Windows 10
®
2nd edition
by Andy Rathbone
Windows® 10 For Dummies®, 2nd Edition
Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030-5774, www.wiley.com
Copyright © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey
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Library of Congress Control Number: 2016947152
ISBN: 978-1-119-31104-1
ISBN (ePDF): 978-1-119-31105-8; ISBN (ePub): 978-1-119-31106-5
Manufactured in the United States of America
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Contents at a Glance
Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Part 1: Windows 10 Stuff Everybody
Thinks You Already Know. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
CHAPTER 1: What Is Windows 10?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Starting with the Start Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
CHAPTER 3: The Traditional Desktop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
CHAPTER 4: Basic Desktop Window Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
CHAPTER 5: Storage: Internal, External, and in the Cloud. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
CHAPTER 2: Part 2: Working with Programs, Apps, and Files . . . . . . . . . . .
123
CHAPTER 6: Playing with Programs, Apps, and Documents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Finding the Lost. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
CHAPTER 8: Printing and Scanning Your Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
CHAPTER 7: Part 3: Getting Things Done on the Internet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
179
CHAPTER 9: Cruising the Web. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Social: Mail, People, and Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
CHAPTER 11: Safe Computing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
CHAPTER 10: Being
Part 4: Customizing and Upgrading Windows 10. . . . . . . . . . .
229
CHAPTER 12: Customizing
Windows with the Control Panels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
CHAPTER 13: Keeping Windows from Breaking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
CHAPTER 14: Sharing
One Computer with Several People. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
Computers with a Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
CHAPTER 15: Connecting
Part 5: Music, Photos, and Movies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHAPTER 16: Playing
305
and Copying Music. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
with Photos (and Videos). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
CHAPTER 17: Fiddling
Part 6: Help!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHAPTER 18: The
Case of the Broken Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHAPTER 19: Strange Messages: What You Did Does Not Compute. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHAPTER 20: Moving from an Old PC to a New Windows 10 PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHAPTER 21: Help on the Windows Help System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
349
351
369
379
387
Part 7: The Part of Tens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
395
CHAPTER 22: Ten
Things You’ll Hate about Windows 10 (And How to Fix Them). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397
CHAPTER 23: Ten
or So Tips for Tablet and Laptop Owners. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409
Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
419
Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
About This Book. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Use This Book. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Touchscreen Owners Aren’t Left Out. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
And What about You?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Icons Used in This Book. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Beyond the Book. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Where to Go from Here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
3
4
5
5
6
6
PART 1: WINDOWS 10 STUFF EVERYBODY
THINKS YOU ALREADY KNOW. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
CHAPTER 1:
What Is Windows 10?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
What Is Windows, and Why Are You Using It?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
What’s New in Windows 10? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Should I Bother Upgrading to Windows 10? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
What’s So Different About Windows 10? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Why Does Windows 10 Keep Changing? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Can My Current PC Still Run Windows 10?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
The Different Flavors of Windows 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
CHAPTER 2:
Starting with the Start Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Being Welcomed to the World of Windows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding user accounts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keeping your account private with a password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Signing up for a Microsoft account. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Figuring Out the New Windows 10 Start Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Toggling Between Tablet and Desktop Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Launching a Start menu program or app . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding something on the Start menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing or closing your open apps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Getting to know your free apps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding or removing Start menu items. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing the Start menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exiting from Windows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Temporarily leaving your computer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Leaving your computer for the day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table of Contents
22
24
25
27
29
33
34
35
36
37
40
41
45
46
47
v
CHAPTER 3:
The Traditional Desktop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Finding the Desktop and the Start Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the Desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Launching apps with the Start menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jazzing up the desktop’s background. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Toggling between Tablet mode and the desktop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dumpster diving in the Recycle Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bellying Up to the Taskbar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shrinking windows to the taskbar and retrieving them. . . . . . . . . .
Switching to different tasks from the taskbar’s Jump Lists. . . . . . .
Clicking the taskbar’s sensitive areas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening the Action Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing the taskbar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up Multiple Desktops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Making Programs Easier to Find. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHAPTER 4:
Basic Desktop Window Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Dissecting a Typical Desktop Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tugging on a window’s title bar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navigating folders with a window’s Address bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding commands on the Ribbon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Quick shortcuts with the Navigation Pane. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving inside a window with its scroll bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Boring borders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maneuvering Windows Around the Desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving a window to the top of the pile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving a window from here to there. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Making a window fill the whole desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Closing a window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Making a window bigger or smaller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Placing two windows side by side. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Making windows open to the same darn size. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHAPTER 5:
50
51
53
54
56
58
59
61
62
62
65
67
69
71
74
75
77
78
80
82
83
84
84
85
85
86
86
87
88
Storage: Internal, External, and in the Cloud. . . . . . . . 89
Browsing the File Explorer File Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Getting the Lowdown on Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Peering into Your Drives, Folders, and Other Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Seeing the files on a drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Seeing what’s inside a folder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Creating a New Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Renaming a File or Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Selecting Bunches of Files or Folders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Getting Rid of a File or Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Copying or Moving Files and Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Seeing More Information about Files and Folders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
vi
Windows 10 For Dummies
Writing to CDs and DVDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Buying the right kind of blank CDs and DVDs for burning . . . . . .
Copying files to or from a CD or DVD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Flash Drives and Memory Cards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OneDrive: Your Cubbyhole in the Clouds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up OneDrive on a new PC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing your OneDrive settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening and saving files from OneDrive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing OneDrive from the Internet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
109
109
110
113
114
115
117
119
121
PART 2: WORKING WITH PROGRAMS,
APPS, AND FILES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
123
Playing with Programs, Apps, and Documents. . . .
125
CHAPTER 6:
Starting a Program or an App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Opening a Document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Saving a Document. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Choosing Which Program Should Open Which File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Navigating the Windows Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Adding new apps from the Store app. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136
Uninstalling apps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Taking the Lazy Way with a Desktop Shortcut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Absolutely Essential Guide to Cutting, Copying, and Pasting. . . . . . . 141
The quick ’n’ dirty guide to cut ’n’ paste. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Selecting things to cut or copy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Cutting or copying your selected goods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Pasting information to another place. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
CHAPTER 7:
CHAPTER 8:
Finding the Lost. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
147
Finding Currently Running Apps and Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding Lost Windows on the Desktop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Locating a Missing App, Program, Setting, or File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Searching with Cortana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up Cortana for the first time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Turning off Cortana. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding a Missing File inside a Folder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding Lost Photos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding Other Computers on a Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
147
149
150
154
154
157
158
160
161
Printing and Scanning Your Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
163
Printing from a Start Menu App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printing Your Masterpiece from the Desktop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting how your work fits on the page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting your printer’s settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Canceling a print job. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
164
165
166
169
171
Table of Contents
vii
Printing a web page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Troubleshooting your printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Scanning from the Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
PART 3: GETTING THINGS DONE ON THE INTERNET . . . . .
CHAPTER 9:
179
Cruising the Web. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
181
What’s an ISP, and Why Do I Need One? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting Wirelessly to the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Browsing the Web with Microsoft Edge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving from one web page to another. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Making Microsoft Edge open to your favorite site. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Revisiting favorite places . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding things on the Internet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding More Information with Cortana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving Information from the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving a web page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving a picture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Downloading a program, song, or other type of file . . . . . . . . . . .
182
183
186
188
190
192
193
194
196
196
196
197
197
CHAPTER 10:
Being Social: Mail, People, and Calendar. . . . . . . . . . .
199
Adding Your Accounts to Windows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understanding the Mail App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Switching among the Mail app’s views, menus, and accounts . . . .
Composing and sending an email. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reading a received email. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sending and receiving files through email. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Your Contacts in the People App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding contacts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting or editing contacts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Appointments in Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
200
202
202
205
207
209
211
213
214
215
Safe Computing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
219
Understanding Those Annoying Permission Messages. . . . . . . . . . . .
Avoiding Viruses with Windows Defender. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Avoiding Phishing Scams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up Controls for Children. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
219
220
223
224
PART 4: CUSTOMIZING AND UPGRADING
WINDOWS 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
229
Customizing Windows with the Control Panels. . .
231
CHAPTER 11:
CHAPTER 12:
Finding the Right Switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Setting the Stage with the Windows Settings App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
viii
Windows 10 For Dummies
Bringing out the Big Guns: The Desktop’s Control Panel. . . . . . . . . . .
System and Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network and Internet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Appearance of Windows (Appearance
and Personalization). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the desktop background. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choosing a screen saver. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the computer’s theme. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the screen resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a second monitor or projector. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware and Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adjusting volume and sounds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing or setting up speakers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Bluetooth gadget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a printer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Time and Language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding or Removing Apps or Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying Windows for the Physically Challenged. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHAPTER 13:
CHAPTER 14:
CHAPTER 15:
235
237
238
238
238
239
241
242
243
244
246
247
248
249
251
252
253
255
Keeping Windows from Breaking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
259
Tuning Up Windows with Built-In Maintenance Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backing Up Your Computer with File History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Finding Technical Information about Your Computer. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Freeing up Space on Your Hard Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Empowering Your Power Button. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up Devices that Don’t Work (Fiddling with Drivers) . . . . . . . .
261
262
266
268
269
271
Sharing One Computer with Several People. . . . . . .
273
Understanding User Accounts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing or Adding User Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding an account for a family member or friend. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing existing accounts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Switching Quickly between Users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing a User Account’s Picture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up Passwords and Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Signing in with Windows Hello . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
274
275
276
280
282
284
286
287
Connecting Computers with a Network. . . . . . . . . . . .
291
Understanding a Network’s Parts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
Setting Up a Small Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
Buying parts for a network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .294
Setting up a wireless router. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
Setting up Windows computers to connect to a network. . . . . . . 296
Table of Contents
ix
Setting Up or Connecting with a Homegroup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298
Accessing what others have shared. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
Sharing a printer on the network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
PART 5: MUSIC, PHOTOS, AND MOVIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHAPTER 16:
Playing and Copying Music. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
307
Playing Music with the Groove Music App. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Handing Music-Playing Chores Back to Windows Media Player. . . . .
Stocking the Windows Media Player Library. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Browsing Windows Media Player’s Libraries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Playing Music Files in a Playlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling Your Now Playing Items. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Playing CDs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Playing DVDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Playing Videos and TV Shows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating, Saving, and Editing Playlists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ripping (Copying) CDs to Your PC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Burning (Creating) Music CDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
308
311
314
318
320
322
324
324
325
327
328
329
Fiddling with Photos (and Videos). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
333
Dumping a Camera’s Photos into Your Computer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Taking Photos with the Camera App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Photos with the Photos App . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing your photo collection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing photo albums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing a slide show. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copying digital photos to a CD or DVD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
334
338
340
340
343
345
346
PART 6: HELP! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
349
The Case of the Broken Window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
351
Toggling Between Tablet and Desktop Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Magic Fixes in Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resetting your computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restoring backups with File History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows Keeps Asking Me for Permission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I Need to Retrieve Deleted Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fixing Broken Apps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
My Settings Are Messed Up. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I Forgot My Password. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
My Computer Is Frozen Solid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
352
353
353
356
361
362
363
363
365
366
CHAPTER 17:
CHAPTER 18:
x
305
Windows 10 For Dummies
CHAPTER 19:
Strange Messages: What You Did Does
Not Compute. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Add Your Microsoft Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choose What Happens with This Device. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Did You Mean to Switch Apps? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Do You Want to Allow This App to Make Changes to
This Computer?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Do You Want to Save Changes?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Found Some Malware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Do You Want to Open This? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Let This App Use Your Precise Location?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reconnect Your Drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
There Is No Email Program Associated to Perform
the Requested Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
You Don’t Currently Have Permission to Access This Folder . . . . . . .
CHAPTER 20:
369
370
370
371
372
373
373
374
375
375
376
377
Moving from an Old PC to a New
Windows 10 PC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
379
Hiring a Third Party to Make the Move . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Buying Laplink’s PCmover program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Visiting a repair shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transferring Files Yourself. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
380
380
382
383
Help on the Windows Help System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
387
Getting Started with Windows 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contacting Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Microsoft’s paid support options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Microsoft’s free support options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
388
389
390
391
PART 7: THE PART OF TENS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
395
CHAPTER 21:
CHAPTER 22:
Ten Things You’ll Hate about Windows 10
(And How to Fix Them). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
397
I Don’t Want Windows 10! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I Want to Avoid the Apps!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pruning apps from the Start menu and your PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Telling desktop programs, not apps, to open your files . . . . . . . .
I Want to Avoid the Desktop!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I Don’t Want a Microsoft Account. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows Makes Me Sign In All the Time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Taskbar Keeps Disappearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I Can’t Line Up Two Windows on the Screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
It Won’t Let Me Do Something Unless I’m an Administrator! . . . . . . .
I Don’t Know What Version of Windows I Have. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
My Print Screen Key Doesn’t Work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
398
398
399
400
401
402
402
403
404
405
406
406
Table of Contents
xi
Ten or So Tips for Tablet and Laptop Owners . . . . .
409
Turning on Tablet Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Switching to Airplane Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting to a New Wireless Internet Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Toggling Your Tablet’s Screen Rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choosing What Happens When You Close Your Laptop’s Lid. . . . . . .
Adjusting to Different Locations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backing Up Your Laptop Before Traveling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing the Mobility Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
INDEX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
419
CHAPTER 23:
xii
Windows 10 For Dummies
Introduction
W
elcome to Windows 10 For Dummies, the world’s best-selling book about
the newest — and supposedly last — Windows version, Windows 10!
This book’s popularity probably boils down to this simple fact: Some people want
to be Windows whizzes. They love interacting with dialog boxes. Some randomly
press keys in the hope of discovering hidden, undocumented ­
features. A few
memorize long strings of computer commands while washing their hair.
And you? Well, you’re no dummy, that’s for sure. But when it comes to Windows
and computers, the fascination just isn’t there. You want to get your work done,
stop, and move on to something more important. You have no intention of changing, and there’s nothing wrong with that.
That’s where this book comes in handy. Instead of making you a whiz at Windows,
it merely dishes out chunks of useful computing information when you need
them. Instead of becoming a Windows expert, you’ll know just enough to get by
quickly, cleanly, and with a minimum of pain so that you can move on to the more
pleasant things in life.
And you’ll be able to do that whether you’re dealing with a touchscreen tablet,
laptop, or desktop computer.
About This Book
Don’t try to read this book in one sitting; there’s no need. Instead, treat this book
like a dictionary or an encyclopedia. Turn to the page with the information you
need and say, “Ah, so that’s what they’re talking about.” Then put down the book
and move on.
Don’t bother trying to memorize all the Windows jargon, such as Select the Menu
Item from the Drop-Down List Box. Leave that stuff for the computer enthusiasts.
In fact, if anything technical comes up in a chapter, a road sign warns you well in
advance. Depending on your mood, you can either slow down to read it or speed
on around it.
Introduction
1
HOW I WROTE THIS BOOK
How did this book arrive in your hands so quickly after Microsoft released its big
Summer update? No, I didn’t crank it out in two weeks. While building Windows 10,
Microsoft ships early releases to people who’ve signed up for its Windows Insider’s
­program (https://insider.windows.com). This gives Microsoft a way to test new
features before shipping them to the public. And it gives me a chance to write about
features before they’re released.
I spent many months poring over early releases, writing up sections of the book in
advance. Then, when Microsoft released its final, approved version to the Windows
Insider members, I went over every section and step-by-step instruction to make sure
the book’s instructions matched Microsoft’s final release.
A few weeks later, when Microsoft released the final version of Windows to the public,
the publisher was able to release this book, as well.
Instead of fancy computer jargon, this book covers subjects like these, all discussed in plain English:
»» Keeping your computer safe and secure
»» Making sense of the new Windows 10 Start menu
»» Finding, starting, and closing programs and apps
»» Locating the file you saved or downloaded yesterday
»» Setting up a computer or tablet for the whole family to share
»» Copying information to and from a disc or flash drive
»» Saving and sharing files from your smartphone or digital camera
»» Printing or scanning your work
»» Creating a network between two or more computers to share the Internet,
files, or a printer
»» Fixing Windows when it’s misbehaving
There’s nothing to memorize and nothing to learn. Just turn to the right page,
read the brief explanation, and get back to work. Unlike other books, this one
enables you to bypass the technical hoopla and still complete your work.
2
Windows 10 For Dummies
How to Use This Book
Windows 10 will most definitely leave you scratching your head at some point. It’s
the most complicated version of Windows ever released to the public, so take pride
in the fact that you’re strong enough to persevere.
When something in Windows leaves you stumped, use this book as a reference.
Find the troublesome topic in this book’s table of contents or index. The table of
contents lists chapter and section titles and page numbers. The index lists topics
and page numbers. Page through the table of contents or index to the spot that
deals with that particular bit of computer obscurity, read only what you have to,
close the book, and apply what you’ve read.
If you’re feeling adventurous and want to find out more, read a little further in the
bulleted items below each section. You can find a few completely voluntary extra
details, tips, or cross-references to check out. There’s no pressure, though. You
aren’t forced to discover anything that you don’t want to or that you simply don’t
have time for.
If you have to type something into the computer, you’ll see easy-to-follow bold
text like this:
Type Media Player into the Search box.
In the preceding example, you type the words Media Player and then press the
keyboard’s Enter key. Typing words into a computer can be confusing, so a
description follows that explains what you should be seeing on the screen.
When I describe a key combination you should press, I describe it like this:
Press Ctrl+B.
That means to hold down your keyboard’s Control key while pressing your keyboard’s B key. (That’s the shortcut key combination that applies bold formatting
to selected text.)
Whenever I describe an email address or filename, I present it this way:
notepad.exe
And website addresses appear like this:
www.andyrathbone.com
Introduction
3
This book doesn’t wimp out by saying, “For further information, consult your
manual.” Windows doesn’t even come with a manual. This book also doesn’t contain information about running specific Windows software packages, such as
Microsoft Office. Windows is complicated enough on its own! Luckily, other
For Dummies books mercifully explain most popular software packages.
Don’t feel abandoned, though. This book covers Windows in plenty of detail for
you to get the job done. Plus, if you have questions or comments about Windows 10
For Dummies, feel free to drop me a line on my website at www.andyrathbone.com.
I answer a reader’s question on my website each week.
Finally, keep in mind that this book is a reference. It’s not designed to teach you
how to use Windows like an expert, heaven forbid. Instead, this book dishes out
enough bite-sized chunks of information so that you don’t have to learn
Windows.
Touchscreen Owners Aren’t Left Out
Although Windows 10 comes preinstalled on all new Windows desktop PCs and
laptops, Microsoft also aims this bold new version of Windows at owners of touchscreens. Tablets, phones, and some laptops and desktop monitors come with
screens you can control by touching them with your fingers.
If you’re a new touchscreen owner, don’t worry. This book explains where you
need to touch, slide, or tap your fingers in all the appropriate places.
If you find yourself scratching your head over explanations aimed at mouse
­owners, remember these three touchscreen rules:
»» When told to click, you should tap. Quickly touching and releasing your
finger on a button is the same as clicking it with a mouse.
»» When told to double-click, tap twice. Two touches in rapid succession does
the trick.
»» When told to right-click something, hold down your finger on the item.
Then, when an icon appears, lift your finger. The right-click menu appears
onscreen. (That’s what would have happened if you’d right-clicked the item
with a mouse.) While you’re looking at the pop-up menu, tap any of its listed
items to have Windows carry out your bidding.
4
Windows 10 For Dummies
If you find touchscreens to be cumbersome while you’re sitting at a desk, you can
always add a mouse and keyboard to your touchscreen tablet. They work just fine.
In fact, a mouse and keyboard almost always work better than fingers on the
­Windows desktop, even in Windows 10. (They’re almost mandatory on small Windows tablets.)
And What about You?
Chances are good that you already own Windows 10, or you’re thinking about
upgrading. You know what you want to do with your computer. The problem lies
in making the computer do what you want it to do. You’ve gotten by one way or
another, perhaps with the help of a computer guru — for instance, a friend at the
office, a relative, or perhaps a neighbor’s teenager.
But when your computer guru isn’t around, this book can be a substitute during
your times of need.
Icons Used in This Book
It just takes a glance at Windows to notice its icons, which are little push-button
pictures for starting various programs. The icons in this book fit right in. They’re
even a little easier to figure out.
Watch out! This signpost warns you that pointless technical information is ­coming
around the bend. Swerve away from this icon to stay safe from awful technical
drivel.
This icon alerts you about juicy information that makes computing easier: a new
method for keeping the cat from sleeping on top of your tablet, for example.
Don’t forget to remember these important points (or at least dog-ear the pages so
that you can look them up again a few days later).
The computer won’t explode while you’re performing the delicate operations
associated with this icon. Still, wearing gloves and proceeding with caution is a
good idea.
Introduction
5
Are you moving to Windows 10 from an older Windows version? This icon alerts
you to areas where Windows 10 behaves quite differently from its predecessors.
Beyond the Book
Like every Windows For Dummies book, this one comes with a free Cheat Sheet
that brings together some of the most commonly needed information for people
struggling with Windows. It describes how Microsoft changed Windows 10 one
year after its release, and offers keyboard shortcuts as well as tips on using Windows 10 on a touchscreen. To get the Cheat Sheet, head for www.dummies.com and
using the Search box, search for Windows 10 For Dummies 2nd Edition Cheat
Sheet.
Where to Go from Here
Now you’re ready for action. Give the pages a quick flip and scan a section or two
that you know you’ll need later. Please remember, this is your book — your weapon
against the computer nerds who’ve inflicted this whole complicated computer
concept on you. Please circle any paragraphs you find useful, highlight key concepts, add your own sticky notes, and doodle in the margins next to the complicated stuff.
The more you mark up your book, the easier it will be for you to find all the good
stuff again.
6
Windows 10 For Dummies
1
Windows 10
Stuff Everybody
Thinks You
Already Know
IN THIS PART . . .
Understand the changes in Windows 10.
Navigate and customize the new Start menu.
Store files in the Cloud with OneDrive.
IN THIS CHAPTER
Getting to know Windows 10
Discovering the new features in
Windows 10
Deciding whether to switch to
Windows 10
Upgrading to Windows 10
Figuring out whether your PC is
powerful enough to run Windows 10
Knowing which version of Windows 10
you need
Chapter 1
What Is Windows 10?
C
hances are good that you’ve heard about Windows: the boxes and windows
that greet you whenever you turn on your computer. In fact, millions of
people worldwide are puzzling over Windows as you read this book. Almost
every new computer and laptop sold today comes with Windows preinstalled,
ready to toss colorful boxes onto the screen.
This chapter helps you understand why Windows lives inside your computer, and
I introduce Microsoft’s latest Windows version, Windows 10. I explain how
Windows 10 differs from previous Windows versions and help you determine
whether you should upgrade your computer to Windows 10.
Finally, I explain what’s new in Windows 10 and how to install this upgrade onto
your Windows 7 or 8.1 computer.
CHAPTER 1 What Is Windows 10?
9
What Is Windows, and Why Are You
Using It?
Created and sold by a company called Microsoft, Windows isn’t like your usual
software that lets you calculate income taxes or send angry emails to politicians.
No, Windows is an operating system, meaning it controls the way you work with
your computer. It’s been around for 30 years, and the latest incarnation is called
Windows 10, shown in Figure 1-1.
FIGURE 1-1: Although
Windows 10 looks
different on
different PCs, it
usually looks
much like this.
The name Windows comes from all the little windows it places on your computer
screen. Each window shows information, such as a picture, a program, or a
­baffling technical reprimand. You can place several windows onscreen simultaneously and jump from window to window, visiting different programs. Or, you can
enlarge one window to fill the entire screen.
When you turn on your computer, Windows jumps onto the screen and begins
supervising any running programs. When everything goes well, you don’t really
notice Windows; you simply see your programs or your work. When things don’t
go well, though, Windows often leaves you scratching your head over a perplexing
error message.
10
PART 1 Windows 10 Stuff Everybody Thinks You Already Know
In addition to controlling your computer and bossing around your programs, Windows comes with a bunch of free programs and apps — mini-programs. These programs and apps let you do different things, such as write and print letters, browse
the Internet, play music, and send your friends dimly lit photos of your latest meal.
And why are you using Windows? Well, you probably didn’t have much choice.
Nearly every computer, laptop, or Windows tablet sold after July 2015, comes with
Windows 10 preinstalled. A few people escaped Windows by buying Apple
­computers (those nicer-looking computers that cost a lot more). But chances are
good that you, your neighbors, your boss, and millions of other people around the
world are using Windows.
SEPARATING THE ADS FROM THE FEATURES
Microsoft touts Windows as a helpful companion that always keeps your best interests
in mind, but that description isn’t really true. Windows always keeps Microsoft’s interests
in mind. You’ll find that out as soon as you call Microsoft for help with a Windows
­problem. Microsoft charges $100 an hour for phone support.
Microsoft also uses Windows to plug its own products and services. Microsoft Edge, the
new Windows web browser opens with links to Microsoft’s own websites, for example.
The browser’s Favorites area, a place for you to add your favorite web destinations,
comes stocked with Microsoft websites.
Windows 10 places a link to OneDrive, its online storage service, in every folder. But
Microsoft isn’t as quick to mention that you must pay an annual fee when you reach
your storage limit.
Ads appear on the Start menu, as well as the Windows Lock Screen, the screen that
appears when you haven’t used your PC for a while.
The Maps app uses the Microsoft Bing mapping service, rather than Google Maps or
another competitor.
Microsoft also wants you to start buying apps rather than traditional programs. Apps
are sold only through the Windows Store, and Microsoft takes a cut of each sale.
The list goes on.
Simply put, Windows not only controls your computer but also serves as a huge
Microsoft advertising vehicle. Treat these built-in advertising flyers as a salesperson’s
knock on your door.
CHAPTER 1 What Is Windows 10?
11
»» Microsoft wants Windows 10 to run on PCs, laptops, tablets, and phones. (It
looks and behaves quite similarly on all of them.) That’s why Windows 10
includes many large buttons for easier poking with fingers on touchscreens.
Windows 10 can also run apps, small programs usually found on smartphones
and tablets, in windows on a desktop PC.
»» To confuse everybody, Microsoft never released a Windows 9. Microsoft
skipped a version number when moving from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10.
»» The desktop’s traditional Start menu, missing from Windows 8 and 8.1,
returns in Windows 10. Microsoft has tinkered with the popular menu since
Windows 10’s initial release, making it a little easier to understand. (I explain
how to customize the new Start menu to your liking in Chapter 2.)
What’s New in Windows 10?
Microsoft views Windows 10 as a one-size-fits-all computing solution that runs
on laptops and desktop PCs (shown earlier in Figure 1-1) as well as phones and
tablets, shown in Figure 1-2.
FIGURE 1-2: Windows 10
behaves almost
identically on
laptops and
desktop PCs
(shown earlier),
phones (left), and
tablets (right).
Windows 10 can even run on your TV through Microsoft’s Xbox One game console.
Windows 10 behaves almost identically on every device, and it brings a huge
bonus: Apps known as universal apps will run on a Windows 10 phone, tablet, PC,
laptop, and Xbox One.
12
PART 1 Windows 10 Stuff Everybody Thinks You Already Know
Besides aiming to run on everything but clock radios, Windows 10 brings these
changes to your computer:
»» Start button and menu: Removed from Windows 8 and half-heartedly
tacked back onto Windows 8.1, the Start button and Start menu triumphantly
return to the desktop in Windows 10. The revamped Start menu sports a
column of icons, as well as fingertip-sized tiles for launching apps. (Tile haters
find instructions for removing them in Chapter 2.)
»» Apps on the desktop: Apps, which are small programs from the world of
phones and tablets, consumed the full screen in Windows 8 and 8.1. Windows
10 now lets you choose whether to run apps full screen or within desktop
windows.
»» Continuum: This buzzword simply means that Windows 10 senses how
you’re using a device and behaves accordingly. When Windows 10 runs on a
tablet, for example, Continuum enlarges the Start menu and apps to fill the
screen with larger buttons, sized appropriately for fingertips to tap. But when
you attach a mouse or keyboard to your tablet, your tablet switches away
from Tablet mode; the Start menu retreats to a small corner of your screen,
and apps begin to run in desktop windows. Continuum lets your tablet switch
quickly into a desktop PC and then back to a tablet when needed.
»» Cortana: The digital assistant in Windows 10, Cortana, helps you manage
your computing by fetching lost files, stocking your calendar with appointments, grabbing up-to-date traffic information about your commute, and
extracting informational tidbits from the Internet. Controlled through either
your voice or keyboard, Cortana works from the Search box adjacent to the
Start button.
»» OneDrive: Formerly called SkyDrive, Microsoft’s online file storage service
comes built into the Windows 10 desktop. However, OneDrive no longer
stores your files on both your PC and the Internet (sometimes called the
“cloud”). Instead, OneDrive asks you to choose which files and folders should
live only on the cloud and which should live on both the cloud and your
computer.
»» More Apps: The Windows Store offers more than 700,000 apps. That’s
nowhere near the number of apps found for the iPhone, iPad, or Android
phones and tablets, but you can find plenty of big names like Facebook and
Netflix, with more on the way.
»» Multiple desktops: Windows 10 lets you create extra desktops, and you can
switch between them with a click or tap. You can set up one desktop for work
and another for gaming, for example. (Or, you can completely ignore the
feature.)
CHAPTER 1 What Is Windows 10?
13
»» Windows Hello: This welcome security update allows you to sign into your
computer without typing in a password. With the right fingerprint reader or
camera, your computer can recognize either your face, fingerprint, or iris and
automatically let you in. You can even access supported websites without
having to type in your username and password.
»» Windows Ink: This big update lets you write on your tablet’s screen with a
special pen, letting you add handwritten notes and drawings to apps like
Maps, the Microsoft Edge browser, and Office.
»» Windows 10 is now a service: Perhaps most important, Microsoft treats
Windows 10 as a constantly changing service rather than a finished product.
Microsoft plans to keep adding new apps, features, and updates to Windows 10
for as long as you own the device.
Unlike Windows 8 and 8.1, Windows 10 no longer feels like two operating systems
crammed into one computer. It feels like a single operating system that brings out
the best in both tablets and desktop PCs.
For its first year of release, Windows 10 was a free upgrade for people owning fully
patched Windows 7 or 8.1 computers. The upgrade is no longer free, but it still
keeps all of your files, apps, and programs in place. Owners of older PCs can also
upgrade to Windows 10, but the upgrade will wipe out all of your files and
­programs. You’ll need to reinstall everything from a backup. (If your old computer
is a slow crawler, it will still be a slow crawler after upgrading to Windows 10.
You’re probably better off buying a new PC with Windows 10 preinstalled.)
Windows no longer comes in a Windows RT version. If you bought a Windows RT
tablet, such as the Surface RT or Surface 2, you can’t upgrade it to Windows 10.
Should I Bother Upgrading to Windows 10?
If you’re happy with your current version of Windows, don’t bother upgrading to
Windows 10. Most people stick with the Windows version that came preinstalled
on their computers. That way they avoid the chore of figuring out a new version.
Windows 10 comes with a steep learning curve because it’s quite different from
earlier Windows versions.
Also, many of the biggest changes in Windows 10 work best with touchscreens —
those fingertip-controlled screens found on expensive cellphones, tablets, and
some of the latest laptops and desktop monitors. Most desktop PC owners don’t
need that feature.
14
PART 1 Windows 10 Stuff Everybody Thinks You Already Know
HISTORY FOR WINDOWS 7 UPGRADERS
Windows 7 diehards missed a lot of hubbub by skipping Windows 8 and 8.1. Those two
poorly received Windows versions affected Windows 10 quite a bit, so here’s a wee bit
of history so you’ll understand Windows 10 a little better.
For years, Microsoft had watched helplessly as hordes of people bought iPhones, iPads,
and apps — small and simple programs for lightweight touchscreen tasks. To compete,
Microsoft designed Windows 8 for touchscreen tablets and unleashed it in 2012. Like
the competition, Windows 8 opened to a screen full of touchable colorful tiles, each
­representing an app.
Even the desktop was relegated to an app, a tiny tile on the screen. But when opened,
the Desktop app lacked its Start button and menu. Microsoft expected people to return
to the tile-filled opening screen to launch their desktop programs.
Most desktop owners hated Windows 8. And because very few people bought Windows
8 tablets, Windows 8 bombed in the marketplace. Windows 8.1 made a few amends,
but not enough.
With Windows 10, Microsoft aims to placate desktop lovers by bringing back a more traditional Start button and Start menu. To please tablet owners, the Start menu can fill the
screen on command, making it easier to control with fingertips.
Best of all, Windows 10 is smart enough to change shape depending on what device it’s
installed on. On a tablet, Windows 10 presents the tile-filled, full-screen Start menu,
which subtly changes its spacing to accommodate finger taps. On desktop PCs,
Windows 10 shows the traditional desktop, Start menu, and Start button. And the
menus remain small, which works well for the pinpoint clicks of a mouse.
With Windows 10, Microsoft hopes Windows will finally serve the needs of both desktop
traditionalists and tablet owners.
Instead of upgrading, stick with the masses and stay with your current Windows
version. When you’re ready to buy a new computer, Windows 10 will be installed
and waiting for you.
But if you’re running Windows 8.1, and you’re unhappy with it, you may enjoy
upgrading to Windows 10. The update smooths over many of the rough edges of
those Windows versions, especially on desktop PCs and tablets that convert
into PCs.
CHAPTER 1 What Is Windows 10?
15
If you’re one of the few people with a Windows cell phone, then move to Windows
10. The two work together quite smoothly.
After Windows 7, Microsoft ended its support for Windows XP mode, a popular way
to run a Windows XP desktop within Windows 7. If you rely on Windows XP mode
in Windows 7, stick with Windows 7. The same holds true for Windows Media
­Center, a popular way to record TV shows and watch DVDs. If you rely on either of
those two programs, don’t upgrade to Windows 10.
What’s So Different About Windows 10?
Today, computing falls into two camps: creating and consuming. People turn to
their desktop PC for creating things. They write papers, send email, prepare tax
returns, update blogs, edit videos, or, quite often, tap whichever keys their boss
requires that day.
But when consuming, people often walk away from their desktop PCs. They pull out
their smartphone or tablet to read email, watch videos, listen to music, and browse
the web.
That split creates a problem. Desktop PCs, phones, and tablets all work differently; each offers different screen sizes, programs, and commands. What works
well with fingers doesn’t always work well with a mouse and keyboard. Sharing
files among gadgets can be a nightmare.
Windows 10 aims to fix those problems by creating one operating system that
works well on everything, letting both consumers and creators work on a single
device. To do that, Windows 10 includes two different modes:
»» Tablet mode: For on-the-go information grabbers with touchscreen tablets,
the Windows 10 Start menu fills the entire screen with large, colorful tiles that
constantly update to show the latest stock prices, weather, email, Facebook
updates, and other tidbits. Shown earlier in Figure 1-2, that information
appears before you touch a button. And touch is a keyword: The full-screen
Start menu works best with a touchscreen monitor or tablet.
»» Desktop mode: When it’s time for work, the traditional Windows desktop
brings all its power — as well as its more powerful and detailed menus.
16
PART 1 Windows 10 Stuff Everybody Thinks You Already Know
Some people like the convenience of having both types of computers built into
one: a touchscreen laptop, for example, or a tablet with a docking station that lets
you plug in a mouse and keyboard. Others find the two experiences to be oddly
disjointed.
»» If you can stomach the initial confusion, Windows 10 may offer you the best of
both worlds: You can stay on the full-screen Start menu for quick, on-the-go
browsing. And when work beckons, you can head for the desktop, where your
traditional Windows programs await.
»» If you’re sitting at a desktop PC, Windows 10 should automatically open to the
desktop. Windows 10 tablets usually open to a full-screen Start menu.
»» If Windows 10 doesn’t open to the mode you prefer, click the Action Center
icon (shown in the margin) found on the taskbar at the bottom of the screen;
when the Action Center pane appears, click the Tablet mode toggle button.
Your Start menu should quickly return to its proper size.
»» Microsoft’s game console, the Xbox One, runs in Tablet mode. The Xbox One’s
game controller serves as your finger, letting you move from tile to tile by
pressing the controller’s arrow keys. (If you’ve attached a Kinect controller, you
can control the Xbox One with your hands, as well.)
»» I explain the new Windows 10 Start menu in Chapter 2; the Windows desktop
awaits your attention in Chapter 3.
Why Does Windows 10 Keep Changing?
Microsoft calls Windows 10 a service rather than an operating system. Like any
other service, it’s subject to changes. Every month or two, Microsoft changes
Windows 10 slightly. Some of Microsoft’s changes occur more quickly: Your apps,
for example, can update weekly. Some update daily.
Other changes arrive packed into large groups. For example, Microsoft released a
large update in November 2015, that changed Windows 10 in a variety of ways. An
update in mid 2016 called the Anniversary Update changed Windows yet again.
(This edition of the book includes all of those updates.)
You may not notice any changes made by the updates. Indeed, most of them just
fix hundreds of annoying bugs, making Windows 10 run and install more smoothly.
CHAPTER 1 What Is Windows 10?
17
But if you’re curious, here are some visible ways that Microsoft has changed
­Windows 10 since its release in late July 2015:
»» Microsoft’s Edge browser now remembers your Favorites, Reading list items,
and settings. It stores them with your Microsoft account, along with your
other settings. When you sign into another Windows PC, tablet, or phone,
Edge will behave just like it did on your old PC.
»» Before the update, Windows 10 painted white across every window’s title bar.
That sea of white title bars made it difficult to find your active window at a
glance. Now you can splash an accent color on the title bars by clicking the
Start menu, choosing Settings, and clicking Personalization. In the Colors
section, click the toggle called Show Color on Start Taskbar, Action Center and
Title Bar.
»» You can install apps to a memory card, a boon for owners of small tablets with
limited memory.
»» Windows 10 includes several new apps: Messaging, Phone, and Skype Video.
Each one includes access to Skype, a system that lets you make voice and
video calls over the Internet.
»» Once limited to Microsoft account holders, Cortana now works with local
accounts, as well. While reading your mail, Cortana can remind you of
upcoming movies and shows, even offering to book you a ride to the event.
Cortana also lets you search within PDF files, too, letting you highlight words
or phrases, right-clicking and choosing Ask Cortana for more information.
Microsoft sends these updates automatically to your computer through Windows
Update; you don’t need to jump through hoops to find and install them.
Your apps update themselves automatically through the Windows Store. That’s
why the Music app automatically changed its name to the Groove Music app, for
example. The Photos app suddenly added a way to search your photos by folder.
So, when something suddenly changes with Windows 10, don’t think it’s your
fault. Microsoft constantly changes Windows 10, and Windows will keep changing
for years to come.
Can My Current PC Still Run Windows 10?
If you want to upgrade to Windows 10, your computer probably won’t complain.
Windows 10 should run without problem on any PC currently running Windows 7,
8, or 8.1.
18
PART 1 Windows 10 Stuff Everybody Thinks You Already Know
If your PC runs Windows Vista or Windows XP, it may still run Windows 10, but
not very well. I don’t recommend it.
If you have a technogeek in your family, have him or her translate Table 1-1, which
shows the Windows 10 hardware requirements you can find written in the fineprint for new computers.
In common language, Table 1-1 simply says that nearly any computer sold in the
past five years can be upgraded to Windows 10 with little problem.
TABLE 1-1
The Windows 10 Hardware Requirements
Architecture
x86 (32-bit)
Processor
x86 (64-bit)
1 GHz or faster
Memory (RAM)
At least 1GB
At least 2GB
Graphics Card
DirectX 9 graphics device with Windows Display Driver
Model (WDDM) driver
HDD free space
At least 16GB
Firmware
Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) 2.3.1 with
secure boot enabled
At least 20GB
Windows 10 runs nearly any program that runs on Windows Vista, Windows 7,
Windows 8, and Windows 8.1. It even runs some Windows XP programs as well.
Some older programs, however, won’t work, including older games and most
security-based programs, such as antivirus, firewall, and security suites. You’ll
need to contact the program’s manufacturer for an upgraded version.
Don’t know what version of Windows runs on your current PC? If clicking the
Start button brings a Start menu, right-click the menu’s Computer entry, and
choose Properties. The screen that appears lists your Windows version.
If there’s no Start button, you’re running Windows 8. And if clicking your Start
button fills the screen with a bunch of colorful tiles, you’re running Windows 8.1.
The Different Flavors of Windows 10
Microsoft offers several different versions of Windows 10, but you’ll probably
want only one: the aptly titled “Home” version.
CHAPTER 1 What Is Windows 10?
19
Small businesses will choose Windows 10 Pro, and larger businesses will want
Windows 10 Enterprise.
Here are some guidelines for choosing the version you need:
»» If you’ll be using your PC at home or small business, pick up Windows Home.
»» If you need to connect to a domain through a work network — and you’ll
know if you’re doing it — you want Windows Pro.
»» If you’re a computer tech who works for businesses, go ahead and argue with
your boss over whether you need Windows Pro or Windows Enterprise. The
boss will make the decision based on whether it’s a small company (Windows
Pro) or a large company (Windows Enterprise).
For more details about upgrading to Windows 10, visit Microsoft’s Windows
­website at www.windows.com.
20
PART 1 Windows 10 Stuff Everybody Thinks You Already Know
IN THIS CHAPTER
Starting Windows
Signing in to Windows
Understanding the Start menu
Switching among apps
Seeing all your apps and programs
Customizing the Start menu
Turning off your computer
Chapter 2
Starting with the
Start Menu
F
irst, the big news: Windows 10 brings back the Start menu! Now the bad
news: The new Start menu doesn’t look much like the Start menu in your
earlier version of Windows. In fact, it doesn’t even look like Windows 10’s
original Start menu from last year.
The basic mechanics remain the same, though. Click the Start button in the
screen’s bottom-left corner, and the Start menu rises, listing the apps and programs installed on your PC. Click an app or program, and it leaps to the screen,
ready for action.
In this chapter, I explain how to figure out this odd, shape-shifting Start menu.
On touchscreen tablets, the Start menu fills the entire screen. Its large tiles make
them easy to tap with your fingertips. On a desktop computer, however, the Start
menu retreats to a corner of the screen, where you can click its tiny buttons and
menus with your mouse pointer.
CHAPTER 2 Starting with the Start Menu
21
Whether you’re using a tablet or desktop PC, this chapter shows how to make the
Start menu do its main job: launch your apps and programs.
If you’re using a touchscreen computer, substitute the word tap when you read the
word click. Tapping twice works like double-clicking. And when you see the term
right-click, touch and hold your finger on the glass; lift your finger when the rightclick menu appears.
Being Welcomed to the World of Windows
Starting Windows is as easy as turning on your computer — Windows leaps onto
the screen automatically with a flourish. But before you can begin working,
­Windows stops you cold: It displays a locked screen, shown in Figure 2-1, with no
entrance key dangling nearby.
FIGURE 2-1: To move past this
lock screen, press
a key on the
keyboard or drag
up on the screen
with your mouse
or finger.
Introduced back in Windows 8, the lock screen appears before you can sign into
your computer with your account name and password.
22
PART 1 Windows 10 Stuff Everybody Thinks You Already Know
How do you unlock the lock screen? The answer depends on whether you’re using
a mouse, keyboard, or touchscreen:
»» Mouse: On a desktop PC or laptop, click any mouse button.
»» Keyboard: Press any key, and the lock screen slides away. Easy!
»» Touch: Touch the screen with your finger and then slide your finger up the
glass. A quick flick of the finger will do.
When you’re in the door, Windows wants you to sign in, as shown in Figure 2-2,
by clicking your name and typing in a password.
FIGURE 2-2: Click your user
account name
and then type
your password on
the next screen.
I’ve customized my lock screen and Sign In screen. Yours will look different. When
facing the Sign In screen, you have several options:
»» If you see your name or email address listed, type your password.
Windows lets you in and displays your Start menu, just as you last left it.
»» If you don’t see your name, but you have an account on the computer,
look in the screen’s bottom-left corner. There, Windows displays a list of all
the account holders. You may see the computer owner’s name.
CHAPTER 2 Starting with the Start Menu
23
»» If you bought a new computer, use the account you created when
turning on your computer for the first time. As part of its setup process,
Windows guides you through creating an account on your computer.
»» No account? Then find out who owns the computer and beg that person to
set up an account for you.
If you need more information about user accounts, including creating new ones
and managing old ones, flip ahead to Chapter 14.
Don’t want to sign in at the Sign In screen? Two of the screen’s bottom-corner
buttons offer these other options:
»» The little wheelchair-shaped button, shown in Figure 2-2 and the margin,
customizes Windows for people with physical challenges in hearing, sight, or
manual dexterity, all covered in Chapter 12. If you choose this button by
mistake, click or touch on a different part of the screen to avoid changing
any settings.
»» The little round button, shown in Figure 2-2 and the margin, lets you shut
down or restart your PC, as well as put it to sleep — a power-saving state that
quickly awakes. (If you’ve accidentally clicked the button and shut down your
PC, don’t panic. Press the power button on your PC’s case, and your PC
returns to this screen.)
Even while locked, as shown earlier in Figure 2-1, your computer’s screen displays
current information in its bottom-left corner. Depending on how your PC is configured, you can see the time and date; your wireless Internet signal strength (the
more radio waves in the icon, the better your connection); battery strength (the
more colorful the icon, the better); your next scheduled appointment; a count of
unread email; and other items.
Understanding user accounts
Windows allows several people to work on the same computer, yet it keeps
­everybody’s work separate. To do that, it needs to know who’s currently sitting in
front of the keyboard. When you sign in — introduce yourself — by clicking your
username and typing your password, as shown in Figure 2-2, the Windows Start
menu and desktop appear as you just left them, ready for you to make your own
personalized mess.
When you’re through working or just feel like taking a break, sign out (explained
at this chapter’s end) so that somebody else can use the computer. Later, when
you sign back in, your own files will be waiting for you.
24
PART 1 Windows 10 Stuff Everybody Thinks You Already Know
Although you may turn your work area into a mess, it’s your own mess. When you
return to the computer, your letters will be just as you saved them. Jerry hasn’t
accidentally deleted your files or folders while playing Words with Friends. Tina’s
Start menu still contains links to her favorite scrapbooking websites. And nobody
will be able to read your email.
Until you customize your username picture, you’ll be a silhouette, like the account
listed in the bottom-left corner of Figure 2-2. To add a photo to your user account,
click the Expand icon (shown in the margin) in the Start menu’s upper-left corner. Then click your username in the column that appears, and choose Change
Account Settings from the pop-up menu. When the Settings menu’s Your Info
section appears, click the Camera icon to take a quick shot with your computer’s
built-in camera. Still wearing your pajamas? Then choose the Browse For One link
to choose a photo already stored in your Pictures folder
Keeping your account private
with a password
Because Windows lets many people use the same computer, how do you stop
Diane from reading Rob’s love letters to Miley Cyrus? How can Grace keep Josh
from deleting her Star Wars movie trailers? Using a password solves some of those
problems.
In fact, a password is more important than ever in Windows 10 because some
accounts can be tied to a credit card. By typing a secret password when signing in,
you enable your computer to recognize you and nobody else. If you protect your
username with a password, nobody can access your files. And nobody can rack up
charges for computer games while you’re away from home.
Also, if your computer is ever stolen, a password keeps the thieves from logging
onto your account and connecting to any websites with your account.
To set up or change the password on your account, follow these steps:
1.
Click the Start button and then click the Settings icon.
When the Start menu appears, click the Settings icon near the menu’s bottomleft corner. (It’s the little gear directly above the Power icon.) The Settings app
appears.
2.
Click the Accounts icon (shown in the margin). When the Accounts pane
appears, click the words Sign-in Options along the pane’s left edge.
Options for signing into your computer appear on the right.
CHAPTER 2 Starting with the Start Menu
25
3.
From the Password section on the app’s right side, click the Change
button, shown in Figure 2-3. Don’t have a password? Click the Add button
instead.
You may need to type your existing password to gain entrance.
FIGURE 2-3: Click the
Password
section’s Change
button.
4.
Type a password that will be easy to remember.
Choose something like the name of your favorite vegetable, for example, or
your dental floss brand. To beef up its security level, capitalize some letters and
embed a number or two in the password, like TurnipsR4Me or Floss2BKleen.
(Don’t use these exact two examples, though, because they’ve probably been
added to every password cracker’s arsenal by now.)
5.
6.
If asked, type that same password into the Retype Password text box so
Windows knows you’re spelling it correctly.
In the Password Hint box, type a hint that reminds you — and only
you — of your password.
Windows won’t let you type in your exact password as a hint. You have to be a
bit more creative.
7.
Click the Next button and click Finish.
Do you suspect you’ve botched something during this process? Click Cancel to
return to Step 3 and either start over or exit.
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PART 1 Windows 10 Stuff Everybody Thinks You Already Know
After you’ve created the password, Windows begins asking for your password
whenever you sign in.
»» Passwords are case-sensitive. The words Caviar and caviar are considered two
different passwords.
»» Afraid that you’ll forget your password someday? Protect yourself now: Flip
ahead to Chapter 14, where I describe how to make a Password Reset Disk,
which is a special way of resetting forgotten passwords for local accounts. (You
can reset a lost Microsoft account password online at http://live.com.)
»» When you change your Microsoft account password on your PC, you also
change it on your Windows phone, your Xbox, and every other device where
you sign in with a Microsoft account. (I cover Microsoft accounts in this
chapter’s next section.)
»» Windows also allows you to create a picture password in Step 4, where you
drag a finger or mouse over a photo in a certain sequence. Then, instead of
entering a password, you redraw that sequence on the sign-in picture. (Picture
passwords work much better on touchscreen tablets than desktop monitors.)
»» Another option in Step 4 is Create a PIN. A PIN is a four-or-more character
code like the ones you punch into Automated Teller Machines (ATMs). The
disadvantage of a PIN? There’s no password hint. Unlike Microsoft accounts,
your PIN only works on the computer where it was created.
»» Tired of constantly entering your password? Connect a Windows 10 compat-
ible fingerprint reader or camera to your PC. (Some laptops, tablets, and
keyboards have them built in.) Your computer quickly lets you in after you
either scan your fingertip or gaze into your PC’s camera. I describe how to sign
in with Windows Hello in Chapter 14.
»» Forgotten your password already? When you type a password that doesn’t
work, Windows automatically displays your hint (if you created one) which
should help to remind you of your password. Careful, though — anybody can
read your hint, so make sure that it’s something that makes sense only to you.
As a last resort, insert your Password Reset Disk, a job I cover in Chapter 14.
I explain lots more about user accounts in Chapter 14.
Signing up for a Microsoft account
Whether you’re signing in to Windows for the first time, trying to access some
apps, or just trying to change a setting, you’ll eventually see a screen similar to
the one in Figure 2-4.
CHAPTER 2 Starting with the Start Menu
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FIGURE 2-4: You need a
Microsoft account
to access many
Windows
features.
You can sign in to your computer with either a Microsoft account or a Local account.
Although a Microsoft account makes Windows much easier to work with, each
type of account serves different needs:
»» Local account: This account works fine for people using traditional Windows
programs on the Windows desktop. However, Local account holders can’t
store files on OneDrive. They can’t download apps from the Windows
Store, either.
»» Microsoft account: Required to access many of Microsoft’s services, this
consists of simply an email address and a password. Microsoft account
holders can store files on the Internet with OneDrive, download apps from the
Windows Store, and monitor their children’s online activities.
You can sign in with a Microsoft account in one of two ways, ranked according to
simplicity:
»» Use an existing Microsoft account. If you already have an account with
Hotmail, MSN, Xbox Live, Outlook.com, or Windows Messenger, you already
have a Microsoft account and password. Type in that email address and
password at the screen shown in Figure 2-4, and then click the Sign In button.
»» Sign up for a new Microsoft account. Click the words Microsoft Account,
shown in Figure 2-4. Click the Create One! link, and Microsoft takes you to a
website where you can create your own Microsoft account. You can use any
email address for a Microsoft account. You simply enter that email address,
create a new password to go with it, and wham: You’ve created a Microsoft
account.
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PART 1 Windows 10 Stuff Everybody Thinks You Already Know
If you’re signing into Windows on a newly purchased computer for the first time
and don’t want a Microsoft account, click the words Skip This Step near a screen’s
bottom, left corner. On the next screen, Windows 10 walks you through creating a
Local account, which is limited to your own computer.
But until you sign in with a Microsoft account, the nag screen in Figure 2-4 will
haunt you whenever you try to access a Windows feature that requires a Microsoft
account. (I explain how to convert a Local account into a Microsoft account in
Chapter 14.)
When you first sign into your new account, Windows may ask whether you want
to find other PCs, devices, and content on your network. If you’re using a home or
work network, click the Yes button. (That lets you print to network printers, as
well as share files with other networked computers.) If you’re connecting to a
public network, perhaps at a hotel, coffee shop, or airport, click the No button.
Figuring Out the New Windows 10
Start Menu
In Windows, everything starts with the Start button and its Start menu. Whether
you’re ready to blow up spaceships, do your taxes, or read the news, you start by
clicking the Start button in the screen’s bottom-left corner: The Start menu leaps
up with a list of your apps and programs.
In theory, you spot the name or tile for your desired app or program and click it;
the app launches, and you’re off to work. In reality, it’s a little more confusing.
On a desktop PC, for example, the Start menu’s right edge is filled with a row of
tiles, shown in Figure 2-5. Each tile represents an app (a small program designed
mainly for touchscreens). On the left edge, the menu lists your most recently
accessed apps and programs, as well as frequently accessed places on your PC.
Recently updated in Windows 10, the desktop PC’s Start menu now sports a strip
of five unlabeled icons along its left edge:
»» Expand: A click on this icon reveals the labels of the mysterious icons I’m
describing now.
»» User Account: This icon looks like your user account picture. Click it to change
your account’s settings to lock your PC to prevent access while you leave your
desk, or to sign out of your account.
CHAPTER 2 Starting with the Start Menu
29
FIGURE 2-5: A desktop PC’s
Start menu stays
in the screen’s
bottom-left
corner.
»» File Explorer: A quick click on this folder icon jumps to the desktop and opens
File Explorer for you to browser your files.
»» Settings: Clicking this little gear icon takes you quickly to the Settings app
(formerly known as the PC Settings app) for changing how your PC behaves.
»» Power: When you’re through working, click this to put your computer to sleep,
shut it down, or restart it (handy when it’s misbehaving).
The Start menu changes drastically when switched to Tablet mode, commonly used
on tablet PCs. The Start menu’s tiles fill the entire screen, shown in Figure 2-6.
The menu also hides the left pane shown earlier in Figure 2-5.
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PART 1 Windows 10 Stuff Everybody Thinks You Already Know
FIGURE 2-6: A tablet’s Start
menu fills the
entire screen with
easy-to-touch
buttons.
»» Expand: Just as when in desktop mode, a click on this icon reveals labels for
other icons along the screen’s left edge.
»» Pinned Tiles: The default option, this displays the Start menu’s tiles across the
entire screen.
»» All Apps: Can’t find a favorite app? Click this to see an alphabetical list of all of
your installed apps and programs.
Despite the Start menu’s latest remodel, it still offers a way to start programs;
adjust Windows settings; find help for sticky situations; or, thankfully, shut down
Windows and get away from the computer for a while.
The tiles along the Start menu’s right edge may be new, but they’re not mere
visual baggage. For example, the Calendar tile constantly updates to show the
current date and day, as well as your next appointment. The Mail tile cycles
through the first words of your latest emails.
Your Start menu will change as you add more programs and apps to your computer. That’s why the Start menu on your friend’s computer, as well as in this
book, is probably arranged differently than your computer’s Start menu. And if
the tiles don’t meet your needs, you can remove them completely, as I describe
later in this chapter.
CHAPTER 2 Starting with the Start Menu
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WHERE’S THE CHARMS BAR?
Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 sported a hidden menu called a Charms bar that popped
into view alongside the screen’s right edge. The Charms bar offered handy menus for
sharing what you’re seeing, adding a new device, searching for something, or changing
your currently viewed app’s settings.
Windows 10 removed the Charms bar. But because some older apps still rely on it, the
Charms bar’s commands are still available by tapping the App menu, which you can
access by clicking those three little lines or dots in an older app’s upper corner. (If the
app fills the screen, right-click inside it or slide your finger down from the screen’s top
edge to reveal the App menu.) With a touch of that little three-lined icon, the App menu
drops down to offer Windows 8-era options like these, including some former Charms
bar options:
• App Commands: Tap this to fetch the app’s menu bar, which lists options for controlling your app.
• Search: This brings up the app’s Search box. Type your search term in the box, and
Windows searches for it, displaying the results.
• Share: This fetches options for sharing what’s currently on your screen. (Not all
apps support this feature, however.)
• Print: Choose this to send your current screen’s information to your printer, which
I cover in Chapter 8.
• Settings: Unlike the Charms bar’s Settings icon, which controlled your entire com-
puter’s settings, this area brings up settings for your currently open app. (To change
your PC’s settings, click the Start button and then choose Settings.)
Try the following tricks to make the Start menu feel a little more like home:
»» To launch a program or app, click or tap its name or tile. The program leaps to
the screen.
»» Keyboard fans can fetch the Start menu by pressing the
key on their
keyboard.
»» Were you unable to spot your desired program or app listed on the Start
menu? Then scroll down the list of alphabetically sorted apps. (I describe how
to scroll down lists in Chapter 4.)
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PART 1 Windows 10 Stuff Everybody Thinks You Already Know