. After cool-down, crank the
starter again, three cycles of 10 seconds followed by 20 seconds of
cool-down. If the engine still fails to start, an investigation to
determine the cause should be initiated_
TAXIING
When taxiing, it is important that speed and use of brakes be
held to a minimum and that all controls be utilized (Refer to Figure
4-2, Taxiing Diagram) to maintain directional control and balance.
Taxiing over loose gravel or cinders should be done at low
engine speed to avoid abrasion and stone damage to the propeller
tips.
4-22
May 30/01
CESSNA
SECTION4
MODEL T206H
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CODE
WIND DIRECTION •
NOTE
Strong quartering tail winds require caution. Avoid sudden bursts
of the throttle and sharp braking when the airplane is in this
situation. Use the steerable nose wheel and rudder to maintain
direction.
0785T1012
Figure 4-2. Taxiing Diagram
May 30/01
4-23
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
BEFORE TAKEOFF
WARM UP
I
If the engine idles (approximately 650 RPM) and accelerates
smoothly, the airplane is ready for takeoff. Since the engine is
lclosely cowled for efficient in-flight engine cooling, precautions
should be taken to avoid overheating during prolonged engine
operation on the ground. Also, with the oil cooler inlet located on
the lower left cowl, oil cooling should be monitored closely during
ground operations with a right cross-wind. Further, long periods of
idling may cause fouled spark plugs.
MAGNETO CHECK
The magneto check should be made at 1800 RPM as follows.
Move ignition switch first to R position and note RPM. Next move
switch back to BOTH to clear the other set of plugs. Then move
switch to the L position, note RPM and return the switch to the
BOTH position. RPM drop should not exceed 150 RPM on either
magneto or show greater than 50 RPM differential between
magnetos. If there is doubt concerning operation of the ignition
system, RPM checks at higher engine speeds will usually confirm
whether a deficiency exists.
An absence of RPM drop may be an indication of faulty
grounding of one side of the ignition system or should be cause for
suspicion that the magneto timing is set in advance of the setting
specified.
ALTERNA TOR CHECK
Prior to flights where verification of proper alternator and
alternator control unit operation is essential (such as night or
instrument flights), a positive verification can be made by loading
the electrical system momentarily (3 to 5 seconds) with the landing
light or by operating the wing flaps during the engine runup (1800
RPM). The ammeter will remain within a needle width of its initial
reading if the alternator and alternator control unit are operating
properly.
4-24
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
LANDING LIGHTS
If landing lights are to be used to enhance the visibility of the
airplane in the traffic pattern or enroute, it is recommended that only
the taxi light be used. This will extend the service life of the landing
light appreciably.
TAKEOFF
POWER CHECK
It is important to check takeoff power early in the takeoff roll. Any
sign of rough engine operation or sluggish engine acceleration is
good cause for discontinuing the takeoff.
Full power run ups over loose gravel are especially harmful to
propeller tips. When takeoffs must be made over a gravel surface, it
is very important that the throttle be advanced slowly. This allows
the airplane to start rolling before high RPM is developed, and the
gravel will be blown back of the propeller rather than pulled into rt.
On the first flight of the day when the throttle is advanced for
takeoff, manifold pressure will normally exceed 39 in. Hg and fuel
flows will exceed 34 GPH if the throttle is opened fully. On any
takeoff, the manifold pressure should be monitored and the throttle
set to provide 39 in. Hg; then, for maximum engine power, the
mixture should be adjusted as required, during the initial takeoff roll
to 34 GPH fuel flow.
After full throttle is applied, adjust the throttle friction lock
clockwise to prevent the throttle from creeping back from a
maximum power position. Similar friction lock adjustments should
be made as required in other flight conditions to maintain a fixed
throttle setting.
WING FLAP SETTINGS
Normal takeoffs are accomplished with wing flaps 0° to 20°.
Using 20° wing flaps reduces the ground roll and total distance over
an obstacle by approximately 10 percent. Flap deflections greater
than 20° are not approved for takeoff.
Nov 9/98
4-25
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
On a short field , 20° wing flaps and an obstacle clearance speed
of 74 KIAS should be used. If 20° wing flaps are used for takeoff,
they should be left down until all obstacles are cleared and a safe
flap retraction speed of 90 KIAS is reached.
Soft or rough field takeoffs are performed with 20° flaps by lifting
the airplane off the ground as soon as practical in a slightly tail low
attitude. If no obstacles are ahead, the airplane should be leveled
off immediately to accelerate to a higher climb speed.
CROSSWIND TAKEOFF
Takeoffs into strong crosswind conditions normally are performed
with the minimum flap setting necessary for the field length, to
minimize the drift angle immediately after takeoff. With the ailerons
partially deflected into the wind, the airplane is accelerated to a
speed slightly higher than normal, then pulled off briskly to prevent
possible settling back to the runway while drifting. When clear of the
ground, make a coordinated turn into the wind to correct for drift.
ENROUTE CLIMB
Power settings for a Best Rate-of-Climb Profile using MCP must
be limited to 39 inches of manifold pressure, 2500 RPM and 34
GPH fuel flow.
A cruise climb at 30 inches of manifold pressure, 2400 RPM, 20
GPH fuel flow, and 95 to 105 KIAS is normally recommended to
provide an optimum combination of performance, visibility ahead,
engine cooling, economy and passenger comfort (due to lower noise
level). However, MCP power settings may be used for increased
climb performance, as desired.
If it is necessary to climb rapidly to clear mountains or reach
favorable winds or better weather at high altitudes, the best rate-ofclimb speed should be used with maximum continuous power. This
speed is 89 KIAS from sea level to 17,000 feet, decreasing to 79
KIAS at 24,000 feet.
If an obstruction dictates the use of a steep climb angle, climb
with flaps retracted and maximum continuous power at 69-72 KIA$.
Engine temperatures should be monitored closely at these climb
speeds.
4-26
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
...__...
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
For maximum power, the mixture should be set in accordance
with the Minimum Fuel Flow placard.
CRUISE
Normal cruising is performed between 55% and 75% of the rated
maximum continuous power (MCP). However, any power setting
within the green arc ranges on the manifold pressure gage and
tachometer may be used. The power settings and corresponding
fuel consumption for various altitudes can be determined by using
the data in Section 5.
NOTE
Cruising should be done at 65% to 75% power as much as
practicable until a total of 50 hours has been accumulated
or oll consumption has stabilized. Operation at this higher
power will ensure proper seating of the rings and is
applicable to new engines, and engines in service following
cylinder replacement or top overhaul of one or more
cylinders.
The Cruise Performance charts in Section 5 provide the pilot with
detailed information concerning the cruise performance of the Model
T206H in still air. Power and altitude, as well as winds aloft, have a
strong influence on the time and fuel needed to complete any flight.
The Cruise Performance table, Figure 5-3, illustrates the advantage
of higher altitude on both true airspeed and nautical miles per
gallon. In addition, the beneficial effect of lower cruise power on
nautical miles per gallon at a given altitude can be observed. The
selection of cruise altitude on the basis of most favorable wind
conditions and the use of low power settings are significant factors
that should be considered on every trip to reduce fuel consumption.
The Cruise Performance charts in Section 5 provide the pilot with
cruise performance at maximum gross weight. When normal cruise
is performed at reduced weights, there is an increase in true
airspeed. During normal cruise at power settings between 65% and
75%, the true airspeed will increase approximately 1 knot for every
125 pounds below maximum gross weight. During normal cruise at
power settings below 65%, the true airspeed will increase
approximately 1 knot for every 100 pounds below maximum gross
weight.
Jan 18/02
4-27
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
75%POWER
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
65%POWER
ALTITUDE
KTAS
NMPG
KTAS
55% POWER
NMPG
KTAS
NMPG
5000 feet
144
7.5
135
8.1
125
8.9
10000 feet
150
7.8
141
8.5
129
9.2
15000 feet
157
8.2
147
8.8
132
9.4
20000 feet
164
8.6
152
9.2
135
9.6
Figure 4-3. Cruise Performance Table
For reduced noise levels and lower fuel consumption, select the
lowest RPM in the green arc range for a given percent power that
will provide smooth engine operation. The cowl flaps should be
opened, if necessary, to maintain the cylinder head temperature at
approximately two-thirds of the normal operating range (green arc)
and the oil temperature within the normal operating range (green
arc).
The fuel injection system employed on this engine is considered
to be non-icing. In the event that unusual conditions cause the
intake air filter to become clogged or iced over, an alternate Intake
air door opens automatically for the most efficient use of either
normal or alternate air, depending on the amount of filter blockage.
Due to the lower intake pressure available through the alternate air
door or a partially blocked filter, manifold pressure can decrease
from a cruise power setting. This manifold pressure should be
recovered by increasing the throttle setting or higher RPM as
necessary to maintain the desired power.
4-28
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
LEANING WITH THE T.I.T. INDICATOR
Exhaust gas turbine inlet temperature (T.I.T.) as shown on the
T.I.T./C.H.T. indicator should be used for mixture leaning in cruising
flight. This unit displays the exhaust gas temperature at the inlet of
the turbine in degrees Fahrenheit.
&CAUTION
LEANING WITH A T.I.T. INDICATOR IS
PERMITTED ONLY WHEN USING POWER
SETTINGS WITHIN THE GREEN ARC RANGES.
IF HIGHER POWER SETTINGS ARE USED,
WHETHER FOR LEVEL FLIGHT OR CLIMB, THE
MINIMUM FUEL FLOW REQUIREMENTS MUST
BE MET.
Cruise performance data in this handbook is based on a
recommended lean mixture setting which may be established using
the T.I.T. indicator at powers of 75% MCP and below as follows:
I
1. Lean the mixture slowly until the T.I.T. peaks and begins to
drop.
2. Enrichen the mixture 75°F rich of peak for recommended lean
or a desired increment based on the data in Figure 4-4, T.I.T.
Table.
At maximum cruise power settings, the 1675°F limit (red line)
T.I.T. may occur before reaching peak T.I.T. In this case, enrichen
the mixture from redline 75°F for Recommended Lean Mixture. Any
change in attitude or power setting will require a change in the
recommended lean mixture setting an a recheck of the T.I.T. setting.
As noted in the T.I.T. table, Figure 4-4, operation at peak T.I.T.
provides the best fuel economy. This results in approximately 5%
greater range than shown in this handbook accompanied by a 4
knot decrease in speed. Under some conditions, engine roughness
may occur while operating at peak T.I.T. In this case, operate at the
Recommended lean Mixture.
May 30/01
4-29
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
MIXTURE DESCRIPTION
TURBINE INLET
TEMPERATURE (T.I.T.)
RECOMMENDED LEAN
(Pilot's Operating Handbook)
75°F Rich of Peak T.I.T.
BEST ECONOMY
Peak T.I.T.
BEST POWER
150°F Rich of Peak T.I.T.
Figure 4-4. T.I.T. Table
£_CAUTION
OPERATION ON THE LEAN SIDE OF PEAK T.I.T
IS NOT APPROVED.
NOTE
When cruising at altitudes above 22,000 feet, the maximum
allowable manifold pressure is below the top of the green
arc due to detonation restrictions. Reference Section 5
cruise tables for operational power settings.
Certain considerations must be made when using a T.I.T.
indicator. Operations which are not approved include:
1. Power settings above the green arc range limitation.
2. Operations atT.I.T. indications above 1675°F.
3. Mixture settings that cause engine roughness or excessive
power loss occurs.
14-30
Apr 12/00
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
FUEL SAVINGS PROCEDURES FOR NORMAL FLIGHT OPERATIONS
For best fuel economy during normal operations, the following
procedures are recommended.
1. After engine start and for all ground operations, set the throttle
to 1200 RPM and lean the mixture for maximum RPM. Afte
leaning, set the throttle to the appropiate RPM for ground
operations. Leave the mixture at this setting until beginning
the BEFORE TAKEOFF checklist. If prolonged ground
operations are conducted after the BEFORE TAKEOFF
checklist is complete, re-lean the mixture as described above
until ready for TAKEOFF checklist.
2. Adjust the mixture for placarded fuel flows during maximum
continuous power climbs.
3. Adjust the mixture at any altitude for RECOMMENDED LEAN
or BEST ECONOMY fuel flows, when using 75% or less
power.
Using the above recommended procedures can provide fuel
savings in excess of 5% when compared to typical operations at full
rich mixture. In addition, the above procedures will minimize spark
plug fouling since the reduction in fuel consumption results in a
proportional reduction in tetraethyl lead passing through the engine.
FUEL VAPOR PROCEDURES
The engine fuel system can become susceptible to fuel vapor
formation on the ground during warm weather. This will generally
occur when the outside ambient air temperature is above 80°F.
The situation is further aggravated by the fact that the engine fuel
flows are lower at idle and taxi engine speeds. When vapor occurs
as evidenced by idle engine speed and fuel flow fluctuations, the
following procedures are recommended.
1. With the mixture full rich, set the throttle at 1800 RPM to 2000
RPM. Maintain this power setting for 1 to 2 minutes or until
smooth engine operation returns.
2. Retard the throttle to idle to verify normal engine operation.
Jan 18/02
4-31
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
3. Advance the throttle to 1200 RPM and lean the mixture as described under FUEL SAVINGS PROCEDURES FOR NORMAL
FLIGHT OPERATIONS.
4. In addition to the above procedures. the Auxiliary Fuel Pump
may be turned ON with the mixture adjusted as required to aid
vapor suppression during ground operations. The Auxiliary
Fuel Pump should be turned OFF prior to takeoff.
5. Just prior to TAKEOFF, advance the throttle to 39 inches Hg.
for approximately 10 seconds to verify smooth engine
operation for takeoff.
NOTE
When the engine is operated above 1800 RPM, the resulting
increased fuel flow also makes for lower fuel temperatures
throughout the engine fuel system. This increased flow
purges the fuel vapor and the cooler fuel minimizes vapor
formation.
In addition to the above procedures, the sections below should be
eviewed and where applicable, adhered to:
Section 2 -Section 3 Section 4 Section 7 -
Take note of the placard on "When Switching From
Dry Tank".
Take note of the excessive fuel vapor procedures
in both the checklist and amplified procedures
sections.
Take note of the hot weather operational notes and
procedures in both the checklist and the amplified
procedures sections.
Take note of the altitude operational procedures
and the section on auxiliary fuel pump operation.
STALLS
The stall characteristics are conventional and aural warning is
provided by a stall warning horn which sounds between 5 and 10
knots above the stall in all configurations.
Power off stall speeds at maximum weight for both forward and
aft C.G. positions are presented in Section 5.
4-32
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
-
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
DESCENT
Descent should be initiated far enough in advance of estimated
landing to allow at gradual rate of descent at cruising speed.
Descent should be at approximately 500 FPM for passenger
comfort, using enough power to keep the engine warm. The
optimum engine RPM in a let-down is usually the lowest RPM in the
green arc range that will allow cylinder head temperature to remain
in the recommended operating range.
The airplane is equipped with a specially marked altimeter to
attract the pilot's attention and prevent misreading the altimeter. A
striped warning segment on the face of the altimeter is exposed at
all altitudes below 10,000 feet to indicate low altitude.
LANDING
NORMAL LANDING
Normal landing approaches can be made with power on or power
off with any flap setting desired. Surface winds and air turbulence
are usually the primary factors in determining the most comfortable
approach speeds.
Actual touchdown should be made with power off and on the
main wheels first to reduce the landing speed and subsequent need
for braking in the landing roll. The nose wheel is lowered to the
runway gently after the speed has diminished to avoid unnecessary
nose gear loads. This procedure is especially important in rough or
soft field landings.
At light operating weights, during ground roll with full flaps, hold
the control wheel full back to ensure maximum weight on the main
wheels for braking. Under these conditions, full nose down elevator
(control wheel full forward) will raise the main wheels off the ground.
Apr 12/00
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SHORT FIELD LANDING
For a short field landing in smooth air conditions, make an
approach at 67 KIAS with full flaps using enough power to control
the glide path. (Slightly higher approach speeds should be used
under turbulent air conditions.) After all approach obstacles are
cleared, smoothly reduce power and maintain the approach speed
by lowering the nose of the airplane. Touchdown should be made
with power off and on the main wheels first. Immediately after
touchdown, lower the nose wheel and apply heavy braking as
required. For maximum brake effectiveness, retract the flaps, hold
the control wheel full back, and apply maximum brake pressure
without sliding the tires.
CROSSWIND LANDING
When landing in a strong crosswind, use the minimum flap
setting required for the field length. Although the crab or
combination method of drift correction may be used, the wing low
method gives the best control. After touchdown, hold a straight
course with the steerable nose wheel and occasional braking if
necessary.
The maximum allowable crosswind velocity is dependent upon
pilot capability as well as airplane limitations. Operation in direct
crosswinds of 20 knots has been demonstrated.
BALKED LANDING
In a balked landing (go-around) climb, reduce the flap setting to
20° immediately after full power is applied. After all obstacles are
cleared and a safe altitude and airspeed are obtained, the wing flaps
should be retracted.
Apr 12/00
--
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
COLD WEATHER OPERATION
Special consideration should be given to the operation of the
airplane fuel system during the winter season or prior to any flight in
cold temperatures. Proper preflight draining of the fuel system is
especially important and will eliminate any free water accumulation.
The use of additives such as isopropyl alcohol, ethylene glycol
monomethyl ether or diethylene glycol monomethyl ether may also
be desirable. Refer to Section 8 for information on the proper use
of additives.
Cold weather often causes conditions which require special care
during airplane operations. Even small accumulations of frost, ice,
or snow must be removed, particularly from wing, tail and all control
surfaces to assure satisfactory flight performance and handling.
Also, control surfaces must be free of any internal accumulations of
ice or snow.
If snow or slush covers the takeoff surface, allowance must be
made for takeoff distances which will be increasingly extended as
the snow or slush depth increases. The depth and consistency of
this cover can, in fact, prevent takeoff in many instances.
NOTE
The waste gate controller will not respond quickly to
variations in manifold pressure when oil temperature is near
the lower limit of the green arc. Therefore, under these
conditions, throttle motion should be made slowly and care
should be exercised to prevent exceeding the 39 inches Hg
manifold pressure limit. In addition, the fuel flow indications
may exceed 34 GPH on takeoff if the mixture isn't leaned to
compensate.
The Turbo-System engine installation has been designed such
that a winterization kit is not required. With the cowl flaps fully
closed, engine temperature will be normal (in the green arc range)
in outside air temperature as low as 20° to 30°C below standard.
When cooler surface temperatures are encountered, the normal air
temperature inversion will result in warmer temperatures at cruise
altitudes above 5000 feet.
-
Apr 12/00
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
If low altitude cruise in very cold temperature results in engine
temperature below the green arc, increasing cruise altitude or cruise
power will increase engine temperature into the green arc. Cylinder
head temperatures will increase approximately 50°F as cruise altirudes increase from 5000 feet to 24,000 feet.
During let-down, observe engine temperatures closely and carry
sufficient power to maintain them in the recommended operating
range.
lsTARTING
AwARNING
WHEN PULLING THE PROPELLER THROUGH BY
HAND, TREAT IT AS IF THE IGNITION SWITCH IS
TURNED ON. A LOOSE OR BROKEN GROUND
WIRE ON EITHER MAGNETO COULD CAUSE
THE ENGINE TO FIRE.
Prior to starting on cold mornings, it is advisable to pull the
propeller through several times by hand to "break loose" or
"limber" the oil, thus conserving battery energy.
When air temperatures are below 20°F (-6°C), the use of an
external preheater and an external power source are recommended
whenever possible to obtain positive starting and to reduce wear
and abuse to the engine and electrical system. Preheat will thaw the
oil trapped in the oil cooler, which probably will be congealed prior
to starting in extremely cold temperatures.
When using an external power source, the master switch must be
in the OFF position before connecting the external power source to
the airplane receptacle. See Section 7, Ground Service Plug
Receptacle, for external power source operations.
4-36
Jan 18/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
COLD WEATHER OPERATION (Continued)
I
STARTING (Continued)
I
Cold weather starting procedures are the same as the normal
starting procedures. Use caution to prevent inadvertent forward
movement of the airplane during starting when parked on snow or
ice.
NOTE
If the engine does not start during the first few
attempts, or if engine firing diminishes in strength, it
is probable that the spark plugs have been frosted
over. Preheat must be used before another start is
attempted.
During cold weather operations, no indication will be apparent on
the oil temperature gage prior to takeoff if outside air temperatures
are very cold. After a suitable warm up period (2 to 5 minutes at
1000 RPM), accelerate the engine several times to higher engine
RPM. If the engine accelerates smoothly and the oil pressure remains normal and steady, the airplane is ready for takeoff.
HOT WEATHER OPERATION
Refer to the general warm temperature starting information under
Starting Engine in this section. Avoid prolonged engine operation on
the ground.
NOISE CHARACTERISTICS
AND NOISE REDUCTION
36001
The certificated takeoff noise level for the Model T206H at
pounds maximum weight is 75.8 dB(A) per 14CFR Part 36
Appendix G and 79.9 dB(A) per ICAO Annex 16 Chapter 10. No
determination has been made that the noise levels of this airplane
are or should be acceptable or unacceptable for operation at, into,
or out of, any airport.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
I
NOISE CHARACTERISTICS
AND NOISE REDUCTION (Continued)
For reduced noise levels, it is desirable to select the lowest RPM
and manifold pressure combination in the green arc ranges
(consistent with safe operating practice under prevailing flight
conditions) that will provide smooth engine operation and required
performance.
The following procedures are suggested to minimize the effect of
airplane noise on the public:
1. Pilots operating airplanes under VFR over outdoor assemblies
of persons, recreational and park areas, and other noise
sensitive areas should make every effort to fly not less than
2000 feet above the surface, weather permitting, even though
flight at a lower level may be consistent with the provisions of
government regulations.
2. During departure from or approach to an airport, climb after
takeoff and descent for landing should be made so as to avoid
prolonged flight at low altitude near noise sensitive areas.
NOTE
The above recommended procedures do not apply
where they would conflict with Air Traffic Control
clearances or instructions, or where, In the pilot's
judgment, an altitude of less than 2000 feet is
necessary to adequately exercise the duty to see
and avoid other airplanes.
14-38
Revision 5
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-3
Use of Performance Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-3
Sample Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-3
Takeoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-4
Cruise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-5
Fuel Required .. . . . . ........... . .... - . . - . . · · · · · ·
5-6I
Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-8
Demonstrated Operating Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-8
Figure 5-1 , Airspeed Calibration - Normal Static Source
5-9
Airspeed Calibration -Alternate Static Source . . . . . . . . . 5-10
Figure 5-2, Altimeter Correction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-13
Figure 5-3, Temperature Conversion Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-14
Figure 5-4, Stall Speeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-15
Figure 5-5, Crosswind Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-16
Figure 5-6, Takeoff Distance - 3600 Lbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-17
Takeoff Distance - 3300 Lbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-18
TakeoffDistance-3000 Lbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-19
Figure 5-7, Maximum Rate of Climb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-20
Figure 5-8, Time, Fuel, and Distance to Climb . . • . . . . . . . . 5-21
Figure 5-9, Cruise Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-23
Figure 5-10, Range Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-37
Figure 5-11 , Endurance Profile . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-41
Figure 5-12, Landing Distance . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . .
5-45/5-46
Revision 5
5-1/5-2
SECTIONS
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
---
INTRODUCTION
Performance data charts on the following pages are presented so
that you may know what to expect from the airplane under various
conditions, and also, to facilitate the planning of flights in detail and
with reasonable accuracy. The data in the charts has been
computed from actual flight tests with the airplane and engine in
good condition and using average piloting techniques.
It should be noted that performance information presented in the
range and endurance profile charts allows for 45 minutes reserve
fuel at the specified cruise power. Fuel flow data for cruise is based
on the recommended lean mixture setting at all altitudes. Some
indeterminate variables such as mixture leaning technique, fuel
metering characteristics, engine and propeller condition, and air
turbulence may account for variations of 10% or more in range and
endurance.
Therefore, it is important to utilize all available
information to estimate the fuel required for the particular flight and
to flight plan in a conservative manner.
USE OF PERFORMANCE CHARTS
Performance data is presented in tabular or graphical form to
illustrate the effect of different variables.
Sufficiently detailed
information is provided in the tables so that conservative values can
be selected and used to determine the particular performance figure
with reasonable accuracy.
SAMPLE PROBLEM
The following sample flight problem utilizes information from the
various charts to determine the predicted performance data for a
typical flight. Assume the following information has already been
determined:
AIRPLANE CONFIGURATION:
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361:
Takeoff weight
Usable fuel
3550 Pounds
88.0 Gallons
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
I
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ISAMPLE PROBLEM (Continued)
AIRPLANE CONFIGURATION:
I
Serials T20608362 and on:
Takeoff weight
Usable fuel
TAKEOFF CONDITIONS
Field pressure altitude
Temperature
Wind component along runway
Field length
CRUISE CONDITIONS:
Total distance
Pressure altitude
Temperature
Expected wind enroute
LANDING CONDITIONS:
Field pressure altitude
Temperature
Field length
3550 Pounds
87.0 Gallons
3500 Feet
24°C (16°C above
standard)
12 Knot Headwind
4000 Feet
475 Nautical Miles
11,500 Feet
s•c
10 Knot Headwind
3000 Feet
2s c
0
3000 Feet
TAKEOFF
The takeoff distance chart, Figure 5-6, should be consulted,
keeping in mind that distances shown are based on the short field
technique. Conservative distances can be established by reading
the chart at the next higher value of weight, altitude and temperature.
For example, in this particular sample problem, the takeoff distance
information presented for a weight of 3600 pounds, pressure altitude
of 4000 feet and a temperature of 30°C should be used and results
in the following:
Ground roll
Total distance to clear a 50-foot obstacle
1310 Feet
2430 Feet
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
CESSNA
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
MODEL T206H
SAMPLE PROBLEM (Continued)
I
TAKEOFF (Continued)
I
These distances are well within the available takeoff field length.
However, a correction for the effect of wind may be made based on
Note 2 of the takeoff chart. The correction for a 12 knot headwind
is:
12 Knots X 10% = 12% Decrease
10 Knots
This results in the following distances, corrected for wind:
Ground roll, zero wind
Decrease in ground roll
(1310 feet X 12%)
Corrected ground roll
Total distance to clear a
SO-foot obstacle, zero wind
Decrease in total distance
(2430 feet X 12%)
Corrected total distance
to clear 50-foot obstacle
1310
-157
1153 Feet
2430
-291
2139 Feet
CRUISE
The cruising altitude should be selected based on a
consideration of trip length, winds aloft, and the airplane's
performance. A typical cruising altitude and the expected wind
enroute have been given for this sample problem. However, the
power setting selection for cruise must be determined based on
several considerations. These include the cruise performance
characteristics presented in Figure 5-9, the range profile charts
presented in Figure 5-10, and the endurance profile charts
presented in Figure 5-11.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
5-51
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ISAMPLE PROBLEM (Continued)
ICRUISE (Continued)
The relationship between power and range is illustrated by the
range profile chart. Considerable fuel savings and longer range
result when lower power settings are used.
For this sample
problem, a cruise power of approximately 70% will be used.
The cruise performance chart, Figure 5-9, is entered at 12,000
feet altitude and 20°c above standard temperature. These values
most nearly correspond to the planned altitude and expected
temperature conditions. The engine speed chosen is 2400 RPM
and 30 inches of manifold pressure, which results in the following:
Power
True airspeed
Cruise fuel flow
70%
151 Knots
17.9GPH
FUEL REQUIRED
The total fuel requirement fqr the flight may be estimated using
the performance information in Figure 5-8 and Figure 5-9. For this
sample problem, Figure 5-8 shows that a climb from 4000 feet to
The corresponding
12,000 feet requires 4.6 gallons of fuel.
distance during the climb is 24 nautical miles. These values are for
a standard temperature and are sufficiently accurate for most flight
planning purposes. However, a further correction for the effect of
temperature may be made as noted on the climb chart. The
approximate effect of a non-standard temperature is to increase the
time, fuel, and distance by 10% for each 8°C above standard
temperature, due to the lower rate of climb. In this case, assuming a
temperature 16°C above standard, the correction would be:
16° X 10% = 20% Increase
8°C
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SAMPLE PROBLEM (Continued)
I
FUEL REQUIRED (Continued)
I
With this factor included, the fuel estimate would be calculated as
follows:
Fuel to climb, standard temperature
Increase due to non-standard temperature
(4.6 X 20%)
4.6
1-,Q
5.6 Gallons
Corrected fuel to climb
Using a similar procedure for the distance to climb results in 29
nautical miles.
The resultant cruise distance is:
475
Total distance
Climb distance
Cruise distance
-29
446
Nautical Miles
With an expected 10 knot headwind, the ground speed for cruise is
predicted to be:
151
-10
141Knots
Therefore, the time required for the cruise portion of the trip is:
446 Nautical Miles = 3.2 Hours
141 Knots
The fuel required for cruise is:
3.2 hours X 17.9 gallons/hour= 57.3 Gallons
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ISAMPLE PROBLEM (Continued)
IFUEL REQUIRED (Continued)
A 45-minute reserve requires:
;g
X 17.9 gallons/ hour= 13.4 Gallons
The total estimated fuel required is as follows:
Engine start, taxi, and takeoff
Climb
Cruise
Reserve
Total fuel required
2.6
5.6
57.3
13.4
78.9 Gallons
Once the flight is underway, ground speed checks will provide a
more accurate basis for estimating the time enroute and the
corresponding fuel required to complete the trip with ample reserve.
LANDING
A procedure similar to takeoff should be used for estimating the
landing distance at the destination airport. Figure 5-12 presents
landing distance information for the short field technique. The
distances corresponding to 3000 feet and 30°C are as follows:
Ground roll
Total distance to clear a 50-foot obstacle
865 Feet
1580 Feet
A correction for the effect of wind may be made based on Note 2
of the landing chart, using the same procedure as outlined for
takeoff.
DEMONSTRATED OPERATING TEMPERATURE
Satisfactory engine cooling has been demonstrated for this
airplane with an outside air temperature 23°C above standard. This
is not to be considered as an operating limitation. Reference should
be made to Section 2 for engine operating limitations.
ls-s
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTIONS
PERFORMANCE
AIRSPEED CALIBRATION
NORMAL STATIC SOURCE
Condition: Power required for level flight or maximum power
descent.
FLAPS
UP
KIAS -
60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180
KCAS -
65 72 80 89 99
108 118 128 138 148 158 168 177
FLAPS
20°
KIAS 50 60 70 80 90 100 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
KCAS 54 59 68 78 89 99 ---
--- --- --- --- --- -- - -- -
FLAPS
FULL
KIAS 50 60 70 80 90 100 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - KCAS 56 62 71 80 90 100 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
. - Figure 5-1. Airspeed Calibration (Sheet 1 of 4)
Serials 120608001 thru T20608361.
Revision 5
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
AIRSPEED CALIBRATION
ALTERNATE STATIC SOURCE
HEATER ON, VENTS AND WINDOWS CLOSED
CABIN HEAT/CABIN AIR AND DEFROSTER ON MAXIMUM
Condition: Power required for level flight or maximum power
descent.
FLAPS
UP
KIAS -
60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180
KCAS -
67 74 82 91 99
109 118 128 138 148 159 170 180
FLAPS
20°
KIAS 50 60 70 80 90 100 - • • - - - - - - • - - - - - • • • • • - • • •
KCAS 59 65 72 80 90 101 • - - • • - - - • - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
FLAPS
FULL
KIAS 50 60 70 80 90 100 • - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - • - - - - - - KCAS 58 65 74 83 93 104 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - • -
...- Figure 5-1. Airspeed Calibration (Sheet 2)
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361.
ls-10
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
AIRSPEED CALIBRATION
NORMAL STATIC SOURCE
Condition: Power required for level flight or maximum power
descent.
FLAPS
UP
KIAS -- 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180
KCAS -- 65 72 80 89 99
108 118 128 138 148 158 168 177
FLAPS
20°
KIAS 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - KCAS 54 59 68 78 89 99 113 127 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
FLAPS
FULL
KIAS 50 60 70 80 90 100 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - KCAS 56 62 71 80 90 100 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
..--
Revision 5
Figure 5-1 . Airspeed Calibration (Sheet 3)
Serials T20608362 and on.
5-111
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
AIRSPEED CALIBRATION
ALTERNATE STATIC SOURCE
HEATER ON, VENTS AND WINDOWS CLOSED
CABIN HEAT/CABIN AIR AND DEFROSTER ON MAXIMUM
Condition: Power required for level flight or maximum power
descent.
FLAPS
UP
KIA$ -
60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180
KCAS -
67 74 82 91 99
109 118 128 138 148 159 170 180
FLAPS
20°
KIAS 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - KCAS 59 65 72 80 90 101 110 123 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- -
FLAPS
FULL
KIAS 50 60 70 80 90 100 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - KCAS 58 65 74 83 93 104 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
..- Figure 5-1 . Airspeed Calibration (Sheet 4)
Serials T20608362 and on.
15-12
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
--
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
ALTIMETER CORRECTION
ALTERNATE STATIC SOURCE
NOTE:
Add correction to desired altitude to obtain indicated altitude to fly.
Windows closed, ventilators closed, cabin heater, cabin air, and defroster on
maximum.
CONDITIONS:
Power required for level flight or maximum power descent cruise configuration. Altimeter corrections for the takeoff and landing configuration are less
than 50 feet.
CONDITION
FLAPS
UP
S.L.
5000ft.
10,000 ft.
15,000 ft.
CORRECTION TO BE ADDED-FEET
KIAS - alternate static source ON
60
50
50
60
70
80
10
10
10
,o
100
-20
-20
-20
-30
120
-20
-20
-30
-30
Figure 5-2. Altimeter Correction
Revision 5
140
-10
-10
-10
-10
160
0
0
0
0
SECTION 5
CESSNA
PERFORMANCE
MODELT206H
TEMPERATURE CONVERSION CHART
120
100
-;
i '
.
.
t-i-
80
· +
.
+
H, ·-++
'
.. ·-'-t-f
!:::
60
. .. .
'
· ±t
'>
cc
~~
J:
~ 40
"-~
w
w
a:
)
;
'
!
... +
~
•
-+ ..
;t
:i_,
.
.
' t-
. f.l,:-1--
'
~t+ ~ -t:
_1;
TT'
0
'
~
. •
!
. -1,
~
I '
- · '-f··
+
I
~ •
'
·+'
·- ·+-+.-<-........... H-· 1"f ·
-20
·t
+
'' '
''
'
-40
-40
'
..µ, - 1-i
+ . -4-( ,. +t .: .. :·
20
-+t-t-t--i·H-µ.j..1--+H-..
'
CJ)
IB0
• !
. ........
tt
.:
H+
~
-;+
I•
l+H
zw
~
-20
;
f-
j
.
•4-f4,,
l
:1-t
-+·
·rH-'
. .:+
'. ; .
-r' ;
;; H·+
0
I
-t-.-+++
· f ·t·H+
'
• !
20
40
60
DEGREES - CELSIUS
Figure 5-3. Temperature Conversion Chart
15-14
Revision 5
-
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
--
STALL SPEEDS
AT 3600 POUNDS
Conditions:
Power Off
MOST REARWARD CENTER OF GRAVITY
ANGLE OF BANK
ANGLE OF BANK
FLAP
oo
SETTING
45•
30°
KIAS KCAS KIAS KCAS KIAS
UP
so
20•
40°
43
39
62
57
54
S4
46
42
67
61
58
600
KCAS KIAS KCAS
59
S1
46
74
68
64
71
61
55
88
81
76
MOST FORWARD CENTER OF GRAVITY
ANGLE OF BANK
ANGLE OF BANK
FLAP
oo
SETTING
30°
45°
60°
KIAS KCAS KIAS KCAS KIAS KCAS KIAS KCAS
UP
59
20°
40°
50
47
67
60
57
63
54
51
72
65
61
70
59
56
80
71
68
83
71
66
95
85
81
NOTES:
1.
2.
Altitude loss during a stall recovery may be as much as 360 feet.
KIAS values are approximate.
Figure 5-4. Stall Speeds
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CROSSWIND COMPONENTS
40
tz
0
:.:
i-:.
z
w
z
0
a..
::E
8
0
z
~
5
10
15
20
25
30
CROSSWIND COMPONENT-KNOTS
NOTE: Maximum Demonstrated Crosswind velocity is 20 knots
(Not a limitation).
Figure 5-5. Crosswind Components
15-16
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
SHORT FIELD TAKEOFF DISTANCE
AT 3600 POUNDS
CONDITIONS:
Flaps 20°
2500 RPM, 39 inches Hg. and Mixture set at 34 GPH
Prior to Brake Release
Cowl Flaps Open
Paved, level, dry runway
Zero Wind
64 KIAS
Lift Off:
Speed at 50 Ft: 74 KIAS
0°C
Press
Alt
In
Feet
s. L.
10°c
20°c
Grnd Total Grnd Total
Roll Ft To Roll Ft To
Ft Clear
Ft Clear
50 Ft
50 Ft
Obst
Obst
1685
1785
1890
2005
2125
2255
2395
2560
2735
945 1800 1015 1920
1010 1905 1080 2035
1075 2020 1150 2160
1150 2145 1230 2290
1225 2275 1310 2430
13 10 2415 1400 2580
1405 2570 1505 2760
1510 2750 1620 2950
1625 2940 1740 3155
1575
1000
1665
2000
1765
3000
1870
4000
1985
5000
2105
6000 1215 2235
7000 1300 2380
8000 1400 2545
825
875
935
1000
1065
1135
30°c
Grnd Total
Roll Ft To
Ft Clear
50 Ft
Obst
885
940
1005
1070
1145
1220
1305
1405
1510
Grnd Total
Roll Ft To
Ft Clear
50 Ft
Obst
4o•c
Grnd Total
Roll Ft To
Ft Clear
50 Ft
Obst
1085
1155
1230
1315
1400
1500
1615
1735
1865
2050
2170
2305
2445
2595
2765
2955
3160
3380
NOTES:
1. Short field technique as specified in Section 4.
2. Decrease distances 10% for each 10 knots headwind. For operation
with tail winds up to 10 knots, increase distances by 10% for each
2.5 knots.
3.
For operation on dry, grass runway, increase distances by 15% of
the ·ground rolr f19ure.
Figure 5-6. Short Field Takeoff Distance (Sheet 1 of 3)
Revision 5
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SHORT FIELD TAKEOFF DISTANCE
AT 3300 POUNDS
CONDITIONS:
Flaps 20•
2500 RPM, 39 inches Hg. and Mixture set at 34 GPH
Prior to Brake Release
Cowl Flaps Open
Paved, level, dry runway
Zero Wind
Lift Off:
61 KIAS
Speed at 50 Ft: 71 KIAS
0°c
Press
Alt
In
Feet
Grnd Total
Roll Ft To
Ft Clear
50 Ft
Obst
S.L.
675 1320
1000 720 1395
2000 765 1475
3000 820 1565
4000 875 1655
5000 930 1755
6000 995 1865
7000 1065 1985
8000 1145 2115
10°c
Grnd Total
Roll Ft To
Ft Clear
50 Ft
Obst
20°c
Grnd Total
Roll Ft To
Ft Clear
725 1410 775
770 1490 825
825 1580 880
880 1670 940
935 1770 1005
1000 1880 1070
1070 1995 1150
1150 2130 1235
1235 2270 1325
Obst
1505
1590
1685
1785
1895
2005
2135
2280
2435
830
885
945
1005
1075
1145
1230
1325
1425
50Ft
40°c
30°c
Grnd Total
Roll Ft To
Ft Clear
50 Ft
Obst
1600
1695
1795
1905
2020
2140
2285
2440
2605
Grnd Total
Roll Ft To
Ft Clear
50ft
Obst
885
945
1010
1075
1145
1225
1320
1420
1525
1705
1805
1915
2030
2150
2290
2445
2610
2785
NOTES:
1. Short field technique as specified in Section 4.
2. Decrease distances 10% for each 10 knots headwind. For operation
with tail winds up to 10 knots. increase distances by 10% for each
2.5 knots.
3. For operation on dry, grass runway, increase distances by 15% of
the "ground roll" figure.
I
ls-1a
Figure 5-6. Short Field Takeoff Distance (Sheet 2)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
SHORT FIELD TAKEOFF DISTANCE
AT 3000 POUNDS
CONDITIONS:
Flaps 20°
2500 RPM, 39 inches Hg. and Mixture set at 34 GPH
Prior to Brake Release
Cowl Flaps Open
Paved, level, dry runway
Zero Wind
Lift Off:
57 KIAS
Speed at 50 Ft: 67 KIAS
o·c
Press
Alt
In
Grnd Total
Roll Ft To
Ft Clear
50 Ft
Obst
Feet
S. L.
545
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000
6000
7000
8000
580
620
660
705
750
805
860
925
1100
1160
1230
1300
1375
1455
1540
1640
1745
10°c
20°c
Grnd Total
Roll Ft To
Ft Clea r
SO Ft
Obst
585
625
665
710
755
805
860
925
995
1175
1240
1310
1385
1465
1555
1645
1755
1870
Grnd Tota l
Roll Ft To
Ft Clear
50 Ft
Obst
625
665
710
760
810
865
925
995
1070
1250
1320
1395
1475
1565
1655
1760
1880
2005
3o•c
Grnd Total
Roll Ft To
Ft Clear
50 Ft
Obst
670
715
760
810
865
925
9995
1065
1145
40•c
Grnd Total
Roll Ft To
Ft Clear
50ft
Obst
1330 715 1410
1405 760 1490
1485 810 1580
1570 865 1675
1665 925 1770
1765 990 1885
1880 1060 2010
2005 1140 2140
2140 1225 2280
NOTES:
1. Short field technique as specified in Section 4.
2. Decrease distances 10% for each 10 knots headwind. For operation
with tail winds up to 10 knots, increase distances by 10% for each
2.5 knots.
3. For operation on dry, grass runway, increase distances by 15% of
the "ground roll' figure.
Figure 5-6. Short Field Takeoff Distance (Sheet 3)
Revision 5
I
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
MAXIMUM RA TE-OF-CLIMB
CONDITIONS:
Flaps Up
2500RPM
Cowl Flaps Open
WEIGHT
LBS
3600
3300
3000
PRESS
ALT
FT
S.L
2000
4000
6000
8000
10,000
12,000
14,000
16,000
20,000
24,000
CLIMB
SPEED
KIAS
87
87
87
87
87
87
87
87
87
81
79
5.l.
2000
4000
6000
8000
10,000
12,000
14,000
16,000
20,000
24,000
85
85
85
85
85
85
85
85
85
79
S.L.
2000
4000
6000
8000
10,000
12,000
14,000
16,000
20,000
24,000
83
83
83
83
83
83
83
83
83
77
77
75
PRESS ALT
MP
GPH
S.l. to 17,000
18,000
20,000
22.000
24,000
39
37
35
33
31
34
30.5
28.5
26.5
24.5
RATE OF CLIMB· FPM
-20°(
1305
1235
1170
1100
1030
970
900
830
765
515
230
o•c
1160
1090
1025
955
890
825
760
695
635
400
120
20°c
1015
945
880
810
745
685
625
560
510
285
40°c
865
795
730
660
600
545
485
430
385
175
1485
1410
1340
1265
1195
1130
1060
990
925
670
370
1330
1260
1190
1120
1050
985
915
850
790
550
260
1180
1105
1040
970
900
1025
950
885
815
750
695
635
580
530
325
1695
1615
1540
1460
1385
131S
1240
1170
110S
840
525
1530
1455
1385
1310
1235
1170
1095
1030
970
720
415
1370
1290
1225
1155
1085
1015
950
890
835
605
310
...
840
n5
715
660
43S
15S
.. .
...
1205
1130
1060
990
925
865
805
750
700
485
21 0
Figure 5-7. Maximum Rate of Climb
ls-20
Revision 5
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
TIME, FUEL AND DISTANCE TO CLIMB
AT 3600 POUNDS
MAXIMUM RA TE OF CLIMB
CONDITIONS
Flaps Up
2500 RPM
Cowl Fla ps Open
Standard Temperature
PRESS ALT
MP
GPH
S.L. to 17,000
39
37
30.5
18,000
35
33
31
20,000
22,000
24,000
PRESS
ALT
FT
CLIMB
SPEED
KIAS
RATE
OF
CLIMB
FPM
S.L.
2000
4000
6000
8000
10,000
12,000
14,000
16,000
18,000
20,000
22,000
24,000
87
87
87
87
87
87
87
87
87
82
81
80
79
1050
1010
975
935
895
860
820
780
745
665
545
420
300
34
28.5
26.5
24.5
FROM SEA LEVEL
TIME
IN
MIN
FUEL
USED
GAL
0
2
4
0.0
1.1
2.2
3.4
4.7
6.0
7.3
6
8
11
13
15
18
21
24
29
34
8.8
10.2
11.8
13.4
15.4
17.8
DIST
NM
0
3
6
9
13
16
20
25
30
35
41
49
60
NOTES:
Add 2.6 gallons of fuel for engine start, taxi and takeoff allowance.
Increase time, fuel and distance by 10% for each 10°c above
standard temperature.
3. Distances shown are based on zero wind.
1.
2.
Figure 5-8. Time, Fuel and Distance to Climb (Sheet 1 of 4)
Revision 5
s-21
I
SECTION 5
CESSNA
PERFORMANCE
MODEL T206H
TIME, FUEL AND DISTANCE TO CLIMB
AT 3300 POUNDS
I
MAXIMUM RA TE OF CLIMB
CONDIT! CNS:
Flaps Up
2500 RPM
Cowl Flaps Open
Standard Temperature
PRESS
ALT
FT
CLIMB
SPEED
KIAS
RATE
OF
CLIMB
FPM
S.L.
85
85
85
85
85
85
85
88
88
88
87
87
86
1215
1175
1140
1095
1055
1020
980
940
905
825
695
565
440
2000
4000
6000
8000
10,000
12,000
14,000
16,000
18,000
20,000
22,000
24,000
I
PRESS ALT
MP
GPH
S.L. to 17,000
18,000
20,000
22,000
24,000
39
37
35
34
30.5
28.5
26.5
24.5
33
31
FROM SEA LEVEL
TIME
IN
MIN
FUEL
USED
GAL
0
2
0.0
1.0
1.9
3.0
4.0
5.1
6.2
7.4
8.7
9.9
11.2
12.7
14.4
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
18
20
24
28
DIST
NM
0
2
5
8
11
14
17
21
25
29
34
39
47
NOTES:
1. Add 2.6 gallons of fuel for en9ine start, taxi and takeoff allowance.
2. Increase time, fuel and distance by 10% for each 1o•c a bove
standard temperature.
3. Distances shown are based on zero wind.
I
ls-22
Figure 5-8. Time, Fuel and Distance to Climb (Sheet 2)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
TIME, FUEL AND DISTANCE TO CLIMB
AT 3000 POUNDS
MAXIMUM RA TE OF CLIMB
PRESS ALT
CONDITIO NS:
S.L. to 17,000
18,000
20,000
22,000
24,000
Flaps Up
2500RPM
Cowl Flaps Open
Standard Temperature
PRESS
ALT
FT
CLIMB
SPEED
KIAS
S.L.
83
2000
4000
6000
83
83
83
8000
10,000
12,000
14,000
16,000
18,000
RATE
OF
CLIMB
FPM
1410
1365
MP
39
37
35
33
31
GPH
34
30.S
28.S
26.S
24.5
FROM SEA LEVEL
TIME
IN
MIN
FUEL
USED
DIST
GAL
NM
0
0.0
1
0.8
0
2
1325
3
1.7
4
1285
4
2.5
6
83
1240
6
3.4
9
83
83
83
83
1205
1160
8
9
12
1120
11
1085
1005
13
4.4
5.3
6.3
7.4
8.4
9.4
10.6
11 .9
20,000
78
77
870
17
22,000
76
730
20
24,000
75
595
23
15
14
17
20
24
28
32
38
NOTES:
1. Add 2.6 gallons of fuel for engine start, taxi and takeoff allowance.
2. Increase time, fuel and distance by 10% for each 10°c above
standard temperature.
3. Distances shown are based on zero wind.
Figure 5-8. Time, Fuel and Distance to Climb (Sheet 3)
Revision 5
I
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTIONS
PERFORMANCE
TIME, FUEL AND DISTANCE TO CLIMB
I NORMAL CLIMB - 95 KIAS I
CONDITIONS:
Flaps Up
2400 RPM, 30 inches Hg, 20 GPH Fuel Flow, Cowl Flaps Open.
standard Temoerature
WEIGHT
LB
~QVU
3300
PRESS
ALT
FT
).L.
O!IU
2000
4000
6000
8000
10,000
12,000
14,000
16,000
18,000
665
640
615
590
560
535
510
485
460
S.L.
815
790
765
740
715
690
665
635
615
585
2000
4000
6000
8000
10,000
12,000
14,000
16,000
18,000
3000
RATE
OF
CLIMB
FPM
S.L.
2000
4000
6000
8000
10,000
12,000
14,000
16,000
18 000
965
935
910
885
860
830
805
780
755
730
FROM SEA LEVEL
TIME
IN
MIN
0
3
6
9
13
16
20
24
28
32
FUEL USED
GAL
DIST
NM
10.6
0
5
10
15
21
27
34
41
49
58
0.0
0.8
1.7
0
4
8
8
2.6
13
11
3.5
4.5
5.4
6.5
7.5
8.7
17
22
28
34
40
47
0.0
0.7
1.4
2.2
0
3
7
10
14
18
23
28
33
38
0
2
5
13
16
19
23
26
0
2
4
7
9
11
14
16
19
21
0.0
1.0
2.0
3.1
4.2
5.4
6.6
7.9
9.2
2.9
3.7
4.5
5.4
6.3
7.2
NOTES:
1.
2.
3.
I
15-24
Add 2.6 gallons of fuel for engine start, taxi and takeoff allowance.
Increase time, fuel and distance by 10% for each 8'C above standard
temperature .
Distances shown are based on zero wind.
Figure 5-8. Time, Fuel and Distance to Climb (Sheet 4)
Revision 5
CESSNA
SECTION 5
MODEL T206H
PERFORMANCE
CRUISE PERFORMANCE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 2000 FEET
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture
Cowl Flaps Closed
20°CB ELOW
STANDARD TEMP
RPM
.g•c
MP
¾
BPH
2400
30
28
26
24
22
20
2300
2200
2100
2000
KTAS
GPH
...
...
.
73
68
63
57
52
135
131
127
122
116
18.7
17.4
16.1
14.7
13.3
75
70
137
19.2
17.9
16.4
15. 1
13.8
12. 5
..
STANDARD
TEMPERATURE
11°C
%
BPH KTAS GPH
74
69
64
59
54
49
16.3
15.1
13.7
12.5
11.5
10.4
40
61
56
51
47
42
130
125
119
112
105
15.5
14.4
13.1
12.0
11.0
58
53
49
44
40
127
122
116
108
100
14.8
13.7
12.6
11.S
10.5
30
28
26
24
22
69
64
58
53
48
132
128
123
117
112
17.6
16.3
14.9
13.5
12.3
65
60
55
50
45
132
127
122
109
16.6
15.3
14 .0
12.7
11 .7
66
129
125
120
114
108
16.8
15.5
14.2
12.9
11.8
62
57
52
47
43
129
124
119
112
105
15.8
14 .6
13.4
12.2
11. 1
46
17.0
15.8
14.5
13.3
12.2
11. 1
133
128
122
115
109
99
57
52
48
43
so
136
131
126
120
114
105
64
59
54
49
45
18.4
17.0
15.5
14. 1
12.9
11.7
60
S6
67
17.3
16.1
14.6
13.3
12.2
11.0
134
130
125
120
115
107
30
28
26
24
22
17.8
16.5
15.4
14.2
13.0
11.8
134
130
124
118
112
104
72.
67
61
55
50
45
63
GPH
138
134
130
125
119
111
18.1
16.8
15. 5
14.2
13.0
11.8
30
28
26
24
22
20
68
KTAS
69
65
60
56
51
46
137
132
128
123
117
110
59
54
49
51
46
%
18.9
17.6
16.4
15.1
13.8
12.6
133
128
124
119
112
56
BPH
139
135
131
126
121
114
30
28
26
24
22
20
64
71
66
61
20°CABOVE
STANDARD TEMP
31•c
115
62
57
52
48
43
NOTE:
1. For bes1 fuel economy, operate at 1 gph leaner than shown In this chart or at
peakT.I.T.
2. Some power settings may not be obtainable, but are listed to aid interpolation.
3. Power settings not approved for cruising are indicated by dashes.
Figure 5-9. Cruise Performance (Sheet 1 of 12)
Revision 5
5-25 1
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CRU~EPERFORMANCE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 4000 FEET
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture
Cowl Flaps Closed
RPM
MP
20°CBELOW
STANDARD TEMP
-13°C
%
BPH
2400
2300
2200
2100
2000
30
28
26
24
22
20
KTAS
--- ---
GPH
-- -
STANDARD
TEMPERATURE
7'C
%
BPH
75
70
65
60
55
50
74
69
64
58
53
138
134
130
125
119
18.9
17.6
16.3
14.9
13.5
30
28
26
24
22
20
76
71
6S
60
55
49
140
136
131
126
121
115
19.4
18.0
16.6
15.3
14.0
12.7
71
66
61
56
30
28
26
24
22
20
72
67
61
18.5
17.1
15.7
14.3
13.1
11.8
68
63
51
46
137
133
128
122
117
109
30
28
26
24
22
69
64
59
53
49
135
130
125
120
114
17.7
16.4
15.0
13.6
12.5
65
60
55
30
28
26
24
22
66
61
56
51
46
132
128
123
117
110
16.9
15.6
14.4
13.0
11.9
62
57
53
48
56
51
47
58
53
48
43
so
46
44
KTAS
GPH
20°CABOVE
STANDARD TEMP
27'C
%
BPH
70
65
61
56
S1
47
KTAS
GPH
141
137
132
127
113
17.9
16.7
15.6
14.4
13.2
12.0
17.1
15.9
14.7
13.5
12.4
11 .3
142
138
134
129
124
117
19.1
17.8
16.6
15.4
14.0
12.8
139
135
130
125
119
112
18.3
17.0
15.7
14.4
13.2
12.0
67
62
57
53
48
44
138
134
129
123
116
108
137
132
127
121
114
106
17.4
16.1
14.8
13.5
12.3
1 1.2
64
59
54
49
45
41
136
131
125
118
110
101
16.4
15.1
13.8
12.7
11.6
10.6
134
130
124
118
111
16.7
15.4
14.2
12.9
11 .8
61
57
52
47
133
128
122
114
106
15.7
14.5
13.3
12.1
11.1
132
127
121
114
107
16.0
14.7
13.5
12.3
11.3
59
54
130
124
118
110
102
15.0
13.8
12.7
11.6
10.7
43
so
45
41
121
NOTE:
1. For best fuel economy, operate at 1 gph leaner than shown In this chart or at
peakT.I.T.
2 . Some power settings may not be obtainable. but are listed to aid interpolation.
3. Power settings not approved for cruising are Indicated by dashes.
Figure 5-9. Cruise Performance (Sheet 2)
ls-26
I
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CRUISE PERFORMANCE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 6000 FEET
CONDITIONS :
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean M ix ture
Cowl Flaps Closed
RPM
MP
20"CBELOW
STANDARD TE MP
-17"C
%
BPH
2400
2300
2200
30
28
26
24
22
20
30
28
26
24
22
20
--75
69
64
59
54
76
71
65
60
55
50
KTAS
GPH
. --
.
141
137
133
127
122
19.1
17.7
16.5
15.0
13.7
142
138
134
129
123
117
19.5
18 .1
16.7
15.4
14.1
12.8
--
STANDARD
TEMPERATURE
3•c
%
BPH
75
70
65
61
55
51
72
67
62
57
52
47
2o•cABOVE
STANDARD TEMP
23°c
KTAS
GPH
145
14 1
136
132
126
120
19.2
18.0
16.7
15.5
14.1
13.0
%
BPH
70
66
61
57
52
47
142
138
133
128
121
114
18.3
17.1
15.8
14.5
13 .3
12.1
KTAS
GPH
144
140
135
130
123
115
18.0
16.9
15.6
14.5
13.3
12.2
67
63
58
53
49
44
141
137
131
125
118
109
17.2
16.0
14.8
13.6
12.5
11.4
17 .5
16.2
14.8
13.6
12.4
11 .3
64
59
16.4
15. 2
13.9
12.8
11.7
10.7
30
28
26
24
22
20
67
62
56
51
46
140
135
130
125
119
11 1
18.6
17.2
15.8
14.4
13.1
11.9
44
139
135
129
123
116
108
41
138
133
127
120
112
103
2100
30
28
26
24
22
70
64
59
54
49
137
133
128
122
116
17.8
16.5
15. l
13.7
12.6
66
61
56
51
46
137
132
127
120
112
16 .8
15.5
14.3
13.0
11.9
62
57
52
47
43
135
130
124
115
108
15.7
14.5
13.4
12.2
11.2
2000
30
28
26
24
22
67
61
57
51
47
135
130
125
119
112
17.1
15.7
14.5
13.1
12.0
63
58
53
48
44
134
129
124
1 16
108
16.1
14.8
13.7
12.4
11.4
59
54
50
45
41
132
127
120
111
103
15.1
13.9
12.9
11.6
10.7
73
68
63
58
53
48
54
50
45
NOTE:
1. For best fuel economy, operate at 1 gph leaner than shown in this chart or at
peak T.1.T.
2. Some power settings may not be obtainable, but are listed to aid interpolation.
3. Power settings not approved for cruising are indicated by dashes.
Figure 5-9. Cruise Performance (Sheet 3)
Revision 5
I
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CRUISE PERFORMANCE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 8000 FEET
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture
Cowl Flaps Closed
RPM
MP
20°C BELOW
STANDARD TEMP
-21°c
%
BPH
2400
2300
2200
2100
2000
30
28
26
24
22
20
KTAS
GPH
STANDARD
TEMPERATURE
-1°c
%
--.
-- -
.
75
69
65
59
19. 1
17.7
16.5
15. 1
13.8
BPH
75
70
65
61
56
51
--
KTAS
GPH
147
144
139
134
128
121
19.2
18.0
16.7
15.6
14.2
13.0
20°CABOVE
STANDARD TEMP
19°c
%
BPH
70
66
61
57
52
KTAS
GPH
146
142
137
132
125
117
18.0
16.9
15.6
14.6
13.3
12.3
144
139
133
127
119
111
17.2
16.0
14.8
13.7
12.5
11.5
140
135
129
121
113
104
16.4
15.2
14.0
12.8
11 .8
10.8
15.8
14.6
13.4
12.3
11.3
15.1
14.0
12.9
11.7
10.8
54
144
139
135
130
124
30
28
26
24
22
20
76
71
66
61
55
50
145
141
136
131
126
119
19.S
18.2
16.8
15.5
14.1
12.9
72
67
62
57
52
48
145
140
135
130
123
115
18.3
17.1
15.8
14.6
13.3
12.2
30
28
26
24
22
20
73
67
62
56
52
47
142
138
133
127
121
113
18.6
17.2
15.8
14.4
13.2
12.1
69
63
58
53
49
44
142
137
131
125
117
109
17.5
16.2
14.9
13.6
12.5
11.4
30
28
26
24
22
70
65
59
54
49
140
135
130
124
117
17.9
16.5
15.2
13.8
12.7
66
61
56
51
46
139
134
129
121
113
16.8
15.5
14.3
13.0
12.0
48
44
138
132
125
117
109
30
28
26
24
22
67
62
57
52
47
137
17.1
15.8
14.6
13.2
12.1
63
58
54
49
44
137
131
126
117
109
16.1
14.9
13.8
12.5
11.4
59
55
51
46
42
135
129
122
113
104
133
128
121
113
48
67
63
58
54
49
45
64
59
55
so
46
41
62
57
53
NOTE:
1. For best fuel economy, operate at 1 gph leaner than shown in this chart or at
peak T.I.T .
2. Some power settings may not be obtainable, but are listed to aid interpolation .
3. Power settings not approved for cruising are indicated by dashes.
I
15-28
Figure 5-9. Cruise Performance (Sheet 4)
Revision 5
CESSNA
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
MODEL T206H
CRUISE PERFORMANCE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 10,000 FEET
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture
Cowl Raps Closed
RPM
MP
20°C BELOW
STANDARD TEMP
-25'(
%
KTAS
GPH
...
. ..
...
75
69
65
59
19.2
17.7
16.6
15.2
13.9
BPH
2400
30
28
2200
.s•c
%
20°CABOVE
STANDARD TEMP
1s•c
%
BPH
KTAS
GPH
75
150
146
141
137
130
123
19.2
18.0
16.7
15.6
14.3
13.1
18.4
17.1
15.8
14.6
13.4
12.3
67
63
58
64
BPH
70
66
61
57
52
54
147
142
138
132
126
30
28
26
24
22
20
76
71
66
61
56
51
148
144
139
134
128
121
19.5
18.2
16.8
15.5
14.2
13.0
67
62
57
52
48
147
143
137
132
125
117
30
28
26
24
145
140
135
129
123
115
18.6
17.2
15.8
14.5
13.3
12.2
69
63
58
53
49
45
144
139
133
126
119
111
17.6
16.2
14.9
13.6
12.5
11.5
59
55
50
46
42
26
24
22
20
2300
STANDARD
TEMPERATURE
71
65
61
56
51
72
48
S4
49
45
KTAS
GPH
149
145
139
134
126
119
18.0
16.9
15.6
14.7
13.4
12. 4
146
141
135
128
120
112
17.2
16.1
14.8
13.7
12.6
11.6
143
137
130
122
114
105
16.5
15.2
14.0
12.8
11 .8
10.9
15.8
14.6
13.5
12.3
11.3
20
73
67
62
57
52
47
2100
30
28
26
24
22
70
65
60
54
50
143
138
133
126
119
17.9
16.6
15.3
13.9
12.7
66
61
56
51
47
142
137
131
123
115
16.9
15.6
14.4
13.1
12.0
62
57
53
48
44
140
134
127
118
2000
30
28
26
24
22
67
62
58
52
47
140
135
130
123
17.2
15.9
14.7
13.3
12.2
63
139
134
128
119
111
16.2
15.0
13.9
12.5
11 .5
59
55
51
46
42
137
131
124
114
22
115
59
54
49
45
110
105
15.2
14.1
13.0
11 .8
10 .9
NOTE:
1. For best fuel economy, operate at 1 gph leaner than shown in this chart or at
peak T.I.T.
2. Some power settings may not be obtainable, but are listed to aid interpolation.
3. Power settings not approved for cruising are indicated by dashes.
Figure 5-9. Cruise Performance {Sheet 5)
Revision 5
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CRU~EPERFORMANCE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 12,000 FEET
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture
Cowl Flaps Closed
RPM
MP
20°c BELOW
STANDARD TEMP
· 29'C
%
BPH
GPH
153
148
143
138
132
124
19. l
17.9
16.6
15.6
14.3
13.2
%
BPH
70
66
61
57
52
48
67
62
57
52
48
150
145
139
133
126
118
18.3
17.0
15.8
14.6
13.4
12.3
18.6
17.1
15.8
14.4
13.3
12.2
69
63
58
53
49
45
147
141
135
127
120
111
17.5
16.1
14.9
13.6
12.5
11.5
so
145
140
135
128
120
17.9
16.5
15.3
13.9
12.7
66
61
56
51
47
144
139
132
124
116
16.9
15.6
14.4
13.1
12.0
62
57
53
48
67
62
58
52
48
143
138
132
124
116
17.2
16.0
14.8
13.3
12.2
63
59
54
49
45
142
136
129
120
112
16.2
15.0
13.9
12.6
11.6
GPH
.. .
. ..
74
69
65
59
55
149
144
140
134
128
19.0
17.7
16.5
15.2
14.0
30
28
26
24
22
20
76
71
65
61
56·
51
150
146
141
136
129
122
19.5
18.1
16.7
15.5
14.2
13.0
30
28
26
24
22
20
73
67
62
56
52
47
148
142
137
131
124
116
2100
30
28
26
24
22
70
65
60
54
2000
30
28
26
24
22
2300
2200
30
28
26
24
22
20
%
BPH
75
70
65
61
56
51
20°CABOVE
STANDARD TEMP
11•c
KTAS
KTAS
...
2400
STANDARD
TEMPERATURE
.9•c
72
KTAS
GPH
151
147
141
135
127
120
17.9
16.8
15.6
14.6
13.4
12.4
67
62
58
53
49
45
148
143
136
129
121
113
17.2
16.0
14.8
13.7
12.6
11.6
64
145
138
131
123
115
105
16.4
15.1
14.0
12.8
11.8
10.9
44
142
135
128
119
110
15.8
14.6
13.5
12.3
11.4
60
55
51
46
42
139
132
125
115
105
15.2
14.1
13.1
11 .9
10.9
59
ss
50
46
42
NOTE:
1. For best fuel economy, operate at 1 gph leaner than shown In this chart or at
peal\ T.I.T.
2. Some power settings may not be obtainable, but are listed to aid interpolation.
3. Power settings not approved for cruising are indicated by dashes.
I
ls.30
Figure 5-9. Cruise Performance (Sheet 6)
Revision 5
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CRUISE PERFORMANCE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 14,000 FEET
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture
Cowl Flaps Closed
20°C BELOW
STANDARD TEMP
RPM
STANDARD
TEMPERATURE
-n·c
-33"(
MP
%
%
KTAS
GPH
30
28
26
24
22
20
-- -
---
---
74
69
64
59
55
151
147
142
136
130
18.9
17.6
16.S
15.2
14.0
BPH
75
70
65
61
56
52
30
28
26
24
22
20
76
70
65
60
56
51
153
148
143
131
123
19.4
18.0
16.7
15.4
14.2
13.0
30
28
26
24
22
20
73
62
56
52
47
150
144
139
132
125
116
2100
30
28
26
24
22
70
65
60
54
50
2000
30
28
26
24
22
67
63
58
52
48
BPH
2400
2300
2200
67
20'CABOVE
STANDARD TEMP
1·c
%
KTAS
GPH
155
151
145
140
133
126
19. 1
17.8
16.6
15.5
14.3
13.2
BPH
70
65
61
57
52
48
72
66
62
57
52
48
152
147
141
135
127
119
18.3
17.0
15.7
14.5
13.4
12.3
18.6
17.1
15.8
14.4
13.3
12.1
68
63
58
53
49
44
149
143
137
128
121
111
148
142
137
129
121
17.9
16.5
15.3
13.9
12.8
66
61
56
51
47
145
140
134
126
117
17.3
16.0
14.8
13.4
12.3
64
59
54
49
45
137
KTAS
GPH
154
149
143
136
128
120
17.9
16.7
15.6
14.5
13.4
12.4
67
62
58
53
49
45
151
145
138
130
122
113
17.2
15.9
14.8
13.6
12.6
11.6
17.5
16.1
14.8
13.6
12.5
11.5
64
59
54
50
46
42
147
140
132
123
115
105
16.4
15.1
13.9
12.8
11.8
10.8
147
140
134
125
117
16.9
15.6
14.4
13.1
12.1
62
57
53
48
44
144
137
129
120
111
15.8
14.6
13.5
12.3
11.4
144
138
131
122
113
16.3
15.1
13.9
12.7
11.6
60
55
51
46
42
141
134
126
116
106
15.3
14.1
13. 1
11.9
11.0
NOTE:
1. For best fuel economy, operate at 1 gph leaner than shown in this chart or at
peakT.I.T.
2. Some power settings may not be obtainable, but are listed to aid interpolation.
3. Power settings not approved for cruising are indicated by dashes.
Figure 5-9. Cruise Performance {Sheet 7)
Revision 5
I
5-311
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CRUISE PERFORMANCE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 16,000 FEET
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture
Cowl Flaps Closed
RPM
MP
20°C8ELOW
STANDARD TEMP
-37°C
%
STANDARD
TEMPERATURE
-11•c
%
BPH
KTAS
GPH
30
28
26
24
22
20
-- -
---
74
69
64
59
55
154
149
144
138
131
--18.8
17.6
16.4
15.2
14.0
8PH
75
69
65
60
56
52
30
28
26
24
22
20
76
70
60
56
51
156
150
145
139
132
124
19.4
17.9
16.6
15.4
14.2
13.0
2200
30
28
26
24
22
20
72
66
61
56
52
47
153
146
141
133
126
117
2100
30
28
26
24
22
70
64
60
54
50
2000
30
28
26
24
22
68
63
58
53
48
2400
2300
65
20°CA80VE
STANDARD TEMP
3•c
%
KTAS
GPH
158
153
148
142
135
127
19.1
17.7
16.6
14.3
13.2
BPH
70
65
61
57
52
48
71
66
61
57
52
48
155
149
143
136
128
119
18.2
16.9
15.7
14.5
13.4
12.3
18.5
17.0
15.7
14.4
13.3
12.1
68
63
58
53
49
44
152
145
138
129
121
111
150
144
139
130
122
17.9
16.5
15.3
13.9
12.8
66
61
56
51
47
148
142
136
127
119
17.3
16.0
14.8
13.5
12.3
64
59
55
50
45
KTAS
GPH
156
150
144
137
129
121
17.9
16.6
15.5
14.5
13.4
12.4
67
62
58
53
49
45
153
146
139
131
12.3
113
17.1
15.8
14.7
13.6
12.6
11.6
17.4
16.0
14.8
13.5
12.5
11 .4
64
59
54
50
46
42
149
141
133
124
115
103
16.4
15.0
13.9
12.7
11.8
10.8
149
142
135
126
117
16.9
15.5
14.4
13.1
12.1
62
57
53
48
44
146
138
130
120
111
15.8
14.6
13.5
12.3
11.4
146
140
132
123
113
16 .3
15.1
14.0
12.7
11 .7
60
55
51
47
42
143
135
127
117
106
15.3
14.1
13.1
12.0
11.0
15.4
NOTE:
1. For best fuel economy. operate at 1 gph leaner than shown In this chart or
peak T.I.T.
2. Some power settings may not be obtainable, but are listed to aid interpolation.
3. Power settings not approved for cruising are indicated by dashes.
I
15-32
at
Figure 5-9. Cruise Performance (Sheet 8)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
---
SECTIONS
PERFORMANCE
CRUISE PERFORMANCE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 18,000 FEET
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture
Cowl Flaps Closed
RPM
2400
MP
30
28
26
24
22
2o•c BELOW
STANDARD TEMP
-41 •c
STANDARD
TEMPERATURE
-21· c
%
BPH
KTAS
GPH
-. .
. ..
.. -
156
151
145
139
%
BPH
74
69
65
60
56
51
KTAS
GPH
161
155
149
142
135
127
20°CABOVE
STANDARD TEMP
-1·c
%
BPH
KTAS
GPH
19.0
17.6
16.5
15.3
14.2
13.2
70
65
61
56
52
48
159
152
145
137
130
121
17.8
16.5
15.5
14.3
13.4
12.4
20
73
68
63
59
55
132
18.7
17.5
16.2
15.1
14.0
2300
30
28
26
24
22
20
75
70
65
60
S5
51
158
152
147
140
133
125
19.3
17.8
16.6
15.3
14.2
13.0
71
65
61
56
52
48
157
151
144
136
129
119
18. 2
16.7
15.6
14.4
13.3
12.3
67
61
S7
53
49
45
155
147
140
131
123
112
17.0
15.7
14.7
13.5
12.6
11.6
2200
30
72
28
66
26
24
22
20
61
56
52
47
155
148
142
134
127
117
18 .4
16.9
15.6
14.3
13.2
12.0
68
62
58
53
49
44
153
146
139
130
122
111
17. 3
15.9
14.7
13.5
12.5
11 .4
64
58
54
49
46
41
150
141
134
124
11 S
101
16.3
14.9
13.8
12.7
11.8
10.8
30
28
26
70
60
54
50
153
146
140
131
123
17.8
16.4
15.3
13.9
12.8
66
61
56
51
47
151
144
136
127
118
16.8
15.5
14.4
13 .1
12.1
62
57
53
48
147
139
131
120
11 1
15.8
14.5
13.5
12. 3
11.4
68
63
58
53
48
150
144
138
129
120
17.3
16.0
14.9
13.S
12.4
64
148
141
134
124
114
16 .3
15.1
14.0
12.7
11.7
60
55
51
47
43
144
15.3
14.1
13.1
12.0
11 .0
2100
24
22
2000
30
28
26
24
22
64
59
55
so
45
44
136
128
117
105
NOTE:
1. For best fuel economy, operate at 1 gph leaner than shown in this chart or at
peakT.I.T.
2 . Some power settings may not be obtainable, but are listed to aid interpolation .
3. Power settings not approved for cruising are indicated by dashes.
Figure 5-9. Cruise Performance (Sheet 9)
Revision 5
I
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CRUISE PERFORMANCE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 20,000 FEET
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture
Cowl Flaps Closed
RPM
MP
20°CBELOW
STANDARD TEMP
-4 5°C
%
BPH
2400
2300
2200
KTAS
GPH
STANDARD
TEMPERATURE
-2s0 c
%
KTAS
GPH
51
163
157
151
143
136
128
BPH
74
68
64
59
20°CABOVE
STANDARD TEMP
. 5•c
%
KTAS
GPH
19.0
17.5
16.4
15.2
14.2
13.1
BPH
70
64
60
56
52
48
161
153
146
138
130
121
17.8
16.4
15.4
14.2
13.3
12.4
30
28
26
24
22
20
--.
.. -
- --
73
68
63
59
158
153
147
141
133
18 .6
17.4
16.1
15.1
13.9
30
28
26
24
22
20
75
69
65
59
50
161
154
149
141
134
125
19.2
17.7
16.5
15.2
14.1
12.9
71
65
61
56
52
48
160
152
146
137
129
119
18.1
16.6
15.6
14.3
13.3
12.2
66
61
57
52
49
45
156
148
140
131
123
111
17.0
15.6
14.6
13.4
12.5
11.5
157
150
144
135
127
18.3
16.8
15.6
14.2
13.2
67
62
57
52
49
155
147
140
130
122
17.2
15.8
14.7
13.4
12.5
63
58
151
142
134
123
114
16.2
14.8
13.8
12.6
11.7
15.7
14.5
13.5
12.3
11.4
15.3
14.1
13.2
12.0
11.1
30
28
26
24
54
55
55
22
72
66
61
56
52
2100
30
28
26
24
22
70
64
60
54
50
155
148
142
132
124
17.8
16.4
15.2
13.9
12.8
66
60
56
51
47
153
145
137
127
118
16.8
15.4
14.4
13.1
12.1
61
57
53
48
44
148
139
131
120
109
2000
30
28
26
68
63
58
53
48
153
146
140
130
120
17.3
16.0
14.9
13.5
12.4
64
59
55
50
45
150
142
135
125
114
16.3
15.1
14.0
12.8
11.7
60
55
51
47
43
145
137
129
117
104
24
22
54
49
46
NOTE:
1. For best fuel economy, operate at 1 gph leaner than shown in this chart or at
peak T.I.T.
2 . Some power settings may not be obtainable, but are listed to aid interpolation.
3 . Power settings not approved for cruising are Indicated by dashes.
I
ls-34
Figure 5-9. Cruise Performance (Sheet 10)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CRUISE PERFORMANCE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 22,000 FEET
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture
Cowl Flaps Closed
RPM
MP
20°CBELOW
STANDARD TEMP
.49•c
%
KTAS
GPH
. -.
72
68
63
59
...
161
155
148
142
54
133
BPH
2400
2300
2200
2100
2000
30
28
26
24
22
20
..-
STANDARD
TEMPERATURE
-29°(
%
BPH
20°CABOVE
STANDARD TEMP
.g•c
%
KTAS
GPH
. .-
.. .
. -.
18.5
17.3
16.0
15.0
13.8
68
64
59
55
51
158
152
144
137
128
17.4
16.3
15.1
14. 1
13.0
. -.
16.5
15.5
14.2
13.2
12.1
.. .
...
-. -
61
57
52
49
44
148
141
131
122
108
15.5
14.5
13.3
12.5
11.5
-..
14.7
BPH
...
64
60
55
52
48
KTAS
GPH
-..
- ..
154
147
138
130
120
16.3
15.3
14.1
13.3
12.3
-..
...
...
. ..
69
64
59
55
50
156
150
142
135
125
17.6
16.4
15.1
14.1
12.9
65
60
55
52
47
...
154
146
137
129
119
30
28
26
24
22
...
65
61
55
51
...
152
145
135
128
. -.
16.7
15.5
14. 1
13.1
...
61
57
52
48
. -.
. -.
...
148
140
130
121
15.7
14.6
13.3
12.4
55
53
49
45
-. .
142
134
123
112
30
28
26
24
22
...
. ..
...
. .-
...
16.3
15.2
13.8
12.7
60
56
51
47
146
138
128
118
...
56
52
48
44
...
150
143
133
124
. -.
15.4
14.3
13.0
12.0
...
64
59
54
50
140
132
120
107
14.4
13.4
12.3
11.4
30
28
26
24
...
62
58
53
. ..
. ..
...
.. .
.. .
148
141
131
16.0
14.9
13.5
59
55
50
143
136
125
15.0
14.0
12.8
...
55
S1
47
30
28
26
24
22
20
. ..
137
129
117
13.7
12.5
11.7
...
14.1
13.2
12.0
NOTE:
1. For best fuel economy, operate at 1 gph leaner than shown in this chart or at
peakT.1.T.
2 . Some power settings may not be obtainable, but are listed to aid interpolation.
3 . Power settings not approved for cruising are indicated by dashes.
Figure 5-9. Cruise Performance (Sheet 11)
Revision 5
I
SECTION 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
PERFORMANCE
CRUISE PERFORMANCE
PRESSURE ALTITUDE 24,000 FEET
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture
Cowl Flaps Closed
RPM
2400
2300
2200
2100
2000
MP
30
28
26
24
22
20
30
28
26
24
22
20°caELOW
STANDARD TEMP
. 53•c
%
BPH
...
72
67
62
58
54
KTAS
GPH
.. .
. ..
18.4
17.2
15.9
14.9
13.7
163
157
149
142
133
.. .
. ..
68
64
59
55
158
152
143
135
STANDARD
TEMPERATURE
.33•c
%
BPH
...
68
64
58
55
51
...
17.5
16.3
15.0
14.0
. ..
. -.
16.6
15.4
14.1
13.1
. ..
. ..
16.2
15.1
13.8
. .
60
56
51
64
60
55
52
%
BPH
KTAS
. ..
...
. ..
...
160
153
144
137
127
17. 3
16.2
15.0
14.1
12.9
63
60
55
52
47
155
147
137
129
117
16.2
15.2
14.0
13.2
12.2
. -.
155
147
137
129
. ..
..-
16.4
15.4
14.1
13.2
60
56
52
48
. ..
149
141
130
121
15.4
14.4
13.2
12.4
. -.
149
140
130
121
. ..
...
15.6
14 .5
13.3
12.4
57
53
49
45
. -.
143
133
122
110
14.6
13.6
12.5
11.6
-. 15.3
14.3
13.0
. ..
. -140
131
118
14.4
13.4
12.3
-. 15.0
14.0
12.8
...
. --
55
51
47
138
129
115
KTAS
GPH
. ..
.. .
...
65
60
55
51
153
145
136
128
30
28
26
24
...
64
59
54
151
144
134
30
28
26
24
-..
. ..
. --
- ..
...
62
58
53
149
142
132
15.9
14.9
13.5
59
55
144
137
125
30
28
26
24
22
.. .
61
57
52
48
-
so
20°CABOVE
STANDARD TEMP
.13•c
...
147
139
128
56
52
48
GPH
...
...
...
...
14.1
13.2
12.0
NOTE:
1. For best fuel economy, operate at 1 gph leaner than shown in this chart or at
peak T.I.T.
2. Some power settings may not be obtainable, but are listed to aid interpolation.
3. Power settings not approved for cruising are indicated by dashes.
I
15-36
Figure 5-9. Cruise Performance (Sheet 12)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
RANGE PROFILE
45 MINUTES RESERVE
65 GALLONS USABLE FUEL
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture for Cruise
Standard Temperature
Zero Wind
NOTE:
This chart allows for the fuel used for engine start, taxi, takeoff and climb, and
the distance during a normal climb up to 20,000 feet and maximum climb
above 20,000 feel
24000 ,-,-,--,---,-c--,---,---,-,,....---,--,-,,:,,.c--r--,-...,...,.....,.--,--,-,-
20000
0 L....l---'-~-U'-.l....l....l-. . i -"--l.----'-...l....J.....!-K.1.....l...........,c......J... .IL.J...,..! .....l,...!...,J
300
350
400
450
500
550
RANGE • NAlJTICAI. MILES
Figure 5-10. Range Profile (Sheet 1 of 4)
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361 .
Revision 5
I
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
RANGE PROFILE
45 MINUTES RESERVE
88 GALLONS USABLE FUEL
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture for Cruise
Standard Temperature
Zero Wind
NOTE;
This chart allows for the fuel used for engine start, taxi, takeoff and climb, and
the distance during a normal climb up to 20,000 feet and maximum climb
above 20,000 feel
450
500
550
600
650
700
750
RANGE • NAU TICAL MILES
I
1s-3e
Figure 5-10. Range Profile (Sheet 2)
Serials T20608001 th ru T20608361.
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
RANGE PROFILE
45 MINUTES RESERVE
64 GALLONS USABLE FUEL
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture for Cruise
Standard Temperature
Zero Wind
NOTE:
This chart allows for the fuel used for engine start, taxi, takeoff and climb, and
the distance during a normal climb up to 20,000 feet and maximum climb
above 20,000 feet.
24,000
I
I
I I I
I
l I I
j
LU
20,000
1
I
I
tii
If
~
I
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l
I
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\
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'
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113
j) CTAS
(/1
\
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139KTAS-
1-.-t 1KTASI
I
8000
I I
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-1
4000
,_ l
I
1
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I
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137 1CTi.s
j[/
0
300
350
I
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400
I
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Revision 5
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120KTAS
I 7
I
7
107 KTAS
IV
450
i
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111 KTAS
500
RANGE - NA\JllCAI. MILES
..,..
I '
-
I
130 KTAS
I
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I~ .
t-H-1l1,
I
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12.000
i
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16,000
~
i=
KT
14$KTA$
158K"l'AS
I
- ':?.1\ 1'.
-,
'--!'641KTf ,
I
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I/\ l'T' ._111
KT
I I 1/1
tssKTi -
Figure 5-10. Range Profile (Sheet 3)
Serials T20608362 and on.
I
I
I
550
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
RANGE PROFILE
45 MINUTES RESERVE
87 GALLONS USABLE FUEL
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture for Cruise
Standard Temperature
Zero Wind
NOTE:
This chart allows for the fuel used for engine start, taxi, takeoff and climb, and
the distance during a normal climb up to 20,000 feet and maximum climb
above 20,000 feet
-·
24,000
,...,....,.,-,-,....,...,....,-l"""""".....,.1.....,...,.....,...1...,..,...\--,-,.......
fl.~.,.,...
, .,.....,1-,....,...,"T""r""T""I
1
I
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,_All
f""c...+{•\---ilf 4/.
' \ "111 !(T•C'
.,..
i
1§4'1!AS j '
1-++-t--t-l-+'I I I r--. 1 I
20,000
'
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i '\
1st I
KT,' 8
L LI
'
~.......1
~....,_,_..._KT,AII_.,.
- · -H---1 ..r r'H·-'!l!
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+rA-f'<-t-'-+ ;' ti7t'--,'S_KTt-rA+-t
I I I I I '
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I
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'
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I 1/
I /
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i u7KTAS
I
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I
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/
Im
, 111 KTAS
8000 l-4-.l-,4--..1-,_;,:.i'IJ;..,--lh-+I...!'>::/-/
. ' +--Kt-NS~-...;i::,.J...-..!.
1_
/I
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1...._~
I Jt-+-+-~--f
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1
'
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/ 137 KTAS ' /
I j
- 101
\ l I
t-+.,._,-+--11-lrr-,_;...+-++-::-':!O
ICTAS - ff .._ 120 KTAS--'- - KTMO
, I r.,
i
/ ...-,
I •
._,,.
T
,...- 1 I
450
i
500
550
600
650
700
750
RANGE • NAlJTlCAL MILES
-15-40
Figure 5-10. Range Profile (Sheet 4)
Serials T20608362 and on.
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
ENDURANCE PROFILE
45 MINUTES RESERVE
65 GALLONS USABLE FUEL
CONDITIONS:
~eoo Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture for Cruise
Standard Temperature
Zero Wind
NOTE:
This chart allows for the fuel used for engine start, taxi, takeoff and climb,
and the distance during a nonnal climb up to 20,000 feet and maximum
climb above 20,000 feet.
2
3
4
ENDURANCE • HOURS
Figure 5-11 . Endurance Profile (Sheet 1 of 4)
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361 .
Revision 5
5
I
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
ENDURANCE PROFILE
45 MINUTES RESERVE
88 GALLONS USABLE FUEL
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture for Cruise
Standard Temperature
Zero Wind
NOTE:
This chart allows for the fuel used for engine start, taxi, takeoff and climb,
and the distance during a normal climb up to 20,000 feet and maximum
climb above 20,000 feet.
24000 i
I
20000 i
I 7
-+--+-t--'1~+-\\l
f :-1-+-I---\:
i
1
I
--· ,
I 7
ii
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=I= :11.
....
w
I
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'
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t
:
fli f
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i-r.,1---- +-i--+--+
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r·
t·--·· 1··--1
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ENDURANCE • HOURS
I
15-42
Figure 5-11 . Endurance Profile (Sheet 2)
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361.
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
ENDURANCE PROFILE
45 MINUTES RESERVE
64 GALLONS USABLE FUEL
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture for Cruise
Standard Temperature
Zero Wind
NOTE:
This chart allows for the fuel used for engine start, taxi, takeoff and climb,
and the distance during a normal climb up to 20.000 feet and maximum
climb above 20,000 feet
""""24,000
\
_.\
,\
\
1
I
20,000
I
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I
16,000
t.;
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j:
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5
<
9000
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ENDURANCE· HOURS
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I \ I
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Figure 5-11. Endurance Profile (Sheet 3)
Serials T20608362 and on.
I
II
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ENDURANCE PROFILE
45 MINUTES RESERVE
87 GALLONS USABLE FUEL
CONDITIONS:
3600 Pounds
Recommended Lean Mixture for Cruise
Standard Temperature
Zero Wind
NOTE;
This chart allows for the fuel used for engine start, taxi, takeoff and climb,
and the distance during a normal climb up to 20,000 feet and maximum
climb above 20,000 feet.
lll6l1i
24,000
I
\
\
\
\
\
\
20,000
I
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!
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0
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ENDURANCE · HOURS
..,-
ls-44
Figure 5-11. Endurance Profile {Sheet 4)
Serials T20608362 and on.
Revision 5
CESSNA
SECTIONS
PERFORMANCE
MODEL T206H
--
SHORT FIELD LANDING DISTANCE
AT 3600 POUNDS
CONDITIONS:
Flaps 40°
Power Off
Maximum Braking
Paved, level, dry runway
Zero Wind
Speed at 50 Ft: 64 KIAS
o·c
Press
Alt
In
Feet
s. L.
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000
6000
7000
8000
1o·c
2o·c
3o•c
4o•c
Grnd Tota l Grnd Total Grnd Total Grnd Tota l Grnd Total
Roll Ft To Roll FtTo Roll Ft To Roll Ft To Roll Ft To
Ft Clear
Ft Clear
Ft Clear Ft Clear
Ft Clear
50 ft
50ft
50 Ft
50 Ft
50 Ft
Obst
Obst
695 1340 720
720 1375 750
750 1415 775
775 1455 805
805 1495 835
835 1540 870
870 1590 900
905 1635 935
940 1690 970
1375
1415
1455
1495
1540
1585
1630
1680
1730
Obst
750
775
805
835
865
900
935
970
1005
1415
1450
1495
1540
1580
1630
1680
1730
1780
Obst
775
800
830
865
895
930
965
1000
1040
1450
1490
1530
1580
1625
1675
1725
1775
1830
Obst
800
830
860
890
925
960
995
1035
1075
1490
1530
1575
1615
1665
1715
1770
1825
1880
NOTES:
1.
2.
Short field technique as specified in Section 4.
Decrease distances 10% for each 10 knots headwind. For operation
with tail winds up to 10 knots, increase distances by 10% for each
2.5 knots.
3. For operation on dry, grass runway, increase distances by 40% of
the ·ground roll" f19ure.
4. If a landing with flaps up is necessary, increase the approach speed
by 9 KlAS and allow for 45% longer distances.
Figure 5-12. Landing Distance
Revision 5
5-45/5-461
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTIONS
WEIGHT & BALANCE/EQUIPMENT LIST
SECTION 6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/
EQUIPMENT LIST
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Airplane Weighing Procedures . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Weight And Balance . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Baggage and CargoTie-Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • .
Comprehensive Equipment List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Revision 5
6-1/6-2
6-3
6-3
6-~
6-1
6-2
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTIONS
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
INTRODUCTION
This section describes the procedure for establishing the basic
empty weight and moment of the airplane. Sample forms are
provided for reference. Procedures for calculating the weight and
moment for various operations are also provided. A comprehensive
list of all Cessna equipment available for this airplane is included at
the back of this section.
It should be noted that specific information regarding the weight,
arm, moment and installed equipment for this airplane as delivered
from the factory can only be found in the plastic envelope carried in
the back of this handbook.
AwARNING
IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PILOT TO
ENSURE THE AIRPLANE IS LOADED PROPERLY.
OPERATION OUTSIDE OF PRESCRIBED WEIGHT
AND BALANCE LIMITATIONS COULD RESULT IN
AN ACCIDENT AND SERIOUS OR FATAL INJURY.
AIRPLANE WEIGHING PROCEDURES
1. Preparation:
a. Inflate tires to recommended operating pressures.
b. Defuel airplane. Refer to the Maintenance Manual.
c. Service engine oil as required to obtain a normal full
indication (11 quarts on dipstick).
d. Move sliding seats to the most forward position.
e. Raise flaps to the fully retracted position.
f. Place all control surfaces in neutral position.
g. Remove all non-required items from airplane.
2. Leveling:
a. Place scales under each wheel (minimum scale capacity,
1000 pounds}.
b. Deflate the nose tire and/or lower or raise the nose strut to
properly center the bubble in the level (Refer to Figure 6-1).
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
I
6-3
SECTION 6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
~ - - N oT·i=-- - ~
IT IS THE RESPONSIBIUTY
OF THE PILOT TO ENSURE
THAT THE AIRPLANE IS
LOADED PROPERLY.
150
REFERENCE
DATUM
(FIREWALL, FRONT FACE.
LOWER PORTION)
100
STA0.0
FUSELAGE STATION (FS) - INCHES
1285T1027
I
6-4
Figure 6-1 . Airplane Weighing Form (Sheet 1 of 3)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
LOCATING CG WITH AIRPLANE ON LANDING GEAR
FORMULA for Longttudinal CG:
(NOSE GEAR NET WEIGHT) (
(XJ=(A}-
) X (B)
- -- - - ------=(
NOSE AND MAIN LANDING G EAR WEIGHT
TOTALED (
)
INCHES
AFT OF
DATUM
MEASURING A AND B
MEASURE A AND B PER PILOrs
OPERATING HANDBOOK
INSTRUCTIONS TO ASSIST IN
LOCATING CG WITH AIRPLANE
WEIGHED ON LANDING GEAR.
LOCATING PERCENT MAC
FORMULA for Percent MAC:
CG Percent MAC=
(CG Arm of Airplane)-25.91
0.5880
LEVELING PROVISIONS
LONGrTUDINAL - LEFT SIDE OF
TAILCONE AT FS 108.00 & 142.00
AIRPLANE AS WEIGHED TABLE
POSITION
SCALE READING
SCALE DRIFT
TARE
NET WEIGHT
LEFT SIDE
RIGHT SIDE
NOSE
AIRPLANE TOTAL AS WEIGHED
BASIC EMPTY WEIGHT AND CENTER-OF-GRAVITY TABLE
ITEM
WEIGHT
POUNDS
CG ARM
(INCHES)
MOMENT
(INCH-POUNDS
24.0
48.0
1.2
/1000)
AIRPLANE (CALCULATEO
OR AS WEIGHED)
(INCLUDES ALL
UNORAINABLE FLUIDS
ANO FULL OIL)
ORAINABLE UNUSABLE
FUEL AT 6.0 POUNDS PER
GALLON -4 GALLONS
BASIC EMPTY WEIGHT
Figure 6-1. Airplane Weighing Form (Sheet 2)
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361.
Revision 5
I
6-51
SECTIONS
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
LOCATING CG WITH AIRPLANE ON LANDING GEAR
FORMULA for Longttudinal CG:
(NOSE GEAR NET WEIGHT) (
) X (B)
(X)=(A}- - - - - - - - - - - - - =(
NOSE AND MAJN LANDING GEAR WEIGtiT
TOTALED ( )
INCHES
AFT OF
DATUM
MEASURING A AND B
MEASURE A AND B PER PILOrs
OPERATING HANDBOOK
INSTRUCTIONS TO ASSIST IN
LOCATING CG WITH AIRPLANE
WEIGHED ON LANDING GEAR.
LOCATING PERCENT MAC
FORMULA for Percent MAC:
(CG Am, of Alrplane). 25.91
CG Percent MAC=
o.suo
LEVELING PROVISIONS
LONGITUDINAL· LEFT SIDE OF
TAILCONE AT FS 108.00 & 142.00
AIRPLANE AS WEIGHED TABLE
POSITION
SCALE READING
SCALE DRIFT
TARE
NET WEIGHT
LEFT SIDE
RIGHT SIDE
NOSE
AIRPLANE-'l'OTAL AS WEIGHED
BASIC EMPTY WEIGHT AND CENTER-OF-GRAVITY TABLE
ITEM
POUNDS
CGARM
(INCHES)
MOMENT
(INCH-POUNDS
30.0
48.0
1.4
WEIGHT
/1000)
AIRPLANE (CALCULATED
OR AS WEIGHED)
(INCLUDES ALL
UNDRAINABLE FLUIDS
AND FULL OIL)
DRAINABLE UNUSABLE
FUEL AT 6.0 POUNDS PER
GALLON • 5 GALLONS
...
BASIC EMPTY WEIGHT
Figure 6-1. A irplane Weighing Form (Sheet 3)
Serials T20608362 and on.
Revision 5
1m)
i nch
l ibs =
l Inch=
Scale Posit ion
0,453592 kg
A
m
B
Tare
Sym bol
0,0254
Scale Reading
left Wheel
l
Right Wheel
R
Nose Wheel
N
Sum of Net Weights (As Weii?ht )
w
61,42
72,05
Net Weight
c.G. (X
2404,36
C .G . Arm (X)
=
Item
Waha v kg
808,66
836,43
759,27
2404,36
Weight (W)
Air lane Basic Empty Wei ht
1,56
1,83
366,8
379,4
344,4
1090,6
Momen t
38,67
92966,06
* B)
A _ (N
w
Moment/1000
Wei ght (Lbs) X C.G. ARM (In.)= (l bs.-ln)
Ai re lane Wei2ht (from Item 5, pa2e 6-31
Add Unusable Fuel:
Standart Tanks 13 Gal at 6 Lbs/ Gal I
Long Range Tanks (5 Gal at 6 Lbs/ Gal )
Equipment Chages
Airplane Basi c Empty Weight
/9. //~~
'?
cO
/ /4
2.404,36
38,67
TomiAIR
e .r.o.
vi
_
-----
Skuteckeh
08615
Prftiti; :<. 3 00 '2'
~
68093 \!,I
DIC: CZ2 968093
92966,06
(
(
;o
(1)
<
~(')
·SAMPLE WEIGHT AND BALANCE RECORD
!i!:
0
::,
01
,,
(CONTINUOUS HISTO RY OF CHANGES IN STRUCTURE OR EQUIPMENT AFFECTING W EIG HT ANO BALANCE)
co·
C:
AIRPLANE MODEL
iil
O>
ITEM NO.
~
DATE
(/)
IN
Ill
3
,::,
11"LA
~
(1)
co·
:,-
-
ARM
(IN.)
-t, 11'1
g
::i::
RUNNING
BASIC EMPTY
WEIGHT
MOMENT WT.
/1000 (LB.)
t0\EN1
/1000
4Cf.f 'ft."ll
7
~
G)
I
~
z(")
OJ
II)
ii>
m
m
::,
--
0
(1)
;o
0
(1)
0
.,
0
0
"'
0)
-
ARM t-OMENT WT.
(IN.) /1000 (LB.)
r Z
I\)
s;:
Q.
I
WT.
(LB.)
REMOVED (·)
men
-;)>
QQ
I I)
-..J
ADDED ( ~ )
0 (/)
-;
::,
(J)
WEIGHT CHANGE
DESCRIPTION
OF ARTICL E OR
MODIFICATION
AS DELIVERED
~
a.
OUT
!PAGE NUMBER
!SERIAL NO.
om
"'~
0
g
s;;
"O
s: (/)
mm
zo
-; -i
c5
(J) Z
-i
0)
SECTION6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
IAIRPLANE WEIGHING PROCEDURES (Continued)
3. Weighing:
a. Weigh the airplane in a close~ hangar to avoid errors
caused by air currents.
b. With the airplane level and brakes released, record the
weight shown on each scale. Deduct the tare, if any, from
each reading.
4. Measuring:
a. Obtain measurement A by measuring horizontally (along
the airplane centerline) from a line stretched between the
main wheel centers to a plumb bob dropped from the
firewall.
b. Obtain measurement B by measuring horizontally and
parallel to the airplane centerline, from center of nose
wheel axle, left side, to a plumb bob dropped from the line
between the main wheel centers. Repeat on right side and
average the measurements.
5. Using weights from item 3 and measurements from item 4, the
airplane weight and C.G. can be determined.
6. Basic Empty Weight may be determined by completing Figure
6-1 .
WEIGHT AND BALANCE
The following information will enable you to operate your Cessna
within the prescribed weight and center of gravity limitations. To
determine weight and balance, use the Sample Loading Problem,
Loading Graph, and Center of Gravity Moment Envelope as follows:
Take the basic empty weight and moment from appropriate
weight and balance records carried in your airplane, and enter them
in the column titled YOUR AIRPLANE on the Sample Loading
Problem.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTIONS
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
WEIGHT AND BALANCE (Continued)
I
NOTE
In addition to the basic empty weight and moment
noted on these records, the C.G. arm (fuselage
station) is also show, but need not be used on the
Sample Loading Problem. The moment which is
shown must be divided by 1000 and this value used
as the moment/1000 on the loading problem.
Use the Loading Graph to determine the moment/1000 for each
additional item to be carried: then list these on the loading problem.
NOTE
Loading Graph information for the pilot, passengers
and baggage is based on seats positioned for
average occupants and baggage loaded in the center
of these areas as shown on the Loading
Arrangements diagram. For loadings which may differ
from these, the Sample Loading Problem lists
fuselage stations for these items to indicate their
forward and aft C.G. range limitations (seat travel and
baggage area limitation).
Additional moment
calculations, based on the actual weight and C.G.
arm (fuselage station) of the item being loaded, must
be made if the position of the load is different from
that shown on the Loading Graph.
When a cargo pack is installed, it is necessary to determine the
C.G. arm and calculate the moment/1000 of items carried in the
pack. The arm for any location in the pack can be determined from
the diagram on figure 6-5. Multiply the weight of the item by the
C.G. arm then divide by 1000 to get the moment/1000. The
maximum loading capacity of the pack is 300 pounds.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
SECTION 6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
IWEIGHT AND BALANCE (Continued)
NOTE
Each loading should be figured in accordance with
the above paragraphs. When the loading is light
(such as pilot and copilot, and no oxygen system,
rear seats or cargo}, be sure to check the forward
balance limits. When loading is heavy (near gross
weight), be sure to check the aft balance limits.
To avoid time consuming delays in cargo and/or passenger
shifting, plan your load so that the heaviest cargo and/or
passengers are in the forward part of the airplane or cargo pack and
the lightest in the rear. Always plan to have any vacant space at
the rear of the airplane or pack. For example, do not have
passengers occupy the aft seat unless the front and center seats
are to be occupied.
Total the weights and moments/1000 and plot these values on
the Center of Gravity Moment Envelope to determine whether the
point falls within the envelope, and if the loading is acceptable.
BAGGAGE AND CARGO TIE-DOWN
A nylon baggage net having four tie-down straps is provided as
standard equipment to secure baggage/cargo in cargo area D. Two
floor-mounted "D" ring tie-downs and two "D" ring tie-clowns
located in the aft cabin top, serve as the attaching points for the net
in cargo area "D". The "D" rings which serve as the attachments
for the forward tie-down straps are mounted in the floor near each
sidewall approximately at station 123. The two "D" rings for the aft
tie-down straps are installed at the aft edge of the top rear windows
approximately at station 135.
(Continued Next Page}
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
WEIGHT AND BALANCE (Continued)
I
I
BAGGAGE AND CARGO TIE-DOWN (Continued)
It will be necessary to properly secure cargo loads before flight.
To supplement the standard "D" rings provided for tie-down,
additional "D" rings are available from any Cessna Dealer. If more
tie-down points are needed, the shoulder harness attaching points
may be used. Rope, strap, or cable used for tie-down should be
rated at a minimum of ten times the load weight capacity of the tiedown fittings used.
Refer to Figure 6-3 for additional information concerning the use
of tie-down blocks and other attachments in restraining cargo.
ITEM
"D" Rings
Shoulder Strap
LOCATION
MAXIMUM
RATED LOAD
(POUNDS)
Floor and Aft Cabin Top
Cabin Top
60
175
Only the total rated load of tie-downs located aft of the cargo load
are to be considered when determining adequate restraint of cargo.
Tie-downs are also required forward of the load to prevent the load
from shifting. The type of tie-downs available, and the sum of their
individual rated loads, are the determining factors in selecting the
number of tie-downs needed.
FOR EXAMPLE:
A 400-pound load would required that a minimum of four (4)
tie-downs rated at 100 pounds each be located aft of the
load for proper restraint. Additional tie-downs forward of the
load would be needed to prevent the load from shifting.
Revision 5
SECTION6
WEIGHT & BALANCE / EQUIPMENT LIST
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
LOADING ARRANGEMENTS
C.G.
ARM
**
** 67 -
**
** 96 - - c
** 127
-
B
** 127 -
D
145 -
I.
- BAGG.
145 -
II.
Ill.
IV.
* Pilot or passenger center of gravity on adjustable seats
positioned for average occupant Numbers in
parentheses indicate forward and aft limits of occupant
center of gravity range.
**Arms measured to the center of the areas shown.
NOTE 1: The usable fuel C.G. arm is located at station 46.50.
NOTE 2: The aft baggage wall (approximate station 145.00) can be
used as a convenient interior reference point for
determining the location of baggage area fuselage
stations.
l 28$X100,
Figure 6-4. Loading Arrangements
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION6
WEIGHT & BALANCE / EQUIPMENT LIST
f + - - -- -- - --
NOTE 1:
-96.50'- --
-
-
-
- --
STATION LOCA11ONAND C.G. ARM ARE IDENTICAL
12.8SX'1011
Figure 6-5. Cargo Pack
Revision 5
SECTION 6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CABIN HEIGHT MEASUREMENTS
\
J!Jl \
t------f.:i!b'-- ----lf----J l
I
I
49.50
\
45.50
[
~===l~)__J__,~i
,j:
I
=::::::==----~=_...L~
47.oo__J
...-E - - - - - -6500__J
CABIN WIDTH MEASUREMENTS
POST BULKHEAD
(STANOAAO)
PANEL
* 38.50
I
1
*
FACE OF
INSTRUMENT FIREWALL
FORWARD DOOR
TIE-DOWN RINGS
•...°:
29.00!
• 30.00
34.00
• 42.00
I
I
I
1b Ido do 4b 3b
145
65.3
:+r
~
* 14.00
I
2~
10
19
I
0
CODE
*CABINFWOR
• LWR WINDOW LINE
DOOR OPENING DIMENSIONS
CABIN DOOR
CARGO DOORS
NOTE 1:
NOTE2:
NOTE3:
HEIGHT
WIDTH
(TOP)
WIDTH
(BOTTOM)
(FRONT)
HEIGHT
(REAR)
32.50
43.00
37.00
40.00
41.00
39.25
39.00
37.50
Use t he forward face of lhe rear door post as a reference point to locate C.G.
aims. For example, a box with Its center of wei,ght located 13.00 inches aft of
the rear door post would have a C.G. ann of (65.30 +13.00 =78.30) 78.30
inches.
Maximum allowable floor loading: 200 pounds/square foot However, when
ijems with small or sharp support areas are carried. the installation of a .25 inch
olvwood floor is highly recommended to proiect the aircraft structure.
All dimensions Shown are in inches.
1285)(1005
Figure 6-6. Internal Cabin Dimensions
16-14
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTIONS
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
WEIGHT AND MOMENT
TABULATION
ITEM DESCRIPTION
SAMPLE
YOUR
AIRPLANE
AIRPLANE
Weight
(lbs.)
1. Basic Empty Weight (Use the
data pe rta in ing to your
airplane as it is presently
equipped. Includes unusab le
f uel and full o il)
2. Usable Fuel (At 6 Lbs./Gal.)
Std Fuel (88 Gallons
Maximum)
Reduced Fuel
(65 Gallons)
3. Pilot and Front Passenger
(Station 32 to 43)
4. Center Passengers (Sta 69 to 79)
Aft Passengers (Sta. 94 to 100)
Baggage IV or V (Sta. 109 to
145; 180 Lbs. Max.)
5. *Cargo "A" (Station 10to 50)
•cargo "B " (Station 50to 84)
*Ca rgo "C" (Stat ion 84to 109)
*Cargo "D" (Station 109 to 145)
6. Car~o Pack (Station 10 to 84;
300 bs. Max.)
7. RAMP WEIGHT AND MOMENT
8. Fuel allowance for eng ine start,
taxi and run up
9. TAKEOFF WEIGHT AND
MOMENT (Subtract Step 8 from
Step 7)
Moment
Moment
Weight
(Lb-ins.
(Lb-ins.
(lbs.)
/1000)
/ 1000)
2359
91 .3
S.28
24.6
3-40
340
12.6
23.8
so
6.3
3617
158.6
.17
-.7
3600
157.9
10. Locate this point (3600 at 157.9) on the Center of Gravity Moment Envelope,
and since this point f alls within the envelope, the loading is acceptable.
.
I
Maximum allowable cargo loads will be determined by the type and
number of tie-downs used, as well as by the airplane weight and C.G.
limitations. Floor loading must not exceed 200 lbs. per square foot.
Figure 6-7. Sample Loading Problem (Sheet 1 of 3)
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361.
Revision 5
SECTION 6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
WEIGHT AND MOMENT
TABULATION
ITEM DESCRIPTION
SAMPLE
AIRPLANE
Weight
(lbs.)
YOUR
AIRPLANE
Moment
Moment
Weight
(Lb-ins.
(Lb-ins.
{lbs.)
/1000)
/1000)
1. Basic Empty Weight (Use the
data pertaining to your
a irp lane as it is presently
equipped. Includes unusable
fuel and full oil)
2365
91.6
2. Usable Fuel (At 6 Lbs.I Gal.)
Std Fuel (87 Gallons
522
24.3
Maximum)
Reduced Fuel
(65 Gallons)
3. Pilot and Front Passenger
(Station 32 to 43)
12.6
340
4. Center Passengers (Sta 69 to 79)
340
23.8
Aft Passengers (Sta. 94 to 100)
Baggage IV or V (Sta. 109 to
145; 180 Lbs. Max.)
50
6.3
5. *Cargo "A" (Station 1Oto 50)
*Cargo "B" (Station 50 to 84)
*Cargo "C" (Station 84 to 109)
*Cargo "D" {Station 109 to 145)
6. Cargo Pack (Station 1 O to 84;
300 lbs. Max.)
7. RAMP WEIGHT AND MOMENT
3617
158.6
8. Fuel allowance for engine start,
taxi and runup
-17
-.7
9. TAKEOFF WEIGHT AND
3600
157.9
MOMENT {Subtract Step 8 from
St en 7l
10. Locate this point (3600 at 157.9) on the Center of Gravity Moment Enve lope,
and since this poi nt falls within the envelope, the loading is acceptable.
*
Maximum allowable cargo loads will be determined by the type and
number of tie-downs used, as well as by the airplane weight and C.G.
lim itations. Floor loading must not exceed 200 lbs. per square foot.
....
Figure 6-7. Sample Loading Problem (Sheet 2)
Serials T20608362 and on.
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
YOUR
AIRPLANE
Weight
(lbs.)
Moment
{Lb-ins,
/ 1000)
SECTION 6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
YOUR
AIRPLANE
Weight
(lbs.)
Moment
(Lb-ins,
/ 1000)
YOUR
AIRPLANE
Weight
(lbs.)
Moment
(Lb-ins,
/1000)
When several loading confipurations a re representative of your
operations, it may be usefu to fil l out one or more of the above columns so
that specific loadings are ava ilable at a glance.
Figure 6-7. Sample Loading Problem (Sheet 3)
Revision 5
I
SECTION6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
250
225
200
175
ci,
0
~ 3
ci,
i
C,
g
150
·125
~
~
S?
w
;.:
100
i..,
75
i 60
i;
fo
15
20
25
:io
35
40
45
LOAD MOMENT/1000 (POUNDS . INCHES)
I
16-18
Figure 6-8. Loading Graph (Sheet 1 of 2)
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361.
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTIONS
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
260
225
·200
175
,ii
i
C,
0
150 :!
~
...::,:
125
..ig
0
100
75
60
, ·o
1s
20
2s
so
35
40
LOAD MOMENT/1000 lPOUNDS • INCHES)
1285T1001
.,.
Revision 5
Figure 6-8. Loading Graph (Sheet 2)
Serials T20608362 and on.
6-191
SECTION6
WEIGHT & BALANCE I EQUIPMENT LIST
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
1650
3600
1600
25
3 100
0
E,. 3000
I-
I
(!)
iw
~
a:
2800
<
0
I
J
2300
1050
2200
1000
950
900
60
70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190
LOADED AIRPLANE MOMENT/1000 (POUND-INCHES)
Figure 6-9. Center of Gravity Moment Envelope
16-20
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 6
WEIGHT & BALANCE / EQUIPMENT LIST
AIRPLANE C.G. LOCATION · MILLIMETERS AFT OF DATUM (STA. 0.0)
850
9 0
950
1000 1050 1100 1150 1200 1250
3800
1700
1650
3600
1600
en
0
1550
3400
z;
::,
0
1500
':!:. 3200
1450
I-
I
C!)
iw
s&
<
0
w
<
en
~
C:
(!)
g
g_
1400 IJ:
C)
1350
3000
~
1300 w
2800
1250
z
:s
CL
1200 a:
<(
1150 0w
0
1100
2600
0
0
c5
..J
..J
· 1050
1000
950
2000
~
M
$
~
~
G
M
G
G
SO
AIRPLANE C.G. LOCATION • INCHES AFT OF DATUM (STA. 0.0)
Figure 6-10. Center of Gravity Limits
Revision 5
6-21
I
SECTIONS
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
COMPREHENSIVE EQUIPMENT LIST
The following figure (Figure &-11) is a comprehensive list of all Cessna
equipment which Is available for the Model T206H airplane.
This
comprehensive equipment list provides the following information in column form:
In the ITEM No. column. each item is assigned a coded number. The first
two digits of the code represent the assignment of the item within the Air
Transport Association Specification 100 breakdown (11 for Paint and
Placards; 24 for Elecncal Power; 77 for Engine Indicating, etc.}. These
assignments also correspond to the Maintenance Manual chapter
breakdown for the airplane. After the first two digits (and hyphen), items
receive a unique sequence number (0 1, 02, 03, etc.). After the sequence
number (and hyphen), a suffix letter is assigned to identify equipment as a
required item, a standard item or an optional item. Suffix letters are as
follows:
R
S
0
A
required items or equipment for FAA certification
standard equipment items
optional equipment items replacing required or standard items
optional equipment items which are in addition to required or
standard Items
In the EQUIPMENT LIST DESCRIPTION column, each item is assigned a
descriptive name to help identify its function.
In the REF DRAWING column. a Cessna drawing number is provided which
corresponds to the item.
NOTE
If additional equipment is to be installed, It must be done in accordance
with the reference drawing, service buUetin or a separate FAA approval.
In the WT LBS and ARM INS columns, information is provided on the weight
(in pounds) and arm (in inches) of the equipment item.
NOTES
Unless otherwise indicated. true values (not net change values) for the
weight and arm are shown. Posttive arms are distances aft of the airplane
datum: negative arms are distances forward of the datum.
Asterisks (") in the weight and arm column indicate complete assembly
installations. Some major components or the assembly are listed on the
lines immediately following. The sum of these major components does not
necessarily equal the complete assembly installation.
ls-22
Revision 5
-
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ITEM
No.
SECTION6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
EQUIPMENT UST DESCRIPTION
REF DRAWING
WT
LBS
ARM
INS.
0.0
20.6
21 ,4•
20.6
0.8
0.0
19.2
89.0
90.8'
89.0
135.9
90.8
0.0
0.8
89.0
135.9
1.7
52.0
-10.0
11 • PLACARDS AND MARKINGS
1Hl1-R
11-02-S
11-03-0
IFR DAY & NIGHT LIMITATIONS PLACARD
PAINT, OVERALL EXTERIOR WHITE
PAINT. OVERALL WHITE W/COLOR STRIPE
• OVERALL WHITE COVER
• COLOR STRIPING
11-04-0 MILLENIUM EXTERIOR STYLING (WHEN
AVAILABLE) (NET CHANGE SHOWN)
• PAINT (METALIC OR GLOSS)
• COLOR STRIPING
0505087-24
1204053
1204053
1204055·3, -4
21 -AIR CONDITIONING
21 ·01 -S
21·02-S
VENTILATORS, ADJUSTABLE, CABIN AIR
CABIN HEATER SYSTEM, SHROUDED
MUFFLER TYPE
1250500-9
1215209-1
2.5
22 • AUTO FLIGHT
22-01-S
SINGLE AXIS AUTOPILOT
• KAP 140 SINGLE AXIS AUTOPILOT
• COMPUTER
• ROLL SERVO INSTALLATION
• CABLEASSY, ROLL ACTUATOR
- CABLE ASSY, KAP 140 AUTOPILOT
- CONFIGURATION MODULE
- KS-271C ROLL SERVO
22-02-0 DUAL AXIS AUTOPILOT
• KAP 140 DUAL AXIS AUTOPILOT
COMPUTER WITH ELECTRIC
ELEVATOR (REPLACES 22-01-S)
- KS-270C PITCH SERVO INSTL.
• KS-272C PITCH TRIM SERVO INSTL.
- ROLL SERVO INSTALLATION
- KAP 140 COMPUTER/CONTROL LER
22-03·0 DUAL AXIS AUTOPILOT
- KAP 140 COMPUTER WITH ALTITUDE
PRESELECT
• KAP 140 CABLE ASSY
- KS-271C ROLL SERVO INSTALLATION
- ROLL SERVO INST CABLE ASSY
• ROLL ACTUATOR CABLE ASSY
• KS-270C PITCH SERVO INSTL
- KS-272C PITCH TRIM SERVO INSTL.
• KMC 100 CONFIGURATION MODULE
s.o·
3900013-1
057-05628-2602
065-00176-2501
3940415-1
1222150-2, -3
3924107
071 -00073-5000
065-00179-0100
3900014-1
065-00176-2501
2.5
2.0
1.6
0.9
0.9
0.1
2.1
11.0·
2.0
1201989-1
1201994-1
3940415-1
IOGS-00176-5402
13900042
ioos-00115.7702
5.1
5.2
4.4
2.6
20.5'
2.6
3924135
3940415-1
3924137-3
139241 11-2
1201989-1
1201994-1
071-00073-5000
4.7
3.6
0.4
0.9
4.1
4 .1
0.1
Figure 6-11. Equipment List Description (Sheet 1 of 12)
Revision 5
36.r
14.6
15.0
49.2
56.0
12.0
18.0
53.1
133. 1·
15.0
219.7
198.9
54.5
14.3
103.0'
15.0
62.8
54.2
66.0
56.0
170.6
195.7
15.0
1
SECTION6
WEIGHT & BALANCE / EQUIPMENT LIST
ITEM
No.
EQUIPMENT UST DESCRIPTION
22-04-A
ALTITUDE PRESELECT OPTION FOR 2-AXIS
AUTOPILOT (SYSTEM CONSISTS OF
CONTROLLER EXCHANGED) (WEIGHT
SHOWN IS NET CHANGE)
23-01-S
23-02-S
STATIC DISCHARGE WICKS
BASIC AVIONICS KIT INSTALLATION
- SUPPORT STRAPS INSTALLATION
• AVIONICS COOLING FAN INSTL
• AVIONICS GROUND INSTALLATION
• CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL INSTL
• CABIN SPEAKER
• AUDIO WIRING, FUSELAGE
- MICROPHONE. HANO HELO
BASIC AVIONICS KIT INSTALLATION
• SUPPORT STRAPS INSTALLATION
• AVIONICS COOLING FAN INSTL.
• AVIONICS GROUND INSTALLATION
• CIRCUIT BREAKER PANEL INSTL.
• CABIN SPEAKER
- MICROPHONE, HAND HELD
AUDIO/INTERCOM/MARKER BEACON INSTL.
• KMA 28 AUDIO/INTERCOM/MARKER
BEACON PANEL
- MARKER BEACON ANTENNA Cl-102
- HARDWARE & CABLE ASSY
AUDIO/INTERCOM/MARKER BEACON INSTL
• KMA 26 AUDIO/INTERCOM/MARKER
BEACON PANEL
• MARKER BEACON ANTENNA C l-102
- HARDWARE & CABLE ASSY
NAV/COM INSTALLATION (RQS 23-02-S)
• KX 155A BENDIX/KING NAV/COM WITH
GS
- Cl-128 COM ANTENNA
• OMNI ANTENNA
• Kl 209 INDICATOR HEAD (VOR/ILS)
- HARDWARE AND CABLE ASSEMBLY
NAV/COM WITH VOR/LOC (2ND UNl1)
• KX 155A BENDIX/KING NAV/COM
WITHOUT GS
• Kl 208 COi INDICATOR
• ANTENNA COUPLER
• Cl-128 COM ANTENNA
- WIRING & MISC. HARDWARE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
REF DRAWING
WT
LBS
ARM
3910299
0.0
-
1201140-1
3930412
1270101-5
3940417-1
3940359-1
3930416-1
C59604-0101
3921117
162800-007
3900042-3
1270101 -5
3940417-1
3940359-1
393041· 1
C59604-0101
162800-007
3900042.J
066-0 1176-0101
0.3
7.4·
0.2
1.2
0.1
0.7
1.7
2.1
0.2
4.o·
0.2
1.2
0.1
0.5
1.7
0.3
6.7·
1.5
168.9
33.o·
12.2
10.0
18.0
18.4
40.0
19.0
24.7"
12.2
10.0
18.0
18.4
40.0
19.0
55.9*
17.1
3960200-1
3921146-9
3930013-1
066-011 55-0101
0.5
4.7
3.5·
1.8
200.9
52.8
68.6·
17.1
3960200-1
3960200-1
3900042-3
069-01032-0101
0.5
1.0
8.4*
4.0
200.9
95.0
49. 1°
16.2
3960 11 3 -9
C598504-0201
066-03056-001 1
3921 138-1
3960412
069-01032-0201
0.5
0.8
1.2
1.9
6.2·
3.5
61.2
245.5
16.4
50.3
066-03056-0002
S24 72-1
39601 13
1.0
0.2
0.5
1.0
INS.
23 · COMMUNICATIONS
23-03-S
23-04-S
23-05-S
23-06-S
23-07-S
I
16-24
54.1
22.s·
16.2
16.4
3.5
61.2
36.3
Figure 6-11. Equipment List Description (Sheet 2)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ITEM
No.
23-08-S
23-09-A
23-10-A
SECTION6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
WT
ARM
INS.
EQUIPMENT LIST DESCRIPTION
RE.F DRAWING
NAV/COM INSTALLATION (ROS 23-02.S)
• KX-155A BENDIXIKJNG NAV/COM WIGS
- KJ-209A INDICATOR HEAD (VOR.ILS)
• CABLE ASSEMBLY
• Cl·126A COM ANTENNA
- OMNI ANTENNA AND CABLE INST
NAV/COM #2 INSTALLATION
- KX-155A BENDIX/KING NAV/COM WIGS
• Kl-209 COi INDICATOR
• ANTENNA COUPLER
• Cl-128A COM ANTENNA
• CABLE ASSEMBLY
HEADSET INSTL, (WEIGHT EACH) 6 PLACES
AVAILABLE (USE ACTUAL WEIGHT AND
PASSENGER C.G. WHEN USED)
3900042-3
069-010 32-0101
066-03056-0011
3921138·1
39601 13-9
C598504-0201
3900043-5
069-01032-0101
066-03056-0003
S2474-1
3960113-9
3921141-1
300048-100
8.4·
4.0
1.2
1.9
0.5
0.8
6.s·
4.0
1.2
0.2
0.5
0.9
1.1
49_1•
16.2
16.4
50.3
61.2
245.5
19.7·
16.2
16.4
3.5
61 .2
18.6
MC01 -2A
5.4•
0.0
1ACC2101
X61-0007
X61-0012
9910591-12
9910591
0.2
0.7
0,7
0.1
10.3
5.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
-32.3
-32.3
1250982-1
23.2
-0.5
1218025
27.2
3.0
0514211-3
34.5
40.8
0514211-4
35.0
40.8
0514211 -7
35.2
40.8
0514211-10
35.1
40.8
LBS
-
24 • ELECTRICAL POWER
24-01-R
POWER JUNCTION BOX (PRECISION
AIRMOTIVE CORP.) INCLUDES:
• ALTERNATOR CONTROL UNIT
• MASTER CONTACTOR
• STARTER CONTACTOR
• AMMETER TRANSDUCER
24-02-R ALTERNATOR, 28 VOLT, 60 AMP
24-03-0 AlTERNATOR, 28 VOLT, 95 AMP (NET WT.
CHANGE OVER 24-02-R)
24-04-R BATTERY, 24 VOLT, 12.75 AMP HR (5 HR
RATE)
24-0S-O
BATTERY, 24 VOLT, HEAVY DUTY
25. EQUIPMENT/FURNISHINGS
25-01-R
25-02-0
25-03-0
25-04-0
25-05-0
SEAT, PILOT, ADJUSTABLE WITH
RECLINING BACK & VERTICAL ADJUST.,
CLOTH COVER
SEAT, PILOT.ADJUSTABLE WITH
RECLINING BACK & VERTICAL ADJUST.,
VINYL COVER
SEAT, PILOT. ADJUSTABLE W ITH
RECLINING BACK & VERTICAL ADJUST.,
LEATHER COVER
SEAT. PILOT,ADJUSTABLE WITH
RECLINING BACK & VERTICAL ADJUST,,
LEATHERNINYL COVER
SEAT, PILOT, ADJUSTABLE WITH
RECLINING BACK & VERTICAL ADJUST.,
MILLENNIUM COVER (WHEN AVAILABLE)
0514211-13
Figure 6-11 . Equipment List Description (Sheet 3)
Revision 5
40.8
I
SECTION 6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
IT£M
No.
25-06-S
25-07-0
25-08-0
25-09-0
25-10-0
25-11-S
I
25-12·0
I
25-13-0
I
25-14-0
I
25-15-0
!
25-1 6-S
25-17-0
25-18-0
25-19 -0
25-20-0
25·21·R
25 -22-0
25-23-R
I
16-26
EQUIPMENT UST DESCRIPTION
SEAT, FRONT PASSENGER, ADJUSTABLE
WITH RECLINING BACK & VERTICAL
ADJUST.. CLOTH COVER
SEAT, FRONT PASSENGER. ADJUSTABLE
WITH RECLINING BACK & VERTICAL
ADJUST., VINYL COVER
SEAT, FRONT PASSENGER, ADJUSTABLE
WITH RECLINING BACK & VERTICAL
ADJUST., LEATHER COVER
SEAT, FRONT PASSENGER, ADJUSTABLE
WITH RECLINING BACK & VERTICAL
ADJUST., LEATHERNINYL COVER
SEAT, FRONT PASSENGER, ADJUSTABLE
WIT H RECLINING BACK & VERTICAL
ADJUST., MILLENNIUM COVER (WHEN
AVAILABLE)
SEAT, 3RD & 4TH, ADJUSTABLE FORE &
AFT WITH RECLINING BACK, CLOTH COVER
SEAT, 3RD & 4TH, ADJUSTABLE FORE &
AFT WITH RECLINING BACK, VINYL COVER
SEAT , 3RD & 4TH, ADJUSTABLE FORE &
AFT WITH RECLINING BACK, LEATHER
COVER
SEAT, 3RD & 4TH, ADJUSTABLE FORE &
AFT WIT H RECLINING BACK, LEATHERNINYL
COVER
SEAT, 3RD & 4TH, ADJUSTABLE FORE &
AFT WITH RECLINING BACK, MILLENNIUM
COVER (WHEN AVAILABLE)
SEAT, REAR, BENCH WITH RECLINING
BACK, CLOTH COVER
SEAT, REAR, BENCH WITH RECLINING
BACK, V INYL COVER
SEAT. REAR. BENCH WITH RECLINING
BACK. LEATHER COVER
SEAT, REAR, BENCH WITH RECLINING
BACK, LEATHERNINYLCOVER
SEAT, REAR, BENCH WITH RECLINING
BACK, MILLENNIUM COVER (WHEN
AVAILABLE)
SEAT BELT AND SHOULDER HARNESS,
INERTIA REEL, AUTO ADJUST. PILOT
SEAT BELT AND SHOULDER HARNESS,
INERTIA REEL, MANUAL ADJUST, PILOT
SEAT BELT AND SHOULDER HARNESS,
INERTIA REEL, AUTO ADJUST, FRONT
PASSENGER
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
WT
LBS
ARM
INS.
0514211-3
34.5
40.8
0514211-4
35.0
40.8
0514211 -7
35.2
40.8
0514211-10
35.1
40.8
REF DRAWING
0514211-1 3
40.8
1214189-1
55.8
78.0
1214189-2
56.8
78.0
1214189-3
57.2
78.0
1214189-4
57.2
78.0
121 4189-5
78.0
1214193-1
34.0
106.2
1214193-2
35.3
105.2
1214193-3
35.3
105.2
1214193-4
36.5
105.2
121 4193-5
504516-401
105.2
2.6
66.0
504851-401
2.0
66.0
504516-401
2.6
66.0
Figure 6-11. Equipment List Description (Sheet 4)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ITEM
SECTION6
WEIGHT & BALANCE / EQUIPMENT LIST
EQUIPMENT LIST DESCRIPTION
No.
25·24-0 SEATBELT AND SHOULDER HARNESS.
INERTIA REEL, MANUAL ADJUST, FRONT
PASSENGER.
25·25-S SEAT BELT AND SHOULDER HARNESS,
INERTIA REEL, AUTO ADJUST, 3RD & 4TH
SEAT (EACH)
25-26-0 SEATBELT AND SHOULDER HARNESS,
INERTIA REEL, MANUAL ADJUST, 3RD &
4 TH SEAT (EACH)
25-27 -S SEAT BELT AND SHOULDER HARNESS.
INERT IA REEL. AUTO ADJUST REAR SEAT
(EACH)
25-28-0 SEAT BELT AND SHOULDER HARNESS,
INERTIA REEL, MANUAL ADJUST REAR
SEAT(EACH)
25-29-S SUN VISORS (SET OF 2)
25-30-0 SUN VISORS MILLENIUM (SET OF 2) (WHEN
AVAILABLE)
25-31-S APPROACH PLATE HOLDER
25-32-S BAGGAGE RETAINING NET
25-33-S CARGO TIEDOWN RINGS (10 TIE DOWNS)
(INSTALL.ATED ARM SHOWN)
25-34-S CARPET, WALL TO WALL
25-35-0 UTILITY FLOOR COVERING
25-36-0 UT ILITY COVERED SIDEWALLS (NET CHG)
25-37-R PILOT'S OPERATING CH ECKLIST (STOWED
IN INSTRUMENT PANEL MAP CASE)
25-38-R PILOT'S OPERATING HANDBOOK AND FM
APPROVED AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
(STOWED IN PILOT'S SEAT BACK)
25-39-S FUEL SAMPLING CUP (STOWED IN PILOT'S
SEAT BACK)
25-40-S MOLDED HEADLINER INSTALLATION
25-41-S TOWBAR, NOSE GEAR (STOWED)
25--12-S EMERGENCY LOCATOR TRANSMITTER
INSTL
• ELT TRANSMITTER
- ANTENNA AND CABLE ASSY
• W IRING AND MISC. HARDWARE
LBS
ARM
INS.
504851-401
2.0
66.0
504516-405
5.2
90.0
504851-405
4.0
90.0
504516-403
5.2
110.0
504851-403
4.0
110.0
0514166-1
0519004-3
1.2
33.0
0715083-2
1215036-3
1201123-2
0.1
0.5
2.5
22.0
127.0
1215212-2
1215213-1
1215207-5
1200901
16.8
13.4
-7.0
0.3
67.0
67.0
64.0
0.0
1200901
1.6
49.5
152107-1
0.1
49.5
121521 1
0501019-1
3940428-1
14.9
1.7
3. 1·
64.5
127.0
137.7·
3000-1 1
3001- 12,3002-12
1.9
0.3
0.9
158.8
171.7
78.9
050101 1-7
A352GS
5.3·
4.8
0.5
43.6"
44.0
40.0
REF DRAWING
WT
71.5
26 • FIRE PROTECTION
26-01-S
FIRE EXTINGUISHER INSTALLATION
- FIRE EXTINGUISHER, HAND TYPE
• MOUNTING CLAMP & HARDWARE
Figure 6-11 . Equipment List Description (Sheet 5)
Revision 5
I
SECTION 6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
ITEM
No.
EQUIPMENT LIST DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ARM
REF DRAWING
WT
LBS
INS.
1260004-14
0760149-10
0760149•7
6.9*
2.6
4.3
15.6·
31.7
5.9
050182- 1
2.9
8.0
0,7
13.0
17.5
13.1
5.1
-43.0
0,7
28.0
0.3
0.1
0.3
17.5
49.0
17.5
0.1
0.5
0.3
0.5
49.0
9.0
19.0
36.0
Z7 • FLIGHT CONTROLS
27-01-S
27-02-0
DUAL CONTROLS INSTL, RIGHT SEAT
• CONTROL WHEEL. COPILOT
• RUDDER & BRAKE PEDAL INSTL,
COPILOT
RUDDER PEDAL EXTENSION INSTL. SET OF
2 (INSTALLED ARM SHOWN)
28 • FUEL
28-01-R
28-02-R
FUEL QUANTITY INDICATORS, LEFT & RIGHT S3317-3
FUEL PUMP, AUXILIARY, ELECTRIC
A-10056-8
30-01-A
ELECTRIC HEATED BOOTS, PROPELLER
1201991-2
(ANTI-ICE) (REQUIRES 24-03-0 AND 24-05-0)
HEATING SYSTEM, STALL SENSOR & PITOT 1220804-5
HEAT (NET CHANGE)
30 • ICE & RAIN PROTECTION
30-02-S
31 • INDICATING/RECORDING SYSTEM
31-02-S
INDICATOR CLOCK & OAT INDICATOR
OAT PROBE
INDICATOR CLOCK & OAT INDICATOR
31-03-S
31-04-R
31 -05-R
OAT PROBE
HOURMETER, .,HOBBS TIME"
ANNUNCIATOR PANEL
STALL WARNING INDICATOR
31.01-S
IAT43200
CNP100-001
M803B-20/28VB
C307PRF·11
C664503·0103
CSEWCA-01
0718007-1
32 • LANDING GEAR
32·01-R
WHEEL BRAKE AND TIRE, 6.00 X 6 MAIN (2)
• WHEEL ASSY, CLEVELAND 40-758 (EA)
• BRAKE ASSY, CLEVELAND 30-52 (LH)
• BRAKE ASSY, CLEVELAND 30-52 (RH)
• TIRE, 6-PLY (EACH)
• TUBE (EACH)
32-02-0 WHEEL BRAKE & TIRE 8.00 X 6 MAIN (2)
• WHEEL ASSY, CLEVELAND 40-750 (EA)
• BRAKE ASSY. CLEVELAND 30-52N (LH)
- BRAKE ASSY, CLEVELAND 30-52N (RH)
• TIRE, 6-PLY (EACH)
• l\JBE (EACH)
32-03-R WHEEL AND T IRE ASSY, 5.00 X 5 NOSE
• WHEEL ASSY, CLEVELAND 40-77
- TIRE, 6-PLY
• TUBE
32-04-0 WHEEL AND TIRE ASSY, 6.00 X 6 NOSE
• WHEEL ASSY. CLEVELAND 40-77
• TIRE, 4-PLY
I
1241118-5, ~
C163001-0301
C 163030-0303
C163030-0304
C262003-0204
C262023-0102
0540000-6
040-07518-1
C163030-0313
C163030-0314
C262003-0207
C262023-0104
0540000·2
1241156-12
C262003-0202
C262023-0101
0540000-4
1241156-43
C262003-0101
39_5•
7.8
2.8
2.8
7.9
1.3
48.4*
7.8
2.9
2.9
11.6
1.9
a.a·
2.8
4.6
1.4
13.6'
3.9
7.9
61.4·
62.1
57.8
57.8
62.1
62.1
s1 .5·
62.1
57.8
57.8
62. 1
62.1
-1.1·
-7.7
-7.7
-7.7
-8.1'
-8.1
-8.1
Figure 6-11 . Equipment List Description (Sheet 6)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ITEM
EQUIPMENT UST DESCRIPTION
No.
32-05-A
32-06-A
32-07-0
32-08-S
SECTIONS
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
- TUBE
• NOSE GEAR STRUT INSTL OVERSIZE
WHEEL (NET CHANGE)
WHEEL FAIRING INSTALLATION - STANDARD
TIRES
- WHEEL FAIRING, MAIN (EACH)
- BRAKE FAIRING. MAIN (EACH)
- WHEEL FAIRING . NOSE
• MOUNTING PLATE, LH & RH
WHEEL FAIRING INSTALLATION - OVERSIZE
T IRES
• WHEEL FAIRING, MAIN (EACH)
• BRAKE FAIRING. MAIN (EACH)
- WHEEL FAIRING, NOSE
- MOUNTING PLATE, LH & RH
PREMIUM TIRES. 6.00 X 6 EXCHANGE WITH
STANDARD TIRES (NET Wf CHANGE)
HUB CAPS, WHEEL
REF DRAWING
C262023-0102
1243615-16
WT
LBS
ARM
INS.
1.3
0.5
-8.1
-7.4
1241 116-1
19.4*
44.s•
0541223-24, -25
1241 113-1, -2
0543079-7
1241114-1,-2
1241231-4
5.6
0.6
3.8
0.9
25.3·
62.0
61 .4
-5.2
61.6
51.6"
1241229-1, -2
1241232-1, -2
1243045-12
1241661-1 , -2
0501166-1
8.0
0.8
4.7
0.9
4.1
62.0
61.4
61.6
46.4
0741046-8
0.1
62.1
0760149-9
1201054-5
1221201-3, -4
0701042-5
0501027-8
1221059-7, -8
0.2
0.7
0.0
0.8
3.2
2.2
22.5
61.9
0.0
256.1
47.0
33.0
S3325-7
1201121-3
S3350-1
0.8
0.2
0.9
17.0
15.4
16.5
S3372-1
0.9
16.5
0.8
0.5
6.7"
2.8
2.1
1.9
19.5"
15.0
21 .1
152'
15.8
15.9
8.7
45.7'
2.1
0.6
1.1
15.9
16.9
11.9
4.8
14.9
-5 .6
33. LIGHTS
33-01..S
33-02-S
33-03-S
33·04-S
33-05-S
33-06-S
MAP LIGHT IN CONTROL WHEEL
COURTESY LIGHTS UNDER WING
NAVIGATION LIGHT DETECTORS
FLASHING BEACON ON VERTICAL FIN TIP
STROBE LIGHT INSTL. ON WING T IPS
LANDING AND TAXI LIGHT INSTL.
34 · NAVIGATION
34-01-R
34-02-S
34-03-R
INDICATOR, TRUE AIRSPEED
ALTERNATE STATIC AIR SOURCE
ALTIMETER, 35,000 FT., SENSITIVE WITH 20
FT. MARKINGS, INCHES OF MERCURY
34-04-0 ALTIMETER. 35,000 FT., SENSITIVE WITH 20
FT. MARKINGS, MILLIBARS
34-05-S BLIND ALTITUDE ENCODER INSTALLATION
34-06-R COMPASS INSTL., MAGNETIC
34-07..S GYRO, INSTALLATION (REQUIRES 37-01-S)
• DIRECTIONAL GYRO
- ALTlTUDE GYRO
• HOSES AND MISC, HARDWARE
34-08-0 GYRO. INSTALLATION WITH HSI (REQUIRES
37-01-S)
- ATTITUDE INDICATOR
- AMMETERNACUUM GAUGE
• HOSES AND MISC. HARDWARE FOR
GYROS
- HSI & NAV INOICATOR
3940413-3.-5
121367~
1201990-1
S3330-2
S3326-1
1201990-2
1201997-2
Figure 6-11. Equipment List Description (Sheet 7)
Revision 5
I
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
ITEM
No.
34-09-0
34-10-S
34-11-S
34-12-A
34-13-S
34-14-0
34-15-A
34-16-S
34-17-A
34-18-A
I
16-30
EQUIPMENT UST DESCRIPTION
• HSI SIAVING AMPLIFIER
• HSVNAV CONVERTER
• HSI FLUX DETECTOR (LH WING)
• WIRING & HARDWARE FOR HSI
HSI INSTALLATION (RQS 37-0 1-S)
• STANDARD GYROS REMOVED
• NAV INDICATOR REMOVED
• GYRO SYSTEM FOR HSI
• HSI & NAV INDICATOR
• HSI SLAVING AMPLIFIER
• HSI FLUX DETECTOR (LH WING)
I/I/IRE & HARDWARE FOR HSI
TURN COORDINATOR INDICATOR
VERTICAL SPEED INDICATOR
ADF INSTALLATION
• KR-87 RECEIVER
• Kl 227 INDICATOR
• KA-448 ACF ANTENNA
• ADF CABLE ASSEMBLY
GPS KLN 89 INSTALLATION
• KLN 89 OPS RECEIVER
• KA -92 GPS ANTENNA
• GPS CABLE ASSEMBLY & HARDWARE
GPS KLN 898 INSTALLATION
- KLN 898 GPS RECENER (EXCHANGE
FORKLN 89)
- M0-41 GPS CONTROL PANEL
• KA·92 GPS ANTENNA
• GPS CABLE ASSEMBLY
OPS INSTALLATION
• KLN 94 OPS RECEJVER
• KA-92 GPS ANTENNA
• GPS CABLE ASSEMBLY & HARDWARE
MODE C TRANSPONDER INSTALLATION
• KT 76C TRANSPONDER
• TRANSPONDER ANTENNA
- HARDWARE ANO CABLE ASSEMBLY
MULTf..FUNCTION DISPLAY INSTALLATION
• KMD540MFD
• CABLE ASSY AND MOUNT HARDWARE
STORMSCOPE INSTALLATION
- WX 500 STORMSCOPE PROCESSOR
• MOUNTING TRAY AND HARDWARE
REFDRAWlNG
3900044-S
1201997-2
3940425-1
3940437· 1
1394T100-10RA
~3327-1
i:3900043~
066-01072-0014
1066--03063-0000
p11-01234-oooo
~922105-1
i:3930412-1
1066--01148·1111
3960198-1
3930412·1
S3100-104
MD41-228
3960198·1
3928103-1
3900043-S
066-01034.0101
i:39601 98-1
3930042-3
066-01156.()101
3960199· 1
3923112-1
3900043-5
066-04035-0101
3927100-1
3900044·9
805-11500-001
805-11590-001
WT
LBS
0.7
2.0
0.6
7.6
11.7
-13.7
- 1.2
11.1
3.4
0.7
0.6
5.8
1.2
0.8
9.4·
3.2
0.7
4.2
1.3
4.6·
3.3
0.3
1.0
4.6·
3.3
0.2
0.3
1.0
s.o·
3.7
0.3
1.0
3.s ·
2.4
0.2
1.0
s .1·
5.1
1.0
5.7·
1.9
0.7
ARM
INS.
1-48.4
159.4
44.1
41 .2
91 .4
5.5
16.4
4.7
14.9
148.4
44.1
43.9
16.8
16.5
89.2·
14.9
17.9
170.5
51 .1
16.r
14.9
39.0
16.6
16.7"
14.9
18.0
39.0
16.6
11.r
14.8
39.0
21 .8
28.s·
14.3
133.2
41 .6
13.1·
13.1
13.1
130.1*
158.0
158.0
Figure 6-11. Equipment List Description (Sheet 8)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ITEM
No.
SECTIONS
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
EQUIPMENT LIST DESCRIPTION
REF DRAWING
WT
ARM
LBS
INS.
5.7
31 _4•
23.2
79.7
163 7•
171.1
35 - 0XYGEN
35-01-S
35--02-S
35-03-S
3544-S
OXYGEN PARTIAL INSTALLATION
OXYGEN BOTTl.E INSTALLATION
• OXYGEN CYLINDER AND VALVE ·
EMPTY
OXYGEN MASKS
• PILOT
• COPILOT AND PASSENGERS
OXYGEN, 76 CU. FT., (1800 PSI) @ 0.0832
LB.ICU. FT.
1200416-41
120041~
C166001-0701
1.4
67.2
6.3
1711
-4.2"
1H5-25
S3280-1
7.1·
1.9
1.9
0.3
0.5
0.5
0.6
1201168-1
1201020-1
10004-98
0500041-3
1200&41-51
0712643-1
2.1
1.0
0.2
2.2
35.0
0.5
13.6
88.0
33.7
206.0
51.0
231 .0
1211670-19
1200197-1
22.2
1.0
90.4
67.3
1201008
2.1
69.9
12010019-1
3.6·
2s.s·
1201142-2
1242001-2
1210651-26
1210059-1
1.4
1.3
0.8
84.9
54.1
24.4
0.0
91 .2
1210080-21
68-1
76.0
0700164-5
-
-
1201107-35
9.5
77.0
C 166005-0SOS
C 166005-0207
37-VACUUM
37-01-S
OUAL VACUUM SYSTEM, ENGINE DRIVEN
• VACUUM PUMP, AIRBORNE 211cc
• VACUUM PUMP, AIRBORNE 212CW
• COOLING SHROUD, AIRBORNE 2COH
• VACUUM RELIEF VALVE
- MANIFOLD
- VACUUM GAUGE/AMMETER
1201990-1
E21 1CC
E212CW
2CDH-A
2H3-48
-1 1.2
-11.2
-1 1.2
4.5
3.0
16.9
53 • FUSELAGE
53-01-S
53--02-S
53-03-0
53--04-A
5~-A
53-06-A
53--07-S
53--08-A
53-09-A
53--09-A
53-11-A
53-12-A
53-13-A
53-14-A
REFUELING STEPS AND HANDLE INSTL
STEPS. CABIN ENTRANCE, FIXED
JACK PAO INSTALLATION UNDER WING
STABILIZER, ABRASION BOOTS
CARGO PACK, EXTERNAL BELLY MOUNTED
TOW HOOK INSTALLTION (INSTALLED ARM
SHOWN)
DOORS, FORWARD AND AFT CARGO
SPOILER (REQUIRES REMOVAL OF 53-o7-S)
(INSTALLED ARMS~)
SKY DIVING KIT. INCLUDES 53-o9-A
AVAILABLE THRU CESSNA SPARES
HEAVY DUTY FUSELAGE OPTION
INSTALLATION (FLOATPLANE PROVISIONS)
- HOISTING RINGS
• U-BRACE ASSEMBLY
• HEAVY DUTY FUSELAGE STRUCTURE
MORTUARY KIT AVAILABLE THRU CESSNA
SPARES
AMBULANCE KIT (WITH OXYGEN BOTTLE)
AVAILABLE THRU CESSNA SPARES
STRETCHER (BOXED) USE ACTUAL WT. &
ARM
PHOTOGRAPHIC PROVISIONS INSTL. .
Figure 6-11. Equipment List Description (Sheet 9)
Revision 5
I
6-311
SECTION6
WEIGHT & BALANCE I EQUIPMENT LIST
ITEM
No,
EQUIPMENT UST DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
REF DRAWI NG
WT
LBS
ARM
071 1050-48
2.3
48.0
0711050-47
2.3
48.0
INS.
56-WINDOWS
56-01-S
56-02-S
WINDOW, HINGED RIGHT SIDE (NET
CHANGE)
W INDOW, HINGED LEFT DOOR (NET
CHANGE)
61 • PROPELLER
61-01 -R
61-02-R
61-03-0
61 -04-R
PROPELLER ASSY, 3-BLADE, Oil FILLED
HUB ANO SWEPT TIPS
SPINNER INSTALLATION 3-SLAOE PROP
POLISHED SPINNER • MILLENNIUM INSTL.
(WiEN AVAILABLE) (NET CHANGE)
GOVERNOR, PROPELLER
P4327345-02
76.0
-44.0
1250987-2
1251019 -1
3.5
0.0
-44.S
-44.5
C161031-120
3.0
-33.S
P197266
0.8
-27.0
1250983
71 • POWERPLANT
71 -01-R
Fi l TER, INDUCTION AIR
72 -ENGINES
72-01-R
72-02-0
ENGINE, LYCOMING TIO-540-AJ1A9734
(INCLUDES TURBO & EXHAUST SYSTEM)
MILLENNIUM ENGINE, LYCOMING TIO-540AJ 1A9921 (WiEN AVAILABLE) (EXCHANGE
W ITH 72-01-R, NET CHANGE)
509.0
-17.5
1251021-1
0.0
-17.5
S3374-1
S3318-2
3930412-1
S3317-3
0.7
0.6
0.3
0.6
17.5
17.5
18.2
17.5
S3329-7
S3318-4
1.0
0.6
17.5
17.5
1250992
1250998-1
2254030-1
2254030-2
3.5·
..s.o·
0.2
10.9
6.6
-9.0
-14 .6
-10.4
1256026-1
5.5
-18.0
S3279-1
0.8
18.8
73 • ENGINE FUEL & CONTROL
73-01-R
73-03-S
73-04-R
FUEL FLOW/MANIFOLD PRESSURE
T.I.T ./CYLINOER HEAD TEMP INDICATOR
ANNUNCIATOR PANEL
FUEL QUANTITY INDICATOR, LEFT & RIGHT
77-01-R
77-02-S
TACHOMETER INSTALLATION, RECORDING
TURBINE INLET TEMP/CHT INDICATOR
78-01-R
78-02-R
EXHAUST OVERBOARD STACK
EXHAUST STACK RETAINING CABLE ASSY
• LH EXHAUST SYSTEM
- RH EXHAUST SYSTEM
73-02-R
77 • ENGINE INDICATING
78-EXHAUST
79-OIL
79-01-R
79-02-R
I
ls.32
OIL COOLER INSTALLATION, STEWART
WARNER 10865B
O IL PRESSURE & TEMPERATURE
INDICAT ORS
Figure 6-11. Equipment List Description (Sheet 10)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ITEM
No.
SECTION6
WEIGHT & BALANCE / EQUIPMENT LIST
EQUIPMENT UST DESCRIPTION
ARM
REF DRAWING
WT
LBS
INS.
1212600-7
1231065
1231034
0.5
-0.4
5.0
270.0
230.0
263.S
1242013
1213624
1242013
1260644
1233000
1242004
0.1
0.6
1.2
3. 1
4.5
1.3
229.6
-4.9
2.0
-9.0
213.9
-4.3
0.3
0.0
90 • MISCELLANEOUS
90-01-A
90-02-A
90-03-A
FLOAT INSTALLATION INFORMATION
(CESSNA PROVIDES 53-1 0·A ONLY). THE
FOLLOWING IS PROVIDED FOR YOUR
CONVENIENCE AND FOR REFERENCE USE
ONLY
• STINGER, FLOATPLANE NET CHANGE
• VERTICAL FIN NET DECREASE
- RUDDER & FLASHING BEACON (NET
CHANGE)
- TAIL DUAL TlEDOWN RINGS
- COWL FLAP, EXTENDED LENGTH
• EXHAUST PIPE EXTENSIONS
• STEERING BUNGEE, FLOATPLANE
• VERTICAL FIN
• WATER RUDDER BELLCRANKS (EACH)
- NOSE GEAR COVER PLATE
LANDING GEAR DELETION (APPROX.)
- NOSE GEAR, FORK & T IRE ASSY
- MAIN GEAR SPRING & WHEEL
ASSEMBLY (PER SIDE)
MILLINNEIUM EQUIPMENT OPTION
• 25-30-0 SUNVISOR INSTL.
- MILLENNIUM EXTERIOR STYLING (NET
CHANGE)
- MILLENNIUM UPHOLSTERY OPTION
25-XX-O LEATHERNINYL SEATS
• SIDEWALL UPHOLSTERY INSERTS
• MILLENNIUM FLOOR MATS
• JEPP STORAGE CONSOLE INSTL.
- POLISHED SPINNER INSTL. (61-03-0)
(NET CHANGE)
• ENGINE INSTALLATION (72-02-0)
• POLISHED FASTENER INSTL.
• MILLENNIUM CONTROL WHEEL PAD
1242012
1260100-4
1201300·3, -4
0519004-3
1204055-3. -4
149.s· 53_5•
43-2 -4.5
53-2 62.7
0.0
90.8
0.0
-44.5
0.0
-17.5
1219004-1
1219007-1
1219004-1
1219004-2
1251019-1
1251021-1
1252628-1
1219012-1
0.0
98 -AVIONICS PACKAGE OPTIONS
98-01-S
STANDARD AVIONICS PACKAGE
• 23-02-S BASIC AVIONICS (REQUIRED
WITH FIRST NAV/COM)
• 23-07-S NAV/COM WITH ILS FIRST
UNIT
• 23-04-S AUDIO PANEL/MARKER
BEACON
• 22-01-S SINGLE AXIS A UTOPILOT
- 23-05-S NAV/COM VOR/l.OC 2ND UNIT
- 25-22-R ELT INSTL.
3900013-1, -2
3900013
3900013
46.7·
7.4
42.4•
33.0
8.6
44.8
3.5
68.5
8.0
36.7
22.9
135.9
6.2
3.2
Figure 6-11 . Equipment List Description (Sheet 11)
Revision 5
SECTION 6
WEIGHT & BALANCE/ EQUIPMENT LIST
ITEM
No.
EQUIPMENT LIST DESCRIPTION
- 34-10-S GPS KLN 89 INSTL
• 34-12-S MODE "C" TRANSPONDER
98-02-S STANDARD AVIONICS PACKAGE
• 22-01-S DUAL AXIS AUTOPILOT
• 2~2 BASIC AVIONICS INSTAUATION
- AUDIO PNUMKR BEACON
- NAV/COM WIGS
• ELT
• MODE "C., TRANSPONDER
98-03-A AVIONICS NAV 1 PACKAGE (NET CHANGE
OVER THE STANDARD AVIONICS PKG)
• 22-02-0 TWO AXIS AUTOPILOT
• 34-12-A ADF INSTALLATION
- 22-01 -S SINGLE AXIS AUTOPILOT
REMOVAL
98-04-A AVIONICS NAV 1 PACKAGE (NET
CHANGE OVER THE STANDARD AVIONICS
PKG)
• 23-05-A NAV/COM #2 INSTALLATION
• 34· 14-A GPS INSTALLATION
• 34-17-A MFD INSTALLATION
98-05-A AVIONICS NAV 1 PACKAGE (NET
CHANGE OVER THE STANDARD AVIONICS
PKG)
• 2~8-A NAV/COM #2 INSTALLATION
• 34-14-A GPS INSTALLATION
• 34-12-A ADF INSTALLATION
• KMH..SS0 MHAS PROVISIONS & HWARE
• KRD-510 FIS PROVISIONS
98-06-A NAV 1 PACKAGE WITH HSI (REPLACING
STANDARD DIRECTIONAL GYRO & NAV
INDICATOR)
• 34-09-0 HSI SYSTEM ADDEO
• 34-06-S STANDARD GYROS REMOVED
• 23-04-S NAV IL$ INDICATOR REMOVED
- 98-03-A NAV 1 PACKAGE ADDED
98-07-A NAV I PACKAGE WITH ADF
- 98-04-A NAV I AVIONICS
• 34-12-A ADF INSTALLAT ION
98-08-A NAV II AVIONICS PACKAGE
- 98·04-A NAV I AVIONICS
- 34-09-0 HSI INSTALLATION
• 34-18-A STORMSCOPE INSTALLATION
98-09-A NAV II AVIONICS PACKAGE WITH ADF
• 98-04-A NAV II AVIONICS
- 34-12-A ADF INSTALLATION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
REF DRAWING
3900013
3900013
3900042-3
WT
LBS
4.6
3.3
46.3'
20.5
4.0
6.7
8.4
3.1
3 .6
ARM
INS.
16.7
28.6
762'
103.0
24.7
55.9
49.1
137.7
28.3
149.3'
3900020
18.4'
3900020
17.0
9.4
-8.0
82.7
3900043-5
26.2'
39.7'
3900043-5
6.8
5.0
6.1
26.2'
19.7
17.7
15.1
39.7'
6.8
5.0
6.1
8.1
0.1
30.0 '
19.7
17.7
15. 1
89.9
15.0
117.2'
19.5
.$',.7
-1.2
18.4
35.6
26.2
45.7
152
16.4
149.3
52.8
3927106
3900043-6
3900044-9
3900044-10
9.4
44.4
26.2
11.7
6.5
53.8
44.4
9.4
133.1
36.7
39.7
89.2
65.3
39.7
91.4
121.5
69.
6S.3
89.2
Figure 6-11 . Equipment List Description (Sheet 12)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Introduction .. ...... . . . ... .. ............... . .... . .
Airframe .. .. . . ......... . ..... .. .. . .. . . . ...... . . .
Flight Controls . ..... . ...... ... . .... , .. . ...... . .. . .
Trim Systems . . . . ...... . .................. .. .. .
Instrument Panel . . . . . . . . . . • . . ... .. . . ........ . . .. ..
Pilot Panel Layout .... . . ... . ........ ... .. . .. .. . . ,
Center Panel Layout . .. ...... . .... .. .. .. . .. . .. . .
Copilot Panel Layout . ...... . ... . ... ............ .
Center Pedestal Layout . , ..... . ...... . .. , . ... . . . .
Ground Control .. , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , ..... ........ . .
Wing Flap System . . . . . . . . . . . .. ..... . . . .......... .
Landing Gear System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... . .. . ... .
Baggage Compartment . ... ... . ... . ... . . .. ..... . .. .
Seats ... . ............ . .... . . ................. .
Integrated Seat Belt/Shoulder Harness ... . . . .......... .
Entrance Doors And Cabin Windows .. . . . . ... ... ..... •
Control Locks . . . . .. ...... . . . .. .. . . .. ....... .. .. . .
Engine .. . .. . . .. . .... . . • .. .. . . . ... ... .... .. • . ..
Engine Controls . . ............... . ..... ... . . .. .
Engine Instruments . . .... . . ... ...... . .......... .
New Engine Break-In And Operation . . .. . ... . .. . . .. .
Engine Lubrication System . ...• . . ..... ...• . . .. . ..
Ignition And Starter System ...... . ... ... .... .. ... .
Air Induction System . ... ...... ........ .. . .. . ... .
Exhaust System ...... . .. . .. . .. .. ......... . . . . .
Fuel Injection System . .. .... ..... ....... . .... . . .
May 30/01
7-5
7-5
7-6
7-9
7-9
7-9
7-12
7-12
7-12
7-13
7-14
7-15
7-15
7-15
7-16
7-18
7-221
7-22
~:;~2
7-2
7-2
7-26
7-271
7-27
7-27
7-1
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
Cooling System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Turbocharging System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Propeller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Indicating System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Auxiliary Fuel Pump Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Return System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Venting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Selector Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . • • . . . . . . . •
Fuel Drain Valves . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Brake System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electrical System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Annunciator Panel . . . . . . . • . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Master Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Avionics Master Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ammeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . .
Low Voltage Annunciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Circuit Breakers And Fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • •
Ground Service Plug Receptacle . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . .
Lighting Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • .
Exterior Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interior Lighting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cabin Heating, Ventilating And Defrosting System . . . . . . . .
Oxygen System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pitot-Static System And Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Airspeed Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-2
Page
7-28
7-29
7-35
7-36
7-37
7-38
7-41
7-42
7-42
7-42
7-44
7-44
7 -45
7-45
7 -46
7-51
7-52
7-52
7-53
7-53
7-55
7-55
7-56
7-58
7 -60
7-65
7-66
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
TABLE OF CONTENTS {Continued)
Page
Vertical Speed Indicator .. . . .... . .. . ... . . . . . . . . . .
Altimeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . ... .
Vacuum System And Instruments ... . . . .. . . • . . . .... . .
Attitude Indicator . . . . . .. . . .. .. . .. . . . .. ....... . . .
Directional Indicator . . . . . • ..... . ...... .... . . ... .
Vacuum Gauge . . . .. . .. . . .. . .. . . .. .. . .. . . . . ... .
Low Vacuum Annunciation . . . . ... . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. .
Clock/OAT. Indicator . .. .. ... . ... ... . . ..... .. ... . .
Stall Warning System . .. . .. .. . .. . . . . .. . .. . .. . . .. . .
Standard Avionics . . ... . . . . .. .. .. .. .. . . .. .... . .. . .
Avionics Support Equipment . ... ... ..... .. . .. ... . . . •
Avionics Cooling Fan . . . ... .. . . .. .. . . .... . ... . ••
-..
'---'
Microphone And Headset Installations
. . . ... . . . . ... . .
Static Dischargers . ... . .. ... .... . . . .. • . .. ... ....
Cabin Features .. . .. .. . ... . . . . .. . . . . . . .. .. ..... . .
Emergency Locator Transmitter .. ... . . . .. .. .. .. . . . .
Cabin Fire Extinguisher ... .... . . . ..... ... . . .. . . . .
Revision 5
7-3/7-4
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
__,
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
INTRODUCTION
This section provides description and operation of the airplane
and its systems. Some equipment described herein is optional and
may not be installed in the airplane. Refer to the Supplements,
section 9 for details of other optional systems and equipment.
I
AIRFRAME
I
The airplane is an all metal, six-place, high wing, single engine
airplane equipped with tricycle landing gear and is designed for
general utility purposes.
..___,
The construction of the fuselage is of conventional aluminum
bulkhead, stringer and skin design commonly known as "semimoncoque". Major components of the structure include the front
and rear carry-thru spars (to which the wings attach): these form the
top element of the forward and aft doorpost bulkhead assemblies.
The lower member of the forward doorpost bulkhead assembly is
below the cabin floor and provides the fuselage attachment for the
wing struts. The lower member of the aft doorpost bulkhead
assembly is also below the floor and serves as the forward web of
the landing gear carry-thru structure. The main landing gear
attaches to the fuselage on each side at an inner and outer forged
bulkhead that attaches at the front to the lower member of the aft
doorpost bulkhead and at the rear to another transverse bulkhead
below the floorboard. The engine mount structure is supported by a
keel beam assembly that also supports the lower cowling, passes
aft through the firewall into the cabin below the floorboard and
attaches to the lower member of the forward doorpost bulkhead
assembly. The keel beam assembly also provides the attachments
for the nose landing gear.
The externally braced wings, containing Integral fuel tanks, are
constructed of a front and rear spar with formed sheet metal ribs,
doublers, and stringers. The entire structure is covered with
aluminum skin. The front spars are equipped with wing-to-fuselage
and wing-to-strut attach fittings. The aft spars are equipped with
wing-to-fuselage attach fittings, and are partial span spars.
May 30/01
7-5
SECTION7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Frise-type ailerons and single-slot type flaps are attached to the
trailing edge of the wings. The ailerons are constructed of a forward
spar, formed sheet metal ribs, a 'V" type corrugated aluminum skin
joined together at the trailing edge, and a formed leading edge containing balance weights. The flaps are constructed basically the
same as the ailerons, with the exception of the balance weights, aft
spars and the addition of a trailing edge stiffener.
The empennage (tail assembly) consists of a conventional
vertical stabilizer, rudder, horizontal stabilizer, and elevator. The
vertical stabilizer consists of forward and aft spar, formed sheet
metal ribs and reinforcements, four skin panels, formed leading
edge skins and a dorsal fin.
The rudder is constructed of a forward and aft spar, formed sheet
metal ribs and reinforcements, and a wrap-around skin panel. The
top of the rudder incorporates a leading edge extension which
contains a balance weight.
The horizontal stabilizer is constructed of a forward and aft spar,
ribs and stiffeners, center upper and lower skin panels, and two left
and two right wrap-around skin panels which also form the leading
edges. The horizontal stabilizer also contains the elevator trim tab
actuator.
Construction of the elevator consists of a forward and aft spar,
ribs, torque tube and bellcrank, left upper and lower skin panels,
and right inboard and outboard formed trailing edges. The elevator
trim tab consists of a bracket assembly, hinge half and a wraparound skin panel. Both elevator tip leading edge extensions
incorporate balance weights.
FLIGHT CONTROLS
The airplane's flight control system (Refer to Figure 7-1) consists
of conventional aileron, elevator and rudder control surfaces. The
control surfaces are manually operated through mechanical linkage
using a control wheel for the ailerons and elevator, and
rudder/brake pedals for the rudder. The elevator control system is
equipped with downsprings which provide improved stability in
flight.
7-6
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
AILERON CONTROL SYSTEM
RUDDER AND RUDDER TRIM
CONTROL SYSTEMS
1285X1008
1285X1009
Figure 7-1. Flight Control and Trim Systems (Sheet 1 of 2)
Nov 9 /98
7-7
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ELEVATOR CONTROL SYSTEM
ELEVATOR TRIM
CONTROL SYSTEM
12"8SX1006
128$X100T
Figure 7- 1. Flight Control and Trim Systems (Sheet 2 of 2)
7-8
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
TRIM SYSTEMS
A manually-operated rudder and elevator trim is provided (refer to
Figure 7-1). Rudder trimming is accomplished through a bungee
unit connected to the rudder control system and a trim control wheel
mounted on the control pedestal. Rudder trimming is accomplished
by rotating the horizontally mounted trim control wheel either left or
right to the desired trim position. Rotating the trim wheel to the right,
will trim nose-right; conversely, rotating it to the left will trim noseleft. Elevator trimming is accomplished through the elevator trim tab
by utilizing the vertically mounted trim control wheel. Forward
rotation of the trim wheel will trim nose-down, conversely, aft
rotation will trim nose-up.
INSTRUMENT PANEL
The instrument panel (Refer to Figure 7-2) Is of all-metal
construction, and is designed in segments to allow related groups of
instruments, switches and controls to be removed without removing
the entire panel. For specific details concerning the instruments,
switches, circuit breakers. and controls on the instrument panel,
refer to related topics in this section.
PILOT PANEL LAYOUT
Flight instruments are contained In a single panel located in front
of the pilot. These instruments are designed around the basic "T'
configuration. The gyros are located immediately in front of the pilot,
and arranged vertically over the control column. The airspeed
indicator and altimeter are located to the left and right of the gyros,
respectively. The remainder of the flight instruments are clustered
around the basic "T".
Below the flight instruments is a sub panel which contains the
engine tachometer and the manifold pressure/fuel flow gauge.
Various navigational instruments are located to the right. To the left
of the flight instruments is a sub panel which contains a left/rigl
fuel quantity indicator unit, an oil temperature/oil pressure indicator
a vacuum gauge/ammeter, a T.I.T./CHT indicator, a clock/OA
indicator and the avionics circuit breaker panel.
May 30/01
7-9
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
1218T1012
Figure 7-2. Instrument Panel (Sheet 1 of 2)
7-10
Jan 18/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
-
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
Oil Temperature and Oil
Pressure Indicator
26. Cabin Heat Control
2.
Fuel Quantity Indicators
27. Cabin Air Control
3.
Vacuum Gauge/Ammeter
1.
4.
Digital Clock/O.A.T. Indicator
28. Flap Switch lever and Flap
Position Indicator
29. Mixture Control
5.
T.I.T. and CHT Indicator
30. Propeller Control
6.
7.
Turn Coord inator
Airspeed Indicator
31. Throttle Control
32. Alternate Static Air Control
8.
Heading Indicator
33. Glareshleld and Pedestal
Dimming Control
9.
Attitude Indicator
34. Radio and Panel Dimming
Control
10. Tachometer
11. Vertical Speed Indicator
12. Altimeter
35. Avionics Master Switch
36. Manifold Pressure/Fuel Flow
Indicator
37. Circuit Breakers and
Switch/Breakers
13. Nav #1 /Nav #2 Course
Deviation and Glide Slope
Indicators
33. Auxiliary Fuel Pump Switch
14. Audio Control Panel
40. Ignition Switch
15. Annunciator Panel
41. RudderTrim
16. GPS Receiver
42. Cowl Flap Control Lever
17. Nav/Com Radio #1
43. Elevator Trim Control
18. Nav/Com Radio #2
44. Fuel Selector
19. Transponder
45. Optional Prop De-ice
Annunciator
20. ElT Remote
Switch/ Annunciator
46. NAV/GPS Selector
21.
47. Autopilot Computer
HourMeter
22. Avionics Circuit Breaker Panel
39. Master Switch
48. Optional Prop De-Ice Switch
23. Glove Box
49. Hand Mic.
24. Cabin Defrost
50. 12-Volt Power Port
25. Auxiliary Cabin Air Control
51. Parking Brake
Figure 7-2. Instrument Panel (Sheet 2 of 2)
Jan 18/02
-7-11
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Below the flight and engine instruments are the circuit breakers
and switches for most of the airplane systems and equipment. The
master switch, avionics master switch, ignition switch, and lighting
controls are located in this area of the panel. The parking brake
control is mounted below the switch and circuit breaker panel.
l
CENTER PANEL LAYOUT
The center panel contains various avionics equipment arranged
in a vertical rack. This arrangement allows each component to be
removed without having to access the backside of the panel. Below
the panel are the throttle, propeller, mixture and alternate static air
controls.
A multi-function annunciator is located above the radio stack and
provides caution and warning messages for low fuel quantity, low oil
pressure, low vacuum, low voltage and autopilot pitch trim
situations.
COPILOT PANEL LAYOUT
The copilot panel
equipment, avionics
indicators and other
the glove box, cabin
flap lever.
contains the hour meter, ELT switch, avionics
circuit breakers and room for expansion of
avionics equipment. Below this sub panel are
heat, defroster and cabin air controls, and wing
CENTER PEDESTAL LAYOUT
The center pedestal, located below the center panel, contains the
elevator and rudder trim control wheels and position indicators, and
provides a bracket for the microphone. The fuel selector valve
handle is located at the base of the pedestal.
7-12
Jan 18/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
'-'
SECTION7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
GROUND CONTROL
Effective ground control while taxiing is accomplished through
nose wheel steering by using the rudder pedals; left rudder pedal to
steer left and right rudder pedal to steer right. When a rudder pedal
is depressed, a spring-loaded steering bungee (which is connected
to the nose gear and to the rudder bars) will tum the nose wheel
through an arc of approximately 15° each side of center. By
applying either left or right brake, the degree of tum may be
increased up to 35° each side of center.
Moving the airplane by hand is most easily accomplished by
attaching a tow bar to the nose gear strut. If a tow bar is not
available, or pushing is required, use the wing struts as push points.
Do not use the vertical or horizontal surfaces to move the airplane. If
the airplane is to be towed by vehicle, never turn the nose wheel
more than 35° either side of center or structural damage to the
nose gear could result.
The minimum turning radius of the airplane, using differential
braking and nose wheel steering during taxi, is approximately 27
feet. To obtain a minimum radius tum during ground handling, the
airplane may be rotated around either main landing gear by
pressing down on a tailcone bulkhead just forward of the horizontal
stabilizer to raise the nose wheel off the ground. Care should be
exercised to ensure that pressure is exerted only on the bulkhead
area and not on skin between the bulkheads. Pressing down on the
horizontal stabilizer to raise the nose wheel off the ground is not
recommended.
Nov 9/98
7-1 3
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
WING FLAP SYSTEM
The single slot-type wing flaps (Refer to Figure 7-3), are
extended or retracted by positioning the wing flap switch lever on
the instrument panel to the desired flap deflection position. The
switch lever is moved up or down in a slotted panel that provides
mechanical stops at the 1 o•, 20°, and FULL (40°) positions. To
change flap setting, the flap lever is moved to the right to clear
mechanical stops at the 10° and 20° positions. A scale and
pointer to the left of the flap switch indicates flap travel in degrees.
The wing flap system circuit is protected by a 10-ampere circuit
breaker, labeled FLAP, on the left side of the control panel.
I
NOTE
A flap interrupt switch, on the upper sill of the forward
cargo door opening, will stop flap operation regardless of
flap position anytime the forward cargo door is unlatched.
The switch is intended to prevent lowering the flaps into
the cargo door when it is open.
Figure 7-3. Wing Flap System
7-14
Jan 18/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
LANDING GEAR SYSTEM
The landing gear is of the tricycle type, with a steerable nose
wheel and two main wheels. Wheel and main gear brake fairings
are standard for both the main and nose wheels. Shock absorption
is provided by the leaf spring steel main landing gear struts and the
air/oil nose gear shock strut. Each main gear wheel is equipped
with a hydraulically-actuated disc-type brake on the inboard side
each wheel. Oversized wheels are available to facilitate operations
from unimproved runways.
ofl
BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT
'-.....
The baggage compartment consists of the area from the back of
the rear passenger seats to the aft cabin bulkhead. Access to the
baggage compartment is gained through the cargo door on the right
side of the airplane, or from within the airplane cabin. A baggage
net with tiedown straps is provided for securing baggage and is
attached by tying the straps to tiedown rings provided in the
airplane. When utilizing the airplane as a cargo carrier, refer to
Section 6 for complete cargo loading details. When loading the
airplane, children should not be placed or permitted in the baggage
compartment, and any material that might be hazardous to the
airplane or occupants should not be placed anywhere in the
airplane. For baggage/cargo area and door dimensions, refer to
Section 6.
SEATS
The airplane is equipped with the conventional style six seat
arrangement. Conventional seating consists of four separate forward
facing seats and the rear seat which is a fixed one-piece seat
bottom and a three-position, reclining back.
I
Seats used for the pilot and front seat passenger are adjustable~
fore and aft, and up and down. Additionally, the angle of the sea
back is infinitely adjustable.
forel
Seats used for the 3rd. and 4th. seat passenger are adjustable
and aft. Additionally, the angle of the seat back is Infinitely
adjustable.
May 30/01
7-15
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Fore and aft adjustment is made using the handle located below
the center of the seat frame. To position the seat, lift handle, slide
the seat into position, release the handle and check that the seat is
locked In place. To adjust the height of the seat, rotate the large
crank under the right hand comer of the seat until a confortable
height is obtained. To adjust the seat back angle, pull up on the release button, position the seat back to the desired angle, and release the button. When the seat is not occupied, the seat back will
automatically fold forward whenever the release button is pulled up
I
The rear passenger' seat consists of fixed, one piece seat bottom
and a three position, recicling back. The recicling back is adjusted
by a lever located below the center of the seat frame. To adjust the
seat back, raise the lever, position the seat back to the desired
angle, release the lever and check that the back is locked in place.
Headrests are installed on both the front and rear seats. To
adjust the headrest, apply enough pressure to it to raise or lower it
to the desired level.
INTEGRATED SEAT BELT/SHOULDER HARNESS
All seat positions are equipped with integrated seat
belts/shoulder harness assemblies (Refer to Figure 7-4). The design
incorporates an overhead inertia reel for the shoulder portion, and a
retractor assembly for the lap portion of the belt. This design allows
for complete freedom of movement of the upper torso area while
providing restraint in the lap belt area. In the event of a sudden
deceleration, reels lock up to provide positive restraint for the user.
In the front and center seats, the inertia reels are located on the
centerline of the roof area. In the rear seats, the inertia reels are
located outboard of each passenger in the roof area.
To use the integrated seat belVshoulder harness, grasp the link
with one hand, and, in a single motion, extend the assembly and
insert into the buckle. Positive locking has occurred when a
distinctive "snap" sound is heard.
l
7-16
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
LANDING GEAR SYSTEM
The landing gear is of the tricycle type, with a steerable nose
wheel and two main wheels. Wheel and main gear brake fairings
are standard for both the main and nose wheels. Shock absorption
is provided by the leaf spring steel main landing gear struts and the
air/oil nose gear shock strut. Each main gear wheel is equipped
with a hydraulically-actuated disc-type brake on the inboard side
each wheel. Oversized wheels are available to facilitate operations
from unimproved runways.
ofl
BAGGAGE COMPARTMENT
'---
The baggage compartment consists of the area from the back of
the rear passenger seats to the aft cabin bulkhead. Access to the
baggage compartment is gained through the cargo door on the right
side of the airplane, or from within the airplane cabin. A baggage
net with tiedown straps is provided for securing baggage and is
attached by tying the straps to tiedown rings provided in the
airplane. When utilizing the airplane as a cargo carrier, refer to
Section 6 for complete cargo loading details. When loading the
airplane, children should not be placed or permitted in the baggage
compartment, and any material that might be hazardous to the
airplane or occupants should not be placed anywhere in the
airplane. For baggage/cargo area and door dimensions, refer to
Section 6.
SEATS
The airplane is equipped with the conventional style six seat
arrangement. Conventional seating consists of four separate forward
facing seats and the rear seat which is a fixed one-piece seat
bottom and a three-position, reclining back.
I
Seats used for the pilot and front seat passenger are adjustable~
fore and aft, and up and down. Additionally, the angle of the sea
back is infinitely adjustable.
forel
Seats used for the 3rd. and 4th. seat passenger are adjustable
and aft. Additionally, the angle of the seat back is infinitely
adjustable.
May 30/01
7-15
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Fore and aft adjustment is made using the handle located below
the center of the seat frame. To position the seat, lift handle, slide
the seat into position, release the handle and check that the seat is
locked in place. To adjust the height of the seat, rotate the large
crank under the right hand corner of the seat until a confortable
height is obtained. To adjust the seat back angle, pull up on the release button, position the seat back to the desired angle, and release the button. When the seat is not occupied, the seat back will
automatically fold forward whenever the release button is pulled up
The rear passenger' seat consists of fixed, one piece seat bottom
and a three position, recicling back. The recicling back is adjusted
by a lever located below the center of the seat frame. To adjust the
seat back, raise the lever. position the seat back to the desired
angle, release the lever and check that the back is locked in place.
I
Headrests are installed on both the front and rear seats. To
adjust the headrest, apply enough pressure to it to raise or lower it
to the desired level.
INTEGRATED SEAT BELT/SHOULDER HARNESS
All seat positions are equipped with integrated seat
belts/shoulder harness assemblies (Refer to Figure 7-4). The design
incorporates an overhead inertia reel for the shoulder portion, and a
retractor assembly for the lap portion of the belt. This design allows
for complete freedom of movement of the upper torso area while
providing restraint in the lap belt area. In the event of a sudden
deceleration, reels lock up to provide positive restraint for the user.
In the front and center seats, the inertia reels are located on the
centerline of the roof area. In the rear seats, the inertia reels are
located outboard of each passenger in the roof area.
To use the integrated seat belVshoulder harness, grasp the link
with one hand, and, in a single motion, extend the assembly and
insert into the buckle. Positive locking has occurred when a
distinctive 'snap• sound is heard.
l
7-16
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
STANDARD INTEGEATED SEATBELT/
SHOULDER HARNESS WITH
INTERTIA REEL
VERTICAL
(HEIGHT)
ADJUSTMENT
CRANK
SEAT BACK
ANGLE
BUTTON
FORE AND AFT
ADJUSTMENT
LEVER
BUCKLE
(NON ADJUSTABLE)
.... PRESSTO
AVAILABLE MANUAL
ADJUSTMENT
RELEASE
(PUSH BUTTON)
ITT /~
1
PUSH BUTTON
RELEASE
....
~
;~i::.~E
(LATCH)
0514T1004
Figure 7-4. Crew Seats, Seat Belts and Shoulder Harnesses
May 30/01
7-17
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Proper locking of the lap belt can be verified by ensuring that the
belts are allowed to retract into the retractors and the lap belt is
snug and low on the waist as worn normally during flight. No more
than one additional inch of belt should be able to be pulled out of
the retractor once the lap belt is in place on the occupant. If more
than one additional inch of belt can be pulled out of the retractor,
the occupant is too small for the installed restraint system and the
seat should not be occupied until the occupant is properly restrained.
Removal is accomplished by lifting the release mechanism on
the buckle or by pressing the release button on the buckle and
pulling out and up on the harness. Spring tension on the inertia
reel will automatically stow the harness.
A manually adjustable seat belt/shoulder harness assembly is
available for all seats.
To use the manually adjustable seat belVshoulder harness, fasten and adjust the seat belt/shoulder harness first. Lengthen the
seat belt as required by pulling on the release strap on the belt.
Snap the connecting link firmly into the buckle, then adjust to
length. A properly adjusted harness will permit the occupant to lean
forward enough to sit erect, but prevent excessive forward movement and contact with objects during sudden deceleration. Also,
the pilot must have the freedom to reach all controls easily.
Disconnecting the manually adjustable seat belt/shoulder harness
is accomplished by pushing the button on the buckle to release the
connecting link.
ENTRANCE DOORS AND CABIN WINDOWS
Entry to, and exit from the airplane is accomplished through an
entry door on the left side of the cabin at the pilot's seat position
and through double cargo doors on the right side of the cabin at the
center and rear seat passenger's positions (refer to Section 6 for
cabin and cabin door dimensions). The left entry door incorporates
a recessed exterior door handle, a conventional interior door handle,
a key-operated door lock, and a door stop mechanism and the
rpenable window.
7-18
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
'-
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
The left door is equipped with an openable window which is held
in the closed position by a detent equipped latch on the lower edg
of the window frame. To open the window, rotate the latch upward.
The window utilizes a spring-loaded retaining arm which will help
rotate the window outward and hold it there. An openable window is
also installed for the right front passenger's seat position, and
functions in the same manner as the window in the entry door. I
required, either window may be opened at any speed up to 182
KIAS. All other cabin windows are fixed and cannot be opened.
I
Revision 6
7-18N7-18B
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION?
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
NOTE
The door latch design on this model requires that the
outside door handle on the pilot's door be extended out
whenever the doors are open. When closing the door, do
not attempt to push the door handle in until the door is fully
shut.
To open the left entry door from outside the airplane, utilize the
recessed door handle near the aft edge of the door by grasping the
forward end of the handle and pulling outboard. To open or close
the door from inside the airplane, use the combination door handle
and arm rest. The inside door handle has three positions and a
placard at its base which reads OPEN, CLOSE, and LOCK. The
handle is spring loaded to the CLOSE (up) position. When the door
has been pulled shut and latched, lock it by rotating the door handle
forward to the LOCK position (flush with the arm rest). When the
handle is rotated to the LOCK position, an over center action will
hold it in that position. Both cabin doors should be locked prior to
flight, and should not be opened intentionally during flight.
NOTE
Accidental opening of the cabin door in flight due to
improper closing does not constitute a need to land the
airplane. The best procedure is to set up the airplane in a
trimmed condition at approximately 90 KIAS, momentarily
shove the door outward slightly, and forcefully close and
lock the door.
Revision 6
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
The double cargo doors can be opened from outside the airplane, only when the forward door inside handle is in the CLOSE
position, by utilizing the recessed door handle near the aft edge of
the forward door. Depress the forward end of the handle to rotate it
out of its recess, and then pull outboard. After the forward door is
opened, the aft door may be opened by grasping the red handle on
the forward edge of the door and pulling downward to release the
locking pawls. To close the cargo doors from inside the airplane,
close the aft door first using the red handle to latch both locking
pawls, and then close the forward door. When the forward door is
closed and latched, rotate the door handle, labeled OPEN, CLOSE,
and LOCK, to the locked position. Both doors must be securely
closed and the forward door locked prior to flight, and they must not
be opened intentionally during flight.
NOTE
I
If the forward cargo door should come unlatched and open
slightly in flight, it is suggested that a landing be made at a
suitable airport to close and latch the door, unless a
passenger is available to close it. It cannot be reached by
the pilot. The wing flaps will not operate with the cargo door
open, even slightly, and the landing should be planned
accordingly.
NOTE
A flap interrupt switch, on the upper sill of the forward cargo
door opening, will stop flap operation regardless of flap
position any time the forward cargo door is unlatched. The
switch is intended to prevent lowering the flaps into the
cargo door when it is open.
Although with flaps extended, the forward cargo door can only be
opened approximately four inches, the aft cargo door will still open
fully, if required, once the forward door is unlatched.
If necessary, the outside door handle can be used to latch the
forward cargo door. Simply lift the handle out of its recess and
grasp the vertical tab of the connecting link behind the handle. Pull
the tab outboard until the connecting link engages a detent at its aft
end. Push the handle back into its recess while observing the
inside handle rotating toward the locked position through the cargo
door window. The inside handle must be rotated into the LOCK
position from inside the airplane.
11-20
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
A_CAUTION
IF THE CARGO DOOR IS CLOSED FROM THE
OUTSIDE WITH PASSENGERS OCCUPYING THE
MIDDLE OR REAR SEAT ROWS, THE INSIDE
DOOR HANDLE MUST BE ROTATED FULLY
FORWARD TO DISENGAGE THE OUTSIDE
CLOSING MECHANISM AND ALLOW THE DOOR
TO BE OPENED FROM THE INSIDE.
The left entry door and the forward cargo door have key-operated
locks which may be used to secure the aircraft during parking.
NOTE
Since the key-operated outside lock engages the door
handle only, the forward cargo door cannot be secured for
flight using only the key lock.
For airplane serial numbers T20608438 and On, the forward
cargo door uses an external handle that rotates to open or close
and latch the door. The new exterior door handle eliminates the
keyed-lock for locking the cargo door from the exterior of the
airplane. The cargo door is now locked using a locking pin inserted
into the forward cargo door operating mechanism from inside the
cabin. The cargo door locking pin must be removed and stowed
before takeoff.
Revision 6
7-21
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CONTROL LOCKS
A control lock is provided to lock the aileron and elevator control
surfaces to prevent damage to these systems by wind buffeting
while the airplane is parked. The lock consists of a shaped steel rod
and flag. The flag identifies the control lock and cautions about its
removal before starting the engine. To install the control lock, align
the hole on the side of the pilot's control wheel shaft with the hole
on the side of the shaft collar on the instrument panel and insert the
rod into the aligned holes. Installation of the lock will secure the
ailerons in a neutral position and the elevators in a slightly trailing
edge down position. Proper installation of the lock will place the flag
over the ignition switch, In areas where high or gusty winds occur, a
control surface lock should be installed over the vertical stabilizer
and rudder. The control lock and any other type of locking device
should be removed prior to starting the engine.
ENGINE
I
The airplane is powered by a horizontally opposed, six-cylinder,
overhead valve, turbocharged, air-cooled, fuel-injected engine with a
wet sump lubrication system. The engine is the Lycoming Model
TIO-540-AJ1A and is rated at 310 horsepower at 2500 RPM and 39
inches of manifold pressure. Major accessories include a propeller
governor on the front of the engine, starter, a belt driven alternator
mounted on the front of the engine, dual magnetos on the rear of
the engine, dual vacuum pumps, and a full flow oil filter mounted on
the rear of the engine accessory case.
Other major accessories include a turbocharger connected to the
induction air and exhaust systems, and associated components.
ENGINE CONTROLS
Engine manifold pressure is set using the throttle control, a
smooth black knob, which is located at the center of the instrument
panel below the radios. The throttle control is configured so that the
throttle is open in the forward position, and closed in the full aft
position. A friction lock is located at the base of the throttle control
shaft and is operated by rotating the knurled disk clockwise to
increase friction or counterclockwise to decrease it.
7-22
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
--
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
Engine speed is controlled by the propeller control.
The
propeller control is a fluted, blue knob located immediately to the
right of the throttle control. This system is described under
"Propeller'' in this section.
The mixture control, mounted near the propeller control, is a red
knob with raised points around the circumference and is equipped
with a lock button in the end of the knob. The rich position is full
forward, and full aft is the idle cutoff position. For small adjustments,
the control may be moved forward by rotating the knob clockwise,
and aft by rotating the knob counterclockwise. For rapid or large
adjustments, the knob may be moved forward or aft by depressing
the lock button in the end of the control, and then positioning the
control as desired.
ENGINE INSTRUMENTS
Engine operation is monitored by the following instruments: oil
temperature/oil pressure indicator , turbine Inlet temperature
(T.I.T.)/cylinder head temperature indicator,
manifold pressure
gauge/fuel flow indicator, and tachometer.
Oil pressure signals are generated from a pressure transducer.
An oil pressure line is routed from the upper front of the engine
case to the rear engine baffle. At the baffle, the oil pressure line is
connected to the transducer. This transducer produces an electrical
signal which translates into a pressure reading at the indicator.
In addition, a separate low oil pressure indication is provided
through the panel annunciator. This annunciator is wired to a
pressure switch located on the rear of the engine accessory case.
When oil pressure is below 20 PSI, the switch grounds and
completes the annunciator circuit, illuminating the red OIL PRESS
annunciator. When pressure exceeds 20 PSI, the ground
removed and the OIL PRESS annunciator extinguishes.
isl
NOTE
The low oil pressure switch is a!so wired into the hour
(Hobbs) meter. When pressure exceeds 20 PSI, a ground is
supplied to the hour meter, completing the hour meter
circuit.
May 30/01
7-23
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Oil temperature signals are generated from a resistance-type
probe located in the accessory case. As oil temperature changes,
the probe resistance changes. This resistance is translated into oil
temperature readings on the indicator.
The T.I.T./CHT indicator unit, located on the left side of the
instrument panel, is activated by electrical signals originating in the
engine compartment. Markings for the turbine inlet temperature
portion of the indicator are in 25°F increments, with normal range
(green arc) between 1350°F and 1675°F and the maximum (red
line) at 1675°F. Marking for the cylinder head temperature portion
of the indicator are in 50°F increments, with numbers at 200°F,
300°F, 400°F and 500°F. Normal operating temperatures (green
arc) for the CHT gauge are 200°F to 480°F, with red line at 480°F.
T.I.T. signals are generated from a thermocouple probe in the
exhaust system. The probe generates a voltage potential with
respect to temperature.
This voltage potential registers as a
temperature change in the indicator.
CHT signals are generated from a resistance-type probe screwed
into the cylinder head of the number 5 (copilot side aft) cylinder.
The resistance of the probe changes in proportion to the
temperature, and is registered on the indicator as a change in
temperature.
I
The engine-driven mechanical tachometer is located on the lower
right side of the pilot's instrument panel. The instrument is marked
in increments of 100 RPM, and indicates both engine and propeller
speed. A recording meter in the lower section of the dial records
elapsed engine time in hours and tenths based on a record speed
of 2400 RPM. Instrument markings include the normal operating
range (green arc) of 2000 to 2400 RPM, and a maximum (red line)
of2500 RPM.
7-24
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
The manifold pressure gauge is the left half of a dual-indicating
instrument located on the lower left side of the instrument panel.
The gauge is direct reading and indicates induction air manifold
pressure in inches of mercury. It has a normal operating range
(green arc) of 15 to 30 In. Hg and a maximum (red line) of 39 in.
Hg. The fuel flow indicator is the right half of a dual-indicating
instrument located on the lower left side of the instrument panel.
The fuel flow is measured by a transducer mounted on the aft
engine baffle. The fuel goes from the engine driven fuel pump
through the transducer by a line to the throttle body. The transducer
receives a voltage from the indicator and returns a signal depending
on the flow through the transducer. The indicator is marked in
gallons per hour and has a green arc from 5 to 20 gal/hr and a
maximum (red line) fuel flow of 34 gph. There may be some
atmospheric conditions that would result in fuel flow rates that
exceed the maximum marked value on the indicator (i.e. very low
density altitude and full throttle). If the indicator is pegged out, the
mixture control should be used to adjust for the desired value. The
fuel flow indicator may indicate low fuel flow rates when the fuel
injector(s) become blocked or partially blocked.
NEW ENGINE BREAK-IN AND OPERATION
I
The engine was run-in at the factory and is ready for the fulll
range of use. It is, however, suggested that cruising be
accomplished at 65% to 75% power as much as practicable until a
total of 50 hours has accumulated or oil consumption has stabilized.
This will ensure proper seating of the piston rings.
I
The airplane is delivered from the factory with corrosion
preventive oil In the engine. If, during the first 25 hours, oil must be
added, use only ashless dispersant oil conforming to specification
MIL-L-22851 or SAE1899.
1
May 30/01
7-25
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ENGINE LUBRICATION SYSTEM
The engine utilizes a full pressure, wet sump type lubrication
system. The capacity of the engine sump (located on the bottom of
the engine) is 11 quarts (one additional quart is contained in the
engine oil filter). Oil is drawn from the sump through a filter screen
on the end of a pickup tube to the engine-driven oil pump. Oil from
lthe pump passes through a full flow oil filter, a pressure relief valve
at the rear of the right oil gallery, and a thermostatically controlled
remote oil cooler. Oil from the remote cooler is then circulated to the
left oil gallery and propeller governor. The engine parts are then
lubricated by oil from the galleries. After lubricating the engine, the
oil returns to the sump by gravity. The filter adapter in the full flow
filter is equipped with a bypass valve which will cause lubricating oil
to bypass the filter in the event the filter becomes plugged, or the oil
temperature is extremely cold.
An oil dipstick/filler tube is located on the right side of the engine
case. The dipstick and oil filler are accessible through a door on the
right side of the engine cowling. The engine should not be operated
on less than 6 quarts of oil. For extended flight, fill to eleven quarts
(dipstick indication only). For engine oil grade and specifications,
refer to Section 8 of this handbook.
IGNITION AND STARTER SYSTEM
Engine ignition is provided by two engine driven magnetos, and
two spark plugs in each cylinder. The right magneto fires the lower
left and upper right spark plugs, and the left magneto fires the lower
right and upper left spark plugs. Normal operation is conducted with
both magnetos due to the more complete burning of the fuel/air
mixture with dual ignition.
I
Ignition and starter operation is controlled by a rotary type switch
located on the left switch and control panel. The switch is labeled
clockwise, OFF, R, L, BOTH, and START. The engine should be
operated on both magnetos (BOTH position) except for magneto
checks.
7-26
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
The R and L positions are for checking purposes and emergency
use only. When the switch is rotated to the START position, (with
the master switch in the ON position), the starter contactor is
energized and the starter will crank the engine. When the switch is
released, it is spring-loaded to return to the BOTH position.
AIR INDUCTION SYSTEM
The engine air induction system receives ram air through an
intake on the lower front portion of the engine cowling. The intake is
covered by an air filter which removes dust and other foreign matter
from the induction air. Airflow passing through the filter enters an air
box. The air box has a spring-loaded alternate air door. If the air
induction filter should become blocked, suction created by the
engine will open the door and draw unfiltered air from inside the
lower cowl area. An open alternate air door can result in manifold
pressure losses of up to 15 in. Hg at full throttle above 8,000 feet.
After passing through the air box, induction air enters a compressor
then to a fuel/air control unit on top of the engine, and is then
ducted to the engine cylinders through intake manifold tubes.
EXHAUST SYSTEM
Exhaust gas from each cylinder passes through riser assemblies
to a heat exchanger, then turbocharger and single tailpipe. Shrouds
are constructed around the outside of the heat exchanger to form a
heating chamber which supplies heat to the cabin.
FUEL INJECTION SYSTEM
The engine is equipped with a fuel injection system. The system
is comprised of an engine-driven fuel pump, fuel/air control unit, fuel
manifold, fuel flow indicator, and air-bleed type injector nozzles.
May 30/01
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Fuel is delivered by the engine-driven fuel pump to the fuel/air
control unit on top of the engine. The fuel/air control unit correctly
proportions the fuel flow to the induction air flow. After passing
through the control unit, induction air is delivered to the cylinders
through the intake manifold tubes and metered fuel is delivered to a
fuel manifold (flow divider). The fuel manifold, through spring
tension on a diaphragm and valve, evenly distributes the fuel to an
air-bleed type injector nozzle in the intake valve chamber of each
cylinder. A fuel flow transducer is also installed upstream of the
fuel/air control unit which attaches to the rear baffle, and is
connected to a fuel flow indicator on the instrument panel.
COOLING SYSTEM
Ram air for engine cooling enters through two intake openings in
the front of the engine cowling. The cooling air is directed from
above the engine. around the cylinders and other areas of the
engine by baffling, and then exits through cowl flaps on the lower aft
edge of the cowling. The cowl flaps are mechanically operated from
the cabin by means of a cowl flap lever on the right side of the
control pedestal. Before starting the engine, during takeoff or high
power operation, the cowl flap lever should be placed in the OPEN
position for maximum cooling. This is accomplished by moving the
lever to the right to clear the detent, then moving the lever up to the
OPEN position.
While in cruise flight, cowl flaps should be closed unless hot day
conditions require them to be adjusted to keep the cylinder head
temperature at approximately two-thirds of the normal operating
range (green arc). During extended let-downs, it may be necessary
to completely close the cowl flaps by moving the cowl flap lever to
the CLOSED position.
I
During ground operations, position the aircraft into the wind for
optimal engine cooling.
7-28
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
-..___.....
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
TURBOCHARGING SYSTEM
Because the engine is turbocharged, some of its characteristics
are different from a normally aspirated engine. The following
information describes the system and points out some of the items
that are affected by turbocharging. Section 4 contains the normal
operating procedures for the turbocharged engine.
The following steps, when combined with the turbocharger
system schematic (Figure 7-5), provide a better understanding of
how the turbocharger system works. The steps follow the induction
air as it enters and passes through the engine until it is expelled as
exhaust gases.
1. Engine induction air is supplied through an opening in the
lower cowl, ducted through a filter and into the compressor
where it is compressed.
2. The pressurized induction air then passes through the throttle
body and induction manifold into the cylinders.
3. The air and fuel are burned and exhausted through the turbine.
4. The exhaust gases drive the turbine which, in turn, drives the
compressor, thus completing the cycle.
The compressor has the capability of producing manifold pressure in excess of the takeoff maximum of 39 inches Hg. In order not
to exceed 39 inches of manifold pressure, a waste gate is used so
that some of the exhaust will bypass the turbine and be vented into
the tailpipe.
May 30/01
SECTION?
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
WASTE
GATE
CONTROLLER OVERBOOST
VALVE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
THROTTLE BODY
(FUEL CONTROL UNITI
-------------
ALTERNATE
AIR DOOR
AIR FILTER
CODE
0
RAM AJA
0
COMPRESSED AIR
INDUCTION
MANIFOLD
AIR
EXHAUST GAS
~
..
12$011008
Figure 7-5. Turbocharger Schematic
7-30
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
_.
SECTION7
AIRPLA!NE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
It can be seen from studying Steps 1 through 4 that anything that
affects the flow of induction air into the compressor or the flow of
exhaust gases into the turbine will increase or decrease the speed
of the turbocharger. This resultant change in flow will have no effect
on the engine if the waste gate is still open because the waste gate
position is changed to hold compressor discharge pressure constant. A waste gate controller automatically maintains maximum allowable compressor discharge pressure any time the turbine and
compressor are capable of producing that pressure.
At high altitude, part throttle, or low RPM, the exhaust flow is not
capable of turning the turbine and compressor fast enough to maintain maximum compressor discharge pressure, and the waste gate
will close to force all of the exhaust flow through the turbine.
When the waste gate is fully closed, any change in turbocharger
speed will mean a change in engine operation. Thus, any Increase
or decrease in turbine speed will cause an increase or decrease in
manifold pressure and fuel flow. If turbine speed increases, the
manifold pressure increases; if the turbine speed decreases, the
manifold pressure decreases. Since the compression ratio approaches 3 to 1 at high altitude, any change in exhaust flow to the
turbine or ram induction air pressure will be magnified proportionally
by the compression ration and the change in flow through the exhaust system.
MANIFOLD PRESSURE VARIATION WITH ENGINE RPM
When the waste gate is open, the turbocharged engine will react
the same as a normally aspirated engine when the engine RPM is
varied. That is, when the RPM is increased, the manifold pressure
will decrease slightly. When the engine RPM is decreased, the
manifold pressure will increase slightly.
However, when the waste gate is closed, manifold variation with
engine RPM is just opposite of the normally aspirated engine. An increase in engine RPM will result in an increase in manifold pressure, and a decrease in engine RPM will result in a decrease in
manifold pressure.
May 30/01
7-311
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
MANIFOLD PRESSURE VARIATION WITH ALTITUDE
At full throttle, the turbocharger has the capability of maintaining
the maximum continuous manifold pressure of 39 inches Hg. to well
above 17,000 feet depending on engine and atmospheric conditions. However, engine operating limitations establish the maximum
manifold pressure that may be used. Manifold pressure should be
reduced above 17,000 feet, as noted on the operating placard in the
airplane (subtract 1 inch Hg. from 39 inches Hg. for each 1000 feet
above 17,000 feet).
At part throttle, the turbocharger is capable of maintaining cruise
climb power of 2400 RPM and 30 in. Hg. from sea level to 22,000
feet in standard temperatures, and from sea level to 17,000 feet under hot day conditions without changing the throttle position, once
the power setting is established after takeoff. Under hot day conditions, this climb power setting is maintained above 17,000 feet by
advancing the throttle as necessary to maintain 30 inches of manifold pressure in the same manner as a normally aspirated engine
during climb.
MANIFOLD PRESSURE VARIATION WITH AIRSPEED
When the waste gate is closed, manifold pressure will vary with
variations in airspeed. This is because the compressor side of the
turbocharger operates at pressure ratios of up to 3 to 1 and any
change in pressure at the compressor inlet is magnified at the compressor outlet with a resulting effect on the exhaust flow and turbine
side of the turbocharger.
FUEL FLOW VARIATIONS WITH CHANGES IN MANIFOLD PRESSURE
The engine-driven fuel pump output is regulated by engine speed
and compressor discharge pressure. Engine fuel flow is regulated
by fuel pump output and the metering effects of the throttle and mixture control. When the waste gate is open, fuel flow will vary directly
with manifold pressure, engine speed, mixture, or throttle control position. In this case, manifold pressure is controlled by throttle position and the waste gate controller, while fuel flow varies with throttle
movement and manifold pressure.
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
ENGINE (Continued)
TURBOCHARGING SYSTEM (Continued)
I
I
FUEL FLOW VARIATIONS WITH CHANGES IN MANIFOLDI
PRESSURE (Continued)
When the waste gate is closed and manifold pressure changes
are due to turbocharger output, as discussed previously, fuel flow
will follow manifold pressure even though the throttle position is
unchanged. This means that fuel flow adjustments required of the
pilot are minimized to (1) small initial adjustments on takeoff or
climb-out for the proper rich climb setting, (2) lean-out in cruise, and
(3) return to full rich position for approach and landing.
MANIFOLD PRESSURE VARIATION WITH INCREASING OR
DECRcASING FUEL FLOW
When the waste gate is open, movement of the mixture control
has little or no effect on the manifold pressure of the turbocharged
engine.
When the waste gate is closed, any change in fuel flow to the
engine will have a corresponding change in manifold pressure.
That is, increasing the fuel flow will increase the manifold pressure
and decreasing the fuel flow will decrease the manifold pressure.
This is because an increased fuel flow to the engine increases the
mass flow of the exhaust. This turns the turbocharger faster,
increasing the induction air flow and raising the manifold pressure.
MOMENTARY OVERSHOOT OF MANIFOLD PRESSURE
Under some circumstances (such as rapid throttle movement,
especially with cold oil), it is possible that the engine can be
overboosted slightly above the maximum takeoff manifold pressure
of 39 inches Hg. This would most likely be experienced during the
takeoff roll or during a change to full throttle operation in flight. The
induction air pressure relief valve will normally limit the overboost to
2 to 3 inches.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
IENGINE (Continued)
ITURBOCHARGING SYSTEM (Continued)
MOMENTARY OVERSHOOT OF MANIFOLD PRESSURE
(Continued)
A slight overboost of 2 to 3 inches of manifold pressure is not
' considered detrimental to the engine as long as it is momentary.
No corrective action is required when momentary overboost corrects
itself and is followed by normal engine operation. However, if
overboosting of this nature persi'sts when oil temperature is normal
or if the amount of overboost tends to exceed 3 inches or more. the
throttle should be retarded to eliminate the overboost and the
controller system, including the waste gate and relief valve, should
be checked for necessary adjustment or replacement of
components.
ALTITUDE OPERATION
Because a turbocharged airplane will climb faster and higher
than a normally aspirated airplane, fuel vaporization may be encountered. When fuel flow variations of ±1 GPH or more are observed (as a ''nervous" fuel flow needle), or if a full rich mixture setting doesn't provide the desired fuel flow, placing the auxiliary fuel
pump switch in the ON position will control vapor. However, it will
also increase fuel flow, making it necessary to adjust the mixture
control for the desired fuel flow. The auxiliary fuel pump should be
left on for the remainder of the climb. It can be turned off whenever
fuel flow will remain steady with it off, and the mixture must be adjusted accordingly. The auxiliary fuel pump should be turned off
and the mixture reset prior to descent.
HIGH ALTITUDE ENGINE ACCELERATION
The engine will accelerate normally from idle to full throttle with
full rich mixture at any altitude below 22,000 feet. At higher
altitudes, it is usually necessary to lean the mixture to get smooth
engine acceleration from idle to maximum power. At altitudes
above 25,000 feet, and with temperatures above standard, it takes
up to two minutes for the turbine to accelerate from idle to maximum
RPM although adequate power is available in 20 to 30 seconds.
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
PROPELLER
The airplane has an all metal, three-bladed, constant speed,
governor-regulated propeller.
Setting the governor with the
propeller control establishes the propeller speed, and thus the
engine speed to be maintained. The governor controls the flow of
engine oil, boosted to high pressure by an internal pump, to or from
a piston in the propeller hub. Oil pressure acting on the piston
twists the blades toward high pitch (low RPM). When oil pressure
to the piston in the propeller hub is reduced, centrifugal force,
assisted by an internal spring, twists the blades toward low pitch
(high RPM).
The propeller control knob in the lower center of the instrument
panel is used to set the governor and control engine RPM as
desired for various flight conditions. The knob is labeled PROP
PUSH INCR RPM. When the control knob is pushed in, blade pitch
will decrease, giving a higher RPM. When the control knob is
pulled out, the blade pitch increases, thereby decreasing RPM.
The propeller control knob is equipped with a vernier feature which
allows slow or fine RPM adjustments by rotating the knob clockwise
to increase RPM, and counterclockwise to decrease it. To make
rapid or large adjustments, depress the button on the end of the
control knob and reposition the control as desired.
An optional propeller de-ice system is available for the airplane.
Details of this system are presented in the Supplements section.
Revision 5
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
FUEL SYSTEM
I
The airplane fuel system (Refer to Figure 7-6) consists of two
vented integral fuel tanks (one tank in each wing), two reservoir
tanks (underneath the cockpit floor), a four-position selector valve,
an electrically-driven auxiliary fuel pump, and a fuel strainer. The
engine-mounted portion of the system consists of the engine-driven
fuel pump, a fuel/air control unit, a fuel distribution valve (flow
divider) and fuel injection nozzles.
ISerials 120608362 and on:
The fuel system also incorporates a fuel return system that
returns fuel from the fuel/air control unit (servo) back to each
integral wing tank. The system includes a flexible fuel hose
assembly between the servo and the firewall. Aluminum fuel lines
return the fuel to the top portion of the selector valve and then to
the aircraft integral tanks. One drain is added to properly drain the
fuel return system.
AwARNING
UNUSABLE FUEL LEVELS FOR THIS AIRPLANE
WERE DETERMINED IN ACCORDANCE WITH
FEDERAL AVIATION REGULATIONS. FAILURE
TO OPERATE THE AIRPLANE IN COMPLIANCE
IN
WITH
FUEL LIMITATIONS
SPECIFIED
SECTION 2 MAY FURTHER REDUCE THE
AMOUNT OF FUEL AVAILABLE IN FLIGHT.
NOTE
Unusable fuel is at a minimum due to the design of
the fuel system. However, with 1/4 tank or less,
prolonged uncoordinated flight such as slips or skids
can uncover the fuel tank outlets, causing fuel
starvation and engine stoppage. Therefore, with low
fuel reserves, do not allow the airplane to remain in
uncoordinated flight for periods in excess of one
minute.
(Continued Next Page)
17-36
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
FUEL SYSTEM (Continued)
I
Serials T20608001 thru T20608361:
I
FUEL
TANKS
FUEL LEVEL
(QUANTITY
EACH TANK)
Two
Full (46.0)
92.0
4.0
88.0
Two
Reduced (34.5)
69.0
4.0
65.0
TOTAL
TOTAL
TOTAL USABLE
FUEL UNUSABLE
ALL FLIGHT
CONDITIONS
Serials T20608362 and on:
FUEL
TANKS
FUEL LEVEL
(QUANTITY
EACH TANK)
Two
Full (46.0)
92.0
5.0
87.0
Two
Reduced (34.5)
69.0
5.0
64.0
TOTAL USABLE
TOTAL
TOTAL
FUEL UNUSABLE
ALL FLIGHT
CONDITIONS
Figure 7-6. Fuel Quantity Data in U.S. Gallons
FUEL DISTRIBUTION
Fuel flows by gravity from the two wing tanks to two reservoir
tanks to a four position selector valve. From the selector valve, fuel
flows through the auxiliary fuel pump, the fuel strainer, and to the
engine driven fuel pump. From the engine driven fuel pump, fuel is
delivered to the fuel/air control unit on the top of the engine. The
fuel/air control unit (fuel servo) meters fuel flow in proportion to
induction air flow. After passing through the control unit, metered
fuel goes to a fuel distribution valve (flow divider) located on top of
the engine. From the fuel distribution valve, individual fuel lines are
routed to air bleed type injector nozzles located in the intake
chamber of each cylinder.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
IFUEL SYSTEM (Continued)
FUEL INDICATING SYSTEM
Fuel quantity is measured by two float-type fuel quantity
transmitters (one in each tank) and indicated by an electrically
operated fuel quantity indicator on the left side of the instrument
panel. The indicators are marked in gallons of fuel. An empty tank
is indicated by a red line and the number "O". When an indicator
shows an empty tank, approximately 2 gallons (Serials T20608001
thru T20608361) or 2.5 gallons (T20608362 and on) remain in a
tank as unusable fuel. The indicators should not be relied upon for
accurate readings during skids, slips, or unusual attitudes.
l
The fuel quantity indicators also incorporate warning circuits
which can detect low fuel conditions and erroneous transmitter
signals. Anytime fuel in the tank drops below approximately 8
gallons (and remains below this level for more than 60 seconds),
the amber LOW FUEL message will flash on the annunciator panel
for approximately 10 seconds and then remain steady.
The
annunciator cannot be turned off by the pilot. If the left tank is low,
the message will read L LOW FUEL. If the right tank is low, the
message will read LOW FUEL R. If both tanks are low, the message
will read L LOW FUEL R
In addition to low fuel annunciation, the warning circuitry is
designed to report failures with each transmitter caused by shorts or
opens. If the circuitry detects any one of these conditions, the fuel
level indicator needle will go to the OFF position (below the "O"
mark on the fuel indicator), and the amber annunciator will
illuminate. If the left tank transmitter has failed, the message will
read L LOW FUEL. If the right tank transmitter has failed, the
message will read LOW FUEL R. If both tanks transmitters have
failed, the message will read L LOW FUEL R.
Fuel flow is measured by use of a fuel transducer (flowmeter)
mounted on the rear engine baffle. This flowmeter produces an
electrical signal which is translated in the cockpit-mounted indicator
as gallons-per-hour. Normal operating (green arc) range is from 5
to 20 gallons-per-hour.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
SECTION7
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
,.,,.
<-.............·---@~~
, . , ,.... . .- ---- ----0 '"1110"""
----r
1285R1034
IIF Figure 7-7. Fuel System Schematic (Sheet 1 of 2)
Serial T20608001 thru T20608361.
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
81:7'13
,.,. .. .-·---©=-~:
,,...:---------©--
1285R1034A
NOTE: Fuel returns to the tank selected.
. - Figure 7-7. Fuel System Schematic (Sheet 2)
Serials T20608362 and on.
Revision 5
•
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
-
SECTION7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
FUEL SYSTEM (Continued)
I
AUXILIARY FUEL PUMP OPERATION
The auxiliary fuel pump is used primarily for priming the engine
before starting. Priming is accomplished through the fuel injection
system. If the auxiliary fuel pump switch is accidentally placed in the
ON position for prolonged periods (with master switch turned on and
mixture rich) with the engine stopped, the engine may be flooded.
The auxiliary fuel pump is also used for vapor suppression in hot
weather. Normally, momentary use will be sufficient for vapor
suppression; however, continuous operation is permissible if
required. Turning on the auxiliary fuel pump with a normally
operating engine pump will result in only a very minor enrichment of
the mixture.
It is not necessary to operate the auxiliary fuel pump during
normal takeoff and landing, since gravity and the engine driven
pump will supply adequate fuel flow. In the event of failure of the
engine driven fuel pump, use of the auxiliary fuel pump will provide
sufficient fuel to maintain flight at maximum continuous power.
__,,
Under hot day, high altitude conditions, or conditions during a
climb that are conducive to fuel vapor formation, it may be
necessary to utilize the auxiliary fuel pump to attain or stabilize the
fuel flow required for the type of climb being performed. In this
case, turn the auxiliary fuel pump on, and adjust the mixture to the
desired fuel flow. If fluctuating fuel flow (greater than 1 GPH) is
observed during climb or cruise at high altitudes on hot days, place
the auxiliary fuel pump switch in the ON position to clear the fuel
system of vapor.
The auxiliary fuel pump may be operated
continuously in cruise.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
IFUEL SYSTEM (Continued)
-----
FUEL RETURN SYSTEM
lserials T20608362 and on:
A fuel return system is incorporated to improve engine operation
during extended idle operation in hot weather environments. The
major components of the system include an restrictor fitting located
in the top of the fuel servo, a dual stack fuel selector valve, and a
drain valve assembly. The system is designed to return fuel/vapor
back to the main tanks at approximately 7 gallons per hour. The
dual-stack selector valve ensures that fuel returns only to the tank
that is selected as the feed tank. For example, if the fuel selector is
positioned to use fuel from the left hand tank, the fuel return system
is returning fuel to the left hand tank only.
l
FUEL VENTING
Fuel system venting is essential to system operation. Complete
blockage of the venting system will result in decreasing fuel flow
and eventual engine stoppage.
Venting consists of an
interconnecting vent line between the tanks, and check valve
equipped overboard vents in each tank. The overboard vents
protrude from the bottom surfaces of the wings behind the wing
struts, slightly below the upper attach points of the struts. The fuel
filler caps are vacuum vented. The vents will open and allow air to
enter the fuel tanks in case the overboard vents become blocked.
FUEL SELECTOR VALVE
The fuel selector is a four-position selector valve, labeled BOTH,
RIGHT, LEFT and OFF. The selector handle must be pushed down
before it can be rotated from RIGHT or LEFT to OFF.
The fuel selector valve should be in the BOTH position for
takeoff, climb, landing, and maneuvers that involve prolonged slips
or skids of more than 30 seconds. Operation from either LEFT or
RIGHT tank is reserved for cruising flight.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
FUEL SYSTEM (Continued}
I
FUEL SELECTOR VALVE (Continued)
I
NOTE
When the fuel selector valve handle is in the BOTH
position in cruising flight, unequal fuel flow from
each tank may occur if the wings are not maintained
exactly level. Resulting wing heaviness can be
alleviated gradually by turning the selector valve
handle to the tank in the "heavy" wing.
NOTE
It is not practical to measure the time required to
consume all of the fuel in one tank, and, after
switching to the opposite tank, expect an equal
duration from the remaining fuel. The airspace in
both fuel tanks is interconnected by a vent line and,
therefore, some transferring of fuel between tanks
can be expected when the tanks are nearly full and
the wings are not level.
NOTE
Unusable fuel is at a minimum due to the desig11 of
the fuel system. However, with 1/4 tank or less,
prolonged uncoordinated flight such as slips or skids
can uncover the fuel tank outlets causing fuel
starvation and engine stoppage. Therefore, with low
fuel reserves, do not allow the airplane to remain in
uncoordinated flight for periods in excess of one
minute.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
IFUEL SYSTEM (Continued)
FUEL DRAIN VALVES
The fuel system is equipped with multiple drain valves to provide
a means for the examination of fuel in the system for contamination
and grade. The system should be examined before each flight and
after each refueling by using the sampler cup provided to drain fuel
from each wing tank sump and the fuel strainer. If any evidence of
fuel contamination is found, it must be eliminated in accordance
with the Preflight Inspection checklist and the discussion in Section
8 of this publication. If takeoff weight limitations for the next flight
permit, the fuel tanks should be filled after each flight to prevent
condensation.
BRAKE SYSTEM
The airplane has a single-disc, hydraulically-actuated brake on
each main landing gear wheel. Each brake is connected, by a
hydraulic line, to a master cylinder attached to each of the pilot's
rudder pedals. The brakes are operated by applying pressure to the
top of either the pilot's or copilot's set of rudder pedals, which are
interconnected. When the airplane is parked, both main wheel
brakes may be set by utilizing the parking brake which is operated
by a handle under the left side of the instrument panel. To set the
parking brake, apply the brakes using the rudder pedals, pull the
handle aft, and rotate it 90° down.
For maximum brake life, keep the brake system properly
maintained, and minimize brake usage during taxi operations and
landings.
Some of the symptoms of impending brake failure are: gradual
decrease in braking action after brake application, noisy or dragging
brakes, soft or spongy pedals, and excessive travel and weak
braking action. If any of these symptoms appear, the brake system
is in need of immediate attention. If, during taxi or landing roll,
braking action decreases, let up on the pedals and then reapply the
brakes with heavy pressure. If the brakes become spongy or pedal
travel increases, pumping the pedals should build braking pressure.
If one brake becomes weak or fails, use the other brake sparingly
while using opposite rudder, as required, to offset the good brake.
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
The airplane is equipped with a 28-vott, direct current electrical
system (Refer to Figure 7-8). The system is powered by a belt
driven, 60-amp alternator and a 24-volt battery, located in the
engine compartment, just forward of the firewall on the right hand
side. An optional 95-amp alternator is available with the prop de-ice
option. Power is supplied to most general electrical circuits through
a split primary bus bar, with an essential bus wired between the two
primaries to provide power for the master switch and annunciator
circuits.
Each primary bus bar is also connected to an avionics bus bar
via a single avionics master switch. The primary buses are on
anytime the master switch is turned on, and are not affected by
starter or external power usage. The avionics buses are on when
the master switch and avionics master switch are in the ON
position.
AcAUTION
PRIOR TO TURNING THE MASTER SWITCH ON
OR OFF, STARTING THE ENGINE OR APPLYING
AN EXTERNAL POWER SOURCE, THE AVIONICS
MASTER SWITCH, SHOULD BE TURNED OFF TO
PREVENT ANY HARMFUL TRANSIENT VOLTAGE
FROM DAMAGING THE AVIONICS EQUIPMENT.
The airplane uses a power distribution module, located on the left
forward side of the firewall, to house all relays used throughout the
airplane electrical system. In addition, the alternator control unit
and the external power connector are housed within the module.
ANNUNCIATOR PANEL
An annunciator panel (with integral toggle switch) is located
above the avionics stack and provides caution (amber) and warning
(red) messages for selected portions of the airplane systems. The
annunciator is designed to flash messages for approximately 10
seconds to gain the attention of the pilot before changing to steady
on. The annunciator panel cannot be turned off by the pilot.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
IELECTRICAL SYSTEM (Continued)
!ANNUNCIATOR PANEL (Continued)
Inputs to annunciator come from each fuel transmitter, low oil
pressure switch, the vacuum transducers and the alternator control
unit (ACU). Highly reliable individual LED bulbs illuminate each
message. Illumination intensity can be controlled by placing the
toggle switch to either the DIM or BRT position.
The annunciator panel can be tested by turning the master
switch On and holding the annunciator panel switch in the TST
position. All amber and red messages will flash until the switch is
released.
NOTE
When the master switch is turned ON, some
annunciators will flash for approximately 10 seconds
before illuminating steadily. When the annunciator
panel switch is toggled up and held in the TST
position, all remaining annunciators will flash until
the switch is released.
NOTE
When holding the annunciator panel switch in the
TST position, with the optional prop de-ice on, the
prop de-ice annunciator will change from green to
amber and return to green when the switch is
released.
MASTER SWITCH
The master switch is a split rocker type switch labeled MASTER,
and is ON in the up position and OFF in the down position. The
right half of the switch, labeled BAT, controls all electrical power to
the airplane. The left half, labeled ALT, controls the alternator.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
r -- --- --- ACU
l~NUNCIATOR
PANEL
LOW VOLT
I
I
- ------' Aao
GROUND!--- - -SENSEt--- --
F
-
-
----,
-, 1
POWER IN!---- - -- ,
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
B
A
AMMETER
I IGNITIO
I SWITCH
I
I
I=
I
I
I
L
BATTERY
MAGNETOS
-7m_-~R
RELAY
POWER
DISTRIBUTION
MODULE
+ + EXTERNAL
0585C2001
POWER
Figure 7-8. Electrical Schematic (Sheet 1 of 2)
Serials T20608001 thru T20608259.
Revision 5
I
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
TO
Ol.-lNSTRUMENTS
NST AND IGNITION
,.,
SWITCH
Cll ~TO FUEL
~ ~~~1' PUMP
;i.
~ T O LANDING
LAND LIGHT
[:tl
~ T O FLASHING
BCN
BEACON
Q)-To FLAPS
~
...J
LU
9!._
TO NAV/COM2
coAt SPKR PWR
C\I
2 MKR BCN
'*
en
RCVR
:)
a:,
Q).- TO TRANSPONDER
~z
-
~ T O AUTO PILOT(2,3)
AUTO
Q
O
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
!!LLOT
VJ- TO ADF (2)
~
Q)i:_ TO HSI & GYRO (3)
GYRO
FLAP
~N- - - - -- - L!:::::===:::;----,
AVIONICS
MASTER
SWITCH
BUS 2
u,
B
WARN
>-tu
"'
ffi~
A
Q)-TO VARIOUS
::lffi
Sc
"'"'
fil2
5
ANNUNCIATORS
TO GLARESHIELD
IQ-INTERIOR
INST INSTRUMENT
LTS LIGHTS
Q)-To MASTER
SWITCH
J
------
~:r'
~/:-J
-----Q)--- - -- - - - - - - - __J
i----
AVN
BUS 1
Q)-- TO
Q)-TOTURN
TURN COORDINATOR
COORD
TO NAVAND
CONTROL WHEEL
MAP LIGHTS
~Xij
AVIONICS FAN
; Q)<>- TO AUTOPILOT (1)
en
AUTO
~ PILOT
cn Q) ..... TO GPS
0
GPS
~ 0)-- TO NAV/COM1.
5
TO STROBE
._ TO TAXI LIGHTS
TAXI
~.--TOPITOT
HEAT
PITOT
HEAT
NAV
<t: COM1
ROBE LIGHTS
HEADSET PWR
Q)-- TO
ADF
ADF (3)
LEGEND
1) BASE
2) NAY
3) NAV WITH HSI
0585C2001
Figure 7-8. Electrical Schematic (Sheet 2)
Serials T20608001 tnru T20608259.
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLA!NE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
r--- --- ---ACU
LOW VOLT
A~NUNCIATO R
PANEL
I
I
- -----< FIELD
GROUND I---
- -- - ~
SENSEi--- - - -POWER !NI - - - --
-
I
I
I
I
I
ALTERNATOR
o'" 10.__ _ __
B
CURRENT
___::S::;
E::;
NS
=::O
:::.R.:.l/T\l
A
AMMETER
TO
INST
CIRCUIT
BR EAKER
MAGNETOS
---"'--
I
L
-
BATTERY
- '--J!'-- - -- - 1 - - - BATIALT
MASTER
SWITCH
-/m-=-- -
-a
EXT
PWR
tT -
RELAY
A
T
. WEA
b\§THIBUTION
MODULE
+ + -
0585C2001
EXTERNAL
POWER
TO ALT FLD
CIRCUIT
BREAKER
Figure 7-9. Electrical Schematic (Sheet 1 of 2)
Serials T20608260 and on.
Revision 5
I
SECTION7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Q) ........ TO
CABIN
LTS/
PWR
GLARESHIELD LT
OVERHEAD LTS
COURTESY LTS
12V POWER
Q)-To INSTRUMENTS
AND IGNITION
SWITCH
'1"0 FUEL
..- NST
qi,
Cf)
~
~-PUMP
TO LANDING
0 LAND LIGHT
~ ~TO FLASHING
o BCN BEACON
~ 0) ........TO FLAPS
-;i_
0)-To AVN FAN
AYN FAN
'II:
(/)
Q)--TO GPS
::i GPS MFD
co
(/) Q)-To HSI
Q GYRO
~ Q)-TO NAV/COMM 1
>
<t:
NAV/ AUDIOPANEL
OM 1
(1)
W FLAP
0)1-- -- -7..._~===::::::-=- -~
B
AVN BUS 1
A
::iiil
!!:0
"'
AVIONICS
MASTER
SWITCH
Q)-TO VARIOUS
WARN ANNUNCIATORS
~l±l
WU.
----~
"'"'
WO
(/)t/)
{3
<i)-To MASTER
SWITCH
ALT
--------
FLO
Q)-- - - --r---=---=---=---=---=---=---=---=---=---=---=---=--=__J
AVN BUS 2
0)-TOTURN
TURN COORDINATOR
COORD
TO NAVAND
CONTROL WHEEL
MAP LIGHTS
<(
~ Q)- TO INSTRUMENT
t5 L'l~l
LIGHTS
~
TO STROBE
w STROBE LIGHTS
AXI
Q)--ro NAV/COMM 2
"' NAV/
~ COM2
AUDIOPANEL (2)
a:
Q)-- TO
?'.5
XPNDER
TRANSPONDER
Z Q)-- TO AUTOPILOT
O AUTO
~ PILOT
Q)--TO ADF
ADF
TO TAXI LIGHTS
~-TO PITOT
PITOT HEAT
HEAT
LEGEND
(1) BASE
(2) ALL OTHERS
0585C2001
I
17-50
Figure 7-9. Electrical Schematic (Sheet 2)
Serials T20608260 and on.
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM (Continued)
I
I
MASTER SWITCH (Continued)
&CAUTION
PRIOR TO TURNING THE MASTER SWITCH ON
OR OFF, STARTING THE ENGINE OR APPLYING
AN EXTERNAL POWER SOURCE, THE AVIONICS
MASTER SWITCH, SHOULD BE TURNED OFF TO
PREVENT ANY HARMFUL TRANSIENT VOLTAGE
FROM DAMAGING THE AVIONICS EQUIPMENT.
-
Normally, both sides of the master switch should be used
simultaneously; however, the BAT side of the switch could be turned
ON separately to check equipment while on the ground. To check
or use avionics equipment or radios while on the ground, the
avionics master switch must also be turned on. The ALT side of the
switch, when placed in the off position, removes the alternator from
the electrical system. With this switch in the OFF position, the
entire electrical load is placed on the battery. Continued operation
with the alternator switch in the OFF position will reduce battery
power low enough to open the battery contactor and prevent
alternator restart.
AVIONICS MASTER SWITCH
The avionics master switch. labeled AVIONICS MASTER, is
located below the control wheel on the pilot's electrical subpanel.
The avionics master switch (Refer to Figure 7-9) is a split rocker-I
type switch; one side controls power from Primary Bus 1 to Avionics
Bus 1 while the other side controls power from Primary Bus 2 to
Avionics Bus 2.
NOTE
On earlier serial number airplanes (Refer to Figure
7-7), the avionics master switch is a rocker switch
that controls power to both Avionics Bus 1 and
Avionics Bus 2 simultaneously. Some earlier serial
number airplanes certified outside the United States
may have the split avionics master switch installed.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
I
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
IELECTRICAL SYSTEM (Continued)
IAVIONICS MASTER SWITCH (Continued)
No electrical power will be supplied to the avionics equipment
with the avionics master switch in the OFF position (regardless of
the position of the master switch or the individual equipment
switches). The avionics master switch should be placed in the OFF
position prior to turning the master switch on or off.
Each avionics bus has a circuit breaker installed between the
primary bus and the avionics master switch. In the event of an
electrical malfunction, this breaker will trip and take the affected
avionics bus off-line.
AMMETER
The vacuum gage/ammeter is located on the lower left side of the
instrument panel. It indicates the amount of current, in amperes,
from the alternator to the battery or from the battery to the airplane
electrical system. When the engine is operating and the master
switch is turned on, the ammeter indicates the charging rate applied
to the battery. In the event the alternator is not functioning or the
electrical load exceeds the output of the alternator, the ammeter
indicates the battery discharge rate.
LOW VOLTAGE ANNUNCIATION
The low voltage warning annunciator is incorporated in the
annunciator panel and activates any time voltage falls below 24.5
volts. If low voltage is detected, the red annunciator VOLTS will
flash for approximately 10 seconds before illuminating steadily. The
pilot cannot tum off the annunciator.
In the event an overvoltage condition occurs, the alternator
control unit automatically trips the ALT FLD circuit breaker,
removing alternator field current and shutting down the alternator.
The battery will then supply system current as shown by a
discharge rate on the ammeter. Under these conditions, depending
on electrical system load, the low voltage warning annunciator will
illuminate when system voltage drops below normal.
(Continued Next Page)
17-52
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM (Continued)
LOW VOLTAGE ANNUNCIATION (Continued)
The alternator control unit may be reset by resetting the circuit
breaker. If the annunciator extinguishes, normal alternator charging
has resumed; however, if the annunciator illuminates again, a malfunction has occurred, and the flight should be terminated as soon
as practical.
NOTE
Illumination of the low voltage annunciator and
ammeter discharge indications may occur during low
RPM conditions with an electrical load on the
system, such as during a low RPM taxi. Under
these conditions, the annunciator will go out at
higher RPM.
CIRCUIT BREAKERS AND FUSES
All circuit breakers inside the airplane are of the "push to reset"
or "switch/breaker'' type. The power distribution module (J-Box)
uses either "push to reset" circuit breakers or spade type
(automotive style) fuses. One glass type fuse is also used to
provide power to the clock.
On aircraft using spade type fuses in the power distribution
module (J-Box), a spare fuse is also included. If the spare fuse is
used, a replacement spare should be obtained and reinstalled
before the next flight.
GROUND SERVICE PLUG RECEPTACLE
A ground service receptacle plug is integral to the power
distribution module and allows the use of an external power source
for cold weather starting, and during lengthy maintenance work on
electrical and avionics equipment. The receptacle is located on the
left side of the airplane near the firewall. Access to the receptacle
is gained by removing the cover plate.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
I
I
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
IELECTRICAL SYSTEM (Continued)
IGROUND SERVICE PLUG RECEPTACLE (Continued)
The ground service plug receptacle incorporates a circuit which
will close the battery contactor when external power is applied with
the master switch turned on. This circuit is intended as a servicing
aid when battery power is too low to close the contactor, and should
not be used to avoid performing proper maintenance procedures on
a low battery.
NOTE
Use of the ground service plug receptacle for
starting an airplane with "dead" battery or charging
a "dead" battery In the airplane is not
recommended. The battery should be removed from
the airplane and serviced in accordance with
Maintenance Manual procedures. Failure to observe
this precaution could result in loss of electrical
power during flight.
NOTE
If no avionics equipment is to be used or worked on,
the avionics master switch should be turned off. If
maintenance is required on the avionics equipment,
it is advisable to utilize a regulated external power
source to prevent damage to the avionics equipment
by transient voltage.
Do not crank or start the
engine with the avionics master switch turned on.
NOTE
Just before connecting an external power source
(generator type or battery cart), the avionics master
switch and the master switch should be turned off.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
ELECTRICAL SYSTEM (Continued)
I
GROUND SERVICE PLUG RECEPTACLE (Continued)
I
If there is any question as to the condition of the battery and/or
alternator, the following check should be made after engine has
been started and external power source has been removed.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Master Switch - - OFF.
Taxi and Landing Light Switches - - ON.
Engine RPM - - REDUCE to idle.
Master Switch - - ON (with taxi and landing lights turned on).
Engine RPM - - INCREASE to approximately 1500 RPM.
Ammeter and Low Voltage Annunciator - - CHECK.
NOTE
If the ammeter does not show a charge or the low
voltage warning annunciator does not go out, the
battery should be removed from the airplane and
properly serviced prior to flight.
LIGHTING SYSTEMS
EXTERIOR LIGHTING
Exterior lighting consists of navigation lights on the wing tips and
tip of the stinger, landing/taxi lights located in the left wing leading
edge, a flashing beacon mounted on top of the vertical fin, and a
strobe light on each wing tip. In addition, two courtesy lights are
recessed into the lower surface of each wing and provide
illumination for each cabin door area.
The exterior courtesy lights are turned on by pressing the
courtesy light switch located in the pilot's overhead console.
Pressing the courtesy light switch again will extinguish the lights.
The remaining exterior lights are operated by switch/breakers
located on the lower left instrument panel. To activate these lights,
place switch in the ON position. To deactivate light, place in the
OFF position.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
7-ssl
SECTION7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ILIGHTING SYSTEMS (Continued)
IEXTERIOR LIGHTING (Continued)
NOTE
The strobes and flashing beacon should not be used
when flying through clouds or overcast; the flashing
light reflected from water droplets or particles in the
atmosphere, particularly at night, can produce
vertigo and loss of orientation.
INTERIOR LIGHTING
Interior lighting is controlled by a combination of overhead flood
lighting, glareshield lighting, pedestal lighting, panel lighting, radio
lighting and pilot control wheel lighting.
Flood lighting is accomplished using two lights in the front and
two dome lights in the rear. These lights are contained in the
overhead console. The two rear lights are turned on and off with
push-type switches located near each light and are fixed position
lights that provide for general illumination in the rear cabin area.
The two front lights are individually dimmable from two knobs
located next to the lights, rotating the knob clockwise for maximum
brightness. These two lights provide lighting for the pilot and front
passenger.
Glareshield lighting is accomplished using a fluorescent light
molded into the glareshield. This light is controlled by rotating the
GLARESHIELD LT dimmer, located below the pilot's panel.
Rotating the dimmer clockwise increases light intensity, and rotating
the dimmer counterclockwise decreases light intensity.
(Continued Next Page)
17-56
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
LIGHTING SYSTEMS (Continued)
INTERIOR LIGHTING (Continued)
I
I
Pedestal lighting consists of a single, hooded light located above
the fuel selector an two lights located above the trim wheels. These
lights are controlled by rotating the PEDESTAL LT dimmer, located
below the pilot's panel. Rotating the dimmer clockwise increases
light intensity, and rotating the dimmer counterclockwise decreases
light intensity.
Panel lighting is accomplished using individual lights mounted in
each instrument and gauge. These lights are wired in parallel and
are controlled by the PANEL LT dimmer, located below the pilot's
panel. Rotating the dimmer clockwise increases light intensity, and
rotating the dimmer counterclockwise decreases light intensity.
Back lighting intensity for radios and instrument lighting for the RH
nav indicators, in the pilot's panel, is controlled by the TST (TEST) BRT (DAY) - DIM (NIGHT) switch. When the switch is in the BRT
(DAY) position, this lighting may be off regardless of the RADIO LT
dimmer position. Some earlier aircraft will always have this lighting
controlled by the RADIO LT dimmer.
Pilot control wheel lighting is accomplished by use of a rheostat
and light assembly, located underneath the pilot control wheel yoke.
The light provides downward illumination from the bottom of the
yoke to the pilot's lap area. Rotating the dimmer clockwise (as
viewed from below the wheel) increases light intensity, and rotating
the dimmer counterclockwise decreases light intensity.
Regardless of the light system in question, the most probable
cause of a light failure is a burned out bulb. However, in the event
any of the lighting systems fail to illuminate when turned on, check
the appropriate circuit breaker. If the circuit breaker has tripped,
and there is no obvious indication of a short circuit (smoke or odor),
turn off the light switch of the affected lights, reset the breaker, and
turn the switch on again. If the breaker opens again, do not reset it
until maintenance has been performed.
Revision 5
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CABIN HEATING, VENTILATING AND
DEFROSTING SYSTEM
The temperature and volume of airflow into the cabin can be
regulated by manipulation of the push-pull CABIN HT and CABIN
AIR controls (Refer to Figure 7-8). When partial cabin heat is
desired, blending warm and cold air will result in improved
ventilation and heat distribution throughout the cabin. Additional
outside air for summer ventilation is provided through the heat and
vent system by operation of the push-pull AUX CABIN AIR knob. All
three control knobs are the double button type with locks to permit
intermediate settings.
Front cabin heat and ventilating air Is supplied by outlet holes
spaced across a cabin manifold just forward of the pilot's and
copilot's feet. Rear cabin heat and air is supplied by three ducts
from the manifold, one outlet at each front doorpost area at floor
level and one extending under the center of the cabin floor to an
outlet in the floor behind the pilot and copilot seats. The cabin floor
outlet is flush mounted, with a removable airflow diverter.
Windshield defrost air is also supplied by a duct from the cabin
manifold an outlet on top of the glareshield; therefore, the
temperature of the defrosting air is the same as heated cabin air. A
rotating control knob, labeled DEFROST, regulates the volume of air
to the windshield.
Turn the knob clockwise to ON and
counterclockwise to OFF. Earlier serial airplanes have a push - pull
control to regulate the volume of defrost air.
Additional cabin ventilation can be obtained from separate
adjustable ventilators, one near each upper corner of the windshield
and one near each forward cabin sidewall area just below the
windshield sill area for the pilot and copilot. Four adjustable
ventilators are in the cabin ceiling adjacent to the center and rear
seat passengers.
(Continued Next Page)
17-58
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION?
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
EXHAUST
MUFFLER
SHROUD
RAM AIR INLET
(ENGINE COMPARTMENT)
CABIN HEAT CONTROL
HEATER VALVE
FRONT CABIN
AIR OUTLET
(TYPICAL)
AUXILIARY
VENTILATING
AIR DOOR
VENTILATING
AIR DOOR
AUX CABIN
AIR CONTROL
WING LEADING
EDGE INTAKE
(TYPICAL)
CABIN FLOOR
AIR OUTLET
(TYPICAL)
CABIN LOWER
AIR OUTLETS
ADJUSTABLE
VENTILATOR
(TYPICAL)
ROTATABLE
FLOORBOARD
AIR OUTLET
ADJUSTABLE
CENTER
OVERHEAD
VENTILATORS
(TYPICAL)
¢
ADJUSTABLE AFT
OVERHEAD
VENTILATORS
(TYPICAL)
RAM AIR FLOW
¢.
VENTILATINGAIR
+-
HEATEDAIR
+. BLENDED AIR
--- MECHANICAL
CONNECTION
1285X10 11
Figure 7-10. Cabin Heating, Ventilating, and Defrosting System
Revision 5
SECTION?
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
IOXYGEN SYSTEM (Continued)
A six-place oxygen system provides the supplementary oxygen
necessary for continuous flight at high altitude. In this system, a 76
cubic foot oxygen cylinder, located in the fuselage tailcone, supplies
the oxygen. Cylinder pressure is reduced to an operating pressure
of 70 PSI by a pressure regulator attached to the cylinder. A shutoff
valve is included as part of the regulator assembly. An oxygen
cylinder filler valve is located on the left side of the fuselage tailcone
(under a cover plate). Cylinder pressure is indicated by a pressure
gauge located in the overhead oxygen console above the pilot's and
front passenger's seats.
Six oxygen outlets are provided; two in the overhead oxygen
console and four in the cabin ceiling just above the side windows
(one at each of the rear seating positions). One permanent,
microphone-equipped mask is provided for the pilot, and five
disposable type masks are provided for the passengers. All masks
are the partial-breathing type, equipped with vinyl plastic hoses and
flow indicators.
NOTE
The hose provided for the pilot is of a higher flow
rate than those for the passengers; it is color-coded
with a red band adjacent to the plug-in fitting. The
passenger hoses are color-coded with an orange
band. If the airplane owner prefers, he may provide
higher flow hoses for all passengers. In any case, it
is recommended that the pilot use the larger capacity
hose.
The pilot's mask is equipped with a
microphone to facilitate use of the radio while using
oxygen. An adapter cord is furnished with the
microphone-equipped mask to mate the mask
microphone lead to the auxiliary microphone jack
located on the left side of the instrument panel.
(Continued Next Page)
17-60
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
OXYGEN SYSTEM (Continued}
I
To connect the oxygen mask microphone, connect
the mask lead to the adapter cord and plug the cord
into the auxiliary microphone jack. (If an optional
microphone-headset combination has been in use,
the microphone lead from this equipment is already
plugged into the auxiliary microphone jack. It will be
necessary to disconnect this lead from the auxiliary
microphone jack so that the adapter cord from the
oxygen mask microphone can be plugged into the
jack.} A switch is incorporated on the left hand
control wheel to operate the microphone.
A remote shutoff valve control, located adjacent to the pilot's
oxygen outlet in the overhead oxygen console, is used to shut off
the supply of oxygen to the system when not in use. The control is
mechanically connected to the shutoff valve at the cylinder. With
the exception of the shutoff function, the system is completely
automatic and requires no manual regulation for change of altitude.
AwARNING
OIL, GREASE OR OTHER LUBRICANTS IN
CONTACT WITH OXYGEN CREATE A SERIOUS
FIRE HAZARD, AND SUCH CONTACT MUST BE
AVOIDED
WHEN
HANDLING
OXYGEN
EQUIPMENT.
(Continued Next Page}
Revision 5
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
OXYGEN DURATION CHART
(76 CUBIC FEET CAPACITY)
1800
lS
1600
,._"' b.._ ~
...
1400
ai
!!:.1200
Q,
""
~'v
ri
"'-
~'<
0
;,.,
w
~ 1000
00
Cl)
~ 800
Cl.
UJ
g
600
400
200
0
0
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
OXYGEN DURAT ION - (HOURS)
NOTE:
THIS CHART IS BASED ON A PILOT WITH A RED COLOR · CODED OXYGEN
LINE FITTING AND PASSENGERS WITH ORANGE COLOR • CODED LINE FITTINGS.
1285T1022
Figure 7-11. Oxygen Duration Chart
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
OXYGEN SYSTEM (Continued)
I
The Oxygen Duration Chart (Figure 7-11) should be used in
determining the usable duration (in hours) of the oxygen supply in
your airplane. The following procedure outlines the method of
finding the duration from the cha~.
1. Note the available oxygen pressure shown on the pressure
gauge.
2. Locate this pressure on the scale on the left side of the chart,
then go across the chart horizontally to the right until you
intersect the line representing the number of persons making
the flight. After intersecting the line, drop down vertically to the
bottom of the chart and read the duration in hours given on
the scale.
3. As an example of the above procedure, 1800 PSI of pressure
will safely sustain the pilot only for 8 hours and 15 minutes.
The same pressure will sustain the pilot and three passengers
for approximately 2 hours and 50 minutes.
NOTE
The Oxygen Duration Chart is based on a standard
configuration oxygen system having one red colorcoded hose assembly for the pilot and orange colorcoded hoses for the passengers. If red color-coded
hoses are provided for pilot and passengers, it will
be necessary to compute new oxygen duration
figures due to the greater consumption of oxygen
with these hoses.
This is accomplished by
computing the total duration available to the pilot
only (from PILOT ONLY line on chart), then dividing
this duration by the number of persons (pilot and
passengers) using oxygen.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
SECTION7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
IOXYGEN SYSTEM (Continued)
When ready to use the oxygen system, proceed as follows:
1. Mask and Hose - SELECT. Adjust mask to face and adjust
metallic nose strap for snug mask fit.
,&WARNING
PERMIT NO SMOKING WHEN USING OXYGEN.
OIL, GREASE, SOAP, LIPSTICK, LIP BALM, AND
OTHER FATTY MATERIALS CONSTITUTE A
SERIOUS FIRE HAZARD WHEN IN CONTACT
WITH OXYGEN.
BE SURE HANDS AND
CLOTHING ARE OIL FREE BEFORE HANDLING
OXYGEN EQUIPMENT.
2. Delivery Hose - PLUG INTO OUTLET nearest to the seat you
are occupying.
NOTE
When the oxygen system is turned on, oxygen will
flow continuously at the proper rate of flow for any
altitude without any manual adjustments.
3. Oxygen Supply Control Knob -- ON.
4. Face Mask Hose Flow Indicator - CHECK. Oxygen is flowing
if the indicator is being forced toward the mask.
5. Delivery Hose - UNPLUG from outlet when discontinuing use
of oxygen This automatically stops the flow of oxygen.
6. Oxygen Supply Control Knob - OFF when oxygen is no
longer required.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
OXYGEN SYSTEM (Continued)
For FAA requirements concerning supplemental oxygen, refer to
FAR 91.32. Supplemental oxygen should be used by all occupants
when cruising above 12,500 feet. It is often advisable to use
oxygen at altitudes lower than 12,500 feet under conditions of night
flying, fatigue, or periods of physiological or emotional disturbances.
Also, habitual and excessive use of tobacco or alcohol will usually
necessitate the use of oxygen at less than 10,000 feet.
PITOT-STATIC SYSTEM AN.D INSTRUMENTS
The pitot-static system supplies dynamic air pressure to the
airspeed indicator and static pressure to the airspeed indicator,
vertical speed indicator and altimeter. The systems are composed
of a heated pitot tube mounted on the lower surface of the left wing,
two external static ports on the lower left and right sides of the
forward fuselage, an alternate static source valve and the
associated plumbing necessary to connect the instruments to the
sources.
The heated pitot system consists of a heating element in the pitot
tube, a 10-amp switch/breaker labeled PITOT HEAT, and associated
wiring. The switch/breaker is located on the lower left side of the
instrument panel. When the pilot heat switch is turned on, the
element in the pitot tube is heated electrically to maintain proper
operation in possible icing conditions.
A static pressure alternate source valve is installed above the
throttle, and can be used if the external static source is
malfunctioning. This valve supplies static pressure from inside the
cabin instead of the external static port.
If erroneous instrument readings are suspected due to water or
ice in the pressure lines going to the standard external static
pressure source, the alternate static source valve should be pulled
on.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
I
SECTION?
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
I
PITOT-STATIC SYSTEM AND INSTRUMENTS
(Continued)
Pressures within the cabin will vary with open heater/vents and
windows. Refer to Section 5 for the configuration applicable to the
use of the alternate static source and the correction charts.
AIRSPEED INDICATOR
The airspeed indicator is calibrated in knots. It incorporates an
internal, rotatable ring which allows true airspeed to be read off the
face of the dial. The indicator incorporates windows at the six and
twelve o'clock positions. The window at the six o'clock position
displays true airspeed, and the window at the twelve o'clock
position displays pressure altitude overlayed with a temperature
scale.
Limitation and range markings (in KIAS) include the white arc (47
to 100 knots), green arc (59 to 149 knots}, yellow arc (149 to 182
knots), and a red line (182 knots).
To find true airspeed, first determine pressure altitude and
outside air temperature. Using this data, rotate the lower left knob
until pressure altitude aligns with outside air temperature in the
twelve o'dock window. True airspeed (corrected for pressure and
temperature) can now be read in the six o'clock window. For
maximum accuracy the true airspeed should be read opposite the
calibration airspeed.
VERTICAL SPEED INDICATOR
The vertical speed indicator depicts airplane rate of climb or
descent in feet per minute. The pointer is actuated by atmospheric
pressure changes resulting from changes of altitude as supplied by
the static source ..
ALTIMETER
Airplane altitude is depicted by a barometric type altimeter. A
knob near the lower left portion of the indicator provides adjustment
of the instrument's barometric scale to the current altimeter setting.
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
VACUUM SYSTEM AND INSTRUMENTS
The vacuum system (Refer to Figure 7-12) provides vacuum
necessary to operate the attitude indicator and directional indicator.
The system consists of two engine driven vacuum pumps, two
switches for measuring vacuum available through each pump, a
vacuum relief valve, a vacuum system air filter, vacuum operated
instruments, a vacuum gage, a low vacuum warning on the
annunciator, and a manifold with check valves to allow for normal
vacuum system operation if one of the vacuum pumps should fail.
ATTITUDE INDICATOR
The attitude indicator is a vacuum/air-driven gyro that gives a
visual indication of flight attitude. Bank attitude is presented by a
pointer at the top of the indicator relative to the bank scale which
has index marks at 10°, 20°, 30°, 60°, and 90° either side of the
center mark. Pitch and roll attitudes are presented by a miniature
airplane superimposed over a symbolic horizon area divided into
two sections by a white horizon bar. The upper "blue sky" area and
the lower "ground" area have pitch reference lines useful for pitch
attitude control. A knob at the bottom of the instrument is provided
for in-flight adjustment of the miniature airplane to the horizon bar
for a more accurate flight attitude indication.
DIRECTIONAL INDICATOR
The directional indicator is a vacuum/air - driven gyro that
displays airplane heading on a compass card in relation to a f1Xed
simulated airplane image and index. The indicator will precess
slightly over a period of time. Therefore, the compass card should
be set with the magnetic compass just prior to takeoff and
readjusted as required throughout the flight. A knob on the lower
left edge of the instrument is used to adjust the compass card to
correct for precession. A knob on the lower right edge of the
instrument is used to move the heading bug.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
SECTION7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CODE
INLET AIR
VACUUM
DISCHARGE
AIR
LOW VACUUM
SWITCHES
(CONNECTED TO
ANNUNCIATOR
PANEL)
MANIFOLD
CHECK VALVE
VACUUM
SYSTEM
AIR FILTER
VACUUM
GAGE/
AMMETER
DIRECTIONAL
INDICATOR
01esc1013
Figure 7-12. Vacuum System Schematic
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
VACUUM SYSTEM AND INSTRUMENTS (Continued)
VACUUM GAGE
The vacuum gage is part of the vacuum gage/ammeter, located
on the lower left corner of the Instrument panel. It is calibrated in
inches of mercury and indicates vacuum air available for operation
of the attitude and directional indicators.
During operation at
altitudes below 15,000 feet, the desired vacuum range is 4.5 to 5.5
inches of mercury. A vacuum reading out of this range at altitudes
below 15,000 feet may indicate a system malfunction or improper
adjustment, and in this case, the indicators should not be
considered reliable. At 15,000 feet and above, the vacuum gage
may indicate below 4.5 in. Hg. and still be adequate for normal
vacuum system operation. A minimum vacuum gage reading of 4.5
in. Hg. is acceptable at 15,000 feet; for each additional 5000 foot
altitude increment, up to 30,000 feet, a decrease of 0.5 in. Hg. is
acceptable.
LOW VACUUM ANNUNCIATION
....__..
Each engine driven vacuum pump is plumbed to a common tee,
located forward of the firewall. From the tee, a single line runs into
the cabin to operate the various vacuum system instruments. This
tee contains check valves to prevent back flow into a pump if it fails.
Transducers are located just upstream of the tee and measure
vacuum output of each pump.
If output of the left pump falls below 3.0 in. Hg., the amber L VAC
message will flash on the annunciator panel for approximately 10
seconds before turning steady on. If output of the right pump falls
below 3.0 in. Hg., the amber VAC R message will flash on the
annunciator panel for approximately 10 seconds before turning
steady on. If output of both pumps falls below 3.0 in. Hg., the
amber L VAC R message will flash on the annunciator panel for
approximately 10 seconds before turning steady on.
Revision 5
I
SECTION7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CLOCK/O.A.T. INDICATOR
An integrated clock/O.A.T./voltmeter is installed in the upper left
side of the instrument panel as standard equipment.
For a
complete description and operating instructions, refer to the
Supplements, Section 9.
STALL WARNING SYSTEM
The airplane is equipped with a vane-type stall warning system,
in the leading edge of the left wing, which is electrically connected
to a stall warning horn located in the headliner above the left cabin
door. A 5-amp push-to-reset circuit breaker labeled WARN, on the
right side of the switch and control panel, protects the sta!I warning
system. The vane in the wing senses the change in airflow over the
wing, and operates the warning horn at airspeeds between 5 and 10
knots above the stall in all configurations.
The airplane has a heated stall warning system, the vane and
sensor unit in the wing leading edge is equipped with a heating
element. The heated part of the system is operated and protected
by the PITOT HEAT switch/breaker.
The stall warning system should be checked during the preflight
inspection by momentarily turning on the master switch and
actuating the vane in the wing. The system is operational if the
warning horn sounds as the vane is pushed upward.
STANDARD AVIONICS
Standard avionics for the Model T206H airplanes include the
following equipment:
Nav/Com Radio with Glide Slope
Indicator Head
Transponder
Audio Panel
Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT)
Global Positioning System (GPS)
Single Axis Autopilot
(Continued Next Page)
17-70
Revision 5
SECTION7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
I
STANDARD AVIONICS (Continued)
For complete operating instructions on the standard and optional
avionics systems, refer to the Supplements, Section 9.
AVIONICS SUPPORT EQUIPMENT
Avionics operations are supported by the avionics cooling fan.
microphone and headset installations and static discharge wicks.
AVIONICS COOLING FAN
An avionics cooling fan is installed on the left side of the interior
firewall. The system utilizes a single electric fan and associated
ductwork to force-cool the center stack radios.
Power to the electric fan is supplied through the AVN FAN circuit
breaker. The fan operates whenever the master and avionics
master switches are ON.
MICROPHONE AND HEADSET INSTALLATIONS
...___
Standard equipment for the airplane includes a handheld
microphone, an overhead speaker, two remote-keyed microphone
switches on the control wheel, and provisions for boom
mic/headsets at each pilot and passenger station.
The handheld microphone contains an integral push-to-talk
switch. This microphone is plugged into the center pedestal and is
accessible to both the pilot and front passenger. Depressing the
push-to-talk switch allows audio transmission on the Com radios.
The overhead speaker is located in the center overhead console.
Volume and output for this speaker is controlled through the audio
panel.
(Continued Next Page)
..__
Revision 5
7-11
I
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
IAVIONICS SUPPORT EQUIPMENT (Continued)
IMICROPHONE AND HEADSET INSTALLATIONS (Continued)
Each control wheel contains a miniature push-to-talk switch. This
switch allows the pilot or front passenger to transmit on the Com
radios using remote mies.
Each station of the airplane is wired for aviation-style headsets.
Mic and headphone jacks are located on each respective arm rest
and allow for communications between passengers and pilot. The
system is wired so that microphones are all voice-activated.
Additional wiring provisions inside the audio panel ensure that only
the pilot or front passenger can transmit through the Com radios.
NOTE
To ensure audibility and clarity when transmitting
with the handheld microphone, always hold it as
closely as possible to the lips, then key the
microphone and speak directly into it.
Avoid
covering opening on back side of microphone for
optimum noise canceling.
STATIC DISCHARGERS
Static wicks (static dischargers) are installed at various points
throughout the airframe to reduce interference from precipitation
static. Under some severe static conditions, loss of radio signals is
possible even with static dischargers installed. Whenever possible,
avoid known severe precipitation areas to prevent loss of
dependable radio signals. If avoidance is impractical, minimize
airspeed and anticipate temporary loss of radio signals while in
these areas.
Static dischargers lose their effectiveness with age, and
therefore, should be checked periodically (at least at every annual
inspection) by qualified avionics technicians, etc.
17-72
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CABIN FEATURES
EMERGENCY LOCATOR TRANSMITTER (ELT)
A remote switch/annunciator is installed on the top center
location of the copilot's instrument panel for control of the ELT from
the flight crew station. The annunciator, which is in the center of
the rocker switch, illuminates when the ELT transmitter is
transmitting. The ELT emits an omni-directional signal on the
international distress frequencies of 121.5 MHz and 243.0 MHz.
General aviation and commercial aircraft, the FAA and CAP monitor
121.5 MHz, and 243.0 Mhz is monitored by the military. For a basic
overview of the ElT, refer to the Supplements, Section 9.
CABIN FIRE EXTINGUISHER
A portable Halon 1211 (Bromochlorodifluoromethane) fire
extinguisher is installed on the floorboard between the pilot's and
copilot's seats where it is accessible in case of fire.
The
extinguisher has an Underwriters Laboratories classification of 5B:C.
The extinguisher should be checked prior to each flight to ensure
that its bottle pressure, as indicated by the gauge on the bottle, is
within the green arc (approximately 125 psi) and the operating lever
lock pin is securely in place.
To operate the fire extinguisher:
1. Loosen retaining clamp(s) and remove extinguisher from
bracket.
2. Hold extinguisher upright, pull operating lever lock pin, and
press lever while directing the discharge at the base of the fire
at the near edge. Progress toward the back of the fire by
moving the nozzle rapidly with a side to side sweeping motion.
(Continued Next Page)
Revision 5
7-731
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE & SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
ICABIN FEATURES (Continued)
lcABIN FIRE EXTINGUISHER (Continued)
AwARNING
VENTILATE THE CABIN PROMPTLY AFTER
SUCCESSFULLY EXTINGUISHING THE FIRE TO
REDUCE THE GASES PRODUCED BY THERMAL
DECOMPOSITION.
3. Anticipate approximately eight seconds of discharge duration.
Fire extinguishers should be recharged by a qualified fire
extinguisher agency after each use. Such agencies are listed under
"Fire Extinguisher" in the telephone directory. After recharging,
secure the extinguisher to its mounting bracket; do not allow It to lie
loose on shelves or seats.
17-74
Revision 5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
SECTION 8
AIRPLANE HANDLING, SERVICE
& MAINTENANCE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
-
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identification Plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cessna Owner Advisories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
United States Airplane Owners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
International Airplane Owners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Airplane File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Airplane Inspection Periods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FAA Required Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cessna Inspection Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • .
Cessna Customer Care Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pilot Conducted Preventive Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alterations Or Repairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ground Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Towing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tie-Down . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jacking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Leveling . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flyable Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . .
Servicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oil Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recommended Viscosity for Temperature Range . . . . . . .
Nov 9/98
Page
8-3
8-3
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-5
8-6
8-7
8-7
8-7
8-8
8-8
8-9
8-9
8-9
8-10
8 -1 O
8-10
8 -11
8-11
8-12
8-13
8 -1 3
8-13
8-1
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)
Page
Capacity of Engine Sump . . • ...... . ....... . . .....
Oil and Oil Filter Change . . .. . ... ... . . . . . ... . . . . . .
Fuel .. . ...... . ....... . ... . .. . . ... . ... ... . . . .. .
Approved Fuel Grades . . . ... . .. . . .. . .. . ..... . .. .
Fuel Capacity . . . ... .... . . . . . . . . . . • .. ...... .. . .
Fuel Additives ... ... . . ....... . .. . . ... . ... .... . .
Fuel Contamination ..
Oxygen Filling Pressures . . . . .. .. ..... .. . • ... ... . . ..
Landing Gear . . . .... . . ... . . .. ..... . .•... . .. .... .
Cleaning And Care . . .. ..... ... . . . ... . . ....... . . . .
Windshield And W indows . . . . . ..... .... • .. ... . • . .
Painted Surfaces . . . . ....... . .. . . .. .. . . . . . . .... .
Stabilizer Abrasion Boot Care . ....... . ..... . .. .. . .
Propeller Care . . ..... . ...... .. ... . . . ... . .. . . . .
Anti-Ice Boot Care . ... . . . • . .. .... • ......... . ....
Engine Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... ... . . . • . . . . . . .. • . .
Interior Care .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .... . . • .. . .. . . .. ..
8-2
8-14
8-14
8-15
8-15
8-15
8-15
8- 19
8-20
8-21
8-21
8-21
8-22
8-23
8-23
8-23
8-25
8-25
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
INTRODUCTION
This section contains factory recommended procedures for
proper ground handling and routine care and servicing of your
airplane. It also identifies certain inspection and maintenancel
requirements which must be followed if your airplane is to retain that_
new airplane performance and dependability. It is important to followl
a planned schedule of lubrication and preventive maintenance
based on climatic and flying conditions encountered in your locall
area.
takel
Keep in touch with your local Cessna Service Station and
advantage of their knowledge and experience. Your Cessna Service
Station knows your airplane and how to maintain it, and will remind
you when lubrications and oil changes are necessary, as well as
other seasonal and periodic services.
The airplane should be regularly inspected and maintained in
accordance with information found in the airplane
manual and in company issued service bulletins and service
newsletters. All service bulletins pertaining to the aircraft by serial
number should be accomplished and the airplane should receive
repetitive and required inspections. Cessna does not condone
modifications, whether by Supplemental Type Certificate o
otherwise, unless these certificates are held and/or approved by
Cessna. other modifications may void warranties on the airplane
since Cessna has no way of knowing the full effect on the overall
airplane. Operation of an airplane that has been modified may be a
risk to the occupants, and operating procedures and performance
data set forth in the operating handbook may no longer bel
considered accurate for the modified airplane.
maintenancel
IDENTIFICATION PLATE
All correspondence regarding your airplane should include the
Serial Number. The Serial Number, Model Number, Production
Certificate Number (PC) and Type Certificate Number (TC) can be
found on the Identification Plate, located on the aft left tailcone. A
secondary identification plate is also installed on the lower part of
the left forward doorpost.
Located adjacent to the secondary
Identification Plate is a Finish and Trim Plate which contains a code
describing the exterior paint combination of the airplane. The code
may be used in conjunction with an applicable Illustrated Parts
Catalog if finish and trim information is needed.
May 30/01
8-3
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CESSNA OWNER ADVISORIES
Cessna Owner Advisories are sent to Cessna Aircraft FAA
registered owners of record at no charge to inform them about
mandatory and/or beneficial aircraft service requirements and
product changes. Copies of the actual bulletins are available from
Cessna Service Stations and Cessna Customer Service.
I
UNITED STATES AIRPLANE OWNERS
If your airplane is registered in the U.S., appropriate Cessna
Owner Advisories will be mailed to you automatically according to
the latest aircraft registration name and address which you have
provided to the FAA. Therefore, it is important that you provide
correct and up-to-date mailing information to the FAA.
If you require a duplicate Owner Advisory to be sent to an
address different from the FAA aircraft registration address, please
complete and return an Owner Advisory Application (otherwise no
action is required on your part).
INTERNATIONAL AIRPLANE OWNERS
To receive Cessna Owner Advisories, please complete and
return an Owner Advisory Application.
Receipt of a valid Owner Advisory Application will establish your
Cessna Owner Advisory service for one year, after which you will be
sent a renewal notice. It Is important that you respond promptly to
update your address for this critical service.
I
8-4
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
PUBLICATIONS
Various publications and flight operation aids are furnished in the
airplane when delivered from the f actory. These Items are listed
below.
Customer Care Program Handbook
Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual
Pilot's Checklist
Passenger Briefing Card
Cessna Sales and Service Directory
To obtain additional publications or owner advisory information,
you may contact Cessna's Product Support Department at (316)
517-5800. Fax (316) 942-9006 or write to Cessna Aircraft Company.I
P.O. Box 7706, Wichita, KS 67277, Dept 751C.
The following additional publications, plus many other supplies
that are applicable to your airplane, are available from your local
Cessna Service Station.
Information Manual (contains Pilot's Operating Handbook
Information)
Maintenance Manual, Wiring Diagram Manual and
Illustrated Parts Catalog
Your local Cessna Service Station has a Customer Care Supplies
and Publications Catalog covering all available items, many of which
the Service Station keeps on hand. The Service Station can place
an order for any item which is not in stock.
NOTE
A Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane
Flight Manual which is lost or destroyed may be replaced by
contacting your local Cessna Service Station. An affidavit
containing the owner's name, a irplane serial number and
reason for replacement must be included in replacement
requests since the Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA
Approved Airplane Flight Manual is Identified for specific
serial numbered airplanes only.
Jan 18/02
I
8-5
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
AIRPLANE FILE
There are miscellaneous data, information and licenses that are a
part of the airplane file. The following is a checklist for that file. In
addition, a periodic check should be made of the latest Federal
Aviation Regulations to ensure that all data requirements are met.
To be displayed in the airplane at all times:
1. Aircraft Airworthiness Certificate (FAA Form 8100-2).
2. Aircraft Registration Certificate (FAA Form 8050-3).
3. Aircraft Radio Station License, (if applicable).
To be carried in the airplane at all times:
I
1. Current Pilot's Operating Handbook and FAA Approved
Airplane Flight Manual.
2. Weight and Balance, and associated papers (latest copy of the
Repair and Alteration Form, FAA Form 337, if applicable).
3. Equipment List.
To be made available upon request:
1. Airplane Log Book.
2. Engine Log Book.
Most of the items listed are required by the United States Federal
Aviation Regulations. Since the Regulations of other nations may
require other documents and data, owners of airplanes not
registered in the United States should check with their own aviation
officials to determine their individual requirements.
Cessna recommends that these items, plus the Pilot's Checklists,
Customer Care Program Handbook and Customer Care Card, be
carried in the airplane at all times.
8-6
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
AIRPLANE INSPECTION PERIODS
FAA REQUIRED INSPECTIONS
As required by U.S. Federal Aviation Regulations, all civil aircraft
of U.S. registry must undergo a complete inspection (annual) each
twelve calendar months. In addition to the required annual
inspection, aircraft operated commercially (for hire) must have a
complete inspection every 100 hours of operation.
The FAA may require other inspections by the issuance of
airworthiness directives applicable to the airplane, engine, propeller
and components. It is the responsibility of the owner/operator to
ensure compliance with all applicable airworthiness directives, and
when the inspections are repetitive, to take appropriate steps to
prevent inadvertent noncompliance.
CESSNA INSPECTION PROGRAMS
"----'
In lieu of the 100 hour and annual inspection requirements, an
airplane may be inspected in accordance w ith a Progressive Carel
Inspection Program or a PhaseCard Inspection Program. Both
programs allow the work load to be divided into smaller operations
that can be accomplished in shorter time periods.
The Cessna Progressive Care Inspection Program allows an
airplane to be inspected and maintained in four operations. The four
operations are recycled each 200 hours and are recorded in a
specially provided Aircraft Inspection Log as each operation is
conducted.
tori
The PhaseCard Inspection Program offers a parallel system
high-utilization flight operations (approximately 600 flight hours per
year). This system utilizes 50 hour intervals (Phase 1 and Phase 2)
to inspect high-usage systems and components. At 12 months or
600 flight hours, whichever occurs first, the airplane undergoes a
complete (Phase 3) inspection.
Regardless of the inspection method selected, the owner should
keep in mind that FAR Part 43 and FAR Part 91 establish the
requirement that properly certified agencies or personnel
accomplish all required FAA inspections and most of the
manufacturer recommended inspections.
May 30/01
8-7
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CESSNA CUSTOMER CARE PROGRAM
Specific benefits and provisions of the Cessna Warranty plus
other important benefits for you are contained in the Customer Care
Program Handbook supplied with your airplane. The Customer Care
Program Handbook should be throughly reviewed and kept in the
airplane at all times.
I
You will also want to return to your Cessna Service Station either
at 50 hours for your first Progressive Care Operation, or at 100
hours for your first 100 hour inspection depending on which
program you choose to establish for your airplane. While these
important inspections will be performed for you by any Cessna
Service Station, in most cases you will prefer to have the Cessna
Service Station from whom you purchased the airplane accomplish
this work.
PILOT CONDUCTED PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
A certified pilot who owns or operates an airplane not used as an
air carrier is authorized by FAR Part 43 to perform limited
maintenance on his airplane. Refer to FAR Part 43 for a list of the
specific maintenance operations which are allowed.
NOTE
Pilots operating airplanes of other than U.S. registry should
refer to the regulations of the country of certification for
information on preventive maintenance that may be
performed by pilots.
8-8
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
A Maintenance Manual must be obtained prior to performing any
preventive maintenance to ensure that proper procedures are
followed. Your local Cessna Service Station should be contacted to~
further information or for required maintenance which must be
accomplished by appropriately licensed personnel.
ALTERATIONS OR REPAIRS
It is essential that the FAA be contacted prior to any alterations. to
the airplane to ensure that airworthiness of the airplane is not
violated. Alterations or repairs to the airplane must be accomplished
by licensed personnel, utiliz.ing only FAA Approved components and
FAA Approved data, such as Cessna Service Bulletins.
GROUND HANDLING
TOWING
The airplane is most easily and safely maneuvered by hand with
the tow bar attached to the nose wheel (the tow bar is stowed
behind the rear passenger seats). When towing with a vehicle, do
not exceed the nose gear turning angle of 35° either side of center,
or damage to the nose landing gear will result.
I
AcAur10N
REMOVE ANY INSTALLED RUDDER LOCK BEFORE
TOWING.
If the airplane is towed or pushed over a rough surface during
hangaring, watch that the normal cushioning action of the nose strut
does not cause excessive vertical movement of the tail and the
resulting contact with low hangar doors or structure. A flat nose tire
or deflated strut will also increase tail height.
May 30/01
8-9
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
PARKING
When parking the airplane, head into the wind and set the
lparking brake. Do not set the parking brake during cold weather
when accumulated moisture may freeze the brakes, or when the
brakes are overheated. Close the cowl flaps, install the control
wheel lock and chock the wheels. In severe weather and high wind
conditions, tie the airplane down as outlined in the following
paragraph.
TIE-DOWN
Proper tie-down procedure is the best precaution against damage
to the parked airplane by gusty or strong winds. To tie-down the
airplane securely, proceed as follows:
1. Set the parking brake and install the control wheel lock.
2. Install a surface control lock over the fin and rudder.
3. Tie sufficiently strong ropes or chains (700 pounds tensile
strength) to the wing, tail and nose tie-down fittings and
secure each rope or chain to a ramp tie-down.
4. Install a pitot tube cover.
JACKING
When a requirement exists to jack the entire airplane off the
ground, or when wing jack points are used in the jacking operation,
refer to the Maintenance Manual for specific procedures and
equipment required.
Individual main gear may be jacked by using the jack pad which
is incorporated in the main landing gear strut step bracket. When
using the individual gear strut jack pad, flexibility of the gear strut
will cause the main wheel to slide inboard as the wheel is raised,
tilting the jack. The jack must then be lowered for a second jacking
operation. Do not jack both main wheels simultaneously using the
individual main gear jack pads.
8-10
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODE:L T206H
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
If nose gear maintenance is required, the nose wheel may be
raised off the ground by pressing down on a tailcone bulkhead, just
forward of the horizontal stabilizer, and allowing the tail to rest on
the tail tie down ring.
AcAUTION
DO NOT APPLY PRESSURE ON THE ELEVATOR
OR HORIZONTAL STABILIZER SURFACES.
WHEN PUSHING ON THE TAILCONE, ALWAYS
APPLY PRESSURE AT A BULKHEAD TO AVOID
BUCKLING THE SKIN.
To assist in raising and holding the nose wheel off the ground,
ground anchors should be utilized at the tail tie down point.
NOTE
Ensure that the nose will be held off the ground under all
conditions by means of suitable stands or supports under
weight supporting bulkheads near the nose of the airplane.
LEVELING
Longitudinal leveling of the airplane is accomplished by placing a
level on leveling screws located on the left side of the tailcone.
Deflate the nose tire and/or lower or raise the nose strut to properly
center the bubble in the level. Corresponding points on both upper
door sills may be used to level the airplane laterally.
FLYABLE STORAGE
Engines in airplanes that are flown only occasionally may n i
achieve normal service life because of internal corrosion. Corrosio
occurs when moisture from the air and the products of combustio
combine to attack cylinder walls and bearing surfaces durin
periods when the airplane is not flown.
Jan 18/02
8-1 1
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
The minimum recommended operating frequency for the engine
is one continuous flight hour (not counting taxi, takeoff and landing
time} with oil temperatures of 165°F to 200°F every 30 days or less
(depending on location and storage conditions}. Airplanes operated
close to oceans, lakes, rivers and in humid regions are in greater
need of engine preservation than airplanes operated in arid regions.
Appropriate engine preservation procedures must be practiced by
the owner or operator of the airplane based on present
environmental conditions and the frequency of airplane activity.
NOTE
The engine manufacturer does not recommend pulling the
engine through by hand during storage periods.
If the airplane is to remain inactive for more than 30 days,
consult the latest revision of Textron Lycoming Service Letter L180
(www. lycoming. textron .com).
SERVICING
In addition to the Preflight Inspection covered in Section 4 of this
handbook, complete servicing, inspection and test requirements for
your airplane are detailed in the Maintenance Manual. The
Maintenance Manual outlines all items which require attention at
specific intervals plus those items which require servicing,
inspection, and/or testing at special intervals.
Since Cessna Service Stations conduct all service, inspection,
and test procedures in accordance with applicable Maintenance
Manuals, it is recommended that you contact your local Cessna
Service Stations concerning these requirements and begin
scheduling your airplane for service at the recommended intervals.
Cessna Progressive Care ensures that these requirements are
accomplished at the required inter,1als to comply with the 100 hour
or annual inspection as previously covered.
8-12
Jan 18/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
Depending on various flight operations, your local Government
Aviation Agency may require additional service, inspections, or
tests. For these regulatory requirements, owners should check with
local aviation officials where the airplane is being operated.
For quick and ready reference, quantities, materials and
specifications for frequently used service items are as follows.
OIL
OIL SPECIFICATION
MIL-L-22851 or SAE J1899 Aviation Grade Ashless Dispersant
Oil: Oil conforming to Textron Lycoming Service Instructions No.
1014, and all revisions and supplements thereto.
The airplane was delivered from the factory with a corrosionpreventive aircraft engine oil. This oil should be drained after the
first 25 hours of operation.
RECOMMENDED VISCOSITY FOR TEMPERATURE RANGE
Multiviscosity or straight grade oil may be used throughout the
year for engine lubrication. Refer to the following table for
temperature verses viscosity ranges.
MIL-L-22851
Temperature
or SAE J1899
Ashless Dispersant Oil
SAE Grade
Above 27°C (80°F)
Above 16°C (60°F)
-1 °c (30°F) to 32°C (90°F)
-18°C (0°F) to 21 °C (70°F)
Below-12°C (10°F)
-18°C (0°F) to 32°C (90°F)
All Temperatures
Jan 18/02
I
60
40 or SO
40
30, 40 or 20W-40
30or 20W-30
20W-S0 or 1SW-SO
1SW-50 or 20W-S0
8-13
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CAPACITY OF ENGINE SUMP
I
The engine has a total capacity of 12 quarts, with the oil filter
accounting for approximately one quart of that total. The engine oil
sump has a capacity of 11 quarts. The engine must not be operated
on less than 6 quarts (as measured by the dipstick). For extended
flights, the engine should be filled to capacity.
OIL AND OIL FILTER CHANGE
After the first 25 hours of operation, drain the engine oil sump
and replace the filter. Refill sump with aviation grade ashless
dispersant oil. Ashless dispersant oil (and oil filter) should be
changed at time intervals set forth by the engine manufacturer.
NOTE
During the first 25 hour oil and filter change, a general
inspection of the overall engine compartment is required.
Items which are not normally checked during a preflight
inspection should be given special attention. Hoses, metal
lines and fittings should be inspected for signs of oil and
fuel leaks, and checked for abrasions, chafing, security,
proper routing and support, and evidence of deterioration.
Inspect the intake and exhaust systems for cracks, evidence
of leakage, and security of attachment. Engine controls and
linkages should be checked for freedom of movement
through their full range, security of attachment and evidence
of wear. Inspect wiring for security, chafing, burning,
defective insulation, loose or broken terminals, heat
deterioration, and corroded terminals. Check the alternator
belt in accordance with Maintenance Manual instructions,
and retighten if necessary. A periodic check of these items
during subsequent servicing operations is recommended.
8-14
Jan 18/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTIONS
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
FUEL
APPROVED FUEL GRADES (AND COLORS)
100LL Grade Aviation Fuel (Blue).
100 Grade Aviation Fuel (Green).
NOTE
lsopropyl alcohol or diethylene glycol monomethyl ether
(DiEGME) may be added to the fuel supply in quantities not
td exceed 1% (alcohol) or 0.15% (DiEGME) of total volume.
Refer to Fuel Additives in later paragraphs for additional
information.
FUEL CAPACITY
92.0 U.S. Gallons Total:
46.0 U.S. Gallons per tank.
NOTE
To ensure maximum fuel capacity when refueling and
minimize cross feeding, the fuel selector valve should be
placed in either the LEFT or RIGHT position and the
airplane parked in a wings level, normal ground attitude.
Refer to Figure 1-1 for a definition of normal ground attitude.
Service the fuel system after each flight, and keep fuel tanks
full to minimize condensation in the tanks.
FUEL ADDITIVES
Strict adherence to recommended preflight draining instructions
as called for in Section 4 will eliminate any free water
accumulations from the tank sumps. While small amounts of water
may still remain in solution in the gasoline, it will normally be
consumed and go unnoticed in the operation of the engine.
Nov 9/98
8-15
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
One exception to this can be encountered when operating under
the combined effect of: (1) use of certain fuels, with (2) high humidity conditions on the ground (3) followed by flight at high altitude
and low temperature. Under these unusual conditions, small
amounts of water in solution can precipitate from the fuel stream
and freeze in sufficient quantities to induce partial icing of the engine fuel system.
While these conditions are quite rare and will not normally pose a
problem to owners and operators, they do exist in certain areas of
the world and consequently must be dealt with, when encountered.
Therefore, to help alleviate the possibility of fuel icing occurring
under these unusual conditions, it is permissible to add isopropyl
alcohol or diethylene glycol monomethyl ether (DiEGME) compound
to the fuel supply.
The introduction of alcohol or DiEGME compound into the fuel
provides two distinct effects: (1) it absorbs the dissolved water from
the gasoline and (2) alcohol has a freezing temperature depressant
effect.
NOTE
I
When using fuel additives, it must be remembered that the
final goal is to obtain a correct fuel-to-additive ratio in the
tank, and not just with fuel coming out of the refueling
nozzle.
For example, adding 15 gallons of correctly
proportioned fuel to a tank which contains 20 gallons of
untreated fuel will result in a lower-than-acceptable
concentration level to the 35 gallons of fuel which now
reside in the tank.
Alcohol, if used, is to be blended with the fuel in a concentration
of 1% by volume. Concentrations greater than 1% are not
recommended since they can be detrimental to fuel tank materials.
The manner in which the alcohol is added to the fuel is
significant because alcohol is most effective when it is completely
dissolved in the fuel. To ensure proper mixing, the following is
recommended:
1.
8-16
For best results, the alcohol should be added during the
fueling operation by pouring the alcohol directly on the
fuel stream issuing from the fueling nozzle.
May 30/01
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
70
60
w
50
>
E
Cl
~ 40
u..
0
Cl)
w
g
30
::::,
0
Cl
5
ii
20
10
10
20
30
40
50
GALLONS OF GASOLINE
Figure 8-1. Fuel Mixing Ratio
Nov 9/98
8-17
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
2. An alternate method that may be used is to premix the
complete alcohol dosage with some fuel in a separate clean
container (approximately 2-3 gallon capacity) and then
transferring this mixture to the tank prior to the fuel
operation.
Diethylene glycol monomethyl ether (DiEGME) compound must
be carefully mixed with the fuel in concentrations between 0.10%
(minimum) and 0.15% (maximum) of total fuel volume. Refer to
Figure 8-1 for a DiEGME-to-fuel mixing chart.
£WARNING
ANTI-ICING ADDITIVE IS DANGEROUS TO
HEALTH WHEN BREATHED AND/OR ABSORBED
INTO THE SKIN.
£CAUTION
MIXING OF DIEGME WITH FUEL IS EXTREMELY
IMPORTANT. A CONCENTRATION IN EXCESS OF
THAT RECOMMENDED (0.15% BY VOLUME
MAXIMUM) WILL RESULT IN DETRIMENTAL
EFFECTS TO THE FUEL TANKS, AND SEALANT,
AND DAMAGE TO 0-RINGS AND SEALS USED
IN
THE
FUEL
SYSTEM
AND
ENGINE
COMPONENTS. A CONCENTRATION OF LESS
THAN THAT RECOMMENDED (0.10% BY TOTAL
VOLUME
MINIMUM)
WILL
RESULT
IN
INEFFECTIVE
TREATMENT.
USE
ONLY
BLENDING
EQUIPMENT
THAT
IS
RECOMMENDED BY THE MANUFACTURER TO
OBTAIN PROPER PROPORTIONING.
Prolonged storage of the airplane will result in a water buildup in
the fuel which "leeches out" the additive. An indication of this is
when an excessive amount of water accumulates in the fuel tank
sumps. The concentration can be checked using a differential
refractometer. It is imperative that the technical manual for the
differential refractometer be followed explicitly when checking the
additive concentration.
8-18
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
FUEL CONTAMINATION
Fuel contamination is usually the result of foreign material
present in the fuel system, and may consist of water, rust, sand, dirt,
microbes or bacterial growth. In addition, additives that are not
compatible with fuel or fuel system components can cause the fuel
to become contaminated.
Before each flight and after each refueling, use a clear sampler
cup and drain at least a cupful of fuel from each fuel tank drai~
location and from the fuel strainer quick-<irain valve to determine l'
contaminants are present, and to ensure the airplane has been
fueled with the proper grade of fuel.
If contamination is detected, drain all fuel drain points againj
including the fuel reservoir and the fuel selector quick drain valves,
and then gently rock the wings and lower the tail to the ground t
move any additional contaminants to the sampling points. Take
repeated samples from all fuel drain points until all contaminatiorl
has been removed. If, after repeated sampling, evidence
contamination still exists, the airplane should not be flown. Tanks
should be drained and system purged by qualified maintenance
personnel. All evidence of contamination must be removed before
further flight. If the airplane has been serviced with the improper fuel
grade, defuel completely and refuel with the correct grade. Do not
fly the airplane with contaminated or unapproved fuel.
or
In addition, Owners/Operators who are not acquainted with a
particular fixed base operator should be assured that the fuel supply
has been checked for contamination and is properly filtered before
allowing the airplane to be serviced. Fuel tanks should be kept full
between flights, provided weight and balance considerations will
permit, to reduce the possibility of water condensing on the walls of
partially filled tanks.
To further reduce the possibility of contaminated fuel, routine
maintenance of the fuel system should be performed in accordance
with the airplane Maintenance Manual. Only the proper fuel, as
recommended in this handbook, should be used, and fuel additives
should not be used unless approved by Cessna and the Federal
Aviation Administration.
May 30/01
8-19
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
OXYGEN FILLING PRESSURES
The oxygen cylinder, when fully charged, contains approximately
76 cubic feet of aviator's breathing oxygen (Spec. No. MIL-027210), under a pressure of 1850 PSI at 21 •c (70.F). Filling
pressures will vary, however, due to ambient temperature in the
filling area, and the temperature rise resulting from compression of
the oxygen. Because of this, merely filling to 1850 PSI will not
result in a properly filled cylinder. Fill to pressures indicated on the
table below for ambient temperature.
AMBIENT
FILLING
TEMPERATURE PRESSURE
Of
PSIG
0
10
20
30
40
AMBIENT
TEMPERATURE
Of
FILLING
PRESSURE
PSIG
50
60
70
80
90
1875
1925
1975
2000
2050
1650
1700
1725
1775
1825
Figure 8-2. Oxygen Filling Pressures
.&WARNING
OIL, GREASE OR OTHER LUBRICANTS IN
CONTACT WITH OXYGEN CREATE A SERIOUS
FIRE HAZARD, AND SUCH CONTACT MUST BE
AVOIDED
WHEN
HANDLING
OXYGEN
EQUIPMENT.
NOTE
Verify that a complete oxygen system installation (not just a
partial system) is in the airplane before attempting to service
the oxygen system.
8-20
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
LANDING GEAR
Consult the following table for servicing information on the
landing gear.
COMPONENT
SERVICING CRITERIA
Nose Wheel (5.00-5, 6-Ply Rated Tire)
Main Wheel (6.00-6 , 6-Ply Rated Tire)
Nose Wheel (6.00-6, 6-Ply Rated Tire)
Main Wheel (8.00-6, 6-Ply Rated Tire)
Brakes
Nose Gear Shock Strut
49.0PSI
42.0 PSI
29.0 PSI
35.0 PSI
MIL-H-5606
MIL-H-5606; 80.0 PSI •
• Keep strut filled with MIL-H-5606 hydraulic fluid per
filling instructions placard, and with no load on the
strut, inflate with air to 80.0 PSI. Do not over inflate.
CLEANING AND CARE
WINDSHIELD AND WINDOWS
The plastic windshield and windows should be cleaned with an
aircraft windshield cleaner. Apply the cleaner sparingly with soft
cloths, and rub with moderate pressure until all dirt, oil scum and
bug stains are removed. Allow the cleaner to dry, then wipe it off
with soft flannel cloths.
AcAUTION
NEVER USE GASOLINE, BENZENE, ALCOHOL,
ACETONE, FIRE EXTINGUISHER, ANTI-ICE
FLUID,
LACQUER THINNER
OR
GLASS
CLEANER TO CLEAN THE PLASTIC. THESE
MATERIALS WILL ATTACK THE PLASTIC ANO
MAY CAUSE IT TO CRAZE.
If a windshield cleaner is not available, the plastic can be
cleaned with soft cloths moistened with Stoddard solvent to remove
oil and grease.
Nov 9/98
8-21
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Follow by carefully washing with a mild detergent and plenty of
water. Rinse thoroughly, then dry with a clean moist chamois. Do
not rub the plastic with a dry cloth since this builds up an
electrostatic charge which attracts dust. Waxing with a good
commercial wax will finish the cleaning job. A thin, even coat of
wax, polished out by hand with clean soft flannel cloths, will fill in
minor scratches and help prevent further scratching.
Do not use a canvas cover on the windshield unless freezing rain
or sleet is anticipated since the cover may scratch the plastic
surface.
PAINTED SURFACES
The painted exterior surfaces of your new Cessna have a
durable, long lasting finish.
Generally, the painted surfaces can be kept bright by washing
with water and mild soap, followed by a rinse with water and drying
with cloths or a chamois. Harsh or ab.rasive soaps or detergents
which cause corrosion or scratches should never be used. Remove
stubborn oil and grease with a cloth moistened with Stoddard
solvent. Take special care to make sure that the exterior graphics
are not touched by the solvent. For complete care of exterior
Igraphics, refer to the Maintenance Manual.
To seal any minor surface chips or scratches and protect against
corrosion, the airplane should be waxed regularly with a good
automotive wax applied in accordance with the manufacturer's
instructions. If the airplane is operated in a seacoast or other salt
water environment, it must be washed and waxed more frequently to
assure adequate protection. Special care should be taken to seal
around rivet heads and skin laps, which are the areas most
susceptible to corrosion. A heavier coating of wax on the leading
edges of the wings and tail and on the cowl nose cap and propeller
spinner will help reduce the abrasion encountered in these areas.
Reapplication of wax will generally be necessary after cleaning with
soap solution or after chemical deicing operations.
8-22
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
When the airplane is parked outside· in cold climates and it is
necessary to remove ice before flight, care should be taken to protect the painted surfaces during ice removal with chemical liquids.
lsopropyl alcohol will satisfactorily remove ice accumulations without
damaging the paint. However, keep the isopropyl alcohol away from
the windshield and cabin windows since it will attack the plastic and
may cause it to craze.
STABILIZER ABRASION BOOT CARE
If the airplane is equipped with stabilizer abrasion boots, keep
them clean and free from oil and grease which can swell the rubber.
Wash them with mild soap and water, using Form Tech AC cleaner
or naphtha to remove stubborn grease. Do not scrub the boots, and
be sure to wipe off all solvent before ii dries. Boots with loosened
edges or small tears should be repaired. Your Cessna Service
Station has the proper materials and experience to do this correctly.
PROPELLER CARE
Preflight inspection of propeller blades for nicks, and wiping them
occasionally with an oily cloth to clean off grass and bug stains will
assure long blade life. Small nicks on the propeller, particularly near
the tips and on the leading edges, should be dressed out as soon
as possible since these nicks produce stress concentrations, and if
ignored, may result in cracks or fai lure of the propeller blade. Never
use an alkaline cleaner on the blades; remove grease and dirt with
Stoddard solvent.
ANTI-ICE BOOT CARE
The optional propeller anti-ice boots have a special electricallyconductive coating to bleed off static charges which cause radio
interference and may perforate the boots. Servicing operations
should be done carefully to avoid damaging this conductive coating
or tearing the boots.
To prolong the lifeof anti-ice boots, they should be washed and
serviced on a regular basis. Keep the boots clean and free from oil,
grease and other solvents which cause rubber to swell and
deteriorate.
Outlined below are recommended cleaning and
servicing procedures.
Nov 9/98
8-23
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
AcAUTION
USE ONLY THE FOLLOWING INSTRUCTIONS
WHEN CLEANING BOOTS.
DISREGARD
INSTRUCTIONS
WHICH
RECOMMEND
PETROLEUM BASE LIQUIDS (MEK, NONLEADED GASOLINE, ETC.) WHICH CAN HARM
THE BOOT MATERIAL
1. Clean boots with mild soap and water, then rinse thoroughly
with clean water.
NOTE
lsopropyl alcohol can be used to remove grime which
cannot be removed using soap. If isopropyl alcohol is used
for cleaning, wash area with mild soap and water, then rinse
thoroughly with clean water.
2. Allow the boots to dry, then apply a coating of Age Master No.
1 to the boots in accordance with application instruction on the
container.
NOTE
Age Master No. 1 is beneficial for its ozone and weather
resistance features.
3. After the boots have been treated with Age Master No. 1,
apply a coating of ICEX to the boots in accordance with
applicable instructions on the ICEX container.
NOTE
ICEX may be beneficial as an ice adhesion depressant.
Both Age Master No. 1 and ICEX are distributed by the B.F.
Goodrich Company.
AcAUTION
ICEX CONTAINS SILICONE, WHICH LESSENS
PAINT ADHESION. USE CARE WHEN APPLYING
ICEX, AND PROTECT ADJACENT SURFACES
FROM OVERSPRAY, SINCE OVERSPRAY OF
ICEX WILL MAKE TOUCH-UP PAINTING ALMOST
IMPOSSIBLE.
8-24
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
---..........,
SECTIONS
HANDLING, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
Age Master No. 1 and ICEX coatings last approximately 15 hours
on propeller anti-ice boots.
ENGINE CARE
The engine may be cleaned, using a suitable solvent, in
accordance with instructions in the airplane Maintenance Manual.
Most efficient cleaning is done using a spray type cleaner. Before
spray cleaning, ensure that protection is afforded for components
which might be adversely affected by the solvent. Refer to thel
Maintenance Manual for proper lubrication of controls and
components after engine cleaning. The induction air filter should bel
replaced when its condition warrants, not to exeed 500 hrs.
INTERIOR CARE
To remove dust and loose dirt from the upholstery and carpet,
clean the interior regularly with a vacuum cleaner.
Blot up any spilled liquid promptly with cleansing tissue or rags.
Don't pat the spot; press the blotting material firmly and hold it for
several seconds. Continue blotting until no more liquid is taken up.
Scrape off sticky materials with a dull knife, then spot clean the
area.
Oily spots may be cleaned with household spot removers, used
sparingly. Before using any solvent, read the instructions on the
container and test it on an obscure place on the fabric to be
cleaned. Never saturate the fabric with a volatile solvent; it may
damage the padding and backing materials.
Soiled upholstery and carpet may be cleaned with foam type
detergent, used according to the manufacturer's instructions. To
minimize wetting the fabric, keep the foam as dry as possible and
remove it with a vacuum cleaner.
For complete information related to interior cleaning, refer to the
Maintenance Manual.
May 30/01
I
8-25/(8-26 blank)
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9
SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENTS
INTRODUCTION
The supplements in this section contain amended operating
limitations, operating procedures, performance data and other
necessary information for airplanes equipped with specific options.
Operators should refer to each supplement to ensure that all
limitations and procedures appropriate for their airplane are
observed.
...___,,
A Log Of Approved Supplements is provided, for convenience
only, beginning on page Log-1 and is a numerical list of all
supplements applicable to this airplane by name, number and
revision level. This log should be used as a checklist to ensure all
applicable supplements have been placed in the Pilot's Operating
Handbook (POH). Supplements may be removed from the POH
provided the equipment is not installed on the airplane. If equipment
is installed on the airplane, however, the supplement(s) must be
retained and updated as revisions to each supplement are issued.
Each individual supplement contains its own Log of Effective
Pages. This log lists the page number and effective date of every
page in the supplement. The log also lists the dates on which
revisions to the supplement occurred. Additionally, the part number
of the supplement provides information on the revision level. Refer
to the following example:
TT
T206HPHUS-S1-01
Revision Level of Supplement
Supplement Number
Type of Airplane Supplement Applies To
Jan 18/02
9-1/(9-2 blank)
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9
SUPPLEMENTS
LOG OF APPROVED SUPPLEMENTS
NOTE
IT IS THE AIRPLANE OWNER'S RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE THAT
HE OR SHE HAS THE LATEST REVISION TO EACH SUPPLEMENT OF A
PILOT'S OPERATING HANDBOOK AND THE LATEST ISSUED "LOG OF
APPROVED
SUPPLEMENTS."
THIS
"LOG
OF
APPROVED
SUPPLEMENTS" WAS THE LATEST REVISION AS OF THE DATE IT WAS
SHIPPED BY CESSNA; HOWEVER, SOME CHANGES MAY HAVE
OCCURRED AND THE OWNER SHOULD VERIFY THIS IS THE LATEST,
MOST UP-TO-DATE VERSION BY CONTACTING CESSNA CUSTOMER
SUPPORT AT (316) 517-5800.
SUPP.
SUPPLEMENT NAME
REVISION EQUIPMENT
LEVEL
INSTALLED
NO.
1
BendiX/King KX 155A VHF
NAV/COMM with Kl 208 or Kl 209A
Indicator Head
0
2
Bendix/King KT 76C Transponder
with Blind Encoder
1
3
Bendix/King KMA 26 Audio Selector
Panel
0
4
Pointer Model 3000-11 or Model
4000-11 Emergency Locator
Transmitter (ELT)
2
5
Bendix/King KLN 89B Global
Positioning System (GPS)
2
6
Bendix/King KR 87 Automatic
Direction Finder (ADF)
0
7
Bendix/King KAP 140 Single Axis
Autopilot
2
IN£.i~t)t.lE'
l~ ~ ?olO
-':-1,. Vf: \
8
Reserved
9
Davtron Model 803 Clock/OAT
0
10
Bendix/King KLN 89 VFR Global
Positioning System (GPS)
1
11
Reserved
'T
____,,
T206HUSLOG13
22 December 2004
U.S.
LOG 1
SECTION 9
SUPPLEMENTS
CESSNA
MODEL T20SH
LOG OF APPROVED SUPPLEMENTS
SUPP.
NO.
12
I
SUPPLEMENT NAME
REVISION EQUIPMENT
LEVEL
INSTALLED
13
Canadian Supplement
Bendix/King KCS-55A Slaved
Compass with Kl-525A Horizontal
Situation Indicator (HSI)
14
Reserved
15
Bendix/King KAP 140
2 Axis Autopilot
6
16
Cargo Pack
0
1
0
17
Propeller De-Ice
0
18
Century Horizontal Situation
Indicator (HSI)
0
19
Bendix/King KLN 94 Global
Positioning System (IFR)
4
20
Bendix/King KMA 28 Audio Selector
Panel
0
21
Bendix/King KMD 550 Multi-Function
Display
0
22
12 Volt Cabin Power System
0
23
BFGoodrich WX-500 Stormscope®
0
24
Astrotech Model TC-2
Clock/OATNolt Indicator
0
25
Bendix/King KX 165A VHF
NAY/COMM
0
26
BendiXIKing KOR 510 Flight
Information Services (FIS)
0
27
KMH 880 Multi-Hazard Awareness
System
0
28
Bendix/King KT 73 Mode S
Transponder
0
T206HUSLOG13
LOG2 U.S.
22 December 2004
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608001 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 1
BENDIXJKING KX 155A
VHF NAY/COMM
with Kl 208 or Kl 209A INOICATOR HEAD
SERIAL NO.
T ZO'
REGISTRATION NO.
Q~ ,1 ';l Z.
Dl<, ftC.p
This supplement must be Inserted Into Section 9 of the Pilot's Operating
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual when the VHF/NAV COMM
with Indicator Head is installed.
FAA APPROVAL
l!M APPROveD UNDER FAR 21 SU89ART J
Tl>eC..Sna Alnnll CO
- ~ ~ Opllo,_\ Manulactuter CE•1
7~'1~ ~Ena,_
oa-.e:"',:~1998
f)
COPYRIGHT O 1998
Member of GAMA
9 November 1998
CESSNA AJRCIW'T COMPANY
WICHITA. t<ANSM. us,,.
T206HPHUS-SU>O
S1-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 1 - FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT 1
BENDIX/KING KX 155A VHF NAV/COMM with
Kl 208 or Kl 209A INDICATOR HEAD
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
Revision Level
Date of Issue
O (Original)
Nov. 9, 1998
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
PAGE
DATE
Title (S1-1)
S1-2
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
S1-3
S1-4
S1-5
S1-6
S1-7
S1-8
PAGE
DATE
S1-9
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
S1-10
S1-11
S1-12
S1-13
$1-14
s1-15
S1-16 blank
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
t~is_ suppleme~_t. Th)s list contains only those Service Bulletins
Airplane
Number Title
S1-2
Unit
Effectivity
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 1 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
BENDIXJKING KX 155A VHF NAV/COMM with
Kl 208 or Kl 209A INDICATOR HEAD
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The Bendix/King KX 155A VHF Nav/Comm, shown in Figure 1,
consists of a panel-mounted receiver-transmitter and a Kl 208 or Kl
209A Indicator.
,.______.,
The set includes a 760-channel VHF communications receivertransmitter and a 200-channel VHF navigation receiver. A 40channel glide- slope receiver is also included if the Kl 209A
indicator is used. The communications receiver-transmitter receives
and transmits signals between 118.00 and 136.975 MHz with 25kHz spacing. Optional 8.33 kHz (2280 channel) Comm is available.
The navigation receiver receives VOR and localizer signals between
108.00 and 117.95 MHz in 50-kHz steps. The glide slope receiver
is automatically tuned when a localizer frequency is selected. The
circuits required to interpret the VOR and localizer signals are also
an integral part of the Nav receiver.
Large self-dimming gas discharge readouts display both the
communications and navigation operating frequencies. The KX·
155A's
"flip-flop" preselect feature enables you to store one
frequency in the standby display while operating on another and
then interchange them instantly with the touch of a button. Both the
active (COMM) and the standby (STBY) frequencies may be
displayed at all times and are stored in nonvolatile memory without
drain on the aircraft battery. KX 155A has 32 programmable comm
channels, a stuck microphone alert and transmitter shutdown,
Bearing To/From radial mode, course deviation indicator mode and
an elapsed timer mode.
Nov 9/98
S1-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 1 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
The Comm portion incorporates an automatic squelch.
To
override the automatic squelch, the Comm volume control knob is
pulled out. Push the knob back in to reactivate the automatic
squelch. A "T" will be displayed during transmit and "R" during
valid signal reception.
The Nav portion uses the pull out feature of the Nav volume
control to receive the Nav signal ldent. Pull the volume control
knob out to hear the ldent signal plus voice. Push the knob in to
attenuate the ldent signal and still hear Nav voice.
All controls for the Nav/Comm, except those for navigation
course selection, are mounted on the front panel of the receivertransmitter. Control lighting is provided by NAV/COMM interior
lighting and the instrument panel flood lighting system. Operation
and description of the audio selector panel used in conjunction with
this radio is shown and described in Supplement 3 in this section.
NOTE
The unit has a stuck microphone alert feature. If the
microphone is keyed continuously for greater than
33 seconds, the transmitter stops transmitting and
the active Comm frequency flashes to alert the pilot
of the stuck mic condition.
S1-4
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 1 - FM APPROVED
2
3
:1.00
4
I , ,1.60
39:5b
fl
11
10
KX 155A VHF NAV/COMM
16
•
TO INDICATION
8
FROM INDICATION
@
FLAG INDICATION
~
18
Kl 209A INDICATOR
18
Kl 208 INDICATOR HEAD
0585C1045
osssc1046
0585C1047
Figure 1. Bendix/King KX 155A VHF NAV/COMM with Kl 208 or
Kl 209A Indicator Head (Sheet 1 of 7)
Nov 9/98
S1-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 1 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
NAV FUNCTION DISPLAYS
(
109.50 j 030
- -,- -- -- __ /\ __ -- --
J
--
VOR MODE: ACTIVE/BEARING, COi FORMAT
(
VOR MODE: ACTIVE/BEARING, FLAG DISPLAY
(
109.50
030'°)
VOR MODE: ACTIVE "BEARING TO" FUNCTION DISPLAY
[
109.EO
VOR MODE: ACTIVE/BEARING, FLAG DISPLAY
(
110.90
- 1- -- --
LO[ ]
--><-- -- -- --
LOCALIZER MODE: FREQUENCY/COi FORMAT
Figure 1. Bendix/King KX 155A VHF NAY/COMM with Kl 208 or
Kl 209A Indicator Head (Sheet 2 of 7)
S1-6
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 1 - FAA APPROVED
1. COMM VOLUME CONTROL (OFF/PULL/TEST) -- Rotate the
VOL knob clockwise from the OFF position. Pull the VOL knob
out and adjust for desired list,ening level. Push the VOL knob
back in to actuate the automatic squelch. The VOL knob may
also be pulled out to hear particularly weak signals.
2. OPERATING COMM FREQUENCY DISPLAY -- Displays
COMM ACTIVE and COMM STANDBY frequencies with a 'T'
between them to indicate TRANSMI T and an "R" to indicate
RECEIVE modes of operation.
3. OPERATING NAY FREQUENCY DISPLAY --
The right
portion of the display is allocated to NAY receiver ACTIVE and
STANDBY information. The frequency channeling is similar to
the COMM when operating in the frequency mode. The NAY
ACTIVE and STANDBY frequencies are stored in the memory
on power down and return on power up.
4. NAV STANDBY/O8S/Bearing/Radialmmer Display - The right
side of the NAV display is controlled by the MODE
SELECTOR BUTTON (see #13 below). With an active VOR
frequency, this portion of the display shows the STANDBY
frequency, OBS setting for the internal COi, the bearing to the
VOR station, radial from the VOR station, or a count-up/countdown timer. With an active localizer frequency, this portion of
the display shows the standby frequency, the letters "LOC", or
count-up/count-down timer.
5. COMM FREQUENCY TRANSFER BUTTON ( ~ ) Interchanges the frequencies in the USE and STANDBY
displays. To tune the rad io to the desired operating frequency,
the desired frequency must be entered into the standby
display and then the transfer button must be pushed. This will
trade the contents of the ac:tive and standby displays. The
operating frequency can also be entered by accessing the
ACTIVE ENTRY (direct tune) mode which is done by pushing
the COMM TRANSFER button for 2 or more seconds. In the
direct tune mode, only the active part of the display is visible.
The desired frequency can be directly entered into the display.
Push the COMM TRANSFER button again to return to the
active/standby display.
Figure 1. BendiX/King KX 155A VHF NAV/COMM with Kl 208 or Kl
209A Indicator Head (Sheet 3 of 7)
Nov 9/98
S1-7
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 1 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
The transceiver is always tuned to the frequency appearing in
the ACTIVE display. It is, therefore, possible to have two
different frequencies stored in the ACTIVE and STANDBY
displays and to change back and forth between them at the
simple push of the transfer button.
6. COMM FREQUENCY SELECTOR KNOB (OUTER) - The
outer, larger selector knob is used to change the MHz portion
of the frequency display. At either band-edge of the 118-136
MHz frequency spectrum, an offscale rotation will wrap the
display around to the other frequency band-edge (i.e., 136
MHz advances to 118 MHz).
7. COMM FREQUENCY SELECTOR KNOB (INNER) - This
smaller knob is designed to change the indicated frequency in
steps of 50-kHz when it is pushed in, and in 25-kHz steps
when it is pulled out. For 8.33 kHz versions, channels are
incremented in 25 kHz steps with the knob pushed in and
8.33 kHz with the knob pulled out.
8. NAVNOLUME CONTROL (PULL IDENT) - Adjusts volume of
navigation receiver audio. When the knob Is pulled out, the
ldent signal plus voice may be heard. The volume of
voice/ident can be adjusted by turni ng this knob.
BUTTON ( ~ ) Interchanges the NAV Active and STANDBY frequencies.
Depressing the NAV frequency transfer button for 2 seconds
or more will cause the display to go into the ACTIVE ENTRY
mode. Only the ACTIVE frequency will be displayed and it can
be directly changed by using the NAV inc/dee knobs. The
display will return to the ACTIVE/STANDBY mode when the
NAV frequency transfer button is pushed.
9. NAV/FREQUENCY TRANSFER
Figure 1. Bendix/King KX 155A VHF NAV/COMM with Kl 208 or Kl
209A Indicator Head (Sheet 4 of 7)
S1-8
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 1 - FAA APPROVED
10. NAV FREQUENCY SELECTOR KNOB (OUTER) - Operates
in 1 MHz steps. The frequency inc/dee operates the
STANDBY frequency display.
A clockwise rotation will
increase the previous frequency while a counterclockwise
rotation will decrease the previous frequency. Exceeding the
upper limit of the frequency band will automatically return to
the lower limit and vice versa.
11. NAV FREQUENCY SELECTOR KNOB (INNER) - Operates in
50 kHz steps. The NAV receiver's lower and upper frequency
limits are 108.00 MHz and 117.95 MHz. Exceeding the upper
limit of frequency band will automatically return to the lower
limit and vice versa. A clockwise rotation will increase (inc) the
previous frequency while a counterclockwise rotation will
decrease (dee) the previous frequency.
12. CHANNEL BUTTON - Pressing the CHAN button for 2 or
more seconds will cause the unit to enter the channel program
(PG) mode. Upon entering the channel program mode, the
channel number will flash indicating that it can be
programmed. The desired channel can be selected by turning
the comm kHz knob. The channel frequency can be entered
by pushing the comm transfer button which will cause the
standby frequency to flash. The comm frequency knobs are
then used to enter the desired frequency. If dashes (located
between 136 MHz and 118 MHz) are entered instead of a
frequency, the corresponding channel is skipped in channel
selection mode. Additional channels may be programmed by
pressing the COMM transfer button and using the same
procedure. The channel information is saved by pushing the
CHAN button which will also cause the unit to return to the
previous frequency entry mode.
The channel selection mode (CH) can then be entered by
momentarily pushing the CHAN button. The comm frequency
knobs can be used to select the desired channel. The unit will
automatically default to the previous mode if no channel is
selected within 2 seconds after entering the channel selection
mode. The unit is placed in the transmit mode by depressing
a mic button.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KX 155A VHF NAV/COMM with Kl 208 or Kl
209A Indicator Head (Sheet 5 of 7)
Nov 9/98
S1-9
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 1 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
13. MODE SELECTOR BUTTON -- Depressing the mode button
will cause the NAV display to go from the ACTIVE/STANDBY
format to the ACTIVE/COi (Course Deviation Indicator) format.
In the COi mode, the frequency inc/dee knob (pushed in)
channels the ACTIVE frequency. When the ACTIVE window is
tuned to a VOR frequency, the standby frequency area is
replaced by a three digit OBS (Omni Bearing Selector)
display. The desired OBS course can be selected by pulling
out the inner NAV frequency knob and turning it. This OBS
display is independent of any OBS course selected on an
external COi. An "OBS" in the middle of the NAV display will
flash while the inner NAV frequency knob is pulled out. The
COi is displayed on the line below the frequency/OBS. When
the ACTIVE window is tuned to a localizer frequency, the
standby frequency area is replaced by "LOC". When the
received signal is too weak to ensure accuracy the display will
"FLAG".
Depressing the mode button again will cause the NAV display
to go from the ACTIVE/COi format to the ACTIVE/BEARING
format. In the BEARING mode, the frequency inc/dee knob
channels the ACTIVE frequency window. Depressing the
frequency transfer button will cause the ACTIVE frequency to
be placed in blind storage and the STANDBY frequency (in
blind storage) to be displayed in the ACTIVE window display.
In bearing mode, the right hand window of the NAV display
shows the bearing TO the station. When a too weak or invalid
VOR signal is received the display flags (dashes).
Another push of the mode button will cause the NAV display
to go from the ACTIVE/BEARING format to the
ACTIVE/RADIAL format. In the RADIAL mode, the frequency
inc/dee knobs channel the ACTIVE frequency window and
depressing the frequency transfer button will cause the
ACTIVE frequency to be placed in blind storage and the
STANDBY frequency (in blind storage) to be displayed in the
ACTIVE window display. In radial mode of operation, the right
hand window of NAV display shows the radial FROM the
station. When a too weak or invalid VOR signal is received
the display flags (dashes).
Figure 1. Bendix/King KX 155A VHF NAV/COMM with Kl 208 or Kl
209A Indicator Head (Sheet 6 of 7)
S1-10
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 1 - FAA APPROVED
Another push of the mode button will cause the unit to go into
the TIMER mode. When the unit is turned on, the elapsed
timer {ET) begins counting upwards from zero. The timer can
be stopped and reset to· zero by pushing the NAV frequency
transfer button for 2 seconds or more causing the ET on the
display to flash. In this state, the timer can be set as a
countdown timer or the elapsed timer can be restarted. The
countdown timer is set by using the NAV frequency inc/dee
knobs to set the desired time and then pushing the NAV
frequency transfer button to start the timer. The large knob
selects minutes. the small kn ob in the "in" position selects 10
second intervals, and the small knob in the "out" position
selects individual seconds. After the countdown timer reaches
zero, the counter will begin to count upwards indefinitely while
flashing for the first 15 seconds. When the elapsed timer is
reset to zero it may be restarted again by momentarily
pushing the NAV frequency transfer button.
14. VOR/Localizer Needle or COi needle.
15. Glideslope Flag
16. TO-FROM-NAV FLAG
17. Azimuth Card
18. OBS Knob
19. Glideslope Needle
Figure 1. Bendix/King KX 155A VHF NAV/COMM with Kl 208 or Kl
209A Indicator Head (Sheet 7 of 7)
Nov 9/98
S1-11
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 1 - FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
There is no change to the airplane limitations when this avionic
equipment is installed.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
There is no change to the airplane emergency procedures when
this avionic equipment is installed. However, if the frequency
readouts fail, the radio will remain operational on the last frequency
selected. If either frequency transfer button is pressed and held
while power is applied to the unit, the unit wakes up with 120.00
MHz in the COMM use frequency and 110.00 MHz in the NAV
active frequency, with both COMM and NAV in the active entry
mode. This will aid the pilot in blind tuning the radio.
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
COMMUNICATION RECEIVER-TRANSMITTER OPERATION:
1. OFF/PULL/TEST Volume Control - Tum clockwise; pull out
and adjust to desired audio level; push control back in to
activate the automatic squelch.
2. MIC Selector Switch (on audio control panel) - SET to COMM
1.
3. SPEAKER Selector (on audio control panel) - SET to desired
mode.
4. COMM Frequency Selector Knobs - Select desired operating
frequency.
5. COMM Transfer Button -- PRESS to transfer desired
frequency from the STBY display into the COMM display.
S1-12
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
'--
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 1 - FM APPROVED
6. Mic Button:
a. To transmit - Press button and speak in microphone.
NOTE
During COMM transmission, a lighted 'T' will appear
between the "COMM" and "STBY" displays to indicate that
the transceiver is operating in the transmit mode.
b. To Receive -- RELEASE mike button.
NAVIGATION RECEIVER OPERATION:
1. NAV Frequency Selector Knobs - SELECT desired operating
frequency in "STBY" display.
2. NAV TRANSFER BUTTON - PRESS to transfer desired
frequency from the "STBY" display into the "NAV" display.
3. Speaker Selector (on audio control panel) - SET to desired
mode ..
4. NAV Volume Control a. ADJUST to desired audio level.
b. PULL out to identify station.
VOR OPERATION:
Channel the NAV Receiver to the desired VOR and monitor the
audio to positively identify the station. To select an OBS course,
turn the OBS knob to set the desired course under the lubber line.
When a signal is received, the NAV flag will pull out of view and
show a ''TO" or "FROM" flag as appropriate for the selected
course.
LOC OPERATION
Localizer circuitry is energized when the NAV Receiver is
channeled to an ILS frequency.
Monitor the LOC audio and
positively identify the station. The NAV flag will be out of view when
the signal is of sufficient strength to be usable.
Nov 9/98
S1-13
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 1 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
GLIDESLOPE OPERATION
The glideslope receiver is automatically channeled when a
localizer frequency is selected. A separate warning flag is provided
to indicate usable signal conditions.
PILOT CONFIGURATION
This mode can be accessed by pressing and holding the NAV
Mode Button for more than 2 seconds and then pressing the Nav
Frequency Transfer Button for an additional 2 seconds, while
continuing to hold the NAV Mode Button. When the Pilot Config
Mode is entered the unit will show the "SWRV" mnemonic which is
the unit software revision level. Adjustment pages can be accessed
by MODE button presses.
The pilot may adjust two parameters in the pilot configuration, the
display minimum brightness and sidetone volume level. Minimum
Brightness (BRIM) will have a range of 0-255. The dimmest is O
and the brightest is 255. Sidetone volume level is adjusted when
SIDE is displayed. Values from 0-255 may be selected with O being
least volume, 255 being the greatest.
Adjustment
Mnemonic
Min Level
Max Level
Software Revision Number
SWRV
---
---
Minimum Display Brightness
BRIM
0
255
Sidetone Level
SIDE
0
255
S1-14
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
__..,,
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 1 - FM APPROVED
Subsequent presses of the MODE button sequences through
SWRV, BRIM, SIDE, and then back to SWRV.
Pressing the NAV Transfer Button momentarily exits Pilot
configuration mode. The NAV returns to its pre-Pilot Config state
with the new brightness and sidetone levels stored in nonvolatile
memory.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when this
avionic equipment is installed. However, the installation of an
externally mounted antenna, or several related antennas, will result
in a minor reduction in cruise performance.
Nov 9/98
S1-15/(S1-16 blank)
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608001 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 2
BENDIX/KING KT 76C
TRANSPONDER WITH BLIND ENCODER
ll!ru/\LNO.,_ __
_
REGISTRATION NO._ __
_ __
_
_
_
_
_
This supplement must be inserted into Section 9 of the Pilot's Operating
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual when the KT 76C
Transponder with Blind Encoder Is Installed.
FAA APPROVAL
IIAAAPPROVEO UNOERFAA21 SUBPART J
The ee..... Aircraft eo
-~~ Option Manlhcturw ce,1
?'~ti~ ~Eiig,,_
o~,-~ ;9-~zbet 1998
i)
COP~ IGHT O 1998
CESSNA A IRCRAFT COMPANY
WICHITA. KANSAS, USA
Member of GAMA
9 November 1998
Revision 1 - 30 May 2001
S2-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 2 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT 2
BENDIX/KING KT 76C TRANSPONDER with BLIND
ENCODER
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
Revision Level Date of Issue
0 (Original)
1
FAA APPROVAL
Nov. 9, 1998
May 30, 2001
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
Dale: 20 June 2001
PAGE
DATE
PAGE
DATE
Title (S2-1)
S2-2
S2-3
S2-4
S2-5
May 30/01
May 30/01
May 30/01
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
S2-6
S2-7
S2-8
S2-9
S2-10 blank
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Number Title
S2-2
Airplane
Unit
Effectivity
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 2 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
BENDIX/KING KT 76C TRANSPONDER
with BLIND ENCODER
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The Bendix/King Transponder (Type KT 76C), shown in Figure
1, is the airborne component of an Air Traffic Control Radar Beacon
System (ATCRBS). The transponder enables the ATC ground
controller to "see" and identify more readily the aircraft on the
radarscope. The blind encoder enables the transponder tol
automatically report aircraft altitude to ATC.
The Bendix/King Transponder system consists of a panelmounted unit and an externally-mounted antenna. The transponder
receives interrogating pulse signals on 1030 MHz and transmits
coded pulse-train reply signals on 1090 MHz. It is capable of
replying to Mode A and also to Mode C (altitude reporting)
interrogations on a selective reply basis on any of 4096 informationl
code selections. A sidewall-mounted Blind Encoder is included in
the avionic configuration, the transponder can provide altitudel
reporting in 100-foot increments between -1000 and +35,000 feet
The KT 76C features microprocessor and LSI (Large Scale
Integrated) control. Mode and code selection are performed using
the rotary knob and numeric buttons and all functions including the
flight level altitude are presented on a gas discharge display. All
display segments are automatically dimmed by a photocell type
sensor.
May 30/01
S2-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 2 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
A VFR programming sequence, described in Section 4, allows
the pilot to preprograrn any single code such as ·1200· into the KT
76C. Pressing the VFR button instantly returns the KT 76C to the
preprogrammed code without having to manually enter "1200".
All Bendix/King Transponder operating controls are located on
the front panel of the unit. Functions of the operating controls are
described in Figure 1.
S2-4
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 2 - FAA APPROVED
6
3
2
Ob5
FL
ALT
4
A
1200
5
8
7
1. MODE SELECTOR KNOB - Controls application of power and
selects transponder operating mode as follows:
OFF -
Tums set off.
SBY -
Turns set on for standby power and code selection.
"SBY" is annunciated.
TST - Self-test fu nction. The transmitter is disabled.
display segments will illuminate.
ON -
All
Turns set on and enables transponder to transmit
Mode A reply pulses. ON is annunciated.
ALT - Turns set on and enables transponder to transmit
either Mode A reply pulses and Mode C pulses
selected automatically by the interrogating signal.
ALT is annunciated.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KT 76C Transponder with Blind Encoder
(Sheet 1 of 2)
Nov 9/98
S2-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 2- FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
2. ALTITUDE DISPLAY - Displays the pressure altitude on the left
side of the display. The display is in hundreds of feet. "FL" is
annunciated to indicate Flight Level altitude. flight Level is a
term to indicate that the altitude is not true altitude, but
barometric altitude which is not corrected for local pressure. For
Example, "FL-040" corresponds to an altitude of 4000 feet,
meaning sea level pressure of 29.92 inches of mercury.
The Flight Level altitude is only displayed when the altitude
reporting is enabled, i.e. in Altitude mode. If an invalid code
from the altimeter is detected dashes will appear in the
altitude window. Altitude reporting is disabled if the altitude
window is blank or has dashes.
3. MODE ANNUNCIATORS - Displays the operating mode of the
transponder.
4. REPLY INDICATOR (R) - "R• is illuminated momentarily when
the transponder is replying to a valid interrogation and during
the 18 ±2 seconds following the initiation of an ldent.
5. NUMERIC KEYS 0-7 - Selects transponder reply (SQUAWK)
code. The new code will be transmitted after a 5-second
delay.
6. IDENT BUTTON (IDT) - When depressed, selects special
identifier pulse to be transmitted with transponder reply to
effect immediate identification of the airplane on the ground
controller's display.
("R" will illuminate steadily for
approximately 18 seconds. Button illumination is controlled by
the avionic light dimming rheostat.
7. VFR CODE BUTTON (VFR) - Pressing the VFR Button will
cause a pre-programmed reply code to supersede whatever
reply code was previously in use. Button illumination is
controlled by the RADIO LT dimming rheostat
8. CLEAR BUTTON (CLR) -- Pressing the CLR button will delete
the last code digit entered.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KT 76C Transponder with Blind Encoder
(Sheet 2 of 2)
S2-6
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 2 - FAA APPROVED
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
There is no change to the airplane limitations when this avionic
equipment is installed.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
TO TRANSMIT AN EMERGENCY SIGNAL:
1. Mode Selector Knob -ALT.
2. Numeric Keys 0-7 -- SELECT 7700 operating code.
TO TRANSMIT A SIGNAL REPRESENTING LOSS OF ALL
COMMUNICATIONS (WHEN IN A CONTROLLED
ENVIRONMENT):
1. Mode Selector Knob -ALT.
2. Numeric Keys 0-7 - SELECT 7600 operating code.
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
BEFORE TAKEOFF:
1. Mode Selector Knob - SBY.
TO TRANSMIT MODE A CODES IN FLIGHT:
1. Numeric Keys 0-7 - SELECT assigned code..
Nov 9/98
S2-7
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 2 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
2. Mode Selector Knob - ON.
NOTES
• During normal operation with Mode Selector Knob
in ON position, reply indicator flashes, indicating
transponder replies to interrogat ions.
• Mode A replies are transmitted in ALT also;
however, Mode C replies are suppressed when the
Mode Selector Knob is positioned to ON.
3. IDT Button -- DEPRESS
momentarily when instructed by
ground controller to "squawk IDENT" ("R" will illuminate
steadily indicating IDENT operation).
TO TRANSMIT MODE C CODES IN FLIGHT:
1. Numeric Keys 0-7 - SELECT assigned code.
2. Mode Selector Knob - ALT.
NOTES
• When directed by ground controller to ·stop
altitude squawk", tum Mode Selector Knob to ON
for Mode A operation only.
• Altitude transmitted by the transponder for altitude
squawk and displayed on the KT 76C panel is
pressure altitude (referenced to 29.92") and
conversion to indicated altitude is done in the
ATC computers.
TO SELF-TEST TRANSPONDER OPERATION:
1. Mode Selector Knob - TST Check all displays.
2. Mode Selector Knob - SELECT desired function.
S2-8
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 2 - FAA APPROVED
TO PROGRAM VFR CODE:
1. Mode Selector Knob -- SBY.
2. Numeric Keys 0-7 -- SELECT desired VFR code.
3. IDT Button -- PRESS AND HOLD.
a. VFR Code Button - PRESS (while still holding IDT button)
to place new VFR code in nonvolatile memory for
subsequent call up.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when this
avionic equipment is installed. However, the installation of an
externally-mounted antenna, or related external antennas, will result
in a minor reduction in cruise performance.
Nov 9/98
S2-9/(S2-10 Blank)
~
Cessna
A Textron Company
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608001 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 3
BENDIX/KING KMA 26
AUDIO SELECTOR PANEL
/2(; b c~~1°2ifl U.,,, L1;'!>7)
REGISTRATION NO,,__;
V' -V\
---'----'l -i'-'l"-!'--- SERJALNO
This supplement must be Inserted into Section 9 of the PIiot's Operating
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual when the KMA 26 Audio
Selector Panel is installed.
FAA APPROVAL
PAAAPPROVEOUNOEf!FAR21SUBPARTJ
The Cessna Aifcra!t Co
_~Option Monthctu<t<CE-1
7~.t'~e.c•~o a,a: 19 Oecembet 1998
i)
COPY'RIGttT c, 1998
CESSNA A IRCRAFT COMPANY
WIC KITA, KANSAS, USA
T:I06HPH US-S3,00
Member of GAMA
9 November 1998
S3-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 3 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT 3
BENDIX/KING KMA 26 AUDIO SELECTOR PANEL
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
Revision Level
Date of Issue
0 (Original)
Nov. 9, 1998
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
PAGE
DATE
PAGE
S3-2
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
S3-3
Nov 9/98
S3-4
Nov 9/98
S3-5
S3-6
S3-7
S3-8
Title (S3-1 )
DATE
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Number Title
S3-2
Airplane
Unit
Effectivity
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 3 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
BENDIX/KING KMA 26 AUDIO SELECTOR PANEL
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The Bendix/King KMA 26 Audio Selector Panel is a combination
audio amplifier, an audio distribution panel intercom, and a marker
beacon receiver. The audio amplifier is for amplification of the
audio signals for the speaker system. All receiver audio distribution
functions are controlled by two 1rows of pushbuttons. A rotary
selector switch on the right side of the console connects the
microphone to either EMG, Com 1, Com 2, Com 3 or PA (Unused
position). All operating controls are shown and described in Figure
1.
A crystal-controlled superheterodyne marker beacon receiver
with 3-light presentation is incorporated within the unit. Dimming
circuitry for the marker lamps automatically adjusts brightness
appropriate to the cockpit ambient light level. Hi and Lo sensitivity
and lamp test functions are also provided.
Light dimming for the audio control panel is manually controlled
by the RADIO light rheostat knob.
MARKER FACILITIES
MARKER
IDENTIFYING TONE
LIGHT*
Inner,
Airway &
Fan
Continuous 6 dots/sec (3000 Hz)
White
Middle
Alternate dots and dashes (1300 Hz)
Amber
Outer
2 dashes/sec (400 Hz)
Blue
"When the identifying tone is keyed, the
respective indicating light will blink
accordingly.
Nov 9/98
S3-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 3 - FAA APPROVED
11
10
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
4
5
3
8
9
7
2
4
6
1. CREW INTERCOM VOLUME (VOL CREW) KNOB and INTERCOM VOX
SENSITIVITY SET (INTERCOM PUSH VOX) SWITCH - Inside knob
adjusts Pilot and Copilot intercom volume. Intercom operation is voice
activated (VOX). where intercom becomes active automatically when a
crew member or passenger begins to speak. Set the intercom VOX
squelch by momentarily pressing and releasing the left Inner knob
when no one is speaking.
2. PASSENGER INTERCOM VOLUME (VOL PASS) KNOB - Adjusts
passenger intercom volume.
3. SPEAKER SELECT (PUSH SPKR) SWITCH - With the Speaker Select
Switch pushed in, both headphone and cabin speaker audio will be
heard. Headphone audio is active full-time. Headphone audio cannot
be deselected.
4. AUDIO SELECT BUTTONS -- Push bu.tton audio selection Is available
for three Communications receivers ("COM 1", "COM 2", and "COM
3"), two Navigation receivers ("NAV 1" and "NAV 2"), the internal
Marker Beacon receiver ("MKR"), one DME, one ADF, and one
additional auxiliary receiver ("AUX"). The "AUX" position could be
used, for example, for a second DME or ADF. \fl/hen a receiver's
audio is selected, the green annunciator illuminates at the bottom of
the button. Push the button again to deselect the receiver's audio.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KMA 26 Audio Selector Panel (Sheet 1 of 3)
S3-4
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 3 - FAA APPROVED
5. MICROPHONE SELECTOR SWITCH (MIC) -- Used to select the
desired transmitter for the cockpit microphones. The "C1", "C2", and
"C3" positions are for transmitting on the Com 1, Com 2, and Com 3
communteations transceivers. respectively. The "EMG" (emergency)
position is used to bypass the KMA 26's audio amplifier and directly
connects Com 1 to the pilot's microphone and headphones. This
erovides a fail-safe method of communication should the unit fail. The
'PA" position may be selected when the aircraft is configured with a
passenger address capability.
The "Auto Com" feature always
pl'Ovides automatic headphone audio selection to match the Com
transmitter in use. To add speaker audio, simply push the Speaker
Select Switch (Inner right knob) to the "in" position. Pulling the switch
to the •out" position removes speaker audio.
6. MONITOR SELECT (MONI) BUTTON - \Nhen activated, if Com 1 is
selected on the Microphone Selector Switch then Com 2 audio is
automatically routed to the speaker. Or if Com 2 is selected on the
Microphone Selector SWitch, then Com 1 Is routed to the speaker.
Pressing the "MON!" button again will disable the feature. Initially
when "MONI" Is selected the green annunciators in the button flash for
approximately 5 seconds, then remains steady while the Com
annunciation returns to Its previous state.
7. INTERCOM MODE SELECT SWITCH - Has three modes "ALL",
"CREW', AND "PILOT" which are selected with the toggle switch on
the lower left side on the faceplate. In the "ALL" position the pilot,
copilot, and passengers are all on the same intercom ioop" and
everyone hears the radios. In the "CREW' position the pilot and
copilot are on one intercom loop and can hear the radios while the
passengers have their own dedicated intercom and do not hear the
radios. In the "PILOT" mode the pilot hears the radios but is isolated
from the intercom while the copilot and passengers are on the same
intercom loop and do not hear the radios.
\Nhen either the "ALL" or "CREW' intercom modes are selected, the
pilot's and copilot's intercom volume is controlled by rotating the Crew
Intercom Volume Knob (left inner knob) while the passenger's volume
is controlled by rotating the Passenger Intercom Volume Knob (left
outer knob). \Nhen the "PILOT" intercom mode is selected, the
copilot's and passenger's volume is controlled wtth the Passenger
Intercom Volume Knob. Remember, the volume knobs- on the KMA 26
control intercom wlume only, not the receiver's volume.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KMA 26 Audio Selector Panel (Sheet 2 of 3 )
Nov 9/98
S3-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 3 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
8. MARKER BEACON ANNUNCIATOR LIGHTS - The three-light marker
beacon receiver built into the KMA 26 gives a visual and aural signal
when the ship's antenna passes over a 75 MHz beacon. The blue,
amber, and white lights on the faceplate, as well as the audio tones,
Identify the beacon type.
INNER, AIRWAY and FAN - Light illuminates white to indicate passage
of !LS inner, airway or fan marker beacons.
OUTER - light illuminates blue to indicate passage of outer marker
beacon.
MIDDLE - light illuminates amber to indicate passage of middle
marker beacon.
9. MARKER MUTE BUTTON - Mutes currently active marker beacon
audio.
10. MARKER BEACON SENSITIVITY LAMP AND TEST SWITCH - The
"MKR" Audio Select button must be pushed so that the green
annunciator is illuminated for the marker beacon to receive to provide
an audio signal at beacon passa11e. When this switch is on "HI SENS"
(upper) position, the high sensitivity is selected which permits you to
hear the outer marker tone about a mile out. At this point you may
select the the "LO SENS" (middle) position to temporarily silence the
tone. It will start to sound again when you are closer to the marker,
giving you a more precise indication of its location.
11. PHOTOCELL FOR AUTOMATIC DIMMING OF MARKER BEACON
LIGHTS AND SELECT BUTTON - The photocell in the faceplate
automatically dims the marker lights as well as the green annunciators
in the Speaker Audio Select Buttons for night operation.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KMA 26 Audio Selector Panel (Sheet 3 of 3)
$3-6
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 3- FAA APPROVED
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
There is no change to the airplane limitations when this avionic
equipment is installed.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
In the event of an audio amplifier failure in the KMA 26, as
evidenced by the inability to transmit in COM 1, 2 or 3.
1. MIC Selector Switch - EMG.
NOTE
This action bypasses the KMA 26 audio amplifier and
connects the pilot's mic/head set directly to COM 1.
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
AUDIO CONTROL SYSTEM OPERATION:
1. MIC Selector Switch - Turn to desired transmitter.
2. SPEAKER and Audio Select Button(s) receiver(s).
SELECT desired
NOTES
Rotation of the MIC selector switch selects the Com audio
automatically.
Nov 9/98
S3-7
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 3 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
MARKER BEACON RECEIVER OPERATION:
1. TEST Position -- HOLD toggle down momentarily to verify all
lights are operational.
2. SENS Selections - Select HI sensitivity for airway flying or LO
for ILS/LOC approaches.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when this
avionic equipment is installed. However, the installation of an
externally mounted antenna or related external antennas, will result
in a minor reduction in cruise performance.
S3-8
Nov 9/98
Pilot's Operating Handbook
and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
THIS DOCUMENT MUST BE
CARRIED IN THE AIRPLANE
AT ALL TIMES.
The Cessna Aircraft
Company
ModelT206H
Serial No.I ~ olo
02{t2
Registration No. _ __
Thia publication includff !he maierial required to be fuml1hed to lhe pilot by FA" Part
23 and constilulff th~ FM Approved Airplane Flight Menual.
FM APPROVAL
ll'M APPROVED UNDER FAA 21 a.PART J
TheCesM1a Awt11fl Co
-~~~rerCE.1
~
:
~ E t l j.....
Dole: 19 Oece-
f)
Member of G"MA
. COPY RIGHT () 1998
The Cessna Aircraft Company
Wichita, Kansas USA
1996
Original issue - 9 November 1998
PUBLICATION PART NUMBER
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Pilot's Operating Handbook
and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
Model T206H Serials T20608001 and On
Original Issue - 9 November 1998
Revision 6 • 12 January 2004
PART NUMBER: T206HPHUS06
Revision6
I
I
j/jj
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
CONGRATULATIONS
CONGRATULATIONS ... .
Congratulations on your purchase and welcome to Cessna ownership! Your
Cessna has been designed and constructed to give you the most in perfonnance,
value and comfort.
This Pilot's Operating Handbook has been prepared as a guide to help you get
the most utility from your airplane. It contains infonnation about your airplane's
equipment, operating procedures, perfonnance and suggested service and care.
Please study it carefully and use it as a reference.
The worldwide Cessna Organization and Cessna Customer Service are
prepared
to serve you.
The following services are offered by each Cessna
Service Station:
THE CESSNA AIRPLANE WARRANTIES, which provide coverage for parts and
labor, are upheld through Cessna Service Stations worldwide.
Warranty
provisions and other important infonnation are contained in the Customer Care
Program Handbook supplied with your airplane.
The Customer Care Card
assigned to you at delivery will establish your eligibility under warranty and
should be presented to your local Cessna Service Station at the time of
warranty service.
FACTORY TRAINED PERSONNEL to provide you with courteous, expert
service.
FACTORY APPROVED SERVICE EQUIPMENT to provide you efficient and
accurate workmanship.
A STOCK OF GENUINE CESSNA SERVICE PARTS are available when you
need them.
THE LATEST AUTHORITATIVE INFORMATION FOR SERVICING CESSNA
AIRPLANES.
Cessna Service Stations have all of the current Maintenance
Manuals, Illustrated Parts Catalogs and various other support publications
produced by Cessna Aircraft Company.
A current Cessna Service Station Directory accompanies your new airplane.
The Directory is revised frequently, and a current copy can be obtained from your
nearest Cessna Service Station.
We urge all Cessna owners/operators to utilize the benefits available within the
Cessna Organization.
Nov 9/98
iii
ELT SUPPLEMENT
Cessna C206 series
SECTION 1
GENERAL
(
The Artex ME 406 series transmits on 2 emergency frequencies (121.5 and 406.025 MHz.)
The ELT automatically activates during a crash and transmits the standard swept tone on
121.5MHz. It also transmits a 406.025 MHz encoded digital message to the
COSPAS/SARSAT satellite system, which allows for rapid identification and reduces search
and rescue response time. ME 406 series has been tested to meet the rigorous requirements
of TSO C126 including 500 G shock, 1000 pound crush as well as flame and vibration tests.
SECTION 2
OPERATING LIMITATIONS
No change.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
In a crash, an acceleration activated crash sensor (G-switch) turns the ELT 'on' automatically
when the ELT experiences a change in velocity (or deceleration) of 4.5 fps ±0.5 fps. Activation
is also accomplished by means of the cockpit mounted remote switch or the panel (local)
switch on the ELT.
After emergency landing, if the rescue assistance is required, should be the ELT used as
follows:
1. Check the ELT functionality:
•
set the remote switch to 'ON' position (the red LED starts blinking)
•
If the communication radio is working and it's usable, tune the frequency
121.5 MHz. If you can hear the ELT, it works correctly.
2.
During waiting on the rescue airplane:
3.
Contact the rescue plane
•
•
4.
Save the airborne battery. Don't turn on the radio communication.
Set the remote switch to 'ARM' position. Try to contact the rescue plane using
the communication radio tuned on the frequency 121.5 MHz. If the contacting
is not successful, set the remote switch back to 'ON' position.
After finishing the rescue
•
•
Set the remote switch to 'ARM' position.
NOTE
The ELT can be activated automatically during hard landing or advanced turbulence. To
deactivate the ELT set either switch to the 'ON' position, then back to 'ARM'.
j
I
December, 2009
AC204-2501
3/6
ELT SUPPLEMENT
Cessna C206 series
POH/AFM
Supplement
Artex M E-406
ELT
Aircraft model:
{ fJ~/1?..
Aircraft Serial No.
Registration No.:
/ot,
T)OG-of.r}J,
{Jl: -ncp
This supplement must be attached to the FAA approved POH/AFM. The information conta ined
in this document supplements or supersedes the basic manual only in those areas listed. For
limitations, procedures, performance , and loading information not contained in this
supplement, consult the basic POH/AFM.
This flight manual supplement is EASA approved under Approval Number 0010002203-001 .
Date:
15 -12· 2009
December, 2009
AC204-2501
- 23-
1/6
ELT SUPPLEMENT
Cessna C206 series
Log of Revisions
Revision
No.
2/6
Pages Affected
Description
AC204-2501
Date
December, 2009
f
ELT SUPPLEMENT
Cessna C206 series
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
(
No change.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
No change.
SECTION 6
WEIGHT AND BALANCE/EQUIPMENT LIST
Cancel old item and insert new item listed below into the equipment list:
Item
Walghtpb]
IN
lour
1. ELT ME 406
2,1
I
Total:
2,1
AnnOnmI
S1at1c tn0rnent PbJnJ
145
304,5
304,5
I
(
(
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE AND SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
)
(
Switch Operation:
In a crash, an acceleration activated crash sensor (G-switch) turns the ELT 'on' automatically
when the ELT experiences a change in velocity (or deceleration) of 4.5 fps ±0.5 fps. Activation
is also accomplished by means of the cockpit mounted remote switch or the panel (local)
switch on the ELT. To deactivate the ELT set either switch to the 'ON' position, then back to
'ARM'. The ELT does not have an 'OFF' position. Instead, a jumper between two pins on the
front D-sub connector must be in place for the G-switch to activate the unit. The Jumper is
installed on the mating half of the connector so that when the connector is installed, the
beacon is armed. This allows the beacon to be handled or shipped without 'nuisance'
activation (front connector removed).
NOTE
The ELT can still be manually activated using the local switch on the front of the ELT.
Care should be taken when transporting or shipping the ELT not to move the switch or
allow packing material to become lodged such as to toggle the switch.
J
4/6
AC204-2501
December, 2009
\
ELT SUPPLEMENT
Cessna C206 series
'I
[C LSJ
r
r.
,_®1110
.
@c::J@
•
f-
fI-,
~
Panel switch
Remote switch
Self Test mode:
Upon turn-off, the ELT automatically enters a self-test mode that transmits a 406 MHz test
coded pulse that monitors certain system functions before returning to the 'ARM'ed mode.
The 406 MHz test pulse is ignored by any satellite that receives the signal, but the ELT uses
this output to check output power and correct frequency. If the ELT is left activated for
approximately 50 seconds or greater, a distress signal is generated that is accepted by one or
more SAR satellites. Therefore, when the self-test mode is required, the ELT must be
activated, then, returned to 'ARM' within about 45 seconds otherwise a "live" distress message
will be transmitted.
NOTE
All activations of the ELT should be kept to a minimum. Local or national regulations may limit
testing of the ELT or special requirements or conditions to perform testing. For the "self test",
Artex recommends that the ELT be "ON" for no more than 5 seconds during the first 5 minutes
after the hour.
In addition to output power of the 121.5/406 MHz signals and 406 MHz frequency, other
parameters of the ELT are checked and a set of error codes generated if a problem is found.
The error codes are displayed by a series of pulses of the ELT LED, remote LED and alert
buzzer. Codes displayed with the associated conditions are as follows :
\
1 Flash - Indicates that the system is operational and that no error conditions were found .
3 Flashes - Bad load detect. Detects open or short condition on the antenna output or cable.
These problems can probably be fixed by the installer. Check that the RF cable is connected
and in good condition. Perform continuity check of center conductor and shield. Check for a
shorted cable. Check for intermittent connection in the RF cable. If this error code persists
there may be a problem with the antenna installation. This can be checked with a VSWR
meter. Check the antenna for opens, shorts, resistive ground plane connection .
14 Flashes - Low power detected. Occurs if output power is below about 33 dBm (2 watts) for
the 406 signal or 17 dBm (50 mW) for the 121.5 MHz output. Also may indicate that 406 signal
is off frequency. For this error code the ELT must be sent back for repair or replacement.
5 Flashes - Indicates that the ELT has not been programmed. Does not indicate erroneous or
corrupted programmed data.
December, 2009
AC2D4-2501
5/6
\
ELT SUPPLEMENT
CLS
Cessna C206 series
6 Flashes - Indicates that G-switch loop between pins 5 and 12 at the O-sub connector is not
installed. ELTwill not activate during a crash. Check that the harness O-sub jumper is installed
by verifying less than 1 ohm of resistance between pins 5 and 12.
7 Flashes - Indicates that the ELT battery has too much accumulated operation time (> 1hr).(
Battery may still power ELT, however, it must be replaced to meet FAA specifications. May
also indicates damage to the battery circuit.
Power
ELT is powering by own battery pack, placed inside the ELT.
SECTION 8
HANDLING, SERVICE AND MAINTENANCE
NOTE
It's required to monitor the battery pack rating life and replace them before passing the battery
life rating.
I
I
\
\
\
6/6
I
AC204-2501
December, 2009
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Fllght Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608001 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 5
BENDIX/KING KLN 898
GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (IFR}
J
.=:.~------
This supplement must be in&&rted Into Section 9 of the Pllofs Operatiig
Handbook. and FAA ApPfoved Airplane Flight Manual when the l<LN 89B Global
Positioning System is ilstalled.
FAA APPROVAL
'-U A~UJDEFI FAA 21 sta>ART J
m;;=:...
ThotC-S-A.c,al!C<>
Clalo: 11; D e - 199e
i)
COPYRIGHT C 19911
CESSNA AIRGRAfT GOMP~Y
WICHITA. MNSAS. USA
T206/if'liUS-SS-02
Member of GAMA
9 November 1998
Revision 2 • 30 May 2001
S5-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
(
SUPPLEMENT 5
BENDIX/KING KLN 89B GLOBAL POSITIONING
SYSTEM (IFR)
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
Revision Level Date of Issue
FM APPROVAL
O (Original)
1
2
Nov. 9, 1998
June 2, 1999
May 30, 2001
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
Date: 20 June 2001
PAGE
DATE
PAGE
DATE
Title (S5-1)
S5-2
SS-3
May 30/01
May 30/01
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov9/98
June 2/99
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
SS-11
SS-12
S5-13
S5-14
S5-15
SS-16
SS-17
SS-18
June 2/99
June 2/99
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
May 30/01
SS-4
SS-5
SS-6
SS-7
SS-8
SS-9
SS-10
SS-2
May 30/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT 5
BENDIX/KING KLN 89B GLOBAL POSITIONING
SYSTEM (IFR)
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Airplane Unit
Effectlvltv
Nov9/98
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
S5-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT
BENDIX/KING KLN 898
GPS NAVIGATION SYSTEM (IFR)
SECTION 1
GENERAL
,A.WARNING
THE KLN 89B IS NOT AUTHORIZED FOR
INSTRUMENT APPROACHES UNLESS THE
OPERATIONAL
REVISION
STATUS
IS
UPGRADED TO "ORS 02" OR LATER, AS READ
ON THE POWER-ON PAGE, AND THE HOST
SOFTWARE IS UPGRADED TO "HOST 008800004" OR LATER, AS READ ON THE KLN 89B
0TH 6 PAGE.
The KLN 89B GPS (Global Positioning System) is a threedimensional precision navigation system based on 24 earth orbiting
satellites. Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) is a
function that every !FR-certified GPS receiver must continuously
perform to assure position accuracy. RAIM is available when 5 or
more of these satellites are in view, or 4 satellites are in view and a
barometrically corrected altitude input from the airplane's altimeter
is made. Annunciation is provided if there are not enough satellites
in view to assure position integrity.
Operational guidance for the KLN 898 GPS Navigation System is
provided with the Bendix/King KLN 89B Pilot's Guide (supplied with
the airplane). This Pilot's Guide should be thoroughly studied and
VFR operations conducted so that you are totally familiar with the
GPS system of navigation before actually using this equipment in
IFR conditions .
S5-4
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5 - FAA APPROVED
The database card is an electronic memory containing
information on airports, navaids, intersections, SID's, STAR's,
instrument approaches, special use airspace, and other items of
interest to the pilot.
Every 28 days, Bendix/King receives new database information
from Jeppesen Sanderson for the North American database region.
This information is processed and downloaded onto the database
cards. Bendix/King makes these database card updates available
to KLN 89B GPS users.
AcAUTION
THE DATABASE MUST BE UPDATED ONLY
WHILE THE AIRCRAFT IS ON THE GROUND.
THE KLN 89B DOES NOT PERFORM ANY
NAVIGATION FUNCTION WHILE THE DATABASE
IS BEING UPDATED.
NOTE
A current database is required by regulation in order to
use the KLN 89B GPS system for nonprecision
approaches.
Provided the KLN 89B navigation system is receiving adequate
usable signals, it has been demonstrated capable of and has been
shown to meet the accuracy specifications of: VFR/IFR en route
oceanic and remote, en route domestic, terminal, and instrument
approach (GPS, Loran-C, VOR, VOR-DME, TACAN, NOB, NDBDME, RNAV) operation within the U.S. National Airspace System,
North Atlantic Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications
(MNPS) Airspace and latitudes bounded by 74° North and 60°
South using the WGS-84 (or NAO 83) coordinate reference datum in
accordance with the criteria of AC 20-138, AC 91-49, and AC 12033.
Navigation data is based upon use of only the global
positioning system (GPS) operated by the United States.
Nov 9/98
S5-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
NOTE
Aircraft using GPS for oceanic IFR operations may use the
KLN 898 to replace one of the other approved means of
long range navigation. A single KLN 898 GPS installation
may also be used on short oceanic routes which require
only one means of long-range navigation.
NOTE
FAA approval of the KLN 898 does not necessarily
constitute approval for use in foreign airspace.
NOTE
When the KLN 898 contains receiver software RCVR
01621-0001 (or higher dash number), as verified on the
0TH 6 page, the unit is qualified for BRNAV {Basic Area
Navigation) operation in the European region in accordance
with the criteria of AC 90-96. (Reference ICAO Doc 7030
Regional Supplementary Procedures, JAA Technical
Guidance Leaflet AMJ20X2 and Eurocontrol RNAV
Standard Doc 003-93 Area Navigation Equipment
Operational Requirements and Functional Requirements
(RNAV).)
SS-6
June 2/99
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5 - FM APPROVED
2
MG
7
NAV
GPS
GPS
APR
6
0585C1042
1. GPS MESSAGE (MSG) ANNUNCIATOR LIGHT - MSG will
begin flashing whenever the message prompt (a large "M" on
the left side of the screen) on the KLN 89B GPS unit begins
flashing to alert the pilot that a message is waiting. Press the
Message (MSG) key on the GPS to display the message. If a
message condition exists which requires a specific action by
the pilot, the message annunciator will remain on but will not
flash.
2. GPS WAYPOINT (WPT) ANNUNCIATOR LIGHT -- GPS
WAYPOINT annunciator will begin to flash approximately 36
seconds prior to reaching a Direct-To waypoint. Also, when
turn anticipation is enabled in the KLN 89B GPS unit, the
annunciator will begin to flash 20 seconds prior to the
beginning of turn anticipation, then illuminate steady at the
very beginning of turn anticipation.
Figure 1. GPS Annunciator/Switch (Sheet 1 of 3)
Nov 9/98
S5-7
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
AwARNING
TURN ANTICIPATION
IS AUTOMATICALLY
DISABLED FOR FAF WAYPOINTS AND THOSE
USED EXCLUSIVELY IN SID/STARS WHERE
OVERFLIGHT IS REQUIRED. FOR WA YPOINTS
SHARED
BETWEEN
SID/STARS
AND
PUBLISHED EN ROUTE SEGMENTS (REQUIRING
OVERFLIGHT IN THE SID/STARS), PROPER
SELECTION ON THE PRESENTED WA YPOINT
PAGE IS NECESSARY TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE
ROUTE PROTECTION ON THE SID/STARS.
3. GPS APPROACH (GPS, APR) SWITCH - Pressing the GPS
APPROACH switch manually selects or disarms the approach
ARM mode and also cancels the approach ACTV mode after
being automatically engaged by the KLN 898 GPS system.
The white background color of the GPS APPROACH
annunciator makes it visible in daylight.
4. ARM ANNUNCIATOR LIGHT -- ARM annunciator will
illuminate when the KLN 898 GPS system automatically
selects the approach ARM mode or when the approach ARM
mode is manually selected. The approach ARM mode will be
automatically selected when the airplane is within 30 NM of an
airport, and an approach is loaded in the flight plan for that
airport. The approach ARM mode can manually be selected
at a greater distance than 30 NM from the airport by pressing
the GPS APPROACH switch; however, this will not change the
CDI scale until the airplane reaches the 30 NM point. The
approach ARM mode can also be disarmed by pressing the
GPS APPROACH switch.
5. ACTIVE (ACTV) ANNUNCIATOR LIGHT - ACTV annunciator
will illuminate when the KLN 898 GPS system automatically
engages the approach ACTV mode (the ACTV mode can only
be engaged by the KLN 898 GPS system which is automatic.)
To cancel the approach ACTV mode, press the GPS
APPROACH switch; this will change the mode to the approach
ARM mode and illuminate the ARM annunciator.
Figure 1. GPS Annunciator/Switch (Sheet 2 of 3)
S5-8
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5- FAA APPROVED
6. NAV/GPS SWITCH - Toggles from Nav 1 to GPS and vice
versa to control the type of navigation data to be displayed on
the CDI (Course Deviation Indicator). The No. 1 CDI Omni
Bearing Selector (OBS) provides analog course input to the
KLN
89B
in
OBS
mode
when
the
NAV/GPS
switch/annunciator is in GPS. When the NA V/GPS switch
annunciation is in NAV, GPS course selection in OBS mode is
digital through the use of the controls and display at the KLN
89B.
NOTE
Manual CDI course centering in OBS mode using the
control knob can be difficult, especially at long
distances. Centering the Course Deviation Indicator
(CDI) needle can best be accomplished by pressing the
Direct-To button and then manually setting the No. 1
CDI course to the course value prescribed in the KLN
89B displayed message.
NOTE
The Heading Indicator (HI) heading (HDG) bug must
also be set to provide proper course datum to the
autopilot if coupled to the KLN 89B in LEG or OBS.
(When the optional HSI is installed, the HSI course
pointer provides course datum to the autopilot.)
7. NAVIGATION SOURCE (NAV) ANNUNCIATOR - The NAV
annunciator will illuminate steady to inform the pilot that NAV
1 information is being displayed on the NAV 1 CDI.
8. NAVIGATION SOURCE (GPS) ANNUNCIATOR - The GPS
annunciator will illuminate steady to inform the pilot that GPS
information is being displayed on the NAV 1 CDI.
Figure 1. GPS Annunciator/Switch (Sheet 3 of 3)
Nov 9/98
SS-9
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
1. The KLN 898 GPS Pilot's Guide, P/N 006-08786-0000, dated
May, 1995 (or later applicable revision) must be available to the
flight crew whenever IFR GPS navigation is used.
The
Operational Revision Status (ORS) of the Pilot's Guide must
match the ORS level annunciated on the Self Test page.
2. IFR Navigation is restricted as follows:
a. The system must utilize ORS level 01 or later FAA approved
revision.
b. The data on the self test page must be verified prior to use.
c. IFR en route and terminal navigation is prohibited unless the
pilot verifies the currency of the database or verifies each
selected waypoint for accuracy by reference to current
approved data.
d. The system must utilize ORS Level 02 or later FAA approved
revision to conduct nonprecision instrument approaches. In
addition, the software level status found on page 0TH 6 must
be "HOST 00880-0004" or later. Instrument approaches must
be accomplished in accordance with approved instrument
approach procedures that are retrieved from the KLN 898
database. The KLN 898 database must incorporate the
current update cycle.
1) The KLN 898 Quick Reference, PIN 006-08787-0000,
dated 5/95 (or later applicable to revision) must be
available to the flight crew during instrument approach
operations.
2) Instrument approaches must be conducted in the approach
mode and RAIM must be available at the Final Approach
Fix.
S5-10
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5- FM APPROVED
3) APR ACTV mode must be annunciated at the Final
Approach Fix.
4) Accomplishment of ILS, LOC, LOC-8C, LDA, SDF, and
MLS approaches are not authorized.
5) When an alternate airport is required by the applicable
operating rules, it must be served by an approach based
on other than GPS or Loran-C navigation.
6) The KLN 898 can only be used for approach guidance if
the reference coordinate datum system for the instrument
approach is WGS-84 or NAD-83. (All approaches in the
KLN 898 database use the WGS-84 or the NAD-83
geodetic datum).
e. For 8RNAV operations in the European region:
1) With 23 (24 if the altitude input to the KLN 898 is not
available) or more satellites projected to be operational for
the flight, the aircraft can depart without further action.
2) With 22 (23 if the altitude input to the KLN 898 is not
available) or fewer satellites projected to be operational for
the flight, the availability of the GPS integrity (RAIM) should
be confirmed for the intended flight (route and time). This
should be obtained from a prediction program run outside
of the aircraft. The prediction program must comply with
the criteria of Appendix 1 of AC90-96. In the event of a
predicted continuous loss of RAIM of more than 5 minutes
for any part of the intended flight, the flight should be
delayed, cancelled, or rerouted on a track where RAIM
requirements can be met.
NOTE
AlliedSignal's Preflight, Version 2.0 or later computer based
prediction program may be used for the RAIM prediction.
Alternate methods should be submitted for approval in
accordance with Advisory Circular AC90-96.
June 2/99
S5-11
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5 - FAA APPROVED
I
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
f. The aircraft must have other approved navigation equipment
appropriate to the route of flight installed and operational.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
There are no changes to the basic airplane emergency
procedures when the KLN 898 GPS is installed.
1. If the KLN 898 GPS information is not available or invalid, utilize
remaining operational navigation equipment as required.
2. If a "RAIM NOT AVAILABLE" message is displayed while
conducting an instrument approach, terminate the approach.
Execute a missed approach if required .
3. If a "RAIM NOT AVAILABLE" message is displayed in the en
route or terminal phase of flight, continue to navigate using the
KLN 898 or revert to an alternate means of navigation
appropriate to the route and phase of flight. When continuing to
use the KLN 898 for navigation, position must be verified every
15 minutes using another IFR approved navigation system.
4. Refer to the KLN 898 Pilot's Guide, Appendices B and C, for
appropriate pilot actions to be accomplished in response to
annunciated messages.
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
OPERATION
Normal operating procedures are outlined in the KLN 898 GPS
Pilot's Guide, P/N 006-08786-0000, dated May, 1995, (or later
applicable revision). A KLN 898 Quick Reference, P/N 006-087870000, dated May, 1995 (or later applicable revision) containing an
approach sequence, operating tips and approach related messages
is intended as well for cockpit use by the pilot familiar with KLN 898
operations when conducting instrument approaches.
S5-12
June 2/99
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5 - FM APPROVED
AwARNING
TO PREVENT THE POSSIBILITY OF TURN
ANTICIPATION
CAUSING
POTENTIALLY
MISLEADING
NAVIGATION
WHEN
THE
AIRCRAFT IS NOT ON COURSE, VERIFY THE CDI
COURSE AND CDI NEEDLE PRESENTATION IS
PROPER PRIOR TO TAKEOFF AND DO NOT
SWITCH FROM OBS TO LEG WITH GREATER
THAN 1 NM CROSS TRACK ERROR (XTK).
IF MISLEADING DATA IS SUSPECTED, A
DIRECT-TO OPERATION TO YOUR DESIRED
WAYPOINT WILL CLEAR ANY PREVIOUS OBS
COURSE, AND CANCEL TURN ANTICIPATION.
NOTE
After the above Direct-To operation, further reorientation to
the nearest leg of the active flight plan may be
accomplished by pressing the Direct-To button followed by
pressing the Clear button and finally the Enter Button.
Refer to the Pilot's Guide section 4.2.2 for an explanation of
turn anticipation, and Appendix A - Navigation Terms for the
definition of cross track error (XTK).
AUTOPILOT COUPLED OPERATION
The KLN 89B may be coupled to the KAP 140 autopilot by first
selecting GPS on the NAV/GPS switch. Manual selection of the
desired track on the pilot's HI heading bug is required to provide
course datum to the KAP 140 autopilot. (Frequent course datum
changes may be necessary, such as in the case of flying a DME
arc.) The autopilot approach mode (APR) should be used when
conducting a coupled GPS approach.
NOTE
Select HDG mode for DME arc intercepts. NAY or APR
coupled DME arc intercepts can result in excessive
overshoots (aggravated by high ground speeds and/or
intercepts from inside the arc).
Nov 9/98
SS-13
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
APPROACH MODE SEQUENCING AND RAIM PREDICTION
AwARNING
FAMILIARITY WITH THE EN ROUTE OPERATION
OF THE KLN 898 DOES NOT CONSTITUTE
PROFICIENCY IN APPROACH OPERATIONS. DO
NOT ATTEMPT APPROACH OPERATIONS IN
IMC
(INSTRUMENT
METEOROLOGICAL
CONDITIONS)
PRIOR
TO
ATTAINING
PROFICIENCY IN THE USE OF THE KLN 898.
NOTE
The special use airspace alert will automatically be
disabled prior to flying an instrument approach to
reduce the potential for message congestion.
1. Prior to arrival, select a STAR if appropriate from the APT 7
page. Select an approach and an initial approach fix (IAF)
from the APT 8 page.
NOTE
Using the outer knob, select the ACT (Active Flight Plan
Waypoints) pages. Pull the inner knob out and scroll to
the destination airport, then push the inner knob in and
select the ACT 7 or ACT 8 page.
To delete or replace a SID, STAR or approach, select
FPL O page. Place the cursor over the name of the
procedure, press ENT to change it, or CLR then ENT to
delete it.
SS-14
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5 - FAA APPROVED
2. En route, check for RAIM availability at the destination airport
ETA on the 0TH 3 page.
NOTE
RAIM must be available at the FAF in order to fly an
instrument approach. Be prepared to terminate the
approach upon loss of RAIM.
3. At or within 30 nm from the airport:
a. Verify automatic annunciation of APRARM.
b. Note automatic CDI needle scaling change from ±5.0 nm
to ±1 .0 nm over the next 30 seconds.
c. Update the KLN 89B altimeter baro setting as required.
d. Internally the KLN 89B will transition from en route to
terminal integrity monitoring.
4. Select NAV 4 page to fly the approach procedure.
a. If receiving radar vectors, or need to fly a procedure turn or
holding pattern, fly in OBS until inbound to the FAF.
NOTE
OBS navigation is TO-FROM (like a VOR) without
waypoint sequencing.
A_WARNING
TO PREVENT THE POSSIBILITY OF TURN
ANTICIPATION
CAUSING
POTENTIALLY
MISLEADING
NAVIGATION
WHEN
THE
AIRCRAFT IS NOT ON COURSE, DO NOT
SWITCH FROM OBS TO LEG WITH GREATER
THAN 1 NM CROSS TRACK ERROR (XTK).
b. NoPT routes including DME arc's are flown in LEG. LEG
is mandatory from the FAF to the MAP.
Nov 9/98
SS-15
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
/
NOTE
\
Select HOG mode for DME arc intercepts. NAV or APR
coupled DME arc intercepts can result in excessive
overshoots (aggravated by high ground speeds and/or
intercepts from inside the arc).
A
WARNING
FLYING FINAL OUTBOUND FROM AN OFFON
AN
OVERLAY
AIRPORT
VORTAC
APPROACH; BEWARE OF THE DME DISTANCE
INCREASING ON FINAL APPROACH, AND THE
GPS DISTANCE-TO-WAYPOINT DECREASING,
AND NOT MATCHING THE NUMBERS ON THE
APPROACH PLATE.
5. At or before 2 nm from the FAF inbound:
a. Select the FAF as the active waypoint, if not accomplished
already.
b. Select LEG operation.
6. Approaching the FAF inbound (within 2 nm):
a. Verify APR ACTV.
b. Note automatic CDI needle scaling change from ±1 .0 nm
to ±0.3 nm over the 2 nm inbound to the FAF.
c. Internally the KLN 898 will transition from terminal to
approach integrity monitoring.
7. Crossing the FAF and APR ACTV is not annunciated:
a. Do not descend.
b. Execute the missed approach.
8. Missed Approach:
a. Climb.
b. Navigate to the MAP (in APRARM if APR ACTV is not
available).
NOTE
There is no automatic LEG sequencing at the MAP.
S5-16
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
c.
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5 - FAA APPROVED
After climbing in accordance with the published missed
approach procedure, press the Direct To button, verify or
change the desired holding fix and press ENT.
GENERAL NOTES
• The database must be up to date for instrument approach
operation.
• Only one approach can be in the flight plan at a time.
• Checking RAIM prediction for your approach while en route using
the 0TH 3 page is recommended.
A self check occurs
automatically within 2 nm of the FAF. APR ACTV is inhibited
without RAIM.
• Data cannot be altered, added to or deleted from the approach
procedures contained in the database. (DME arc intercepts may
be relocated along the arc through the NAV 4 or the FPL 0
pages).
• Some approach waypoints do not appear on the approach
plates (including in some instances the FAF).
• Waypoint suffixes in the flight plan:
i -- IAF
f- FAF
m -- MAP
h -- missed approach holding fix.
•The DME arc IAF (arc intercept waypoint) will be on your present
position radial off the arc VOR when you load the IAF into the flight
plan, or the beginning of the arc if currently on a radial beyond the
arc limit. To adjust the arc intercept to be compatible with a
current radar vector, bring up the arc IAF waypoint in the NAV 4
page scanning field or under the cursor on the FPL O page, press
CLR, then ENT. Fly the arc in LEG. Adjust the heading bug (if
autopilot coupled) and CDI course with reference to the desired
track value on the NAV 4 page (it will flash to remind you).
Left/right CDI needle information is relative to the arc. Displayed
distance is not along the arc but direct to the active waypoint. (The
DME arc radial is also displayed in the lower right corner of the
NAV 4 page.)
Nov 9/98
SS-17
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 5 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
• The DME arc IAF identifier may be unfamiliar. Example: D098G
where 098 stands for the 098° radial off the referenced VOR,
and G is the seventh letter in the alphabet indicating a 7 DME
arc.
• APRARM to APR ACTV is automatic provided that:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
You are in APRARM (normally automatic).
You are in LEG mode.
The FAF is the active waypoint.
Within 2 nm of the FAF.
Outside of the FAF.
Inbound to the FAF.
RAIM is available.
• Direct-To operation between the FAF and MAP cancels APR
ACTV. Fly the missed approach in APRARM.
• Flagged navigation inside the FAF may usually be restored (not
guaranteed) by pressing the GPS APR button changing from
ACTV to ARM. Fly the missed approach.
• The instrument approach using the KLN 898 may be essentially
automatically started 30 nm out (with a manual baro setting
update) or it may require judicious selection of the OBS and LEG
modes.
I
• APRARM may be canceled at any time by pressing the GPS APR
button. (A subsequent press will reselect it.)
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when this avionics
However, installation of an externallyequipment is installed.
mounted antenna or related external antennas, will result in a minor
reduction in cruise performance.
SS-18
May 30/01
PUot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Fllght Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES 120608001 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 6
BENDIX/KING KR87
AUTOMATIC DIRECTION FINDER (ADF)
HRIALNO.
"r70{; (Jcf',ff Z-
IIIC~TION NO.
tJt( - (At
r
This supJ)lement must be inserted il'lto sec1ion 9 of the Pilot's 0Jlerating
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual when the Automatic
Direction Finder is installed.
FAA APPROVAL
~ APPAOY!DUNDEft FAA 21 SU9!"AIU J
-~Si~~,
7~~EweuM-0ale: 1g lleilem,er 19911
~ Member of GAMA
COF'YRJGHT " 1$98
CESSNA A~CAAFTCOMPPNY
WICHITA, KA~, USA
T200tiPHUS-
9 November 1998
S6-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 6 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT 6
BENDIX/KING KR 87 AUTOMATIC DIRECTION
FINDER (ADF)
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
Revision Level
Date of Issue
O (Original)
Nov. 9, 1998
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
PAGE
DATE
PAGE
DATE
Title (S6-1)
S6-2
S6-3
S6-4
S6-5
S6-6
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
S6-7
S6-8
S6-9
S6-10
S6-11
S6-12
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Airplane Unit
Effectivity
S6-2
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 6 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
BENDIX/KING KR 87 AUTOMATIC DIRECTION
FINDER (ADF)
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The Bendix/King Digital ADF is a panel-mounted, digitally tuned
automatic direction finder. It is designed to provide continuous 1kHz digital tuning in the frequency range of 200-kHz to 1799-kHz
and eliminates the need for mechanical band switching.
The
system is comprised of a receiver, a built-in electronics timer, a
bearing indicator, and a KA-44B combined loop and sense antenna.
Operating controls and displays for the Bendix/King Digital ADF are
shown and described in Figure 1. The audio system used in
conjunction with this radio for speaker-phone selection is shown and
described in Supplement 3 of this handbook.
The -Bendix/King Digital ADF can be used for position plotting
and homing procedures, and for aural reception of amplitudemodulated (AM) signals.
The "flip-flop" frequency display allows switching between preselected "STANDBY" and "ACTIVE" frequencies by pressing the
frequency transfer button. Both pre-selected frequencies are stored
in a non-volatile memory circuit (no battery power required) and
displayed in large, easy-to-read, self-dimming gas discharge
numerics. The active frequency is continuously displayed in the left
window, while the right window will display either the standby
frequency or the selected readout from the built-in electronic timer.
The built-in electronic timer has two separate and independent
timing functions. An automatic flight timer that starts whenever the
unit is turned on. This timer functions up to 59 hours and 59
minutes. An elapsed timer which will count up or down for up to 59
minutes and 59 seconds. When a preset time interval has been
programmed and the countdown reaches :00, the display will flash
for 15 seconds. Since both the flight timer and elapsed timer
operate independently, it is possible to monitor either one without
disrupting the other. The pushbutton controls and the bearing
indicators are internally lighted. Intensity is controlled by the RADIO
light dimming rheostat.
Nov 9/98
S6-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 6 - FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
1
6
ANT
ADF
-
12
11
10
9
8
13
16
14
15
0S85C104l
0S85C1044
Figure 1. KR 87 Automatic Direction Finder (ADF) (Sheet 1 of 4)
S6-4
Nov 9198
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 6 - FAA APPROVED
1. ANT/ADF MODE ANNUNCIATOR Antenna (ANT) is
selected by the "out" position of the ADF button. This mode
improves the audio reception and is usually used for station
identification. The bearing pointer is deactivated and will park
in the 90° relative position. Automatic Direction Finder (ADF)
mode is selected by the depressed position of the ADF button.
This mode activates the bearing pointer. The bearing pointer
will point in the direction of the station relative to the aircraft
heading.
2. IN-USE FREQUENCY DISPLAY - The frequency to which the
ADF is tuned is displayed here. The active ADF frequency can
be changed directly when either of the timer functions is
selected.
3. BFO (Beat Frequency Oscillator) ANNUNCIATOR - The BFO
mode, activated and annunciated when the "BFO" button is
depressed, permits the carrier wave and associated morse
code identifier broadcast on the carrier wave to be heard.
NOTE
CW signals (Morse Code) are unmodulated and no audio
will be heard without use of BFO. This type of signal is not
used in the United States air navigation. It is used in some
foreign countries and marine beacons.
4. STANDBY FREQUENCY/FLIGHT TIME OR ELAPSED TIME
ANNUNCIATION - When FRO is displayed the STANDBY
frequency is displayed in the right hand display. The
STANDBY frequency is selected using the frequency select
knobs. The selected STANDBY frequency is put into the
ACTIVE frequency windows by pressing the frequency transfer
button. Either the standby frequency, the flight timer, or the
elapsed time is displayed in this position. The flight timer and
elapsed timer are displayed replacing the standby frequency
which goes into "blind" memory to be called back at any time
by depressing the FRO button. Flight time or elapsed time are
displayed and annunciated alternatively by depressing the
FL TIET button.
Figure 1. KR 87 Automatic Direction Finder (ADF) (Sheet 2 of 4)
Nov 9/98
S6-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 6 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
5. FLIGHT TIMER AND ELAPSED TIMER MODE ANNUNCIATION -- Either the elapsed time (ET) or flight time (FLT) mode
is annunciated here.
6. FREQUENCY SELECT KNOBS -- Selects the standby
frequency when FRQ is displayed and directly selects the
active frequency whenever either of the time functions is
selected. The frequency selector knobs may be rotated either
clockwise or counterclockwise. The small knob is pulled out to
tune the 1's. The small knob is pushed in to tune the 1O's.
The outer knob tunes the 100's with rollover into the 1000's
up to 1799. These knobs are also used to set the desired
time when the elapsed timer is used in the countdown mode.
7. ON/OFFNOLUME CONTROL SWITCH (ON/OFFNOL) Controls primary power and audio output level. Clockwise
rotation from OFF position applies primary power to the
receiver; further clockwise rotation increases audio level.
Audio muting causes the audio output to be muted unless the
receiver is locked on a valid station.
8. SET/RESET ELAPSED TIMER BUTTON (SET/RST) - The
seUreset button when pressed resets the elapsed timer
whether it is being displayed or not.
9. FLIGHT TIMER/ELAPSED TIMER MODE SELECTOR
BUTTON (FLTIET) -- The Flight Timer/Elapsed Time mode
selector button when pressed alternatively selects either Flight
Timer mode or Elapsed Timer mode.
Figure 1. KR 87 Automatic Direction Finder (ADF) (Sheet 3 of 4)
S6-6
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9- SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 6 - FAA APPROVED
10. FREQUENCY TRANSFER BUTTON (FRQ) - The FRQ
transfer button when pressed exchanges the active and
standby frequencies. The new frequency becomes active and
the former active frequency goes into standby.
11. BFO (Beat Frequency Oscillator) BUTTON - The BFO button
selects the BFO mode when in the depressed position. (See
note under item 3).
12. ADF BUTTON -- The ADF button selects either the ANT mode
or the ADF mode. The ANT mode is selected with the ADF
button in the out position. The ADF mode is selected with the
ADF button in the depressed position.
13. LUBBER LINE - Indicates relative or magnetic heading of the
aircraft. The heading must be manually input by the pilot with
the heading (HOG) knob.
14. COMPASS CARD - Manually rotatable card that indicates
relative or magnetic heading of aircraft, as selected by HOG
knob.
15. BEARING POINTER -- Indicates relative or magnetic bearing
to station as selected by HDG knob. If the relative heading of
North (N) is manually selected under the lubber line by the
pilot, then the bearing pointer indicates the relative bearing to
the station. If the aircraft's magnetic heading is selected
under the lubber line by the pilot, then the bearing pointer
indicates the magnetic bearing to the station.
16. HEADING KNOB (HDG) -Rotates card to set in relative or
magnetic heading of aircraft.
Figure 1. KR 87 Automatic Direction Finder (ADF) (Sheet 4 of 4)
Nov 9/98
S6-7
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 6 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
There is no change to airplane limitations when the KR 87 ADF
is installed.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
There are no changes to the basic airplane emergency
procedures when the KR 87 ADF is installed.
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
TO OPERATE AS AN AUTOMATIC DIRECTION FINDER:
1. OFFNOL Control - ON.
2. Frequency Selector Knobs -- SELECT desired frequency in
the standby frequency display.
3. FRQ Button -- PRESS to move the desired frequency from the
standby to the active position.
4. ADF Selector Switch (on audio control panel) - SELECT as
desired.
5. OFFNOL Control -- SET to desired volume level and identify
that desired station is being received.
6. ADF Button - SELECT ADF mode and note relative bearing
on indicator.
ADF TEST (PRE-FLIGHT or IN-FLIGHT):
1. ADF Button - SELECT ANT mode and note pointer moves to
90° position.
2. ADF Button -- SELECT ADF mode and note the pointer moves
without hesitation to the station bearing. Excessive pointer
sluggishness, wavering or reversals indicate a signal that is
too weak or a system malfunction.
S6-8
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 6 - FM APPROVED
TO OPERATE BFO:
1. OFFNOL Control - ON.
2. BFO Button -- PRESS on .
3. ADF Selector Buttons (on audio control panel) desired mode.
4. VOL Control -- ADJUST to desired listening level.
SET to
NOTE
A 1000-Hz tone and Morse Code identifier is heard in
the audio output when a CW signal is received.
TO OPERATE FLIGHT TIMER:
1. OFFNOL Control - ON.
2. FLTIET Mode Button - PRESS (once or twice) until FLT is
annunciated.
Timer will already be counting since it is
activated by turning the unit on.
3. OFFNOL Control - OFF and then ON if it is desired to reset
the flight timer.
TO OPERA TE AS A COMMUNICATIONS RECEIVER ONLY:
1. OFFNOL Control - ON.
2. ADF Button - SELECT ANT mode.
3. Frequency Selector Knobs - SELECT desired frequency in
the standby frequency display.
4. FRQ Button - PRESS to move the desired frequency from the
standby to the active position .
5. ADF Selector Buttons (on audio control panel) - SET to
desired mode.
6. VOL Control -- ADJUST to desired listening level.
Nov 9/98
S6-9
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 6 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
TO OPERATE ELAPSED TIME TIMER-COUNT UP MODE:
1. OFFNOL Control - ON.
2. FLTIET Mode Button - PRESS (once or twice) until ET is
annunciated.
3. SETIRST Button -- PRESS momentarily to reset elapsed timer
to zero.
NOTE
The Standby Frequency which is in memory while Flight
Time or Elapsed Time modes are being displayed may
be called back by pressing the FRQ button, then
transferred to active use by pressing the FRQ button
again.
TO OPERATE ELAPSED TIME TIMER-COUNT DOWN MODE:
1. OFFNOL Control - ON.
2. FLTIET Mode Button - PRESS (once or twice) until ET is
annunciated.
3. SETIRST Button -- PRESS until the ET annunciation begins to
flash.
4. FREQUENCY SELECTOR KNOBS - SET desired time in the
elapsed time display. The small knob is pulled out to tune the
1's. The small knob is pushed in to tune the 10's. The outer
knob tunes minutes up to 59 minutes.
NOTE
Selector knobs remain in the time set mode for 15
seconds after the last entry or until the SETIRST,
FLTIET or FRQ button is pressed.
5. SETIRST Button - PRESS to start countdown. When the
timer reaches 0, it will start to count up as display flashes for
15 seconds.
NOTE
While FLT or ET are displayed, the active frequency on
the left side of the window may be changed, by using
the frequency selector knobs, without any effect on the
stored standby frequency or the other modes.
S6-10
Nov 9198
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 6- FAA APPROVED
ADF OPERATION NOTES:
ERRONEOUS ADF BEARING DUE TO RADIO FREQUENCY
PHENOMENA:
In the U.S., the FCC, which assigns AM radio frequencies,
occasionally will assign the same frequency to more than one
station in an area. Certain conditions, such as Night Effect, may
cause signals from such stations to overlap. This should be taken
into consideration when using AM broadcast station for navigation.
Sunspots and atmospheric phenomena may occasionally distort
reception so that signals from two stations on the same frequency
will overlap. For this reason, it is always wise to make positive
identification of the station being tuned, by switching the function
selector to ANT and listening for station call letters.
ELECTRICAL STORMS:
In the vicinity of electrical storms, an ADF indicator pointer tends
to swing from the station tuned toward the center of the storm.
NIGHT EFFECT:
This is a disturbance particularly strong just after sunset and just
after dawn. An ADF indicator pointer may swing erratically at these
times. If possible, tune to the most powerful station at the lowest
frequency. If this is not possible, take the average of pointer
oscillations to determine relative station bearing.
MOUNTAIN EFFECT:
Radio waves reflecting from the surface of mountains may cause
the pointer to fluctuate or show an erroneous bearing. This should
be taken into account when taking bearings over mountainous
terrain.
COASTAL REFRACTION:
Radio waves may be refracted when passing from land to sea or
when moving parallel to the coastline. This also should be taken
into account.
Nov 9/98
S6-11
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 6 - FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane perfonnance when this
avionic equipment is installed. However, the installation of an
externally mounted antenna or related external antennas, will result
in a minor reduction in cruise performance.
S6-12
Nov 9/98
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608001 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 7
BENDIX/KING KAP 140
SINGLE AXIS AUTOPILOT
SERLlLNO.
T71J6 ~--i(,f2
IJit. .-,- flt?
11£0ISTltATIOM NO.
This supplement must be inserted into Section i of the Pilors Operating
Handbook end FM Approved Airplane Flight Manual when the KAP 140 Single
Axis Autopitrt is instaMed.
@
COPYRIGHT c, 1999
CESSW\.AIRCIW'T COlo!PANY
WICHITA, AAflSAS. USA
T21JfHl'HU$-sT-02
Member of GAMA
28 DECEMBER 1999
Revision 2 - 31 October 2002
S7-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
1 (
SUPPLEMENT 7
BENDIXJKING KAP 140
SINGLE AXIS AUTOPILOT
I
Use the Log of Effective Pages to determine the current status of
this supplement. Pages affected by the current revision are
indicated by an asterisk(·) preceeding the page number.
Supplement Status
Date
Original Issue
Revision 1
28 December 1999
30 May2001
31 October 2002
Revision 2
LOG OF EFFECTIVE PAGES
,. Title (S7-1}
* S7-1 thru $7-19
Page
Status
Revised
Revised
* S7-20
Added
Page
S7-2
Revision
Number
2
2
2
Revision 2
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 • SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT 7
BENDIX/KING KAP 140
SINGLE AXIS AUTOPILOT
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of SeNice Bulletins that are applicable to the
operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into this
supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins that are
currently active.
A~j!
na
Effectivity
KC-14l)..M1
(Honeywell
Service Bulletin)
Revision 2
KAP 140 AP
Revision
Incorjiorairon
Revision2
Incorporated
In Airplane
I
S7-3/(S7-4 blank)
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FM APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT 7
BENDIX/KING KAP 140
SINGLE AXIS AUTOPILOT
I
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The Bendix/King KAP 140 is an all-electric, single-axis (aileron
control) autopilot system that provides lateral and directional control.
Components are a computer, a turn coordinator, an aileron actuator,
a course deviation indicator, and a directional indicator or HSI (if
installed).
Roll and yaw motions of the airplane are sensed by the turn
coordinator gyro. The computer computes the necessary correction
and signals the actuator to move the ailerons to maintain the
airplane in the commanded lateral attitude.
The KAP 140 will provide wing leveler, heading hold, NAV track,
and approach and backcourse lateral modes.
A lockout device prevents autopilot engagement until the system
has been successfully preflight tested. Automatic preflight self-test
begins with initial power application to the autopilot.
The following conditions will cause the autopilot to disengage:
A.
8.
C.
D.
Electric power failure.
Internal autopilot system failure.
Turn coordinator failure (flagged gyro).
Computer autopilot monitor that detects the R (ROLL) axis
annunciator.
The AVIONICS MASTER switch supplies power to the avionics bus
bar at the radio circuit breakers and the autopilot circuit breaker.
The AVIONICS MASTER switch also services as an emergency
autopilot (AP) shutoff.
Revision 2
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
The following circuit breakers are used to protect the listed
elements of the KAP 140 single axis autopilot:
LABEL
ls1-s
FUNCTIONS
AUTO
PILOT
Supplies power to the KC 140
Computer and the autopilot.
WARN
Supplies power
disconnect tone.
to
the
autopilot
Revision 2
CESSNA
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FAA APPROVED
MODEL T206H
I\IAV/COMM 1
CONTROL PANEL
GPS
-
PILOT
,,. ,,.
HORIZONTAL
SITUATION
INDICATOR
NAVIGATION
SOURCE
SELECTOR
SWITCH
(
,
.,, , ""
9
CONTROL
WHEEL
DIRECTIONAL
INDICATOR
7
TURN
COORDINATOR
05851054
Figure 1. Bendix/King KAP 140 Single Axis Autopilot, Operating
Controls and Indicators (Sheet 1 of 3)
Revision 2
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FAA APPROVED
-
I
KAP 140
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
12
Hf>G
AP
R
!API
2
3
4
5
6
1. ROLL (R) AXIS ANNUNCIATOR - When illuminated, indicates
a failure in the roll axis and prevents engagement or
disengages the autopilot.
I
2. AUTOPILOT ENGAGE/DISENGAGE (AP) BUTTON -- When
pushed* or pressed and held (approx 0.25 seconds)**,
engages autopilot if all preflight self test conditions are met.
The autopilot will engage in the basic ROL mode which
functions as a wings leveler. The AP button can also be used
to disengage the autopilot.
3. HEADING (HDG) MODE SELECTOR BUTTON -- When
pushed, will select the Heading mode, which commands the
airplane to turn to and maintain the heading selected by the
heading bug on the Directional Gyro or HSI (if installed). A
new heading may be selected at any time and will result in the
airplane turning to the new heading. The button can also be
used to toggle between HDG and ROL modes. This button
can also be used to engage the autopilot in HDG mode. For
airplane serials T20608001 thru T20608383 not incorporating
Honeywell Service Bulletin KC140-M1, this button will also
engage the autopilot in HDG mode.
* Airplane serials T20608001 thru T20608383 not incorporating
Honeywell Service Bulletin KC 140-M 1.
** Airplane serials T20608001 thru 20608383 incorporating
Honeywell Service Bulletin KC140-M1, and airplane serials
T20608384 and on.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KAP 140 Single Axis Autopilot, Operating
Controls and Indicators (Sheet 2 of 3)
ls1-s
Revision 2
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FAA APPROVED
4. NAVIGATION (NAY) MODE SELECTOR BUTTON - When
pushed, will select the Navigation mode. This mode provides
automatic beam capture and tracking of VOR, LOC, or GPS
signals as selected for presentation on the NAV#1 CDI or HSI
(if installed).
5. APPROACH (APR) MODE SELECTOR BUTTON -- When
pushed, will select the Approach mode. This mode provides
automatic beam capture and tracking of VOR, LOC, or GPS
signals as selected for presentation on the NAY #1 CDI or HSI
(if installed). The greater tracking sensitivity of the APR mode
is recommended for instrument approaches.
6. BACK COURSE APPROACH (REV) MODE SELECTOR
BUTTON - This button is active only when the coupled
navigation receiver is tuned to a LOC/ILS frequency. When
pushed, it will select the Back Course (BC) approach mode.
This mode functions indentically to the approach mode except
that the autopilot response to LOC signals is reversed.
7. HEADING SELECT KNOB (HDG) -- Positions the heading
pointer ("bug") on the compass card. Note that the position
the heading bug also provides course datum to the autopilot
when tracking in NAY, APR, or REV (BC) modes. This is in
addition to its more intuitive use in the HDG mode.
ofl
8. OMNI BEARING SELECT KNOB (OBS) - Selects the desired
course radial to be tracked by the autopilot. (Note that the
HDG bug must also be positioned to the proper course to
capture and track the selected radial).
9. AUTOPILOT DISCONNECT (A/P DISC) SWITCH - When
depressed will disengage the autopilot.
The autopilot
disconnect will be annunciated by a continuous two-second
tone accompanied by a flashing "AP" displayed on the
autopilot computer.
10. AUTOPILOT CIRCUIT BREAKER - A 5-amp circuit breaker
supplying 28 VDC to the KAP 140 system.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KAP 140 Autopilot, Operating Controls and
Indicators (Sheet 3 of 3)
Revision 2
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
(
11. WARN C/B -- Power to the autopilot disconnect horn.
12.AUTOPILOT ENGAGE IAP I Annunciation** -- Illuminates
whenever the autopilot is engaged. Flashes during pilot
initiated or automatic disengagement.
* Airplane serials T20608001 thru T20608383 not incorporating
Honeywell Service Bulletin KC140-M1.
** Airplane serials T20608001 thru 20608383 incorporating
Honeywell Service Bulletin KC 140-M 1, and airplane serials
T20608384 and on.
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
The following autopilot limitations must be adhered to:
1. The autopilot must be OFF during takeoff and landing.
2. During autopilot operation, the pilot, with seat belt fastened,
must be seated in the left front seat.
3. Continued autopilot system use is prohibited following
abnormal or malfunctioning operation, and prior to corrective
maintenance.
4. The entire PREFLIGHT procedure, outlined under Section 4,
including steps 1 through 6, must be successfully completed
prior to each flight. Use of the autopilot is prohibited prior to
completion of these tests.
5. KMA 28 audio amplifier PUSH OFF/EMG operation is
prohibited during normal operations.
NOTE
During emergency operation of the audio amplifier, the
PUSH OFF/EMG state of the KMA 28 will prevent flight
control system alerts from being heard.
ls1-10
Revision 2
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FAA APPROVED
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
The two step procedure listed under paragraph 1 should be
among the basic airplane emergency procedures that are
committed to memory. It is important that the pilot be proficient
in accomplishing both steps without reference to this manual.
1. In case of Autopilot malfunction (accomplish Items a. and b.
simultaneously):
a. Airplane Control Wheel - GRASP FIRMLY and regain
aircraft control.
b. NP DISC Switch - PRESS and HOLD throughout recovery.
NOTE
The AVIONICS MASTER switch may be used as an
alternate means of removing power from the autopilot. In
addition to the above, power may be removed with the
Engage/Disengage button or the airplane MASTER switch. If
necessary perform steps a. and b. above, then turn off the
AVIONICS MASTER switch.
Primary attitude, airspeed,
directional and altitude control instruments will remain
operational with either master switch OFF.
,&WARNING
• DO NOT ATTEMPT TO RE-ENGAGE THE
AUTOPILOT FOLLOWING AN AUTOPILOT
MALFUNCTION.
I
IN
COMMAND
MUST
• THE
PILOT
CONTINUOUSLY MONITOR THE AUTOPILOT
WHEN IT IS ENGAGED, AND BE PREPARED TO
DISCONNECT THE AUTOPILOT AND TAKE
IMMEDIATE CORRECTIVE ACTION - INCLUDING
MANUAL CONTROL OF THE AIRPLANE
AND/OR PERFORMANCE OF EMERGENCY
PROCEDURES - IF AUTOPILOT OPERATION IS
NOT AS EXPECTED OR IF AIRPLANE CONTROL
IS NOT MAINTAINED.
I
Revision 2
s1-11
I
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
AMPLIFIED EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
The following paragraphs are presented to supply additional
information for the purpose of providing the pilot with a more
complete understanding of the recommended course of action for
an emergency situation.
£WARNING
DO NOT ATTEMPT TO RE-ENGAGE THE
AN
AUTOPILOT
AUTOPILOT
FOLLOWING
MALFUNCTION UNTIL CORRECTIVE SERVICE
ACTION HAS BEEN PERFORMED ON THE
SYSTEM.
An autopilot malfunction occurs when there is an uncommanded
deviation in the airplane flight path or when there is abnormal
control wheel movement. The main concern in reacting to an
autopilot malfunction, or to an automatic disconnect of the autopilot,
is in maintaining control of the airplane. Immediately grasp the
control wheel and press and hold down the A/P DISC switch
throughout the recovery. Manipulate the controls as required to
safely maintain operation of the airplane within all of its operating
limitations.The AVIONICS MASTER switch may be used as required
to remove all power from the Autopilot.
With the AVIONICS
MASTER switch off, all flight instruments will remain operational;
however, communications, navigation, and identification equipment
will be inoperative.
Note that the emergency procedure for any malfunction is
essentially the same: immediately grasp the control wheel and
regain airplane control while pressing and the holding the A/P DISC
switch down.
It is important that all portions of the autopilot system are preflight
tested prior to each flight in accordance with the procedures
published herein in order to assure their integrity and continued safe
operation during flight.
A flashing mode annunciation on the face of the autopilot is
normally an indication of mode loss.
(
1s1-12
Revision 2
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FM APPROVED
NOTE
An exception to this is HDG annunciation which will flash for
5 seconds along with steady NAVARM, APRARM, or
REVARM annunciation to remind the pilot to set the HDG
bug for course datum use.
1. Flashing HOG -- Indicates a failed heading. PRESS HDG
button to terminate flashing. ROL will be displayed.
2. Flashing NAV, APR or REV -- Indicates a flagged navigation
source. If no NAV source is flagged, a failed heading mode
can be the cause. PRESS NAV, APR or REV button to
terminate flashing. ROL will be displayed.
NOTE
At the onset of mode annunciator flashing, the autopilot
has already reverted to a default mode of operation,
(i.e., ROL mode). An immediate attempt to reengage
the lost mode may be made if the offending navigation
flag has cleared.
Effects of instrument losses upon autopilot operation:
1. Loss of the artificial horizon - no effect on the autopilot.
2. Loss of the tum coordinator -- autopilot inoperative.
3. Loss of the Directional Gyro (DG) - The directional gyro does
not provide any system valid flag. If the DG fails to function
properly the autopilot heading and navigation mode will not
function correctly. Under these conditions, the only useable
lateral mode is ROL.
4. Loss of Horizontal Situation Indicator (HSI) (if installed) -- If the
HSI fails to function properly the autopilot heading and
navigation mode will not function correctly.
Under these
conditions, the only usable lateral mode is ROL.
Revision 1
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FAA APPROVED
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
PREFLIGHT (PERFORM PRIOR TO EACH FLIGHT):
1. GYROS -- Allow time for the turn coordinator to come up to
speed, as evidenced by the turn coordinator flag being pulled
from view.
2. AVIONICS MASTER - ON.
3. POWER APPLICATION AND SELF TEST
A self test is performed upon power application to the
computer. This test is a sequence of internal checks that
validate proper system operation prior to allowing normal
system operation. The sequence is indicated by "PFT" (preflight test) with an increasing number for the sequence steps.
Successful completion of self test is identified by all display
segments being illuminated (Display Test) and the disconnect
tone sounding.
4. AUTOPILOT -- ENGAGE by pressing AP button.
5. FLIGHT CONTROLS - MOVE left and right to verify that the
autopilot can be overpowered.
NOTE
Normal use will not require the autopilot to be overpowered.
6. A/P DISC Switch -- PRESS.
disconnects and tone sounds.
Verify that the autopilot
BEFORE TAKEOFF:
1. Autopilot -- OFF.
AUTOPILOT ENGAGEMENT:
1. AP Button -- PRESS. Note ROL annunciator on. If no other
modes are selected the autopilot will operate in the ROL
mode.
NOTE
Aircraft heading
turbulence.
ls1-14
may change
in
ROL mode due to
Revision 1
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FAA APPROVED
AUTOPILOT ENGAGEMENT:
1. AP Button - PRESS. Note ROL annunciator on. If no other
modes are selected the autopilot will operate in the ROL
mode.
NOTE
Aircraft heading
turbulence.
may
change
in
ROL
mode due to
HEADING HOLD
1. Heading Selector Knob - SET bug to desired heading.
2. HOG Mode Selector Button - PRESS. Note HDG mode
annunciator ON. Autopilot will automatically turn the aircraft to
the selected heading.
COMMAND TURNS (HEADING HOLD MODE ENGAGED)
1. Heading Selector Knob -- MOVE bug to the desired heading.
Autopilot will automatically turn the aircraft to the new selected
heading.
NAV COUPLING
1. When equipped with DG:
a. NAV#1 OBS Knob - SELECT desired course.
b. NAV Mode Selector Button - PRESS. Note NAVARM
annunciated.
c. Heading Selector Knob - ROTATE BUG to agree with OBS
course.
NOTE
When NAV is selected, the autopilot will flash HDG for 5
seconds to remind the pilot to reset the HDG bug to the
OBS course. If HDG mode was in use at the time of NAV
button selection, a 45° intercept angle will then be
automatically established based on the position of the bug.
Revision 2
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
(
NOTE
All angle intercepts compatible with radar vectors may be
accomplished by selecting ROL mode PRIOR to pressing
the NAV button. The HDG bug must still be positioned to
agree with the OBS course to provide course datum to the
autopilot when using a DG (Directional Gyro).
I
1) If the CDI needle is greater than 2 to 3 dots from center,
the autopilot will annunciate NAVARM- When the computed
capture point is reached, the ARM annunciator will go out
and the selected course will be automatically captured and
tracked.
I
2) If the CDI needle is less than 2 to 3 dots from center, the
HDG mode will disengage upon selecting NAV mode. The
NAV annunciator will then illuminate and the capture/track
sequence will automatically begin.
2. When equipped with HSI:
a. Course Bearing Pointer - SET to desired course.
b. Heading Selector Knob -- SET BUG to provide desired
intercept angle and engage HDG mode.
c. NAV Mode Selector Button - PRESS .
I
1) If the Course Deviation Bar (D-Bar) is greater than 2 to 3
dots from center, the autopilot will annunciate NAVARM·
When the computed capture point is reached the ARM
annunciator will go out and the selected course will be
automatically captured and tracked.
I
2) If the D-Bar is less than 2 to 3 dots from center, the HOG
mode will disengage upon selecting NAV mode; the NAV
annunciator will illuminate and the capture/track sequence
will automatically begin.
(
ls?-16
Revision 2
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FAA APPROVED
APPROACH (APR) COUPLING: (To enable glideslope coupling on
an ILS and more precise tracking on instrument approaches).
1. When equipped with DG:
a. NAV #1 OBS Knob - SELECT desired approach course. (For
a localizer, set it to serve as a memory aid.)
b. APR Mode Selector Button annunciated.
PRESS.
Note APRARM
c. Heading Selector Knob - ROTATE BUG to agree with desired
approach.
NOTE
When APR is selected, the autopilot will flash HDG for 5
seconds to remind the pilot to reset the HDG bug to the
approach course. If HDG mode was in use at the time of
APR button selection a 45° intercept angle will then be
automatically established based on the positon of the bug.
NOTE
All angle intercepts compatible with radar vectors may be
accomplished by selecting ROL mode PRIOR to pressing
the APR button. The HDG bug must still be positioned to
agree with the desired approach course to provide course
datum to the autopilot when using a DG.
1) If the CDI needle is greater than 2 to 3 dots from center.I
the autopilot will annunciate APRARM; when the computed
capture point is reached the ARM annunciator will go out
and the selected course will be automatically captured and
tracked.
Revision 2
S7-171
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FAA APPROVED
I
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
2) If the CDI needle is less than 2 to 3 dots from center, the
HDG mode will disengage upon selecting APR mode; the
APR annunciator will illuminate and the capture/track
sequence will automatically begin.
2. When equipped with HSI:
a. Course Bearing Pointer - SET to desired course.
b. Heading Selector Knob -- SET BUG to provide desired
intercept angle.
c. APR Mode Selector Button - PRESS.
I
1) If the D-Bar is greater than 2 to 3 dots from center, the
autopilot will annunciate APRARM; when the computed
capture point is reached the ARM annunciator will go out
and the selected course will be automatically captured and
tracked.
I
2) If the D-Bar is less than 2 to 3 dots from center, the HDG
mode will disengage upon selecting APR mode; the APR
annunciator will illuminate and the capture/track sequence
will automatically begin.
d. Airspeed - MAINTAIN 90 KIAS during autopilot approaches
(recommended).
BACK COURSE (REV) APPROACH COUPLING (i.e., reverse
localizer):
1. When equipped with DG:
a. NAV #1 OBS Knob -- SELECT the localizer course to the
front course inbound (as a memory aid).
b. REV Mode Selector Button -- PRESS.
c. Heading Selector Knob - ROTATE BUG to the heading
corresponding to the localizer front course bound.
1s7-1B
Revision 2
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
(
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FAA APPROVED
NOTE
• When REV is selected, the autopilot will flash HDG
for 5 seconds to remind the pilot to reset the HDG
bug to the localizer FRONT COURSE INBOUND
heading. If heading mode was in use at the time of
REV button selection, a 45° intercept angle will
then be automatically established based on the
position of the bug.
I
• All angle intercepts compatible with radar vectors
may be accomplished by selecting ROL mode
PRIOR to pressing the REV button. The HDG bug
must still be positioned to the localizer FRONT
COURSE INBOUND heading to provide course
datum to the autopilot when using a DG.
I
1) If the CDI needle is greater than 2 to 3 dots from center, I
the autopilot will annunciate REVARM; when the computed
capture point is reached the ARM annunciator will go out
and the selected back course will be automatically captured
and tracked .
2) If the CDI needle is less than 2 to 3 dots from center, thel
HDG mode will disengage upon selecting REV mode; the
REV annunciator will illuminiate and the capture/track
sequence will automatically begin.
2. When equipped with HSI:
a. Course Bearing Pointer -- SET to the ILS front course inbound
heading.
b. Heading Selector Knob -- SET BUG to provide desired
intercept angle and engage HDG mode.
c. REV Mode Selector Button -- PRESS.
1) If the D-Bar is greater than 2 to 3 dots from center, the I
autopilot will annunciate REVARM ; when the computed
capture point is reached the ARM annunciator will go out
and the selected back course will be automatically captured
and tracked.
·
Revision 2
S?-191
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 7 - FAA APPROVED
I
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
2) If the D-Bar is less than 2 to 3 dots from center, the HOG
mode will disengage upon selecting REV mode; the REV
annunciator will illuminate and the capture/track
sequence will automatically begin.
d. Airspeed - MAINTAIN 90 KIAS during autopilot approaches (recommended).
MISSED APPROACH
1. A/P DISC - PRESS to disengage AP.
2. MISSED APPROACH - EXECUTE.
3. AP Button - PRESS (if AP operation is desired). Note ROL
annunciator ON. Select optional lateral modes as desired.
BEFORE LANDING
1. A/P DISC Switch -- PRESS to disengage AP .
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when the KAP140
Autopilot is installed.
ls1-20
Revision 2
(
r
IP SUPPLEMENT
Cessna 206 series
CLS
. _._....
POH/AFM
Supplement
Instrument Panel
{
Aircraft model:
(eJ!,J,,c..
Aircraft Serial No.
TJo, - oJ17L
Registration No.:
oh-n(P
/oc.
This supplement must be attached to the FAA approved POH/AFM. The information contained
in this document supplements or supersedes the basic manual only in those areas listed. For
limitations, procedures, performance, and loading information not contained in this
supplement, consult the basic POH/AFM.
The technical
content
DOA No.EASA.21J.337.
Date:
April , 2010
of
this
document
is
approved
under
authority
of
18 -04- 2010
AC204-2504
,
1/6
IP SUPPLEMENT
Cessna 206 series
Log of Revisions
Revision
No.
Pages Affected
Description
Date
(
(
(
(
(
2/6
AC204-2504
April, 2010
IP SUPPLEMENT
Cessna 206 series
SECTION 1
(
GENERAL
No change.
SECTION 2
OPERATING LIMITATIONS
No change.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
No change.
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
(
No change.
SECTION 5
(
(
PERFORMANCE
No change.
SECTION 6
WEIGHT AND BALANCE/EQUIPMENT LIST
See weight and balance sheet and/or equipment list of basic Aircraft Flight Manual for
information regarding the installation of this system.
[
(
April, 2010
AC204-2504
3/6
IP SUPPLEMENT
Cessna 206 series
SECTION 7
AIRPLANE AND SYSTEMS DESCRIPTION
(
INSTRUMENT PANEL
I
I
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4/6
AC204-2504
April, 2010
IP SUPPLEMENT
Cessna 206 series
{
CLS I
SECTION 8
l
I
HANDLING, SERVICE AND MAINTENANCE
No change.
l
(
(
I
(
I
April, 2010
AC204-2504
5/6
IP SUPPLEMENT
Cessna 206 series
(
)
(
\
I
Intentionally left blank
(
/
6/6
\
,\"
AC204-2504
April, 2010
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608001 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 9
OAVTRON MODEL 803
CLOCK/0.A.T.
Jl /) b(; <1 l z
RCGJSTMTION NO.
O{iz / t(Cf
SERIAL NO,
Thi$ $UPf)lement mu5i be inserted into Section 9 of tile PIiot's Operating
HandbGOk and FM Approved Airplane Fight Manual when the Cloc;k/OAT.
gauge I& installed_
O MemberofGAMA
COPYR~T O 1998
CESSN.I.AIRCR-'FT COMPANY
WICMnA, KANSAS. US..
T2oo-ll'HIJS.S9-00
9 November 1998
$9-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 9 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
(
SUPPLEMENT 9
DAVTRON MODEL 803 CLOCK/0.A.T.
/
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
Revision Level
Date of Issue
0 (Original)
Nov. 9, 1998
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
PAGE
Title (S9-1)
S9-2
S9-3
S9-4
DATE
PAGE
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
S9-5
S9-6
DATE
Nov 9/98
Nov 9/98
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Number
S9-2
Title
Airplane
Unit
Effectivity
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 9 - FM APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
DIGITAL CLOCK/O.A.T.
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The Davtron Model 803 digital clock combines the features of a
clock, outside air temperature gauge (O.A.T.) and voltmeter in a
single unit. The unit is designed for ease of operation with a three
button control system. The upper button is used to control
sequencing between temperature and voltage. The lower two
buttons control reading and timing functions related to the digital
clock. Temperature and voltage functions are displayed in the upper
portion of the unit's LCD window, and clock/timing functions are
displayed in the lower portion of the unit's LCD window.
The digital display features an internal light (back light) to
ensure good visibility under low cabin lighting conditions and at
night. The intensity of the back light is controlled by the PANEL LT
rheostat. In addition, the display incorporates a test function which
allows checking that all elements of the display are operating.
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
There is no change to the airplane limitations when the digital
clock/O.A.T. is installed.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
There is no change to the airplane emergency procedures when
the digital clock/O.A.T. is installed.
Nov 9/98
S9-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT 9 • FM APPROVED
(
UPPER
BIJTTON
UPPER LCD
WINDOW
SELEC
BUTTON
CONTROL
BUTTON
Figure 1. Davtron Model 803 Digital Clock
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
TEST MODE
The unit may be tested by holding the SELECT button down for
three seconds. Proper operation is indicated by the display 88:88
and activation of all four annunciators.
0.A.T. I VOLllllETER OPERATION
The upper portion of the LCD window is dedicated to O.A.T. and
voltmeter operations. The voltmeter reading is preselected upon
startup and is indicated by an "E" following the display reading.
Pushing the upper button will sequence the window from voltage to
fahrenheit ("F") to centigrade {"C"), and back again to voltage.
S9-4
Nov 9/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 9 - FAA APPROVED
CLOCK OPERATIONS
The lower portion of the LCD window is dedicated to clock and
timing operations. Pushing the SELECT button will sequence the
window from universal time (UT) to local time (LT) to flight time (FT)
to elapsed time (ET), and back again to universal time. Pushing the
CONTROL button allows for timing functions within the four
SELECT menus. Setting procedures are as follows:
SETTING UNIVERSAL TIME
Use the SELECT button to select universal time (UT).
Simultaneously press both the SELECT and the CONTROL buttons
to enter the set mode. The tens of hours digit will start flashing. The
CONTROL button has full control of the flashing digit, and each
button push increments the digit. Once the tens of hours is set the
SELECT button selects the next digit to be set. After the last digit
has been selected and set with the CONTROL button, a final push
of the SELECT button exits the set mode. The lighted annunciator
will resume its normal flashing, indicating the clock is running in
universal time mode.
SETTING LOCAL TIME
Use the SELECT button to select local time (LT). Simultaneously
press both the SELECT and the CONTROL buttons to enter the set
mode. The tens of hours digit will start flashing. The set operation is
the same as for UT, except that minutes are already synchronized
with the UT clock and cannot be set in local time.
FLIGHT TIME RESET
Use the SELECT button to select flight time (FT). Hold the
CONTROL button down for 3 seconds, or until 99:59 appears on
the display. Flight time will be zeroed upon release of the
CONTROL button.
SETTING FLIGHT TIME FLASHING ALARM
Use the SELECT button to select flight time (FT).
Simultaneously press both the SELECT and the CONTROL buttons
to enter the set mode. The tens of hours digit will start flashing. The
set operation is the same as for UT. When actual flight time equals
the alarm time, the display will flash. Pressing either the SELECT or
CONTROL button will turn the flashing off and zero the alarm time.
Flight time is unchanged and continues counting .
Nov 9/98
S9-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 9- FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SETTING ELAPSED TIME COUNT UP
Use the SELECT button to select elapsed time (ET). Press the
CONTROL button and elapsed time will start counting . Elapsed time
counts up to 59 minutes, 59 seconds, and then switches to hours
and minutes. It continues counting up to 99 hours and 59 minutes.
Pressing the CONTROL button again resets elapsed time to zero.
SETTING ELAPSED TIME COUNT DOWN
Use the SELECT button to select Elapsed Time (ET).
Simultaneously press both the SELECT and the CONTROL buttons
to enter the set mode. The tens of hours digit will start flashing. The
set operation is the same as for UT, and a count down time can be
set from a maximum of 59 minutes and 59 seconds. Once the last
digit is set, pressing the SELECT button exits the set mode and the
clock is ready to start the countdown. Pressing the CONTROL
button now will start the countdown . When countdown reaches zero,
the display will flash. Pressing either the SELECT or CONTROL
button will reset the alarm. After reaching zero, the elapsed time
counter will count up.
BUTTON SELECT DISABLE
When there is no airplane power applied to the unit, the
CONTROL and SELECT buttons are disabled.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when this
equipment is installed. However, installation of this OAT probe will
result in a minor reduction in cruise performance.
S9-6
Nov 9/98
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES 720608001 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT10
BENDIX/KING KLN 89 GLOBAL
VFR POSJTIONING SYSTEM (GPS)
SERIAL NO.
Tat~11.zi
M@IS'IRATION 110.
#tf - lltl'
This suppl11ment must be insefled inlo Section 9 of lllll Pilot's Operating
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual when the KLN 89 Global
Pos~ioning System Is Installed.
f)
COPYRIGHT c, 1994!
CESSMA AIRCRAFT COMPNIY
\'VIO!rTA. l<NISAS, USA
T206HPHUS-S10-01
Member of GAMA
9 November 1998
Revision 1 - 30 May 2001
S10-1
SECTION 9 • SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 10- FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT10
BENDIX/KING KLN 89
VFR GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS)
I
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
FM APPROVAL
Revision Level Date of Issue
0 (Original)
1
Nov. 9, 1998
May 30, 2001
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
DATE
PAGE
Tille (S10-1)
S10-2
S10-3
S10-4
PAGE
DATE
May 30/01
May 30101
May 30/01
Nov 9/98
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Number
S10-2
TIHe
Airplane
Unff
Effectlvlty
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
May30I01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 10 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
I
BENDIX/KING KLN 89 VFR
GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM {GPS)
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The Bendix/King KLN 89 is a navigation system based on the
Global Positioning Satellite network. It contains a database cartridge
which may be updated by subscription. Complete descriptive
material on the KLN 89 may be found in the Bendix/King KLN 89
Pilot's Guide supplied with the unit. This pilot guide must be
available during operation of the KLN 89 unit.
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
Use of the KLN 89 is limited to VFR operations only. The
following information must be presented in the form of placards
when the airplane is equipped with a KLN 89 unit:
1.
On the instrument panel near the KLN 89 unit:
GPS NOT APPROVED
FOR IFR NAVIGATION
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
There is no change to the airplane emergency procedures when
the KLN 89 GPS is installed.
May 30/01
S10-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 10 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
There is no change to basic airplane normal
procedures with the KLN 89 GPS installed.
operating
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when the KLN
89 GPS is installed. However, installation of an externally-mounted
antenna or related external antennas will result in a minor reduction
in cruise performance.
S10-4
Nov 9/98
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608001 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 12
CANADIAN
SUPPLEMENT
!-=-··------
This supplement must be Inserted i11to Section 9 of the PIiot's Qperat,)g
1-t1111dbook ,md FAA A))l'roved Airplane Flight Manual wtieri used fof Can.idian
Operation.
@
COPYRIGtfT O 19'J9
c~~~~:,._ANv REVISION 1
MemberofGAMA
19 March 1999
25 February 2003
s12-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
CESSNA
SUPPLEMENT 12 ~ FAA. APPROVED
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT12
CANADIAN SUPPLEMENT
Use the Log of Effective Pages to determine the current status of
this supplement.
Pages affected by the current revision are
indicated by an asterisk (*) preceding the page number.
Supplement Status
Date
Original Issue
Revision 1
19 March 1999
25 February 2003
LOG OF EFFECTIVE PAGES
Page
Status
Page
"Title (S12-1)
• S12-1 thru $12-4
• S12-5 thru S12-6
Revision
Number
Revised
Revised
Added
-----~
Al'f'RO'ftl)
11'1'
MA~I.H:lel!INll21___,J
, , . ~. . . . I)).
~
1s12-2
Revision 1
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 12 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT12
CANADIAN SUPPLEMENT
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bullelins that are applicable to the
operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into this
supplement. This lisl contains only those Service Bulletins that are
cunently active.
Aisplarr
ena
Effectivitv
Revision 1
Revision
lnccij)omon
looor-porated
In Afrplane
I
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 12 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT12
CANADIAN SUPPLEMENT
SECTION 1
GENERAL
This supplement is required for Canadian operation of Cessna
Model T206H.
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
£.WARNING
THE SEATING CAPACITY OF THIS AIRPLANE IS
LIMITED TO 5 OCCUPANTS.
ONE OF THE
CENTER SEATS MUST BE REMOVED WHEN ANY
AFT SEAT IS OCCUPIED. REFER TO SECTION 6
OF THE PILOrs OPERA TING HANDBOOK FOR
LOADING ARRANGEMENTS WITH ONE OR
MORE SEA TS REMOVED.
The following placards must be installed.
1. Near the fuel tank filler cap:
ISerials T20608001 thru T20608361:
FUEL
100LU 100 MIN. GRADE AVIATION GASOLINE
CAP. 44.0 U.S. GAL. (166 LITRES) USABLE
CAP 32.5 U.S. GAL. (123 LITRES) USABLE
TO BOTTOM OF FILLER INDICATOR TAB
(
ls12-4
Revision 1
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 12- FM APPROVED
Serials T20608362 and On:
FUEL
100LU 100 MIN. GRADE AVIATION GASOLINE
CAP. 43 .5 U.S. GAL. (164 LITRES) USABLE
CAP 32.0 U.S. GAL. (121 LITRES) USABLE
TO BOTTOM OF FILLER INDICATOR TAB
2. Above Pilot door frame:
OPERATING THIS AIRCRAFT WITH MORE THAN FIVE
OCCUPANTS IS PROHIBITED.
ONE CENTER SEAT MUST BE REMOVED WHEN ANY AFT
SEAT IS OCCUPIED.
FLOOR AREA EXPOSED DUE TO ABSENCE OF ONE
CENTER SEAT SHALL BE KEPT CLEAR.
FOR ADDITIONAL LOADING INSTRUCTIONS SEE
WEIGHT AND BALANCE DATA.
3. On the left hand cabin wall below the aft side window and on
the right hand aft cargo door below the window:
OCCUPANCY OF THE AFT SEATS IS PROHIBITED WHEN
BOTH CENTER SEATS ARE INSTALLED.
Revision 1
s12-sl
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 12 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
(
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
There is no change to the airplane emergency procedures when
used for Canadian operation.
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
There is no change to basic airplane normal
procedures when used for Canadian operation.
operating
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when used for
Canadian operation.
Revision 1
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608362 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT13
BENDIX/KING KCS-55A SLAVED COMPASS SYSTEM
WITH Kl-525A
HORIZONTAL SITUATION INDICATOR (HSI)
I::::.~------This supplement must be insefted into Section 9 of the Pilol's Operating
Harldbook arid FAA Approved Airplane Flight Man11al when Horiz:ontal Sttualion
Iooicator is installed,
FAA APPROVAL
0....:6~r2001
i)
COPmlGHT o 2001
Member of GAMA
10 October 2001
CESSNA AJ!CIW'l COMPANY
v.1CH!TA, KANSAS, USA
TlOOHPHUS-S13-00
S13-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT13-FAAAPPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT13
BENDIX/KING KCS-55A SLAVED COMPASS
SYSTEM WITH Kl-525A HORIZONTAL SITUATION
INDICATOR (HSI)
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
Revision Level Date of Issue
0 (Original)
Oct 10, 2001
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGE
PAGE
DATE
Title (S13-1)
S13-2
S13-3
S13-4
Oct
Oct
Oct
Oct
10/01
10/01
10/01
10/01
PAGE
S13-5
S13-6
S13-7
S13-8
DATE
Oct
Oct
Oct
Oct
10/01
10/01
10/01
10/01
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Number
Title
Airplane
Unit
Effectivity
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
(
S13-2
Oct 10/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 13 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT13
BENDIX/KING KCS-SSA SLAVED COMPASS
SYSTEM WITH Kl-525A HORIZONTAL SITUATION
INDICATOR (HSI)
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The Bendix/King KCS-55A Slaved Compass System with Kl525A HSI Indicator is an additional navigation indicator option. The
KCS-55A compass system includes a slaving control and
compensator unit, magnetic slaving transmitter and a remote
directional gyro.
The information obtained from the KCS-55A
compass system is displayed on the Kl-525A Indicator.
The panel-mounted Kl-525A indicator combines the display
functions of both the standard Directional Gyro (Heading Indicator)
and the Course Deviation Indicator's VOR/LOC/Glideslope
information to provide the pilot with a single visual presentation of
the complete horizontal navigation situation.
This system also incorporates a slaving accessory and
compensator unit. This unit indicates any difference between the
displayed heading and the magnetic heading.
Up deflection
indicates a clockwise error of the compass card. Down deflection
indicates a counterclockwise error of the compass card. Whenever
the aircraft is in a turn and the compass card rotates, it is normal
for this meter to show a full deflection to one side or the other.
Oct 10/01
S13-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 13 - FAA APPROVED
1
2
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
4
3
15
13
5
10
Figure 1. Horizontal Situation Indicator System (Sheet 1 of 2)
1. HORIZONTAL SITUATION INDICATOR (HSI) - Provides a
pictorial presentation of aircraft deviation relative to VOR/GPS
It also displays glide slope
radials and localizer beams.
deviations and gives heading reference with respect to
magnetic north. The gyro is remote-mounted and electricallydriven
2. NAV FLAG - Flag is in view when the NAV receiver signal is
inadequate.
3. HEADING REFERENCE (LUBBER LINE) - Magnetic heading
appears under this line when the compass card is slaved or
slewed to the aircraft's magnetic heading.
4. HEADING WARNING FLAG (HOO) - When flag is in view, the
heading display is invalid.
5. COURSE SELECT POINTER - Indicates VCR/localizer or
GPS course on the compass caret The selected VOR radial
or localizer heading remains set on the compass card when
the compass card rotates.
{
\
S13-4
Oct 10/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 13 - FAA APPROVED
6. TO/FROM INDICATOR - Indicates direction of VOR station
relative to the selected course. Displays TO when a LOC
frequency is selected .
7. DUAL GLIDE SLOPE POINTERS - Displays deviation of
airplane from an ILS glideslope. Full scale deflection of the
glideslope pointers represents ±0. 7 degrees. Pointers will be
out of view if an invalid glideslope signal is received .
8. GLIDE SLOPE SCALES -- Indicates displacement from glide
slope beam center. A glide slope deviation bar displacement
of 2 dots represents full-scale (0. 7°) deviation above or below
glide slope beam centerline.
9. HEADING SELECTOR KNOB (E;f )- Positions the heading
bug on compass card by rotating the heading selector knob.
The bug rotates with the compass card .
10. COMPASS CARD -- Rotates to display heading of airplane
with reference to lubber line on HSI.
t )--
11. COURSE SELECTOR KNOB (
Positions the course
bearing pointer on the compass card by rotating the course
selector knob.
12. COURSE DEVIATION BAR (D-BAR) - The center portion of
the omni bearing pointer moves laterally to pictorially indicate
the relationship of airplane to the selected course. It indicates
degrees of angular displacement from VOR radials and
localizer beams, or displacement in nautical miles from GPS
desired course.
13. COURSE DEVIATION SCALE - A course deviation bar
displacement of 5 dots represents full scale (VOR = ±10°,
LOC = ±2-1/2°, GPS = 5nm enroute, GPS APR = .3nm)
deviation from beam centerline.
14. HEADING BUG heading.
Moved by {E;1) knob to select desired
15. SYMBOLIC AIRCRAFT - Provides pictorial presentation of the
airplane position and intercept angle relative to selected VOR
Radial or localizer course.
Figure 1. Horizontal Situation Indicator System (Sheet 2 of 2)
Oct 10/01
S13-5
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 13 - FAA APPROVED
2
4
3
11
'
-
1
Figure 2. KA-51 B Slaving Accessory and Compensator Unit
1. KA-518 SLAVING ACCESSORY AND COMPENSATOR UNIT
- Controls the KCS-55A Compass System.
2. MANUAUAUTOMATIC (FREE/SLAVE) COMPASS SLAVE
SWITCH - Selects either the manual or automatic slaving
mode for the Compass System.
3. CW/CCW COMPASS MANUAL SLAVE SWITCH -- With the
manual/automatic compass slave switch in the FREE position,
allows manual compass card slaving in either the clockwise or
counterclockwise direction. The switch is spring loaded to the
center position.
4. SLAVING
displayed
indicates
deflection
card.
METER - Indicates the difference between the
heading and the magnetic heading. Up deflection
a clockwise error of the compass card.
Down
indicates a counterclockwise error of the compass
(
S13-6
Oct 10/01
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 13 - FAA APPROVED
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
There is no change to the airplane limitations when this
instrument is installed.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
There is no change to the airplane emergency procedures when
this instrument is installed.
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
AcAUTION
ELECTRICAL POWER MUST BE SUPPLIED TO
THIS INSTRUMENT FOR PROPER FUNCTIONING.
ABSENCE OF WHICH WILL RESULT IN
UNRELIABLE HEADING INFORMATION.
Normal procedures for operation of this system differ little from
those required for the more conventional Course Deviation
Indicators. However, several small differences are worth noting.
The rectilinear movement of the course deviation bar in
combination with the rotation of the compass card in response to
heading changes, provides an intuitive picture of the navigation
situation at a glance when tuned to an omni station. When tuned to
a localizer frequency, the course select pointer must be set to the
inbound front course for both front and back-course approaches to
retain this pictorial presentation.
Oct 10/01
S13-7
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 13 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
For normal procedures with autopilots, refer to the Autopilot
Supplements in the Supplement section of this handbook. A
description of course datum and autopilot procedures for course
datum are incorporated in the appropriate autopilot supplements.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when this
instrument is installed.
S13-8
Oct 10/01
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airprane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608001 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 15
BENDIX/KING KAP 140
2 AXIS AUTOPILOT
S-NO.
7?tJ60,fJ=ft
RiQIBT,V.TIOfl NO.
Pi<, ({Cf
This supplement must be insert&d Into Seeticn 9 of the Pilot's Operating
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual when the KAP 140 2 Am
Autopilot System is installed.
, ) MemlM!r of GAMA
COPYRIGHT '-' 1'911
CesstlA A~R,t.ff ~PN<N
WICHITA. KANSAS, USA
T20liH~1$-0(\
9 November 1998
Revision 6 - 4 June 2003
S15-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
:(
SUPPLEMENT 15
BENDIX/KING KAP 140
2 AXIS AUTOPILOT
Use the log of Effective Pages to determine the current status of
this supplement.
Pages affected by the current revision are
indicated by an asterisk (") preceeding the page number.
Supplement Status
Date
9 November 1998
Original Issue
Revision 1
Revision2
Revision 3
Revision 4
Revision 5
Revision 6
21 ~mber 1998
22 December 1999
30 December 2000
28 June2002
31 October 2002
4 June 2003
LOG OF EFFECTIVE PAGES
Page
Paige
" S15-11hru S15-20
" S15-20A thru S15-20B
• S15-21 thru S15-32
* S15-33 thru S15-36
status
Revised
Deleted
Revised
Added
Revision
Number
6
6
6
6
APPROVED BY
DATE OF APPROVAL
S15-2
Revision6
(
\
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 • SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FM APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT15
BEN DIX/KING KAP 140
2 AXIS AUTOPILOT
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to the
operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into this
supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins that are
currently active.
~
~
Title
KC-140-M1
(Honeywell
Service Bulletin)
Revision 6
KAP 140AP
Effeciivlty
Revision
Jncoiporailon
Revision 3
Incorporate<!
In A1rpla ne
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
I
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT 15
BENDIX/KING KAP 140
2 AXIS AUTOPILOT
SECTION 1
GENERAL
IThe KAP 140 2 Axis Autopilot provides the pilot with the following
features: Vertical Speed mode (VS); Altitude hold (ALT); Wing
Level (ROL); Heading select (HDG); Approach (APR); ILS coupling
to Localizer (LOC) and Glideslope (GS); and backcourse (REV)
modes of operation. The optional KAP 140, 2 Axis Autopilot with
Altitude Preselect (if installed) adds Altitude Alerter and Altitude
Preselect capabilities.
IThe KAP 140 2 Axis Autopilot has an electric trim system which
provides autotrim during autopilot operation and manual electric trim
(MET) for the pilot when the autopilot is not engaged. The electric
trim system is designed to be fail safe for any single inflight trim
malfunction. Trim faults are visually and aurally annunciated.
A lockout device prevents autopilot or MET engagement until the
Automatic
preflight self-test begins with initial power application to the
autopilot.
lsystem has successfully passed preflight self-test.
The following conditions will cause the autopilot to disengage:
A. Electric Power failure.
B. Internal Autopilot System failure.
I
C. Pitch accelerations in excess of +1 .4g or less than +0.6g
only when produced by a failure causing servo runaway. The
pilot cannot maneuver the airplane and trip the monitor.
D. Turn coordinator failure (small square red flag visible on
instrument).
E. Computer autopilot monitor that detects either the R (ROLL)
or P (PITCH) axis annunciator.
ls15-4
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FM APPROVED
Activation of NP DISC/TRIM INT control wheel switch will also
disconnect the autopilot.
The AVIONICS MASTER switch supplies power to the avionics bus
bar of the radio circuit breakers and the autopilot circuit breaker.
The AVIONICS MASTER switch also serves as an emergency
AP/MET shutoff.
The following circuit breakers are used to protect the KAP 140 2
Axis Autopilot:
LABEL
I
FUNCTIONS
AUTO
PILOT
Pull-off circuit breaker supplies power to the KC
140 Computer and the autopilot pitch, roll and
pitch trim servos.
WARN
Supplies separate power for autopilot alerting
(PITCH TRIM) on the airplane's annunciator
panel.
At T206H serial number T20608404 and On, automated Roll
Steering functionality has been added to the Bendix/King KLN 94
GPS Navigation System and the KAP 140 2 Axis Autopilot System.
Roll Steering coupling between the GPS and the Autopilot provides
area navigation with automatic course changes at flight plan
waypoints similar to Flight Management System (FMS) operations,
but without vertical navigation capability.
The Roll Steering
function is similar to "turn anticipation" for the autopilot.
At the noted serial effectivity, the KLN 94 GPS (ORS 03 or later)
has an added Roll Steering signal output. In order for the GPS Roll
Steering output to be utilized, the KAP 140 Autopilot (-7904 or later)
has an added input for the Roll Steering signal and additional
system wiring has been added to the airplane to connect the Roll
Steering signal output from the KLN 94 GPS to the Roll Steering
input of the KAP 140 Autopilot.
Revision 6
S15-51
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
14
LEVATOR
ACTUATOR ELEVATOR
TRIM
ACTUATOR
07851026
I
Figure 1. Bendix/King KAP 140 2 Axis Autopilot Schematic
(Serials T20608001 thru T20608403) (Sheet 1 of 2)
1s15-6
Revision6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
LEVATOR
ACTUATOR ELEVATOR
TRIM
ACTUATOR
URN COORDINATOR
ROLL STEERING
07!151026
tr' Figure 1. Bendix/King KAP 140 2 Axis Autopilot Schematic
(Serials 120608404 and On) (Sheet 2)
Revision 6
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 • FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
18"*
BENDIX
2
9
Ht>GrmRLT
KJNG
KAP 140
3
4
5
6
7
8
KAP 140 WITHOUT ALTITUDE PRESELECT
1. PITCH AXIS (P) ANNUNCIATOR - When illuminated,
indieates failure of pitch axis and will either disengage the
autopilot or not allow engagement of the pitch axis.
In
will
illuminate
during
abnormal
turbulent
air,
verticaVaccelerations.
2. AUTOPILOT ENGAGE/DISENGAGE (AP} BUTTON - When
pushed", or pre$Sed and held (approx. 0.25 secondsf*,
engages autopilot if all preflight self-test conditions are met.
The autopilot will engage in the basic roll (ROL) mode which
functions as a wing leveler and the pitch axis vertical speed
(VS) mode. The commanded vertical speed will be displayed
in the upper right corner of autopilot display area.
The
captured VS will be the vertical speed present at the moment
the AP button is pressed. The button may also be used to
disengage the autopilot.
3. ROLL AXIS (R) ANNUNCIATOR -- When illuminated, indicates
failure of the roll axis and disengages the autopilot.
* Airplane serials T20608001 thru T20608383 not incorporating
Honeywell Service Bulletin KC140-M1.
** Airplane
Honeywell
serials
Service
T20608001
Bulletin
thru
T20608383
KC140-Mt , and
incorporating
airplane serials
T20608384 and On.
I
$15-8
Figure 2. Bendix/King KAP 140 2 Axis Autopilot,
Operating Controls and Indicators (Sheet 1 of4)
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT15-FMAPPROVED
4. HEADING (HDG) MODE SELECTOR BUTTON -- When
pushed, will select the Heading mode, which commands the
airplane to turn to and maintain the heading selected by the
heading bug on the Directional Gyro or HSI (if installed). A
new heading may be selected at any time and will result in
the airplane turning to the new heading. The button can also
be used to toggle between HDG and ROL modes. For
airplane serials T20608001 thru T20608383 not incorporating
Honeywell Service Bulletin KC140-M1, this button can also be
used to engage the autopilot in HDG mode.
5. NAVIGATION (NAV) MODE SELECTOR BUTTON -- When
pushed, will select the Navigation mode. This mode provides
automatic beam capture and tracking of VOR, LOC, or GPS
signals as selected for presentation on the #1 CDI. NAV
mode is recommended for enroute navigation tracking.
6. APPROACH (APR) MODE SELECTOR BUTTON - When
pushed, will select the Approach mode. This mode provides
automatic beam capture and tracking of VOR, GPS, LOC and
Glideslope (GS) on an ILS, as selected for presentation on #1
CDI. APR mode tracking sensitivity is recommended for
instrument approaches.
7. BACK COURSE APPROACH (REV) MODE BUTTON - This
button is active only when the coupled navigation receiver is
tuned to a LOC/ILS frequency. When pushed will select the
Back Course approach mode. This mode functions identically
to the approach mode except that the autopilot response to
LOC signals is reversed. Glideslope is locked out with REV
mode.
8. ALTITUDE HOLD (ALT) MODE SELECT BUTTON - When
pushed, will select the altitude hold mode.
This mode
provides capture and tracking of the selected altitude. The
selected altitude is the airplane altitude at the moment the
ALT button is pressed. If the ALT button is pressed with an
established VS rate present, there will be about a 10% (of VS
rate) overshoot. The airplane will return positively to the
selected altitude.
For airplane serials T20608001 thru
T20608383 not incorporating Honeywell Service Bulletin
KC 140-M 1, this button can also be used to engage the
autopilot in ALT mode.
Figure 2. Bendix/King KAP 140 2 Axis Autopilot,
Operating Controls and Indicators (Sheet 2)
Revision 6
I
S15-9
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15- FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
9. VERTICAL SPEED (UP/DN) MODE BUTTONS - The action
of these buttons depends on the vertical mode present when
pressed. If VS mode is active (AP plus any lateral mode) and
the UP button is pressed, the autopilot will modify the
displayed VS command (FPM) in the up direction. Single
momentary cycles on either the UP or DN button will
increment the VS command by 100 FPM per cycle. When
either button is continuously held in, it will modify the vertical
speed command by 300 fpm per second.
If ALT mode is active, pressing the UP/DN buttons will modify
the captured altitude by 20 feet per cycle, or if held
continuously will command the airplane up or down at the rate
of 500 FPM, synchronizing the ALT reference to the actual
airplane altitude upon button release.
10. AUTO PILOT CIRCUIT BREAKER - A 5-amp pull-off circuit
breaker supplying 28 VDC to the KAP 140 system.
11. WARN C/B - Power to the autopilot disconnect horn and the
airplane's annunciator panel (PITCH TRIM).
12. AUTOPILOT DISCONNECT (A/P DISC/TRIM INT) SWITCH -When depressed will disengage the autopilot and interrupt
manual electric trim (MET) power. An autopilot disconnect
will be annunciated by a continuous 2 second tone
accompanied by flashing "AP" annunciations on the autopilot
computer display.
13. MANUAL ELECTRIC TRIM (MET) SWITCHES - When both
switches are pressed in the same direction, the trim system
will provide pitch trim in the selected direction. Use of manual
electric trim during autopilot operation will disengage the
autopilot.
I
S15-10
Figure 2. Bendix/King KAP 140 2 Axis Autopilot,
Operating Controls and Indicators (Sheet 3)
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT15-FMAPPROVED
14. OMNI BEARING SELECT (OBS) KNOB -- Selects the desired
course to be tracked by the autopilot. (Note: The HDG bug
must also be positioned to the proper course to capture and
track the selected radial or desired track).
15. HEADING SELECT KNOB (HDG) -- Positions the heading
pointer ("bug") on the compass card. Note that the position
of the heading bug also provides course datum to the
autopilot when tracking in NAV, APR, or REV (BC) modes.
This is in addition to its more intuitive use in the HDG mode.
16. PITCH TRIM (PT) Annunciator -- Indicates the direction of
required pitch trim. The annunciation will flash if auto trim
has not satisfied the request for trim for a period of 1O
seconds. A solid ~ without an arrowhead is an indication of
a pitch trim fault. Refer to the EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
for proper response to a pitch trim fault.
17. PITCH TRIM Annunciation (located on instrument panel or
glareshield) - Illuminates whenever the automated preflight
self test detects a pitch trim fault or the continuous monitoring
Refer to the
system detects a pitch trim fault in flight.
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES for proper response to a pitch
trim fault.
I I
-18. AUTOPILOT ENGAGE AP
Annunciation - Illuminates
whenever the autopilot is engaged. Flashes during pilot
initiated or automatic disengagement.
** Airplane serials T20608001 thru T20608383 incorporating
Honeywell Service Bulletin KC140-M1, and airplane serials
T20608384 and On.
Figure 2. Bendix/King KAP 140 2 Axis Autopilot,
Operating Controls and Indicators (Sheet 4)
Revision 6
I
S15-11
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
5
BENDIX.IX/NG
KAP1-40
•
p
HI> G
RLT pT
A
?
R
[0
',[10
ALERT FT
4
3
2
l'"p'I
IHDG! INAV! !APA! IREV! IALT! I DN I
KAP 140 WITH ALTITUDE PRESELECT
NOTE
Numbered items apply to the KAP 140 with Altitude
Preselect. Other controls and indicators shown are
the same as those on the KAP 140 without Altitude
Preselect (refer to Figure 2).
1. ROTARY KNOBS - Used to set the altitude alerter reference
altitude; or may be used immediately after pressing the BARO
button, to adjust the autopilot baro setting to match that of the
airplane's altimeter when manual adjustment is required. (In
some systems, the baro setting may be automatically synched
to that of the altimeter.)
2. BARO SET (BARO) BUTTON - When pushed and released,
will change the display from the altitude alerter selected
altitude to the baro setting display (either IN HG or HPA) for 3
seconds. If pushed and held for 2 seconds, will change the
baro setting display from IN HG to HPA or vice versa. Once
the baro setting display is visible the rotary knobs may be
used to adjust the baro setting.
I
Figure 3. Bendix/King KAP 140 2 Axis Autopilot with Altitude
Preselect, Operating Controls and Indicators (Sheet 1 of 2)
S15-12
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
(
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FM APPROVED
3. ALTITUDE ARM (ARM) BUTTON -- When pushed, will toggle
altitude arming on or off. When ALT ARM is annunciated, the
autopilot will capture the altitude alerter displayed altitude
(provided the airplane is climbing or descending in VS to thel
displayed altitude). ALT hold arming when the autopilot is
engaged is automatic upon altitude alerter altitude selection
via the rotary knobs. Note that the alerter functions are
independent of the arming process thus providing full time
alerting, even when the autopilot is disengaged.
4. ALTITUDE ALERTERNERTICAL SPEED/BARO SETTING
DISPLAY - Normally displays the altitude alerter selected
altitude. If the UP or DN button is pushed while in VS hold,
the display changes to the command reference for the VS
mode in FPM for 3 seconds. If the BARO button is pushed,
the display changes to the autopilot baro setting in either IN
HG or HPA for 3 seconds.
NOTE
This display may be dashed for up to 3 minutes on
start up if a blind encoder is installed which requires
a warm-up period.
5. ALTITUDE ALERT (ALERT) ANNUNCIATION -- Illuminates
continuously in the region of from 200 to 1000 feet from the
selected altitude if the airplane was previously outside of this
region. Flashes (1) for two seconds the first time the airplane
crossed the selected altitude and (2) continuously in the 200
to 1000 feet region if the airplane was previously inside of this
region (i.e. at the selected altitude). Associated with the visual
alerting is an aural alert (5 short tones) which occurs 1000
feet from the selected altitude upon approaching the altitude
and 200 feet from the selected altitude on leaving the altitude.
Figure 3. Bendix/King KAP 140 2 Axis Autopilot with Altitude
Preselect, Operating Controls and Indicators (Sheet 2)
Revision 6
I
S15-13
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15- FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
The following autopilot limitations must be adhered to:
1. The entire preflight test procedure outlined under Section 4,
paragraph A of this supplement, including steps 1 through 7,
must be successfully completed prior to each flight. Use of
the autopilot or manual electric trim system is prohibited prior
to completion of these tests.
2. During autopilot operation, a pilot with seat belt fastened must
be seated at the left pilot position.
3. The autopilot must be OFF during takeoff and landing.
4. KMA 28 audio amplifier PUSH OFF/EMG operation
prohibited during normal operations.
is
NOTE
During emergency operation of the audio amplifier,
the PUSH OFF/EMG state of the KMA 28 will
prevent flight control system alerts from being heard.
5. The system is approved for Category I operation only
(Approach mode selected).
6. Autopilot maximum airspeed limitation - 160 KIAS.
Autopilot minimum airspeed limitation - 90 KIAS.
7. Maximum flap extension -- 10°.
8. Maximum fuel in balance with autopilot engaged - 100 lbs.
9. The autopilot must be disengaged below 200 feet AGL during
approach operations and below 800 feet AGL for all other
phases offlight.
10. Overriding the autopilot to change pitch or roll attitude is
prohibited. (Disengage with A/P DISC/TRIM INT or AP select
button.)
I
11. The AUTO PILOT circuit breaker must be pulled following any
inflight illumination of the red "PITCH TRIM" warning
annunciator (located on the airplane annunciator panel), but
only after first completing the Emergency Procedures (Section
3, paragraph 1.). The manual electric trim and autopilot
autotrim systems will be disabled with the AUTO PILOT circuit
breaker pulled.
S15-14
Revision 6
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
The four step procedure (steps A thru D) listed under paragraph 1
should be among the basic airplane emergency procedures that are
committed to memory. It is important that the pilot be proficient in
accomplishing all four steps without reference to this manual.
I
1. In case of Autopilot, Autopilot Trim, or Manual Electric Trim
malfunction (accomplish Items A and B simultaneously):
A. Airplane Control Wheel -- GRASP FIRMLY and regain
aircraft control.
B. A/P DISCITRIM INT Switch -- PRESS and HOLD
throughout recovery.
C. AIRCRAFT - RE-TRIM Manually as Needed.
D. AUTO PILOT Circuit Breaker -- PULL.
NOTE
The AVIONICS MASTER Switch may be used as an
alternate means of removing all electric power from
the autopilot and electric trim systems. If necessary
perform steps 1A thru 1C above, then turn the
AVIONICS MASTER Switch OFF before locating
and pulling the AUTO PILOT Circuit Breaker. Turn
the AVIONICS MASTER Switch ON as soon as
possible to restore power to all other avionics
equipment. Primary attitude, airspeed, directional
compass, and altitude instruments will remain
operational at all times.
I
I
,& WARNING
DO NOT ATTEMPT TO RE-ENGAGE THE
AUTOPILOT FOLLOWING AN AUTOPILOT,
AUTOTRIM, OR MANUAL ELECTRIC TRIM
MALFUNCTION UNTIL THE CAUSE FOR THE
MALFUNCTION HAS BEEN CORRECTED.
Maximum Altitude losses due to autopilot malfunction:
CONFIGURATION
Cruise, Climb, Descent
Maneuvering
Approach
Revision 6
ALT. LOSS
550 ft.
100 ft.
50 ft.
S15-15
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15- FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
AMPLIFIED EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
The following paragraphs are presented to supply additional
information for the purpose of providing the pilot with a more
complete understanding of the recommended course of action for
an emergency situation.
I
1. An autopilot or autotrim malfunction occurs when there is an
uncommanded deviation in the airplane flight path or when
there is abnormal control wheel or trim wheel motion. In some
cases, and especially for autopilot trim, there may be little to
no airplane motion, yet the red PITCH TRIM annunciator
(airplane annunciator panel) may illuminate and an alert tone
may sound.
The primary concern in reacting to an autopilot or autopilot
trim malfunction, or to an automatic disconnect of the
autopilot, is in maintaining control of the airplane. Immediately
grasp the control wheel and press and hold down the A/P
DISC/TRIM INT switch throughout the recovery. Manipulate
the controls as required to safely maintain operation of the
airplane within all of its operating limitations. Elevator trim
should be used manually as needed to relieve control forces.
Locate and pull the AUTO PILOT circuit breaker on the
right hand circuit breaker panel to completely disable the
autopilot system.
2. A manual electric trim malfunction may be recognized by
illumination of the red PITCH TRIM annunciator, accompanied
by an alert tone, or by unusual trim wheel motions with the
autopilot OFF, without pilot actuation of the manual electric
trim switches. As with an autopilot malfunction, the first
concern following a manual electric trim malfunction is
maintaining control of the airplane. Grasp the control wheel
firmly and press and hold down the A/P DISCfTRIM INT
switch. Locate and pull the AUTO PILOT circuit breaker on
the right hand breaker panel.
S15-16
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
3. Note that the emergency procedure for any malfunction is
essentially the same: immediately grasp the control wheel
and regain airplane control while pressing and holding the A/P
DISC/TRIM INT switch down, and retrim the airplane as
needed. After these steps have been accomplished secure
the autopilot electric trim system by pulling the autopilot
(AUTO PILOT) circuit breaker. As with any other airplane
emergency procedure, it is important that the 4 steps of the
emergency procedure located on Page 15 be committed to
memory.
4. The AVIONICS MASTER switch may be used to remove all
electric power from the Autopilot and Electric Trim systems
while the circuit breaker is located and pulled. Return the
AVIONICS MASTER switch to the ON position as soon as
possible. With the AVIONICS MASTER switch off, all avionics
and autopilot equipment will be inoperable.
5. It is important that all portions of the autopilot and electric trim
system are preflight tested prior to each flight in accordance
with the procedures published herein in order to assure their
integrity and continued safe operation during flight.
,&WARNING
DO NOT RESET AUTOPILOT CIRCUIT BREAKER
FOLLOWING AN AUTOPILOT/AUTOTRIM OR
MANUAL ELECTRIC TRIM MALFUNCTION UNTIL
THE CAUSE FOR THE MALFUNCTION HAS
BEEN CORRECTED.
A flashing ~ auto trim annunciation on the face of the autopilot
indicates a failure of the auto trim function to relieve pitch servo
loading in a timely manner. This condition should be temporary.
1. FLASHING ~ ANNUNCIATION -- OBSERVE airplane pitchl
behavior. If pitch behavior is satisfactory, wait 5-10 seconds
for the annunciation to stop.
Revision 6
S15-17
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
2. If annunciation continues, Airplane Control Wheel - GRASP
FIRMLY, disengage the autopilot and check for an out of pitch
trim condition. Manually retrim as required.
3. AUTOPILOT OPERATION - CONTINUE if satisfied that the
out of trim indication was temporary.
DISCONTINUE if
evidence indicates a failure of the auto trim function.
A red P or R on the face of the autopilot computer:
1. A red P is an indication that the pitch axis of the autopilot has
been disabled and cannot be engaged. DO NOT ENGAGE
INTO A ROLL AXIS ONLY SYSTEM.
NOTE
If the red P lamp was the result of some abnormal
accelerations on the airplane, the annunciation
should go out within approximately one minute and
normal use of the autopilot will be re-established.
I
I
2. A red R is an indication that the roll axis of the autopilot has
been disabled and cannot be engaged. The autopilot cannot
be engaged again.
Flashing mode annunciation in the display of the autopilot computer:
1. Flashing HDG - Indicates a failed heading. PRESS HDG
button to terminate flashing. ROL will be displayed.
2. Flashing NAV, APR or REV - Usually an indication of a
flagged navigation source. PRESS the NAV, APR or REV
button to terminate flashing. ROL will be displayed. (Select a
valid navigation source.)
NOTE
A flashing NAV, APR or REV annunciation can also
be caused by a failed heading valid input.
S15-18
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
3. Flashing GS - Indication of a flagged glideslope.
rearm automatically if a valid GS signal is received.)
(GS will
NOTE
I
• To continue tracking the localizer, observe the
appropriate
minimums
for
a
nonprecIsIon
approach. (Press ALT twice in rapid succession to
terminate the flashing. Control the pitch axis in
the default VS mode.)
I
• At the onset of mode annunciator flashing, the
autopilot has already reverted to a default mode of
operation, i.e., ROL and or VS mode.
An
immediate attempt to reengage to lost mode may
be made if the offending navigation, glideslope or
compass flag has cleared .
EXCEPTION
The HOG annunciation will flash for 5 seconds upon
selection of NAV, APR, or REV modes to remind the
pilot to set the HDG bug for use as course datum.
Effects of instrument losses upon autopilot operation:
1. Loss of the artificial horizon - no effect on the autopilot.
2. Loss of the turn coordinator -- autopilot inoperative.
3. Loss of the Directional Gyro (DG) -- The directional gyro does
not provide any system valid flag. If the DG fails to function
properly the autopilot heading and navigation mode will not
function correctly. Under these conditions, the only usable
lateral mode is ROL.
4. Loss of Horizontal Situation Indicator (HSI) (if installed) - If
the HSI fails to function properly the autopilot heading and
navigation mode will not function correctly.
Under these
conditions, the only usable lateral mode is ROL.
5. Loss of Blind Altitude Encoder -- Altitude Alerter and Altitude
Preselect function inoperative.
Revision 6
S15-19
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
NOTE
The following procedures apply to airplane serials
T20608001 thru T20608383 incorporating Honeywell
Service Bulletin KC140-M1, and serials T20608384
and On.
The following voice messages will be annunciated as conditions
warrant:
1. ''TRIM IN MOTION" - Elevator trim running for more than 5
seconds, message repeats every 5 seconds.
2. "CHECK PITCH TRIM" - An out of trim condition has existed
for approximately 20 seconds, take immediate corrective
action.
a. Airplane Control Wheel aircraft control.
b. A/P DISCfTRIM INT
throughout recovery.
I
GRASP FIRMLY and regain
Switch
--
PRESS
and
HOLD
c. AIRPLANE - RETRIM Manually as Needed.
d. AUTO PILOT Circuit Breaker - PULL.
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
A.
PREFLIGHT (PERFORM PRIOR TO EACH FLIGHT):
I
1. AVIONICS MASTER SWITCH - ON.
I
2. POWER APPLICATION AND SELF-TEST -- A self-test is
performed upon power application to the computer. This test
is a sequence of internal checks that validate proper system
operation prior to allowing normal system operation. The
sequence is indicated by "PFT' with an increasing number for
the sequence steps. Successful completion of self-test is
identified by all display segments being illuminated (Display
Test), external "Pitch Trim" (A/C System Annunciator Panel)
being illuminated, and the disconnect tone sounding .
I
S15-20
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT15-FMAPPROVED
NOTE
Upon applying power to the autopilot, the red P
warning on the face of the autopilot may illuminate
indicating that the pitch axis cannot be engaged.
This condition should be temporary, lasting
approximately 30 seconds. The P will extinguish
and normal operation will be available.
&WARNING
IF PITCH TRIM LIGHT STAYS ON, THEN THE
AUTOTRIM DID NOT PASS PREFLIGHT TEST.
THE AUTOPILOT CIRCUIT BREAKER MUST BE
PULLED. MANUAL ELECTRIC TRIM AND AUTOPILOT ARE INO PERA TIVE.
3. MANUAL ELECTRIC TRIM - TEST as follows:
a. LH SWITCH -- PUSH FORWARD to DN position and hold.
OBSERVE NO MOVEMENT of Elevator Trim Wheel.
Release switch to Center OFF Position.
NOTE
If movement of the elevator trim wheel is observed
during a check of either LH or RH Switch, the
manual electric trim system has malfunctioned. The
flight may be continued if the AUTOPILOT Circuit
Breaker is pulled to the OFF position and secured
until repairs can be made.
b. LH SWITCH - PULL AFT to UP position and hold.
OBSERVE NO MOVEMENT of the Elevator Trim Wheel.
Release switch to center OFF position.
c. RH SWITCH - PUSH FORWARD to DN position and hold
for 5 seconds. OBSERVE NO MOVEMENT of Elevator
Trim Wheel. Verify red ~ light on the autopilot display.I
Release switch to center OFF position.
Revision 6
S15-21
I
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
NOTE
I
I
If red
; light is not observed after holding RH
switch for 5 seconds, the trim monitor system has
failed.
The flight may be continued if the
AUTOPILOT Circuit Breaker is pulled to the OFF
position until repairs can be made.
d. RH SWITCH -- PULL AFT to UP position and hold for 5
seconds. OBSERVE NO MOVEMENT of Elevator Trim
Wheel. Verify red ; on the autopilot display. Release
switch to center OFF position.
e. LH
and
RH
Switch
PUSH
FORWARD
SIMULTANEOUSLY and HOLD. OBSERVE MOVEMENT
of Elevator Trim Wheel in proper direction (nose down).
While holding LH and RH Switches forward, PRESS and
HOLD A/P DISC/TRIM INT Switch.
OBSERVE NO
MOVEMENT of Elevator Trim Wheel. Continue to hold LH
and RH Switches forward and RELEASE A/P DISC/TRIM
INT Switch.
OBSERVE MOVEMENT of Elevator Trim
Wheel in proper direction. Release LH and RH Switches to
center OFF position.
NOTE
During Steps e. and f., verify movement of elevator
trim tab in proper direction (the elevator trim tab will
move up for nose down trim).
If movement of
Elevator Trim Wheel is observed while the A/P
DISC/TRIM INT Switch is pressed, the manual
electric trim system has failed. The flight may be
continued if the AUTOPILOT Circuit Breaker is
pulled to the OFF position until repairs can be made.
f. LH and RH Switch - PULL AFT SIMULTANEOUSLY and
HOLD. OBSERVE MOVEMENT of Elevator Trim Wheel in
proper direction (nose up). While holding LH and RH
Switches aft, PRESS and HOLD A/P DISC/TRIM INT
Switch.
OBSERVE NO MOVEMENT of Elevator Trim
Wheel. Continue to hold LH and RH Switches aft and
RELEASE A/P DISC/TRIM INT Switch.
OBSERVE
MOVEMENT of Elevator Trim Wheel in proper direction.
Release LH and RH Switches to center OFF position.
ls1s-22
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15- FAA APPROVED
4. FLASHING BARO SETTING (if installed) - SET proper baro
setting manually (or press BARO to accept the present value).
5. AUTOPILOT - ENGAGE by pressing*, or pressing and
holding'"'" AP button.
6. FLIGHT CONTROLS -- MOVE fore, aft, left and right to verify
the autopilot can be overpowered.
7. A/P DISC/TRIM INT Switch -- PRESS.
autopilot disconnects.
Verify that the
8. TRIM - SET to take off position manually.
AwARNING
• THE
PILOT
IN
COMMAND
MUST
CONTINUOUSLY MONITOR THE AUTOPILOT
WHEN IT IS ENGAGED, AND BE PREPARED TO
DISCONNECT THE AUTOPILOT AND TAKE
IMMEDIATE
CORRECTIVE
ACTION
INCLUDING MANUAL CONTROL OF THE
AIRPLANE
AND/OR
PERFORMANCE
OF
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES - IF AUTOPILOT
OPERATION IS NOT AS EXPECTED OR IF
AIRPLANE CONTROL IS NOT MAINTAINED.
• DURING
ALL
AUTOPILOT
COUPLED
OPERATIONS, THE PILOT IN COMMAND MUST
USE PROPER AUTOPILOT COMMANDS AND
USE THE PROPER ENGINE POWER TO
ENSURE THAT THE AIRPLANE IS MAINTAINED
BETWEEN 90 AND 160 KIAS, AND DOES NOT
EXCEED OTHER BASIC AIRPLANE OPERATING
LIMITATIONS.
I
I
,. Airplane serials T20608001 thru T20608383 not incorporating
Honeywell Service Bulletin KC140-M1.
,.,. Airplane serials T20608001 thru T20608383 incorporating
Honeywell Service Bulletin KC140-M1, and airplane serials
T20608384 and On.
Revision 6
S15-23'
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT15-FAAAPPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
NOTE
Autopilot tracking performance will be degraded in
turbulence.
At T206H Serial number T20608404 and On, Roll Steering
functionality enables the GPS navigation computer to control the
autopilot and automatically perform course changes (turns) and
intercept the course to the next active waypoint (when GPS is
selected as the autopilot navigation source). The GPS navigation
computer uses ground speed, track, and tum rate data to calculate
the required bank angle for waypoint course changes. The GPS
Roll Steering output will command the autopilot to turn and
intercept the course to the new active waypoint without directly
overflying the immediate waypoint (except designated flyover
waypoints). Distance from the waypoint for the GPS to initiate the
turn will vary with groundspeed, etc., but will usually be within one
nautical mile of the waypoint. Sequencing to the next waypoint will
occur approximately at the midpoint of the tum (transition segment).
Roll Steering is the default operating mode for the autoflight system
when all of the following conditions are met:
1. The autopilot is engaged in NAV or APR mode.
2. GPS is selected as the autopilot navigation source.
3. The GPS navigation computer is executing an active flight
plan.
4. The GPS is operating in LEG mode.
ls15-24
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9-SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT15-FMAPPROVED
I
1. BEFORE TAKEOFF:
a. A/P DISC/TRIM INT Switch - PRESS.
b. BARO setting (if installed) -- CHECK.
AcAuT10N
CONTINUE TO SET MANUALLY THROUGHOUT
THE FLIGHT EACH TIME THE ALTIMETER BARO
SETTING REQUIRES ADJUSTMENT.
NO
FURTHER REMINDERS (FLASHING) WILL BE
GIVEN.
c. ALTITUDE SELECT KNOB (if installed) - ROTATE until
the desired altitude is displayed.
NOTE
An altitude alert is annunciated 1000 ft. prior to
arrival at the selected altitude. Airplane deviations
greater than 200 feet above or below the selected
altitude will produce an altitude alert. The alert
annunciation is accompanied by a series of short
tones.
I
2. AFTER TAKE OFF:
a. Elevator Trim -- VERIFY or SET to place the airplane in a
trimmed condition prior to autopilot engagement.
NOTE
Engaging the autopilot into a mistrim condition may
cause unwanted attitude changes and a "TRIM
FAIL" annunciation.
b. Airspeed and Rate of Climb - STABILIZED.
Revision 6
s1s-2sl
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT15-FMAPPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
NOTE
Avoid autopilot engagement into a climb condition
that either cannot be maintained, or is on the
performance limits of the airplane for its power and
weight configuration .
c. AP Button - PRESS*, or PRESS and HOLD**. Note ROL
and VS annunciator on. If no other modes are selected the
autopilot will operate in the ROL and VS modes.
AwARNING
OPERATING AT OR NEAR THE BEST
RATE OF CLIMB AIRSPEED, AT CLIMB POWER
SETTINGS, AND USING VERTICAL SPEED (VS)
MODE, CONTINUED OPERATION IN VERTICAL
SPEED MODE CAN RESULT IN AN AIRPLANE
STALL. IF NECESSARY, DISCONNECT THE
AUTOPILOT AND RETURN THE AIRPLANE TO
A
STABILIZED
CLIMB
PRIOR
TO
RE-ENGAGMENT.
I
• WHEN
I
• WHEN
I
• DO NOT HELP
OPERATING AT OR NEAR THE
MAXIMUM AUTOPILOT SPEED, IT WILL BE
NECESSARY TO REDUCE POWER IN ORDER
TO MAINTAIN THE DESIRED RATE OF
DESCENT AND NOT EXCEED THE MAXIMUM
AUTOPILOT SPEED.
THE AUTOPILOT OR HAND-FLY
THE AIRPLANE WITH THE AUTOPILOT
ENGAGED AS THE AUTOPILOT WILL RUN THE
PITCH TRIM TO OPPOSE CONTROL WHEEL
MOVEMENT. A MISTRIM OF THE AIRPLANE,
WITH ACCOMPANYING LARGE ELEVATOR
CONTROL FORCES, MAY RESULT IF THE
PILOT MANIPULATES THE CONTROL WHEEL
MANUALLY WHILE THE AUTOPILOT IS
ENGAGED.
* Airplane serials T20608001 thru T20608383 not incorporating
Honeywell Service Bulletin KC140-M1.
** Airplane serials T20608001 thru T20608383 incorporating
Honeywell Service Bulletin KC140-M1, and airplane serials
T20608384 and On.
ls1s-2s
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
3. CLIMB OR DESCENT:
a. BARO setting (if installed) -- CHECK.
b. Using Vertical Trim:
1) VERTICAL SPEED Control -- PRESS either the UP or
DN button to select aircraft vertical speed within the
±2000 ft./min command limits.
2) VERTICAL SPEED Control -- RELEASE when desired
vertical speed is displayed. The autopilot will maintain
the selected vertical speed.
NOTE
Avoid selecting a climb rate that either cannot be
maintained or is on the performance limit of the
airplane for its power and weight configuration.
4. ALTITUDE HOLD:
a. Capture preselected altitudes (if installed):
1) ALTITUDE SELECT knob - ROTATE until the desired
altitude is displayed. Note ARM annunciation occurs
automatically with altitude selection when the autopilot is
engaged.
2) ALTITUDE SELECT MODE (ARM) button - PUSH to
alternately disarm or arm altitude capture.
3) Airplane -- ESTABLISH vertical speed necessary to
intercept the selected altitude.
NOTE
It may be possible to observe minor difference
between the autopilot's selected altitude and the
airplane altimeter after an altitude capture. These
discrepancies are attributed to the autopilot and
altimeter using different static sources combined
with autopilot system tolerances. Not inputing the
proper barometric setting into the autopilot computer
will produce inaccuracies.
Revision 6
I
S15-271
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
NOTE
Altitude preselect captures are not recommended on
nonprecision approaches to capture the MDA.
Glideslope coupling will preclude a preselect altitude
capture on an ILS.
b. Altitude (ALT) Hold Button:
1) ALT Hold Selector Button -- PRESS. Note ALT hold
annunciator ON. Autopilot will maintain the selected
altitude.
NOTE
It is recommended by the FAA (AC00-24B) to use
basic "PITCH ATTITUDE HOLD" mode during
operation in severe turbulence. However, since this
autopilot does not use the attitude gyro as a pitch
reference, it is recommended that the autopilot be
disconnected and that the airplane be flown by hand
in severe turbulence.
c. Changing altitudes:
1) Using Vertical Speed (Recommended
changes less than 100 ft.)
for
altitude
a) VERTICAL SPEED Control - PRESS and HOLD
either the UP or DN button. Vertical Speed will seek
a rate of change of about 500 fpm.
b) VERTICAL SPEED Control desired altitude is reached.
maintain the desired altitude.
RELEASE
when
The autopilot will
NOTE
As an alternative, a series of quick momentary
presses on the UP or DN button will program either
an increase or decrease of the altitude reference, 20
feet each time the button is pressed.
ls15-2a
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
5. HEADING HOLD:
a. Heading Selector Knob -- SET BUG to desired heading.
b. HDG Mode Selector Button -- PRESS. Note HDG mode
annunciator ON.
Autopilot will automatically turn the
airplane to the selected heading.
I
NOTE
I
Airplane heading may change in ROL mode due to
turbulence.
c. Heading Selector Knob - MOVE BUG to the desired
heading. Autopilot will automatically turn the airplane tol
the new selected heading.
6. NAV COUPLING:
a. When equipped with DG:
1) OBS Knob - SELECT desired course.
2) NAV Mode Selector Button -- PRESS.
annunciated.
Note NAVARM
3) Heading Selector Knob - ROTATE BUG to agree with
OBS course.
NOTE
• When NAV is selected, the autopilot will flash HOG
for 5 seconds to remind the pilot to reset the HOG
bug to the OBS course. IF HOG mode was in use
at the time of NAV button selection, a 45°
intercept angle will then be automatically
established based on the position of the bug.
• All angle intercepts compatible with radar vectors
may be accomplished by selecting ROL mode
PRIOR to pressing the NAV button. The HOG bug
must still be positioned to agree with the OBS
course to provide course datum to the autopilot
when using a DG (Directional Gyro).
Revision 6
I
I
S15-291
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SU PP LEM ENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
a) If the CDI needle is greater than 2 to 3 dots from
center, the autopilot will annunciate NAVARM. When
the computed capture point is reached the ARM
annunciator will go out and the selected course will
be automatically captured and tracked.
b) If the CDI needle is less than 2 to 3 dots from center,
the HDG mode will disengage upon selecting NAV
mode. The NAV annunciator will then illuminate and
the capture/track sequence will automatically begin.
b. When equipped with HSI:
1) Course Bearing Pointer - SET to desired course.
2) Heading Selector Knob - SET BUG to provide desired
intercept angle and engage HDG mode.
3) NAV Mode Selector Button -- PRESS.
a) If the Course Deviation Bar {D-Bar) is greater than 2
to 3 dots from center, the autopilot will annunciate
NAVARM. When the computed capture point is
reached the ARM annunciator will go out and the
selected course will be automatically captured and
tracked.
b) If the D-Bar is less than 2 to 3 dots from center, the
HDG mode will disengage upon selecting NAV mode.
The NAV annunciator will then illuminate and the
capture/track sequence will automatically begin.
ls1s-3o
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
When Roll Steering is in operation, adjusting or changing the
position of the heading bug or the course pointer will have no effect
on heading or course. It is recommended that both the heading
bug and the course pointer (or NO 1. OBS) always be set to the
current course to enhance situational awareness, especially in the
event of an unexpected autoflight equipment failure. GPS signal
loss requires that the pilot immediately select an alternate autopilot
operating mode (such as HDG) or select NAV (NAV1) as the
autopilot navigation source. If autopilot function is lost, the pilot is
required to resume manual control of the airplane. Keeping the
heading bug and course pointer set to the present course makes
immediate recovery easier.
Roll Steering will not function when the GPS is in OBS mode, when
the autopilot is in HDG or ROL mode or when the autopilot is in
NAV mode with NAV selected as the autopilot navigation source.
7. APPROACH (APR) COUPLING: (To enable glideslope
coupling on an ILS and more precise tracking on instrument
approaches).
Roll Steering will operate on instrument approach procedures
selected from a current GPS aeronautical database only when:
• The autopilot is engaged in either NAV or APR
mode.
AND
• GPS is selected as the autopilot NAV input.
Ensure that the appropriate GPS mode (LEG or OBS) is selected
during each portion of the approach procedure.
a. When equipped with DG:
1) BARO setting -- CHECK (if installed).
2) OBS Knob -- SELECT desired approach course. (For a
localizer, set it to serve as a memory aid.)
3) APR Mode Selector Button -- PRESS.
annunciated.
Note APRARM
4) Heading Selector Knob - ROTATE BUG to agree with
desired approach.
Revision 6
S15-31
I
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
NOTE
I
• When APR is selected, the autopilot will flash
I
• All
HDG
for 5 seconds to remind the pilot to reset the HDG
bug to the approach course. If HDG mode was in
use at the time of APR button selection, a 45°
intercept angle will then be automatically
established based on the position of the bug.
angle intercepts compatible with radar vectors
may be accomplished by selecting ROL mode
PRIOR to pressing the APR button. The HDG bug
must still be positioned to agree with the desired
approach course to provide course datum to the
autopilot when using a DG.
a) If the CDI needle is greater than 2 to 3 dots from the
center, the autopilot will annunciate APRARM; when
the computed capture point is reached the ARM
annunciator will go out and the selected course will
be automatically captured and tracked.
b) If the CDI needle is less than 2 to 3 dots form the
center, the HDG mode will disengage upon selecting
APR mode; the APR annunciator will illuminate and
the capture/track sequence will automatically begin.
b. When equipped with HSI:
1) BARO Setting (if installed) - CHECK.
2) Course Bearing Pointer - SET to desired course.
3) Heading Selector Knob -- SET BUG to provide desired
intercept angle.
ls15-32
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15- FM APPROVED
4) APR Mode Selector Button - PRESS.
a) If the D-Bar is greater than 2 to 3 dots from center,
the autopilot will annunciate APRARM; when the
computed capture point is reached the ARM
annunciator will go out and the selected course will
be automatically captured and tracked.
b) If the D-Bar is less than 2 to 3 dots from center, the
HDG mode will disengage upon selecting APR mode;
the APR annunciator will illuminate and the
capture/track sequence will automatically begin.
5) Airspeed - MAINTAIN 100 KIAS minimum during
coupled autopilot approaches (recommended).
8. BACK COURSE (REV) APPROACH COUPLING (i.e., reverse
localizer):
a. When equipped with DG:
1) BARO setting (if installed) - CHECK.
2) OBS Knob - SELECT the localizer course to the front
course inbound (as a memory aid).
3) REV Mode Selector Button - PRESS.
4) Heading Selector Knob - ROTATE BUG to the heading
corresponding to the localizer front course inbound.
Revision 6
S15-331
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
NOTE
I
• When REV is selected,
I
• All
the autopilot will flash HOG
for 5 seconds to remind the pilot to reset the HOG
bug to the localizer FRONT COURSE INBOUND
heading . If heading mode was in use at the time
of REV button selection, a 45° intercept angle will
then be automatically established based on the
position of the bug.
angle intercepts compatible with radar vectors
may be accomplished by selecting ROL mode
PRIOR to pressing the REV button. The HOG bug
must still be positioned to the localizer FRONT
COURSE INBOUND heading to provide course
datum to the autopilot when using a DG.
a) If the CDI needle is greater than 2 to 3 dots from
center, the autopilot will annunciate REVARM; when
the computed capture point is reached the ARM
annunciator will go out and the selected back course
will be automatically captured and tracked.
b) If the COi needle is less than 2 to 3 dots from center,
the HDG mode will disengage upon selecting REV
mode; the REV annunciator will illuminate and the
capture/track sequence will automatically begin.
b. When equipped with HSI:
1) BARO Setting (if installed) - CHECK.
2) Course Bearing pointer - SET to the ILS front course
inbound heading.
3) Heading Selector Knob - SET BUG to provide desired
intercept angle and engage HOG mode.
4) REV Mode Selector Button - PRESS .
ls1s-34
Revision 6
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15 - FAA APPROVED
a) If the D-Bar is greater than 2 to 3 dots from center,
the autopilot will annunciate REVARM; when the
computed capture point is reached the ARM
annunciator will go out and the selected back course
will be automatically captured and tracked.
b) If the D-Bar is less than 2 to 3 dots from center, the
HOG mode will disengage upon selecting REV mode;
the REV annunciator will illuminate and the
capture/track sequence will automatically begin.
5) Airspeed - MAINTAIN 100 KIAS minimum duringl
autopilot coupled approaches (recommended).
9. GLIDESLOPE COUPLING
a. APR Mode - ENGAGED, Note GSARM annunciated.
NOTE
Glideslope coupling is inhibited when operating in NAV or
REV modes. With NAV 1 selected to a valid ILS, glideslope
armed and coupling occurs automatically in the APR mode
when tracking a localizer.
b. At Glideslope centering - note ARM annunciator goes out.
NOTE
Autopilot can capture glideslope from above or
below the beam.
c. Airspeed -- MAINTAIN 100 KIAS minimum during autopilot
coupled approaches (recommended).
Revision 6
S15-351
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 15- FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
10. MISSED APPROACH
a. A/P DISC/TRIM INTER Switch - PRESS to disengage AP.
b. MISSED APPROACH - EXECUTE.
c. If autopilot is desired:
1) Elevator Trim - VERIFY or SET.
2) Airspeed and Rate of Climb -- STABILIZED.
NOTE
Avoid autopilot engagement into a climb condition
that either cannot be maintained, or is on the
performance limits of the airplane for its power and
weight configuration.
3) AP Button - PRESS. Note ROL and VS annunciators
on. If no other modes are selected the autopilot will
operate in the ROL and VS modes. Verify that the
airplane Vertical Speed Indicator (VSI) and the Autopilot
VS agree.
I
NOTE
If tracking the ILS course outbound as part of the
missed approach procedure is desired, use the NAV
mode to prevent inadvertent GS coupling.
11. BEFORE LANDING
a. A/P DISC/TRIM INT Switch -- PRESS* or PRESS and
HOLD** to disengage AP.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when the KAP 140
2 Axis Autopilot is installed.
* Airplane serials T20608001 thru T20608383 not incorporating
Honeywell Service Bulletin KC140-M1.
** Airplane serials T20608001
thru T20608383 incorporating
Honeywell Service Bulletin KC140-M1, and airplane serials
T20608384 and On.
ls1s-36
Revision 6
~
Cessna
AT-• Company
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Alrplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608001 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 16
CARGO PACK
Sl;Rl/1.LIK)
Tz() GP i' A=1,-z
NaGISTAATIOH NO.
Ok- MC'"f
This supplement must be Inserted Into Secllon 9 of 1he Pilot's Operc1tin9
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual v.tien th$ cargo Pack Is
installed .
FMAPPROVAL
MAMIPltOYEDIJNDERFAR218\.19P-'RT J
-~r-~~oe.1
~..,_
~:
Dale: ,
11191
i)
OOP'IRIGHT e 19911
CESSNA AIRCRAFT CO...P.<W'I
WICHITA, IWIS.O.S, USA
T206HPHl)$-S16-ll0
Member of GAMA
31 March 1999
S16-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 16- FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT16
CARGO PACK
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
Revision Level
Date of Issue
0 (Original)
March 31, 1999
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
PAGE
DATE
Title (S16-1)
S16-2
S16-3
S16-4
Mar 31/99
Mar 31/99
Mar 31/99
Mar 31/99
PAGE
DATE
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Number
S16-2
Title
Airplane
Unit
Effectivity
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
Mar 31/99
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 16 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
CARGO PACK
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The cargo pack provides additional cargo and baggage space.
The basic shell of the cargo pack, including the loading door, is
fabricated from fiberglass. Corrugated aluminum forms the inner
floor of the pack. A loading door is located on the left side of the
pack, and is hinged at the bottom. It is secured in the closed
position by two quick-release fasteners, and has a key-operated
lock.
The volume of the cargo pack is 16 cubic feet. Dimensions of
the pack and its loading door opening are contained in Section 6 of
the basic handbook. The pack is designed to accommodate three
"two-suiters", plus other small miscellaneous articles.
The pack is attached to the bottom of the fuselage with screws
and, after the initial installation, can readily be removed or installed.
Complete instructions for installation of the cargo pack, and required
modifications to the nose gear access panels, fuel pump vent line
and exhaust stack are contained in the Accessory Kit and Service
Manual.
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
The following information must be presented in the form of a
placard, located on the inside of the cargo pack door:
REFER TO WEIGHT & BALANCE DATA FOR
BAGGAGE/CARGO LOADING. NEVER EXCEED 300
LBS. CARGO WEIGHT.
Mar 31/99
S16-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 16 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
There is no change to the airplane emergency procedures when
the cargo pack is installed.
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
Consideration should be given to loading of the cargo pack and
the necessary weight and balance computations outlined in Section
6 of the basic handbook. All other normal procedures specified in
the basic handbook are applicable when the cargo pack is installed.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
The climb performance ·of the airplane equipped with the
pack is approximately 80 fpm less than shown in the
performance charts in Section 5 of the basic handbook. The
speeds are approximately 5 KTAS lower than shown in the
charts in Section 5 of the basic handbook.
cargo
climb
cruise
cruise
DEMONSTRATED OPERATING TEMPERATURE
Satisfactory engine cooling has been demonstrated for this
airplane with an outside air temperature 23°C above standard. This
is not to be considered as an operating limitation. Reference should
be made to Section 2 of the basic handbook for engine operating
limitations.
S16-4
Mar 31/99
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608001 and ON
SUPPLEMENT17
PROPELLER DE-ICE
- - - MO.
7 i O , ew.t':f 1
CJ K--- HCP
REGISTRATION NO.
Tl'i$ $Upplemera must be Inserter:! Into Section 9 of lhe Pilot's Operating
~ne!bool< and FAA Approve<! Airplane Flight Manual when the Prop De-Ice
System ls Installed.
0
OOPV'RIGHT ~ 1QN
CESSNA.A.II!~ COMPANY
W!O,JTA. KANSAS. USA
1'2-PNUS-S17-00
Membetof GAMA
7 December 1998
S17-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 17 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT17
PROPELLER HEAT SYSTEM
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
Revision Level
Date of Issue
0 (Original)
Dec. 7, 1998
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
DATE
PAGE
Title (S17-1)
S17-2
S17-3
S17-4
PAGE
DATE
Dec 7/98
Dec 7/98
Dec 7/98
Dec 7/98
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Number
Title
Airplane
Unit
Effectivity
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
(
S17-2
Dec 7/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 17 - FM APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
PROPELLER DE-ICE SYSTEM
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The propeller de-ice system provides a measure of protection for
the propeller blade surfaces if unexpected icing conditions are
encountered. The system is operated by a 20 amp switch breaker
labeled PROP DE-ICE located on the circuit breaker and control
switch panel. When the switch is placed to the ON position, electric
current flows to a propeller de-ice timer which cycles the current on
and off for 90-second periods to the heated boots located on each
of the propeller blades. The timer monitors the system current draw
during the on periods and checks the system for open and shortcircuit conditions. When the system conditions are normal, a green
PROP HEAT annunciator is illuminated in the center instrument
panel above the radio rack. If the timer detects faulty system wiring
or a heated boot failure, it removes the current supply to the boots,
extinguishes the green PROP HEAT light and illuminates an amber
PROP HEAT light adjacent to the green one.
The timer will continue to monitor the status of the system during
the fault condition and will return the system to normal operation
automatically if the detected faults are cleared. When the system is
on and operating normally the monitor circuits of the timer can be
tested by placing the master warning test/brt/dim switch located on
the top of the center instrument panel above the radio rack to TEST.
The test switch simulates a propeller de-ice system fault and the
timer will extinguish the green PROP HEAT light and illuminate the
amber PROP HEAT light. Upon release of the test switch the
system will return to normal operation.
Dec 7/98
S17-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 17 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
(
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
There is no change to the airplane limitations when the propeller
de-ice system is installed; intentional flight into known icing
conditions is prohibited, regardless of installed ice protection
equipment.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
Flight into known icing conditions is prohibited. If unexpected
icing conditions are encountered, the Inadvertent Icing Encounter
checklist in Section 3 of the basic handbook should be followed. In
addition, the following procedure is recommended.
1. Master Switch - ON.
2. PROP DE-ICE Switch -- ON. CHECK green PROP HEAT light
illuminated.
NOTE
For accurate magnetic compass readings, turn the PITOT
HEAT and PROP DE-ICE switches OFF momentarily.
3. PROP DE-ICE Switch -- Cycle OFF then ON when amber
PROP HEAT light illuminated. If amber PROP HEAT light
illuminates again, place PROP DE-ICE switch to OFF and
advise maintenance.
DO NOT RUN THE PROP HEAT SYSTEM MORE
THAN 15 SECONDS ON THE GROUND WITHOUT
ENGINE POWER.
4. PROP DE-ICE Switch required.
S17-4
OFF when DE-ICE is no longer
Dec 7/98
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 17- FAA APPROVED
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
There is no change to the airplane normal procedures when the
propeller heat system is installed.
Refer to Section 8 of the basic handbook for care and
maintenance of the propeller heated boots.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when the
propeller heat system is installed.
Dec 7/98
S17-5/(S17-6 blank)
~
Cessna
AT8lltron Company
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane FHght Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608147 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 18
CENTURY
HORIZONTAL SITUATION INDICATOR {HSI)
seRIALNO.
7 70Gt2RI::fP
A!...STRATJOH NO.
OK «CP
r'
This supplement must be Inserted into Secllon & of the ~ors Operating
Handbook and FAA Approvecl Airplane Flight Manual when this Horizontal
Situation Indicator Is installed.
FMAPPRO\/AL
l'AAAPMOVED~FAR2t SUBPAAJJ
ltie C..-Airciell Co
-~~..._,_,.cs.,
~~~an.Dato: 20 D o - 1009
@
COP'ffiJGHT C> 19SK>
Member of GAMA
20 December 1999
C.SSNA •IRCR.-FT CQMP.lNY
V\OCHITA l<A'°'SAS, USA
~l'tjVS-$11).00
S18-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 18- FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT18
CENTURY HORIZONTAL SITUATION INDICATOR
(HSI)
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
Revision Level
Date of Issue
0 (Original)
Dec. 20, 1999
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
PAGE
DATE
PAGE
DATE
Title (S18-1)
S18-2
S18-3
S18-4
Dec 20/99
Dec 20/99
Dec 20/99
Dec20/99
S18-5
S18-6
S18-7
S18-8
Dec 20/99
Dec 20/99
Dec 20/99
Dec 20/99
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Number
S18-2
Title
Airplane
Unit
Effectivity
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
Dec 20/99
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 18 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
CENTURY HORIZONTAL SITUATION
INDICATOR (HSI)
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The Century Horizontal Situation Indicator (HSI) is an additional
navigation indicator option available with various Bendix/King
KX155A Nav/Comm Radios and autopilot options.
When dual
Nav/Coms are installed, the HSI is coupled to the first Nav/Com and
a VOR/LOC indicator is coupled to the second Nav/Com.
This system consists of a Horizontal Situation Indicator (HSI), a
remote HSI control switch, a remote magnetic flux detector and a
remote VOR/LOC converter. The HSI features the modified ARING
face presentation, providing a slaved gyro heading display with a
built-in slaving indicator and full ILS navigation capability. Each
control and indicator function is described in Figure 1.
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
There is no change to the airplane limitations when this
instrument is installed.
Dec 20/99
S18-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT18-FMAPPROVE0
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
1
10
11
1. HORIZONTAL SITUATION INDICATOR {HSI) - Provides a
pictorial presentation of aircraft deviation relative to VOR
radials, localizer beams and GPS courses. It also displays
glide slope deviations and gives heading reference with
respect to magnetic north.
2. OMNI BEARING POINTER - Indicates selected VOR course
or localizer course on compass card (16). The selected VOR
radial or localizer heading remains set on the compass card
when the compass card (16) is rotated.
3. NAV FLAG - When flag is in view, indicates that the NAV
receiver signal being received is not reliable.
4. HEADING REFERENCE {LUBBER LINE) - Indicates aircraft
magnetic heading on compass card (16).
Figure 1. Horizontal Situation Indicator (HSI) (Sheet 1 of 3).
S16-4
Oec20/99
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 18 - FM APPROVED
5. HEADING WARNING FLAG (HDG) -- When flag is in view the
heading display is invalid due to interruption of electrical
power.
6. GYRO SLAVING INDICATOR - Displays visual indication of
heading indicator and flux detector synchronization. When
slaving needle is aligned with the HSI 45° right index, it shows
that the heading indicator agrees with the aircraft magnetic
heading. Off-center pointer deflection show the direction of
heading indicator error relative to aircraft magnetic heading.
The compass CARD SET knob (9) may be used at any time to
more rapidly accomplish synchronization of the heading
indicator reading with magnetic heading as indicated by the
slaving indicator.
7. HEADING BUG -- Indicates selected reference heading
relative to the compass card (16).
8. TO I FROM INDICATOR FLAG -- Indicates direction of VOR
station relative to selected course.
9. HEADING SELECTOR AND CARD SET KNOB (PUSH6.
CARD SET) -- When rotated in normal (out) position, positions
heading "bug" (7) on compass card (16) to indicate selected
heading for reference or for autopilot tracking. When pushed
in and rotated, sets compass card (16) to agree with magnetic
compass. The omni bearing pointer (2), heading bug (7), and
deviation bar (10) rotate with the compass card (16).
10. COURSE (OMNI) DEVIATION BAR -- Bar is center portion of
omni bearing pointer and moves laterally to pictorially indicate
relationship of aircraft to selected course. It relates in degrees
of angular displacement from VOR radials or localizer beam
center.
11. COURSE DEVIATION DOTS -- Indicates aircraft displacement
from VOR, or localizer beam center. A course deviation bar
displacement of 2 dots represents full scale (VOR = ±10°,
Loe = ±2 ° or GPS=displacement in nautical miles)
deviation from beam centerline.
Figure 1. Horizontal Situation Indicator (HSI) (Sheet 2 of 3).
Dec20/99
S18-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 18- FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
12. COURSE SELECTOR+
) KNOB -- When rotated, positions
omni bearing pointer (~) on the compass card (16) to select
desired VOR radial, localizer course or GPS course.
13. GLIDE SLOPE SCALE - Indicates displacement from glide
slope beam center. A glide slope deviation bar displacement
of 2 dots represents full scale (0.7°) deviation above or below
glide slope beam centerline.
14. GLIDE SLOPE POINTER - Indicates on glide slope scale (13)
aircraft displacement from glide slope beam center.
15. GLIDE SLOPE FLAG - When in view, indicates glide slope
receiver signal is not reliable.
16. COMPASS CARD - Rotates to display heading of airplane
with reference to lubber line (4).
Figure 1. Horizontal Situation Indicator (HSI) (Sheet 3 of 3).
S18-6
Dec 20/99
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 18- FAA APPROVED
17
18
FREE
OFF
SLAVE
17. MD 189-1 HSI CONTROL UNIT -- Controls power and slaving
to the HSI.
18. HSI CONTROL SWITCH -- A three position toggle switch that
selects between FREE, OFF and SLAVE operational modes.
FREE -
The HSI system is powered but magnetic slaving is
disabled.
Requires manual HSI compass card
adjustment at the HEADING SELECTOR and
CARD SET KNOB.
OFF -
All power is removed from the HSI system.
SLAVE -- The HSI system is powered and automatic slaving
of the COMPASS CARD from the left wing
mounted flux detector is enabled.
Figure 2. HSI Control Switch.
Dec 20/99
S18-7
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 18 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
There is no change to the airplane emergency procedures when
this instrument is installed.
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
ELECTRICAL POWER MUST BE SUPPLIED TO
THIS INSTRUMENT FOR PROPER FUNCTIONING.
ABSENCE OF ELECTRICAL POWER WILL
IN
UNRELIABLE
HEADING
RESULT
INFORMATION.
Normal procedures for operation of this system differ little from
those required for the more conventional Course Deviation
Indicators. However, several small differences are worth noting.
The rectilinear movement of the omni deviation bar in
combination with the rotation of the compass card in response to
heading changes, provides an intuitive picture of the navigation
situation at a glance when tuned to an omni station. When tuned to
a localizer frequency, the omni bearing pointer must be set to the
inbound front course for both front and back-course approaches to
retain this pictorial presentation.
For normal procedures with autopilots, refer to the autopilot
suppl.ements in this handbook. A description of course datum and
autopilot procedures for course datum are incorporated in the
appropriate autopilot supplements.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when this
instrument is installed.
S18-8
Dec 20/99
(
'',
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
.,.,,..,.,. >··,
,,·
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···,;
·:·
.....·.......
CESSNA MODEL T206H
\'.
..... : · ..: ...,
-:
'f:.>.t " · . .:: .. . .. ..
AIRPLANES T20608173
ANDON
SUPPLEMENT 19
BENDIX/KING KLN 94
GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (IFR)
SERIA&. NC>.
-rz&t ou 1z
1!£GIATAATION NO.
Ok-- fl{P
This supplement must be inserted into Section 9 of 1he Pilofs Operating
Handbook and FM Approved Airplane Flight t,1an11,1J when the Global Pos~ioning
System is installed.
FM APPROVAL
Co: 1H)oaurbor 2000
, ) Member of GAMA
COPVRIGHT C> lOOO
CF.:ISNA AIRCRAFT oat,IPAN'I'
WICHITA. l<fll,&S, USA
T2Q6HPflUS-S1lM>'
6 November 2000
Revision 4 - 4 June 2003
S19-1
SECTION 9 • SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19 • FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT 19
BENDIX/KING KLN 94
GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (IFR)
use the Log of Effective Pages to determine the current status of
his supplement.
Pages affected by the current revision are
ndicated by an asterisk(") preceding the page number.
f
Supplement Status
Date
Original Issue
Revision 1
Revision 2
Revision 3
Revision 4
I
6 November 2000
18 December 2000
30 December 2000
22 January 2001
4 June 2003
LOG OF EFFECTIVE PAGES
Page
Number
* S19-1 lhru S19-20
• S19-21/S19-22
Page
Status
Revision
Number
Revised
Revision4
Revision4
Added
APPAOVEDBV
DATE OF APPROVAL
S19-2
Revision 4
CESSNA
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19 - FM APPROVED
MODEL T206H
(
SUPPLEMENT19
BENDIX/KING KLN 94
GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (IFR)
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of SeNice Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Aillane
Se al
Eileciiv ity
Revision 4
Revision
Incorporation
1n3rat.ed
In _ane
I
S19-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT
BENDIX/KING KLN 94
GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (IFR}
SECTION 1
GENERAL
I
The KLN 94 Global Positioning System (GPS) is a threedimensional precision navigation system based on 24 earth orbiting
satellites. Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) is a
function that every !FR-certified GPS receiver must continuously
perform to assure position accuracy. RAIM is available when 5 or
more of these satellites are in view, or 4 satellites are in view and a
barometrically corrected altitude input from the airplane's altimeter
is made. Annunciation is provided if there are not enough satellites
in view to assure position integrity.
Operational guidance for the KLN 94 GPS Navigation System is
provided with the Bendix/King KLN 94 Pilot's Guide (supplied with
the airplane). This Pilot's Guide should be thoroughly studied and
VFR operations conducted so that you are totally familiar with GPS
navigation before actually using this equipment in IFR conditions.
At T206H serial number T20608404 and On, automated Roll
Steering functionality has been added to the Bendix/King KLN 94
GPS Navigation System and the KAP 140 2 Axis Autopilot System.
Roll Steering coupling between the GPS and the Autopilot provides
area navigation with automatic course changes at flight plan
aypoints similar to Flight Management System (FMS) operations,
but without vertical navigation capability. The Roll Steering function
is similar to "turn anticipation" for the autopilot.
At the noted serial effecUvity, the KLN 94 GPS (ORS 03 or later)
has an added Roll Steering signal output. In order for the GPS Roll
Steering output to be utilized, the KAP 140 Autopilot (-7904 or later)
has an added input for the Roll Steering· signal and additional
system wiring has been added to the airplane to connect the Roll
Steering signal output from the KLN 94 GPS to the Roll Steering
input of the KAP 140 Autopilot.
S19-4
Revision 4
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT19-FAAAPPROVED
Every 28 days, Bendix/King receives new aeronautical database
infonnation from Jeppesen Sanderson for each database region.
This information is processed and downloaded onto the database
cards. Bendix/King makes these database card updates available
to KLN 94 GPS users.
The database card is an electronic memory containing
information on airports, navaids, intersections, DPs, STARs,
instrument approaches, special use airspace, and other items of
interest to the pilot.
AcAUTION
THE DATABASE MUST BE UPDATED ONLY
WHILE THE AIRPLANE IS ON THE GROUND.
THE KLN 94 DOES NOT PERFORM ANY
NAVIGATION FUNCTION WHILE THE DATABASE
IS BEING UPDATED.
I
NOTE
A current database is required by regulation in order
to use the KLN 94 GPS system for non-precision
approaches.
Provided the KLN 94 navigation system is receiving adequate
usable signals, it has been demonstrated capable of and has been
shown to meet the accuracy specifications of: VFR/IFR enroute
oceanic and remote, enroute domestic, terminal, and instrument
approach (GPS, Loran-C, VOR, VOR-DME, TACAN, NOB, NDBDME, RNAV) operation within the U.S. National Airspace System,
North Atlantic Minimum Navigation Performance Specifications
(MNPS) Airspace and latitudes bounded by 74° North and 60°
South using the WGS-84 (or NAO 83) coordinate reference datum in
accordance with the criteria of AC 20-138, AC 91-49, and AC 12033.
Navigation data is based upon use of only the global
positioning system (GPS) operated by the United States.
Revision 4
S19-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
NOTE
I
• Airplanes
I
• FAA approval
I
• The
S19-6
using GPS for oceanic IFR operations
may use the KLN 94 to replace one of the other
approved means of long range navigation. A single
KLN 94 GPS installation may also be used on
short oceanic routes which require only one means
of long-range navigation.
of the KLN 94 does not necessarily
constitute approval for use in foreign airspace.
KLN 94 is qualified for BRNAV (Basic Area
Navigation) operation in the European region in
accordance with the criteria of AC 90-96.
(Reference
ICAO
Doc
7030
Regional
Supplementary
Procedures,
JAA
Technical
Guidance Leaflet AMJ20X2 and Eurocontrol RNAV
Standard Doc 003-93 Area Navigation Equipment
Operational
Requirements
and
Functional
Requirements (RNAV).)
Revision 4
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19 - FAA APPROVED
2
MG
7
NAV
GPS
6
0585C1042
1. GPS MESSAGE (MSG) ANNUNCIATOR LIGHT - MSG will
begin flashing whenever the message prompt (a large "M" on
the left side of the screen) on the KLN 94 GPS unit begins
flashing to alert the pilot that a message is waiting. Press the
Message (MSG) key on the GPS to display the message. If a
message condition exists which requires a specific action by
the pilot, the message annunciator will remain on but will not
flash.
2. GPS WAYPOINT (WPT) ANNUNCIATOR LIGHT - GPS
WAYPOINT annunciator will begin to flash approximately 36
seconds prior to reaching a Direct-To waypoint. Also, when
turn anticipation is enabled in the KLN 94 GPS unit, the
annunciator will begin to flash 20 seconds prior to the
beginning of turn anticipation, then illuminate steady at the
very beginning of turn anticipation.
Figure 1. GPS Annunciator/Switch
(Serials T20608173 thru T20608259) (Sheet 1 of 3)
Revision 4
I
S19-7
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19- FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
A_ WARNING
TURN ANTICIPATION IS AUTOMATICALLY
DISABLED FOR FAF WAYPOINTS AND THOSE
USED EXCLUSIVELY IN DP/STARS WHERE
OVERFLIGHT IS REQUIRED. FOR WAYPOINTS
SHARED BETWEEN DP/STARS AND PUBLISHED
ENROUTE
SEGMENTS
(REQUIRING
OVERFLIGHT IN THE DP/STARS), PROPER
SELECTION ON THE PRESENTED WAYPOINT
PAGE IS NECESSARY TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE
ROUTE PROTECTION ON THE DP/STARS.
I
3. GPS APPROACH (GPS, APR) SWITCH - Pressing the GPS
APPROACH switch manually selects or disarms the approach
ARM mode and also cancels the approach ACTV mode after
being automatically engaged by the KLN 94 GPS system.
The white background color of the GPS APPROACH
annunciator makes it visible in daylight.
4. ARM ANNUNCIATOR LIGHT -- ARM annunciator will
illuminate when the KLN 94 GPS system automatically selects
the approach ARM mode or when the approach ARM mode is
manually selected.
The approach ARM mode will be
automatically selected when the airplane is within 30 NM of an
airport, and an approach is loaded in the flight plan for that
airport. The approach ARM mode can manually be selected
at a greater distance than 30 NM from the airport by pressing
the GPS APPROACH switch; however, this will not change the
CDI scale until the airplane reaches the 30 NM point. The
approach ARM mode can also be disarmed by pressing the
GPS APPROACH switch.
5. ACTIVE (ACTV) ANNUNCIATOR LIGHT - ACTV annunciator
will illuminate when the KLN 94 GPS system automatically
engages the approach ACTV mode (the ACTV mode can only
be engaged by the KLN 94 GPS system which is automatic).
To cancel the approach ACTV mode, press the GPS
APPROACH switch; this will change the mode to the approach
ARM mode and illuminate the ARM annunciator.
I
S19-8
Figure 1. GPS Annunciator/Switch
(Serials T20608173 thru T20608259) (Sheet 2 of 3)
Revision 4
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT19-FMAPPROVED
6. NAV/GPS SWITCH - Toggles from Nav 1 to GPS and vice
versa to control the type of navigation data to be displayed on
the Course Deviation Indicator (CDI). The No. 1 CDI Omni
Bearing Selector (OBS) provides analog course input to the
KLN 94 in OBS mode when the NAV/GPS switch/annunciator
is in GPS. When the NAV/GPS switch annunciation is in
NAV, GPS course selection in OBS mode is digital through
the use of the controls and display at the KLN 94.
I
NOTE
• Manual CDI course centering in OBS mode using
the control knob can be difficult, especially at long
distances.
Centering the Course Deviation
Indicator (CDI) needle can best be accomplished
by pressing the Direct-To button and then manually
setting the No. 1 CDI course to the course value
prescribed in the KLN 94 displayed message.
I
• The Directional Indicator heading (HDG) bug must
also be set to provide proper course datum to the
autopilot if coupled to the KLN 94 in LEG or OBS.
(When the optional HSI is installed, the HSI course
pointer provides course datum to the autopilot.)
I
7. NAVIGATION SOURCE (NAV) ANNUNCIATOR -- The NAV
annunciator will illuminate steady to inform the pilot that NAV
1 information is being displayed on the NAV 1 CDI.
8. NAVIGATION SOURCE (GPS) ANNUNCIATOR - The GPS
annunciator will illuminate steady to inform the pilot that GPS
information is being displayed on the NAV 1 CDI.
I
Figure 1. GPS Annunciator/Switch
(Serials T20608173 thru T20608259) (Sheet 3 of 3)
Revision 4
S19-9
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19- FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
4
HSI
2
----L-NAV
NAV
GPS
GPS
3
1. HSI ANNUNCIATOR LIGHT - This label is present when the
optional HSI is installed. The HSI course pointer provides
course datum to the autopilot.
2. NAVIGATION SOURCE (NAV) ANNUNCIATOR - The NAV
annunciator will illuminate steady to inform the pilot that NAV
1 information is being displayed on the NAV 1 CDI.
3. NAVIGATION SOURCE (GPS) ANNUNCIATOR - The GPS
annunciator will illuminate steady to inform the pilot that GPS
information is being displayed on the NAV 1 CDI.
4. NAV/GPS SWITCH - Toggles from Nav 1 to GPS and vice
versa to control the type of navigation data to be displayed on
the CDI (Course Deviation Indicator). The No. 1 CDI Omni
Bearing Selector (OBS) provides analog course input to the
KLN 94 in OBS mode when the NA V/GPS switch/annunciator
is in GPS. When the NAV/GPS switch annunciation is in
NAV, GPS course selection in OBS mode is digital through
the use of the controls and display at the KLN 94.
I
S19-10
Figure 2. GPS Annunciator/Switch
(Serials T20608260 and On) (Sheet 1 of 2)
Revision 4
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19- FAA APPROVED
NOTE
• Manual CDI course centering in OBS mode using
the control knob can be difficult, especially at long
distances.
Centering the Course Deviation
Indicator (CDI) needle can best be accomplished
by pressing the Direct-To button and then manually
setting the No. 1 CDI course to the course value
prescribed in the KLN 94 displayed message.
I
• The Directional Indicator heading (HOG) bug must
also be set to provide proper course datum to the
autopilot if coupled to the KLN 94 in LEG or OBS.
(When the optional HSI is installed, the HSI course
pointer provides course datum to the autopilot.)
I
Figure 2. GPS Annunciator/Switch
(Serials T20608260 and On) (Sheet 2 of 2)
Revision 4
I
S 19-11
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
I
1. The KLN 94 GPS Pilot's Guide, P/N 006-18207-0000, dated
September 2000 (or later applicable revision) must be
available to the flight crew whenever IFR GPS navigation is
used. The Operational Revision Status (ORS) of the Pilot's
Guide must match the ORS level annunciated on the Self-Test
page.
2. Navigation is prohibited within 60 nautical miles of the North
and South Poles (i.e., at greater than 89° north and south
latitude).
3. IFR Navigation is restricted as follows:
a. The system must utilize ORS level 01
approved revision.
or later FAA
b. The data on the Self-Test page must be verified prior to
use.
I
c. IFR enroute and tenninal navigation is prohibited unless
the pilot verifies the currency of the database or verifies
each selected waypoint for accuracy by reference to
current approved data.
d. Instrument approaches must be accomplished in
accordance with approved instrument approach procedures
that are retrieved from the KLN 94 database. The KLN 94
aeronautical database must incorporate the current update
cycle.
1) The KLN 94 Quick Reference, P/N 006-18228-0000,
Revision 1, dated August 2000 (or later applicable
revision) must be available to the flight crew during
instrument approach operations.
2) Instrument approaches must be conducted in the
approach mode and RAIM must be available at the Final
Approach Fix.
S19-12
Revision 4
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
NOTE
Honeywell's Preflight, Version 2.0 or later computer
based prediction program may be used for the RAIM
prediction. Alternate methods should be submitted
for approval in accordance with Advisory Circular AC
90-96.
I
g. The airplane must have other approved navigation equipment
appropriate to the route of flight installed and operational.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
There are no changes to the basic airplane emergency
procedures when the KLN 94 GPS is installed.
1. If the KLN 94 GPS information is not available or Invalid,
utilize remaining operational navigation equipment as
required.
2. If a "RAIM NOT AVAILABLE" message is displayed while
conducting an instrument approach, terminate the approach.
Execute a missed approach if required.
3. If a "RAIM NOT AVAILABLE" message is displayed in the en
route or terminal phase of flight, continue to navigate using the
KLN 94 or revert to an alternate means of navigation
appropriate to the route and phase of flight. When continuing
to use the KLN 94 for navigation, position must be verified
every 15 minutes (or as required by applicable country's
operating rules) using another IFR approved navigation
system.
4. Refer to the KLN 94 Pilot's Guide, Appendices B and C, for
appropriate pilot actions to be accomplished in response to
annunciated messages.
S19-14
Revision4
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19 - FAA APPROVED
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
-_
OPERATION
Normal operating procedures are outlined in the KLN 94 GPS
Pilot's Guide, P/N 006-18207-0000, dated September 2000 (or later
applicable revision). A KLN 94 Quick Reference, PIN 006-182280000, dated August 2000 (or later applicable revision) containing an
approach sequence, operating tips and approach related messages
is intended as well for cockpit use by the pilot familiar with KLN 94
operations when conducting instrument approaches.
AUTOPILOT COUPLED OPERATION
whenl
The KLN 94 may be coupled to the KAP 140 autopilot
engaged In NAV mode by selecting GPS on the NAV/GPS switch.
Manual selection of the desired course on the NO. 1 OBS or HSI
course pointer is required to provide course datum to the KAP 140
autopilot. (Frequent course datum changes may be necessary,
such as in the case of flying a DME arc.) The autopilot approach
mode (APR) should be used when conducting a coupled GPS
approach.
NOTE
NAV or APR coupled DME arc intercepts can result
in excessive overshoots (aggravated by high ground
speeds and/or intercepts from inside the arc).
-
At T206H serial number T20608404 and On, Roll Steering
functionality enables the GPS navigation computer to control the
autopilot and automatically perform course changes (turns) and
intercept the course to the next active waypoint (when GPS is
selected as the autopilot navigation source). The GPS navigation
computer uses ground speed, track and turn rate data to calculate
the required bank angle for waypoint course changes. The GPS
Roll Steering output will command the autopilot to tum and
intercept the course to the new active waypoint without directly
overflying the immediate waypoint (except designated flyover
waypoints). Distance from the waypoint for the GPS to initiate the
turn will vary with ground speed, etc., but will usually be within one
nautical mile of the waypolnt. Sequencing to the next waypoint will
occur approximately at the midpoint of the turn (transition segment).
Revision 4
S19-151
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Roll Steering is the default operating mode for the autoflight system
when all of the following conditions are met:
1. The autopilot is engaged in NAV or APR mode.
2. GPS is selected as the autopilot navigation source.
3. The GPS navigation computer is executing an active flight
plan.
4. The GPS is operating in LEG mode.
When Roll Steering is in operation, adjusting or change in the
position of the heading bug or the course pointer will have no effect
on heading or course. It is recommended that both the heading bug
and the course pointer always be set to the current course to
enhance situational awareness, especially in the event of
unexpected autoflight equipment failure. GPS signal loss requires
that the pilot immediately select and alternate autopilot navigation
source. If autopilot function is lost, the pilot is required to resume
manual control of the airplane. Keeping the heading bug and
course pointer set to the present course makes immediate recovery
easier.
Roll Steering will not function when the GPS is in OBS mode,
when the autopilot is in HOG or ROL mode or when the autopilot Is
in NAV mode with NAV selected as the autopilot navigation source.
APPROACH MODE SEQUENCING AND RAIM PREDICTION
A WARNING
I
1s19-1s
FAMILIARITY WITH THE ENROUTE OPERATION
OF THE KLN 94 DOES NOT CONSTITUTE
PROFICIENCY IN APPROACH OPERATIONS. DO
NOT ATTEMPT APPROACH OPERATIONS IN IMC
(INSTRUMENT METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS)
PRIOR TO ATTAINING PROFICIENCY IN THE
USE OF THE KLN 94.
Revision 4
..___.
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19 - FAA APPROVED
NOTE
The special use airspace alert will automatically be
disabled prior to flying an instrument approach to
reduce the potential for message congestion.
Roll Steering will operate on instrument approach
procedures selected from a current GPS aeronautical
database only when:
• The autopilot is engaged in either NAV or APR
mode
AND
• GPS is selected as the autopilot NAV input.
Ensure that the appropriate GPS mode (LEG or
OBS) is selected during each portion of the
approach procedure.
1. Prior to arrival, select a STAR if appropriate from the APT 7
page. Select an approach and an initial approach fix (IAF)
from the APT 8 page. The most efficient means of getting to
these pages is initiated by pressing the PROC (PROCEDURE)
button on the KLN 94.
a. Press PROC button.
b. Select Approach, Arrival or Departure.
c. Select the airport from the list or enter the desired airport
identifier.
d. The APT 7 or APT 8 page will be displayed as appropriate.
NOTE
To delete or replace a DP, STAR or approach, select
FPL O page. Place the cursor over the name of the
procedure, press ENT to change it, or CLR then ENT
to delete it.
2. En route, check for RAIM availability at the destination airport
ETA on the 0TH 3 page.
NOTE
RAIM must be available at the FAF in order to fly an
instrument approach. Be prepared to terminate the
approach upon loss of RAIM.
Revision 4
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
3. At or within 30 nm from the airport
a. Verify automatic annunciation of APRARM.
b. Note automatic CDI needle scaling change from ±5.0 nm
to ± 1. 0 nm over the next 30 seconds.
c. Update the KLN 94 altimeter baro setting as required.
d. Internally the KLN 94 will transition from en route to
terminal integrity monitoring.
4. Select NAV 4 page to fly the approach procedure.
a. If receiving radar vectors, or need to fly a procedure turn or
holding pattern, fly in OBS until inbound to the FAF.
NOTE
OBS navigation is TO-FROM (like a VOR) without
waypoint sequencing.
b. If receiving radar vectors, choose VECTORS as the IAF,
activate vectors when the first vector for the approach is
received and leave the unit in LEG mode.
c. NoPT routes including DME arc's are flown in LEG. LEG
is mandatory from the FAF to the MAP.
NOTE
NAV or APR coupled DME arc intercepts can result
in excessive overshoots (aggravated by high ground
speeds and/or intercepts from ~
the arc).
AwARNING
FLYING FINAL OUTBOUND FROM AN OFFAIRPORT
VORTAC
ON
AN
OVERLAY
APPROACH; BEWARE OF THE DME DISTANCE
INCREASING ON FINAL APPROACH, AND THE
GPS DISTANCE-TO-WAYPOINT DECREASING,
AND NOT MATCHING THE NUMBERS ON THE
APPROACH PLATE.
1s19-18
Revision 4
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT19-FAAAPPROVED
3) APR ACTV mode must be annunciated at the Final
Approach Fix.
4) Accomplishment of ILS, LOC, LOC-BC, LDA, SDF, and
MLS approaches are not authorized.
5) When an alternate airport is required by the applicable
operating rules, it must be served by an approach based
on other than GPS or Loran-C navigation.
6) The KLN 94 can only be used for approach guidance if
the reference coordinate datum system for the
instrument approach is WGS-84 or NAD-83.
(All
approaches in the KLN 94 database use the WGS-84 or
the NAD-83 geodetic datum.)
e. For BRNAV operations in the European region:
1) With 23 (24 if the altitude input to the KLN 94 is not
available) or more satellites projected to be operational
for the flight, the airplane can depart without furtherl
action.
2) With 22 (23 if the altitude input to the KLN 94 is not
available) or fewer satellites projected to be operatioflal
for the flight, the availability of the GPS integrity (RAIM)
should be confirmed for the intended flight (route and
time).
This should be obtained from a prediction
program run outside of the airplane. The predictionl
program must comply with the criteria of Appendix 1 of
AC 90-96. In the event of a predicted continuous loss of
RAIM of more than 5 minutes for any part of the
intended flight, the flight should be delayed, cancelled,
or rerouted on a track where RAIM requirements can be
met.
f. If a "RAIM NOT AVAILABLE" message is displayed in the
enroute or terminal phase of flight, continue to navigate
using the KLN 94 or revert to an alternate means of
navigation appropriate to the route and phase of flight.
When continuing to use the KLN 94 for navigation, position
must be verified every 15 minutes (or as required by
applicable country's operating rules) using another IFR
approved navigation system.
Revision 4
S19-13
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT19-FMAPPROVED
5. At or before 2 nm from the FAF inbound:
a. Select the FAF as the active waypoint, if not accomplished
already.
b. Select LEG operation.
6. Approaching the FAF inbound (within 2 nm):
a. Verify APR ACTV.
b. Note automatic CDI needle scaling change from ±1.0 nm
to ±0.3 nm over the 2 nm inbound to the FAF.
c. Internally the KLN 94 will transition from terminal to
approach integrity monitoring.
7. Crossing the FAF and APR ACTV is not annunciated:
a. Do not descend.
b. Execute the missed approach.
8. Missed Approach :
a. Climb.
b. Navigate to the MAP (in APR ARM if APR ACTV is not
available).
NOTE
There is no automatic LEG sequencing at the MAP.
c. After climbing in accordance with the published missed
approach procedure, press the Direct To button, verify or
change the desired holding fix and press ENT.
Revision 4
S19-191
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
GENERAL NOTES
• The aeronautical database must be up to date for instrument
approach operation.
• Only~ approach can be in the flight plan at a time.
• Checking RAIM prediction for your approach while enroute using
A self check occurs
the AUX 3 page is recommended.
automatically within 2 nm of the FAF. APR ACTV is inhibited
without RAIM.
• Data cannot be altered, added to or deleted from the approach
procedures contained in the database. (DME arc intercepts may
be relocated along the arc through the NAV 4 or the FPL 0
pages.)
• Some approach waypoints do not appear on the approach
plates (including in some instances the FAF).
• Waypoint suffixes in the flight plan:
i- IAF
f-- FAF
m-- MAP
h - missed approach holding fix.
• The DME arc IAF (arc intercept waypoint) will be on your present
position radial off the arc VOR when you load the IAF into the
flight plan, or the beginning of the arc if currently on a radial
beyond the arc limit.
To adjust the arc intercept to be
compatible with a current radar vector, bring up the arc IAF
waypoint in the NAV 4 page scanning field or under the cursor
on the FPL O page, press CLR, then ENT. Fly the arc in LEG.
Adjust the heading bug (if autopilot coupled) and CDI course with
reference to the desired track value on the NAV 4 page (it will
flash to remind you). Left/right CDI needle information is relative
to the arc. Displayed distance is not along the arc but direct to
the active waypoint. (The DME arc radial is also displayed in the
lower right corner of the NAV 4 page.)
1s19-20
Revision 4
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 19- FAA APPROVED
• The DME arc IAF identifier may be unfamiliar. Example: D098G
where 098 stands for the 098° radial off the referenced VOR,
and G is the seventh letter in the alphabet indicating a 7 DME
arc.
• APRARM to APR ACTV is automatic provided that:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
You are in APRARM (normally automatic).
You are in LEG mode.
The FAF is the active waypoint.
Within 2 nm of the FAF.
Outside of the FAF.
Inbound to the FAF.
RAIM is available.
• Direct-To operation between the FAF and MAP cancels APR
ACTV. Fly the missed approach in APRARM.
• Flagged navigation inside the FAF may automatically bring up
the message page stating:
PRESS PROC BUTTON NOW FOR NAVIGATION
Pressing the PROC button will usually restore navigation (not
guaranteed) by changing from APR ACTV to APR ARM. Fly the
missed approach.
• The instrument approach using the KLN 94 may be essentially
automatic starting 30 nm out (with a manual baro setting update)
or it may require judicious selection of the OBS and LEG modes.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when this avionics
equipment is installed.
However, installation of an externallymounted antenna or related external antennas, will result in a minor
reduction in cruise performance.
Revision 4
S19-21/S19-221
~
Cessna
A Te1'1l'<>n Company
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608260 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 20
BENDIX/KING KMA 28
AUDIO SELECTOR PANEL
I=~···------
Th Is supplement must be Inserted Into section 9 of Ille Pilots Operating
Handhool< and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual.
FAA APPROVAL
, ) Member of GAMA
COPYRIGHT ~ 200Q
30 December 2000
CE&StlA All<CR.6FT COMPNlY
WICHITA. IIA~. USA
T206HP!iU~20-00
$20-1
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9-SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 20 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT 20
BENDIX/KING KMA 28 AUDIO SELECTOR PANEL
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
Revision Level
Date of Issue
0 (Original)
Dec.30,2000
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
PAGE
DATE
Title (S20-1 )
S20-2
S20-3
S20-4
S20-5
S20-6
PAGE
Dec30/00
Dec30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
S20-7
S20-8
S20-9
S20-10
S20-11
S20-12
DATE
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Number
S20-2
Title
Airplane
Unit
Effectivity
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
Dec 30/00
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 20 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
BENDIX/KING KMA 28 AUDIO SELECTOR PANEL
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The Bendix/King KMA 28 Audio Selector Panel is a combination
audio selector panel, cabin intercom, audio amplifier and marker
beacon receiver. The audio amplifier powers the cockpit overhead
speaker when selected.
Receiver audio is selected using ten back-lit pushbutton
switches. Selected receivers can be identified by the illuminated
green LED on the appropriate switch pushbutton.
The rotary
microphone selector switch automatically supplies the audio for the
transceiver selected; The Com 1 and Com 2 switches permit the
user to monitor or "guard" the audio from the other transceiver. All
operating controls are shown and described in Figure 1.
An unamplified and unswitched stereo audio input is provided for
an entertainment audio source (Walkman or similar Portable
Electronic Device (PED)). The Entertainment audio input is located
on the lower half of the cockpit center pedestal; the 3.5 mm stereo
jack is labeled "AUX AUDIO IN". The KMA 28 includes the Soft
Mute feature that lowers the audio level of the entertainment signal
whenever radio or intercom audio is present. Refer to 14 CFR Part
91.21 and Advisory Circular No. 91.21-1() "Use of Portable
Electronic Devices Aboard Aircraft" for further information and
requirements regarding the use of portable electronic devices in
aircraft.
The cabin intercom uses the lntellivoxrM automatic squelch circuit
to minimize non-voice signals. The intercom audio level is set using
the front-mounted intercom volume control; audio levels for the
receivers and entertainment are controlled at the source.
Dec 30/00
S20-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 20 - FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
(
NOTE
In this stereo installation, all headset locations are wired in
parallel.
If a monaural headset is plugged in at any
location, one intercom channel will be shorted. Although no
damage to the intercom will result, all stereo headset users
will lose one audio channel. The monaural headset will
perform normally.
A crystal-controlled superheterodyne marker beacon receiver
with 3-light presentation is incorporated within the unit. Dimming
circuitry for the marker beacon lamps automatically adjusts
brightness appropriate to the cockpit ambient light level. HI and LO
sensitivity and lamp test/receiver audio mute (T/M) functions are
also provided.
Light dimming for the audio control panel is manually controlled
by the RADIO light rheostat knob.
MARKER FACILITIES
MARKER
IDENTIFYING TONE
LIGHT*
Inner,
Airway &
Fan
Continuous 6 dots/sec (3000 Hz)
White
Middle
Alternate dots and dashes (1300 Hz)
Amber
Outer
2 dashes/sec (400 Hz)
Blue
*When the identifying tone is keyed, the
respective indicating light will blink
accordingly.
S20-4
Dec 30/00
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 20- FAA APPROVED
3
2
11
10
9
8
4
7
6
5
1. MARKER BEACON ANNUNCIATOR LIGHTS - The three-light marker
beacon receiver built into the KMA 28 gives a visual and aural signal
when the ship's antenna passes over a 75 MHz beacon. The blue,
amber, and white lights on the faceplate, as well as the audio tones,
identify the beacon type.
OUTER [OJ -- Light illuminates blue to indicate passage of outer marker
beacon.
MIDDLE [M] - Light illuminates amber to indicate passage of middle
marker beacon.
INNER, AIRWAY and FAN [I] - Light illuminates white to indicate
passage of ILS inner, airway or fan marker beacons.
2. MARKER BEACON SENSITIVITY & TEST/MUTE SELECT SWITCH -The three-position switch is used to set the receiver sensitivity and to
test the annunciator lamps.
When this switch is on "HI" (upper)
position, the high sensitivity is selected which permits you to hear the
outer marker tone about a mile out. At this point you may select the
"LO" (middle) position to give you a more accurate location of the
Marker. When used only for approach markers, many pilots choose to
leave the switch in the LO sensitivity position. The "T/M" (bottom)
position is a momentary switch that will illuminate all three lamps
simultaneously to assure they are in working order. This switch also
has a Marker Beacon "mute" function. Pushing the switch to the TIM
position while receiving a marker beacon signal will cause the audio to
be temporarily silenced. No action is required to restore the audio in
time for the next beacon.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KMA 28 Audio Selector Panel (Sheet 1 of 5)
Dec 30/00
S20-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 20 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
3. RECEIVE AUDIO SELECT BUTTONS - Push button audio selection is
available for two Communications receivers ("COM 1", "COM 2"), two
Navigation receivers ("NAV 1" and "NAV 2"), the internal Marker
Beacon receiver ("MKR"), one DME, one ADF, one additional auxiliary
receiver ("AUX") and a speaker amplifier ("SPR"). The "AUX" position
could be used, for example, for a second DME or ADF. When a
receiver's audio is selected, the green annunciator illuminates at the
side of the button. Push the button again to deselect the receiver's
audio. These buttons are "latched" type switches. When one of these
buttons is pressed, it will stay in the "in" position until the button is
pressed again and it will be put in the "out" position and removes that
receiver from the audio. To provide additional feedback for button
operation, activate the key "click" by pushing and holding both COM 1
and COM 2 receiver buttons for five seconds, and release. Repeat to
defeat the click.
4. MICROPHONE SELECTOR SWITCH (MIC) -- Used to select the
desired transmitter for the cockpit microphones. The "COM 1", "COM
2", and "COM 3" positions are for transmitting on the Com 1, Com 2,
and Com 3 communications transceivers, respectively. When the mic
selector switch is in the COM 1 position, both pilot and copilot will be
connected to the COM 1 transceiver. Only the person who presses
their Push-to-Talk (PTT) switch, will be heard over the aircraft radio.
Turning the rotary switch to the COM 2 position will place pilot and
copilot on COM 2. The KMA 28 gives priority to the pilot's PTT. If the
copilot is transmitting, and the pilot presses his PTT, the pilot's
microphone will be heard over the selected COM transmitter. Turning
the mic selector counterclockwise to COM 3 places both the pilot and
copilot on COM 3. Com 3 receiver audio is automatically placed in the
headset (and speaker if selected). COM 1 and/or COM 2 receiver
audio can be selected to monitor those transceivers. Audio from the
selected transceiver is automatically heard in the headsets. This
function can be checked by switching from COM 1 to COM 2 and
watching the selected audio light on the selector change from COM 1
to COM 2. This ensures the pilot will always hear the audio from the
transceiver he is transmitting on. When transmitting, the COM 1 or
COM 2 LED audio selector will blink as a further indication of the
selected transmitter. When switching the mic selector switch from
COM 1 to COM 2, if the COM 1 audio has been selected, COM 1 audio
will continue to be heard. When switching from COM 1 to COM 2 if
COM 1 has NOT been selected, COM 1 audio will be switched off.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KMA 28 Audio Selector Panel (Sheet 2 of 5)
(
S20-6
Dec 30/00
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 20- FAA APPROVED
TELEPHONE MODE (TEL) - The telephone mode is not available on
this installation.
SPLIT MODE (COM 1/2 OR COM 2/1) -- Moving the mic selector switch
to COM 1/2 places the KMA 28 into "split mode". This places the pilot
on Com 1 and the copilot on Com 2. Switching to COM 2/1 will reverse
the "split mode" radio selection. For more information regarding split
mode operations, consult the Bendix/King Silver Crown Plus Avionics
Systems Pilot's Guide, P/N 006-18110-0000.
5. SWAP INDICATOR installation.
The swap function is not available on this
6. TRANSMIT INDICATOR -- This indicator illuminates when either Pushto-Talk (PTT) switch is pressed.
7. SPEAKER SWITCH (SPR) - This switch will place all selected audio on
the cockpit speaker when selected.
8. CREW ICS/MUSIC 1 MUTE BUTTON (ICS) -- The front panel ICS
button controls muting of the entertainment source. Pushing this button
places the ICS in Karaoke (or sing along) mode, which inhibits the soft
mute feature. The soft mute feature assures that the aircraft radio
transmissions will not be missed due to entertainment playing. When
there is radio reception or intercom conversation, the music level is
dropped to background level.
When the radio or intercom traffic
ceases, the level gradually returns to normal. Karaoke allows the
music to continue uninterrupted by intercom or radio traffic when
cockpit workload is appropriate. Pushing the button again will release
the mute inhibit function.
In split mode, the pilot and copilot are isolated from each other on the
intercom, simultaneously using their respective radios. Depressing the
ICS button in split mode will activate VOX intercom between the pilot
and copilot positions. This permits intercommunication when desired
between the crew. Pressing the ICS button again disables the crew
intercom function.
9. PHOTOCELL FOR AUTOMATIC DIMMING OF MARKER BEACON
LIGHTS AND SELECT BUTTON -- The photocell in the faceplate
automatically dims the marker lights as well as the green annunciators
in the Speaker Audio Select Buttons for night operation.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KMA 28 Audio Selector Panel (Sheet 3 of 5)
Dec 30/00
S20-7
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 20 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
1O. INTERCOM MODE SELECT (ISO-ALL-CREW) - A three-position mode
switch that allows the pilot to tailor the intercom function to best meet
the current cockpit situation.
ISO - (Up Position )
The pilot is isolated from the intercom and is
connected only to the aircraft radio system. The pilot will hear the
aircraft radio reception (and sidetone during radio transmissions). The
copilot will hear passenge~s intercom and Entertainment, while
passengers will hear copilot intercom and Entertainment. Neither will
hear aircraft radio receptions or pilot transmissions.
ALL - (Middle Position) All parties will hear the aircraft radio and
intercom.
Crew will hear Entertainment, passengers will hear
Entertainment.
During any radio or intercom communications, the
music volume automatically decreases. The music volume increases
gradually back to the original level after communications have been
completed.
CREW - (Down Position) Pilot and copilot are connected on one
intercom channel and have exclusive access to the aircraft radios.
They may also listen to Entertainment. Passengers can continue to
communicate among themselves without interrupting the crew and also
may listen to Entertainment. Anytime the KMA 28 is in either the COM
1/2 or COM 2/1 split modes, the pilot and copilot intercom is controlled
the
JCS
button.
The
passengers
will
maintain
with
intercommunications, but never hear aircraft radios.
MODE
Isolate
PILOT HEARS
AIC Radios Pilot
Sidetone (during
radio transmission)
COPILOT HEARS
Copilotand passenger intercom
Entertainment
PASSENGER
HEARS
Passenger and Copilot intercom
Entertainment
Entertainment is
Crew
Pilot
Copilot
AIC Radio
Passengers
Entertainment
This mode allows the pilot
to communicate without the
others bothered by the conversalions. Copilot and pas-
sengers can continue to
communicate and listen to
music.
Muted
All
COMMENTS
Copilot
Passengers
Pilot
Pilot
AIC Radio
Passengers
Copilot
A/C Radio
Entertainment
Entertainment
Pilot
Copilot
AI C Rad io
Copilot
Pilot
A/C Radio
Passengers
Entertainment
Entertainment
Entertainment
This mode allows all to hear
radio reception as well as
communicate on the inter-
com. Music and intercom is
muted during intercom and
radio communications.
This mode allows the pilot
and copilot to concentrate
on flying wh ile the passengers can communicate
amongst themselves.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KMA 28 Audio Selector Panel (Sheet 4 of 5)
S20-8
Dec 30/00
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 20 - FAA APPROVED
11.VOLUME CONTROUPOWER SWITCH/EMERGENCY OPERATION
The KMA 28 unit is turned on and off by pushing the volume
KNOB knob. In the OFF or EMG (Emergency) position, the pilot is connected
directly to Com 1. This allows communication capability regardless of
unit condition. Any time power is removed or turned off, the audio
selector will be placed in the emergency mode. The power switch also
controls the audio selector panel functions, intercom, and marker
beacon receiver. Unless the mic selector is in Com 3 mode, at least
one of the selected audio LED's will be on (Com 1 or Com 2). Turn
the outer area of the knob to adjust the loudness of the intercom for
the pilot and copilot only. It has no effect on selected radio levels,
music input levels or passenger's volume level. Adjust the radios and
intercom volume for a comfortable listening level for the pilot.
Passenger volume can be adjusted at the headset. All passenger
headsets are connected in parallel. Therefore, if a monaural headset
is plugged into a stereo KMA 28 installation, one channel will be
shorted. Although no damage to the unit will occur, all passengers will
lose one channel.
NOTE
During KMA 28 operation in the OFF or EMG position, the
audio is disabled preventing installed system alerts
(autopilot disconnect tone) from being heard. The marker
beacon receiver audio and annunciator lights will be
inoperative.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KMA 28 Audio Selector Panel (Sheet 5 of 5)
Dec 30/00
S20-9
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 20 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
1. PUSH OFF/EMG
operations.
operation
is
prohibited
during
normal
2. Use of the Entertainment audio input (and PED) is prohibited
during takeoff and landing.
3. Use of the Entertainment audio input (and PED) is prohibited
under IFR unless the operator of the aircraft has determined
that the use of the 12 VDC power supply and the connected
portable electronic device(s) will not cause interference with
the navigation or communication system of the airplane.
NOTE
During KMA 28 operation in the OFF or EMG position, the
audio is disabled preventing installed system alerts
(autopilot disconnect tone) from being heard. The marker
beacon receiver audio and annunciator lights will be
inoperative.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
In the event of a failure of the KMA 28, as evidenced by the
inability to transmit in COM 1, 2 or 3.
1. Volume Control/Power Switch/Emergency Operation Knob -Push OFF.
NOTE
This action bypasses the KMA 28 and connects the pilot's
mic/headset directly to COM 1.
S20-10
Dec 30/00
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 20 - FAA APPROVED
I\
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
AUDIO CONTROL SYSTEM OPERATION:
1. MIC Selector Switch - Turn to desired transmitter.
2. SPEAKER and Audio Select Button(s) -- SELECT desired
receiver(s).
NOTES
Rotation of the MIC selector switch selects the Com audio
automatically.
MARKER BEACON RECEIVER OPERATION:
1. TEST Position -- HOLD toggle down momentarily to verify all
lights are operational.
2. SENS Selections -- Select HI sensitivity for airway flying or LO
for ILS/LOC approaches.
The Entertainment audio input ("AUX AUDIO IN") is unswitched,
so there is no means of deselecting the entertainment source except
by unplugging the Audio Input connector. In the event of failure of
the "Soft Mute" function or during periods of high pilot workload
and/or heavy radio traffic, it may be wise to disable the
Entertainment audio to eliminate a source of distraction for the flight
crew.
NOTE
Use caution with audio cables in the cabin to avoid
entangling occupants or cabin furnishings and to prevent
damage to cables.
Dec 30/00
S20-11
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 20 - FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
NOTE
Disconnect the audio cable from the Entertainment audio
input jack whenever the PED is not in use.
NOTE
Passenger briefing should specify that Entertainment audio
input (and PED) use is permitted only during the enroute
phase of flight.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when this
avionic equipment is installed. However, the installation of an
externally mounted antenna or related external antennas, will result
in a minor reduction in cruise performance.
·
S20-12
Dec 30/00
- 21 -
KT 73 XPDR system SUPPLEMENT
Cessna 206 series
r.~.AlS
'.:~I.\,
POH / AFM / OM
Supplement
BendixKing KT 73 Transponder
(Elementary Surveillance only}
Aircraft model:
C..i:..~~ I\ 1 2..CC.
Aircraft Serial No.
T2.0C. 05 \ l-L
Regislration No.:
0\::..-1--\C.....\'
This supplement must be attached lo the approved POH / AFM / OM when the optional KT 73
syslem is installed The information contained in lhis document supplements or supersedes the
basic manual only in those areas listed. For limilations, procedures, performance, and loading
information not contained in this supplement, consult the basic POH / AFM / OM .
This Flight Manual Supplement is EASA approved under the Approval No.
10051896, dated 14 January 2015
January, 2015
AC253-2501
1/10
KT 73 XPDR system SUPPLEMENT
Cessna 206 series
Log of Revisioos
Revision
No.
Pages Affected
Descriplion
Date
Approved
(
(
2110
AC253-2501
Ja111.1ary, 2015
KT 73 XPOR system SUPPLEMENi
- 2 1 ..
J
Cessna 206 series
SECTION 1
General
The KT 73 Mode S Transponder is a panel mounted transponder that fulfills the
role of the airborne beacon eguipment according to the requirements of the Air
Traffic Radar Beacon System (ATCRBS). Its functionality includes replying lo
ATCRBS Mode A and C, lntermode and Mode S interrogations as well as handling
Comm A and B Mode $ Data Link protocols. The basic surveillance capability of the
KT 73 satisfies the European Mode S mandate. KT 73 has ETSO approval
No.EASA.210.063.
The KT 73 also provides Mode '' C" or altitude reporting information. When the
KT 73 is operated In the "ALT" Mode and used in conjunction with an encoding
allirneter, the flight level (pressure altitude) is displayed in addition to the 4096
code, and the altitude information is transmitted to the ground in response to Mode
•c• interrogations.
The Mode S function of the KT 73 will allow the ground station lo individually
select the aircraft by its Aircraft Address assigned to the aircraft by the Certification
Aircraft Authority.
f
The installed transponder system is able to respond to interrogations in Modes
A, C and Sand is fully compliant with the requirements of CS ACNS.D.ELS.
Encodflg Altimoter
Almude Wind~"
ldonl
Wlridow
/
Fan
ladicotion
Fu 11( 1io1 1
Se-lec1or
Kaob
4 ATCRBS CO<l•
~1-clor Knob$
Figure 1 - KT 73
SECTION 2
Limitations
KT 73 transponder operates in ELS (Elementary Surveillance) only.
January, 2015
AC253-2501
3/10
KT 73 XPDR system SUPPLEMENT
Cessna 206 series
l ~ g_sj
SECTION 3
Emergency Procedures
Special A mode codes for air emergencies:
(1) Special A mode codes, which depend on the type of incident, are stipulated for
certain air emergencies:
7500 Hijacking
•
7600 Loss of communications
•
7700 Emergency on t>oard which constitutes an immediate danger to
the aircraft
(2) The code evaluation devices of the radar systems automatically alarm the
controllers at the radar screens immediately if one of the se special codes is
received.
(
(
4/10
AC253-2501
Januruy, 2015
KT 13 XPDRsystem SUPPLEMENT
Cessna 206 series
- 2 1-
SECTION 4
Normal Procedures
Switching on the unit (pre-flight check)
{1) Check that the circuil breaker is set and switch on the aircraft power supply.
CAUTION: Do not switch on the transponder before the aircraft engines are
started. Switch off the transponder before the engines are shut down.
(2) Using Function Selector Knob, switch the transponder from OFF to SBY.
The rollowing Circuit Breaker is associated with the XPDR system
CJD NAME
XPDR
AMPS
5
LOCATION
Main C/8 anel
BUS
+2s voe
Function Serector Knob
(
The Function Selector Knob on the right side of the KT 73 enables you to
choose from among the following operating modes:
OFF - The unit is not receiving power. When the unit is turned to another mode,
it will reply or squitter within two seconds, according to the selected mode.
FLT ID (FLIGHT ID) - The Flight ID should be the aircraft identification
employed in the flight plan. When no flight plan is available, the registration marking
of the aircraft should be used. When the FLT ID mode is selected, the KT 73 is
inhibited from replying to any interrogation, "FLT ID" is annunciated on the display
and the flight ID is displayed. The Flight ID is modified by rotating the CRSR knob to
position the cursor L) under the character to be changed then rotating the FLT 1D
knob to select the desired character. Once the CRSR and FLT ID kr1obs have been
idle for 5 seconds or the mode select knob has been turned to the SBY position the
mght ID will be saved.
Figure 2 - FLT ID mode
\
SBY (STANDBY) - In Standby, the unit is energized but is inhibited from
replying to any interrogation. •sey· is shown on the left side of the display and the
ID code is shown on the right.
January, 2015
AC253-2501
5/10
KT 73 XPDR system SUPPLEMENT
Cessna 206 series
~CLS)
1
(
Figure 3 - KT 73 SBY mode
TST (TEST) - Replies are disabled and all display segments are illuminated for
at least four seconds, A series of internal tests is perlonned to check the KT 73's
int~rity, verifying all aircraft specific configuration data and make hardware and
squitter checks. If no faults are detected, "TEST OK" is d isplayed and an audio
message "TEST OK" is annunciated.
Figure 4 - KT 73 TST mode
Should a fault be detected, "SBY" will be displayed on the left and the display on
the right will cycle through all the detected faults. If the faults are associated with
external data, an audio message "CHECK FAULT CODES" will be annunciated.
Faults internal to the KT 73 will annunciate an audio message "TRANSPONDER
TEST FAIL". Internal faults will also cause "FAIL" to be anm.mciated in the lower left
of the display in any mode of operation.
The fault codes are as follows:
F1 YY' - Squitter (Internal)
F2YY· - Internal or External EEPROM (lnlemal)
F3YY• - Hardware (Internal)
F401 -
Mooe S address/Max Airspeea (lntemal)
f5yy• - Gilham or Executive (External)
F6YY· - Interface (External)
•
YY denotes the specific fault.
GND (GROUND) - The KT 73 will inhibit ATCRBS (Air Traffic Control Radar
Beacon System), ATCRBS/Mode $ All Call and Mode S-only All Call replies.
However, the unit will continue to generate Mode S squiller transmissions and reply
to discretely addressed Mode S interrogations. The ID code is shown on the right
side of the display and the letters "GND" are shown on the left side.
6/10
AC253-2501
January, 2015
(
- 2 1- ·
KT 73 XPDR system SUPPLEMENT
Cessna 206 series
0
(
I
CLS I
~
I 2 0 0 I"::;~'
o____
Bb
- - Off G1D
GN ]
GND~'-!''!._T
CRS~
b___FU_t)
____
FLTIO
Q
'EJIOIIIUII
Figure 5- KT 73 GND mode
ON - The KT 73 is able to reply to all valid Mode A, C and S interrogations.
However, the altitude information will not be transmitted. In the ON mode, the
altitude window is left blank and the ID code is shown on the right side of the
display.
klllTSO
~
I
12 0 0
IDT
0
II
::~ta···..
1..
FUID
BIil
0
Off
ALT
I
1/
~
Figure 6 - KT 73 ON mode
(
ALT (ALTITUDE) - The KT 73 replies to all valid Mode A, C and S
interrogations. The ID code is displayed in the right window and altitude information
(in hundreds of feet) is shown on the left. The letters "FL" will be illuminated,
indicating Flight Level. If altitude information is unavailable or invalid, the left portion
of the display will be dashed.
,rnm l
~
Fl
0
Lj
I
I2 0 0
r::lQ""~;
"fLTIDa
,. 0
. "'t) 0 "b
...
,,..,,
FAJL
Off~
0
Figure 7 - KT 73 ALT mode
IDENT BUTTON
Marked IDT, the KT 73's Iden! button is pressed when ATC requests an "ldent"
or "Squawk ldent" from your aircraft. When the ldent button is pressed while in the
GND, ON or ALT modes, "IDT' will be illuminated on the display for approximately
18 seconds. An optional Remote Ident switch may also be installed to perform the
same function.
January, 2015
AC253-2501
7110
KT 73 XPDR system SUPPLEMENT
Cessna 206 series
ID CODE
The ATCRBS Transponder Identification code (squawk code) for the aircraft is
displayed in the /dent Window on the right side of the display. Each of the four
Transponder Code Selector Knobs selects a separate digit of the identification
code.
(
REPLY INDICATOR
When the KT 73 is replying to a valid ground Mode S interrogation, the reply
nomenclature "R" will be illuminated twice per second. When the KT 73 is replying
to a valid ATCRBS or airborne Mode S interrogation, the reply nomenclature "R" will
be illuminated once per second.
Altitude Display
When the ALT mode is selected, the KT 73 displays the current Flight Level,
marked by the letters "FL" and a number in hundreds of feet. This is shown on the
left side of the display. For example, if "FL 071" is displayed, this corresponds to a
reported pressure altitude of 7.100 feet Note that the displayed Flight Level, or
pressure altitude, may not agree with the aircraft's baro-corrected altitude under
non-standard conditions. The Flight Level, or pressure altitude, reported by the KT
73 will be corrected as required by the ATC facility.
(
A fault in the altitude interface or an invalid altitude input to the KT 73 will cause
the display to show a series of dashes when the KT 73 is in the ALT mode.
(
8/10
AC253-2501
January, 2015
KT 73 XPDR system SUPPLEMENT
Cessna 206 series
- 2 1-
VFR
Momentarily pressing the VFR Pushbutton recalls the reprogrammed VFR code,
superseding whatever code was previously entered. If the VFR Pushbutton is
pressed inadvertently, the previous code may be retrieved by pressing the VFR
button and holding it for two seconds.
DISPLAY BRIGHTNESS ADJUSTMENT
The KT 73's display brightness is controlled by an ambient light sensor. In
addition, it has a manual adjustment to allow for matching to the brightness of other
lighted displays that may be in the cockpit. The display is adjusted in the test (TST)
mode.
To manually adjust the display brightness, perform the following operations:
1.
Turn the Function Selector Knob to "TST".
2.
Turn the BRT knob clockwise to increase the display brightness, or
counterclockwise to decrease the display brightness.
The eight carets below the alphanumeric display characters indicate the
brightness setting (relative to the photocell reading). Maximum brightness is
indicated by all eight carets being illuminated. Minimum brightness is indicated by
no carets being illuminated. The factory default setting is represented by four carets
being illuminated. Pressing the IDT button will return the brightness to the default
factory value.
3. Turn the Function Selector Knob from TST to store the display brightness
settings.
NOTE: If power is removed from the KT 73 while still in the test code, the
brightness setting will be lost and the unit will revert to the last known setting.
\
January, 2015
AC253-2501
9/10
KT 73 XPDR system SUPPLEMENT
Cessna 206 series
c1s1
,....__,,,__
(
SECTION 5
Performance
No change
SECTION 6
Weight and Balance/Equipment List
Cancel old item and insert new item listed below into the equipment list:
Item
1. KT 73
a:
(
SECTION 7
Airplane & Systems Description
No change
SECTION 8
Airplane Handling, Service & Maintenance
No change
(
10/10
AC253-2501
January, 2015
'I
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608260 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 21
BENDIX/KING KMD 550
MULTl-FUNCTION DISPLAY
I
=,;_. ______
This supplemeflt mu6t be inserte<I into Section 9 of the Pilol's Operating
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flighl Manual when the KMD 550 MultiFunction Display is installed_
FAA APPROVAL
Dole: Jarn•ry e, 2001
, ) M!!mber of GAMA
COPYRIG~ <> 2000
30 December 2000
CESSW. AIRCRN'T CCMPNIY
WCHITA, KANSAS, USA
T200HPHU8-S21 .00
S21·1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 21 - FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT 21
BENDIX/KING KMD 550 MULTI-FUNCTION DISPLAY
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
Revision Level
Date of Issue
0 (Original)
Dec.30,2000
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
DATE
PAGE
Title (S21-1)
S21-2
S21-3
S21-4
S21-5
PAGE
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
S21-6
S21-7
S21-8
S21-9
S21-10 blank
DATE
Dec
Dec
Dec
Dec
Dec
30/00
30/00
30/00
30/00
30/00
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Number
S21-2
Title
Airplane
Unit
Effectivity
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
Dec 30/00
(
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 21 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
BENDIX/KING KMD 550 MULTl-FUNCTION DISPLAY
SECTION 1
GENERAL
A WARNING
NEVER REMOVE THE DATABASE CARD WHILE
THE UNIT IS SWITCHED ON AND NEVER
ATTEMPT TO SWITCH THE UNIT ON WHEN
THERE IS NO DATABASE CARD INSTALLED.
The KMD 550 is a multi-function display that combines an
internal aeronautical and cartographic database with external GPS
data to display current aircraft position on a 5-inch diagonal screen.
In addition to position, the KMD 550 can display weather avoidance
information when optional sensor equipment is installed. The KMD
550 is powered from the AVIONICS MASTER BUS 1 switch and is
current-protected by the GPS circuit breaker.
The KMD 550 is operated via a joystick, a series of five Power
Keys that are located along the right side of the unit, a series of
Function Select Keys located along the bottom, and an inner and
outer Control Knob. The joystick allows movement of the pointer in
MAP mode and is used to select and change setup fields. The
appropriate key labels for a particular page are configured in
software and displayed alongside the appropriate key. The rotary
brightness control is used for adjusting the brightness of the screen.
Operational guidance for the KMD 550 Multi-function Display is
provided with the Bendix/King KMD 550 Pilot's Guide (supplied with
the airplane). This Pilot's Guide provides a detailed explanation of
each of the display screen pages, with a step-by-step tutorial on
each of them.
Dec 30/00
S21-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 21 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
NOTE
The KMD 550 is designed to be used as a supplemental
navigation system. You should always carefully compare
indications from your KMD 550 unit with the information
available from all other navigation sources including NDB's,
VOR's, DME's, visual sightings, charts, etc. For safety, any
discrepancies observed should be resolved immediately.
j\CAUTION
THIS EQUIPMENT IS NOT A REPLACEMENT FOR
YOUR CHART. IT IS INTENDED AS AN AID TO
NAVIGATION ONLY.
j\WARNING
NEVER USE THE WEATHER DISPLAYED ON
THIS EQUIPMENT AS YOUR SOLE REFERENCE
FOR WEATHER AVOIDANCE.
CHANGING THE DATABASE CARD
To change the data card follow these simple steps:
1. Turn off the KMD 550.
2. Grasp the data card and pull it straight out of it's socket.
3. With the card facing upward, as indicated on its label, insert
the new data card being careful to align the card with the
socket then press the new card firmly into place.
4. Turn the unit on and check for correct operation. If the new
data card contains a newer version of operating software the
unit will update the operating system to this newer version.
Status bars will be displayed during the update process.
S21-4
Dec 30/00
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 21 - FAA APPROVED
10
12
13
9
7
1.BRIGHTNESS CONTROL -- Clockwise rotation will increase
the brightness of the display.
Counter-clockwise rotation
decreases the display brightness.
2. DATABASE CARO - The database card contains the
aeronautical and topographical database for the KMD 550.
Updated database cards are available by subscription every
28 days. The KMD 550 is not an IFR primary-means-ofnavigation system.
Therefore, its use as an advisory
navigation system does not mandate that the database be
current. However, it is strongly recommended from a safety
viewpoint that you continue to keep your database current.
3. DISPLAY - The KMD 550 utilizes a 5" diagonal, color active
mab'ix liquid crystal display.
4. AVAILABLE FUNCTIONS LEGEND - These icons indicate
what functions are available and their current status. The
icons shown depend on what optional sensor equipment is
installed and how it is configured.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KMD 550 Multi-Function Display
(Sheet 1 of 3)
Dec30/00
S21-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 21 - FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
5. ON/OFF CONTROL - Rotating clockwise to the "ON" position
provides power to the KMD 550. Rotating counter-clockwise
to the "OFF" position removes power from the unit.
6. FUNCTION SELECT INDICATORS - When a function key is
pressed, the Function Select Indicator above it will illuminate
to show that this function is presently being displayed.
7. FUNCTION SELECT KEYS -- These keys are used to select
available data sources (as indicated on the key) for display.
Pressing the same key multiple times will sequence through
the available pages associated with that function.
8. CONTROL KNOB - The inner and outer Control Knobs,
located in the lower right of the unit are not functional in this
installation.
9. POWER LABELS - When the Power Label is illuminated on
the right side of the key, that key's function is dedicated to the
function described by the label and that function is active.
The following is a list of the dedicated functions:
MODE -- Pressing this key will sequence through all
available modes associated with the displayed
page.
RNG~ -- Pressing this key will increase the range scale one
level on the displayed page. Range scales on
other pages will not be affected.
RNGv - Pressing this key will decrease the range scale
one level on the displayed page. Range scales on
other pages will not be affected.
VIEW
Pressing this key will sequence through the
available views associated with the displayed
page.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KMD 550 Multi-Function Display
(Sheet 2 of 3)
S21-6
Dec 30/00
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
OVLY -
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 21 - FAA APPROVED
Pressing the Overlay Key allows data from more
than once source to be displayed simultaneously
on the screen. Soft labels will indicate which data
sources are available for overlay.
10. SOFT LABELS - Soft Labels are located to the left of the
Power Keys in the display area. The description indicated in
the label describes the key's present function related to the
displayed page. Whenever a new function is selected, by
pressing a key with a Soft Label, a new display is shown
along with its new key labels.
11. JOYSTICK -- This a pointing device that moves a mouse-like
pointer around the display. It is primarily used for pointing at
items on the map for further information and for measuring
range and bearing to specific points. The joystick is also used
to modify configuration settings on the AUX setup pages.
12. POWER KEYS -- These five keys are used to manipulate the
page being displayed. Their present functionality can be
indicated by the use of Soft Labels on the left side of the key
or Power Labels on the right side of the key.
13. FAULT INDICATOR - The Fault Indicator is located between
the Range buttons. If this small "F" is illuminated, a system
hardware problem exists. This could be caused by the unit
failing a self-test or an improper installation configuration. If
the Fault Indicator appears, cycle the unit power. If the fault
reoccurs, the unit needs to be taken to an authorized service
center to correct the configuration or repair the unit.
NOTE
If the fault indicator is lit, refer to KMD 550 Pilot's Guide for
service instructions.
Figure 1. Bendix/King KMD 550 Multi-Function Display
(Sheet 3 of 3)
Dec 30/00
S21-7
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 21 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
STARTUP DISPLAY
This display will be seen after power-up. The Stormscope logo
will be present if a Stormscope is installed and enabled. The selftest results are also displayed. Pressing the OK soft key will show
the next display. The expiration date of the Jeppesen database
must be acknowledged by again pressing the OK soft key.
POP-UP HELP DISPLAYS
Pop-up status displays are shown if a Function Key or available
Power Key is pressed and held for longer than two seconds. These
can help provide a reference for monitoring the status of selected
functions and overlays.
GPS DATA SOURCES
The KMD 550 accepts GPS data from the KLN 94. The active
flight plan and waypoints are imported directly from the KLN 94.
DISPLAY ICONS
When showing any map screen - airports, navaids, towns,
intersections, user waypoints and many other data classes are
represented by symbols or icons, some of which are user selectable
in the Map Setup Screens. Please refer to Map Setup in the
Getting Started section of the KMD 550 Pilot's Guide for further
details.
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
The KMD 550 Multi-Function Display Pilot's Guide must be
readily available to the flight crew when operating the KMD 550.
S21-8
Dec 30/00
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 21 - FAA APPROVED
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
There is no change to the airplane emergency procedures when
the KMD 550 Multi-Function Display is installed.
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
There is no change to the airplane normal procedures when the
KMD 550 Multi-Function Display is installed.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when the KMD
550 Multi-Function Display is installed.
Dec 30/00
S21-9/(S21-10 blank)
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608260 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 22
12 VOLT CABIN POWER SYSTEM
I
-·"'·
. R£OIS11!ATIONN0 •._ _ _ _ __
This supplement must be Inserted Into SecU011 9 of the PIiot'$ Ope,atiJl!J
Hano:iooot: and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Man~al wnen tne 12 Volt C11bin
Power System is installed.
FAA APPROVAL.
@
COl'YRIGHT e 2000
CESSNA AJRCMFT COMPNI\'
MemberofGAMA
30 December 2000
WICHITA, KANSAS. USA
ll()l,HPHUS-SZ/.-00
S22-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 22 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT 22
12 VOLT CABIN POWER SYSTEM
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
Revision Level
Date of Issue
0 (Original)
Dec. 30/00
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
PAGE
DATE
PAGE
DATE
Title (S22-1)
S22-2
S22-3
S22-4
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
S22-5
S22-6
S22-7
S22-8 blank
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Number
S22-2
Title
Airplane
Unit
Effectivity
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
Dec 30/00
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT22 • FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
12 VOLT CABIN POWER SYSTEM
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The 12 Volt Cabin Power System provides passenger access to
a fixed direct current (DC) voltage for powering portable electronic
devices {PED). The remote power outlet (RPO), labeled "CABIN
PWR 12V', is located on the lower portion of the cockpit center
pedestal (See Figure 1). The RPO conforms to ARING 628 Part 2
requirements for commercial airline in-seat power connectors,
except that the Cabin Power System supplies automotive-type 12
voe, in lieu Of the 15 voe provided by the airlines.
CABIN POWER
12V
Figure 1. 12 Volt Cabin Power System Connector
Dec30/0D
S22-3
SECTION 8 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 22 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
RELEASE
BUTTON
Figure 2. Mating Plug
The mating plug is a plastic 9-pin circular connector with a quick
disconnect push button release (Hypertronics 002PBMRTH-0025 or
equivalent) (See Figure 2). Adapter cable assemblies are available
that feature the ARING 628 plug with a standard automotive
cigarette lighter socket (Radio Shack, Cat. No. 270-1580 or similar).
Most laptop computer manufacturers and a number of accessory
manufacturers (Absolute Battery, Mobility Electronics, USI, Extended
Microdevices, etc.) can provide suitable power cables for these
devices. A light-colored mating plug is preferred for visibility.
Plug Contact As!Jignmtm19
1
2
3
4
Not used
Not used
Not used
Nd und
Not used
Output E!labhio
0 ~ Enable RTN
Oulput P°"'8r (+) - - - , _
Output ~ RTN (-) ___i--TO PED or DC Volliige A4apler
Figure 3. Mating Plug Wiring
S22-4
Dec 30/00
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 22 - FAA APPROVED
Power is supplied to the 12-volt Cabin Power System from a DC
to DC power converter located in the tailcone of the aircraft. The
power converter receives 28 VDC power from the "CABIN
LTS/PWR" circuit breaker located on the electrical switch/circuit
breaker panel. By using two small signal pins located in the Cabin
Power System connector, the power converter will not supply power
to the Cabin Power connector when there is nothing plugged in.
Refer to 14 CFR 91.21 and Advisory Circular No. 91.21-1 () "Use
of Portable Electronic Devices Aboard Aircraft" for further
information and requirements regarding the use of portable
electronic devices in aircraft.
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
The following limitations must be adhered to:
1. The 12 Volt Cabin Power System is not certified for supplying
power to flight-critical communications or navigation devices.
2. Use of the 12 Volt Cabin Power System is prohibited during
takeoff and landing.
3. Use of the 12 Volt Cabin Power System is prohibited under
IFR unless the operator of the aircraft has determined that the
use of the 12 VDC power supply and the connected portable
electronic device(s) will not cause interference with the
navigation or communication systems of the airplane.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
There is no change to the airplane emergency procedures when
the 12 Volt Cabin Power System is installed. The system is
disabled by unplugging the power or adapter cable from the 12 Volt
Cabin Power System connector. In the event of an alternator
failure, load shedding of nonessential auxiliary equipment may be
accomplished by simply unplugging equipment from the connector.
Dec 30/00
S22-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 22 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
The pilot must be familiar with the location of the 12 Volt Cabin
Power System connector and with the operation of locking and
release features common to the connector and power/adapter
cables.
AcAuT10N
USE CAUTION WITH POWER/ADAPTER CABLES
IN THE CABIN TO AVOID ENTANGLING
OCCUPANTS OR CABIN FURNISHINGS AND TO
PREVENT DAMAGE TO CABLES SUPPLYING
LIVE ELECTRIC CURRENT.
1. 12 volt power shall be limited to a maximum of 10 amps. If a
load in excess of this limit is applied to the Cabin Power
System connector the "CABIN LTS/PWR" circuit breaker may
open or the protection circuitry in the DC to DC power
converter may limit the excess power by lowering the supplied
voltage below 12 volts.
2. The 12 volt Cabin Power System may not be used to charge
lithium batteries.
AcAUTION
CHARGING OF LITHIUM BATTERIES MAY CAUSE
THE LITHIUM BATTERIES TO EXPLODE.
NOTE
Take care to observe the manufacturer's power
requirements prior to plugging any device into the 12 volt
Cabin Power System connector.
(
S22-6
Dec 30/00
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 22 - FAA APPROVED
NOTE
During passenger briefing, it must be explained that use of
the PED (portable electronic device) is not permitted during
takeoffs and landings.
NOTE
Disconnect the power/adapter cable from the Cabin Power
System connector whenever the PED (portable electronic
device) is not in use.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when this
equipment is installed.
Dec 30/00
S22-7/(S22-8 blank)
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608260 ANO ON
SUPPLEMENT 23
BFGoodrich
WX-500 Stonnscope®
S~IAL NO.
I
.
REGISTRATION NO.._ _ _ _ __
This supplement roost be lnsel11'!d Into Section 9 of the Pilofs Operating
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Fight Manual when 1he WX-500
SlDrmscopefll is in$ialled.
_____ __
,.,,..,
FAA APPROVAL
,
-----,,.
.,._
__..a.o,,,----
~
_._
0...: Janllal)' 9, 2001
, ) Member of GAMA
COPYRIGHT o 2000
CESSNA~CRAl'T ~ N i t
Vlllci.TA. KANISAS. USA
T:206~~US-S23-00
30 December 2000
S23-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 23 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT 23
BFGoodrich WX-500 Stormscope®
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
Revision Level
Date of Issue
0 (Original)
Dec. 30, 2000
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
PAGE
DATE
Title (S23-1)
S23-2
S23-3
PAGE
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
S23-4
S23-5
S23-6
DATE
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
Dec 30/00
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Number
S23-2
Title
Airplane
Unit
Effectivity
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
Dec 30/00
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 23 - FM APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
BFGoodrich WX-500 Stormscope®
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The BFGoodrich WX-500 Stormscope® Series II Weather
Mapping Sensor is a "black-box" type weather sensor/processor
that uses an external controller/display unit for control input and
output display functions. In this aircraft, the WX-500 is integrated
with the Honeywell KMD 550 Multifunction Display (MFD) for the
control and display of all Stormscope® functions. See the KMD 550
Pilot's Guide for more information regarding operation of the KMD
550 Multifunction Display.
AcAUTION
THE WX-500 STORMSCOPE® IS APPROVED FOR
USE ONLY IN AVOIDING HAZARDOUS WEATHER
(THUNDERSTORMS); USE OF THE WX-500 TO
PENETRATE
HAZARDOUS
WEATHER
IS
PROHIBITED.
The Stormscope® sensor detects electrical discharge (lightning)
activity through a dedicated antenna mounted on the bottom of the
airplane.
The Stormscope® processor continuously acquires
electrical discharge data and performs self-test functions to ensure
that the data presented to the pilot is always current and reliable
when displayed. The system is heading-stabilized, so that the
proper orientation of displayed data relative to the airplane position
during maneuvering is maintained.
The WX-500 Stormscope® maps electrical discharge activity at
ranges up to 200 nautical miles (nm) and displays that activity map
to the flight crew, either centered on the airplane position (360°
view) or ahead of the airplane position through 60° on either side of
the airplane heading (120° view).
Dec 30/00
S23-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 23 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
No dedicated external power control for the WX-500 is provided.
The WX-500 is powered through the AVIONICS MASTER BUS 2
switch and is current-protected by the STRMSCOPE circuit breaker.
At startup, the WX-500 will perform self-tests and provide error
messages, if necessary, through the KMD 550 display. See the
WX-500 User's Guide for recommended actions if an error message
appears.
WX-500 availability is confirmed at startup by the appearance of
the Stormscope® logo at the upper right hand corner of the startup
screen for the KMD 550 display. WX-500 weather data availability
is signaled during operation by the small lightning bolt icon shown
at the lower left hand corner of the KMD 550 display. A yellow
lightning bolt on a light blue background signifies that Stormscope®
data is being displayed. A black lighting bolt on a gray background
indicates that Stormscope® data is not being displayed. A black
lightning bolt on a gray background with a red slash and circle
(international "NO" symbol) indicates that there is a problem with
the WX-500 unit.
The WX-500 System Menu may be accessed by selecting the
AUX Function Key on the KMD 550 and the Smart Key next to the
WX SETUP label. This screen permits the user to select a system
self-test, noise check, strike test or to view and edit system
installation settings. As with most sophisticated electronic devices,
the user should defer changes to the system setup and installation
settings to a qualified and experienced avionics technician.
WX-500 weather data can be displayed exclusively or may be
displayed (overlayed) on the moving map display. Selecting the WX
Function Key on the KMD 550 provides for exclusive display of
Stormscope® weather data. The user may select the desired view
(360° or 120°) by pressing the VIEW Smart Key. The range (25 to
200 nautical miles) may be selected by using the RNG L::... or
RNG v Smart Keys; the 25 nautical mile range ring is displayed
regardless of the range selected. The user may also choose
between Strike or Cell display modes using the MODE Smart Key.
See the WX-500 User's Guide for information regarding Strike and
Cell mode display differences.
S23-4
Dec 30/00
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 23 - FAA APPROVED
To overlay weather data on the Map Mode display of the KMD
550, while in Map Mode, select the OVLY Function Key and then
the Smart Key next to the STORMSCOPE label. Lightning strikes
will be depicted on the Map Mode display as red lightning bolts.
The Stormscope® display mode (Strike or Cell) will be as selected
on the WX display page. View and Range settings will be as set for
the Map Mode page.
NOTE
In evaluating lightning strike data, it may be useful to clear
the accumulated strike points on the display from time to
time by moving the KMD 550 joystick control and then
monitoring the reappearance of strike activity on the cleared
display.
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
The WX-500 Stormscope® is approved only as an aid to
hazardous weather (thunderstorm) avoidance; use for hazardous
weather penetration is prohibited.
The Honeywell Bendix/King® KMD 550 Multi-Function Display
Pilot's Guide must be available to the flight crew when operating the
WX-500 Stormscope®.
The BFGoodrich WX-500 Stormscope® Series II Weather
Mapping Sensor User's Guide must be available to the flight crew
when operating the WX-500 Stormscope®.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
There is no change to the airplane emergency procedures when
the BFGoodrich WX-500 Stormscope® is installed.
Dec 30/00
S23-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 23 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
Static discharge from the static wicks on the tail may cause false
indications of lightning strikes at the 6 o'clock position with the 200
nm range selected.
Refer to the WX-500 User's Guide under "Error Message
Recommended Actions" for discontinuing use of the Stormscope® if
a Stormscope® error message appears.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when the
BFGoodrich WX-500 Stormscope® is installed.
S23-6
Dec 30/00
Pilot"s Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608362 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 24
ASTROTECH MODEL TC-2
CLOCKJOATNOLT INDICATOR
I=-~----
This supplement must be inserted into Section 9 of 1he Pilofs Operating
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual when the Astrotecti
ClockJOATNolt Indicator is installed .
FAA APPROVAL
Date: 31 J--,MY 2002
f)
COPYRIG~T e 2002
Member of GAMA
31 January 2002
CESSNA AIR.CJW'T OO..iPANY
v.lCl-tJTA. l<ANSAS, USA
T206HPHUS-S:U-OO
S24-1
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 24 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT 24
ASTROTECH MODEL TC-2 CLOCK/OATNOLT
INDICATOR
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision.
Revision Level
Date of Issue
0 (Original)
Jan.31,2002
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
PAGE
DATE
PAGE
Title (S24-1 )
S24-2
S24-3
Jan 31/02
Jan 31/02
Jan 31/02
S24-4
S24-5
S24-6
DATE
Jan 31/02
Jan 31/02
Jan 31/02
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Number
S24-2
Title
Airplane
Serial
Effectivity
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
Jan 31/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 24 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
DIGITAL CLOCK/OATNOLT INDICATOR
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The Astrotech Model TC-2 digital clock combines the features of
a clock, outside air temperature gauge (OAT) and voltmeter in a
single unit. The unit is designed for ease of operation with a four
button control system.
The upper button is used to control
sequencing between temperature and voltage. The lower three
buttons control reading and timing functions related to the digital
clock. Temperature and voltage functions are displayed in the
upper portion of the unit's LCD window, and clock/timing functions
are displayed in the lower portion of the unit's LCD window.
The digital display features an internal light (back light) to ensure
good visibility under low cabin lighting conditions and at night. The
intensity of the back light is controlled by the PANEL LT rheostat.
Jan 31/02
S24-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 24 • FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
UPPER LCD
WINDOW
LOWER LCD
WINDOW
Figure 1. Astrotech Model TC-2 Clock/OATNolt Indicator
1. OATNOLT BUTTON - Volts are displayed at power up. When
the button is pressed, the display switches to outside air
temperature in "F. Pressing the button again selects outside air
temperature in •c. Pressing the button a third time selects
voltage.
2. ST/SP (ADV} BUTTON - When the ST/SP (Start/Stop) button is
pressed in the Clock Mode, the date is displayed for 1.5 seconds
and then the display retums to the clock. During the set function
the button is used to advance the oount of the digit currently
being set. When in the Timer Mode, the button alternately starts
and stops the elapsed counter with each push.
3. MODE BUTTON - The MODE button toggles between clock and
timer. Each time the button is pressed the mode changes.
While in the Timer Mode the word 'TIMER" is displayed below
the digits (as shown in Figure 1).
4. RESET (SET) BUTTON - When the RESET button is pressed in
the Timer Mode, it resets the timer to 00:00. In the Clock Mode,
the button initiates the set function for setting the date and time
of day. The set function can be recognized by the Month (left
two) digits flashing . If the set function is not desired the MODE
button may be pressed to exit from the set operation.
S24-4
Jan 31/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 24 - FAA APPROVED
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
There is no change to the airplane limitations when the digital
clock/OAT/volt indicator is installed.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
There is no change to the airplane emergency procedures when
the clock/OAT/volt indicator is installed.
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
OATNOLTMETER OPERATION
The upper LCD window is dedicated to OAT and voltmeter
operations. The voltmeter reading is preselected upon startup and
is indicated by an "E" following the display reading . Pushing the
OATNOLT button will sequence the window from voltage to
Fahrenheit ("F") to Celsius ("C"), and back again to voltage.
CLOCK OPERATIONS
The lower LCD window is dedicated to clock and timing
operations. Pushing the MODE button toggles between clock and
timer. Each time the button is pushed the mode changes. Time of
day is displayed in hours and minutes in the 24-hour format.
Setting procedures are as follows:
While in the Clock Mode, press the SET (RESET) button and the
left two digits will flash; these are the month digits. Press the ADV
(ST/SP) button to change to the current month. Then press the SET
(RESET) button and the right two digits will flash; these are the day
of the month digits. Press the ADV (ST/SP) button to change to the
current day. Then press the SET (RESET) button and both the
month and day will be displayed.
Jan 31/02
$24-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 24 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Press the SET (RESET) button and the left two digits will flash,
these are the hour digits. Press the ADV (ST/SP) button to change
to the current hour. Press the SET (RESET) button and the right
two digits will flash; these are the minute digits. Press the ADV
(ST/SP) button to change to the current minute. Then press the
SET (RESET) button and both the hour and minutes will be
displayed. If the minutes were changed, the clock is stopped and
holding. When the time reference being used to set the clock
reaches the exact minute shown on the display, press the ST/SP
button. The display will show the date and start the clock running.
If the minutes were not changed, the minutes will continue to run
and not need to be restarted.
When operating in the Timer Mode the word "TIMER" is shown
on the display directly below the digits and indicates that the
elapsed time is being displayed. The timer can be reset to 00:00,
started, stopped, or restarted. It counts in minutes and seconds for
the first hour and then counts in hours and minutes to 23:59. The
timer continues to keep elapsed time when the display is in the
clock mode. Pushing the ST/SP (ADV) button alternately starts and
stops the elapsed counter with each push. The RESET (SET)
button when pushed resets the timer to 00:00.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when this
equipment is installed.
S24-6
Jan 31/02
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608362 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 25
BENDIX/KING KX 165A
VHF NAVJCOMM
I=..:...______
This supplement must be inserted Into Section 9 of th& PIiot's O~rating
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual when the VHF NAY/COMM
with Indicator Head is installed.
FAA APPROVAL
f}
COPYRJGHT",ooz
Member of GAMA
31 January 2002
C~~AIRCIVl"TCOt,1PJINY
,IIICHITA, AANSAS. USA
T206HPHUS-S2r,.-OO
S25-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 25 - FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT 25
BENDIX/KING KX 165A VHF NAV/COMM
The following Log of Effective Pages provides the date of issue
for original and revised pages, as well as a listing of all pages in
the Supplement. Pages which are affected by the current
revision will carry the date of that revision
Revision Level Date of Issue
O (Original)
Jan. 31,2002
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
PAGE
DATE
PAGE
DATE
Title (S1-1)
S1-2
S1-3
S1-4
S1-5
S1-6
S1-7
Jan
Jan
Jan
Jan
Jan
Jan
Jan
S1-8
S1-9
S1-10
S1-11
S1-12
S1-13
S1-14(blank)
Jan 31/02
Jan 31/02
Jan 31/02
Jan 31/02
Jan 31/02
Jan 31/02
Jan 31/02
31/02
31/02
31/02
31/02
31/02
31/02
31/02
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to
the operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into
this supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins
that are currently active.
Number
S25-2
Title
Airplane
Serial
Effectivity
Revision
Incorporation
Incorporated
In Airplane
Jan 31/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 25 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
BENDIX/KING KX 165A VHF NAV/COMM
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The KX 165A VHF Nav/Comm Transceiver is very similar to the
KX 155A VHF Nav/Comm Transceiver except, the KX 165A has a
built in VOR/LOC converter, enabling it to directly drive a horizontal
situation indicator (HSI). The KX 165A will only be installed with an
HSI. For detailed information of the HSI refer to the HSI supplement
in this section of the POH (refer to Section 9 index).
The KX 165A includes a 760-channel VHF communications
receiver-transmitter, a 200-channel VHF navigation receiver, and a
40-channel glideslope receiver.
The communications receivertransmitter receives and transmits signals between 118.00 and
135.975 MHz with 25-kHz spacing.
The navigation receiver
receives VOR and localizer signals between 108.00 and 117.95
MHz in 50-kHz steps. The glideslope receiver is automatically
tuned when a localizer frequency is selected. The circuits required
to interpret the VOR and localizer signals are also an integral part of
the Nav receiver.
Large self-dimming gas discharge readouts display both the
communications and navigation operating frequencies. The KX
165A's "flip-flop" preselect feature enables you to store one
frequency in the standby display while operating on another and
then interchange them instantly with the touch of a button. Both the
active (COMM) and the standby (STBY) frequencies may be
displayed at all times and are stored in nonvolatile memory without
drain on the aircraft battery. The KX 165A has 32 programmable
comm channels, a stuck microphone alert and transmitter shutdown,
Bearing To/From radial mode, course deviation indicator mode and
an elapsed timer mode.
Jan 31/02
S25-3
CESSNA
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 25 • FAA APPROVED
MODEL T206H
The Comm portion inoorporates an automatic squelch. To
override the automatic squelch, the Comm volume control knob is
pulled out. Push the knob back in to reactivate the automatic
squelch. A "T" will be displayed during transmit and "R" during
valid signal reception.
The Nav portion uses the pull out feature of the Nav volume
control to receive the Nav signal !dent. Pull the volume control
knob out to hear the Iden! signal plus voice. Push the knob in to
attenuate the !dent signal and still hear Nav voice.
All controls for the Nav/Comm, except those for navigation
course selection, are mounted on the front panel of the receivertransmitter. Control lighting is provided by NAV/COMM interior
lighting and the instrument panel flood lighting system. For detailed
information of the audio selector panel used in conjunction with this
radio refer to the audio s~ector panel supplement in this section of
the POH (refer to Section 9 index).
NOTE
The unit has a stuck microphone alert feature. If the
microphone is keyed continuously for greater than
33 seconds, the transmitter stops transmitting and
the active Comm frequency flashes to alert the pilot
of the stuck mic condition.
2
3
122.1
·aO
13
12
8
7
6 5
4
OSSST104S
KX 165A VHF NAVICOMM
Figure 1. Bendix/King KX165AVHF NAV/COMM (Sheet 1 of2)
S25-4
Jan 31/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 25 - FM APPROVED
NAV FUNCTION DISPLAYS
~(
1051.fiO j 030
\
)
VOR MODE; ACTIVE/BEARING, CDI FORMAT
109.50 s~ 030
FLRG
(
)
VOR MODE: ACTIVE/BEARING, FLAG DISPLAY
[
/09.Ei0
VORE MODE: ACTIVE "BEARING
(
030]
ro~ FUNCTION DISPLAy
109.50
VOR MODE: ACTIVE/BEARING, FLAG DISPLAY
(
f/0.90
LO[ ]
LOCALIZER MODE: FREQUENCY/COi FORMAT
05851'1053
Figure 1. Bendix/King KX 165A VHF NAV/COMM (Sheet 2 of 2)
Jan 31/02
S25--5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 25 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
1. OPERATING COMM FREQUENCY DISPLAY -- Displays
COMM ACTIVE and COMM STANDBY frequencies with a
'T' between them to indicate TRANSMIT and an "R" to
indicate RECEIVE modes of operation.
2. OPERATING NAV FREQUENCY DISPLAY -- The right
portion of the display is allocated to NAV receiver ACTIVE
and STANDBY information. The frequency channeling is
similar to the COMM when operating in the frequency
mode. The NAV ACTIVE and STANDBY frequencies are
stored in the memory on power down and return on power
up.
3. NAV STANDBY/OBS/Bearing/Radialfrimer Display - The
right side of the NAV display is controlled by the MODE
SELECTOR BUTTON (see #7 below). With an active VOR
frequency, this portion of the display shows the STANDBY
frequency, OBS setting for the internal CDI, the bearing to
the VOR station, radial from the VOR station, or a countup/count-down timer. With an active localizer frequency,
this portion of the display shows the standby frequency, the
letters "LOC", or count-up/count-down timer.
4. NAV FREQUENCY SELECTOR KNOB (SMALL) Operates in 50-kHz steps. The NAV receiver's lower and
upper frequency limits are 108.00 MHz and 117.95 MHz.
Exceeding the upper limit of frequency band will
automatically return to the lower limit and vice versa. A
clockwise rotation will increase (inc) the previous frequency
while a counterclockwise rotation will decrease (dee) the
previous frequency.
5. NAV FREQUENCY SELECTOR KNOB (LARGE) -Operates in 1-MHz steps. The frequency inc/dee operates
the STANDBY frequency display. A clockwise rotation will
increase the previous frequency while a counterclockwise
rotation will decrease the previous frequency. Exceeding the
upper limit of the frequency band will automatically return to
the lower limit and vice versa.
S25-6
Jan 31/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 25 - FAA APPROVED
6. NAV/FREQUENCY TRANSFER BUTTON ( c:
> ) -Interchanges the NAV ACTIVE and STANDBY frequencies.
Depressing the NAV frequency transfer button for 2 seconds
or more will cause the display to go into the ACTIVE ENTRY
mode. Only the ACTIVE frequency will be displayed and it can
be directly changed by using the NAV inc/dee knobs. The
display will return to the ACTIVE/STANDBY mode when the
NAV frequency transfer button is pushed.
7. MODE SELECTOR BUTTON -- Depressing the mode button
will cause the NAV display to go from the ACTIVE/STANDBY
format to the ACTIVE/COi (Course Deviation Indicator) format.
In the CDI mode, the frequency inc/dee knob (pushed in)
channels the ACTIVE frequency. When the ACTIVE window is
tuned to a VOR frequency, the standby frequency area is
replaced by a three digit OBS (Omni Bearing Selector)
display. The desired OBS course can be selected by pulling
out the inner NAV frequency knob and turning it. This OBS
display is independent of any OBS course selected on an
external CDI. An "OBS" in the middle of the NAV display will
flash while the inner NAV frequency knob is pulled out. The
CDI is displayed on the line below the frequency/OBS. When
the ACTIVE window is tuned to a localizer frequency, the
standby frequency area is replaced by "LOC". When the
received signal is too weak to ensure accuracy the display will
"FLAG".
Depressing the mode button again will cause the NAV display
to go from the ACTIVE/COi format to the ACTIVE/BEARING
format. In the BEARING mode, the frequency inc/dee knob
channels the ACTIVE frequency window. Depressing the
frequency transfer button will cause the ACTIVE frequency to
be placed in blind storage and the STANDBY frequency (in
blind storage) to be displayed in the ACTIVE window display.
In bearing mode, the right hand window of the NAV display
shows the bearing TO the station. When a too weak or invalid
VOR signal is received the display flags (dashes).
Jan 31/02
S25-7
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 25 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
Another push of the mode button will cause the NAV display
to go from the ACTIVE/BEARING format to the
ACTIVE/RADIAL format. In the RADIAL mode, the frequency
inc/dee knobs channel the ACTIVE frequency window and
depressing the frequency transfer button will cause the
ACTIVE frequency to be placed in blind storage and the
STANDBY frequency (in blind storage) to be displayed in the
ACTIVE window display. In radial mode of operation, the right
hand window of NAV display shows the radial FROM the
station. When a too weak or invalid VOR signal is received
the display flags (dashes).
Another push of the mode button will cause the unit to go into
the TIMER mode. When the unit is turned on, the elapsed
timer (ET) begins counting upwards from zero. The timer can
be stopped and reset to zero by pushing the NAV frequency
transfer button for 2 seconds or more causing the ET on the
display to flash. In this state, the timer can be set as a
countdown timer or the elapsed timer can be restarted. The
countdown timer is set by using the NAV frequency inc/dee
knobs to set the desired time and then pushing the NAV
frequency transfer button to start the timer. The large knob
selects minutes, the small knob in the "in" position selects 1O
second intervals, and the small knob in the "out'' position
selects individual seconds. After the countdown timer reaches
zero, the counter will begin to count upwards indefinitely while
flashing for the first 15 seconds. When the elapsed timer is
reset to zero it may be restarted again by momentarily
pushing the NAV frequency transfer button.
8. NAVNOLUME CONTROL (PULL IDENT) -- Adjusts volume of
navigation receiver audio. When the knob is pulled out, the
ldent signal plus voice may be heard. The volume of
voice/ident can be adjusted by turning this knob.
9. COMM FREQUENCY SELECTOR KNOB (INNER) - This
smaller knob is designed to change the indicated frequency in
steps of 50-kHz when it is pushed in, and in 25-kHz steps
when it is pulled out.
S25-8
Jan 31/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 25 - FM APPROVED
10. COMM FREQUENCY SELECTOR KNOB (OUTER) - The
outer, larger selector knob is used to change the MHz portion
of the frequency display. At either band-edge of the 118-136
MHz frequency spectrum, an offscale rotation will wrap the
display around to the other frequency band-edge (i.e., 136
MHz advances to 118 MHz).
11. CHANNEL BUTTON -- Pressing the CHAN button for 2 or
more seconds will cause the unit to enter the channel program
(PG) mode. Upon entering the channel program mode, the
channel number will flash indicating that it can be
programmed. The desired channel can be selected by turning
the comm kHz knob. The channel frequency can be entered
by pushing the COMM TRANSFER button which will cause
the standby frequency to flash. The comm frequency knobs
are then used to enter the desired frequency. If dashes
(located between 136 MHz and 118 MHz) are entered instead
of a frequency, the corresponding channel is skipped in
channel selection mode. Additional channels may be
programmed by pressing the COMM TRANSFER button and
using the same procedure. The channel information is saved
by pushing the CHAN button which will also cause the unit to
return to the previous frequency entry mode.
The channel selection mode (CH) can then be entered by
momentarily pushing the CHAN button. The comm frequency
knobs can be used to select the desired channel. The unit will
automatically default to the previous mode if no channel is
selected within 2 seconds after entering the channel selection
mode. The unit is placed in the transmit mode by depressing
a mic button.
Jan 31/02
S25-9
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 25 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
12. COMM FREQUENCY TRANSFER BUTTON ( c;
• ) Interchanges the frequencies in the USE and STANDBY
displays. To tune the radio to the desired operating frequency,
the desired frequency must be entered into the standby
display and then the COMM TRANSFER button must be
pushed. This will trade the contents of the active and standby
displays. The operating frequency can also be entered by
accessing the ACTIVE ENTRY (direct tune) mode which is
done by pushing the COMM TRANSFER button for 2 or more
seconds. In the direct tune mode, only the active part of the
display is visible. The desired frequency can be directly
entered into the display. Push the COMM TRANSFER button
again to return to the active/standby display.
The transceiver is always tuned to the frequency appearing in
the ACTIVE display. It is, therefore, possible to have two
different frequencies stored in the ACTIVE and STANDBY
displays and to change back and forth between them at the
simple push of the COMM TRANSFER button.
13. COMM VOLUME CONTROL (OFF/PULL/TEST) -- Rotate the
VOL knob clockwise from the OFF position. Pull the VOL knob
out and adjust for desired listening level. Push the VOL knob
back in to actuate the automatic squelch. The VOL knob may
also be pulled out to hear particularly weak signals.
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
There is no change to the airplane limitations when this avionic
equipment is installed.
S25-10
Jan 31/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 25 - FAA APPROVED
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
There is no change to the airplane emergency procedures when
However, if the frequency
this avionic equipment is installed.
readouts fail, the radio will remain operational on the last frequency
selected. If either frequency transfer button is pressed and held
while power is applied to the unit, the unit wakes up with 120.00
MHz in the COMM use frequency and 110.00 MHz in the NAV
active frequency, with both COMM and NAV in the active entry
mode. This will aid the pilot in blind tuning the radio.
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
COMMUNICATION RECEIVER-TRANSMITTER OPERATION:
1. OFF/PULL/TEST Volume Control - Turn clockwise; pull out
and adjust to desired audio level; push control back in to
activate the automatic squelch.
2. MIC Selector Switch (on audio control panel) -- SET to COMM
1.
3. SPEAKER Selector (on audio control panel) - SET to desired
mode.
4. COMM Frequency Selector Knobs -- Select desired operating
frequency.
5. COMM TRANSFER Button - PRESS to transfer desired
frequency from the STBY display into the COMM display.
6. Mic Button:
a. To transmit - Press button and speak in microphone.
NOTE
During COMM transmission, a lighted "T" will appear
between the "COMM" and "STBY" displays to indicate that
the transceiver is operating in the transmit mode.
b. To Receive -- RELEASE mike button.
Jan 31/02
S25-11
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 25 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
NAVIGATION RECEIVER OPERATION:
1. NAV Frequency Selector Knobs -- SELECT desired operating
frequency in "STBY" display.
2. NAV TRANSFER BUTTON -- PRESS to transfer desired
frequency from the "STBY" display into the "NAV" display.
3. Speaker Selector (on audio control panel) - SET to desired
mode.
4. NAV Volume Control a. ADJUST to desired audio level.
b. PULL out to identify station.
VOR OPERATION:
Channel the NAV Receiver to the desired VOR and monitor the
audio to positively identify the station. To select an OBS course,
turn the OBS knob to set the desired course under the lubber line.
When a signal is received, the NAV flag will pull out of view and
show a "TO" or "FROM" flag as appropriate for the selected
course.
LOC OPERATION:
Localizer circuitry is energized when the NAV Receiver is
channeled to an ILS frequency.
Monitor the LOC audio and
positively identify the station. The NAV flag will be out of view when
the signal is of sufficient strength to be usable.
GLIDESLOPE OPERATION:
The glideslope receiver is automatically channeled when a
localizer frequency is selected. A separate warning flag is provided
to indicate usable signal conditions.
PILOT CONFIGURATION:
This mode can be accessed by pressing and holding the NAV
Mode Button for more than 2 seconds and then pressing the Nav
Frequency Transfer Button for an additional 2 seconds, while
continuing to hold the NAV Mode Button. When the Pilot Config
Mode is entered, the unit will show the "SWRV" mnemonic which is
the unit software revision level. Adjustment pages can be accessed
by MODE button presses.
S25-12
Jan 31/02
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 25 - FAA APPROVED
The pilot may adjust two parameters in the pilot configuration, the
display minimum brightness and sidetone volume level. Minimum
Brightness (BRIM) will have a range of 0-255. The dimmest is 0
and the brightest is 255. Sidetone volume level is adjusted when
SIDE is displayed. Values from 0-255 may be selected with O being
least volume, 255 being the greatest.
Adjustment
Mnemonic
Min Level
Max Level
Software Revision Number
SWRV
- --
-- -
Minimum Display Brightness
BRIM
0
255
Sidetone Level
SIDE
0
255
Subsequent presses of the MODE button sequences through
SWRV, BRIM, SIDE, and then back to SWRV.
Pressing the NAV Transfer Button momentarily exits Pilot
configuration mode. The NAV returns to its pre-Pilot Config state
with the new brightness and sidetone levels stored in nonvolatile
memory.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when this
avionic equipment is installed. However, the installation of an
externally mounted antenna, or several related antennas, will result
in a minor reduction in cruise performance.
Jan 31/02
S25-13 (S25-14 blank)
Pilot's Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608388 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 26
BENDIX/KING KOR 510
FLIGHT INFORMATION SERVICES (FIS)
/-=-~-------
This supplement must be inserted into Sectioo 9 of the PIiot's Cperatlng
Handbook and FM Appt'Oved Airp~ Flight Manual when the airplane is
equipped witti the 8endixl1<ing KOR 5-1 O Flight Information Services (FIS).
APPROVED !IV
DATE OF APPROVAL
a-rt ~ez.
@
tOr>Yl<~T c, 2002
CleSSt.lA AIRCRAFT COIIIP.t.NY
WICHITA, KA~SAS. USA
T2oeHPHUS-,S2$-00
MemberofGAMA
12 NOVEMBER 2002
S26-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 26 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT 26
BENDIX/KING KDR 510
FLIGHT INFORMATION SERVICES (FIS)
Use the Log of Effective Pages to determine the current status of
this supplement.
Pages affected by the current revision are
indicated by an asterisk (*) preceding the page number.
Supplement Status
Original Issue
Date
12 November 2002
LOG OF EFFECTIVE PAGES
Page
Title (S26-1)
S26-2 thru S26-6
S26-2
Page
Status
Original Issue
Original Issue
Revision
Number
0
0
Original Issue
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 26- FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT 26
BENDIX/KING KOR 510
FLIGHT INFORMATION SERVICES (FIS)
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to the
operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into this
supplement This list contains only those Service Bulletins that are
currently active
~
senar
Effecn'yny
Original Issue
Revision
ln~raled
lnoorpcirauo n lriirolane
S26-3/S~
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 26 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT
BENDIX/KING KDR 510
FLIGHT INFORMATION SERVICES (FIS)
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The Bendix/King KDR 510 Flight Information Services (FIS)
installation provides weather information and other flight advisory
information to pilots to enhance situational awareness. The services
rely on a network of ground based VHF transmitters that
continuously broadcast data to any aircraft within line-of-sight of the
transmitter. The aircraft must be equipped with a dedicated VHF
antenna and receiver for FIS. Data is then presented to the pilot
using the KMD 550 Multi-function display.
FIS information is
intended to be used as a strategic planning tool to help the pilot
avoid inclement weather areas that are beyond his visual range.
FIS lacks the sufficient resolution and update rate necessary for
severe weather penetration.
NOTE
Cessna Aircraft Company does not guarantee the
quality, accuracy, or availability of FIS data. Some data
is available to all KDR 510 installations while other data
is available only by subscription.
The network of
transmitters may not cover the entire area where the
aircraft is operated, and the aircraft may need to be
above 5000 feet AGL to receive FIS data in areas where
coverage does exist.
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
Use of the Bendix/King KDR 510 Flight Information Services (FIS)
for severe weather penetration is prohibited.
Original Issue
S26-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 26 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
No additional emergency procedures are required when the KOR
510 Flight Information Services (FIS) equipment is installed in the
airplane.
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
Press the WX function select key of the KMD 550 Multi-function
display to toggle through weather related systems installed on the
aircraft that display on the KMD 550. The MODE button toggles
between different weather related infonnation displays such as
switching between METARs and PIREPs. It is highly recommended
that the pilot read the Bendix/King subscription agreement and the
FIS addendum to the KMD 550/850 Pilot's Guide to understand the
entire range of information available.
It is possible that data
availability and subscription services may change over time.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
Airplane performance does not change when the KDR 510 Flight
Information Services (FIS) equipment is installed.
(
S26-6
Original Issue
A Teictron Company
Pilofs Operating Handbook and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608438 ANO ON
SUPPLEMENT 27
KMH 880 MULTJ-HAZARD
AWARENESS SYSTEM
I=-:.. .______
This supplement must be In~erted into Secllon 9 of the Pilot's Operating
Handbook and FAA Ap~d Airplane Flight Manual when the KMH 880 MultiHazard Awareness System i& instBlled.
__,.,,.
""'ROVED BY
__-~_
f'AAl~~,M2flUlf'MTJ
,.,_o....-...a.c.o.
@
~
MemberofGAMA
COP'/l(jGHT c 20(),I
CESSW.A/Rc;,v.R CONP/'l'IV
\IIIIOIITA. KNISAS, US-0.
T206HPHIJS.SZ1.00
DAT! 01' AWROVAL
Pt -
z / - pf-
21 JANUARY 2004
S27-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT27 • FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT 27
KMH 880 MULTl-HAZARD AWARENESS SYSTEM
Use the Log of Effective Pages to determine the current status of
this supplement.
Pages affected by the current revision are
inc:licated by an asterisk(*) preceding the page number.
Supplement Status
Date
O (Original)
21 January 2004
LOG OF EFFECTIVE PAGES
Page
Number
S27-1 thru S27-16
Page
Status
Revision
Number
Original
0
(
S27-2
Original
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 27 - FAA APPROVED
SUPPLEMENT 27
KMH 880 MULTr~HAZARD AWARENESS SYSTEM
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to the
operation of the airplane, and have been incorporated into this
supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins that are
currently active.
A~lan e
r1a 1
Efleciivrty
Original
Revision
I nCQt:Porated
lncoipoijiilon in Airplane
S27-3
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 27 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT
KMH 880 MULTl-HAZARD AWARENESS SYSTEM
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The Bendix/King KMH 880 Multi-Hazard Awareness System
supplied with the Cessna Model T206H provides the pilot with
supplemental flight information through the Bendix/King KMD 550
Multi-Function Display (MFD), glareshield annunciator lights and
aural warnings. The KMH 880 system includes a Traffic Advisory
System (TAS) for air traffic and an Enhanced Ground Proximity
Warning System (EGPWS) for terrain. The traffic and terrain
information provided by the KMH 880 system is intended only to
enhance the pilot's situational awareness.
Refer to the Bendix/King KTA 870/KMH 880 Traffic Advisory
System/Multi-Hazard Awareness System Pilot's Guide, Honeywell
part number 006-18265-0000, Revision 1, dated 03/2002, or later
revision, for information regarding the specific operating details of
the KMH 880.
Refer to the KMD 550/850 Terrain Function (EGPWS) Pilot's Guide
Addendum, Honeywell part number 006-18236-0000, Revision 2,
dated Sept/2001, or later revision, for information regarding the
operating details of the EGPWS.
Refer to the KMD 550/850 Traffic Avoidance Function Pilot's Guide
Addendum, Honeywell part number 006-18238-0000, Revision 2,
dated Nov/2002, or later revision, for information regarding the
operating details of the Traffic Advisory System.
S27-4
Original
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 27 - FM APPROVED
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
1. The Bendix/King KTA 870/KMH 880 Traffic Advisory
System/Multi-Hazard Awareness System Pilot's Guide,
Honeywell part number 006-18265-0000, Revision 1, dated
03/2002, or later revision, must be readily accessible to the
pilot when operating the KMH 880 system.
2. The Bendix/King KMD 550/850 Pilot's Guide, Honeywell part
number 006-18222-0000, Revision 2, dated Nov/2001, or
later revision, the KMD 550/850 Terrain function (EGPWS)
Pilot's Guide Addendum, Honeywell part number 00618236-0000, Revision 2, dated Sept/2001, or later revision,
and the KMD 550/850 Pilot's Guide Traffic Avoidance
Function Pilot's Guide Addendum, Honeywell part number
006-18238-0000, Revision 2, dated Nov/2002, or later
revision, must be readily accessible to the pilot when
operating the KMH 880 system.
3. The Traffic Advisory function is not to be used to maneuver
the airplane to avoid other traffic. The traffic display is
intended to assist in visually locating traffic. The traffic
display lacks the resolution necessary for use in evasive
maneuvering.
4. The Terrain Awareness function is not to be used for
navigation. The terrain awareness display is intended to
serve as a situational awareness tool only, and may not
provide the accuracy and/or fidelity on which to solely base
terrain or obstacle avoidance maneuvering decisions.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
For ditching or other off airport landings, inhibit the Terrain
Awareness Alerting and Display (TMD) and Terrain Clearance
Floor (TCF) functions by selecting the TERR mode key on the KMD
550 MFD and holding the MODE soft key in for a few seconds until
TERR INHBT is annunciated on the MFD and the TERR NIA
annunciator on the glareshield illuminates.
Original
S27-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 27 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
(
SYSTEM ACTIVATION
TRAFFIC ADVISORY SYSTEM (TAS) FUNCTION
Normal operation of the TAS is described in the Bendix/King KTA
870/KMH 880 Traffic Advisory System/Multi-Hazard Awareness
System Pilot's Guide, Honeywell part number 006-18265-0000,
Revision 1, dated 03/2002, or later revision.
Test the TAS function before takeoff by selecting the TRFC (traffic)
function select button on the KMD 550 MFD and then selecting the
TST position using the outer control knob located in the lower right
corner of the MFD. The test pattern is best viewed at a range
selection of 5 nm.
Use of the self-test function while in flight will inhibit the TAS
operation for up to twelve seconds, depending on the number of
targets being tracked.
NOTE
The KMH 880 TAS is unable to detect an intruding
aircraft if the intruder is not equipped with an
operating transponder. TAS can detect and track
aircraft with either Mode A, Mode C, or Mode S
transponders.
Due to aircraft geometry, the relative bearing to a Mode A (nonaltitude reporting) aircraft may appear erratic when the intruding
aircraft is at close horizontal range with a large vertical separation.
In this case, the non-altitude reporting traffic symbol may
momentarily disappear or move rapidly around the TAS display.
Continue to use visual scan techniques to scan for this and all other
intruding aircraft.
(Continued Next Page)
S27-6
Original
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 27 - FM APPROVED
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES (Continued)
ENHANCED GROUND PROXIMITY WARNING SYSTEM (EGPWS)
FUNCTION
The EGPWS (TERR) function is active when electrical power is
supplied, the amber TERR NIA annunciator is extinguished and the
following systems are operational:
• Multi-Hazard Warning Processor
• Altitude Encoder
If the horizontal position derived from the GPS receiver is invalid,
the EGPWS will not be available.
Test the EGPWS function before takeoff by selecting the TERR
(terrain) function select button on the KMD 550 MFD. The pilot
must put the rotary knob in the TST position using the outer control
knob located in the lower right corner of the MFD.
INDICATORS AND CONTROLS
TRAFFIC ADVISORY SYSTEM (TAS) FUNCTION
All of the TAS indication and control is via the KMD 550 MFD.
Refer to the Bendix/King KTA 870/KMH 880 Traffic Advisory
System/Multi-Hazard Awareness System Pilot's Guide, Honeywell
part number 006-18265-0000, Revision 1, dated 03/2002, or later
revision.
Refer to the KMD 550/850 Traffic Avoidance Function Pilot's Guide
Addendum, Honeywell part number 006-18238-0000, Revision 2,
dated Nov/2002, or later revision.
(Continued Next Page)
Original
S27-7
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 27 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES (Continued)
ENHANCED GROUND PROXIMITY WARNING SYSTEM {EGPWS)
FUNCTION
All of the EGPWS indication and control is through the KMD 550
MFD. Refer to the Bendix/King KTA 870/KMH 880 Traffic Advisory
System/Multi-Hazard Awareness System Pilot's Guide, Honeywell
part number 006-18265-0000, Revision 1, dated 03/2002, or later
revision.
Refer to the KMD 550/850 Terrain Function (EGPWS) Pilot's Guide
Addendum, Honeywell part number 006-18236-0000, Revision 2,
dated Sept/2001, or later revision.
An amber TERR NIA lamp is provided in the annunciator panel
located in the instrument panel glareshield. The TERR N/A lamp
illuminates when the terrain function is not available.
HSI
NAV
GPS
D
TERR N/A
Figure S27-1
(Continued Next Page)
S27-8
Original
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
(
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 27 - FAA APPROVED
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES (Continued)
\
ALERT PRIORITIES
TRAFFIC ADVISORY SYSTEM (TAS) FUNCTION
TAS Traffic Annunciations (TAs) are shown in the following table:
AURAL
"TRAFFIC,
TRAFFIC"
VISUAL
PILOT RESPONSE
A filled in yellov, Conduct visual searc~
circle on the traffic for the intruder.
11
display.
successful,
maintain
visual acquisition to
ensure safe operation.
NOTE
• In most situations, no maneuvering will be
necessary to maintain safe separation from traffic.
Maneuver only if it becomes apparent safe
operation will not be maintained.
• Attempt to visually acquire the intruder aircraft and
achieve or maintain safe separation in accordance
with regulatory requirements and good operating
practice.
• If the intruder aircraft is not in view, air traffic
control should be contacted to obtain any
information that may assist concerning the intruder
aircraft.
• Minor adjustments to the vertical flight path
consistent with air traffic requirements are not
considered evasive maneuvers.
(Continued Next Page)
Original
S27-9
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 27 - FAA APPROVED
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
ALERT PRIORITIES (Continued)
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
(Continued)
TRAFFIC ADVISORY SYSTEM (TAS) FUNCTION (Continued)
WARNING
MANEUVERING BASED UPON THE TRAFFIC
DISPLAY INFORMATION ONLY MAY ACTUALLY
RESULT IN A REDUCED SEPARATION FROM AN
INTRUDER AIRCRAFT.
NOTE
• Traffic Advisories (TAs) can be expected to occur
during normal flight operation. Generally, TAs will
occur more frequently in terminal areas during
arrival, and less frequently during departure and
enroute operations. In the vast majority of these
cases, the aircraft displayed will be safely
separated and there will be no need for pilots to
initiate any avoidance maneuvers.
• Evasive maneuvers (rapid change in pitch, roll,
normal acceleration thrust or speed) should only
be conducted after visual acquisition of the intruder
and then only when necessary to achieve or
assure safe separation.
• Minor adjustments to the vertical flight path that
are consistent with an existing ATC clearance,
instruction, or restriction are not considered
evasive maneuvers.
(Continued Next Page)
(
S27-10
Original
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 27 - FM APPROVED
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES (Continued)
ENHANCED GROUND PROXIMITY WARNING SYSTEM (EGPWS)
FUNCTION
When any of the aural EGPWS messages are in progress, all aural
TAS alert messages are inhibited.
SYSTEM SELF-TEST
TRAFFIC ADVISORY SYSTEM (TAS) FUNCTION
Proper operation of the TAS system can be verified as follows:
1. Select the TRFC display mode on the KMD 550 MFD.
2. Select 5 nm range.
3. Select TST using the MFD control.
4. Note normal traffic display sequence (Normal Traffic display
defined in the Pilot's Guide).
5. The aural announcement ''TAS SYSTEM TEST OK" is
enunciated over the cockpit speaker.
NOTE
Use of the TAS self-test function in flight will inhibit
normal TAS operation for up to twelve seconds.
ENHANCED GROUND PROXIMITY WARNING SYSTEM (EGPWS)
FUNCTION
Proper operation of the Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning
System can be verified when the aircraft is on the ground as
follows:
Select the TERR display mode on the MFD.
Select TST via the MFD control.
The amber TERR N/A light comes on.
The aural announcement "EGPWS SYSTEM TEST OK" is
enunciated over the cockpit speaker.
5. A terrain self-test pattern appears on the MFD.
6. The terrain self-test pattern disappears after several sweeps
of the terrain display.
7. The amber TERR N/A light goes out.
1.
2.
3.
4.
(Continued Next Page)
Original
S27-11
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 27 - FAA APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES (Continued)
RESPONSE TO GROUND PROXIMITY WARNINGS/
ALERTS
Respond to Ground Proximity warnings as follows:
When an aural "PULL UP" warning occurs, the following procedure
should be followed:
1. Level the wings and simultaneously apply maximum power.
2. Smoothly pitch up at a rate of 2 to 3 degrees per second
towards an initial target pitch attitude of 15 degrees nose up.
3. Adjust pitch attitude to ensure terrain clearance, while
respecting the stall warning. If flaps are extended, retract
flaps to the UP position.
4. Continue climb at best angle of climb speed (Vx) until terrain
clearance is assured.
NOTE
• Only vertical maneuvers are recommended unless
operating in VMC or the pilot determines, using all
available information and instruments, that a turn,
in addition to the vertical escape maneuver, is the
safest course of action.
• Pilots are authorized to deviate from their current
air traffic control clearance to the extent necessary
to comply with an EGPWS warning.
When an aural alert other than "PULL UP" occurs, initiate
corrective action to remove the cause of the alert. The following
aural alert can occur:
Mode 1: "SINK RATE"
Mode 2: "DON'T SINK"
NOTE
During operations at certain locations, warning
thresholds may be exceeded due to specific terrain
or operating procedures. During day VFR, these
expected warnings may be considered as cautionary
and the approach continued.
(Continued Next Page)
S27-12
(
Original
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 27 - FAA APPROVED
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES (Continued)
ADVISORY CALLOUT$
The following advisory callouts are provided in this installation:
"FIVE HUNDRED" - Approach height callout based on present
airplane position determined by GPS and compared to the on-board
terrain database, occurs at 500 feet AGL.
RESPONSE TO TERRAIN/OBSTACLE AWARENESS
ALERTS
CAUTION ALERT
When an aural "CAUTION TERRAIN" or a "CAUTION OBSTACLE"
alert occurs, take positive corrective action until the alert ceases.
Stop descending, or initiate a climb and/or turn as necessary, based
on analysis of all available instruments and information.
If the EGPWS issues a caution when the terrain display page is not
selected, a pop up message will appear on the active display page
of the MFD. The pilot must acknowledge the pop up message by
pressing the POWER key next to the "OK" soft label to clear it.
WARNING ALERT
When an aural "TERRAIN TERRAIN, PULL UP" or "OBSTACLE
OBSTACLE, PULL UP" warning occurs, the following procedure
should be followed:
1. Level the wings and simultaneously apply maximum power.
2. Smoothly pitch up at a rate of 2 to 3 degrees per second
towards an initial target pitch attitude of 15 degrees nose up.
3. Adjust pitch attitude to ensure terrain clearance, while
respecting the stall warning. If flaps are extended, retract
flaps to the UP position.
4. Continue climb at best angle of climb speed (Vx) until terrain
clearance is assured.
If the EGPWS issues a warning when the terrain display page is not
selected, a pop up message will appear on the active display page
of the MFD. The pilot must acknowledge the pop up message by
pressing the POWER key next to the OK soft label to clear it.
(Continued Next Page)
Original
S27-13
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 27 - FAA APPROVED
SECTION4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
(Continued)
USE OF TERRAIN AWARENESS DISPLAY
The Terrain Awareness display is selected by pressing the TERR
function key on the KMD 550 MFD. The display is intended to
enhance situational awareness with respect to separation from
terrain or obstacles.
WARNING
THE TERRAIN AWARENESS DISPLAY IS NOT
INTENDED TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION
PURPOSES.
Color and intensity variations are used to show terrain/obstacle
heights relative to the airplane. Refer to the KTA 870/KMH 880
Pilot's Guide.
The 500/250 foot green to yellow boundary is below the airplane in
order to account for altimetry and/or terrain/obstacle height errors.
For situational awareness with respect to terrain/obstacles shown on
the display, the pilot should assume that the yellow or red terrain or
obstacle is at or above the airplane, green terrain is below the
airplane. These boundary levels are biased upwards by half of the
aircraft's descent rate greater than 1000 feet per minute.
If there is no terrain data in the database for a particular area, that
portion of the display is indicated by a magenta dot pattern. Terrain
is not shown {black) if it is below the lowest band and/or is within
400 feet of the runway elevation nearest the aircraft.
Two elevation numbers indicate the highest and lowest terrain
currently displayed on the screen. The elevation numbers indicate
terrain in hundreds of feet above sea level ("125" is 12,500 feet
MSL) and are color matched to the display. In the event that there
is no appreciable difference between the highest and lowest
elevations {flat terrain or over water), only the highest numeric value
is displayed.
(Continued Next Page)
(
S27-14
Original
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 27 - FAA APPROVED
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES (Continued)
USE OF TERRAIN AWARENESS DISPLAY (Continued)
Geometric altitude, which is displayed on the upper left corner of the
terrain display, is an additional feature incorporated into the
EGPWS. Based on GPS altitude, geometric altitude is a computed
pseudo-barometric altitude designed to reduce or eliminate errors
potentially induced in corrected barometric altitude by temperature
extremes, non-standard pressure altitude conditions, and wrong
altimeter settings. This ensures an optimal EGPWS terrain display
and alerting capability. Geometric altitude also allows continuous
EGPWS operations in QFE environments without custom inputs or
special operational procedures.
Geometric altitude requires a GPS altitude input with its associated
Vertical Figure Of Merit (VFOM) and RAIM failure indication,
standard (uncorrected) altitude, and aircraft position (latitude and
longitude). Additionally, corrected barometric altitude, GPS mode,
and the number of satellites tracked are used, if available.
The geometric altitude is computed by blending a calculated nonstandard altitude, runway calibrated altitude (determined during
takeoff), GPS calibrated altitude, and barometric altitude (if
available). Estimates of the VFOM for each of these are determined
and applied in order to determine its weight in computing the final
altitude. The blending algorithm gives the most weight to altitudes
with a higher estimated accuracy, reducing the effect of less
accurate altitudes. Each component altitude is also checked for
reasonableness using a value computed from GPS altitude and it's
VFOM. Altitudes that are invalid, not available, or fall outside the
reasonableness window are not included in the final geometric
altitude.
The geometric altitude algorithm is designed to allow continued
operation when one or more of the altitude components are not
available. If all component altitudes are invalid or unreasonable, the
GPS altitude is used directly. If GPS altitude fails or is not present,
then the EGPWS reverts to using corrected barometric altitude
alone.
Original
S27-15
SECTION 9- SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 27 - FM APPROVED
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES (Continued)
USE OF TERRAIN AWARENESS DISPLAY (Continued)
The geometric altitude function is fully automatic and requires no
pilot action other than properly setting the corrected barometric
altitude on the altimeter.
NOTE
An indication of MSL altitude appears in the left
comer of the MFD. This altitude is the reference
altitude for the display and the terrain awareness
algorithm.
This reference altitude is based on
internally calculated geometric altitude and not
It represents the
corrected barometric altitude.
aircraft's calculated true height above sea level
(MSL) and serves as the reference altitude for color
coding of the terrain display and the altitude input to
the look-ahead algorithm. Because it is primarily
comprised of GPS altitude, this reference altitude will
often differ from cockpit displayed corrected
barometric altitude. This altitude is not to be used
for navigation. It is presented to provide the crew
with additional situational awareness of true height
above sea level, upon which terrain alerting and
display is based.
SYSTEM CONSTRAINTS
1. If there is no terrain data in the database for a particular
area, then terrain/obstacle awareness alerting is not
available for that area. The affected display area is color
with a magenta dot pattern.
2. If the terrain/obstacle awareness features of the KMH 880
have been inhibited (e.g. selected OFF due to excessive
navigation system position error), the EGPWS will not give
aural alerts. A WARNINGS INHIBITED message will be
annunciated on the MFD.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to the airplane performance when the KMD 880
Multi-Hazard Awareness System is installed.
S27-16
Original
SUPPLEMENT
ORIGINAL ISSUE
MODEL T206H
PILOT'S OPERATING HANDBOOK
AND FAA APPROVED
AIRPLANE FLIGHT MANUAL
ORIGINAL ISSUE
22 DECEMBER 2004
PART NUMBER:
T206HPHUS-S28-00
INSERT THE FOLLOWING PAGES INTO
THE SUPPLEMENT SECTION OF THE PILOT'S
OPERATING HANDBOOK
~
Cessna
A Tenron Company
Pilot's Operating Handbook
and
FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual
CESSNA MODEL T206H
AIRPLANES T20608001 AND ON
SUPPLEMENT 28
BENDIX/KING KT 73 MODE S TRANSPONDER
SERIALMO. _ _ _ _ _ __
REGISTRATION N O . ~ - - - - -
TIiis supplement must be insertecl into Section 9 of the Pilot's Operaijng
Handbook and FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual when a Bendix/King KT 73
MCKle s Transponder is installed.
APPROVED BY
DATE OF APPROVAL
, ) Member of GAMA
COPYRIGHT ~ 2004
CESSNA ~CRAfl COMPANY
22 DECEMBER 2004
WICIJITA. KANSAS, USA
U.S.
S28-1
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 28
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SUPPLEMENT 28
BENDIX/KING KT 73 MODE S TRANSPONDER
Use the Log of Effective Pages to determine the current status of
this supplement
Pages affected by the current revision are
preceding the page number.
indicated by an asterisk
r)
Date
Supplement Status
Original lnue
22 December 2004
LOG OF EFFECTIVITY PAGES
Page
Number
Page
Status
$28-1 thru
S28-11/S28-12
Original
Revision
Number
0
(
S26-2
U.S.
FAA APPROVED
Original
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 • SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 28
SERVICE BULLETIN CONFIGURATION LIST
The following is a list of Service Bulletins that are applicable to the
operation of the airplane• . and have been Incorporated into this
supplement. This list contains only those Service Bulletins that are
currently actrve.
Airpla11e Serial
Eflectivity
Revision
Incorporated
Incorporated
in Airplane
FAA APPROVED
Original
U.S.
S28-3/S28-4
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 28
SUPPLEMENT
BENDIX/KING KT 73 MODE S TRANPONDER
SECTION 1
GENERAL
The Bendix/King Mode S Transponder (KT 73), shown in Figure
S28-1, is the airborne component of the Air Traffic Control Radar
Beacon System (ATCRBS). The transponder enables the ATC
ground controller to accurately identify the airplane on the
radarscope.
The KT 73 Transponder system consists of a transponder unit
mounted in the instrument panel, an analog pressure altitude
encoder, and an externally-mounted L-Band antenna. The KT 73
Transponder system installation uses the same antenna, altitude
encoder and mounting hardware as the Bendix/King KT 76C Mode
NC Transponder. The KT 73 Transponder operates in Mode A
("SQUAWK"), Mode C (altitude reporting), and Mode S (elementary
surveillance/selective interrogation).
The transponder receives
interrogating signals on 1030 MHz and transmits coded reply
signals on 1090 MHz. In Mode C operation, the KT 73 provides
altitude information automatically to ATC ground stations. The
transponder reports altitude in 100-foot increments between -1000
and +20,000 feet MSL. Mode S allows the ground station to
individually interrogate the airplane by the unique 24-bit address
assigned to the airplane.
The KT 73 Transponder features an all solid-state transmitter with
microprocessor controls. Rotary control knobs are used to control
the operating mode and to set the squawk code. The gas discharge
display shows all functions including the flight level (pressure
altitude), airplane identification (SQUAWK}, and surveillance
interrogator (SI) code (airplane call sign). A photocell dims all
display segments automatically.
(Continued Next Page)
FAA APPROVED
Original
U.S.
S28-5
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
CESSNA
SUPPLEMENT 28
MODEL T206H
GENERAL (Continued)
BENDIX/KING KT 73 MODES TRANSPONDER
2
3
5
4
.
FLQ42
7
7
1
Figure S28--1
7
e
"""
1. IDENT BUTTON {IOT)-When pushed, a pulse is transmitted
for identification of the airplane on ATC radar display. IDT
will be d~played steadily and R will flash for approximately
18 seconds when the Function Selector Knob is set lo GND,
ON, or ALT. Button brightness is controlled by the avionics
light dimming rheostat.
2. MODE ANNUNCIATOR - Displays "FL" on the transponder
when "ALT", "SBY", or "GND" is selected on 1he Mode
Selector Switch. Displays "IDT' when the IDT button is
pushed.
3. ALTITUDE DISPLAY (FL) - The Flight Level altitude is
shown on the left side of the display only when the Mode
Selector Switch is set to Altitude mode (ALT). In ALT mode,
the KT 73 shows the pressure altitude on the left side of the
display area. The altitude is shown in hundreds of feet.
Dashes will appear in the altitude display instead of
numbers if an invalid code is received from the encoder.
(Continued Next Page}
FM APPROVED
S28-6
U.S.
Original
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 28
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
GENERAL (Continued)
4. REPLY INDICATOR (R) - The R will illuminate on the
display panel when the transponder is replying to a valid
interrogation during the following conditions:
1. Twice per second with valid interrogation on the ground
in Mode S (GND).
2. Once per second with valid interrogation from ATCRBS
in airborne Mode S (ON or ALT).
3. During the 18 seconds after pushing the ident button
(IDT).
5. MODE SELECT SWITCH - Controls application of power
and selects transponder operating mode as follows:
OFF -
De-energizes the KT 73 Transponder.
FLT ID - The KT 73 shows the airplane's flight identification
code and allows it to be changed. The Flight ID
should be the airplane identification assigned in the
flight plan. When no flight plan is available, the
registration marking of the airplane should be used.
FLT ID is modified by turning the CRSR Knob to
position the cursor under the character to be
changed then turning the FLT ID Knob to select the
desired character. When the CRSR and FLT ID
Knobs have not been turned for 5 seconds or the
Mode Select Switch has been turned to the SBY
position, the FLT ID will be saved. The unit does
not transmit in SBY mode.
SBY -
(Standby) Sets the KT 73 to standby power. While
in the standby mode the transponder identification
code may be selected. SBY is shown on the left
side of the display. The airplane identification code
is shown on the right side of the display. SBY
should be used only when the airplane is parked.
(Continued Next Page)
FAA APPROVED
Original
U.S.
S28-7
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 28
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
GENERAL (Continued)
TST -
Self-test function. The transmitter is disabled. All
display segments will come on for a minimum of 4
seconds. If no faults have been detected "TEST
OK" will be displayed.
Refer to the KT 73
Transponder section of the Bendix/King Silver
Crown Plus Pilot's Guide.
GND -
Sets the transponder to
inhibit ATCRBS,
ATCRBS/Mode S All Call and Mode S-only replies.
The KT 73 Transponder will continue to generate
Mode S squitter transmissions and reply to selective
interrogations. The KT 73 Transponder should be
set to the GND position when the airplane is in
operation on the ground before or after flight.
ON -
Sets transponder to transmit Mode A/S (airplane
identification) reply pulses with altitude information
suppressed.
Transponder identification code is
annunciated on the right side of the display.
ALT -
Sets transponder to transmit Mode A (squawk),
Mode C (altitude squawk) and Mode S (airplane
identification) reply pulses after receiving the
interrogation signal. FL is shown on the left side of
the display with the pressure altitude in hundreds of
feet. The airplane identification code is shown on
the right side of the display.
6. VFR CODE BUTTON (VFR) - Pushing the 'VFR" Button will
replace the current Mode A reply code with a preprogrammed Mode A reply code (usually 1200).
7. CODE SELECTOR KNOBS - Selects assigned Mode A
(squawk) code. Each knob sets a digit of the 4-character
code. The new code will be transmitted after a 5 second
delay.
Refer to the KT 73 Transponder section of the Bendix/King Silver
Crown Plus Pilot's Guide for additional information.
(
S28-8
U.S.
FAA APPROVED
Original
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 28
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 2
LIMITATIONS
The Bendix/King KT 73 Mode S Transponder is not approved for
operation above 20,000 feet MSL.
SECTION 3
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
TO TRANSMIT AN EMERGENCY SIGNAL
1. Mode Selector Switch - ALT.
2. Transponder Code Selector Knobs - SELECT 7700
operating code.
TO TRANSMIT A SIGNAL REPRESENTING LOSS OF ALL
COMMUNICATIONS (WHEN IN A CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT)
1. Mode Selector Switch - ALT.
2. Transponder Code Selector Knobs - SELECT 7600
operating code.
TO PROGRAM FLIGHT IDENTIFICATION CODE
1. Mode Selector Switch - ALT
2. Transponder Code Selector
SQUAWK code.
Knobs
-
SET
assigned
SECTION 4
NORMAL PROCEDURES
DURING TAXI
1. Mode Selector Switch - GND.
(Continued Next Page)
FAA APPROVED
Original
U.S.
S28-9
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 28
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
NORMAL PROCEDURES (Continued)
TO TRANSMIT MODE A/S (AIRPLANE IDENTIFICATION) CODES
IN FLIGHT
1. Transponder Code Selector Knobs - SET assigned code.
2. Mode Selector Switch - ON.
NOTE
During normal operation with Mode Selector
Switch in ON position, reply indicator flashes,
indicating transponder replies to interrogations.
Mode A reply codes are transmitted in ALT also;
however, Mode C codes are suppressed when
the Mode Selector Switch is positioned to ON.
3. IDT Button - PUSH when instructed by ground controller to
"SQUAWK IDENT" (R will come on steadily indicating
IDENT operation).
TO TRANSMIT MODE A/C/S (ALTITUDE REPORTING) CODES IN
FLIGHT
1. Transponder Code Selector Knobs - SELECT assigned
code.
2. Mode Selector Switch - ALT.
NOTE
•
When directed by ground controller to "STOP
ALTITUDE SQUAWK", turn Mode Selector
Switch to ON for Mode NS operation only.
•
Altitude transmitted by the transponder and
displayed on the KT 73 panel is pressure
altitude (referenced to 29.92 inches Hg (1013
hPa)). The conversion to indicated altitude is
done in the ATC computer.
(Continued Next Page)
(
FM APPROVED
S28-10
U.S.
Original
CESSNA
MODEL T206H
SECTION 9 - SUPPLEMENTS
SUPPLEMENT 28
NORMAL PROCEDURES (Continued)
TO SELF-TEST TRANSPONDER OPERATION
1. Mode Selector SWitch - TST.
2. Check all displays come on.
3. TEST OK displayed. If not refer to the KT 73 Transponder
section of the Bendix/t<ing Silver Crown Plus Pilot's Guide.
4. Mode Selector Switch - SELECT desired function.
SECTION 5
PERFORMANCE
There is no change to 1he airplane perfonnance when this
avionic equipment is installed.
FAA APPROVED
Original
U.S.
S28-11/S28-12
KT73
KT73
Mode S, Data/ink Transponder
Operating the KT 73
ldent
WilldOII'
i:ncod ng Alti rnci~r
Alli rude Wind ow
laent
Pt1~ll~ut1u11
\
Re~ly
Indicator
\
\
Function
Seier.tor
Kno~
Photocell
Fail
lnoication
VFR
BulttlR
4 ATCRBS Co<I~
Se lec1e< Knot},
IDENT Button
ALTITUDE DISPLAY
Marked IDT, the KT 73's ldenl button is pressed when ATC requests an
"ldent" or "Squawk Iden!" from your aircraft. When the ldent button is pressed
while in the GND, ON or ALT modes,
"IDT" will be illuminated on the display
for approximately 18 seconds. An
optional Remote ldenl switch may also
be installed to perform the same function.
When the ALT mode is selected,
the KT 73 displays the current Flight
Level, markecl by the letters "FL" and a
number in hundreds of feet This is
shown on the left side of the display.
For example, if "FL 071" is displayed,
this conresponds to a reported pressure
altitude of 7.100 feet. Note that the displayed Flight Level, or pressure altitude. may not agree with the aircraft's
baro-corrected altitude under non-standard conditions. The Flight Level, or
pressure altitude, reponed by the KT 73
will be corrected as required by the
ATC facility.
ID CODE
The ATCRBS Transponder
Identification code (squawk code) for
the aircraft is displayed in the ldent
Window on the right side of the display.
Each of lhe four Transponder Code
Selector Knobs selects a separate digit
of the identification code.
REPLY INDICATOR
When the KT 73 is replying to a
valid ground Mode S interrogation, the
reply nomenclature "R" will be Hluminated twice per second. When the KT 73
is reptying to a valid ATCRBS or airborne Mode S interrogation, the reply
nomenclature 'R" will be illuminated
once per second .
A fault in the altitude interface or an
invalid altitude input to the KT 73 will
cause the display to show a series of
dashes when the KT 73 is in the ALT
mode.
VFR
Momentarily pressing the VFR
Pushbut1on recalls the preprogrammed
VFR code, superseding whatever code
was previously entered. If the VFR
Pushbutton is pressed inadvertently,
the previous code may be retrieved by
Silver Crown Plus Pilot's Guide:
pressing the VFR button and holding it
for two seconds.
If a preset VFR code other than the
factory-set 1200 is desired. a new code
may be programmed as follows:
1 Place the unit in S1andby (SBY)
2. Select the desired VFR code
3. While holding the IDT (ldent) button
in, momentarily press the VFR bu!ion .
FUNCTION SELECTOR KNOB
The Function Selector Knob on the
right side of the KT 73 enables you to
choose from the following operating
modes:
OFF - The unit is not receiving power.
When the unit is turned to another
mode, it will reply or squitter within two
seconds. according to the selected
mode .
It).· !,<\
C8
:'. i'-J H .:' Li i i
FLT ID (FLIGHT ID) - The Flight ID
should be lhe aircraft identification
employed in the flighl plan. When no
flight plan is available, the registration
marking or the aircraft should be used.
When the FL"T ID mode is selected. the
KT 73 is inhibited from replying to any
interrogation, "FLT ID" is annunciated
on the display and the llight ID is displayed. The Flight ID is modified by
rotating the CRSR knob to position tt,e
cursor{_....) under the character to tie
changed then rotating the FLT ID knob
to select the desired character. Once
the CRSR and FLT ID knobs have been
idle for 5 seconds or the mode select
knob has been turned to lhe SBY position the flight ID will be saved.
SBY (STANDBY) - In Standby, the unit
is energized but is inhibited from replying \o any interrogation. "SBY" is
shown on the left side or the display
and lhe ID code is shown on tne right.
~1d~& ~g-£1;d:~2'.!
TST (TE.ST) - Replies are disabled and
all display segments are iiluminaled for
at least four seconds A series of internal tests is performed lo check the KT
73's integrity. verifying all aircraft specific configuration data and make hardware and squitter checks. If no faults
are detected, 'TEST OK' is displayed
and an audio message "TEST OK" is
annunciated, if the audio function is
installed.
The audio volume is set during inslallalion. Contact your avionics installer to
adjust the volume level to your personal preference.
Should a fault be detec1ed, "SBYwill be displayed on the left and the display on the right will cycle through all
the detected faults If the faults are
associated with external dala, an audio
message "CHECK FAULT CODES" will
be annunciated. Faul1s internal to the
KT 73 will annunciate an audio message 'TRANSPONDER TEST FAIL".
Internal faults will also cause ''FAIL" lo
be annunciated in 1he lower left of the
display in any mode of operation.
The fau!I codes are as follows :
F1 YY" • Squitter (Internal)
F2YY" · Internal or External EEPROM
(lnlemal)
F3YY' - Hardware (Internal)
F401 - Mode S address/Max Airspeed
(Internal)
FSYY- - Gilham or Execulive (External)
F6YY" - Interface (External)
• YY denotes the specific fault.
KT73
Except for the acquisition data fault
right window and altitude information (in
(code 101 ), the KT 73 will not inhibit
hundreds of feet) is shown on the left .
replies when an internal fault is identified.
The letters "FL" will be illuminated, inoi~
eating Flight Level . If altitude information is unavailable or im•alid, the left
portion of the display will be dashed.
·J.6
,c·
:'- -·'·,.,b
L \I
"bjj .,
-------~~~----~
GND (GROUND) - The KT 73 will inhibit ATC RBS (Air Traffic Control Radar
Beacon System). ATC RBS/Mode SAU
Call and Mode S-only All Call replies.
However, the unit will continue to generate Mode S squilter transmissions
and reply to discretely addressed Mode
S interrogations. The ID code is shown
on the right side of the display and the
letters "GND" are shown on the left
side.
Note: An optional remote 'air/ground"
switch may be installed. This feature
eliminates the need to manually place
the KT 73 in the GND mode. In addition, when the aircraft is airborne, tne
KT 73 will function as though the
Function Selector Knob is in the ALT
position when it is actually in the GND
position.
ON . The KT 73 is able to repiy to all
valid Mode A, C and S interrogaHons.
However, the altitude information will
not be transmitted. In the ON mode,
the altitude window is left blank and the
ID code is shown on the right side or
the display.
i7"
k:_I ";
···o·
-;
ALT (ALTITUDE) - Tile KT 73 replies to
all valid Mode A C and S interrogations. The ID code is displayed in the
DISPLAY BRIGHTNESS ADJUSTMENT - The KT 73's display brightness
is controlled by an ambient light sensor.
In addition, it has a manual adjustment
to allow For matching to lhe bnghtnes of
other lighted displays that may be in
the cockpit The display is adjusted in
the test (TST) mode.
To manually adjust the display
brightness, perform the following operations:
1. Tum the Function Selector Knob to
"TST".
2. Turn the BRT knob ctoci<wise to
increase the dis play brightness, or
coLJnterclockwise to decrease lhe display brightness.
The eight carets below the alphanumer!c display characters indicate the
brightness setting (relative to the photocell reading). Maximum brightness is
indicated by all eight carets being illuminated . Minimum brightness is indicated by no carets being illuminated.
The factory default setting is represented by four carets being illuminated.
Pressing the IDT button will return the
brightness to the default factory value.
3 Turn the Function Selector Knob
from TST to store the display brightness settings
NOTE: If power is removed from lhe KT
73 while still in the test mode, the brightness set1ing will be lost and the unil will
revert to the last known setting .
~
Cessna
ATe!dronCompany
Pi lot Safety
and Warning
Supplements
The Information contained in this document is not intended to supersede the
owner's Manual or Pilot's Operating Handbook applicable to a specific airplane. If
there is a conflict between this Pilot Safety and Warning Supplement and either the
Owner's Manual or Pilot's Operating Handbook to a specific airplane. the Owner's
Manual or Pilot's Operating Handbook shall take precedence. This publication
replaces the original issue (D5099-13) in its entirety.
COPYRIGHT~ 1991!
Cessna Aircrafl Company
Wichita, Kansas USA
0
Mamber of GAIIA
D5fJ9-13
Ong,nal Issue - 2 Oclob&r 1985
Reissue - 1 June 1998
CONTENTS
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNtNG SUPPLEMENTS
CONTENTS
SUPPLEMENT
INTRODUCTION
FLIGHT CONSIDERATIONS
Physiological • . . . • . . . • • . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .•. , 1
Checklists • . . . . . . . • . • .. • . . . • • . . . .. • . . . .. . .. • • .. . .. . . .. 2
Aircraft Loading . . . . . . . • . . . . . • • • • . . . . • • • • • • • . • . • . . . . . . • .
Single Engine Flight Information (Multi-engine Airplanes) . . • • . . . . • •
Pilot Prolidency • . . . . . • • • . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . .
Fuel Management . . • . . • . • . . • • . • • • • . . . . • . . . • • • • • • • . . • . • .
Airframe Icing ..•...............•.......•.......... , . . .
Weather .............................................
3
4
5
6
7
8
SYSTEM OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS
Restraint Systems • • • • . . • . . . . • . . • . • . • . . . . . . • . . . . , • . • • • • . 9
Fuel System Contamination • • • . • . . . . • . . . . • . . • • • . . . • . . . . . . 10
Fuel Pump Operation . . . . . . . . • . . . . . • . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Auxiliary Fuel Tanks .••••
Instrument Power • • • • . . .
Alternate AJr Systetn . • • • •
Carbon Monoxide • . . • • • •
Turbocharger
, •• ,
.•..
•••.
..•.
•••..•.••••..•.•.••.•.••
•••. . . . .. •. . . . •••••••••.
. •• •. • . ••••• • •••• ••. . . . .
. .••••••.••. . . . . . .. •. . . .
,,
.•
••
.•
12
13
14
15
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . • 16
In-Right Fires . • • • • • • • • . • • . . . . • • • . . . . . • • • . • . . . • • . • • • • .
In-Flight Opening of Doors .•••....••.... , . • • • • • . • • • • • . . . •
17
18
MAINTENANCE CONSIDERATIONS
Maintenance . • . . . . . . . . . . • . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . • • • . • . . . • 19
Seat and Restraint Systems • . . . . . . . • . • • . . . . • . • • • • . . . . • • . . 20
Exhaust and Fuel Systems . • . . . . . . • . . • • . . . . • . • . • . . . . . . . . . 21
Retractable Landing Gear
Pressurized Airplanes
Potential Hazards
Reissue - 1 June 1998
.. . . • • • . . . . • • • .. . • • . . . .. . . .. • • .
22
• • • . . . . . • • . • . . • . . . . . • . • . . . • . . . . . . . 23
. . •. • . •• •• ••• ••• . . . ••. •• . . . ••. . . •• •• .
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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INTRODUCTION
INTRODUCTION
Pilots should know the information contained in the airplane's operating
handbook, placards and checklists, and be familiar with service/maintenance
publications, including service letters and bulletins, .to ensure maximum safe
utilization of the airplane. When the airplane was manufactured, it was
equipped with a Pilot's Operating Handbook, Flight Manual, and/or Owner's
Manual. If a handbook or manual is missing, a replacement should be
obtained by contacting a Cessna Authorized Service Station.
In an effort to re-emphasize subjects that are generally known to most pilots;
safety and operational information has been provided in the following Pilot
Safety and Warning Supplements. As outlined in the table of contents, the
Supplements are arranged numerically to make it easier to locate a particular
Supplement. Supplement coverage is classified in three (3) categories: Flight
Considerations, System Operational Considerations, and Maintenance
Considerations. Most of the information relates to all Cessna airplanes,
although a few Supplements are directed at operation of specific configurations
such as multi-engine airplanes, pressurized airplanes, or airplanes certified for
f)jght into known icing conditions.
Day-to-day safety practices play a key role in achieving maximum utilization of
any piece of equipment.
WARNING
IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PILOT TO ENSURE
THAT ALL ASPECTS OF PREFLIGHT PREPARATION ARE
CONSIDERED BEFORE A FLIGHT IS INITIATED. ITEMS
WHICH MUST BE CONSIDERED INCLUDE, BUT ARE NOT
NECESSARILY LIMITED TO, THE FOLLOWING:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
PILOT PHYSICAL CONDITION AND PROFICIENCY
AIRPLANE AIRWORTHINESS
AIRPLANE EQUIPI\/IENT APPROPRIATE FOR THE
FLIGHT
AIRPLANE LOADING AND WEIGHT AND BALANCE
ROUTE OF THE FLIGHT
WEATHER DURING THE FLIGHT
FUEL QUANTITY REQUIRED FOR THE FLIGHT,
INCLUDING ADEQUATE RESERVES
AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL AND ENROUTE NAVIGATION
FACILITIES
FACILITIES AT AIRPORTS OF INTENDED USE
(Continued Next Page)
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INTRODUCTION
PILOT SAFETY AND
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WARNING
•
•
(Continued)
ADEQUACY OF AIRPORT (RUNWAY LENGTH, SLOPE,
CONDITION, ETC.)
LOCAL NOTICES, AND PUBLISHED NOTAMS
FAILURE TO CONSIDER THESE ITEMS COULD RESULT
IN AN ACCIDENT CAUSING EXTENSIVE PROPERTY
DAMAGE AND SERIOUS OR EVEN FATAL INJURIES TO
THE PILOT, PASSENGERS, AND OTHER PEOPLE ON
THE GROUND.
The following Pilot Safety and Warning Supplements discuss in detail many of
the subjects. which must be considered by a pilot before embarking on any
flight. Knowledge of this information is considered essential for safe, efficient
operation of an airplane.
Prop.er flight safety begins long before the takeoff. A pilot's attitude toward
safety and safe operation determines the thoroughness of the preflight
preparation, including the assessment of the weather and airplane conditions
and limitations. The pilot's physical and mental condition and proficiency are
also major contributing factors. The use of current navigation charts, the
Aeronautical Information Manual, NOTAMs, airport data, weather information,
Advisory Circulars and training information, etc., is important. Individuals often
develop their own personal methods for performing certain flight operations;
however, it is required that these do not conflict with the limitations or
recommended operating procedures for a specific airplane.
The pilot should know the Emergency· Procedures for the airplane, since there
may not be time to review the checklist in an emergency situation. It is
essential that the pilot review the entire operating handbook to retain familiarity.
He or she should maintain a working knowledge of the ·limitations of his or her
airplane. When the pilot deliberately or inadvertently operates the airplane
outside the limitations, he or she is violating Federal Aviation Regulations and
may be subject to disciplinary actions.
Cessna does not support modifications to Cessna airplanes, whether by
Supplemental Type Certificate or otherwise, unless these certificates are
approved by Cessna. Such modifications, although approved by the FAA, may
void any and all Cessna warranties on the airplane since Cessna may not
know the full effects on the overall airplane. Cessna does not and has not
tested and approved all such modifications by other companies. Maintenance
and operating procedures and performance data provided by Cessna may no
longer be accurate for the modified airplane.
Airplanes require maintenance on a regular basis. As a result, it is essential
that the airplane be regularly inspected and repaired when parts are worn or
damaged in order to maintain flight safety.
Information for the proper
maintenance of the airplane is found in the airplane Service/Maintenance
Manual, Illustrated Parts Catalog, and in company-issued Service Information
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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INTRODUCTION
Letters or Service Bulletins, etc. Pilots should assure themselves that all
recommendations for product changes or modifications called for by Service
Bulletins, etc., are accomplished and that the airplane receives repetitive and
required inspections.
Much of the subject matter discussed in the following Supplements has been
derived from various publications of the U.S. Government. Since these
documents contain considerably more information and detail than is contained
here, it is highly recommended that the pilot also read them in order to gain an
even greater understanding of the subjects related to flight safety. These
publications include the following:
AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION MANUAL (AIM). This Federal Aviation
Administration (FAA) manual is designed to provide airmen with basic flight
information and Air Traffic Control (ATC) procedures for use in the National
Airspace System (NAS). It also contains items of interest to pilots concerning
health and medical facts, factors affecting flight safety, a piloVcontroller
glossary of terms used in the Air Traffic Control System, and information on
safety, accident and hazard reporting. This manual can be purchased at retail
dealers, or on a subscription basis from the Superintendent of Documents,
U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.
· NOTICES TO AIRMEN (Class II). This is a publication containing current
1
Notices to Airmen (NOTAMS) which are considered essential to the safety of
flight as well as supplemental data affecting the other operational publications
listed here. It also includes current Flight Data Center (FDC) NOTAMS, which
are regulatory in nature, issued to establish restrictions to flight or amend
charts or published Instrument Approach Procedures. This publication is
issued every 14 days and is available by subscription from the Superintendent
of Documents.
AIRPORT FACILITY DIRECTORY, ALASKA and PACIFIC CHART
SUPPLEMENTS.
These publications contain information on airports,
communications, navigation aids, instrument landing systems, VOA receiver
checks, preferred routes, FSS/Weather Service telephone numbers, Air Route
Traffic · Control Center (ARTCC) frequencies, and various other pertinent
special notices essential to air navigation. These publications are available by
subscription from the National Ocean Service (NOS), NOAA N/ACC3
Distribution Division, Riverdale, Maryland 20737, telephone 1-800-638-8972
FAX (301) 436-6829.
FEDERAL AVIATION REGULATIONS (FARs). The FAA publishes the FARs
to make readily available to the aviation community the regulatory requirements
placed upon them. These regulations are sold as individual parts by the
Superintendent of Documents. The more frequently amended parts are sold
by subscription service with subscribers receiving changes automatically as
they are issued. Less active parts are sold on a single-sale basis. Changes
to single-sale parts .will be sold separately as issued. Information concerning
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INTRODUCTION
PILOT SAFETY AND
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these changes v,jM bt:J furnished by the FAA through its S1atus of Federal
Aviation Regulations, AC 00-4411.
ADVISORY CIRCULARS (ACs). The FAA issues ACs to inform the aviation
public of nonreg1Jlatory material of interest. Advisory .Circulars are Issued in a
numbered subject system com~spondlng to the subjl:JCI arHs of the Federal
Aviation Regulations. AC 00-2.11, Advisory Circular Cheddlst contms a listing
of ACs covering a wide range of subjects and how to order them, many of
whlcn are distributed fretH>t-ctwge.
AC 00-2.11 Is issued every lour months and iS available at no cost from: U.S.
Department of Transportation, Distribution requirements Seotion. SVC 121.21,
Washington, DC 20590. The checklist is also available via the memet st
http://WWW.faa.gov/abc/ac-chkliSVactoc.htm.
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PHYSIOLOGICAL
PHYSIOLOGICAL
FATIGUE
Fatigue continues to be one of the most treacherous hazards to flight safety. It
generally slows reaction times and causes errors due to inattention, and it may
not be apparent to a pilot until serious errors are made. Fatigue is best
described as either acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term). As a normal
occurrence of everyday living, acute fatigue is the tiredness felt after long
periods of physical and/or mental strain, including strenuous muscular effort,
immobility, heavy mental workload, strong emotional pressure, monotony, and
lack of sleep. In addition to these common causes, the pressures of business,
financial worries, and unique family problems can be important contributing
factors. Consequently, coordination and alertness, which are vital to safe pilot
performance, can be reduced. Acute fatigue can be prevented by adequate
rest and sleep, as well as regular exercise and proper nutrition.
Chronic fatigue occurs when there is insufficient time for full recovery between
periods of acute fatigue. Performance continues to degrade and judgment
becomes impaired so that unwarranted risks may be taken. Recovery from
chronic fatigue requires a prolonged period of rest. If a pilot is markedly
fatigued prior to a given flight, he or she should not fly. To prevent cumulative
fatigue effects during long flights, pilots should conscientiously make efforts to
remain mentally active by making frequent visual and radio navigation positi~n
checks, estimates of time of arrival at the next check point, etc.
STRESS
Stress from the pressures of everyday living can impair pilot performance,
often in very subtle ways. Difficulties can occupy thought processes enough to
markedly decrease alertness. .Distractions can also interfere with judgment to
the point that unwarranted risks are taken, such as flying into deteriorating
weather conditions to keep on schedule. Stress and fatigue can be an
extr.emely hazardous combination.
It is. virtually impossible to leave stress on the ground. Therefore, when more
than usual difficulties are being experienced, a pilot should consider delaying
flight until these difficulties are satisfactorily resolved.
EMOTION
Certain emotionally upsetting events, including a serious argument, death of a
family member, separation or divorce, loss of job, or financial catastrophe can
seriously impair a pilot's ability to fly an airplane safely. The emotions of
anger, depression, and anxiety from such events not only decrease alertness
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but may also lead to taking unnecessary risks. Any pilot who experiences an
emotionally upsetting event should not fly until satisfactorily recovered from the
event.
ILLNESS
A pilot should not fly with a known medical condition or a change of a known
medical condition that would make the pilot unable to meet medical certificate
standards. Even a minor illness suffered in day-to-day living can seriously
degrade performance of many piloting skills vital to safe flight. An illness may
produce a fever and other distracting symptoms that can impair judgment,
memory, alertness, and the ability to make decisions. Even if the symptoms of
an illness are under adequate control with a medication, the medication may
adversely affect pilot performance, and invalidate his or her medical certificate.
The safest approach is not to fly while suffering from any illness. If there is
doubt about a particular illness, the pilot should contact an Aviation Medical
Examiner for advice.
MEDICATION
Pilot performance can be seriously degraded by both prescribed and over-thecounter medications. Many medications, such as tranquilizers, sedatives,
strong pain relievers, and cough suppressant preparations, have primary
effects that may impair judgment, memory, alertness, coordination, vision, and
ability to make decisions. Other medications, such as antihistamines, blood
pressure drugs, muscle relaxants, and agents to control diarrhea and motion
sickness, have side effects that may impair the body's critical functions. Any
medications that depress the nervous system, such as a sedative, tranquilizer
or antihistamine, can make a pilot more susceptible to hypoxia.
FARs prohibit pilots from flying while using any medication that affects their
faculties in any way contrary to safety. The safest advice is to not fly while
taking medications, unless approved to do so by an Aviation Medical
Examiner. The condition for which the drug is required may itself be very
hazardous to flying, even when the symptoms are suppressed by the drug. A
combination of medications may cause adverse effects that do not result from
a single medication.
ALCOHOL
Do not fly while under the influence of alcohol. Flying and alcohol are definitely
a lethal combination. FARs prohibit pilots from flying within 8 hours after
consuming any alcoholic beverage or while under the influence of alcohol. A
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PHYSIOLOGICAL
pilot may still be under the influence 8 hours after drinking a moderate amount
of alcohol. Therefore, an excellent practice is to allow at least 24 hours
between "bottle and throttle," depending on the amount of alcoholic beverage
consumed.
Extensive research has provided a number of facts about the hazards of
alcohol consumption and flying. As little as one ounce of liquor, one bottle of
beer, or four ounces of wine can impair flying skills, with the alcohol consumed
in these drinks being detectable in the breath and blood for at least three
hours. Alcohol also renders a pilot much more susceptible to disorientation
and hypoxia. In addition, the .after effects of alcohol increase the level of
fatigue significantly.
There is simply no way of alleviating a hangover. Remember that the human
body metabolizes alcohol at a fixed rate, and no amount of coffee or
medications will alter this rate. Do not fly with a hangover, or a "masked
hangover" (symptoms suppressed by aspirin or other medication). A pilot can
be severely impaired for many hours by hangover.
DRINKING THE RIGHT FLUIDS
One of the main sources of pilot and passenger complaints stems from the
relatively lowered humidity during air travel encountered at altitude particularly
on extended flights. Even though an individual may not be physically active,
body water is continuously expired from the lungs and through the skin. This
physiological phenomenon is .called insensible perspiration or insensible loss
of water.
The loss of water through the skin, lungs, and kidneys never ceases. Water
loss is increased with exercise, fever, and in some disease conditions such as
hyperthyroidism. Combatting the effects of insensible water loss during flight
requires frequent water intake. Unless this is done, dehydration will occur and
this causes interference with blood circulation, tissue metabolism, and
excretion of the kidneys. Water is vital for the normal chemical reaction of
human tissue. It is also necessary for the regulation of body temperature and
as an excretory medium.
Beginning a flight in a rested, healthy condition is of prime importance. Proper
water balance through frequent fluid intake relieves the adverse effects
produced by insensible water loss in an atmosphere of lowered humidity.
Typical dehydration conditions are: dryness of the tissues and resulting
irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat as well as other conditions previously
mentioned plus the associated fatigue relating to the state of acidosis .(reduced
alkalinity of the blood and the body tissues). A person reporting for a flight in a
dehydrated state will more readily notice these symptoms until fluids are
adequately replaced.
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Consumption of coffee, tea, cola, and cocoa should be minimized since these
drinks contain caffeine. In addition, tea contains a related drug, theophylline,
while cocoa (and chocolate) contain theobromine, of the same drug group.
These drugs, besides having a diuretic effect, have a marked stimulating effect
and can cause an increase in pulse rate, elevation of blood pressure,
stimulation of digestive fluid formation, and irritability of the gastrointestinal
tract.
HYPOXIA
Hypoxia, in simple terms, is a lack of sufficient oxygen to keep the brain and
other body tissues functioning properly. Wide individual variation occurs with
respect to susceptibility to and symptoms of hypoxia.
In addition to
progressively insufficient oxygen at higher altitudes, .anything interfering with
the blood's ability to carry oxygen can contribute to hypoxia (e.g., anemias,
carbon monoxide, and certain drugs). Also, alcohol and various -other drugs
decrease the brain's tolerance to hypoxia. A human body has no built-in alarm
system to let the pilot know when he is not getting enough oxygen. It is
difficult to predict when or where hypoxia will occur during a given flight, or
·
how it will manifest itself.
Although a deterioration in night vision occurs at a cabin pressure altitude as
low as 5000 feet, other significant effects of altitude hypoxia usually do not
occur in a normal healthy pilot below 12,000 feet. From 12,000 to 15,000 feet
of altitude, judgment, memory, alertness, coordination, and ability to make
decisions are impaired, and headache, drowsiness, dizziness, and either a
sense of well-being (euphoria) or belligerence occurs. The effects appear
following increasingly shorter periods of exposure to increasing altitude. In
fact, a pilot's performance can seriously deteriorate within 15 minutes at
15;000 feet. At cabin pressures above 15,000 feet, the periphery of the visual
field grays out to a point where only central vision remains (tunnel vision). A
blue coloration (cyanosis) of the fingernails and lips develops and the ability to
take corrective and protective action is lost in 20 to 30 minutes at 18,000 feet
and 5 to 12 minutes at 20,000 feet, followed soon. thereafter by
unconsciousness.
The altitude at which significant effects of hypoxia occur can be lowered by a
number of factors. Carbon monoxide inhaled in smoking or from exhaust
fumes, lowered hemoglobin (anemia), and certain medications can reduce the
oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood to the degree that the amount of oxygen
provided to body tissues will already be equivalent to the oxygen provided to
the tissues when exposed to a cabin pressure altitude of several thousand
feet. Small amounts of alcohol and low doses of certain drugs, such as
antihistamines, tranquilizers, sedatives, and analgesics can, through their
depressant action, render the brain ·much more susceptible to· hypoxia.
Extreme heat and cold, fever, and anxiety increase the body's demand for
oxygen, and hence, its susceptibility to hypoxia.
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PHYSIOLOGICAL
Current regulations require that pilots use supplemental oxygen .after 30
minutes of exposure to cabin pressure altitudes between 12,500 and 14,000
feet and immediately upon exposure to .cabin pressure altitudes above 14,000
feet. Every occupant of the airplane JllUSt be .provided with supplemental
oxygen at cabin pressure altitudes above 15,000 feei.
Hypoxia can be prevented by avoiding factors that reduce tolerance to altitude,
by enrichening the air with oxygen from an appropriate oxygen system, and by
maintaining a comfortable, safe cabin pressure altitude.
For optimum
protection, pilots are encouraged to use supplemental oxygen above 10,000
feet during the day, and above 5000 feet at night.
NOTE
When using oxygen systems that do not supply "pressure
breathing" , 100% oxygen cannot maintain proper blood
oxygen level above 25,000 feet altitude. Pilot's must be
familiar with limitations of the airplane oxygen system.
Pilots are encouraged to attend physiological training and susceptibility testing
in a high-altitude chamber to experience and make ·note of their own personal
reactions to the effects of hypoxia. These chambers are located at the FAA
Civil Aeromedical Institute and many governmental and military facilities.
Knowing before hand what your own early symptoms of hypoxia are will allow a
greater time margin for taking corrective action. The corrective action, should
symptoms be noticed, is to use supplemental oxygen and/or decrease cabin
altitude. These actions must not be delayed.
SMOKING
Smokers are slightly resistant to the initial symptoms of hypoxia. Because of
this, smokers risk the possibility of delayed detection of hypoxia. Pilots should
avoid any detrimental factors, such as second · hand smoke, which can· cause
such insensitivity. The small merit of hypoxic tolerance in smokers will do
more harm than good by rendering them insensitive and unaware of the
hypoxic symptoms.
Smoking in the cabin of the airplane exposes other passengers to high
concentrations of noxious gas and residue. Furthermore, many of the systems
of the airplane are contaminated and deteriorated by long-term exposure to
smoking residue. Due to the large number of known dangers and hazards, as
well as those which are still the subject of research, it is strongly
recommended that smoking not take place in flight.
WARNING
SMOKING WHILE OXYGEN SYSTEMS ARE
CREATES AN EXTREME FIRE HAZARD.
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HYPERVENTILATION
Hyperventilation, or an abnormal increase in the volume of air breathed in and
out of the lungs, can occur subconsciously when a stressful situation is
encountered in flight. As hyperventilation expels excessive carbon dioxide
from the body, a pilot can experience symptoms of light headedness,
suffocation, drowsiness, tingling in the extremities, -and coolness -- and react to
them with even greater hyperventilation. Incapacitation can eventually result.
Uncoordination, disorientation, painful muscle spasms, and finally,
unconsciousness may ultimately occur.
The symptoms of hyperventilation will subside within a few minutes if the rate
and depth of breathing are consciously brought back under control. The
restoration of normal carbon dioxide levels in the body can be hastened by
controlled breathing in and out of a paper bag held over the nose and mouth.
Early symptoms of hyperventilation and hypoxia are similar.
Moreover,
hyperventilation a:nd hypoxia can occur at the same time. Therefore, if a pilot
is using oxygen when symptoms are experienced, the oxygen system should
be checked to assure that it has been functioning effectively before giving
attention to rate and depth of breathing.
EAR BLOCK
As an airplane climbs and the cabin pressure decreases, trapped air in the
middle ear expands and escapes through the eustachian tube to the nasal
passages, thus equalizing with the pressure iri the cabin. During descent,
cabin pressure increases and some air must return to the middle ear through
the eustachian tube to maintain equal pressure. However, this process does
not always occur without effort. In most cases it can be accomplished by
swallowing, yawning, tensing the muscles in the throat or, if these do not work,
by the combination of closing the mouth, pinching the nose closed, and
attempting to blow gently through the nostrils (Valsalva maneuver).
Either an upper respiratory infection, such as a cold or sore throat, or a nasal
allergic condition can produce enough congestion around the eustachian tube
to make equalization difficult.
Consequently, the difference in pressure
between the middle ear and the airplane cabin can build up to a level that will
hold the eustachian tube closed, making equalization difficult, if not impossible.
This situation is commonly referred to as an "ear block." An ear block
produces severe pain and loss of hearing that can last from several hours to
several days. Rupture of the ear drum can occur in flight or after landing.
Fluid can accumulate in the middle ear and become infected. If an ear block
is experienced and does not clear shortly after landing, a physician should be
consulted. Decongestant sprays or drops to reduce congestion usually do not ·
provide adequate protection around the eustachian tubes. Oral decongestants
have side effects that can significantly impair pilot performance. An ear block
can be prevented by not flying with an upper respiratory infection or nasal
allergic condition.
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PHYSIOLOGICAL
SINUS BLOCK
During climb and descent, air pressure in the sinuses equalizes with the
airplane.cabin pressure through small openings that connect the sinuses to the
nasal passages. Either an upper respiratory infection, such as a cold ·or
sinusitis, or a nasal allergic condition can produce enough congestion around
the openings to slow equalization, and as the difference in pressure between
the sinus and cabin increases, eventually the openings plug. This "sinus
block" occurs most frequently during descent.
A sinus block can occur in the frontal sinuses, located above each eyebrow, or
in the maxillary sinuses, located in each upper cheek. It will usually produce
excruciating pain over the sinus area. A maxillary sinus block can also make
the upper teeth ache. Bloody mucus may discharge from nasal passages. A
sinus block can be prevented by not flying with an upper respiratory infection
or nasal allergic condition. If a sinus block does occur and does not clear
shortly after landing, a physician should be consulted.
VISION IN FLIGHT
Of all the pilot's senses, vision is the most critical to safe flight. The level of
illumination is the major factor to adequate in-flight vision. Details on flight
instruments or aeronautical charts become difficult to discern under dimly lit
conditions. Likewise, the detection of other aircraft is much more difficult
under such conditions.
In. darkness, vision becomes more sensitive to light, a process called dark
adaptation. Although exposure to total darkness for at least 30 minutes is
required for complete dark adaptation, a pilot can achieve a moderate degree
of dark adaptation within 20 minutes under dim red lighting. Since red light
severely distorts colors, especially on aeronautical charts, and can cause
serious difficulty in focusing the eyes on objects inside the cabin, its use is
advisable only where optimum outside night vision is necessary. Even so,
white flight station lighting must be available when needed for map and
instrument reading, especially while under IFR conditions. Dark adaptation is
impaired by exposure to cabin pressure altitudes above 5000 feet, carbon
monoxide inhaled in smoking and from. exhaust fumes, deficiency of vitamin A
in the diet, and by prolonged exposure to bright sunlight. Since any degree of
dark adaptation is lost within a few seconds of viewing a bright light, pilots
should close one eye when using a light to preserve some degree of night
vision. In addition, use of sunglasses during the day wm · help speed the
process of dark adaptation during night flight.
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SCUBA DIVING
A pilot or passenger who flies shortly after prolonged scuba diving could be· in
serious danger. Anyone who intends to fly after scuba diving should allow the
body sufficient time to rid itself of excess nitrogen absorbed during diving. If
not, decompression sickness (commonly referred to as the "bends"), due to
dissolved gas, can occur even at low altitude and create a serious in-flight
emergency. The recommended waiting time before flight to cabin altitudes of
8000 feet or less is at least 12 hours after diving which has not required
controlled ascent (non-decompression diving), and at least 24 hours after
diving which has required a controlled ascent (decompression diving), The
waiting time before flight to cabin pressure altitudes above 8000 feet should be
at least 24 hours after any scuba diving.
AEROBATIC FLIGHT
Pilots planning to engage in aerobatic maneuvers should be aware of the
physiological stresses associated with accelerative forces during _ such
maneuvers. Forces experienced with a rapid push-over maneuver will result in
the blood and body organs being displaced toward the head. Depending on
the forces involved and the individual tolerance, the pilot may experience
discomfort, headache, "red-out", and even unconsciousness.
Forces
experienced with a rapid pull-up maneuver result in the blood and body organs
being displaced toward the lower part of the body away from the head. Since
the brain requires continuous blood circulation for an adequate oxygen supply,
there is a physiological limit to the time the pilot can tolerate higher forces
before losing consciousness. As the blood circulation to the brain decreases
as a result of the forces involved, the pilot will experience "narrowing" of visual
fields, "gray-out", "black-out", and unconsciousness.
Physiologically, humans progressively adapt to imposed strains and stresses,
and with practice, any maneuver will have a decreasing effect. Tolerance to
"G" forces is dependent on human physiology and the individual pilot. These
factors include the skeletal anatomy, the cardiovascular architecture, the
nervous system, blood make-up, the general physical state, and experience
and recency of exposure. A pilot should consult an Aviation Medical Examiner
prior to aerobatic training and be aware that poor physical condition can
reduce tolerance to accelerative forces.
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SCUBA DIVING
A pilot or passenger who flies shortly after prolonged scuba diving could be· in
serious danger. Anyone who intends to fly after scuba diving should allow the
body sufficient time to rid itself of excess nitrogen absorbed during diving. If
not, decompression sickness (commonly referred to as the "bends"), due to
dissolved gas, can occur even at low altitude and create a serious in-flight
emergency. The recommended waiting time before flight to cabin altitudes of
8000 feet or less is at least 12 hours after diving which has not required
controlled ascent (non-decompression diving), and at least 24 hours after
diving which has required a controlled ascent (decompression diving). The
waiting time before flight to cabin pressure altitudes above 8000 feet should be
at least 24 hours after any scuba diving.
AEROBATIC FLIGHT
Pilots planning to engage in aerobatic maneuvers should be aware of the
physiological stresses associated with accelerative forces during _ such
maneuvers. Forces experienced with a rapid push-over maneuver will result in
the blood and body organs being displaced toward the head. Depending on
the forces involved and the individual tolerance, the pilot may experience
discomfort, headache, "red-out", and even unconsciousness.
Forces
experienced with a rapid pull-up maneuver result in the blood and body organs
being displaced toward the lower part of the body away from the head. Since
the brain requires continuous blood circulation for an adequate oxygen supply,
there is a physiological limit to the time the pilot can tolerate higher forces
before losing consciousness. As the blood circulation to the brain decreases
as a result of the forces involved, the pilot will experience "narrowing" of visual
fields, "gray-out", "black-out", and unconsciousness.
Physiologically, humans progressively adapt to imposed strains and stresses,
and with practice, any maneuver will have a decreasing effect. Tolerance to
"G" forces is dependent on human physiology and the individual· pilot. These
factors include the skeletal anatomy, the cardiovascular architecture, the
nervous system, blood make-up, the general physical state, and experience
and recency of exposure, A pilot should consult an Aviation Medical Examiner
prior to aerobatic training and be aware that poor physical condition can
reduce tolerance to accelerative forces.
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CHECKLISTS
CHECKLISTS
CONSISTENT USE
Airplane checklists are available for those persons who do not wish to use the
operating handbook on every flight. These checklists contain excerpts from
the operating handbook written for that particular airplane and are designed to
remind pilots of the minimum items to check for safe operation of the airplane,
without providing details concerning the operation of any particular system.
Checklists should be used by the pilot and not placed in the seat pocket and
forgotten. Even pilots who consistently carry the checklists tend to memorize
certain· areas and intentionally overlook these procedural references.
Consequently, in time, these individuals find that operating something as
complex as an airplane on memory alone is practically impossible, and
eventually, could find themselves in trouble because one or more important
items are overlooked or completely forgotten. The consistent use of all
checklists is required for the safe operation of an airplane.
NOTE
Abbreviated checklists ·can be used in place of the airplane
operating manual However, they should be used only after
the pilot becomes familiar with the airplane operating manual,
and thoroughly understands the required procedures for
airplane operation.
CONTRIBUTIONS TO SAFETY
Most large airplanes in the transport category are flown by consistent use of all
checklists. Experience has shown that pilots who consistently use checklists
on every flight maintain higher overall proficiency, and have better safety
records. The pilot should not become preoccupied inside the cockpit (such as
with a checklist) and fail to remain alert for situations outside the airplane.
CHECKLIST ARRANGEMENT (ORGANIZATION OF
ITEMS)
Abbreiviated checklists are written in a concise form to provide pilots with a
means of complying with established requirements for the safe operation of
their airplane. The checklists are usually arranged by "Item" and "Condition"
headings. The item to be checked is listed with the desired condition stated.
Key words or switch and lever positions are usually emphasized by
capitalization in the "Condition" column. The checklist may also contain
supplemental information pertinent to the operation of the airplane, such as
performance data, optional equipment operation, etc., that the pilot might
routinely use.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
2
CHECKLISTS
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
EMERGENCY CHECKLISTS
Emergency checklists are provided for emergency situations peculiar to a
particular airplane design, operating or handling characteristic. Pilots should
periodically review the airplane operating handbook to be completely familiar
with information published by the manufacturer concerning the airplane.
Emergency situations are never planned and may occur at the worst possible
time. During most emergency conditions, there will not be sufficient time to
refer to an emergency checklist; therefore, it is essential that the pilot commit
to memory those emergency procedures that may be shown in bold-face type
or outlined with a black border, within the emergency procedures section in
operating handbooks or equivalent hand-held checklists. These items are
essential for continued safe flight. After the emergency situation is under
control, the pilot should complete the checklist in its entirety, in the proper
sequence, and confirm that all items have been accomplished. It is essential
that the pilot review and know published emergency checklists and any other
emergency procedures. Familiarity with the airplane and its systems and a
high degree of pilot proficiency are valuable assets if an emergency should
arise.
2
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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3
AtRPLANE LOADING
AIRPLANE LOADING
AIRPLANE CENTER-OF-GRAVITY RANGE
Pilots should never become complacent about the weight and balance
limitations of an airplane, and the reasons for these limitations. Since weight
and balance are vital to safe airplane operation, every pilot should have a
thorough understanding of airplane loading, with its limitations, and the
principles of airplane balance. Airplane balance is maintained by controlling
the position of the center-of-gravity. Overloading, or misloading, may not result
in obvious structural damage, but could do harm to hidden structure or
produce a dangerous situation in the event of an emergency under those
conditions. Overloading, or misloading may also produce hazardous airplane
handling characteristics.
There are several different weights to be considered when dealing with
airplane weight and balance. These are defined in another paragraph in this
supplement. Airplanes are designed. with predetermined structural limitations
to meet certain performance and flight characteristics and standards. Their
balance is determined by the relationship of the center-of-gravity (C.G.) to the
center of lift. Normally, the C.G. of an airplane is located slightly forward of the
center of lift. The pilot can safely use the airplane flight controls to maintain
stabilized balance of the airplane as long as the C.G. is located within
specified forward and aft limits. The allowable variation of the C.G. location is
called the center-of-gravity range. The exact location of the allowable C.G.
range is specified in the operating handbook for that particular airplane.
LOCATING THE LOAD
It is the responsibility of the pilot to ensure that the airplane is loaded properly.
Operation outside of prescribed weight and balance limitations could result in
an accident and serious or fatal injury.
To determine the center-of-gravity (C.G.) of an airplane, a pilot must have an
understanding of the three terms used in weight and balance calculations.
These terms are weight, moment, and arm. The principles associated with
these terms are applied to .each occupant, piece of cargo or baggage, the
airplane itself, and to all fuel to determine the overall C.G. of the airplane.
The weight of an object should be carefully determined or calculated. All
weights must be measured in the same units as the aircraft empty weight. The
arm is the distance that the weight of a particular item is located from the
reference datum line or the imaginary vertical line from which all horizontal
distances are measured for balance purposes (refer to examples in Figure 1).
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3
PILOT SAFETY AND
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AIRPLANE LOADING
The word •moment,• as used in airplane loading procedures, is the product of
the weight al the object multiplied by the arm.
10 LEIS.
IOI
'-'
z
Ill
C
r
Ill
.....----20
IN.- - - - (AVERAGE ARM)
i - - - - - - - - 3 0 IH.-------.....i
a:
(ARMJ
M
WXA
10 LllX 30 IN.
10 YI, X lQ IN.
20 LB(W)
+ 300 LA IN.
+
+
JOO
THEN, A •
LA IN.
400 LB. IN.
TOTAL MOMENT ~
TOTAL WEIGHT
- + 400 LB.IN.•
~ ~
1 ~lo,MOM£NTS
+ 20 I._
20LII.
r
Figure 1. Computing the Center-of-Gravity
Pilots can remember and use lhe relationship of these terms most easily by
arranging them in a mathematical triangle:
weJgh1i x arm "' moment
momeni + weJght = 1U-m.
moment + um == weight
The relative positioo of any two terms indicates the mathematical process
(multiplication or division) required to compute the third term.
A loading graph or loading tables, a center-of-gravity limits chart and/or a
center-of-gravity moment envelope chart, as well as a sample loading problem
are_ p,ovided in most airplane operating handbooks. By following the narrative
directions, the pilot can determine the correct airplane C.G. for any
configuration of the airplane. II the position of the load is different from that
shown on the loading graph or In the loading tables, additional moment
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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3
AIRPLANE LOADING
calculations, based on the actual weight and C.G. arm (fuselage station) of the
item being loaded, must be performed.
LOAD SECURITY
In addition to the security of passengers, it is the pilot's responsibility to
determine that all cargo and/or baggage is secured before flight. When
required, the airplane may be equipped with tie-down rings or fittings for the
purpose of securing cargo or baggage in the baggage compartment or cabin
area. The maximum allowable cargo loads to be carried are determined by
cargo weight limitations, the type and number of tie-downs used, as well as by
Always carefully observe all
the airplane weight and C.G. limitations.
precautions listed in the operating handbook concerning cargo tiedown.
Pilots should assist in ensuring seat security and proper restraint for all
passengers. Pilots should also advise passengers not to put heavy or sharp
items under occupied seats since these items may interfere with the seats'
energy absorption characteristics in the· event of a crash.
Optional equipment installed in the airplane can affect loading, and the airplane
center-of-gravity. Under certain loading conditions in tricycle gear airplanes, it
is possible to exceed the aft C.G. limit, which could cause the airplane to tip
and allow the fuselage tailcone to strike the ground while loading the airplane.
The force of a tail ground strike could damage internal structure, resulting in
possible interference with elevator control system operation.
EFFECTS OF LOADING ON. THE FLIGHT
Weight and balance limits are placed on airplanes for three principal reasons:
first, the effect of the weight on the primary and secondary structures; second,
the effect on airplane performance; and third, the effect on flight controllability,
particularly in stall and spin recovery.
A knowledge of load factors in flight maneuvers and gusts is important for
understanding how an increase in maximum weight affects the characteristics
of an airplane. The structure of an airplane subjected to a load factor of 3 Gs,
must be capable of withstanding an added load of three hundred pounds ·for
each hundred pound increase in weight. All Cessna airplanes are analyzed
and tested for flight at the maximum authorized weight, and within the speeds
posted for the type of flight to be performed. Flight at weights in excess of this
amount may be possible, but loads for which the airplane was not designed
may be imposed on all or some part of the structure.
An airplane loaded to the rear limit of its permissible center-of-gravity range will
respond differently than when it is loaded near the forward limit. The stall
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3
AIRPLANE LOADING
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
characteristics of an airplane change as 'the airplane load changes, and stall
characteristics become progressively better as center-of-gravity moves
forward. Distribution of weight can also have a significant effect on spin
characteristics. Forward location of the C.G. will usually make it more difficult
to obtain a spin. Conversely, extremely aft C.G. locations will tend to promote
lengthened recoveries since a more complete stall can be achieved. Changes
in airplane weight as well as its distribution can have an effect on spin
characteristics since increases in weight will increase inertia. Higher weights
may delay recoveries.
An airplane loaded beyond the forward C.G. limit will be nose heavy, and can
be difficult to rotate for takeoff or flare for landing. Airplanes with tail wheels
can be nosed over more easily.
LOAD AND LATERAL TRIM
Some airplanes have a maximum limit for wing fuel lateral imbalance and/or a
maximum wing locker load limitation. These limitations are required for one or
both of two primary reasons. The first is to ensure that the airplane will
maintain certain roll responses mandated by its certification. The other is to
prevent overheating and interruption of lateral trim on certain types of
autopilots caused by the excessive work required to maintain a wings level
attitude while one wing is heavier than the other. Pilots should carefully
observe such limitations and keep the fuel balance within the limits set forth in
the respective operating handbook.
WEIGHT AND BALANCE TERMINOLOGY
The following list is provided in order to familiarize pilots and owners with the
terminology used in calculating the weight and balance of Cessna airplanes.
(Some terminology listed herein is defined and used in Pilot's Operating
Handbooks only.)
Arm
The horizontal distance from the reference datum to
the center-of-gravity (C.G.) of an item.
Basic Empty Weight
The standard empty weight plus the weight of
installed optional equipment.
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AIRPLANE LOADING
C.G. Arm
The arm obtained by adding the airplane's individual
moments and dividing the sum by the total weight.
C.G. Limits
The extreme center-of;.gravity locations within which
the airplane must be operated at a given weight.
Center-of-Gravity
(C.G.)
The, point at which an airplane or item of equipment
would balance if suspended. Its distance from the
reference datum is found by dividing the total moment,
by the total weight of the airplane or item of
equipment.
MAC
The mean aerodynamic chord of a wing is the chord
of an imaginary airfoil which throughout the flight
range will have the same force vectors as those of
the wing.
Maximum Landing
Weight
The maximum weight approved for the landing
touchdown.
Maximum Ramp
Weight
The maximum weight approved for ground
maneuvers. It Includes the weight of start, taxi and
runup fuel.
Maximum Takeoff
Weight
The maximum weight approved for the start of the
takeoff roll.
Maximum Zero Fuel
Weight
The maximum weight exclusive of usable fuel.
Moment
The product of the weight of an item multiplied by its
arm. (Moment divided by a constant is used to
simplify balance calculations by reducing the number·
of digits.)
Payload
The weight of occupants, cargo, and baggage.
Reference Datum
An imaginary vertical plane from which all horizontal
distances are measured for balance purposes.
Standard Empty
Weight
The weight of a standard airplane, including unusable
fuel, full operating fluids and full engine oil. In those
manuals which refer to this weight as Licensed Empty
Weight, the weight of engine oil is not included and
must be added separately in weight and balance
calculations.)
Station
A location along the airplane fuselage given in terms
of the distance from the reference datum.
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AIRPLANE LOADING
Tare
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
when
The weight of chocks, bkx::ks, stands, etc., used
weighing an airplane, and Is included In the scale
readings. Tare Is de<lucted from the scare reaclng to
obtain the actual (net) uplane weight
Unusable Fuel
The quantity of fuel that cannot be safely used In
fight.
Usable Fuel
The fuel available for flight planning.
Useful Load
The difference between ramp weight and the basic
empty weight
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4
SINGLE ENGINE FLIGHT
(MULTl-ENGINE AIRPLANES)
SINGLE ENGINE FLIGHT
INFORMATION (MULTI-ENGINE
AIRPLANES)
INTRODUCTION
The following discussion is intended primarily for pilots of propeller-driven, light
twin-engine airplanes, powered by reciprocating engines and certified under
CAR Part 3 or FAR Part 23. This discussion is not intended to apply to
specific models, but is intended, instead, to give general guidelines or
recommendations for operations in the event of an engine failure during flight.
SINGLE ENGINE TAKEOFF AND CLIMB
Each time a pilot considers a takeoff in a twin-engine airplane, knowledge is
required of the Minimum Control Speed CVMc) for that particular airplane.
Knowledge of this speed, is essential to ensure safe operation of the airplane
in the event an engine power loss occurs during the most critical phases of
flight, the takeoff and initial climb.
VMc is the minimum flight speed at which the airplane is directionally and
laterally controllable as determined in accordance with Federal Aviation
Regulations. Airplane certification conditions include: one engine becoming
inoperative and windmilling; not more than a 5-degree bank toward the
operative engine; takeoff power on the operative engine; landing gear
retracted; flaps in the takeoff position; and the most critical C.G. (center of
gravity). A multi-engine airplane must reach the minimum control speed before
full control deflections can counteract the adverse rolling and/or yawing
tendencies associated with one engine inoperative and full power operation on
the other engine. The most critical time for an engine failure is during a two or
three second period, late in the takeoff, while the airplane is accelerating to a
safe speed.
Should an engine failure be experienced before liftoff speed is reached, the
takeoff must be aborted. If an engine failure occurs immediately after liftoff,
but before the landing gear is retracted, continue takeoff while retracting gear.
Abort takeoff only if sufficient runway is available. This decision should be
made before the takeoff is initiated.
The pilot of a twin-engine airplane must exercise good judgment and take
prompt action in the decision whether or not to abort a takeoff attempt
following an engine failure, since many factors will influence the decision.
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SINGLE ENGINE FLIGHT
(MULTI-ENGINE AIRPLANES)
PILOT SAFETY AND
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Some of these factors include: runway length, grade and surface condition
(i.e., slippery, dry, etc.), field elevation, temperature, wind speed and direction,
terrain or obstructions in the vicinity of the runway, airplane weight and single
engine climb capability under the prevailing conditions, among .others. The
pilot should abort the takeoff, following an engine-out, even if the airplane has
lifted off the runway; if runway conditions permit. However, under limited
circumstances (i.e., short runway with obstructions) the pilot may have to
continue the takeoff following a liftoff and an engine-out.
While it may be possible to continue the takeoff at light weights and with
favorable atmospheric conditions following an engine failure just after liftoff,
long distances are required to clear even small obstacles. . Distances required
to clear an obstacle are reduced under more favorable combinations of weight,
headwind component, or obstacle height.
The pilot's decision to continue the takeoff after an engine failure should be
based on consideration of either the single engine best angle-of-climb speed
(VxsE) if an obstacle is ahead, or the single engine best rate-of-climb speed
(VvsE) when no obstacles are present in the climb .area. Once the single
engine best angle-of-climb speed is reached, altitude becomes more important
than airspeed until the obstacle is cleared. On the other hand, the single
engine best rate-of-climb speed becomes more important when there are no
obstacles ahead. Refer to the Owners Manual, Flight Manual or Pilot's
Operating Handbook for the proper airspeeds and procedures to be used in
the event of an engine failure during takeoff. Refer to the warning placard "To
Continue Flight With An Inoperative Engine" in the airplane's operating
handbook and/or on the instrument panel for additional information.
Should an engine failure occur at or above these prescribed airspeeds, the
airplane, within the limitations of its single engine climb performance, should be
maneuvered to a landing. After the airplane has been "cleaned up" following
an engine failure (landing gear and wing flaps retracted and the propeller
feathered on the inoperative engine), it may be accelerated to its single engine
best rate-of-climb speed: If immediate obstructions so dictate, the single
engine best angle-of-climb speed may be maintained until the obstacles are
cleared. In no case should the speed be allowed to drop below single engine
best angle-of-climb speed unless an immediate landing is planned, since
airplane performance capabilities will deteriorate rapidly as the airspeed
decreases. After clearing all immediate obstacles, the airplane should be
accelerated slowly to its single engine best rate-of-climb speed and the climb
continued to a safe altitude which will allow maneuvering for a return to the
airport for landing.
To obtain single engine best climb performance with one engine inoperative,
the airplane must be flown in a 3 to 5 degree bank toward the operating
engine. The rudder is used to maintain straight flight, compensating for the
asymmetrical engine power. The ball of the tum-and-bank indicator should not
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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SINGLE ENGINE FLIGHT
(MULTl-ENGINE AIRPLANES)
be centered, but should be displaced about 1/2 ball width toward the operating
engine.
The propeller · on the inoperative engine must be ·feathered, the landing gear
retracted, and the wing flaps retracted for continued safe flight. Climb
performance Cif an airplane with a propeller windmilling usually is nonexistent.
Once the decision to feather a propeller has been made, the pilot should
ensure that the propeller feathers properly and remains feathered. The landing
gear and wing flaps also cause a severe reduction in climb performance and
both should be retracted as soon as possible (in accordance with the
operating handbook limitations).
The following general facts .should be used as a guide if an engine failure
occurs during or immediately after takeoff:
1.
2.
3.
4-
5.
Discontinuing a takeoff upon encountering an engine failure is
advisable under most circumstances. Continuing the takeoff, if an
engine failure occurs prior to reaching single engine best angle-ofclimb speed and landing gear retraction, is not advisable.
Altitude is more valuable to safety immediately after takeoff than is
airspeed in excess of the single engine best angle~of-climb speed.
A windmilling propeller .and extended landing gear cause a severe
drag penalty and, therefore, climb or continued level flight is
improbable, depending on weight; altitude and temperature. Prompt
retraction of the landing gear (except Model 337 series), identification
of the inoperative ·engine, and feathering of the propeller is of utmost
importance if the takeoff is to be continued.
Unless touchdown is imminent, in no case should airspeed be allowed
to fall below single engine best angle-of-climb speed even though
altitude is lost, since any lesser speed will result in significantly
reduced climb performance.
If the requirement for an immediate climb is not present, allow the
airplane to accelerate to the single engine best rate-of climb speed
since this speed will always provide the ·best chance of climb or least
altitude loss.
0
SINGLE ENGINE CRUISE
Losing one engine during cruise on a multi-engine airplane causes little
immediate problem for a proficient, properly trained pilot. After advancing
power on the operating engine and retrimming the airplane to maintain altitude,
if possible the pilot should attempt to determine if the cause of the engine
failure can be corrected in flight prior to feathering the propeller. The
magneto/ignition switches should be checked to see if they are on, and the
fuel flow and fuel quantity for the affected engine should also be verified. If the
engine failure was apparently caused by fuel starvation, switching to another
fuel tank and/or turning on the auxiliary fuel pump (if equipped) or adjusting the
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SINGLE ENGINE FLIGHT
(MULTl-ENGINE AIRPLANES)
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLE,V,ENTS
mixture control may alleviate the condition. It must be emphasized that these
procedures are not designed to replace the procedural steps listed in the
emergency procedures section of the airplane operating handbook, but are
presented as a guide to be used by the pilot if,. in his or her judgment,
corrective action should be attempted prior .to shutting down a failing or
malfunctioning engine.
Altitude, terrain, weather conditions, weight, and
accessibility of suitable landing areas must all be considered ·before attempting
to determine and/or correct the cause of an engine failure. In any event, if an
engine fails in cruise and cannot be restarted, a landing at the nearest suitable
airport is recommended.
SINGLE ENGINE APPROACH AND LANDING OR
GO-AROUND
An approach and landing with one engine inoperative on a multi-engine
airplane can easily be completed by a proficient, properly trained pilot.
However, the ·pilot must plan and prepare the airplane much earlier than
normal to ensure success. While preparing, fuel should be scheduled so that
an adequate amount is available for use by the operative engine. All
crossfeeding should be completed during level flight above a minimum altitude
of 1000 feet AGL
During final approach, the pilot should maintain the single engine best rate-ofclimb speed or higher, until the landing is assured. An attempt should be
made to keep the approach as normal as possible, considering the situation.
Landing gear should be extended on downwind leg or over the final approach
fix, as applicable. Flaps should be used to .control the descent through the
approach.
Consideration should be given to a loss of the other engine or the necessity to
make an engine inoperative 99 around. Under certain combinations of weight,
temperature and altitude, neither level flight nor a single engine go-around may
be possible. Do not attempt an engine inoperative go-around after the wing
flaps have been extended beyond the normal approach or the published
approach flap setting, unless enough altitude is available to allow the wing
flaps to be retracted to the normal approach or the published approach flap
setting, or less.
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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5
PILOT PROFICIENCY
PILOT PROFICIENCY
AIRSPEED CONTROL
Flying other than published airspeeds could put the pilot and airplane in an
unsafe situation.
The airspeeds published in the airplane's operating
handbook have been tested and proven to help prevent unusual situations.
For example, proper liftoff speed puts the airplane in the best position for a
smooth transition to a climb attitude. However, if liftoff is too early, drag
increases and consequently increases the takeoff ground run. This procedure
also degrades controllability of multi-er,gine airplanes in the event an engine
failure occurs after takeoff. In addition, early liftoff increases the time required
to accelerate from liftoff to either the single-engine best rate-of-climb speed
(VvsE) or the single-engine best angle-of-climb speed (VxsE) if an obstacle is
ahead. On the other hand, if liftoff is late, the airplane will tend to "leap" into
the climb. Pilots should adhere to the published liftoff or takeoff speed for their
particular airplane.
The pilot should be familiar with the stall characteristics of the airplane when
, stalled from a normal 1 G stall. Any airplane can be stalled at any speed. The
absolute maximum speed at which full aerodynamic control can be safely
applied is listed in the airplane's operating handbook as the maneuvering
speed. Do not make full or abrupt control movements above this speed. To
do so could induce structural damage to the airplane.
TRAFFIC PATTERN MANEUVERS
There have been incidents in the vicinity of controlled airports that were
caused primarily by pilots executing unexpected maneuvers.
Air Traffic
Control (ATC) service is based upon observed or known traffic and airport
conditions. Air Traffic Controllers establish the sequence of arriving and
departing airplanes by advising them to adjust their flight as necessary to
achieve proper spacing. These adjustments can only· be based on observed
traffic, accurate pilot radio reports, and anticipated airplane maneuvers. Pilots
are expected to cooperate so as to preclude disruption of the traffic flow or the
creation of conflicting traffic patterns. The pilot in command of an airplane is
directly responsible for and is the final authority as to the operation of his. or
her airplane. On occasion, it may be necessary for a pilot to maneuver an
airplane to maintain spacing with. the traffic he or she has been sequenced to
follow. The controller can anticipate minor maneuvering such as shallow "S"
turns. The controller cannot, however, anticipate a major maneuver such as a
360-degree turn. This can result in. a gap in the landing interval and more
importantly, it causes a chain_ reaction which may result in a conflict with other
traffic and an interruption of the sequence · established by the tower or
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PILOT PROFICIENCY
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
approach controller. The pilot should always. advise the controller of the need
to make any maneuvering turns.
USE OF LIGHTS
Aircraft position (navigation) and anti-collision lights are required to be
illuminated on aircraft operated at night. Anti-collision lights, however, may be
turned off when the pilot in command determines that, because of operating
conditions, it would be in the interest of safety to do so. For example, strobe
lights should be turned off on the gro1,1nd when they adversely affect ground
personnel or other pilots, and in flight when there are adverse reflections from
clouds.
To enhance the "see-and-avoid" concept, pilots are encouraged to turn on
their rotation beacon any time the engine(s) are operating, day or night. Pilots
are further encouraged to turn on their landing lights when operating within ten
miles of any airport, day or night, in conditions of reduced visibility and areas
where flocks of birds may be expected (i.e., coastal areas, around refuse
dumps, etc.). Although turning on airplane lights does enhance the "see-andavoid" concept, pilots should not become complacent about keeping a sharp
lookout for other airplanes. Not all airplanes are equipped with lights and
some pilots may not have their lights turned on. Use of the taxi light, in lieu of
the landing light, on some smaller airplanes may extend the landing light
service life.
Propeller and jet blast forces generated by large airplanes have overturned or
damaged several smaller airplanes taxiing behind them. To avoid similar
results, and in the interest of preventing upsets and injuries to ground
personnel from such forces, the FAA recommends that air carriers and
commercial operators turn on their rotating beacons anytime their airplane
engine(s) are operating. All other pilots, using airplanes equipped with rotating
beacons, are also encouraged to participate in this program which is designed
to alert others to the potential hazard. Since this is a voluntary program,
exercise caution and do not rely solely on the rotating beacon as an indication
that airplane engines are operating.
PARTIAL PANEL FLYING
All pilots, and especially instrument rated pilots, should know the emergency
procedures for partial instrument panel operation included in their respective
operating handbook, as well as any FAA training material .on the subject.
Routine periodic practice under simulated instrument conditions with a partial
instrument panel can be very beneficial to a pilot's proficiency. In this case,
2
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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5
PILOT PROFICIENCY
the pilot should have a qualified safety pilot monitoring the simulated
instrument practice.
)If a second vacuum system is not installed and a complete vacuum system
failure occurs during flight, the vacuum-driven directional indicator and attitude
indicator will be disabled, and the pilot will have to ·rely on the tum coordinator
or the turn and bank indicator if he or she flies Into instrument meteorological
conditions. If an autopilot is installed, it too will ·be affected, and should not be
used. The following instructions assume that only the electrically-powered turn
coordinator is operative, and that the pilot is not completely proficient in
instrument flying.
EXECUTING A 180° TURN IN CLOUDS
Upon inadvertently entering a cloud(s), an immediate plan should be made to
turn back as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Note compass heading.
Note the time in both minutes and seconds.
When the seconds indicate the nearest half-minute, initiate a standard
rate left turn, holding the tum coordinator (or turn and bank indicator if
installed) symbolic airplane wing opposite the lower left wing index
mark for 60 seconds. Then roll back to level flight by leveling the
miniature airplane.
Assure level flight through and after the turn by referencing the
altimeter, VSI, and airspeed indicator. Altitude may be maintained
with cautious use of the elevator controls.
Check accuracy of turn by observing the compass heading which
should be the reciprocal of the original heading.
If necessary, -adjust heading primarily with skidding motions rather
than rolling motions so that the compass will read more accurately.
Maintain altitude and airspeed by cautious application of elevator
control. Avoid over-controlling by keeping the hands off the control
wheel as much as possible and steering only with the rudder.
EMERGENCY DESCENT THROUGH CLOUDS
If conditions preclude reestablishment of VFR flight by a 180° turn, a descent
through a cloud deck to VFR conditions may be appropriate. If possible,
obtain ATC clearance for an emergency descent. To guard against a spiral
dive, choose an easterly or westerly heading to minimize compass card swings
due to changing bank angles. In addition, keep hands off the control wheel
and steer a straight course with rudder control by monitoring the tum and bank
ior turn coordinator. Occasionally check the compass heading and make minor
corrections to hold an approximate course. Before descending into the clouds,
set up a stabilized let-down condition as follows:
1.
Extend the landing gear (if applicable).
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Reduce power to set up a 500 to 800 fVmin rate of descent.
Adjust mixture(s) as required for smooth engine operation.
Adjust elevator or stabilizer, rudder and aileron trim controls for a
stabilized descent.
Keep hands off the control wheel. Monitor turn and bank or turn
coordinator and make corrections by rudder alone.
Check trend of compass card movement and make cautious
corrections with rudder inputs to stop tum.
Upon breaking out of the clouds, resume normal cruising flight.
RECOVERY FROM A SPIRAL DIVE
If a spiral dive is encountered while in the clouds, proceed as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Retard the throttle(s) to idle.
Stop the turn by using coordinated aileron and rudder control to align
the symbolic airplane in the turn coordinator with the horizontal
reference line, or center the turn needle and ball of the turn and bank
indicator.
a. With a significant airspeed increase or altitude loss while in the
spiral, anticipate that the aircraft will pitch nose-up when the wings
are level. Take care not to overstress the airframe as a result of
this nose-up pitching tendency.
Cautiously apply control wheel back pressure (if necessary) to slowly
reduce the airspeed.
Adjust the elevator or stabilizer trim control to. maintain a constant
glide airspeed.
Keep hands off the control wheel, using rudder control to hold a
straight heading. Use rudder trim to relieve unbalanced rudder force,
if present.
If the power-off glide is of sufficient duration, adjust the mixture(s), as
required.
Upon breaking out of the clouds, resume normal cruising flight.
USE OF LANDING GEAR AND FLAPS
A review of airplane accident investigation reports indicates a complacent
attitude on the part of some pilots toward the use of checklists for landing gear
and wing flap operation. The main confession of most pilots involved in
involuntary gear-up landings is that they "forgot" to lower the gear prior to
landing. Consistent use of the Before Landing Checklist would have alerted
these pilots and prevented a potentially hazardous situation. Other causes of
gear-up landings have been attributed to poor judgment, such as not leaving
the landing gear extended while performing several landings while remaining in
the traffic pattern. The following recommendations will lessen the possibility of
a gear-up landing.
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Never move the landing gear control switch, handle, or lever while the
airplane is on the ground.
Do not deliberately disable any landing gear warning device or light
unless indicated otherwise in the operating handbook.
Apply brakes before retraction of the landing gear to stop wheel
rotation.
After takeoff, do not retract the landing gear until a positive rate of
climb is indicated.
When selecting a landing gear position, whether up or down, allow the
landing gear to complete the initial cycle to the locked position before
moving the control switch, handle, or lever in the opposite direction.
Never exceed the published landing gear operating speed (VLO) while
the landing gear is in transit or the maximum landing gear extended
speed (VLE),
Prepare for -landing early in the approach so that trim adjustments
after lowering landing gear or flaps will not compromise the approach.
Leave landing gear extended during consecutive landings when the
airplane remains in the traffic pattern unless traffic pattern speeds
exceed the Maximum Landing Gear Extended Speed (VLE),
A rare, but serious problem that. may result from a mechanical failure in the
flap system is split wing flaps. This phenomenon occurs when the wing flap
position on one wing does not agree with the flap position on the opposite
wing, causing a rolling tendency. Split flaps can be detected and safely
countered if flap control movement is limited to small increments during inflight
operations from full down to full up and full up to full down. If a roll is detected
during flap selection, reposition the flap selector to the position. from which it
was moved and the roll should be eliminated. Depending on the experience
and proficiency of the pilot, the rolling tendencies caused by a split flap
situation may be controlled with opposite aileron (and differential power for
multi-engine aircraft). Some documented contributing factors to split flaps are:
1.
2.
3.
Pilots exceeding the Maximum Flap Extended (VFE) speed for· a given
flap setting.
Mechanical failure.
Improper maintenance.
ILLUSIONS IN FLIGHT
Many different illusions can be experienced in flight. Some can lead to spatial
disorientation. Others can lead to landing errors. Illusions rank among the
most common factors cited as contributing to fatal airplane accidents. Various
complex motions and forces and certain visual scenes encountered in flight
can create illusions of. motion and position. Spatial disorientation .from these
illusions can be prevented only by visual reference to reliable, fixed points on
the ground, or to flight instruments.
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An abrupt correction of banked attitude, which has been entered too slowly to
stimulate the motion sensing system in the middle ear, can create the illusion
of banking in the opposite direction. The disoriented pilot will roll the airplane
back to its original dangerous attitude or, if level flight is maintained, will feel
compelled to lean in the perceived vertical plane until this illusion subsides.
This phenomenon is usually referred to as the "leans" and the following
illusions fall under this category.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
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Corlolls Illusion - An abrupt head movement in a prolonged constantrate turn that has ceased stimulating the motion sensing system can
create the illusion of rotation or movement on an entirely different axis.
The disoriented pilot will maneuver the airplane into a dangerous
attitude in an attempt to stop this illusion of rotation. This most
overwhelming of all illusions in flight may be prevented by not making
sudden, extreme head movements, particularly while making
prolonged constant-rate turns under IFR conditions.
Graveyard spin - A proper recovery from a spin that has ceased
stimulating the motion sensing system can create the illusion of
spinning in the opposite direction. The disoriented pilot will return the
airplane to its original spin.
Graveyard splral - An observed loss of altitude during a coordinated
constant-rate turn that has ceased stimulating the motion sensing
system can create the illusion of being in a descent with the wings
level. In this case, the disoriented pilot will pull back on the controls,
tightening the spiral and increasing the normal load .factor on the
airplane.
Somatogravlc Illusion . - A rapid acceleration during takeoff can
create the illusion of being in a nose up attitude. The disoriented pilot
will push the airplane into a nose low, or dive attitude. A rapid
deceleration by a quick reduction of the throttle(s) can have the
opposite .effect, .with the disoriented pilot pulling the airplane into a
nose up, or stall attitude.
Inversion llluslon - An abrupt change from climb to straight and level
flight can create the illusion of tumbling backwards. The disoriented
pilot will push the airplane abruptly into a nose low attitude, possibly
intensifying this illusion.
Elevator Illusion - An abrupt upward vertical acceleration, usually
caused by an updraft, can create the illusion of being in a climb. The
disoriented pilot will push the airplane into a nose low attitude. An
abrupt downward vertical acceleration, usually caused by a downdraft,
has the opposite effec~, with the disoriented pilot pulling the airplane
into a nose up attitude.
False horizon - Sloping cloud formations, an obscured horizon, a dark
scene spread with ground lights and stars, and certain geometric
patterns of ground light can create illusions of not being aligned
correctly with the horizon. The disoriented pilot will place the airplane
in a dangerous attitude.
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Autoklnesls - In the dark, a static light will appear to move about
when stared at for many seconds. The disoriented pilot will lose
control of the airplane in attempting to align it with the light.
Various surface features and atmospheric conditions encountered during
landing can create illusions of incorrect height above and distance away from
the runway threshold. Landing errors from these illusions can be prevented
by: anticipating them during approaches, aerial visual inspection of unfamiliar
airports before landing, using an electronic glide slope or visual approach
slope indicator (VASI) system when available, and maintaining optimum
proficiency in landing procedures.
The following illusions apply to this
category.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Runway width llluslon - A narrower than usual runway can create the
illusion that the airplane is at a higher altitude than it actually is. The
pilot who does not recognize this illusion will tend to fly a lower
approach, with the risk of striking objects along the approach path, or
land short. A wider than usual runway can have the opposite. effect,
with the risk of flaring high and landing hard or overshooting the
runway.
Runway and terrain slopes IIIUslon - An up sloping runway, up
sloping terrain, or both, can create the illusion that the airplane is at a
higher altitude than it actually is. The pilot who does not recognize
this illusion will fly a lower approach. A down sloping runway, down
sloping approach terrain, or both, canhave the opposite effect.
Featureless terrain Illusion - An absence of ground features, as
when landing over water, darkened areas and terrain made
featureless by snow, can create the illusion that the airplane is at a
higher altitude than it actually is. The pilot who does not recognize
this illusion will tend to fly a lower approach.
Atmospheric Illusion - Rain on the windshield can create an illusion
of greater height, and a greater distance from the runway. The pilot
who does not recognize this illusion will tend to fly a lower approach.
Penetration of fog can create the illusion of pitching up. The pilot who
does not recognize this illusion will steepen the approach, often quite
abruptly.
Ground llghtlng Illusions - Lights along a straight path, such as a
road, and even lights on trains, can be mistaken for runway and
approach lights.
Bright runway and approach lighting systems,
especially where few lights illuminate the surrounding terrain, may
create the illusion of less distance to the runway. The pilot who does
not recognize this illusion will tend to fly a higher approach.
Conversely, the pilot overflying terrain which has few lights to provide
height cues may make a lower than normal approach.
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SPATIAL DISORIENTATION
Spatial disorientation is the confusion of the senses affecting balance, which
occurs when a person is deprived of the normal cues upon which he or she
depends for "indexing" a .sense of balance. These cues include, most
prominently, his or her visual reference to the earth's horizon and celestial
bodies, and his or her acceptance of the force of gravity as acting vertically.
When flying an airplane, the pilot may have all outside visual references
obscured by clouds or complete darkness, and his interpretation of the
direction of gravity may become confused by forces imposed on his or her
body by centrifugal force, accelerations of maneuvering, and turbulence, which
may act in any direction.
Spatial disorientation usually leads to vertigo, but is not necessarily identical to
it. Vertigo is an uncertain feeling of disorientation, turning, or imbalance, which
is usually accompanied by feelings of dizziness or incipient nausea.
When flying by reference to the natural horizon, the attitude of the airplane can
be determined visually at all times. During instrument flight, when the natural
horizon is not visible, the attitude of the airplane must be determined from the
gyro horizon and other flight instruments. Sight, supported by other senses,
maintains orientation in·either case.
Sometimes during conditions of low visibility, the supporting senses conflict
with what is seen or what the pilot believes he sees. When this happens,
there is a definite susceptibility to disorientation. The degree of disorientation
varies considerably with individual pilots, their proficiency, and the conditions
which induced the problem. Complete· disorientation, even for a short period
of time, can render a pilot incapable of controlling an airplane, to the extent
that he cannot maintain level flight, or even prevent fatal turns and diving
spirals.
Lack of effective visual reference is common on over-water flights at night, and
in low visibility conditions over land. Other contributing factors to disorientation
and vertigo are reflections from outside lights, and cloud reflections of beams
from rotating beacons or strobe lights.
It is important that all pilots understand the possibility of spatial disorientation,
and the steps necessary to minimize the loss of control as a result of it: The
following basic items should be known to every pilot:
1.
2.
8
Obtain training and maintain proficiency in the control of an airplane by
reference to instruments before flying in visibility of less than three
miles.
Refer to the attitude instruments frequently when flying at night or in
reduced visibility conditions.
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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4.
5.
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To maintain competency in night operations, practice should include
operations in the traffic pattern, subject to the confusion caused by
reflections of ground lights; as well as the control of an airplane by
reference to instruments.
Familiarization with the meteorological conditions which may lead to
spatial disorientation is important. These include smoke, fog, haze,
and other restrictions to visibility.
Familiarity with local areas and commonly used flight routes assists in
the avoidance of disorientation by permitting the pilot to anticipate and
look for prominent terrain features.
The most important precaution for avoiding disorientation is the habit
of thoroughly checking the weather before each flight, while enroute,
and near the destination.
A pilot without the demonstrated competence to control an airplane by sole
reference to instruments has little chance . of surviving an unintentional flight
into IFR conditions. Tests conducted by the U.S. Air Force, using qualified
instrument pilots, indicate that it may take as long as 35 seconds to establish
full control by reference to instruments after disorientation during an attempt to
maintain VFR flight in IFR weather. Instrument training and certification and
ongoing recurrent training in accordance with FAR Part 61, are designed to
provide the pilot with the skills needed to maintain control solely by .reference
to flight instruments and the ability to ignore the false kinesthetic sensations
inherent with flight when no outside references are available.
MOUNTAIN FLYING
A pilot's first experience of flying over mountainous terrain (particularly if most
of his or her flight time has been over flatlands) could be a never-to-beforgotten experience if proper planning is not done and if the pilot is not aware
of potential hazards. Those familiar section lines in some regions are not
present in the mountains. Rat, level fields ·for forced landings are •practically
nonexistent; abrupt changes in wind direction and velocity may occur; severe
updrafts and downdrafts are common during high wind conditions, particularly
near or above abrupt changes of terrain, such · as cliffs or rugged areas; and
clouds can build up with startling rapidity. Mountain flying need not be
hazardous if you follow the recommendations below:
1.
2.
3.
For pilots with little or no mountain flying experience, always get dual
instruction from .a qualified flight instructor to become familiar with
conditions which may be encountered before flying in mountainous
terrain.
Plan your route to avoid topography which would prevent a safe
forced landing. The route should be near populated areas and well
known mountain passes. Sufficient altitude should be maintained to
permit gliding to a safe landing in the event of engine failure.
Always file a flight plan.
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5.
6.
7.
8.
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Don't fly a light airplane when the winds aloft, at your proposed
altitude, exceed 35 miles per hour. Expect the winds to be of much
greater velocity over mountain passes than reported a few miles from
them. Approach . mountain passes with as much altitude as possible.
Downdrafts of from 1500 to 2000 feet per minute are not uncommon
on the leeward (downwind} side.
Severe turbulence can be expected near or above changes in terrain,
especially in high wind conditions.
Some canyons ·run into a dead end. Don't fly so far into a canyon that
you get trapped. Always be able to make a 180-degree turn, or if
canyon flying is necessary, fly down the canyon (toward lower terrain),
not up the canyon (toward higher terrain).
Plan the trip for the early morning hours. As a rule, the -air starts to
get turbulent at about 10 a.m., and grows steadily worse until around
4 p.m. , then gradually improves until dark.
When -landing at a high altitude airfield, the same indicated airspeed
should be used as at low elevation fields. Due to the less dense air
at altitude, this same indicated airspeed actually results in a higher
true airspeed, a faster landing speed, and a longer landing distance.
During gusty wind conditions, which often prevail at high altitude fields,
a "power approach'~ is recommended. Additionally, due to the faster
ground speed and reduced engine performance at altitude, the takeoff
distance will increase considerably over that required at lower
altitudes.
OBSTRUCTIONS TO FLIGHT
Pilots should exercise extreme caution when flying less than 2000 feet above
ground level (AGL) because of the numerous structures (radio and television
antenna towers) exceeding 1000 feet AGL, with some extending higher than
2000 feet AGL. Most truss type structures are supported by guy wires. The
wires are difficult to see in -good weather and can be totally _obscured during
periods of dusk and reduced visibility. These wires can extend approximately
1500 feet horizontally from a structure; therefore, all truss type structures
should be avoided by at least 2000 feet, horizontally and vertically.
Overhead transmission and utility lines often span approaches to runways and
scenic flyways such as lakes, rivers, and canyons. The supporting ·structures
of these lines may not always be readily visible and the wires may be virtually
invisible under certain conditions. Most of these installations do not meet
criteria which determine them to be obstructions to air navigation and
therefore, do not require marking and/or lighting. The supporting structures of
some overhead transmission lines are equipped with flashing strobe lights.
These lights indicate wires exist between the strobe equipped structures.
(
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6
FUEL MANAGEMENT
FUEL MANAGEMENT
POOR TECHNIQUES .
Poor fuel management is often the cause of aircraft accidents. Some airplane
accident reports have listed such poor fuel management techniques as
switching to another fuel tank after the before takeoff runup was completed,
and then experiencing engine problems on takeoff. Other reports tell of pilots
switching fuel tanks at a critical point on the approach to a landing and
inadvertently selecting an empty tank when there is not enough time to
compensate for the subsequent loss of power. Flying. low during day crosscountry, or moderately low at night, can be hazardous if a fuel tank runs dry.
Too much altitude may be lost during the time it takes to discover the reason
for power loss, select a different fuel tank, and restart the engine. Pilots
should be thoroughly familiar with the airplane fuel system and. tank switching
procedures. Furthermore, it is an unsafe technique to run a fuel tank dry as a
routine· procedure, although there are exceptions. Any sediment or water not
drained from the fuel tank could be drawn into the fuel system and cause
erratic operation or even total power loss.
FUELING THE AIRCRAFT
The aircraft should be on level ground during all fueling operations, since filling
the tanks when the aircraft is not level may result in a fuel quantity less than
the maximum capacity. Rapid filling of a fuel tank, without allowing time for air
in the tank to escape, may result in a lower fuel quantity. Some single engine
aircraft that allow simultaneous use of fuel from more than one tank have fuel
tanks with interconnected vent lines. If the tanks are filled with fuel and the
aircraft allowed to sit with one wing lower than the other, fuel may drain from
the higher tank to the lower and subsequently out the fuel vent. This will result
in loss of fuel. This fuel loss may be prevented by placing the fuel selector in
a position other than "both".
Some Cessna single-engine airplanes have long, narrow fuel tanks. If your
airplane is so equipped, it may be necessary to partially fill each tank
alternately, and repeat the sequence as required to completely fill the tanks to
their maximum capacity. This method of fueling helps prevent the airplane
from settling to a wing-low attitude because of increased fuel weight in the
fullest wing tank.
It is always the responsibility of the pilot-in-command to ensure sufficient fuel is
available for the planned flight. Refer to the airplane operating handbook for
proper. fueling procedures.
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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UNUSABLE FUEL
Unusable fuel is the quantity of fuel that cannot safely be used in flight. The
~mount of unusable fuel varies with airplane and fuel system design, and the
maximum amount is determined in accordance with Civil or Federal Aviation
Regulations (CARs or FARs).
Unusable fuel is always included in the
airplane's licensed or basic empty weight for weight and balance purposes.
Unusable fuel should never be included when computing the endurance of any
airplane.
FUEL PLANNING WITH MINIMUM RESERVES
Airplane accidents involving engine power loss continue to reflect fuel
starvation as the primary cause or a contributing factor. Some of these
accidents were caused by departing with insufficient fuel onboard to complete
the intended flight. Fuel exhaustion in flight can mean only one thing - a
forced landing with the possibility of serious damage, injury, or death.
A pilot should not begin a flight without determining the fuel required and
verifying its presence onboard. To be specific, during VFR conditions, do not
take off unless there is enough fuel to fly to the planned destination
(considering wind and forecast weather conditions), assuming the airplane's
normal cruising airspeed, fly after that for at least 30 minutes during the day, or
at least 45 minutes at night.
Departure fuel requirements are a little different when operating under IFR
conditions. Do not depart an airport on an IFR trip unless the airplane has
enough fuel to complete the flight to the first airport of intended landing
(considering weather reports and forecasts) and fly from that airport to the
planned alternate airport, and afterwards still fly· at least 45 minutes at normal
cruising speed.
FLIGHT COORDINATION VS. FUEL FLOW
The shape of most airplane wing fuel tanks is such th11t, in certain flight
maneuvers, the fuel may move away from the fuel tank supply outlet. If the
outlet is uncovered, fuel flow to the engine may be interrupted and a temporary
loss of power might result. Pilots can prevent inadvertent uncovering of the
tank outlet by having adequate fuel in the tank selected and avoiding
maneuvers such as prolonged uncoordinated flight or sideslips which move
fuel away from the feed lines.
It is important to observe the uncoordinated flight or sideslip limitations listed in
the respective operating handbook. As a general rule, limit uncoordinated
flight or sideslip to 30 seconds in duration when the fuel level in the selected
fuel tank is 1/4 full or less. Airplanes are usually considered in a sideslip
anytime the turn and bank "ball" is more than one quarter ball out of the
center (coordinated flight) position. The amount of usable fuel decreases with
the severity of the sideslip in all cases.
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6
FUEL MANAGEMENT
FUEL SELECTION FOR APPROACH/LANDING
On some single-engine airplanes, the fuel selector valve handle is normally
positioned to the BOTH position to allow symmetric fuel feed from each wing
fuel tank. However, if the airplane is not kept in coordinated flight, unequal fuel'
flow may occur. The resulting wing heaviness may be corrected during flight
by turning the fuel selector valve handle to the tank in the "heavy" wing. On
other single-engine airplanes, the fuel selector has LEFT ON or RIGHT ON
positions, and takeoffs and landings are to be accomplished using fuel from
the fuller tank.
Most multi-engine airplanes have fuel tanks in each wing or in wing tip tanks,
and it is advisable to feed the engines symmetrically during cruise so that
approximately the same amount of fuel will be left in each side for descent,
approach, and landing. If fuel has been consumed at uneven rates between
the two wing tanks because of prolonged single-engine flight, fuel leak or
siphon, or improper fuel servicing, it is desirable to balance the fuel load by
operating both engines from the fuller tank. However, as long as there is
sufficient fuel in both wing tanks, even though they may have unequal
quantities, it is important to switch the left and right fuel selectors to the left
and right wing tanks, respectively, feeling for the detent, prior to the approach.
This will ensure that adequate fuel flow will be available to each operating
engine if a go-around is necessary. In the case· of single-engine operation,
operate from the fuller tank, attempting to have a little more fuel in the wing on
the side with the operating engine prior to descent.
On all multi-engine airplanes equipped with wing tip fuel tanks, the tip tanks are
the main fuel tanks on the tank selector valve controls. Refer to Supplement
12 of this Pilot Safety and Warning Supplements Manual and the applicable
airplane operating handbook.
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AIRFRAME ICING
AIRFRAME ICING
Pilots should monitor weather conditions while flying and should be alert to
conditions which might lead to icing. Icing conditions should be avoided when
possible, even if the airplane is certified and approved for flight into known
icing areas. A climb normally is the best ice avoidance action to take.
Alternatives are a course reversal or a descent to warmer air. ·11 icing
conditions are encountered inadvertently, immediate corrective action is
required.
FLIGHT INTO KNOWN ICING
Flight into known icing is the intentional flight into icing conditions that are
known to exist. Icing conditions exist anytime the indicated OAT (outside air
temperature) is + 10°C or below, or the RAT (ram air temperature) is + 10°C
or below, and visible moisture in any form is present. Any airplane that is not
specifically certified for flight into known icing conditions, is prohibited by
regulations from doing so.
1
Ice accumulations significantly alter the shape of the airfoil and increase the
weight of the aircraft. Ice accumulations on the aircraft will increase stall
speeds and alter the speeds for optimum performance. Flight at -high angles
of attack (low airspeed) can result in ice buildup on the underside of wings and
the horizontal tail aft of the areas protected by boots or leading edge anti-ice
systems. Trace or light amounts of icing on the horizontal tail can significantly
alter airfoil characteristics, which will affect stability and control of the aircraft.
lnflight ice protection equipment is not designed to remove ice, snow, or frost
accumulations on a parked airplane sufficiently enough to ensure a safe
takeoff or subsequent flight. Other means (such as a heated hangar or
approved deicing solutions) must be employed to ensure that all wing, tail,
control, propeller, windshield, static port surfaces and fuel vents are free of ice,
snow, and frost accumulations, and that there are no internal accumulations of
ice or debris in the control surfaces, engine intakes, brakes, pitot-static system
ports, and fuel vents prior to takeoff.
AIRPLANES CERTIFIED FOR FLIGHT INTO KNOWN
ICING
. An airplane certified for flight into known icing conditions must have all required
: FAA approved equipment installed and fully operational. Certain airplanes
have a flight into known icing equipment package available which, if installed in
its entirety and completely operational, allows intentional penetration of areas
of known icing conditions as reported in weather sequences or by PIREPS.
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AIRFRAME ICING
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
This known icing package is designed specifically for the airplane to provide
adequate in-flight protection during normally encountered icing conditions
produced by moisture-laden clouds. It will not provide total protection under
severe conditions such as those which exist in areas of freezing rain, nor will it
~ecessarily provide complete protection for continuous operation in extremely
widespread areas of heavy cloud moisture_ content. The installed equipment
should be used to protect the airplane from ice while seeking a different
altitude or routing where ice does not exist. During all operations, the pilot
must exercise good judgement and be prepared to alter his flight if conditions
exceed the capacity of the ice protection equipment or if any component of
this equipment fails.
The airplane's operating handbook will indicate the required equipment for
intentional flight into known icing conditions. Such equipment may include:
wing leading edge deice/anti-ice system, vertical and horizontal stabUizer
leading edge deice/anti-ice system, propeller deice/anti-ice system, windshield
anti-ice, heated pitot tube, heated static ports and fuel vents, heated stall
warning vane/transducer or optional angle-ofsattack lift sensor vane, ice
detector light(s), and increased capacity electrical and vacuum systems.
If there is any doubt whether the airplane is certified or has all the required
equipment, the pilot should assume that the airplane is not certified for flight
into known icing and avoid any encounters with areas of icing.
KINDS OF ICING
Airframe icing is a major hazard. It is at its worst when the supercooled (liquid
below freezing temperature) water droplets are large and plentiful. Droplets of
this type are usually found in cumulus clouds and are the cause of "clear ice".
Clear ice is transparent ice deposited in layers, and may be either smooth or
rough. This ice coats more of the wing than "rime ice" because the droplets
flow back from the leading edge over the upper and lower wing surface before
freezing, and the rate of accumulation is higher.
Rime ice is an opaque, granular, and rough deposit of ice that is usually
encountered in stratus clouds. Small supercooled droplets freeze instantly
when struck by the ·1eading edges of the airplane. Rime ice can quickly
change the drag characteristics of the airplane. Under some conditions, a
large "double horn" buildup on the leading edges can occur which drastically
alters the airfoil shape. Altitude changes usually work well as an avoidance
strategy for rime ice. In colder temperatures, these types of supercooled
water droplets quickly convert to ice crystals.
·
Icing in precipitation comes from freezing rain or drizzle which falls from
warmer air aloft to colder air below. This results in a very rapid buildup of
clear ice, and must be avoided by all means available to the pilot.
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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7
AIRFRAME ICING
If it is snowing, the problem is not so much the snow sticking to the airplane as
the icing caused by the supercooled water droplets in the clouds from which
the snow is falling. The amount of ice will depend upon cloud saturation.
Pilots should report all icing conditions to ATC/FSS, and if operating under IPR
conditions, request new routing or altitude if icing will be a hazard. Be sure tb
give type of airplane when·reporting icing.
The following describe how to report icing conditions:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Trace - Ice becomes visible. Rate of accumulation is slightly greater
than the rate of sublimation. Anti-ice equipment must be on and deice
equipment may or may not be required.
Ught - The rate of accumulation may create a problem if flight is
prolonged in this environment (over 1 hour). Occasional use of
deicing equipment and continuous use of anti-icing equipment
removes/prevents accumulation.
Moderate - The rate of accumulation is such that even short
encounters become potentially hazardous and use of deicing/anti-icing
equipment and flight diversion is necessary.
Severe - The rate of accumulation is such that deicing/anti-icing
equipment fails to reduce or control the hazard. Immediate flight
diversion is necessary.
RESULTS OF ICING
Airplane performance can be severely reduced by ice accumulation.
Accumulation of 1/2 inch of ice on the leading edges of the wings and
empennage can cause-a large loss in rate of climb, a cruise speed reduction
of up to 30 KIAS, as well as a significant buffet and stall speed increase. Even
if the airplane is certified for flight into known icing and the equipment is
working properly, ice remaining on unprotected areas of the airplane can
cause large performance losses. With one inch of residual ice accumulation,
these losses can double, or even triple.. Ice accumulation also will increase
airplane weight.
INADVERTENT ICING ENCOUNTER
Flight into icing conditions is not recommended. However, an inadvertent
encounter with these conditions is possible. The following are things to
consider doing if inadvertent icing is experienced. These items are not
intended to replace procedures described in any operating handbook. Instead,
this list has been generated to familiarize pilots of older model Cessnas with
guidelines they can use in the event of an inadvertent icing condition. The
best procedure is a change of. altitude, or course reversal to escape the icing
conditions.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
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7
AIRFRAME ICING
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
1O.
11.
12.
4
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
Turn pitot heat, stall warning heat, propeller deice/anti-ice, and
windshield anti-ice switches ON (if installed).
Change altitude (usually climb) or turn back to obtain an outside air
temperature that is less conducive to icing.
Increase power as necessary to maintain cruise airspeed and to
minimize ice accumulation. Maintain a minimum indicated airspeed of
Vy + 1O KIAS until assured that all ice is off the airframe.
Turn cabin heat and defroster controls full on and open defrost control
to obtain maximum windshield defroster effectiveness.
Increase engine speed to minimize ice buildup on. propeller blades. If
excessive vibration is noted, momentarily reduce engine speed with
the propeller control, and then rapidly move the control full forward.
Cycling the RPM flexes the propeller blades and high RPM increases
centrifugal force, causing ice. to shed more readily.
Watch for signs of induction air filter ice. Regain manifold pressure by
increasing the throttle setting and/or selecting alternate air or
carburetor heat. If ice accumulates on the intake filter (requiring
alternate air), a decrease. of manifold pressure will be experienced,
and the mixture should be adjusted as required.
If icing conditions are unavoidable, plan a landing at the nearest
airport. In the event of an extremely rapid ice buildup, select a
suitable Mott airport" landing site.
Ice accumulation of 1/4 inch or more on the wing leading edges may
require significantly higher power and a higher approach and landing
speed, and result in a higher stall speed and longer landing roll.
If practical, open the window and, scrape ice from a portion of the
windshield for visibility in the landing approach.
Approach with reduced flap extension to ensure adequate elevator
effectiveness in the approach and landing.
Avoid a slow and high flare-out.
Missed approaches should be avoided whenever possible, because of
severely reduced climb capability.
However, if a go-around is
mandatory, make the decision much earlier in the approach than
normal. Apply maximum power while retracting the flaps slowly in
small increments (if extended).
Retract the landing gear after
immediate obstacles are cleared.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
8
WEATHER
WEATHER
ALERTNESS
Most pilots pay particularly close attention to the business of flying when they
are intentionally operating in instrument weather conditions. On the other
hand, unlimited visibility tends to encourage a sense of security which may not
be justified. The pilot should be alert to the potential of weather hazards, and
prepared if these hazards are encountered on every flight.
VFR JUDGMENT
Published distance from clouds and visability regulations establish the
minimums for VFR flight. The pilot who uses even greater margins exercises
good judgment. VFR operation in class D airspace, when the official visibility
is 3 miles or greater, is not .prohibited, but good judgment would dictate that
VFR pilots keep out of the approach area under marginal conditions.
Precipitation reduces forward visibility. Although it is perfectly legal to cancel
an IFR flight plan whenever the pilot feels he can proceed VFR, it is usually a
good practice to continue IFR into a terminal area until the destination airport is
in sight.
While conducting simulated instrument flights, pilots should ensure that the
weather provides adequate visibility to the safety pilot. Greater visibility is
advisable when flying in or near a busy airway or close to an airport.
IFR JUDGMENT
The following tips are not necessarily based on Federal Aviation Regulations,
but are offered as recommendations for pilot consideration. They do, however,
address those elements of IFR flight that are common causes of accidents.
1.
2.
3.
4.
All pilots should have an annual IFR proficiency check, regardless of
IFR hours flown.
For the first 25 hours of pilot-in-command time in airplane type,
increase ILS visibility minimums and raise nonprecision approach
minimums.
An operating autopilot or wing leveler is strongly recommended for
·
single pilot IFR operations.
Do not depart on an IFR flight without an independent power source
for attitude and heading systems, and an emergency power source for
Reissue - 1 June 1998
8
WEATHER
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
at least one VHF communications radio, or a hand-held
communications radio.
Be sure the airplane has enough fuel to fly to the destination with a
headwind calculated at 125 percent of the forecast wind, and a
tailwind calculated at 75 percent of forecast wind. Also, include
enough fuel to miss the approach at the destination airport, climb to
cruise altitude -and fly an approach at an alternate airport, plus 45
minutes of fuel for low altitude holding.
The IFR takeoff runway should meet the criteria of the acceleratestop/go distances for that particular twin-engine airplane, or 200
percent of the distance to clear a 50-foot obstacle for a single.
Do not enter an area of embedded thunderstorms without on-board
weather detection equipment (radar and/or Stormscope,.M) and unless
cloud bases are at least 2000 feet above the highest terrain, terrain is
essentially level, and VFR can be maintained. Avoid all cells by five
miles, and severe storms by 20 miles.
Do not enter possible icing conditions unless all deice and anti-ice
systems are fully operational, or the weather provides at least a 1ODOfoot ceiling and three miles visibility for the entire route over level
terrain, and the surface temperatures are greater than 5°C.
Adhere to weather minimums, missed approach procedures and
requirements for visual contact with the runway environment. If an
approach is missed, with the runway not in sight at the appropriate
time because of weather conditions, do not attempt another approach
unless there is a valid reason to believe .there has been a substantial
improvement in the weather.
Observe the minimum runway requirement for an IFR landing. The
minimum IFR runway length for propeller driven airplanes should be·
considered 200 percent of maximum landing distance. Increase these
distances 90 percent for a wet runway and 150 percent for ice on the
runway.
Make a missed approach if speed and configuration are not stable
inside the middle marker or on nonprecision final, or if the touchdown
aiming point will be missed by more than 1000 feet. If an approach is
missed because of pilot technique, evaluate the reasons and options
before attempting another approach.
Use supplemental oxygen above a cabin altitude of 5000 feet at night,
and above 10,000 feet during the day.
0
WIND
The keys to successfully counteracting the effects of wind are proficiency,
understanding the wind response characteristics of the airplane, and a
thoughtful approach to the operation. Some operating handbooks indicate a
maximum demonstrated crosswind velocity, but this value is not considered to
be limiting. There is an ultimate limit on wind for safe operation, which varies
with the airplane and pilot. The lighter the airplane and the lower the stalling
speed, the less wind it will take to exceed this limit. The way an airplane rests
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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8
WEATHER
on its landing gear affects handling characteristics. If it sits nose down, the
wing will be unloaded and the airplane will handle better in wind than an
airplane which sits in a nose up attitude, creating a positive angle of attack.
For the latter type, the full weight of the airplane cannot be on the wheels as
the airplane is facing into the wind. Airplanes with these characteristics cause
pilots to work harder to keep the airplane under control.
CROSSWIND
While an airplane is moving on the ground, it is affected by the direction and
velocity of the wind. When taxiing into the wind, the control effectiveness is
increased by the speed of the wind. The tendency of an airplane to
weathervane is the greatest while taxiing .directly crosswind, which makes this
maneuver difficult. When .taxiing in crosswind, speed and use of brakes should
be held to a minimum and all controls should be utilized to maintain directional
control and balance (see Crosswind Taxi Diagram, Figure 1).
Takeoffs into strong crosswinds are normally performed with the minimum flap
setting necessary for the field length. With the ailerons deflected into the wind,
the airplane should be accelerated to a speed slightly higher than normal (on
multi-engine airplanes, additional power may be carried on the upwind engine
until the rudder becomes effective), and then the airplane should be flown off
abruptly to prevent possible settling back to the runway while drifting. When
clear of the ground and any obstacle, the pilot should execute a coordinated
turn into the wind to correct for drift. The pilot's ability to handle a crosswind is
more dependent upon pilot proficiency than airplane limitations.
A crosswind approach and landing may be performed using either the winglow, crab, or combination drift correction technique, depending upon the
training, experience, and desires of the pilot. Use of the minimum flap setting
required for the field length is recommended . Whichever method is used, the
pilot should hold a straight course after touchdown with the steerable nose or
tailwheel and occasional differential braking, if necessary.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
3
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
8
WEATHER
NOTE
CODE
WIND DIRECTION •
Strong quarterlog taft winds required
caution. Avoid sudden bursts of the
throttle and sharp braking when the
airplane is in th~ attitude.
Use the
steerable nose "' tail wheel and rudder to
maintain direction.
Frgure 1. Crosswind T~I Diagram
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t June 1998
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
8
WEATHER
On those airplanes with a steerable tailwheel, landings may be made with the
tailwheel lock (if installed) engaged or disengaged. Although the use of the
lock is left to the individual pilot's preference, it should be used during strong
crosswind landings on rough fields with a heavily loaded airplane. If the lock
were disengaged, this condition could lead to a touchdown with a deflected
tailwheel and subsequent external forces on the tailwheel that are conducive to
shimmy.
LOW LEVEL WIND SHEAR
Low level wind shear is the interflow of air masses near the ground, having
different speeds and directions. As an airplane passes through the narrow
boundary between the two air masses, large fluctuations in airspeed may be
encountered depending on the difference in speed and direction of the air
masses. Low level wind shear can be experienced through both the horizontal
and vertical plane. One major risk with a wind shear encounter is that a
sudden loss of airspeed may render the airplane out of control near the
ground. Recovery depends on altitude and the magnitude of the airspeed
loss.
A wind shear encounter can be reported as either positive or negative. A
positive wind shear is one in which the headwind component suddenly
· increases. The airplane's inertia makes it tend to maintain the same velocity
through space, not through air, so the first thing a pilot is likely to notice is an
increase in airspeed. The opposite case, a negative wind shear, is a sudden
decrease in headwind component. The airplane will begin to sink immediately,
as lift is decreased by the reduced airspeed; and as the natural aerodynamics,
and/or the pilot, lowers the nose, the descent rate increases.
The effects of wind shear on smaller airplanes are sometimes less severe than
on large jetliners. Smaller airplanes have less mass (and therefore less
inertia), and their speed can change more quickly. Thus, a smaller airplane
can return to its trimmed- speed, after encountering a wind shear, more rapidly
than a larger, heavier one.
TYPES OF WIND SHEAR CONDITIONS
Wind shear is encountered in several distinct weather scenarios. Within a
frontal zone, as one air mass overtakes another, variations in wind speed and
direction can be significant. Fast moving cold fronts, squall lines, and gust
fronts pose the highest risk.
A temperature inversion can present a fast moving air mass directly above a
very stable calm layer at the surface. Under these conditions an airplane on
approach with a headwind aloft will experience a rapid loss of airspeed during
descent through the boundary layer to the calm air beneath.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
5
8
WEATHER
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
The most violent type of wind shear is that induced by convective activity and
thunderstorms. Downdrafts created by local areas of descending air (roughly 5
to 20 miles diameter) can exceed 700 feet per minute. At times, very small
areas of descending air (1 mile or so in diameter), called microbursts, can
reach vertical speeds of 6000 feet per minute or more. Such .downdrafts
generate significant turbulence and exceed the climb capability of many
airplanes. In addition, as the downdraft/microburst reaches the ground, the air
spreads in all directions. The pilot entering the area at relatively low altitude
will likely experience an increase in airspeed followed by a dramatic decrease
in airspeed and altitude while exiting the area.
INDICATIONS OF WIND SHEAR
The winds near or around the base of a thunderstorm are largely
unpredictable, but there are identifiable signs that may indicate that wind shear
conditions exist. Small areas of rainfall, or shafts of heavy rain are clues to
possible wind shear conditions. Virga, or ·rain shafts that evaporate before
reaching the ground, may indicate cool, dense air sinking rapidly and may
contain microburst winds. On the ground, such signs as trees bending in the
wind, ripples on water, or a line of dust clouds should alert the pilot.
With the presence of a strong temperature inversion, if low clouds are moving
rapidly but winds are calm or from a different direction on the surface, a narrow
wind shear zone might exist and the pilot may elect to use·, a higher climb
speed until crossing the zone. Conversely, while in the landing pattern or on
an approach, if the reported surface winds are significantly different than that
being experienced in flight, it must be taken as a warning to the potential of
wind shear.
A pilot who has been holding a wind correction angle on final approach, and
suddenly finds that a change has to be made - i.e., the runway (or CDI needle)
starts moving off to the side - most likely encountered wind shear. The usual
techniques apply, such as an appropriate heading change, but more
importantly, the pilot has been alerted to the presence of a wind shear situation
and should be ready to deal with a more serious headwind to tailwind shear at
any time.
COPING WITH WIND SHEAR
A pilot can cope with wind shear by maintaining a somewhat higher airspeed
not to exceed VA (maneuvering speed), since the conditions conducive to wind
shear are also often conducive to turbulence. Pilots should be alert for
negative wind . shear; if the airspeed is suddenly decreasing, the sink rate
increasing, or more than usual approach power is required, a negative wind
shear may well have been encountered. Also, the closer the airplane gets to
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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8
WEATHER
the ground, the smaller the margin for sink recovery. Be prepared to go
around at the first indication of a negative wind shear. A positive wind shear
may be followed immediately by a negative shear.
Some larger airports are equipped with a low-level wind shear alerting system
(LLWAS). Many have ATIS, and or AWOS wind information. All elements of
the weather conditions including pilot reports should be carefully considered
and any pilot who experiences wind shear should warn others.
In summary, all pilots should remain alert to the possibility of low level wind
shear. If wind shear is encountered on final approach, usually characterized
by erratic airspeed and altimeter indications and almost always associated with
uncommanded airplane attitude changes, do not hesitate to go around. If the
approach profile and airspeed . cannot be reestablished, . it cannot be
emphasized too strongly that a go-around is often the pilot's best course of
action, and the earlier the decision to go around, the better the chance of
recovery.
THUNDERSTORM AVOIDANCE
Much has been written about thunderstorms. They have been studied for
, years, and while considerable information has been learned, the studies
· continue because questions still remain. Knowledge and weather radar have
modified our attitudes toward thunderstorms. But any storm recognizable as a
thunderstorm should be considered hazardous.
Never regard any
thunderstorm lightly, even when radar observers report the echoes are of light
intensity. Avoiding all thunderstorms is the best policy.
The following are some do's and don'ts of thunderstorm avoidance:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Don't land or takeoff in the face of an approaching thunderstorm. A
sudden gust front of low level turbulence (wind shear) could cause
loss of control.
Don't attempt to fly under a thunderstorm, even if you can see through
to the other side. Turbulence and wind shear under the storm is likely
and hazardous.
Don't fly near clouds containing embedded thunderstorms. Scattered
thunderstorms that are not embedded usually can be visually
circumnavigated.
Don't trust the visual appearance to be a reliable indicator of the
turbulence inside a thunderstorm.
Do avoid, by at least 20 miles, any thunderstorm identified as severe
or giving an intense radar echo. This is especially true under the anvil
of a large cumulonimbus.
Do circumnavigate the entire area if the area has 6/1 O thunderstorm
coverage.
Do remember that vivid and frequent lightning indicates the probability
of a severe thunderstorm.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
7
8
WEATHER
8.
9.
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
Do regard, as extremely hazardous, any thunderstorm with tops
35,000 feet or higher, whether the top is visually sighted or
determined by radar.
Do check the convective outlook during weather briefings.
The following are some do's and don'ts during inadvertent thunderstorm area
penetration:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Do keep your eyes on the instruments. Looking outside the cabin can
increase the danger of temporary blindness from lightning.
Don't change power settings; maintain settings for the recommended
turbulent air penetration speed.
Do maintain a generally constant attitude.
Don't attempt to maintain altitude. Maneuvers made in attempting to
maintain an exact altitude increase the stress on the airplane.
Exit the storm as soon as possible.
A pilot on an IFR flight plan must not deviate from an approved route or
altitude without proper clearance, as this may place him in conflict with other
air traffic. Strict adherence to traffic clearance is necessary to assure an
adequate level of safety.
Always remember, all thunderstorms are potentially hazardous and the pilot is
best advised to avoid them whenever possible.
FROM WARM WEATHER TO COLD WEATHER
Flying from warm weather to cold weather can do unusual things to airplanes.
To cope with this problem, pilots must be alerted to a few preparations. If the
airplane is serviced with a heavier grade of oil, such as SAE 50, the oil should
be changed to a lighter grade such as SAE 30 before flying into very cold
weather. If use of a multi-viscosity oil is approved, it is recommended for
improved starting in cold weather. Refer to the airplane operating handbook or
maintenance manual for approved oils. An engine/airplane winterization kit
may be available for the airplane. It usually contains restrictive covers for the
cowl nose cap and/or oil cooler and engine crankcase breather for flight in
very cold weather. Proper preflight draining of the fuel system from all drains
is especially important and will help eliminate any free water accumulation.
The use of fuel additives, such as Prist or EGME, may also be desirable.
Refer to the airplane operating handbook or maintenance manual for approved
fuel additives.
In order to prevent propeller freeze-up when operating in very cold weather, it
may be necessary to exercise the constant speed prop every few minutes.
This can be accomplished by moving the prop controls forward or aft from
their cruise position 300 RPM and back during flight.
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PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
8
WEATHER
ICE, SNOW, FROST, Etc.
For any extended time, it is always best to park an airplane in a hangar,
particularly during inclement weather. When this is not possible, all ice, snow,
frost, etc., must be removed from the entire airframe and engine(s) prior to
starting.
The presence of ice, snow, frost, etc., on the wings, tail, control surfaces
(externally and internally), etc., is hazardous. Safe operation depends upon
their removal. Too often, their effects on airplane performance are not
completely understood or appreciated.
WAKE TURBULENCE
Airplanes are significantly affected by the wake turbulence of any heavier
aircraft or helicopter. Wake turbulence dissipation and displacement are
functions of elapsed time and prevailing wind speed and direction. During
calm conditions, severe turbulence generated by large aircraft can persist as
long as 10 minutes. Delay takeoff to ensure dissipation and displacement of
wake turbulence. When it is necessary to take off behind a heavier aircraft or
helicopter, avoid wake turbulence, particularly wake vortices, by vertical or
lateral spacing or an appropriate time delay.
Vertical avoidance is appropriate to longer runways where operations can be
completed on portions of the runway not affected by the vortices of preceding
aircraft and flying above areas where vortices will be present is possible.
Become airborne well before the preceding aircraft rotation point and climb
above its flight path, or lift off beyond the touchdown point of a landing aircraft.
When it is necessary to land behind another aircraft, remain above its
approach path and land beyond its touchdown point. Touchdown prior to the
rotation point of a departing aircraft.
Lateral movement of wake vortices is only possible when a significant
crosswind exists and is not detectable unless exhaust smoke or dust marks
the vortices. Consider offsetting the takeoff path to the upwind side of the
runway.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
9/(10 blank)
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
9
RESTRAINT SYSTEMS
RESTRAINT SYSTEMS
SEAT RESTRAINTS
Records of general aviation airplane accident iniunes reveal a surprising
number of instances In which .the occupants were not properly using the
available restraint system, indicating the presence of a complacent attitude
during airplane preflight briefing inspections. An unbuckled restraint system
during a critical phase of flight, such as during turbulence, could cause loss of
control of the airplane and/or injuries. Although the ultimate responsibility lies
with the pilot-in-command, each user of a restraint system should be cognizant
of the importance of proper use of the complete restraint system.
Pilots should ensure that all occupants properly use their individual restraint
systems. The system should be adjusted snug across the body. A loose
restraint belt will allow the wearer excessive movement and could result in
serious injuries. The wearer should not allow sharp or hard items in pockets or
other clothing to remain between their body and the restraint system to avoid
discomfort or injury during adverse flight conditions or accidents. Each
occupant must have their own restraint system. Use of a single system by
more than one person could result in serious injury.
Occupants of adjustable seats should position and lock their seats before
fastening their restraint system. Restraint belts can be lengthened before use
by grasping the sides of the link on the link half of the belt and pulling against
the belt. Then, after locking the belt link into the belt buckle, the belt can be
tightened by pulling the free end. The belt is released by pulling upward on
the top of the buckle. Restraint systems must be fastened anytime the
airplane is in motion. Before takeoff, the pilot should brief all passengers on
the proper use, including the method of unlatching the entire restraint system,
in the event that emergency egress from the airplane is necessary.
Small children must be secured in an approved child restraint system as
defined in FAR 91.107 "Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses, and child
restraint systems". The pilot should know and follow the instructions for
installation and use provided by the seat manufacturer. The child restraint
system should be installed in an aircraft seat other than a front seat. If the
child restraint system is installed in a front seat, the pilot must ensure that it
does not interfere with full control movement or restrict access to any aircraft
controls. Also, the pilot should consider whether the child restraint system
could interfere with emergency egress. Refer to AC 91-62A, "Use of Child
Seats In Aircraft" for more information.
If shoulder restraints are not installed, kits are available from Cessna or from
other approved sources. Cessna strongly recommends the installation of
shoulder harnesses.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
9
RESTRAINT SYSTEMS
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
SEAT STOPS/LATCHES
The pilot should visually check the seat for security on the seat tracks and
assure that the seat is locked in position. This can be accomplished by
visually ascertaining pin engagement and physically attempting to move the
seat fore and aft to verify the seat is secured in position. Failure to ensure that
the seat is locked in position could result in the seat sliding aft during a critical
phase of flight, such as initial climb. Mandatory Service Bulletin SEB89-32
installs· secondary seat stops and is available from Cessna.
The pilot's seat should be adjusted and locked in a position to allow full rudder
deflection and brake application without having to shift position in the seat. For
takeoff and landing, passenger seat backs should be adjusted to the most
upright position.
SECURITY IN AFT-FACING SEATS
Some aft-facing seats are adjustable fore and aft, within the limits of th~ seat
stops. Ensure the seat stop pins are engaged with the holes in the seat tracks
before takeoff and landing. The restraint system should be worn anytime the
seat is occupied. Assure that the seats are installed in the correct positions.
Approved seat designs differ between forward-facing and rear-facing seats and
proper occupant protection is dependent upon proper seat installation.
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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10
FUEL SYSTEM CONTAMINATION
FUEL SYSTEM CONTAMINATION
ADEQUATE PREFLIGHT OF THE FUEL SYSTEM
A full preflight inspection is recommended before each flight for general
aviation airplanes. Inspection procedures for the fuel system must include
checking the quantity of. fuel with the airplane on level ground, checking the
security of fuel filler .caps and draining the fuel tank sumps, fuel reservoir(s),
fuel line drain(s), fuel selector drains, and fuel strainer(s). To ensure that no
unsampled fuel remains in the airplane, an adequate sample of fuel from the
fuel strainer must be taken with the fuel selector valve placed in each of its
positions (BOTH, LEFT, RIGHT, etc.). Some Cessna airplanes are equipped
with a fuel reservoir(s). If so equipped, the pilot should be aware of the
location of the fuel reservoir(s) and its drain plug or quick-drain. The fuel
reservoir(s) on most single-engine airplanes is located near the fuel system
low point where water will accumulate. Therefore, the fuel reservoir(s) must be
drained routinely during each preflight inspection. Periodically check the
condition of the fuel filler cap seals, pawls, and springs for evidence of wear
and/or deterioration which indicates a need for replacement. Check fuel cap
adapters and seals to insure that the sealing surfaces are clean and not rusted
or pitted. Deformed pawls may affect the sealing capabilities of the seals
and/or cause it to be exposed to detrimental weather elements. Precautions
should be taken to prevent water entry into fuel tanks, due to damaged filler
caps and every effort made to check and remove all water throughout the fuel
system. Umbrella caps will assist in preventing water entry into the fuel tank
through the fuel filler.
It is the pilot's responsibility to ensure that the airplane is properly serviced
before each flight with the correct type of fuel. The pilot must take the time to
inspect· the airplane thoroughly, making sure all of the fuel filler caps are
installed and secured properly after visually checking the fuel quantity with the
airplane on level ground. During the check of the fuel tanks, observe the color
and odor of the fuel while draining a generous sample from each sump and
drain point into a transparent container. Check for the presence of water, dirt,
rust, or other contaminants. Never save the fuel sample and risk the possibility
of contaminating the system. Also, ensure that each fuel tank vent is clear of
restrictions (i.e., dirt, insect nests, ice, snow, bent or pinched tubes, etc.).
Refer to the airplanes Maintenance Manual for for fuel tank vent removal and
inspection if needed.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
10
FUEL SYSTEM CONTAMINATION
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
PROPER SAMPLING FROM QUICK DRAINS
The fuel system sumps and drains should always be drained and checked for
contaminants after each refueling and during each preflight inspection. Drain
at least a cupful of fuel into a clear container to check for solid and/or liquid
contaminants, and proper fuel grade. If contamination is observed, take further
samples at all fuel drain points until fuel is clear of contaminants; then, gently
rock wings and,. if possible, lower the tail to move any· additional contaminants
to the sampling points. Take repeated samples from all fuel drain points until
all contamination has been removed. If excessive sampling is required,
completely defuel, drain and clean the airplane fuel system, and attempt to
discover where or how the contamination originated before the airplane flies
again. Do not fly the airplane · with contaminated or unapproved fuel. If an
improper fuel type is detected, the mandatory procedure is to completely
defuel and drain the fuel system.
Extra effort is needed for a proper preflight of all fuel drains on a .float plane. If
water is detected after rocking the wings and lowering the tail, the aircraft
should not be flown until after the fuel system · is completely drained and
cleaned.
80 versus 100 OCTANE FUEL
When 80 octane (red) fuel began to be replaced by 100LL (blue) there was
concern about the service life expectancy of low compression engines. It was
claimed that some engines experienced .accelerated exhaust valve erosion and
valve guide wear from the use of highly leaded 100/130 (green) avgas in
engines that were rated to use a minimum grade of 80 octane fuel. Engine
manufacturers have provided amended operating procedures and maintenance
schedules to minimize problems resulting from the use of high lead 100/130
avgas. Experience has now proven that low-compression aircraft engines can
be operated safely on 1OOLL avgas providing they are regularly operated and
serviced in accordance with the operating handbook or other officially
approved document.
AVGAS versus JET FUEL
Occasionally, airplanes are inadvertently serviced with the wrong type of fuel.
Piston engines may run briefly on jet fuel, but detonation and overheating will
soon cause power failure. All piston-engine airplanes should have fuel filler
restrictors installed to prevent jet fuel from being pumped into the fuel tanks.
An engine failure caused by running a turbine engine on the wrong fuel may
not be as sudden, but prolonged operation on avgas will severely damage the
engine because of the lead content and differing combustion temperature of
the fuel. Time limitations for use of avgas in turbine engines are listed in the
operating handbook.
·
2
Reissue - 1 June 1998
(
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
10
FUEL SYSTEM CONTAMINATION
AUTOMOTIVE GASOLINE/FUEL
Never use automotive gasoline in an airplane unless the engine and airplane
fuel system are specifically certified and approved for automotive gasoline use.
The additives used in the production of automotive gasoline vary widely
throughout the petroleum industry and may have deteriorating effects on
airplane fuel system components. The qualities of automotive gasoline can
induce vapor lock, increase the probability of carburetor icing, and can cause
internal engine problems.
FUEL CAP SECURITY
The consequence of a missing or incorrectly installed fuel filler cap is inflight
fuel siphoning. lnflight siphoning may distort the fuel .cell on some airplanes
with bladder-type fuel cells. This distortion will change the fuel. cell capacity,
and may interfere with the operation of the fuel quantity indicator sensing
mechanism inside the cell. This condition will generally cause an erroneous
and misleading fuel quantity reading and may result in incomplete filling for the
next flight.
CONTAMINATION
Solid contamination may consist of rust, sand, pebbles, dirt, microbes or
bacterial growth. If any solid contaminants are found in any part of the fuel
system, drain and clean the airplane fuel system. .Do not fly the airplane with
fuel contaminated with Solid material.
Liquid contamination is usually water, improper fuel type, fuel grade, or
additives that are not compatible with the fuel or fuel system components.
Liquid contamination should be addressed as set forth in the section entitled
"Proper Sampling from Quick Drains", and as prescribed in the airplane's
approved flight manual.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
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PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
11
FUEL PUMP OPERATION
FUEL PUMP OPERATION
AUXILIARY FUEL PUMP OPER"ATION - GENERAL
The engine-driven fuel pump is designed to supply an engine with a steady,
uninterrupted flow of fuel. Temperature changes, pressure changes, agitation
in the fuel lines, fuel quality, and other factors can cause a release of vapor in
the fuel system. Some airplanes (single and multi-engine) incorporate an
auxiliary fuel pump to reduce excess fuel vapor in the fuel supply for each
engine. This pump is also used to ensure that a positive supply of fuel is
available in the event the engine driven fuel pump should fail.
FUEL VAPOR
Under hot, high altitude conditions, or in situations during a climb that are
conducive to fuel vapor formation, it may be necessary to utilize the auxiliary
fuel pump(s) to attain or stabilize the fuel flow required for proper engine
operation. Use the auxiliary fuel pump(s) in all conditions where there is any
possibility of excessive fuel vapor. formation or temporary disruption of fuel flow
in accordance with operating handbook procedures.
SINGLE ENGINE FUEL PUMP OPERATION
(CARBURETED ENGINE)
On some carbureted, high wing, single engine airplanes, the auxiliary fuel
pump should be turned on anytime the indicated fuel pressure falls below the
minimum. Typically this would only occur in an extreme climb attitude following
failure of the engine driven fuel pump. Consult the operating handbook of the
affected model for a detailed description of the procedure.
SINGLE ENGINE FUEL PUMP OPERATION
(PRECISION/BENDIX FUEL INJECTED ENGINE)
The auxiliary fuel pump is used primarily for priming the engine before starting.
Priming is accomplished through the regular injection system. If the auxiliary
fuel pump switch is placed in the ON position for prolonged periods with the
master switch turned on, the mixture rich, and the engine stopped, the intake
manifolds will become flooded.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
11
FUEL PUMP OPERATION
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
The auxiliary fuel pump is also used for vapor suppression in hot weather.
Normally, momentary use will be sufficient for vapor suppression. Turning on
the auxiliary fuel pump with a normally operating engine pump will result in
enrichment of the mixture. The auxiliary fuel pump should not be operated
during takeoff and landing, since gravity and the engine driven fuel pump will
supply adequate fuel flow to the fuel injector unit. In the event of failure of the
engine driven fuel pump, use of the auxiliary fuel pump will provide sufficient
fuel to maintain flight at maximum continuous power.
To ensure a prompt engine restart after running a fuel tank dry, switch the fuel
selector to the opposite tank at the first indication of fuel flow fluctuation or
power loss. Turn on the auxiliary fuel pump and advance the mixture control
to full rich. After power and steady fuel flow are restored, turn off the auxiliary
fuel pump and lean the mixture as necessary.
SINGLE ENGINE FUEL PUMP OPERATION (TCM
FUEL INJECTED ENGINE)
The auxiliary fuel pump on single engine airplanes is controlled by a split
rocker type switch labeled AUX PUMP. One side of the switch is red and is
labeled HI; the other side is yellow and is labeled LO.
The LO side operates the pump at low speed, and, if desired, can be used for
starting or vapor suppression. The HI side operates the pump at high speed,
supplying sufficient fuel flow to maintain adequate power in the event of an
engine driven fuel pump failure. In addition, the HI side may be used for
normal engine starts, vapor elimination in flight, and inflight engine starts.
When the engine driven fuel pump is functioning and the auxiliary fuel pump is
placed in the HI position, a fuel/air ratio considerably richer than best power is
produced unless the mixture is leaned. Therefore, the auxiliary fuel pump
must be turned off during takeoff or landing, and during all other normal flight
conditions. With the engine stopped and the battery switch on, the cylinder
intake ports can become flooded if the HI or LO side of the auxiliary fuel pump
switch is turned on.
In hot, high altitude conditions, or climb conditions that are conducive to fuel
vapor formation, it may be necessary to utilize the auxiliary fuel pump to attain
or stabilize the fuel flow required for the type of climb being performed. Select
either the HI or LO position of the switch as required, and adjust the mixture to
the desired fuel flow. If fluctuating fuel flow (greater than 5 lbs/hr) is observed,
place the auxiliary fuel pump switch in the HI or LO position as required to
clear the fuel system of vapor. The auxiliary fuel pump may be operated
continuously in cruise, if necessary, but should be turned off prior to descent.
Each time the auxiliary fuel pump switch is turned on or off, the mixture should
be readjusted.
2
Reissue - 1 June 1998
PILOT SAFETY AND
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11
FUEL PUMP OPERATION
MULTI-ENGINE FUEL PUMP OPERATION
Cessna .multi-engine, low wing. airplanes utilize engine driven fuel pumps to
assist the continuous flow of fuel to the engine. As a general rule, the auxiliary
fuel pumps should be utilized under the following conditions:
1.
2.
Every takeoff.
Initial climb after takeoff (unless the operating handbook indicates that
it is not necessary).
3.. When switching the fuel selector(s) from one tank to another.
4. Every approach and· Ianding.
5. Anytime the fuel pressure is fluctuating and the engine is affected by
the fluctuation.
6. During hot weather, such as hot engine ground operation where fuel
vapor problems cause erratic engine operation.
7. High altitude. (For auxiliary fuel pump operation at high altitude
consult the operating handbook.)
8. If the engine driven fuel pump should fail.
9. On some twins when using the auxiliary fuel tanks.
If the auxiliary fuel pump is used during ground operations, such as hot day
engine starts or purging fuel vapor, pilots should check the condition of the
engine driven fuel pump before takeoff. by turning the auxiliary fuel pump OFF
briefly, and then back ON for takeoff. If the engine driven fuel pump has failed,
the engine will not continue to operate.
If the battery or master switch is on while an engine is stopped on the ground
or in flight, the cylinder intake ports can become flooded if the auxiliary fuel
pump is turned on. If this situation occurs in excess of 60 seconds, the
cylinders must be purged as follows:
1. With the auxiliary fuel pump OFF, allow the induction manifold to drain
at least five minutes or until fuel ceases to flow from the drains on the
bottom of the engine.
2. If natural draining has occurred, ensure that the auxiliary fuel pump is
OFF, the magnetos or ignition switch is OFF, the mixture is in IDLE
CUT-OFF, and the throttle is FULL OPEN, then turn the engine with
the starter .
3. If natural draining has not occurred, perform maintenance as required.
A mandatory service bulletin (MEBBB-3) was issued to replace the automatic
fuel pressure sensing and the cockpit auxiliary fuel pump switches for each
engine with three-position lever lock type toggle switches. These modifications
provide direct pilot activation of the auxiliary fuel pumps.
On low wing multi-engine airplanes (except model 310, 310A, and 3108, which
are not affected by this change), the switches are labeled AUX PUMP, L (left
engine) and R (right engine) and switch positions are labeled LOW, OFF, and
HIGH. The LOW position operates the auxiliary fuel pumps at low pressure
Reissue - 1 June .1995
3
11
FUEL PUMP OPERATION
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
and can be used, when required, to provide. supplementary fuel pressure for all
normal operations. The switches are OFF in the middle position. The HIGH
position is reserved for emergency operation, and operates the pumps at high
pressure. The switches are locked out of the HIGH position and the switch
toggle must be pulled to clear the lock before it can be moved to the HIGH
setting. The toggle need not be pulled to return the switch to OFF.
The LOW position of the auxiliary fuel pump switches should be used
whenever an original manual/handbook or checklist procedure specifies either
LOW (PRIME, in 310C, 310D, 310F, 310G, 310H, 320, and 320A.) or ON. The
LOW position is also used anytime there are indications of vapor, as evidenced
by fluctuating fuel flow. Auxiliary fuel pumps, if needed, are to be operated on
LOW in all conditions except when an engine driven fuel pump fails.
The HIGH position supplies sufficient fuel flow to sustain partial engine power
and should be used solely to sustain the operation of an engine in the event its
engine driven fuel pump fails. Failure of an engine driven fuel pump will be
evidenced by a sudden reduction in the fuel flow indication immediately prior to
a loss of power while operating from a fuel tank containing adequate fuel. In
an emergency, where loss of an engine driven fuel pump is involved, pull the
applicable auxiliary fuel pump switch to clear the lock and select the HIGH
position. Then adjust the throttle and mixture controls to obtain satisfactory
operation. At high manifold pressure and RPM, auxiliary fuel pump output may
not be sufficient for normal engine operation. In this case, reduce manifold
pressure to a level compatible with the indicated fuel flow. At low power
settings, the mixture may have to be leaned for smooth engine operation. If
HIGH auxiliary pump output does not restore adequate fuel flow, a fuel leak
may exist. The auxiliary pump should be shut off and the engine secured.
If the auxiliary fuel pump switches are placed in the HIGH position with the
engine-driven fuel pump(s) operating normally, total loss of engine power may
occur due to flooding.
When performing single engine operations, the auxiliary fuel pump of the
engine to be shutdown should be turned OFF prior to any intentional engine
shutdown, to preclude fuel accumulation in the engine intake system.
In models 310, 310A, and 310B, which are equipped with pressure type
carburetors, the electric fuel boost pumps in the tanks provide a positive fuel
flow as emergency pumps in the event of failure of the engine driven fuel
pumps. They also provide fuel pressure for priming and starting. The boost
pumps are operated by two electric switches, and the up position is ON.
Always take off and land with these pumps turned ON. Anytime the boost
pumps are turned on without the engines running, mixture controls must be in
the idle cut-off position to prevent flooding the intake manifolds.
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Reissue - 1 June 1998
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
11
FUEL PUMP OPERATION
CENTERLINE THRUST TWINS (FUEL PUMP
OPERATION)
The auxiliary fuel pumps on the centerline thrust models (336 and 337
Skymaster) are controlled by two split rocker type switches. The switches are
labeled AUX PUMPS and F ENGINE R. One side of each switch is red and is
labeled HI. The other side is yellow and is labeled LO. The LO side operates
the pumps at low speed, and if desired, can. be used for starting or vapor
suppression. The HI side operates the pumps at high speed, supplying
sufficient fuel flow to maintain adequate power in the event of an engine.driven
fuel pump failure. In addition, the HI side may be used for normal engine
starts,. vapor elimination in flight, and inflight engine starts.
When the engine driven fuel pump is functioning and the auxiliary fuel pump is
placed in the HI position, a fuel/air ratio considerably richer than best power is
produced unless the mixture is leaned. Therefore, these switches must be
turned OFF during takeoff or landing, and during all other normal flight
conditions. With the engine stopped and the· battery switch ON, the. cylinder
intake ports can become flooded if the HI or LO side of the auxiliary fuel pump
switch is turned on.
In hot, high altitude conditions, or climb conditions that are conducive to fuel
vapor formation, it may be necessary to utilize the auxiliary fuel pumps to attain
or stabilize the fuel flow required for the type of climb being performed. Select
either the HI or LO position of the switches as required, and adjust the
mixtures to the desired fuel flow. If fluctuating fuel flow (greater than 5 lbs/hr)
is observed, place the appropriate auxiliary fuel pump switch in the HI or LO
position as required to clear the fuel system of vapor. The auxiliary fuel pump
may be operated continuously in cruise, if necessary, but should be turned off
prior to descent. Each time the auxiliary fuel pump switches are turned on or
off, the mixtures should be readjusted.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
.5/(6 blank)
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
12
AUXILIARY FUEL TANKS
AUXILIARY FUEL TANKS
Many twin engine Cessna airplanes incorporate auxiliary fuel tanks to increase
range and endurance. These tanks are usually bladder type cells located
symmetrically in the outboard wing areas and contain no internal fuel pumps.
When selected, the fuel from these tanks is routed to the engine driven fuel
pump.
If the auxiliary fuel tanks are to be used, the pilot must first select main tank
(tip tank) fuel for at least 60 minutes of flight (with use of 40-gallon auxiliary fuel
tanks) or 90 minutes of flight (with use of 63-gallon auxiliary fuel tanks). This is
necessary to provide space in the main fuel tanks for vapor and fuel returned
from the engine driven fuel pumps when operating on the auxiliary fuel tanks.
If sufficient space is not available in the main tanks for this returned fuel, the
tanks can overflow through the overboard fuel .vents. Since part of the fuel
from the auxiliary fuel tanks• is diverted back to the. main tanks instead of being
consumed by the engines, the auxiliary tanks will empty sooner than may be
anticipated. However, the main tank volume or quantity will be increased by
the returned fuel.
The fuel supply in the auxiliary fuel tanks is intended for use during cruise flight
only. The shape of the auxiliary fuel tanks is such that during certain flight
maneuvers, the fuel will move away from the fuel tank outlet. If the outlet is
uncovered while feeding the engine, fuel flow to the engine will be interrupted
and a temporary loss of power may result. Because of this, operation from the
auxiliary fuel-tanks is not recommended below 1000 feet AGL.
An optional auxiliary fuel tank may be installed on some centerline thrust twins
(336 and 337 Skymaster). The system consists of two tanks, each containing
18 gallons (108 pounds) usable, one located in each inboard wing panel. The
tanks feed directly to the fuel selector valves. The left auxiliary tank provides
fuel to the front engine only and the right auxiliary tank provides fuel to the rear
engine only. Fuel quantity for the auxiliary tanks is read on the same fuel
quantity indicators used for the main fuel tanks. This is accomplished when
the fuel selector valve handles are turned to the AUXILIARY position. As each
selector valve handle is turned to this position, it depresses a gaging button,
labeled PUSH TO GAGE, located in the AUXILIARY quadrant of the fuel
selector valve placard. The depressed button actuates a microswitch and
electrically senses auxiliary fuel rather than main fuel quantity. Auxiliary fuel
quantity can be checked without changing the selector valve handle, by
depressing the PUSH TO GAGE button manually. Depressing the gaging
button, either manually or by rotating the selector valve handle to the
AUXILIARY position,,will illuminate the amber AUX FUEL ON indicator lights
mounted above the' engine instrument cluster. When fuel is being used from
the auxiliary fuel tanks, any excess fuel and vapor from the engine driven
pumps is returned to fuel line manifolds. The returned vapor passes through
the fuel line manifolds to the vent lines and is routed overboard. The excess
Reissue - 1 June 1998
12
AUXILIARY FUEL TANKS
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
fuel passes into the fuel line manifold and is returned to the engine driven
pumps.
On some early model Skymasters, fuel vapor from the engine driven fuel
pumps is returned to the main fuel tanks. When the selector valve handles are
in the AUXILIARY position, the left auxiliary tank feeds only the front engine
and the right auxiliary tank feeds only the rear engine. If the auxiliary tanks are
to be used, select fuel from the main tanks for 60 minutes prior to switching to
auxiliary tanks. This is necessary to provide space in the main tanks for vapor
and fuel returned from the engine driven fuel pumps when operating on
auxiliary tanks. On some models, auxiliary fuel boost pumps are not provided
for the auxiliary .fuel tank. Therefore it is recommended to use the auxiliary
fuel tanks only in straight and level flight. When unsure of the type of auxiliary
tank installation, consult the operating handbook for the respective airplane.
A few single-engine airplanes contain an auxiliary fuel tank. The system's
main components include a fuel tank installed on the baggage compartment
floor and an electric fuel transfer pump. The auxiliary fuel system is plumbed
into the right main fuel tank.
To use the auxiliary fuel system, select the right wing fuel tank in cruise and
operate on that tank until the fuel tank has adequate room for the transfer of
auxiliary fuel. After selecting the left main tank, turn on the auxiliary fuel
transfer pump to refill the right main fuel tank from the auxiliary tank. Transfer
will take from 45 minutes to 1 hour. Prior to transfer, ensure that adequate fuel
is available in the left tank to allow time for the auxiliary tank to transfer.
Do not operate the transfer pump with the fuel selector valve turned to either
the BOTH or RIGHT positions. Total or partial engine stoppage will result from
air being pumped into fuel lines after fuel transfer has been completed. If this
should occur the engine will restart in 3 to 5 seconds after turning off the
transfer pump, as the air in the fuel line will be evacuated rapidly.
After transfer is complete and the pump has been turned off, the selector may
be returned to BOTH or RIGHT. Takeoff, climb, and landing should always be
conducted with the selector in the BOTH position for maximum safety.
WING LOCKER FUEL TANK USAGE
Some twins may have wing locker fuel tanks installed in the forward portion of
each wing locker baggage area. These tanks are bladder type cells for
storage of extra fuel to supplement the main tank fuel quantity. The fuel in
these tanks cannot be fed directly to the engines. Instead, it has to be
transferred to the main tanks by wing locker fuel transfer pumps. Fuel transfer
should begin as soon as adequate volume is available in the main fuel tanks to
hold the wing locker fuel. Waiting until the main tanks are low before
transferring wing locker fuel does not allow early recognition of possible failure
to transfer.
·
2
Reissue - 1 June 1998
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
12
AUXILIARY FUEL TANKS
AUXILIARY FUEL TANKS
Many twin engine Cessna airplanes incorporate auxiliary fuel tanks to increase
range and endurance. These tanks are usually bladder type cells located
symmetrically in the outboard wing areas and contain no internal fuel pumps.
When selected, the fuel from these tanks is routed to the engine driven fuel
pump.
If the auxiiiary fuel tanks are to be used, the pilot must first select main tank
(tip tank) fuel for at least 60 minutes of flight (with use of 40-gallon auxiliary fuel
tanks) or 90 minutes of flight (with use of 63-gallon auxiliary fuel tanks). This is
necessary to provide space in the main fuel tanks for vapor and fuel returned
from the engine driven fuel pumps when operating on the auxiliary fuel tanks.
If sufficient space is not available in the main tanks for this returned fuel, the
tanks can overflow through the overboard fuel vents. Since part of the fuel
from the auxiliary fuel tanks is diverted back to the main tanks instead of being
consumed by the engines, the auxiliary tanks will empty sooner than may be
anticipated. However, the main tank volume or quantity will be increased by
the returned fuel.
The fuel supply in the auxiliary fuel tanks is intended for use during cruise flight
only. The shape of the auxiliary fuel tanks is such that during certain flight
maneuvers, the fuel will move away from the fuel tank outlet. If the outlet is
uncovered while feeding the engine, fuel flow to the engine will be interrupted
and a temporary loss of power may result. Because of this, operation from the
auxiliary fuel·tanks is not recommended below 1000 feet AGL.
An optional auxiliary fuel tank may be installed on some centerline thrust twins
(336 and 337 Skymaster). The system consists of two tanks, each containing
18 gallons (108 pounds) usable, one located in each inboard wing panel. The
tanks feed directly to the fuel selector valves. The left auxiliary tank provides
fuel to the front engine only and the right auxiliary tank provides fuel to the rear
engine only. Fuel quantity for the auxiliary tanks is read on the same fuel
quantity indicators used for the main fuel tanks. This is accomplished when
the fuel selector valve handles are turned to the AUXILIARY position. As each
selector valve handle is turned to this position, it depresses a gaging button,
labeled PUSH TO GAGE, located in the AUXILIARY quadrant of the fuel
selector valve placard. The depressed button actuates a microswitch and
electrically senses auxiliary fuel rather than main. fuel quantity. Auxiliary fuel
quantity can be checked without changing the selector valve handle, by
depressing the PUSH TO GAGE button manually. Depressing the gaging
button, either manually or by rotating the selector valve handle to the
AUXILIARY position,,,.-Will illuminate the amber AUX FUEL ON indicator lights
mounted above the engine instrument cluster. When fuel is being used from
the auxiliary fuel tanks, any excess fuel and vapor from the engine driven
pumps is returned to fuel line manifolds. The returned vapor passes through
the fuel line manifolds to the vent lines and is routed overboard. The excess
Reissue - 1 June 1998
12
AUXILIARY FUEL TANKS
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
fuel passes into the fuel line manifold and is returned to the engine driven
pumps.
On some early model Skymasters, fuel vapor from the engine driven fuel
pumps is returned to the main fuel tanks. When the selector valve handles are
in the AUXILIARY position, the left auxiliary tank feeds only the front engine
and the right auxiliary tank feeds only the rear engine. If the auxiliary tanks are
to be used, select fuel from the main tanks for 60 minutes prior to switching to
auxiliary tanks. This is necessary to provide space in the main tanks for vapor
and fuel returned from the engine driven fuel pumps when operating on
auxiliary tanks. On some models, auxiliary fuel boost pumps are not provided
for the . auxiliary .fuel tank. Therefore it is recommended to use the auxiliary
fuel tanks only in straight and level flight. When unsure of the type of auxiliary
tank installation, consult the operating handbook for the respective airplane.
A few single-engine airplanes contain an auxiliary fuel tank. The system's
main components include a fuel tank installed on the baggage compartment
floor and an electric fuel transfer pump. The auxiliary fuel system is plumbed
into the right main fuel tank.
To use the auxiliary fuel system, select the right wing fuel tank in cruise and
operate on that tank until the fuel tank has adequate room for the transfer of
auxiliary fuel. After selecting the left main tank, turn on the auxiliary fuel
transfer pump to refill the right main fuel tank from the auxiliary tank. Transfer
will take from 45 minutes to 1 hour. Prior to transfer, ensure that adequate fuel
is available in the left tank to allow time for th1:1 auxiliary tank to transfer.
Do not operate the transfer pump with the fuel selector valve turned to either
the BOTH or RIGHT positions. Total or partial engine stoppage will result from
air being pumped into fuel lines after fuel transfer has been completed. If this
should occur the engine will restart in 3 to 5 seconds after turning off the
transfer pump, as the air in the fuel line will be evacuated rapidly.
After transfer is complete and the pump has been turned off, the selector may
be returned to BOTH or RIGHT. Takeoff, __climb, and landing should always be
conducted with the selector in the BOTH position for maximum safety.
WING LOCKER FUEL TANK USAGE
Some twins may have wing locker fuel tanks installed in the forward ·portion of.
each wing locker baggage area. These tanks are bladder type cells for
storage of extra fuel to supplement the main tank fuel quantity. The fuel -in
these tanks cannot be fed directly to the engines. Instead, it has to be
transferred to the main tanks by wing locker fuel transfer pumps. Fuel transfer
should begin as soon as adequate volume is available in the main fuel tanks to
hold the wing locker fuel. Waiting until the main tanks are low before
transferring wing locker fuel does not allow early recognition of possible failure
to transfer.
2
Reissue - 1 June 1998
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
12
AU~LIARVFUELTANKS
If wing locker fuel is to be used. consult the operating handbook for the
quantity of main tank fuel which must lirst be used in the respective main tank
for the transferred wing locker fuel. This wiR prevent overflowing ol the main
tank(s) when transferring the wing locker fuel.
Wing locker fuel transfer pump switches are provided to manually control the
transfer of the wing locker fuel to the main tanks. These switches should be
tumed ON only to transfer tuel and turned OFF when indicator lights llluminate
to show that fuel has been transferred. The transfer pumps use the fuel in the
wing locker tank !or lubrication and cooling.
Therefore, transfer pump
operation after fuel transfer Is complete win shorten the· life of the pump. Fuel
should be cross fed, as required, to maintain fuel balance.
Reissue - 1 June t 988
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PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
13
INSTRUMENT POWER
INSTRUMENT POWER
VACUUM POWER FAILURES
Many airplanes may be equipped with some type of back-up vacuum system
for operation in the event the primary vacuum system becomes inoperative in
flight. The backup system may be in the form of another engine-driven
vacuum pump, in parallel with the primary pump, or an electric standby
vacuum pump, also in parallel with the primary pump, or both. If a back-up
system is not available and the attitude and directional indicators are disabled,
the pilot must rely on partial instrument panel operation. This may include
using the electrically-powered turn coordinator or turn and bank indicator and
the magnetic compass, altimeter, airspeed indicator, and rate of climb
indicator.
A suction gage, and in some airplanes a low-vacuum warning light, provides a
means of monitoring the vacuum system for proper operation in flight.
Operating handbooks reflect a desired suction range during normal operation
of the airplane. A suction reading outside of this range may indicate a system
malfunction, and in this case, the vacuum driven instruments should not be
considered reliable. Whenever operation of the airplane's vacuum system is in
doubt, land when practical for repairs.
In the event of a directional indicator and attitude indicator failure due to
vacuum failure, the pilot must rely on partial instrument panel operation using
the remaining instruments. VFR .operations can generally be conducted
satisfactorily without the vacuum instruments.
· However, instrument
meteorological conditions {IMC) can be considerably more challenging. An
instrument rated .pilot should stay current on partial panel flying skills but both
VFR and IFR pilots should maintain VFR conditions if a vacuum failure occurs
while clear of clouds. All pilots should become familiar with the following
procedure for executing a 180° turn in clouds with the aid of either the turn
coordinator or the turn and bank indicator.
Upon inadvertently entering clouds, maintain control of the aircraft. If it is
desired to turn back out of the clouds, the following action should be
employed:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Note the compass heading.
Note the time in both minutes and seconds.
When the seconds indicate the nearest half minute, initiate a standard
rate left turn, holding the turn coordinator or turn and bank indicator {if
installed) symbolic airplane wing opposite the lower left index mark for
60 seconds. Then roll back to level flight by leveling the miniature
airplane.
Check accuracy of turn by observing the compass heading which
should be the reciprocal ofthe original heading.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
13
PILOT SAFETY AND
INSTRUMENT POWER
5.
6.
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
If necessary, adjust heading primarily with. skidding motions rather
than rolling motions so that the compass will read more accurately.
Maintain altitude and airspeed by cautious application of elevator
control. Avoid over controlling by keeping the hands off the control
wheel as much as possible and steering only with the rudder.
If conditions dictate, a descent through a cloud deck to VFR conditions may be
appropriate. To guard against a spiral dive, choose an easterly or westerly
heading to minimize c·ompass card swings due to changing bank angles. In
addition, keep hands off the .control wheel and steer a straight course with
rudder control by monitoring the turn coordinator. Occasionally check the
compass heading and make minor corrections to hold an approximate course.
Before descending into the clouds, .set up a stabilized let-down conditions as
follows:
1.
2.
3:
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Extend landing gear (if applicable).
Enrichen the fuel mixture.
Use full carburetor heat (if applicable).
Reduce power to set up a 500 to 800 ft/min rate of descent.
Adjust the elevator trim and rudder trim (if installed) for a stabilized
descent at 5 to 20 knots above the best glide speed for the airplane.
Keep hands off the control wheel.
Monitor turn coordinator and make corrections by rudder alone.
Check trend of compass card movement and make cautious
corrections with rudder to stop the turn.
Upon breaking out of clouds, resume normal cruise flight.
ELECTRICAL POWER FAILURES
Many operating handbooks have emergency procedures for partial or total loss
of electrical power in flight. These procedures should be reviewed periodically
to remain knowledgeable of what to do in the event of an electrical problem.
The pilot should maintain control of the airplane and land when practical if an
electrical power loss is evident.
Early detection of an electrical power supply system malfunction can be
accomplished by periodically monitoring the ammeter and, if equipped, lowvoltage warning light. The cause of these malfunctions is difficult to determine
in flight. Common causes of alternator or generator failure are a broken drive
belt, alternator or generator drive, a defective alternator control unit or voltage
regulator or wiring. Problems of this nature constitute an el.ectrical emergency
and should be addressed immediately.
If alternator power cannot be restored, and a second or back up alternator is
not available, the pilot must rely on .the limited power of the battery only. Every
effort should be made to conserve electrical power for use with the most
essential equipment, such as communication and navigation radios, by turning
off or not using any non-essenti!il equipment. Electric or electro-hydraulic
landing gear systems should be extended manually and flaps (if electrically
2
Reissue - 1 June 1998
PILOT SAFETYAND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
13
INSTRUMENT POWER
operated) should remain retracted during approach and landing to conserve
battery power, especially in instrument conditions.
If an electrical power loss is experienced, continued flight is possible but
should be terminated as soon as practical. Such things as fuel quantity and
engine temperature indicators and panel lights may no longer work. Hand-held
nav/comm radios and other s_uch products are widely available and marketed
for just such a scenario; otherwise navigation by pilotage and appropriate loss
of communication procedures for the airspace involved should be conducted.
The pilot should always have a flashlight available for night flights.
LOSS OF PITOT/STATIC SOURCES
A thorough preflight inspection should reveal any blockage of the pitot tube,
drain hole, or static port on the ground to allow corrective action to be taken
prior to flight. Pilots should understand the various conditions and remedies
associated with a loss of pitot-static sources.
Pitot heat should be used whenever flying in visible moisture and the
temperature is near freezing. If airspeed is suspected to be in error while
flying in possible icing ·conditions with the pitot heat on, the pitot heat switch
should be cycled and the circuit breaker should be checked. If proper
operation cannot be restored, the airspeed indicator must be considered
unreliable.
If the pitot tube ram air inlet becomes blocked, the airspeed will drop to zero.
If this blockage cannot be removed in flight, the pilot must rely on pitch.attitude.
and power settings to maintain a safe airspeed. A slightly higher than normal
power setting should be used to maintain a reasonable margin of extra
airspeed on final.
When flying in clear ice conditions and pitot heat is unavailable, both the ram
air inlet and the pitot drain hole could become blocked. This will cause the
airspeed indicator to react like an altimeter, indicating a higher airspeed at
higher altitudes and.a lower airspeed at lower altitudes. The airspeed indicator
must be ignored. A higher power setting appropriate to. the overall icing
problem should be used during the landing phase.
Many light single engine airplanes equipped with pitot heat may not be
equipped with static source heat. If the static source becomes blocked, the
airspeed indicator will still function, but will give erroneous indications. If the
airplane climbs after the blockage occurs, the airspeed indicator will indicate
lower than normal. If the airplane descends after the blockage occurs, the
airspeed will indicate higher than actual. During the landing phase, this
condition could deceive the pilot into thinking the airspeed is too high. The
altimeter and vertical speed indicator will also be affected by a static source
blockage. The altimeter will not indicate a change of altitude and the vertical
speed indicator will indicate zero airspeed. Neither instrument will reflect any
altitude changes.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
3
13
INSTRUMENT POWER
PILOT SAFElY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
Many airplanes are equipped with an alternate static air source vented within
the cabin area. If static port blockage is suspected, the alternate static source
should be selected. The cabin pressure will be slightly lower than ambient air,
but will provide a reasonable level of accuracy to the pitot static system. With
slightly less dense air in the cabin, the airspeed indicator and altimeter will
both show slightly higher than normal indications.
If the airplane is not equipped with an alternate static source, and pitot/static
instruments are essential for continued flight, the glass on the vertical speed
indicator may be broken to provide cabin air to the static system lines. The
vertical speed indicator will no longer be reliable, but the airspeed indicator
and altimeter will be functional again, with slightly higher than normal
indications.
GYRO SPIN UP AND SPIN DOWN
Gyro instruments, such as attitude and directional indicators, contain a highspeed rotor assembly driven by either electric or .vacuum power. These
instruments normally operate at very high RPM and can take up to 1O minutes
or more to spin down after power is removed.
Although some gyro
instruments have a "quick erect" mechanism to permit· manual erection of the
rotor, which effectively minimizes time required before use, some gyro
instruments still require up to 5 minutes or more to spin up and stabilize after
power is applied. During this spin up or spin down time, the gyro instruments
should not be .considered reliable. A failed gyro can be detected by first
checking the suction gage and, if available, low-voltage -or low-vacuum lights
as applicable and, second, checking for slow or erratic· indications of the gyro
instruments by cross-referencing with other flight instruments for contradictory
indications.
FAILED GYRO EFFECT ON AUTOPILOT
Some autopilot .systems receive roll and/or yaw rate inputs from the
electrically-driven turn coordinator or turn and bank indicator. Other autopilot
systems_ depend on vacuum-driven attitude and directional indicators for
horizontal and azimuth reference. If a failure should occur 1n any of these
instruments, the autopilot should be turned off. Random signals generated by
a malfunctioning gyro could cause the autopilot to position the airplane in an
unusual attitude. ·Use of the autopilot after a gyro failure may result in an out
of trim condition. Be prepared to correct for this when turning off the autopilot.
(
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Reissue - 1 June 1998
PILOT SAFETY AND
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14
ALTERNATE AIR SYSTEM
ALTERNATE AIR SYSTEM
An alternate source of air is provided to ensure satisfactory engine operation in
the event the normal induction air filter or air inlet becomes obstructed.
Although alternate air controls vary from one airplane to another, the types are:
carburetor heat, direct manual control, automatic control, or a combination of
automatic and manual controls. In most cases, the alternate air is extracted
from inside the engine cowling and is, therefore, unfiltered and hotter than
normal induction air. A loss of power will be caused by the hotter air. The
richer mixture may require adjustment of the mixture control. Consult the
applicable airplane operating handbook for details concerning the use of the
alternate air system.
CARBURETOR HEAT AND INDUCTION ICING
Carburetor heat and manually operated alternate air valve(s) are controlled by
the pilot. The carburetor heat system uses unfiltered air from inside the engine
cowling. This air is drawn into a shroud around an exhaust riser or muffler and
then ducted to the carburetor heat valve in the induction air manifold. The
carburetor heat valve is controlled by the pilot and should be used during
suspected or known carburetor icing conditions. Carburetor heat may also be
used as an alternate air source should the induction air inlet· or induction air
filter become blocked for any reason.
The use of full carburetor heat at full throttle usually results in a 1 to 2 inch loss
of manifold pressure or a loss of approximately 150 RPM, depending upon the
airplane model. Application or removal of carburetor heat at higher power
settings may require adjustment ·of the fuel mixture. It may be impractical to
lean the mixture under low engine power conditions.
When a go-around or balked landing is initiated after use of carburetor heat
during -the landing approach, the pilot should usually advance the throttle first,
then move the carburetor heat to off or cold. The throttle application must be
smooth and positive. Rapid throttle advancement in some icing conditions
could result in the engine failing to respond and the loss of power could
become critical because of the low altitude and low airspeed.
When the relative humidity is more than 50 percent and the ambient air
temperature is between 20°F to 90°F, it is possible for ice to form inside the
carburetor, since the temperature of the air passing through the venturi may
drop as much as 60°F below the ambient air temperature. If not corrected, ice
accumulation. may cause complete engine stoppage.
A drop in engine RPM on fixed pitch propeller airplanes and a drop in engine
manifold pressure on constant speed propeller airplanes are indications of
Reissue - 1 June 1998
1
14
ALTERNATE AIR SYSTEM
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
carburetor ice. If the airplane is equipped with a carburetor air temperature
gage, the possibility of carburetor ice may be anticipated and prevented by
maintaining the recommended amount of heat during cruise and letdown.
Without the indications of a carburetor air temperature gage for reference, a
pilot should use only the full heat or full cold position. An unknown amount of
partial heat can cause carburetor ice. This can occur when ice that would
ordinarily pass through the induction system is melted by partial carburetor
heat and the water droplets then refreeze upon contact with the cold metal of
the throttle plate. A carburetor air temperature gage may allow partial
carburetor heat use, resulting in less power loss.
ALTERNATE AIR··FOR FUEL INJECTED ENGINE
ICING
Either an automatic alternate air system, a manually controlled alternate air
system, or a combination automatic and manual system are incorporated on
most fuel injected engines to address the potential of a blocked air induction
system.
On engines equipped with automatic alternate air, ram air from the engine
cowling inlet enters an air filter, which removes dust and other foreign matter
that would be harmful to the engine. If the air inlet or the. induction air filter
should become blocked, suction created by the engine will open an alternate
air door, allowing air to be admitted from either inside or outside the cowling,
depending upon the airplane model. This air bypasses the filter and will result
in a slight decrease in full throttle manifold pressure on non-turbocharged
engines, and a notable decrease in manifold pressure from the selected cruise
power setting on turbocharged engines. This manifold pressure may be
recoverable, up to a particular altitude, with throttle and/or RPM adjustment.
The alternate air doors should be kept closed on the ground to prevent engine
damage caused by ingesting debris through the unfiltered air ducts. For
details concerning a specific model, consult the airplane operating handbook.
Most twin engine airplanes have a manually controlled alternate air door in
each engine induction air system. If a decrease in manifold pressure is
experienced when flying in icing. conditions,. the alternate air doors should be
manually opened. On most twins, this manual control has two positions.
When fully in, normal filtered ram air is provided; when fully out, warm
unfiltered air from inside the cowling is provided. Other twins have alternate air
controls with an additional intermediate or center detent to provide cool,
unfiltered ram .air to the induction system in the event the induction air filter is
blocked by matter other than ice.
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Reissue - 1 June 1998
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
14
ALTERNATE AIR SYSTEM
Since the higher intake air temperature of the alternate air results in a
decrease in engine power and turbocharger capability, it is recommended that
the alternate induction air not be utilized until indications of induction air
blockage (decreased manifold pressure) are actually observed.
If additional power is required, the pilot should increase RPM as required,
move the throttles forward to maintain desired manifold pressure and readjust
the fuel mixture controls as required. These recommendations do not replace
the procedure in the airplane operating handbook.
Although most pilots are aware of the potential of carburetor to icing, many
may think that a fuel injected engine is not subject to induction icing. Although
a fuel injected engine will not form carburetor ice, other parts of the induction
system such as bends in the system or the air filter can gather ice. Slush
and/or snow can block the induction air filter. Induction air blockage can cause
loss of manifold pressure or engine stoppage.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
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PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
15
CARBON MONOXIDE
CARBON MONOXIDE
Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless product of an internal
combustion engine and is always present in exhaust fumes. Even minute
quantities of carbon monoxide breathed over a long period of time may lead to
dire consequences. Carbon monoxide has a greater ability to combine with
the blood than oxygen. Once carbon monoxide is absorbed in the blood, it
prevents the oxygen from being absorbed.
The symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are difficult to detect by the
person afflicted and may include blurred thinking, a feeling of uneasiness,
dizziness, headache, and loss of consciousness. If any of these symptoms
occur, immediately open all cabin vents and turn the cabin heater off. Land as
soon as possible at the nearest airport and seek medical attention if needed.
HEATER OPERATION
Many cabin heaters in general aviation airplanes operate by allowing ambient
air to flow through an exhaust shroud where it is heated before being ducted
into the cabin. Therefore, if anyone in the cabin smells exhaust fumes when
using the cabin heater, immediately turn off the cabin heater and open all
cabin vents. Land as soon as possible at the nearest airport and seek medical
attention if needed.
WINDOW VENTILATION
If carbon monoxide is suspected in the cabin at any time, it is imperative that
immediate ventilation be initiated, including the opening of cabin windows.
Observe the maximum speed for window opening in flight. Opening a cabin
window is probably the best means of ventilating the cabin while on th~
ground. However, care should be taken when parked with engine(s) operating
or when in the vicinity of other airplanes that have their engines running. The
exhaust gases from your airplane or the other airplane could enter the cabin
through the open window. Also, engine exhaust could be forced into the cabin
area during taxi operations or when taxiing downwind.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
15
CARBON MONOXIDE
PILOT SAFETY AND
. WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
PRESSURIZED AIRPLANES
Refer to the operating handbook and/or approved flight manual for appropriate
ventilation procedures.
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PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
16
TURBOCHARGER
TURBOCHARGER
When operating turbocharged engines, any power increases should be
accomplished by increasing the propeller RPM first, then increasing the
manifold pressure. Power reductions should be acco_mplished by reducing the
manifold pressure first, then the RPM.
During cold weather operation, care should be exercised to insure that
overboost does not occur during takeoff as a result of congealed oil in the
waste gate actuating system. Before takeoff engine checks should not be
accomplished until oil temperature is at least 75°F (minimum approved
operating limit). Takeoff should not be started until oil temperature is above
100° F and oil pressure below 100 psi to assure proper oil flow to the
turbocharger and its actuating system. Monitor manifold pressure during
takeoff so as not to exceed specified takeoff limits. Advance the throttle
slowly, pausing momentarily at approximately 30" MP to permit turbine speed
to stabilize, then gradually open the throttle to obtain takeoff manifold pressure.
Prior to engine shut down, operate the engine at idle RPM for approximately 5
minutes to allow the turbocharger to cool and slow down. This reduces the
possibility of turbine bearing coking caused by oil breakdown. This 5 minutes
may be calculated from landing touchdown.
During pilot training, simulated engine out operation requiring the engine be
shut down by closing the mixture should be held to an absolute minimum.
TURBOCHARGER FAILURE
The turbocharger system's purpose is to elevate manifold pressure and thus
engine power to a level higher than can be obtained without it. A failure of the
system will cause either an overboost condition or some degree of power loss.
An overboost can be determined on the manifold pressure instrument and can
be controlled by a throttle reduction.
If turbocharger failure results in power loss, it may be further complicated by
an overly rich mixture. This rich mixture condition may be so severe as to
cause a total power failure. Leaning the rpixture may restore partial power.
Partial or total power loss may also be causad by an exhaust system leak. A
landing should be made as soon as practical for either an overboost or
partial/total power loss.
Reissue • 1 June 1998
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PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
17
IN-FLIGHT FIRES
IN-FLIGHT FIRES
FIRES IN FLIGHT
A preflight checklist is provided to aid the pilot in detecting conditions which
could contribute to an airplane fire. Flight should not be attempted with known
fuel, oil, or exhaust leaks, since they can lead to a fire. The presence of fuel
or unusual oil or exhaust stains may be an indication of system leaks and
should be corrected prior to flight.
Fires in flight must be controlled as quickly as possible by identifying and
shutting down the affected system(s), then extinguishing the fire. Until this
process is complete, the pilot should assume the worst and initiate action for
an immediate landing. A pilot must not become distracted by the fire to the
point that control of the airplane is lost The pilot must be able to complete a
deductive analysis of the situation to determine the source of the fire.
Complete familiarity with the airplane and its systems will prove invaluable
should a fire occur.
ENGINE COMPARTMENT FIRES
An engine compartment fire is usually caused by fuel contacting a hot surface,
an electrical short, bleed air leak, or exhaust leak. If an engine compartment
fire occurs on a single engine airplane, the first step should be to shut off the
fuel supply to the engine by placing the mixture to idle cut off and the fuel
selector/shutoff valve to the OFF position. The ignition switch should be left
ON in order for the engine to use up the fuel which remains in the fuel lines
and components between the fuel selector/shutoff valve and the engine. The
airplane should be put into a sideslip, which will tend to keep the flames away
from the occupants and the fuel tanks. If this procedure is ineffective, the pilot
must make the most rapid emergency descent possible and an immediate
landing.
In multi-engine airplanes, both auxiliary fuel pumps should be turned off to
reduce pressure in the total fuel system (each auxiliary fuel pump pressurizes
a crossfeed line to the opposite fuel selector). If equipped, the emergency
crossfeed shutoff should also be activated. The engine on the wing in which
the fire exists should be shut down and its fuel selector positioned to OFF
even though the fire may not have originated in the fuel system. The cabin
heater draws fuel from the crossfeed system on some airplanes, and should
be turned off as well. The engine compartment fire extinguisher should be
discharged if the airplane is so equipped.
An open foul weather window or emergency exit may produce a low pressure
in the cabin. To avoid drawing the fire into the cabin area, the foul weather
Reissue - 1 June 1998
17
IN~FLIGHT FIRES
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
window, emergency exits, or any openable windows should be kept closed;
This condition is aggravated on some models, with the landing gear and wing
flaps extended. Therefore, it is recommended to lower. the landing gear as
late in the landing approach as possible. A no flap landing should also be
attempted, if practical.
ELECTRICAL FIRES
The initial indication of an electrical fire is usually the distinct odor of burning
insulation. Once an electrioal fire is detected, the pilot should attempt to
identify the effected circuit by checking circuit breakers, instruments, avionics,
etc. If the affected circuit cannot be readily detected and flight conditions
permit, the battery/master switch and alternator switch(es) should be turned
OFF to remove the possible sources of the fire. If at night, ensure the
availability of a flashlight before turning off electrical power.
Then, close off
ventilating air as much as practical to reduce the chances of a sustained fire.
If an oxygen system is available in the airplane and no visible signs of flame
are evident, occupants should use oxygen until smoke clears.
If electrical power is essential for the flight, an attempt may be made to identify
and isolate the effected circuit by turning the Master Switch and other electrical
(except magneto) switches off and checking the condition of the circuit
breakers to identify the affected circuit. If the circuit can be readily identified,
leave it deactivated and restore power to the other circuits. If the circuit cannot
be readily identified, turn the Master Switch on, and select switches that were
on before the fire indication, one at a time, permitting some time to elapse
after each switch is turned on, until the short circuit is identified. Make sure
the fire is completely extinguished before opening vents. Land as soon as
possible for repairs.
CABIN FIRES
Fire or smoke in the cabin should be controlled by identifying and shutting
down the affected system, which is most likely to be electrical in nature, and
landing as soon as possible. Smoke may be removed by opening the cabin
air controls. However, if the smoke increases in intensity when the air coritrols
are opened, they should · be closed as this indicates a possible fire in the
heating system, nose compartment baggage area, or that the increase ·in
airflow is aggravating this condition.
In pressurized airplanes, the pressurization air system will remove smoke from
the cabin. However, if the smoke is intense, it may be necessary to either
depressurize at altitude, if oxygen is available for all occupants, or execute an
emergency descent to 10,000 feet, terrain permitting. "Ram Air Dump" handle
may be pulled to aid the clearing of smoke from the cabin.
2
Reissue - 1 June 1998
Pl LOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
17
IN-FLIGHT FIRES
The pilot may choose to expel the smoke through the foul weather window(s).
The foul weather wlndow(s) should be closed immediately if the fire becomes
more Intense when the window(s) are opened. tt smoke is severe, and there
are no visible signs of flame, use ox,roen masks (if installed) and begin an
immediate descent.
It a fire extinguisher Is used, ventilate the cabin promptly after extinguishing the
fire to reduce the gases produced by lhermal decomposition. If the fjre cannot
be extinguished immediately, land as soon as possible.
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3/(4 blank)
18
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
IN-FLIGHT OPENING OF DOORS
IN-FLIGHT OPENING OF DOORS
The occurrence of an inadvertent door opening is not as great of a concern to
the safety of the flight, as the pilot's reaction to the opening. If the pilot is
overly distracted, loss of airplane control may result even though disruption of
airflow by the door is minimal. While the shock of a sudden loud noise and
increase in sustained noise level may be surprising, mental preparation for this
event and a plan of action can eliminate inappropriate pilot reaction.
INADVERTENT OPENING OF BAGGAGE/CARGO
DOORS
The flight characteristics of an airplane will not normally be affected by an
open baggage or cargo door. The aerodynamic effects on an open door can
vary, depending on the location of the door on the airplane and the method
used to hinge the door in relation to the slipstream. Baggage/cargo doors
mounted on the side of the aft fuselage and hinged at the front will tend to stay
in a nearly closed position at most airspeeds and pose no special problems as
1 long as the airplane is not in uncoordinated flight in a direction which would
permit unsecured baggage to fall out of the airplane. Because of the door
location and the presence of baggage in the immediate area, the door may not
be accessible for closing in flight. Passengers, especially children, should
never be allowed to occupy the baggage portion of the cabin for the purpose
of closing the door in flight. The pilot should slow the airplane to minimize
buffeting of the door and land as soon as practical.
Top hinged baggage/cargo doors will react differently than front hinged doors if
improperly latched before takeoff. Doors of this type, may pop open at rotation
because of the increase in angle of attack and the slipstream pushing
underneath the edge of the unsecured door. After the initial opening, a
baggage door will generally tend to stay open and then may gently close as
speed is reduced and the aircraft is configured for landing (the doors will
probably tend to open again during flair). A top hinged door on the side of the
aft fuselage of a high wing airplane can sometimes be moved to a nearly
closed position by lowering the wing flaps full down (within approved airspeed
limitations) so that wing downwash will act upon the door. Unlatched nose
baggage doors and large cargo doors on the side of the aft fuselage cannot
be closed in flight and a landing should be made as soon as practical. The
pilot should avoid any abrupt airplane maneuvers in multi-engine airplanes with
an open nose baggage door, as this could throw loose objects out of the
baggage compartment and into the propeller.
Reissue - 1 June 1998
18
IN-FLIGHT OPENING OF DOORS
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
Front hinged wing locker doors in the aft part of the engine nacelle of multiengine airplanes will likely trail open a few inches if they· become unlatched.
Near stall speed just prior to landing, an unlatched door may momentarily float
to a full open position.
If a door comes open on takeoff and sufficient runway remains for a safe abort,
the airplane should be stopped. If the decision is made to continue the
takeoff, maintain required airspeed and return for landing as soon as practical.
INADVERTENT OPENING OF CABIN/EMERGENCY
EXIT DOORS (UNPRESSURIZED)
If a cabin or emergency exit door should inadvertently open during
unpressurized flight, the primary concern should be directed toward
maintaining control of the airplane. Then, if a determination is made to close
the door in flight, establish a safe altitude, trim the airplane at a reduced
airspeed, and attempt to close the door. To facilitate closing the door, slide
the adjacent seat aft slightly to obtain a better grasp of the door handle. The
door handle must be in the close position prior to pulling the door closed,
followed by rotating the handle to the locked position. Under no circumstances
should the pilot leave his/her seat, or unfasten the restraint system to secure a
door.
If a cabin door reopens when latched closed, the flight should be terminated
as soon as practical and repairs made.
INADVERTENT OPENING OF CABIN/EMERGENCY
EXIT DOPAS (PRESSURIZED)
An inadvertent opening of a cabin/emergency exit door while the cabin is
pressurized and the aircraft is above 12,500 feet, will require the use of
supplemental oxygen or an emergency descent to an altitude below 12,500
feet. The pilot may attempt to close the door after ensuring that all occupants
are using supplemental oxygen or the cabin altitude is below 10,000 feet.
However, the primary concern should be maintaining control of the airplane.
The flight should be terminated as soon as practical and the cause of the door
opening determined before pressurized flight is continued.
Under no
circumstances should the pilot leave his/her seat, or unfasten the restraint
system to secure a door.
2
Reissue - 1 Jun~ 1998
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
19
MAINTENANCE
MAlNTENANCE
Airplanes require inspection and maintenance on a regular basis as outlined in
the operating handbook, service/maintenance manuals, other servicing
publications, and in Federal Aviation Regulations. A good visual inspection is a
continuing maintenance procedure and should be performed by anyone who is
involved with an airplane.
This includes pilots, line personnel, and the
maintenance department. When worn or damaged parts are discovered, it is
essential that the defective parts be repaired or replaced to assure all systems
remain operational. The source of information for proper maintenance is the
airplane Service/Maintenance Manual and Service Letters or Service Bulletins.
Cessna's Service/Maintenance Manuals are occasionally revised. Maintenance
personnel should follow the recommendations in the latest revision. The
owner/operator must ensure that all unacceptable conditions are corrected and
the airplane receives repetitive and required inspections.
UNAUTHORIZED REPAIRS/MODIFICATIONS
All repair facilities and personnel should follow established repair procedures.
Cessna does not support modifications to Cessna airplanes, whether by
Supplemental Type Certificate or otherwise, unless those modifications are
approved by Cessna. Such modifications may void any and all warranties on
the airplane, since Cessna may not know the full effects on the overall airplane.
Cessna has not tested and approved all such modifications by other
companies. Operating procedures and performance data specified in the
operating handbook and maintenance procedures specified in the
service/Maintenance Manual may no longer be accurate for the modified
airplane. Operating procedures, maintenance procedures and performance
data that are effected by modifications not approved by Cessna should be
obtained from the STC owner.
AIRWORTHINESS OF OLDER AIRPLANES
For an airplane to remain airworthy and safe to operate, it should be operated
in accordance with Cessna recommendations and cared for with sound
inspection and maintenance practices.
An aging airplane needs more care and attention during maintenance
processes and may require more frequent inspection of structural components
for damage due to the effects of wear, deterioration, fatigue, environmental
exposure, and accidental damage. Typical areas requiring more frequent
inspection are:
Reissue - 1 June 1998
19
PILOT SAFETY AND
MAINTENANCE
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6:
7.
8.
9.
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
Wing attach points and fuselage carry-1hrough structure.
Wing -spar capstrips, especially the lower ones.
Horizontal and vertical stabilizer attach points and spar structure.
Control surface structure and attach points.
Engine mounts, beams, and cowlings.
Landing gear structure and attach points.
Structural and flooring integrtty of seat and equipment attachments.
Pressurized structures, especially around all doors, windows,
windshields and other cutouts on pressurized airplanes.
Exhaust and cabin heater systems.
,
(
The final responsibility for airplane care rests with the owner/operator. All
airplane owners/operators should use the following steps as a minimum
guideline to ensure continued airworthiness of their airplanes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Always follow recommended maintenance and inspection procedures.
Recognize that corrosion, overloading, or damage to structure can
drastically shorten fatigue life.
Comply with all applicable Service Bulletins, Service Letters, and FAA
Airworthiness Directives.
Use one of Cessna's Progressive Care Inspection and maintenance
programs to get the maximum utilization of your airplane a.fa minimUill
cost and downtime.
CORROSION
Corrosion can cause structural failure if left unchecked. The appearance of the
corrosion varies with the metal. On aluminum and magnesium, it appears as
surface pitting and etching, often combined with a grey or white powdery
deposit. On copper and copper alloys the corrosion forms a greenish .oxide
and on steel, a reddish rust. When grey, white, green or red deposits are
removed, each of the surfaces may appear etched and pitted, depending upon
the length of exposure and severity of the attack. If the damage is not too
deep, it may not significantly alter the strength of the metal. However, the pits
may become sites for crack development. Some types of corrosion can travel
beneath surface coatings and spread until the part fails.
Remove corrosion as soon as possible because it attacks and holds moisture
in contact with the metal, . which causes more corrosion to form. Every visible
trace must be removed by some mechanical or chemical means. The surface
must then be chemically treated to form a film which prevents oxygen or
moisture from contacting the surface. Then, the protective surface (paint) must
be restored.
·
There are several different types of .corrosion and different ways of detecting ·it
in its early stages. Uniform surface corrosion is the most common type of
corrosion. When an area of unprotected metal is exposed to the atmosphere,
there will be a uniform attack over the entire unprotected area. On a polished
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PILOTSAFETY AND
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19
MAINTENANCE
surface, this type of corrosion is first seen as a general dulling of the surface.
If the corrosion is allowed to continue, the surface becomes rough and
possibly frosted in appearance.
If surface corrosion is allowed to go untreated, it can progress into the next
type of corrosion, called pitting. Pits form in localized areas and appear as
white or grey powdery deposits. Metal is converted to salts, and when
deposits are cleaned away, tiny pits or holes can be seen on the surface. If
allowed to continue, pitting can progress completely through the metal in
extreme cases.
Stress corrosion cracking is caused by the simultaneous effects of tensile
stress and corrosion. Stress may be either internal or applied. Residual stress
from the processes of heat treatment and forming, or sustained operating or
static loads, can lead to stress corrosion.
Fretting corrosion is corrosion damage between close fitting parts which are
allowed to rub together. It is the corrosive attack on one or both metals
because of chafing under a load. The results of fretting are removal or pitting
of the metal in the area of contact, galling, seizing, cracking or fatigue of the
metal, loss of tolerance in accurately fitted parts, and loosening of bolted or
clamped surfaces.
·
Corrosion is a universal problem that costs considerable amounts of time and
money. It is essential that each airplane owner maintain his or her airplane
based on the operating conditions, environment, and service experience.
Corrosion can be effectively prevented and/or controlled if appropriate action is
taken early.
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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20
SEAT AND RESTRAINT SYSTEMS
SEAT AND RESTRAINT SYSTEMS
ADJUSTABLE SEAT ASSEMBLIES
Most Cessna manually-adjustable seats are suspended on two parallel, cabin
floor mounted seat tracks by roller assemblies which allow the seat to move
forward and rearward along the tracks. A series of holes are provided, usually
in the forward end of either or both seat tracks, to accommodate a mechanical
locking pin(s) which allows intermediate positioning and locking of the seat. To
prevent the seat from disengaging from the seat tracks when reaching the
ends, a mechanical seat stop is installed near both ends of the track(s).
Incidents of manually-adjustable seats slipping rearward or forward during
acceleration or deceleration of the airplane have been reported.
The
investigations following these incidents have revealed discrepancies such as
gouged lockpin holes, bent lockpins, excessive clearance between seat rollers
and tracks, and missing seat stops, to name a few. Also, dust, dirt, and debris
accumulations on seat tracks and in the intermediate adjustment holes have
been found to contribute to the problem. A close check of each seat during
daily preflight, improved cabin cleanliness, and replacement of parts when
necessary will help prevent accidents involving seats. Visual checks of the
airplane should always include the cabin interior.
When inspections
recommended:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
are
made,
examination
of
the
following
items
is
Check the seat assembly for structural integrity.
Inspect the roller assemblies for separation and wear.
Check the locking mechanism (actuating arm, linkage, locking pin or
pins) for wear.
Check all seat track stops for security and proper installation.
Inspect seat tracks for condition and security, and the locking pin
holes for wear, and dirt or debris accumulation.
Determine that the floor structure in the vicinity of the seat tracks is
not cracked or distorted.
Ensure that the secondary seat stop addressed in mandatory Service
Bulletin SEB89-32 is installed.
Damaged or worn parts are a potential hazard which should be immediately
repaired or replaced. Cessna recommends ·repair and/or replacement of
damaged components in accordance with the airplane's service or
maintenance publications and Service Bulletins.
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SEAT AND RESTRAINT SYSTEMS
PILOT- SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
RESTRAINT SYSTEMS
While performing the cabin portion of the daily preflight, it is recommended that
pilots check each restraint system installed in the airplane. This should include
a functional check of the restraint belt locking and releasing mechanism. If
new passengers or students are to be -carried, it is a good practice to insist
that they operate the restraint system to become familiar with the procedures.
During inspections, maintenance personnel should check each restraint system
installation for serviceability in accordance with current publications applicable
to the airplane. Special attention should be given to restraint attachment points
and to the nylon bushing on the belt at the -point where the shoulder restraint
harness attaches. -Undetected cracks or broken connections could cause a
serious situation to develop when it is least expected. The restraint system
webbing should be inspected for degradation. Repair or replace the restraint
system per Cessna instructions if damage is detected.
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21
EXHAUST AND FUEL SYSTEMS
EXHAUST AND FUEL SYSTEMS
THE ENGINE EXHAUST SYSTEM
The primary function of an engine exhaust system is to route exhaust gases
safely overboard. Other functions of the exhaust system may include use as
the driving source for a turbocharger turbine and/or use as a heat source for
carburetor and/or cabin heat requirements.
Heat and carbon monoxide are the unavoidable byproducts of all reciprocating
engine operations. The temperatures within the exhaust system of an engine
can exceed 1750°F. Consequently, if an exhaust leak should occur, heat
damage can occur to the engine mounting structure, and accessories such as
hoses, belts, wire bundles, etc. In some cases, the position of the leak could
lead to engine stoppage and/or an engine compartment fire.
An exhaust system leak can also lead to carbon monoxide poisoning. This
colorless, odorless, tasteless combustion byproduct is always present in
exhaust fumes. For this reason, special seals are provided wherever cables,
hoses, wire bundles, etc. pass through the engine firewall. . For even greater
protection from carbon monoxide, special window, door, and fuselage seals
are installed. No leakage of exhaust into the cabin should be tolerated.
Exhaust systems should be checked for stains indicative of exhaust leaks at
cylinder heads or cracks in the exhaust or tailpipe. The condition and security
of the exhaust system in the area of the exhaust muffler shroud should be
checked. Any cracks or leaks in this area could be a source for exhaust to
enter the cabin.
ENGINE COMPARTMENT TEMPERATURES
High engine compartment temperatures can degrade the operational efficiency
of the engine and also accelerate the deterioration of engine components.
Several conditions could cause or contribute to a higher than normal engine
compartment temperature; however, improper operating techniques are found
to be the most common cause. Avoid excessive operation of an engine on the
ground. Prolonged ground operations should be done into the wind at rich
mixture settings. If the cowling has been removed for maintenance, cooling
airflow is poor and cylinder head temperature and oil temperature gages must
be monitored during engine runups.
On virtually all air-cooled reciprocating engines, the engine and engine
compartment are cooled by .utilizing a pressure cooling baffle system with
airflow as the cooling medium. The condition of these baffles and their seals
is important.
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EXHAUST AND FUEL SYSTEMS
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
Baffles should be secure and baffle seals should be positioned ·in a direction
which would seal airflow around the engine baffles. Even a slight reduction in
cooling efficiency can cause the engine to operate hotter than normal, thus
increasing the potential for heat damaged components.
An inspection of the . engine compartment. plus careful observation of the
engine temperatures during normal flight, can be of great assistance in
verifying the condition of the engine. If the pilot takes the time to record
engine temperatures on a regular basis, trends within the engine can be
detected early and corrected before a serious condition occurs.
HOSES AND WIRE HARNESS INTEGRITY
All fuel, oil, and hydraulic components should be checked for condition,
security and any evidence of leakage. All leaks should be repaired before
starting the engine.
As airplanes and engines age, there is a need to re-emphasize the inspection
or replacement requirements of engine hoses or lines that carry fuel, oil, or
hydraulic fluid. For newer Cessnas, a replacement requirement for hoses in
the engine compartment (except teflon lined) has been established at each 5
years or at engine overhaul, whichever occurs first. This is considered to
include "shelf" life.
All hose manufactured for airplane use is marked
indicating the quarter-year in which they were manufactured. For instance, a
listing of "4085" means the hose was manufactured in the fourth quarter of
1985. Maintenance personnel should not use hoses with · a high "shelf" life
age.
Like time, heat is always a detriment to hoses. The prudent pilot realizes
during the daily preflight, that an engine hose might look good, but if it is
wiggled, a telltale "crackle" may be heard. This means that the hose is brittle
and should be replaced. Also if he slides his hand over the back side of the
hose, he may find an abrasion or wear not visible from the front side.
Ignition leads/wire harnesses and spark plugs are also affected by excessive
heating in the engine compartment. Overheating of the spark plug barrels,
sometimes caused by damaged cylinder baffles or missing cooling air blast
tubes, may seriously deteriorate the ignition leads. Any overheating of a spark
plug by a defective baffle or exhaust gas leak at the exhaust pipe mounting
flange can generate temperatures sufficient to cause pre-ignition and piston
distress.
(
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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RETRACTABLE LANDING GEAR
RETRACTABLE LANDING.GEAR
The ad}ustment and rigging of a re1ractable landln.9 gear system should be
done by trained mainlenanoe personnel. Continued reliability of the landing
gear system is only possible if it is properly maintained in the prescribed
The rigging process must be performed exacily as
published manner.
published in the Cessna Service/Maintenance Manual and Service Bulletins.
For complete emergency procedures cooceming landing gear extension, refer
to 1he airplane ('Jperating handbook.
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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(
PRESSURIZED AIRPLANES
PRESSURIZED AIRPLANES
DOOR SECURITY
The conventional and air-stair doors on pressurized airplanes have a series of
pins, actuated by an overcenter locking handle, to maintain the door seal
during the pressurization cycle.
Some air-stair doors are sealed by
pressurization air pressing against the cabin door windlace which covers the
door gap. Door security can be verified by visually checking the locking
indicator for the door handle safety lock, in the case of single-engine airplanes,
and checking for correct locking indications provided in the door of multiengine airplanes. It is recommended that pilots check the locking pins and
door seals for cracks or damage during each preflight. Any damaged parts
should be repaired prior .to pressurized flight.
WINDOWS AND WINDSHIELDS
The windows in pressurized airplanes are exposed to a fatigue cycle each time
the airplane is pressurized. These cycles could lead to fatigue cracks in and
around the windows. Windows should be inspected frequently for condition
and serviceability. Windows or windshields having replacement life limits
should be replaced prior to intervals defined in applicable service/maintenance
manuals.
The windows and windshields on pressurized airplanes are particularly
sensitive to crazing and scratches. Any crazing, cracks, or deep scratchei:l
cannot be tolerated for pressurized flight. Consult the airplane's operating
manual when in doubt about the severity of the damage. Repairs should be
completed prior to pressurized flight.
THE PRESSURE VESSEL
There are significant structural differences between the fuselage of a nonpressurized airplane and one which is pressurized. The pressure vessel is the
portion of the cabin area to be pressurized. Pressure differential is the
difference between the atmospheric pressure at the altitude at which the
airplane is flying and the pressure inside the cabin.
Any seam, joint, or hole where wire bundles or tubing pass through . the
pressure vessel must be sealed to maintain the selected pressurization. If any
of these seals are deteriorated or missing, the normal cabin pressure
differential may be impossible to attain. Maintenance personnel should inspect
the pressure seals for serviceability. Any cracks. in the skin of the pressure
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23
PRESSUfUZEO AIRPLANES
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
vessel could lead to sudden depressurization. Maintenance personnel should
carefully inspect the pressure vessel for cracks, corrosion, and deterioration.
Any damage shotlld be COO'ected before pressurized ftight.
If the airplane cabin is pressurized and it becomes necessary to use the
heated alternate induction air oo both engine:,, the pressurization controls must
be selected OFF to preventing nacele fumes from entemg the cabin. The
cabin should be depressurized and maximum ventilation provided. Therefore,
if the flight altitude is above 10,000 feet, all occupants should use oxygen, ii
available, or descent should be initiated.
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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POTENTIAL HAZARDS
POTENTIAL HAZARDS
PROPELLERS
WARNING
ALWAYS STAND CLEAR OF PROPELLER BLADE PATHS,
ESPECIALLY
WHEN
MOVING
THE
PROPELLER.
PARTICULAR CAUTION SHOULD BE PRACTICED
AROUND WARM ENGINES.
Review of propeller accidents indicates that most were preventable. A
propeller under power, even at slow idling speed, has sufficient force to inflict
fatal injuries. Pilots can be most effective in ensuring that passengers arrive
and depart the vicinity of the airplane safely by stopping the engine(s) during
loading and unloading.
Cessna airplanes are delivered with propellers using paint schemes to
increase visibility of the blades. Owners should maintain the original paint
scheme.
Pilots and Service personnel should develop the following safety habits:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Before moving a propeller or connecting an external power source to
an airplane, be -sure that the airplane is chocked, ignition switches are
in the OFF position, throttle is closed, mixture is in IDLE CUT-OFF
position, and all equipment and personnel are clear of the propeller.
Failed diodes in airplane electrical systems have caused starters to
engage when external power was applied regardless of the switch
position.
When removing ·an external power source from an airplane, keep the
equipment and yourself clear of the propeller.
Pilots should make certain that all personnel are clear of the propeller,
prior to engine start.
Attach pull ropes to wheel chocks located close to a rotating
propeller( s).
Before removing the wheel chocks, the pilot should hold brakes or
apply the parking brake.
Be absolutely sure that an- equipment and personnel are clear of the
airplane before releasing the brakes.
Ground personnel should be given recurrent propeller safety training
to keep them alert to the dangers of working around airplanes.
The pilot should carefully inspect the propeller during each preflight inspection.
Some constant speed propellers manufactured by McCauley are subject to a·
requirement that they be filled with a red~dyed oil. This oil helps lubricate and
Reissue - 1 June 1998
24
PILOT SAFETY AND
POTENTIAL HAZARDS
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
prevent corrosion of internal propeller parts and may assist in detection of
cracks. If a crack is detected, the airplane . should not be flown until the
propeller is replaced.
AIR CONDITIONING FREON
The refrigerant R- 12 (FREON) is relatively safe to handle when using proper
protective safety equipment. Since at sea level the boiling point of R- 12 is 21.6°F, any contact with bare skin will immediately burn (freeze) the area .. If
R-12 should contact your eye, it will burn and can cause permanent blindness.
Treat spills or splashes on your body by washing with clean, cool, water, and
seek immediate medical attention. R-12, when heated .to a high temperature
such as with an open flame or spillage on a .hot manifold, generates phosgene
gas (a colorless gas with an unpleasant odor); This gas is a severe respiratory
irritant and should be considered as a DEADLY POISON.
USED ENGINE OIL
Pilots and maintenance personnel -who handle. engine oil. .are... .advised to
minimize skin contact with used oil, and promptly remove any used engine oii
from their skin.
The following are some do's and don'ts concerning used engine oil:
1. . Do follow work practices that minimize the amount of skin exposed,
and the length of time used oil stays on the skin.
2. Do thoroughly wash used oil off skin as soon as possible.
3. Do wash oil-soaked clothing before wearing them again. Discard oilsoaked shoes.
4. Do use gloves made from material that oil cannot penetrate.
5. Don't use kerosene, gasoline, thinners, or solvents to remove used
engine oil. These products can cause serious toxic effects.
7. Don't put oily rags in pockets, or tuck them under a belt. This can
cause continuous skin contact.
8. · Don't pour used engine oil on the ground, or down drains and sewers.
This is a violation of Federal Law. The Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) encourages collection of used engine oil at collection
points in compliance with appropriate state and local ordinances.
AVIATION FUEL ADDITIVE
Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME), which is a primary ingredient in
aviation fuel additives, is toxic. It creates a. dangerous health hazard when
breathed or absorbed into the skin. When inhaled, EGME is primarily a central
nervous system depressant, and acute inhalation overexposure may cause
kidney injury. The primary symptoms of inhalation overexposure include
2
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PILOT SAFETY AND
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24
POTENTIAL HAZARDS
headache, drowsiness, blurred vision, weakness, lack of coordination, tremor,
unconsciousness, and even death. EGME is irritating to the eyes and skin and
can be readily absorbed through the skin in toxic amounts. Symptoms of
overexposure due to skin absorption are essentially the same as those
outlined for inhalation.
When servicing fuel with an anti-ice additive containing EGME, follow the
manufacturers instructions and use appropriate personal protective equipment.
These items would include chemical safety goggles or shield, respirator with
organic vapor cartridges, nonabsorbing neoprene rubber gloves and an apron
and long-sleeved shirt as additional skin protection from spraying or splashing
anti-ice additive.
In the event EGME contact is experienced, the following emergency and first
aid procedures should be used.
1.
2.
3.
If EGME is inhaled, remove person to fresh air. If breathing is difficult,
administer oxygen. If the person is not breathing give artificial
respiration. Always call a physician.
If eye or skin contact is experienced, flush with plenty of water (use
soap. and water .for,,skin) for at ·least · 15 minutes while removing
contaminated· clothing and shoes. Call a physician. Thoroughly wash
contaminated clothing and shoes before reuse.
If ingested, drink large quantities of water and induce vomiting by
placing a finger far back in throat. Contact a physician immediately; If
vomiting cannot be induced, or if victim is unconscious or in
convulsions, take immediately to a hospital or physician. Do not
induce vomiting or give anything by mouth to an unconscious person.
Diethylene glycol monomethyl ether (DIEGME), a fuel anti-icing additive
approved for use in some airplanes, is slightly toxic if swallowed and may
cause eye redness, swelling and irritation. DIEGME also is. combustible.
Before using DIEGME, refer to all safety information on the container.
BIRDS, INSECTS, AND RODENTS
Bird, insect, and mouse nests in airplanes are both hazardous and costly.
They seem to find even the smallest opening on an airplane to make their
nests. Evidence of nest building activities may include the following:
1.
2.
3.
Any mud smears or droplets at pitot/static masts, fuel tank vents,
crankcase breathers, stall warning vanes, cabin air vents, and any
fluid drain holes are indications of mud dauber wasp activities.
Straw, string, or blades of grass extending from cowling openings,
carburetor air intakes, blast. tubes, or exhaust stacks are signs of birds
at work.
Cotton batting, shreds of fabric, and/or paper at wheel wells and
empennage. openings are frequently indicators that rodents such as
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24
POTENTIAL HAZARDS
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
mice have been or may still be on board. They may gnaw on any
material in the airplane including wire bundles and rubber or plastic
tubing.
O:.nests or building mat4;1rials are found on the airplane, they must be removed
before flight. It is strongly recommended that a qualified mechanic thoroughly
inspect components such as pitot/static systems for remains of any nesting
material after its removal and before flight to ensure complete removal. Even
small amounts of foreign material can result in.significant problems in flight.
Some precautions can be taken to prevent problems. Always use the pitcit
tube cover and any other external covers when the airplane is being stored. If
the airplane is hangared, make sure the hangar is kept clean and neat to
prevent insects and mice from lodging in the hanger in the first place. If need
be, set traps for rodents and/or · spray the area tor insects. Models of
predators that appear life-like such as owls or snakes may also be effective at
preventing some birds from lodging in a hangar.
Removal of the nest of an insect, bird, or rodent does not prevent
reconstruction elsewhere on the airplane or even in the same location again.
Some creatures are not easily discouraged and may return to cause problems
within a very short time period. Regardless of precautions used to prevent
such problems, the pilot should be alert to the evidence of small animal
activities during every preflight inspection.
FIRE EXTINGUISHER AGENTS
Halon, Bromochloromethane (CB), Carbon Dioxide (CO2), and dry chemical
extinguishing agents are four of the most common types of fire extinguishing
agents found in and around airplanes. Prolonged exposure (5 minutes or
more) to any of these agents in a confined area could cause serious injury or
even death. Pilots and ground personnel should become familiar with the
precautions associated with each particular agent. Adequate respiratory and
eye protection from excessive exposure, including the use of oxygen when
available, should be sought as soon as the primary fire emergency will permit.
The discharge of large amounts of carbon dioxide to extinguish a fire may
create hazards to personnel such as oxygen deficiency and reduced visibility.
The dilution of the oxygen in the air, by the carbon dioxide concentrations that
will extinguish a fire, may create an atmosphere that will not sustain life.
Personnel rendered unconscious under these conditions can usually be
revived without any permanent ill effects when promptly removed from the
adverse condition.
The discharge of large amounts of dry chemical agents may create hazards to
personnel such as reduced visibility and temporary breathing difficulty. Where
there is a possibility that personnel may be exposed to dry chemical agents,
suitable safeguards should be provided to ensure prompt evacuation.
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24
POTENTIAL HAZARDS
OXYGEN
Before servicing any airplane with oxygen, consult the specific airplan~
service/maintenance manual to determine the proper type of serviciri~
equipment to be used. Airplanes should not be serviced with oxygen during
refueling, defueling, or other maintenance work which could provide fuel and a
source of ignition.
Also, oxygen servicing 9f an airplane should be
accomplished outside, not in hangars.
Oxygen is a very reactive material, combining with most of the chemical
elements. The union of oxygen with another substance is known as oxidation.
Extremely rapid or spontaneous oxidation is known as combustion. While
oxygen is non-combustible in itself, it strongly and rapidly accelerates the
combustion of all flammable materials; some to an explosive degree.
The following are some do's and don'ts when handling or using oxygen:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Do check that only "aviators breathing oxygen" is going into the
airplane system.
Don't confuse aviators breathing oxygen With "hospital/medical"
oxygen. (The latter is pure enough for breathing, but the moisture
content is usually higher which could freeze and plug the lines and
valves of an airplane oxygen system.)
Do reject any oxygen that has an abnormal odor (good oxygen is
odorless).
°"
Do follow the published applicable instructions regarding chargingi
purging, and maintenance of airplane oxygen systems.
Don't use oil or grease (including certain lipsticks and lip balms)
around oxygen systems.
Don't expose oxygen containers to high temperatures.
COMPRESSED AIR
Compressed air is a mechanic's tool as versatile as electricity, and can be as
deadly. The use of compressed air to blow dust or dirt from parts of the body
or clothing is a dangerous practice. As little as 12 psi can dislocate an
eyeball. Air can enter the navel through a layer of clothing and inflate and
rupture the intestines. Compressed air has been known to strike a small
wound on a person's hand and inflate the arm.
Never look into or point any compressed air apparatus toward any part of the
body.
Always wear prescribed personal protective equipment.
Also,
continuously check the condition of air tools and air hoses to m!3ke sure they
do not show signs of damage or looseness. A loose hose carrying pressure is
like a bullwhip and can cause serious injury to personnel and/or cause damage
Reissue - 1 June 1998
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24
POTENTIAL HAZARDS
PILOT SAFETY AND
WARNING SUPPLEMENTS
to surrounding equipment. If a situation such as this should occur, do not
attempt to catch the hose end; shut off the air source first.
STATIC ELECTRICITY
S'tatic electricity, by definition, is a negative or positive charge of electricity that
an object accumulates, and creates a spark when the object comes near
another object. Static electricity may accumulate on an airplane during flight or
while it is on the ground, as long as air is flowing over its surfaces. Unless
static electricity is carried away by ground wires, an explosion may be caused
during any fueling operations.
Grounding an airplane is a good safety precaution because static electricity
cannot be seen until it's too late. To properly ground an airplane, attach one
end of a static ground wire to an unpainted point on the airplane and the other
end to an approved grounding stake. Attaching the ground wire to the airplane
first will ensure that any spark of static electricity will occur at the grounding
stake and not at the airplane. Do not attach a ground wire to any antenna.
Antennas are poor grounding attachment points because they are insulated
from the airplane structure.
On some airplanes, wick-type static dischargers are installed to improve radio
communications during flight through dust or various forms of precipitation
(rain, snow or ice crystals).
Under these conditions, the build-up and
~ischarge of static electricity from the trailing edges of wings, rudder, elevator,
l:(nd propeller tips can result in loss of usable radio signals on all
c<:>mmunications and navigation radio equipment. .Usually the ADF is first to be
affected and VHF communication equipment is the last to be affected.
Installation of static dischargers reduces interference from precipitation static,
but it is possible to encounter severe precipitation static conditions which might
cause the loss of radio s