Sample Content from Windows Vista Step by Step

™
Windows Vista
Step by Step
Joan Preppernau and
Joyce Cox
To learn more about this book, visit Microsoft Learning at
http://www.microsoft.com/MSPress/books/9362.aspx
9780735622692
Publication Date: December 2006
Contents
About the Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Introducing Windows Vista . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
Windows Vista Editions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii
Let’s Get Started! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi
The Microsoft Business Certification Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Information for New Computer Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi
Using Your Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxii
Working with Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xxiii
Giving Instructions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xxiv
Message Boxes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv
Features and Conventions of This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvii
Using the Book’s CD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxix
What’s on the CD?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xxix
Minimum System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxxii
Installing the Practice Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xxxiv
Using the Practice Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxxv
Removing and Uninstalling the Practice Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxxvi
Getting Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxxvii
Getting Help with This Book and Its Companion CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxxvii
Getting Help with Windows Vista. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxxvii
Quick Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxxix
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iii
iv
Contents
1
Getting Started with Windows Vista
1
Sidebar: Upgrading to Windows Vista . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Logging On to Windows Vista . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Sidebar: Networks, Domains, and Workgroups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Activating Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Sidebar: Identifying Genuine Windows Software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Sidebar: The Perils of Piracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Updating Windows System Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Sidebar: Switching Quickly Among Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Ending a Computing Session. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Making Your Computer Easier to Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Keyboard Shortcuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
2
Working Efficiently in Windows Vista
27
Finding Your Way Around the Windows Desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Using and Modifying the Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Finding Your Way Around Your Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Using and Modifying the Taskbar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Creating Shortcuts to Files, Folders, and Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Rearranging and Deleting Items on the Desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Keyboard Shortcuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
3
Working with Folders and Files
61
Navigating to Folders and Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Sidebar: Accessing Your Entire Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Viewing Folders and Files in Different Ways. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Viewing Information About a Folder or File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Creating, Renaming, and Deleting Folders and Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Moving and Copying Folders and Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Finding Specific Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94
Keyboard Shortcuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Contents
4
Personalizing Windows Vista
v
97
Changing the Look of Windows Vista on Your Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Optimizing Visual Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Changing the Desktop Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
Selecting and Managing a Screen Saver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Managing Your System Date and Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Changing Your Computer’s Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Sidebar: Changing the Name of the Computer Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Keyboard Shortcuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
5
Installing and Configuring Devices
123
Sidebar: Need More Ports? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
Displaying More on Your Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126
Configuring Your System for Multiple Monitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Sidebar: Expanding Your Laptop with Peripheral Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Changing the Way Your Mouse Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Changing the Keyboard Input Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136
Configuring Tablet PC Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Installing and Sharing a Local Printer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Connecting to a Remote Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154
Sidebar: Updating Device Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156
Setting Up Speakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157
Setting Up a Microphone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160
Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
Keyboard Shortcuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
vi
Contents
6
Safely and Efficiently Accessing the Internet
165
Connecting to the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Displaying Web Sites in Internet Explorer 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Sidebar: Protecting Personal Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Blocking Pop-Up Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Changing Your Home Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Changing the Appearance of Web Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Finding, Saving, and Returning to Web Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182
Printing Web Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .185
Sending Web Pages and Links to Other People. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188
Discovering and Subscribing to RSS Feeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .190
Restricting Objectionable Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .193
Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198
Keyboard Shortcuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199
7
Working with Programs
201
Installing and Removing Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202
Starting Programs Automatically . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207
Specifying the Default Program for a Type of File. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
Sidebar: Changing Your Default Middleware Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212
Using the Programs That Come with Windows Vista . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Sidebar: Playing Games . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .220
Using and Modifying Sidebar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .223
Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229
Keyboard Shortcuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229
8
Making Connections
231
Connecting Your Computer to a Workgroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232
Connecting to a Domain from Another Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .235
Sidebar: Creating an Ad Hoc Wireless Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .240
Connecting Your Computer to a Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
Accessing Your Domain Computer Remotely . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .244
Sidebar: Storing and Managing Network Passwords. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
Sharing Drives and Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250
Sidebar: Restricting Permission to a Shared Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Keyboard Shortcuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Contents
9
Working with Digital Media
vii
255
Viewing and Cataloging Pictures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .256
Sidebar: Retrieving Images from a Digital Camera or Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . .262
Playing Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .263
Configuring Windows Media Center Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269
Burning Audio and Data Discs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272
Sharing Pictures and Other Digital Media Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .275
Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .277
Keyboard Shortcuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .278
10
Managing Computer Security
281
Administering Windows User Accounts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .282
Managing Your Windows User Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .287
Sidebar: Backing Up Your Windows Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .290
Limiting Access to the Computer, to Programs, and to the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . .291
Analyzing Your Computer’s Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .294
Configuring Internet Security Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .302
Sidebar: Protecting Yourself from Phishing Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .308
Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .309
Keyboard Shortcuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .309
11
Optimizing Your Computer System
311
Improving Your Computer’s Performance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .312
Turning Windows Features On and Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
Managing Cached Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
Removing Unnecessary Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .322
Consolidating Files on Your Hard Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .327
Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .329
Keyboard Shortcuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .329
viii
Contents
12
Identifying and Solving Problems
331
Finding Solutions to Common Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332
Sidebar: Reporting Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .336
Finding Information Through a Newsgroup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337
Sidebar: Getting Help from Microsoft Product Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .338
Getting Help from Other Windows Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .338
Backing Up and Restoring Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .342
Sidebar: Enabling and Disabling Remote Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .343
Restoring Your Operating System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .350
Transferring Software, Settings, and Files to Another Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .354
Key Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .356
Keyboard Shortcuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .356
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357
Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367
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Chapter at a Glance
Make your
computer
easier to use,
page 21
End a computing
session, page 18
Update Windows
system files, page 12
1
Getting Started
with Windows Vista
In this chapter, you will learn to:
Log on to Windows Vista.
Activate Windows.
Update Windows system files.
End a computing session.
Make your computer easier to use.
Each time you turn on your computer, it goes through a process of starting up (also called
booting) during which it loads the system files necessary for you to interact with your
computer and for your computer to interact with other devices. After the startup process
completes, you log on to your Windows Vista user account—a package of permissions and
preferences (recorded in a user profile) in accordance with which Windows Vista presents
an individually tailored working environment (or user interface). If your computer is part of
a domain, logging on to Windows Vista also logs you on to the domain. The process might
sound somewhat complicated, but in actual practice, it is quite simple.
The first time you log on to Windows Vista, it is a very good idea to check for and install
any available system updates. Then you can be sure that your computer system includes
the most current features, tools, and security precautions by instructing Windows to update itself whenever necessary. You might also want to adapt Windows Vista to make its
features easier for you to use or to make the on-screen elements easier to see.
When you finish working with your computer, you can either shut down the computer
entirely, or you can leave it in running in various ways. For example, you can log off from
Windows Vista, lock the computer, or put the computer into sleep mode to conserve
resources.
In this chapter, you will log on to Windows Vista and if necessary, activate it. You will ensure
that any available system updates are installed on your computer and that Windows Vista
is configured to keep itself up to date by automatically checking for, downloading, and
1
2
Chapter 1
Getting Started with Windows Vista
installing any available security and performance updates. Then you will explore different
methods of logging off and shutting down your computer. We end with a discussion of the
many accessibility features available as part of the Windows Vista operating system.
See Also Do you need only a quick refresher on the topics in this chapter? See the Quick
Reference entries on pages xxxix–lxxiii.
Important No practice files are required to complete the exercises in this chapter. For
more information about practice files, see “Using the Book’s CD” on page xxix.
For all the exercises, Windows Vista must already be installed on your computer and
you must know your user name and password (if your user account requires one).
Upgrading to Windows Vista
Upgrading is the process of updating your computer’s operating system to a newer
version, without disturbing the programs installed on your computer, your personal
preferences and settings, or existing information, such as documents, spreadsheets,
and data files. You can upgrade to Windows Vista from Microsoft Windows XP. You
might be able to upgrade from a computer running an earlier version of Windows,
but most computers purchased more than two years ago probably won’t meet the
Windows Vista hardware requirements.
Although upgrading to Windows Vista should not affect your personal files and
settings, it is always a good policy to back up important files before upgrading.
The time and effort it takes to back up files and settings will likely be far less
than the time and effort required to re-create the same information.
See Also For information about backing up files and settings in Windows XP, refer to
Microsoft Windows XP Step by Step (ISBN 0-7356-2114-4) by Online Training Solutions,
Inc. (Microsoft Press, 2005) or consult Windows Help And Support.
If you have questions or concerns about whether you can upgrade your existing computer to Windows Vista, you can download the Windows Vista Upgrade Advisor from
www.microsoft.com/windowsvista/getready/upgradeadvisor/
After installing the program on your computer, you can run it to generate a list
of any known compatibility issues with your computer and the peripheral devices
connected to it. The Upgrade Advisor can recommend solutions for fixing some
issues and also provides information about which edition of Windows Vista best fits
the way you plan to use your computer.
Logging On to Windows Vista
3
Whether you have purchased a new computer with the Windows Vista operating system
already installed on it or you have upgraded your computer’s operating system from an
earlier version of Microsoft Windows, this chapter will help you quickly get started doing
useful work.
See Also For information about the different editions of the Windows Vista operating system
and how they are addressed in this book, see “Introducing Windows Vista” earlier in this book.
Logging On to Windows Vista
Your computer might be used by only you, or it might be used by several people. If only
you use your computer, it needs only one configuration, or user account. If other people
use your computer, each person logs on with his or her own account. By using separate
accounts, each person can set up the Windows Vista environment the way she or he
wants it, without interfering with another person’s computing experience. Each account
is associated with a user profile that describes the way the computer environment looks
and operates for that particular user. This information includes simple things such as the
color scheme, desktop background, fonts, and program shortcuts, and personal information that you want to keep confidential, such as saved passwords, site-specific cookies,
links to favorite sites and folders, and your Internet browsing history. Each user profile
includes a personal folder not accessible by other people using the computer, in which
you can store documents, pictures, media, and other files you want to keep private.
Important In the high-tech world, people who use computers are referred to collectively
as users. Although we use that rather impersonal term throughout this book, we never forget
that users are people too!
Each user account is designated as either an administrator account or a standard account. The first user account created on your computer is automatically an administrator
account—every computer must have at least one—so if you are the first person using
the computer you are probably operating as an administrator.
See Also For information about standard and administrator accounts and why it is more
secure to operate as a standard user, see “Administering Windows User Accounts” in Chapter
10, “Managing Computer Security.”
The process of starting a computer session is called logging on. When you start the
computer, Windows displays a Welcome screen containing links to each of the computer’s active user accounts. (If your computer is part of a domain, you will need to press
Ctrl+Alt+Delete to display the Welcome screen.) You select your user account and, if your
account is password protected, enter your password to log on to the computer. When
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logging on to a computer that is part of a domain, you will always enter your domain
credentials.
Networks, Domains, and Workgroups
A network is a physical group of computers that communicate with each other
through a wired or wireless connection. A network can be as small as two computers
connected by a cable, or as large as the Internet. For the purpose of simplifying the
process of authorizing access to networked resources, computers on a network are
grouped in one of two ways:
A domain is a logical (rather than physical) group of resources—computers,
—computers,
servers, and other hardware devices—on a network, that are centrally administered through Microsoft Windows Server. Computers and users can connect to
a domain—a computer connecting to the domain and validated by a machine
accountt is visible as a domain resource; and a person logging on to the domain
with a user accountt can access domain resources, from whatever computer she
or he is working on. With the appropriate permissions, a domain user can connect to the computer of another domain user by entering the computer’s UNC
(Universal Naming Convention) address.
A workgroup is a logical group of computers that is not centrally administered
but communicates through a network. Individual users do not log on to a
workgroup.
See Also For information about connecting your computer to a domain or workgroup,
see Chapter 8, “Making Connections.”
If you are not working on a domain and you enter your user account password incorrectly, Windows displays your password hint. If you still can’t remember the password,
all is not lost. If you have taken the time to create a password reset disk, you can reset
the password by clicking the Reset Password link and then following the instructions
given by the Password Reset wizard. If you are working on a domain and you experience password problems, you will have to seek the help of your network administrator.
See Also For information about password reset disks, see the sidebar “Backing Up Your
Windows Password” in Chapter 10, “Managing Computer Security.”
After you log on, Windows Vista loads your user profile and then displays your personalized working environment. The first time you log on to a computer, Windows also
prepares your desktop, which takes a few extra seconds.
Logging On to Windows Vista
5
In this exercise, you will log on to a computer running Windows Vista. There are no
practice files for this exercise.
See Also If you are new to computing, see the section “Information for New Computer Users”
at the beginning of this book for an explanation of basic terminology you will encounter
throughout this book.
BE SURE TO know your user account name and password (if your account is password
protected) before beginning this exercise.
1. Start your computer. Then if you see the message Press CTRL+ALT+DELETE or use
the Windows Security button to log on, press H+J+A to start the process of
logging on to a domain.
After the computer starts, the Welcome screen appears, displaying the names and
pictures associated with all active user accounts.
Troubleshooting Certain editions of Windows Vista might bypass the Welcome
screen when only one user account is active on your computer and that account is not
password protected.
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2. If multiple user accounts are available, point to each in turn.
A glow effect enhances each picture as you point to it.
3. Click your user account name or the associated picture.
See Also For information about changing your account picture, see “Managing Your
Windows User Account” in Chapter 10, “Managing Computer Security.”
4. If your account is password protected, type your password in the Password box,
and then click the Go button or press F to continue.
Go
Your Windows Vista desktop appears. The Welcome Center opens, and the
Windows Sidebar appears at the right side of the screen.
Windows Sidebar
Quick Launch toolbar
Start button
Taskbar
Desktop
Notification area
Activating Windows
7
Troubleshooting Some editions of Windows Vista do not automatically display the
Windows Sidebar. For information about displaying and working with this useful and fun
new feature, see “Using and Modifying Sidebar” in Chapter 7, “Working with Programs.”
The manufacturer will probably have set a brand-specific desktop on any new computers you purchase with Windows Vista already installed. When you install Windows Vista
yourself, you have the choice of several photographic desktop backgrounds. The default
Windows Vista desktop background for new user accounts displays a picturesque scene
of a lake and mountains. You can change this to one of the many beautiful photographs
or artistic renderings that comes with Windows Vista, to a blank colored background, or
to one of your own photos or graphics.
See Also For information about desktop background options, see “Changing the Desktop
Background” in Chapter 4,”Personalizing Windows Vista.”
Don’t confuse the Welcome Center with the Welcome screen—they are similarly named,
but completely different. The top section of the Welcome Center displays information
specific to your computer; clicking Show More Details displays the System window and
information about your computer hardware, network settings, and licensing. The middle
section includes links to basic computer administration options, and the bottom section includes links to training, services, add-ins, and other offers from Microsoft. Clicking
Show All in either of these two sections displays additional links. The Welcome Center
opens each time you log on to a new Windows Vista session; if you would prefer not to
see it, clear the Run At Startup check box in the lower-left corner of the Welcome Center.
See Also For detailed information about the elements of the Windows Vista desktop, see
Chapter 2, “Working Efficiently in Windows Vista.”
Activating Windows
When you upgrade your computer’s operating system to Windows Vista, or the first
time you start a new computer on which Windows Vista has been installed by the
original equipment manufacturer (OEM), you are prompted to activate your copy of
Windows.
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Each copy of Windows Vista must be activated within 30 days of the first use. After that
grace period expires, you will not be able to use all the functions of Windows. You can
activate Windows over the Internet or by telephone, or it will activate itself after a few
days, if you have an active Internet connection. You don’t have to give any personal information about yourself or your computer during the activation process.
The goal of Windows Product Activation is to reduce a form of software piracy known
as casual copying or softlifting, which is the sharing of software in a way that infringes on
the software’s license terms.
In this exercise, you will check whether Windows Vista has been activated, and manually
activate it if necessary. There are no practice files for this exercise.
BE SURE TO log on to Windows before beginning this exercise.
1. At the left end of the taskbar, click the Start button.
Start
The Start menu opens.
Activating Windows
9
A link to your personal folder, labeled with your user name, appears in the upperright corner of the menu. The appearance of the Start menu will vary depending
on the programs installed on your computer and any previous computing activities.
2. On the Start menu, click Control Panel. Then in Control Panel, click System and
Maintenance.
You can access all the Windows Vista tools and settings by navigating through the
Control Panel feature groups.
See Also For information about navigating through Windows Vista, see “Finding Your
Way Around Your Computer” in Chapter 2, “Working Efficiently in Windows Vista,” and
“Navigating to Folders and Files” in Chapter 3, “Working with Folders and Files.”
3. In the System and Maintenance window, click System.
The System window provides current information about your computer system.
If your copy of Windows has been activated, “Windows is activated” appears in
the Windows Activation area at the bottom of the window. Otherwise, the time
remaining in the grace period appears. A Windows security icon appears to the
left of the activation information to indicate that the action requires administrator
permission.
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4. If Windows has not yet been activated, in the Windows activation area, click
Activate Windows now.
5. In the User Account Control dialog box, if you are logged on as an administrator,
click Continue. Otherwise, enter an administrator password and then click OK.
See Also For information about User Account Control, see “Introducing Windows Vista”
at the beginning of this book.
The Windows Activation dialog box opens.
6. In the Windows Activation dialog box, click Activate Windows online now.
Activating Windows
Windows Vista connects to the Internet, verifies that your copy of Windows is
genuine, and activates it.
7. In the Windows Activation dialog box, click Close.
Identifying Genuine Windows Software
Counterfeit software floppy disks, CDs, DVDs, and packaging might look the same
as or similar to the authentic software. A genuine individual copy of Windows Vista
(one not acquired with the purchase of a computer or through the Microsoft Volume
Licensing program) is distributed on a holographic CD. Each copy has a Certificate of
Authenticity stickerr on the top of the retail package and an orange product key label
on the installation CD holder. The front of the CD features:
A copper hologram with a clean, wavy outer edge.
A high-resolution, three-dimensional hologram of the Windows logo, in
which the flag appears to wave when you tilt the CD.
A security patch located at the bottom of the CD, in which the word Microsoft
changes to the word GENUINEE when you tilt the CD.
The back of the CD features a detailed hologram on the inner mirror band,
containing the words Microsoftt and GENUINE.
GENUINE.
See Also You can see samples of counterfeited software from around the world at
www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/.
/ To verify whether your copy of Windows
Vista is genuine, run the Windows Validation Assistant from that same location.
Pirated software is often distributed with re-bundled software or through auction
Web sites, spam e-mail messages, and downloads from Web sites other than those
located within the microsoft.com domain. The easiest way to avoid counterfeit
software is to purchase it from a reputable reseller.
11
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The Perils of Piracy
Windows Product Activation is a security measure instituted by Microsoft to help
prevent the use of unlicensed copies of Windows. Software piracy—
—the illegal
reproduction and distribution of software applications—is a multi-billion dollar
industry. A recent Global Software Piracy Study commissioned by the Business
Software Alliance (www.bsa.org) concluded that “thirty-five percent of the packaged software installed on personal computers worldwide in 2005 was illegal,
amounting to $34 billion in global losses due to software piracy.”
The counterfeit software manufacturing industry stifles the potential growth of the
high-tech industry and contributes to loss of tax revenue. Software piracy is also
harmful to its users, for these reasons:
Unlicensed software is not eligible for technical support or product upgrades.
When you attempt to install a product update, security patch, or service pack
from the Microsoft Web site, your system or software is tested to verify
whether it is licensed.
Abuse of software licenses can result in financial penalties and legal costs, as
well as a bad reputation for you or your company. Individual company executives can be held criminally and civilly liable for the copyright infringements
of individuals within their organizations.
Pirated software can contain harmful viruses with the potential to damage
individual computers or entire networks.
Windows Vista has a built-in piracy protection system—if certain conditions alert it
to the possibility that you are running a pirated copy, most Windows Vista functionality will shut down, and you will be able to use only Windows Internet Explorer, for
only one hour at a time. During that hour, you will be able to browse the Internet
and receive security updates, but you won’t be able to create or save any files until
you activate your copy of Windows.
See Also For more information about software piracy, visit www.microsoft.com/piracy/.
www.microsoft.com/piracy//
Updating Windows System Files
When you first upgrade to Windows Vista or purchase a computer with Windows Vista
already installed, the operating system files installed on your computer are the ones available to the manufacturer when your installation media or computer was manufactured.
Updating Windows System Files
13
Over time, Microsoft will undoubtedly release Windows Vista updates, either to provide
additional functionality or to protect your computer from new security threats. It’s important to install these updates as soon as possible after they’re released.
Microsoft Windows Update is a utility that scans your computer, confers with the
Microsoft Update online database, and recommends or installs any updates that are
available for your operating system, your software programs, or your hardware. Quite
apart from knowing that you have the “latest and greatest,” by using Windows Update,
you can be sure that your computer is updated whenever necessary. You can access the
Microsoft Update site at windowsupdate.microsoft.com, as well as from the Start menu,
Control Panel, and Windows Help And Support.
During the update process, Windows Update collects the version numbers of your
operating system, Web browser, and other installed software, as well as information
about the hardware devices that are connected to your computer. It then compiles a
list of updates that are available for your system. Updates are classified as follows:
Critical updates are selected for installation by default. If you do not want to install
a critical update, you can remove it from your list of selections.
Optional updates are listed, but you must select the ones you want to install.
When the update process is complete, the version and ID information that was collected
from your computer is discarded.
During the Windows Vista installation process, you are asked to indicate whether you
want Windows to automatically update your system as updates become available on the
Windows Update site. Automatic updating is very convenient if you don’t want to bear
the responsibility of remembering to manually update your system, or if you want to be
sure you have updates as soon as they become available.
If you chose not to update automatically when Windows Vista was installed, you can
change your selected update option at any time through Control Panel. The options are
to have Windows Vista do one of the following:
Download and install updates automatically.
Download updates and notify you when they are ready to be installed.
Simply notify you when an update is available.
Important If your computer is part of a domain, your network administrator might
control the installation of updates.
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In this exercise, you will check your update settings, install any available updates, and
make sure your computer is set to automatically install any available critical updates.
There are no practice files for this exercise.
BE SURE TO log on to Windows Vista before beginning this exercise.
Start
1. Click the Start button. Then on the Start menu, click Control Panel.
2. In the Control Panel window, click Security, and then click Windows Update.
See Also For information about other Windows Vista security features, see Chapter 10,
“Managing Computer Security.”
Windows Update displays information about your computer’s update history and
settings. Depending on the edition of Windows Vista installed on your computer,
additional information about Windows components might also be shown here.
Your current update settings
3. If a View available updates link appears in the update status box, click it.
(Otherwise, skip to Step 6.) Then in the list of available updates, select the check
box for any update you want to install.
Updating Windows System Files
15
Windows Security icon
The Windows security icon on the Install button indicates that administrator
permission is required to use that command.
4. Click Install. In the User Account Control dialog box, if you are logged on as an
administrator, click Continue. Otherwise, enter an administrator password and then
click OK.
A progress bar in the Windows Update window reports on the update activities
as Windows downloads the selected update(s), creates a restore point, and then
installs each update.
After installing the selected update(s), Windows Vista might prompt you to restart
your computer. This is an indication that Windows is currently using some of the
system files that need to be updated.
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5. If Windows Vista prompts you to restart your computer, close any open files, and
then click Restart now. After your computer restarts, log on and then repeat Steps
1 and 2 to return to Windows Update.
6. In the left pane, click the Change settings task.
The Change Settings window opens. You can change the frequency, time, type, and
scope of automatic updates.
Microsoft recommends that you automatically install updates each day at 3:00 A.M.
An obvious problem with this setting is that your computer might not be on in the
middle of the night. You can change the update time and frequency by selecting
from the lists.
7. If the Install updates automatically option is not already selected, select it now.
8. In the second Install new updates list, select a time at which your computer will
usually be on and online.
It’s best to select a time outside your core work hours—say at the beginning or end
of your workday—when connecting to the Internet and installing updates won’t
impact your ability to work by monopolizing your computer’s resources.
Updating Windows System Files
17
Tip If you prefer to have more control over the update process but still enjoy the
benefit of automatic updates, select the Download Updates But Let Me Choose
Whether To Install Them option. Windows Vista will then download available updates
to your computer and displays a security icon in the notification area. You can click
the icon to review and approve or reject the installation of each update.
9. With the Include recommended updates and Use Microsoft Update check boxes
selected, click OK. In the User Account Control dialog box, if you are logged on as
an administrator, click Continue. Otherwise, enter an administrator password, and
then click OK.
Windows Update displays your selected settings.
CLOSE the Windows Update window.
Switching Quickly Among Users
Fast User Switching makes it possible for multiple people to be logged on to their
user accounts on a single computer at the same time. For example, if you want to
read your e-mail or access a file stored in your Documents folder, but another person
has been working on the computer you want to use, you can log on to your account
without requiring that the other person close the programs and files she or he is
working with. Fast User Switching was an optional feature in Windows XP but is
always on in Windows Vista.
To log on to your user account while another account is active:
1. On the Start menu, click the Shut Down Options button, and click Switch User.
Userr.
The Welcome screen appears.
2. Click the user account you want to log on to, and enter the password if one is
required.
Multiple user accounts can be logged on to a computer at one time without interfering with the activities of each other. If you want files to be available to all user accounts,
store them in the Public folders rather than the folders within your user profile.
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Ending a Computing Session
If you are going to stop working with your computer for any length of time, you
can safeguard your information and save power in a number of ways:
If you want to prevent passersby from seeing what you’re working, you can lock the
computer, which displays the Welcome screen and requires that you log on to your
account to resume. Locking is most effective when your user account is protected
by a password; otherwise anyone can click your user account picture to unlock the
computer and access your information.
You can have Windows lock itself by configuring a screen saver to start after a
designated period of time and to display the logon screen when you resume your
computing session.
See Also For information about configuring a screen saver, see “Selecting and Managing
a Screen Saver” in Chapter 4, “Personalizing Windows Vista.”
If you’re finished working on a computer that you share with other people, you can
end your Windows Vista session (but not affect other users’ sessions) by logging off.
You must save your files and shut down all running programs before you log off; if
you don’t, Windows Vista will close any open windows, losing unsaved data in the
process.
If you’re going to be away from your computer, conserve power and protect
your work by putting your computer into Sleep mode. This is one of the best features of Windows Vista—you simply click the Sleep button and within seconds,
Windows Vista saves any open files, records their state and the state of any running programs in memory and on your hard disk, and then puts your computer
into a power-saving mode. When you “wake” the computer, usually by pressing
the Enter key or the power button, Windows Vista needs only a few seconds to
restore your previous computer session exactly as it was when you left it. Now
that we have Windows Vista, we realize just how Sleep-deprived we were with
earlier versions of Windows!
Putting your computer to sleep conserves power and keeps your work quickly
available. When a desktop computer is sleeping, it uses approximately 10 percent
of the power required to run normally. When a mobile computer is sleeping, it uses
approximately 2 percent of its battery power per hour.
Troubleshooting Some video card drivers do not support Sleep mode. If the Sleep
option doesn’t appear on the Shut Down Options menu, update your video driver or
consult the video card manufacturer’s Web site for driver information.
Ending a Computing Session
19
If you need to turn off your computer entirely—for example, to install hardware or
to move a desktop computer—you do so by shutting down the computer. Shutting
down closes all your open applications and files, ends your computing session,
closes network connections, stops system processes, stops the hard disk, and turns
off the computer.
In this exercise, you will lock and unlock your computer, put it to sleep and wake it up,
log off from Windows Vista, and then shut down the computer. There are no practice
files for this exercise.
BE SURE TO log on to Windows Vista before beginning this exercise.
1. If no programs are currently running on your computer, click the Launch Internet
Explorer Browser button on the Quick Launch toolbar or the Internet Explorer
link in the upper-left corner of the Start menu.
Later in this exercise, having a program running will make the effect of the different
shutdown options more apparent.
2. On the Start menu, click the Lock button.
Lock
Windows displays the Welcome screen with only your user account available. The
word Locked appears under your user name.
3. If your account is password protected, enter your password in the Password box,
and then press the F key. Otherwise, click your account picture.
Your previous computing session resumes.
4. On the Start menu, click the Sleep button.
Sleep
Windows saves your file and program information and then your computer goes
into a power-saving state. The hard disk stops turning (the computer no longer
makes any noise), but the power light on the computer itself is still on, either
steadily or blinking slowly.
5. Depending on your specific hardware, either press F or press your computer’s
power button to wake up your computer.
Troubleshooting If you don’t know which method to use to wake up your computer,
try pressing Enter first, and if that doesn’t work, press the power button. If neither
method works, consult the computer’s manual or manufacturer’s Web site.
The computer comes out of its power-saving state, and Windows Vista displays the
Welcome screen.
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6. If your account is password protected, enter your password in the Password box,
and then press F. Otherwise, click your account picture to resume your previous
computer session.
7. On the Start menu, click the Shut Down Options button to display a list of ways
you can pause or end your computing session.
Shut Down
Options
The Shut Down Options list will vary depending on your computer’s hardware
configuration.
8. In the Shut Down Options list, click Log Off.
If no programs are running on your computer, Windows Vista logs you off.
Otherwise, Windows Vista displays a list of running programs and open files.
Making Your Computer Easier to Use
21
9. If you don’t have any unsaved work, click Log off now to complete the process and
display the Welcome screen. Otherwise, click Cancel to return to your computing
session; then save and close open files, shut down running programs, and click Log
Off in the Shut Down Options list to complete the process.
Troubleshooting If you have unsaved files but don’t click Cancel within 30
seconds, Windows Vista shuts down the running programs and logs you off.
10. In the lower-right corner of the Welcome screen, click the Shut Down button.
Shut Down
Troubleshooting If any other user accounts are logged on to the computer,
Windows Vista gives you the opportunity to cancel the Shut Down process. If you
shut down a computer while people are logged on to it, they could lose data in open
files or running programs.
Windows Vista shuts down all the computer processes and turns off your
computer.
Troubleshooting If your computer seems to be operating unusually slowly, or you’re
experiencing technical problems that seem related to the operating system rather than to
an application, try restarting your computer. Restarting clears the system cache—an
—an area
in memory where Windows Vista stores information it might need to access quickly—and
frequently resolves minor issues. To restart your computer, click Restart on the Shut Down
Options menu.
Making Your Computer Easier to Use
Are the words on the screen too small to read easily? Do you wish the icons were larger?
Does it take you a while to locate the insertion point because it is so skinny? Windows
Vista includes these utilities (small programs) to assist people with visual or auditory
disabilities:
Audio Description narrates videos as they play, if this feature is available within the
video file.
High Contrast changes the display of your screen from the usual muted Windows
Vista colors to a starker color scheme that makes individual items stand out on the
screen.
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Magnifier opens a magnification panel in which the screen under the mouse pointer
is displayed, magnified up to nine times. You can adjust the size and location of the
magnification panel.
Narrator is a text-to-speech tool that works with Windows setup, the Windows
desktop, Control Panel programs, Windows Explorer, Notepad, and WordPad. It
reads menu commands, dialog box options, and other screen features out loud,
telling you what options are available and how to use them. It also reads your
keystrokes to you as you type them and tells you the pointer location as you
move the mouse around.
Sound Sentry flashes the screen element you specify (your choices are the active
caption bar, active window, or desktop) every time the system’s built-in speaker
plays a sound.
You can turn off unnecessary animations and background images; specify how long
notifications stay open (the default is seven seconds); and change the size of text, icons,
the focus rectangle, the cursor, and the mouse pointer. Windows Vista also supports text
captions for spoken dialogue and text narratives for videos, if they are available for the
content you are working with.
The traditional method of entering information into a computer document is by typing it
using the keyboard. However, mobility problems can make typing difficult. Windows Vista
includes a variety of tools to help with entering information, including the following:
On-Screen Keyboard displays a visual representation of a keyboard from which you
can select individual keys by using your mouse, pen, or other device.
Speech Recognition allows you to control Windows, control open programs, and
dictate text by speaking into a microphone.
Sticky Keys makes it easier to use the keyboard with one hand by making the Ctrl,
Shift, and Alt keys “stick” down until you press the next key.
Filter Keys causes Windows to ignore brief or repeated keystrokes, or slows the
repeat rate.
Mouse Keys enables you to move the cursor around the screen by pressing the
Arrow keys on the numeric keypad.
Toggle Keys sounds an audio signal when you press the Caps Lock, Num Lock, or
Scroll Lock key. A high-pitched sound plays when the keys are activated, and a
low-pitched sound plays when the keys are deactivated.
You can also make the keyboard shortcut for a command more obvious by underlining the
letter in the command name that corresponds to the shortcut key, and you can activate a
Making Your Computer Easier to Use
23
window by pointing to it rather than clicking it. If your hardware supports handwriting
recognition, you can write, draw, or otherwise record information within variety of programs, because Windows Vista includes the Tablet PC functions that were previously
available only in Windows XP Tablet PC Edition.
See Also For information about using keyboard shortcuts, see “Information for New
Computer Users” at the beginning of this book, and the “Keyboard Shortcuts” sections at the
end of each chapter. For information about handwriting recognitions, see “Configuring Tablet
PC Options” in Chapter 5, “Installing and Configuring Devices.”
You can turn on the Narrator, Magnifier, High Contrast, On-Screen Keyboard, Sticky Keys,
or Filter Keys features before logging on to Windows Vista by clicking the Ease Of Access
icon in the lower-left corner of the Welcome screen (or by pressing Windows logo
key+U), selecting the options you want, and then clicking Apply or OK.
After logging on to Windows Vista, you can control the accessibility settings from the
Ease Of Access Center. To open the Ease Of Access Center:
1. On the Start menu, click Control Panel.
2. In Control Panel, click Ease of Access, and then click Ease of Access Center.
When you first open the Ease Of Access Center, an audio guide reads aloud the text at
the top of the screen, and provides mouse-free access to the Magnifier, Narrator, and
On-Screen Keyboard utilities, or to switch to a high-contrast display.
You can turn off the audio guide and/or scan functions if you don’t need them.
To optimize a specific type of element, you can select from the groups of settings at the
bottom of the Ease Of Access Center.
24
Chapter 1
Getting Started with Windows Vista
If you want Windows to help you determine what settings will improve your computing
experience, click Get Recommendations To Make Your Computer Easier To Use near
the center of the window to begin a simple, five-part questionnaire about your eyesight,
dexterity, hearing, speech, and reasoning. (Don’t worry; your results are private.) Based
on the issues you indicate, Windows Vista recommends and describes adjustments that
might be helpful. Some are accessibility features and others are simple adjustments to
Windows settings.
You can enact any suggested change by selecting its check box and clicking Apply or Save.
Keyboard Shortcuts
25
The tools available with Windows Vista provide only a minimum level of assistance for
users with special needs. Most users with disabilities will need specialized programs with
more advanced functionality for daily use.
Key Points
You start a Windows Vista session by logging on, and end it by logging off. You
can log off and leave the computer running, or you can log off as part of the process of shutting down.
Each person who uses the computer logs on with his or her own user account. Your
Windows Vista environment preferences are stored with your user account so that
when you log on to Windows Vista, it looks and works the way you want.
You must activate your copy of Windows Vista within 30 days of first use. After that
period, you won’t be able to create or save files until you activate Windows Vista.
Windows Vista includes many alternative input and output options designed to
make your computer more accessible.
You can change the look of Windows Vista and the way your computer functions
to make it easier for you to see or use the computer. You make these changes from
the Ease Of Access Center as well as from the Welcome screen.
It is important to keep your computer up to date with the most current upgrades
and security updates. Windows Update makes it easy to do this automatically or
manually.
You can save power without closing files and quitting programs by putting your
computer to sleep. This conserves more energy than shutting down the computer.
Keyboard Shortcuts
Press this
Ctrl+Esc or Windows logo key
Windows logo key+L
Right Shift for eight seconds
Left Alt+left Shift+Print Screen
Left Alt+left Shift+Num Lock
Shift five times
Num Lock for five seconds
Windows logo key+U
To do this
Display the Start menu
Lock your computer
Turn Filter Keys on or off
Turn High Contrast on or off
Turn Mouse Keys on or off
Turn Sticky Keys on or off
Turn Toggle Keys on or off
Open the Ease Of Access Center